WorldWideScience

Sample records for transport model mediante

  1. A mesoscale chemical transport model (MEDIUM) nested in a global chemical transport model (MEDIANTE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claveau, J.; Ramaroson, R. [Office National d`Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), 92 - Chatillon (France)

    1997-12-31

    The lower stratosphere and upper troposphere (UT-LS) are frequently subject to mesoscale or local scale exchange of air masses occurring along discontinuities. This exchange (e.g. downward) can constitute one of the most important source of ozone from the stratosphere down to the middle troposphere where strong mixing dilutes the air mass and competing the non-linear chemistry. The distribution of the chemical species in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere depends upon various source emissions, e.g. from polluted boundary layer or from aircraft emissions. Global models, as well as chemical transport models describe the climatological state of the atmosphere and are not able to describe correctly the stratosphere and troposphere exchange. Mesoscale models go further in the description of smaller scales and can reasonably include a rather detailed chemistry. They can be used to assess the budget of NO{sub x} from aircraft emissions in a mesoscale domain. (author) 4 refs.

  2. Modelling of Transport Phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    K., Itoh; S.-I., Itoh; A., Fukuyama

    1993-01-01

    In this review article, we discuss key features of the transport phenomena and theoretical modelling to understand them. Experimental observations have revealed the nature of anomalous transport, i.e., the enhancement of the transport coefficients by the gradients of the plasma profiles, the pinch phenomena, the radial profile of the apomalous transport coefficients, the variation of the transport among the Bohm diffusion, Pseudo-classical confinement, L-mode and variety of improved confineme...

  3. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGraw, M.

    2000-01-01

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations

  4. ESTADO DEL ARTE MPLS-TP CONMUTACIÓN MULTIPROTOCOLO MEDIANTE ETIQUETAS - PERFIL DE TRANSPORTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lois Albert Espinel García

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available La creciente demanda en servicios de telecomunicaciones genera la necesidad de desarrollar diferentes modelos de red. En el año 2008, la UIT-T une sinergias con la IETF para desarrollar un protocolo llamado MPLS-TP cuya arquitectura representa el resultado la agregación de la eficiencia en el transporte de paquetes de IP/MPLS con la fiabilidad en el transporte de SONET/SDH. Este trabajo presenta un estado del arte de MPLS-TP donde se plasman los estudios actuales y avances relacionados con ésta tecnología: modelos de arquitectura óptica, modelos de protección en OAM. Además se presenta la estructura, funcionamiento y características que hacen de MPLS-TP una opción para las redes de transporte de siguiente generación. El material de apoyo para el desarrollo de este artículo ha sido obtenido de la base documental de recursos electrónicos con contenido científico de apoyo a la investigación de la Universidad Distrital Francisco José de Caldas.

  5. Reconstrucción del maxilar superior mediante transporte del proceso alveolar: Presentación de un caso Reconstruction of the maxilla by means of transport of the alveolar process: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    A. Bilbao; R. Cobo; M. Hernández; R. Rocha; J.M. Albertos

    2006-01-01

    La osteogénesis mediante distracción aplicada a la reconstrucción del proceso alveolar es una técnica sobradamente contrastada en la literatura, al igual que la utilización del transporte óseo en la reconstrucción de defectos segmentarios mandibulares. Presentamos en este artículo un caso de reconstrucción de un defecto segmentario del maxilar superior mediante transporte de proceso alveolar y su posterior rehabilitación protésica implantosoportada. Mostramos tanto la técnica quirúrgica como ...

  6. Stochastic models of intracellular transport

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2013-01-09

    The interior of a living cell is a crowded, heterogenuous, fluctuating environment. Hence, a major challenge in modeling intracellular transport is to analyze stochastic processes within complex environments. Broadly speaking, there are two basic mechanisms for intracellular transport: passive diffusion and motor-driven active transport. Diffusive transport can be formulated in terms of the motion of an overdamped Brownian particle. On the other hand, active transport requires chemical energy, usually in the form of adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis, and can be direction specific, allowing biomolecules to be transported long distances; this is particularly important in neurons due to their complex geometry. In this review a wide range of analytical methods and models of intracellular transport is presented. In the case of diffusive transport, narrow escape problems, diffusion to a small target, confined and single-file diffusion, homogenization theory, and fractional diffusion are considered. In the case of active transport, Brownian ratchets, random walk models, exclusion processes, random intermittent search processes, quasi-steady-state reduction methods, and mean-field approximations are considered. Applications include receptor trafficking, axonal transport, membrane diffusion, nuclear transport, protein-DNA interactions, virus trafficking, and the self-organization of subcellular structures. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  7. Goods Transport Modelling, Vol 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Morten Steen (red.); Kristiansen, Jørgen

    The report is a study of data requirements and methodologies for goods transport. The study is intended to provide the basis for general discussion about the application of goods transport models in Denmark. The report provides an overview of different types of models and data availability....

  8. System Convergence in Transport Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Jeppe; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Cantarella, Guilio E.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental premise of most applied transport models is the existence and uniqueness of an equilibrium solution that balances demand x(t) and supply t(x). The demand consists of the people that travel in the transport system and on the defined network, whereas the supply consists of the resulting...... level-of-service attributes (e.g., travel time and cost) offered to travellers. An important source of complexity is the congestion, which causes increasing demand to affect travel time in a non-linear way. Transport models most often involve separate models for traffic assignment and demand modelling...

  9. Uranium Transport Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostick, William D.

    2008-01-01

    Uranium contamination is prevalent at many of the U.S. DOE facilities and at several civilian sites that have supported the nuclear fuel cycle. The potential off-site mobility of uranium depends on the partitioning of uranium between aqueous and solid (soil and sediment) phases. Hexavalent U (as uranyl, UO 2 2+ ) is relatively mobile, forming strong complexes with ubiquitous carbonate ion which renders it appreciably soluble even under mild reducing conditions. In the presence of carbonate, partition of uranyl to ferri-hydrate and select other mineral phases is usually maximum in the near-neutral pH range ∼ 5-8. The surface complexation reaction of uranyl with iron-containing minerals has been used as one means to model subsurface migration, used in conjunction with information on the site water chemistry and hydrology. Partitioning of uranium is often studied by short-term batch 'equilibrium' or long-term soil column testing ; MCLinc has performed both of these methodologies, with selection of method depending upon the requirements of the client or regulatory authority. Speciation of uranium in soil may be determined directly by instrumental techniques (e.g., x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS; x-ray diffraction, XRD; etc.) or by inference drawn from operational estimates. Often, the technique of choice for evaluating low-level radionuclide partitioning in soils and sediments is the sequential extraction approach. This methodology applies operationally-defined chemical treatments to selectively dissolve specific classes of macro-scale soil or sediment components. These methods recognize that total soil metal inventory is of limited use in understanding bioavailability or metal mobility, and that it is useful to estimate the amount of metal present in different solid-phase forms. Despite some drawbacks, the sequential extraction method can provide a valuable tool to distinguish among trace element fractions of different solubility related to mineral phases

  10. Probabilistic transport models for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milligen, B.Ph. van; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Sanchez, R.

    2005-01-01

    A generalization of diffusive (Fickian) transport is considered, in which particle motion is described by probability distributions. We design a simple model that includes a critical mechanism to switch between two transport channels, and show that it exhibits various interesting characteristics, suggesting that the ideas of probabilistic transport might provide a framework for the description of a range of unusual transport phenomena observed in fusion plasmas. The model produces power degradation and profile consistency, as well as a scaling of the confinement time with system size reminiscent of the gyro-Bohm/Bohm scalings observed in fusion plasmas, and rapid propagation of disturbances. In the present work we show how this model may also produce on-axis peaking of the profiles with off-axis fuelling. It is important to note that the fluid limit of a simple model like this, characterized by two transport channels, does not correspond to the usual (Fickian) transport models commonly used for modelling transport in fusion plasmas, and behaves in a fundamentally different way. (author)

  11. Reconstrucción del maxilar superior mediante transporte del proceso alveolar: Presentación de un caso Reconstruction of the maxilla by means of transport of the alveolar process: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bilbao

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available La osteogénesis mediante distracción aplicada a la reconstrucción del proceso alveolar es una técnica sobradamente contrastada en la literatura, al igual que la utilización del transporte óseo en la reconstrucción de defectos segmentarios mandibulares. Presentamos en este artículo un caso de reconstrucción de un defecto segmentario del maxilar superior mediante transporte de proceso alveolar y su posterior rehabilitación protésica implantosoportada. Mostramos tanto la técnica quirúrgica como el manejo de del vector de distracción utilizando elásticos de ortodoncia y tornillos de bloqueo intermaxilar.Osteogenesis by means of distraction applied to the reconstruction of the alveolar process is a well-documented technique in the literature, as is the use of bone transport in the reconstruction of mandibular segment defects. In the present article we report on a case of reconstruction of a segment defect in the maxilla using the alveolar transport process, and on the subsequent rehabilitation by means of an implant-supported prosthesis. Both the surgical technique and the handling of the distraction vector using orthodontic bands and inter-maxillary fixation screws are shown.

  12. Next Generation Transport Phenomenology Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Douglas J.; Knight, Harold; Evans, J. Scott

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the progress made in Quarter 3 of Contract Year 3 on the development of Aeronomy Phenomenology Modeling Tool (APMT), an open-source, component-based, client-server architecture for distributed modeling, analysis, and simulation activities focused on electron and photon transport for general atmospheres. In the past quarter, column emission rate computations were implemented in Java, preexisting Fortran programs for computing synthetic spectra were embedded into APMT through Java wrappers, and work began on a web-based user interface for setting input parameters and running the photoelectron and auroral electron transport models.

  13. Methods for testing transport models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, C.; Cox, D.

    1991-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made over the past year on six aspects of the work supported by this grant. As a result, we have in hand for the first time a fairly complete set of transport models and improved statistical methods for testing them against large databases. We also have initial results of such tests. These results indicate that careful application of presently available transport theories can reasonably well produce a remarkably wide variety of tokamak data

  14. Modelling pollutant transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinath, D.V.

    1994-01-01

    An attempt has been made here to present a brief outline of the major processes and problems in the environmental modelling with special reference to radionuclide migration in surface waters. The intention has been only to provide a bird's eye view of this fertile and socially relevant area of scientific pursuit. (author). 2 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Modeling axisymmetric flow and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    Unmodified versions of common computer programs such as MODFLOW, MT3DMS, and SEAWAT that use Cartesian geometry can accurately simulate axially symmetric ground water flow and solute transport. Axisymmetric flow and transport are simulated by adjusting several input parameters to account for the increase in flow area with radial distance from the injection or extraction well. Logarithmic weighting of interblock transmissivity, a standard option in MODFLOW, can be used for axisymmetric models to represent the linear change in hydraulic conductance within a single finite-difference cell. Results from three test problems (ground water extraction, an aquifer push-pull test, and upconing of saline water into an extraction well) show good agreement with analytical solutions or with results from other numerical models designed specifically to simulate the axisymmetric geometry. Axisymmetric models are not commonly used but can offer an efficient alternative to full three-dimensional models, provided the assumption of axial symmetry can be justified. For the upconing problem, the axisymmetric model was more than 1000 times faster than an equivalent three-dimensional model. Computational gains with the axisymmetric models may be useful for quickly determining appropriate levels of grid resolution for three-dimensional models and for estimating aquifer parameters from field tests.

  16. Modeling Radionuclide Transport in Clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Li, Lianchong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Liu, Hui -Hai [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    tests (e.g. Garcia-Gutierrez et al. 2006, Soler et al. 2008, van Loon et al. 2004, Wu et al. 2009) and numerical modeling (de Windt et al. 2003; 2006), the effects of THMC processes on radionuclide transport are not fully investigated. The objectives of the research activity documented in this report are to improve a modeling capability for coupled THMC processes and to use it to evaluate the THMC impacts on radionuclide transport. This research activity addresses several key Features, Events and Processes (FEPs), including FEP 2.2.08, Hydrologic Processes, FEP 2.2.07, Mechanical Processes and FEP 2.2.09, Chemical Process— Transport, by studying near-field coupled THMC processes in clay/shale repositories and their impacts on radionuclide transport. This report documents the progress that has been made in FY12. Section 2 discusses the development of THMC modeling capability. Section 3 reports modeling results of THMC impacts on radionuclide transport. Planned work for the remaining months of FY12 and proposed work for FY13 are presented in Section 4.

  17. Advanced transport modeling of toroidal plasmas with transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, A.; Murakami, S.; Honda, M.; Izumi, Y.; Yagi, M.; Nakajima, N.; Nakamura, Y.; Ozeki, T.

    2005-01-01

    Transport modeling of toroidal plasmas is one of the most important issue to predict time evolution of burning plasmas and to develop control schemes in reactor plasmas. In order to describe the plasma rotation and rapid transition self-consistently, we have developed an advanced scheme of transport modeling based on dynamical transport equation and applied it to the analysis of transport barrier formation. First we propose a new transport model and examine its behavior by the use of conventional diffusive transport equation. This model includes the electrostatic toroidal ITG mode and the electromagnetic ballooning mode and successfully describes the formation of internal transport barriers. Then the dynamical transport equation is introduced to describe the plasma rotation and the radial electric field self-consistently. The formation of edge transport barriers is systematically studied and compared with experimental observations. The possibility of kinetic transport modeling in velocity space is also examined. Finally the modular structure of integrated modeling code for tokamaks and helical systems is discussed. (author)

  18. Avances en el diagnóstico de fallas en sistemas eléctricos de transporte mediante redes neuronales: Un enfoque modular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Morant Anglada

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} En este trabajo se propone un nuevo método para el diagnóstico de fallas en sistemas eléctricos de potencia basado en módulos neuronales. El método realiza el diagnóstico mediante la asignación de un módulo neuronal genérico para cada tipo de componente que conforma al sistema eléctrico de potencia, ya sea línea de transporte, bus o transformador. En total se diseñan tres módulos neuronales genéricos, uno para cada tipo de componente. Los módulos neuronales para buses y transformadores se componen de dos niveles de diagnóstico tomando en cuenta los estados lógicos de interruptores y relevadores tanto propios como de respaldo, a excepción del módulo neuronal para líneas de transporte, que además de los dos niveles de diagnóstico con los que cuentan los módulos neuronales para buses y transformadores, cuenta con un tercer nivel de diagnóstico que toma en consideración los oscilogramas de voltajes y corrientes de falla, así como los espectros de frecuencia  de estos oscilogramas, para verificar si la línea de transporte realmente estuvo sujeta a una falla y a la vez determinar el tipo de ésta (L-g, LL-g, LL, LLL, LLL-g, esto a través de una estructura neuronal. Este tercer nivel de diagnóstico, es posible llevarlo a cabo ya que toda línea de transporte  que es sometida a una falla presentará corrientes y voltajes de falla, antes de que ésta sea liberada del sistema  por la acción de sus esquemas de protección.

  19. Modelling of radon transport in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, E.R.; de Meijer, R.J.; Katase, A; Shimo, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the state of the art of modelling radon transport in soil on basis of multiphase radon transport equations. Emphasis is given to methods to obtain a consistent set of input parameters needed For such models. Model-measurement comparisons with the KVI radon transport

  20. Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J.; Bastein, L.; Price, P.N.

    2010-02-19

    This review examines current approximations and approaches that underlie the evaluation of transport properties for combustion modeling applications. Discussed in the review are: the intermolecular potential and its descriptive molecular parameters; various approaches to evaluating collision integrals; supporting data required for the evaluation of transport properties; commonly used computer programs for predicting transport properties; the quality of experimental measurements and their importance for validating or rejecting approximations to property estimation; the interpretation of corresponding states; combination rules that yield pair molecular potential parameters for unlike species from like species parameters; and mixture approximations. The insensitivity of transport properties to intermolecular forces is noted, especially the non-uniqueness of the supporting potential parameters. Viscosity experiments of pure substances and binary mixtures measured post 1970 are used to evaluate a number of approximations; the intermediate temperature range 1 < T* < 10, where T* is kT/{var_epsilon}, is emphasized since this is where rich data sets are available. When suitable potential parameters are used, errors in transport property predictions for pure substances and binary mixtures are less than 5 %, when they are calculated using the approaches of Kee et al.; Mason, Kestin, and Uribe; Paul and Warnatz; or Ern and Giovangigli. Recommendations stemming from the review include (1) revisiting the supporting data required by the various computational approaches, and updating the data sets with accurate potential parameters, dipole moments, and polarizabilities; (2) characterizing the range of parameter space over which the fit to experimental data is good, rather than the current practice of reporting only the parameter set that best fits the data; (3) looking for improved combining rules, since existing rules were found to under-predict the viscosity in most cases; (4

  1. Directions in Radiation Transport Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Nicholas Smith

    2016-12-01

    More exciting advances are on the horizon to increase the power of simulation tools. The advent of high performance computers is allowing bigger, higher fidelity models to be created, if the challenges of parallelization and memory management can be met. 3D whole core transport modelling is becoming possible. Uncertainty quantification is improving with large benefits to be gained from more accurate, less pessimistic estimates of uncertainty. Advanced graphical displays allow the user to assimilate and make sense of the vast amounts of data produced by modern modelling tools. Numerical solvers are being developed that use goal-based adaptivity to adjust the nodalisation of the system to provide the optimum scheme to achieve the user requested accuracy on the results, thus removing the need to perform costly convergence studies in space and angle etc. More use is being made of multi-physics methods in which radiation transport is coupled with other phenomena, such as thermal-hydraulics, structural response, fuel performance and/or chemistry in order to better understand their interplay in reactor cores.

  2. Modeling of a PWR using 3D components; Modelado de un PWR mediante componentes 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesado, C.; Garcia-Fenoll, M.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G.

    2013-07-01

    The simulation of the behavior of the nucleus in nuclear reactors is especially important in the design, operation and safety of the plant. It is such importance that it has been decided to make a model of a nuclear reactor fully 3D. This has been used trailers codes TRACE v5.0 patch 3/PARCS v3.0. In addition, the model has been validated with another model of the same reactor through the attached code basis/PARCS2.7.

  3. Up-gradient transport in a probabilistic transport model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavnholt, J.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Garcia, O.E.

    2005-01-01

    The transport of particles or heat against the driving gradient is studied by employing a probabilistic transport model with a characteristic particle step length that depends on the local concentration or heat gradient. When this gradient is larger than a prescribed critical value, the standard....... These results supplement recent works by van Milligen [Phys. Plasmas 11, 3787 (2004)], which applied Levy distributed step sizes in the case of supercritical gradients to obtain the up-gradient transport. (c) 2005 American Institute of Physics....

  4. Business Models For Transport eBusiness

    OpenAIRE

    Dragan Cisic; Ivan Franciskovic; Ana Peric

    2003-01-01

    In this paper authors are presenting expectations from electronic commerce and its connotations on transport logistics. Based on trends, the relations between the companies in the international transport have to be strengthened using Internet business models. In the paper authors are investigating e-business information models for usage in transport

  5. Use of Models in Urban Transportation Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-04-01

    The report describes the most commonly used models in urban transportation planning. A background on urban transportation planning is given including changes in planning objectives and the effects of Federal legislation. General concepts and problems...

  6. Modelling of Transport Projects Uncertainties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salling, Kim Bang; Leleur, Steen

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a new way of handling the uncertainties present in transport decision making based on infrastructure appraisals. The paper suggests to combine the principle of Optimism Bias, which depicts the historical tendency of overestimating transport related benefits and underestimating......-based graphs which function as risk-related decision support for the appraised transport infrastructure project....

  7. SATURATED ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODEL ABSTRACTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B.W. ARNOLD

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the saturated zone (SZ) flow and transport model abstraction task is to provide radionuclide-transport simulation results for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) calculations. This task includes assessment of uncertainty in parameters that pertain to both groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in the models used for this purpose. This model report documents the following: (1) The SZ transport abstraction model, which consists of a set of radionuclide breakthrough curves at the accessible environment for use in the TSPA-LA simulations of radionuclide releases into the biosphere. These radionuclide breakthrough curves contain information on radionuclide-transport times through the SZ. (2) The SZ one-dimensional (I-D) transport model, which is incorporated in the TSPA-LA model to simulate the transport, decay, and ingrowth of radionuclide decay chains in the SZ. (3) The analysis of uncertainty in groundwater-flow and radionuclide-transport input parameters for the SZ transport abstraction model and the SZ 1-D transport model. (4) The analysis of the background concentration of alpha-emitting species in the groundwater of the SZ

  8. Logistics and Transport - a conceptual model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Per Homann; Drewes, Lise

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes how the freight transport sector is influenced by logistical principles of production and distribution. It introduces new ways of understanding freight transport as an integrated part of the changing trends of mobility. By introducing a conceptual model for understanding...... the interaction between logistics and transport, it points at ways to over-come inherent methodological difficulties when studying this relation...

  9. RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT MODELS UNDER AMBIENT CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Magnuson

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this model report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) radionuclide transport model, which evaluates, by means of three-dimensional numerical models, the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the UZ, under ambient conditions, from the repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

  10. Modelling of Transport Projects Uncertainties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salling, Kim Bang; Leleur, Steen

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new way of handling the uncertainties present in transport decision making based on infrastructure appraisals. The paper suggests to combine the principle of Optimism Bias, which depicts the historical tendency of overestimating transport related benefits and underestimating......-based graphs which functions as risk-related decision support for the appraised transport infrastructure project. The presentation of RSF is demonstrated by using an appraisal case concerning a new airfield in the capital of Greenland, Nuuk....

  11. Biological transportation networks: Modeling and simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Albi, Giacomo

    2015-09-15

    We present a model for biological network formation originally introduced by Cai and Hu [Adaptation and optimization of biological transport networks, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 (2013) 138701]. The modeling of fluid transportation (e.g., leaf venation and angiogenesis) and ion transportation networks (e.g., neural networks) is explained in detail and basic analytical features like the gradient flow structure of the fluid transportation network model and the impact of the model parameters on the geometry and topology of network formation are analyzed. We also present a numerical finite-element based discretization scheme and discuss sample cases of network formation simulations.

  12. A Sediment Transport Model for Sewers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Ole; Larsson, Johan; Larsen, Torben

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a mathematical model for transport processes in sewers. The model consists of three sub models, a surface model for the description of the buildup and the washoff of sediment particles from the surface area, a morphological model and an advection-dispersion model. The model...

  13. Una propuesta para la localización de áreas de servicio y descanso adaptadas al transporte de mercancías peligrosas mediante un modelo de optimización; aplicación al territorio español || A Proposal for the Location of Service Areas Adapted to the Transport of Dangerous Goods through an Optimization Model and its Application to the Spanish Territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caro Vela, María Dolores

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo analiza la importancia de contar con una red de estacionamientos adaptados a los vehículos que transportan mercancías peligrosas. Se estudia en primer lugar la cobertura actual de la demanda que ofrecen los estacionamientos existentes y se plantea en segundo lugar un modelo de localización de máxima cobertura para estudiar la ubicación de áreas que permitan una mayor satisfacción de la demanda de descanso de los conductores cumpliendo con la normativa legal y de seguridad. El modelo se aplica en el territorio español con la ayuda de sistemas de información geográfica (SIG. || This paper analyzes the importance of having a network of stations adapted to vehicles carrying dangerous goods. In the first place, it is studied the current demand which is offered by the existing parking areas, and in the second place, it is explained a maximum coverage location model in order to study the location of areas that meet the drivers’ demand of rest to a greater extent complying with legal and safety regulations. The model is applied into Spanish territory with the help of geographic information systems (GIS.

  14. The european Trans-Tools transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijen, T. van; Burgess, A.

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the use of ArcGIS in the Transtools Transport Model, TRANS-TOOLS, created by an international consortium for the European Commission. The model describe passenger as well as freight transport in Europe with all medium and long distance modes (cars, vans, trucks, train, inland

  15. A Mercury Model of Atmospheric Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Alex B. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chodash, Perry A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Procassini, R. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-19

    Using the particle transport code Mercury, accurate models were built of the two sources used in Operation BREN, a series of radiation experiments performed by the United States during the 1960s. In the future, these models will be used to validate Mercury’s ability to simulate atmospheric transport.

  16. Dileptons from transport and hydrodynamical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huovinen, P.; Koch, V.

    2000-01-01

    Transport and hydrodynamical models used to describe the expansion stage of a heavy-ion collision at the CERN SPS give different dilepton spectrum even if they are tuned to reproduce the observed hadron spectra. To understand the origin of this difference we compare the dilepton emission from transport and hydrodynamical models using similar initial states in both models. We find that the requirement of pion number conservation in a hydrodynamical model does not change the dilepton emission. Also the mass distribution from the transport model indicates faster cooling and longer lifetime of the fireball

  17. Optimal transportation networks models and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bernot, Marc; Morel, Jean-Michel

    2009-01-01

    The transportation problem can be formalized as the problem of finding the optimal way to transport a given measure into another with the same mass. In contrast to the Monge-Kantorovitch problem, recent approaches model the branched structure of such supply networks as minima of an energy functional whose essential feature is to favour wide roads. Such a branched structure is observable in ground transportation networks, in draining and irrigation systems, in electrical power supply systems and in natural counterparts such as blood vessels or the branches of trees. These lectures provide mathematical proof of several existence, structure and regularity properties empirically observed in transportation networks. The link with previous discrete physical models of irrigation and erosion models in geomorphology and with discrete telecommunication and transportation models is discussed. It will be mathematically proven that the majority fit in the simple model sketched in this volume.

  18. Two-point model for divertor transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galambos, J.D.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1984-04-01

    Plasma transport along divertor field lines was investigated using a two-point model. This treatment requires considerably less effort to find solutions to the transport equations than previously used one-dimensional (1-D) models and is useful for studying general trends. It also can be a valuable tool for benchmarking more sophisticated models. The model was used to investigate the possibility of operating in the so-called high density, low temperature regime

  19. Multiple mode model of tokamak transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, C.E.; Ghanem, E.S.; Bateman, G.; Stotler, D.P.

    1989-07-01

    Theoretical models for radical transport of energy and particles in tokamaks due to drift waves, rippling modes, and resistive ballooning modes have been combined in a predictive transport code. The resulting unified model has been used to simulate low confinement mode (L-mode) energy confinement scalings. Dependence of global energy confinement on electron density for the resulting model is also described. 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  20. Multiple mode model of tokamak transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, C.E.; Ghanem, E.S.; Bateman, G.; Stotler, D.P.

    1989-07-01

    Theoretical models for radical transport of energy and particles in tokamaks due to drift waves, rippling modes, and resistive ballooning modes have been combined in a predictive transport code. The resulting unified model has been used to simulate low confinement mode (L-mode) energy confinement scalings. Dependence of global energy confinement on electron density for the resulting model is also described. 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Approximation by mediants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosma, Wieb

    1990-01-01

    The distribution is determined of some sequences that measure how well a number is approximated by its mediants (or intermediate continued fraction convergents). The connection with a theorem of Fatou, as well as a new proof of this, is given.

  2. Concept Layout Model of Transportation Terminals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-ya Yao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transportation terminal is the key node in transport systems. Efficient terminals can improve operation of passenger transportation networks, adjust the layout of public transportation networks, provide a passenger guidance system, and regulate the development of commercial forms, as well as optimize the assembly and distribution of modern logistic modes, among others. This study aims to clarify the relationship between the function and the structure of transportation terminals and establish the function layout design. The mapping mechanism of demand, function, and structure was analyzed, and a quantitative relationship between function and structure was obtained from a design perspective. Passenger demand and terminal structure were decomposed into several demand units and structural elements following the principle of reverse engineering. The relationship maps between these two kinds of elements were then analyzed. Function-oriented concept layout model of transportation terminals was established using the previous method. Thus, a technique in planning and design of transportation structures was proposed. Meaningful results were obtained from the optimization of transportation terminal facilities, which guide the design of the functional layout of transportation terminals and improve the development of urban passenger transportation systems.

  3. Highway and interline transportation routing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, D.S.; Johnson, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    The potential impacts associated with the transportation of hazardous materials are important issues to shippers, carriers, and the general public. Since transportation routes are a central characteristic in most of these issues, the prediction of likely routes is the first step toward the resolution of these issues. In addition, US Department of Transportation requirements (HM-164) mandate specific routes for shipments of highway controlled quantities of radioactive materials. In response to these needs, two routing models have been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These models have been designated by DOE's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Transportation Management Division (DOE/EM) as the official DOE routing models. Both models, HIGHWAY and INTERLINE, are described

  4. Multimodal transportation best practices and model element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This report provides guidance in developing a multimodal transportation element of a local government comprehensive : plan. Two model elements were developed to address differences in statutory requirements for communities of different : sizes and pl...

  5. NODA for EPA's Updated Ozone Transport Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Find EPA's NODA for the Updated Ozone Transport Modeling Data for the 2008 Ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) along with the ExitExtension of Public Comment Period on CSAPR for the 2008 NAAQS.

  6. MODELADO CONCEPTUAL DE USUARIOS EN AMBIENTES UBICUOS MEDIANTE AGENTES Y ONTOLOGÍAS MODELAGEM CONCEITUAL DE USUÁRIOS EM AMBIENTES UBÍQUOS MEDIANTE AGENTES E ONTOLOGIAS CONCEPTUAL USER MODELING IN UBIQUITOUS ENVIRONMENTS THROUGH AGENTS AND ONTOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana González

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta una propuesta para el modelado conceptual de usuarios en ambientes ubicuos mediante agentes y ontologías. La integración de estos dos conceptos permite descubrir, procesar y mantener la información de los usuarios de sistemas pervasivos. La aproximación está compuesta por arquitectura conceptual, tipos de agentes que componen el sistema, estructura básica de cada agente y estrategia de comunicación. También se presenta una ontología para modelar usuarios y se mencionan dos escenarios de interacción de agentes: solicitud de conexión al sistema y envío de una consulta. Esta propuesta soluciona inconvenientes como la falta de estandarización en el modelado de usuarios de ambientes ubicuos y la ausencia de un componente inteligente que permita analizar dicha información para ofrecer configuraciones personalizadas dependiendo de datos como el perfil y las preferencias de los actores participantes.Este artigo apresenta uma proposta para a modelagem conceitual de usuários em ambientes ubíquos mediante agentes e ontologias. A integração destes dois conceitos permite descobrir, processar e manter a informação dos usuários de sistemas pervasivos. A aproximação está composta por arquitetura conceitual, tipos de agentes que compõem o sistema, estrutura básica de cada agente e estratégia de comunicação. Também se apresenta uma ontologia para modelar usuários e se mencionam dois cenários de interação de agentes: solicitação de conexão ao sistema e envio de uma consulta. Esta proposta soluciona inconvenientes como a falta de estandardização na modelagem de usuários de ambientes ubíquos e a ausência de um componente inteligente que permita analisar dita informação para oferecer configurações personalizadas dependendo de dados como o perfil e as preferências dos atores participantes.This paper presents a proposal for the conceptual modeling of user in ubiquitous environments through agents

  7. Mathematical modeling plasma transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiang, Ji

    1995-01-01

    In this work, the author applied a systematic calibration, validation and application procedure based on the methodology of mathematical modeling to international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) ignition studies. The multi-mode plasma transport model used here includes a linear combination of drift wave branch and ballooning branch instabilities with two a priori uncertain constants to account for anomalous plasma transport in tokamaks. A Bayesian parameter estimation method is used including experimental calibration error/model offsets and error bar rescaling factors to determine the two uncertain constants in the transport model with quantitative confidence level estimates for the calibrated parameters, which gives two saturation levels of instabilities. This method is first tested using a gyroBohm multi-mode transport model with a pair of DIII-D discharge experimental data, and then applied to calibrating a nominal multi-mode transport model against a broad database using twelve discharges from seven different tokamaks. The calibrated transport model is then validated on five discharges from JT-60 with no adjustable constants. The results are in a good agreement with experimental data. Finally, the resulting class of multi-mode tokamak plasma transport models is applied to the transport analysis of the ignition probability in a next generation machine, ITER. A reference simulation of basic ITER engineering design activity (EDA) parameters shows that a self-sustained thermonuclear burn with 1.5 GW output power can be achieved provided that impurity control makes radiative losses sufficiently small at an average plasma density of 1.2 X 10 20 /m 3 with 50 MW auxiliary heating. The ignition probability of ITER for the EDA parameters, can be formally as high as 99.9% in the present context. The same probability for concept design activity (CDA) parameters of ITER, which has smaller size and lower current, is only 62.6%

  8. Uncertainty associated with selected environmental transport models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.A.; Miller, C.W.

    1979-11-01

    A description is given of the capabilities of several models to predict accurately either pollutant concentrations in environmental media or radiological dose to human organs. The models are discussed in three sections: aquatic or surface water transport models, atmospheric transport models, and terrestrial and aquatic food chain models. Using data published primarily by model users, model predictions are compared to observations. This procedure is infeasible for food chain models and, therefore, the uncertainty embodied in the models input parameters, rather than the model output, is estimated. Aquatic transport models are divided into one-dimensional, longitudinal-vertical, and longitudinal-horizontal models. Several conclusions were made about the ability of the Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model to predict accurately downwind air concentrations from releases under several sets of conditions. It is concluded that no validation study has been conducted to test the predictions of either aquatic or terrestrial food chain models. Using the aquatic pathway from water to fish to an adult for 137 Cs as an example, a 95% one-tailed confidence limit interval for the predicted exposure is calculated by examining the distributions of the input parameters. Such an interval is found to be 16 times the value of the median exposure. A similar one-tailed limit for the air-grass-cow-milk-thyroid for 131 I and infants was 5.6 times the median dose. Of the three model types discussed in this report,the aquatic transport models appear to do the best job of predicting observed concentrations. However, this conclusion is based on many fewer aquatic validation data than were availaable for atmospheric model validation

  9. Real time model for public transportation management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ireneusz Celiński

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The article outlines managing a public transportation fleet in the dynamic aspect. There are currently many technical possibilities of identifying demand in the transportation network. It is also possible to indicate legitimate basis of estimating and steering demand. The article describes a general public transportation fleet management concept based on balancing demand and supply. Material and methods: The presented method utilizes a matrix description of demand for transportation based on telemetric and telecommunication data. Emphasis was placed mainly on a general concept and not the manner in which data was collected by other researchers.  Results: The above model gave results in the form of a system for managing a fleet in real-time. The objective of the system is also to optimally utilize means of transportation at the disposal of service providers. Conclusions: The presented concept enables a new perspective on managing public transportation fleets. In case of implementation, the project would facilitate, among others, designing dynamic timetables, updated based on observed demand, and even designing dynamic points of access to public transportation lines. Further research should encompass so-called rerouting based on dynamic measurements of the characteristics of the transportation system.

  10. Transport properties site descriptive model. Guidelines for evaluation and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, Sten; Selroos, Jan-Olof

    2004-04-01

    This report describes a strategy for the development of Transport Properties Site Descriptive Models within the SKB Site Investigation programme. Similar reports have been produced for the other disciplines in the site descriptive modelling (Geology, Hydrogeology, Hydrogeochemistry, Rock mechanics, Thermal properties, and Surface ecosystems). These reports are intended to guide the site descriptive modelling, but also to provide the authorities with an overview of modelling work that will be performed. The site descriptive modelling of transport properties is presented in this report and in the associated 'Strategy for the use of laboratory methods in the site investigations programme for the transport properties of the rock', which describes laboratory measurements and data evaluations. Specifically, the objectives of the present report are to: Present a description that gives an overview of the strategy for developing Site Descriptive Models, and which sets the transport modelling into this general context. Provide a structure for developing Transport Properties Site Descriptive Models that facilitates efficient modelling and comparisons between different sites. Provide guidelines on specific modelling issues where methodological consistency is judged to be of special importance, or where there is no general consensus on the modelling approach. The objectives of the site descriptive modelling process and the resulting Transport Properties Site Descriptive Models are to: Provide transport parameters for Safety Assessment. Describe the geoscientific basis for the transport model, including the qualitative and quantitative data that are of importance for the assessment of uncertainties and confidence in the transport description, and for the understanding of the processes at the sites. Provide transport parameters for use within other discipline-specific programmes. Contribute to the integrated evaluation of the investigated sites. The site descriptive modelling of

  11. Thermal model of spent fuel transport cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.E.M.; Rahman, F.A.; Sultan, G.F.; Khalil, E.E.

    1996-01-01

    The investigation provides a theoretical model to represent the thermal behaviour of the spent fuel elements when transported in a dry shipping cask under normal transport conditions. The heat transfer process in the spent fuel elements and within the cask are modeled which include the radiant heat transfer within the cask and the heat transfer by thermal conduction within the spent fuel element. The model considers the net radiant method for radiant heat transfer process from the inner most heated element to the surrounding spent elements. The heat conduction through fuel interior, fuel-clad interface and on clad surface are also presented. (author) 6 figs., 9 refs

  12. Coupling of transport and geochemical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noy, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    This report considers mass transport in the far-field of a radioactive waste repository, and detailed geochemical modelling of the ground-water in the near-field. A parallel approach to this problem of coupling transport and geochemical codes is the subject of another CEC report (ref. EUR 10226). Both studies were carried out in the framework of the CEC project MIRAGE. (Migration of radionuclides in the geosphere)

  13. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Moridis; Q. Hu

    2001-12-20

    The purpose of Revision 00 of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada.

  14. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moridis, G.; Hu, Q.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of Revision 00 of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada

  15. Regional transport model of atmospheric sulfates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.S.; Thomson, I.; Egan, B.A.

    1977-01-01

    As part of the Sulfate Regional Experiment (SURE) Design Project, a regional transport model of atmospheric sulfates has been developed. This quasi-Lagrangian three-dimensional grid numerical model uses a detailed SO 2 emission inventory of major anthropogenic sources in the Eastern U.S. region, and observed meteorological data during an episode as inputs. The model accounts for advective transport and turbulent diffusion of the pollutants. The chemical transformation of SO 2 and SO 4 /sup =/ and the deposition of the species at the earth's surface are assumed to be linear processes at specified constant rates. The numerical model can predict the daily average concentrations of SO 2 and SO 4 /sup =/ at all receptor locations in the grid region during the episode. Because of the spatial resolution of the grid, this model is particularly suited to investigate the effect of tall stacks in reducing the ambient concentration levels of sulfur pollutants. This paper presents the formulations and assumptions of the regional sulfate transport model. The model inputs and results are discussed. Isopleths of predicted SO 2 and SO 4 /sup =/ concentrations are compared with the observed ground level values. The bulk of the information in this paper is directed to air pollution meteorologists and environmental engineers interested in the atmospheric transport modeling studies of sulfur oxide pollutants

  16. Commercial Consolidation Model Applied to Transport Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilherme de Aragão, J.J.; Santos Fontes Pereira, L. dos; Yamashita, Y.

    2016-07-01

    Since the 1990s, transport concessions, including public-private partnerships (PPPs), have been increasingly adopted by governments as an alternative for financing and operations in public investments, especially in transport infrastructure. The advantage pointed out by proponents of these models lies in merging the expertise and capital of the private sector to the public interest. Several arrangements are possible and have been employed in different cases. After the duration of the first PPP contracts in transportation, many authors have analyzed the success and failure factors of partnerships. The occurrence of failures in some stages of the process can greatly encumber the public administration, incurring losses to the fiscal responsibility of the competent bodies. This article aims to propose a new commercial consolidation model applied to transport infrastructure to ensure fiscal sustainability and overcome the weaknesses of current models. Initially, a systematic review of the literature covering studies on transport concessions between 1990 and 2015 is offered, where the different approaches between various countries are compared and the critical success factors indicated in the studies are identified. In the subsequent part of the paper, an approach for the commercial consolidation of the infrastructure concessions is presented, where the concessionary is paid following a finalistic performance model, which includes the overall fiscal balance of regional growth. Finally, the papers analyses the usefulness of the model in coping with the critical success factors explained before. (Author)

  17. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Moridis; Q. Hu

    2000-03-12

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. This is in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan U0060, Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). This AMR documents the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model (RTM). This model considers: the transport of radionuclides through fractured tuffs; the effects of changes in the intensity and configuration of fracturing from hydrogeologic unit to unit; colloid transport; physical and retardation processes and the effects of perched water. In this AMR they document the capabilities of the UZ RTM, which can describe flow (saturated and/or unsaturated) and transport, and accounts for (a) advection, (b) molecular diffusion, (c) hydrodynamic dispersion (with full 3-D tensorial representation), (d) kinetic or equilibrium physical and/or chemical sorption (linear, Langmuir, Freundlich or combined), (e) first-order linear chemical reaction, (f) radioactive decay and tracking of daughters, (g) colloid filtration (equilibrium, kinetic or combined), and (h) colloid-assisted solute transport. Simulations of transport of radioactive solutes and colloids (incorporating the processes described above) from the repository horizon to the water table are performed to support model development and support studies for Performance Assessment (PA). The input files for these simulations include transport parameters obtained from other AMRs (i.e., CRWMS M and O 1999d, e, f, g, h; 2000a, b, c, d). When not available, the parameter values used are obtained from the literature. The results of the simulations are used to evaluate the transport of radioactive

  18. Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moridis, G.; Hu, Q.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to evaluate (by means of 2-D semianalytical and 3-D numerical models) the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids in the unsaturated zone (UZ) under ambient conditions from the potential repository horizon to the water table at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. This is in accordance with the ''AMR Development Plan U0060, Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). This AMR documents the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model (RTM). This model considers: the transport of radionuclides through fractured tuffs; the effects of changes in the intensity and configuration of fracturing from hydrogeologic unit to unit; colloid transport; physical and retardation processes and the effects of perched water. In this AMR they document the capabilities of the UZ RTM, which can describe flow (saturated and/or unsaturated) and transport, and accounts for (a) advection, (b) molecular diffusion, (c) hydrodynamic dispersion (with full 3-D tensorial representation), (d) kinetic or equilibrium physical and/or chemical sorption (linear, Langmuir, Freundlich or combined), (e) first-order linear chemical reaction, (f) radioactive decay and tracking of daughters, (g) colloid filtration (equilibrium, kinetic or combined), and (h) colloid-assisted solute transport. Simulations of transport of radioactive solutes and colloids (incorporating the processes described above) from the repository horizon to the water table are performed to support model development and support studies for Performance Assessment (PA). The input files for these simulations include transport parameters obtained from other AMRs (i.e., CRWMS M and O 1999d, e, f, g, h; 2000a, b, c, d). When not available, the parameter values used are obtained from the literature. The results of the simulations are used to evaluate the transport of radioactive solutes and colloids, and

  19. Hydrogen recycle modeling in transport codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    The hydrogen recycling models now used in Tokamak transport codes are reviewed and the method by which realistic recycling models are being added is discussed. Present models use arbitrary recycle coefficients and therefore do not model the actual recycling processes at the wall. A model for the hydrogen concentration in the wall serves two purposes: (1) it allows a better understanding of the density behavior in present gas puff, pellet, and neutral beam heating experiments; and (2) it allows one to extrapolate to long pulse devices such as EBT, ISX-C and reactors where the walls are observed or expected to saturate. Several wall models are presently being studied for inclusion in transport codes

  20. GEOS-5 Chemistry Transport Model User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouatchou, J.; Molod, A.; Nielsen, J. E.; Auer, B.; Putman, W.; Clune, T.

    2015-01-01

    The Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) General Circulation Model (GCM) makes use of the Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) to enable model configurations with many functions. One of the options of the GEOS-5 GCM is the GEOS-5 Chemistry Transport Model (GEOS-5 CTM), which is an offline simulation of chemistry and constituent transport driven by a specified meteorology and other model output fields. This document describes the basic components of the GEOS-5 CTM, and is a user's guide on to how to obtain and run simulations on the NCCS Discover platform. In addition, we provide information on how to change the model configuration input files to meet users' needs.

  1. Modelling Transition Towards Sustainable Transportation Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominkovic, Dominik Franjo; Bačeković, I.; Mýrdal, Jón Steinar Garðarsson

    2016-01-01

    two energy sectors. In order to deal with the raised issue, authors of this paper developed amethodology for calculation of the transition towards sustainable transport sector, focusing on thesolutions that are already available. Furthermore, as a part of the model, a detailed mapping ofresources......In a transition towards 100% renewable energy system, transportation sector is rarely dealt withusing the holistic approach and measuring its impact on the whole energy system. Furthermore, assolutions for power and heat sectors are clearer, it is a tendency of the researchers to focus on thelatter...... needed has been carried out for each of the alternatives. It was shown that theelectrification of the transportation sector is a crucial point in transition, while for the transportmodes that cannot be electrified, or shifted to different transportation modes, four alternatives weredefined: synthetic...

  2. Models in Planning Urban Public Passenger Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Štefančić

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The solving of complex problems in public transport requiresthe usage of models that are based on the estimate of demandin planning the transport routes. The intention is to predictwhat is going to happen in the future, if the proposed solutionsare implemented. In the majority of cases, the publictransport system is formed as a network and stored in the computermemory in order to start the evaluation process by specifYingthe number of trip origins and destinations in each zone.The trip distribution model which is used to calculate the numberof trips between each pair in the zone is based on the overalltravel frictions from zone to zone.

  3. Uncertainty calculation in transport models and forecasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzo, Stefano; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    . Forthcoming: European Journal of Transport and Infrastructure Research, 15-3, 64-72. 4 The last paper4 examined uncertainty in the spatial composition of residence and workplace locations in the Danish National Transport Model. Despite the evidence that spatial structure influences travel behaviour...... to increase the quality of the decision process and to develop robust or adaptive plans. In fact, project evaluation processes that do not take into account model uncertainty produce not fully informative and potentially misleading results so increasing the risk inherent to the decision to be taken...

  4. Reactive transport models and simulation with ALLIANCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leterrier, N.; Deville, E.; Bary, B.; Trotignon, L.; Hedde, T.; Cochepin, B.; Stora, E.

    2009-01-01

    Many chemical processes influence the evolution of nuclear waste storage. As a result, simulations based only upon transport and hydraulic processes fail to describe adequately some industrial scenarios. We need to take into account complex chemical models (mass action laws, kinetics...) which are highly non-linear. In order to simulate the coupling of these chemical reactions with transport, we use a classical Sequential Iterative Approach (SIA), with a fixed point algorithm, within the mainframe of the ALLIANCES platform. This approach allows us to use the various transport and chemical modules available in ALLIANCES, via an operator-splitting method based upon the structure of the chemical system. We present five different applications of reactive transport simulations in the context of nuclear waste storage: 1. A 2D simulation of the lixiviation by rain water of an underground polluted zone high in uranium oxide; 2. The degradation of the steel envelope of a package in contact with clay. Corrosion of the steel creates corrosion products and the altered package becomes a porous medium. We follow the degradation front through kinetic reactions and the coupling with transport; 3. The degradation of a cement-based material by the injection of an aqueous solution of zinc and sulphate ions. In addition to the reactive transport coupling, we take into account in this case the hydraulic retroaction of the porosity variation on the Darcy velocity; 4. The decalcification of a concrete beam in an underground storage structure. In this case, in addition to the reactive transport simulation, we take into account the interaction between chemical degradation and the mechanical forces (cracks...), and the retroactive influence on the structure changes on transport; 5. The degradation of the steel envelope of a package in contact with a clay material under a temperature gradient. In this case the reactive transport simulation is entirely directed by the temperature changes and

  5. Multi-compartment Aerosol Transport Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, Joshua Allen; Santarpia, Joshua; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Omana, Michael Alexis; Rivera, Danielle; Lucero, Gabriel Anthony

    2017-06-01

    A simple aerosol transport model was developed for a multi-compartmented cleanroom. Each compartment was treated as a well-mixed volume with ventilating supply and return air. Gravitational settling, intercompartment transport, and leakage of exterior air into the system were included in the model. A set of first order, coupled, ordinary differential equations was derived from the conservation equations of aerosol mass and air mass. The system of ODEs was then solved in MATLAB using pre-existing numerical methods. The model was verified against cases of (1) constant inlet-duct concentration, and (2) exponentially decaying inlet-duct concentration. Numerical methods resulted in normalized error of less than 10 -9 when model solutions were compared to analytical solutions. The model was validated against experimental measurements from a single field test and showed good agreement in the shape and magnitude of the aerosol concentration profile with time.

  6. Error estimation and adaptive chemical transport modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malte Braack

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical method to use several chemical transport models of increasing accuracy and complexity in an adaptive way. In largest parts of the domain, a simplified chemical model may be used, whereas in certain regions a more complex model is needed for accuracy reasons. A mathematically derived error estimator measures the modeling error and provides information where to use more accurate models. The error is measured in terms of output functionals. Therefore, one has to consider adjoint problems which carry sensitivity information. This concept is demonstrated by means of ozone formation and pollution emission.

  7. Propuesta del Plan Regulador de Rutas Interdistrital y Evaluación mediante SIG del transporte urbano público de pasajeros en Cajamarca, 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Ravines Azañero, Irene Del Rosario

    2016-01-01

    En la ciudad de Cajamarca, el transporte de pasajeros constituye un problema cada vez más importante en nuestra sociedad, en los últimos años se ha demostrado empíricamente que la construcción de infraestructura o la ampliación de las vías existentes no es una solución adecuada a este problema, sino que se debe planificar el transporte de pasajeros otorgando incentivos al uso del transporte público, para intentar disminuir los efectos negativos que produce la operación del sistema de transpor...

  8. Modelling anisotropic water transport in polymer composite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This work reports anisotropic water transport in a polymer composite consisting of an epoxy matrix reinforced with aligned triangular bars made of vinyl ester. By gravimetric experiments, water diffusion in resin and polymer composites were characterized. Parameters for Fickian diffusion and polymer relaxation models were ...

  9. Climate impact of transportation A model comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Girod, B.; Vuuren, D.P. van; Grahn, M.; Kitous, A.; Kim, S.H.; Kyle, P.

    2013-01-01

    Transportation contributes to a significant and rising share of global energy use and GHG emissions. Therefore modeling future travel demand, its fuel use, and resulting CO2 emission is highly relevant for climate change mitigation. In this study we compare the baseline projections for global

  10. Logistics Chains in Freight Transport Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davydenko, I.Y.

    2015-01-01

    The flow of trade is not equal to transport flows, mainly due to the fact that warehouses and distribution facilities are used as intermediary stops on the way from production locations to the points of consumption or further rework of goods. This thesis proposes a logistics chain model, which

  11. Modelling soil transport by wind in drylands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.H.A.

    1994-01-01

    Understanding the movement of windblown soil particles and the resulting formation of complex surface features are among the most intriguing problems in dryland research. This understanding can only be achieved trough physical and mathematical modelling and must also involve observational data and laboratory experiments. Some current mathematical models that have contributed to the basic understanding of the transportation and deposition of soil particles by wind are presented and solved in these notes. (author). 26 refs, 5 figs

  12. Calculation of electromagnetic field in electric machines through the finite element: Electromagnetic modeling; Calculo de campos electromagneticos en maquinas electricas mediante elemento finito: Modelacion electromagnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales, Mario F. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1987-12-31

    In this article are presented the general characteristics of the electromagnetic phenomena that can be described by means of the software CALIIE-2D of the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) derived from a modeling based in the magnetic and electric potentials, always using the MKS rationalized units system. Closed regions are considered with axial or moving symmetry to incorporate the bi-dimensional behavior of the electromagnetic fields. The possibility of means with movement is also included. [Espanol] En este articulo se presentan las caracteristicas generales de los fenomenos electromagneticos que pueden describirse mediante el programa de computo CALIIE-2D, del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), que provienen de una modelacion basada en los potenciales magnetico y electrico, en esta se utiliza sistema MKS racionalizado de unidades. Se consideran regiones cerradas con simetria axial o traslacional para incorporar el comportamiento bidimensional de los campos electromagneticos, se incluye tambien la posibilidad de medios con movimiento.

  13. Numerical modelling of ion transport in flames

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Jie

    2015-10-20

    This paper presents a modelling framework to compute the diffusivity and mobility of ions in flames. The (n, 6, 4) interaction potential is adopted to model collisions between neutral and charged species. All required parameters in the potential are related to the polarizability of the species pair via semi-empirical formulas, which are derived using the most recently published data or best estimates. The resulting framework permits computation of the transport coefficients of any ion found in a hydrocarbon flame. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data on the mobility of selected ions in single-component neutral gases. Based on this analysis, the value of a model constant available in the literature is modified in order to improve the model\\'s predictions. The newly determined ion transport coefficients are used as part of a previously developed numerical approach to compute the distribution of charged species in a freely propagating premixed lean CH4/O2 flame. Since a significant scatter of polarizability data exists in the literature, the effects of changes in polarizability on ion transport properties and the spatial distribution of ions in flames are explored. Our analysis shows that changes in polarizability propagate with decreasing effect from binary transport coefficients to species number densities. We conclude that the chosen polarizability value has a limited effect on the ion distribution in freely propagating flames. We expect that the modelling framework proposed here will benefit future efforts in modelling the effect of external voltages on flames. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13647830.2015.1090018. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.

  14. Symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, E.M.; Gee, G.W.; Nelson, R.W. (eds.)

    1982-09-01

    This document records the proceedings of a symposium on flow and transport processes in partially saturated groundwater systems, conducted at the Battelle Seattle Research Center on March 22-24, 1982. The symposium was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of assessing the state-of-the-art of flow and transport modeling for use in licensing low-level nuclear waste repositories in partially saturated zones. The first day of the symposium centered around research in flow through partially saturated systems. Papers were presented with the opportunity for questions following each presentation. In addition, after all the talks, a formal panel discussion was held during which written questions were addressed to the panel of the days speakers. The second day of the Symposium was devoted to solute and contaminant transport in partially saturated media in an identical format. Individual papers are abstracted.

  15. Molecular modeling of auxin transport inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, G.; Black-Schaefer, C.; Bures, M.G.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular modeling techniques have been used to study the chemical and steric properties of auxin transport inhibitors. These bind to a specific site on the plant plasma membrane characterized by its affinity for N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). A three-dimensional model was derived from critical features of ligands for the NPA receptor, and a suggested binding conformation is proposed. This model, along with three-dimensional structural searching techniques, was then used to search the Abbott corporate database of chemical structures. Of the 467 compounds that satisfied the search criteria, 77 representative molecules were evaluated for their ability to compete for [ 3 H]NPA binding to corn microsomal membranes. Nineteen showed activity that ranged from 16 to 85% of the maximum NPA binding. Four of the most active of these, from chemical classes not included in the original compound set, also inhibited polar auxin transport through corn coleoptile sections

  16. Model prodrugs for the intestinal oligopeptide transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C U; Andersen, R; Brodin, Birger

    2001-01-01

    The human intestinal di/tri-peptide carrier, hPepT1, has been suggested as a target for increasing intestinal transport of low permeability compounds by creating prodrugs designed for the transporter. Model ester prodrugs using the stabilized dipeptides D-Glu-Ala and D-Asp-Ala as pro...... with a pH of approximately 6.0, but still release the model drug at the intercellular and blood pH of approximately 7.4. Even though benzyl alcohol is not a low molecular weight drug molecule, these results indicate that the dipeptide prodrug principle is a promising drug delivery concept. However......, the physico-chemical properties such as electronegativity, solubility, and log P of the drug molecule may also have an influence on the potential of these kinds of prodrugs. The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether the model drug electronegativity, estimated as Taft substitution parameter...

  17. Numerical modelling of ion transport in flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Belhi, Memdouh; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Mani Sarathy, S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a modelling framework to compute the diffusivity and mobility of ions in flames. The (n, 6, 4) interaction potential is adopted to model collisions between neutral and charged species. All required parameters in the potential are related to the polarizability of the species pair via semi-empirical formulas, which are derived using the most recently published data or best estimates. The resulting framework permits computation of the transport coefficients of any ion found in a hydrocarbon flame. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data on the mobility of selected ions in single-component neutral gases. Based on this analysis, the value of a model constant available in the literature is modified in order to improve the model's predictions. The newly determined ion transport coefficients are used as part of a previously developed numerical approach to compute the distribution of charged species in a freely propagating premixed lean CH4/O2 flame. Since a significant scatter of polarizability data exists in the literature, the effects of changes in polarizability on ion transport properties and the spatial distribution of ions in flames are explored. Our analysis shows that changes in polarizability propagate with decreasing effect from binary transport coefficients to species number densities. We conclude that the chosen polarizability value has a limited effect on the ion distribution in freely propagating flames. We expect that the modelling framework proposed here will benefit future efforts in modelling the effect of external voltages on flames. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13647830.2015.1090018.

  18. Validity Examination of EFQM’s Results by DEA Models = Examen de la validez de los resultados de EFQM mediante modelos DEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mustafa, Adli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Validity Examination of EFQM’s Results by DEA Models = Examen de la validez de los resultados de EFQM mediante modelos DEAAbstract: The European Foundation Quality Management is one of the models which deal with the assessment of function of an organization using a self-assessment for measuring the concepts some of which are more and more qualitative. Consequently, complete understanding and correct usage of this model in an organization depend on the comprehensive recognition of that model and different strategies of self-assessment. The process of self-assessment on the basis of this model in an organization needs to use the experienced auditors. This leads to reduce the wrong privilege making to the criteria and to subcriteria probable way. In this paper, first some of the weaknesses of the EFQM model are studied, then with the usage of structure of input-output governing of the model and using of Data Envelopment Analysis, a method is offered to recognize the lack of the proportion between Enablers and the results of organization which may occur due to problems and obstacles hidden in the heart of organization. = La Fundación Europea de Gestión de la Calidad (EFQM significa uno de los modelos para la evaluación de las funciones de las organizaciones, utilizando la autoevaluación para medir aspectos que, algunos de los cuales, son cada vez más cualitativos. Consecuentemente, la comprensión completa y el uso correcto de este modelo en una organización dependen del conocimiento profundo del modelo y de las diferentes estrategias de autoevaluación. El proceso de autoevaluación en la base de este modelo, en cualquier organización, necesita la intervención de auditores experimentados. Esto es precisamente lo que lleva a reducir el uso incorrecto de los criterios y de los subcriterios. En este artículo, primero se estudian algunas de las debilidades del modelo EFQM y después, mediante la utilización de estructura de control de

  19. Modelling contaminant transport in saturated aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshminarayana, V.; Nayak, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    With the increase in population and industrialization the problem of pollution of groundwater has become critical. The present study deals with modelling of pollutant transport through saturated aquifers. Using this model it is possible to predict the concentration distribution, spatial as well as temporal, in the aquifer. The paper also deals with one of the methods of controlling the pollutant movement, namely by pumping wells. A simulation model is developed to determine the number, location and rate of pumping of a number of wells near the source of pollution so that the concentration is within acceptable limits at the point of interest. (Author) (18 refs., 14 figs., tab.)

