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Sample records for transplantation therapy embryonic

  1. Embryonic stem cell therapy of heart failure in genetic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Satsuki; Nelson, Timothy J; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Liu, Xiao-Ke; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Behfar, Atta; Terzic, Andre

    2008-10-01

    Pathogenic causes underlying nonischemic cardiomyopathies are increasingly being resolved, yet repair therapies for these commonly heritable forms of heart failure are lacking. A case in point is human dilated cardiomyopathy 10 (CMD10; Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man #608569), a progressive organ dysfunction syndrome refractory to conventional therapies and linked to mutations in cardiac ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channel subunits. Embryonic stem cell therapy demonstrates benefit in ischemic heart disease, but the reparative capacity of this allogeneic regenerative cell source has not been tested in inherited cardiomyopathy. Here, in a Kir6.2-knockout model lacking functional K(ATP) channels, we recapitulated under the imposed stress of pressure overload the gene-environment substrate of CMD10. Salient features of the human malignant heart failure phenotype were reproduced, including compromised contractility, ventricular dilatation, and poor survival. Embryonic stem cells were delivered through the epicardial route into the left ventricular wall of cardiomyopathic stressed Kir6.2-null mutants. At 1 month of therapy, transplantation of 200,000 cells per heart achieved teratoma-free reversal of systolic dysfunction and electrical synchronization and halted maladaptive remodeling, thereby preventing end-stage organ failure. Tracked using the lacZ reporter transgene, stem cells engrafted into host heart. Beyond formation of cardiac tissue positive for Kir6.2, transplantation induced cell cycle activation and halved fibrotic zones, normalizing sarcomeric and gap junction organization within remuscularized hearts. Improved systemic function induced by stem cell therapy translated into increased stamina, absence of anasarca, and benefit to overall survivorship. Embryonic stem cells thus achieve functional repair in nonischemic genetic cardiomyopathy, expanding indications to the therapy of heritable heart failure. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is

  2. The postischemic environment differentially impacts teratoma or tumor formation after transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seminatore, Christine; Polentes, Jerome; Ellman, Ditte

    2010-01-01

    Risk of tumorigenesis is a major obstacle to human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell therapy. Likely linked to the stage of differentiation of the cells at the time of implantation, formation of teratoma/tumors can also be influenced by factors released by the host tissue. We have...... analyzed the relative effects of the stage of differentiation and the postischemic environment on the formation of adverse structures by transplanted human embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitors....

  3. Derivation of Traceable and Transplantable Photoreceptors from Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Decembrini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Retinal degenerative diseases resulting in the loss of photoreceptors are one of the major causes of blindness. Photoreceptor replacement therapy is a promising treatment because the transplantation of retina-derived photoreceptors can be applied now to different murine retinopathies to restore visual function. To have an unlimited source of photoreceptors, we derived a transgenic embryonic stem cell (ESC line in which the Crx-GFP transgene is expressed in photoreceptors and assessed the capacity of a 3D culture protocol to produce integration-competent photoreceptors. This culture system allows the production of a large number of photoreceptors recapitulating the in vivo development. After transplantation, integrated cells showed the typical morphology of mature rods bearing external segments and ribbon synapses. We conclude that a 3D protocol coupled with ESCs provides a safe and renewable source of photoreceptors displaying a development and transplantation competence comparable to photoreceptors from age-matched retinas.

  4. Human Embryonic Stem Cell Therapy in Crohn’s Disease: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 21 Final Diagnosis: Crohn’s disease Symptoms: Intolerance to specific foods • abdominal pain and diarrhea Medication: Human embryonic stem cell therapy Clinical Procedure: Human embryonic stem cell transplantation Specialty: Gastroenterology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the intestines, mainly the colon and ileum, related with ulcers and fistulae. It is estimated to affect 565 000 people in the United States. Currently available therapies, such as antibiotics, thiopurines, and anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha agents, are only observed to reduce the complications associated with Crohn’s disease and to improve quality of life, but cannot cure the disease. Stem cell therapy appears to have certain advantages over conventional therapies. Our study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of human embryonic stem cell therapy in a patient with Crohn’s disease. Case Report: A 21-year-old male with chief complaints of intolerance to specific foods, abdominal pain, and diarrhea underwent human embryonic stem cell therapy for two months. After undergoing human embryonic stem cell therapy, the patient showed symptomatic relief. He had no complaints of back pain, abdominal pain, or diarrhea and had improved digestion. The patient had no signs and symptoms of skin infection, and had improved limb stamina, strength, and endurance. The condition of patient was stable after the therapy. Conclusions: Human embryonic stem cell therapy might serve as a new optimistic treatment approach for Crohn’s disease. PMID:26923312

  5. [Personalized medicine in transplantation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Kaname

    2013-05-01

    Personalized medicine based on pharmacogenomics is being developed at the clinical stage. Various evidence is accumulating in transplantation therapy. Tacrolimus, a calcineurin inhibitor, is usually used for immunosuppressive therapy after transplantation. Tacrolimus is mainly metabolized by cytochrome P450 isozymes, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5, expressed in the intestine as well as in the liver. Recent studies of pharmacogenomics have reported that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CYP3A5 are correlated with gene expression and enzyme activity. Phenotypes of CYP3A5 are typed as expressors (*1/*1 and *1/*3) or non-expressors (*3/*3) . In living-donor liver transplantation, CYP3A5 phenotypes could predict the blood concentration of tacrolimus. In particular, preoperative assessment of CYP3A5 genotypes in both recipients (intestine) and donors (graft liver) is required for predicting tacrolimus pharmacokinetics. In kidney transplantation, blood tacrolimus concentrations were significantly different between expressors and non-expressors. Genotyping and phenotyping of recipients were useful to predict blood tacrolimus levels in early phase of post-transplantation. Furthermore, phenotypes of CYP3A5 could predict the initial dose of tacrolimus. Combination therapy was performed after bone marrow transplantation to prevent complications. Genotyping and phenotyping of metabolic enzymes for combination dugs would be useful for predicting drug actions. In conclusion, phenotyping based on pharmacogenomics supports personalized medicine in transplantation therapy. In future, multiplex testing should be developed to support personalized medicine in various fields.

  6. DORSAL ROOT REGENERATION INTO TRANSPLANTS OF DORSAL OR VENTRAL HALF OF EMBRYONIC SPINAL CORD

    OpenAIRE

    Ohta, Tohru; Itoh, Yasunobu; Tessler, Alan; Mizoi, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    Adult cut dorsal root axons regenerate into the transplants of embryonic spinal cord (ESC) and form functional synapses within the transplants. It is unknown whether the growth is specific to transplants of dorsal half of ESC, a normal target of most dorsal root axons, or whether it is due to properties shared by transplants of ventral half of ESC. We used calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunohistochemistry to label to the subpopulations of regenerated adult dorsal root axons, quantit...

  7. Early embryonic development and transplantation in tree shrews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan-Zhen YAN

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available As a novel experimental animal model, tree shrews have received increasing attention in recent years. Despite this, little is known in regards to the time phases of their embryonic development. In this study, surveillance systems were used to record the behavior and timing of copulations; embryos at different post-copulation stages were collected and cultured in vitro; and the developmental characteristics of both early-stage and in vitro cultured embryos were determined. A total of 163 females were collected following effective copulation, and 150 were used in either unilateral or bilateral oviduct embryo collections, with 307 embryos from 111 females obtained (conception rate=74%. Among them, 237 embryos were collected from 78 females, bilaterally, i.e., the average embryo number per female was 3.04; 172 fertilized eggs collected from 55 females, bilaterally, were cultured for 24-108 h in vitro for developmental observations; finally, 65 embryos from 23 bilateral cases and 70 embryos from 33 unilateral cases were used in embryo transplantation.

  8. Targeting embryonic signaling pathways in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Pamela Jo; Speranza, Giovanna; Dansky Ullmann, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    The embryonic signaling pathways (ESP), Hedgehog, Notch and Wnt, are critical for the regulation of normal stem cells and cellular development processes. They are also activated in the majority of cancers. ESP are operational in putative cancer stem cells (CSC), which drive initial tumorigenesis and sustain cancer progression and recurrence in non-CSC bulk subpopulations. ESP represent novel therapeutic targets. A variety of inhibitors and targeting strategies are being developed. This review discusses the rationale for targeting ESP for cancer treatment, as well as specific inhibitors under development; mainly focusing on those approaching clinical use and the challenges that lie ahead. The data sources utilized are several database search engines (PubMed, Google, Clinicaltrials.gov), and the authors' involvement in the field. CSC research is rapidly evolving. Expectations regarding their therapeutic targeting are rising quickly. Further definition of what constitutes a true CSC, proper validation of CSC markers, a better understanding of cross-talk among ESP and other pathways, and interactions with tumor non-CSC and the tumor microenvironment are needed. The appropriate patient population, the right clinical setting and combination strategies to test these therapies, as well as the proper pharmacodynamic markers to measure, need to be further established.

  9. Subretinally transplanted embryonic stem cells rescue photoreceptor cells from degeneration in the RCS rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraermeyer, U; Thumann, G; Luther, T; Kociok, N; Armhold, S; Kruttwig, K; Andressen, C; Addicks, K; Bartz-Schmidt, K U

    2001-01-01

    The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat is an animal model for retinal degeneration such as the age-related macular degeneration. The RCS rat undergoes a progressive retinal degeneration during the early postnatal period. A potential treatment to prevent this retinal degeneration is the transplantation into the subretinal space of cells that would replace functions of the degenerating retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells or may form neurotrophic factors. In this study we have investigated the potential of subretinally transplanted embryonic stem cells to prevent the genetically determined photoreceptor cell degeneration in the RCS rat. Embryonic stem cells from the inner cell mass of the mouse blastocyst were allowed to differentiate to neural precursor cells in vitro and were then transplanted into the subretinal space of 20-day-old RCS rats. Transplanted and sham-operated rats were sacrificed 2 months following cell transplantation. The eyes were enucleated and photoreceptor degeneration was quantified by analyzing and determining the thickness of the outer nuclear layer by light and electron microscopy. In the eyes transplanted with embryonic cells up to 8 rows of photoreceptor cell nuclei were observed, whereas in nontreated control eyes the outer nuclear layer had degenerated completely. Transplantation of embryonic stem cells appears to delay photoreceptor cell degeneration in RCS rats.

  10. Neuroprotective effect of transplanted human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursors in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Aharonowiz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS is an immune mediated demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS. A potential new therapeutic approach for MS is cell transplantation which may promote remyelination and suppress the inflammatory process. METHODS: We transplanted human embryonic stem cells (hESC-derived early multipotent neural precursors (NPs into the brain ventricles of mice induced with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the animal model of MS. We studied the effect of the transplanted NPs on the functional and pathological manifestations of the disease. RESULTS: Transplanted hESC-derived NPs significantly reduced the clinical signs of EAE. Histological examination showed migration of the transplanted NPs to the host white matter, however, differentiation to mature oligodendrocytes and remyelination were negligible. Time course analysis of the evolution and progression of CNS inflammation and tissue injury showed an attenuation of the inflammatory process in transplanted animals, which was correlated with the reduction of both axonal damage and demyelination. Co-culture experiments showed that hESC-derived NPs inhibited the activation and proliferation of lymph node-derived T cells in response to nonspecific polyclonal stimuli. CONCLUSIONS: The therapeutic effect of transplantation was not related to graft or host remyelination but was mediated by an immunosuppressive neuroprotective mechanism. The attenuation of EAE by hESC-derived NPs, demonstrated here, may serve as the first step towards further developments of hESC for cell therapy in MS.

  11. Transplantation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Lyme Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shroff, Geeta

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 42 ? Female, 30 Final Diagnosis: Human embryonic stem cells showed good therapeutic potential for treatment of multiple sclerosis with lyme disease Symptoms: Fatigue ? weakness in limbs Medication: ? Clinical Procedure: Human embryonic stem cells transplantation Specialty: Transplantology Objective: Rare disease Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease in which the myelin sheath of nerve cells is damaged. It can cause dela...

  12. Embryonic Stem Cell Therapy of Heart Failure in Genetic Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Satsuki; Nelson, Timothy J.; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J.; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Liu, Xiao-Ke; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Behfar, Atta; Terzic, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic causes underlying nonischemic cardiomyopathies are increasingly being resolved, yet repair therapies for these commonly heritable forms of heart failure are lacking. A case in point is human dilated cardiomyopathy 10 (CMD10; Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man #608569), a progressive organ dysfunction syndrome refractory to conventional therapies and linked to mutations in cardiac ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel sub-units. Embryonic stem cell therapy demonstrates benefit in ischemi...

  13. A review on stem cell therapy for multiple sclerosis: special focus on human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Geeta

    2018-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS), a complex disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), is characterized with axonal loss underlying long-term progressive disability. Currently available therapies for its management are able to slow down the progression but fail to treat it completely. Moreover, these therapies are associated with major CNS and cardiovascular adverse events, and prolonged use of these treatments may cause life-threatening diseases. Recent research has shown that cellular therapies hold a potential for CNS repair and may be able to provide protection from inflammatory damage caused after injury. Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) transplantation is one of the promising cell therapies; hESCs play an important role in remyelination and help in preventing demylenation of the axons. In this study, an overview of the current knowledge about the unique properties of hESC and their comparison with other cell therapies has been presented for the treatment of patients with MS.

  14. Maturation and function of human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic progenitors in macroencapsulation devices following transplant into mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruin, Jennifer E; Rezania, Alireza; Xu, Jean; Narayan, Kavitha; Fox, Jessica K; O'Neil, John J; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2013-09-01

    Islet transplantation is a promising cell therapy for patients with diabetes, but it is currently limited by the reliance upon cadaveric donor tissue. We previously demonstrated that human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived pancreatic progenitor cells matured under the kidney capsule in a mouse model of diabetes into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells capable of reversing diabetes. However, the formation of cells resembling bone and cartilage was a major limitation of that study. Therefore, we developed an improved differentiation protocol that aimed to prevent the formation of off-target mesoderm tissue following transplantation. We also examined how variation within the complex host environment influenced the development of pancreatic progenitors in vivo. The hESCs were differentiated for 14 days into pancreatic progenitor cells and transplanted either under the kidney capsule or within Theracyte (TheraCyte, Laguna Hills, CA, USA) devices into diabetic mice. Our revised differentiation protocol successfully eliminated the formation of non-endodermal cell populations in 99% of transplanted mice and generated grafts containing >80% endocrine cells. Progenitor cells developed efficiently into pancreatic endocrine tissue within macroencapsulation devices, despite lacking direct contact with the host environment, and reversed diabetes within 3 months. The preparation of cell aggregates pre-transplant was critical for the formation of insulin-producing cells in vivo and endocrine cell development was accelerated within a diabetic host environment compared with healthy mice. Neither insulin nor exendin-4 therapy post-transplant affected the maturation of macroencapsulated cells. Efficient differentiation of hESC-derived pancreatic endocrine cells can occur in a macroencapsulation device, yielding glucose-responsive insulin-producing cells capable of reversing diabetes.

  15. Transplantation of embryonic porcine neocortical tissue into newborn rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro, Anthony J; Meyer, Morten; Møller Dall, Annette

    2003-01-01

    cavities made in newborn rats. Sacrifice at 3-12.5 weeks posttransplantation revealed healthy looking grafts in several animals. Apparent graft rejection evidenced by areas of necrosis and OX1 reactivity was observed in some of the older transplants. Treatment of nursing mothers or of postweaning newborns...... with cyclosporin A did not appear to promote graft survival. Some transplants grew to extremely large proportions and were characterized by bands of cells and bundles of axons as observed using immunohistochemical staining for pig neurofilament. Neurofilament-positive axons projected from several of the grafts...

  16. In vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into functional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-22

    Aug 22, 2011 ... hepatocyte transplantation therapy and toxicity screening in drug discovery. Key words: Embryonic stem cells, hepatic-like cells, in vitro differentiation, sodium butyrate, ... from embryonic stem (ES) cell or induced pluripotent.

  17. Nutritional Therapy in Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hammad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein-energy malnourishment is commonly encountered in patients with end-stage liver disease who undergo liver transplantation. Malnutrition may further increase morbidity, mortality and costs in the post-transplantation setting. The importance of carefully assessing the nutritional status during the work-up of patients who are candidates for liver replacement is widely recognized. The metabolic abnormalities induced by liver failure render the conventional assessment of nutritional status to be challenging. Preoperative loss of skeletal muscle mass, namely, sarcopenia, has a significant detrimental impact on post-transplant outcomes. It is essential to provide sufficient nutritional support during all phases of liver transplantation. Oral nutrition is preferred, but tube enteral nutrition may be required to provide the needed energy intake. Herein, the latest currently employed perioperative nutritional interventions in liver transplant recipients are thoroughly illustrated including synbiotics, micronutrients, branched-chain amino acid supplementation, immunonutrition formulas, fluid and electrolyte balance, the offering of nocturnal meals, dietary counselling, exercise and rehabilitation.

  18. Induction immunosuppressive therapies in renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven; Martin, Spencer T; Roberts, Keri L; Grafals, Monica

    2011-02-01

    Induction immunosuppressive therapies for patients undergoing renal transplantation are reviewed. The goal of induction therapy is to prevent acute rejection during the early posttransplantation period by providing a high degree of immunosuppression at the time of transplantation. Induction therapy is often considered essential to optimize outcomes, particularly in patients at high risk for poor short-term outcomes. All of the induction immunosuppressive agents currently used are biological agents and are either monoclonal (muromonab-CD3, daclizumab, basiliximab, alemtuzumab) or polyclonal (antithymocyte globulin [equine] or antithymocyte globulin [rabbit]) antibodies. Although antithymocyte globulin (rabbit) is not labeled for induction therapy, it is used for this purpose more than any other agent. Basiliximab is not considered as potent an immunosuppressive agent but has a much more favorable adverse-effect profile compared with antithymocyte globulin (rabbit) and is most commonly used in patients at low risk for acute rejection. Rituximab is being studied for use as induction therapy but to date has not demonstrated any significant benefits over placebo. While head-to-head data are available comparing most induction agents, the final decision on the most appropriate induction therapy for a transplant recipient is highly dependent on preexisting medical conditions, donor characteristics, and the maintenance immunosuppressive regimen to be used. No standard induction immunosuppressive regimen exists for patients undergoing renal transplantation. Antithymocyte globulin (rabbit) is the most commonly used agent, whereas basiliximab appears safer. The choice of regimen depends on the preferences of clinicians and institutions.

  19. Embryonic chicken transplantation is a promising model for studying the invasive behaviour of melanoma cells.

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    Aparna eJayachandran

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition is a hallmark event in the metastatic cascade conferring invasive ability to tumor cells. There are ongoing efforts to replicate the physiological events occurring during mobilization of tumor cells in model systems. However, few systems are able to capture these complex in vivo events. The embryonic chicken transplantation model has emerged as a useful system to assess melanoma cells including functions that are relevant to the metastatic process, namely invasion and plasticity. The chicken embryo represents an accessible and economical 3-dimensional in vivo model for investigating melanoma cell invasion as it exploits the ancestral relationship between melanoma and its precursor neural crest cells. We describe a methodology which enables the interrogation of melanoma cell motility within the developing avian embryo. This model involves the injection of melanoma cells into the neural tube of chicken embryos. Melanoma cells are labelled using fluorescent tracker dye, Vybrant DiO, then cultured as hanging drops for 24 hours to aggregate the cells. Groups of approximately 700 cells are placed into the neural tube of chicken embryos prior to the onset of neural crest migration at the hindbrain level (embryonic day 1.5 or trunk level (embryonic day 2.5. Chick embryos are reincubated and analysed after 48 hours for the location of melanoma cells using fluorescent microscopy on whole mounts and cross-sections of the embryos. Using this system, we compared the in vivo invasive behavior of epithelial-like and mesenchymal-like melanoma cells. We report that the developing embryonic microenvironment confers motile abilities to both types of melanoma cells. Hence the embryonic chicken transplantation model has potential to become a valuable tool for in vivo melanoma invasion studies. Importantly, it may provide novel insights into and reveal previously unknown mediators of the metastatic steps of invasion and

  20. Stem cell biology and cell transplantation therapy in the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakada, Fumitaka; Hirami, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Masayo

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells, which are derived from the inner cell mass of mammalian blastocyst stage embryos, have the ability to differentiate into any cell type in the body and to grow indefinitely while maintaining pluripotency. During development, cells undergo progressive and irreversible differentiation into specialized adult cell types. Remarkably, in spite of this restriction in potential, adult somatic cells can be reprogrammed and returned to the naive state of pluripotency found in the early embryo simply by forcing expression of a defined set of transcription factors. These induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are molecularly and functionally equivalent to ES cells and provide powerful in vitro models for development, disease, and drug screening, as well as material for cell replacement therapy. Since functional impairment results from cell loss in most central nervous system (CNS) diseases, recovery of lost cells is an important treatment strategy. Although adult neurogenesis occurs in restricted regions, the CNS has poor potential for regeneration to compensate for cell loss. Thus, cell transplantation into damaged or diseased CNS tissues is a promising approach to treating various neurodegenerative disorders. Transplantation of photoreceptors or retinal pigment epithelium cells derived from human ES cells can restore some visual function. Patient-specific iPS cells may lead to customized cell therapy. However, regeneration of retinal function will require a detailed understanding of eye development, visual system circuitry, and retinal degeneration pathology. Here, we review the current progress in retinal regeneration, focusing on the therapeutic potential of pluripotent stem cells.

  1. Transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors into rat spinal cord injuries does not cause harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, Frank; Siegenthaler, Monica M; Nistor, Gabriel; Keirstead, Hans S

    2006-07-01

    Demyelination contributes to loss of function following spinal cord injury. We have shown previously that transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors into adult rat 200 kD contusive spinal cord injury sites enhances remyelination and promotes recovery of motor function. Previous studies using oligodendrocyte lineage cells have noted a correlation between the presence of demyelinating pathology and the survival and migration rate of the transplanted cells. The present study compared the survival and migration of human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitors injected 7 days after a 200 or 50 kD contusive spinal cord injury, as well as the locomotor outcome of transplantation. Our findings indicate that a 200 kD spinal cord injury induces extensive demyelination, whereas a 50 kD spinal cord injury induces no detectable demyelination. Cells transplanted into the 200 kD injury group survived, migrated, and resulted in robust remyelination, replicating our previous studies. In contrast, cells transplanted into the 50 kD injury group survived, exhibited limited migration, and failed to induce remyelination as demyelination in this injury group was absent. Animals that received a 50 kD injury displayed only a transient decline in locomotor function as a result of the injury. Importantly, human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor transplants into the 50 kD injury group did not cause a further decline in locomotion. Our studies highlight the importance of a demyelinating pathology as a prerequisite for the function of transplanted myelinogenic cells. In addition, our results indicate that transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells into the injured spinal cord is not associated with a decline in locomotor function.

  2. Degenerative changes and cell death in long-living homo- and heterotopic transplants from embryonic germ layers of rat neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, E S; Otellin, V A

    2003-09-01

    Morphological study of allotransplants of rat embryonic neocortex 14-18 months after transplantation into the neocortex, lateral cerebral ventricle, and sciatic nerve of adult animals revealed death of nerve and glial cells in the delayed postoperation period independently on the site of transplantation. After heterotopic transplantation the count of degenerated neurons was 2 times higher that after homotopic transplantation. In heterotopic transplants a considerable number of grafted neurons underwent reversible and irreversible degenerative changes accompanied by their premature aging. Neuronal death is probably determined by insufficiency of trophic influence from afferent structures and target tissues. We hypothesized that antiapoptotic preparations can be used for prevention of transplanted cell death. It was also found that degeneration of neurons was associated with impaired vascularization of transplants and pronounced immune reaction of the recipient in late posttransplantation period. Transplantation of embryonic brain structures can serve as a model system in studies concerning involutive and pathological processes in the central nervous system and in the search for factors improving survival of neurons.