  20. Modelling an Ammonium Transporter with SCLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Troina

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The Stochastic Calculus of Looping Sequences (SCLS is a recently proposed modelling language for the representation and simulation of biological systems behaviour. It has been designed with the aim of combining the simplicity of notation of rewrite systems with the advantage of compositionality. It also allows a rather simple and accurate description of biological membranes and their interactions with the environment.In this work we apply SCLS to model a newly discovered ammonium transporter. This transporter is believed to play a fundamental role for plant mineral acquisition, which takes place in the arbuscular mycorrhiza, the most wide-spread plant-fungus symbiosis on earth. Due to its potential application in agriculture this kind of symbiosis is one of the main focuses of the BioBITs project. In our experiments the passage of NH3 / NH4+ from the fungus to the plant has been dissected in known and hypothetical mechanisms; with the model so far we have been able to simulate the behaviour of the system under different conditions. Our simulations confirmed some of the latest experimental results about the LjAMT2;2 transporter. The initial simulation results of the modelling of the symbiosis process are promising and indicate new directions for biological investigations.

  1. Modeling tritium transport in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A model of tritium transport in the environment near an atmospheric source of tritium is presented in the general context of modeling material cycling in ecosystems. The model was developed to test hypotheses about the process involved in tritium cycling. The temporal and spatial scales of the model were picked to allow comparison to environmental monitoring data collected in the vicinity of the Savannah River Plant. Initial simulations with the model showed good agreement with monitoring data, including atmospheric and vegetation tritium concentrations. The model can also simulate values of tritium in vegetation organic matter if the key parameter distributing the source of organic hydrogen is varied to fit the data. However, because of the lack of independent conformation of the distribution parameter, there is still uncertainty about the role of organic movement of tritium in the food chain, and its effect on the dose to man

  2. Modelling radioiodine transport across a capillary fringe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathias, Simon A.; Butler, Adrian P.; Wheater, Howard S.

    2008-01-01

    Due to its long radioactive half-life, iodine-129 is considered to be an important radionuclide in the context of underground radioactive waste disposal safety assessment. Iodine speciates as iodide (I - ) in reducing conditions and iodate (IO 3 - ) in oxidizing conditions. As iodate is more reactive, it is much less mobile than iodide. Consequently, in considering vertically upward transport within a soil profile, iodine will tend to accumulate at the top of the capillary fringe. In this paper, a model of iodine transport across a capillary fringe is developed by coupling equations for variably saturated flow, oxygen dynamics and rate-limited sorption. Model parameters are obtained by consideration of literature values, calibration on soil column data and other supporting laboratory experiments. The results demonstrate the importance of rate kinetics on the migration and bioavailability of radioiodine in the near-surface environment

  3. Modelling radioiodine transport across a capillary fringe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Simon A; Butler, Adrian P; Wheater, Howard S

    2008-04-01

    Due to its long radioactive half-life, iodine-129 is considered to be an important radionuclide in the context of underground radioactive waste disposal safety assessment. Iodine speciates as iodide (I-) in reducing conditions and iodate (IO3-) in oxidizing conditions. As iodate is more reactive, it is much less mobile than iodide. Consequently, in considering vertically upward transport within a soil profile, iodine will tend to accumulate at the top of the capillary fringe. In this paper, a model of iodine transport across a capillary fringe is developed by coupling equations for variably saturated flow, oxygen dynamics and rate-limited sorption. Model parameters are obtained by consideration of literature values, calibration on soil column data and other supporting laboratory experiments. The results demonstrate the importance of rate kinetics on the migration and bioavailability of radioiodine in the near-surface environment.

  4. Modelling sediment clasts transport during landscape evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretier, Sébastien; Martinod, Pierre; Reich, Martin; Godderis, Yves

    2016-03-01

    Over thousands to millions of years, the landscape evolution is predicted by models based on fluxes of eroded, transported and deposited material. The laws describing these fluxes, corresponding to averages over many years, are difficult to prove with the available data. On the other hand, sediment dynamics are often tackled by studying the distribution of certain grain properties in the field (e.g. heavy metals, detrital zircons, 10Be in gravel, magnetic tracers). There is a gap between landscape evolution models based on fluxes and these field data on individual clasts, which prevent the latter from being used to calibrate the former. Here we propose an algorithm coupling the landscape evolution with mobile clasts. Our landscape evolution model predicts local erosion, deposition and transfer fluxes resulting from hillslope and river processes. Clasts of any size are initially spread in the basement and are detached, moved and deposited according to probabilities using these fluxes. Several river and hillslope laws are studied. Although the resulting mean transport rate of the clasts does not depend on the time step or the model cell size, our approach is limited by the fact that their scattering rate is cell-size-dependent. Nevertheless, both their mean transport rate and the shape of the scattering-time curves fit the predictions. Different erosion-transport laws generate different clast movements. These differences show that studying the tracers in the field may provide a way to establish these laws on the hillslopes and in the rivers. Possible applications include the interpretation of cosmogenic nuclides in individual gravel deposits, provenance analyses, placers, sediment coarsening or fining, the relationship between magnetic tracers in rivers and the river planform, and the tracing of weathered sediment.

  5. Turbulence modification and multiphase turbulence transport modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besnard, D.C.; Kataoka, I.; Serizawa, A.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown here that in the derivation of turbulence transport models for multiphase flows, terms naturally appear that can be interpreted as related to turbulence modification of one field by the other. We obtain two such terms, one suggesting turbulence enhancement due to instabilities in two-phase flow, the second one showing turbulence damping due to the presence of the other field, both in gas-particle and gas-liquid cases

  6. Abstracts of the symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    Abstract titles are: Recent developments in modeling variably saturated flow and transport; Unsaturated flow modeling as applied to field problems; Coupled heat and moisture transport in unsaturated soils; Influence of climatic parameters on movement of radionuclides in a multilayered saturated-unsaturated media; Modeling water and solute transport in soil containing roots; Simulation of consolidation in partially saturated soil materials; modeling of water and solute transport in unsaturated heterogeneous fields; Fluid dynamics and mass transfer in variably-saturated porous media; Solute transport through soils; One-dimensional analytical transport modeling; Convective transport of ideal tracers in unsaturated soils; Chemical transport in macropore-mesopore media under partially saturated conditions; Influence of the tension-saturated zone on contaminant migration in shallow water regimes; Influence of the spatial distribution of velocities in porous media on the form of solute transport; Stochastic vs deterministic models for solute movement in the field; and Stochastic analysis of flow and solute transport

  7. Transport Models for Inland and Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Peter

    This proceedings volume originates from a symposium held at Berkeley, California, in August 1980. The purpose of the symposium was to assess the ability of models to predict surface water flow and the transport of dissolved substances in natural systems. The authors were invited, after an initial call for papers, by a Scientific Committee of the International Association for Hydraulic Research.In this context, predictive modeling is limited to hydrodynamic and transport models as applied to rivers, estuaries, shallow coastal waters, lakes, and reservoirs. This is a large subject, though evidently not the whole story on predictive techniques applied to natural water bodies, and many different models are described with applications to a wide variety of natural systems. There is relatively little overlap of material between chapters. It is noteworthy that 21 out of 24 authors of the chapters are affiliated with institutions outside the United States, and many of these are from large European hydraulic laboratories. A number of the chapters summarize numerical modeling studies undertaken by these institutions and so provide the U.S. reader with valuable references to the European open literature and laboratory technical reports. The latter are not usually readily available in the United States. This bias reflects a greater willingness of European engineers to employ sophisticated hydrodynamic numerical models as tools for the solution of engineering and environmental problems of natural water bodies.

  8. Natural analogues and radionuclide transport model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lever, D.A.

    1987-08-01

    In this paper, some possible roles for natural analogues are discussed from the point of view of those involved with the development of mathematical models for radionuclide transport and with the use of these models in repository safety assessments. The characteristic features of a safety assessment are outlined in order to address the questions of where natural analogues can be used to improve our understanding of the processes involved and where they can assist in validating the models that are used. Natural analogues have the potential to provide useful information about some critical processes, especially long-term chemical processes and migration rates. There is likely to be considerable uncertainty and ambiguity associated with the interpretation of natural analogues, and thus it is their general features which should be emphasized, and models with appropriate levels of sophistication should be used. Experience gained in modelling the Koongarra uranium deposit in northern Australia is drawn upon. (author)

  9. Model for radionuclide transport in running waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Karin; Elert, Mark [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-11-15

    Two sites in Sweden are currently under investigation by SKB for their suitability as places for deep repository of radioactive waste, the Forsmark and Simpevarp/Laxemar area. As a part of the safety assessment, SKB has formulated a biosphere model with different sub-models for different parts of the ecosystem in order to be able to predict the dose to humans following a possible radionuclide discharge from a future deep repository. In this report, a new model concept describing radionuclide transport in streams is presented. The main difference from the previous model for running water used by SKB, where only dilution of the inflow of radionuclides was considered, is that the new model includes parameterizations also of the exchange processes present along the stream. This is done in order to be able to investigate the effect of the retention on the transport and to be able to estimate the resulting concentrations in the different parts of the system. The concentrations determined with this new model could later be used for order of magnitude predictions of the dose to humans. The presented model concept is divided in two parts, one hydraulic and one radionuclide transport model. The hydraulic model is used to determine the flow conditions in the stream channel and is based on the assumption of uniform flow and quasi-stationary conditions. The results from the hydraulic model are used in the radionuclide transport model where the concentration is determined in the different parts of the stream ecosystem. The exchange processes considered are exchange with the sediments due to diffusion, advective transport and sedimentation/resuspension and uptake of radionuclides in biota. Transport of both dissolved radionuclides and sorbed onto particulates is considered. Sorption kinetics in the stream water phase is implemented as the time scale of the residence time in the stream water probably is short in comparison to the time scale of the kinetic sorption. In the sediment

  10. Modeling VOC transport in simulated waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Peterson, E.S.; Rae, C.; Hotz, N.J.; Connolly, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    A volatile organic compound (VOC) transport model has been developed to describe unsteady-state VOC permeation and diffusion within a waste drum. Model equations account for three primary mechanisms for VOC transport from a void volume within the drum. These mechanisms are VOC permeation across a polymer boundary, VOC diffusion across an opening in a volume boundary, and VOC solubilization in a polymer boundary. A series of lab-scale experiments was performed in which the VOC concentration was measured in simulated waste drums under different conditions. A lab-scale simulated waste drum consisted of a sized-down 55-gal metal drum containing a modified rigid polyethylene drum liner. Four polyethylene bags were sealed inside a large polyethylene bag, supported by a wire cage, and placed inside the drum liner. The small bags were filled with VOC-air gas mixture and the VOC concentration was measured throughout the drum over a period of time. Test variables included the type of VOC-air gas mixtures introduced into the small bags, the small bag closure type, and the presence or absence of a variable external heat source. Model results were calculated for those trials where the VOC permeability had been measured. Permeabilities for five VOCs [methylene chloride, 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (Freon-113), 1,1,1-trichloroethane, carbon tetrachloride, and trichloroethylene] were measured across a polyethylene bag. Comparison of model and experimental results of VOC concentration as a function of time indicate that model accurately accounts for significant VOC transport mechanisms in a lab-scale waste drum

  11. Modeling of radon transport in unsaturated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.; Green, R.

    1995-01-01

    This study applies a recently developed model, LEACHV, to simulate transport of radon through unsaturated soil and compares calculated soil radon activities against field-measured values. For volatile and gas phase transport, LEACHV is modified from LEACHP, a pesticide version of LEACHM, as well-documented one-dimensional model for water and chemical movement through unsaturated soil. LEACHV adds consideration of air temperature changes and air flow driven by barometric pressure change to the other soil variables currently used in LEACHP. It applies diurnal barometric pressure and air temperature changes to reflect more accurately the typical field conditions, Sensitivity analysis and simulated results have clearly demonstrated the relative importance of barometric pressure change, rainfall events, changes in water content, gas advection, and radon source term in radon transport process. Comparisons among simulated results illustrated that the importance of barometric pressure change and its pumping phenomenon produces both fluctuation in soil gas radon activities and an elevation of the long-term average radon activity in shallow soils of an equal magnitude to the disturbed source parameter. Comparisons between measured and simulated soil radon activities showed that LEACHV can provide realistic estimates of radon activity concentration in the soil profile. 41 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  12. 3 Lectures: "Lagrangian Models", "Numerical Transport Schemes", and "Chemical and Transport Models"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A.

    2005-01-01

    The topics for the three lectures for the Canadian Summer School are Lagrangian Models, numerical transport schemes, and chemical and transport models. In the first lecture I will explain the basic components of the Lagrangian model (a trajectory code and a photochemical code), the difficulties in using such a model (initialization) and show some applications in interpretation of aircraft and satellite data. If time permits I will show some results concerning inverse modeling which is being used to evaluate sources of tropospheric pollutants. In the second lecture I will discuss one of the core components of any grid point model, the numerical transport scheme. I will explain the basics of shock capturing schemes, and performance criteria. I will include an example of the importance of horizontal resolution to polar processes. We have learned from NASA's global modeling initiative that horizontal resolution matters for predictions of the future evolution of the ozone hole. The numerical scheme will be evaluated using performance metrics based on satellite observations of long-lived tracers. The final lecture will discuss the evolution of chemical transport models over the last decade. Some of the problems with assimilated winds will be demonstrated, using satellite data to evaluate the simulations.

  13. Risk management model in road transport systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhapov, R. L.; Nikolaeva, R. V.; Gatiyatullin, M. H.; Makhmutov, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The article presents the results of a study of road safety indicators that influence the development and operation of the transport system. Road safety is considered as a continuous process of risk management. Authors constructed a model that relates the social risks of a major road safety indicator - the level of motorization. The model gives a fairly accurate assessment of the level of social risk for any given level of motorization. Authors calculated the dependence of the level of socio-economic costs of accidents and injured people in them. The applicability of the concept of socio-economic damage is caused by the presence of a linear relationship between the natural and economic indicators damage from accidents. The optimization of social risk is reduced to finding the extremum of the objective function that characterizes the economic effect of the implementation of measures to improve safety. The calculations make it possible to maximize the net present value, depending on the costs of improving road safety, taking into account socio-economic damage caused by accidents. The proposed econometric models make it possible to quantify the efficiency of the transportation system, allow to simulate the change in road safety indicators.

  14. Modeling in transport phenomena a conceptual approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tosun, Ismail

    2007-01-01

    Modeling in Transport Phenomena, Second Edition presents and clearly explains with example problems the basic concepts and their applications to fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, chemical reaction engineering and thermodynamics. A balanced approach is presented between analysis and synthesis, students will understand how to use the solution in engineering analysis. Systematic derivations of the equations and the physical significance of each term are given in detail, for students to easily understand and follow up the material. There is a strong incentive in science and engineering to

  15. Coupling of transport and geochemical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noy, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    This contract stipulated separate pieces of work to consider mass transport in the far-field of a repository, and more detailed geochemical modelling of the groundwater in the near-field. It was envisaged that the far-field problem would be tackled by numerical solutions to the classical advection-diffusion equation obtained by the finite element method. For the near-field problem the feasibility of coupling existing geochemical equilibrium codes to the three dimensional groundwater flow codes was to be investigated. This report is divided into two sections with one part devoted to each aspect of this contract. (author)

  16. A disaggregate freight transport model of transport chain and shipment size choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windisch, E.; De Jong, G.C.; Van Nes, R.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    The field of freight transport modelling is relatively young compared to passenger transport modelling. However, some key issues in freight policy, like growing freight shares on the road, advanced logistics concepts or emerging strict freight transport regulations, have been creating increasing

  17. Uncertainty in reactive transport geochemical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oedegaard-Jensen, A.; Ekberg, C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Geochemical modelling is one way of predicting the transport of i.e. radionuclides in a rock formation. In a rock formation there will be fractures in which water and dissolved species can be transported. The composition of the water and the rock can either increase or decrease the mobility of the transported entities. When doing simulations on the mobility or transport of different species one has to know the exact water composition, the exact flow rates in the fracture and in the surrounding rock, the porosity and which minerals the rock is composed of. The problem with simulations on rocks is that the rock itself it not uniform i.e. larger fractures in some areas and smaller in other areas which can give different water flows. The rock composition can be different in different areas. In additions to this variance in the rock there are also problems with measuring the physical parameters used in a simulation. All measurements will perturb the rock and this perturbation will results in more or less correct values of the interesting parameters. The analytical methods used are also encumbered with uncertainties which in this case are added to the uncertainty from the perturbation of the analysed parameters. When doing simulation the effect of the uncertainties must be taken into account. As the computers are getting faster and faster the complexity of simulated systems are increased which also increase the uncertainty in the results from the simulations. In this paper we will show how the uncertainty in the different parameters will effect the solubility and mobility of different species. Small uncertainties in the input parameters can result in large uncertainties in the end. (authors)

  18. Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the conceptual and numerical models used for modeling of unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid (water and air) flow and solute transport processes. This is in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0030 Conceptual and Numerical Models for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Processes, Rev 00''. The conceptual and numerical modeling approaches described in this AMR are used for models of UZ flow and transport in fractured, unsaturated rock under ambient and thermal conditions, which are documented in separate AMRs. This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR), the Near Field Environment PMR, and the following models: Calibrated Properties Model; UZ Flow Models and Submodels; Mountain-Scale Coupled Processes Model; Thermal-Hydrologic-Chemical (THC) Seepage Model; Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model; Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA); and UZ Radionuclide Transport Models

  19. A Lagrangian mixing frequency model for transported PDF modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkeri, Hasret; Zhao, Xinyu

    2017-11-01

    In this study, a Lagrangian mixing frequency model is proposed for molecular mixing models within the framework of transported probability density function (PDF) methods. The model is based on the dissipations of mixture fraction and progress variables obtained from Lagrangian particles in PDF methods. The new model is proposed as a remedy to the difficulty in choosing the optimal model constant parameters when using conventional mixing frequency models. The model is implemented in combination with the Interaction by exchange with the mean (IEM) mixing model. The performance of the new model is examined by performing simulations of Sandia Flame D and the turbulent premixed flame from the Cambridge stratified flame series. The simulations are performed using the pdfFOAM solver which is a LES/PDF solver developed entirely in OpenFOAM. A 16-species reduced mechanism is used to represent methane/air combustion, and in situ adaptive tabulation is employed to accelerate the finite-rate chemistry calculations. The results are compared with experimental measurements as well as with the results obtained using conventional mixing frequency models. Dynamic mixing frequencies are predicted using the new model without solving additional transport equations, and good agreement with experimental data is observed.

  20. Documentation of TRU biological transport model (BIOTRAN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, A.F.; Garcia, B.J.; Sutton, C.M.

    1980-01-01

    Inclusive of Appendices, this document describes the purpose, rationale, construction, and operation of a biological transport model (BIOTRAN). This model is used to predict the flow of transuranic elements (TRU) through specified plant and animal environments using biomass as a vector. The appendices are: (A) Flows of moisture, biomass, and TRU; (B) Intermediate variables affecting flows; (C) Mnemonic equivalents (code) for variables; (D) Variable library (code); (E) BIOTRAN code (Fortran); (F) Plants simulated; (G) BIOTRAN code documentation; (H) Operating instructions for BIOTRAN code. The main text is presented with a specific format which uses a minimum of space, yet is adequate for tracking most relationships from their first appearance to their formulation in the code. Because relationships are treated individually in this manner, and rely heavily on Appendix material for understanding, it is advised that the reader familiarize himself with these materials before proceeding with the main text

  1. Documentation of TRU biological transport model (BIOTRAN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, A.F.; Garcia, B.J.; Sutton, C.M.

    1980-01-01

    Inclusive of Appendices, this document describes the purpose, rationale, construction, and operation of a biological transport model (BIOTRAN). This model is used to predict the flow of transuranic elements (TRU) through specified plant and animal environments using biomass as a vector. The appendices are: (A) Flows of moisture, biomass, and TRU; (B) Intermediate variables affecting flows; (C) Mnemonic equivalents (code) for variables; (D) Variable library (code); (E) BIOTRAN code (Fortran); (F) Plants simulated; (G) BIOTRAN code documentation; (H) Operating instructions for BIOTRAN code. The main text is presented with a specific format which uses a minimum of space, yet is adequate for tracking most relationships from their first appearance to their formulation in the code. Because relationships are treated individually in this manner, and rely heavily on Appendix material for understanding, it is advised that the reader familiarize himself with these materials before proceeding with the main text.

  2. Parameter optimization for surface flux transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitbread, T.; Yeates, A. R.; Muñoz-Jaramillo, A.; Petrie, G. J. D.

    2017-11-01

    Accurate prediction of solar activity calls for precise calibration of solar cycle models. Consequently we aim to find optimal parameters for models which describe the physical processes on the solar surface, which in turn act as proxies for what occurs in the interior and provide source terms for coronal models. We use a genetic algorithm to optimize surface flux transport models using National Solar Observatory (NSO) magnetogram data for Solar Cycle 23. This is applied to both a 1D model that inserts new magnetic flux in the form of idealized bipolar magnetic regions, and also to a 2D model that assimilates specific shapes of real active regions. The genetic algorithm searches for parameter sets (meridional flow speed and profile, supergranular diffusivity, initial magnetic field, and radial decay time) that produce the best fit between observed and simulated butterfly diagrams, weighted by a latitude-dependent error structure which reflects uncertainty in observations. Due to the easily adaptable nature of the 2D model, the optimization process is repeated for Cycles 21, 22, and 24 in order to analyse cycle-to-cycle variation of the optimal solution. We find that the ranges and optimal solutions for the various regimes are in reasonable agreement with results from the literature, both theoretical and observational. The optimal meridional flow profiles for each regime are almost entirely within observational bounds determined by magnetic feature tracking, with the 2D model being able to accommodate the mean observed profile more successfully. Differences between models appear to be important in deciding values for the diffusive and decay terms. In like fashion, differences in the behaviours of different solar cycles lead to contrasts in parameters defining the meridional flow and initial field strength.

  3. Ecosystem element transport model for Lake Eckarfjaerden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalenko, L.; Bradshaw, C. [The Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University (Sweden); Andersson, E.; Kautsky, U. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. - SKB (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    The ecosystem transport model of elements was developed for Lake Eckarfjaerden located in the Forsmark area in Sweden. Forsmark has currently a low level repository (SFR) and a repository for spent fuel is planned. A large number of data collected during site-investigation program 2002-2009 for planning the repository were available for the creation of the compartment model based on carbon circulation, physical and biological processes (e.g. primary production, consumption, respiration). The model is site-specific in the sense that the food web model is adapted to the actual food web at the site, and most estimates of biomass and metabolic rates for the organisms and meteorological data originate from site data. The functional organism groups of Lake Eckarfjaerden were considered as separate compartments: bacterio-plankton, benthic bacteria, macro-algae, phytoplankton, zooplankton, fish, benthic fauna. Two functional groups of bacteria were taken into account for the reason that they have the highest biomass of all functional groups during the winter, comprising 36% of the total biomass. Effects of ecological parameters, such as bacteria and algae biomass, on redistribution of a hypothetical radionuclide release in the lake were examined. The ecosystem model was used to estimate the environmental transfer of several elements (U, Th, Ra) and their isotopes (U-238, U-234,Th-232, Ra-226) to various aquatic organisms in the lake, using element-specific distribution coefficients for suspended particle and sediment. Results of chemical analyses of the water, sediment and biota were used for model validation. The model gives estimates of concentration factors for fish based on modelling rather on in situ measurement, which reduces the uncertainties for many radionuclides with scarce of data. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  4. Modelling of sediment transport at Muria peninsula coastal, Jepara

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heni Susiati; Yarianto SBS; Wahyu Pandoe; Eko Kusratmoko; Aris Poniman

    2010-01-01

    Modelling of transport sediment modelling at Muria Peninsula have been done. In this study we had been used mathematical model that consist of hydrodynamics and sediment transport . Data input for modelling has been used tidal, monsoon wind, and river debit. Simulation result of sediment transport modelling showed that tides pattern and seasonal variations are the main causes of variations in the suspended sediment distribution in Muria Peninsula. (author)

  5. Modelling Emission of Pollutants from transportation using mobile sensing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Anders

    to use data acquired from smartphones to im- prove transportation related air quality models and models for climate gas emission from transportation. These models can be used for planning of transportation net- works, monitoring of air quality, and automate transport related green accounting. More...... accurate transportation models can be obtained by using observed travel routes, acquired from smartphone data, rather than indirectly computed routes, as input to a model of route choice in a transportation network. Smartphone data can also be used to gain detailed knowledge of the driving style...... scientific contributions of the dissertation are: • Algorithm for origin destination demand matrix creation from smartphone data. • The development of a novel map matching algorithm suitable for a database. • Using user experienced routes as a seed for a transport model. • Driving mode detection from...

  6. Probabilistic finite-size transport models for fusion: Anomalous transport and scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milligen, B.Ph. van; Sanchez, R.; Carreras, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Transport in fusion plasmas in the low confinement mode is characterized by several remarkable properties: the anomalous scaling of transport with system size, stiff (or 'canonical') profiles, power degradation, and rapid transport phenomena. The present article explores the possibilities of constructing a unified transport model, based on the continuous-time random walk, in which all these phenomena are handled adequately. The resulting formalism appears to be sufficiently general to provide a sound starting point for the development of a full-blown plasma transport code, capable of incorporating the relevant microscopic transport mechanisms, and allowing predictions of confinement properties

  7. Modelling total solar irradiance using a flux transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasi Espuig, Maria; Jiang, Jie; Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami

    2014-05-01

    Reconstructions of solar irradiance into the past are of considerable interest for studies of solar influence on climate. Models based on the assumption that irradiance changes are caused by the evolution of the photospheric magnetic field have been the most successful in reproducing the measured irradiance variations. Our SATIRE-S model is one of these. It uses solar full-disc magnetograms as an input, and these are available for less than four decades. Thus, to reconstruct the irradiance back to times when no observed magnetograms are available, we combine the SATIRE-S model with synthetic magnetograms, produced using a surface flux transport model. The model is fed with daily, observed or modelled statistically, records of sunspot positions, areas, and tilt angles. To describe the secular change in the irradiance, we used the concept of overlapping ephemeral region cycles. With this technique TSI can be reconstructed back to 1700.

  8. Modeling Oxygen Transport in the Human Placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serov, Alexander; Filoche, Marcel; Salafia, Carolyn; Grebenkov, Denis

    Efficient functioning of the human placenta is crucial for the favorable pregnancy outcome. We construct a 3D model of oxygen transport in the placenta based on its histological cross-sections. The model accounts for both diffusion and convention of oxygen in the intervillous space and allows one to estimate oxygen uptake of a placentone. We demonstrate the existence of an optimal villi density maximizing the uptake and explain it as a trade-off between the incoming oxygen flow and the absorbing villous surface. Calculations performed for arbitrary shapes of fetal villi show that only two geometrical characteristics - villi density and the effective villi radius - are required to predict fetal oxygen uptake. Two combinations of physiological parameters that determine oxygen uptake are also identified: maximal oxygen inflow of a placentone and the Damköhler number. An automatic image analysis method is developed and applied to 22 healthy placental cross-sections demonstrating that villi density of a healthy human placenta lies within 10% of the optimal value, while overall geometry efficiency is rather low (around 30-40%). In a perspective, the model can constitute the base of a reliable tool of post partum oxygen exchange efficiency assessment in the human placenta. Also affiliated with Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

  9. A Process-Based Transport-Distance Model of Aeolian Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, A. K.; Okin, G.; Wainwright, J.; Parsons, A. J.

    2017-12-01

    We present a new approach to modeling aeolian transport based on transport distance. Particle fluxes are based on statistical probabilities of particle detachment and distributions of transport lengths, which are functions of particle size classes. A computational saltation model is used to simulate transport distances over a variety of sizes. These are fit to an exponential distribution, which has the advantages of computational economy, concordance with current field measurements, and a meaningful relationship to theoretical assumptions about mean and median particle transport distance. This novel approach includes particle-particle interactions, which are important for sustaining aeolian transport and dust emission. Results from this model are compared with results from both bulk- and particle-sized-specific transport equations as well as empirical wind tunnel studies. The transport-distance approach has been successfully used for hydraulic processes, and extending this methodology from hydraulic to aeolian transport opens up the possibility of modeling joint transport by wind and water using consistent physics. Particularly in nutrient-limited environments, modeling the joint action of aeolian and hydraulic transport is essential for understanding the spatial distribution of biomass across landscapes and how it responds to climatic variability and change.

  10. A CONCEPTUAL TRAJECTORY MULTIDIMENSIONAL MODEL: AN APPLICATION TO PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCISCO MORENO

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Actualmente, gracias a tecnologías como los sistemas de posicionamiento global y dispositivos móviles provistos de sensores, se puede recopilar una gran cantidad de datos sobre objetos móviles, e.g., datos relacionados con la trayectoria seguida por estos objetos. Por otra parte, las Bodegas de Datos (BDs, usualmente modeladas mediante una vista multidimensional de los datos, son bases de datos especializadas para ayudar en la toma de decisiones. Desafortunadamente, las BDs convencionales ofrecen poco soporte para la gestión de trayectorias. Aunque existen algunas propuestas que tratan con BDs de trayectorias, ninguna de ellas se enfoca en su modelamiento conceptual multidimensional. En este artículo se extiende un modelo conceptual multidimensional espacial donde se incorporan las trayectorias como conceptos de primera clase. Con el fi n de mostrar la conveniencia de la propuesta, se presenta un ejemplo relacionado con transporte público.

  11. A transport model with color confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loh, S.

    1997-01-01

    First the mostly important properties of QCD are dealt with. It is made plausible, how the QCD vacuum generates a screening of color charges and is by this responsible for the quark confinement in color singlets. in the following the behaviour of classical color charges and color fields is studied and it is concluded that by this approximation, the neglection of quantum-mechanical fluctuation, the quark confinement cannot be explained, because the mean-field approximation leads to a screening of the color charges. Motivated by this result the Friedberg-Lee soliton model is presented, in which the the color confinement and all further nonperturbative QCD effects are phenomenologically modelled by means of a scalar field. Thereafter a derivation of the transport equations for quarks in the framework of the Wigner-function is presented. An extension of the equation to the Friedberg-Lee model is explained. As results the ground-state properties of the model are studied. Mesonic and baryonic ground-state solutions (soliton solutions) of the equations are constructed, whereby the constituents are both light quarks and heavy quarks. Furthermore the color coupling constant of QCD is fixed by means of the string tension by dynamical separation of the quarks of the meson. The flux tubes formed dynamically in this way are applied, in order to study the interaction of two strings and to calculate a string-string potential. Excited states of the meson (isovectorial modes) are presented as well as the influence of the color confinement on the quark motion. Finally the dynamical formation and the break-up of a string by the production of light and heavy quark pairs is described

  12. Survey of research reports in transportation modelling. Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, A.; Wamsteker-Andriessen, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    A survey of research reports in transportation modelling in two parts. Part one is devided in reports concerning economic development and car mobility, analyzing large transportation data files and transportation planning and spatial development. Part two consists of reserach reports concerning

  13. Survey of research reports in transportation modelling. Part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, A.; Wamsteker-Andriessen, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    A survey of research reports in transportation modelling in two parts. Part one is devided in reports concerning economic development and car mobility, analyzing large transportation data files and transportation planning and spatial development. Part two consists of reserach reports concerning

  14. Modeling and analysis of transport in the mammary glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada, Ana; Vafai, Kambiz

    2014-08-01

    The transport of three toxins moving from the blood stream into the ducts of the mammary glands is analyzed in this work. The model predictions are compared with experimental data from the literature. The utility of the model lies in its potential to improve our understanding of toxin transport as a pre-disposing factor to breast cancer. This work is based on a multi-layer transport model to analyze the toxins present in the breast milk. The breast milk in comparison with other sampling strategies allows us to understand the mass transport of toxins once inside the bloodstream of breastfeeding women. The multi-layer model presented describes the transport of caffeine, DDT and cimetidine. The analysis performed takes into account the unique transport mechanisms for each of the toxins. Our model predicts the movement of toxins and/or drugs within the mammary glands as well as their bioaccumulation in the tissues.

  15. UVM Transportation Research Center signature project 1B : integrated land-use, transportation and environmental modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Land use and transportation are inextricably linked. Models that capture the dynamics and interactions : of both systems are indispensable for evaluating alternative courses of action in policy and investment. : These models must be spatially disaggr...

  16. Reduction transport of corrosion products through the secondary circuit by increasing the dosage of ammonia; Reduccion del transporte de productos de corrosion a traves del circuito secundario mediante el aumento de la dosificacion de amoniaco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espanol, J.; Boronat, M.

    2015-07-01

    Reduce transport of corrosion products through the Secondary Circuit, mainly magnetite, by increasing the dosage of ammonia in order to reduce oxides accumulation in the Steam Generators top of tube sheet where become hard sludge, as one of the TTS denting mitigation actions. (Author)

  17. Modelling global container freight transport demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavasszy, L.A.; Ivanova, O.; Halim, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to discuss methods and techniques for a quantitative and descriptive analysis of future container transport demand at a global level. Information on future container transport flows is useful for various purposes. It is instrumental for the assessment of returns of

  18. Modelling multicomponent solute transport in structured soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beinum, van G.W.

    2007-01-01

    The mobility of contaminants in soil is an important factor in determining their ability to spread into the wider environment. For non-volatile substances, transport within the soil is generally dominated by transport of dissolved fractions in the soil water phase, via either diffusion or

  19. Modelling the transport system in China and evaluating the current strategies towards the sustainable transport development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wen; Lund, Henrik; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    2013-01-01

    Transport is one of the most challenge sectors when addressing energy security and climate change due to its high reliance on oil products and lack of the alternative fuels. This paper explores the ability of three transport strategies to contribute to the development of a sustainable transport in China. With this purpose in mind, a Chinese transport model has been created and three current transport strategies which are high speed railway (HSR), urban rail transit (URT) and electric vehicle (EV) were evaluated together with a reference transport system in 2020. As conservative results, 13% of the energy saving and 12% of the CO 2 emission reduction can be attained by accomplishing three strategies compared with the reference transport system. However, the energy demand of transport in 2020 with the implementation of three strategies will be about 1.7 times as much as today. The three strategies show the potential of drawing the transport demand to the more energy efficient vehicles; however, more initiatives are needed if the sustainable transport is the long term objective, such as the solutions to stabilise the private vehicle demands, to continuously improve the vehicle efficiency and to boost the alternative fuels produced from the renewable energy sources. - Highlights: • A Chinese transport model was created and three transport strategies were evaluated • Transport is the biggest driver of the oil demand in China not the industry • The energy demand of transport in 2020 will be twice as much as today • Strategies contribute 13% energy saving and 12% CO 2 emission reduction • More initiatives are needed if a sustainable transport is the long-term objective

  20. System Identification Theory Approach to Cohesive Sediment Transport Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    CHEN, HUIXIN

    1997-01-01

    Two aspects of the modelling sediment transport are investigated. One is the univariate time series modelling the current velocity dynamics. The other is the multivariate time series modelling the suspended sediment concentration dynamics. Cohesive sediment dynamics and numerical sediment transport model are reviewed and investigated. The system identification theory and time series analysis method are developed and applied to set up the time series model for current velocity a...

  1. Modeling emissions for three-dimensional atmospheric chemistry transport models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, Volker; Arndt, Jan A; Aulinger, Armin; Bieser, Johannes; Denier Van Der Gon, Hugo; Kranenburg, Richard; Kuenen, Jeroen; Neumann, Daniel; Pouliot, George; Quante, Markus

    2018-01-24

    Poor air quality is still a threat for human health in many parts of the world. In order to assess measures for emission reductions and improved air quality, three-dimensional atmospheric chemistry transport modeling systems are used in numerous research institutions and public authorities. These models need accurate emission data in appropriate spatial and temporal resolution as input. This paper reviews the most widely used emission inventories on global and regional scale and looks into the methods used to make the inventory data model ready. Shortcomings of using standard temporal profiles for each emission sector are discussed and new methods to improve the spatio-temporal distribution of the emissions are presented. These methods are often neither top-down nor bottom-up approaches but can be seen as hybrid methods that use detailed information about the emission process to derive spatially varying temporal emission profiles. These profiles are subsequently used to distribute bulk emissions like national totals on appropriate grids. The wide area of natural emissions is also summarized and the calculation methods are described. Almost all types of natural emissions depend on meteorological information, which is why they are highly variable in time and space and frequently calculated within the chemistry transport models themselves. The paper closes with an outlook for new ways to improve model ready emission data, for example by using external databases about road traffic flow or satellite data to determine actual land use or leaf area. In a world where emission patterns change rapidly, it seems appropriate to use new types of statistical and observational data to create detailed emission data sets and keep emission inventories up-to-date. Emission data is probably the most important input for chemistry transport model (CTM) systems. It needs to be provided in high temporal and spatial resolution and on a grid that is in agreement with the CTM grid. Simple

  2. Computer supported estimation of input data for transportation models

    OpenAIRE

    Cenek, Petr; Tarábek, Peter; Kopf, Marija

    2010-01-01

    Control and management of transportation systems frequently rely on optimization or simulation methods based on a suitable model. Such a model uses optimization or simulation procedures and correct input data. The input data define transportation infrastructure and transportation flows. Data acquisition is a costly process and so an efficient approach is highly desirable. The infrastructure can be recognized from drawn maps using segmentation, thinning and vectorization. The accurate definiti...

  3. Transportation of Dangerous Goods: Turkey Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Şencan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The shortcomings in the implementation of hazardous substances transport in the world and in our country lead to very serious hazards. These problems lead to life, property and very serious environmental disasters. This is not only a matter of transportation, but also of the chemistry, textile and fuel industries. This study provides information on the legislation on dangerous goods transport in Turkey. It also contains technical information on hazardous substances, following the search of the relevant literature for the province of hazardous goods.

  4. Contaminant transport at a waste residue deposit: 1. Inverse flow and non-reactive transport modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenborg, Torben Obel; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard; Rosbjerg, Dan

    1996-01-01

    An application of an inverse flow and transport model to a contaminated aquifer is presented. The objective of the study is to identify physical and nonreactive flow and transport parameters through an optimization approach. The approach can be classified as a statistical procedure, where a flow ...... is the first in a two-paper series describing contaminant transport at a waste residue site. III the second paper, reactive transport at the site is investigated.......An application of an inverse flow and transport model to a contaminated aquifer is presented. The objective of the study is to identify physical and nonreactive flow and transport parameters through an optimization approach. The approach can be classified as a statistical procedure, where a flow...

  5. Modeling of capacitated transportation systems for integral scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebben, Mark; van der Heijden, Matthijs C.; Hurink, Johann L.; Schutten, Johannes M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Motivated by a planned automated cargo transportation network, we consider transportation problems in which the finite capacity of resources has to be taken into account. We present a flexible modeling methodology which allows to construct, evaluate, and improve feasible solutions. The modeling is

  6. Modeling of capacitated transportation systems for integral scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebben, Mark; van der Heijden, Matthijs C.; Hurink, Johann L.; Schutten, Johannes M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Motivated by a planned automated cargo transportation network, we consider transportation problems in which the finite capacity of resources has to be taken nto account. We present a flexible modeling methodology which allows to construct, evaluate, and improve feasible solutions. The modeling is

  7. Transport models for relativistic heavy-ion collisions at Relativistic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    transport model analysis of two important and complementary observables, the anisotropic flow of bulk hadrons and suppression of hadron yields at high transverse momentum, provide exciting new information on the properties of the plasma formed. Keywords. Quark-gluon plasma; transport models; flow; jet quenching.

  8. Transport models for relativistic heavy-ion collisions at Relativistic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-04-29

    Apr 29, 2015 ... We review the transport models that are widely used to study the properties of the quark-gluon plasma formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We show that transport model analysis of two important and complementary observables, the anisotropic flow of bulk hadrons and suppression ...

  9. A Coupled Chemical and Mass Transport Model for Concrete Durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Mønster; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a general continuum theory is used to evaluate the service life of cement based materials, in terms of mass transport processes and chemical degradation of the solid matrix. The model established is a reactive mass transport model, based on an extended version of the Poisson-Nernst-...

  10. A quantum energy transport model for semiconductor device simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sho, Shohiro, E-mail: shoshohiro@gmail.com [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan); Odanaka, Shinji [Computer Assisted Science Division, Cybermedia Center, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes numerical methods for a quantum energy transport (QET) model in semiconductors, which is derived by using a diffusion scaling in the quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model. We newly drive a four-moments QET model similar with a classical ET model. Space discretization is performed by a new set of unknown variables. Numerical stability and convergence are obtained by developing numerical schemes and an iterative solution method with a relaxation method. Numerical simulations of electron transport in a scaled MOSFET device are discussed. The QET model allows simulations of quantum confinement transport, and nonlocal and hot-carrier effects in scaled MOSFETs.

  11. European initiatives for modeling emissions from transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joumard, Robert; Hickman, A. John; Samaras, Zissis

    1998-01-01

    In Europe there have been many cooperative studies into transport emission inventories since the late 80s. These cover the scope of CORINAIR program involving experts from seven European Community laboratories addressing only road transport emissions at national level. These also include the latest...... COST 319 action bringing together about 80 active scientists from the whole of Europe and considering all modes of transport and all inventory levels. The paper briefly presents the history of the various multilateral and EC initiatives and discusses the latest in more detail, from the collection...... of the raw data to the design of the inventory tools. The paper also considers the structures and the main assumptions of the current inventory methods for the various transport modes and various areas of application, including reference to work currently in progress or planned for the near future. Topics...

  12. Symmetrization of mathematical model of charge transport in semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Blokhin

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of charge transport in semiconductors is considered. The model is a quasilinear system of differential equations. A problem of finding an additional entropy conservation law and system symmetrization are solved.

  13. Advances in dynamic network modeling in complex transportation systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ukkusuri, Satish V

    2013-01-01

    This book focuses on the latest in dynamic network modeling, including route guidance and traffic control in transportation systems and other complex infrastructure networks. Covers dynamic traffic assignment, flow modeling, mobile sensor deployment and more.

  14. Application of rrm as behavior mode choice on modelling transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surbakti, M. S.; Sadullah, A. F.

    2018-03-01

    Transportation mode selection, the first step in transportation planning process, is probably one of the most important planning elements. The development of models that can explain the preference of passengers regarding their chosen mode of public transport option will contribute to the improvement and development of existing public transport. Logit models have been widely used to determine the mode choice models in which the alternative are different transport modes. Random Regret Minimization (RRM) theory is a theory developed from the behavior to choose (choice behavior) in a state of uncertainty. During its development, the theory was used in various disciplines, such as marketing, micro economy, psychology, management, and transportation. This article aims to show the use of RRM in various modes of selection, from the results of various studies that have been conducted both in north sumatera and western Java.

  15. Sediment Transport Model for a Surface Irrigation System

    OpenAIRE

    Mailapalli, Damodhara R.; Raghuwanshi, Narendra S.; Singh, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    Controlling irrigation-induced soil erosion is one of the important issues of irrigation management and surface water impairment. Irrigation models are useful in managing the irrigation and the associated ill effects on agricultural environment. In this paper, a physically based surface irrigation model was developed to predict sediment transport in irrigated furrows by integrating an irrigation hydraulic model with a quasi-steady state sediment transport model to predict sediment load in fur...

  16. One-Dimensional Transport with Equilibrium Chemistry (OTEQ) - A Reactive Transport Model for Streams and Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkel, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    OTEQ is a mathematical simulation model used to characterize the fate and transport of waterborne solutes in streams and rivers. The model is formed by coupling a solute transport model with a chemical equilibrium submodel. The solute transport model is based on OTIS, a model that considers the physical processes of advection, dispersion, lateral inflow, and transient storage. The equilibrium submodel is based on MINTEQ, a model that considers the speciation and complexation of aqueous species, acid-base reactions, precipitation/dissolution, and sorption. Within OTEQ, reactions in the water column may result in the formation of solid phases (precipitates and sorbed species) that are subject to downstream transport and settling processes. Solid phases on the streambed may also interact with the water column through dissolution and sorption/desorption reactions. Consideration of both mobile (waterborne) and immobile (streambed) solid phases requires a unique set of governing differential equations and solution techniques that are developed herein. The partial differential equations describing physical transport and the algebraic equations describing chemical equilibria are coupled using the sequential iteration approach. The model's ability to simulate pH, precipitation/dissolution, and pH-dependent sorption provides a means of evaluating the complex interactions between instream chemistry and hydrologic transport at the field scale. This report details the development and application of OTEQ. Sections of the report describe model theory, input/output specifications, model applications, and installation instructions. OTEQ may be obtained over the Internet at http://water.usgs.gov/software/OTEQ.

  17. Review of petroleum transport network models and their applicability to a national refinery model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooker, J. N.

    1982-04-01

    This report examines four petroleum transport network models to determine whether parts of them can be incorporated into the transportation component of a national refinery model. Two questions in particular are addressed. (a) How do the models under examination represent the oil transport network, estimate link capacities, and calculate transport costs. (b) Are any of these network representations, capacity estimates, or cost functions suitable for inclusion in a linear programming model of oil refinery and primary distribution in the US. Only pipeline and waterway transport is discussed. The models examined are the Department of Energy's OILNET model, the Department of Transportation's Freight Energy Model, the Federal Energy Administration Petroleum Transportation Network Model, and an Oak Ridge National Laboratory oil pipeline energy model. Link capacity and cost functions are recommended for each transport mode. The coefficients of the recommended pipeline cost functions remain to be estimated.

  18. Transport Routes Optimization Model Through Application of Fuzzy Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Bortas

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The transport policy of the European Union is based on the mission of restructuring road traffic into other and energy-favourable transport modes which have not been sufficiently represented yet. Therefore, the development of the inland waterway and rail transport, and connectivity in the intermodal transport network are development planning priorities of the European transport strategy. The aim of this research study was to apply the scientific methodology and thus analyse the factors that affect the distribution of the goods flows and by using the fuzzy logic to make an optimization model, according to the criteria of minimizing the costs and negative impact on the environment, for the selection of the optimal transport route. Testing of the model by simulation, was performed on the basis of evaluating the criteria of the influential parameters with unprecise and indefinite input parameters. The testing results show that by the distribution of the goods flow from road transport network to inland waterways or rail transport, can be predicted in advance and determine the transport route with optimal characteristics. The results of the performed research study will be used to improve the process of planning the transport service, with the aim of reducing the transport costs and environmental pollution.

  19. Parameters measurement transport hydrogen in Fe alloys with low contents of C through the technique of permeation; Medida de los Parametros de Transporte de Hidrogeno en Aleaciones de Fe con Bajo Contenidos de C mediante la Tecnica de Permeacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penalva, I.; Alberro, G.; Legarda, F.; Vila, R.; Ortiz, C. J.

    2012-07-01

    The characterization of the candidates materials to be part of a fusion reactor implies interaction with hydrogen isotopes. Their transport parameters will affect the inventory of hydrogen retained in components of the fusion reactor and permeation of these isotopes through the materials structure can affect areas of human work. Therefore, the analysis of any concept related to fusion reactors, the plasma stability or radiation safety, lies in the knowledge of these parameters. The main objective of this work was to determine the influence of the C content of the iron alloys in the transport parameters of hydrogen using the technique of permeation. Six samples were analyzed experimentally by EFDA (European Fusion Development Agreement) with microstructure and chemical content of alloys controlled. Three of them, Fe pure, FeP y Fe10%Cr, contained insignificant amounts of C, while the other three, FeC, FePC y Fe10%CrC, had the same metallurgical composition as its corresponding pair, with the exception of the content of C.

  20. Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, B.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the transport methodology and component analysis is to provide the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport and model setup for transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ) site-scale model. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated into the FEHM computer code and the resulting changes in the FEHM code are to be submitted to the software configuration management system. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) outlines the assumptions, design, and testing of a model for calculating radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. In addition, methods for determining colloid-facilitated transport parameters are outlined for use in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) analyses. Concurrently, process-level flow model calculations are being carrier out in a PMR for the unsaturated zone. The computer code TOUGH2 is being used to generate three-dimensional, dual-permeability flow fields, that are supplied to the Performance Assessment group for subsequent transport simulations. These flow fields are converted to input files compatible with the FEHM code, which for this application simulates radionuclide transport using the particle-tracking algorithm outlined in this AMR. Therefore, this AMR establishes the numerical method and demonstrates the use of the model, but the specific breakthrough curves presented do not necessarily represent the behavior of the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone

  1. PRONOSTICANDO EL ÍNDICE ENSO VARIOS PASOS EN ADELANTE MEDIANTE TÉCNICAS DE MODELAMIENTO NO LINEAL FORECASTING ENSO SEVERAL STEPS AHEAD THROUGH NONLINEAR MODELING TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Salini Calderón

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Se indica cómo manejar una gran base de datos consistente de series temporales no lineales, aplicando distintas técnicas de modelamiento no lineal a estas series. Aunque no existen guías explícitas de manipulación de series temporales no lineales en la profusa bibliografía actual, existen diferentes enfoques que pueden ser tomados en cuenta. Para ello se estudió una base de datos mensual correspondiente a datos del Fenómeno del Niño (ENSO, entre los años 1866 y 2006. Se explica cómo debe manipularse esta base de datos que poseen características de no linealidad, la cual será usada para hacer pronósticos varios pasos en adelante. Se aplicaron dos test estándar: Información Mutua Promedio (AMI y Falsos Vecinos más Cercanos (FNN. Se obtuvo el espaciamiento óptimo de los datos, así como el número de datos hacia atrás necesarios para pronosticar valores hacia el futuro. Luego, se diseñaron varios modelos de redes neuronales artificiales (RNA, con diferentes reglas de aprendizajes, funciones de transferencia, elementos de procesamiento (o neuronas en la capa escondida, etc., que permitieron hacer pronóstico de hasta 20 pasos en adelante. Las mejores redes correspondieron a aquellas que poseían como regla de aprendizaje la Regla Delta y la Regla Extendida, con función de transferencia sigmoide y tangente hiperbólica. El tipo de RNA usada fue una de multicapas alimentada hacia adelante y entrenada mediante la técnica de propagación hacia atrás. Se probaron redes con una, dos capas ocultas y sin ninguna capa. El mejor modelo que se obtuvo resultó ser uno consistente de una capa oculta.We indicate how to handle a large database consisting of nonlinear time series, applying different nonlinear modelling techniques to this kind of times series. Nowadays in the current references there is no explicit guide of how to manipulate data from nonlinear time series; however, there are approaches that can be taken account. To this end

  2. Limitations of sorption isotherms on modeling groundwater contaminant transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Eduardo Figueira da

    2007-01-01

    Design and safety assessment of radioactive waste repositories, as well as remediation of radionuclide contaminated groundwater require the development of models capable of accurately predicting trace element fate and transport. Adsorption of trace radionuclides onto soils and groundwater is an important mechanism controlling near- and far- field transport. Although surface complexation models (SCMs) can better describe the adsorption mechanisms of most radionuclides onto mineral surfaces by directly accounting for variability of system properties and mineral surface properties, isotherms are still used to model contaminant transport in groundwater, despite the much higher system dependence. The present work investigates differences between transport model results based on these two approaches for adsorption modeling. A finite element transport model is used for the isotherm model, whereas the computer program PHREEQC is used for the SCM approach. Both models are calibrated for a batch experiment, and one-dimensional transport is simulated using the calibrated parameters. At the lower injected concentrations there are large discrepancies between SCM and isotherm transport predictions, with the SCM presenting much longer tails on the breakthrough curves. Isotherms may also provide non-conservative results for time to breakthrough and for maximum concentration in a contamination plume. Isotherm models are shown not to be robust enough to predict transport behavior of some trace elements, thus discouraging their use. The results also illustrate the promise of the SCM modeling approach in safety assessment and environmental remediation applications, also suggesting that independent batch sorption measurements can be used, within the framework of the SCM, to produce a more versatile and realistic groundwater transport model for radionuclides which is capable of accounting more accurately for temporal and spatial variations in geochemical conditions. (author)

  3. Transport services quality measurment using SERVQUAL model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksimović Mlađan V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality in the world is considered to be the most important phenomenon of our age, with a permanent and irreversible growing trend of its emphasis. Many companies have come to the conclusion that high quality of services can provide them with a potential competitive advantage, leading to superior sales results and profit making. The aim of this paper is to test the applicability of service SERVQUAL dimensions and measure the quality of services in the public transport of passengers. Based on the data obtained by researching the views of public transport users in Kragujevac using the SERVQUAL methodology and statistical analysis based on defined service quality dimensions, this research will show the level of quality of urban transport services in Kragujevac and based on this, make recommendations for improving the quality of service.

  4. Modeling radon transport in multistory residential buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persily, A.K.

    1993-01-01

    Radon concentrations have been studied extensively in single-family residential buildings, but relatively little work has been done in large buildings, including multistory residential buildings. The phenomena of radon transport in multistory residential buildings is made more complicated by the multizone nature of the airflow system and the numerous interzone airflow paths that must be characterized in such a system. This paper presents the results of a computer simulation of airflow and radon transport in a twelve-story residential building. Interzone airflow rates and radon concentrations were predicted using the multizone airflow and contaminant dispersal program (CON-TAM88). Limited simulations were conducted to study the influence of two different radon source terms, indoor-outdoor temperature difference and exterior wall leakage values on radon transport and radon concentration distributions

  5. Advanced transport systems analysis, modeling, and evaluation of performances

    CERN Document Server

    Janić, Milan

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a systematic analysis, modeling and evaluation of the performance of advanced transport systems. It offers an innovative approach by presenting a multidimensional examination of the performance of advanced transport systems and transport modes, useful for both theoretical and practical purposes. Advanced transport systems for the twenty-first century are characterized by the superiority of one or several of their infrastructural, technical/technological, operational, economic, environmental, social, and policy performances as compared to their conventional counterparts. The advanced transport systems considered include: Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) and Personal Rapid Transit (PRT) systems in urban area(s), electric and fuel cell passenger cars, high speed tilting trains, High Speed Rail (HSR), Trans Rapid Maglev (TRM), Evacuated Tube Transport system (ETT), advanced commercial subsonic and Supersonic Transport Aircraft (STA), conventionally- and Liquid Hydrogen (LH2)-fuelled commercial air trans...

  6. Assessment of applications of transport models on regional scale solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z.; Fogg, G. E.; Henri, C.; Pauloo, R.

    2017-12-01

    Regional scale transport models are needed to support the long-term evaluation of groundwater quality and to develop management strategies aiming to prevent serious groundwater degradation. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the capacity of previously-developed upscaling approaches to accurately describe main solute transport processes including the capture of late-time tails under changing boundary conditions. Advective-dispersive contaminant transport in a 3D heterogeneous domain was simulated and used as a reference solution. Equivalent transport under homogeneous flow conditions were then evaluated applying the Multi-Rate Mass Transfer (MRMT) model. The random walk particle tracking method was used for both heterogeneous and homogeneous-MRMT scenarios under steady state and transient conditions. The results indicate that the MRMT model can capture the tails satisfactorily for plume transported with ambient steady-state flow field. However, when boundary conditions change, the mass transfer model calibrated for transport under steady-state conditions cannot accurately reproduce the tailing effect observed for the heterogeneous scenario. The deteriorating impact of transient boundary conditions on the upscaled model is more significant for regions where flow fields are dramatically affected, highlighting the poor applicability of the MRMT approach for complex field settings. Accurately simulating mass in both mobile and immobile zones is critical to represent the transport process under transient flow conditions and will be the future focus of our study.

  7. Neutron transport model for standard calculation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukhminskij, B.E.; Lyutostanskij, Yu.S.; Lyashchuk, V.I.; Panov, I.V.

    1989-01-01

    The neutron transport calculation algorithms in complex composition media with a predetermined geometry are realized by the multigroups representations within Monte Carlo methods in the MAMONT code. The code grade was evaluated with benchmark experiments comparison. The neutron leakage spectra calculations in the spherical-symmetric geometry were carried out for iron and polyethylene. The MAMONT code utilization for metrological furnishes of the geophysics tasks is proposed. The code is orientated towards neutron transport and secondary nuclides accumulation calculations in blankets and geophysics media. 7 refs.; 2 figs

  8. Exploring morphological indicators for improved model parameterization in transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumahor, Samuel K.; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2017-04-01

    Two phenomena that control transport of colloidal materials, including nanoparticles, are interaction at the air-water and solid-water interfaces for unsaturated flow. Current approaches for multiphase inverse modeling to quantify the associated processes utilize empirical parameters and/or assumptions to characterise these interactions. This introduces uncertainty in model outcomes. Two classical examples are: (i) application of the Young-Laplace Equation, assuming spherical air-water interfaces, to quantify interactions at the air-water interface and (ii) the choice of parameters that define the nature and shape of retention profiles for modeling straining at the solid-water interface. In this contribution, an alternate approach using some morphological indicators derived from X-ray micro-computed tomography (µ-CT) to quantify interaction at both the air-water interface and solid-water interface is presented. These indicators, related to air-water and solid-water interface densities, are thought to alleviate the deficiencies associated with modeling interaction at both the solid-water and air-water interfaces.

  9. Stochastic dynamics modeling solute transport in porous media modeling solute transport in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Kulasiri, Don

    2002-01-01

    Most of the natural and biological phenomena such as solute transport in porous media exhibit variability which can not be modeled by using deterministic approaches. There is evidence in natural phenomena to suggest that some of the observations can not be explained by using the models which give deterministic solutions. Stochastic processes have a rich repository of objects which can be used to express the randomness inherent in the system and the evolution of the system over time. The attractiveness of the stochastic differential equations (SDE) and stochastic partial differential equations (SPDE) come from the fact that we can integrate the variability of the system along with the scientific knowledge pertaining to the system. One of the aims of this book is to explaim some useufl concepts in stochastic dynamics so that the scientists and engineers with a background in undergraduate differential calculus could appreciate the applicability and appropriateness of these developments in mathematics. The ideas ...

  10. An optimization model for transportation of hazardous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyed-Hosseini, M.; Kheirkhah, A. S.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the optimal routing problem for transportation of hazardous materials is studied. Routing for the purpose of reducing the risk of transportation of hazardous materials has been studied and formulated by many researcher and several routing models have been presented up to now. These models can be classified into the categories: the models for routing a single movement and the models for routing multiple movements. In this paper, according to the current rules and regulations of road transportations of hazardous materials in Iran, a routing problem is designed. In this problem, the routs for several independent movements are simultaneously determined. To examine the model, the problem the transportations of two different dangerous materials in the road network of Mazandaran province in the north of Iran is formulated and solved by applying Integer programming model

  11. Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, B.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the abstraction model being used in total system performance assessment (TSPA) model calculations for radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ). The UZ transport abstraction model uses the particle-tracking method that is incorporated into the finite element heat and mass model (FEHM) computer code (Zyvoloski et al. 1997 [DIRS 100615]) to simulate radionuclide transport in the UZ. This report outlines the assumptions, design, and testing of a model for calculating radionuclide transport in the UZ at Yucca Mountain. In addition, methods for determining and inputting transport parameters are outlined for use in the TSPA for license application (LA) analyses. Process-level transport model calculations are documented in another report for the UZ (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). Three-dimensional, dual-permeability flow fields generated to characterize UZ flow (documented by BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]; DTN: LB03023DSSCP9I.001 [DIRS 163044]) are converted to make them compatible with the FEHM code for use in this abstraction model. This report establishes the numerical method and demonstrates the use of the model that is intended to represent UZ transport in the TSPA-LA. Capability of the UZ barrier for retarding the transport is demonstrated in this report, and by the underlying process model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]). The technical scope, content, and management of this report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Transport Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171282]). Deviations from the technical work plan (TWP) are noted within the text of this report, as appropriate. The latest version of this document is being prepared principally to correct parameter values found to be in error due to transcription errors, changes in source data that were not captured in the report, calculation errors, and errors in interpretation of source data

  12. Composite Transport Model and Water and Solute Transport across Plant Roots: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangmin X. Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The present review examines recent experimental findings in root transport phenomena in terms of the composite transport model (CTM. It has been a well-accepted conceptual model to explain the complex water and solute flows across the root that has been related to the composite anatomical structure. There are three parallel pathways involved in the transport of water and solutes in roots – apoplast, symplast, and transcellular paths. The role of aquaporins (AQPs, which facilitate water flows through the transcellular path, and root apoplast is examined in terms of the CTM. The contribution of the plasma membrane bound AQPs for the overall water transport in the whole plant level was varying depending on the plant species, age of roots with varying developmental stages of apoplastic barriers, and driving forces (hydrostatic vs. osmotic. Many studies have demonstrated that the apoplastic barriers, such as Casparian bands in the primary anticlinal walls and suberin lamellae in the secondary cell walls, in the endo- and exodermis are not perfect barriers and unable to completely block the transport of water and some solute transport into the stele. Recent research on water and solute transport of roots with and without exodermis triggered the importance of the extension of conventional CTM adding resistances that arrange in series (epidermis, exodermis, mid-cortex, endodermis, and pericycle. The extension of the model may answer current questions about the applicability of CTM for composite water and solute transport of roots that contain complex anatomical structures with heterogeneous cell layers.

  13. Mathematical modelling on transport of petroleum hydrocarbons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A brief theory has been included on the composition and transport of petroleum hydrocarbons following an onshore oil spill in order to demonstrate the level of complexity associated with the LNAPL dissolution mass transfer even in a classical porous medium. However, such studies in saturated fractured rocks are highly ...

  14. Strategic Network Modelling for Passenger Transport Pricing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, E.-S.

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade the Netherlands has experienced an economic recession. Now, in 2017, the economy is picking up again. This growth does not only come with advantages because economic growth demands more from the transport system. Congestion is increasing again, the capacity of the train system is

  15. Modelling anisotropic water transport in polymer composite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This work reports anisotropic water transport in a polymer composite consisting of an epoxy matrix reinforced with aligned triangular bars made of vinyl ester. By gravimetric experiments, water diffusion in resin and polymer composites were characterized. Parameters for Fickian diffusion and polymer relaxation ...

  16. Structural Design of Oligopeptides for Intestinal Transport Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong-Min; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Koyanagi, Riho; Shen, Weilin; Matsui, Toshiro

    2016-03-16

    Glycyl-sarcosine (Gly-Sar) is a well-known model substrate for the intestinal uptake of dipeptides through peptide transporter 1 (PepT1). However, there are no other model peptides larger than tripeptides to evaluate their intestinal transport ability. In this study, we designed new oligopeptides based on the Gly-Sar structure in terms of protease resistance. Gly-Sar-Sar was found to be an appropriate transport model for tripeptides because it does not degrade during the transport across the rat intestinal membrane, while Gly-Gly-Sar was degraded to Gly-Sar during the 60 min transport. Caco-2 cell transport experiments revealed that the designed oligopeptides based on Gly-Sar-Sar showed a significantly (p transport ability by factors of 1/10-, 1/25-, and 1/40-fold for Gly-Sar-Sar, Gly-Sar-Sar-Sar, and Gly-Sar-Sar-Sar-Sar, respectively, compared to Gly-Sar (apparent permeability coefficient: 38.6 ± 11.4 cm/s). Cell experiments also showed that the designed tripeptide and Gly-Sar were transported across Caco-2 cell via PepT1, whereas the tetra- and pentapeptides were transported through the paracellular tight-junction pathway.

  17. Modelling radionuclide transport in the geosphere: a review of the models available

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacas, M.C.; Cordier, E.; Coudrain-Ribstein, A.; Fargue, D.; Goblet, P.; Jamet, Ph.; Ledoux, E.; Marsily, G. de; Vinsot, A.; Brun, Ch.; Cernes, A.; Jacquier, Ph.; Lewi, J.; Priem, Th.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last twelve years, several models have been developed to simulate the transport of radionuclides in the environment of a radioactive waste repository: - continuous equivalent porous media flow and transport models using the finite element method in 1, 2 or 3 dimensions and taking into account various coupled mechanisms; - discontinuous stochastic fracture network models in 3 dimensions representing flow, transport, matrix diffusion, heat flow and mechanical stress; - geochemical models representing interactions between transported elements and a solid matrix; - transport process models coupling non dominant phenomena such as thermo-diffusion or thermo-gravitation. This paper reviews the role that each of these models can play in safety analyses. 3 refs [fr

  18. Study of reactive oxygen species-induced ion transport in different models by using electrophysiological approaches.

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Moreno, Ana

    2012-01-01

    En esta tesis doctoral se analiza el papel del estrés oxidativo en el transporte iónico en distintos modelos, mediante técnicas de imagen y de electrofisiología. El trabajo se subdivide en cuatro capítulos. El primero, a modo de marco teórico, introduce el transporte iónico en condiciones de estrés oxidativo. La interacción entre especies reactivas de oxígeno (ROS) y el transporte iónico ha sido poco estudiada hasta el momento, por lo que los principales objetivos de la tesis se han centrado ...

  19. Use of artificial neural networks for transport energy demand modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murat, Yetis Sazi; Ceylan, Halim

    2006-01-01

    The paper illustrates an artificial neural network (ANN) approach based on supervised neural networks for the transport energy demand forecasting using socio-economic and transport related indicators. The ANN transport energy demand model is developed. The actual forecast is obtained using a feed forward neural network, trained with back propagation algorithm. In order to investigate the influence of socio-economic indicators on the transport energy demand, the ANN is analyzed based on gross national product (GNP), population and the total annual average veh-km along with historical energy data available from 1970 to 2001. Comparing model predictions with energy data in testing period performs the model validation. The projections are made with two scenarios. It is obtained that the ANN reflects the fluctuation in historical data for both dependent and independent variables. The results obtained bear out the suitability of the adopted methodology for the transport energy-forecasting problem

  20. Numerical Calculation of Transport Based on the Drift Kinetic Equation for plasmas in General Toroidal Magnetic Geometry; Calculo Numerico del Transporte mediante la Ecuacion Cinetica de Deriva para Plasmas en Geometria Magnetica Toroidal: Preliminares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, J. M.; Lopez-Bruna, D.

    2009-12-11

    This report is the first of a series dedicated to the numerical calculation of the evolution of fusion plasmas in general toroidal geometry, including TJ-II plasmas. A kinetic treatment has been chosen: the evolution equation of the distribution function of one or several plasma species is solved in guiding center coordinates. The distribution function is written as a Maxwellian one modulated by polynomial series in the kinetic coordinates with no other approximations than those of the guiding center itself and the computation capabilities. The code allows also for the inclusion of the three-dimensional electrostatic potential in a self-consistent manner, but the initial objective has been set to solving only the neoclassical transport. A high order conservative method (Spectral Difference Method) has been chosen in order to discretized the equation for its numerical solution. In this first report, in addition to justifying the work, the evolution equation and its approximations are described, as well as the baseline of the numerical procedures. (Author) 28 refs.

  1. Physics and modelling of scrape-off layer transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, R.H.; Allen, S.L.; Crotinger, J.A.; Kaiser, T.B.; Milovich, J.L.; Mattor, N.; Nevins, W.M.; Porter, G.D.; Rensink, M.E.; Rognlien, T.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Berk, H.L. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Campbell, R.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Diamond, P.H.; Rosenbluth, M.N. [California Univ., San Diego, CA (United States); Hinton, F.L.; Staebler, G.M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Knoll, D.A. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Modi, B.; Xu, X.Q. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Prinja, A.K. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ryutov, D.D.; Tsidulko, Y.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russia)

    1992-12-31

    We present studies of three schemes for reducing the peak heat flux on divertor plates, divertor biasing, impurity injection (``radiative divertor``) and neutral gas injection (``gas target divertor``). We report on theoretical analysis of a likely source of turbulent transport in the SOL and incorporation of the resultant transport coefficients into self-consistent models.

  2. Physics and modelling of scrape-off layer transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, R.H.; Allen, S.L.; Crotinger, J.A.; Kaiser, T.B.; Milovich, J.L.; Mattor, N.; Nevins, W.M.; Porter, G.D.; Rensink, M.E.; Rognlien, T.D. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Berk, H.L. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies); Campbell, R.B. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Diamond, P.H.; Rosenbluth, M.N. (California Univ., San Di

    1992-01-01

    We present studies of three schemes for reducing the peak heat flux on divertor plates, divertor biasing, impurity injection ( radiative divertor'') and neutral gas injection ( gas target divertor''). We report on theoretical analysis of a likely source of turbulent transport in the SOL and incorporation of the resultant transport coefficients into self-consistent models.

  3. A model for assessing the environmental impact of transport

    OpenAIRE

    Malgorzata Latuszynska; Roma Strulak-Wojcikiewicz

    2013-01-01

    Environmental effects of transport, with a particular focus on the natural environment have been discussed. The authors present methods for assessing the influence of investments in transport infrastructure on the environment, as well as the concept of a simulation model which integrates various methods and approaches used to assess the impact of such investments on the environment. (original abstract)

  4. Physics and modelling of scrape-off layer transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.H.; Allen, S.L.; Crotinger, J.A.; Kaiser, T.B.; Milovich, J.L.; Mattor, N.; Nevins, W.M.; Porter, G.D.; Rensink, M.E.; Rognlien, T.D.; Berk, H.L.; Diamond, P.H.; Rosenbluth, M.N.; Hinton, F.L.; Staebler, G.M.; Knoll, D.A.; Modi, B.; Xu, X.Q.; Prinja, A.K.; Ryutov, D.D.; Tsidulko, Y.A.

    1992-01-01

    We present studies of three schemes for reducing the peak heat flux on divertor plates, divertor biasing, impurity injection (''radiative divertor'') and neutral gas injection (''gas target divertor''). We report on theoretical analysis of a likely source of turbulent transport in the SOL and incorporation of the resultant transport coefficients into self-consistent models

  5. Olkiluoto surface hydrological modelling: Update 2012 including salt transport modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karvonen, T.

    2013-11-01

    Posiva Oy is responsible for implementing a final disposal program for spent nuclear fuel of its owners Teollisuuden Voima Oyj and Fortum Power and Heat Oy. The spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed at a depth of about 400-450 meters in the crystalline bedrock at the Olkiluoto site. Leakages located at or close to spent fuel repository may give rise to the upconing of deep highly saline groundwater and this is a concern with regard to the performance of the tunnel backfill material after the closure of the tunnels. Therefore a salt transport sub-model was added to the Olkiluoto surface hydrological model (SHYD). The other improvements include update of the particle tracking algorithm and possibility to estimate the influence of open drillholes in a case where overpressure in inflatable packers decreases causing a hydraulic short-circuit between hydrogeological zones HZ19 and HZ20 along the drillhole. Four new hydrogeological zones HZ056, HZ146, BFZ100 and HZ039 were added to the model. In addition, zones HZ20A and HZ20B intersect with each other in the new structure model, which influences salinity upconing caused by leakages in shafts. The aim of the modelling of long-term influence of ONKALO, shafts and repository tunnels provide computational results that can be used to suggest limits for allowed leakages. The model input data included all the existing leakages into ONKALO (35-38 l/min) and shafts in the present day conditions. The influence of shafts was computed using eight different values for total shaft leakage: 5, 11, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 l/min. The selection of the leakage criteria for shafts was influenced by the fact that upconing of saline water increases TDS-values close to the repository areas although HZ20B does not intersect any deposition tunnels. The total limit for all leakages was suggested to be 120 l/min. The limit for HZ20 zones was proposed to be 40 l/min: about 5 l/min the present day leakages to access tunnel, 25 l/min from

  6. Monte Carlo impurity transport modeling in the DIII-D transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.E.; Finkenthal, D.F.

    1998-04-01

    A description of the carbon transport and sputtering physics contained in the Monte Carlo Impurity (MCI) transport code is given. Examples of statistically significant carbon transport pathways are examined using MCI's unique tracking visualizer and a mechanism for enhanced carbon accumulation on the high field side of the divertor chamber is discussed. Comparisons between carbon emissions calculated with MCI and those measured in the DIII-D tokamak are described. Good qualitative agreement is found between 2D carbon emission patterns calculated with MCI and experimentally measured carbon patterns. While uncertainties in the sputtering physics, atomic data, and transport models have made quantitative comparisons with experiments more difficult, recent results using a physics based model for physical and chemical sputtering has yielded simulations with about 50% of the total carbon radiation measured in the divertor. These results and plans for future improvement in the physics models and atomic data are discussed

  7. A Coupled Model of Multiphase Flow, Reactive Biogeochemical Transport, Thermal Transport and Geo-Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C. H.; Yeh, G. T.

    2015-12-01

    In this investigation, a coupled model of multiphase flow, reactive biogeochemical transport, thermal transport and geo-mechanics in subsurface media is presented. It iteratively solves the mass conservation equation for fluid flow, thermal transport equation for temperature, reactive biogeochemical transport equations for concentration distributions, and solid momentum equation for displacement with successive linearization algorithm. With species-based equations of state, density of a phase in the system is obtained by summing up concentrations of all species. This circumvents the problem of having to use empirical functions. Moreover, reaction rates of all species are incorporated in mass conservation equation for fluid flow. Formation enthalpy of all species is included in the law of energy conservation as a source-sink term. Finite element methods are used to discretize the governing equations. Numerical experiments are presented to examine the accuracy and robustness of the proposed model. The results demonstrate the feasibility and capability of present model in subsurface media.

  8. Transport modeling of L/H transition in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuji, Y.; Fukuyama, A.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.I.

    1995-01-01

    In order to study the particle transport and the mechanism of the L/H transition in tokamaks, a one-dimensional transport code which describes the toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation as well as the radial electric field has been developed. The neoclassical transport, turbulent transport and ion orbit loss are included. Using a turbulent transport model based on the current diffusive high-n ballooning mode and a fixed temperature profile, the density profile in a steady state and the dependence on the edge temperature are studied. With high edge temperature, the density gradient near the edge becomes steep and a H-mode like density profile is obtained. The preliminary calculation including heat transport is also presented. 10 refs., 3 figs

  9. Metal transport across biomembranes: emerging models for a distinct chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello, José M; Raimunda, Daniel; González-Guerrero, Manuel

    2012-04-20

    Transition metals are essential components of important biomolecules, and their homeostasis is central to many life processes. Transmembrane transporters are key elements controlling the distribution of metals in various compartments. However, due to their chemical properties, transition elements require transporters with different structural-functional characteristics from those of alkali and alkali earth ions. Emerging structural information and functional studies have revealed distinctive features of metal transport. Among these are the relevance of multifaceted events involving metal transfer among participating proteins, the importance of coordination geometry at transmembrane transport sites, and the presence of the largely irreversible steps associated with vectorial transport. Here, we discuss how these characteristics shape novel transition metal ion transport models.

  10. Capabilities and requirements for modelling radionuclide transport in the geosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paige, R.W.; Piper, D.

    1989-02-01

    This report gives an overview of geosphere flow and transport models suitable for use by the Department of the Environment in the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal sites. An outline methodology for geosphere modelling is proposed, consisting of a number of different types of model. A brief description of each of the component models is given, indicating the purpose of the model, the processes being modelled and the methodologies adopted. Areas requiring development are noted. (author)

  11. An architecture model for communication of safety in public transportation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajabalinejad, Mohammad; Horváth, Imre; Pernot, Jean-Paul; Rusák, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Safety in transportation is under the influence of the rising complexity, increasing demands for capacity and decreasing cost. Furthermore, the interdisciplinary environment of operation and altered safety regulations invite for a centralized (integrated) modelling/ communication approach. This

  12. Modelling of hydrodynamics and mecury transport in lake Velenje. Part 2, Modelling and model verification

    OpenAIRE

    Kotnik, Jože; Žagar, Dušan; Rajar, Rudi; Horvat, Milena

    2004-01-01

    PCFLOW3D - a three-dimensional mathematical model that was developed at the Chair of Fluid Mechanics of the Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, University of Ljubljana, was used for hydrodynamic and Hg transport simulations in Lake Velenje. The model is fully non-linear and computes three velocity components, water elevation and pressure. Transport-dispersion equations for salinity and heat (and/or any pollutant) are further used to compute the distributions of these par...

  13. Fate and transport modelling of uranium in Port Hope Harbour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinilla, C.E.; Garisto, N.; Peters, R.

    2010-01-01

    Fate and transport modelling of contaminants in Port Hope Harbour and near-shore Lake Ontario was undertaken in support of an ecological and human health risk assessment. Uranium concentrations in the Harbour and near-shore Lake Ontario due to groundwater and storm water loadings were estimated with a state-of-the-art 3D hydrodynamic and contaminant transport model (ECOMSED). The hydrodynamic model was simplified to obtain a first estimate of the flow pattern in the Harbour. The model was verified with field data using a tracer (fluoride). The modelling results generally showed good agreement with the tracer field data. (author)

  14. Modeling of pollutant emissions from road transport; Modelisation des emissions de polluants par le transport routier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    COPERT III (computer programme to calculate emissions from road transport) is the third version of an MS Windows software programme aiming at the calculation of air pollutant emissions from road transport. COPERT estimates emissions of all regulated air pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM) produced by different vehicle categories as well as CO{sub 2} emissions on the basis of fuel consumption. This research seminar was organized by the French agency of environment and energy mastery (Ademe) around the following topics: the uncertainties and sensitiveness analysis of the COPERT III model, the presentation of case studies that use COPERT III for the estimation of road transport emissions, and the future of the modeling of road transport emissions: from COPERT III to ARTEMIS (assessment and reliability of transport emission models and inventory systems). This document is a compilation of 8 contributions to this seminar and dealing with: the uncertainty and sensitiveness analysis of the COPERT III model; the road mode emissions of the ESCOMPTE program: sensitivity study; the sensitivity analysis of the spatialized traffic at the time-aggregation level: application in the framework of the INTERREG project (Alsace); the road transport aspect of the regional air quality plan of Bourgogne region: exhaustive consideration of the road network; intercomparison of tools and methods for the inventory of emissions of road transport origin; evolution of the French park of vehicles by 2025: new projections; application of COPERT III to the French context: a new version of IMPACT-ADEME; the European ARTEMIS project: new structural considerations for the modeling of road transport emissions. (J.S.)

  15. Modeling the fate and transport of plastic debris in freshwaters

    OpenAIRE

    Kooi, Merel; Besseling, Ellen; Kroeze, Carolien; Wenzel, van, Annemarie P.; Koelmans, Albert A.

    2018-01-01

    Contamination with plastic debris has been recognized as one of today’s major environmental quality problems. Because most of the sources are land based, concerns are increasingly focused on the freshwater and terrestrial environment. Fate and transport models for plastic debris can complement information from measurements and will play an important role in the prospective risk assessment of plastic debris. We review the present knowledge with respect to fate and transport modeling of plastic...

  16. Meridional Flow Observations: Implications for the current Flux Transport Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Hernandez, Irene; Komm, Rudolf; Kholikov, Shukur; Howe, Rachel; Hill, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Meridional circulation has become a key element in the solar dynamo flux transport models. Available helioseismic observations from several instruments, Taiwan Oscillation Network (TON), Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) and Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI), have made possible a continuous monitoring of the solar meridional flow in the subphotospheric layers for the last solar cycle, including the recent extended minimum. Here we review some of the meridional circulation observations using local helioseismology techniques and relate them to magnetic flux transport models.

  17. Probabilistic transport models for plasma transport in the presence of critical thresholds: Beyond the diffusive paradigma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, R.; van Milligen, B. Ph.; Carreras, B. A.

    2005-05-01

    It is argued that the modeling of plasma transport in tokamaks may benefit greatly from extending the usual local paradigm to accommodate scale-free transport mechanisms. This can be done by combining Lévy distributions and a nonlinear threshold condition within the continuous time random walk concept. The advantages of this nonlocal, nonlinear extension are illustrated by constructing a simple particle density transport model that, as a result of these ideas, spontaneously exhibits much of nondiffusive phenomenology routinely observed in tokamaks. The fluid limit of the system shows that the kind of equations that are appropriate to capture these dynamics are based on fractional differential operators. In them, effective diffusivities and pinch velocities are found that are dynamically set by the system in response to the specific characteristics of the fueling source and external perturbations. This fact suggests some dramatic consequences for the extrapolation of these transport properties to larger size systems.

  18. Probabilistic transport models for plasma transport in the presence of critical thresholds: Beyond the diffusive paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, R.; Milligen, B.Ph. van; Carreras, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    It is argued that the modeling of plasma transport in tokamaks may benefit greatly from extending the usual local paradigm to accommodate scale-free transport mechanisms. This can be done by combining Levy distributions and a nonlinear threshold condition within the continuous time random walk concept. The advantages of this nonlocal, nonlinear extension are illustrated by constructing a simple particle density transport model that, as a result of these ideas, spontaneously exhibits much of nondiffusive phenomenology routinely observed in tokamaks. The fluid limit of the system shows that the kind of equations that are appropriate to capture these dynamics are based on fractional differential operators. In them, effective diffusivities and pinch velocities are found that are dynamically set by the system in response to the specific characteristics of the fueling source and external perturbations. This fact suggests some dramatic consequences for the extrapolation of these transport properties to larger size systems

  19. Transport modelling in coastal waters using stochastic differential equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charles, W.M.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, the particle model that takes into account the short term correlation behaviour of pollutants dispersion has been developed. An efficient particle model for sediment transport has been developed. We have modified the existing particle model by adding extra equations for the

  20. Numerical Calculation of Transport Based on the Drift-Kinetic Equation for Plasmas in General Toroidal Magnetic Geometry: Convergence and Testing; Calculo Numerico del Transporte mediante la Ecuacion Cinetica de Deriva para Plasmas en Geometria Magnetica Toroidal: Convergencia y Comprobaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, J. M.; Lopez-Bruna, D.

    2009-12-11

    This report is the third of a series [Informes Tecnicos Ciemat 1165 y 1172] devoted to the development of a new numerical code to solve the guiding center equation for electrons and ions in toroidal plasmas. Two calculation meshes corresponding to axisymmetric tokamaks are now prepared and the kinetic equation is expanded so the standard terms of neoclassical theory --fi rst order terms in the Larmor radius expansion-- can be identified, restricting the calculations correspondingly. Using model density and temperature profiles for the plasma, several convergence test are performed depending on the calculation meshes and the expansions of the distribution function; then the results are compared with the theory [Hinton and Hazeltine, Rev. Mod. Phys. (1976)]. (Author) 18 refs.

  1. Economic model of pipeline transportation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banks, W. F.

    1977-07-29

    The objective of the work reported here was to develop a model which could be used to assess the economic effects of energy-conservative technological innovations upon the pipeline industry. The model is a dynamic simulator which accepts inputs of two classes: the physical description (design parameters, fluid properties, and financial structures) of the system to be studied, and the postulated market (throughput and price) projection. The model consists of time-independent submodels: the fluidics model which simulates the physical behavior of the system, and the financial model which operates upon the output of the fluidics model to calculate the economics outputs. Any of a number of existing fluidics models can be used in addition to that developed as a part of this study. The financial model, known as the Systems, Science and Software (S/sup 3/) Financial Projection Model, contains user options whereby pipeline-peculiar characteristics can be removed and/or modified, so that the model can be applied to virtually any kind of business enterprise. The several dozen outputs are of two classes: the energetics and the economics. The energetics outputs of primary interest are the energy intensity, also called unit energy consumption, and the total energy consumed. The primary economics outputs are the long-run average cost, profit, cash flow, and return on investment.

  2. ATTILA - Atmospheric Tracer Transport In a Langrangian Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reithmeier, C.; Sausen, R.

    2000-07-01

    The Lagrangian model ATTILA (atmospheric tracer transport in a Lagrangian model) has been developed to treat the global-scale transport of passive trace species in the atmosphere within the framework of a general circulation model (GCM). ATTILA runs online within the GCM ECHAM4 and uses the GCM produced wind field to advect the centrois of 80.000 to 180.000 constant mass air parcels into which the model atmosphere is divided. Each trace constituent is thereby represented by a mass mixing ratio in each parcel. ATTILA contains state-of-the-art parameterizations of convection, turbulent boundary layer mixing, and interparcel transport and provides an algorithm to map the tracer concentrations from the trajectories to the ECHAM model grid. We use two experiments to evaluate the transport characteristics of ATTILA against observations and the standard semiLagrangian transport scheme of ECHAM. In the first experiment we simulate the distribution of the short-lived tracer Radon ({sup 222}Rn) in order to examine fast vertical transport over continents, and long-range transport from the continents to remote areas. In the second experiment, we simulate the distribution of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) that was injected into the northern stratosphere during the nuclear weapon tests in the early 60ties, in order to examine upper tropospheric and stratospheric transport characteristics. ATTILA compares well to the observations and in many respects to the semiLagrangian scheme. However, contrary to the semiLagrangian scheme, ATTILA shows a greatly reduced meridional transport in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and a reduced downward flux from the stratosphere to the troposphere, especially in midlatitudes. Since both transport schemes use the same model meteorology, we conclude that the often cited enhanced meridional transport and overestimated downward flux in ECHAM as described above is rather due to the numerical properties of the semiLagrangian scheme than due to an

  3. Transport lattice models of heat transport in skin with spatially heterogeneous, temperature-dependent perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Gregory T

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigation of bioheat transfer problems requires the evaluation of temporal and spatial distributions of temperature. This class of problems has been traditionally addressed using the Pennes bioheat equation. Transport of heat by conduction, and by temperature-dependent, spatially heterogeneous blood perfusion is modeled here using a transport lattice approach. Methods We represent heat transport processes by using a lattice that represents the Pennes bioheat equation in perfused tissues, and diffusion in nonperfused regions. The three layer skin model has a nonperfused viable epidermis, and deeper regions of dermis and subcutaneous tissue with perfusion that is constant or temperature-dependent. Two cases are considered: (1 surface contact heating and (2 spatially distributed heating. The model is relevant to the prediction of the transient and steady state temperature rise for different methods of power deposition within the skin. Accumulated thermal damage is estimated by using an Arrhenius type rate equation at locations where viable tissue temperature exceeds 42°C. Prediction of spatial temperature distributions is also illustrated with a two-dimensional model of skin created from a histological image. Results The transport lattice approach was validated by comparison with an analytical solution for a slab with homogeneous thermal properties and spatially distributed uniform sink held at constant temperatures at the ends. For typical transcutaneous blood gas sensing conditions the estimated damage is small, even with prolonged skin contact to a 45°C surface. Spatial heterogeneity in skin thermal properties leads to a non-uniform temperature distribution during a 10 GHz electromagnetic field exposure. A realistic two-dimensional model of the skin shows that tissue heterogeneity does not lead to a significant local temperature increase when heated by a hot wire tip. Conclusions The heat transport system model of the

  4. Radiative Transport Modelling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-24

    derived by Thrane et al from Fresnel-Huygens diffraction theory .5 The Thrane model defines the normalized signal current as a function of integrated...problem is in part application-driven, namely based on the need to be able to extract the radiative properties from the shape the LCI signal . On the...walk model to test model approaches 75 June 2017 4 Apply the theory to experimental data on TBCs 20 June 2017 5 Report on results and future

  5. Interfacial and Wall Transport Models for SPACE-CAP Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Soon Joon; Choo, Yeon Joon; Han, Tae Young; Hwang, Su Hyun; Lee, Byung Chul [FNC Tech., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hoon; Ha, Sang Jun [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The development project for the domestic design code was launched to be used for the safety and performance analysis of pressurized light water reactors. And CAP (Containment Analysis Package) code has been also developed for the containment safety and performance analysis side by side with SPACE. The CAP code treats three fields (gas, continuous liquid, and dispersed drop) for the assessment of containment specific phenomena, and is featured by its multidimensional assessment capabilities. Thermal hydraulics solver was already developed and now under testing of its stability and soundness. As a next step, interfacial and wall transport models was setup. In order to develop the best model and correlation package for the CAP code, various models currently used in major containment analysis codes, which are GOTHIC, CONTAIN2.0, and CONTEMPT-LT, have been reviewed. The origins of the selected models used in these codes have also been examined to find out if the models have not conflict with a proprietary right. In addition, a literature survey of the recent studies has been performed in order to incorporate the better models for the CAP code. The models and correlations of SPACE were also reviewed. CAP models and correlations are composed of interfacial heat/mass, and momentum transport models, and wall heat/mass, and momentum transport models. This paper discusses on those transport models in the CAP code.

  6. Transport modeling and advanced computer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, J.C.; Ross, D.W.; Miner, W.H. Jr.

    1988-11-01

    A workshop was held at the University of Texas in June 1988 to consider the current state of transport codes and whether improved user interfaces would make the codes more usable and accessible to the fusion community. Also considered was the possibility that a software standard could be devised to ease the exchange of routines between groups. It was noted that two of the major obstacles to exchanging routines now are the variety of geometrical representation and choices of units. While the workshop formulated no standards, it was generally agreed that good software engineering would aid in the exchange of routines, and that a continued exchange of ideas between groups would be worthwhile. It seems that before we begin to discuss software standards we should review the current state of computer technology --- both hardware and software to see what influence recent advances might have on our software goals. This is done in this paper

  7. Mathematical Model of Ion Transport in Electrodialysis Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Rohman

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models of ion transport in electrodialysis process is reviewed and their basics concept is discussed. Three scales of ion transport reviewed are: 1 ion transport in the membrane, where two approaches are used, the irreversible thermodynamics and modeling of the membrane material; 2 ion transport in a three-layer system composed of a membrane with two adjoining diffusion layers; and 3 coupling with hydraulic flow system in an electrodialysis 2D and 3D cell, where the differential equation of convectivediffusion is used. Most of the work carried out in the past implemented NP equations since relatively easily coupled with other equations describing hydrodynamic conditions and ion transport in the surrounding solutions, chemical reactions in the solutions and the membrane, boundary and other conditions. However, it is limited to point ionic transport in homogenous and uniformly - grainy phases of structure. © 2008 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Received: 21 January 2008, Accepted: 10 March 2008][How to Cite: F.S. Rohman, N. Aziz (2008. Mathematical Model of Ion Transport in Electrodialysis Process. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 3(1-3: 3-8. doi:10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.7122.3-8][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.3.1-3.7122.3-8 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/7122 ] 

  8. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 2 -- Appendices: Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This volume contains input data and parameters used in the model of the transportation sector of the National Energy Modeling System. The list of Transportation Sector Model variables includes parameters for the following: Light duty vehicle modules (fuel economy, regional sales, alternative fuel vehicles); Light duty vehicle stock modules; Light duty vehicle fleet module; Air travel module (demand model and fleet efficiency model); Freight transport module; Miscellaneous energy demand module; and Transportation emissions module. Also included in these appendices are: Light duty vehicle market classes; Maximum light duty vehicle market penetration parameters; Aircraft fleet efficiency model adjustment factors; and List of expected aircraft technology improvements.

  9. Modeling the atmospheric transport of radioactive contamination using the ETA model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telenta, B.; Antic, D.

    1996-01-01

    The atmosphere is the main medium that transports and disperses the radioactive and/or chemical contaminants in operational use and in accidents. Atmospheric models can be used to simulate the transport of contaminants in typical accidents and for realistic meteorological conditions. This paper describes an approach to simulating the Chernobyl accident and similar hypothetical cases. The study is based on an atmospheric model extended by an additional equation that models the transport of a certain radioactive concentration. A step mountain synoptic model, called the ETA model (well-known model for weather forecasting), is used to investigate the transport and deposition of radioactive material in the Chernobyl accident zone

  10. Modelling anisotropic water transport in polymer composite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and polymer composites were characterized. Parameters for Fickian diffusion and polymer relaxation models were determined by least-square curve fitting to the experimental data. Diffusion parameters of epoxy and vinyl ester resin were used as input during development of finite element (FE) model of polymer composite.

  11. UNCERTAINTY SUPPLY CHAIN MODEL AND TRANSPORT IN ITS DEPLOYMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Lucena Oliveira

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the Model Uncertainty of Supply Chain, and proposes a matrix with their transportation modes best suited to their chains. From the detailed analysis of the matrix of uncertainty, it is suggested transportation modes best suited to the management of these chains, so that transport is the most appropriate optimization of the gains previously proposed by the original model, particularly when supply chains are distant from suppliers of raw materials and / or supplies.Here we analyze in detail Agile Supply Chains, which is a result of Uncertainty Supply Chain Model, with special attention to Manaus Industrial Center. This research was done at Manaus Industrial Pole, which is a model of industrial agglomerations, based in Manaus, State of Amazonas (Brazil, which contemplates different supply chains and strategies sharing same infrastructure of transport, handling and storage and clearance process and uses inbound for suppliers of raw material.  The state of art contemplates supply chain management, uncertainty supply chain model, agile supply chains, Manaus Industrial Center (MIC and Brazilian legislation, as a business case, and presents concepts and features, of each one. The main goal is to present and discuss how transport is able to support Uncertainty Supply Chain Model, in order to complete management model. The results obtained confirms the hypothesis of integrated logistics processes are able to guarantee attractivity for industrial agglomerations, and open discussions when the suppliers are far from the manufacturer center, in a logistics management.

  12. Models of transport processes in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pommersheim, J.M.; Clifton, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    An approach being considered by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for disposal of low-level radioactive waste is to place the waste forms in concrete vaults buried underground. The vaults would need a service life of 500 years. Approaches for predicting the service life of concrete of such vaults include the use of mathematical models. Mathematical models are presented in this report for the major degradation processes anticipated for the concrete vaults, which are corrosion of steel reinforcement, sulfate attack, acid attack, and leaching. The models mathematically represent rate controlling processes including diffusion, convection, and reaction and sorption of chemical species. These models can form the basis for predicting the life of concrete under in-service conditions. 33 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs

  13. Tokamak transport based on the Braginskii model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitzner, H.

    1987-01-01

    The two-fluid model of Braginskii is applied to the case of a moderately large tokamak. By estimation of the order of magnitude of the various effects and omission of small terms a somewhat simpler reduced two-fluid Braginskii model is obtained. The model applies on a time scale of order τ e m i /m e , where τ e is the electron-electron collision time, and energy confinement time is of this order. With electron and ion flow velocities no larger than is necessary to obtain the correct equilibrium currents, classical parallel viscosity becomes a dominant dissipative mechanism. The model allows for the slow evolution of equilibrium states. The equilibria, which include static, ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibria as a special case, are described. Generally the number density, electrostatic potential, and flows are not constant on a flux surface. The procedure for determination of the slow evolution of the equilibrium is sketched. (orig.)

  14. Cosmic-Ray Transport in Heliospheric Magnetic Structures. II. Modeling Particle Transport through Corotating Interaction Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopp, Andreas [Université Libre de Bruxelles, Service de Physique Statistique et des Plasmas, CP 231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Wiengarten, Tobias; Fichtner, Horst [Institut für Theoretische Physik IV, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Effenberger, Frederic [Department of Physics and KIPAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Kühl, Patrick; Heber, Bernd [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrecht-Universität zu Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Raath, Jan-Louis; Potgieter, Marius S. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, 2520 Potchefstroom (South Africa)

    2017-03-01

    The transport of cosmic rays (CRs) in the heliosphere is determined by the properties of the solar wind plasma. The heliospheric plasma environment has been probed by spacecraft for decades and provides a unique opportunity for testing transport theories. Of particular interest for the three-dimensional (3D) heliospheric CR transport are structures such as corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which, due to the enhancement of the magnetic field strength and magnetic fluctuations within and due to the associated shocks as well as stream interfaces, do influence the CR diffusion and drift. In a three-fold series of papers, we investigate these effects by modeling inner-heliospheric solar wind conditions with the numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) framework Cronos (Wiengarten et al., referred as Paper I), and the results serve as input to a transport code employing a stochastic differential equation approach (this paper). While, in Paper I, we presented results from 3D simulations with Cronos, the MHD output is now taken as an input to the CR transport modeling. We discuss the diffusion and drift behavior of Galactic cosmic rays using the example of different theories, and study the effects of CIRs on these transport processes. In particular, we point out the wide range of possible particle fluxes at a given point in space resulting from these different theories. The restriction of this variety by fitting the numerical results to spacecraft data will be the subject of the third paper of this series.

  15. Stencil method: a Markov model for transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgoshaie, A. H.; Tchelepi, H.; Jenny, P.

    2016-12-01

    In porous media the transport of fluid is dominated by flow-field heterogeneity resulting from the underlying transmissibility field. Since the transmissibility is highly uncertain, many realizations of a geological model are used to describe the statistics of the transport phenomena in a Monte Carlo framework. One possible way to avoid the high computational cost of physics-based Monte Carlo simulations is to model the velocity field as a Markov process and use Markov Chain Monte Carlo. In previous works multiple Markov models for discrete velocity processes have been proposed. These models can be divided into two general classes of Markov models in time and Markov models in space. Both of these choices have been shown to be effective to some extent. However some studies have suggested that the Markov property cannot be confirmed for a temporal Markov process; Therefore there is not a consensus about the validity and value of Markov models in time. Moreover, previous spacial Markov models have only been used for modeling transport on structured networks and can not be readily applied to model transport in unstructured networks. In this work we propose a novel approach for constructing a Markov model in time (stencil method) for a discrete velocity process. The results form the stencil method are compared to previously proposed spacial Markov models for structured networks. The stencil method is also applied to unstructured networks and can successfully describe the dispersion of particles in this setting. Our conclusion is that both temporal Markov models and spacial Markov models for discrete velocity processes can be valid for a range of model parameters. Moreover, we show that the stencil model can be more efficient in many practical settings and is suited to model dispersion both on structured and unstructured networks.

  16. A colloid-facilitated transport model with variable colloid transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Bruce A.; Wolfsberg, Andrew V.; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Reimus, Paul W.

    2007-05-01

    Anomalous contaminant transport velocities in groundwater for species generally considered to be immobile are often attributed to the mechanism of colloid-facilitated transport. In some of the field observations attributed to colloid facilitation, an extremely small fraction of the total contaminant mass introduced to the groundwater is detected downstream. In this study, a new model of colloid-facilitated contaminant transport is proposed that explains this phenomenon as the variability of mobility of individual colloids in the population. The process of retardation via attachment and detachment of colloids on immobile surfaces is often modeled with time and space invariant parameters; here it is modeled assuming a diverse population of transport properties that account for the inherent variability of colloid size, surface charge and chemical properties, mineralogy, and the concomitant impact on colloid mobility. When the contaminant is assumed to irreversibly attach to or form colloids, the migration of the contaminant plume exhibits extremely non-Fickian behavior. The plume's center of mass travels with a velocity governed by the groundwater velocity divided by the mean colloid retardation factor. However, small quantities of contaminant attached to a few highly mobile colloids travel at velocities up to the groundwater velocity, far exceeding the velocity of the centroid of the plume. This paper introduces the colloid diversity model, presents some sensitivity calculations for an idealized case, and discusses the implications of such a model on data needs, simulation of field observations, and model scaling.

  17. A multimodal location and routing model for hazardous materials transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuanchang; Lu, Wei; Wang, Wen; Quadrifoglio, Luca

    2012-08-15

    The recent US Commodity Flow Survey data suggest that transporting hazardous materials (HAZMAT) often involves multiple modes, especially for long-distance transportation. However, not much research has been conducted on HAZMAT location and routing on a multimodal transportation network. Most existing HAZMAT location and routing studies focus exclusively on single mode (either highways or railways). Motivated by the lack of research on multimodal HAZMAT location and routing and the fact that there is an increasing demand for it, this research proposes a multimodal HAZMAT model that simultaneously optimizes the locations of transfer yards and transportation routes. The developed model is applied to two case studies of different network sizes to demonstrate its applicability. The results are analyzed and suggestions for future research are provided. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Sustainable logistics and transportation optimization models and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Gakis, Konstantinos; Pardalos, Panos

    2017-01-01

    Focused on the logistics and transportation operations within a supply chain, this book brings together the latest models, algorithms, and optimization possibilities. Logistics and transportation problems are examined within a sustainability perspective to offer a comprehensive assessment of environmental, social, ethical, and economic performance measures. Featured models, techniques, and algorithms may be used to construct policies on alternative transportation modes and technologies, green logistics, and incentives by the incorporation of environmental, economic, and social measures. Researchers, professionals, and graduate students in urban regional planning, logistics, transport systems, optimization, supply chain management, business administration, information science, mathematics, and industrial and systems engineering will find the real life and interdisciplinary issues presented in this book informative and useful.

  19. A mobile-mobile transport model for simulating reactive transport in connected heterogeneous fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunhui; Wang, Zhiyuan; Zhao, Yue; Rathore, Saubhagya Singh; Huo, Jinge; Tang, Yuening; Liu, Ming; Gong, Rulan; Cirpka, Olaf A.; Luo, Jian

    2018-05-01

    Mobile-immobile transport models can be effective in reproducing heavily tailed breakthrough curves of concentration. However, such models may not adequately describe transport along multiple flow paths with intermediate velocity contrasts in connected fields. We propose using the mobile-mobile model for simulating subsurface flow and associated mixing-controlled reactive transport in connected fields. This model includes two local concentrations, one in the fast- and the other in the slow-flow domain, which predict both the concentration mean and variance. The normalized total concentration variance within the flux is found to be a non-monotonic function of the discharge ratio with a maximum concentration variance at intermediate values of the discharge ratio. We test the mobile-mobile model for mixing-controlled reactive transport with an instantaneous, irreversible bimolecular reaction in structured and connected random heterogeneous domains, and compare the performance of the mobile-mobile to the mobile-immobile model. The results indicate that the mobile-mobile model generally predicts the concentration breakthrough curves (BTCs) of the reactive compound better. Particularly, for cases of an elliptical inclusion with intermediate hydraulic-conductivity contrasts, where the travel-time distribution shows bimodal behavior, the prediction of both the BTCs and maximum product concentration is significantly improved. Our results exemplify that the conceptual model of two mobile domains with diffusive mass transfer in between is in general good for predicting mixing-controlled reactive transport, and particularly so in cases where the transfer in the low-conductivity zones is by slow advection rather than diffusion.

  20. Mathematical models for volume rendering and neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Max, N.

    1994-09-01

    This paper reviews several different models for light interaction with volume densities of absorbing, glowing, reflecting, or scattering material. They include absorption only, glow only, glow and absorption combined, single scattering of external illumination, and multiple scattering. The models are derived from differential equations, and illustrated on a data set representing a cloud. They are related to corresponding models in neutron transport. The multiple scattering model uses an efficient method to propagate the radiation which does not suffer from the ray effect

  1. Routing and Scheduling Optimization Model of Sea Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    barus, Mika debora br; asyrafy, Habib; nababan, Esther; mawengkang, Herman

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines the routing and scheduling optimization model of sea transportation. One of the issues discussed is about the transportation of ships carrying crude oil (tankers) which is distributed to many islands. The consideration is the cost of transportation which consists of travel costs and the cost of layover at the port. Crude oil to be distributed consists of several types. This paper develops routing and scheduling model taking into consideration some objective functions and constraints. The formulation of the mathematical model analyzed is to minimize costs based on the total distance visited by the tanker and minimize the cost of the ports. In order for the model of the problem to be more realistic and the cost calculated to be more appropriate then added a parameter that states the multiplier factor of cost increases as the charge of crude oil is filled.

  2. Transport modeling of sorbing tracers in artificial fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keum, Dong Kwon; Baik, Min Hoon; Park, Chung Kyun; Cho, Young Hwan; Hahn, Phil Soo

    1998-02-01

    This study was performed as part of a fifty-man year attachment program between AECL (Atomic Energy Canada Limited) and KAERI. Three kinds of computer code, HDD, POMKAP and VAMKAP, were developed to predict transport of contaminants in fractured rock. MDDM was to calculate the mass transport of contaminants in a single fracture using a simple hydrodynamic dispersion diffusion model. POMKAP was to predict the mass transport of contaminants by a two-dimensional variable aperture model. In parallel with modeling, the validation of models was also performed through the analysis of the migration experimental data obtained in acrylic plastic and granite artificial fracture system at the Whiteshell laboratories, AECL, Canada. (author). 34 refs., 11 tabs., 76 figs.

  3. Modeling and simulation of emergent behavior in transportation infrastructure restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Akhilesh; Corns, Steven; Shoberg, Thomas G.; Qin, Ruwen; Long, Suzanna K.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to create a methodology to model the emergent behavior during a disruption in the transportation system and that calculates economic losses due to such a disruption, and to understand how an extreme event affects the road transportation network. The chapter discusses a system dynamics approach which is used to model the transportation road infrastructure system to evaluate the different factors that render road segments inoperable and calculate economic consequences of such inoperability. System dynamics models have been integrated with business process simulation model to evaluate, design, and optimize the business process. The chapter also explains how different factors affect the road capacity. After identifying the various factors affecting the available road capacity, a causal loop diagram (CLD) is created to visually represent the causes leading to a change in the available road capacity and the effects on travel costs when the available road capacity changes.

  4. Evaluation of cloud convection and tracer transport in a three-dimensional chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Feng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the performance of cloud convection and tracer transport in a global off-line 3-D chemical transport model. Various model simulations are performed using different meteorological (reanalyses (ERA-40, ECMWF operational and ECMWF Interim to diagnose the updraft mass flux, convective precipitation and cloud top height.

    The diagnosed upward mass flux distribution from TOMCAT agrees quite well with the ECMWF reanalysis data (ERA-40 and ERA-Interim below 200 hPa. Inclusion of midlevel convection improves the agreement at mid-high latitudes. However, the reanalyses show strong convective transport up to 100 hPa, well into the tropical tropopause layer (TTL, which is not captured by TOMCAT. Similarly, the model captures the spatial and seasonal variation of convective cloud top height although the mean modelled value is about 2 km lower than observed.

    The ERA-Interim reanalyses have smaller archived upward convective mass fluxes than ERA-40, and smaller convective precipitation, which is in better agreement with satellite-based data. TOMCAT captures these relative differences when diagnosing convection from the large-scale fields. The model also shows differences in diagnosed convection with the version of the operational analyses used, which cautions against using results of the model from one specific time period as a general evaluation.

    We have tested the effect of resolution on the diagnosed modelled convection with simulations ranging from 5.6° × 5.6° to 1° × 1°. Overall, in the off-line model, the higher model resolution gives stronger vertical tracer transport, however, it does not make a large change to the diagnosed convective updraft mass flux (i.e., the model results using the convection scheme fail to capture the strong convection transport up to 100 hPa as seen in the archived convective mass fluxes. Similarly, the resolution of the forcing winds in the higher resolution CTM does not make a

  5. Solvable Model for Dynamic Mass Transport in Disordered Geophysical Media

    KAUST Repository

    Marder, M.

    2018-03-29

    We present an analytically solvable model for transport in geophysical materials on large length and time scales. It describes the flow of gas to a complicated absorbing boundary over long periods of time. We find a solution to this model using Green\\'s function techniques, and apply the solution to three absorbing networks of increasing complexity.

  6. A transport model for prediction of wildfire behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linn, R.R.

    1997-07-01

    Wildfires are a threat to human life and property, yet they are an unavoidable part of nature. In the past people have tried to predict wildfire behavior through the use of point functional models but have been unsuccessful at adequately predicting the gross behavior of the broad spectrum of fires that occur in nature. The majority of previous models do not have self-determining propagation rates. The author uses a transport approach to represent this complicated problem and produce a model that utilizes a self-determining propagation rate. The transport approach allows one to represent a large number of environments including transition regions such as those with nonhomogeneous vegetation and terrain. Some of the most difficult features to treat are the imperfectly known boundary conditions and the fine scale structure that is unresolvable, such as the specific location of the fuel or the precise incoming winds. The author accounts for the microscopic details of a fire with macroscopic resolution by dividing quantities into mean and fluctuating parts similar to what is done in traditional turbulence modelling. The author develops a complicated model that includes the transport of multiple gas species, such as oxygen and volatile hydrocarbons, and tracks the depletion of various fuels and other stationary solids and liquids. From this model the author also forms a simplified local burning model with which he performs a number of simulations for the purpose of demonstrating the properties of a self-determining transport-based wildfire model.

  7. Genetics of traffic assignment models for strategic transport planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bliemer, M.C.J.; Raadsen, M.P.H.; Brederode, L.J.N.; Bell, M.G.H.; Wismans, Luc Johannes Josephus; Smith, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a review and classification of traffic assignment models for strategic transport planning purposes by using concepts analogous to genetics in biology. Traffic assignment models share the same theoretical framework (DNA), but differ in capability (genes). We argue that all traffic

  8. Modelling of transport phenomena and defects in crystal growth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A brief review of single crystal growth techniques and the associated problems is presented. Emphasis is placed on models for various transport and defect phenomena involoved in the growth process with the ultimate aim of integrating them into a comprehensive numerical model. The sources of dislocation nucleation in ...

  9. Sediment Transport Model for a Surface Irrigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damodhara R. Mailapalli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling irrigation-induced soil erosion is one of the important issues of irrigation management and surface water impairment. Irrigation models are useful in managing the irrigation and the associated ill effects on agricultural environment. In this paper, a physically based surface irrigation model was developed to predict sediment transport in irrigated furrows by integrating an irrigation hydraulic model with a quasi-steady state sediment transport model to predict sediment load in furrow irrigation. The irrigation hydraulic model simulates flow in a furrow irrigation system using the analytically solved zero-inertial overland flow equations and 1D-Green-Ampt, 2D-Fok, and Kostiakov-Lewis infiltration equations. Performance of the sediment transport model was evaluated for bare and cropped furrow fields. The results indicated that the sediment transport model can predict the initial sediment rate adequately, but the simulated sediment rate was less accurate for the later part of the irrigation event. Sensitivity analysis of the parameters of the sediment module showed that the soil erodibility coefficient was the most influential parameter for determining sediment load in furrow irrigation. The developed modeling tool can be used as a water management tool for mitigating sediment loss from the surface irrigated fields.

  10. Spatial Economics Model Predicting Transport Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Bo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available It is extremely important to predict the logistics requirements in a scientific and rational way. However, in recent years, the improvement effect on the prediction method is not very significant and the traditional statistical prediction method has the defects of low precision and poor interpretation of the prediction model, which cannot only guarantee the generalization ability of the prediction model theoretically, but also cannot explain the models effectively. Therefore, in combination with the theories of the spatial economics, industrial economics, and neo-classical economics, taking city of Zhuanghe as the research object, the study identifies the leading industry that can produce a large number of cargoes, and further predicts the static logistics generation of the Zhuanghe and hinterlands. By integrating various factors that can affect the regional logistics requirements, this study established a logistics requirements potential model from the aspect of spatial economic principles, and expanded the way of logistics requirements prediction from the single statistical principles to an new area of special and regional economics.

  11. Modelling radon transport in Dutch dwellings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen MPM; Vries L de; Phaff JC; Graaf ER van der; Blaauboer RO; Stoop P; Lembrechts J; TNO-Bouw; KVI; LSO

    1998-01-01

    Radon concentrations and external exposure by nuclides of the U-238 decay chain were quantified for a typical Dutch townhouse using a series of interconnected computer models. The effect is studied of changes in parameter values which have simulated changes in building practices over the past

  12. Contaminant transport modeling studies of Russian sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu

    1993-01-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) established mechanisms that promoted cooperation between U.S. and Russian scientists in scientific research as well as environmental technology transfer. Using Russian experience and U.S technology, LBL developed approaches for field investigations, site evaluation, waste disposal, and remediation at Russian contaminated sites. LBL assessed a comprehensive database as well as an actual, large-scale contaminated site to evaluate existing knowledge of and test mathematical models used for the assessment of U.S. contaminated sites

  13. Assessment of parametric uncertainty for groundwater reactive transport modeling,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoqing; Ye, Ming; Curtis, Gary P.; Miller, Geoffery L.; Meyer, Philip D.; Kohler, Matthias; Yabusaki, Steve; Wu, Jichun

    2014-01-01

    The validity of using Gaussian assumptions for model residuals in uncertainty quantification of a groundwater reactive transport model was evaluated in this study. Least squares regression methods explicitly assume Gaussian residuals, and the assumption leads to Gaussian likelihood functions, model parameters, and model predictions. While the Bayesian methods do not explicitly require the Gaussian assumption, Gaussian residuals are widely used. This paper shows that the residuals of the reactive transport model are non-Gaussian, heteroscedastic, and correlated in time; characterizing them requires using a generalized likelihood function such as the formal generalized likelihood function developed by Schoups and Vrugt (2010). For the surface complexation model considered in this study for simulating uranium reactive transport in groundwater, parametric uncertainty is quantified using the least squares regression methods and Bayesian methods with both Gaussian and formal generalized likelihood functions. While the least squares methods and Bayesian methods with Gaussian likelihood function produce similar Gaussian parameter distributions, the parameter distributions of Bayesian uncertainty quantification using the formal generalized likelihood function are non-Gaussian. In addition, predictive performance of formal generalized likelihood function is superior to that of least squares regression and Bayesian methods with Gaussian likelihood function. The Bayesian uncertainty quantification is conducted using the differential evolution adaptive metropolis (DREAM(zs)) algorithm; as a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, it is a robust tool for quantifying uncertainty in groundwater reactive transport models. For the surface complexation model, the regression-based local sensitivity analysis and Morris- and DREAM(ZS)-based global sensitivity analysis yield almost identical ranking of parameter importance. The uncertainty analysis may help select appropriate likelihood

  14. Modeling tracer transport in randomly heterogeneous porous media by nonlocal moment equations: Anomalous transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Casique, E.; Lezama-Campos, J. L.; Guadagnini, A.; Neuman, S. P.

    2013-05-01

    Modeling tracer transport in geologic porous media suffers from the corrupt characterization of the spatial distribution of hydrogeologic properties of the system and the incomplete knowledge of processes governing transport at multiple scales. Representations of transport dynamics based on a Fickian model of the kind considered in the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fail to capture (a) the temporal variation associated with the rate of spreading of a tracer, and (b) the distribution of early and late arrival times which are often observed in field and/or laboratory scenarios and are considered as the signature of anomalous transport. Elsewhere we have presented exact stochastic moment equations to model tracer transport in randomly heterogeneous aquifers. We have also developed a closure scheme which enables one to provide numerical solutions of such moment equations at different orders of approximations. The resulting (ensemble) average and variance of concentration fields were found to display a good agreement against Monte Carlo - based simulation results for mildly heterogeneous (or well-conditioned strongly heterogeneous) media. Here we explore the ability of the moment equations approach to describe the distribution of early arrival times and late time tailing effects which can be observed in Monte-Carlo based breakthrough curves (BTCs) of the (ensemble) mean concentration. We show that BTCs of mean resident concentration calculated at a fixed space location through higher-order approximations of moment equations display long tailing features of the kind which is typically associated with anomalous transport behavior and are not represented by an ADE model with constant dispersive parameter, such as the zero-order approximation.