  3. Generation of skeletal muscle from transplanted embryonic stem cells in dystrophic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhagavati, Satyakam; Xu Weimin

    2005-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have great therapeutic potential because of their capacity to proliferate extensively and to form any fully differentiated cell of the body, including skeletal muscle cells. Successful generation of skeletal muscle in vivo, however, requires selective induction of the skeletal muscle lineage in cultures of ES cells and following transplantation, integration of appropriately differentiated skeletal muscle cells with recipient muscle. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a severe progressive muscle wasting disease due to a mutation in the dystrophin gene and the mdx mouse, an animal model for DMD, are characterized by the absence of the muscle membrane associated protein, dystrophin. Here, we show that co-culturing mouse ES cells with a preparation from mouse muscle enriched for myogenic stem and precursor cells, followed by injection into mdx mice, results occasionally in the formation of normal, vascularized skeletal muscle derived from the transplanted ES cells. Study of this phenomenon should provide valuable insights into skeletal muscle development in vivo from transplanted ES cells

  4. The Postischemic Environment Differentially Impacts Teratoma or Tumor Formation After Transplantation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Progenitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seminatore, CH.; Polentes, J.; Ellman, D.; Kozubenko, Nataliya; Itier, V.; Tine, S.; Tritschler, L.; Brenot, M.; Guidou, E.; Blondeau, J.; Lhuillier, M.; Bugi, A.; Aubry, L.; Jendelová, Pavla; Syková, Eva; Perrier, A. L.; Finsen, B.; Onteniente, B.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 1 (2010), s. 153-159 ISSN 0039-2499 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : brain transplantation * human embryonic stem cells * neural differentiation Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.756, year: 2010

  5. Monitoring embryonic stem cell transplantation into rat corpus cavernosum using optical imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Jung Joon; Moon, Sung Min; Le, Uyenchi N.; Park, Kwang Sung; Lee, Hyun Suk; Song, Ho Cheon; Bom, Hee Seung; Han, Ha Jae

    2005-01-01

    The conventional method for the analysis of stem cell transplantation depends on postmortem histology. Here, we have sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a longitudinal monitoring of transplanted cell survival in living animals, by employing optical imaging techniques. Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) were obtained from American Type Culture Collection (ES-E14TG2a). Mouse ES cells were cultured in the DMEM (Gibco-BRL, Gaithersburg, MD) supplemented with 3.7 g/L sodium bicarbonate, 1 % penicillin and streptomycin, 1.7 mM L-glutamine, 0.1mM β-mercaptoethanol 5 ng/mL mouse leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and 15% fetal bovine serum (FBS) with or without a feeder layer and cultured for five days in standard medium plus LIF. ESCs were then transfected (MOI=100) overnight with Ad-CMV-Fluc. Our experimental Sprague-Dawley rats (n=7) were given with different numbers of ESCs 6) expressing Fluc into corpus cavernosum. In cell cultures, firefly luciferase activity correlated linearly with cell numbers from 10 5 to 5x10 6 (r2=0.95). In living animal imaging, imaging signal activity correlated linearly with cell numbers injected from 10 5 to 5x10 6 at each time point (r2=0.62 ∼ 0.98), In all three groups of rats, imaging signal was detected in rat genital area from the 2nd day to the 47th day after cellular injection. Adenovirus mediated transient expression of firefly luciferase reporter gene in ESCs was feasible to monitor cell survival over a month after transplantation. The locations, magnitude, and survival duration of the ESCs were noninvasively monitored with a bioluminescence optical imaging system

  6. Antibody induction therapy for lung transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Møller, Christian H; Penninga, Ida Elisabeth Irene

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplantation has become a valuable and well-accepted treatment option for most end-stage lung diseases. Lung transplant recipients are at risk of transplanted organ rejection, and life-long immunosuppression is necessary. Clear evidence is essential to identify an optimal, safe and effect...... and effective immunosuppressive treatment strategy for lung transplant recipients. Consensus has not yet been achieved concerning use of immunosuppressive antibodies against T-cells for induction following lung transplantation....

  7. Storing live embryonic and adult human cartilage grafts for transplantation using a joint simulating device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I; Robinson, D; Cohen, N; Nevo, Z

    2000-11-01

    Cartilage transplantation as a means to replace damaged articular surfaces is of interest. A major obstacle is the long-term preservation of cartilage grafts. The commonly used technique of freezing the grafts inevitably leads to cellular death. The current study compares the technique to an innovative approach using a pulsed-pressure perfusion system termed a joint simulating device (JSD), intended to simulate intra-articular mechanical forces. Human articular cartilage explants were harvested from both embryonic epiphyseal tissue and femoral heads of elderly women (over 70 years of age) undergoing a partial joint replacement (hemi-arthroplasty) and were divided in two groups: half of the samples were incubated in the JSD while the remaining half were grown in static culture within tissue culture plates. After 10 days all samples were evaluated for: (a) cell vitality as assessed by image analysis and XTT assay; (b) biosynthetic activity as expressed by radioactive sulfate incorporation into glycosaminoglycans (GAG's); and (c) proteoglycan content as assessed by alcian blue staining intensity. A 10-fold increase in sulfate incorporation in samples held in the JSD compared to the static culture group was observed in embryonic cartilage. In adult cartilage culture in the JSD elevated sulfate incorporation by threefold as compared to static culture. Central necrosis was observed in specimens grown in the static culture plates, while it did not occur in the samples held in the JSD. Cell vitality as assessed by XTT assay was significantly better in the JSD group as compared to static culture. The difference was more pronounced in the embryonic specimens as compared to adult cartilage. The specimens cultured within the JSD retained proteoglycans significantly better than those cultured in static culture. Maintenance of cartilage specimens in a JSD was highly effective in keeping the vitality of cartilage explants in vitro over a 10-day period. A possible future

  8. Kidney transplantation in the context of renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Todd E

    2009-12-01

    Kidney transplantation has dramatically evolved from a life-saving yet unproven therapy for patients with renal failure to a mature field that is the preferred treatment for those suffering from ESRD. Patients who receive a transplant experience a 68% lower risk of death compared with those waiting on dialysis for a transplant. This benefit is afforded to all patient subgroups including the elderly (> or =70 yr), and diabetics, who can gain 11 yr of extra life with transplantation. Prolonged transplant wait times result in a higher risk of death but this can be ameliorated with preemptive transplantation. Future challenges will focus on appropriate organ allocation and addressing long-term renal function and comorbid conditions so patients can enjoy the full benefits of transplantation.

  9. Transplantation Tolerance Induction: Cell Therapies and Their Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Scalea, Joseph R.; Tomita, Yusuke; Lindholm, Christopher R.; Burlingham, William

    2016-01-01

    Cell based therapies have been studied extensively in the context of transplantation tolerance induction. The most successful protocols have relied on transfusion of bone marrow prior to the transplantation of a renal allograft. However, it is not clear that stem cells found in bone marrow are required in order to render a transplant candidate immunologically tolerant. Accordingly, mesenchymal stem cells, regulatory myeloid cells, T regulatory cells, and other cell types, are being tested as ...

  10. Transplantation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Lyme Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Geeta

    2016-12-13

    BACKGROUND Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease in which the myelin sheath of nerve cells is damaged. It can cause delayed neurologic symptoms similar to those seen in Lyme disease (LD) patients. Thymus derived T-cells (myelin reactive) migrate to the blood brain barrier and stimulate an inflammatory cascade in the central nervous system. Cell based therapies play an important role in treating neurological diseases such as MS and LD. CASE REPORT Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) therapy was used to treat two patients with both MS and LD. The hESCs were administered via different routes including intramuscular, intravenous, and supplemental routes (e.g., deep spinal, caudal, intercostal through eye drops) to regenerate the injured cells. Both the patients showed remarkable improvement in their functional skills, overall stamina, cognitive abilities, and muscle strength. Furthermore, the improvement in the patients' conditions were assessed by magnetic resonance tractography and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). CONCLUSIONS Therapy with hESCs might emerge as an effective and safe treatment for patients with both MS and LD. Well-designed clinical trials and follow-up studies are needed to prove the long-term efficacy and safety of hESC therapy in the treatment of patients with MS and LD.

  11. Human embryonic stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cell transplants remyelinate and restore locomotion after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keirstead, Hans S; Nistor, Gabriel; Bernal, Giovanna; Totoiu, Minodora; Cloutier, Frank; Sharp, Kelly; Steward, Oswald

    2005-05-11

    Demyelination contributes to loss of function after spinal cord injury, and thus a potential therapeutic strategy involves replacing myelin-forming cells. Here, we show that transplantation of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) into adult rat spinal cord injuries enhances remyelination and promotes improvement of motor function. OPCs were injected 7 d or 10 months after injury. In both cases, transplanted cells survived, redistributed over short distances, and differentiated into oligodendrocytes. Animals that received OPCs 7 d after injury exhibited enhanced remyelination and substantially improved locomotor ability. In contrast, when OPCs were transplanted 10 months after injury, there was no enhanced remyelination or locomotor recovery. These studies document the feasibility of predifferentiating hESCs into functional OPCs and demonstrate their therapeutic potential at early time points after spinal cord injury.

  12. Culture conditions have an impact on the maturation of traceable, transplantable mouse embryonic stem cell-derived otic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Nesrine; Fontbonne, Arnaud; Watabe, Isabelle; Tonetto, Alain; Brezun, Jean Michel; Feron, François; Zine, Azel

    2017-09-01

    The generation of replacement inner ear hair cells (HCs) remains a challenge and stem cell therapy holds the potential for developing therapeutic solutions to hearing and balance disorders. Recent developments have made significant strides in producing mouse otic progenitors using cell culture techniques to initiate HC differentiation. However, no consensus has been reached as to efficiency and therefore current methods remain unsatisfactory. In order to address these issues, we compare the generation of otic and HC progenitors from embryonic stem (ES) cells in two cell culture systems: suspension vs. adherent conditions. In the present study, an ES cell line derived from an Atoh1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mouse was used to track the generation of otic progenitors, initial HCs and to compare these two differentiation systems. We used a two-step short-term differentiation method involving an induction period of 5 days during which ES cells were cultured in the presence of Wnt/transforming growth factor TGF-β inhibitors and insulin-like growth factor IGF-1 to suppress mesoderm and reinforce presumptive ectoderm and otic lineages. The generated embryoid bodies were then differentiated in medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) for an additional 5 days using either suspension or adherent culture methods. Upon completion of differentiation, quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis and immunostaining monitored the expression of otic/HC progenitor lineage markers. The results indicate that cells differentiated in suspension cultures produced cells expressing otic progenitor/HC markers at a higher efficiency compared with the production of these cell types within adherent cultures. Furthermore, we demonstrated that a fraction of these cells can incorporate into ototoxin-injured mouse postnatal cochlea explants and express MYO7A after transplantation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons

  13. Human Embryonic Stem Cell Therapy in Crohn's Disease: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Geeta

    2016-02-29

    Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the intestines, mainly the colon and ileum, related with ulcers and fistulae. It is estimated to affect 565,000 people in the United States. Currently available therapies, such as antibiotics, thiopurines, and anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha agents, are only observed to reduce the complications associated with Crohn's disease and to improve quality of life, but cannot cure the disease. Stem cell therapy appears to have certain advantages over conventional therapies. Our study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of human embryonic stem cell therapy in a patient with Crohn's disease. A 21-year-old male with chief complaints of intolerance to specific foods, abdominal pain, and diarrhea underwent human embryonic stem cell therapy for two months. After undergoing human embryonic stem cell therapy, the patient showed symptomatic relief. He had no complaints of back pain, abdominal pain, or diarrhea and had improved digestion. The patient had no signs and symptoms of skin infection, and had improved limb stamina, strength, and endurance. The condition of patient was stable after the therapy. Human embryonic stem cell therapy might serve as a new optimistic treatment approach for Crohn's disease.

  14. Renal transplantation across the donor-specific antibody barrier: Graft outcome and cancer risk after desensitization therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yao Yang

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: When compared to renal transplantation without DSA, desensitization therapy for DSA resulted in equivalent renal transplant outcome but potentially increased risk of urothelial carcinoma after transplantation.

  15. A Systematic Review of Cellular Transplantation Therapies for Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okon, Elena B.; Karimi-Abdolrezaee, Soheila; Hill, Caitlin E.; Sparling, Joseph S.; Plemel, Jason R.; Plunet, Ward T.; Tsai, Eve C.; Baptiste, Darryl; Smithson, Laura J.; Kawaja, Michael D.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Kwon, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cell transplantation therapies have become a major focus in pre-clinical research as a promising strategy for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). In this article, we systematically review the available pre-clinical literature on the most commonly used cell types in order to assess the body of evidence that may support their translation to human SCI patients. These cell types include Schwann cells, olfactory ensheathing glial cells, embryonic and adult neural stem/progenitor cells, fate-restricted neural/glial precursor cells, and bone-marrow stromal cells. Studies were included for review only if they described the transplantation of the cell substrate into an in-vivo model of traumatic SCI, induced either bluntly or sharply. Using these inclusion criteria, 162 studies were identified and reviewed in detail, emphasizing their behavioral effects (although not limiting the scope of the discussion to behavioral effects alone). Significant differences between cells of the same “type” exist based on the species and age of donor, as well as culture conditions and mode of delivery. Many of these studies used cell transplantations in combination with other strategies. The systematic review makes it very apparent that cells derived from rodent sources have been the most extensively studied, while only 19 studies reported the transplantation of human cells, nine of which utilized bone-marrow stromal cells. Similarly, the vast majority of studies have been conducted in rodent models of injury, and few studies have investigated cell transplantation in larger mammals or primates. With respect to the timing of intervention, nearly all of the studies reviewed were conducted with transplantations occurring subacutely and acutely, while chronic treatments were rare and often failed to yield functional benefits. PMID:20146557

  16. Adoptive regulatory T cell therapy: challenges in clinical transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safinia, Niloufar; Sagoo, Pervinder; Lechler, Robert; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2010-08-01

    The identification and characterisation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) has recently opened up exciting opportunities for Treg cell therapy in transplantation. In this review, we outline the basic biology of Tregs and discuss recent advances and challenges for the identification, isolation and expansion of these cells for cell therapy. Tregs of thymic origin have been shown to be key regulators of immune responses in mice and humans, preventing autoimmunity, graft-versus-host disease and organ graft rejection in the transplantation setting. To date, a variety of different methods to isolate and expand Tregs ex vivo have been advocated. Although promising, relatively few clinical trials of human Treg cell infusion have been initiated. Many key questions about Treg cell therapy still remain and here we provide an in-depth analysis and highlight the challenges and opportunities for immune intervention with Treg-based therapeutics in clinical transplantation.

  17. Progressing a human embryonic stem-cell-based regenerative medicine therapy towards the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Paul; Kerby, Julie; Coffey, Peter; da Cruz, Lyndon; McKernan, Ruth

    2015-10-19

    Since the first publication of the derivation of human embryonic stem cells in 1998, there has been hope and expectation that this technology will lead to a wave of regenerative medicine therapies with the potential to revolutionize our approach to managing certain diseases. Despite significant resources in this direction, the path to the clinic for an embryonic stem-cell-based regenerative medicine therapy has not proven straightforward, though in the past few years progress has been made. Here, with a focus upon retinal disease, we discuss the current status of the development of such therapies. We also highlight some of our own experiences of progressing a retinal pigment epithelium cell replacement therapy towards the clinic. © 2015 The Author(s).

  18. Ambivalent journeys of hope: embryonic stem cell therapy in a clinic in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Amit

    2015-03-01

    Stem cell therapy in non-Western countries such as India has received a lot of attention. Apart from media reports, there are a number of social science analyses of stem cell policy, therapy, and research, their ethical implications, and impact of advertising on patients. Nevertheless, in the media reports as well as in academic studies, experiences of patients, who undertake overseas journeys for stem cell therapy, have largely been either ignored or presented reductively, often as a "false hope." In this article, I analyze the experiences of patients and their "journeys of hope" to NuTech Mediworld, an embryonic stem cell therapy clinic in New Delhi, India. My analysis, which draws on my observations in the clinic and patients' experiences, instead of seeking to adjudicate whether embryonic stem cell therapy in clinics such as NuTech is right or wrong, true or false, focuses on how patients navigate and contest these concerns. I utilize Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's "concepts," lines of flight and deterritorialization, to highlight how embryonic stem cell therapy's "political economy of hope" embodies deterritorialization of several "regimes of truth" and how these deterritorializations impact patients' experiences. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Antibody Desensitization Therapy in Highly Sensitized Lung Transplant Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, L. D.; Gray, A. L.; Reynolds, J. M.; Arepally, G. M.; Bedoya, A.; Hartwig, M. G.; Davis, R. D.; Lopes, K. E.; Wegner, W. E.; Chen, D. F.; Palmer, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    As HLAs antibody detection technology has evolved, there is now detailed HLA antibody information available on prospective transplant recipients. Determining single antigen antibody specificity allows for a calculated panel reactive antibodies (cPRA) value, providing an estimate of the effective donor pool. For broadly sensitized lung transplant candidates (cPRA ≥ 80%), our center adopted a pretransplant multimodal desensitization protocol in an effort to decrease the cPRA and expand the donor pool. This desensitization protocol included plasmapheresis, solumedrol, bortezomib and rituximab given in combination over 19 days followed by intravenous immunoglobulin. Eight of 18 candidates completed therapy with the primary reasons for early discontinuation being transplant (by avoiding unacceptable antigens) or thrombocytopenia. In a mixed-model analysis, there were no significant changes in PRA or cPRA changes over time with the protocol. A sub-analysis of the median fluorescence intensity (MFI) change indicated a small decline that was significant in antibodies with MFI 5000–10 000. Nine of 18 candidates subsequently had a transplant. Posttransplant survival in these nine recipients was comparable to other pretransplant-sensitized recipients who did not receive therapy. In summary, an aggressive multi-modal desensitization protocol does not significantly reduce pretransplant HLA antibodies in a broadly sensitized lung transplant candidate cohort. PMID:24666831

  20. Current trends in immunosuppressive therapies for renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ruth-Ann; Gabardi, Steven

    2012-11-15

    Current trends in immunosuppressive therapies for renal transplant recipients are reviewed. The common premise for immunosuppressive therapies in renal transplantation is to use multiple agents to work on different immunologic targets. The use of a multidrug regimen allows for pharmacologic activity at several key steps in the T-cell replication process and lower dosages of each individual agent, thereby producing fewer drug-related toxicities. In general, there are three stages of clinical immunosuppression: induction therapy, maintenance therapy, and treatment of an established acute rejection episode. Only immunosuppressive therapies used for maintenance therapy are discussed in detail in this review. The most common maintenance immunosuppressive agents can be divided into five classes: (1) the calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) (cyclosporine and tacrolimus), (2) costimulation blockers (belatacept), (3) mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (sirolimus and everolimus), (4) antiproliferatives (azathioprine and mycophenolic acid derivatives), and (5) corticosteroids. Immunosuppressive regimens vary among transplantation centers but most often include a CNI and an adjuvant agent, with or without corticosteroids. Selection of appropriate immunosuppressive regimens should be patient specific, taking into account the medications' pharmacologic properties, adverse-event profile, and potential drug-drug interactions, as well as the patient's preexisting diseases, risk of rejection, and medication regimen. Advancements in transplant immunosuppression have resulted in a significant reduction in acute cellular rejection and a modest increase in long-term patient and graft survival. Because the optimal immunosuppression regimen is still unknown, immunosuppressant use should be influenced by institutional preference and tailored to the immunologic risk of the patient and adverse-effect profile of the drug.

  1. Terapia nutricional no transplante hepático Nutritional therapy in liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Beatriz PAROLIN

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Racional - Deficiências nutricionais, por vezes graves, são comuns em pacientes com insuficiência hepática, candidatos a transplante de fígado. A terapia nutricional pode corrigir total ou parcialmente tais deficiências, melhorando as condições clínicas e o prognóstico desses indivíduos, frente ao grande desafio do transplante hepático. Objetivos - Breve revisão do papel do fígado no metabolismo dos diversos nutrientes. Descrição dos métodos de avaliação do estado nutricional, traçando-se as bases da terapia nutricional segundo condições hepáticas diversas, no pré e pós-transplante, em relação às necessidades calóricas e dos diversos nutrientes. Apresentação de intervenções nutricionais, no controle das complicações metabólicas resultantes do uso de drogas imunossupressoras. Conclusão - A terapia nutricional é valiosa aliada no tratamento clínico de pacientes candidatos ou já submetidos ao transplante hepático, contribuindo para um prognóstico favorável e para a melhora da qualidade de vida desses indivíduos.Background - Malnutrition, sometimes severe is common in patients with chronic hepatic diseases who are candidates for liver transplantation. Nutritional therapy can induce partial or total correction of such deficiencies, improving clinical conditions and prognosis of patients who face the great defiance of liver transplantation. Aims - Brief revision of hepatic role in the metabolism of several nutrients. Description of available methods of dietary therapy and its application both under different abnormal hepatic conditions and pre and post-transplant periods. The role of nutritional intervention in metabolic side effects due to immunosuppressive drugs. Conclusion - Nutritional therapy is a valuable adjuvant resource to the clinical treatment of candidates and submitted patients to hepatic transplantation providing better prognosis and improved life quality.

  2. Transplantation Tolerance Induction: Cell Therapies and their Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R Scalea

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell based therapies have been studied extensively in the context of transplantation tolerance induction. The most successful protocols have relied on transfusion of bone marrow prior to the transplantation of a renal allograft. However, it is not clear that stem cells found in bone marrow are required in order to render a transplant candidate immunologically tolerant. Accordingly, mesenchymal stem cells, regulatory myeloid cells, T regulatory cells, and other cell types, are being tested as possible routes to tolerance induction, in the absence of donor derived stem cells. Early data with each of these cell types have been encouraging. However, the induction regimen capable of achieving consistent tolerance, whilst avoiding unwanted sided effects, and which is scalable to the human patient, has yet to be identified. Here we present the status of investigations of various tolerogenic cell types and the mechanistic rationale for their use in in tolerance induction protocols.

  3. Current Status and Future Development of Cell Transplantation Therapy for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Washio, Kaoru; Iwata, Takanori; Okano, Teruo; Ishikawa, Isao

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that stem cell transplantation can regenerate periodontal tissue, and several clinical trials involving transplantation of stem cells into human patients have already begun or are in preparation. However, stem cell transplantation therapy is a new technology, and the events following transplantation are poorly understood. Several studies have reported side effects and potential risks associated with stem cell transplantation therapy. To protect patients from such risks, governments have placed regulations on stem cell transplantation therapies. It is important for the clinicians to understand the relevant risks and governmental regulations. This paper describes the ongoing clinical studies, basic research, risks, and governmental controls related to stem cell transplantation therapy. Then, one clinical study is introduced as an example of a government-approved periodontal cell transplantation therapy. PMID:22315604

  4. Current Status and Future Development of Cell Transplantation Therapy for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Yoshida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that stem cell transplantation can regenerate periodontal tissue, and several clinical trials involving transplantation of stem cells into human patients have already begun or are in preparation. However, stem cell transplantation therapy is a new technology, and the events following transplantation are poorly understood. Several studies have reported side effects and potential risks associated with stem cell transplantation therapy. To protect patients from such risks, governments have placed regulations on stem cell transplantation therapies. It is important for the clinicians to understand the relevant risks and governmental regulations. This paper describes the ongoing clinical studies, basic research, risks, and governmental controls related to stem cell transplantation therapy. Then, one clinical study is introduced as an example of a government-approved periodontal cell transplantation therapy.