  15. Computer-Supported Modelling of Multi modal Transportation Networks Rationalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratko Zelenika

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with issues of shaping and functioning ofcomputer programs in the modelling and solving of multimoda Itransportation network problems. A methodology of an integrateduse of a programming language for mathematical modellingis defined, as well as spreadsheets for the solving of complexmultimodal transportation network problems. The papercontains a comparison of the partial and integral methods ofsolving multimodal transportation networks. The basic hypothesisset forth in this paper is that the integral method results inbetter multimodal transportation network rationalization effects,whereas a multimodal transportation network modelbased on the integral method, once built, can be used as the basisfor all kinds of transportation problems within multimodaltransport. As opposed to linear transport problems, multimodaltransport network can assume very complex shapes. This papercontains a comparison of the partial and integral approach totransp01tation network solving. In the partial approach, astraightforward model of a transp01tation network, which canbe solved through the use of the Solver computer tool within theExcel spreadsheet inteiface, is quite sufficient. In the solving ofa multimodal transportation problem through the integralmethod, it is necessmy to apply sophisticated mathematicalmodelling programming languages which supp01t the use ofcomplex matrix functions and the processing of a vast amountof variables and limitations. The LINGO programming languageis more abstract than the Excel spreadsheet, and it requiresa certain programming knowledge. The definition andpresentation of a problem logic within Excel, in a manner whichis acceptable to computer software, is an ideal basis for modellingin the LINGO programming language, as well as a fasterand more effective implementation of the mathematical model.This paper provides proof for the fact that it is more rational tosolve the problem of multimodal transportation networks by

  16. Combining Inverse and Transport Modeling to Estimate Bacterial Loading and Transport in a Tidal Embayment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mac Sisson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Poquoson River is a tidal coastal embayment located along the Western Shore of the Chesapeake Bay about 4 km south of the York River mouth in the City of Poquoson and in York County, Virginia. Its drainage area has diversified land uses, including high densities of residence, agricultural, salt marsh land uses, as well as a National Wildlife Refuge. This embayment experiences elevated bacterial concentration due to excess bacterial inputs from storm water runoff, nonpoint sources, and wash off from marshes due to tide and wind-induced set-up and set-down. Bacteria can also grow in the marsh and small tributaries. It is difficult to use a traditional watershed model to simulate bacterial loading, especially in this low-lying marsh area with abundant wildlife, while runoff is not solely driven by precipitation. An inverse approach is introduced to estimate loading from unknown sources based on observations in the embayment. The estimated loadings were combined with loadings estimated from different sources (human, wildlife, agriculture, pets, etc. and input to the watershed model. The watershed model simulated long-term flow and bacterial loading and discharged to a three-dimensional transport model driven by tide, wind, and freshwater discharge. The transport model efficiently simulates the transport and fate of the bacterial concentration in the embayment and is capable of determining the loading reduction needed to improve the water quality condition of the embayment. Combining inverse, watershed, and transport models is a sound approach for simulating bacterial transport correctly in the coastal embayment with complex unknown bacterial sources, which are not solely driven by precipitation.

  17. Model development for transport studies in negative shear modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spang, M.C.; Casper, T.B.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1997-05-01

    This study develops a simple transport model which can be used predictively for tokamak negative central shear (NCS) modes, with the assistance of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s core plasma simulation code, CORSICA. The results show that the the Rebut-Lallia-Watkins Critical Electron Temperature Gradient Model, coupled with an NCS transport model and TRANSP data, renders a reasonably close match to experimental temperature profiles. Additionally, this research offers the first benchmark calculation indicating that the CORSICA code itself, when given transport coefficients from the analysis of experimental data, replicates the experimental profiles, indicating that both TRANSP and CORSICA together are consistent in their analysis of the plasma evolution. This means CORSICA is working properly and has no known major internal flaws. 14 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Model development for transport studies in negative shear modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spang, M.C.; Casper, T.B.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1997-05-01

    This study develops a simple transport model which can be used predictively for tokamak negative central shear (NCS) modes, with the assistance of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's core plasma simulation code, CORSICA. The results show that the the Rebut-Lallia-Watkins Critical Electron Temperature Gradient Model, coupled with an NCS transport model and TRANSP data, renders a reasonably close match to experimental temperature profiles. Additionally, this research offers the first benchmark calculation indicating that the CORSICA code itself, when given transport coefficients from the analysis of experimental data, replicates the experimental profiles, indicating that both TRANSP and CORSICA together are consistent in their analysis of the plasma evolution. This means CORSICA is working properly and has no known major internal flaws. 14 refs., 12 figs

  19. Modeling transport and deposition of the Mekong River sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zuo; He, Ruoying; Liu, J. Paul; Warner, John C.

    2012-01-01

    A Coupled Wave–Ocean–SedimentTransport Model was used to hindcast coastal circulation and fine sedimenttransport on the Mekong shelf in southeastern Asian in 2005. Comparisons with limited observations showed that the model simulation captured the regional patterns and temporal variability of surface wave, sea level, and suspended sediment concentration reasonably well. Significant seasonality in sedimenttransport was revealed. In summer, a large amount of fluvial sediments was delivered and deposited near the MekongRiver mouth. In the following winter, strong ocean mixing, and coastal current lead to resuspension and southwestward dispersal of a small fraction of previously deposited sediments. Model sensitivity experiments (with reduced physics) were performed to investigate the impact of tides, waves, and remotely forced ambient currents on the transport and dispersal of the fluvial sediment. Strong wave mixing and downwelling-favorable coastal current associated with the more energetic northeast monsoon in the winter season are the main factors controlling the southwestward along-shelf transport.

  20. GIS-Based Analytical Tools for Transport Planning: Spatial Regression Models for Transportation Demand Forecast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Becker Lopes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of spatial issues in transport planning, the main objective of this study was to analyze the results obtained from different approaches of spatial regression models. In the case of spatial autocorrelation, spatial dependence patterns should be incorporated in the models, since that dependence may affect the predictive power of these models. The results obtained with the spatial regression models were also compared with the results of a multiple linear regression model that is typically used in trips generation estimations. The findings support the hypothesis that the inclusion of spatial effects in regression models is important, since the best results were obtained with alternative models (spatial regression models or the ones with spatial variables included. This was observed in a case study carried out in the city of Porto Alegre, in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, in the stages of specification and calibration of the models, with two distinct datasets.

  1. Physics models in the toroidal transport code PROCTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, H.C.

    1990-08-01

    The physics models that are contained in the toroidal transport code PROCTR are described in detail. Time- and space-dependent models are included for the plasma hydrogenic-ion, helium, and impurity densities, the electron and ion temperatures, the toroidal rotation velocity, and the toroidal current profile. Time- and depth-dependent models for the trapped and mobile hydrogenic particle concentrations in the wall and a time-dependent point model for the number of particles in the limiter are also included. Time-dependent models for neutral particle transport, neutral beam deposition and thermalization, fusion heating, impurity radiation, pellet injection, and the radial electric potential are included and recalculated periodically as the time-dependent models evolve. The plasma solution is obtained either in simple flux coordinates, where the radial shift of each elliptical, toroidal flux surface is included to maintain an approximate pressure equilibrium, or in general three-dimensional torsatron coordinates represented by series of helical harmonics. The detailed coupling of the plasma, scrape-off layer, limiter, and wall models through the neutral transport model makes PROCTR especially suited for modeling of recycling and particle control in toroidal plasmas. The model may also be used in a steady-state profile analysis mode for studying energy and particle balances starting with measured plasma profiles.

  2. Multiscale modeling for fluid transport in nanosystems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jonathan W.; Jones, Reese E.; Mandadapu, Kranthi Kiran; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.

    2013-09-01

    Atomistic-scale behavior drives performance in many micro- and nano-fluidic systems, such as mircrofludic mixers and electrical energy storage devices. Bringing this information into the traditionally continuum models used for engineering analysis has proved challenging. This work describes one such approach to address this issue by developing atomistic-to-continuum multi scale and multi physics methods to enable molecular dynamics (MD) representations of atoms to incorporated into continuum simulations. Coupling is achieved by imposing constraints based on fluxes of conserved quantities between the two regions described by one of these models. The impact of electric fields and surface charges are also critical, hence, methodologies to extend finite-element (FE) MD electric field solvers have been derived to account for these effects. Finally, the continuum description can have inconsistencies with the coarse-grained MD dynamics, so FE equations based on MD statistics were derived to facilitate the multi scale coupling. Examples are shown relevant to nanofluidic systems, such as pore flow, Couette flow, and electric double layer.

  3. A self-organized criticality model for plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreras, B.A.; Newman, D.; Lynch, V.E.

    1996-01-01

    Many models of natural phenomena manifest the basic hypothesis of self-organized criticality (SOC). The SOC concept brings together the self-similarity on space and time scales that is common to many of these phenomena. The application of the SOC modelling concept to the plasma dynamics near marginal stability opens new possibilities of understanding issues such as Bohm scaling, profile consistency, broad band fluctuation spectra with universal characteristics and fast time scales. A model realization of self-organized criticality for plasma transport in a magnetic confinement device is presented. The model is based on subcritical resistive pressure-gradient-driven turbulence. Three-dimensional nonlinear calculations based on this model show the existence of transport under subcritical conditions. This model that includes fluctuation dynamics leads to results very similar to the running sandpile paradigm

  4. The Global Modeling Initiative Assessment Model: Model Description, Integration and Testing of the Transport Shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotman, D.A.; Tannahill, J.R.; Kinnison, D.E.; Connell, P.S.; Bergmann, D.; Proctor, D.; Rodriquez, J.M.; Lin, S.J.; Rood, R.B.; Prather, M.J.; Rasch, P.J.; Considine, D.B.; Ramaroson, R.; Kawa, S.R.

    2000-04-25

    We describe the three dimensional global stratospheric chemistry model developed under the NASA Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) to assess the possible environmental consequences from the emissions of a fleet of proposed high speed civil transport aircraft. This model was developed through a unique collaboration of the members of the GMI team. Team members provided computational modules representing various physical and chemical processes, and analysis of simulation results through extensive comparison to observation. The team members' modules were integrated within a computational framework that allowed transportability and simulations on massively parallel computers. A unique aspect of this model framework is the ability to interchange and intercompare different submodules to assess the sensitivity of numerical algorithms and model assumptions to simulation results. In this paper, we discuss the important attributes of the GMI effort, describe the GMI model computational framework and the numerical modules representing physical and chemical processes. As an application of the concept, we illustrate an analysis of the impact of advection algorithms on the dispersion of a NO{sub y}-like source in the stratosphere which mimics that of a fleet of commercial supersonic transports (High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT)) flying between 17 and 20 kilometers.

  5. Modelling of JET hybrid scenarios with GLF23 transport model: E × B shear stabilization of anomalous transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voitsekhovitch, I.; Belo, da Silva Ares; Citrin, J.; Fable, E.; Ferreira, J.; Garcia, J.; Garzotti, L.; Hobirk, J.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Joffrin, E.; Kochl, F.; Litaudon, X.; Moradi, S.; Nabais, F.; JET-EFDA Contributors,; EU-ITM ITER Scenario Modelling group,

    2014-01-01

    The E × B shear stabilization of anomalous transport in JET hybrid discharges is studied via self-consistent predictive modelling of electron and ion temperature, ion density and toroidal rotation velocity performed with the GLF23 model. The E × B shear

  6. The Extended Generalized Cost Concept and its Application in Freight Transport and General Equilibrium Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavasszy, L.; Davydenko, I.; Ruijgrok, K.

    2009-01-01

    The integration of Spatial Equilibrium models and Freight transport network models is important to produce consistent scenarios for future freight transport demand. At various spatial scales, we see the changes in production, trade, logistics networking and transportation, being driven by

  7. Flavonoid metabolites transport across a human BBB model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Ana; Meireles, Manuela; Fernandes, Iva; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Gonzalez-Manzano, Susana; Dueñas, Montserrat; de Freitas, Victor; Mateus, Nuno; Calhau, Conceição

    2014-04-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the transmembrane transport of different flavonoids (flavan-3-ols, anthocyanins and flavonols) and some of their metabolites (methylated and conjugated with glucuronic acid) across hCMEC/D3 cells (a blood-brain barrier (BBB) model). Further metabolism of the tested compounds was assayed and their transport modulated in an attempt to elucidate the mechanisms behind this process. The transport across hCMEC/D3 cells was monitored in basolateral media at 1, 3 and 18 h by HPLC-DAD/MS. All the flavonoids and their metabolites were transported across hCMEC/D3 cells in a time-dependent manner. In general, the metabolites showed higher transport efficiency than the native flavonoid. No further biotransformation of the metabolites was found as consequence of cellular metabolism. Anthocyanins and their metabolites crossed this BBB cell model in a lipophilicity-dependent way. Quercetin transport was influenced by phosphatase modulators, suggesting a phosphorylation/dephosphorylation regulation mechanism. Overall, this work suggests that flavonoids are capable of crossing the BBB and reaching the central nervous system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Radon transport in fractured soil. Laboratory experiments and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, A.

    1997-10-01

    Radon (Rn-222) transport in fractured soil has been investigated by laboratory experiments and by modelling. Radon transport experiments have been performed with two sand columns (homogeneous and inhomogeneous) and one undisturbed clayey till column containing a net of preferential flow paths (root holes). A numerical model (the finite-element model FRACTRAN) and an analytic model (a pinhole model) have been applied in simulations if soil gas and radon transport in fractured soil. Experiments and model calculations are included in a discussion of radon entry rates into houses placed on fractured soil. The main conclusion is, that fractures does not in general alter transport of internally generated radon out of soil, when the pressure and flow conditions in the soil is comparable to the conditions prevailing under a house. This indicates the important result, that fractures in soil have no impact on radon entry into a house beyond that of an increased gas permeability, but a more thorough investigation of this subject is needed. Only in the case where the soil is exposed to large pressure gradients, relative to gradients induced by a house, may it be possible to observe effects of radon exchange between fractures and matrix. (au) 52 tabs., 60 ill., 5 refs

  9. Coupled models in porous media: reactive transport and fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amir, L.

    2008-12-01

    This thesis deals with numerical simulation of coupled models for flow and transport in porous media. We present a new method for coupling chemical reactions and transport by using a Newton-Krylov method, and we also present a model of flow in fractured media, based on a domain decomposition method that takes into account the case of intersecting fractures. This study is composed of three parts: the first part contains an analysis, and implementation, of various numerical methods for discretizing advection-diffusion problems, in particular by using operator splitting methods. The second part is concerned with a fully coupled method for modeling transport and chemistry problems. The coupled transport-chemistry model is described, after discretization in time, by a system of nonlinear equations. The size of the system, namely the number of grid points times the number a chemical species, precludes a direct solution of the linear system. To alleviate this difficulty, we solve the system by a Newton-Krylov method, so as to avoid forming and factoring the Jacobian matrix. In the last part, we present a model of flow in 3D for intersecting fractures, by using a domain decomposition method. The fractures are treated as interfaces between sub-domains. We show existence and uniqueness of the solution, and we validate the model by numerical tests. (author)

  10. Consistency between 2D-3D Sediment Transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaret, Catherine; Jodeau, Magali

    2017-04-01

    Sediment transport models have been developed and applied by the engineering community to estimate transport rates and morphodynamic bed evolutions in river flows, coastal and estuarine conditions. Environmental modelling systems like the open-source Telemac modelling system include a hierarchy of models from 1D (Mascaret), 2D (Telemac-2D/Sisyphe) and 3D (Telemac-3D/Sedi-3D) and include a wide range of processes to represent sediment flow interactions under more and more complex situations (cohesive, non-cohesive and mixed sediment). Despite some tremendous progresses in the numerical techniques and computing resources, the quality/accuracy of model results mainly depend on the numerous choices and skills of the modeler. In complex situations involving stratification effects, complex geometry, recirculating flows… 2D model assumptions are no longer valid. A full 3D turbulent flow model is then required in order to capture the vertical mixing processes and to represent accurately the coupled flow/sediment distribution. However a number of theoretical and numerical difficulties arise when dealing with sediment transport modelling in 3D which will be high-lighted : (1) Dependency of model results to the vertical grid refinement and choice of boundary conditions and numerical scheme (2) The choice of turbulence model determines also the sediment vertical distribution which is governed by a balance between the downward settling term and upward turbulent diffusion. (3) The use of different numerical schemes for both hydrodynamics (mean and turbulent flow) and sediment transport modelling can lead to some inconsistency including a mismatch in the definition of numerical cells and definition of boundary conditions. We discuss here those present issues and present some detailed comparison between 2D and 3D simulations on a set of validation test cases which are available in the Telemac 7.2 release using both cohesive and non-cohesive sediments.

  11. Modelling and simulation of soot generation and transport

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xiaoqin

    2016-01-01

    Soot released from fires not only causes danger to lives and property damage, but also effects fire spread by altering the radiation characteristics of fire effluents. In many situations, it is the soot concentration that controls the fire development. Therefore, soot modelling is of great importance in fire safety science. This necessitates the development of a global and general soot model within fire field models that can simulate the amount of soot generated and transported in large-scale...

  12. Computer-based modelling and optimization in transportation

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    This volume brings together works resulting from research carried out by members of the EURO Working Group on Transportation (EWGT) and presented during meetings and workshops organized by the Group under the patronage of the Association of European Operational Research Societies in 2012 and 2013. The main targets of the EWGT include providing a forum to share research information and experience, encouraging joint research and the development of both theoretical methods and applications, and promoting cooperation among the many institutions and organizations which are leaders at national level in the field of transportation and logistics. The primary fields of interest concern operational research methods, mathematical models and computation algorithms, to solve and sustain solutions to problems mainly faced by public administrations, city authorities, public transport companies, service providers and logistic operators. Related areas of interest are: land use and transportation planning, traffic control and ...

  13. Continuous Modeling of Calcium Transport Through Biological Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasielec, J. J.; Filipek, R.; Szyszkiewicz, K.; Sokalski, T.; Lewenstam, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work an approach to the modeling of the biological membranes where a membrane is treated as a continuous medium is presented. The Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including Poisson equation for electric potential is used to describe transport of ions in the mitochondrial membrane—the interface which joins mitochondrial matrix with cellular cytosis. The transport of calcium ions is considered. Concentration of calcium inside the mitochondrion is not known accurately because different analytical methods give dramatically different results. We explain mathematically these differences assuming the complexing reaction inside mitochondrion and the existence of the calcium set-point (concentration of calcium in cytosis below which calcium stops entering the mitochondrion).

  14. Cuttings Transport Models and Experimental Visualization of Underbalanced Horizontal Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerated underbalanced horizontal drilling technology has become the focus of the drilling industry at home and abroad, and one of the engineering core issues is the horizontal borehole cleaning. Therefore, calculating the minimum injection volume of gas and liquid accurately is essential for the construction in aerated underbalanced horizontal drilling. This paper establishes a physical model of carrying cuttings and borehole cleaning in wellbore of horizontal well and a critical transport mathematical model according to gas-liquid-solid flow mechanism and large plane dunes particle transport theory.

  15. Visualization and Modeling of Nanoparticle Transport in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, B.; Naftaly, A.; Dror, I.

    2015-12-01

    We examine transport of nanoparticles (NPs) in a refraction index-matched, three-dimensional, water-saturated porous medium, consisting of polyacrylamide beads which carry a negative surface charge. Flow cell experiments involved use of synthesized, negatively-charged gold and silver nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs) and positively-charged AgNPs, to determine the effect of surface charge on NP transport behavior. From sequential imaging of the flow cell and detailed image analysis, we obtained measurements of the temporally evolving spatial NP concentration distribution. The current experiments focused on point source, pulse injection of AuNPs and AgNPs into a uniform flow field. Parallel experiments employing a conservative (Congo red) tracer demonstrated the transport to be mildly non-Fickian. A continuous time random walk (CTRW) particle tracking (PT) model was then used to quantify the spatial and temporal migration of both the conservative and reactive tracer plumes; model parameters related to the non-Fickian transport were determined from conservative (column and flow cell) tracer experiments. The results show that the negatively-charged NPs behaved similarly to the conservative tracer. These results are in accord with previous measurements of transport of negatively-charged AgNPs in sand columns. The positively-charged AgNPs, in contrast, displayed a decreasing tendency over distance to attach to the negatively-charged porous medium. Further analysis showed that the decreasing tendency of these NPs to attach to the porous medium may be correlated to the particle residence time. This transport behavior is understood by DLS and ζ potential measurements, which showed that aggregation processes and inversion in particle surface charge occurred during the transport of the positively-charged NPs. Modeling results indicated the transport to be more non-Fickian for the positively-charged AgNPs, highlighting a coupling between attachment and transport processes. We

  16. Modelling radon transport in Dutch dwellings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, M.P.M.; De Vries, L.; Phaff, J.C.; Van der Graaf, E.R.; Blaauboer, R.O.; Stoop, P.; Lembrechts, J

    1998-07-01

    Radon concentrations and external exposure by nuclides of the U-238 decay chain were quantified for a typical Dutch townhouse using a series of interconnected computer models. The effect is studied of changes in parameter values which have simulated changes in building practices over the past decades. Three groups of parameters were distinguished: (1) the air-tightness of the building shell and the distribution of leaks over outer walls and ground floor, (2) the radon-relevant characteristics of the building materials, and 3) those characterising 'habits of the occupant', such as changing mechanical ventilation rate and opening of air inlets or doors. The relative importance of increased air-tightness and of substitution of concrete by other building materials in new dwellings is illustrated. On average changes in building practices clearly enhanced the radon concentration in the living room without affecting external exposure. In new, airtight dwellings the relative effect of occupant behaviour is demonstrated as considerably larger than in old ones.

  17. Green Transport Balanced Scorecard Model with Analytic Network Process Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Staš

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, the performance of economic and non-economic activities has required them to be friendly with the environment. Transport is one of the areas having considerable potential within the scope. The main assumption to achieve ambitious green goals is an effective green transport evaluation system. However, these systems are researched from the industrial company and supply chain perspective only sporadically. The aim of the paper is to design a conceptual framework for creating the Green Transport (GT Balanced Scorecard (BSC models from the viewpoint of industrial companies and supply chains using an appropriate multi-criteria decision making method. The models should allow green transport performance evaluation and support of an effective implementation of green transport strategies. Since performance measures used in Balanced Scorecard models are interdependent, the Analytic Network Process (ANP was used as the appropriate multi-criteria decision making method. The verification of the designed conceptual framework was performed on a real supply chain of the European automotive industry.

  18. A ballistic transport model for electronic excitation following particle impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, S.; Heuser, C.; Weidtmann, B.; Wucher, A.

    2018-01-01

    We present a ballistic model for the transport of electronic excitation energy induced by keV particle bombardment onto a solid surface. Starting from a free electron gas model, the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) is employed to follow the evolution of the temporal and spatial distribution function f (r → , k → , t) describing the occupation probability of an electronic state k → at position r → and time t. Three different initializations of the distribution function are considered: i) a thermal distribution function with a locally and temporally elevated electron temperature, ii) a peak excitation at a specific energy above the Fermi level with a quasi-isotropic distribution in k-space and iii) an anisotropic peak excitation with k-vectors oriented in a specific transport direction. While the first initialization resembles a distribution function which may, for instance, result from electronic friction of moving atoms within an ion induced collision cascade, the peak excitation can in principle result from an autoionization process after excitation in close binary collisions. By numerically solving the BTE, we study the electronic energy exchange along a one dimensional transport direction to obtain a time and space resolved excitation energy distribution function, which is then analyzed in view of general transport characteristics of the chosen model system.

  19. Ground-water transport model selection and evaluation guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, C.S.; Cole, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    Guidelines are being developed to assist potential users with selecting appropriate computer codes for ground-water contaminant transport modeling. The guidelines are meant to assist managers with selecting appropriate predictive models for evaluating either arid or humid low-level radioactive waste burial sites. Evaluation test cases in the form of analytical solutions to fundamental equations and experimental data sets have been identified and recommended to ensure adequate code selection, based on accurate simulation of relevant physical processes. The recommended evaluation procedures will consider certain technical issues related to the present limitations in transport modeling capabilities. A code-selection plan will depend on identifying problem objectives, determining the extent of collectible site-specific data, and developing a site-specific conceptual model for the involved hydrology. Code selection will be predicated on steps for developing an appropriate systems model. This paper will review the progress in developing those guidelines. 12 references

  20. Analysing Models as a Knowledge Technology in Transport Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsson, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    critical analytic literature on knowledge utilization and policy influence. A simple scheme based in this literature is drawn up to provide a framework for discussing the interface between urban transport planning and model use. A successful example of model use in Stockholm, Sweden is used as a heuristic......Models belong to a wider family of knowledge technologies, applied in the transport area. Models sometimes share with other such technologies the fate of not being used as intended, or not at all. The result may be ill-conceived plans as well as wasted resources. Frequently, the blame...... device to illuminate how such an analytic scheme may allow patterns of insight about the use, influence and role of models in planning to emerge. The main contribution of the paper is to demonstrate that concepts and terminologies from knowledge use literature can provide interpretations of significance...

  1. System convergence in transport models: algorithms efficiency and output uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Jeppe; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2015-01-01

    of this paper is to analyse convergence performance for the external loop and to illustrate how an improper linkage between the converging parts can lead to substantial uncertainty in the final output. Although this loop is crucial for the performance of large-scale transport models it has not been analysed......-scale in the Danish National Transport Model (DNTM). It is revealed that system convergence requires that either demand or supply is without random noise but not both. In that case, if MSA is applied to the model output with random noise, it will converge effectively as the random effects are gradually dampened...... in the MSA process. In connection to DNTM it is shown that MSA works well when applied to travel-time averaging, whereas trip averaging is generally infected by random noise resulting from the assignment model. The latter implies that the minimum uncertainty in the final model output is dictated...

  2. Intelligent Transportation and Evacuation Planning A Modeling-Based Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Naser, Arab

    2012-01-01

    Intelligent Transportation and Evacuation Planning: A Modeling-Based Approach provides a new paradigm for evacuation planning strategies and techniques. Recently, evacuation planning and modeling have increasingly attracted interest among researchers as well as government officials. This interest stems from the recent catastrophic hurricanes and weather-related events that occurred in the southeastern United States (Hurricane Katrina and Rita). The evacuation methods that were in place before and during the hurricanes did not work well and resulted in thousands of deaths. This book offers insights into the methods and techniques that allow for implementing mathematical-based, simulation-based, and integrated optimization and simulation-based engineering approaches for evacuation planning. This book also: Comprehensively discusses the application of mathematical models for evacuation and intelligent transportation modeling Covers advanced methodologies in evacuation modeling and planning Discusses principles a...

  3. Model for cadmium transport and distribution in CHO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, T.L.; Turner, J.E.; Williams, M.W.; Cook, J.S.; Hsie, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    A compartmental model is developed to study the transport and distribution of cadmium in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Of central importance to the model is the role played by sequestering components which bind free Cd/sup 2 +/ ions. The most important of these is a low-molecular-weight protein, metallothionein, which is produced by the cells in response to an increase in the cellular concentration of Cd/sup 2 +/. Monte Carlo techniques are used to generate a stochastic model based on existing experimental data describing the intracellular transport of cadmium between different compartments. This approach provides an alternative to the usual numerical solution of differential-delay equations that arise in deterministic models. Our model suggests subcellular structures which may be responsible for the accumulation of cadmium and, hence, could account for cadmium detoxification. 4 figures, 1 table.

  4. Analytical modelling of hydrogen transport in reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manno, V.P.

    1983-09-01

    A versatile computational model of hydrogen transport in nuclear plant containment buildings is developed. The background and significance of hydrogen-related nuclear safety issues are discussed. A computer program is constructed that embodies the analytical models. The thermofluid dynamic formulation spans a wide applicability range from rapid two-phase blowdown transients to slow incompressible hydrogen injection. Detailed ancillary models of molecular and turbulent diffusion, mixture transport properties, multi-phase multicomponent thermodynamics and heat sink modelling are addressed. The numerical solution of the continuum equations emphasizes both accuracy and efficiency in the employment of relatively coarse discretization and long time steps. Reducing undesirable numerical diffusion is addressed. Problem geometry options include lumped parameter zones, one dimensional meshs, two dimensional Cartesian or axisymmetric coordinate systems and three dimensional Cartesian or cylindrical regions. An efficient lumped nodal model is included for simulation of events in which spatial resolution is not significant. Several validation calculations are reported

  5. Analytical model of reactive transport processes with spatially variable coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Matthew J; Morrow, Liam C

    2015-05-01

    Analytical solutions of partial differential equation (PDE) models describing reactive transport phenomena in saturated porous media are often used as screening tools to provide insight into contaminant fate and transport processes. While many practical modelling scenarios involve spatially variable coefficients, such as spatially variable flow velocity, v(x), or spatially variable decay rate, k(x), most analytical models deal with constant coefficients. Here we present a framework for constructing exact solutions of PDE models of reactive transport. Our approach is relevant for advection-dominant problems, and is based on a regular perturbation technique. We present a description of the solution technique for a range of one-dimensional scenarios involving constant and variable coefficients, and we show that the solutions compare well with numerical approximations. Our general approach applies to a range of initial conditions and various forms of v(x) and k(x). Instead of simply documenting specific solutions for particular cases, we present a symbolic worksheet, as supplementary material, which enables the solution to be evaluated for different choices of the initial condition, v(x) and k(x). We also discuss how the technique generalizes to apply to models of coupled multispecies reactive transport as well as higher dimensional problems.

  6. A deterministic model of electron transport for electron probe microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünger, J.; Richter, S.; Torrilhon, M.

    2018-01-01

    Within the last decades significant improvements in the spatial resolution of electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) were obtained by instrumental enhancements. In contrast, the quantification procedures essentially remained unchanged. As the classical procedures assume either homogeneity or a multi-layered structure of the material, they limit the spatial resolution of EPMA. The possibilities of improving the spatial resolution through more sophisticated quantification procedures are therefore almost untouched. We investigate a new analytical model (M 1-model) for the quantification procedure based on fast and accurate modelling of electron-X-ray-matter interactions in complex materials using a deterministic approach to solve the electron transport equations. We outline the derivation of the model from the Boltzmann equation for electron transport using the method of moments with a minimum entropy closure and present first numerical results for three different test cases (homogeneous, thin film and interface). Taking Monte Carlo as a reference, the results for the three test cases show that the M 1-model is able to reproduce the electron dynamics in EPMA applications very well. Compared to classical analytical models like XPP and PAP, the M 1-model is more accurate and far more flexible, which indicates the potential of deterministic models of electron transport to further increase the spatial resolution of EPMA.

  7. Inverse modelling for flow and transport in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giudici, M.

    2004-01-01

    The problem of parameter identification for flow and transport model in porous media is discussed in this communication. First, a general framework for the development and application of environmental models is discussed. Then the forward and inverse problems for discrete models are described in detail, introducing fundamental concepts (uniqueness, identifiability, stability, conditioning). The importance of model scales is reviewed and is shown its link with the stability and conditioning issues. Finally some remarks are given to the use of several independent sets of data in inverse modelling

  8. Modeling of impurity transport in the core plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of computer modeling of impurity transport in the core region of controlled thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The atomic processes of importance in these high temperature plasmas and the numerical formulation of the model are described. Selected modeling examples are then used to highlight some features of the physics of impurity behavior in large tokamak fusion devices, with an emphasis on demonstrating the sensitivity of such modeling to uncertainties in the rate coefficients used for the atomic processes. This leads to a discussion of current requirements and opportunities for generating the improved sets of comprehensive atomic data needed to support present and future fusion impurity modeling studies

  9. Modeling biogechemical reactive transport in a fracture zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinero, Jorge; Samper, Javier; Yang, Chan Bing, and Zhang, Guoxiang; Guoxiang, Zhang

    2005-01-14

    A coupled model of groundwater flow, reactive solute transport and microbial processes for a fracture zone of the Aspo site at Sweden is presented. This is the model of the so-called Redox Zone Experiment aimed at evaluating the effects of tunnel construction on the geochemical conditions prevailing in a fracture granite. It is found that a model accounting for microbially-mediated geochemical processes is able to reproduce the unexpected measured increasing trends of dissolved sulfate and bicarbonate. The model is also useful for testing hypotheses regarding the role of microbial processes and evaluating the sensitivity of model results to changes in biochemical parameters.

  10. Modeling biogeochemical reactive transport in a fracture zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinero, Jorge; Samper, Javier; Yang, Chan Bing; Zhang, Guoxiang; Guoxiang, Zhang

    2005-01-01

    A coupled model of groundwater flow, reactive solute transport and microbial processes for a fracture zone of the Aspo site at Sweden is presented. This is the model of the so-called Redox Zone Experiment aimed at evaluating the effects of tunnel construction on the geochemical conditions prevailing in a fracture granite. It is found that a model accounting for microbially-mediated geochemical processes is able to reproduce the unexpected measured increasing trends of dissolved sulfate and bicarbonate. The model is also useful for testing hypotheses regarding the role of microbial processes and evaluating the sensitivity of model results to changes in biochemical parameters

  11. Modelling of Human Transplacental Transport as Performed in Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, L.; Morck, T. A.; Zuri, G.

    2014-01-01

    classes of chemicals and nanoparticles for comparisons across chemical structures as well as different test systems. Our test systems are based on human material to bypass the extrapolation from animal data. By combining data from our two test systems, we are able to rank and compare the transport...... the relationships between maternal and foetal exposures to various compounds including pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated flame retardants, nanoparticles as well as recombinant human antibodies. The compounds have been studied in the human placenta perfusion model and to some extent...... in vitro with an established human monolayer trophoblast cell culture model. Results from our studies distinguish placental transport of substances by physicochemical properties, adsorption to placental tissue, binding to transport and receptor proteins and metabolism. We have collected data from different...

  12. Review of modeling and control during transport airdrop process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Xu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the review of modeling and control during the airdrop process of transport aircraft. According to the airdrop height, technology can be classified into high and low altitude airdrop and in this article, the research is reviewed based on the two scenarios. While high altitude airdrop is mainly focusing on the precise landing control of cargo, the low altitude flight airdrop is on the control of transport aircraft dynamics to ensure flight safety. The history of high precision airdrop system is introduced first, and then the modeling and control problem of the ultra low altitude airdrop in transport aircraft is presented. Finally, the potential problems and future direction of low altitude airdrop are discussed.

  13. Cerebrospinal and interstitial fluid transport via the glymphatic pathway modeled by optimal mass transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Vadim; Gao, Yi; Lee, Hedok; Elkin, Rena; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2017-05-15

    The glymphatic pathway is a system which facilitates continuous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange and plays a key role in removing waste products from the rodent brain. Dysfunction of the glymphatic pathway may be implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Intriguingly, the glymphatic system is most active during deep wave sleep general anesthesia. By using paramagnetic tracers administered into CSF of rodents, we previously showed the utility of MRI in characterizing a macroscopic whole brain view of glymphatic transport but we have yet to define and visualize the specific flow patterns. Here we have applied an alternative mathematical analysis approach to a dynamic time series of MRI images acquired every 4min over ∼3h in anesthetized rats, following administration of a small molecular weight paramagnetic tracer into the CSF reservoir of the cisterna magna. We use Optimal Mass Transport (OMT) to model the glymphatic flow vector field, and then analyze the flow to find the network of CSF-ISF flow channels. We use 3D visualization computational tools to visualize the OMT defined network of CSF-ISF flow channels in relation to anatomical and vascular key landmarks from the live rodent brain. The resulting OMT model of the glymphatic transport network agrees largely with the current understanding of the glymphatic transport patterns defined by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI revealing key CSF transport pathways along the ventral surface of the brain with a trajectory towards the pineal gland, cerebellum, hypothalamus and olfactory bulb. In addition, the OMT analysis also revealed some interesting previously unnoticed behaviors regarding CSF transport involving parenchymal streamlines moving from ventral reservoirs towards the surface of the brain, olfactory bulb and large central veins. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. A new turbulence-based model for sand transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayaud, Jerome; Wiggs, Giles; Bailey, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the changing rate of sediment flux in space and time is essential for quantifying surface erosion and deposition in desert landscapes. While many aeolian studies have relied on time-averaged parameters such as wind velocity (U) and wind shear velocity (u*) to determine sediment flux, there is increasing evidence that high-frequency turbulence is an important driving force behind the entrainment and transport of sand. However, turbulence has yet to be incorporated into a functional sand transport model that can be used for predictive purposes. In this study we present a new transport model (the 'turbulence model') that accounts for high-frequency variations in the horizontal (u) and vertical (w) components of wind flow. The turbulence model is fitted to wind velocity and sediment transport data from a field experiment undertaken in Namibia's Skeleton Coast National Park, and its performance at three temporal resolutions (10 Hz, 1 Hz, 1 min) is compared to two existing models that rely on time-averaged wind velocity data (Radok, 1977; Dong et al., 2003). The validity of the three models is analysed under a variety of saltation conditions, using a 2-hour (1 Hz measurement resolution) dataset from the Skeleton Coast and a 5-hour (1 min measurement resolution) dataset from the southwestern Kalahari Desert. The turbulence model is shown to outperform the Radok and Dong models when predicting total saltation count over the three experimental periods. For all temporal resolutions presented in this study (10 Hz-10 min), the turbulence model predicted total saltation count to within at least 0.34%, whereas the Radok and Dong models over- or underestimated total count by up to 5.50% and 20.53% respectively. The strong performance of the turbulence model can be attributed to a lag in mass flux response built into its formulation, which can be adapted depending on the temporal resolution of investigation. This accounts for the inherent lag within the physical

  15. Comparison of mechanistic transport cycle models of ABC exporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szöllősi, Dániel; Rose-Sperling, Dania; Hellmich, Ute A; Stockner, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    ABC (ATP binding cassette) transporters, ubiquitous in all kingdoms of life, carry out essential substrate transport reactions across cell membranes. Their transmembrane domains bind and translocate substrates and are connected to a pair of nucleotide binding domains, which bind and hydrolyze ATP to energize import or export of substrates. Over four decades of investigations into ABC transporters have revealed numerous details from atomic-level structural insights to their functional and physiological roles. Despite all these advances, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanistic principles of ABC transporter function remains elusive. The human multidrug resistance transporter ABCB1, also referred to as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), is one of the most intensively studied ABC exporters. Using ABCB1 as the reference point, we aim to compare the dominating mechanistic models of substrate transport and ATP hydrolysis for ABC exporters and to highlight the experimental and computational evidence in their support. In particular, we point out in silico studies that enhance and complement available biochemical data. "This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Beyond the Structure-Function Horizon of Membrane Proteins edited by Ute Hellmich, Rupak Doshi and Benjamin McIlwain." Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A quasilinear model for solute transport under unsaturated flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houseworth, J.E.; Leem, J.

    2009-01-01

    We developed an analytical solution for solute transport under steady-state, two-dimensional, unsaturated flow and transport conditions for the investigation of high-level radioactive waste disposal. The two-dimensional, unsaturated flow problem is treated using the quasilinear flow method for a system with homogeneous material properties. Dispersion is modeled as isotropic and is proportional to the effective hydraulic conductivity. This leads to a quasilinear form for the transport problem in terms of a scalar potential that is analogous to the Kirchhoff potential for quasilinear flow. The solutions for both flow and transport scalar potentials take the form of Fourier series. The particular solution given here is for two sources of flow, with one source containing a dissolved solute. The solution method may easily be extended, however, for any combination of flow and solute sources under steady-state conditions. The analytical results for multidimensional solute transport problems, which previously could only be solved numerically, also offer an additional way to benchmark numerical solutions. An analytical solution for two-dimensional, steady-state solute transport under unsaturated flow conditions is presented. A specific case with two sources is solved but may be generalized to any combination of sources. The analytical results complement numerical solutions, which were previously required to solve this class of problems.

  17. Solute transport modelling with the variable temporally dependent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pintu Das

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... In this present study, analytical and numerical solutions are obtained for solute transport modelling in homogeneous ..... Clay (0.40). Analytical solution. Numerical solution. Figure 3. Comparison of concentration distribution for sinu- soidal velocity pattern for boundary condition c0. 2 1 ю sec wt р. Ю.

  18. Modelling two-phase transport of 3H/3He

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.; Schaap, J.D.; Leijnse, T.; Broers, H.P.; Bierkens, M.F.P.

    2008-01-01

    Degassing of groundwater by excess denitrification of agricultural pollution complicates the interpretation of 3H/3He data and hinders the estimation of travel times in nitrate pollution studies. In this study we used a two-phase flow and transport model (STOMP) to evaluate the method presented by

  19. Modeling the fate and transport of plastic debris in freshwaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, Merel; Besseling, Ellen; Kroeze, Carolien; Wenzel, van Annemarie P.; Koelmans, Albert A.

    2018-01-01

    Contamination with plastic debris has been recognized as one of today’s major environmental quality problems. Because most of the sources are land based, concerns are increasingly focused on the freshwater and terrestrial environment. Fate and transport models for plastic debris can complement

  20. Development of a transport model for the microbial degradation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A mathematical model for first order reaction rate under isothermal condition was developed for predicting the diffusivity and transport rate of anthracene and pyrene during biodegradation using two microbial strains (corynebacteria spp and pseudomonas putida) in a heterogeneous porous medium. The formulation ...

  1. Transport of Pathogen Surrogates in Soil Treatment Units: Numerical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Morales

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Segmented mesocosms (n = 3 packed with sand, sandy loam or clay loam soil were used to determine the effect of soil texture and depth on transport of two septic tank effluent (STE-borne microbial pathogen surrogates—green fluorescent protein-labeled E. coli (GFPE and MS-2 coliphage—in soil treatment units. HYDRUS 2D/3D software was used to model the transport of these microbes from the infiltrative surface. Mesocosms were spiked with GFPE and MS-2 coliphage at 105 cfu/mL STE and 105–106 pfu/mL STE, respectively. In all soils, removal rates were >99.99% at 25 cm. The transport simulation compared (1 optimization; and (2 trial-and-error modeling approaches. Only slight differences between the transport parameters were observed between these approaches. Treating both the die-off rates and attachment/detachment rates as variables resulted in an overall better model fit, particularly for the tailing phase of the experiments. Independent of the fitting procedure, attachment rates computed by the model were higher in sandy and sandy loam soils than clay, which was attributed to unsaturated flow conditions at lower water content in the coarser-textured soils. Early breakthrough of the bacteria and virus indicated the presence of preferential flow in the system in the structured clay loam soil, resulting in faster movement of water and microbes through the soil relative to a conservative tracer (bromide.

  2. Mathematical modelling on transport of petroleum hydrocarbons in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, such studies in saturated fractured rocks are highly complex and limited, and hence, deserve a special attention as the fate and transport of the petroleum hydrocarbons are not uncommon in saturated fractured rocks. In this context, an improved mathematical model has been proposed that will better describe the ...

  3. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sherman, Peter; Van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics

  4. Solute transport modelling with the variable temporally dependent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pintu Das

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... Abstract. In this present study, analytical and numerical solutions are obtained for solute transport modelling in homogeneous semi-infinite porous medium. The dispersion coefficient is assumed to be initial dispersion and velocity is assumed to be temporally dependent with initial seepage velocity. Also ...

  5. Solving vertical transport and chemistry in air pollution models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.F. Berkvens (Patrick); M.A. Botchev; J.G. Verwer (Jan); M.C. Krol; W. Peters

    2000-01-01

    textabstractFor the time integration of stiff transport-chemistry problems from air pollution modelling, standard ODE solvers are not feasible due to the large number of species and the 3D nature. The popular alternative, standard operator splitting, introduces artificial transients for short-lived

  6. Solving Vertical Transport and Chemistry in Air Pollution Models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkvens, P.J.F.; Bochev, Mikhail A.; Verwer, J.G.; Krol, M.C.; Peters, W.

    For the time integration of stiff transport-chemistry problems from air pollution modelling, standard ODE solvers are not feasible due to the large number of species and the 3D nature. The popular alternative, standard operator splitting, introduces artificial transients for short-lived species.

  7. Solving vertical transport and chemistry in air pollution models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkvens, P.J.F.; Bochev, M.A.; Krol, M.C.; Peters, W.; Verwer, J.G.; Chock, David P.; Carmichael, Gregory R.; Brick, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    For the time integration of stiff transport-chemistry problems from air pollution modelling, standard ODE solvers are not feasible due to the large number of species and the 3D nature. The popular alternative, standard operator splitting, introduces artificial transients for short-lived species.

  8. Sample selection and taste correlation in discrete choice transport modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mabit, Stefan Lindhard

    2008-01-01

    of taste correlation in willingness-to-pay estimation are presented. The first contribution addresses how to incorporate taste correlation in the estimation of the value of travel time for public transport. Given a limited dataset the approach taken is to use theory on the value of travel time as guidance...... many issues that deserve attention. This thesis investigates how sample selection can affect estimation of discrete choice models and how taste correlation should be incorporated into applied mixed logit estimation. Sampling in transport modelling is often based on an observed trip. This may cause...... a sample to be choice-based or governed by a self-selection mechanism. In both cases, there is a possibility that sampling affects the estimation of a population model. It was established in the seventies how choice-based sampling affects the estimation of multinomial logit models. The thesis examines...

  9. Multiphysical modelling of fluid transport through osteo-articular media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Thibault; Naili, Salah; Sansalone, Vittorio

    2010-03-01

    In this study, a multiphysical description of fluid transport through osteo-articular porous media is presented. Adapted from the model of Moyne and Murad, which is intended to describe clayey materials behaviour, this multiscale modelling allows for the derivation of the macroscopic response of the tissue from microscopical information. First the model is described. At the pore scale, electrohydrodynamics equations governing the electrolyte movement are coupled with local electrostatics (Gauss-Poisson equation), and ionic transport equations. Using a change of variables and an asymptotic expansion method, the macroscopic description is carried out. Results of this model are used to show the importance of couplings effects on the mechanotransduction of compact bone remodelling.

  10. Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinds, J.

    2001-01-01

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) describes the methods used to develop numerical grids of the unsaturated hydrogeologic system beneath Yucca Mountain. Numerical grid generation is an integral part of the development of a complex, three-dimensional (3-D) model, such as the Unsaturated-Zone Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model) of Yucca Mountain. The resulting numerical grids, developed using current geologic, hydrogeologic, and mineralogic data, provide the necessary framework to: (1) develop calibrated hydrogeologic property sets and flow fields, (2) test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport, and (3) predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal loading conditions. Revision 00 of the work described herein follows the planning and work direction outlined in the ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (CRWMS M and O 1999c). The technical scope, content, and management of ICN 01 of this AMR is currently controlled by the planning document, ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (BSC 2001a). The scope for the TBV resolution actions in this ICN is described in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department'' (BSC 2001 b, Addendum B, Section 4.1). The steps involved in numerical grid development include: (1) defining the location of important calibration features, (2) determining model grid layers and fault geometry based on the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), the Integrated Site Model (ISM), and definition of hydrogeologic units (HGUs), (3) analyzing and extracting GFM and ISM data pertaining to layer contacts and property distributions, (4) discretizing and refining the two-dimensional (2-D), plan-view numerical grid, (5) generating the 3-D grid with finer resolution at the repository horizon and within the Calico Hills nonwelded (CHn) hydrogeologic unit, and (6) formulating the dual-permeability mesh. The

  11. Model documentation report: Transportation sector model of the National Energy Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description of TRAN for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirements of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, 57(b)(1)). Third, it permits continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

  12. Modeling of Species Transport and Macrosegregation in Heavy Steel Ingots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wensheng; Shen, Houfa; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Baicheng

    2014-04-01

    In the current study, two significant phenomena involved in heavy steel ingot casting, i.e., species transport and macrosegregation, were numerically simulated. First, a ladle-tundish-mold species transport model describing the entire multiple pouring process of heavy steel ingots was proposed. Carbon distribution and variation in both the tundish and the mold of a 292-ton steel ingot were predicted. Results indicate high carbon concentration in the bottom of the mold while low concentration carbon at the top of mold after the pouring process. Such concentration distribution helps in reducing both negative segregation in the bottom of the solidified ingot and positive segregation at the top. Second, a two-phase multiscale macrosegregation model was used to simulate the solidification process of industrial steel ingots. This model takes into account heat transfer, fluid flow, solute transport, and equiaxed grain motion on a system scale, as well as grain nucleation and growth on a microscopic scale. The model was first used to analyze a three-dimensional industry-scale steel ingot as a benchmark. Then, it was applied to study macrosegregation formation in a 53-ton steel ingot. Macrosegregation predicted by the numerical model was presented and compared with experimental measurements. Typical macrosegregation patterns in heavy steel ingots are found to be well reproduced with the two-phase model.

  13. Advective transport in heterogeneous aquifers: Are proxy models predictive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, A.; Zarlenga, A.; Gotovac, H.; Jankovic, I.; Volpi, E.; Cvetkovic, V.; Dagan, G.

    2015-12-01

    We examine the prediction capability of two approximate models (Multi-Rate Mass Transfer (MRMT) and Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW)) of non-Fickian transport, by comparison with accurate 2-D and 3-D numerical simulations. Both nonlocal in time approaches circumvent the need to solve the flow and transport equations by using proxy models to advection, providing the breakthrough curves (BTC) at control planes at any x, depending on a vector of five unknown parameters. Although underlain by different mechanisms, the two models have an identical structure in the Laplace Transform domain and have the Markovian property of independent transitions. We show that also the numerical BTCs enjoy the Markovian property. Following the procedure recommended in the literature, along a practitioner perspective, we first calibrate the parameters values by a best fit with the numerical BTC at a control plane at x1, close to the injection plane, and subsequently use it for prediction at further control planes for a few values of σY2≤8. Due to a similar structure and Markovian property, the two methods perform equally well in matching the numerical BTC. The identified parameters are generally not unique, making their identification somewhat arbitrary. The inverse Gaussian model and the recently developed Multi-Indicator Model (MIM), which does not require any fitting as it relates the BTC to the permeability structure, are also discussed. The application of the proxy models for prediction requires carrying out transport field tests of large plumes for a long duration.

  14. Combining Deterministic structures and stochastic heterogeneity for transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Alraune; Attinger, Sabine; Dietrich, Peter; Teutsch, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Contaminant transport in highly heterogeneous aquifers is extremely challenging and subject of current scientific debate. Tracer plumes often show non-symmetric but highly skewed plume shapes. Predicting such transport behavior using the classical advection-dispersion-equation (ADE) in combination with a stochastic description of aquifer properties requires a dense measurement network. This is in contrast to the available information for most aquifers. A new conceptual aquifer structure model is presented which combines large-scale deterministic information and the stochastic approach for incorporating sub-scale heterogeneity. The conceptual model is designed to allow for a goal-oriented, site specific transport analysis making use of as few data as possible. Thereby the basic idea is to reproduce highly skewed tracer plumes in heterogeneous media by incorporating deterministic contrasts and effects of connectivity instead of using unimodal heterogeneous models with high variances. The conceptual model consists of deterministic blocks of mean hydraulic conductivity which might be measured by pumping tests indicating values differing in orders of magnitudes. A sub-scale heterogeneity is introduced within every block. This heterogeneity can be modeled as bimodal or log-normal distributed. The impact of input parameters, structure and conductivity contrasts is investigated in a systematic manor. Furthermore, some first successful implementation of the model was achieved for the well known MADE site.

  15. Towards a transport model for epistemic UQ in RANS closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edeling, Wouter; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2016-11-01

    Due to their computational efficiency, Reynold-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) turbulence models remain a vital tool for modeling turbulent flows. However, it is well known that RANS predictions are locally corrupted by epistemic model-form uncertainty. Whereas some Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) approaches attempt to quantify this uncertainty by considering the model coefficients as random variables, we directly perturb the Reynold-stress tensor at locations in the flow domain where the modeling assumptions are likely to be invalid. Inferring the perturbations on a point-by-point basis would lead to a high-dimensional problem. To reduce the dimensionality, we propose separate model equations based on the transport of linear invariants of the anisotropy tensor. This provides us with a low-dimensional UQ framework where the invariant transport model decides on the magnitude and direction of the perturbations. Where the perturbations are small, the RANS result is recovered. Using traditional turbulence modeling practices we derive weak realizability constraints, and we will rely on Bayesian inference to calibrate the model on high-fidelity data. We will demonstrate our framework on a number of canonical flow problems where RANS models are prone to failure.

  16. Plutonium air transportable package Model PAT-1. Safety analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    The document is a Safety Analysis Report for the Plutonium Air Transportable Package, Model PAT-1, which was developed by Sandia Laboratories under contract to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The document describes the engineering tests and evaluations that the NRC staff used as a basis to determine that the package design meets the requirements specified in the NRC ''Qualification Criteria to Certify a Package for Air Transport of Plutonium'' (NUREG-0360). By virtue of its ability to meet the NRC Qualification Criteria, the package design is capable of safely withstanding severe aircraft accidents. The document also includes engineering drawings and specifications for the package. 92 figs, 29 tables

  17. In vitro placental model optimization for nanoparticle transport studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cartwright L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Laura Cartwright1, Marie Sønnegaard Poulsen2, Hanne Mørck Nielsen3, Giulio Pojana4, Lisbeth E Knudsen2, Margaret Saunders1, Erik Rytting2,51Bristol Initiative for Research of Child Health (BIRCH, Biophysics Research Unit, St Michael's Hospital, UH Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, UK; 2University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Public Health, 3University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutics and Analytical Chemistry, Copenhagen, Denmark; 4Department of Environmental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics, University Ca' Foscari Venice, Venice, Italy; 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USABackground: Advances in biomedical nanotechnology raise hopes in patient populations but may also raise questions regarding biodistribution and biocompatibility, especially during pregnancy. Special consideration must be given to the placenta as a biological barrier because a pregnant woman's exposure to nanoparticles could have significant effects on the fetus developing in the womb. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to optimize an in vitro model for characterizing the transport of nanoparticles across human placental trophoblast cells.Methods: The growth of BeWo (clone b30 human placental choriocarcinoma cells for nanoparticle transport studies was characterized in terms of optimized Transwell® insert type and pore size, the investigation of barrier properties by transmission electron microscopy, tight junction staining, transepithelial electrical resistance, and fluorescein sodium transport. Following the determination of nontoxic concentrations of fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles, the cellular uptake and transport of 50 nm and 100 nm diameter particles was measured using the in vitro BeWo cell model.Results: Particle size measurements, fluorescence readings, and confocal microscopy indicated both cellular uptake of

  18. Sediment and radionuclide transport in rivers: radionuclide transport modeling for Cattaraugus and Buttermilk Creeks, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Y.; Yabusaki, S.B.; Kincaid, C.T.; Skaggs, R.L.; Walters, W.H.

    1982-12-01

    SERATRA, a transient, two-dimensional (laterally-averaged) computer model of sediment-contaminant transport in rivers, satisfactorily resolved the distribution of sediment and radionuclide concentrations in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system in New York. By modeling the physical processes of advection, diffusion, erosion, deposition, and bed armoring, SERATRA routed three sediment size fractions, including cohesive soils, to simulate three dynamic flow events. In conjunction with the sediment transport, SERATRA computed radionuclide levels in dissolved, suspended sediment, and bed sediment forms for four radionuclides ( 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 239 240 Pu, and 3 H). By accounting for time-dependent sediment-radionuclide interaction in the water column and bed, SERATA is a physically explicit model of radionuclide fate and migration. Sediment and radionuclide concentrations calculated by SERATA in the Cattaraugus Creek stream system are in reasonable agreement with measured values. SERATRA is in the field performance phase of an extensive testing program designed to establish the utility of the model as a site assessment tool. The model handles not only radionuclides but other contaminants such as pesticides, heavy metals and other toxic chemicals. Now that the model has been applied to four field sites, including the latest study of the Cattaraugus Creek stream system, it is recommended that a final model be validated through comparison of predicted results with field data from a carefully controlled tracer test at a field site. It is also recommended that a detailed laboratory flume be tested to study cohesive sediment transport, deposition, and erosion characteristics. The lack of current understanding of these characteristics is one of the weakest areas hindering the accurate assessment of the migration of radionuclides sorbed by fine sediments of silt and clay

  19. Modelling animal waste pathogen transport from agricultural land to streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Pramod K; Soupir, Michelle L; Ikenberry, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The transport of animal waste pathogens from crop land to streams can potentially elevate pathogen levels in stream water. Applying animal manure into crop land as fertilizers is a common practice in developing as well as in developed countries. Manure application into the crop land, however, can cause potential human health. To control pathogen levels in ambient water bodies such as streams, improving our understanding of pathogen transport at farm scale as well as at watershed scale is required. To understand the impacts of crop land receiving animal waste as fertilizers on stream's pathogen levels, here we investigate pathogen indicator transport at watershed scale. We exploited watershed scale hydrological model to estimate the transport of pathogens from the crop land to streams. Pathogen indicator levels (i.e., E. coli levels) in the stream water were predicted. With certain assumptions, model results are reasonable. This study can be used as guidelines for developing the models for calculating the impacts of crop land's animal manure on stream water

  20. Coupled transport/hyperelastic model for nastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homison, Chris; Weiland, Lisa M.

    2006-03-01

    Nastic materials are high energy density active materials that mimic processes used in the plant kingdom to produce large deformations through the conversion of chemical energy. These materials utilize the controlled transport of charge and fluid across a selectively-permeable membrane to achieve bulk deformation in a process referred to in the plant kingdom as nastic movements. The nastic material being developed consists of synthetic membranes containing biological ion pumps, ion channels, and ion exchangers surrounding fluid-filled cavities embedded within a polymer matrix. In this paper the formulation of a biological transport model and its coupling with a hyperelastic finite element model of the polymer matrix is discussed. The transport model includes contributions from ion pumps, ion exchangers, and solvent flux. This work will form the basis for a feedback loop in material synthesis efforts. The goal of these studies is to determine the relative importance of the various parameters associated with both the polymer matrix and the biological transport components.

  1. Integrating wildfire plume rises within atmospheric transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallia, D. V.; Kochanski, A.; Wu, D.; Urbanski, S. P.; Krueger, S. K.; Lin, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Wildfires can generate significant pyro-convection that is responsible for releasing pollutants, greenhouse gases, and trace species into the free troposphere, which are then transported a significant distance downwind from the fire. Oftentimes, atmospheric transport and chemistry models have a difficult time resolving the transport of smoke from these wildfires, primarily due to deficiencies in estimating the plume injection height, which has been highlighted in previous work as the most important aspect of simulating wildfire plume transport. As a result of the uncertainties associated with modeled wildfire plume rise, researchers face difficulties modeling the impacts of wildfire smoke on air quality and constraining fire emissions using inverse modeling techniques. Currently, several plume rise parameterizations exist that are able to determine the injection height of fire emissions; however, the success of these parameterizations has been mixed. With the advent of WRF-SFIRE, the wildfire plume rise and injection height can now be explicitly calculated using a fire spread model (SFIRE) that is dynamically linked with the atmosphere simulated by WRF. However, this model has only been tested on a limited basis due to computational costs. Here, we will test the performance of WRF-SFIRE in addition to several commonly adopted plume parameterizations (Freitas, Sofiev, and Briggs) for the 2013 Patch Springs (Utah) and 2012 Baker Canyon (Washington) fires, for both of which observations of plume rise heights are available. These plume rise techniques will then be incorporated within a Lagrangian atmospheric transport model (STILT) in order to simulate CO and CO2 concentrations during NASA's CARVE Earth Science Airborne Program over Alaska during the summer of 2012. Initial model results showed that STILT model simulations were unable to reproduce enhanced CO concentrations produced by Alaskan fires observed during 2012. Near-surface concentrations were drastically

  2. Colloid transport in saturated porous media: Elimination of attachment efficiency in a new colloid transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landkamer, Lee L.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Ryan, Joseph N.

    2013-01-01

    A colloid transport model is introduced that is conceptually simple yet captures the essential features of colloid transport and retention in saturated porous media when colloid retention is dominated by the secondary minimum because an electrostatic barrier inhibits substantial deposition in the primary minimum. This model is based on conventional colloid filtration theory (CFT) but eliminates the empirical concept of attachment efficiency. The colloid deposition rate is computed directly from CFT by assuming all predicted interceptions of colloids by collectors result in at least temporary deposition in the secondary minimum. Also, a new paradigm for colloid re-entrainment based on colloid population heterogeneity is introduced. To accomplish this, the initial colloid population is divided into two fractions. One fraction, by virtue of physiochemical characteristics (e.g., size and charge), will always be re-entrained after capture in a secondary minimum. The remaining fraction of colloids, again as a result of physiochemical characteristics, will be retained “irreversibly” when captured by a secondary minimum. Assuming the dispersion coefficient can be estimated from tracer behavior, this model has only two fitting parameters: (1) the fraction of the initial colloid population that will be retained “irreversibly” upon interception by a secondary minimum, and (2) the rate at which reversibly retained colloids leave the secondary minimum. These two parameters were correlated to the depth of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) secondary energy minimum and pore-water velocity, two physical forces that influence colloid transport. Given this correlation, the model serves as a heuristic tool for exploring the influence of physical parameters such as surface potential and fluid velocity on colloid transport.

  3. Interactive 4D Visualization of Sediment Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkiewicz, T.; Englert, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Coastal sediment transport models simulate the effects that waves, currents, and tides have on near-shore bathymetry and features such as beaches and barrier islands. Understanding these dynamic processes is integral to the study of coastline stability, beach erosion, and environmental contamination. Furthermore, analyzing the results of these simulations is a critical task in the design, placement, and engineering of coastal structures such as seawalls, jetties, support pilings for wind turbines, etc. Despite the importance of these models, there is a lack of available visualization software that allows users to explore and perform analysis on these datasets in an intuitive and effective manner. Existing visualization interfaces for these datasets often present only one variable at a time, using two dimensional plan or cross-sectional views. These visual restrictions limit the ability to observe the contents in the proper overall context, both in spatial and multi-dimensional terms. To improve upon these limitations, we use 3D rendering and particle system based illustration techniques to show water column/flow data across all depths simultaneously. We can also encode multiple variables across different perceptual channels (color, texture, motion, etc.) to enrich surfaces with multi-dimensional information. Interactive tools are provided, which can be used to explore the dataset and find regions-of-interest for further investigation. Our visualization package provides an intuitive 4D (3D, time-varying) visualization of sediment transport model output. In addition, we are also integrating real world observations with the simulated data to support analysis of the impact from major sediment transport events. In particular, we have been focusing on the effects of Superstorm Sandy on the Redbird Artificial Reef Site, offshore of Delaware Bay. Based on our pre- and post-storm high-resolution sonar surveys, there has significant scour and bedform migration around the

  4. A simplified tether model for molecular motor transporting cargo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang-Zhen, Li; Li-Chun, Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Molecular motors are proteins or protein complexes which function as transporting engines in biological cells. This paper models the tether between motor and its cargo as a symmetric linear potential. Different from Elston and Peskin's work for which performance of the system was discussed only in some limiting cases, this study produces analytic solutions of the problem for general cases by simplifying the transport system into two physical states, which makes it possible to discuss the dynamics of the motor–cargo system in detail. It turns out that the tether strength between motor and cargo should be greater than a threshold or the motor will fail to transport the cargo, which was not discussed by former researchers yet. Value of the threshold depends on the diffusion coefficients of cargo and motor and also on the strength of the Brownian ratchets dragging the system. The threshold approaches a finite constant when the strength of the ratchet tends to infinity. (general)

  5. Modeling and simulation of transport phenomena in ionic gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichsenring, Peter; Wallmersperger, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Ionic hydrogels belong to the class of polyelectrolyte gels or ionic gels. Their ability to swell or shrink under different environmental conditions such as change of pH, ion concentration or temperature make them promising materials, e.g. for microsensoric or microactuatoric devices. The hydrogel swelling exhibits nonlinear effects due to the occurrence of different interacting transport phenomena. Numerical simulations are an essential part in the ongoing development of microsensors and microactuators. In order to determine transport effects due to diffusion, migration and convection a multiphase mesoscale model based on the Theory of Porous Media is applied. The governing field equations are solved in the transient regime by applying the Finite Element Method. By means of the derived numerical framework a detailed investigation of the different transport phenomena is carried out. Numerical experiments are performed to characterize the dominating transfer phenomena for ionic gels under chemical stimulation.

  6. Coupling of Groundwater Transport and Plant Uptake Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rein, Arno; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Trapp, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Plants significantly influence contaminant transport and fate. Important processes are uptake of soil and groundwater contaminants, as well as biodegradation in plants and their root zones. Models for the prediction of chemical uptake into plants are required for the setup of mass balances...... in environmental systems at different scale. Feedback mechanisms between plants and hydrological systems can play an important role, however having received little attention to date. Here, a new model concept for dynamic plant uptake models applying analytical matrix solutions is presented, which can be coupled...... to groundwater transport simulation tools. Exemplary simulations of plant uptake were carried out, in order to estimate concentrations in the soilplant- air system and the influence of plants on contaminant mass fluxes from soil to groundwater....

  7. Optimal Filtering in Mass Transport Modeling From Satellite Gravimetry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditmar, P.; Hashemi Farahani, H.; Klees, R.

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring natural mass transport in the Earth's system, which has marked a new era in Earth observation, is largely based on the data collected by the GRACE satellite mission. Unfortunately, this mission is not free from certain limitations, two of which are especially critical. Firstly, its sensitivity is strongly anisotropic: it senses the north-south component of the mass re-distribution gradient much better than the east-west component. Secondly, it suffers from a trade-off between temporal and spatial resolution: a high (e.g., daily) temporal resolution is only possible if the spatial resolution is sacrificed. To make things even worse, the GRACE satellites enter occasionally a phase when their orbit is characterized by a short repeat period, which makes it impossible to reach a high spatial resolution at all. A way to mitigate limitations of GRACE measurements is to design optimal data processing procedures, so that all available information is fully exploited when modeling mass transport. This implies, in particular, that an unconstrained model directly derived from satellite gravimetry data needs to be optimally filtered. In principle, this can be realized with a Wiener filter, which is built on the basis of covariance matrices of noise and signal. In practice, however, a compilation of both matrices (and, therefore, of the filter itself) is not a trivial task. To build the covariance matrix of noise in a mass transport model, it is necessary to start from a realistic model of noise in the level-1B data. Furthermore, a routine satellite gravimetry data processing includes, in particular, the subtraction of nuisance signals (for instance, associated with atmosphere and ocean), for which appropriate background models are used. Such models are not error-free, which has to be taken into account when the noise covariance matrix is constructed. In addition, both signal and noise covariance matrices depend on the type of mass transport processes under

  8. Cellular automaton model of coupled mass transport and chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karapiperis, T.

    1994-01-01

    Mass transport, coupled with chemical reactions, is modelled as a cellular automaton in which solute molecules perform a random walk on a lattice and react according to a local probabilistic rule. Assuming molecular chaos and a smooth density function, we obtain the standard reaction-transport equations in the continuum limit. The model is applied to the reactions a + b ↔c and a + b →c, where we observe interesting macroscopic effects resulting from microscopic fluctuations and spatial correlations between molecules. We also simulate autocatalytic reaction schemes displaying spontaneous formation of spatial concentration patterns. Finally, we propose and discuss the limitations of a simple model for mineral-solute interaction. (author) 5 figs., 20 refs

  9. CFD modelling of insulation debris transport phenomena in water flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krepper, Eeckhard; Cartland-Glover, Gregory; Grahn, Alexander [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung

    2009-11-15

    The investigation of insulation debris generation, transport and sedimentation becomes important with regard to reactor safety research for PWR and BWR, when considering the long-term behaviour of emergency core cooling systems during all types of loss of coolant accidents. A joint research project on such questions is being performed in cooperation between the University of Applied Sciences Zittau/Goerlitz and the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The project deals with the experimental investigation of particle transport phenomena in coolant flow and the development of CFD models for its description. While the experiments are performed at the University at Zittau/Goerlitz, the theoretical modelling efforts are concentrated at Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. In the current paper the basic concepts for CFD modelling are described and feasibility studies are presented. (orig.)

  10. Simplified analytical model for radionuclide transport simulation in the geosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiromoto, G.

    1996-01-01

    In order to evaluate postclosure off-site doses from a low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities, an integrated safety assessment methodology has being developed at Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. The source-term modelling approach adopted in this system is described and the results obtained in the IAEA NSARS 'The Safety Assessment of Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities' programme for model intercomparison studies are presented. The radionuclides released from the waste are calculated using a simple first order kinetics model, and the transport, through porous media below the waste is determined by using an analytical solution of the mass transport equation. The methodology and the results obtained in this work are compared with those reported by others participants of the NSARS programme. (author). 4 refs., 4 figs

  11. Transport modelling and gyrokinetic analysis of advanced high performance discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsey, J.E.; Imbeaux, F.; Staebler, G.M.; Budny, R.; Bourdelle, C.; Fukuyama, A.; Garbet, X.; Tala, T.; Parail, V.

    2005-01-01

    Predictive transport modelling and gyrokinetic stability analyses of demonstration hybrid (HYBRID) and advanced tokamak (AT) discharges from the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) profile database are presented. Both regimes have exhibited enhanced core confinement (above the conventional ITER reference H-mode scenario) but differ in their current density profiles. Recent contributions to the ITPA database have facilitated an effort to study the underlying physics governing confinement in these advanced scenarios. In this paper, we assess the level of commonality of the turbulent transport physics and the relative roles of the transport suppression mechanisms (i.e. E x B shear and Shafranov shift (α) stabilization) using data for select HYBRID and AT discharges from the DIII-D, JET and AUG tokamaks. GLF23 transport modelling and gyrokinetic stability analysis indicate that E x B shear and Shafranov shift stabilization play essential roles in producing the improved core confinement in both HYBRID and AT discharges. Shafranov shift stabilization is found to be more important in AT discharges than in HYBRID discharges. We have also examined the competition between the stabilizing effects of E x B shear and Shafranov shift stabilization and the destabilizing effects of higher safety factors and parallel velocity shear. Linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of idealized low and high safety factor cases reveal some interesting consequences. A low safety factor (i.e. HYBRID relevant) is directly beneficial in reducing the transport, and E x B shear stabilization can dominate parallel velocity shear destabilization allowing the turbulence to be quenched. However, at low-q/high current, Shafranov shift stabilization plays less of a role. Higher safety factors (as found in AT discharges), on the other hand, have larger amounts of Shafranov shift stabilization, but parallel velocity shear destabilization can prevent E x B shear quenching of the turbulent

  12. Transport modeling and gyrokinetic analysis of advanced high performance discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsey, J.; Imbeaux, F.; Bourdelle, C.; Garbet, X.; Staebler, G.; Budny, R.; Fukuyama, A.; Tala, T.; Parail, V.

    2005-01-01

    Predictive transport modeling and gyrokinetic stability analyses of demonstration hybrid (HYBRID) and Advanced Tokamak (AT) discharges from the International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) profile database are presented. Both regimes have exhibited enhanced core confinement (above the conventional ITER reference H-mode scenario) but differ in their current density profiles. Recent contributions to the ITPA database have facilitated an effort to study the underlying physics governing confinement in these advanced scenarios. In this paper, we assess the level of commonality of the turbulent transport physics and the relative roles of the transport suppression mechanisms (i.e. ExB shear and Shafranov shift (α) stabilization) using data for select HYBRID and AT discharges from the DIII-D, JET, and AUG tokamaks. GLF23 transport modeling and gyrokinetic stability analysis indicates that ExB shear and Shafranov shift stabilization play essential roles in producing the improved core confinement in both HYBRID and AT discharges. Shafranov shift stabilization is found to be more important in AT discharges than in HYBRID discharges. We have also examined the competition between the stabilizing effects of ExB shear and Shafranov shift stabilization and the destabilizing effects of higher safety factors and parallel velocity shear. Linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of idealized low and high safety factor cases reveals some interesting consequences. A low safety factor (i.e. HYBRID relevant) is directly beneficial in reducing the transport, and ExB shear stabilization can win out over parallel velocity shear destabilization allowing the turbulence to be quenched. However, at low-q/high current, Shafranov shift stabilization plays less of a role. Higher safety factors (as found in AT discharges), on the other hand, have larger amounts of Shafranov shift stabilization, but parallel velocity shear destabilization can prevent ExB shear quenching of the turbulent

  13. Anomalous reactive transport in porous media: Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edery, Yaniv; Dror, Ishai; Scher, Harvey; Berkowitz, Brian

    2015-05-01

    We analyze dynamic behavior of chemically reactive species in a porous medium, subject to anomalous transport. In this context, we present transport experiments in a refraction-index-matched, three-dimensional, water-saturated porous medium. A pH indicator (Congo red) was used as either a conservative or a reactive tracer, depending on the tracer solution pH relative to that of the background solution. The porous medium consisted of an acrylic polymer material formed as spherical beads that have pH-buffering capacity. The magnitude of reaction during transport through the porous medium was related to the color change of the Congo red, via image analysis. Here, we focused on point injection of the tracer into a macroscopically uniform flow field containing water at a pH different from that of the injected tracer. The setup yielded measurements of the temporally evolving spatial (local-in-space) concentration field. Parallel experiments with the same tracer, but without reactions (no changes in pH), enabled identification of the transport itself to be anomalous (non-Fickian); this was quantified by a continuous time random walk (CTRW) formulation. A CTRW particle tracking model was then used to quantify the spatial and temporal migration of both the conservative and reactive tracer plumes. Model parameters related to the anomalous transport were determined from the conservative tracer experiments. An additional term accounting for chemical reaction was established solely from analysis of the reactant concentrations, and significantly, no other fitting parameters were required. The measurements and analysis emphasized the localized nature of reaction, caused by small-scale concentration fluctuations and preferential pathways. In addition, a threshold radius for pH-controlled reactive transport processes was defined under buffering conditions, which delineated the region in which reactions occurred rapidly.

  14. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdows, Kate L.; Panitchob, Nuttanont; Crocker, Ian P.; Please, Colin P.; Hanson, Mark A.; Sibley, Colin P.; Johnstone, Edward D.; Sengers, Bram G.; Lewis, Rohan M.; Glazier, Jocelyn D.

    2015-01-01

    Uptake of system L amino acid substrates into isolated placental plasma membrane vesicles in the absence of opposing side amino acid (zero-trans uptake) is incompatible with the concept of obligatory exchange, where influx of amino acid is coupled to efflux. We therefore hypothesized that system L amino acid exchange transporters are not fully obligatory and/or that amino acids are initially present inside the vesicles. To address this, we combined computational modeling with vesicle transport assays and transporter localization studies to investigate the mechanisms mediating [14C]l-serine (a system L substrate) transport into human placental microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles. The carrier model provided a quantitative framework to test the 2 hypotheses that l-serine transport occurs by either obligate exchange or nonobligate exchange coupled with facilitated transport (mixed transport model). The computational model could only account for experimental [14C]l-serine uptake data when the transporter was not exclusively in exchange mode, best described by the mixed transport model. MVM vesicle isolates contained endogenous amino acids allowing for potential contribution to zero-trans uptake. Both L-type amino acid transporter (LAT)1 and LAT2 subtypes of system L were distributed to MVM, with l-serine transport attributed to LAT2. These findings suggest that exchange transporters do not function exclusively as obligate exchangers.—Widdows, K. L., Panitchob, N., Crocker, I. P., Please, C. P., Hanson, M. A., Sibley, C. P., Johnstone, E. D., Sengers, B. G., Lewis, R. M., Glazier, J. D. Integration of computational modeling with membrane transport studies reveals new insights into amino acid exchange transport mechanisms. PMID:25761365

  15. A combined model of sediment production, supply and transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fujita

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In previous sediment-runoff models, the sediment production rates of mountain slopes, and the sediment supply rates to streams typically have been developed using empirical methods. A process-based model for sediment production and supply is, however, required for more exact simulations of sediment runoff. In this study, we develop a method to calculate the sediment production rate due to both freeze-thaw action and the sediment supply rate (i.e. erosion rate of talus. These numerical models were then connected to an existing sediment transport model. The integrated model presented here was applied to a small mountainous watershed. We found that the calculated sediment production rate was within the range of values typically observed for this region. Additionally, the estimated annual sediment discharge using the model agreed with observational results. Lastly, we found that the model can be used to qualitatively characterize typical features of the actual sediment routine in mountainous watersheds.

  16. Modeling Phosphorus Transport and Cycling in the Greater Everglades Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, A. I.; Grace, K. A.; Jawitz, J. W.; Muller, S.; Munoz-Carpena, R.; Flaig, E. G.

    2005-12-01

    A solute transport model was used to predict phosphorus mobility in the northern Everglades. Over the past several decades, agricultural drainage waters discharged into the northern Everglades, have been enriched in phosphorus (P) relative to the historic rainfall-driven inputs. While methods of reducing total P concentrations in the discharge water have been actively pursued through implementation of agricultural Best Management Practices (BMPs), a major parallel effort has focused on the construction of a network of constructed wetlands for P removal before these waters enter the Everglades. This study describes the development of a water quality model for P transport and cycling and its application to a large constructed wetland: Stormwater Treatment Area 1 West (STA 1W), located southeast of Lake Okeechobee on the eastern perimeter of the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA). In STA 1W agricultural nutrients such as phosphorus (P) are removed from EAA runoff before entering the adjacent Water Conservation Areas (WCAs) and the Everglades. STA 1W is divided by levees into 4 cells, which are flooded for most of the year; thus the dominant mechanism for flow and transport is overland flow. P is removed either through deposition into sediments or is taken up by plants; in either case the soils end up being significantly enriched in P. The model has been applied and calibrated to several years of water quality data from Cell 4 within STA 1W. Most existing P models have been applied to agricultural/upland systems, with only a few relevant to treatment wetlands such as STA 1W. To ensure sufficient flexibility in selecting appropriate system components and reactions, the model has been designed to incorporate a wide range of user-selectable mechanisms for P uptake and release parameters between soils and inflowing water. The model can track a large number of mobile and nonmobile components and utilizes a Godunov-style operator-splitting technique for the transported

  17. ALGE3D: A Three-Dimensional Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maze, G. M.

    2017-12-01

    Of the top 10 most populated US cities from a 2015 US Census Bureau estimate, 7 of the cities are situated near the ocean, a bay, or on one of the Great Lakes. A contamination of the water ways in the United States could be devastating to the economy (through tourism and industries such as fishing), public health (from direct contact, or contaminated drinking water), and in some cases even infrastructure (water treatment plants). Current national response models employed by emergency response agencies have well developed models to simulate the effects of hazardous contaminants in riverine systems that are primarily driven by one-dimensional flows; however in more complex systems, such as tidal estuaries, bays, or lakes, a more complex model is needed. While many models exist, none are capable of quick deployment in emergency situations that could contain a variety of release situations including a mixture of both particulate and dissolved chemicals in a complex flow area. ALGE3D, developed at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), is a three-dimensional hydrodynamic code which solves the momentum, mass, and energy conservation equations to predict the movement and dissipation of thermal or dissolved chemical plumes discharged into cooling lakes, rivers, and estuaries. ALGE3D is capable of modeling very complex flows, including areas with tidal flows which include wetting and drying of land. Recent upgrades have increased the capabilities including the transport of particulate tracers, allowing for more complete modeling of the transport of pollutants. In addition the model is capable of coupling with a one-dimension riverine transport model or a two-dimension atmospheric deposition model in the event that a contamination event occurs upstream or upwind of the water body.

  18. Maximum likelihood Bayesian model averaging and its predictive analysis for groundwater reactive transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Gary P.; Lu, Dan; Ye, Ming

    2015-01-01

    While Bayesian model averaging (BMA) has been widely used in groundwater modeling, it is infrequently applied to groundwater reactive transport modeling because of multiple sources of uncertainty in the coupled hydrogeochemical processes and because of the long execution time of each model run. To resolve these problems, this study analyzed different levels of uncertainty in a hierarchical way, and used the maximum likelihood version of BMA, i.e., MLBMA, to improve the computational efficiency. This study demonstrates the applicability of MLBMA to groundwater reactive transport modeling in a synthetic case in which twenty-seven reactive transport models were designed to predict the reactive transport of hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) based on observations at a former uranium mill site near Naturita, CO. These reactive transport models contain three uncertain model components, i.e., parameterization of hydraulic conductivity, configuration of model boundary, and surface complexation reactions that simulate U(VI) adsorption. These uncertain model components were aggregated into the alternative models by integrating a hierarchical structure into MLBMA. The modeling results of the individual models and MLBMA were analyzed to investigate their predictive performance. The predictive logscore results show that MLBMA generally outperforms the best model, suggesting that using MLBMA is a sound strategy to achieve more robust model predictions relative to a single model. MLBMA works best when the alternative models are structurally distinct and have diverse model predictions. When correlation in model structure exists, two strategies were used to improve predictive performance by retaining structurally distinct models or assigning smaller prior model probabilities to correlated models. Since the synthetic models were designed using data from the Naturita site, the results of this study are expected to provide guidance for real-world modeling. Limitations of applying MLBMA to the

  19. Modelling of electron transport and of sawtooth activity in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angioni, C

    2001-10-01

    Transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas strongly limit the particle and energy confinement and represent a crucial obstacle to controlled thermonuclear fusion. Within the vast framework of transport studies, three topics have been tackled in the present thesis: first, the computation of neoclassical transport coefficients for general axisymmetric equilibria and arbitrary collisionality regime; second, the analysis of the electron temperature behaviour and transport modelling of plasma discharges in the Tokamak a configuration Variable (TCV); third, the modelling and simulation of the sawtooth activity with different plasma heating conditions. The work dedicated to neoclassical theory has been undertaken in order to first analytically identify a set of equations suited for implementation in existing Fokker-Planck codes. Modifications of these codes enabled us to compute the neoclassical transport coefficients considering different realistic magnetic equilibrium configurations and covering a large range of variation of three key parameters: aspect ratio, collisionality, and effective charge number. A comparison of the numerical results with an analytical limit has permitted the identification of two expressions for the trapped particle fraction, capable of encapsulating the geometrical effects and thus enabling each transport coefficient to be fitted with a single analytical function. This has allowed us to provide simple analytical formulae for all the neoclassical transport coefficients valid for arbitrary aspect ratio and collisionality in general realistic geometry. This work is particularly useful for a correct evaluation of the neoclassical contribution in tokamak scenarios with large bootstrap cur- rent fraction, or improved confinement regimes with low anomalous transport and for the determination of the plasma current density profile, since the plasma conductivity is usually assumed neoclassical. These results have been included in the plasma transport code

  20. Computational modeling of drug transport across the in vitro cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Joseph; Chen, Z J; Sun, Kay; Przekwas, Andrzej; Walenga, Ross; Fan, Jianghong

    2018-01-01

    A novel quasi-3D (Q3D) modeling approach was developed to model networks of one dimensional structures like tubes and vessels common in human anatomy such as vascular and lymphatic systems, neural networks, and respiratory airways. Instead of a branching network of the same tissue type, this approach was extended to model an interconnected stack of different corneal tissue layers with membrane junction conditions assigned between the tissues. The multi-laminate structure of the cornea presents a unique barrier design and opportunity for investigation using Q3D modeling. A Q3D model of an in vitro rabbit cornea was created to simulate the drug transport across the cornea, accounting for transcellular and paracellular pathways of passive and convective drug transport as well as physicochemistry of lipophilic partitioning and protein binding. Lipophilic Rhodamine B and hydrophilic fluorescein were used as drug analogs. The model predictions for both hydrophilic and lipophilic tracers were able to match the experimental measurements along with the sharp discontinuities at the epithelium-stroma and stroma-endothelium interfaces. This new modeling approach was successfully applied towards pharmacokinetic modeling for use in topical ophthalmic drug design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Modelling of radionuclide transport in forests: Review and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, G.; Schell, W.; Linkov, I.

    1997-01-01

    Ecological modeling is a powerful tool which can be used to synthesize information on the dynamic processes which occur in ecosystems. Models of radionuclide transport in forests were first constructed in the mid-1960's, when the consequences of global fallout from nuclear weapons tests and waste disposal in the environment were of great concern. Such models were developed based on site-specific experimental data and were designed to address local needs. These models had a limited applicability in evaluating distinct ecosystems and deposition scenarios. Given the scarcity of information, the same experimental data sets were often used both for model calibration and validation, an approach which clearly constitutes a methodological error. Even though the carry modeling attempts were far from being faultless, they established a useful conceptual approach in that they tried to capture general processes in ecosystems and thus had a holistic nature. Later, radioecological modeling attempted to reveal ecosystem properties by separating the component parts from the whole system, as an approach to simplification. This method worked well for radionuclide transport in agricultural ecosystems, in which the biogeochemistry of radionuclide cycling is relatively well understood and can be influenced by fertilization. Several models have been successfully developed and applied to human dose evaluation and emergency response to contaminating events in agricultural lands

  2. Benchmarking of a Markov multizone model of contaminant transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachael M; Nicas, Mark

    2014-10-01

    A Markov chain model previously applied to the simulation of advection and diffusion process of gaseous contaminants is extended to three-dimensional transport of particulates in indoor environments. The model framework and assumptions are described. The performance of the Markov model is benchmarked against simple conventional models of contaminant transport. The Markov model is able to replicate elutriation predictions of particle deposition with distance from a point source, and the stirred settling of respirable particles. Comparisons with turbulent eddy diffusion models indicate that the Markov model exhibits numerical diffusion in the first seconds after release, but over time accurately predicts mean lateral dispersion. The Markov model exhibits some instability with grid length aspect when turbulence is incorporated by way of the turbulent diffusion coefficient, and advection is present. However, the magnitude of prediction error may be tolerable for some applications and can be avoided by incorporating turbulence by way of fluctuating velocity (e.g. turbulence intensity). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  3. COMPARISON OF RF CAVITY TRANSPORT MODELS FOR BBU SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilkyoung Shin,Byung Yunn,Todd Satogata,Shahid Ahmed

    2011-03-01

    The transverse focusing effect in RF cavities plays a considerable role in beam dynamics for low-energy beamline sections and can contribute to beam breakup (BBU) instability. The purpose of this analysis is to examine RF cavity models in simulation codes which will be used for BBU experiments at Jefferson Lab and improve BBU simulation results. We review two RF cavity models in the simulation codes elegant and TDBBU (a BBU simulation code developed at Jefferson Lab). elegant can include the Rosenzweig-Serafini (R-S) model for the RF focusing effect. Whereas TDBBU uses a model from the code TRANSPORT which considers the adiabatic damping effect, but not the RF focusing effect. Quantitative comparisons are discussed for the CEBAF beamline. We also compare the R-S model with the results from numerical simulations for a CEBAF-type 5-cell superconducting cavity to validate the use of the R-S model as an improved low-energy RF cavity transport model in TDBBU. We have implemented the R-S model in TDBBU. It will improve BBU simulation results to be more matched with analytic calculations and experimental results.

  4. Comparison Of RF Cavity Transport Models For BBU Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Ilkyoung; Yunn, Byung; Satogata, Todd; Ahmed, Shahid

    2011-01-01

    The transverse focusing effect in RF cavities plays a considerable role in beam dynamics for low-energy beamline sections and can contribute to beam breakup (BBU) instability. The purpose of this analysis is to examine RF cavity models in simulation codes which will be used for BBU experiments at Jefferson Lab and improve BBU simulation results. We review two RF cavity models in the simulation codes elegant and TDBBU (a BBU simulation code developed at Jefferson Lab). elegant can include the Rosenzweig-Serafini (R-S) model for the RF focusing effect. Whereas TDBBU uses a model from the code TRANSPORT which considers the adiabatic damping effect, but not the RF focusing effect. Quantitative comparisons are discussed for the CEBAF beamline. We also compare the R-S model with the results from numerical simulations for a CEBAF-type 5-cell superconducting cavity to validate the use of the R-S model as an improved low-energy RF cavity transport model in TDBBU. We have implemented the R-S model in TDBBU. It will improve BBU simulation results to be more matched with analytic calculations and experimental results.

  5. Hydrological model for the transport of radioisotope in surface water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adoboah, E.K.

    2011-01-01

    The use of radioisotopes has gained grounds in Ghana as a result of the numerous benefits that could be derived from it. In Ghana, radioisotope materials are used for various purposes in a number of institutions. However, improper disposal of the waste poses threat to the environment. To evaluate the environmental impact of radioisotope pollution, mathematical models play a major role in predicting the pollution level in any medium. This study is concerned with the hydrological model for the transport of radioactive material in the river. The model was composed by employing partial differential equations, describing relevant physical processes evolution (water level, velocities and dissolved substances concentrations) that occurs in water bodies. The mass conservation and momentum laws, state equation and state transport equations are equation system basis. The explicit central difference scheme in space and a forward difference method in time were used for the evaluation of the generalized transport equation, the Advection-Dispersion Equation. A Matlab code was developed to predict the concentration of the radioactive contaminant at any particular time along the river and in a reservoir. The model was able to simulate accurately the various levels of radionuclide concentration changes in the flowing rivers as the flows are augmented by tributary inflows. (au)

  6. Modeling unsteady-state VOC transport in simulated waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liekhus, K.J.; Gresham, G.L.; Peterson, E.S.; Rae, C.; Hotz, N.J.; Connolly, M.J.

    1994-01-01

    This report is a revision of an EG ampersand G Idaho informal report originally titled Modeling VOC Transport in Simulated Waste Drums. A volatile organic compound (VOC) transport model has been developed to describe unsteady-state VOC permeation and diffusion within a waste drum. Model equations account for three primary mechanisms for VOC transport from a void volume within the drum. These mechanisms are VOC permeation across a polymer boundary, VOC diffusion across an opening in a volume boundary, and VOC solubilization in a polymer boundary. A series of lab-scale experiments was performed in which the VOC concentration was measured in simulated waste drums under different conditions. A lab-scale simulated waste drum consisted of a sized-down 55-gal metal drum containing a modified rigid polyethylene drum liner. Four polyethylene bags were sealed inside a large polyethylene bag, supported by a wire cage, and placed inside the drum liner. The small bags were filled with VOC-air gas mixture and the VOC concentration was measured throughout the drum over a period of time. Test variables included the type of VOC-air gas mixtures introduced into the small bags, the small bag closure type, and the presence or absence of a variable external heat source. Model results were calculated for those trials where the permeability had been measured

  7. Modelling Transcapillary Transport of Fluid and Proteins in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Pietribiasi

    Full Text Available The kinetics of protein transport to and from the vascular compartment play a major role in the determination of fluid balance and plasma refilling during hemodialysis (HD sessions. In this study we propose a whole-body mathematical model describing water and protein shifts across the capillary membrane during HD and compare its output to clinical data while evaluating the impact of choosing specific values for selected parameters.The model follows a two-compartment structure (vascular and interstitial space and is based on balance equations of protein mass and water volume in each compartment. The capillary membrane was described according to the three-pore theory. Two transport parameters, the fractional contribution of large pores (αLP and the total hydraulic conductivity (LpS of the capillary membrane, were estimated from patient data. Changes in the intensity and direction of individual fluid and solute flows through each part of the transport system were analyzed in relation to the choice of different values of small pores radius and fractional conductivity, lymphatic sensitivity to hydraulic pressure, and steady-state interstitial-to-plasma protein concentration ratio.The estimated values of LpS and αLP were respectively 10.0 ± 8.4 mL/min/mmHg (mean ± standard deviation and 0.062 ± 0.041. The model was able to predict with good accuracy the profiles of plasma volume and serum total protein concentration in most of the patients (average root-mean-square deviation < 2% of the measured value.The applied model provides a mechanistic interpretation of fluid transport processes induced by ultrafiltration during HD, using a minimum of tuned parameters and assumptions. The simulated values of individual flows through each kind of pore and lymphatic absorption rate yielded by the model may suggest answers to unsolved questions on the relative impact of these not-measurable quantities on total vascular refilling and fluid balance.

  8. Glider observations and modeling of sediment transport in Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Travis; Seroka, Greg; Kohut, Josh; Schofield, Oscar; Glenn, Scott

    2015-03-01

    Regional sediment resuspension and transport are examined as Hurricane Sandy made landfall on the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) in October 2012. A Teledyne-Webb Slocum glider, equipped with a Nortek Aquadopp current profiler, was deployed on the continental shelf ahead of the storm, and is used to validate sediment transport routines coupled to the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). The glider was deployed on 25 October, 5 days before Sandy made landfall in southern New Jersey (NJ) and flew along the 40 m isobath south of the Hudson Shelf Valley. We used optical and acoustic backscatter to compare with two modeled size classes along the glider track, 0.1 and 0.4 mm sand, respectively. Observations and modeling revealed full water column resuspension for both size classes for over 24 h during peak waves and currents, with transport oriented along-shelf toward the southwest. Regional model predictions showed over 3 cm of sediment eroded on the northern portion of the NJ shelf where waves and currents were the highest. As the storm passed and winds reversed from onshore to offshore on the southern portion of the domain waves and subsequently orbital velocities necessary for resuspension were reduced leading to over 3 cm of deposition across the entire shelf, just north of Delaware Bay. This study highlights the utility of gliders as a new asset in support of the development and verification of regional sediment resuspension and transport models, particularly during large tropical and extratropical cyclones when in situ data sets are not readily available.

  9. A reconstruction of solar irradiance using a flux transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasi Espuig, Maria; Jiang, Jie; Krivova, Natalie; Solanki, Sami

    2013-04-01

    Reconstructions of solar irradiance into the past are of considerable interest for studies of solar influence on climate. Models based on the assumption that irradiance changes are caused by the evolution of the photospheric magnetic field have been the most successful in reproducing the measured irradiance variations. Our SATIRE-S model is one of these. It uses solar full-disc magnetograms as an input, and these are available for less than four decades. Thus, to reconstruct the irradiance back to times when no observed magnetograms are available, we combine the SATIRE-S model with synthetic magnetograms, produced using a surface flux transport model. The model is fed with daily, observed or modelled statistically, records of sunspot positions, areas, and tilt angles. To describe the secular change in the irradiance, we used the concept of overlapping ephemeral region cycles. With this technique TSI can be reconstructed back to 1610.

  10. Generalized heat-transport equations: parabolic and hyperbolic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogolino, Patrizia; Kovács, Robert; Ván, Peter; Cimmelli, Vito Antonio

    2018-03-01

    We derive two different generalized heat-transport equations: the most general one, of the first order in time and second order in space, encompasses some well-known heat equations and describes the hyperbolic regime in the absence of nonlocal effects. Another, less general, of the second order in time and fourth order in space, is able to describe hyperbolic heat conduction also in the presence of nonlocal effects. We investigate the thermodynamic compatibility of both models by applying some generalizations of the classical Liu and Coleman-Noll procedures. In both cases, constitutive equations for the entropy and for the entropy flux are obtained. For the second model, we consider a heat-transport equation which includes nonlocal terms and study the resulting set of balance laws, proving that the corresponding thermal perturbations propagate with finite speed.

  11. Assessing policies towards sustainable transport in Europe: an integrated model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachariadis, Theodoros

    2005-01-01

    A transport simulation and forecast model is presented, which is designed for the assessment of policy options aiming to achieve sustainability in transportation. Starting from a simulation of the economic behaviour of consumers and producers within a microeconomic optimisation framework and the resulting calculation of the modal split, the allocation of the vehicle stock into vintages and technological groups is modelled. In a third step, a technology-oriented algorithm, which incorporates the relevant state-of-the-art knowledge in Europe, calculates emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases as well as appropriate indicators for traffic congestion, noise and road accidents. The paper outlines the methodology and the basic data sources used in connection with work done so far in Europe, presents the outlook according to a 'reference case' run for the 15 current European Union Member States up to 2030, displays aggregate results from a number of alternative scenarios and outlines elements of future work

  12. Macroscopic Modeling of Transport Phenomena in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian

    An increasing need for energy efficiency and high energy density has sparked a growing interest in direct methanol fuel cells for portable power applications. This type of fuel cell directly generates electricity from a fuel mixture consisting of methanol and water. Although this technology...... for studying their transport. In this PhD dissertation the macroscopic transport phenomena governing direct methanol fuel cell operation are analyzed, discussed and modeled using the two-fluid approach in the computational fluid dynamics framework of CFX 14. The overall objective of this work is to extend...... the present fundamental understanding of direct methanol fuel cell operation by developing a three-dimensional, two-phase, multi-component, non-isotherm mathematical model including detailed non-ideal thermodynamics, non-equilibrium phase change and non-equilibrium sorption-desorption of methanol and water...

  13. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Locatelli, R.; Bousquet, P.; Chevallier, F.; Fortems-Cheney, A.; Szopa, S.; Saunois, M.; Agusti-Panareda, A.; Bergmann, D.; Bian, H.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Chipperfield, M.P.; Gloor, E.; Houweling, S.; Kawa, S.R.; Krol, M.C.; Patra, P.K.; Prinn, R.G.; Rigby, M.; Saito, R.; Wilson, C.

    2013-01-01

    A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model outputs from the international TransCom-CH4 model inter-comparison exercise,

  14. Validation of Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment ozone profiles and evaluation of stratospheric transport in a global chemistry transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, A.T.J.; Landgraf, J.; Aben, I.; Hasekamp, O.; Bregman, B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a validation of Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) ozone (O3) profiles which are used to evaluate stratospheric transport in the chemistry transport model (CTM) Tracer Model version 5 (TM5) using a linearized stratospheric O3 chemistry scheme. A

  15. Validation of Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment zone profiles and evaluation of stratospheric transport in a global chemistry transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, A.T.J.de; Landgraf, J.; Aben, I.; Hasekamp, O.; Bregman, B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a validation of Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) ozone (O3) profiles which are used to evaluate stratospheric transport in the chemistry transport model (CTM) Tracer Model version 5 (TM5) using a linearized stratospheric O3 chemistry scheme. A comparison of GOME O3

  16. Modelling reactive transport in a phosphogypsum dump, Venezia, Italia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcara, Massimo; Borgia, Andrea; Cattaneo, Laura; Bartolo, Sergio; Clemente, Gianni; Glauco Amoroso, Carlo; Lo Re, Fabio; Tozzato, Elena

    2013-04-01

    We develop a reactive-transport porous media flow model for a phosphogypsum dump located on the intertidal deposits of the Venetian Lagoon: 1. we construct a complex conceptual and geologic model from field data using the GMS™ graphical user interface; 2. the geological model is mapped onto a rectangular MODFLOW grid; 3. using the TMT2 FORTRAN90 code we translate this grid into the MESH, INCON and GENER input files for the TOUGH2 series of codes; 4. we run TOUGH-REACT to model flow and reactive transport in the dump and the sediments below it. The model includes 3 different dump materials (phosphogypsum, bituminous and hazardous wastes) with the pores saturated by specific fluids. The sediments below the dump are formed by an intertidal sequence of calcareous sands and silts, in addition to clays and organic deposits, all of which are initially saturated with lagoon salty waters. The recharge rain-water dilutes the dump fluids. In turn, the percolates from the dump react with the underlying sediments and the sea water that saturates them. Simulation results have been compared with chemical sampled analyses. In fact, in spite of the simplicity of our model we are able to show how the pH becomes neutral at a short distance below the dump, a fact observed during aquifer monitoring. The spatial and temporal evolution of dissolution and precipitation reactions occur in our model much alike reality. Mobility of some elements, such as divalent iron, are reduced by specific and concurrent conditions of pH from near-neutrality to moderately high values and positive redox potential; opposite conditions favour mobility of potentially toxic metals such as Cr, As Cd and Pb. Vertical movement are predominant. Trend should be therefore heavily influenced by pH and Eh values. If conditions are favourable to mobility, concentration of these substances in the bottom strata could be high. However, simulation suggest that the sediments tend to reduce the transport potential of

  17. Evaluating transport in the WRF model along the California coast

    OpenAIRE

    C. E. Yver; H. D. Graven; D. D. Lucas; P. J. Cameron-Smith; R. F. Keeling; R. F. Weiss

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a step in the development of a top-down method to complement the bottom-up inventories of halocarbon emissions in California using high frequency observations, forward simulations and inverse methods. The Scripps Institution of Oceanography high-frequency atmospheric halocarbons measurement sites are located along the California coast and therefore the evaluation of transport in the chosen Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model at these sites is crucial fo...

  18. Evaluating transport in the WRF model along the California coast

    OpenAIRE

    C. Yver; H. Graven; D. D. Lucas; P. Cameron-Smith; R. Keeling; R. Weiss

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a step in the development of a top-down method to complement the bottom-up inventories of halocarbon emissions in California using high frequency observations, forward simulations and inverse methods. The Scripps Institution of Oceanography high-frequency atmospheric halocarbon measurement sites are located along the California coast and therefore the evaluation of transport in the chosen Weather Research Forecast (WRF) model at these sites is crucial for inverse mo...

  19. Analytic solution of a five-direction radiation transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, S.N.

    1988-01-01

    In order to test certain spatial and angular dependent Monte Carlo biasing techniques, a one-dimensional, one energy, two-media, five-direction radiation transport model has been devised for which an analytic solution exists. Although this solution is too long to be conveniently expressed in an explicit form, it can be easily evaluated on the smallest of computers. This solution is discussed in this paper. 1 ref

  20. Modeling bacteria fate and transport in watersheds to support TMDLs

    OpenAIRE

    Benham, B. L.; Baffaut, C.; Zeckoski, R. W.; Mankin, K. R.; Pachepsky, Y. A.; Sadeghi, A. A.; Brannan, Kevin M.; Soupir, M. L.; Habersack, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    Fecal contamination of surface waters is a critical water-quality issue, leading to human illnesses and deaths. Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs), which set pollutant limits, are being developed to address fecal bacteria impairments. Watershed models are widely used to support TMDLs, although their use for simulating in-stream fecal bacteria concentrations is somewhat rudimentary. This article provides an overview of fecal microorganism fate and transport within watersheds, describes current ...

  1. Modelling the Molecular Transportation of Subcutaneously Injected Salubrinal

    OpenAIRE

    Andy Chen; Ping Zhang; Zhiyao Duan; Guofeng Wang; Hiroki Yokota

    2011-01-01

    For the subcutaneous administration of a chemical agent (salubrinal), we constructed a mathematical model of molecule transportation and subsequently evaluated the kinetics of diffusion, convection, and molecular turnover. Salubrinal is a potential therapeutic agent that can reduce cellular damage and death. The understanding of its temporal profiles in local tissue as well as in a whole body is important to develop a proper strategy for its administration. Here, the diffusion and convection ...

  2. Multiphysical modelling of fluid transport through osteo-articular media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Lemaire

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a multiphysical description of fluid transport through osteo-articular porous media is presented. Adapted from the model of Moyne and Murad, which is intended to describe clayey materials behaviour, this multiscale modelling allows for the derivation of the macroscopic response of the tissue from microscopical information. First the model is described. At the pore scale, electrohydrodynamics equations governing the electrolyte movement are coupled with local electrostatics (Gauss-Poisson equation, and ionic transport equations. Using a change of variables and an asymptotic expansion method, the macroscopic description is carried out. Results of this model are used to show the importance of couplings effects on the mechanotransduction of compact bone remodelling.Neste estudo uma descrição multifísica do transporte de fluidos em meios porosos osteo articulares é apresentada. Adaptado a partir do modelo de Moyne e Murad proposto para descrever o comportamento de materiais argilosos a modelagem multiescala permite a derivação da resposta macroscópica do tecido a partir da informação microscópica. Na primeira parte o modelo é apresentado. Na escala do poro as equações da eletro-hidrodinâmica governantes do movimento dos eletrolitos são acopladas com a eletrostática local (equação de Gauss-Poisson e as equações de transporte iônico. Usando uma mudança de variáveis e o método de expansão assintótica a derivação macroscópica é conduzida. Resultados do modelo proposto são usados para salientar a importância dos efeitos de acoplamento sobre a transdução mecânica da remodelagem de ossos compactados.

  3. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, P; Van Sebille, E

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics floating on the ocean surface from 2015 to 2025, with the goal to assess the optimal marine microplastic removal locations for two scenarios: removing the most surface microplastic and reducing the ...

  4. A model problem concerning ionic transport in microstructured solid electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curto Sillamoni, Ignacio J.; Idiart, Martín I.

    2015-11-01

    We consider ionic transport by diffusion and migration through microstructured solid electrolytes. The assumed constitutive relations for the constituent phases follow from convex energy and dissipation potentials which guarantee thermodynamic consistency. The effective response is determined by homogenizing the relevant field equations via the notion ofmulti-scale convergence. The resulting homogenized response involves several effective tensors, but they all require the solution of just one standard conductivity problem over the representative volume element. A multi-scale model for semicrystalline polymer electrolytes with spherulitic morphologies is derived by applying the theory to a specific class of two-dimensional microgeometries for which the effective response can be computed exactly. An enriched model accounting for a random dispersion of filler particles with interphases is also derived. In both cases, explicit expressions for the effective material parameters are provided. The models are used to explore the effect of crystallinity and filler content on the overall response. Predictions support recent experimental observations on doped poly-ethylene-oxide systems which suggest that the anisotropic crystalline phase can actually support faster ion transport than the amorphous phase along certain directions dictated by the morphology of the polymeric chains. Predictions also support the viewpoint that ceramic fillers improve ionic conductivity and cation transport number via interphasial effects.

  5. Connectivity, flow and transport in network models of fractured media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, P.C.

    1984-10-01

    In order to evaluate the safety of radioactive waste disposal underground it is important to understand the way in which radioactive material is transported through the rock to the surface. If the rock is fractured the usual models may not be applicable. In this work we look at three aspects of fracture networks: connectivity, flow and transport. These are studied numerically by generating fracture networks in a computer and modelling the processes which occur. Connectivity relates to percolation theory, and critical densities for fracture systems are found in two and three dimensions. The permeability of two-dimensional networks is studied. The way that permeability depends on fracture density, network size and spread of fracture length can be predicted using a cut lattice model. Transport through the fracture network by convection through the fractures and mixing at the intersections is studied. The Fickian dispersion equation does not describe the resulting hydrodynamic dispersion. Extensions to the techniques to three dimensions and to include other processes are discussed. (author)

  6. Modeling of transport phenomena in tokamak plasmas with neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneghini, O., E-mail: meneghini@fusion.gat.com [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, 120 Badger Ave, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Luna, C. J. [Arizona State University, 411 N. Central Ave, Phoenix, Arizona 85004 (United States); Smith, S. P.; Lao, L. L. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    A new transport model that uses neural networks (NNs) to yield electron and ion heat flux profiles has been developed. Given a set of local dimensionless plasma parameters similar to the ones that the highest fidelity models use, the NN model is able to efficiently and accurately predict the ion and electron heat transport profiles. As a benchmark, a NN was built, trained, and tested on data from the 2012 and 2013 DIII-D experimental campaigns. It is found that NN can capture the experimental behavior over the majority of the plasma radius and across a broad range of plasma regimes. Although each radial location is calculated independently from the others, the heat flux profiles are smooth, suggesting that the solution found by the NN is a smooth function of the local input parameters. This result supports the evidence of a well-defined, non-stochastic relationship between the input parameters and the experimentally measured transport fluxes. The numerical efficiency of this method, requiring only a few CPU-μs per data point, makes it ideal for scenario development simulations and real-time plasma control.

  7. A quasi-linear gyrokinetic transport model for tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casati, A.

    2009-10-01

    After a presentation of some basics around nuclear fusion, this research thesis introduces the framework of the tokamak strategy to deal with confinement, hence the main plasma instabilities which are responsible for turbulent transport of energy and matter in such a system. The author also briefly introduces the two principal plasma representations, the fluid and the kinetic ones. He explains why the gyro-kinetic approach has been preferred. A tokamak relevant case is presented in order to highlight the relevance of a correct accounting of the kinetic wave-particle resonance. He discusses the issue of the quasi-linear response. Firstly, the derivation of the model, called QuaLiKiz, and its underlying hypotheses to get the energy and the particle turbulent flux are presented. Secondly, the validity of the quasi-linear response is verified against the nonlinear gyro-kinetic simulations. The saturation model that is assumed in QuaLiKiz, is presented and discussed. Then, the author qualifies the global outcomes of QuaLiKiz. Both the quasi-linear energy and the particle flux are compared to the expectations from the nonlinear simulations, across a wide scan of tokamak relevant parameters. Therefore, the coupling of QuaLiKiz within the integrated transport solver CRONOS is presented: this procedure allows the time-dependent transport problem to be solved, hence the direct application of the model to the experiment. The first preliminary results regarding the experimental analysis are finally discussed

  8. Ground-water solute transport modeling using a three-dimensional scaled model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crider, S.S.

    1987-01-01

    Scaled models are used extensively in current hydraulic research on sediment transport and solute dispersion in free surface flows (rivers, estuaries), but are neglected in current ground-water model research. Thus, an investigation was conducted to test the efficacy of a three-dimensional scaled model of solute transport in ground water. No previous results from such a model have been reported. Experiments performed on uniform scaled models indicated that some historical problems (e.g., construction and scaling difficulties; disproportionate capillary rise in model) were partly overcome by using simple model materials (sand, cement and water), by restricting model application to selective classes of problems, and by physically controlling the effect of the model capillary zone. Results from these tests were compared with mathematical models. Model scaling laws were derived for ground-water solute transport and used to build a three-dimensional scaled model of a ground-water tritium plume in a prototype aquifer on the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. Model results compared favorably with field data and with a numerical model. Scaled models are recommended as a useful additional tool for prediction of ground-water solute transport

  9. How Open Data Shapes In Silico Transporter Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, Floriane; Zdrazil, Barbara

    2017-03-07

    Chemical compound bioactivity and related data are nowadays easily available from open data sources and the open medicinal chemistry literature for many transmembrane proteins. Computational ligand-based modeling of transporters has therefore experienced a shift from local (quantitative) models to more global, qualitative, predictive models. As the size and heterogeneity of the data set rises, careful data curation becomes even more important. This includes, for example, not only a tailored cutoff setting for the generation of binary classes, but also the proper assessment of the applicability domain. Powerful machine learning algorithms (such as multi-label classification) now allow the simultaneous prediction of multiple related targets. However, the more complex, the less interpretable these models will get. We emphasize that transmembrane transporters are very peculiar, some of which act as off-targets rather than as real drug targets. Thus, careful selection of the right modeling technique is important, as well as cautious interpretation of results. We hope that, as more and more data will become available, we will be able to ameliorate and specify our models, coming closer towards function elucidation and the development of safer medicine.

  10. Analysis of Intelligent Transportation Systems Using Model-Driven Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Fernández-Isabel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITSs integrate information, sensor, control, and communication technologies to provide transport related services. Their users range from everyday commuters to policy makers and urban planners. Given the complexity of these systems and their environment, their study in real settings is frequently unfeasible. Simulations help to address this problem, but present their own issues: there can be unintended mistakes in the transition from models to code; their platforms frequently bias modeling; and it is difficult to compare works that use different models and tools. In order to overcome these problems, this paper proposes a framework for a model-driven development of these simulations. It is based on a specific modeling language that supports the integrated specification of the multiple facets of an ITS: people, their vehicles, and the external environment; and a network of sensors and actuators conveniently arranged and distributed that operates over them. The framework works with a model editor to generate specifications compliant with that language, and a code generator to produce code from them using platform specifications. There are also guidelines to help researchers in the application of this infrastructure. A case study on advanced management of traffic lights with cameras illustrates its use.

  11. Qubit transport model for unitary black hole evaporation without firewalls*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuga, Kento; Page, Don N.

    2018-03-01

    We give an explicit toy qubit transport model for transferring information from the gravitational field of a black hole to the Hawking radiation by a continuous unitary transformation of the outgoing radiation and the black hole gravitational field. The model has no firewalls or other drama at the event horizon, and it avoids a counterargument that has been raised for subsystem transfer models as resolutions of the firewall paradox. Furthermore, it fits the set of six physical constraints that Giddings has proposed for models of black hole evaporation. It does utilize nonlocal qubits for the gravitational field but assumes that the radiation interacts locally with these nonlocal qubits, so in some sense the nonlocality is confined to the gravitational sector. Although the qubit model is too crude to be quantitatively correct for the detailed spectrum of Hawking radiation, it fits qualitatively with what is expected.

  12. Cost damping and functional form in transport models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Jeppe; Mabit, Stefan Lindhard

    2016-01-01

    take different forms and be represented as a non-linear-in-parameter form such as the well-known Box–Cox function. However, it could also be specified as non-linear-in-cost but linear-in-parameter forms, which are easier to estimate and improve model fit without increasing the number of parameters....... The specific contributions of the paper are as follows. Firstly, we discuss the phenomenon of cost damping in details and specifically why it occurs. Secondly, we provide a test of damping and an easy assessment of the (linear) damping rate for any variable by estimating two auxiliary linear models. This turns......Transport models allowing for cost damping are characterised by marginally decreasing cost sensitivities in demand. As a result, cost damping is a model extension of the simple linear-in-cost model requiring an appropriate non-linear link function between utility and cost. The link function may...

  13. Development of CANDU 6 Primary Heat Transport System Modeling Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Hyung-beom; Kim, Sung-min; Park, Joong-woo; Kim, Kwang-su; Ko, Dae-hack; Han, Bong-seob

    2007-01-01

    NUCIRC is a steady-state thermal-hydraulic code used for design and performance analyses of CANDU Heat Transport System. The code is used to build PHT model in Wolsong NPP and to calculate channel flow distribution. Wolsong NPP has to calculate channel flow distribution and quality of coolant at the ROH header after every outage by OPP (Operating Policy and Principal). PHT modeling work is time consuming which need a lot of operation experience and specialty. It is very difficult to build PHT model as plant operator in two weeks which is obligate for plant operation after every outage. That is why Wolsong NPP develop NUMODEL (NUcirc MODELing) with many-years experience and a know-how of using NUCIRC code. NUMODEL is computer program which is used to create PHT model based on utilizing NUCIRC code

  14. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the PATHWAY radionuclide transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otis, M.D.

    1983-01-01

    Procedures were developed for the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of a dynamic model of radionuclide transport through human food chains. Uncertainty in model predictions was estimated by propagation of parameter uncertainties using a Monte Carlo simulation technique. Sensitivity of model predictions to individual parameters was investigated using the partial correlation coefficient of each parameter with model output. Random values produced for the uncertainty analysis were used in the correlation analysis for sensitivity. These procedures were applied to the PATHWAY model which predicts concentrations of radionuclides in foods grown in Nevada and Utah and exposed to fallout during the period of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in Nevada. Concentrations and time-integrated concentrations of iodine-131, cesium-136, and cesium-137 in milk and other foods were investigated. 9 figs., 13 tabs

  15. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.L. Hardin

    2000-07-17

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II).