  5. Side Effects of Transplant Immunosuppressive Therapy in Post Renal Transplant Recipients, Mazandaran, Northern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abazar Akbarzadeh Pasha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Post-kidney transplant survival relies on patient adherence to the intake of immunosuppressive medication. This study was performed to investigate complications associated with immunosuppressive therapy in renal transplantation. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 188 transplanted patients in Shahid Beheshti hospital of Babol in 2013. Check list and demographic questionnaire for data collecting were used. Then the data using were analyzed in SPSS.18 software by using chi-square test. Results A total of 188 transplanted patients, 115 (61.2% was male and mean age was 12.9 ± 42.9 years. 181 (96.3% of the subjects had at least one complication. The most common complication in 142 cases (75.5% was “excessive hair growth” and after this complication “increased blood sugar” had higher frequency and 119 (63.3% had this complication. Severe form of gingival overgrowth in women was significantly that more than men (22 (30.1, 14 (12.2, P = 0.004, and the other side effect was not significant difference between men and women or different age groups (P > 0.05 Conclusions Finding show that nearly all transplanted recipients suffered from one complication which need to recognize, control and treatment. It suggested that period visiting for early diagnosis and education to patient was recommend.

  6. Renal Infarction during Anticoagulant Therapy after Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Onda

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Liver transplant recipients are at risk for complications of vascular thrombosis. The reconstructed hepatic artery and portal vein thrombosis potentially result in hepatic failure and graft loss. Renal infarction is a rare clinical condition, but in severe cases, it may lead to renal failure. We herein report a case of renal infarction after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT during anticoagulant therapy. Case Presentation: A 60-year-old woman with end-stage liver disease due to primary biliary cholangitis underwent LDLT with splenectomy. Postoperatively, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid were used for initial immunosuppression therapy. On postoperative day (POD 5, enhanced computed tomography (CT revealed splenic vein thrombosis, and anticoagulant therapy with heparin followed by warfarin was given. Follow-up enhanced CT on POD 20 incidentally demonstrated right renal infarction. The patient’s renal function was unchanged and the arterial flow was good, and the splenic vein thrombosis resolved. At 4 months postoperatively, warfarin was discontinued, but she developed recurrent splenic vein thrombosis 11 months later, and warfarin was resumed. As of 40 months after transplantation, she discontinued warfarin and remains well without recurrence of splenic vein thrombosis or renal infarction. Conclusion: Renal infarction is a rare complication of LDLT. In this case, renal infarction was incidentally diagnosed during anticoagulant therapy and was successfully treated.

  7. Transplantation of human neonatal foreskin stromal cells in ex vivo organotypic cultures of embryonic chick femurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    NSSCs in ex vivo organotypic cultures of embryonic chick femurs. Isolated embryonic chick femurs (E10 and E11) were cultured for 10 days together with micro-mass cell pellets of hNSSCs, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or a combination of the two cell types. Changes in femurs gross morphology......We have previously reported that human neonatal foreskin stromal cells (hNSSCs) promote angiogenesis in vitro and in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay in vivo. To examine the in vivo relevance of this observation, we examined in the present study the differentiation potential of h......NSSC + HUVEC cultures. Our data suggest that organotypic cultures can be employed to test the differentiation potential of stem cells and demonstrate the importance of stem cell interaction with 3D-intact tissue microenvironment for their differentiation....

  8. Cyclophosphamide/x-ray: combined mode preparation for transplantation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meredith, R.; Okunewick, J.; Shadduck, R.; Raikow, R.; Brozovich, B.; Seeman, P.

    1979-01-01

    Use of total body irradiation (TBI) and/or chemotherapy as a preparation for marrow transplantation in the treatment of leukemia has been only moderately successful in the clinic. Although cyclophosphamide (CY) has shown promise as a marrow ablative agent, leukemia relapses are often found, and optimal therapeutic protocols have not been established. Our transplantation therapy studies of murine leukemia with parental recipients and hybrid donors provide an excellent model for research aimed at improved survival of human transplant patients. Utilizing a murine leukemia induced by a virus, various doses of CY in combination with sub-lethal irradiation were compared to determine the optimal pretreatment for transplantation therapy. Both normal and leukemic mice were engrafted with virus resistant, histocompatible marrow following these preparations, then monitored for survival and long term effects. Leukemic mice were also evaluated for pluripotent as well as myeloid committed stem cells as a measure of the effectiveness of the treatment in elimination of leukemic cells. Leukemic groups were also compared for the percentage and time of leukemia relapse. All CY/X-ray combinations were more effective in elimination of stem cell populations than supralethal TBI alone. However, the best survival was obtained with lethal TBI alone or low dose CY in combination with 550 R

  9. Use of polyclonal/monoclonal antibody therapies in transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Melissa Y; Gabardi, Steven; Sayegh, Mohamed H

    2017-03-01

    For over thirty years, antibody (mAb)-based therapies have been a standard component of transplant immunosuppression, and yet much remains to be learned in order for us to truly harness their therapeutic capabilities. Current mAbs used in transplant directly target and destroy graft-destructive immune cells, interrupt cytokine and costimulation-dependent T and B cell activation, and prevent down-stream complement activation. Areas covered: This review summarizes our current approaches to using antibody-based therapies to prevent and treat allograft rejection. It also provides examples of promising novel mAb therapies, and discusses the potential for future mAb development in transplantation. Expert opinion: The broad capability of antibodies, in parallel with our growing ability to synthetically modulate them, offers exciting opportunities to develop better biologic therapeutics. In order to do so, we must further our understanding about the basic biology underlying allograft rejection, and gain better appreciation of how characteristics of therapeutic antibodies affect their efficacy.

  10. Effect of milrinone therapy on splanchnic perfusion after heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanowicz, Tomasz; Ligowski, Marcin; Camacho, Estillita; Walczak, Maciej; Straburzyńska-Migaj, Ewa; Tomczyk, Jadwiga; Jemielity, Marek

    2014-09-23

    Milrinone is a selective inhibitor of the cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase III isoenzyme in myocardium and vascular smooth muscle. Milrinone administration following heart transplantation is routine practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of milrinone therapy on splanchnic perfusion following heart transplantation. There were 12 patients (10 males and 2 females) with a mean age of 42 ± 12 who underwent heart transplantation. Milrinone parenteral following surgery was started after surgery and continued for the next 67 ± 4 h. Repeated Swann-Ganz measurements and control transthoracic echocardiography were performed. Blood samples were taken to estimate level of lactic acid (LA), liver transaminases, serum amylase, and GFR ratio. The mean time of milrinone administration was 67 ± 4 h. The serum LA increase following milrinone discontinuation was 1.7 ± 0.7 mmol/dm(3) vs. 3.8 ± 0.9 mmol/dm(3), (pmilrinone discontinuation was 79 ± 30 IU/L vs. 135 ± 55 IU/L, pmilrinone withdrawn. There was a progressive increase in serum amylase levels after milrinone was withdrawn (80.6 ± 29 IU/L vs. 134 ± 45 IU/L, pMilrinone withdrawal during the postoperative period was associated with deterioration of splanchnic perfusion, as shown by a transient increase in lactic acid and serum increase of aminotransferases (ALT/ASP) concentration and amylase activity. The study results show the extracardiac effects of milrinone therapy.

  11. Adherence to immunosuppressive therapy following liver transplantation: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ramon Antônio; Turrini, Ruth Natália Teresa; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2016-08-29

    to investigate the evidence available in the literature on non-adherence to immunosuppressive therapy among patients undergoing liver transplantation. integrative literature review, including research whose sample consisted of patients aged over 18 years undergoing liver transplantation. It excluded those containing patients undergoing multiple organ transplants. For the selection of articles, Medline / Pubmed, CINAHL, LILACS, Scopus and Embase were searched. The search period corresponded to the initial date of indexation of different bases, up to the deadline of February 10, 2015, using controlled and uncontrolled descriptors: liver transplantation, hepatic transplantation, liver orthotopic transplantation, medication adherence, medication non-adherence, medication compliance and patient compliance. were located 191 investigations, 10 of which met the objectives of the study and were grouped into four categories, namely: educational process and non-adherence; non-adherence related to the number of daily doses of immunosuppressive medications; detection methods for non-adherence and side effects of therapy. there were risk factors related to the health service, such as control and reduction of the number of doses; related to the individual, such as being male, divorced, alcohol or other substances user, exposed to low social support and being mentally ill. investigar as evidências disponíveis na literatura sobre a não adesão à terapêutica imunossupressora entre pacientes submetidos ao transplante de fígado. revisão integrativa da literatura, que incluiu investigações cuja amostra era composta por pacientes com idade igual ou superior a 18 anos, submetidos a transplante de fígado. Excluíram-se as que continham pacientes submetidos a transplantes de múltiplos órgãos. Para a seleção dos artigos foram consultadas as bases Medline/Pubmed, CINAHL, LILACS, Scopus e Embase. O período de busca determinado correspondeu à data inicial de indexação das

  12. TACE: therapy of the HCC before liver transplantation - experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herber, S.; Schneider, J.; Brecher, B.; Thelen, M.; Pitton, M.B.; Hoehler, T.; Otto, G.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Analysis of the course of disease in patients with histologically proven HCC before and after orthotopic liver transplantation (LTx) who received transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). Material and Methods: Thirty-five of a total collective of 363 patients with histologically proven HCC underwent LTx. Before LTx, all patients were treated with sequential TACE. According to treatment pattern, TACE should be performed every 6 weeks, using a suspension consisting of max. 10 mg Mitomycin C as well as 10-30 ml iodized oil (Lipiodol). Patients were classified according to the Milano criteria. Criteria were called exceeded if the tumor size was >5 cm and/or >3 tumors larger than 3 cm were found. Therapy success and liver function were examined by means of spiral CT and laboratory controls. Investigation parameters included the number of tumor knots as well as the maximum tumor size. Additionally, the Lipiodol accumulation, the patency of the portal vein and the occurrence of complications were checked. Results: Altogether, 184 TACE procedures were accomplished (5.3+/-3.3, range 1-14). The waiting period up to the transplantation amounted to 366+/-255 days (range 44-1137). The average number of tumor knots for each patient was 3.1+/-2.2 before and 2.9+/-2.2 after TACE (p=0.887). The average tumor size was 4.2+/-2.5 before and 2.8+/-1.4 after TACE. The Milano criteria to LTx crossed 17/35 patients. Patients with exceeded Milan criteria showed a highly significant size reduction of the tumor after TACE (p=0.001); in 9/17 cases the transplantation criteria were secondarily fulfilled through downstaging. A successful LTx was accomplished in 35/35 cases. Follow up after LTx was 769+/-509 days. The tumor recurrence in patients with exceeded vs. fulfilled transplantation criteria was 11.1% vs. 11.8% (p=0.99). The recurrence free survival was 93.3%, 82.5% and 82.5% at 1, 3 and 5 years, respectively. There were no relevant differences between patients with exceeded vs

  13. Antibody-mediated rejection across solid organ transplants: manifestations, mechanisms, and therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Nicole M; Reed, Elaine F

    2017-06-30

    Solid organ transplantation is a curative therapy for hundreds of thousands of patients with end-stage organ failure. However, long-term outcomes have not improved, and nearly half of transplant recipients will lose their allografts by 10 years after transplant. One of the major challenges facing clinical transplantation is antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) caused by anti-donor HLA antibodies. AMR is highly associated with graft loss, but unfortunately there are few efficacious therapies to prevent and reverse AMR. This Review describes the clinical and histological manifestations of AMR, and discusses the immunopathological mechanisms contributing to antibody-mediated allograft injury as well as current and emerging therapies.

  14. Osteosarcoma target therapy with stem cell transplant: A case review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawzy, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Radioisotopes with medium-energy beta emission and half life of a few days are attractive option for systemic delivery of targeted irradiation. Samarium-153 ethylene diamine tetra-ethylene phosphonale (153Sm-EDTMP), a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical, provides therapeutic irradiation to osteoblastic osseous lesion. The usual dose of Sm-153 in metastatic disease is 1mCi/Kg (37MBq/Kg) and the dose limiting toxicity is thrombocytopenia. As local radiotherapy has only a limited therapeutic role in the treatment of osteosarcoma, and some types of the tumour portray an unpredictable response to chemotherapy. High dose Sm-153 (30mCi/Kg) was proposed for the target management of recurrent osteosarcoma, this was followed by stem cell transplant (peripheral-blood progenitor, PBPCs). A female child, 10 years old, with polyostotic osteosarcoma with local recurrence in the right hipbone was chosen for therapy. She had left knee prosthesis, right lower limb dis-articulation, and was given chemotherapy in multiple regions. She was subjected to MDP bone scan showing active uptake in an expanding bone lesion in the right hip bone, and was also subjected to MIBI scan, which showed negative uptake. She received 30mCi/Kg Sm-153 (660mCi in total dose), with no major events occurring in the post-injection period. After 10 days the patient went into pancytopenia, which necessitated haematological support. By day 14, there was minimal radiation in the whole body image and the child received her bone marrow transplant. There was marked improvement in the tumour size after 6 weeks of therapy, with improvement in the alkaline phosphatase level (from 1350Iu, before treatment to 350 post treatment). This was confirmed by serial MDP bone scan. High dose Sm-153 with stem cell transplant is considered view a promising method in the management of osteosarcoma. (author)

  15. [Gene therapy and cell transplantation for Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Shin-ichi

    2005-11-01

    Increasing enthusiasm in the field of stem cell research is raising the hope of novel cell replacement therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD), but it also raises both scientific and ethical concerns. In most cases, dopaminergic cells are transplanted ectopically into the striatum instead of the substantia nigra. If the main mechanism underlying any observed functional recovery with these cell replacement therapies is restoration of dopaminergic neurotransmission, then viral vector-mediated gene delivery of dopamine-synthesizing enzymes is a more straight forward approach. The development of a recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector is making gene therapy for PD a feasible therapeutic option in the clinical arena. Efficient and long-term expression of genes for dopamine-synthesizing enzymes in the striatum restored local dopamine production and allowed behavioral recovery in animal models of PD. A clinical trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of AAV vector-mediated gene transfer of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, an enzyme that converts L-dopa to dopamine, is underway. With this strategy patients would still need to take L-dopa to control their PD symptoms, however, dopamine production could be regulated by altering the dose of L-dopa. Another AAV vector-based clinical trial is also ongoing in which the subthalamic nucleus is transduced to produce inhibitory transmitters.

  16. Immunoglobulin therapy in hematologic neoplasms and after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Masumi; Berger, Melvin; Gale, Robert Peter; Lazarus, Hillard M

    2018-03-01

    Immunoglobulins are used to prevent or reduce infection risk in primary immune deficiencies and in settings which exploit its anti-inflammatory and immune-modulatory effects. Rigorous proof of immunoglobulin efficacy in persons with lympho-proliferative neoplasms, plasma cell myeloma, and persons receiving hematopoietic cell transplants is lacking despite many clinical trials. Further, there are few consensus guidelines or algorithms for use in these conditions. Rapid development of new therapies targeting B-cell signaling and survival pathways and increased use of chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapy will likely result in more acquired deficiencies of humoral immunity and infections in persons with cancer. We review immunoglobulin formulations and discuss efficacy and potential adverse effects in the context of preventing infections and in graft-versus-host disease. We suggest an algorithm for evaluating acquired deficiencies of humoral immunity in persons with hematologic neoplasms and recommend appropriate use of immunoglobulin therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Stem cell transplantation therapy for multifaceted therapeutic benefits after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ling; Wei, Zheng Z; Jiang, Michael Qize; Mohamad, Osama; Yu, Shan Ping

    2017-10-01

    One of the exciting advances in modern medicine and life science is cell-based neurovascular regeneration of damaged brain tissues and repair of neuronal structures. The progress in stem cell biology and creation of adult induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has significantly improved basic and pre-clinical research in disease mechanisms and generated enthusiasm for potential applications in the treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases including stroke. Endogenous neural stem cells and cultured stem cells are capable of self-renewal and give rise to virtually all types of cells essential for the makeup of neuronal structures. Meanwhile, stem cells and neural progenitor cells are well-known for their potential for trophic support after transplantation into the ischemic brain. Thus, stem cell-based therapies provide an attractive future for protecting and repairing damaged brain tissues after injury and in various disease states. Moreover, basic research on naïve and differentiated stem cells including iPS cells has markedly improved our understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of neurological disorders, and provides a platform for the discovery of novel drug targets. The latest advances indicate that combinatorial approaches using cell based therapy with additional treatments such as protective reagents, preconditioning strategies and rehabilitation therapy can significantly improve therapeutic benefits. In this review, we will discuss the characteristics of cell therapy in different ischemic models and the application of stem cells and progenitor cells as regenerative medicine for the treatment of stroke. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. High-dose therapy followed by bone marrow transplantation for relapsed follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, IC; Raemaekers, JJM; Kluin-Nelemans, HC; vanKamp, H; Mellink, WAM; vantVeer, MB

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze whether, in addition to survival, and disease-free survival progression-free interval after transplantation would be longer than the last progression-free interval before transplantation, supporting the argument that high-dose therapy may change the biologic behavior of the

  19. Downstaging therapy followed by liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma beyond Milan criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young; Stahl, Christopher C; Makramalla, Abouelmagd; Olowokure, Olugbenga O; Ristagno, Ross L; Dhar, Vikrom K; Schoech, Michael R; Chadalavada, Seetharam; Latif, Tahir; Kharofa, Jordan; Bari, Khurram; Shah, Shimul A

    2017-12-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation is a curative treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma within Milan criteria, but these criteria preclude many patients from transplant candidacy. Recent studies have demonstrated that downstaging therapy can reduce tumor burden to meet conventional criteria. The present study reports a single-center experience with tumor downstaging and its effects on post-orthotopic liver transplantation outcomes. All patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who were evaluated by our multidisciplinary liver services team from 2012 to 2016 were identified (N = 214). Orthotopic liver transplantation candidates presenting outside of Milan criteria at initial radiographic diagnosis and/or an initial alpha-fetoprotein >400 ng/mL were categorized as at high risk for tumor recurrence and post-transplant mortality. Of the 214 patients newly diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma, 73 (34.1%) eventually underwent orthotopic liver transplantation. The majority of patients who did not undergo orthotopic liver transplantation were deceased or lost to follow-up (47.5%), with 14 of 141 (9.9%) currently listed for transplantation. Among transplanted patients, 21 of 73 (28.8%) were considered high-risk candidates. All 21 patients were downstaged to within Milan criteria with an alpha-fetoprotein hepatocellular carcinoma was higher but acceptable between downstaged high-risk and traditional candidates (9.5% vs 1.9%; P > .05) at a median follow-up period of 17 months. Downstaged high-risk candidates had a similar overall survival compared with those transplanted within Milan criteria (log-rank P > .05). In highly selected cases, patients with hepatocellular carcinoma outside of traditional criteria for orthotopic liver transplantation may undergo downstaging therapy in a multidisciplinary fashion with excellent post-transplant outcomes. These data support an aggressive downstaging approach for selected patients who would otherwise be deemed ineligible for

  20. Maintenance immunosuppression with intermittent intravenous IL-2 receptor antibody therapy in renal transplant recipients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gabardi, Steven

    2011-09-01

    To report what we believe to be the first 2 cases of long-term (>24 months) intermittent intravenous interleukin-2 receptor antibody (IL-2RA) therapy for maintenance immunosuppression following renal transplantation.

  1. [Hepatic cell transplantation: a new therapy in liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Eugenia; Cortés, Miriam; Martínez, Amparo; Vila, Juan José; López, Rafael; Montalvá, Eva; Calzado, Angeles; Mir, José

    2010-07-01

    Liver transplantation has been remarkably effective in the treatment in patients with end-stage liver disease. However, disparity between solid-organ supply and increased demand is the greatest limitation, resulting in longer waiting times and increase in mortality of transplant recipients. This situation creates the need to seek alternatives to orthotopic liver transplantation.Hepatocyte transplantation or liver cell transplantation has been proposed as the best method to support patients. The procedure consists of transplanting individual cells to a recipient organ in sufficient quantity to survive and restore the function. The capacity of hepatic regeneration is the biological basis of hepatocyte transplantation. This therapeutic option is an experimental procedure in some patients with inborn errors of metabolism, fulminant hepatic failure and acute and chronic liver failure, as a bridge to orthotopic liver transplantation. In the Hospital La Fe of Valencia, we performed the first hepatocyte transplantation in Spain creating a new research work on transplant program. Copyright 2009 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Relationship between Post-kidney Transplantation Antithymocyte Globulin Therapy and Wound Healing Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Pourmand, G. R.; Dehghani, S.; Saraji, A.; Khaki, S.; Mortazavi, S. H.; Mehrsai, A.; Sajadi, H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Wound healing disorders are probably the most common post-transplantation surgical complications. It is thought that wound healing disturbance occurs due to antiproliferative effects of immunosuppressive drugs. On the other hand, success of transplantation is dependent on immunosuppressive therapies. Antihuman thymocyte globulin (ATG) has been widely used as induction therapy but the impact of this treatment on wound healing is not fully understood. Objective: To investigate wound...

  3. Current Status of Immunomodulatory and Cellular Therapies in Preclinical and Clinical Islet Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Preeti; Brayman, Kenneth L.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical islet transplantation is a β-cell replacement strategy that represents a possible definitive intervention for patients with type 1 diabetes, offering substantial benefits in terms of lowering daily insulin requirements and reducing incidences of debilitating hypoglycemic episodes and unawareness. Despite impressive advances in this field, a limiting supply of islets, inadequate means for preventing islet rejection, and the deleterious diabetogenic and nephrotoxic side effects associated with chronic immunosuppressive therapy preclude its wide-spread applicability. Islet transplantation however allows a window of opportunity for attempting various therapeutic manipulations of islets prior to transplantation aimed at achieving superior transplant outcomes. In this paper, we will focus on the current status of various immunosuppressive and cellular therapies that promote graft function and survival in preclinical and clinical islet transplantation with special emphasis on the tolerance-inducing capacity of regulatory T cells as well as the β-cells regenerative capacity of stem cells. PMID:22046502

  4. Current Status of Immunomodulatory and Cellular Therapies in Preclinical and Clinical Islet Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Chhabra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical islet transplantation is a -cell replacement strategy that represents a possible definitive intervention for patients with type 1 diabetes, offering substantial benefits in terms of lowering daily insulin requirements and reducing incidences of debilitating hypoglycemic episodes and unawareness. Despite impressive advances in this field, a limiting supply of islets, inadequate means for preventing islet rejection, and the deleterious diabetogenic and nephrotoxic side effects associated with chronic immunosuppressive therapy preclude its wide-spread applicability. Islet transplantation however allows a window of opportunity for attempting various therapeutic manipulations of islets prior to transplantation aimed at achieving superior transplant outcomes. In this paper, we will focus on the current status of various immunosuppressive and cellular therapies that promote graft function and survival in preclinical and clinical islet transplantation with special emphasis on the tolerance-inducing capacity of regulatory T cells as well as the -cells regenerative capacity of stem cells.

  5. Progressive necrotic encephalopathy following tacrolimus therapy for liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aridon, Paolo; Ragonese, Paolo; Di Benedetto, Norma; Grasso, Giovanni; Conaldi, Pier Giulio; D'Amelio, Marco; Savettieri, Giovanni

    2009-12-01

    Previously described neurologic damage induced by immunosuppressive treatments includes transient or reversible central nervous system involvement. We describe a 57-year-old man who underwent liver transplantation and was started on immunosuppressive therapy with tacrolimus (FK506). Six months later, he started complaining of a progressive motor and sensory impairment of the left side, together with cognitive impairment. Brain MRI showed an enlarging lesion of the white matter with peripheral contrast enhancement. PET study indicated severe hypometabolism in the right hemisphere and spectroscopic MRI showed a peak of choline and relative reduction of other metabolites. Findings of CSF examinations and cultures, serology, and molecular techniques were normal. Tacrolimus treatment was stopped. A cerebral biopsy of the lesion showed a sub acute necrotizing process. In the following months, cognitive status of the patient tended to improve although he remained hemiplegic, while serial MRI confirmed the tendency to the recovery of the lesion that was still present 1 year after. The present observation describes a progressive encephalopathy associated with immune suppression with an unusual feature and permanent brain damage.

  6. Differentiation and Transplantation of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cone Photoreceptors into a Mouse Model of End-Stage Retinal Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Kruczek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The loss of cone photoreceptors that mediate daylight vision represents a leading cause of blindness, for which cell replacement by transplantation offers a promising treatment strategy. Here, we characterize cone differentiation in retinas derived from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs. Similar to in vivo development, a temporal pattern of progenitor marker expression is followed by the differentiation of early thyroid hormone receptor β2-positive precursors and, subsequently, photoreceptors exhibiting cone-specific phototransduction-related proteins. We establish that stage-specific inhibition of the Notch pathway increases cone cell differentiation, while retinoic acid signaling regulates cone maturation, comparable with their actions in vivo. MESC-derived cones can be isolated in large numbers and transplanted into adult mouse eyes, showing capacity to survive and mature in the subretinal space of Aipl1−/− mice, a model of end-stage retinal degeneration. Together, this work identifies a robust, renewable cell source for cone replacement by purified cell suspension transplantation.

  7. [Embryonic stem cells. Future perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groebner, M; David, R; Franz, W M

    2006-05-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ES cells) are able to differentiate into any cell type, and therefore represent an excellent source for cellular replacement therapies in the case of widespread diseases, for example heart failure, diabetes, Parkinson's disease and spinal cord injury. A major prerequisite for their efficient and safe clinical application is the availability of pure populations for direct cell transplantation or tissue engineering as well as the immunological compatibility of the transplanted cells. The expression of human surface markers under the control of cell type specific promoters represents a promising approach for the selection of cardiomyocytes and other cell types for therapeutic applications. The first human clinical trial using ES cells will start in the United States this year.

  8. A longitudinal assessment of adherence with immunosuppressive therapy following kidney transplantation from the Mycophenolic Acid Observational REnal Transplant (MORE) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapepas, Demetra; Langone, Anthony; Chan, Laurence; Wiland, Anne; McCague, Kevin; Chisholm-Burns, Marie

    2014-04-17

    Nonadherence with immunosuppressive therapy after renal transplantation is a major clinical concern, but longitudinal data are sparse. Adherence data were recorded during the Mycophenolic Acid Observational REnal Transplant (MORE) study to help inform compliance management decisions. Prospective data were analyzed from the four-year, observational MORE study of de novo adult renal transplant recipients receiving mycophenolic acid (MPA) as enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) or mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) at 40 US sites under routine management. Adherence was assessed using the Immunosuppressant Therapy Adherence Scale (ITAS): total score 0-12 (12, adherence; adherent recipients (p=0.59); graft loss was 4.7% (19/402) vs. 3.0% (12/406) (p=0.20); death was 1.5% (6/402) vs. 4.7% (19/406) (p=0.013). Adherence to the immunosuppressive regimen decreases over time, highlighting the need to monitor and encourage adherence even in long-term maintenance kidney transplant patients. Other than African American race, demographic factors may be of limited value in predicting nonadherence.

  9. Cell transplantation for Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Liu; Hongyun Huang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) can be improved by cell transplantation,which has caught general attention from the field of the therapy for PD recently. In this paper, we summarize the cell-based therapy for PD.DATA SOURCES: A search for English literature related to the cellular transplantation of PD from January 1979to July 2006 was conducted in Medline with the key words of "Parkinson's disease, cell transplantation,embryonic stem cells, neural stem cells".STUDY SELECTTON: Data were checked in the first trial, and literatures about PD and cell transplantation were selected. Inclusive criteria: ① PD; ② Cell transplantation. Exclusive criteria: repetitive researches.DATA EXTRACTTON: A total of 100 papers related to cellular transplant and PD were collected and 41literatures were in accordance with the inclusive criteria.DATA SYNTHESIS: PD is a neural degeneration disease that threatens the health of the aged people, and most traditional therapeusis cannot delay its pathological proceeding. Cell transplantation is becoming popular as a new therapeutic tool, and the cells used to transplant mainly included dopamine-secreting cells, fetal ventral mesencephalic cells, embryonic stem cells and neural stem cells up to now. Animal experiment and clinical test demonstrate that cell transplantation can relieve the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease obviously, but there are some problems need to be solved.CONCLUSTON: Cell transplantation has visible therapeutic efficacy on PD. Following the improvement of technique, and we have enough cause to credit that cell therapy may cure PD in the future.

  10. Medical nutrition therapy in chronic kidney disease; from dialysis to transplant: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Leal-Escobar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease has direct implications in nutritional status, causing anorexia and muscular catabolism. These situations are frequent in kidney renal replacement therapy in which nutritional disorders and inflammatory mechanisms associated with therapy often lead to the development of protein-energy wasting. Nutrition therapy has shown an adequate therapeutic strategy to prevent and treat metabolic alterations, reducing surgical and nutritional complication risks in kidney transplantation patients. The current case reports nutritional intervention on a continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient who was subsequently prescribed to automatic peritoneal dialysis and, finally, kidney transplant from a living donor.

  11. Primary prevention of skin dysplasia in renal transplant recipients with photodynamic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togsverd-Bo, K; Omland, S H; Wulf, H C

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplant recipients (OTRs) are at high risk of developing cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC); prevention includes early treatment of premalignant actinic keratosis (AK). Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a noninvasive field therapy that reduces new AKs in patients with existing AK...

  12. Nursing care of patients receiving interventional therapy for hepatic artery stenosis after liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Lin; Liu Shiguang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the perioperative nursing care of patients who is going to receive interventional therapy for hepatic artery stenosis after liver transplantation and to provide useful reference for reducing surgery-related complication and for improving the prognosis of patients. Methods: Based on the patient's condition and operative requirement,we provided effective nursing care for 20 patients who were admitted to receive the interventional therapy for hepatic artery stenosis after liver transplantation. The nursing care included preoperative preparation,postoperative nursing and medical guidance at the time of discharge. Results: Interventional therapy was successfully performed in all 20 cases, and no hemorrhagic tendency or acute thrombosis occurred. Marked symptomatic improvement was obtained in all patients. Conclusion: The interventional therapy is an effective treatment for hepatic artery stenosis after liver transplantation. Intensive perioperative nursing care can well prevent the occurrence of surgery-related complications and can surely improve the therapeutic results. (authors)

  13. The future of replacement and restorative therapies: from organ transplantation to regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daar, A S

    2013-01-01

    As we continue to have severe shortages of organs for transplantation, we need to consider alternatives for the future. The most likely to make a real difference in the long term is regenerative medicine (RM), a field that has emerged from the conjunction of stem cell biology and cell therapies; gene therapy; biomaterials and tissue engineering; and organ transplantation. Transplantation and RM share the same essential goal: to replace or restore organ function. Herein I briefly review some major breakthroughs of RM that are relevant to the future of organ transplantation, with a focus on the needs of people in the developing world. A definition of RM is provided and the ethical, legal, and social issues are briefly highlighted. In conclusion, I provide a projection of what the future may be for RM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Music Therapy for Symptom Management After Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation: Results From a Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Debbie; Bolwell, Brian; Majhail, Navneet S; Rybicki, Lisa; Yurch, Melissa; Abounader, Donna; Kohuth, Joseph; Jarancik, Shannon; Koniarczyk, Heather; McLellan, Linda; Dabney, Jane; Lawrence, Christine; Gallagher, Lisa; Kalaycio, Matt; Sobecks, Ronald; Dean, Robert; Hill, Brian; Pohlman, Brad; Hamilton, Betty K; Gerds, Aaron T; Jagadeesh, Deepa; Liu, Hien D

    2017-09-01

    High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is frequently performed in patients with hematologic malignancies. ASCT can result in significant nausea, pain, and discomfort. Supportive care has improved, and pharmacologic therapies are frequently used, but with limitations. Music has been demonstrated to improve nausea and pain in patients undergoing chemotherapy, but little data are available regarding the effects of music therapy in the transplantation setting. In a prospective study, patients with lymphoma or multiple myeloma undergoing ASCT were randomized to receive either interactive music therapy with a board-certified music therapist or no music therapy. The music therapy arm received 2 music therapy sessions on days +1 and +5. Primary outcomes were perception of pain and nausea measured on a visual analog scale. Secondary outcomes were narcotic pain medication use from day -1 to day +5 and impact of ASCT on patient mood as assessed by Profile of Mood States (POMS) on day +5. Eighty-two patients were enrolled, with 37 in the music therapy arm and 45 in the no music therapy arm. Patients who received MT had slightly increased nausea by day +7 compared with the no music therapy patients. The music therapy and no music therapy patients had similar pain scores; however, the patients who received music therapy used significantly less narcotic pain medication (median, 24 mg versus 73 mg; P = .038). Music therapy may be a viable nonpharmacologic method of pain management for patients undergoing ASCT; the music therapy patients required significantly fewer morphine equivalent doses compared with the no music therapy patients. Additional research is needed to better understand the effects of music therapy on patient-perceived symptoms, such as pain and nausea. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Pathogenesis and therapy of hydronephrosis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lu-ping; Xu, Tao; Huang, Xiao-bo; Wang, Xiao-feng

    2014-08-18

    To investigate the pathogenesis and therapy of hydronephrosis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). From March 2004 to March 2014, 23 patients with hydronephrosis after HSCT were identified. With these data, the pathogenesis of hydronephrosis after HSCT were analyzed. According to the surgical intervention of hydronephrosis and ureteral dialation of ureteral stricture, the patients were divided into two groups, rank-sum test and exact probability test were used to evaluate whether there were significant differences in the time of hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) occurred, ureteritis and viremia. HC, ureteritis, ureteral stenosis were all the causes of hydronephrosis after HSCT. In this study, 69.6% (16/23) of the patients suffered from HSCT were cured by conservative treatment, 30.4% (7/23) by surgical intervention, and 13.0% (3/23) by insertion DJ stent or nephrostomy.Of the patients [17.4% (4/23)] who suffered ureteral stenosis, 2 were cured after the balloon dialation of ureter, 1 needed DJ tube long-term insertion, and 1 was still followed-up. rank-sum test and exact probability test results showed that the patients who needed surgical intervention might suffer from HC later than other patients, and their incidences of viremia and ureteritis were higher, but the differences between the two groups were not statistically significant (P = 0.524, P = 0.169, and P = 0.124, respectively). The results also showed that the ureteritis incidences of the patients who suffered from ureteral stricture and needed ureteral dialation were higher than that of the other patients, and the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.024). The patients who needed ureteral dialation suffered from HC later and their incidences of viremia was higher, but the differences between the two groups were not statistically significant (P = 0.73 and P = 0.27). HC, ureteritis and ureteral stenosis may cause hydronephrosis after HSCT. Patients may treated by

  16. Maintenance immunosuppression with intermittent intravenous IL-2 receptor antibody therapy in renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven; Catella, Jennifer; Martin, Spencer T; Perrone, Ronald; Chandraker, Anil; Magee, Colm C; McDevitt-Potter, Lisa M

    2011-09-01

    To report what we believe to be the first 2 cases of long-term (>24 months) intermittent intravenous interleukin-2 receptor antibody (IL-2RA) therapy for maintenance immunosuppression following renal transplantation. The first patient is a 52-year-old female with a history of intolerance to calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) and sirolimus. Following her second transplant, the patient received mycophenolate mofetil 100 mg twice daily, a tapering corticosteroid regimen (initial dose of methylprednisolone 500 mg tapered over 1 week to prednisone 30 mg/day), and biweekly intravenous daclizumab 1-1.2 mg/kg/dose; 33 months after transplant the IL-2RA was changed to intravenous basiliximab 40 mg once a month. At 40 months after transplant, the patient continued to have stable renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate 48 mL/min/1.73 m²) with excellent tolerability. The second patient is a 59-year-old female also intolerant to CNIs and sirolimus who required intermittent maintenance therapy with intravenous basiliximab 20 mg/dose. Despite an initial rejection episode, the patient tolerated more than 2 years of basiliximab therapy with good renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate 103 months after transplant 69 mL/min/1.73 m²) and no adverse events. The IL-2RAs basiliximab and daclizumab possess several characteristics of ideal maintenance immunosuppressive agents (ie, nondepleting, long half-lives, limited adverse events). Based on a MEDLINE search (through December 31, 2010) using the search terms basiliximab, daclizumab, organ transplant, immunosuppression, and/or maintenance immunosuppression, and an advanced search in the published abstracts from the American Transplant Congress and World Transplant Congress (2000-2010), it appears that IL-2RAs have been used successfully as short-term therapy in both renal and extrarenal transplant recipients to allow for renal recovery following CNI-induced nephrotoxicity. In heart transplant recipients, the IL-2

  17. Amniotic membrane transplantation ineffective as additional therapy in patients with aggressive Mooren's ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallenberg, Maurice; Westekemper, Henrike; Steuhl, Klaus-Peter; Meller, Daniel

    2013-12-17

    Mooren's ulcer is a severe ulcerative inflammation of the cornea. The exact pathogenesis remains unclear. Therefore many therapies of Mooren's ulcer are recommended in literature. To shed more light on the ongoing question of optimal treatment of severe progressive Mooren's ulcer, we here report on a retrospective case series of patients treated with systemic immunosuppressive therapy and additional amniotic membrane transplantation. Medical records from seven patients (eleven eyes), 4 male and 3 female, with severe progressive Mooren's ulcer were analysed retrospectively. The mean follow up was 88.4 ± 80.8 months (range 12-232 month). A HLA-typing was performed in all patients. A systemic immunosuppressive therapy was administered in all patients. The amniotic membrane was transplanted after the base of the ulcer was resected. Multiple amniotic membrane transplantations were necessary in six patients. The visual outcome of all patients was poor. No patient achieved a visual acuity better than 20/630 Snellen chart. Five patients were positive for HLA-DQ2 and four patients were positive for HLA-DR17(3). The aggressive and highly inflammatory form of Mooren's ulcer is difficult to treat and the progression of the disease is hard to influence positively even under systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, the main intention of therapy is to achieve a stable epithelialized corneal surface without the risk of perforation. Amniotic membrane transplantation is not able to cure severe forms of Mooren's ulcer. However it supports the immunosuppressive therapy in acute situations as in critical corneal thinning.

  18. Parthenogenetic embryonic stem cells with H19 siRNA-mediated knockdown as a potential resource for cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Minhye; Hong, Su; Yu, Seong-Lan; Sim, Bo-Woong; Seo, Jeong-Sun; Kang, Jaeku

    2012-02-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are used in cell therapy and tissue engineering due to their ability to produce different cells types. However, studies of ES cells that are derived from fertilized embryos have raised concerns about the limitations imposed by ethical and political considerations. Therefore, many studies of stem cells use the stem cells that are derived from unfertilized oocytes and adult tissue. Although parthenogenetic embryonic stem (ESP) cells also avoid ethical and political dilemmas and can be used in cell-based therapy, the ESP cells exhibit growth retardation problems. Therefore, to investigate the potential for muscle growth from genetically modified ESP cells, we established four ES cell types, including normal embryonic stem (ESN) cells, ESP cells, ESP cells that overexpress the insulin-like growth factor 2 (Igf2) gene (ESI) and ESP cells with down-regulated H19 gene expression (ESH). Using these cells, we examined the expression profiles of genes that were related to imprinting and muscle using microarrays. The gene expression patterns of ESI and ESH cells were similar and were more closely related to the ESN pattern than that of the ESP cells. Differentiated ESH cells exhibited increased expression of bone morphologic protein 4 (BMP4), which is a mesoderm marker, compared with the differentiated ESI cells. We showed that Igf2 expression was induced by H19 silencing in the ESP cells via hypermethylation of the H19 imprinting control region 1 (ICR1). Moreover, the proportion of ESH-derived chimera was slightly higher than those produced from the ESP cells. In addition, we detected increased cell proliferation in the MEF cells following H19 knock-down. These results indicate that the ESH cells may be a source of cell-based therapy for conditions such as muscular atrophy.

  19. Photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis in organ transplant patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basset-Seguin, N; Baumann Conzett, K; Gerritsen, M J P

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of actinic keratoses (AK) and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in organ transplant recipients (OTRs) is significantly higher than in immunocompetent patients. Rates of progression and recurrence following treatment are higher too, in part due to the effects of the immunosu......Background The incidence of actinic keratoses (AK) and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in organ transplant recipients (OTRs) is significantly higher than in immunocompetent patients. Rates of progression and recurrence following treatment are higher too, in part due to the effects...... investigate induced immunosuppression with PDT in healthy volunteers....

  20. Downregulation of telomerase maintenance-related ACD expression in patients undergoing immunosuppresive therapy following kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowska, Agnieszka; Strzalka-Mrozik, Barbara; Owczarek, Aleksander; Gola, Joanna; Mazurek, Urszula; Grzeszczak, Wladyslaw; Gumprecht, Janusz

    2015-12-01

    Chronic administration of immunosuppressants has been associated with long-term consequences, including a higher risk of neoplasm development. The processes regulating telomere function exert a major influence on human cancer biology. The present study aimed to assess the effect of immunosuppressive therapy on the expression of genes associated with telomere maintenance and protection in patients following renal transplantation. A total of 51 patients that had undergone kidney transplantation and 54 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. The 51 transplant patients received a three-drug immunosuppressive regimen consisting of cyclosporine A, prednisone and mycophenolate mofetil. In stage 1 of the study, the expression profiles of 123 transcripts, which represented 70 genes, were assessed in peripheral mononuclear blood cells using an oligonucleotide microarray technique in 8 transplant recipients and 4 healthy control subjects. Among the analyzed transcripts, the expression levels of 4 differed significantly between the studied groups; however, only the ACD (adrenocortical dysplasia homolog) gene, encoding the telomere-binding protein POT1-interacting protein 1 (TPP1), was sufficiently specific for telomere homeostasis. The expression of ACD was downregulated in transplant recipients (fold change, 2.11; P=0.006). In stage 2 of the study, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of ACD , DKC1 and hTERT mRNA was conducted for all transplant patients and control subjects. The results confirmed the downregulation of the ACD gene in patients that had received immunosuppressive therapy (P=0.002). The results of the present study indicate that the downregulation of ACD gene transcription, and thus TPP1 protein expression, may enhance the capacity for cell immortalization, despite normal levels of other key telomere maintenance factors, in patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy. Furthermore, the results indicate that TPP1 has

  1. Reversal of Type 1 Diabetes in Mice by Brown Adipose Tissue Transplant

    OpenAIRE

    Gunawardana, Subhadra C.; Piston, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Current therapies for type 1 diabetes (T1D) involve insulin replacement or transplantation of insulin-secreting tissue, both of which suffer from numerous limitations and complications. Here, we show that subcutaneous transplants of embryonic brown adipose tissue (BAT) can correct T1D in streptozotocin-treated mice (both immune competent and immune deficient) with severely impaired glucose tolerance and significant loss of adipose tissue. BAT transplants result in euglycemia, normalized gluco...

  2. Advances in Cell Transplantation Therapy for Diseased Myocardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Outi M. Villet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall objective of cell transplantation is to repopulate postinfarction scar with contractile cells, thus improving systolic function, and to prevent or to regress the remodeling process. Direct implantation of isolated myoblasts, cardiomyocytes, and bone-marrow-derived cells has shown prospect for improved cardiac performance in several animal models and patients suffering from heart failure. However, direct implantation of cultured cells can lead to major cell loss by leakage and cell death, inappropriate integration and proliferation, and cardiac arrhythmia. To resolve these problems an approach using 3-dimensional tissue-engineered cell constructs has been investigated. Cell engineering technology has enabled scaffold-free sheet development including generation of communication between cell graft and host tissue, creation of organized microvascular network, and relatively long-term survival after in vivo transplantation.

  3. Skin carcinomas in organ-transplant recipients : from early oncogenic events to therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, Ymke Grete Leontien de

    2008-01-01

    Skin carcinomas develop at a high rate in organ-transplant recipients who are kept on immune suppressive drugs to prevent graft rejection. The present study dealt with a broad range of aspects of this elevated carcinoma risk, starting from the earliest oncogenic events to the ultimate therapy.

  4. Fecal microbiota transplantation as novel therapy in gastroenterology: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, N.G.; MacDonald, J.K.; Vries, de E.M.; Haens, D' G.R.; Vos, de W.M.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Ponsioen, C.Y.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the clinical efficacy and safety of Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). We systematically reviewed FMT used as clinical therapy. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and Conference proceedings from inception to July, 2013. Treatment effect of FMT was

  5. Fecal microbiota transplantation as novel therapy in gastroenterology: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossen, Noortje G.; Macdonald, John K.; de Vries, Elisabeth M.; D'Haens, Geert R.; de Vos, Willem M.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.