  16. Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E.L. Hardin

    2000-01-01

    The Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is one of nine PMRs supporting the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) being developed by the Yucca Mountain Project for the Site Recommendation Report (SRR). The EBS PMR summarizes the development and abstraction of models for processes that govern the evolution of conditions within the emplacement drifts of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Details of these individual models are documented in 23 supporting Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs). Nineteen of these AMRs are for process models, and the remaining 4 describe the abstraction of results for application in TSPA. The process models themselves cluster around four major topics: ''Water Distribution and Removal Model, Physical and Chemical Environment Model, Radionuclide Transport Model, and Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model''. One AMR (Engineered Barrier System-Features, Events, and Processes/Degradation Modes Analysis) summarizes the formal screening analysis used to select the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) included in TSPA and those excluded from further consideration. Performance of a potential Yucca Mountain high-level radioactive waste repository depends on both the natural barrier system (NBS) and the engineered barrier system (EBS) and on their interactions. Although the waste packages are generally considered as components of the EBS, the EBS as defined in the EBS PMR includes all engineered components outside the waste packages. The principal function of the EBS is to complement the geologic system in limiting the amount of water contacting nuclear waste. A number of alternatives were considered by the Project for different EBS designs that could provide better performance than the design analyzed for the Viability Assessment. The design concept selected was Enhanced Design Alternative II (EDA II)

  17. Modeling Fate and Transport of Rotavirus in Surface Flow by Integrating WEPP and a Pathogen Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, R.; Kalita, P. K.; Davidson, P. C.; Kuhlenschmidt, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    More than 3.5 million people die each year from a water related diseases in this world. Every 20 seconds, a child dies from a water-related illness. Even in a developed country like the United States, there have been at least 1870 outbreaks associated with drinking water during the period of 1920 to 2002, causing 883,806 illnesses. Most of these outbreaks are resulted due to the presence of microbial pathogens in drinking water. Rotavirus infection has been recognized as the most common cause of diarrhea in young children throughout the world. Laboratory experiments conducted at the University of Illinois have demonstrated that recovery of rotavirus has been significantly affected by climatic and soil-surface conditions like slope, soil types, and ground cover. The objective of this study is to simulate the fate and transport of Rotavirus in overland and near-surface flow using a process-based model. In order to capture the dynamics of sediment-bound pathogens, the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) is coupled with the pathogen transport model. Transport of pathogens in overland flow can be simulated mathematically by including terms for the concentration of the pathogens in the liquid phase (in suspension or free-floating) and the solid phase (adsorbed to the fine solid particles like clay and silt). Advection, adsorption, and decay processes are considered. The mass balance equations are solved using numerical technique to predict spatial and temporal changes in pathogen concentrations in two phases. Outputs from WEPP simulations (flow velocity, depth, saturated conductivity and the soil particle fraction exiting in flow) are transferred as input for the pathogen transport model. Three soil types and three different surface cover conditions have been used in the experimental investigations. Results from these conditions have been used in calibrating and validating the simulation results. Bare surface conditions have produced very good agreement between

  18. Fluid transport and ion fluxes in mammalian kidney proximal tubule: a model analysis of isotonic transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, E.H.; Møbjerg, N.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2006-01-01

    Aim: By mathematical modelling, we analyse conditions for near-isotonic and isotonic transport by mammalian kidney proximal tubule. Methods: The model comprises compliant lateral intercellular space (lis) and cells, and infinitely large luminal and peritubular compartments with diffusible species...... with luminal and peritubular baths of identical composition. Results: The model of the tubular epithelium with physiological water permeability and paracellular electrical resistance generates solute coupled water uptake with an approx. 3% hypertonic absorbate. This function remains unperturbed following...... simulates major physiological features of proximal tubule, including significantly lower water permeability of the AQP1-null preparation, and a ratio of net sodium uptake and oxygen consumption exceeding that predicted from stoichiometry of the Na+/K+-pump. Physical properties of interspace basement...

  19. Modeling water transport in liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenpeng; Wang, Chao-Yang

    Proper water management in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is very critical and complicated because of many interacting physicochemical phenomena. Among these, the liquid saturation in the cathode side is believed to have a very strong effect on water crossover through the membrane, a key parameter to determine water balance between the anode and cathode. In this paper, based on an interfacial liquid coverage model implemented in a three-dimensional (3D) two-phase DMFC model, the liquid saturation variations in the cathode are examined in detail and their effects on the net water transport coefficient through the membrane discussed.

  20. Jet propagation within a Linearized Boltzmann Transport model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Tan; He, Yayun [Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Wang, Xin-Nian [Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Nuclear Science Division, Mailstop 70R0319, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94740 (United States); Zhu, Yan [Departamento de Física de Partículas and IGFAE, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    A Linearized Boltzmann Transport (LBT) model has been developed for the study of parton propagation inside quark–gluon plasma. Both leading and thermal recoiled partons are tracked in order to include the effect of jet-induced medium excitation. In this talk, we present a study within the LBT model in which we implement the complete set of elastic parton scattering processes. We investigate elastic parton energy loss and their energy and length dependence. We further investigate energy loss and transverse shape of reconstructed jets. Contributions from the recoiled thermal partons and jet-induced medium excitations are found to have significant influences on the jet energy loss and transverse profile.

  1. Meteorological implementation issues in chemistry and transport models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Strahan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Offline chemistry and transport models (CTMs are versatile tools for studying composition and climate issues requiring multi-decadal simulations. They are computationally fast compared to coupled chemistry climate models, making them well-suited for integrating sensitivity experiments necessary for understanding model performance and interpreting results. The archived meteorological fields used by CTMs can be implemented with lower horizontal or vertical resolution than the original meteorological fields in order to shorten integration time, but the effects of these shortcuts on transport processes must be understood if the CTM is to have credibility. In this paper we present a series of sensitivity experiments on a CTM using the Lin and Rood advection scheme, each differing from another by a single feature of the wind field implementation. Transport effects arising from changes in resolution and model lid height are evaluated using process-oriented diagnostics that intercompare CH4, O3, and age tracer carried in the simulations. Some of the diagnostics used are derived from observations and are shown as a reality check for the model. Processes evaluated include tropical ascent, tropical-midlatitude exchange, poleward circulation in the upper stratosphere, and the development of the Antarctic vortex. We find that faithful representation of stratospheric transport in this CTM is possible with a full mesosphere, ~1 km resolution in the lower stratosphere, and relatively low vertical resolution (>4 km spacing in the middle stratosphere and above, but lowering the lid from the upper to lower mesosphere leads to less realistic constituent distributions in the upper stratosphere. Ultimately, this affects the polar lower stratosphere, but the effects are greater for the Antarctic than the Arctic. The fidelity of lower stratospheric transport requires realistic tropical and high latitude mixing barriers which are produced at 2°×2.5°, but not lower

  2. Transport Studies and Modeling in PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittelsteadt, Cortney K. [Giner, Inc., Auburndale, MA (United States); Xu, Hui [Giner, Inc., Auburndale, MA (United States); Brawn, Shelly [Giner, Inc., Auburndale, MA (United States)

    2014-07-30

    This project’s aim was to develop fuel cell components (i.e. membranes, gas-diffusion media (GDM), bipolar plates and flow fields) that possess specific properties (i.e. water transport and conductivity). A computational fluid dynamics model was developed to elucidate the effect of certain parameters on these specific properties. Ultimately, the model will be used to determine sensitivity of fuel cell performance to component properties to determine limiting components and to guide research. We have successfully reached our objectives and achieved most of the milestones of this project. We have designed and synthesized a variety of hydrocarbon block polymer membranes with lower equivalent weight, structure, chemistry, phase separation and process conditions. These membranes provide a broad selection with optimized water transport properties. We have also designed and constructed a variety of devices that are capable of accurately measuring the water transport properties (water uptake, water diffusivity and electro-osmatic drag) of these membranes. These transport properties are correlated to the membranes’ structures derived from X-ray and microscopy techniques to determine the structure-property relationship. We successfully integrated hydrocarbon membrane MEAs with a current distribution board (CBD) to study the impact of hydrocarbon membrane on water transport in fuel cells. We have designed and fabricated various GDM with varying substrate, diffusivity and micro-porous layers (MPL) and characterized their pore structure, tortuosity and hydrophobicity. We have derived a universal chart (MacMullin number as function of wet proofing and porosity) that can be used to characterize various GDM. The abovementioned GDMs have been evaluated in operating fuel cells; their performance is correlated to various pore structure, tortuosity and hydrophobicity of the GDM. Unfortunately, determining a universal relationship between the MacMullin number and these properties

  3. A whole range hygric material model: Modelling liquid and vapour transport properties in porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheffler, Gregor Albrecht; Plagge, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the modelling of hygric material coefficients bridging the gap between measured material properties and the non-linear storage and transport coefficients in the transfer equation. The conductivity approach and a bundle of tubes model are the basis. By extending this model...... with a mechanistic treatment of serial and parallel structured transport, a semi-empirical material model is developed. Deriving the transport properties from the pore structure of the material, the model provides a physical basis whereas a high flexibility and adjustability is obtained by the coupling...... with the mechanistic model. The required minimum input data are basic standard material properties. The model is very suitable for sophisticated research as well as for a broad application to porous materials in general....

  4. Paving the road from transport models to “new mobilities” models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind, Simon; Jensen, Ole B.; Kaplan, Sigal

    2012-01-01

    For half a century, tremendous efforts have been invested in developing transport models as a decision aid for policy makers in designing effective policy interventions and deciding among costly public projects for the benefit of the population. Transport and activity-based models are often...... criticized for neglecting the “new mobilities” turn (Urry 2007, Cresswell 2006), namely multiple mobility aspects and rationales, including social, cultural, material, aesthetic and affective, in analyzing travel behavior. This paper aims at taking a tentative first step in bridging the gap between...... the traditional transport modeling approach and “new mobilities” research by suggesting a model framework that considers non-instrumental transport rationales, personal latent traits and intra-household decision dynamics....

  5. Un problema de consenso para problemas de toma de decisiones multicriterio en grupo mediante relaciones de preferencia intervalares difusas lingüísticas || A Consensus Model for Group Multicriteria Decision Making Problems with Interval Fuzzy Preference Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amor Pulido, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available En el contexto de toma de decisiones multicriterio y bajo ciertas circunstancias, puede ocurrir que no se pueda expresar una cierta valoración mediante una única etiqueta lingüística, ya que puede haber duda en esa valoración. En este trabajo, presentamos un modelo de consenso para problemas de toma de decisiones en grupo con relaciones de preferencia intervalares lingüísticas. Este modelo está basado en dos criterios de consenso, una medida de consenso y una de proximidad, y en el concepto de coincidencia entre preferencias. Calcularemos ambos criterios en los tres niveles de representación de una relación de preferencia y diseñaremos un mecanismo de realimentación automático para guiar a los expertos en el proceso para alcanzar el consenso. || In some circumstances a decision maker, expert, in a group decision making problem cannot express his/her preferences with a unique linguistic fuzzy preference because he/she is dubious into some preferences. In this paper, we present a consensus model for group decision making problems with interval fuzzy preference relations. This model is based on two consensus criteria, a consensus measure and a proximity measure, and on the concept of co- incidence among preferences. We compute both consensus criteria in the three representation levels of a preference relation and design an automatic feedback mechanism to guide experts in the consensus reaching process.

  6. MODEL CAR TRANSPORT SYSTEM - MODERN ITS EDUCATION TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Bouchner

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The model car transport system is a laboratory intended for a practical development in the area of the motor traffic. It is also an important education tool for students’ hands-on training, enabling students to test the results of their own studies. The main part of the model car transportation network is a model in a ratio 1:87 (HO, based on component units of FALLER Car system, e.g. cars, traffic lights, carriage way, parking spaces, stop sections, branch-off junctions, sensors and control sections. The model enables to simulate real traffic situations. It includes a motor traffic in a city, in a small village, on a carriageway between a city and a village including a railway crossing. The traffic infrastructure includes different kinds of intersections, such as T-junctions, a classic four-way crossroad and four-way traffic circle, with and without traffic lights control. Another important part of the model is a segment of a highway which includes an elevated crossing with highway approaches and exits.

  7. GIS-Based Population Model Applied to Nevada Transportation Routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, G.S.; Neuhauser, K.S.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, a model based on geographic information system (GIS) processing of US Census Block data has made high-resolution population analysis for transportation risk analysis technically and economically feasible. Population density bordering each kilometer of a route may be tabulated with specific route sections falling into each of three categories (Rural, Suburban or Urban) identified for separate risk analysis. In addition to the improvement in resolution of Urban areas along a route, the model provides a statistically-based correction to population densities in Rural and Suburban areas where Census Block dimensions may greatly exceed the 800-meter scale of interest. A semi-automated application of the GIS model to a subset of routes in Nevada (related to the Yucca Mountain project) are presented, and the results compared to previous models including a model based on published Census and other data. These comparisons demonstrate that meaningful improvement in accuracy and specificity of transportation risk analyses is dependent on correspondingly accurate and geographically-specific population density data

  8. Simulations and Transport Models for Imbalanced Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chung-Sang; Dennis, T.

    2016-10-01

    We present results from a series of three-dimensional simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence based on reduced MHD equations. Alfven waves are launched from both ends of a long tube along the background uniform magnetic field so that turbulence develops due to collision between counter propagating Alfven waves in the interior region. Waves are launched randomly with specified correlation time Tc such that the length of the tube, L, is greater than (but of the same order of) VA *Tc such that turbulence can fill most of the tube. While waves at both ends are launched with equal power, turbulence generated is imbalanced in general, with normalized cross-helicity gets close to -1 at one end and 1 at the other end. This simulation setup allows easier comparison of turbulence properties with one-dimensional turbulence transport models, which have been applied rather successfully in modeling solar wind turbulence. However, direct comparison of such models with full simulations of solar wind turbulence is difficult due to much higher level of complexity involved. We will present our latest simulations at different resolutions with decreasing dissipation (resistivity and viscosity) levels and compare with model outputs from turbulence transport models. This work is supported by a NASA Grant NNX15AU61G.

  9. Web-based reactive transport modeling using PFLOTRAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H.; Karra, S.; Lichtner, P. C.; Versteeg, R.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Actionable understanding of system behavior in the subsurface is required for a wide spectrum of societal and engineering needs by both commercial firms and government entities and academia. These needs include, for example, water resource management, precision agriculture, contaminant remediation, unconventional energy production, CO2 sequestration monitoring, and climate studies. Such understanding requires the ability to numerically model various coupled processes that occur across different temporal and spatial scales as well as multiple physical domains (reservoirs - overburden, surface-subsurface, groundwater-surface water, saturated-unsaturated zone). Currently, this ability is typically met through an in-house approach where computational resources, model expertise, and data for model parameterization are brought together to meet modeling needs. However, such an approach has multiple drawbacks which limit the application of high-end reactive transport codes such as the Department of Energy funded[?] PFLOTRAN code. In addition, while many end users have a need for the capabilities provided by high-end reactive transport codes, they do not have the expertise - nor the time required to obtain the expertise - to effectively use these codes. We have developed and are actively enhancing a cloud-based software platform through which diverse users are able to easily configure, execute, visualize, share, and interpret PFLOTRAN models. This platform consists of a web application and available on-demand HPC computational infrastructure. The web application consists of (1) a browser-based graphical user interface which allows users to configure models and visualize results interactively, and (2) a central server with back-end relational databases which hold configuration, data, modeling results, and Python scripts for model configuration, and (3) a HPC environment for on-demand model execution. We will discuss lessons learned in the development of this platform, the

  10. Particle transport model sensitivity on wave-induced processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staneva, Joanna; Ricker, Marcel; Krüger, Oliver; Breivik, Oyvind; Stanev, Emil; Schrum, Corinna

    2017-04-01

    Different effects of wind waves on the hydrodynamics in the North Sea are investigated using a coupled wave (WAM) and circulation (NEMO) model system. The terms accounting for the wave-current interaction are: the Stokes-Coriolis force, the sea-state dependent momentum and energy flux. The role of the different Stokes drift parameterizations is investigated using a particle-drift model. Those particles can be considered as simple representations of either oil fractions, or fish larvae. In the ocean circulation models the momentum flux from the atmosphere, which is related to the wind speed, is passed directly to the ocean and this is controlled by the drag coefficient. However, in the real ocean, the waves play also the role of a reservoir for momentum and energy because different amounts of the momentum flux from the atmosphere is taken up by the waves. In the coupled model system the momentum transferred into the ocean model is estimated as the fraction of the total flux that goes directly to the currents plus the momentum lost from wave dissipation. Additionally, we demonstrate that the wave-induced Stokes-Coriolis force leads to a deflection of the current. During the extreme events the Stokes velocity is comparable in magnitude to the current velocity. The resulting wave-induced drift is crucial for the transport of particles in the upper ocean. The performed sensitivity analyses demonstrate that the model skill depends on the chosen processes. The results are validated using surface drifters, ADCP, HF radar data and other in-situ measurements in different regions of the North Sea with a focus on the coastal areas. The using of a coupled model system reveals that the newly introduced wave effects are important for the drift-model performance, especially during extremes. Those effects cannot be neglected by search and rescue, oil-spill, transport of biological material, or larva drift modelling.

  11. Building 235-F Goldsim Fate And Transport Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G. A.; Phifer, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, at the request of Area Completion Projects (ACP), evaluated In-Situ Disposal (ISD) alternatives that are under consideration for deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of Building 235-F and the Building 294-2F Sand Filter. SRNL personnel developed and used a GoldSim fate and transport model, which is consistent with Musall 2012, to evaluate relative to groundwater protection, ISD alternatives that involve either source removal and/or the grouting of portions or all of 235-F. This evaluation was conducted through the development and use of a Building 235-F GoldSim fate and transport model. The model simulates contaminant release from four 235-F process areas and the 294-2F Sand Filter. In addition, it simulates the fate and transport through the vadose zone, the Upper Three Runs (UTR) aquifer, and the Upper Three Runs (UTR) creek. The model is designed as a stochastic model, and as such it can provide both deterministic and stochastic (probabilistic) results. The results show that the median radium activity concentrations exceed the 5 ρCi/L radium MCL at the edge of the building for all ISD alternatives after 10,000 years, except those with a sufficient amount of inventory removed. A very interesting result was that grouting was shown to basically have minimal effect on the radium activity concentration. During the first 1,000 years grouting may have some small positive benefit relative to radium, however after that it may have a slightly deleterious effect. The Pb-210 results, relative to its 0.06 ρCi/L PRG, are essentially identical to the radium results, but the Pb-210 results exhibit a lesser degree of exceedance. In summary, some level of inventory removal will be required to ensure that groundwater standards are met

  12. Building 235-F Goldsim Fate And Transport Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, G. A.; Phifer, M. A.

    2012-09-14

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel, at the request of Area Completion Projects (ACP), evaluated In-Situ Disposal (ISD) alternatives that are under consideration for deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of Building 235-F and the Building 294-2F Sand Filter. SRNL personnel developed and used a GoldSim fate and transport model, which is consistent with Musall 2012, to evaluate relative to groundwater protection, ISD alternatives that involve either source removal and/or the grouting of portions or all of 235-F. This evaluation was conducted through the development and use of a Building 235-F GoldSim fate and transport model. The model simulates contaminant release from four 235-F process areas and the 294-2F Sand Filter. In addition, it simulates the fate and transport through the vadose zone, the Upper Three Runs (UTR) aquifer, and the Upper Three Runs (UTR) creek. The model is designed as a stochastic model, and as such it can provide both deterministic and stochastic (probabilistic) results. The results show that the median radium activity concentrations exceed the 5 ?Ci/L radium MCL at the edge of the building for all ISD alternatives after 10,000 years, except those with a sufficient amount of inventory removed. A very interesting result was that grouting was shown to basically have minimal effect on the radium activity concentration. During the first 1,000 years grouting may have some small positive benefit relative to radium, however after that it may have a slightly deleterious effect. The Pb-210 results, relative to its 0.06 ?Ci/L PRG, are essentially identical to the radium results, but the Pb-210 results exhibit a lesser degree of exceedance. In summary, some level of inventory removal will be required to ensure that groundwater standards are met.

  13. Fractal continuum model for tracer transport in a porous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Hernández, E C; Coronado, M; Hernández-Coronado, H

    2013-12-01

    A model based on the fractal continuum approach is proposed to describe tracer transport in fractal porous media. The original approach has been extended to treat tracer transport and to include systems with radial and uniform flow, which are cases of interest in geoscience. The models involve advection due to the fluid motion in the fractal continuum and dispersion whose mathematical expression is taken from percolation theory. The resulting advective-dispersive equations are numerically solved for continuous and for pulse tracer injection. The tracer profile and the tracer breakthrough curve are evaluated and analyzed in terms of the fractal parameters. It has been found in this work that anomalous transport frequently appears, and a condition on the fractal parameter values to predict when sub- or superdiffusion might be expected has been obtained. The fingerprints of fractality on the tracer breakthrough curve in the explored parameter window consist of an early tracer breakthrough and long tail curves for the spherical and uniform flow cases, and symmetric short tailed curves for the radial flow case.

  14. Modelling the Molecular Transportation of Subcutaneously Injected Salubrinal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For the subcutaneous administration of a chemical agent (salubrinal, we constructed a mathematical model of molecule transportation and subsequently evaluated the kinetics of diffusion, convection, and molecular turnover. Salubrinal is a potential therapeutic agent that can reduce cellular damage and death. The understanding of its temporal profiles in local tissue as well as in a whole body is important to develop a proper strategy for its administration. Here, the diffusion and convection kinetics was formulated using partial and ordinary differential equations in one- and three-dimensional (semi-spherical coordinates. Several key parameters including an injection velocity, a diffusion coefficient, thickness of subcutaneous tissue, and a permeability factor at the tissue-blood boundary were estimated from experimental data in rats. With reference to analytical solutions in a simplified model without convection, numerical solutions revealed that the diffusion coefficient and thickness of subcutaneous tissue determined the timing of the peak concentration in the plasma, and its magnitude was dictated by the permeability factor. Furthermore, the initial velocity, induced by needle injection, elevated an immediate transport of salubrinal at t < 1h. The described analysis with a combination of partial and ordinary differential equations contributes to the prediction of local and systemic effects and the understanding of the transportation mechanism of salubrinal and other agents.

  15. Modelling transport energy demand: A socio-technical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anable, Jillian; Brand, Christian; Tran, Martino; Eyre, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Despite an emerging consensus that societal energy consumption and related emissions are not only influenced by technical efficiency but also by lifestyles and socio-cultural factors, few attempts have been made to operationalise these insights in models of energy demand. This paper addresses that gap by presenting a scenario exercise using an integrated suite of sectoral and whole systems models to explore potential energy pathways in the UK transport sector. Techno-economic driven scenarios are contrasted with one in which social change is strongly influenced by concerns about energy use, the environment and well-being. The ‘what if’ Lifestyle scenario reveals a future in which distance travelled by car is reduced by 74% by 2050 and final energy demand from transport is halved compared to the reference case. Despite the more rapid uptake of electric vehicles and the larger share of electricity in final energy demand, it shows a future where electricity decarbonisation could be delayed. The paper illustrates the key trade-off between the more aggressive pursuit of purely technological fixes and demand reduction in the transport sector and concludes there are strong arguments for pursuing both demand and supply side solutions in the pursuit of emissions reduction and energy security.

  16. Modeling atrazine transport in soil columns with HYDRUS-1D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Leju Celestino Ladu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Both physical and chemical processes affect the fate and transport of herbicides. It is useful to simulate these processes with computer programs to predict solute movement. Simulations were run with HYDRUS-1D to identify the sorption and degradation parameters of atrazine through calibration from the breakthrough curves (BTCs. Data from undisturbed and disturbed soil column experiments were compared and analyzed using the dual-porosity model. The study results show that the values of dispersivity are slightly lower in disturbed columns, suggesting that the more heterogeneous the structure is, the higher the dispersivity. Sorption parameters also show slight variability, which is attributed to the differences in soil properties, experimental conditions and methods, or other ecological factors. For both of the columns, the degradation rates were similar. Potassium bromide was used as a conservative non-reactive tracer to characterize the water movement in columns. Atrazine BTCs exhibited significant tailing and asymmetry, indicating non-equilibrium sorption during solute transport. The dual-porosity model was verified to best fit the BTCs of the column experiments. Greater or lesser concentration of atrazine spreading to the bottom of the columns indicated risk of groundwater contamination. Overall, HYDRUS-1D successfully simulated the atrazine transport in soil columns.

  17. Modeling field scale unsaturated flow and transport processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelhar, L.W.; Celia, M.A.; McLaughlin, D.

    1994-08-01

    The scales of concern in subsurface transport of contaminants from low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities are in the range of 1 to 1,000 m. Natural geologic materials generally show very substantial spatial variability in hydraulic properties over this range of scales. Such heterogeneity can significantly influence the migration of contaminants. It is also envisioned that complex earth structures will be constructed to isolate the waste and minimize infiltration of water into the facility. The flow of water and gases through such facilities must also be a concern. A stochastic theory describing unsaturated flow and contamination transport in naturally heterogeneous soils has been enhanced by adopting a more realistic characterization of soil variability. The enhanced theory is used to predict field-scale effective properties and variances of tension and moisture content. Applications illustrate the important effects of small-scale heterogeneity on large-scale anisotropy and hysteresis and demonstrate the feasibility of simulating two-dimensional flow systems at time and space scales of interest in radioactive waste disposal investigations. Numerical algorithms for predicting field scale unsaturated flow and contaminant transport have been improved by requiring them to respect fundamental physical principles such as mass conservation. These algorithms are able to provide realistic simulations of systems with very dry initial conditions and high degrees of heterogeneity. Numerical simulation of the movement of water and air in unsaturated soils has demonstrated the importance of air pathways for contaminant transport. The stochastic flow and transport theory has been used to develop a systematic approach to performance assessment and site characterization. Hypothesis-testing techniques have been used to determine whether model predictions are consistent with observed data

  18. Some issues in two-dimensional modeling of tritium transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, S.W.

    1991-01-01

    Among the major processes leading to tritium transport through Li ceramic breeders the percolation of gaseous tritium species through the connected porosity remains the lest amenable to a satisfactory treatment. The combination of diffusion and reaction through the convoluted transport pathways prescribed by the system of pores poses a formidable challenge. The key issue is to make the fundamental connection between the tortuousity of the medium with the transport processes in terms of only basic parameters that are amenable to fundamental understanding and experimental determinations. This fundamental challenges is met within the following approaches. The technique that we have employed is a random network percolation model. Local transport in each individual pore channel is described by a set of convection-diffusion-reaction equations. Long range transport is described by a matrix technique. The heterogeneous structure of the medium is accounted for via Monte Carlo methods. In this way the approach requires as inputs only physical-chemical parameters that are amenable to clear basic understanding and experimental determination. In the sense it provides predictive capability. The approach has been applied to an analysis of the concept of tritium residence time which is associated with the first passage time, a direct output of our analysis. In the next stage of our work the tool that we have developed would be employed to investigate the issues of vary large networks, realistic microstructural information and the effect of varying pressure gradient along the purge channels. We have demonstrated that the approach that has been adopted can be utilized to analyze in a very illuminating way the underlying issues of the concept of residence time. We believe that the present approach is ideally suited to tackle these very important yet difficult issues

  19. Modeling bidirectional transport of quantum dot nanoparticles in membrane nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A V

    2011-08-01

    This paper develops a model of transport of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles in membrane nanotubes (MNTs). It is assumed that QDs are transported inside intracellular organelles (called here nanoparticle-loaded vesicles, NLVs) that are propelled by either kinesin or dynein molecular motors while moving on microtubules (MTs). A vesicle may have both types of motors attached to it, but the motors are assumed to work in a cooperative fashion, meaning that at a given time the vesicle is moved by either kinesin or dynein motors. The motors are assumed not to work against each other, when one type of motors is pulling the vesicle, the other type is inactive. From time to time the motors may switch their roles: passive motors can become active motors and vice versa, resulting in the change of the vesicle's direction of motion. It is further assumed that QDs can escape NLVs and become free QDs, which are then transported by diffusion. Free QDs can be internalized by NLVs. The effects of two possible types of MT orientation in MNTs are investigated: when all MTs have a uniform polarity orientation, with their plus-ends directed toward one of the cells connected by an MNT, and when MTs have a mixed polarity orientation, with half of MTs having their plus-ends directed toward one of the cells and the other half having their plus-ends directed toward the other cell. Computational results are presented for three cases. The first case is when organelles are as likely to be transported by kinesin motors as by dynein motors. The second case is when organelles are more likely to be transported by kinesin motors than by dynein motors, and the third case is when NLVs do not associate with dynein motors at all. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Calibration of a groundwater flow and contaminant transport computer model: Progress toward model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.R.; Ketelle, R.H.; Bownds, J.M.; Rizk, T.A.

    1989-09-01

    A groundwater flow and contaminant transport model calibration was performed to evaluate the ability of a typical, verified computer code to simulate groundwater tracer migration in the shallow aquifer of the Conasauga Group. Previously, standard practice site data interpretation and groundwater modeling resulted in inaccurate simulations of contaminant transport direction and rate compared with tracer migration behavior. The site's complex geology, the presence of flow in both fractured and weathered zones, and the transient character of flow in the shallow aquifer combined to render inaccurate assumptions of steady-state, homogeneous groundwater flow. The improvement of previous modeling results required iterative phases of conceptual model development, hypothesis testing, site field investigations, and modeling. The activities focused on generating a model grid that was compatible with site hydrogeologic conditions and on establishing boundary conditions based on site data. An annual average water table configuration derived from site data and fixed head boundary conditions was used as input for flow modeling. The contaminant transport model was combined with the data-driven flow model to obtain a preliminary contaminant plume. Calibration of the transport code was achieved by comparison with site tracer migration and concentration data. This study documents the influence of fractures and the transient character of flow and transport in the shallow aquifer. Although compatible with porous medium theory, site data demonstrate that the tracer migration pathway would not be anticipated using conventional porous medium analysis. 126 figs., 22 refs., 5 tabs

  1. Modeling of ionic transport in solid polymer electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheang, P L; Teo, L L; Lim, T L

    2010-01-01

    A Monte Carlo model describing the ionic trans port in solid polyme relectrolyte is developed. Single cation simulation is carried out using hopping rate to study the transport mechanism of a thermally activated ion in solid polymer electrolyte. In our model, the ion is able to hop along a polymer chain and to jump between different chains, surmounting energy barriers that consist of polymer's activation energy and the externally applied electric field. The model is able to trace the motion of ion across polymer electrolyte. The mean hopping distance is calculated based on the available open bond in the next nearest side. Random numbers are used to determine the hopping distances, free flight times, final energy and direction of the cation after successful hop. Drift velocity and energy of cation are simulated in our work. The model is expected to be able to simulate the lithium-polymer battery in future.

  2. Mathematical modeling of transport phenomena in porous SOFC anodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, M.M.; Li, X. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); Dincer, I. [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) Oshawa, Ontario L1H 7K4 (Canada)

    2007-01-15

    In the present study, a mathematical model describing the transport of multi-component species inside porous SOFC anodes is developed. The model considers the reaction zone layer as a distinct volume rather than a mere mathematical surface (boundary condition) as treated in the existing models. The reaction zone layer is a relatively thin layer in the vicinity of electrolyte where electrochemical H{sub 2} oxidation takes place to produce electrons and water vapor. The model also incorporates the effect of Knudsen diffusion in the porous electrode and reaction zone layers. Simulations are performed using multi-component ethanol reformate fuel to predict the distribution of multi-component species in the electrode and reaction zone layers at different loads (current densities). In addition, the effect of shift reaction on the concentration over-potential is examined. Moreover, the effect of treating reaction zone layer as a discrete volume is investigated. (author)

  3. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Ralph G.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    Computational modeling of radiation transport problems including homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety all depend upon material definitions. This document has been created to serve two purposes: (1) to provide a quick reference of material compositions for analysts and (2) a standardized reference to reduce the differences between results from two independent analysts. Analysts are always encountering a variety of materials for which elemental definitions are not readily available or densities are not defined. This document provides a location where unique or hard to define materials will be located to reduce duplication in research for modeling purposes. Additionally, having a common set of material definitions helps to standardize modeling across PNNL and provide two separate researchers the ability to compare different modeling results from a common materials basis.

  4. Land transportation model for supply chain manufacturing industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Fajar

    2017-12-01

    Supply chain is a system that integrates production, inventory, distribution and information processes for increasing productivity and minimize costs. Transportation is an important part of the supply chain system, especially for supporting the material distribution process, work in process products and final products. In fact, Jakarta as the distribution center of manufacturing industries for the industrial area. Transportation system has a large influences on the implementation of supply chain process efficiency. The main problem faced in Jakarta is traffic jam that will affect on the time of distribution. Based on the system dynamic model, there are several scenarios that can provide solutions to minimize timing of distribution that will effect on the cost such as the construction of ports approaching industrial areas other than Tanjung Priok, widening road facilities, development of railways system, and the development of distribution center.

  5. Modelling of Sediment Transport in Beris Fishery Port

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Ardani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the large amount of sedimentation and the resultant shoreline advancements at the breakwaters of Beris Fishery Port are studied. A series of numerical modeling of waves, sediment transport, and shoreline changes were conducted to predict the complicated equilibrium shoreline. The outputs show that the nearshore directions of wave components are not perpendicular to the coast which reveals the existence of longshore currents and consequently sediment transport along the bay. Considering the dynamic equilibrium condition of the bay, the effect of the existing sediment resources in the studied area is also investigated. The study also shows that in spite of the change of the diffraction point of Beris Bay after the construction of the fishery port, the bay is approaching its dynamic equilibrium condition, and the shoreline advancement behind secondary breakwater will stop before blocking the entrance of the port. The probable solutions to overcome the sedimentation problem at the main breakwater are also discussed.

  6. The international radioactive transportation regulations: A model for national regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, R.B.; Rawl, R.R.

    1990-06-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, Safety Series No. 6 (herein after denoted as the ''International Regulations'') serve as the model for the regulations for individual countries and international modal organizations controlling the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. The purpose of this paper is to outline the background and history of the International Regulations, the general principles behind the requirements of the International Regulations, the structure and general contents of the latest edition of the International Regulations, and the roles of various international bodies in the development and implementation of the International Regulations and the current status of regulatory and supportive document development at both the international and domestic level. This review will provide a basis for users and potential users to better understand the source and application of the International Regulations. 1 tab

  7. Vapor Transport Modeling of Continental Water Isotope Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritch, A. J.; Caves, J. K.; Ibarra, D. E.; Winnick, M. J.; Chamberlain, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    Stable isotopes have been widely used to reconstruct past climatic conditions and topographic histories of mountain belts. However, many studies do not account for the influences of evapotranspiration and vapor recycling on downstream meteoric water isotopic compositions. Here we present a case study of the modern Sierra Nevada and Basin and Range to illustrate the value of using process-based models across larger spatial scales to reconstruct the conditions driving local- to regional-scale water isotopic compositions. We use a one-dimensional reactive vapor transport model, driven by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) high-resolution North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) dataset, to simulate the isotopic composition of modern meteoric waters (δ18O and δD) along storm tracks across the Sierra Nevada and Basin and Range. Storm track pathways are generated using NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory's Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model. In addition, we couple the vapor transport model with a soil moisture model to simulate depth profiles of the oxygen isotopic composition of authigenic carbonate along our storm tracks. We show that, given reasonable estimates of the modern partitioning between evaporation and transpiration, our model output is in agreement with modern isotopic data both from compilations of published meteoric water samples and from newly collected soil carbonate samples along a transect across the northern Sierra Nevada and Basin and Range (~38-42° N). These results demonstrate that our modeling approach can be used to analyze the relative contributions of climate and topography to observed isotopic gradients. Future studies can apply this modeling framework to isotopes preserved in the geologic record to provide a quantitative means of understanding the paleoclimatic influences on spatial isotopic distributions.

  8. Aerosols and clouds in chemical transport models and climate models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann,U.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2008-03-02

    Clouds exert major influences on both shortwave and longwave radiation as well as on the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of clouds in climate models is a major unsolved problem because of high sensitivity of radiation and hydrology to cloud properties and processes, incomplete understanding of these processes, and the wide range of length scales over which these processes occur. Small changes in the amount, altitude, physical thickness, and/or microphysical properties of clouds due to human influences can exert changes in Earth's radiation budget that are comparable to the radiative forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gases, thus either partly offsetting or enhancing the warming due to these gases. Because clouds form on aerosol particles, changes in the amount and/or composition of aerosols affect clouds in a variety of ways. The forcing of the radiation balance due to aerosol-cloud interactions (indirect aerosol effect) has large uncertainties because a variety of important processes are not well understood precluding their accurate representation in models.

  9. Systematic evaluation of atmospheric chemistry-transport model CHIMERE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvorostyanov, Dmitry; Menut, Laurent; Mailler, Sylvain; Siour, Guillaume; Couvidat, Florian; Bessagnet, Bertrand; Turquety, Solene

    2017-04-01

    Regional-scale atmospheric chemistry-transport models (CTM) are used to develop air quality regulatory measures, to support environmentally sensitive decisions in the industry, and to address variety of scientific questions involving the atmospheric composition. Model performance evaluation with measurement data is critical to understand their limits and the degree of confidence in model results. CHIMERE CTM (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere/) is a French national tool for operational forecast and decision support and is widely used in the international research community in various areas of atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate, and environment (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/chimere/CW-articles.php). This work presents the model evaluation framework applied systematically to the new CHIMERE CTM versions in the course of the continuous model development. The framework uses three of the four CTM evaluation types identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the American Meteorological Society (AMS): operational, diagnostic, and dynamic. It allows to compare the overall model performance in subsequent model versions (operational evaluation), identify specific processes and/or model inputs that could be improved (diagnostic evaluation), and test the model sensitivity to the changes in air quality, such as emission reductions and meteorological events (dynamic evaluation). The observation datasets currently used for the evaluation are: EMEP (surface concentrations), AERONET (optical depths), and WOUDC (ozone sounding profiles). The framework is implemented as an automated processing chain and allows interactive exploration of the results via a web interface.

  10. Modeling flow and transport in fracture networks using graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karra, S.; O'Malley, D.; Hyman, J. D.; Viswanathan, H. S.; Srinivasan, G.

    2018-03-01

    Fractures form the main pathways for flow in the subsurface within low-permeability rock. For this reason, accurately predicting flow and transport in fractured systems is vital for improving the performance of subsurface applications. Fracture sizes in these systems can range from millimeters to kilometers. Although modeling flow and transport using the discrete fracture network (DFN) approach is known to be more accurate due to incorporation of the detailed fracture network structure over continuum-based methods, capturing the flow and transport in such a wide range of scales is still computationally intractable. Furthermore, if one has to quantify uncertainty, hundreds of realizations of these DFN models have to be run. To reduce the computational burden, we solve flow and transport on a graph representation of a DFN. We study the accuracy of the graph approach by comparing breakthrough times and tracer particle statistical data between the graph-based and the high-fidelity DFN approaches, for fracture networks with varying number of fractures and degree of heterogeneity. Due to our recent developments in capabilities to perform DFN high-fidelity simulations on fracture networks with large number of fractures, we are in a unique position to perform such a comparison. We show that the graph approach shows a consistent bias with up to an order of magnitude slower breakthrough when compared to the DFN approach. We show that this is due to graph algorithm's underprediction of the pressure gradients across intersections on a given fracture, leading to slower tracer particle speeds between intersections and longer travel times. We present a bias correction methodology to the graph algorithm that reduces the discrepancy between the DFN and graph predictions. We show that with this bias correction, the graph algorithm predictions significantly improve and the results are very accurate. The good accuracy and the low computational cost, with O (104) times lower times than

  11. ATR, Radiation Transport Models in Atmosphere at Various Altitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: ATR is a user-oriented code for calculating quickly and simply radiation environment problems at all altitudes in the atmosphere. The code is based on parametric models of a comprehensive data base of air transport results which were generated using discrete ordinates transport techniques for infinite homogeneous air. The effects of air-ground interface and non-uniform air density are treated as perturbation corrections on homogeneous air results. ATR includes parametric models for neutrons and secondary gamma rays as a function of space, energy and source- target angle out to angles of 550 g/cm 2 of air. ATR contains parameterizations of infinite medium air transport of neutrons and secondary gamma rays and correction factors for the air-ground interface and high altitude exponential air. It responds to a series of user-oriented commands which specify the source, geometry and print options to output a variety of useful air transport information, including energy-angle dependent fluence, dose, current, and isodose ranges. 2 - Method of solution: The version 3 differs from earlier versions in that version 3 contains the parameterization of the new neutron and secondary gamma rays data base that was calculated using the latest DNA approved cross sections for air. Other improvements to the ATR code include: parameterization and inclusion into ATR of new air- over-ground correction factors, low energy x-rays calculations, new fission source, and new convenience options. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: ATR takes approximately 36,000 decimal words of storage. This can be lessened by overlaying different parts of the code

  12. Integrated land-use and transport modelling using OTP to determine lowest cost trips

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Heerden, Q

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This presentation discusses the link between economic infrastructure, that includes transport, and social infrastructure that includes social well-being and the basic necessities of people. It shows how transport models and urban models influence...

  13. Cellular automaton model of mass transport with chemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karapiperis, T.; Blankleider, B.

    1993-10-01

    The transport and chemical reactions of solutes are modelled as a cellular automaton in which molecules of different species perform a random walk on a regular lattice and react according to a local probabilistic rule. The model describes advection and diffusion in a simple way, and as no restriction is placed on the number of particles at a lattice site, it is also able to describe a wide variety of chemical reactions. Assuming molecular chaos and a smooth density function, we obtain the standard reaction-transport equations in the continuum limit. Simulations on one-and two-dimensional lattices show that the discrete model can be used to approximate the solutions of the continuum equations. We discuss discrepancies which arise from correlations between molecules and how these discrepancies disappear as the continuum limit is approached. Of particular interest are simulations displaying long-time behaviour which depends on long-wavelength statistical fluctuations not accounted for by the standard equations. The model is applied to the reactions a + b ↔ c and a + b → c with homogeneous and inhomogeneous initial conditions as well as to systems subject to autocatalytic reactions and displaying spontaneous formation of spatial concentration patterns. (author) 9 figs., 34 refs

  14. Coupled Modeling of Rhizosphere and Reactive Transport Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque-Malo, S.; Kumar, P.

    2017-12-01

    The rhizosphere, as a bio-diverse plant root-soil interface, hosts many hydrologic and biochemical processes, including nutrient cycling, hydraulic redistribution, and soil carbon dynamics among others. The biogeochemical function of root networks, including the facilitation of nutrient cycling through absorption and rhizodeposition, interaction with micro-organisms and fungi, contribution to biomass, etc., plays an important role in myriad Critical Zone processes. Despite this knowledge, the role of the rhizosphere on watershed-scale ecohydrologic functions in the Critical Zone has not been fully characterized, and specifically, the extensive capabilities of reactive transport models (RTMs) have not been applied to these hydrobiogeochemical dynamics. This study uniquely links rhizospheric processes with reactive transport modeling to couple soil biogeochemistry, biological processes, hydrologic flow, hydraulic redistribution, and vegetation dynamics. Key factors in the novel modeling approach are: (i) bi-directional effects of root-soil interaction, such as simultaneous root exudation and nutrient absorption; (ii) multi-state biomass fractions in soil (i.e. living, dormant, and dead biological and root materials); (iii) expression of three-dimensional fluxes to represent both vertical and lateral interconnected flows and processes; and (iv) the potential to include the influence of non-stationary external forcing and climatic factors. We anticipate that the resulting model will demonstrate the extensive effects of plant root dynamics on ecohydrologic functions at the watershed scale and will ultimately contribute to a better characterization of efflux from both agricultural and natural systems.

  15. A stochastic model for colloid transport and deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, S A; Toride, N

    2007-01-01

    Profiles of retained colloids in porous media have frequently been observed to be hyper-exponential or non-monotonic with transport depth under unfavorable attachment conditions, whereas filtration theory predicts an exponential profile. In this work we present a stochastic model for colloid transport and deposition that allows various hypotheses for such deviations to be tested. The model is based on the conventional advective dispersion equation that accounts for first-order kinetic deposition and release of colloids. One or two stochastic parameters can be considered in this model, including the deposition coefficient, the release coefficient, and the average pore water velocity. In the case of one stochastic parameter, the probability density function (PDF) is characterized using log-normal, bimodal log-normal, or a simple two species/region formulation. When two stochastic parameters are considered, then a joint log-normal PDF is employed. Simulation results indicated that variations in the deposition coefficient and the average pore water velocity can both produce hyper-exponential deposition profiles. Bimodal formulations for the PDF were also able to produce hyper-exponential profiles, but with much lower variances in the deposition coefficient. The shape of the deposition profile was found to be very sensitive to the correlation of deposition and release coefficients, and to the correlation of pore water velocity and deposition coefficient. Application of the developed stochastic model to a particular set of colloid transport and deposition data indicated that chemical heterogeneity of the colloid population could not fully explain the observed behavior. Alternative interpretations were therefore proposed based on variability of the pore size and the water velocity distributions.

  16. Modeling transport phenomena and uncertainty quantification in solidification processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fezi, Kyle S.

    Direct chill (DC) casting is the primary processing route for wrought aluminum alloys. This semicontinuous process consists of primary cooling as the metal is pulled through a water cooled mold followed by secondary cooling with a water jet spray and free falling water. To gain insight into this complex solidification process, a fully transient model of DC casting was developed to predict the transport phenomena of aluminum alloys for various conditions. This model is capable of solving mixture mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation equations during multicomponent solidification. Various DC casting process parameters were examined for their effect on transport phenomena predictions in an alloy of commercial interest (aluminum alloy 7050). The practice of placing a wiper to divert cooling water from the ingot surface was studied and the results showed that placement closer to the mold causes remelting at the surface and increases susceptibility to bleed outs. Numerical models of metal alloy solidification, like the one previously mentioned, are used to gain insight into physical phenomena that cannot be observed experimentally. However, uncertainty in model inputs cause uncertainty in results and those insights. The analysis of model assumptions and probable input variability on the level of uncertainty in model predictions has not been calculated in solidification modeling as yet. As a step towards understanding the effect of uncertain inputs on solidification modeling, uncertainty quantification (UQ) and sensitivity analysis were first performed on a transient solidification model of a simple binary alloy (Al-4.5wt.%Cu) in a rectangular cavity with both columnar and equiaxed solid growth models. This analysis was followed by quantifying the uncertainty in predictions from the recently developed transient DC casting model. The PRISM Uncertainty Quantification (PUQ) framework quantified the uncertainty and sensitivity in macrosegregation, solidification

  17. Transportation Sector Model of the National Energy Modeling System. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Transportation Model (TRAN). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated by the model. The NEMS Transportation Model comprises a series of semi-independent models which address different aspects of the transportation sector. The primary purpose of this model is to provide mid-term forecasts of transportation energy demand by fuel type including, but not limited to, motor gasoline, distillate, jet fuel, and alternative fuels (such as CNG) not commonly associated with transportation. The current NEMS forecast horizon extends to the year 2010 and uses 1990 as the base year. Forecasts are generated through the separate consideration of energy consumption within the various modes of transport, including: private and fleet light-duty vehicles; aircraft; marine, rail, and truck freight; and various modes with minor overall impacts, such as mass transit and recreational boating. This approach is useful in assessing the impacts of policy initiatives, legislative mandates which affect individual modes of travel, and technological developments. The model also provides forecasts of selected intermediate values which are generated in order to determine energy consumption. These elements include estimates of passenger travel demand by automobile, air, or mass transit; estimates of the efficiency with which that demand is met; projections of vehicle stocks and the penetration of new technologies; and estimates of the demand for freight transport which are linked to forecasts of industrial output. Following the estimation of energy demand, TRAN produces forecasts of vehicular emissions of the following pollutants by source: oxides of sulfur, oxides of nitrogen, total carbon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds.

  18. Heat transport modeling of the dot spectroscopy platform on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, W. A.; Jones, O. S.; Barrios, M. A.; Strozzi, D. J.; Koning, J. M.; Kerbel, G. D.; Hinkel, D. E.; Moody, J. D.; Suter, L. J.; Liedahl, D. A.; Lemos, N.; Eder, D. C.; Kauffman, R. L.; Landen, O. L.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.

    2018-04-01

    Electron heat transport within an inertial-fusion hohlraum plasma is difficult to model due to the complex interaction of kinetic plasma effects, magnetic fields, laser-plasma interactions, and microturbulence. Here, simulations using the radiation-hydrodynamic code, HYDRA, are compared to hohlraum plasma experiments which contain a Manganese-Cobalt tracer dot (Barrios et al 2016 Phys. Plasmas 23 056307). The dot is placed either on the capsule or on a film midway between the capsule and the laser-entrance hole. From spectroscopic measurements, electron temperature and position of the dot are inferred. Simulations are performed with ad hoc flux limiters of f = 0.15 and f = 0.03 (with electron heat flux, q, limited to fnT 3/2/m 1/2), and two more physical means of flux limitation: the magnetohydrodynamics and nonlocal packages. The nonlocal model agrees best with the temperature of the dot-on-film and dot-on-capsule. The hohlraum produced x-ray flux is over-predicted by roughly ˜11% for the f = 0.03 model and the remaining models by ˜16%. The simulated trajectories of the dot-on-capsule are slightly ahead of the experimental trajectory for all but the f = 0.03 model. The simulated dot-on-film position disagrees with the experimental measurement for all transport models. In the MHD simulation of the dot-on-film, the dot is strongly perturbative, though the simulation predicts a peak dot-on-film temperature 2-3 keV higher than the measurement. This suggests a deficiency in the MHD modeling possibly due to the neglect of the Righi-Leduc term or interpenetrating flows of multiple ion species which would reduce the strength of the self-generated fields.

  19. Parameter estimation in six numerical models of transperitoneal transport of potassium in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Fugleberg, S; Joffe, P

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms of transperitoneal potassium transport during peritoneal dialysis were evaluated by validation of different mathematical models. The models were designed to elucidate the presence or absence of diffusive, non-lymphatic convective and lymphatic convective solute transport....... Experimental results were obtained from 26 non-diabetic patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. The validation procedure demonstrated that models including both diffusive and non-lymphatic convective solute transport were superior to the other models. Lymphatic convective solute transport was not identifiable...

  20. Contaminant transport model validation: The Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.R.; Ketelle, R.H.

    1988-09-01

    In the complex geologic setting on the Oak Ridge Reservation, hydraulic conductivity is anisotropic and flow is strongly influenced by an extensive and largely discontinuous fracture network. Difficulties in describing and modeling the aquifer system prompted a study to obtain aquifer property data to be used in a groundwater flow model validation experiment. Characterization studies included the performance of an extensive suite of aquifer test within a 600-square-meter area to obtain aquifer property values to describe the flow field in detail. Following aquifer test, a groundwater tracer test was performed under ambient conditions to verify the aquifer analysis. Tracer migration data in the near-field were used in model calibration to predict tracer arrival time and concentration in the far-field. Despite the extensive aquifer testing, initial modeling inaccurately predicted tracer migration direction. Initial tracer migration rates were consistent with those predicted by the model; however, changing environmental conditions resulted in an unanticipated decay in tracer movement. Evaluation of the predictive accuracy of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models on the Oak Ridge Reservation depends on defining the resolution required, followed by field testing and model grid definition at compatible scales. The use of tracer tests, both as a characterization method and to verify model results, provides the highest level of resolution of groundwater flow characteristics. 3 refs., 4 figs

  1. HADES. A computer code for fast neutron cross section from the Optical Model; HADES. Un programa numerico para el calculo de seccciones eficaces neutronicas mediante el modelo optico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guasp, J.; Navarro, C.

    1973-07-01

    A FORTRAN V computer code for UNIVAC 1108/6 using a local Optical Model with spin-orbit interaction is described. The code calculates fast neutron cross sections, angular distribution, and Legendre moments for heavy and intermediate spherical nuclei. It allows for the possibility of automatic variation of potential parameters for experimental data fitting. (Author) 55 refs.

  2. Modelling of transport processes in porous media for energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kangas, M.

    1996-12-31

    Flows in porous media are encountered in many branches of technology. In these phenomena, a fluid of some sort is flowing through porous matrix of a solid medium. Examples of the fluid are water, air, gas and oil. The solid matrix can be soil, fissured rock, ceramics, filter paper, etc. The flow is in many cases accompanied by transfer of heat or solute within the fluid or between the fluid and the surrounding solid matrix. Chemical reactions or microbiological processes may also be taking place in the system. In this thesis, a 3-dimensional computer simulation model THETA for the coupled transport of fluid, heat, and solute in porous media has been developed and applied to various problems in the field of energy research. Although also applicable to porous medium applications in general, the version of the model described and used in this work is intended for studying the transport processes in aquifers, which are geological formations containing groundwater. The model highlights include versatile input and output routines, as well as modularity which, for example, enables an easy adaptation of the model for use as a subroutine in large energy system simulations. Special attention in the model development has been attached to high flow conditions, which may be present in Nordic esker aquifers located close to the ground surface. The simulation model has been written with FORTRAN 77 programming language, enabling a seamless operation both in PC and main frame environments. For PC simulation, a special graphic user interface has been developed. The model has been used with success in a wide variety of applications, ranging from basic thermal analyses to thermal energy storage system evaluations and nuclear waste disposal simulations. The studies have shown that thermal energy storage is feasible also in Nordic high flow aquifers, although at the cost of lower recovery temperature level, usually necessitating the use of heat pumps. In the nuclear waste studies, it

  3. A multiscale transport model for non-classical nanochannel electroosmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadauria, Ravi; Aluru, N. R.

    2017-12-01

    We present a multiscale model describing the electroosmotic flow (EOF) in nanoscale channels involving high surface charge liquid-solid interfaces. The departure of the EOF velocity profiles from classical predictions is explained by the non-classical charge distribution in the confined direction including charge inversion, reduced mobility of interfacial counter-ions, and subsequent enhancement of the local viscosity. The excess component of the local solvent viscosity is modeled by the local application of the Fuoss-Onsager theory and the Hubbard-Onsager electro-hydrodynamic equation based dielectric friction theory. The electroosmotic slip velocity is estimated from the interfacial friction coefficient, which in turn is calculated using a generalized Langevin equation based dynamical framework. The proposed model for local viscosity enhancement and EOF velocity shows good agreement of corresponding physical quantities against relevant molecular dynamics simulation results, including the cases of anomalous transport such as EOF reversal.

  4. Modeling CO2-facilitated transport across a diethanolamine liquid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lihong Bao; Michael C. Trachtenberg [Carbozyme Inc., Monmouth Junction, NJ (United States)

    2005-12-15

    We compared experimental and model data for the facilitated transport of CO2 from a CO2-air mixture across an aqueous solution of diethanolamine (DEA) via a hollow fiber, contained liquid membrane (HFCLM) permeator. A two-step carbamate formation model was devised to analyze the data instead of the one-step mechanism used by previous investigators. The effects of DEA concentration, liquid membrane thickness and feed CO2 concentration were also studied. With a 20% (wt) DEA liquid membrane and feed of 15% CO2 in CO2-air mixture at atmosphere pressure, the permeance reached 1.51E-8 mol/m{sup 2} s Pa with a CO2/N2 selectivity of 115. Model predictions compared well with the experimental results at CO2 concentrations of industrial importance. Short-term stability of the HFCLM permeator performance was examined. The system was stable during 5-days of testing.

  5. Generalized transport model for phase transition with memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chi; Ciucci, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    A general model for phenomenological transport in phase transition is derived, which extends Jäckle and Frisch model of phase transition with memory and the Cahn–Hilliard model. In addition to including interfacial energy to account for the presence of interfaces, we introduce viscosity and relaxation contributions, which result from incorporating memory effect into the driving potential. Our simulation results show that even without interfacial energy term, the viscous term can lead to transient diffuse interfaces. From the phase transition induced hysteresis, we discover different energy dissipation mechanism for the interfacial energy and the viscosity effect. In addition, by combining viscosity and interfacial energy, we find that if the former dominates, then the concentration difference across the phase boundary is reduced; conversely, if the interfacial energy is greater then this difference is enlarged.

  6. Heat transport modelling in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Brunsell, P. R.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.

    2009-02-01

    A model to estimate the heat transport in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch (RFP) is described. The model, based on experimental and theoretical results, divides the RFP electron heat diffusivity χe into three regions, one in the plasma core, where χe is assumed to be determined by the tearing modes, one located around the reversal radius, where χe is assumed not dependent on the magnetic fluctuations and one in the extreme edge, where high χe is assumed. The absolute values of the core and of the reversal χe are determined by simulating the electron temperature and the soft x-ray and by comparing the simulated signals with the experimental ones. The model is used to estimate the heat diffusivity and the energy confinement time during the flat top of standard plasmas, of deep F plasmas and of plasmas obtained with the intelligent shell.

  7. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, R.; Bousquet, P.; Chevallier, F.; Fortems-Cheney, A.; Szopa, S.; Saunois, M.; Agusti-Panareda, A.; Bergmann, D.; Bian, H.; Cameron-Smith, P.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Gloor, E.; Houweling, S.; Kawa, S. R.; Krol, M.; Patra, P. K.; Prinn, R. G.; Rigby, M.; Saito, R.; Wilson, C.