    2015-01-01

    To study the clinical efficacy and safety of Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). We systematically reviewed FMT used as clinical therapy. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and Conference proceedings from inception to July, 2013. Treatment effect of FMT was calculated as the

  6. Novel therapies and their integration into allogeneic stem cell transplant for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaglowski, Samantha M; Byrd, John C

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, numerous advances have been made in elucidating the biology of and improving treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). These studies have led to identification of select CLL patient groups that generally have short survival dating from time of treatment or initial disease relapse who benefit from more aggressive therapeutic interventions. Allogeneic transplantation represents the only potentially curative option for CLL, but fully ablative regimens applied in the past have been associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Reduced-intensity preparative regimens has made application of allogeneic transplant to CLL patients much more feasible and increased the number of patients proceeding to this modality. Arising from this has been establishment of guidelines where allogeneic stem cell transplantation should be considered in CLL. Introduction of new targeted therapies with less morbidity, which can produce durable remissions has the potential to redefine where transplantation is initiated in CLL. This review briefly summarizes the field of allogeneic stem cell transplant in CLL and the interface of new therapeutics with this modality. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anti-TNFα therapy for chronic inflammatory disease in kidney transplant recipients: Clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrouste, Cyril; Anglicheau, Dany; Kamar, Nassim; Bachelier, Claire; Rivalan, Joseph; Pereira, Bruno; Caillard, Sophie; Aniort, Julien; Gatault, Philippe; Soubrier, Martin; Sayegh, Johnny; Colosio, Charlotte; Buisson, Anthony; Thervet, Eric; Bouvier, Nicolas; Heng, Anne Elisabeth

    2016-10-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) therapy has improved the prognosis of many chronic inflammatory diseases. It appears to be well-tolerated by liver-transplant patients. However, their use and their safety in kidney-transplant patients have yet to be determined.In this retrospective study, we identified 16 adult kidney-transplant patients aged 46.5 years (34-51.8) who received anti-TNFα therapy from 7 kidney transplantation centers. The indications for this treatment included: chronic inflammatory bowel disease (n = 8), inflammatory arthritis (n = 5), AA amyloidosis (n = 1), psoriasis (n = 1), and microscopic polyangiitis (n = 1).Anti-TNFα therapies resulted in a clinical response in 13/16 patients (81%). Estimated glomerular filtration rates (MDRD-4) were similar on day 0 and at 24 months (M24) after anti-TNFα treatment had been initiated (41 [12-55] and 40 [21-53] mL/min/1.73 m, respectively). Two allograft losses were observed. The 1st case was due to antibody-mediated rejection (M18), while the 2nd was the result of AA amyloidosis recurrence (M20). There were several complications: 8 patients (50%) developed 23 serious infections (18 bacterial, 4 viral, and 1 fungal) and 4 developed cancer. Five patients died (infection n = 2, cardiac AA amyloidosis n = 1, intraalveolar hemorrhage following microscopic polyangiitis n = 1, and acute respiratory distress syndrome n = 1). On univariate analysis, recipient age associated with death (P = 0.009) and infection development (P = 0.06).Using anti-TNFα therapies, remission can be achieved in chronic inflammatory diseases in kidney-transplant patients. However, concommitant anti-TNFα and immunosuppresive therapies must be used with caution due to the high risk of infection, particularly after the age of 50.

  8. Salvage therapy for CLL and the role of stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribben, John G

    2005-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) remains an incurable disease and, notwithstanding the excellent remission rates now achieved with purine analogs and monoclonal antibodies, the vast majority of patients with CLL are destined to relapse after primary treatment. The management of relapsed CLL patients is then dependent upon a number of factors, most importantly age, performance status, previous therapy administered, the response and duration of response to such therapy, and time from last therapy. Although prior therapy and response to such therapy are important factors in determining next therapy, it is often difficult to determine their importance from published studies. Furthermore, the goal of therapy, whether palliative or aggressive, must also be weighed into the decision when deciding on the next line of treatment. With many potential treatments available, the sequence of treatments and the timing of procedures such as stem cell transplantation remain controversial and are the focus of ongoing clinical trials.

  9. Immune Profiles to Predict Response to Desensitization Therapy in Highly HLA-Sensitized Kidney Transplant Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabu, Julie M; Siebert, Janet C; Maecker, Holden T

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most effective treatment for end-stage kidney disease. Sensitization, the formation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies, remains a major barrier to successful kidney transplantation. Despite the implementation of desensitization strategies, many candidates fail to respond. Current progress is hindered by the lack of biomarkers to predict response and to guide therapy. Our objective was to determine whether differences in immune and gene profiles may help identify which candidates will respond to desensitization therapy. Single-cell mass cytometry by time-of-flight (CyTOF) phenotyping, gene arrays, and phosphoepitope flow cytometry were performed in a study of 20 highly sensitized kidney transplant candidates undergoing desensitization therapy. Responders to desensitization therapy were defined as 5% or greater decrease in cumulative calculated panel reactive antibody (cPRA) levels, and non-responders had 0% decrease in cPRA. Using a decision tree analysis, we found that a combination of transitional B cell and regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies at baseline before initiation of desensitization therapy could distinguish responders from non-responders. Using a support vector machine (SVM) and longitudinal data, TRAF3IP3 transcripts and HLA-DR-CD38+CD4+ T cells could also distinguish responders from non-responders. Combining all assays in a multivariate analysis and elastic net regression model with 72 analytes, we identified seven that were highly interrelated and eleven that predicted response to desensitization therapy. Measuring baseline and longitudinal immune and gene profiles could provide a useful strategy to distinguish responders from non-responders to desensitization therapy. This study presents the integration of novel translational studies including CyTOF immunophenotyping in a multivariate analysis model that has potential applications to predict response to desensitization, select candidates, and personalize

  10. Transplantation of rat embryonic stem cell-derived retinal progenitor cells preserves the retinal structure and function in rat retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zepeng; Guan, Yuan; Cui, Lu; Song, Jian; Gu, Junjie; Zhao, Hanzhi; Xu, Lei; Lu, Lixia; Jin, Ying; Xu, Guo-Tong

    2015-11-09

    Degenerative retinal diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are the leading cause of blindness. Cell transplantation showed promising therapeutic effect for such diseases, and embryonic stem cell (ESC) is one of the sources of such donor cells. Here, we aimed to generate retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) from rat ESCs (rESCs) and to test their therapeutic effects in rat model. The rESCs (DA8-16) were cultured in N2B27 medium with 2i, and differentiated to two types of RPCs following the SFEBq method with modifications. For rESC-RPC1, the cells were switched to adherent culture at D10, while for rESC-RPC2, the suspension culture was maintained to D14. Both RPCs were harvested at D16. Primary RPCs were obtained from P1 SD rats, and some of them were labeled with EGFP by infection with lentivirus. To generate Rax::EGFP knock-in rESC lines, TALENs were engineered to facilitate homologous recombination in rESCs, which were cotransfected with the targeting vector and TALEN vectors. The differentiated cells were analyzed with live image, immunofluorescence staining, flow cytometric analysis, gene expression microarray, etc. RCS rats were used to mimic the degeneration of retina and test the therapeutic effects of subretinally transplanted donor cells. The structure and function of retina were examined. We established two protocols through which two types of rESC-derived RPCs were obtained and both contained committed retina lineage cells and some neural progenitor cells (NPCs). These rESC-derived RPCs survived in the host retinas of RCS rats and protected the retinal structure and function in early stage following the transplantation. However, the glia enriched rESC-RPC1 obtained through early and longer adherent culture only increased the b-wave amplitude at 4 weeks, while the longer suspension culture gave rise to evidently neuronal differentiation in rESC-RPC2 which significantly improved the visual function of RCS rats. We have successfully differentiated

  11. Cardiac transplantation after bridged therapy with continuous flow left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Salil V; Sung, Kiick; Daly, Richard C; Shah, Ishan K; Altarabsheh, Salah E; Stulak, John M; Joyce, Lyle D; Boilson, Barry A; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Park, Soon J

    2014-03-01

    Cardiac transplantation is an effective surgical therapy for end-stage heart failure. Patients (pts) may need to be bridged with a continuous flow left ventricular assist device (CF-LVAD) while on the transplant list as logistic factors like organ availability are unknown. Cardiac transplantation post-LVAD can be a surgically challenging procedure and outcome in these pts is perceived to be poorer based on experience with earlier generation pulsatile flow pumps. Data from a single institution comparing these pts with those undergoing direct transplantation in the present era of continuous flow device therapy are limited. Evaluate results of cardiac transplantation in pts bridged with a CF-LVAD (BTx) and compare outcomes with pts undergoing direct transplantation (Tx) in a single institution. From June 2007 till January 2012, 106 pts underwent cardiac transplantation. Among these, 37 (35%) pts (51±11 years; 85% male) were bridged with a CF-LVAD (BTx), while 70 (65%) comprised the Tx group (53±12 years; 72% males). The median duration of LVAD support was 227 (153,327) days. During the period of LVAD support, 10/37 (27%) pts were upgraded to status 1A and all were successfully transplanted. Median hospital stay in the BTx (14 days) was slightly longer than the Tx group (12 days) but not statistically significant (p=0.21). In-hospital mortality in the BTx (5%) and Tx (1%) were comparable (p=0.25). Estimated late survival in the BTx cohort was 94±7, 90±10 and 83±16% at the end of one, two and three years, respectively which was comparable to 97±4%, 93±6% and 89±9% for the Tx group (p=0.50). Cardiac transplantation after LVAD implant can be performed with excellent results. Patients can be supported on the left ventricular assist device even for periods close to a year with good outcome after cardiac transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand

  12. TRANSPLANTATION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    stage ... renal artery thrombosis, renal vein thrombosis, ureteric leak or stenosis ... alternative organ source for patients with end-stage renal disease. Kidney ... status.27,28 Post-transplant acute tubular necrosis is caused by ischaemic injury to the ...

  13. Efficient and Fast Differentiation of Human Neural Stem Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based therapies have been used for repairing damaged brain tissue and helping functional recovery after brain injury. Aberrance neurogenesis is related with brain injury, and multipotential neural stem cells from human embryonic stem (hES cells provide a great promise for cell replacement therapies. Optimized protocols for neural differentiation are necessary to produce functional human neural stem cells (hNSCs for cell therapy. However, the qualified procedure is scarce and detailed features of hNSCs originated from hES cells are still unclear. In this study, we developed a method to obtain hNSCs from hES cells, by which we could harvest abundant hNSCs in a relatively short time. Then, we examined the expression of pluripotent and multipotent marker genes through immunostaining and confirmed differentiation potential of the differentiated hNSCs. Furthermore, we analyzed the mitotic activity of these hNSCs. In this report, we provided comprehensive features of hNSCs and delivered the knowledge about how to obtain more high-quality hNSCs from hES cells which may help to accelerate the NSC-based therapies in brain injury treatment.

  14. B cell repertoires in HLA-sensitized kidney transplant candidates undergoing desensitization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, John F; Fan, H Christina; Sit, Rene; Hutchins, Maria U; Jirage, Kshama; Curtis, Rachael; Hutchins, Edward; Quake, Stephen R; Yabu, Julie M

    2017-01-13

    Kidney transplantation is the most effective treatment for end-stage renal disease. Sensitization refers to pre-existing antibodies against human leukocyte antigen (HLA) protein and remains a major barrier to successful transplantation. Despite implementation of desensitization strategies, many candidates fail to respond. Our objective was to determine whether measuring B cell repertoires could differentiate candidates that respond to desensitization therapy. We developed an assay based on high-throughput DNA sequencing of the variable domain of the heavy chain of immunoglobulin genes to measure changes in B cell repertoires in 19 highly HLA-sensitized kidney transplant candidates undergoing desensitization and 7 controls with low to moderate HLA sensitization levels. Responders to desensitization had a decrease of 5% points or greater in cumulated calculated panel reactive antibody (cPRA) levels, and non-responders had no decrease in cPRA. Dominant B cell clones were not observed in highly sensitized candidates, suggesting that the B cells responsible for sensitization are either not present in peripheral blood or present at comparable levels to other circulating B cells. Candidates that responded to desensitization therapy had pre-treatment repertoires composed of a larger fraction of class-switched (IgG and IgA) isotypes compared to non-responding candidates. After B cell depleting therapy, the proportion of switched isotypes increased and the mutation frequencies of the remaining non-switched isotypes (IgM and IgD) increased in both responders and non-responders, perhaps representing a shift in the repertoire towards memory B cells or plasmablasts. Conversely, after transplantation, non-switched isotypes with fewer mutations increased, suggesting a shift in the repertoire towards naïve B cells. Relative abundance of different B cell isotypes is strongly perturbed by desensitization therapy and transplantation, potentially reflecting changes in the relative

  15. Pediatric Anaplastic Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma: Targeted Therapy Guided by Genetic Analysis and a Patient-Derived Xenograft Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart L. Cramer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapy for rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS has generally been limited to combinations of conventional cytotoxic agents similar to regimens originally developed in the late 1960s. Recently, identification of molecular alterations through next-generation sequencing of individual tumor specimens has facilitated the use of more targeted therapeutic approaches for various malignancies. Such targeted therapies have revolutionized treatment for some cancer types. However, malignancies common in children, thus far, have been less amenable to such targeted therapies. This report describes the clinical course of an 8-year-old female with embryonal RMS having anaplastic features. This patient experienced multiple relapses after receiving various established and experimental therapies. Genomic testing of this RMS subtype revealed mutations in BCOR, ARID1A, and SETD2 genes, each of which contributes to epigenetic regulation and interacts with or modifies the activity of histone deacetylases (HDAC. Based on these findings, the patient was treated with the HDAC inhibitor vorinostat as a single agent. The tumor responded transiently followed by subsequent disease progression. We also examined the efficacy of vorinostat in a patient-derived xenograft (PDX model developed using tumor tissue obtained from the patient’s most recent tumor resection. The antitumor activity of vorinostat observed with the PDX model reflected clinical observations in that obvious areas of tumor necrosis were evident following exposure to vorinostat. Histologic sections of tumors harvested from PDX tumor-bearing mice treated with vorinostat demonstrated induction of necrosis by this agent. We propose that the evaluation of clinical efficacy in this type of preclinical model merits further evaluation to determine if PDX models predict tumor sensitivity to specific agents and/or combination therapies.

  16. Immunosuppressive therapy for transplant-ineligible aplastic anemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Körper, Sixten; Höchsmann, Britta

    2015-02-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare life-threatening bone marrow failure that is characterized by bicytopenia or pancytopenia in the peripheral blood and a hypoplastic or aplastic bone marrow. The patients are at risk of infection and hemorrhage due to neutropenia and thrombocytopenia and suffer from symptoms of anemia. The main treatment approaches are allogeneic stem cell transplantation and immunosuppression. Here, we review current standard immunosuppression and the attempts that have been made in the past two decades to improve results: review of recent developments also reveals that sometimes not only the advent of new drugs, good ideas and well-designed clinical trials decide the progress in the field but also marketing considerations of pharmaceutical companies. Aplastic anemia experts unfortunately had to face the situation that efficient drugs were withdrawn simply for marketing considerations. We will discuss the current options and challenges in first-line treatment and management of relapsing and refractory patients with an emphasis on adult patients. Some promising new approaches are currently under investigation in prospective, randomized trials.

  17. Endoscopic therapy of posttransplant biliary stenoses after right-sided adult living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoepf, Thomas; Maldonado-Lopez, Evelyn J; Hilgard, Philip; Schlaak, Joerg; Malago, Massimo; Broelsch, Christoph E; Treichel, Ulrich; Gerken, Guido

    2005-11-01

    Endoscopic treatment of biliary strictures after liver transplantation is a therapeutic challenge. In particular, outcomes of endoscopic therapy of biliary complications in the case of duct-to-duct anastomosis after living related liver transplantation are limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and success of an endoscopic treatment approach to posttransplant biliary strictures (PTBS) after right-sided living donor liver transplantation (RLDLT) with duct-to-duct anastomosis. Ninety patients who received adult-to-adult RLDLT in our center were screened retrospectively with respect to endoscopic treatment of PTBS. Therapy was judged as successful when cholestasis parameters returned to normal and bile duct narrowing was reduced significantly after the completion of therapy. Forty of 90 RLDLT patients received duct-to-duct anastomosis, 12 (30%) showed PTBS. Seven of 12 patients were treated successfully by endoscopy; the remaining 5 patients were treated primarily by surgery. Most patients were treated by balloon dilatation followed by insertion of endoprostheses. A median of 2.5 dilatation sessions were necessary and the median treatment duration was 8 months. One patient developed endoscopy-treatable recurrent stenosis, no surgical intervention was necessary. Mild pancreatitis occurred in 7.9% and cholangitis in 5.3% of the procedures. One minor bleeding episode occurred during sphincterotomy. Bleeding was managed endoscopically. Endoscopic therapy of adult-to-adult right living related liver transplantation with duct-to-duct anastomosis is feasible and frequently is successful. The duct-to-duct anastomosis offers the possibility of endoscopic treatment. Endoscopic treatment of posttransplant biliary strictures is safe, with a low specific complication rate.

  18. Extra-anatomic transplantations in autologous adult cell therapies aiding anatomical regeneration and physiological recovery – An insight and categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial

    2015-12-01

    stimuli (voluntary and lack propagation of action potentials. However, the skeletal myoblasts in vitro, expanded as patches, have aided the in situ regeneration of the dysfunctional myocardium by secreting relevant growth factors [3]. Similarly, the buccal mucosal epithelium which is an opaque tissue has been applied to regenerate the damaged corneal epithelium, which in contrast is a transparent tissue. Here the buccal mucosal epithelium has been found to replace directly the dysfunctional corneal epithelium to assist in its regeneration and the resumption of proper function [4]. Though the source of the cells taken for repair of cartilage and corneal epithelium are extra-anatomic, they belong to the same germ layer of developmental origin; skeletal myoblasts (source and cardiomyocytes (target both from the mesoderm while buccal mucosal epithelium (source and corneal epithelium (target are both from the ectoderm. Extra-anatomic cell therapies reported in the literature such as the transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells in spinal cord injury [5] also fit into this association, as the cell source for the replacement and the target organ exist within the same germ layer of ectoderm, developmentally but separated regionally. All these exchanges, we propose, should be termed as “Intra-germ Extra-anatomic Cell Therapies” (IECT. We have come across two extra-anatomic cell therapies that have been reported in the literature, where cells of the source and target tissue have different embryonic origins. Firstly, the transplantation of in vitro expanded buccal mucosal epithelial cells to treat urethral strictures in the “BEES-HAUS” (Buccal Epithelium Expanded & encapsulated in Scaffold - Hybrid Approach to Urethral Stricture approach reported by Vaddi et al [6] and secondly the use of gingival fibroblasts to replace the lost dermal fibroblasts in cell therapy for facial anti-aging [7] by Ebisawa et al both fall under this category. The buccal mucosal epithelial

  19. Recent advances in post autologous transplantation maintenance therapies in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperla, Narendranath; Fenske, Timothy S; Hari, Parameswaran N; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Lymphomas constitute the second most common indication for high dose therapy (HDT) followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT). The intent of administering HDT in these heterogeneous disorders varies from cure (e.g., in relapsed aggressive lymphomas) to disease control (e.g., most indolent lymphomas). Regardless of the underlying histology or remission status at transplantation, disease relapse remains the number one cause of post auto-HCT therapy failure and mortality. The last decade has seen a proliferation of clinical studies looking at prevention of post auto-HCT therapy failure with various maintenance strategies. The benefit of such therapies is in turn dependent on disease histology and timing of transplantation. In relapsed, chemosensitive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), although post auto-HCT maintenance rituximab seems to be safe and feasible, it does not provide improved survival outcomes and is not recommended. The preliminary results with anti- programmed death -1 (PD-1) antibody therapy as post auto-HCT maintenance in DLBCL is promising but requires randomized validation. Similarly in follicular lymphoma, maintenance therapies including rituximab following auto-HCT should be considered investigational and offered only on a clinical trial. Rituximab maintenance results in improved progression-free survival but has not yet shown to improve overall survival in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), but given the poor prognosis with post auto-HCT failure in MCL, maintenance rituximab can be considered on a case-by-case basis. Ongoing trials evaluating the efficacy of post auto-HCT maintenance with novel compounds (e.g., immunomodulators, PD-1 inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors and bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitors) will likely change the practice landscape in the near future for B cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas patients following HDT and auto-HCT. PMID:26421260

  20. Prevention and treatment of relapse after stem cell transplantation by cellular therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenburg, Fred; Ruggiero, Eliana; Bonini, Chaira; Porter, David; Miller, Jeff; Malard, Floran; Mohty, Mohamad; Kröger, Nicolaus; Kolb, Hans Jochem

    2018-05-24

    Despite recent advances in reducing therapy-related mortality after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) relapse remains the major cause of treatment failure and little progress has been achieved in the last decades. At the 3rd International Workshop on Biology, Prevention, and Treatment of Relapse held in Hamburg/Germany in November 2016 international experts presented and discussed recent developments in the field. Here, the potential of cellular therapies including unspecific and specific T cells, genetically modified T cells, CAR-T cells, NK-cells, and second allografting in prevention and treatment of relapse after alloSCT are summarized.

  1. Outcome after intensive reinduction therapy and allogeneic stem cell transplant in paediatric relapsed acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Lene; Forestier, Erik; Hasle, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Given that 30-40% of children with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) relapse after primary therapy it is important to define prognostic factors and identify optimal therapy. From 1993 to 2012, 543 children from the Nordic countries were treated according to two consecutive protocols: 208 children...... relapsed. The influence of disease characteristics, first line treatment, relapse therapy and duration of first remission on outcome was analysed. Second complete remission (CR2) was achieved in 146 (70%) patients. Estimated 5-year overall survival (OS5y ) was 39 ± 4% for the whole group and 43 ± 4......, no allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) in first remission and core binding factor AML were independent favourable prognostic factors for survival. For the 128 children (124 in CR2) that received SCT as consolidation therapy after relapse, OS5y was 61 ± 5%. Four of 19 children (21%) survived without...

  2. Translating G-CSF as an Adjunct Therapy to Stem Cell Transplantation for Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Ike dela; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-12-01

    Among recently investigated stroke therapies, stem cell treatment holds great promise by virtue of their putative ability to replace lost cells, promote endogenous neurogenesis,and produce behavioral and functional improvement through their "bystander effects." Translating stem cell in the clinic, however, presents a number of technical difficulties. A strategy suggested to enhance therapeutic utility of stem cells is combination therapy, i.e., co-transplantation of stem cells or adjunct treatment with pharmacological agents and substrates,which is assumed to produce more profound therapeutic benefits by circumventing limitations of individual treatments and facilitating complementary brain repair processes. We previously demonstrated enhanced functional effects of cotreatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF)and human umbilical cord blood cell (hUCB) transplantation in animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here,we suggest that the aforementioned combination therapy may also produce synergistic effects in stroke. Accordingly, G-CSF treatment may reduce expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enhance neurogenesis rendering a receptive microenvironment for hUCB engraftment. Adjunct treatment of GCSF with hUCB may facilitate stemness maintenance and guide neural lineage commitment of hUCB cells. Moreover, regenerative mechanisms afforded by G-CSF-mobilized endogenous stem cells, secretion of growth factors by hUCB grafts and G-CSF-recruited endothelial progenitor cells(EPCs), as well as the potential graft–host integration that may promote synaptic circuitry re-establishment could altogether produce more pronounced functional improvement in stroked rats subjected to a combination G-CSF treatment and hUCB transplantation. Nevertheless, differences in pathology and repair processes underlying TBI and stroke deserve consideration when testing the effects of combinatorial G-CSF and hUCB cell transplantation for stroke treatment. Further

  3. Application of human amniotic mesenchymal cells as an allogeneic transplantation cell source in bone regenerative therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuno, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Toshiko; Nogami, Makiko; Koike, Chika; Okabe, Motonori; Noto, Zenko; Arai, Naoya; Noguchi, Makoto; Nikaido, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    Autogenous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have therapeutic applications in bone regenerative therapy due to their pluripotency. However, the ability of MSCs to proliferate and differentiate varies between donors. Furthermore, alternative sources of MSCs are required for patients with contraindications to autogenous cell therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of mesenchymal cells from the human amniotic membrane (HAM) as a source of cells for allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. Cells that retained a proliferative capacity of more than 50 population doubling level were distinguished from other HAM cells as HAMα cells and induced to osteogenic status—their in vivo osteogenesis was subsequently investigated in rats. It was found that HAMα cells were spindle shaped and were positive for MSC markers and negative for hematopoietic stem cell markers. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition increased with osteogenic status of HAMα cells. The expression of osteocalcin mRNA was increased in HAMα cells cultured on calcium phosphate scaffolds. Moreover, xenografted HAMα cells remained viable and produced extracellular matrix for several weeks. Thus, this study suggests that human amniotic mesenchymal cells possess osteogenic differentiation potential and could be applied to allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. - Highlights: ► Human amniotic mesenchymal cells include cells (HAMα cells) that have the properties of MSCs. ► HAMα cells have excellent osteogenic differentiation potential. ► Osteogenic differentiation ability of HAMα was amplified by calcium phosphate scaffolds. ► HAMα cells can be applicable to allogeneic cell transplantation in bone regenerative therapy.

  4. Application of human amniotic mesenchymal cells as an allogeneic transplantation cell source in bone regenerative therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuno, Hiroaki [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Yoshida, Toshiko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Nogami, Makiko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Koike, Chika; Okabe, Motonori [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Noto, Zenko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Arai, Naoya; Noguchi, Makoto [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Nikaido, Toshio, E-mail: tnikaido@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Autogenous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have therapeutic applications in bone regenerative therapy due to their pluripotency. However, the ability of MSCs to proliferate and differentiate varies between donors. Furthermore, alternative sources of MSCs are required for patients with contraindications to autogenous cell therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of mesenchymal cells from the human amniotic membrane (HAM) as a source of cells for allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. Cells that retained a proliferative capacity of more than 50 population doubling level were distinguished from other HAM cells as HAM{alpha} cells and induced to osteogenic status-their in vivo osteogenesis was subsequently investigated in rats. It was found that HAM{alpha} cells were spindle shaped and were positive for MSC markers and negative for hematopoietic stem cell markers. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition increased with osteogenic status of HAM{alpha} cells. The expression of osteocalcin mRNA was increased in HAM{alpha} cells cultured on calcium phosphate scaffolds. Moreover, xenografted HAM{alpha} cells remained viable and produced extracellular matrix for several weeks. Thus, this study suggests that human amniotic mesenchymal cells possess osteogenic differentiation potential and could be applied to allogeneic transplantation in bone regenerative therapy. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human amniotic mesenchymal cells include cells (HAM{alpha} cells) that have the properties of MSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAM{alpha} cells have excellent osteogenic differentiation potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osteogenic differentiation ability of HAM{alpha} was amplified by calcium phosphate scaffolds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAM{alpha} cells can be applicable to allogeneic cell transplantation in bone regenerative therapy.

  5. STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION AS A POSSIBLE STRATEGY FOR TREATING STANDARD THERAPY-RESISTANT ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Z. Gaidukova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors have analyzed the literature dealing with studies of the efficiency and safety of stem cell transplantation (SCT in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS through the electronic resources Pubmed and Medline by using the keywords «bone marrow transplantation», «hematopoietic stem cell transplantation», «ankylosing spondylitis», «autoimmune diseases», and «sacroiliac joint biopsy». The paper describes four cases of SCT in AS patients, including transplantation that was carried out in one patient with lymphoma concurrent with AS, in two AS patients without blood cancers, and in one patient with AS concurrent with myeloid leukemia. Drug-free remission was achieved in 3 cases: lymphoma concurrent with AS (n=1, AS concurrent with myeloid leukemia (n=1, and AS without comorbidities (n=1. In addition to an improvement in the course of AS, there were also two cases with clinical presentations of AS after SCT. The given cases show that SCT can be basically used to induce drug-free remission in patients with severe forms of standard therapy-resistant AS. However, the introduction of SCT in clinical practice needs to adjust the technique to the specific features of AS patients. 

  6. Comparison of Transplant Waitlist Outcomes for Pediatric Candidates Supported by Ventricular Assist Devices Versus Medical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Sabrina P; Oron, Assaf P; Kemna, Mariska S; Albers, Erin L; McMullan, D Michael; Chen, Jonathan M; Law, Yuk M

    2018-05-01

    Ventricular assist devices have gained popularity in the management of refractory heart failure in children listed for heart transplantation. Our primary aim was to compare the composite endpoint of all-cause pretransplant mortality and loss of transplant eligibility in children who were treated with a ventricular assist device versus a medically managed cohort. This was a retrospective cohort analysis. Data were obtained from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. The at-risk population (n = 1,380) was less than 18 years old, either on a ventricular assist device (605 cases) or an equivalent-severity, intensively medically treated group (referred to as MED, 775 cases). None. The impact of ventricular assist devices was estimated via Cox proportional hazards regression (hazard ratio), dichotomizing 1-year outcomes to "poor" (22%: 193 deaths, 114 too sick) versus all others (940 successful transplants, 41 too healthy, 90 censored), while adjusting for conventional risk factors. Among children 0-12 months old, ventricular assist device was associated with a higher risk of poor outcomes (hazard ratio, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.5-3.0; p comparative study of ventricular assist devices versus medical therapy in children. Age is a significant modulator of waitlist outcomes for children with end-stage heart failure supported by ventricular assist device, with the impact of ventricular assist devices being more beneficial in adolescents.

  7. Renal transplantation across the donor-specific antibody barrier: Graft outcome and cancer risk after desensitization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-Yao; Lee, Chih-Yuan; Yeh, Chi-Chuan; Tsai, Meng-Kun

    2016-06-01

    Desensitization regimens including use of intravenous immune globulin and rituximab have been reported to overcome renal transplant hyperacute rejection. A retrospective case-control study was performed to assess the results and complications of renal transplantation with desensitization therapy for donor-specific antibody (DSA) in a transplant center in Asia, where donor exchange was usually not allowed. Between January 2007 and December 2013, 22 patients with DSA received live-donor renal transplantation after desensitization (DSA group). During the same period, the DSA group was compared to the NSA group (152 renal transplants) who had no specific antibody to the donors (66 from deceased donors and 86 from living relatives). Rejection, renal function, graft and patient survival rates, infection, and cancer incidence were reviewed and analyzed from medical records. The DSA group (46.8%) had significantly higher acute rejection rates than the NSA group (13.7%) at the 1-year follow-up. The estimated renal function, 5-year graft, and patient survival rates were comparable between the groups. The DSA group (19.6%) had significantly higher 5-year de novo cancer incidence than the NSA group (8.5%; p = 0.028); three patients of the DSA group developed urothelial carcinoma 17.0 ± 3.0 months after transplantation. By using stepwise Cox regression analysis, desensitization therapy was identified as the sole independent risk factor for post-transplant urothelial carcinoma. When compared to renal transplantation without DSA, desensitization therapy for DSA resulted in equivalent renal transplant outcome but potentially increased risk of urothelial carcinoma after transplantation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Invasive fungal infections and antifungal therapies in solid organ transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven; Kubiak, David W; Chandraker, Anil K; Tullius, Stefan G

    2007-12-01

    This manuscript will review the risk factors, prevalence, clinical presentation, and management of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Primary literature was obtained via MEDLINE (1966-April 2007) and EMBASE. Abstracts were obtained from scientific meetings or pharmaceutical manufacturers and included in the analysis. All studies and abstracts evaluating IFIs and/or antifungal therapies, with a primary focus on solid organ transplantation, were considered for inclusion. English-language literature was selected for inclusion, but was limited to those consisting of human subjects. Infectious complications following SOT are common. IFIs are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates in this patient population. Determining the best course of therapy is difficult due to the limited availability of data in SOT recipients. Well-designed clinical studies are infrequent and much of the available information is often based on case-reports or retrospective analyses. Transplant practitioners must remain aware of their therapeutic options and the advantages and disadvantages associated with the available treatment alternatives.

  9. Orchestration of transplantation tolerance by regulatory dendritic cell therapy or in situ targeting of dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Adrian E.; Thomson, Angus W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Extensive research in murine transplant models over the past two decades has convincingly demonstrated the ability of regulatory dendritic cells (DCreg) to promote long-term allograft survival. We review important considerations regarding the source of therapeutic DCreg (donor or recipient) and their mode of action, in situ targeting of DCreg, and optimal therapeutic regimens to promote DCreg function. Recent findings Recent studies have defined protocols and mechanisms whereby ex vivo-generated DCreg of donor or recipient origin subvert allogeneic T cell responses and promote long-term organ transplant survival. Particular interest has focused on how donor antigen (Ag) is acquired, processed and presented by autologous DCs, on the stability of DCreg, and on in situ targeting of DC to promote their tolerogenic function. New evidence of the therapeutic efficacy of DCreg in a clinically-relevant non-human primate organ transplant model and production of clinical grade DCreg support early evaluation of DCreg therapy in human graft recipients. Summary We discuss strategies currently used to promote DC tolerogenicity, including DCreg therapy and in situ targeting of DC, with a view to improved understanding of underlying mechanisms and identification of the most promising strategies for therapeutic application. PMID:24926700

  10. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the management of wound infection following renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, B M; Nathan, V C; Delbridge, M C; Parker, K; Throssell, D; McKane, W S; Karim, M S; Raftery, A T

    2007-01-01

    Wound infection in the setting of immunosuppressed state such as renal transplantation (RT) causes significant morbidity from sepsis, prolongs hospital stay and is expensive. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a new technique of management of wound based on the principle of application of controlled negative pressure. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of VAC therapy in the management of wound infection following RT. This is a prospective study of a cohort of 180 consecutive RTs performed over a period of 4 years, where the data were retrieved from a prospectively maintained computerised database and case-notes. 9 of 180 (5%) patients developed wound infection following RT which led to cavitations and dehiscence with copious discharge, and refused to heal with conventional treatment. All 9 cases were treated with VAC therapy. The VAC system was removed after a median of 9 (range 3-30) days when discharge from the wound ceased. Four patients were discharged home with portable VAC device and managed on an outpatient basis, where the system was removed after a median 5.5 (range 3-7) days. The median hospital stay after initiation of VAC therapy was significantly shorter (5, range 2-12 days) than on conventional treatment prior to VAC therapy (11, range, 5-20 days) (p=0.003). Complete healing was achieved in all cases. The use of VAC therapy is an effective and safe adjunct to conventional and established treatment modalities for the management of wound infection and dehiscence following RT. Key words: Renal transplantation, wound infection, vacuum-assisted closure therapy.

  11. Selection of patients for heart transplantation in the current era of heart failure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Javed; Khadim, Ghazanfar; Paul, Kimberly M; Davis, Stacy F; Kronenberg, Marvin W; Chomsky, Don B; Pierson, Richard N; Wilson, John R

    2004-03-03

    We sought to assess the relationship between survival, peak exercise oxygen consumption (VO(2)), and heart failure survival score (HFSS) in the current era of heart failure (HF) therapy. Based on predicted survival, HF patients with peak VO(2) 14 ml/min/kg (p = 0.04). Of the patients with peak VO(2) of 10 to 14 ml/min/kg, 55% had low-risk HFSS and exhibited 88% one-year event-free survival. One-year survival after transplantation was 88%, which is similar to the 85% rate reported by the United Network for Organ Sharing for 1999 to 2000. Survival for HF patients in the current era has improved significantly, necessitating re-evaluation of the listing criteria for heart transplantation.

  12. [Defibrotide therapy for patients with sinusoidal obstruction syndrome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushijin, Kimikazu; Okamura, Atsuo; Ono, Kanako; Kawano, Yuko; Kawano, Hiroki; Funakoshi, Yohei; Kawamori, Yuriko; Nishikawa, Shinichiro; Minagawa, Kentaro; Sada, Akiko; Shimoyama, Manabu; Yamamoto, Katsuya; Katayama, Yoshio; Matsui, Toshimitsu

    2009-01-01

    Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) is one of the life-threatening complications caused by endothelial damage to the hepatic sinusoids after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, a satisfactory treatment for SOS has not yet been established. Defibrotide has anti-thrombotic, anti-ischemic, anti-inflammatory, and thrombolytic properties without systemic anticoagulant effects. We treated eight post-transplant SOS patients with defibrotide. Three patients responded to the therapy and the initial response was observed within a week. In addition to the improvement of liver function, rapid recovery of response to diuretic drugs followed by the improvement of renal function was observed. All of the five patients with respiratory dysfunction died despite administration of defibrotide, suggesting that early treatment might lead to better outcomes. There were no severe adverse effects directly due to defibrotide administration. Defibrotide seems to be a promising treatment for SOS, and the initiation of a clinical study in Japan would be important.

  13. Hypercholesterolemia in Renal Transplant Recipients; contributing Factors, Effect of Dietary Modification and Fluvastatin Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahed Awad

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypercholesterolemia which frequently follows renal transplantation, places kidney graft recipients at an increased risk for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. We attempt in this study to determine the prevalence, and evaluate severity and treatment of hypercholesterolemia in kidney transplant recipients. We studied 78 renal transplant patients with a mean age of 42.1 years and mean transplant duration of 6.2 years (range from six months to 8.5 years. They were on triple immunosuppressive therapy and had serum creatinine level of less than 160µmol/L. Thirty-one patients (39.8% were found to have blood cholesterol levels > 6.4 mmol/L. Significant positive correlation was found between hypercholesterolemia and cyclosporine blood levels above 200 ng/ml (p< 0.0009. Furthermore, proteinuria positively correlated with hypercholesterolemia (p< 0.0006. There was no significant correlation between cholesterol blood level and the patient age, sex, presence of diabetes, prednisolone, dose, or treatment with C.-blockers and diuretics. Dietary modification was not effective in reducing the blood cholesterol level in our patients, so we used fluvastatin in a dose of 20 to 40 mg daily for a period of three months. This drug was effective in lowering the mean cholesterol blood levels from 7.1 to 5.2 mmol/L (p< 0.005. One out of 19-electromyogram studies showed abnormal pattern. We did not notice change in the levels of creatinine phosphokinase, serum creatinine or lover enzymes. In conclusion, hyper-cholesterolemia is common in stable renal transplant patients. The presence of proteinuria and the high level of blood cyclosporine are significantly associated with hypercholesterolemia. Low-dose fluvastatin was well-tolerated and effective cholesterol lowering treatment.

  14. Post transplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric solid organ transplant patients: A possible role for [{sup 18}F]-FDG-PET(/CT) in initial staging and therapy monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falck, C. von [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)], E-mail: Falck.Christian.von@mh-hannover.de; Maecker, B. [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Schirg, E. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Boerner, A.R.; Knapp, W.H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Klein, C. [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany); Galanski, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Medical School Hanover), Carl-Neuberg-Strasse 1, 30625 Hannover (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    Post transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a severe complication after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. In pediatric transplant recipients PTLD is the most common malignancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate a possible role for positron emission tomography with [{sup 18}F]-2-fluoro-2-desoxy-glucose (FDG) in the initial staging and in therapy monitoring of pediatric patients suffering from biopsy-proven CD20-positive PTLD after solid organ transplantation. Seven pediatric patients were included. All available imaging studies - CT (n = 15), MRI (n = 16) and PET/PETCT (n = 16) - were reviewed on a lesion by lesion base. The performance of FDG-PET in the initial staging and during therapy with a chimeric anti-CD20 antibody was compared to conventional cross sectional imaging and correlated with the clinical outcome. FDG-PET identified all sites of disease as shown by CT/MRI and helped to clarify the significance of equivocal findings. The initial stage of disease was correctly identified by FDG-PET alone when compared to CT/MRI. During therapy, FDG-PET was superior to conventional cross-sectional imaging in the early evaluation of response.

  15. Low-level laser therapy activates NF-kB via generation of reactive oxygen species in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron C-H Chen

    Full Text Available Despite over forty years of investigation on low-level light therapy (LLLT, the fundamental mechanisms underlying photobiomodulation at a cellular level remain unclear.In this study, we isolated murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF from transgenic NF-kB luciferase reporter mice and studied their response to 810 nm laser radiation. Significant activation of NF-kB was observed at fluences higher than 0.003 J/cm(2 and was confirmed by Western blot analysis. NF-kB was activated earlier (1 hour by LLLT compared to conventional lipopolysaccharide treatment. We also observed that LLLT induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS production similar to mitochondrial inhibitors, such as antimycin A, rotenone and paraquat. Furthermore, we observed similar NF-kB activation with these mitochondrial inhibitors. These results, together with inhibition of laser induced NF-kB activation by antioxidants, suggests that ROS play an important role in the laser induced NF-kB signaling pathways. However, LLLT, unlike mitochondrial inhibitors, induced increased cellular ATP levels, which indicates that LLLT also upregulates mitochondrial respiration.We conclude that LLLT not only enhances mitochondrial respiration, but also activates the redox-sensitive NFkB signaling via generation of ROS. Expression of anti-apoptosis and pro-survival genes responsive to NFkB could explain many clinical effects of LLLT.

  16. Paradoxical Reaction of Tuberculosis in a Heart Transplant Recipient During Antituberculosis Therapy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamiya, A; Seguchi, O; Shionoiri, A; Kumai, Y; Kuroda, K; Nakajima, S; Yanase, M; Matsuda, S; Wada, K; Matsumoto, Y; Fukushima, S; Fujita, T; Kobayashi, J; Fukushima, N

    2018-04-01

    Tuberculous paradoxical reactions (PRs) are excessive immune reactions occurring after antituberculosis (TB) treatment and are commonly observed in immunocompromised hosts such as patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. We recently encountered a 63-year-old male heart transplant recipient who developed tuberculous PR after treatment for miliary TB. The patient had been receiving immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil for over 15 years. The diagnosis of miliary TB was made based on the presence of intermittent fever and fatigue; thus, anti-TB treatments (isoniazid, levofloxacin, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide) were started, which led to rapid defervescence and regression of the granular shadow and pleural effusion. However, a new persistent fever and confused state developed 1 month after the anti-TB therapy was started. After excluding possible etiologies of the patient's symptom, a PR was suspected, and anti-TB drugs were continued; corticosteroids were added as anti-inflammatory agents. After that, he has shown a favorable course with long-term anti-TB chemotherapy. A PR should always be considered when the patients' symptoms of tuberculosis re-exacerbate after an appropriate anti-TB therapy. A PR commonly occurs in patients with various immunologic conditions including heart transplant recipients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Combining cell transplants or gene therapy with deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Nathan C; Starr, Philip A; Larson, Paul S; Ostrem, Jill L; Marks, William J; Lim, Daniel A

    2015-02-01

    Cell transplantation and gene therapy each show promise to enhance the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, because cell transplantation and gene therapy generally require direct delivery to the central nervous system, clinical trial design involves unique scientific, ethical, and financial concerns related to the invasive nature of the procedure. Typically, such biologics have been tested in PD patients who have not received any neurosurgical intervention. Here, we suggest that PD patients undergoing deep brain stimulation (DBS) device implantation are an ideal patient population for the clinical evaluation of cell transplantation and gene therapy. Randomizing subjects to an experimental group that receives the biologic concurrently with the DBS implantation-or to a control group that receives the DBS treatment alone-has several compelling advantages. First, this study design enables the participation of patients likely to benefit from DBS, many of whom simultaneously meet the inclusion criteria of biologic studies. Second, the need for a sham neurosurgical procedure is eliminated, which may reduce ethical concerns, promote patient recruitment, and enhance the blinding of surgical trials. Third, testing the biologic by "piggybacking" onto an established, reimbursable procedure should reduce the cost of clinical trials, which may allow a greater number of biologics to reach this critical stage of research translation. Finally, this clinical trial design may lead to combinatorial treatment strategies that provide PD patients with more durable control over disabling motor symptoms. By combining neuromodulation with biologics, we may also reveal important treatment paradigms relevant to other diseases of the brain. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  18. Radiation therapy for renal transplant rejection refractory to pulse steroids and OKT3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, William R.; Rodriguez, Rey; Knechtle, Stuart J.; Pirsch, John D.; Sollinger, Hans W.; D'Alessandro, Anthony M.; Chappell, Rick; Belzer, Folkert O.; Kinsella, Timothy J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the response rate and kidney graft survival following local irradiation to the transplanted renal graft undergoing persistent rejection after medical management including pulse steroids and OKT3. The role of radiation for renal transplant rejection after failure of OKT3 has not been previously reported. Methods and Materials: From July 1, 1988 to July 1, 1994, 72 consecutive patients with kidney graft rejection were treated with local irradiation to the transplanted renal graft following failure of medical management. All patients received pulse steroids and OKT3, an anti-CD3 immunosuppressant. Patients who failed to respond to methylprednisolone and OKT3 therapy were referred for radiation therapy. The median time from the diagnosis of rejection to irradiation was 8 days. All kidney grafts received local graft irradiation to a total of 8 Gy delivered in four daily fractions. Results: Sixty (83%) patients initially responded to radiotherapy at 7 days after completion of radiotherapy, as defined by a decrease in serum creatinine. Thirty-five responding patients have not experienced a second episode of graft rejection. Overall, 43 (60%) patients have renal graft survival, with a median follow-up of 16 months (range of 6-73 months). Conclusion: It is concluded that there is a subgroup of kidney graft patients undergoing graft rejection who are refractory to pulse steroids and OKT3 therapy where irradiation may be an effective modality with high rates of response and a moderate rate of graft survival. However, a prospective, randomized trial in these medically refractory patients is needed to ascertain whether these results are clinically significant

  19. Gene therapy/bone marrow transplantation in ADA-deficient mice: roles of enzyme-replacement therapy and cytoreduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiangyang; Wang, Xingchao; Yu, Xiao-Jin; Rozengurt, Nora; Kaufman, Michael L.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Zhou, Yang; Blackburn, Michael R.; Kohn, Donald B.

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy (GT) for adenosine deaminase–deficient severe combined immune deficiency (ADA-SCID) can provide significant long-term benefit when patients are given nonmyeloablative conditioning and ADA enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) is withheld before autologous transplantation of γ-retroviral vector-transduced BM CD34+ cells. To determine the contributions of conditioning and discontinuation of ERT to the therapeutic effects, we analyzed these factors in Ada gene knockout mice (Ada−/−). Mice were transplanted with ADA-deficient marrow transduced with an ADA-expressing γ-retroviral vector without preconditioning or after 200 cGy or 900 cGy total-body irradiation and evaluated after 4 months. In all tissues analyzed, vector copy numbers (VCNs) were 100- to 1000-fold greater in mice receiving 900 cGy compared with 200 cGy (P < .05). In mice receiving 200 cGy, VCN was similar whether ERT was stopped or given for 1 or 4 months after GT. In unconditioned mice, there was decreased survival with and without ERT, and VCN was very low to undetectable. When recipients were conditioned with 200 cGy and received transduced lineage-depleted marrow, only recipients receiving ERT (1 or 4 months) had detectable vector sequences in thymocytes. In conclusion, cytoreduction is important for the engraftment of gene-transduced HSC, and short-term ERT after GT did not diminish the capacity of gene-corrected cells to engraft and persist. PMID:22833548

  20. Gene therapy/bone marrow transplantation in ADA-deficient mice: roles of enzyme-replacement therapy and cytoreduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonaro, Denise A; Jin, Xiangyang; Wang, Xingchao; Yu, Xiao-Jin; Rozengurt, Nora; Kaufman, Michael L; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Zhou, Yang; Blackburn, Michael R; Kohn, Donald B

    2012-11-01

    Gene therapy (GT) for adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immune deficiency (ADA-SCID) can provide significant long-term benefit when patients are given nonmyeloablative conditioning and ADA enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) is withheld before autologous transplantation of γ-retroviral vector-transduced BM CD34+ cells. To determine the contributions of conditioning and discontinuation of ERT to the therapeutic effects, we analyzed these factors in Ada gene knockout mice (Ada(-/-)). Mice were transplanted with ADA-deficient marrow transduced with an ADA-expressing γ-retroviral vector without preconditioning or after 200 cGy or 900 cGy total-body irradiation and evaluated after 4 months. In all tissues analyzed, vector copy numbers (VCNs) were 100- to 1000-fold greater in mice receiving 900 cGy compared with 200 cGy (P < .05). In mice receiving 200 cGy, VCN was similar whether ERT was stopped or given for 1 or 4 months after GT. In unconditioned mice, there was decreased survival with and without ERT, and VCN was very low to undetectable. When recipients were conditioned with 200 cGy and received transduced lineage-depleted marrow, only recipients receiving ERT (1 or 4 months) had detectable vector sequences in thymocytes. In conclusion, cytoreduction is important for the engraftment of gene-transduced HSC, and short-term ERT after GT did not diminish the capacity of gene-corrected cells to engraft and persist.