    2013-10-01

    A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model outputs from the international TransCom-CH4 model inter-comparison exercise, are combined with a prior scenario of methane emissions and sinks, and integrated into the three-component PYVAR-LMDZ-SACS (PYthon VARiational-Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique model with Zooming capability-Simplified Atmospheric Chemistry System) inversion system to produce 10 different methane emission estimates at the global scale for the year 2005. The same methane sinks, emissions and initial conditions have been applied to produce the 10 synthetic observation datasets. The same inversion set-up (statistical errors, prior emissions, inverse procedure) is then applied to derive flux estimates by inverse modelling. Consequently, only differences in the modelling of atmospheric transport may cause differences in the estimated fluxes. In our framework, we show that transport model errors lead to a discrepancy of 27 Tg yr-1 at the global scale, representing 5% of total methane emissions. At continental and annual scales, transport model errors are proportionally larger than at the global scale, with errors ranging from 36 Tg yr-1 in North America to 7 Tg yr-1 in Boreal Eurasia (from 23 to 48%, respectively). At the model grid-scale, the spread of inverse estimates can reach 150% of the prior flux. Therefore, transport model errors contribute significantly to overall uncertainties in emission estimates by inverse modelling, especially when small spatial scales are examined. Sensitivity tests have been carried out to estimate the impact of the measurement network and the advantage of higher horizontal resolution in transport models. The large differences found between methane flux estimates inferred in these different configurations highly question the consistency of

  8. Impact of transport model errors on the global and regional methane emissions estimated by inverse modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Locatelli

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A modelling experiment has been conceived to assess the impact of transport model errors on methane emissions estimated in an atmospheric inversion system. Synthetic methane observations, obtained from 10 different model outputs from the international TransCom-CH4 model inter-comparison exercise, are combined with a prior scenario of methane emissions and sinks, and integrated into the three-component PYVAR-LMDZ-SACS (PYthon VARiational-Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique model with Zooming capability-Simplified Atmospheric Chemistry System inversion system to produce 10 different methane emission estimates at the global scale for the year 2005. The same methane sinks, emissions and initial conditions have been applied to produce the 10 synthetic observation datasets. The same inversion set-up (statistical errors, prior emissions, inverse procedure is then applied to derive flux estimates by inverse modelling. Consequently, only differences in the modelling of atmospheric transport may cause differences in the estimated fluxes. In our framework, we show that transport model errors lead to a discrepancy of 27 Tg yr−1 at the global scale, representing 5% of total methane emissions. At continental and annual scales, transport model errors are proportionally larger than at the global scale, with errors ranging from 36 Tg yr−1 in North America to 7 Tg yr−1 in Boreal Eurasia (from 23 to 48%, respectively. At the model grid-scale, the spread of inverse estimates can reach 150% of the prior flux. Therefore, transport model errors contribute significantly to overall uncertainties in emission estimates by inverse modelling, especially when small spatial scales are examined. Sensitivity tests have been carried out to estimate the impact of the measurement network and the advantage of higher horizontal resolution in transport models. The large differences found between methane flux estimates inferred in these different configurations highly

  9. Modeling methane fluxes in wetlands with gas-transporting plants. 1. Single-root scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, R.; Leffelaar, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    Methane dynamics in a water-saturated soil layer with gas-transporting roots is modeled with a weighed set of single-root model systems. Each model system consists of a soil cylinder with a gas-transporting root along its axis or a soil sphere with a gas-transporting root at its center. The weights

  10. Modeling methane fluxes in wetlands with gas-transporting plants 2. Soil layer scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, R; Rappoldt, C; Leffelaar, PA

    2001-01-01

    Methane dynamics in a water-saturated soil layer with gas-transporting roots is modeled with a weighed set of single-loot model systems. Each model system consists of a soil cylinder with a gas-transporting root along its axis or a soil sphere with a gas-transporting root at its centre. The weights

  11. Environmental Transport Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Wasiolek

    2004-01-01

    This analysis report is one of the technical reports documenting the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows relationships among the reports developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for the TSPA-LA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]) (TWP). This figure provides an understanding of how this report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application (LA). This report is one of the five reports that develop input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the conceptual model and the mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the Biosphere Model Report in Figure 1-1, contain detailed description of the model input parameters. The output of this report is used as direct input in the ''Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' and in the ''Disruptive Event Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' that calculate the values of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater and volcanic ash exposure scenarios, respectively. The purpose of this analysis was to develop biosphere model parameter values related to radionuclide transport and accumulation in the environment. These parameters support calculations of radionuclide concentrations in the environmental media (e.g., soil, crops, animal products, and air) resulting from a given radionuclide concentration at the source of contamination (i.e., either in groundwater or in volcanic ash). The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573])

  12. Environmental Transport Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Wasiolek

    2004-09-10

    This analysis report is one of the technical reports documenting the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows relationships among the reports developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for the TSPA-LA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]) (TWP). This figure provides an understanding of how this report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application (LA). This report is one of the five reports that develop input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the conceptual model and the mathematical model. The input parameter reports, shown to the right of the Biosphere Model Report in Figure 1-1, contain detailed description of the model input parameters. The output of this report is used as direct input in the ''Nominal Performance Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' and in the ''Disruptive Event Biosphere Dose Conversion Factor Analysis'' that calculate the values of biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs) for the groundwater and volcanic ash exposure scenarios, respectively. The purpose of this analysis was to develop biosphere model parameter values related to radionuclide transport and accumulation in the environment. These parameters support calculations of radionuclide concentrations in the environmental media (e.g., soil, crops, animal products, and air) resulting from a given radionuclide concentration at the source of contamination (i.e., either in groundwater or in volcanic ash). The analysis

  13. Modeling interfacial area transport in multi-fluid systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Many typical chemical engineering operations are multi-fluid systems. They are carried out in distillation columns (vapor/liquid), liquid-liquid contactors (liquid/liquid) and other similar devices. An important parameter is interfacial area concentration, which determines the rate of interfluid heat, mass and momentum transfer and ultimately, the overall performance of the equipment. In many cases, the models for determining interfacial area concentration are empirical and can only describe the cases for which there is experimental data. In an effort to understand multiphase reactors and the mixing process better, a multi-fluid model has been developed as part of a research effort to calculate interfacial area transport in several different types of in-line static mixers. For this work, the ensemble-averaged property conservation equations have been derived for each fluid and for the mixture. These equations were then combined to derive a transport equation for the interfacial area concentration. The final, one-dimensional model was compared to interfacial area concentration data from two sizes of Kenics in-line mixer, two sizes of concurrent jet and a Tee mixer. In all cases, the calculated and experimental data compared well with the highest scatter being with the Tee mixer comparison.

  14. Hyporheic flow and transport processes: mechanisms, models, and biogeochemical implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boano, Fulvio; Harvey, Judson W.; Marion, Andrea; Packman, Aaron I.; Revelli, Roberto; Ridolfi, Luca; Anders, Wörman

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years of hyporheic zone research have shown the important role played by the hyporheic zone as an interface between groundwater and surface waters. However, it is only in the last two decades that what began as an empirical science has become a mechanistic science devoted to modeling studies of the complex fluid dynamical and biogeochemical mechanisms occurring in the hyporheic zone. These efforts have led to the picture of surface-subsurface water interactions as regulators of the form and function of fluvial ecosystems. Rather than being isolated systems, surface water bodies continuously interact with the subsurface. Exploration of hyporheic zone processes has led to a new appreciation of their wide reaching consequences for water quality and stream ecology. Modern research aims toward a unified approach, in which processes occurring in the hyporheic zone are key elements for the appreciation, management, and restoration of the whole river environment. In this unifying context, this review summarizes results from modeling studies and field observations about flow and transport processes in the hyporheic zone and describes the theories proposed in hydrology and fluid dynamics developed to quantitatively model and predict the hyporheic transport of water, heat, and dissolved and suspended compounds from sediment grain scale up to the watershed scale. The implications of these processes for stream biogeochemistry and ecology are also discussed."

  15. Multispecies reactive transport modelling of electrokinetic remediation of harbour sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Matteo; Ceccarini, Alessio; Iannelli, Renato

    2017-03-15

    We implemented a numerical model to simulate transport of multiple species and geochemical reactions occurring during electrokinetic remediation of metal-contaminated porous media. The main phenomena described by the model were: (1) species transport by diffusion, electromigration and electroosmosis, (2) pH-dependent buffering of H + , (3) adsorption of metals onto particle surfaces, (4) aqueous speciation, (5) formation and dissolution of solid precipitates. The model was applied to simulate the electrokinetic extraction of heavy metals (Pb, Zn and Ni) from marine harbour sediments, characterized by a heterogeneous solid matrix, high buffering capacity and aged pollution. A good agreement was found between simulations of pH, electroosmotic flow and experimental results. The predicted residual metal concentrations in the sediment were also close to experimental profiles for all of the investigated metals. Some removal overestimation was observed in the regions close to the anode, possibly due to the significant metal content bound to residual fraction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Uranium(VI) transport modeling: geochemical data and submodels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    Understanding the geochemical mobility of U(VI) and modeling its transport is important in several contexts including ore genesis, uranium exploration, nuclear and mill-tailings waste management, and solution mining of uranium ores. Adsorption is a major control on partitioning of solutes at the mineral/solution interface. The effect of carbonate, fluoride, and phosphate complexing on adsorption of uranium was investigated. A critical compilation of stability constants of inorganic complexes and solid compounds of U(VI) necessary for proper design of experiment and for modeling transport of uranium was prepared. The general features of U(VI) adsorption in ligand-free systems are similar to those characteristic of other hydrolyzable metal ions. The adsorption processes studied were found to be reversible. The adsorption model developed in ligand-free systems, when solution complexing is taken into account, proved remarkably successful in describing adsorption of uranium in the presence of carbonate and fluoride. The presence of phosphate caused a much smaller decrease in the extent of adsorption than expected; however, a critical reassessment of the stability of UO 2 2+ .HPO 4 2- complexes, showed that phosphato complexes, if any, are extremely weak under experimental conditions. Removal of uranium may have occurred due to precipitation of sodium uranyl phosphates in addition to adsorption

  17. Evaluating transport in the WRF model along the California coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Yver

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a step in the development of a top-down method to complement the bottom-up inventories of halocarbon emissions in California using high frequency observations, forward simulations and inverse methods. The Scripps Institution of Oceanography high-frequency atmospheric halocarbons measurement sites are located along the California coast and therefore the evaluation of transport in the chosen Weather Research Forecast (WRF model at these sites is crucial for inverse modeling. The performance of the transport model has been investigated by comparing the wind direction and speed and temperature at four locations using aircraft weather reports as well at all METAR weather stations in our domain for hourly variations. Different planetary boundary layer (PBL schemes, horizontal resolutions (achieved through nesting and two meteorological datasets have been tested. Finally, simulated concentration of an inert tracer has been briefly investigated. All the PBL schemes present similar results that generally agree with observations, except in summer when the model sea breeze is too strong. At the coarse 12 km resolution, using ERA-interim (ECMWF Re-Analysis as initial and boundary conditions leads to improvements compared to using the North American Model (NAM dataset. Adding higher resolution nests also improves the match with the observations. However, no further improvement is observed from increasing the nest resolution from 4 km to 0.8 km. Once optimized, the model is able to reproduce tracer measurements during typical winter California large-scale events (Santa Ana. Furthermore, with the WRF/CHEM chemistry module and the European Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR version 4.1 emissions for HFC-134a, we find that using a simple emission scaling factor is not sufficient to infer emissions, which highlights the need for more complex inversions.

  18. Procesamiento de datos mediante Wavelet para la modelación térmica de transformadores de potencia; Data processing using wavelet for power transformers thermal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rómulo Pérez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo las mediciones recabadas por una estación experimental instalada en un Transformador de 100 MVA de la Subestación Barquisimeto de Venezuela son procesadas para eliminar factores de ruido que introducen errores en la identificación de parámetros del modelo térmico para el cálculo de la temperatura superior del aceite. Se usa una metodología para el control de calidad y eliminación del ruido en las mediciones recabadas basada en experiencias propias y reforzadas con experiencias de reconocidos autores internacionales, la cual aplica la Transformada Discreta de Wavelet DWT para obtener datos que muestran buenos indicadores de calidad en las principales variables del modelo térmico, como lo son la corriente de carga, la temperatura ambiente y la temperatura del aceite superior. Finalmente se comparan los resultados de la modelación térmica antes y después de ser procesados los datos, donde se evidencia un notable incremento en la exactitud del modelo.  In this work measurement get of experimental station connected in a power transformer of 100 MVA in a Barquisimeto Substation in Venezuela are processing to eliminate noise that introduce mistake in the parameters identification for top oil temperature model calculation. A methodology based in your experiences with experiences of international authors for the control of quality and elimination of the noise in the successfully obtained measurements is used. It’s apply the Discreet Wavelet Transform (DWT to collect data that show good indicators of quality in the main values of the thermal model, as the load current, the ambient temperature and the top oil temperature. Finally is compared thermal model results after and beforedata processing, where at increase in the exactitude of the thermal model is demonstrated.

  19. Mesoscopic Modeling of Multiphysicochemical Transport Phenomena in Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinjun Kang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present our recent progress on mesoscopic modeling of multiphysicochemical transport phenomena in porous media based on the lattice Boltzmann method. Simulation examples include injection of CO2-saturated brine into a limestone rock, two-phase behavior and flooding phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, and electroosmosis in homogeneously charged porous media. It is shown that the lattice Boltzmann method can account for multiple, coupled physicochemical processes in these systems and can shed some light on the underlying physics occurring at the fundamental scale. Therefore, it can be a potential powerful numerical tool to analyze multiphysicochemical processes in various energy, earth, and environmental systems.

  20. An Optimised Human Cell Culture Model for Alveolar Epithelial Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Nigel P.; Suresh, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Robust and reproducible in vitro models are required for investigating the pathways involved in fluid homeostasis in the human alveolar epithelium. We performed functional and phenotypic characterisation of ion transport in the human pulmonary epithelial cell lines NCI-H441 and A549 to determine their similarity to primary human alveolar type II cells. NCI-H441 cells exhibited high expression of junctional proteins ZO-1, and E-cadherin, seal-forming claudin-3, -4, -5 and Na+-K+-ATPase while A549 cells exhibited high expression of pore-forming claudin-2. Consistent with this phenotype NCI-H441, but not A549, cells formed a functional barrier with active ion transport characterised by higher electrical resistance (529 ± 178 Ω cm2 vs 28 ± 4 Ω cm2), lower paracellular permeability ((176 ± 42) ×10−8 cm/s vs (738 ± 190) ×10−8 cm/s) and higher transepithelial potential difference (11.9 ± 4 mV vs 0 mV). Phenotypic and functional properties of NCI-H441 cells were tuned by varying cell seeding density and supplement concentrations. The cells formed a polarised monolayer typical of in vivo epithelium at seeding densities of 100,000 cells per 12-well insert while higher densities resulted in multiple cell layers. Dexamethasone and insulin-transferrin-selenium supplements were required for the development of high levels of electrical resistance, potential difference and expression of claudin-3 and Na+-K+-ATPase. Treatment of NCI-H441 cells with inhibitors and agonists of sodium and chloride channels indicated sodium absorption through ENaC under baseline and forskolin-stimulated conditions. Chloride transport was not sensitive to inhibitors of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) under either condition. Channels inhibited by 5-nitro-1-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) contributed to chloride secretion following forskolin stimulation, but not at baseline. These data precisely define experimental conditions for the application of NCI

  1. Three dimensional heat transport modeling in Vossoroca reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcie Polli, Bruna; Yoshioka Bernardo, Julio Werner; Hilgert, Stephan; Bleninger, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Freshwater reservoirs are used for many purposes as hydropower generation, water supply and irrigation. In Brazil, according to the National Energy Balance of 2013, hydropower energy corresponds to 70.1% of the Brazilian demand. Superficial waters (which include rivers, lakes and reservoirs) are the most used source for drinking water supply - 56% of the municipalities use superficial waters as a source of water. The last two years have shown that the Brazilian water and electricity supply is highly vulnerable and that improved management is urgently needed. The construction of reservoirs affects physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the water body, e.g. stratification, temperature, residence time and turbulence reduction. Some water quality issues related to reservoirs are eutrophication, greenhouse gas emission to the atmosphere and dissolved oxygen depletion in the hypolimnion. The understanding of the physical processes in the water body is fundamental to reservoir management. Lakes and reservoirs may present a seasonal behavior and stratify due to hydrological and meteorological conditions, and especially its vertical distribution may be related to water quality. Stratification can control heat and dissolved substances transport. It has been also reported the importance of horizontal temperature gradients, e.g. inflows and its density and processes of mass transfer from shallow to deeper regions of the reservoir, that also may impact water quality. Three dimensional modeling of the heat transport in lakes and reservoirs is an important tool to the understanding and management of these systems. It is possible to estimate periods of large vertical temperature gradients, inhibiting vertical transport and horizontal gradients, which could be responsible for horizontal transport of heat and substances (e.g. differential cooling or inflows). Vossoroca reservoir was constructed in 1949 by the impoundment of São João River and is located near to

  2. Modular coupling of transport and chemistry: theory and model applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfingsten, W.

    1994-06-01

    For the description of complex processes in the near-field of a radioactive waste repository, the coupling of transport and chemistry is necessary. A reason for the relatively minor use of coupled codes in this area is the high amount of computer time and storage capacity necessary for calculations by conventional codes, and lack of available data. The simple application of the sequentially coupled code MCOTAC, which couples one-dimensional advective, dispersive and diffusive transport with chemical equilibrium complexation and precipitation/dissolution reactions in a porous medium, shows some promising features with respect to applicability to relevant problems. Transport, described by a random walk of multi-species particles, and chemical equilibrium calculations are solved separately, coupled only by an exchange term to ensure mass conservation. The modular-structured code was applied to three problems: a) incongruent dissolution of hydrated silicate gels, b) dissolution of portlandite and c) calcite dissolution and hypothetical dolomite precipitation. This allows for a comparison with other codes and their applications. The incongruent dissolution of cement phases, important for degradation of cementitious materials in a repository, can be included in the model without the problems which occur with a directly coupled code. The handling of a sharp multi-mineral front system showed a much faster calculation time compared to a directly coupled code application. Altogether, the results are in good agreement with other code calculations. Hence, the chosen modular concept of MCOTAC is more open to an easy extension of the code to include additional processes like sorption, kinetically controlled processes, transport in two or three spatial dimensions, and adaptation to new developments in computing (hardware and software), an important factor for applicability. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  3. Environmental Transport Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasiolek, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    This analysis report is one of the technical reports documenting the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows relationships among the reports developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for the TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (TWP) (BSC 2003 [163602]). Some documents in Figure 1-1 may be under development and not available when this report is issued. This figure provides an understanding of how this report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application (LA), but access to the listed documents is not required to understand the contents of this report. This report is one of the reports that develops input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003 [160699]) describes the conceptual model, the mathematical model, and the input parameters. The purpose of this analysis is to develop biosphere model parameter values related to radionuclide transport and accumulation in the environment. These parameters support calculations of radionuclide concentrations in the environmental media (e.g., soil, crops, animal products, and air) resulting from a given radionuclide concentration at the source of contamination (i.e., either in groundwater or volcanic ash). The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2003 [163602]). This analysis develops values of parameters associated with many features, events, and processes (FEPs) applicable to the reference biosphere (DTN: M00303SEPFEPS2.000 [162452]), which are addressed in the biosphere model (BSC 2003 [160699]). The treatment of these FEPs is described in BSC (2003 [160699], Section 6.2). Parameter values

  4. Environmental Transport Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. A. Wasiolek

    2003-06-27

    This analysis report is one of the technical reports documenting the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN), a biosphere model supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the ERMYN is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows relationships among the reports developed for biosphere modeling and biosphere abstraction products for the TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan: for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (TWP) (BSC 2003 [163602]). Some documents in Figure 1-1 may be under development and not available when this report is issued. This figure provides an understanding of how this report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application (LA), but access to the listed documents is not required to understand the contents of this report. This report is one of the reports that develops input parameter values for the biosphere model. The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2003 [160699]) describes the conceptual model, the mathematical model, and the input parameters. The purpose of this analysis is to develop biosphere model parameter values related to radionuclide transport and accumulation in the environment. These parameters support calculations of radionuclide concentrations in the environmental media (e.g., soil, crops, animal products, and air) resulting from a given radionuclide concentration at the source of contamination (i.e., either in groundwater or volcanic ash). The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2003 [163602]). This analysis develops values of parameters associated with many features, events, and processes (FEPs) applicable to the reference biosphere (DTN: M00303SEPFEPS2.000 [162452]), which are addressed in the biosphere model (BSC 2003 [160699]). The treatment of these FEPs is described in BSC (2003 [160699

  5. Erosion and Sediment Transport Modelling in Shallow Waters: A Review on Approaches, Models and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajigholizadeh, Mohammad; Melesse, Assefa M; Fuentes, Hector R

    2018-03-14

    The erosion and sediment transport processes in shallow waters, which are discussed in this paper, begin when water droplets hit the soil surface. The transport mechanism caused by the consequent rainfall-runoff process determines the amount of generated sediment that can be transferred downslope. Many significant studies and models are performed to investigate these processes, which differ in terms of their effecting factors, approaches, inputs and outputs, model structure and the manner that these processes represent. This paper attempts to review the related literature concerning sediment transport modelling in shallow waters. A classification based on the representational processes of the soil erosion and sediment transport models (empirical, conceptual, physical and hybrid) is adopted, and the commonly-used models and their characteristics are listed. This review is expected to be of interest to researchers and soil and water conservation managers who are working on erosion and sediment transport phenomena in shallow waters. The paper format should be helpful for practitioners to identify and generally characterize the types of available models, their strengths and their basic scope of applicability.

  6. Erosion and Sediment Transport Modelling in Shallow Waters: A Review on Approaches, Models and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Hector R.

    2018-01-01

    The erosion and sediment transport processes in shallow waters, which are discussed in this paper, begin when water droplets hit the soil surface. The transport mechanism caused by the consequent rainfall-runoff process determines the amount of generated sediment that can be transferred downslope. Many significant studies and models are performed to investigate these processes, which differ in terms of their effecting factors, approaches, inputs and outputs, model structure and the manner that these processes represent. This paper attempts to review the related literature concerning sediment transport modelling in shallow waters. A classification based on the representational processes of the soil erosion and sediment transport models (empirical, conceptual, physical and hybrid) is adopted, and the commonly-used models and their characteristics are listed. This review is expected to be of interest to researchers and soil and water conservation managers who are working on erosion and sediment transport phenomena in shallow waters. The paper format should be helpful for practitioners to identify and generally characterize the types of available models, their strengths and their basic scope of applicability. PMID:29538335

  7. Transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Here is the decree of the thirtieth of July 1998 relative to road transportation, to trade and brokerage of wastes. It requires to firms which carry out a road transportation as well as to traders and to brokers of wastes to declare their operations to the prefect. The declaration has to be renewed every five years. (O.M.)

  8. Diseño y optimización del sistema de renovación de la carga de un motor dual fuel para transporte pesado mediante sobrealimentación en doble etapa

    OpenAIRE

    SIRVENT SANJOSÉ, ROBERTO ANDRÉS

    2016-01-01

    El trabajo consiste en el diseño del sistema de admisión y escape de un motor dual-fuel para transporte pesado. Se deberá seleccionar la arquitectura adecuada para poder conseguir las condiciones de deseadas en el interior del cilindro (sistema de sobrealimentación, producción de EGR). Se deberá también seleccionar la estrategia adecuada para el control de cada uno de los elementos utilizados. Sirvent Sanjosé, RA. (2016). Diseño y optimización del sistema de renovación de la carga de un mo...

  9. Administración del riesgo por cambios en el precio del combustible mediante el uso de derivados financieros en una empresa dedicada al transporte marítimo

    OpenAIRE

    Vásquez Rodríguez, Verónica Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Tesis de maestría -- Universidad de Costa Rica. Posgrado en Administración y Dirección de Empresas. Maestría Profesional en Administración y Dirección de Empresas con énfasis en Finanzas, 2014 La industria del transporte marítimo es de suma importancia para el mundo moderno. Tiene gran influencia en cuestiones de desarrollo social y económico, como así también es generadora de fuente de empleos, ya que millones de personas en el mundo trabajan en actividades, directa o indirectamente, rela...

  10. Sediment Transport and erosion modeling at Heaundae Beach in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, K.; Yoo, J.; McCall, R. T.

    2016-12-01

    The sand pocket beaches with two headlands are global features, but it's not easy to predict berm and dune erosion due to alongshore variation of water depth. This study investigates the sediment transport and morphological change using available wave and beach profile data, as well as to assess the applicability of the XBeach morphological model (Roelvink et al., 2009). The Haeundae is small pocket beach, 1.4 km long, located in the southern corner of the Korean Peninsula. The Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology (KIOST) measured beach profile along 27 survey lines. The beach profiles were surveyed five times from 17 June 2014 to 10 October 2014. For this duration, a wave gauge (AWAC) was installed at a depth about 23 m off the coast of Haeundae Beach. Severe four storms attacked Haeundae Beach for this duration and these storms lasted about 1 2 days with a peak significant wave height of 2.5 4.0 m. The placed sand is fairly sorted and its median diameter is 0.23 mm. 2DH coastal morphological model, XBeach developed to simulate dune erosion due to storm impacts. The model is based on the nonlinear shallow water equation and resolves nearshore hydrodynamics by employing a 2DH description of wave groups and infragravity motions. In this study, the numerical model XBeach was compared with the field data and used to estimate the sediment transport pattern on the sand pocket beach. The numerical model resulted in a comparable prediction in the west-part, but the east-part cannot reproduce the erosion and accretion of the sand, partly due to complex bathymetry and the lack of sediment. This limitation needs to be improved to use measured sand thickness data in future study

  11. A computerized coal-water slurry transportation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljubicic, B.R.; Trostad, B. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Bukurov, Z.; Cvijanovic, P. [Univ. of Novi Sad (Yugoslavia)

    1995-12-01

    Coal-water fuel (CWF) technology has been developed to the point where full-scale commercialization is just a matter of gaining sufficient market confidence in the price stability of alternate fossil fuels. In order to generalize alternative fuel cost estimates for the desired combinations of processing and/or transportation, a great deal of flexibility is required owing to the understood lack of precision in many of the newly emerging coal technologies. Previously, decisions regarding the sequential and spatial arrangement of the various process steps were made strictly on the basis of experience, simplified analysis, and intuition. Over the last decade, computer modeling has progressed from empirically based correlation to that of intricate mechanistic analysis. Nomograms, charts, tables, and many simple rules of thumb have been made obsolete by the availability of complex computer models. Given the ability to view results graphically in real or near real time, the engineer can immediately verify, from a practical standpoint, whether the initial assumptions and inputs were indeed valid. If the feasibility of a project is being determined in the context of a lack of specific data, the ability to provide a dynamic software-based solution is crucial. Furthermore, the resulting model can be used to establish preliminary operating procedures, test control logic, and train plant/process operators. Presented in this paper is a computerized model capable of estimating the delivered cost of CWF. The model uses coal-specific values, process and transport requirements, terrain factors, and input costs to determine the final operating configuration, bill of materials, and, ultimately, the capital, operating, and unit costs.

  12. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fan [Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Luo, Wensui [ORNL; Parker, Jack C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Brooks, Scott C [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  13. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fan, E-mail: zhangfan@itpcas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, Beijing, 100085 (China); Luo Wensui [Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen, 361021 (China); Parker, Jack C. [Institute for a Secure and Sustainable Environment, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Brooks, Scott C.; Watson, David B. [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Jardine, Philip M. [Biosystems Engineering and Soil Science Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Gu Baohua [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  14. Low-Rank Kalman Filtering in Subsurface Contaminant Transport Models

    KAUST Repository

    El Gharamti, Mohamad

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the geology and the hydrology of the subsurface is important to model the fluid flow and the behavior of the contaminant. It is essential to have an accurate knowledge of the movement of the contaminants in the porous media in order to track them and later extract them from the aquifer. A two-dimensional flow model is studied and then applied on a linear contaminant transport model in the same porous medium. Because of possible different sources of uncertainties, the deterministic model by itself cannot give exact estimations for the future contaminant state. Incorporating observations in the model can guide it to the true state. This is usually done using the Kalman filter (KF) when the system is linear and the extended Kalman filter (EKF) when the system is nonlinear. To overcome the high computational cost required by the KF, we use the singular evolutive Kalman filter (SEKF) and the singular evolutive extended Kalman filter (SEEKF) approximations of the KF operating with low-rank covariance matrices. The SEKF can be implemented on large dimensional contaminant problems while the usage of the KF is not possible. Experimental results show that with perfect and imperfect models, the low rank filters can provide as much accurate estimates as the full KF but at much less computational cost. Localization can help the filter analysis as long as there are enough neighborhood data to the point being analyzed. Estimating the permeabilities of the aquifer is successfully tackled using both the EKF and the SEEKF.

  15. Co-evolution of transportation and land use : modeling historical dependencies in land use and transportation decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    The interaction between land use and transportation has long been the central issue in urban and regional planning. Models of such : interactions provide vital information to support many public policy decisions, such as land supply, infrastructure p...

  16. Modelling of transport and biogeochemical processes in pollution plumes: Literature review of model development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brun, A.; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard

    2002-01-01

    A literature survey shows how biogeochemical (coupled organic and inorganic reaction processes) transport models are based on considering the complete biodegradation process as either a single- or as a two-step process. It is demonstrated that some two-step process models rely on the Partial Equi....... A second paper [J. Hydrol. 256 (2002) 230-249], reports the application of the model to a field study of biogeochemical transport processes in a landfill plume in Denmark (Vejen). (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  17. Inverse modeling of methane sources and sinks using the adjoint of a global transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, S; Kaminski, T; Dentener, F; Lelieveld, J; Heimann, M

    1999-01-01

    An inverse modeling method is presented to evaluate the sources and sinks of atmospheric methane. An adjoint version of a global transport model has been used to estimate these fluxes at a relatively high spatial and temporal resolution. Measurements from 34 monitoring stations and 11 locations

  18. Solving vertical transport and chemistry in air pollution models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkvens, P.J.F.; Botchev, M.A.; Verwer, J.G.; Krol, M.C.; Peters, W.

    2000-01-01

    For the time integration of stiff transport-chemistry problems from air pollution modelling, standard ODE solvers are not feasible due to the large number of species and the 3D nature. The popular alternative, standard operator splitting, introduces artificial transients for short-lived species. This complicates the chemistry solution, easily causing large errors for such species. In the framework of an operational global air pollution model, we focus on the problem formed by chemistry and vertical transport, which is based on diffusion, cloud-related vertical winds, and wet deposition. Its specific nature leads to full Jacobian matrices, ruling out standard implicit integration. We compare Strang operator splitting with two alternatives: source splitting and an (unsplit) Rosenbrock method with approximate matrix factorization, all having equal computational cost. The comparison is performed with real data. All methods are applied with half-hour time steps, and give good accuracies. Rosenbrock is the most accurate, and source splitting is more accurate than Strang splitting. Splitting errors concentrate in short-lived species sensitive to solar radiation and species with strong emissions and depositions. 30 refs

  19. Dust resuspension and transport modeling for loss of vacuum accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humrickhouse, P.W.; Corradini, M.L.; Sharpe, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    Plasma surface interactions in tokamaks are known to create significant quantities of dust, which settles onto surfaces and accumulates in the vacuum vessel. In ITER, a loss of vacuum accident may result in the release of dust which will be radioactive and/or toxic, and provides increased surface area for chemical reactions or dust explosion. A new method of analysis has been developed for modeling dust resuspension and transport in loss of vacuum accidents. The aerosol dynamic equation is solved via the user defined scalar (UDS) capability in the commercial CFD code Fluent. Fluent solves up to 50 generic transport equations for user defined scalars, and allows customization of terms in these equations through user defined functions (UDF). This allows calculation of diffusion coefficients based on local flow properties, inclusion of body forces such as gravity and thermophoresis in the convection term, and user defined source terms. The code accurately reproduces analytical solutions for aerosol deposition in simple laminar flows with diffusion and gravitational settling. Models for dust resuspension are evaluated, and code results are compared to available resuspension data, including data from the Toroidal Dust Mobilization Experiment (TDMX) at the Idaho National Laboratory. Extension to polydisperse aerosols and inclusion of coagulation effects is also discussed. (orig.)

  20. Bidirectional transport model of morphogen gradient formation via cytonemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Kim, Hyunjoong

    2018-03-01

    Morphogen protein gradients play an important role in the spatial regulation of patterning during embryonic development. The most commonly accepted mechanism for gradient formation is diffusion from a source combined with degradation. Recently, there has been growing interest in an alternative mechanism, which is based on the direct delivery of morphogens along thin, actin-rich cellular extensions known as cytonemes. In this paper, we develop a bidirectional motor transport model for the flux of morphogens along cytonemes, linking a source cell to a one-dimensional array of target cells. By solving the steady-state transport equations, we show how a morphogen gradient can be established, and explore how the mean velocity of the motors affects properties of the morphogen gradient such as accumulation time and robustness. In particular, our analysis suggests that in order to achieve robustness with respect to changes in the rate of synthesis of morphogen, the mean velocity has to be negative, that is, retrograde flow or treadmilling dominates. Thus the potential targeting precision of cytonemes comes at an energy cost. We then study the effects of non-uniformly allocating morphogens to the various cytonemes projecting from a source cell. This competition for resources provides a potential regulatory control mechanism not available in diffusion-based models.

  1. Multiphasic fluid models and multicomponents reactive transport in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juncosa, R.

    2001-01-01

    The design and construction of repositories for toxic waste, such as radioactive waste of medium and high activity, require tools, that will enable us to predict how the system will behave. The rational behind this Dissertation is based precisely on developing numerical models to study and predict coupled thermal, mechanical, hydrodynamic and geochemical behavior of clays intended to be used as engineered barriers in radioactive waste repository. In order to meet the requirements of the FEBEX Project (Full Scale Engineered Barriers Experiment) it was necessary to develop thermo-hydro-geochemical conceptual and numerical models (THG). For this purpose a THG code was developed to simulate and predict the THG behavior of the clay barrier. The code was created after considering two options. a) The development of a completely new code, or b) the coupling of existing codes. In this Dissertation we chose the second option, and developed a new program (FADES-CORE), which was obtained by using the FADES thermo-hydro-mechanical code (Navarro, 1997) and the CORE-LE code (Samper et al., 1998). This process entailed the modification of FADES, the addition of new subroutines for the calculation of solute transport, the modification of CORE-LE and the introduction of additional geochemical and transport processes. (Author)

  2. Modelling the transport system in China and evaluating the current strategies towards the sustainable transport development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, W.; Lund, H.; Mathiesen, B.V.

    2013-01-01

    Transport is one of the most challenge sectors when addressing energy security and climate change due to its high reliance on oil products and lack of the alternative fuels. This paper explores the ability of three transport strategies to contribute to the development of a sustainable transport i...... and to boost the alternative fuels produced from the renewable energy sources.......Transport is one of the most challenge sectors when addressing energy security and climate change due to its high reliance on oil products and lack of the alternative fuels. This paper explores the ability of three transport strategies to contribute to the development of a sustainable transport......% of the energy saving and 12% of the CO2 emission reduction can be attained by accomplishing three strategies compared with the reference transport system. However, the energy demand of transport in 2020 with the implementation of three strategies will be about 1.7 times as much as today. The three strategies...

  3. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of environmental transport models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulies, T.S.; Lancaster, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    An uncertainty and sensitivity analysis has been made of the CRAC-2 (Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences) atmospheric transport and deposition models. Robustness and uncertainty aspects of air and ground deposited material and the relative contribution of input and model parameters were systematically studied. The underlying data structures were investigated using a multiway layout of factors over specified ranges generated via a Latin hypercube sampling scheme. The variables selected in our analysis include: weather bin, dry deposition velocity, rain washout coefficient/rain intensity, duration of release, heat content, sigma-z (vertical) plume dispersion parameter, sigma-y (crosswind) plume dispersion parameter, and mixing height. To determine the contributors to the output variability (versus distance from the site) step-wise regression analyses were performed on transformations of the spatial concentration patterns simulated. 27 references, 2 figures, 3 tables

  4. Approximate models for neutral particle transport calculations in ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Shizuca

    2000-01-01

    The problem of neutral particle transport in evacuated ducts of arbitrary, but axially uniform, cross-sectional geometry and isotropic reflection at the wall is studied. The model makes use of basis functions to represent the transverse and azimuthal dependences of the particle angular flux in the duct. For the approximation in terms of two basis functions, an improvement in the method is implemented by decomposing the problem into uncollided and collided components. A new quadrature set, more suitable to the problem, is developed and generated by one of the techniques of the constructive theory of orthogonal polynomials. The approximation in terms of three basis functions is developed and implemented to improve the precision of the results. For both models of two and three basis functions, the energy dependence of the problem is introduced through the multigroup formalism. The results of sample problems are compared to literature results and to results of the Monte Carlo code, MCNP. (author)

  5. Modeling airflow and particle transport/deposition in pulmonary airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstreuer, Clement; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Zheng

    2008-11-30

    A review of research papers is presented, pertinent to computer modeling of airflow as well as nano- and micron-size particle deposition in pulmonary airway replicas. The key modeling steps are outlined, including construction of suitable airway geometries, mathematical description of the air-particle transport phenomena and computer simulation of micron and nanoparticle depositions. Specifically, diffusion-dominated nanomaterial deposits on airway surfaces much more uniformly than micron particles of the same material. This may imply different toxicity effects. Due to impaction and secondary flows, micron particles tend to accumulate around the carinal ridges and to form "hot spots", i.e., locally high concentrations which may lead to tumor developments. Inhaled particles in the size range of 20nm< or =dp< or =3microm may readily reach the deeper lung region. Concerning inhaled therapeutic particles, optimal parameters for mechanical drug-aerosol targeting of predetermined lung areas can be computed, given representative pulmonary airways.

  6. A GoldSim Model for Colloid Facilitated Nuclide Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Jeong, Jong Tae

    2010-01-01

    Recently several total system performance assessment (TSPA) programs, called 'template' programs, ready for the safety assessment of radioactive waste repository systems which are conceptually modeled have been developed by utilizing GoldSim and AMBER at KAERI. It is generally believed that chelating agents (chelators) that could be disposed of together with radioactive wastes in the repository and natural colloids available in the geological media affect on nuclides by enhancing their transport in the geological media. A simple GoldSim module to evaluate such quantitative effects, by which colloid and chelator-facilitated nuclide release cases could be modeled and evaluated is introduced. Effects of the chelators alone are illustrated with the case associated with well pumping scenario in a hypothetical repository system

  7. Model Transport: Towards Scalable Transfer Learning on Manifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freifeld, Oren; Hauberg, Søren; Black, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the intersection of two research fields: transfer learning and statistics on manifolds. In particular, we consider, for manifold-valued data, transfer learning of tangent-space models such as Gaussians distributions, PCA, regression, or classifiers. Though one would hope to simply use...... ordinary Rn-transfer learning ideas, the manifold structure prevents it. We overcome this by basing our method on inner-product-preserving parallel transport, a well-known tool widely used in other problems of statistics on manifolds in computer vision. At first, this straightforward idea seems to suffer...... “commutes” with learning. Consequently, our compact framework, applicable to a large class of manifolds, is not restricted by the size of either the training or test sets. We demonstrate the approach by transferring PCA and logistic-regression models of real-world data involving 3D shapes and image...

  8. Pion-nucleus reactions in a microscopic transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, A.; Cassing, W.; Mosel, U.; Schaefer, M.; Wolf, G.

    1994-01-01

    We analyse pion-nucleus reactions in a microscopic transport model of the BUU type, which propagates nucleons, pions, deltas and N(1440) resonances explicitly in space and time. In particular we examine pion absorption and inelastic-scattering cross sections for pion kinetic energies T π =85-315 MeV and various target masses. In general, the mass dependence of the experimental data is well described for energies up to the Δ-resonance (∼160 MeV), while the absorption cross sections are somewhat overestimated for the higher energies. In addition we study the possible dynamical effects of delta and pion potentials in the medium on various observables as well as alternative models for the in-medium Δ-width. ((orig.))

  9. Computational modeling of geometry dependent phonon transport in silicon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Drew A.

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that thermal properties of semiconductor nanostructures depend on nanostructure boundary geometry. Phonons are quantized mechanical vibrations that are the dominant carrier of heat in semiconductor materials and their aggregate behavior determine a nanostructure's thermal performance. Phonon-geometry scattering processes as well as waveguiding effects which result from coherent phonon interference are responsible for the shape dependence of thermal transport in these systems. Nanoscale phonon-geometry interactions provide a mechanism by which nanostructure geometry may be used to create materials with targeted thermal properties. However, the ability to manipulate material thermal properties via controlling nanostructure geometry is contingent upon first obtaining increased theoretical understanding of fundamental geometry induced phonon scattering processes and having robust analytical and computational models capable of exploring the nanostructure design space, simulating the phonon scattering events, and linking the behavior of individual phonon modes to overall thermal behavior. The overall goal of this research is to predict and analyze the effect of nanostructure geometry on thermal transport. To this end, a harmonic lattice-dynamics based atomistic computational modeling tool was created to calculate phonon spectra and modal phonon transmission coefficients in geometrically irregular nanostructures. The computational tool is used to evaluate the accuracy and regimes of applicability of alternative computational techniques based upon continuum elastic wave theory. The model is also used to investigate phonon transmission and thermal conductance in diameter modulated silicon nanowires. Motivated by the complexity of the transmission results, a simplified model based upon long wavelength beam theory was derived and helps explain geometry induced phonon scattering of low frequency nanowire phonon modes.

  10. Modeling Blazar Spectra by Solving an Electron Transport Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Tiffany; Finke, Justin; Becker, Peter A.

    2018-01-01

    Blazars are luminous active galaxies across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, but the spectral formation mechanisms, especially the particle acceleration, in these sources are not well understood. We develop a new theoretical model for simulating blazar spectra using a self-consistent electron number distribution. Specifically, we solve the particle transport equation considering shock acceleration, adiabatic expansion, stochastic acceleration due to MHD waves, Bohm diffusive particle escape, synchrotron radiation, and Compton radiation, where we implement the full Compton cross-section for seed photons from the accretion disk, the dust torus, and 26 individual broad lines. We used a modified Runge-Kutta method to solve the 2nd order equation, including development of a new mathematical method for normalizing stiff steady-state ordinary differential equations. We show that our self-consistent, transport-based blazar model can qualitatively fit the IR through Fermi g-ray data for 3C 279, with a single-zone, leptonic configuration. We use the solution for the electron distribution to calculate multi-wavelength SED spectra for 3C 279. We calculate the particle and magnetic field energy densities, which suggest that the emitting region is not always in equipartition (a common assumption), but sometimes matter dominated. The stratified broad line region (based on ratios in quasar reverberation mapping, and thus adding no free parameters) improves our estimate of the location of the emitting region, increasing it by ~5x. Our model provides a novel view into the physics at play in blazar jets, especially the relative strength of the shock and stochastic acceleration, where our model is well suited to distinguish between these processes, and we find that the latter tends to dominate.

  11. Impact of Transport Zone Number in Simulation Models on Cost-Benefit Analysis Results in Transport Investments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Jacek

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, feasibility studies need to be prepared for all planned transport investments, mainly those co-financed with UE grants. One of the fundamental aspect of feasibility study is the economic justification of an investment, evaluated in an area of so called cost-benefit analysis (CBA). The main goal of CBA calculation is to prove that a transport investment is really important for the society and should be implemented as economically efficient one. It can be said that the number of hours (PH - passengers hours) in trips and travelled kilometres (PK - passengers kilometres) are the most important for CBA results. The differences between PH and PK calculated for particular investment scenarios are the base for benefits calculation. Typically, transport simulation models are the best source for such data. Transport simulation models are one of the most powerful tools for transport network planning. They make it possible to evaluate forecast traffic volume and passenger flows in a public transport system for defined scenarios of transport and area development. There are many different transport models. Their construction is often similar, and they mainly differ in the level of their accuracy. Even models for the same area may differ in this matter. Typically, such differences come from the accuracy of supply side representation: road and public transport network representation. In many cases only main roads and a public transport network are represented, while local and service roads are eliminated as a way of reality simplification. This also enables a faster and more effective calculation process. On the other hand, the description of demand part of these models based on transport zones is often stable. Difficulties with data collection, mainly data on land use, resulted in the lack of changes in the analysed land division into so called transport zones. In this paper the author presents an influence of land division on the results of traffic analyses, and hence

  12. A transportable system of models for natural resource damage assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, M.; French, D.

    1992-01-01

    A system of computer models has been developed for assessment of natural resource economic damages resulting from spills of oil and hazardous materials in marine and fresh water environments. Under USA federal legislation, the results of the model system are presumed correct in damage litigation proceedings. The model can address a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The equations describing the motion of both pollutants and biota are solved in three dimensions. The model can simulate continuous releases of a contaminant, with representation of complex coastal boundaries, variable bathymetry, multiple shoreline types, and spatially variable ecosystem habitats. A graphic user interface provides easy control of the system in addition to the ability to display elements of the underlying geographical information system data base. The model is implemented on a personal computer and on a UNIX workstation. The structure of the system is such that transport to new geographic regions can be accomplished relatively easily, requiring only the development of the appropriate physical, toxicological, biological, and economic data sets. Applications are currently in progress for USA inland and coastal waters, the Adriatic Sea, the Strait of Sicily, the Gulf of Suez, and the Baltic Sea. 4 refs., 2 figs

  13. Radionuclide transport and dose assessment modelling in biosphere assessment 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjerpe, T.; Broed, R.

    2010-11-01

    Following the guidelines set forth by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (now Ministry of Employment and Economy), Posiva is preparing to submit a construction license application for the final disposal spent nuclear fuel at the Olkiluoto site, Finland, by the end of the year 2012. Disposal will take place in a geological repository implemented according to the KBS-3 method. The long-term safety section supporting the license application will be based on a safety case that, according to the internationally adopted definition, will be a compilation of the evidence, analyses and arguments that quantify and substantiate the safety and the level of expert confidence in the safety of the planned repository. This report documents in detail the conceptual and mathematical models and key data used in the landscape model set-up, radionuclide transport modelling, and radiological consequences analysis applied in the 2009 biosphere assessment. Resulting environmental activity concentrations in landscape model due to constant unit geosphere release rates, and the corresponding annual doses, are also calculated and presented in this report. This provides the basis for understanding the behaviour of the applied landscape model and subsequent dose calculations. (orig.)

  14. Edge and coupled core-edge transport modelling in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodestro, L.L.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in the theory and modelling of tokamak edge, scrape-off-layer (SOL) and divertor plasmas are described. The effects of the poloidal ExB drift on inner/outer divertor-plate asymmetries within a 1D analysis are shown to be in good agreement with experimental trends; above a critical v ExB, the model predicts transitions to supersonic SOL flow at the inboard midplane. 2D simulations show the importance of ExB flow in the private-flux region and of ∇ B-drifts. A theory of rough plasma-facing surfaces is given, predicting modifications to the SOL plasma. The parametric dependence of detached-plasma states in slab geometry has been explored; with sufficient pumping, the location of the ionization front can be controlled; otherwise only fronts near the plate or the X-point are stable. Studies with a more accurate Monte-Carlo neutrals model and a detailed non-LTE radiation-transport code indicate various effects are important for quantitative modelling. Detailed simulations of the DIII-D core and edge are presented; impurity and plasma flow are discussed and shown to be well modelled with UEDGE. (author)

  15. Edge and coupled core/edge transport modelling in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodestro, L.L.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    Recent advances in the theory and modelling of tokamak edge, scrape-off-layer (SOL) and divertor plasmas are described. The effects of the poloidal E x B drift on inner/outer divertor-plate asymmetries within a 1D analysis are shown to be in good agreement with experimental trends; above a critical v ExB , the model predicts transitions to supersonic flow at the inboard midplane. 2D simulations show the importance of E x B flow in the private-flux region and of ∇ B-drifts. A theory of rough plasma-facing surfaces is given, predicting modifications to the SOL plasma. The parametric dependence of detached-plasma states in slab geometry has been explored; with sufficient pumping, the location of the ionization front can be controlled; otherwise only fronts near the plate or the X-point are stable. Studies with a more accurate Monte-Carlo neutrals model and a detailed non-LTE radiation-transport code indicate various effects are important for quantitative modelling. Detailed simulations of the DIII-D core and edge are presented; impurity and plasma flow are discussed and shown to be well modelled with UEDGE. (author)

  16. Life cycle assessment of urban solid wastes collecting using vehicles of liquefied natural gas and diesel; Analisis del ciclo de vida comparativo de la etapa de recogida y transporte de RSU mediante vehiculos propulsados por gas natural licaudo y gasoleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieradevall, J.; Domenech, X.; Bala, A.; Gazulla, C.; Mila, L. [Universidad de Barcelona (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    This paper shows an environmental comparison using the Life cycle Assessment (LCA)-between two types of duscarts of CESPA Ingenieria Urbana: one of them using Natural Liquid Gas as a fuel and the other using Diesel. Both vehicles are similar in the rest of technical characteristics. The data to make this study has been given by CESPA which made a follow-up of this duscarts while they were working in Barcelona, the first quarter of 2001. the functional unit to make the comparison is: ''Collect and transport one ton of solid urban waste along a urban circuit of 50 kilometres (with a duscart of 18 ton of Maximum Authorizer Weight)''. (Author) 7 refs.

  17. Mejorando la Calidad de los Métodos de Solución para Redes de Transporte de Gas Natural mediante Técnicas de Optimización

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Z Rios Mercado

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se estudia el problema de minimizar el consumo de combustible incurrido por las estaciones compresoras en un sistema de redes de transporte de gas natural en estado estable, el cual es uno de los problemas de mayor relevancia e importancia en la industria energética por la enorme cantidad de gas que se mueve por un sistema de distribución cada año.  En el mundo real, este tipo de instancias son muy grandes, en términos del número de variables de decisión y del número de restricciones tecnológicas, y muy complejas debido a la presencia de no linealidad y no convexidad en el conjunto  de soluciones factibles y en la función objetivo.  La contribución del presente trabajo consiste en ilustrar cómo un método de solución basado en técnicas avanzadas de optimización como lo son la programación dinámica no secuencial y la descomposición de redes puede emplearse para mejorar notablemente la operación de redes de transporte de gas natural.  Los resultados computacionales muestran la superioridad del método desarrollado al compararlo con el trabajo existente, convirtiéndose así en un avance considerable al estado del arte en esta disciplina.

  18. Evaluation of Stratospheric Transport in New 3D Models Using the Global Modeling Initiative Grading Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahan, Susan E.; Douglass, Anne R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) Team developed objective criteria for model evaluation in order to identify the best representation of the stratosphere. This work created a method to quantitatively and objectively discriminate between different models. In the original GMI study, 3 different meteorological data sets were used to run an offline chemistry and transport model (CTM). Observationally-based grading criteria were derived and applied to these simulations and various aspects of stratospheric transport were evaluated; grades were assigned. Here we report on the application of the GMI evaluation criteria to CTM simulations integrated with a new assimilated wind data set and a new general circulation model (GCM) wind data set. The Finite Volume Community Climate Model (FV-CCM) is a new GCM developed at Goddard which uses the NCAR CCM physics and the Lin and Rood advection scheme. The FV-Data Assimilation System (FV-DAS) is a new data assimilation system which uses the FV-CCM as its core model. One year CTM simulations of 2.5 degrees longitude by 2 degrees latitude resolution were run for each wind data set. We present the evaluation of temperature and annual transport cycles in the lower and middle stratosphere in the two new CTM simulations. We include an evaluation of high latitude transport which was not part of the original GMI criteria. Grades for the new simulations will be compared with those assigned during the original GMT evaluations and areas of improvement will be identified.

  19. Guidelines for effective radiation transport for cable SGEMP modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumm, Clifton Russell [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fan, Wesley C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Turner, C. David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-07-01

    This report describes experiences gained in performing radiation transport computations with the SCEPTRE radiation transport code for System Generated ElectroMagnetic Pulse (SGEMP) applications. SCEPTRE is a complex code requiring a fairly sophisticated user to run the code effectively, so this report provides guidance for analysts interested in performing these types of calculations. One challenge in modeling coupled photon/electron transport for SGEMP is to provide a spatial mesh that is sufficiently resolved to accurately model surface charge emission and charge deposition near material interfaces. The method that has been most commonly used to date to compute cable SGEMP typically requires a sub-micron mesh size near material interfaces, which may be difficult for meshing software to provide for complex geometries. We present here an alternative method for computing cable SGEMP that appears to substantially relax this requirement. The report also investigates the effect of refining the energy mesh and increasing the order of the angular approximation to provide some guidance on determining reasonable parameters for the energy/angular approximation needed for x-ray environments. Conclusions for γ-ray environments may be quite different and will be treated in a subsequent report. In the course of the energy-mesh refinement studies, a bug in the cross-section generation software was discovered that may cause underprediction of the result by as much as an order of magnitude for the test problem studied here, when the electron energy group widths are much smaller than those for the photons. Results will be presented and compared using cross sections generated before and after the fix. We also describe adjoint modeling, which provides sensitivity of the total charge drive to the source energy and angle of incidence, which is quite useful for comparing the effect of changing the source environment and for determining most stressing angle of incidence and source

  20. Computer system to manage information rigs by 3D electronic models; Sistema computacional para administrar la informacion de plataformas petroleras mediante modelos electronicos 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez Bustos, Jesus; Segura Ozuna, Victor Octavio [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2012-06-22

    The evolution and incorporation of new hardware technologies, as well as recent advances in computer systems have enabled the development of applications of computer aided design of most complete scope, such as those used for the design of industrial process plants. This article describes a software system developed to complement the capabilities of one of these systems for the design of process plants. A 3D electronic model is generated through the user interface of the design system that at the same time gives the user the ability to generate, publish, review and control the engineering document that are generated during the entire life cycle of a marine oil platform, a very particular type of industrial process plant. This way, the user obtains not only a tool for the design of an industrial plant, but also a system for managing information and engineering documents that are developed. This allows the user to do a more efficient job by putting at his disposal and in the same system, all documents and information required to perform his duty. [Spanish] La evolucion e incorporacion de nuevas tecnologias de hardware, junto con los avances recientes en sistemas de computo ha permitido el desarrollo de aplicaciones de interesante diseno de computo de mayor alcance, tales como los que se emplean en las plantas de procesos industriales. Este articulo describe un sistema de software desarrollado para complementar las capacidades de uno de estos sistemas para el diseno de proceso. Un modelo electronico se genera por medio de la interfaz de usuario del sistema de diseno, que al mismo tiempo da al usuario la capacidad para crear, publicar, revisar y controlar los documentos de ingenieria que se producen durante el ciclo de vida completo de una plataforma marina petrolera, un tipo muy particular de planta de proceso industrial. De este modo, el usuario no solo obtiene una herramienta para el diseno de una planta industrial, sino tambien un sistema para manejar informacion y

  1. Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Dobson

    2003-01-01

    This Scientific Analysis report describes the methods used to develop numerical grids of the unsaturated hydrogeologic system beneath Yucca Mountain. Numerical grid generation is an integral part of the development of the Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model), a complex, three-dimensional (3-D) model of Yucca Mountain. This revision incorporates changes made to both the geologic framework model and the proposed repository layout. The resulting numerical grids, developed using current geologic, hydrogeologic, and mineralogic data, provide the necessary framework to: (1) develop calibrated hydrogeologic property sets and flow fields, (2) test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport, and (3) predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions. The technical scope, content, and management of this Scientific Analysis report was initially controlled by the planning document, ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Sections of License Application Chapters 8 and 12'' (BSC 2002 [159051], Section 1.6.4). This TWP was later superseded by ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819]), which contains the Data Qualification Plan used to qualify the DTN: MO0212GWLSSPAX.000 [161271] (See Attachment IV). Grids generated and documented in this report supersede those documented in previous versions of this report (BSC 2001 [159356]). The constraints, assumptions, and limitations associated with this report are discussed in the appropriate sections that follow. There were no deviations from the TWP scope of work in this report. Two software packages not listed in Table IV-2 of the TWP (BSC 2002 [159051]), ARCINFO V7.2.1 (CRWMS M and O 2000 [157019]; USGS 2000 [148304]) and 2kgrid8.for V1.0 (LBNL 2002 [154787]), were utilized in the development of the numerical grids; the use of additional software is accounted for in the TWP (BSC 2002 [159051], Section 13). The use of

  2. Transportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allshouse, Michael; Armstrong, Frederick Henry; Burns, Stephen; Courts, Michael; Denn, Douglas; Fortunato, Paul; Gettings, Daniel; Hansen, David; Hoffman, Douglas; Jones, Robert

    2007-01-01

    .... The ability of the global transportation industry to rapidly move passengers and products from one corner of the globe to another continues to amaze even those wise to the dynamics of such operations...

  3. Lattice Boltzmann based multicomponent reactive transport model coupled with geochemical solver for scale simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, R.A.; Perko, J.; Jaques, D.; De Schutter, G.; Ye, G.; Van Breugel, K.

    2013-01-01

    A Lattice Boltzmann (LB) based reactive transport model intended to capture reactions and solid phase changes occurring at the pore scale is presented. The proposed approach uses LB method to compute multi component mass transport. The LB multi-component transport model is then coupled with the

  4. Modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Innovative heating research on cooking, pasteurization/sterilization, defrosting, thawing and drying, often focuses on areas which include the assessment of processing time, evaluation of heating uniformity, studying the impact on quality attributes of the final product as well as considering the energy efficiency of these heating processes. During the last twenty years, so-called electro-heating-processes (radio-frequency - RF, microwaves - MW and ohmic - OH) gained a wide interest in industrial food processing and many applications using the above mentioned technologies have been developed with the aim of reducing processing time, improving process efficiency and, in many cases, the heating uniformity. In the area of innovative heating, electro-heating accounts for a considerable portion of both the scientific literature and commercial applications, which can be subdivided into either direct electro-heating (as in the case of OH heating) where electrical current is applied directly to the food or indirect electro-heating (e.g. MW and RF heating) where the electrical energy is firstly converted to electromagnetic radiation which subsequently generates heat within a product. New software packages, which make easier solution of PDEs based mathematical models, and new computers, capable of larger RAM and more efficient CPU performances, allowed an increasing interest about modelling transport phenomena in systems and processes - as the ones encountered in food processing - that can be complex in terms of geometry, composition, boundary conditions but also - as in the case of electro-heating assisted applications - in terms of interaction with other physical phenomena such as displacement of electric or magnetic field. This paper deals with the description of approaches used in modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context such as RF, MW and OH assisted heating.

  5. Modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, Francesco [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica e Alimentare - Università degli studi di Salerno Via Ponte Don Melillo - 84084 Fisciano SA (Italy)

    2015-01-22

    Innovative heating research on cooking, pasteurization/sterilization, defrosting, thawing and drying, often focuses on areas which include the assessment of processing time, evaluation of heating uniformity, studying the impact on quality attributes of the final product as well as considering the energy efficiency of these heating processes. During the last twenty years, so-called electro-heating-processes (radio-frequency - RF, microwaves - MW and ohmic - OH) gained a wide interest in industrial food processing and many applications using the above mentioned technologies have been developed with the aim of reducing processing time, improving process efficiency and, in many cases, the heating uniformity. In the area of innovative heating, electro-heating accounts for a considerable portion of both the scientific literature and commercial applications, which can be subdivided into either direct electro-heating (as in the case of OH heating) where electrical current is applied directly to the food or indirect electro-heating (e.g. MW and RF heating) where the electrical energy is firstly converted to electromagnetic radiation which subsequently generates heat within a product. New software packages, which make easier solution of PDEs based mathematical models, and new computers, capable of larger RAM and more efficient CPU performances, allowed an increasing interest about modelling transport phenomena in systems and processes - as the ones encountered in food processing - that can be complex in terms of geometry, composition, boundary conditions but also - as in the case of electro-heating assisted applications - in terms of interaction with other physical phenomena such as displacement of electric or magnetic field. This paper deals with the description of approaches used in modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context such as RF, MW and OH assisted heating.