  1. Human embryonic stem cells: preclinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarda Kanchan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs have been extensively discussed in public and scientific communities for their potential in treating diseases and injuries. However, not much has been achieved in turning them into safe therapeutic agents. The hurdles in transforming hESCs to therapies start right with the way these cells are derived and maintained in the laboratory, and goes up-to clinical complications related to need for patient specific cell lines, gender specific aspects, age of the cells, and several post transplantation uncertainties. The different types of cells derived through directed differentiation of hESC and used successfully in animal disease and injury models are described briefly. This review gives a brief outlook on the present and the future of hESC based therapies, and talks about the technological advances required for a safe transition from laboratory to clinic.

  2. Materializing Heart Regeneration: Biomimicry of Key Observations in Cell Transplantation Therapies and Natural Cardiac Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yen P.; Jongpaiboonkit, Leena

    2016-07-01

    New regenerative paradigms are needed to address the growing global problem of heart failure as existing interventions are unsatisfactory. Outcomes from the current paradigm of cell transplantation have not been stellar but the mechanistic knowledge learned from them is instructive in the development of future paradigms. An emerging biomaterial-based approach incorporating key mechanisms and additional ones scrutinized from the process of natural heart regeneration in zebrafish may become the next evolution in cardiac repair. We highlight, with examples, tested key concepts and pivotal ones that may be integrated into a successful therapy.

  3. Knowledge-based immunosuppressive therapy for kidney transplant patients--from theoretical model to clinical integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeling, Walter; Plischke, Max; de Bruin, Jeroen S; Schuh, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive therapy is a risky necessity after a patient received a kidney transplant. To reduce risks, a knowledge-based system was developed that determines the right dosage of the immunosuppresive agent Tacrolimus. A theoretical model, to classify medication blood levels as well as medication adaptions, was created using data from almost 500 patients, and over 13.000 examinations. This model was then translated into an Arden Syntax knowledge base, and integrated directly into the hospital information system of the Vienna General Hospital. In this paper we give an overview of the construction and integration of such a system.

  4. Music therapy for mood disturbance during hospitalization for autologous stem cell transplantation: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassileth, Barrie R; Vickers, Andrew J; Magill, Lucanne A

    2003-12-15

    High-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) is a commonly used treatment for hematologic malignancies. The procedure causes significant psychological distress and no interventions have been demonstrated to improve mood in these patients. Music therapy has been shown to improve anxiety in a variety of acute medical settings. In the current study, the authors determined the effects of music therapy compared with standard care on mood during inpatient stays for HDT/ASCT. Patients with hematologic malignancy admitted for HDT/ASCT at two sites (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Ireland Cancer Center in Cleveland, Ohio) were randomized to receive music therapy given by trained music therapists or standard care. Outcome was assessed at baseline and every 3 days after randomization using the Profile of Mood States. Of 69 patients registered in the study, follow-up data were available for 62 (90%). During their inpatient stay, patients in the music therapy group scored 28% lower on the combined Anxiety/Depression scale (P = 0.065) and 37% lower (P = 0.01) on the total mood disturbance score compared with controls. Music therapy is a noninvasive and inexpensive intervention that appears to reduce mood disturbance in patients undergoing HDT/ASCT. Copyright 2003 American Cancer Society.

  5. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H Joachim

    2014-12-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  6. Orthotopic liver transplantation after the combined use of locoregional therapy and sorafenib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo EJ

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Eun Jin Yoo,1,* Hye Sun Shin,1,* Seung Up Kim,1,2,7 Dong Jin Joo,3,4 Jun Yong Park,1,2,7 Gi Hong Choi,3 Do Young Kim,1,2,7 Sang Hoon Ahn,1,2,7 Jinsil Seong,5 Myung Joo Koh,6 Kwang-Hyub Han,1,2,7 Chae Yoon Chon1,2,7 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Institute of Gastroenterology, 3Department of Surgery, 4Research Institute for Transplantation, 5Department of Radiation Oncology, 6Department of Pathology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; 7Liver Cirrhosis Clinical Research Center, Seoul, South Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: We herein report a patient with advanced hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC beyond the Milan criteria. He underwent orthotopic liver transplantation after successful HCC downstaging that satisfied the University of California, San Francisco criteria, using concurrent chemoradiation therapy with a combination of repeated hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC and sorafenib. A 52-year-old male was diagnosed with advanced hepatitis B virus-related HCC beyond the Milan criteria. He underwent concurrent chemoradiation therapy (50 Gy with 20 fractions over 5 weeks with HAIC using 5-fluorouracil at a dose of 500 mg/day, which was administered during the first and fifth weeks of radiation therapy as an initial treatment modality. This was followed by the combined use of HAIC using 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m2 for 5 hours on days 1–3 and cisplatin (60 mg/m2 for 2 hours on day 2 every 4 weeks (twelve cycles and sorafenib (from the third to the twelfth cycle of HAIC to treat the remaining HCC. Because a remarkable decrease in the tumor burden that satisfied the University of California, San Francisco criteria was observed after these combination treatments, the patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation with curative aim and survived for 11 months without evidence of HCC recurrence. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, liver transplantation

  7. Music therapy for patients who have undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Chelsea G; Prinsloo, Sarah; Richardson, Michael; Baynham-Fletcher, Laura; Lee, Richard; Chaoul, Alejandro; Cohen, Marlene Z; de Lima, Marcos; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study examines the short- and long-term QOL benefits of a music therapy intervention for patients recovering from hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods. Ninety allogeneic HSCT patients, after transplant, were randomized to receive ISO-principle (i.e., mood matching) based music therapy (MT; n = 29), unstructured music (UM; n = 30), or usual care (UC; n = 31) for four weeks. The ISO principle posits that patients may shift their mood from one state to another by listening to music that is "equal to" the individual's initial mood state and subsequently listening to music selections that gradually shift in tempo and mood to match the patient's desired disposition. Participants in MT and UM groups developed two audio CDs to help them feel more relaxed and energized and were instructed to use the CDs to improve their mood as needed. Short-term effects on mood and long-term effects on QOL were examined. Results. MT and UM participants reported improved mood immediately after listening to CDs; the within-group effect was greater for UM participants compared to MT participants. Participant group was not associated with long-term QOL outcomes. Conclusions. Music listening improves mood acutely but was not associated with long-term benefits in this study.

  8. Music Therapy for Patients Who Have Undergone Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea G. Ratcliff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study examines the short- and long-term QOL benefits of a music therapy intervention for patients recovering from hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Methods. Ninety allogeneic HSCT patients, after transplant, were randomized to receive ISO-principle (i.e., mood matching based music therapy (MT; n=29, unstructured music (UM; n=30, or usual care (UC; n=31 for four weeks. The ISO principle posits that patients may shift their mood from one state to another by listening to music that is “equal to” the individual’s initial mood state and subsequently listening to music selections that gradually shift in tempo and mood to match the patient’s desired disposition. Participants in MT and UM groups developed two audio CDs to help them feel more relaxed and energized and were instructed to use the CDs to improve their mood as needed. Short-term effects on mood and long-term effects on QOL were examined. Results. MT and UM participants reported improved mood immediately after listening to CDs; the within-group effect was greater for UM participants compared to MT participants. Participant group was not associated with long-term QOL outcomes. Conclusions. Music listening improves mood acutely but was not associated with long-term benefits in this study.

  9. Plasticity and regeneration in the injured spinal cord after cell transplantation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Satoshi; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically damages the long axonal tracts of the spinal cord which results in permanent disability. However, regeneration of the injured spinal cord is approaching reality according to the advances in stem cell biology. Cell transplantation therapy holds potential to lead to recovery following SCI through some positive mechanisms. Grafted cells induce plasticity and regeneration in the injured spinal cord by promoting remyelination of damaged axons, reconstruction of neural circuits by synapse formation between host neurons and graft-derived neurons, and secreting neurotrophic factors to promote axonal elongation as well as reduce retrograde axonal degeneration. In this review, we will delineate (1) the microenvironment of the injured spinal cord that influence the plasticity and regeneration capacity after SCI, (2) a number of different kinds of cell transplantation therapies for SCI that has been extensively studied by researchers, and (3) potential mechanisms of grafted cell-induced regeneration and plasticity in the injured spinal cord. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Hedgehog-GLI pathway in embryonic development and cancer: implications for pulmonary oncology therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas-López, Leonel; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Arrieta, Oscar; Ávila-Moreno, Federico

    2017-01-01

    transcriptional mechanisms has remained mostly unexplored, which could identify the interaction networks between specific biomarkers and/or new therapeutic targets in malignant tumor progression and resistance to lung oncologic therapy. In the present work, we aimed to revise the most important up-to-date experimental and clinical findings in biology, embryology and cancer research regarding the Hh pathway. We explore the potential control of the transcriptional-epigenetic programming versus reprogramming mechanisms associated with its Hh-GLI cell signaling pathway members. Last, we present a summary of this information to systematically integrate the Hh signaling pathway to identify and propose novel compound strategies or better oncological therapeutic schemes for lung cancer patients. PMID:28948003

  11. Glycemia, Hypoglycemia, and Costs of Simultaneous Islet-Kidney or Islet After Kidney Transplantation Versus Intensive Insulin Therapy and Waiting List for Islet Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Philipp A; Locher, Rebecca; Zuellig, Richard A; Tschopp, Oliver; Ajdler-Schaeffler, Evelyne; Kron, Philipp; Oberkofler, Christian; Brändle, Michael; Spinas, Giatgen A; Lehmann, Roger

    2015-10-01

    Long-term data of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) after simultaneous islet-kidney (SIK) or islet-after-kidney transplantation (IAK) are rare and have never been compared to intensified insulin therapy (IIT). Twenty-two patients with T1D and end-stage renal failure undergoing islet transplantation were compared to 70 patients matched for age and diabetes duration treated with IIT and to 13 patients with kidney transplantation alone or simultaneous pancreas-kidney after loss of pancreas function (waiting list for IAK [WLI]). Glycemic control, severe hypoglycemia, insulin requirement, and direct medical costs were analyzed. Glycated hemoglobin decreased significantly from 8.2 ± 1.5 to 6.7 ± 0.9% at the end of follow-up (mean 7.2 ± 2.5 years) in the SIK/IAK and remained constant in IIT (7.8 ± 1.0% and 7.6 ± 1.0) and WLI (7.8 ± 0.8 and 7.9 ± 1.0%). Daily insulin requirement decreased from 0.53 ± 0.15 to 0.29 ± 0.26 U/kg and remained constant in IIT (0.59 ± 0.19 and 0.58 ± 0.23 U/kg) and in WLI (0.76 ± 0.28 and 0.73 ± 0.11 U/kg). Severe hypoglycemia dropped in SIK/IAK from 4.5 ± 9.7 to 0.3 ± 0.7/patient-year and remained constant in IIT (0.1 ± 0.7 and 0.2 ± 0.8/patient-year). Detailed cost analysis revealed US $57,525 of additional cost for islet transplantation 5 years after transplantation. Based on a 5- and 10-year analysis, cost neutrality is assumed to be achieved 15 years after transplantation. This long-term cohort with more than 7 years of follow-up shows that glycemic control in patients with T1D after SIK/IAK transplantation improved, and the rate of severe hypoglycemia decreased significantly as compared to control groups. Cost analysis revealed that islet transplantation is estimated to be cost neutral at 15 years after transplantation.

  12. Budget impact analysis of conversion from cyclosporine to sirolimus as immunosuppressive medication in renal transplantation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroutan N

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Naghmeh Foroutan,1 Hamid R Rasekh,1 Jamshid Salamzadeh,1 Hamid R Jamshidi,1 Mohsen Nafar2 1Department of Pharmacoeconomics and Pharmaceutical Management, School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, 2Department of Kidney Transplantation, Urinary Nephrology Research Center (UNRC, Shahid Labbafinejad Medical Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine budget impact of conversion from cyclosporine (CsA to sirolimus (SRL in renal transplant therapy (RTT from the perspective of insurance organizations in Iran. Methods: An Excel-based model was developed to determine cost of RTT, comparing current CsA based therapy to an mTOR inhibitor-based therapy regimen. Total cost included both cost of immunosuppressive agents and relative adverse events. The inputs were derived from database of Ministry of Health and insurance organizations, hospital and pharmacy based registries, and available literature that were varied through a one-way sensitivity analysis. According to the model, there were almost 17,000 patients receiving RTT in Iran, out of which about 2,200 patients underwent the operation within the study year. The model was constructed based on the results of a local RCT, in which test and control groups received CsA, SRL, and steroids over the first 3 months posttransplantation and, from the fourth month on, CsA, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF, and steroids were used in the CsA group and SRL, MMF, and steroids were administered in the SRL group, respectively. Results: The estimated cost of RTT with CsA was US$4,850,000 versus US$4,300,000 receiving SRL. These costs corresponded to the cost saving of almost US$550,000 for the payers. Conclusion: To evaluate the financial consequence of adding mTOR inhibitors to the insurers’ formulary, in the present study, a budget impact analysis was conducted on sirolimus. Fewer cases of costly adverse events along with

  13. Predictors of renal function recovery among patients undergoing renal replacement therapy following orthotopic liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Maria Claudia Cruz; Souza, Nádia Karina Guimarães de; Ammirati, Adriano Luiz; Matsui, Thais Nemoto; Carneiro, Fabiana Dias; Ramos, Ana Claudia Mallet de Souza; Iizuca, Ilson Jorge; Coelho, Maria Paula Vilela; Afonso, Rogério Carballo; Ferraz-Neto, Ben-Hur; Almeida, Marcio Dias de; Durão, Marcelino; Batista, Marcelo Costa; Monte, Julio Cesar; Pereira, Virgílio Gonçalves; Santos, Oscar Pavão Dos; Santos, Bento Cardoso Dos

    2017-01-01

    Renal dysfunction frequently occurs during the periods preceding and following orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), and in many cases, renal replacement therapy (RRT) is required. Information regarding the duration of RRT and the rate of kidney function recovery after OLT is crucial for transplant program management. We evaluated a sample of 155 stable patients undergoing post-intensive care hemodialysis (HD) from a patient population of 908 adults who underwent OLT. We investigated the average time to renal function recovery (duration of RRT required) and determined the risk factors for remaining on dialysis > 90 days after OLT. Log-rank tests were used for univariate analysis, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify factors associated with the risk of remaining on HD. The results of our analysis showed that of the 155 patients, 28% had pre-OLT diabetes mellitus, 21% had pre-OLT hypertension, and 40% had viral hepatitis. Among the patients, the median MELD (Model for End-Stage Liver Disease) score was 27 (interquartile range [IQR] 22-35). When they were listed for liver transplantation, 32% of the patients had serum creatinine (Scr) levels > 1.5 mg/dL or were on HD, and 50% had serum creatinine (Scr) levels > 1.5 mg/dL or were on HD at the time of OLT. Of the transplanted patients, 25% underwent pre-OLT intermittent HD, and 14% and 41% underwent continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) pre-OLT and post-OLT, respectively. At 90 days post-OLT, 118 (76%) patients had been taken off dialysis, and 16 (10%) patients had died while undergoing HD. The median recovery time of these post-OLT patients was 33 (IQR 27-39) days. In the multivariate analysis, fulminant hepatic failure as the cause of liver disease (prenal function after OLT, and those who were diagnosed with fulminant hepatic failure, had no pre-OLT hypertension, received a lower transfused volume of intraoperative FFP and did not undergo pre-OLT intermittent HD had a higher probability

  14. High-dose therapy and autologous transplantation for lymphoma: the Peter MacCallum Cancer institute experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, A.J.; Prince, H.M.; Wolf, M.; Januszewicz, H.; Seymour, J.F.; Gates, P.; Wirth, A.; Juneja, S.; Smith, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    High-dose therapy (HDT) with autologous bone marrow or blood cell transplantation for the treatment of lymphoma commenced at Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute in 1986. To examine the patient characteristics and outcomes of patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin's disease (HD) treated with HDT and autologous transplantation at our Institute in the first 10 years of the service (1986-95). A retrospective analysis was performed examining patient characteristics, prior chemotherapy regimens, pretransplant disease status, HDT regimen, source of stem cells, time for haematopoietic recovery, complications of transplantation, response rates, overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Sixty-seven patients with NHL were treated with an estimated 5-year OS rate of 44% (95% confidence interval (CI) 32-56%) and PFS rate of 34% (95% CI 21-44%). Factors independently predictive of an unfavourable PFS on multivariate analyses were presence of constitutional symptoms at transplant (P < 0.002) and chemotherapy-resistant disease at transplant (P= 0.02). Twenty-three patients with HD were treated with a 5-year predicted OS rate of 74% (95% CI 56-92%) and PFS rate of 57% (95% CI 36-77%).There was no difference in PFS for HD patients who relapsed either within 12 months of completion of front-line therapy or after this time (P =0.5). The transplant-related mortality for the entire cohort was 17%, with a progressive decrease over time. HDT with autologous transplantation achieves durable PFS and OS in patients with lymphoma. Improved patient selection, therapy modifications according to prognostic factors and ongoing improvements in supportive care should improve outcomes further

  15. Function of external respiration in patients after kidney transplantation under conditions of immunosuppressive therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Kuryata

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to evaluate the changes in the parameters of the function of external respiration in patients after kidney transplantation due to chronic kidney disease and to assess the relationship between the level of cyclosporin A and tacrolimus in the blood with FVD indices. The study included 37 patients after kidney transplantation. The first group included 27 patients who received cyclosporine at an average dose of 225 [175-350] mg/day under the immunosuppressive therapy regimen, the second group included 10 patients who received tacrolimus at an average dose of 8.25 [5.0-9.0] mg/day. A significant difference (p˂0.05 between the indicators of the VCmax (78 [71-90]% and 76.5 [72-78]%, FVC (93 [85-99]% and 95 [91-98]%, PEF (82 [64-94]% and 80 [69-84]%, MEF25-75 (75 [66-112]% and 82.5 [67-90]% was found in patients of the first and second groups relative to the FVD of the comparison group: VCmax (102.5 [98-113]%, FVC (107.5 [105.5-124]%, PEF (99.5 [95-102.5]%, MEF25-75 (98.5 [97.5-101.5]%. In both groups, a statistically significant negative correlation between the indicators of the VCmax, FVC and the level of cyclosporin A (R=-0.69, p<0.0001 and R=-0.4, p<0.037 in the blood in the first group and FVC and tacrolimus (R=-0.72, p<0.018 in the second group was found. A moderate decrease in the VCmax values in patients after kidney transplantation requires monitoring of the function of external respiration and managing such patients by nephrologists together with specialists in the pulmonological profile.

  16. Bridging Locoregional Therapy Prolongs Survival in Patients Listed for Liver Transplant with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Minzhi; Sakaria, Sonali; Dhanasekaran, Renumathy; Parekh, Samir; Spivey, James; Knechtle, Stuart J.; Zhang, Di; Kim, Hyun S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and AimsTo evaluate the long-term survival benefit of bridging locoregional therapy (LRT) prior to orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) within Milan criteria.MethodsOur transplant center registry was studied for all HCC patients within the Milan criteria who were listed for OLT from 1998 to 2013. Baseline clinical characteristics and median overall survival (OS) were calculated and stratified by LRT, OLT status, and wait times. Survival analysis was conducted using Kaplan–Meier estimation and log-rank test.ResultsOf 265 listed, 205 underwent OLT (mean follow-up 7.6 years). Of 205, 111 received bridging LRT (A), and 94 did not (B). Both were similar in demographics and tumor characteristics (p > 0.05). Median OS from HCC for A/B were 86.4 vs. 68.9 months (p = 0.01). Median OS from OLT for A/B were 74.6 vs. 63.6 months (p = 0.03). On multivariate analysis, independent predictors for survival from HCC were bridging LRT (p = 0.002) and high wait time (p = 0.008); independent predictors for survival from OLT were bridging LRT (p = 0.005) and high wait time (p = 0.005). Of 60 who were listed but did not undergo transplant, 44 received LRT (C) and 16 received best supportive care (D). Median OS from HCC for C/D were 37.1 vs. 24.8 months (p = 0.03).ConclusionsBridging LRT and high wait times were independent positive prognostic factors for survival from HCC diagnosis and OLT.

  17. Bridging Locoregional Therapy Prolongs Survival in Patients Listed for Liver Transplant with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Minzhi [Yale School of Medicine, Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging (United States); Sakaria, Sonali [Emory University School of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine (United States); Dhanasekaran, Renumathy [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (United States); Parekh, Samir; Spivey, James [Emory University School of Medicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine (United States); Knechtle, Stuart J. [Duke University School of Medicine, Division of Transplant Surgery, Department of Surgery (United States); Zhang, Di [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health (United States); Kim, Hyun S., E-mail: kevin.kim@yale.edu [Yale School of Medicine, Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Background and AimsTo evaluate the long-term survival benefit of bridging locoregional therapy (LRT) prior to orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) within Milan criteria.MethodsOur transplant center registry was studied for all HCC patients within the Milan criteria who were listed for OLT from 1998 to 2013. Baseline clinical characteristics and median overall survival (OS) were calculated and stratified by LRT, OLT status, and wait times. Survival analysis was conducted using Kaplan–Meier estimation and log-rank test.ResultsOf 265 listed, 205 underwent OLT (mean follow-up 7.6 years). Of 205, 111 received bridging LRT (A), and 94 did not (B). Both were similar in demographics and tumor characteristics (p > 0.05). Median OS from HCC for A/B were 86.4 vs. 68.9 months (p = 0.01). Median OS from OLT for A/B were 74.6 vs. 63.6 months (p = 0.03). On multivariate analysis, independent predictors for survival from HCC were bridging LRT (p = 0.002) and high wait time (p = 0.008); independent predictors for survival from OLT were bridging LRT (p = 0.005) and high wait time (p = 0.005). Of 60 who were listed but did not undergo transplant, 44 received LRT (C) and 16 received best supportive care (D). Median OS from HCC for C/D were 37.1 vs. 24.8 months (p = 0.03).ConclusionsBridging LRT and high wait times were independent positive prognostic factors for survival from HCC diagnosis and OLT.