  6. Modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marra, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Innovative heating research on cooking, pasteurization/sterilization, defrosting, thawing and drying, often focuses on areas which include the assessment of processing time, evaluation of heating uniformity, studying the impact on quality attributes of the final product as well as considering the energy efficiency of these heating processes. During the last twenty years, so-called electro-heating-processes (radio-frequency - RF, microwaves - MW and ohmic - OH) gained a wide interest in industrial food processing and many applications using the above mentioned technologies have been developed with the aim of reducing processing time, improving process efficiency and, in many cases, the heating uniformity. In the area of innovative heating, electro-heating accounts for a considerable portion of both the scientific literature and commercial applications, which can be subdivided into either direct electro-heating (as in the case of OH heating) where electrical current is applied directly to the food or indirect electro-heating (e.g. MW and RF heating) where the electrical energy is firstly converted to electromagnetic radiation which subsequently generates heat within a product. New software packages, which make easier solution of PDEs based mathematical models, and new computers, capable of larger RAM and more efficient CPU performances, allowed an increasing interest about modelling transport phenomena in systems and processes - as the ones encountered in food processing - that can be complex in terms of geometry, composition, boundary conditions but also - as in the case of electro-heating assisted applications - in terms of interaction with other physical phenomena such as displacement of electric or magnetic field. This paper deals with the description of approaches used in modelling transport phenomena in a multi-physics context such as RF, MW and OH assisted heating

  7. Development of an Integrated Nonlinear Aeroservoelastic Flight Dynamic Model of the NASA Generic Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ting, Eric

    2018-01-01

    This paper describes a recent development of an integrated fully coupled aeroservoelastic flight dynamic model of the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM). The integrated model couples nonlinear flight dynamics to a nonlinear aeroelastic model of the GTM. The nonlinearity includes the coupling of the rigid-body aircraft states in the partial derivatives of the aeroelastic angle of attack. Aeroservoelastic modeling of the control surfaces which are modeled by the Variable Camber Continuous Trailing Edge Flap is also conducted. The R.T. Jones' method is implemented to approximate unsteady aerodynamics. Simulations of the GTM are conducted with simulated continuous and discrete gust loads..

  8. Photo-chemical transport modelling of tropospheric ozone: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumit; Sharma, Prateek; Khare, Mukesh

    2017-06-01

    Ground level ozone (GLO), a secondary pollutant having adverse impact on human health, ecology, and agricultural productivity, apart from being a major contributor to global warming, has been a subject matter of several studies. In order to identify appropriate strategies to control GLO levels, accurate assessment and prediction is essential, for which elaborate simulation and modelling is required. Several studies have been undertaken in the past to simulate GLO levels at different scales and for various applications. It is important to evaluate these studies, widely spread over in literature. This paper aims to critically review various studies that have been undertaken, especially in the past 15 years (2000-15) to model GLO. The review has been done of the studies that range over different spatial scales - urban to regional and continental to global. It also includes a review of performance evaluation and sensitivity analysis of photo-chemical transport models in order to assess the extent of application of these models and their predictive capability. The review indicates following major findings: (a) models tend to over-estimate the night-time GLO concentrations due to limited titration of GLO with NO within the model; (b) dominance of contribution from far-off regional sources to average ozone concentration in the urban region and higher contribution of local sources during days of high ozone episodes; requiring strategies for controlling precursor emissions at both regional and local scales; (c) greater influence of NOx over VOC in export of ozone from urban regions due to shifting of urban plumes from VOC-sensitive regime to NOx-sensitive as they move out from city centres to neighbouring rural regions; (d) models with finer resolution inputs perform better to a certain extent, however, further improvement in resolutions (beyond 10 km) did not show improvement always; (e) future projections show an increase in GLO concentrations mainly due to rise in

  9. A finite element model for protein transport in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montas Hubert J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological mass transport processes determine the behavior and function of cells, regulate interactions between synthetic agents and recipient targets, and are key elements in the design and use of biosensors. Accurately predicting the outcomes of such processes is crucial to both enhancing our understanding of how these systems function, enabling the design of effective strategies to control their function, and verifying that engineered solutions perform according to plan. Methods A Galerkin-based finite element model was developed and implemented to solve a system of two coupled partial differential equations governing biomolecule transport and reaction in live cells. The simulator was coupled, in the framework of an inverse modeling strategy, with an optimization algorithm and an experimental time series, obtained by the Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP technique, to estimate biomolecule mass transport and reaction rate parameters. In the inverse algorithm, an adaptive method was implemented to calculate sensitivity matrix. A multi-criteria termination rule was developed to stop the inverse code at the solution. The applicability of the model was illustrated by simulating the mobility and binding of GFP-tagged glucocorticoid receptor in the nucleoplasm of mouse adenocarcinoma. Results The numerical simulator shows excellent agreement with the analytic solutions and experimental FRAP data. Detailed residual analysis indicates that residuals have zero mean and constant variance and are normally distributed and uncorrelated. Therefore, the necessary and sufficient criteria for least square parameter optimization, which was used in this study, were met. Conclusion The developed strategy is an efficient approach to extract as much physiochemical information from the FRAP protocol as possible. Well-posedness analysis of the inverse problem, however, indicates that the FRAP protocol provides insufficient

  10. A Reactive Transport Model for Marcellus Shale Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Heidari, P.; Jin, L.; Williams, J.; Brantley, S.

    2017-12-01

    Shale formations account for 25% of the land surface globally. One of the most productive shale-gas formations is the Marcellus, a black shale that is rich in organic matter and pyrite. As a first step toward understanding how Marcellus shale interacts with water, we developed a reactive transport model to simulate shale weathering under ambient temperature and pressure conditions, constrained by soil chemistry and water data. The simulation was carried out for 10,000 years, assuming bedrock weathering and soil genesis began right after the last glacial maximum. Results indicate weathering was initiated by pyrite dissolution for the first 1,000 years, leading to low pH and enhanced dissolution of chlorite and precipitation of iron hydroxides. After pyrite depletion, chlorite dissolved slowly, primarily facilitated by the presence of CO2 and organic acids, forming vermiculite as a secondary mineral. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the most important controls on weathering include the presence of reactive gases (CO2 and O2), specific surface area, and flow velocity of infiltrating meteoric water. The soil chemistry and mineralogy data could not be reproduced without including the reactive gases. For example, pyrite remained in the soil even after 10,000 years if O2 was not continuously present in the soil column; likewise, chlorite remained abundant and porosity remained small with the presence of soil CO2. The field observations were only simulated successfully when the specific surface areas of the reactive minerals were 1-3 orders of magnitude smaller than surface area values measured for powdered minerals, reflecting the lack of accessibility of fluids to mineral surfaces and potential surface coating. An increase in the water infiltration rate enhanced weathering by removing dissolution products and maintaining far-from-equilibrium conditions. We conclude that availability of reactive surface area and transport of H2O and gases are the most important

  11. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConn, Ronald J.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.; Rucker, Robert A.; Williams III, Robert

    2011-03-04

    Introduction Meaningful simulations of radiation transport applications require realistic definitions of material composition and densities. When seeking that information for applications in fields such as homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety, researchers usually encounter a variety of materials for which elemental compositions are not readily available or densities are not defined. Publication of the Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling, Revision 0, in 2006 was the first step toward mitigating this problem. Revision 0 of this document listed 121 materials, selected mostly from the combined personal libraries of staff at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and thus had a scope that was recognized at the time to be limited. Nevertheless, its creation did provide a well-referenced source of some unique or hard-to-define material data in a format that could be used directly in radiation transport calculations being performed at PNNL. Moreover, having a single common set of material definitions also helped to standardize at least one aspect of the various modeling efforts across the laboratory by providing separate researchers the ability to compare different model results using a common basis of materials. The authors of the 2006 compendium understood that, depending on its use and feedback, the compendium would need to be revised to correct errors or inconsistencies in the data for the original 121 materials, as well as to increase (per users suggestions) the number of materials listed. This 2010 revision of the compendium has accomplished both of those objectives. The most obvious change is the increased number of materials from 121 to 372. The not-so-obvious change is the mechanism used to produce the data listed here. The data listed in the 2006 document were compiled, evaluated, entered, and error-checked by a group of individuals essentially by hand, providing no library

  12. Application of atmospheric transport models for complex terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, D.S.; Bunker, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    Numerical modeling techniques are applied to several diverse situations to study mesoscale transport of effluents in the earth's atmosphere. Simulations of a tracer release in complex terrain are compared with experiments carried out in the Northern California Geysers area during a period when nighttime drainage flow was the dominant feature. In addition, we study two situations, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Savannah River Laboratory, for which the terrain is assumed to not be a factor. These involve large modeling areas and in one case, time periods extending over more than two diurnal cycles. These model simulations indicate that a diagnostic wind model utilizing terrain-following coordinates gives reasonable agreement with observations obtained over simple as well as complex terrain. In order to increase the accuracy in simulations of pollutant concentration distribution, much more refinement in wind measurements in space and time is needed since small differences in wind direction, for example, can produce a large difference in computed and measured concentration sufficiently downwind of a source

  13. Stochastic models of solute transport in highly heterogeneous geologic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semenov, V.N.; Korotkin, I.A.; Pruess, K.; Goloviznin, V.M.; Sorokovikova, O.S.

    2009-09-15

    A stochastic model of anomalous diffusion was developed in which transport occurs by random motion of Brownian particles, described by distribution functions of random displacements with heavy (power-law) tails. One variant of an effective algorithm for random function generation with a power-law asymptotic and arbitrary factor of asymmetry is proposed that is based on the Gnedenko-Levy limit theorem and makes it possible to reproduce all known Levy {alpha}-stable fractal processes. A two-dimensional stochastic random walk algorithm has been developed that approximates anomalous diffusion with streamline-dependent and space-dependent parameters. The motivation for introducing such a type of dispersion model is the observed fact that tracers in natural aquifers spread at different super-Fickian rates in different directions. For this and other important cases, stochastic random walk models are the only known way to solve the so-called multiscaling fractional order diffusion equation with space-dependent parameters. Some comparisons of model results and field experiments are presented.

  14. Corner-transport-upwind lattice Boltzmann model for bubble cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofonea, V.; Biciuşcǎ, T.; Busuioc, S.; Ambruş, Victor E.; Gonnella, G.; Lamura, A.

    2018-02-01

    Aiming to study the bubble cavitation problem in quiescent and sheared liquids, a third-order isothermal lattice Boltzmann model that describes a two-dimensional (2D) fluid obeying the van der Waals equation of state, is introduced. The evolution equations for the distribution functions in this off-lattice model with 16 velocities are solved using the corner-transport-upwind (CTU) numerical scheme on large square lattices (up to 6144 ×6144 nodes). The numerical viscosity and the regularization of the model are discussed for first- and second-order CTU schemes finding that the latter choice allows to obtain a very accurate phase diagram of a nonideal fluid. In a quiescent liquid, the present model allows us to recover the solution of the 2D Rayleigh-Plesset equation for a growing vapor bubble. In a sheared liquid, we investigated the evolution of the total bubble area, the bubble deformation, and the bubble tilt angle, for various values of the shear rate. A linear relation between the dimensionless deformation coefficient D and the capillary number Ca is found at small Ca but with a different factor than in equilibrium liquids. A nonlinear regime is observed for Ca≳0.2 .

  15. Modeling the Influence of Hemispheric Transport on Trends in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    We describe the development and application of the hemispheric version of the CMAQ to examine the influence of long-range pollutant transport on trends in surface level O3 distributions. The WRF-CMAQ model is expanded to hemispheric scales and multi-decadal model simulations were recently performed for the period spanning 1990-2010 to examine changes in hemispheric air pollution resulting from changes in emissions over this period. Simulated trends in ozone and precursor species concentrations across the U.S. and the northern hemisphere over the past two decades are compared with those inferred from available measurements during this period. Additionally, the decoupled direct method (DDM) in CMAQ is used to estimate the sensitivity of O3 to emissions from different source regions across the northern hemisphere. The seasonal variations in source region contributions to background O3 is then estimated from these sensitivity calculations and will be discussed. A reduced form model combining these source region sensitivities estimated from DDM with the multi-decadal simulations of O3 distributions and emissions trends, is then developed to characterize the changing contributions of different source regions to background O3 levels across North America. The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Computational Exposure Division (CED) develops and evaluates data, decision-support tools, and models to be applied to media-specific or receptor-specific problem areas

  16. How uncertainty in socio-economic variables affects large-scale transport model forecasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzo, Stefano; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    time, especially with respect to large-scale transport models. The study described in this paper contributes to fill the gap by investigating the effects of uncertainty in socio-economic variables growth rate projections on large-scale transport model forecasts, using the Danish National Transport......A strategic task assigned to large-scale transport models is to forecast the demand for transport over long periods of time to assess transport projects. However, by modelling complex systems transport models have an inherent uncertainty which increases over time. As a consequence, the longer...... the period forecasted the less reliable is the forecasted model output. Describing uncertainty propagation patterns over time is therefore important in order to provide complete information to the decision makers. Among the existing literature only few studies analyze uncertainty propagation patterns over...

  17. Parameterized Radiation Transport Model for Neutron Detection in Complex Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, C. M.; Bisson, D.; Gilligan, J.; Fisher, B. M.; Mayo, R. M.

    2013-04-01

    There is interest in developing the ability to rapidly compute the energy dependent neutron flux within a complex geometry for a variety of applications. Coupled with sensor response function information, this capability would allow direct estimation of sensor behavior in multitude of operational scenarios. In situations where detailed simulation is not warranted or affordable, it is desirable to possess reliable estimates of the neutron field in practical scenarios which do not require intense computation. A tool set of this kind would provide quantitative means to address the development of operational concepts, inform asset allocation decisions, and exercise planning. Monte Carlo and/or deterministic methods provide a high degree of precision and fidelity consistent with the accuracy with which the scene is rendered. However, these methods are often too computationally expensive to support the real-time evolution of a virtual operational scenario. High fidelity neutron transport simulations are also time consuming from the standpoint of user setup and post-simulation analysis. We pre-compute adjoint solutions using MCNP to generate a coarse spatial and energy grid of the neutron flux over various surfaces as an alternative to full Monte Carlo modeling. We attempt to capture the characteristics of the neutron transport solution. We report on the results of brief verification and validation measurements which test the predictive capability of this approach over soil and asphalt concrete surfaces. We highlight the sensitivity of the simulated and experimental results to the material composition of the environment.

  18. Analytical and numerical models of transport in porous cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garboczi, E.J.; Bentz, D.P.

    1990-01-01

    Most chemical and physical processes that degrade cementitious materials are dependent on an external source of either water or ions or both. Understanding the rates of these processes at the microstructural level is necessary in order to develop a sound scientific basis for the prediction and control of the service life of cement-based materials, especially for radioactive-waste containment materials that are required to have service lives on the order of hundreds of years. An important step in developing this knowledge is to understand how transport coefficients, such as diffusivity and permeability, depend on the pore structure. Fluid flow under applied pressure gradients and ionic diffusion under applied concentration gradients are important transport mechanisms that take place in the pore space of cementitious materials. This paper describes: (1) a new analytical percolation-theory-based equation for calculating the permeability of porous materials, (2) new computational methods for computing effective diffusivities of microstructural models or digitized images of actual porous materials, and (3) a new digitized-image mercury intrusion simulation technique

  19. Transport phenomena in the human nasal cavity: a computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftali, S; Schroter, R C; Shiner, R J; Elad, D

    1998-01-01

    Nasal inspiration is important for maintaining the internal milieu of the lung, since ambient air is conditioned to nearly alveolar conditions (body temperature and fully saturated with water vapor) on reaching the nasopharynx. We conducted a two-dimensional computational study of transport phenomena in model transverse cross sections of the nasal cavity of normal and diseased human noses for inspiration under various ambient conditions. The results suggest that during breathing via the normal human nose there is ample time for heat and water exchange to enable equilibration to near intraalveolar conditions. A normal nose can maintain this equilibrium under extreme environments (e.g., hot/humid, cold/dry, cold/humid). The turbinates increase the rate of local heat and moisture transport by narrowing the passageways for air and by induction of laminar swirls downstream of the turbinate wall. However, abnormal blood supply or mucous generation may reduce the rate of heat or moisture flux into the inspired air, and thereby affect the efficacy of the process.

  20. Structural Health Monitoring of Transport Aircraft with Fuzzy Logic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray C. Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A structural health monitoring method based on the concept of static aeroelasticity is presented in this paper. This paper focuses on the estimation of these aeroelastic effects on older transport aircraft, in particular the structural components that are most affected, in severe atmospheric turbulence. Because the structural flexibility properties are mostly unknown to aircraft operators, only the trend, not the magnitude, of these effects is estimated. For this purpose, one useful concept in static aeroelastic effects for conventional aircraft structures is that under aeroelastic deformation the aerodynamic center should move aft. This concept is applied in the present paper by using the fuzzy-logic aerodynamic models. A twin-jet transport aircraft in severe atmospheric turbulence involving plunging motion is examined. It is found that the pitching moment derivatives in cruise with moderate to severe turbulence in transonic flight indicate some degree of abnormality in the stabilizer (i.e., the horizontal tail. Therefore, the horizontal tail is the most severely affected structural component of the aircraft probably caused by vibration under the dynamic loads induced by turbulence.

  1. Community Options Model): Using Artificial Intelligence for Transportation Planning and Community Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the Community Options Model for Transportation-Related Issues (COMTRI) designed to estimate the social and economic impacts of highway realignments on rural Michigan communities for the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT...

  2. Colloids and Radionuclide Transport: A Field, Experimental and Modeling Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, P.; Zavarin, M.; Sylwester, E. E.; Allen, P. G.; Williams, R. W.; Kersting, A. B.

    2002-05-01

    Natural inorganic colloids (colloid-facilitated transport to the transport of low-solubility actinides, such as Pu, is still not well understood. In an effort to better understand the dominant geochemical mechanisms that control Pu transport, we have performed a series of sorption/desorption experiments using mineral colloids. We focused on natural colloidal minerals present in water samples collected from both saturated and vadose zone waters at the Nevada Test Site. These minerals include zeolites, clays, silica, Mn-oxides, Fe-oxides, and calcite. X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy ( both XANES and EXAFS) was performed in order to characterize the speciation of sorbed plutonium. The XANES spectra show that only Pu(IV) was detected (within experimental error) on these mineral surfaces when the starting Pu oxidation state was +5, indicating that Pu(V) was reduced to Pu(IV) during sorption. The EXAFS detected Pu-M and Pu-C interactions (where M=Fe, Mn, or Si) indicating Pu(IV) surface complexation along with carbonate ternary complex formation on most of the minerals tested. Although the plutonium sorption as Pu(IV) species is mineral independent, the actual sorption paths are different for different minerals. The sorption rates were compared to the rates of plutonium disproportionation under similar conditions. The batch sorption/desorption experiments of Pu(IV) and Pu(V) onto colloidal zeolite (clinoptilolite, colloids particle size 171 ñ 25 nm) were conducted in synthetic groundwater (similar to J-13, Yucca Mountain standard) with a pH range from 4 to 10 and initial plutonium concentration of 10-9 M. The results show that Pu(IV) sorption takes place within an hour, while the rates of Pu(V) sorption onto the colloids is much slower and mineral dependent. The kinetic results from the batch sorption/desorption experiments, coupled with redox kinetics of plutonium in solution will be used in geochemical modeling of Pu surface complexation to colloids and

  3. Modelling transport and deposition of caesium and iodine from the Chernobyl accident using the DREAM model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, J.; Christensen, J.H.; Frohn, L.M.; Frydendall, J.; Geels, C.; Hansen, K.M.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: A tracer model, DREAM (the Danish Rimpuff and Eulerian Accidental release Model), has been developed for modelling transport, dispersion and deposition (wet and dry) of radioactive material from accidental releases, as the Chernobyl accident. The model is a combination of a Lagrangian model, that includes the near source dispersion, and an Eulerian model describing the long-range transport. The MM5v2 model is used as a meteorological driver. The performance of the transport model has previously been tested within the European Tracer Experiment, ETEX, which included transport and dispersion of an inert, non-depositing tracer from a controlled release. The focus of this paper is the model performance with respect to the total deposition of 137 Cs, 134 Cs and 131 I from the Chernobyl accident, using different relatively simple and comprehensive parameterizations for dry- and wet deposition. The performance, compared to measurements, of using different combinations of two different wet deposition parameterizations and three different parameterizations of dry deposition has been evaluated, using different statistical tests. The best model performance, compared to measurements, is obtained when parameterizing the total deposition combined of a simple method for dry deposition and a subgrid-scale averaging scheme for wet deposition based on relative humidities. The same major conclusion is obtained for all the three different radioactive isotopes and using two different deposition measurement databases. Large differences are seen in the results obtained by using the two different parameterizations of wet deposition based on precipitation rates and relative humidities, respectively. The parameterization based on subgrid-scale averaging is, in all cases, performing better than the parameterization based on precipitation rates. This indicates that the in-cloud scavenging process is more important than the below cloud scavenging process for the submicron particles

  4. Forward and Inverse Analysis of Chemical Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar

    Assessing the discrepancy between modeled and observed distributions of aerosols is a persistent problem on many scales. Tools for analyzing the evolution of aerosol size distributions using the adjoint method are presented in idealized box model calculations. The ability to recover information about aerosol growth rates and initial size distributions is assessed given a range of simulated observations of evolving systems. While such tools alone could facilitate analysis of chamber measurements, improving estimates of aerosol sources on regional and global scales requires explicit consideration of many additional chemical and physical processes that govern secondary formation of atmospheric aerosols from emissions of gas-phase precursors. The adjoint of the global chemical transport model GEOS-Chem is derived, affording detailed analysis of the relationship between gas-phase aerosol precursor emissions (SOx, NOx and NH 3) and the subsequent distributions of sulfate - ammonium - nitrate aerosol. Assimilation of surface measurements of sulfate and nitrate aerosol is shown to provide valuable constraints on emissions of ammonia. Adjoint sensitivities are used to propose strategies for air quality control, suggesting, for example, that reduction of SOx emissions in the summer and NH3 emissions in the winter would most effectively reduce non-attainment of aerosol air quality standards. The ability of this model to estimate global distributions of carbonaceous aerosol is also addressed. Based on new yield data from environmental chamber studies, mechanisms for incorporating the dependence of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation on NOx concentrations are developed for use in global models. When NOx levels are appropriately accounted for, it is demonstrated that sources such as isoprene and aromatics, previously neglected as sources of aerosol in global models, significantly contribute to predicted SOA burdens downwind of polluted areas (owing to benzene and toluene

  5. Multiscale model reduction for shale gas transport in fractured media

    KAUST Repository

    Akkutlu, I. Y.

    2016-05-18

    In this paper, we develop a multiscale model reduction technique that describes shale gas transport in fractured media. Due to the pore-scale heterogeneities and processes, we use upscaled models to describe the matrix. We follow our previous work (Akkutlu et al. Transp. Porous Media 107(1), 235–260, 2015), where we derived an upscaled model in the form of generalized nonlinear diffusion model to describe the effects of kerogen. To model the interaction between the matrix and the fractures, we use Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method (Efendiev et al. J. Comput. Phys. 251, 116–135, 2013, 2015). In this approach, the matrix and the fracture interaction is modeled via local multiscale basis functions. In Efendiev et al. (2015), we developed the GMsFEM and applied for linear flows with horizontal or vertical fracture orientations aligned with a Cartesian fine grid. The approach in Efendiev et al. (2015) does not allow handling arbitrary fracture distributions. In this paper, we (1) consider arbitrary fracture distributions on an unstructured grid; (2) develop GMsFEM for nonlinear flows; and (3) develop online basis function strategies to adaptively improve the convergence. The number of multiscale basis functions in each coarse region represents the degrees of freedom needed to achieve a certain error threshold. Our approach is adaptive in a sense that the multiscale basis functions can be added in the regions of interest. Numerical results for two-dimensional problem are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of proposed approach. © 2016 Springer International Publishing Switzerland

  6. Reduced Lorenz models for anomalous transport and profile resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rypdal, K.; Garcia, Odd Erik

    2007-01-01

    The physical basis for the Lorenz equations for convective cells in stratified fluids, and for magnetized plasmas imbedded in curved magnetic fields, are reexamined with emphasis on anomalous transport. It is shown that the Galerkin truncation leading to the Lorenz equations for the closed boundary...... problem is incompatible with finite fluxes through the system in the limit of vanishing diffusion. An alternative formulation leading to the Lorenz equations is proposed, invoking open boundaries and the notion of convective streamers and their back-reaction on the profile gradient, giving rise...... to resilience of the profile. Particular emphasis is put on the diffusionless limit, where these equations reduce to a simple dynamical system depending only on one single forcing parameter. This model is studied numerically, stressing experimentally observable signatures, and some of the perils of dimension...

  7. Modeling molecular effects on plasmon transport: Silver nanoparticles with tartrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntsen, Christopher; Lopata, Kenneth; Wall, Michael R.; Bartell, Lizette; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2011-02-01

    Modulation of plasmon transport between silver nanoparticles by a yellow fluorophore, tartrazine, is studied theoretically. The system is studied by combining a finite-difference time-domain Maxwell treatment of the electric field and the plasmons with a time-dependent parameterized method number 3 simulation of the tartrazine, resulting in an effective Maxwell/Schrödinger (i.e., classical/quantum) method. The modeled system has three linearly arranged small silver nanoparticles with a radius of 2 nm and a center-to-center separation of 4 nm; the molecule is centered between the second and third nanoparticles. We initiate an x-polarized current on the first nanoparticle and monitor the transmission through the system. The molecule rotates much of the x-polarized current into the y-direction and greatly reduces the overall transmission of x-polarized current.

  8. A simulation model for intermodal freight transportation in Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    With increased emphasis on intermodal transportation development, the issue of how to evaluate an intermodal freight transportation system and provide intermodal solutions has been receiving intensive attention. In order to improve freight flow effic...

  9. Hypernetwork generation for multi-modal transportation system modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The transportation debate has evolved in recent decades to include ideas such as sustainability and livability alongside mobility and safety. Definitional complexities aside, there is no doubt that this evolution has created a national transportation...

  10. Longshore sediment transport model for the Indian west coast

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandramohan, P.; Nayak, B

    Longshore sediment transport rates for the Indian west coast from Cochin to Porbandar are estimated from ship observed wave data (1968 to 1986). The sediment transport rate is relatively high during the southwest monsoon period from June...

  11. Reactive transport modelling of iron-bentonite interface evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, James; Watson, Claire; Benbow, Steven; Savage, David; Sasamoto, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The interaction of steel (as canister metal, rock bolts, tunnel arches etc.) and its corrosion products with bentonite buffers in engineered barrier systems (EBS) may result in the alteration of montmorillonite to non-swelling Fe-rich minerals, potentially leading to a reduction of buffer swelling pressure and changes in other physical properties. In this paper the results of fully-coupled reactive-transport modelling of a steel-bentonite interface are presented. The models were constructed using the Quintessa code 'QPAC' which allows reactions to be modelled on compartment interfaces and as such, there is not the requirement to have a compartment comprising of steel with a fictive porosity. Therefore, more realistic simulations of the steel-bentonite interface can be produced. The conceptual model comprises a hypothetical 1D steel overpack-buffer interface with a 70 cm thick bentonite-sand buffer (70 wt.% Kunigel V1 bentonite and 30 wt.% quartz sand, as included in the Japanese H12 performance assessment; JNC, 1999). The simulations were produced for a constant temperature of 70 deg. C (P = P sat ) and included the following processes: mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions (kinetic treatment); ion exchange; aqueous speciation; and diffusive solute transport (coupled to porosity evolution). A number of model cases were produced in order to: assess which processes are likely to dominate at iron-bentonite interfaces; to determine the influence of process inclusion/exclusion on the evolution of the system; and to determine the implications of uncertainty in input parameters on predicted bentonite evolution. The models predict that iron-rich clays will replace bentonite primary minerals (especially montmorillonite) at steel-bentonite interfaces over timescales relevant for performance assessment. In addition, the models suggest that Fe-rich layer silicates could dominate the volume of the alteration zone with the

  12. Interfacial Thermal Transport via One-Dimensional Atomic Junction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohuan Xiong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In modern information technology, as integration density increases rapidly and the dimension of materials reduces to nanoscale, interfacial thermal transport (ITT has attracted widespread attention of scientists. This review introduces the latest theoretical development in ITT through one-dimensional (1D atomic junction model to address the thermal transport across an interface. With full consideration of the atomic structures in interfaces, people can apply the 1D atomic junction model to investigate many properties of ITT, such as interfacial (Kapitza resistance, nonlinear interface, interfacial rectification, and phonon interference, and so on. For the ballistic ITT, both the scattering boundary method (SBM and the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF method can be applied, which are exact since atomic details of actual interfaces are considered. For interfacial coupling case, explicit analytical expression of transmission coefficient can be obtained and it is found that the thermal conductance maximizes at certain interfacial coupling (harmonic mean of the spring constants of the two leads and the transmission coefficient is not a monotonic decreasing function of phonon frequency. With nonlinear interaction—phonon–phonon interaction or electron–phonon interaction at interface, the NEGF method provides an efficient way to study the ITT. It is found that at weak linear interfacial coupling, the nonlinearity can improve the ITT, but it depresses the ITT in the case of strong-linear coupling. In addition, the nonlinear interfacial coupling can induce thermal rectification effect. For interfacial materials case which can be simulated by a two-junction atomic chain, phonons show interference effect, and an optimized thermal coupler can be obtained by tuning its spring constant and atomic mass.

  13. Validation Analysis of the Shoal Groundwater Flow and Transport Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Hassan; J. Chapman

    2008-11-01

    Environmental restoration at the Shoal underground nuclear test is following a process prescribed by a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Characterization of the site included two stages of well drilling and testing in 1996 and 1999, and development and revision of numerical models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Agreement on a contaminant boundary for the site and a corrective action plan was reached in 2006. Later that same year, three wells were installed for the purposes of model validation and site monitoring. The FFACO prescribes a five-year proof-of-concept period for demonstrating that the site groundwater model is capable of producing meaningful results with an acceptable level of uncertainty. The corrective action plan specifies a rigorous seven step validation process. The accepted groundwater model is evaluated using that process in light of the newly acquired data. The conceptual model of ground water flow for the Project Shoal Area considers groundwater flow through the fractured granite aquifer comprising the Sand Springs Range. Water enters the system by the infiltration of precipitation directly on the surface of the mountain range. Groundwater leaves the granite aquifer by flowing into alluvial deposits in the adjacent basins of Fourmile Flat and Fairview Valley. A groundwater divide is interpreted as coinciding with the western portion of the Sand Springs Range, west of the underground nuclear test, preventing flow from the test into Fourmile Flat. A very low conductivity shear zone east of the nuclear test roughly parallels the divide. The presence of these lateral boundaries, coupled with a regional discharge area to the northeast, is interpreted in the model as causing groundwater from the site to flow in a northeastward direction into Fairview Valley. Steady-state flow conditions are assumed given the absence of

  14. Critical review: Radionuclide transport, sediment transport, and water quality mathematical modeling; and radionuclide adsorption/desorption mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Y.; Serne, R.J.; Arnold, E.M.; Cowan, C.E.; Thompson, F.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1981-01-01

    This report describes the results of a detailed literature review of radionuclide transport models applicable to rivers, estuaries, coastal waters, the Great Lakes, and impoundments. Some representatives sediment transport and water quality models were also reviewed to evaluate if they can be readily adapted to radionuclide transport modeling. The review showed that most available transport models were developed for dissolved radionuclide in rivers. These models include the mechanisms of advection, dispersion, and radionuclide decay. Since the models do not include sediment and radionuclide interactions, they are best suited for simulating short-term radionuclide migration where: (1) radionuclides have small distribution coefficients; (2) sediment concentrations in receiving water bodies are very low. Only 5 of the reviewed models include full sediment and radionuclide interactions: CHMSED developed by Fields; FETRA SERATRA, and TODAM developed by Onishi et al, and a model developed by Shull and Gloyna. The 5 models are applicable to cases where: (1) the distribution coefficient is large; (2) sediment concentrations are high; or (3) long-term migration and accumulation are under consideration. The report also discusses radionuclide absorption/desorption distribution ratios and addresses adsorption/desorption mechanisms and their controlling processes for 25 elements under surface water conditions. These elements are: Am, Sb, C, Ce, Cm, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, I, Fe, Mn, Np, P, Pu, Pm, Ra, Ru, Sr, Tc, Th, {sup 3}H, U, Zn and Zr.

  15. Contaminant transport at a waste residue deposit: 1. Inverse flow and non-reactive transport modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenborg, Torben Obel; Engesgaard, Peter Knudegaard; Rosbjerg, Dan

    1996-01-01

    to steady state versus transient flow conditions and to the amount of hydraulic and solute data used is investigated. The flow parameters, transmissivity and leakage factor, are estimated simultaneously with the transport parameters: source strength, porosity, and longitudinal dispersivity. This paper...... is the first in a two-paper series describing contaminant transport at a waste residue site. III the second paper, reactive transport at the site is investigated....

  16. Modification of the finite element heat and mass transfer code (FEHMN) to model multicomponent reactive transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, H.S.

    1995-01-01

    The finite element code FEHMN is a three-dimensional finite element heat and mass transport simulator that can handle complex stratigraphy and nonlinear processes such as vadose zone flow, heat flow and solute transport. Scientists at LANL have been developed hydrologic flow and transport models of the Yucca Mountain site using FEHMN. Previous FEHMN simulations have used an equivalent K d model to model solute transport. In this thesis, FEHMN is modified making it possible to simulate the transport of a species with a rigorous chemical model. Including the rigorous chemical equations into FEHMN simulations should provide for more representative transport models for highly reactive chemical species. A fully kinetic formulation is chosen for the FEHMN reactive transport model. Several methods are available to computationally implement a fully kinetic formulation. Different numerical algorithms are investigated in order to optimize computational efficiency and memory requirements of the reactive transport model. The best algorithm of those investigated is then incorporated into FEHMN. The algorithm chosen requires for the user to place strongly coupled species into groups which are then solved for simultaneously using FEHMN. The complete reactive transport model is verified over a wide variety of problems and is shown to be working properly. The simulations demonstrate that gas flow and carbonate chemistry can significantly affect 14 C transport at Yucca Mountain. The simulations also provide that the new capabilities of FEHMN can be used to refine and buttress already existing Yucca Mountain radionuclide transport studies

  17. Modelling transport and deposition of caesium and iodine from the Chernobyl accident using the DREAM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brandt

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A tracer model, DREAM (the Danish Rimpuff and Eulerian Accidental release Model, has been developed for modelling transport, dispersion and deposition (wet and dry of radioactive material from accidental releases, as the Chernobyl accident. The model is a combination of a Lagrangian model, that includes the near source dispersion, and an Eulerian model describing the long-range transport. The performance of the transport model has previously been tested within the European Tracer Experiment, ETEX, which included transport and dispersion of an inert, non-depositing tracer from a controlled release. The focus of this paper is the model performance with respect to the total deposition of  137Cs, 134Cs and 131I from the Chernobyl accident, using different relatively simple and comprehensive parameterizations for dry- and wet deposition. The performance, compared to measurements, of using different combinations of two different wet deposition parameterizations and three different parameterizations of dry deposition has been evaluated, using different statistical tests. The best model performance, compared to measurements, is obtained when parameterizing the total deposition combined of a simple method for dry deposition and a subgrid-scale averaging scheme for wet deposition based on relative humidities. The same major conclusion is obtained for all the three different radioactive isotopes and using two different deposition measurement databases. Large differences are seen in the results obtained by using the two different parameterizations of wet deposition based on precipitation rates and relative humidities, respectively. The parameterization based on subgrid-scale averaging is, in all cases, performing better than the parameterization based on precipitation rates. This indicates that the in-cloud scavenging process is more important than the below cloud scavenging process for the submicron particles and that the precipitation rates are

  18. Preduction of transport properties of gases using classical nonspherical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verlin, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    The general formulation of the classical kinetic theory, which is needed to predict transport properties of gases in situations where the hydrodynamic equations are valid, is reviewed. A rigid convex model of tetrahedral symmetry is used to predict the Senftleben-Beenakker effect of a static magnetic field on the thermal conductivity and viscosity of pure CH 4 , CD 4 and CF 4 . The parameters of the model are optimized and are found to assume physically reasonable values. The calculations agree with experiment to a degree comparable to that of similar work on diatomic molecules. A generalized scattering cross section, γ, is defined which can be evaluated exactly for the limiting cases of a spherical soft potential and rigid ovaloids. For a general soft nonspherical interaction of the Kihara type, a suitable approximation for the momentum dependence is made with the following attributes: γ reduces to the form for soft sphere and rigid ovaloid in the limits and the resulting matrix elements of the collision operator can be written in terms of the familiar Ω* integrals. This formulation is used to investigate thermal diffusion in binary isotopic mixtures of CO. Calculations are made in an 80 0 K to 300 0 K range which includes the inversion temperatures for all mixtures studied. Thermal conductivity and diffusion coefficients of CO are also calculated. The parameters of the model can be adjusted to account for the major features of the experimental data. The physical significance of the parameters is discussed

  19. Towards CFD modeling of turbulent pipeline material transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahirpour, Amir; Herzog, Nicoleta; Egbers, Cristoph

    2013-04-01

    Safe and financially efficient pipeline transportation of carbon dioxide is a critical issue in the developing field of the CCS Technology. In this part of the process, carbon dioxide is transported via pipes with diameter of 1.5 m and entry pressure of 150 bar, with Reynolds number of 107 and viscosity of 8×10(-5) Pa.s as dense fluid [1]. Presence of large and small scale structures in the pipeline, high Reynolds numbers at which CO2 should be transferred, and 3 dimensional turbulence caused by local geometrical modifications, increase the importance of simulation of turbulent material transport through the individual components of the CO2 chain process. In this study, incompressible turbulent channel flow and pipe flow have been modeled using OpenFoam, an open source CFD software. In the first step, simulation of a turbulent channel flow has been considered using LES for shear Reynolds number of 395. A simple geometry has been chosen with cyclic fluid inlet and outlet boundary conditions to simulate a fully developed flow. The mesh is gradually refined towards the wall to provide values close enough to the wall for the wall coordinate (y+). Grid resolution study has been conducted for One-Equation model. The accuracy of the results is analyzed with respect to the grid smoothness in order to reach an optimized resolution for carrying out the next simulations. Furthermore, three LES models, One-Equation, Smagorinsky and Dynamic Smagorinsky are applied for the grid resolution of (60 × 100 × 80) in (x, y, z) directions. The results are then validated with reference to the DNS carried out by Moser et al.[2] for the similar geometry using logarithmic velocity profile (U+) and Reynolds stress tensor components. In the second step the similar flow is modeled using Reynolds averaged method. Several RANS models, like K-epsilon and Launder-Reece-Rodi are applied and validated against DNS and LES results in a similar fashion. In the most recent step, it has been intended

  20. A mathematical model for transporting the biomass to biomass based power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jagtar [Mechanical Engineering Department, SLIET Longowal, District Sangrur, Punjab (India); Panesar, B.S. [Project Professional, SCS Engineers, 11260 Roger Bacon Drive, 300, Virginia 20190 (United States); Sharma, S.K. [Mechanical Engineering Department, NIT Kurukshetra, Haryana (India)

    2010-04-15

    In Punjab, million of tons of agricultural biomass are being generated every year, but it is spatially scattered. The spatial distribution of this resource and the associated costs on collection and transportation are the major bottleneck in the success of biomass energy-conversion facilities. This paper deals with the mathematical model for collection and transporting the biomass from fields to biomass based power plant. The unit transport cost was calculated by using this model. Four systems of transport were conceptualized for two transport modes (tractor with wagon and truck). Three types of agricultural biomass (loose, baled and briquetted) were considered for transport analysis. For all modes of transport, it was observed that unit cost of transport decreases with increase in distance. The transport cost was least for briquetted biomass as compared to loose and baled biomass. (author)

  1. A Mathematical Model of Solute Coupled Water Transport in Toad Intestine Incorporating Recirculation of the Actively Transported Solute

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of an absorbing leaky epithelium is developed for analysis of solute coupled water transport. The non-charged driving solute diffuses into cells and is pumped from cells into the lateral intercellular space (lis). All membranes contain water channels with the solute passing...... increases with hydraulic conductance of the pathway carrying water from mucosal solution into lis. Uphill water transport is accomplished, but with high hydraulic conductance of cell membranes strength of transport is obscured by water flow through cells. Anomalous solvent drag occurs when back flux...

  2. Three-dimensional two-phase mass transport model for direct methanol fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.W.; Zhao, T.S.; Xu, C.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) steady-state model for liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) is presented in this paper. This 3D mass transport model is formed by integrating five sub-models, including a modified drift-flux model for the anode flow field, a two-phase mass transport model for the porous anode, a single-phase model for the polymer electrolyte membrane, a two-phase mass transport model for the porous cathode, and a homogeneous mist-flow model for the cathode flow field. The two-phase mass transport models take account the effect of non-equilibrium evaporation/ condensation at the gas-liquid interface. A 3D computer code is then developed based on the integrated model. After being validated against the experimental data reported in the literature, the code was used to investigate numerically transport behaviors at the DMFC anode and their effects on cell performance

  3. Predicted congestions never occur. On the gap between transport modeling and human behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald FREY

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an introduction to meso-scale transport modeling and issues of human behaviour in transport systems. Along with other examples of the human ability to learn in transport systems we look at the comparison of real life data and the prediction of modeling tools for the closure of Vienna’s inner ring road during the 2008 European Football Championship (EURO 2008. Some light is shed on the scientific question, whether currently used modeling tools are able to adequately reproduce the real-life behaviour of human beings in the transport system and should be used for transport policy decision making.

  4. Tratamiento del hombro doloroso mediante terapia manual

    OpenAIRE

    Gabucio López, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    Introducción: Las disfunciones de hombro son un problema de salud común en las sociedades occidentales. Algunos protocolos de tratamiento han sido desarrollados mediante ensayos clínicos con pacientes que presentan dolor de hombro. Sin embargo, no hay evidencias que sustenten que un protocolo es mejor que otros. El principal objetivo de este trabajo es presentar un caso clínico en el que mediante terapia manual y la prescripción de ejercicios físicos se consigue la resolución del ...

  5. Modeling the Effects of a Transportation Security Incident on the Commercial Container Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    handling system. Transport Reviews: A Transnational Transdisciplinary Journal , 25 (2), 181–199. Danskin, J. W. (1967). The Theory of Max-Min. New York...review of the state of the art . Analytical Studies in Transport Economics, MIT Press, 161–206. Infrastructure. (n.d.). In The American Heritage

  6. A multimedia fate and chemical transport modeling system for pesticides: II. Model evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Rong; Yang Fuquan; Sloan, James J; Trevor Scholtz, M

    2011-01-01

    Pesticides have adverse health effects and can be transported over long distances to contaminate sensitive ecosystems. To address problems caused by environmental pesticides we developed a multimedia multi-pollutant modeling system, and here we present an evaluation of the model by comparing modeled results against measurements. The modeled toxaphene air concentrations for two sites, in Louisiana (LA) and Michigan (MI), are in good agreement with measurements (average concentrations agree to within a factor of 2). Because the residue inventory showed no soil residues at these two sites, resulting in no emissions, the concentrations must be caused by transport; the good agreement between the modeled and measured concentrations suggests that the model simulates atmospheric transport accurately. Compared to the LA and MI sites, the measured air concentrations at two other sites having toxaphene soil residues leading to emissions, in Indiana and Arkansas, showed more pronounced seasonal variability (higher in warmer months); this pattern was also captured by the model. The model-predicted toxaphene concentration fraction on particles (0.5-5%) agrees well with measurement-based estimates (3% or 6%). There is also good agreement between modeled and measured dry (1:1) and wet (within a factor of less than 2) depositions in Lake Ontario. Additionally this study identified erroneous soil residue data around a site in Texas in a published US toxaphene residue inventory, which led to very low modeled air concentrations at this site. Except for the erroneous soil residue data around this site, the good agreement between the modeled and observed results implies that both the US and Mexican toxaphene soil residue inventories are reasonably good. This agreement also suggests that the modeling system is capable of simulating the important physical and chemical processes in the multimedia compartments.

  7. Modeling Human Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis-Associated Changes in Drug Transporter Expression Using Experimental Rodent Models

    OpenAIRE

    Canet, Mark J.; Hardwick, Rhiannon N.; Lake, April D.; Dzierlenga, Anika L.; Clarke, John D.; Cherrington, Nathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a prevalent form of chronic liver disease that can progress to the more advanced stage of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH has been shown to alter drug transporter regulation and may have implications in the development of adverse drug reactions. Several experimental rodent models have been proposed for the study of NASH, but no single model fully recapitulates all aspects of the human disease. The purpose of the current study was to determine whic...

  8. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, Peter; Van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics floating on the ocean surface from 2015 to 2025, with the goal to assess the optimal marine microplastic removal locations for two scenarios: removing the most surface microplastic and reducing the impact on ecosystems, using plankton growth as a proxy. The simulations show that the optimal removal locations are primarily located off the coast of China and in the Indonesian Archipelago for both scenarios. Our estimates show that 31% of the modeled microplastic mass can be removed by 2025 using 29 plastic collectors operating at a 45% capture efficiency from these locations, compared to only 17% when the 29 plastic collectors are moored in the North Pacific garbage patch, between Hawaii and California. The overlap of ocean surface microplastics and phytoplankton growth can be reduced by 46% at our proposed locations, while sinks in the North Pacific can only reduce the overlap by 14%. These results are an indication that oceanic plastic removal might be more effective in removing a greater microplastic mass and in reducing potential harm to marine life when closer to shore than inside the plastic accumulation zones in the centers of the gyres. (letter)

  9. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Peter; van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics floating on the ocean surface from 2015 to 2025, with the goal to assess the optimal marine microplastic removal locations for two scenarios: removing the most surface microplastic and reducing the impact on ecosystems, using plankton growth as a proxy. The simulations show that the optimal removal locations are primarily located off the coast of China and in the Indonesian Archipelago for both scenarios. Our estimates show that 31% of the modeled microplastic mass can be removed by 2025 using 29 plastic collectors operating at a 45% capture efficiency from these locations, compared to only 17% when the 29 plastic collectors are moored in the North Pacific garbage patch, between Hawaii and California. The overlap of ocean surface microplastics and phytoplankton growth can be reduced by 46% at our proposed locations, while sinks in the North Pacific can only reduce the overlap by 14%. These results are an indication that oceanic plastic removal might be more effective in removing a greater microplastic mass and in reducing potential harm to marine life when closer to shore than inside the plastic accumulation zones in the centers of the gyres.

  10. Contaminant transport in aquifers: improving the determination of model parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabino, C.V.S.; Moreira, R.M.; Lula, Z.L.; Chausson, Y.; Magalhaes, W.F.; Vianna, M.N.

    1998-01-01

    Parameters conditioning the migration behavior of cesium and mercury are measured with their tracers 137 Cs and 203 Hg in the laboratory, using both batch and column experiments. Batch tests were used to define the sorption isotherm characteristics. Also investigated were the influences of some test parameters, in particular those due to the volume of water to mass of soil ratio (V/m). A provisional relationship between V/m and the distribution coefficient, K d , has been advanced, and a procedure to estimate K d 's valid for environmental values of the ratio V/m has been suggested. Column tests provided the parameters for a transport model. A major problem to be dealt with in such tests is the collimation of the radioactivity probe. Besides mechanically optimizing the collimator, a deconvolution procedure has been suggested and tested, with statistical criteria, to filter off both noise and spurious tracer signals. Correction procedures for the integrating effect introduced by sampling at the exit of columns have also been developed. These techniques may be helpful in increasing the accuracy required in the measurement of parameters conditioning contaminant migration in soils, thus allowing more reliable predictions based on mathematical model applications. (author)

  11. Parameterization of Fire Injection Height in Large Scale Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paugam, R.; Wooster, M.; Atherton, J.; Val Martin, M.; Freitas, S.; Kaiser, J. W.; Schultz, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    The parameterization of fire injection height in global chemistry transport model is currently a subject of debate in the atmospheric community. The approach usually proposed in the literature is based on relationships linking injection height and remote sensing products like the Fire Radiative Power (FRP) which can measure active fire properties. In this work we present an approach based on the Plume Rise Model (PRM) developed by Freitas et al (2007, 2010). This plume model is already used in different host models (e.g. WRF, BRAMS). In its original version, the fire is modeled by: a convective heat flux (CHF; pre-defined by the land cover and evaluated as a fixed part of the total heat released) and a plume radius (derived from the GOES Wildfire-ABBA product) which defines the fire extension where the CHF is homogeneously distributed. Here in our approach the Freitas model is modified, in particular we added (i) an equation for mass conservation, (ii) a scheme to parameterize horizontal entrainment/detrainment, and (iii) a new initialization module which estimates the sensible heat released by the fire on the basis of measured FRP rather than fuel cover type. FRP and Active Fire (AF) area necessary for the initialization of the model are directly derived from a modified version of the Dozier algorithm applied to the MOD14 product. An optimization (using the simulating annealing method) of this new version of the PRM is then proposed based on fire plume characteristics derived from the official MISR plume height project and atmospheric profiles extracted from the ECMWF analysis. The data set covers the main fire region (Africa, Siberia, Indonesia, and North and South America) and is set up to (i) retain fires where plume height and FRP can be easily linked (i.e. avoid large fire cluster where individual plume might interact), (ii) keep fire which show decrease of FRP and AF area after MISR overpass (i.e. to minimize effect of the time period needed for the plume to

  12. Modeling Np and Pu transport with a surface complexation model and spatially variant sorption capacities: Implications for reactive transport modeling and performance assessments of nuclear waste disposal sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, P.D.

    2003-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) geochemical transport modeling is used to demonstrate the effects of speciation and sorption reactions on the ground-water transport of Np and Pu, two redox-sensitive elements. Earlier 1D simulations (Reardon, 1981) considered the kinetically limited dissolution of calcite and its effect on ion-exchange reactions (involving 90Sr, Ca, Na, Mg and K), and documented the spatial variation of a 90Sr partition coefficient under both transient and steady-state chemical conditions. In contrast, the simulations presented here assume local equilibrium for all reactions, and consider sorption on constant potential, rather than constant charge, surfaces. Reardon's (1981) seminal findings on the spatial and temporal variability of partitioning (of 90Sr) are reexamined and found partially caused by his assumption of a kinetically limited reaction. In the present work, sorption is assumed the predominant retardation process controlling Pu and Np transport, and is simulated using a diffuse-double-layer-surface-complexation (DDLSC) model. Transport simulations consider the infiltration of Np- and Pu-contaminated waters into an initially uncontaminated environment, followed by the cleanup of the resultant contamination with uncontaminated water. Simulations are conducted using different spatial distributions of sorption capacities (with the same total potential sorption capacity, but with different variances and spatial correlation structures). Results obtained differ markedly from those that would be obtained in transport simulations using constant Kd, Langmuir or Freundlich sorption models. When possible, simulation results (breakthrough curves) are fitted to a constant K d advection-dispersion transport model and compared. Functional differences often are great enough that they prevent a meaningful fit of the simulation results with a constant K d (or even a Langmuir or Freundlich) model, even in the case of Np, a weakly sorbed radionuclide under the

  13. A Data-Driven Air Transportation Delay Propagation Model Using Epidemic Process Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Baspinar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In air transport network management, in addition to defining the performance behavior of the system’s components, identification of their interaction dynamics is a delicate issue in both strategic and tactical decision-making process so as to decide which elements of the system are “controlled” and how. This paper introduces a novel delay propagation model utilizing epidemic spreading process, which enables the definition of novel performance indicators and interaction rates of the elements of the air transportation network. In order to understand the behavior of the delay propagation over the network at different levels, we have constructed two different data-driven epidemic models approximating the dynamics of the system: (a flight-based epidemic model and (b airport-based epidemic model. The flight-based epidemic model utilizing SIS epidemic model focuses on the individual flights where each flight can be in susceptible or infected states. The airport-centric epidemic model, in addition to the flight-to-flight interactions, allows us to define the collective behavior of the airports, which are modeled as metapopulations. In network model construction, we have utilized historical flight-track data of Europe and performed analysis for certain days involving certain disturbances. Through this effort, we have validated the proposed delay propagation models under disruptive events.

  14. Modelling public transport passenger flows in the era of intelligent transport systems COST Action TU1004 (TransITs)

    CERN Document Server

    Noekel, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    This book shows how transit assignment models can be used to describe and predict the patterns of network patronage in public transport systems. It provides a fundamental technical tool that can be employed in the process of designing, implementing and evaluating measures and/or policies to improve the current state of transport systems within given financial, technical and social constraints. The book offers a unique methodological contribution to the field of transit assignment because, moving beyond “traditional” models, it describes more evolved variants that can reproduce: • intermodal networks with high- and low-frequency services; • realistic behavioural hypotheses underpinning route choice; • time dependency in frequency-based models; and • assumptions about the knowledge that users have of network conditions that are consistent with the present and future level of information that intelligent transport systems (ITS) can provide. The book also considers the practical perspective of practit...

  15. Car sharing demand estimation and urban transport demand modelling using stated preference techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Catalano, Mario; Lo Casto, Barbara; Migliore, Marco

    2008-01-01

    The research deals with the use of the stated preference technique (SP) and transport demand modelling to analyse travel mode choice behaviour for commuting urban trips in Palermo, Italy. The principal aim of the study was the calibration of a demand model to forecast the modal split of the urban transport demand, allowing for the possibility of using innovative transport systems like car sharing and car pooling. In order to estimate the demand model parameters, a specific survey was carried ...

  16. Confirmación de un modelo explicativo del estrés y de los síntomas psicosomáticos mediante ecuaciones estructurales Confirmation of a descriptive model of stress and psychosomatic symptoms using structural equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Teresa González Ramírez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Evaluar mediante ecuaciones estructurales un modelo del estrés que integra la explicación de los síntomas psicosomáticos y la teoría transaccional del estrés. MÉTODOS: Se seleccionó una muestra representativa, aleatoria y estratificada de estudiantes de la Facultad de Psicología de la Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, México. Los sujetos se seleccionaron a partir del listado de alumnos proporcionado por la facultad. Se utilizaron cuestionarios de autoevaluación con adecuadas propiedades psicométricas para valorar cada una de las variables incluidas en el modelo. Los resultados se analizaron con el programa AMOS 5.0, empleando el método de máxima verosimilitud. Asimismo, se compararon el modelo estructural con variables observables y un modelo con variables latentes endógenas. RESULTADOS:Los resultados obtenidos confirman parcialmente el modelo presentado y corroboran los efectos del estrés y el cansancio emocional sobre los síntomas psicosomáticos, y de la autoestima, la autoeficacia y el apoyo social sobre el estrés. El modelo con variables observables (c²/gl = 2,87; GFI (índice de bondad del ajuste = 0,985; AGFI (índice de bondad de ajuste corregido = 0,946; RMSEA (error de aproximación cuadrático medio = 0,072; IFI (índice de ajuste incremental = 0,982 tiene mejor ajuste que el modelo con variables latentes (c²/gl = 3,74; GFI = 0,924; AGFI = 0,876; RMSEA = 0,09, IFI = 0,927. En ambos casos, el ajuste es adecuado. CONCLUSIONES:El modelo presentado constituye el principal aporte de este trabajo. Se trata de un modelo explicativo de síntomas psicosomáticos, con buen ajuste, que explica el 24,3% de la varianza al utilizar variables observables y el 39,4% al utilizar variables latentes.OBJECTIVES:To evaluate a descriptive model of stress that integrates an explanation of psychosomatic symptoms with the transactional theory of stress. METHODS:A random and stratified representative sample was selected from

  17. A cellular automata-based land use and transport interaction model applied to Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aljoufie, Mohammed; Zuidgeest, M.H.P.; Brussel, M.J.G.; van Vliet, Jasper; van Maarseveen, M.F.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the interaction between urban land-use change and transport is critical for urban planning as well as for transport planning, particularly in the case of rapidly growing and motorising cities, such as Jeddah in Saudi Arabia. Dynamic land use and transport interaction models provide a

  18. Influence of 3D printing on transport : a theory and experts judgment based conceptual model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, Wouter; Van Wee, Bert

    2017-01-01

    Consumer 3D printing is on the rise and has the potential to significantly change the transport and logistics sector. Current literature on 3D printing and transport studies does not provide a systematic model of the impact of 3D printing on transport and related (policy relevant) areas, such as

  19. Application of a LUTI model for the assessment of land use plans and public transport investments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bok, Michiel; Geurs, Karst Teunis; Zondag, Barry; Viegas, J.M.; Macario, R.

    2010-01-01

    Integrated land-use and transport interaction models (LUTI) are praised for their ability to evaluate land-use and transport planning in an integrated and consistent modeling system. However, applications of empirically estimated land use models are rare. This paper will present the application of

  20. Anomalous solute transport in saturated porous media: Relating transport model parameters to electrical and nuclear magnetic resonance properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Ryan D; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; France, Samantha; Osterman, Gordon; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Singha, Kamini

    2015-01-01

    The advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fails to describe commonly observed non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models such as the dual-domain mass-transfer (DDMT) model. DDMT model parameters are commonly calibrated via curve fitting, providing little insight into the relation between effective parameters and physical properties of the medium. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can provide insight into the geometry and connectedness of pore spaces related to transport model parameters. Here, we consider proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), direct-current (DC) resistivity, and complex conductivity (CC) measurements for this purpose, and assess these methods using glass beads as a control and two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material that demonstrates non-Fickian transport due to intragranular porosity. We estimate DDMT parameters via calibration of a transport model to column-scale solute tracer tests, and compare NMR, DC resistivity, CC results, which reveal that grain size alone does not control transport properties and measured geophysical parameters; rather, volume and arrangement of the pore space play important roles. NMR cannot provide estimates of more-mobile and less-mobile pore volumes in the absence of tracer tests because these estimates depend critically on the selection of a material-dependent and flow-dependent cutoff time. Increased electrical connectedness from DC resistivity measurements are associated with greater mobile pore space determined from transport model calibration. CC was hypothesized to be related to length scales of mass transfer, but the CC response is unrelated to DDMT.