  18. Early conversion from calcineurin inhibitor- to everolimus-based therapy following kidney transplantation : Results of the randomized ELEVATE trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Fijter, Johan W; Holdaas, Hallvard; Øyen, Ole; Sanders, Jan Stephan; Sundar, Sankaran; Bemelman, Frederike J; Sommerer, Claudia; Pascual, Julio; Avihingsanon, Yingyos; Pongskul, Cholatip; Oppenheimer, Frederic; Toselli, Lorenzo; Russ, Graeme; Wang, Zailong; Lopez, Patricia; Kochuparampil, Jossy; Cruzado, Josep M; van der Giet, Markus

    In a 24-month, multicenter, open-label, randomized trial, 715 de novo kidney transplant recipients were randomized at 10-14 weeks to convert to everolimus (n=359) or remain on standard calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) therapy (n=356; 231 tacrolimus; 125 cyclosporine), all with mycophenolic acid and

  19. Transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells as adjunct cell therapy for peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Christine; Wewetzer, Konstantin; Reimers, Kerstin; Vogt, Peter M

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic events, such as work place trauma or motor vehicle accident violence, result in a significant number of severe peripheral nerve lesions, including nerve crush and nerve disruption defects. Transplantation of myelin-forming cells, such as Schwann cells (SCs) or olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), may be beneficial to the regenerative process because the applied cells could mediate neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects by secretion of chemokines. Moreover, myelin-forming cells are capable of bridging the repair site by establishing an environment permissive to axonal regeneration. The cell types that are subject to intense investigation include SCs and OECs either derived from the olfactory bulb or the olfactory mucosa, stromal cells from bone marrow (mesenchymal stem cells, MSCs), and adipose tissue-derived cells. OECs reside in the peripheral and central nervous system and have been suggested to display unique regenerative properties. However, so far OECs were mainly used in experimental studies to foster central regeneration and it was not until recently that their regeneration-promoting activity for the peripheral nervous system was recognized. In the present review, we summarize recent experimental evidence regarding the regenerative effects of OECs applied to the peripheral nervous system that may be relevant to design novel autologous cell transplantation therapies. © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.

  20. Primary tacrolimus (FK506) therapy and the long-term risk of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease in pediatric liver transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciarelli, T V; Reyes, J; Jaffe, R; Mazariegos, G V; Jain, A; Fung, J J; Green, M

    2001-10-01

    While the overall incidence of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) in pediatric liver transplant recipients has been reported to be 4-11%, the long-term risk of PTLD associated with primary tacrolimus therapy is unknown. Therefore, in order to determine the incidence and long-term risk of PTLD, the present study examined 131 pediatric recipients who underwent liver transplantation (LTx) between October 1989 and December 1991 and received primary tacrolimus therapy. This cohort of children was evaluated over an extended time-period (until December 31 1996) with a mean follow-up of 6.3 yr. Actuarial Kaplan-Meier analysis was utilized to determine the risk of PTLD over time. The overall incidence of PTLD was 13% (17/131) with an average age of 4.3 +/- 0.75 yr at diagnosis. Pretransplant Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) serologies were negative in 82%, positive in 12%, and not available in 6% of the patients. The median time to diagnosis of PTLD post-Tx was 11.9 months (mean 16.4 +/- 3.9, range 1.7-63.0 months). Mean tacrolimus dose and plasma trough level (as evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA]) at the time of diagnosis was 0.32 +/- 0.06 mg/kg/day and 1.3 +/- 0.3 ng/mL, respectively. The cumulative long-term risk of PTLD was found to increase over time: 3% at 6 months, 8% at 1 yr, 12% at 2 yr, 14% at 3 yr, and 15% at 4 and 5 yr. Mortality from PTLD was 12% (two of 17 patients). Primary tacrolimus use in pediatric LTx has a long-term risk of PTLD approaching 15%, with the majority of episodes (78%) occurring in the first 2 yr, suggesting that intense EBV surveillance should occur early post-transplantation.

  1. Therapeutic approaches for treating hemophilia A using embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuda, Shogo; Tatsumi, Kohei; Sakurai, Yoshihiko; Shima, Midori; Hatake, Katsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked rescessive bleeding disorder that results from F8 gene aberrations. Previously, we established embryonic stem (ES) cells (tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18) that secrete human factor VIII (hFVIII) by introducing the human F8 gene in mouse Ainv18 ES cells. Here, we explored the potential of cell transplantation therapy for hemophilia A using the ES cells. Transplant tet-226aa/N6-Ainv18 ES cells were injected into the spleens of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-pretreated wild-type mice, and CCl4-pretreated hemophilia A mice. F8 expression was induced by doxycycline in drinking water, and hFVIII-antigen production was assessed in all cell transplantation experiments. Injecting the ES cells into SCID mice resulted in an enhanced expression of the hFVIII antigen; however, teratoma generation was confirmed in the spleen. Transplantation of ES cells into wild-type mice after CCl4-induced liver injury facilitated survival and engraftment of transplanted cells without teratoma formation, resulting in hFVIII production in the plasma. Although CCl4 was lethal to most hemophilia A mice, therapeutic levels of FVIII activity, as well as the hFVIII antigen, were detected in surviving hemophilia A mice after cell transplantation. Immunolocalization results for hFVIII suggested that transplanted ES cells might be engrafted at the periportal area in the liver. Although the development of a safer induction method for liver regeneration is required, our results suggested the potential for developing an effective ES-cell transplantation therapeutic model for treating hemophilia A in the future. Copyright © 2016 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Combination of low-energy shock-wave therapy and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation to improve the erectile function of diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Hai-Bo; Chen, Wen-Tao; Chen, Feng-Zhi; Wang, Tao; Luo, Jin-Tai; Yue, Min; Lin, Ji-Hong; Wei, An-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation and low-energy shock-wave therapy (LESWT) have emerged as potential and effective treatment protocols for diabetic erectile dysfunction. During the tracking of transplanted stem cells in diabetic erectile dysfunction models, the number of visible stem cells was rather low and decreased quickly. LESWT could recruit endogenous stem cells to the cavernous body and improve the microenvironment in diabetic cavernous tissue. Thus, we deduced that LESWT might benefit transplanted stem cell survival and improve the effects of stem cell transplantation. In this research, 42 streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were randomized into four groups: the diabetic group (n = 6), the LESWT group (n = 6), the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) transplantation group (n = 15), and the combination of LESWT and BMSC transplantation group (n = 15). One and three days after BMSC transplantation, three rats were randomly chosen to observe the survival numbers of BMSCs in the cavernous body. Four weeks after BMSC transplantation, the following parameters were assessed: the surviving number of transplanted BMSCs in the cavernous tissue, erectile function, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and penile immunohistochemical assessment. Our research found that LESWT favored the survival of transplanted BMSCs in the cavernous body, which might be related to increased stromal cell-derived factor-1 expression and the enhancement of angiogenesis in the diabetic cavernous tissue. The combination of LESWT and BMSC transplantation could improve the erectile function of diabetic erectile function rats more effectively than LESWT or BMSC transplantation performed alone.

  3. Impact of long term left ventricular assist device therapy on donor allocation in cardiac transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriel, Nir; Jorde, Ulrich P; Woo Pak, Sang; Jiang, Jeff; Clerkin, Kevin; Takayama, Hiroo; Naka, Yoshifumi; Schulze, P Christian; Mancini, Donna M

    2013-02-01

    Left Ventricular Assist Devices (LVAD) are increasingly used as a bridge to transplant (BTT) for patients with advanced congestive heart failure (CHF) and are assigned United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) high priority status (1B or 1A). The purpose of our study was asses the effect of organ allocation in the era of continuous flow pumps. A retrospective chart review was performed of all patients transplanted between 1/2001-1/2011 at Columbia University Medical Center. Seven hundred twenty six adult heart transplantations were performed. Two hundred seventy four BTT patients were implanted with LVAD; of which 227 patients were transplanted. Sixty three patients were transplanted as UNOS-1B, while 164 were transplanted as UNOS-1A (72%). Of these 164 patients, 65 were transplanted during their 30-day 1A period (43%) and 96 after upgrading to UNOS-1A for device complication (56%). For 452 non-device patients 139 (31%) were transplanted as UNOS-1A, 233 as UNOS-1B (52%), and 80 as UNOS-2 (17%). The percentage of patients bridged with LVAD increased from 19% in 2001 to 64% in 2010 while the number transplanted during their 30 day 1A grace period declined from 57% in 2005 to 16% in 2011; i.e. 84% of BTT patients in 2011 needed more than 30 days 1A time to be transplanted. Most LVAD patients are now transplanted while suffering device complication. There was no difference in post transplant survival between LVAD patients transplanted as UNOS 1B, 1A grace period or for a device complication As wait time for cardiac transplantation increased the percentage of patients being bridged to transplant with an LVAD has increased with the majority of them transplanted in the setting of device complication. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Features of transfusion therapy in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Balashov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The indications for transfusion of blood components support after stem cell transplantation (SCT usually do not differ form other clinical situations, but the rules for such therapy have a number of features. One of them is the possibility of inconsistence of AB0 group between donor and recipient of hematopoietic stem cells, which is not only fraught with the development of various alloimmune complications, but also fundamentally changes the standards for the selection of blood components for transfusion. A major problem after HSCT is a secondary immunodeficiency, which is important to consider for ensuring prevention of transfusion-transmitted infections (eg, CMV, as well as to carry out activities aimed for the prevention of transfusion- associated graft-versus-host disease. HSCT is a medical technology today, the effectiveness of which is often dependent on the accuracy and integrity of its implementation. So, serious attitude to various supportive therapy, including transfusions of blood components is an important component which determines the success of the treatment.

  5. A drive through cellular therapy for CLL in 2015: allogeneic cell transplantation and CARs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mato, Anthony; Porter, David L

    2015-07-23

    Over the past decade the development of safer reduced-intensity conditioning regimens, expanded donor pools, advances in supportive care, and prevention/management of graft-versus-host disease have expanded stem cell transplantation (SCT) availability for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. However, there are now increasingly active treatment options available for CLL patients with favorable toxicity profiles and convenient administration schedules. This raises the critical issue of whether or not attainment of cure remains a necessary goal. It is now less clear that treatment with curative intention and with significant toxicity is required for long-term survival in CLL. In addition, the demonstrated safety and activity of genetically modified chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells present the opportunity of harnessing the power of the immune system to kill CLL cells without the need for SCT. We attempt to define the role of SCT in the era of targeted therapies and discuss questions that remain to be answered. Furthermore, we highlight the potential for exciting new cellular therapy using genetically modified anti-CD19 CAR T cells and discuss its potential to alter treatment paradigms for CLL. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Features of transfusion therapy in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Balashov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The indications for transfusion of blood components support after stem cell transplantation (SCT usually do not differ form other clinical situations, but the rules for such therapy have a number of features. One of them is the possibility of inconsistence of AB0 group between donor and recipient of hematopoietic stem cells, which is not only fraught with the development of various alloimmune complications, but also fundamentally changes the standards for the selection of blood components for transfusion. A major problem after HSCT is a secondary immunodeficiency, which is important to consider for ensuring prevention of transfusion-transmitted infections (eg, CMV, as well as to carry out activities aimed for the prevention of transfusion- associated graft-versus-host disease. HSCT is a medical technology today, the effectiveness of which is often dependent on the accuracy and integrity of its implementation. So, serious attitude to various supportive therapy, including transfusions of blood components is an important component which determines the success of the treatment.

  7. Thoracic radiation therapy before autologous bone marrow transplantation in relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, R.W.; Gospodarowicz, M.K.; Sutcliffe, S.B.; Crump, M.; Keating, A.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between radiation therapy (RT) and treatment-related mortality in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) for recurrent/refractory Hodgkin's disease (HD). Between December 1986 and December 1992, 59 patients previously treated at the Princess Margaret Hospital underwent HDCT (etoposide 60 mg/kg, melphalan 160 mg/m 2 ) and ABMT, performed for refractory (13 patients) or relapsed (46 patients) HD. RT was incorporated in the salvage treatment with the intent to achieve complete control of disease prior to ABMT. RT was given before ABMT in 33 patients, and after ABMT in 4 patients. Treatment-related (TR) mortality was defined as any death occurring within 100 days of ABMT. Autopsies were performed for all patients with TR deaths. With a median follow-up of 4.6 years (range 1.2-7.4 years), the actuarial overall survival was 41%±14% at 5 years. We observed 37 deaths, and 10 of these were TR deaths. Among the 24 patients who received thoracic RT before ABMT, there were 8 TR deaths, 3 of these solely attributable to radiation pneumonitis. The remaining 5 TR deaths all had respiratory failure with complicating sepsis as a major medical problem. The interval from RT to ABMT was shorter for 8 patients dying of TR death (mean 37 days; range 0-103 days), than for the 16 survivors (mean 105 days; range 0-263 days) (P=0.026). Among 9 patients with ABMT within 50 days of thoracic RT, 6 had TR death. In contrast, among the 35 patients without thoracic RT (26 no RT, 9 non-thoracic RT), there were only 2 TR deaths. The 4 patients treated with mantle RT post-ABMT had no serious pulmonary complications. The use of thoracic RT before HDCT and ABMT was associated with a high post-transplant mortality rate. It was most evident in patients who received thoracic RT within 50 days prior to ABMT, or when the target volume included large volume of lung. We recommend that the use of

  8. The Effect of One Session Low Level Laser Therapy of Extracted Follicular Units on the Outcome of Hair Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabaie, Seyed Mehdi; Berenji Ardestani, Hoda; Azizjalali, Mir Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Photobiostimulation with low level laser (LLL) has been used in medicine for a long time and its effects have been shown in many diseases. Some studies have evaluated the effect of LLL on androgenic alopecia. One of the most important limitations of the use of LLL in the treatment of alopecia is the requirement for multiple sessions, which is hardly accepted by patients. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of the irradiation of extracted follicular hair units by LLL on the outcome of hair transplantation. We enrolled 10 patients with androgenic alopecia and after screening tests for infections and other diseases, we extracted hair follicular units. The hair units were divided in two groups. One group was irradiated by LLL 20 minutes before transplantation (660 nm, 80 Hz, 100 mW) and the other one was used as control. The containing plates were labeled as A and B and sent to the operation room. The surgeon was unaware of the therapy assigned to the plates and transplanted them randomly on the right or left side of the head. One hundred follicular units on each sides of the scalp were transplanted symmetrically. The follicles on both sides were evaluated at 3 and 6 months of transplantation for hair growth rate by another physician, blinded to the treatment assigned to each side. Ten patient with androgenic alopecia and mean (SD) age of 31.5 (6.6) years (range 25-45 years) completed the study. All patients had 100% hair growth at 3 and 6 months follow-up except one who had hair growth of 20% at three months of transplantation, which changed to 100% at sixth months. There was no significant difference between the groups regarding hair growth (P > 0.8). One session of LLL irradiation has no significant effect on the outcome of transplanted hair follicles. Studies with larger sample size are needed to draw a definite conclusion.

  9. Autologous Transplantation in Follicular Lymphoma with Early Therapy Failure: A National LymphoCare Study and Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casulo, Carla; Friedberg, Jonathan W; Ahn, Kwang W; Flowers, Christopher; DiGilio, Alyssa; Smith, Sonali M; Ahmed, Sairah; Inwards, David; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Chen, Andy I; Choe, Hannah; Cohen, Jonathon; Copelan, Edward; Farooq, Umar; Fenske, Timothy S; Freytes, Cesar; Gaballa, Sameh; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Jethava, Yogesh; Kamble, Rammurti T; Kenkre, Vaishalee P; Lazarus, Hillard; Lazaryan, Aleksandr; Olsson, Richard F; Rezvani, Andrew R; Rizzieri, David; Seo, Sachiko; Shah, Gunjan L; Shah, Nina; Solh, Melham; Sureda, Anna; William, Basem; Cumpston, Aaron; Zelenetz, Andrew D; Link, Brian K; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2017-12-11

    Patients with follicular lymphoma (FL) experiencing early therapy failure (ETF) within 2 years of frontline chemoimmunotherapy have poor overall survival (OS). We analyzed data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) and the National LymphoCare Study (NLCS) to determine whether autologous hematopoietic cell transplant (autoHCT) can improve outcomes in this high-risk FL subgroup. ETF was defined as failure to achieve at least partial response after frontline chemoimmunotherapy or lymphoma progression within 2 years of frontline chemoimmunotherapy. We identified 2 groups: the non-autoHCT cohort (patients from the NLCS with ETF not undergoing autoHCT) and the autoHCT cohort (CIBMTR patients with ETF undergoing autoHCT). All patients received rituximab-based chemotherapy as frontline treatment; 174 non-autoHCT patients and 175 autoHCT patients were identified and analyzed. There was no difference in 5-year OS between the 2 groups (60% versus 67%, respectively; P = .16). A planned subgroup analysis showed that patients with ETF receiving autoHCT soon after treatment failure (≤1 year of ETF; n = 123) had higher 5-year OS than those without autoHCT (73% versus 60%, P = .05). On multivariate analysis, early use of autoHCT was associated with significantly reduced mortality (hazard ratio, .63; 95% confidence interval, .42 to .94; P = .02). Patients with FL experiencing ETF after frontline chemoimmunotherapy lack optimal therapy. We demonstrate improved OS when receiving autoHCT within 1 year of treatment failure. Results from this unique collaboration between the NLCS and CIBMTR support consideration of early consolidation with autoHCT in select FL patients experiencing ETF. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Rosiglitazone attenuates transplant arteriosclerosis after allogeneic aorta transplantation in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onuta, Geanina; Rienstra, Heleen; de Boer, Jan Freark; Boer, Mark Walther; Roks, Anton J. M.; Klatter, Flip A.; Uges, Donald R. A.; Navis, Gerjan; Rozing, Jan; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk

    2007-01-01

    Background. Transplant arteriosclerosis is a leading cause of chronic transplant dysfunction and is characterized by occlusive neointima formation in intragraft arteries. Development of transplant arteriosclerosis is refractory to conventional immunosuppressive drugs and adequate therapy is not

  11. Hepatic veno-occlusive disease after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: update on defibrotide and other current investigational therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, V T; Revta, C; Richardson, P G

    2008-02-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), also known as sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), remains one of the most serious and common complications after myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Clinical diagnosis of hepatic VOD is based on the clinical triad of (1) painful hepatomegaly, (2) hyperbilirubinemia and (3) unexplained fluid retention. While milder cases usually resolve spontaneously, severe VOD is associated with a grim prognosis. Defibrotide (DF), a polydisperse mixture of single-stranded oligonucleotide with antithrombotic and fibrinolytic effects on microvascular endothelium, has emerged as an effective and safe therapy for patients with severe VOD. Multiple studies, including a recent large international multicenter phase II clinical trial, have demonstrated 30-60% complete remission rates with DF, even among patients with severe VOD and multiorgan failure. This article will review our current understanding of hepatic VOD, and update the clinical trial experience with DF and other potential therapies for this feared transplant complication.

  12. One year results of preoperative single bolus ATG-Fresenius induction therapy in sensitized renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Chen, J H; Wu, W Z; Yang, S L; Wu, G J; Wang, H; Tan, J M

    2007-01-01

    Sensitization in kidney transplantation is associated with more acute rejections, inferior graft survival, and an increase in delayed graft function. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of preoperative single bolus antithymocyte globulin (ATG) induction therapy in sensitized renal transplant recipients. Fifty-six cadaveric donor kidney transplant recipients were divided into two groups: Group I (nonsensitized group, n = 30) and group II (sensitized group, PRA>10%, n = 26). ATG was given as a single preoperative bolus induction therapy to group II (ATG IV; 9 mg/kg). The group I patients were treated with mycophenolate mofetil preoperatively as induction therapy. The basic immunosuppressive regimen included tacrolimus (FK-506) or cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisolone. After hospital discharge, patients were followed on a routine outpatient basis for 12 months. Acute rejection episodes (ARE) occurred in 20% (6/30) of group I and 15.38% (4/26) of group II patients (P = NS). Infections occurred in eight patients (26.7%) as 11 episodes (36.7%), averaging 1.4 episodes per infected patient in group 1, and 6 patients (23.1%) for a total of 10 episodes (38.5%), averaging 1.7 episodes per infected patient, in group II (P = NS). Occurrence of side effects and hospital stay were almost comparable in the two groups. No delayed graft function was observed in either group. The 12-month actuarial patient and graft survival were 100% in Group I and II. A preoperative single bolus ATG induction therapy was an effective and safe therapeutic measure, yielding an acceptable acute rejection rate in presensitized renal transplant recipients.

  13. Differential impact of transplantation on peripheral and tissue-associated viral reservoirs: Implications for HIV gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher W; Wang, Jianbin; Deleage, Claire; Reddy, Sowmya; Kaur, Jasbir; Polacino, Patricia; Reik, Andreas; Huang, Meei-Li; Jerome, Keith R; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Holmes, Michael C; Estes, Jacob D; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2018-04-01

    Autologous transplantation and engraftment of HIV-resistant cells in sufficient numbers should recapitulate the functional cure of the Berlin Patient, with applicability to a greater number of infected individuals and with a superior safety profile. A robust preclinical model of suppressed HIV infection is critical in order to test such gene therapy-based cure strategies, both alone and in combination with other cure strategies. Here, we present a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of latent infection using simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in pigtail macaques. We demonstrate that transplantation of CCR5 gene-edited hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) persist in infected and suppressed animals, and that protected cells expand through virus-dependent positive selection. CCR5 gene-edited cells are readily detectable in tissues, namely those closely associated with viral reservoirs such as lymph nodes and gastrointestinal tract. Following autologous transplantation, tissue-associated SHIV DNA and RNA levels in suppressed animals are significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.05), relative to suppressed, untransplanted control animals. In contrast, the size of the peripheral reservoir, measured by QVOA, is variably impacted by transplantation. Our studies demonstrate that CCR5 gene editing is equally feasible in infected and uninfected animals, that edited cells persist, traffic to, and engraft in tissue reservoirs, and that this approach significantly reduces secondary lymphoid tissue viral reservoir size. Our robust NHP model of HIV gene therapy and viral persistence can be immediately applied to the investigation of combinatorial approaches that incorporate anti-HIV gene therapy, immune modulators, therapeutic vaccination, and latency reversing agents.

  14. Differential impact of transplantation on peripheral and tissue-associated viral reservoirs: Implications for HIV gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W Peterson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Autologous transplantation and engraftment of HIV-resistant cells in sufficient numbers should recapitulate the functional cure of the Berlin Patient, with applicability to a greater number of infected individuals and with a superior safety profile. A robust preclinical model of suppressed HIV infection is critical in order to test such gene therapy-based cure strategies, both alone and in combination with other cure strategies. Here, we present a nonhuman primate (NHP model of latent infection using simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART in pigtail macaques. We demonstrate that transplantation of CCR5 gene-edited hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs persist in infected and suppressed animals, and that protected cells expand through virus-dependent positive selection. CCR5 gene-edited cells are readily detectable in tissues, namely those closely associated with viral reservoirs such as lymph nodes and gastrointestinal tract. Following autologous transplantation, tissue-associated SHIV DNA and RNA levels in suppressed animals are significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.05, relative to suppressed, untransplanted control animals. In contrast, the size of the peripheral reservoir, measured by QVOA, is variably impacted by transplantation. Our studies demonstrate that CCR5 gene editing is equally feasible in infected and uninfected animals, that edited cells persist, traffic to, and engraft in tissue reservoirs, and that this approach significantly reduces secondary lymphoid tissue viral reservoir size. Our robust NHP model of HIV gene therapy and viral persistence can be immediately applied to the investigation of combinatorial approaches that incorporate anti-HIV gene therapy, immune modulators, therapeutic vaccination, and latency reversing agents.

  15. SOMATIC-CELL NUCLEAR TRANSFER: AUTOLOGOUS EMBRYONIC INTRA-SPINAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANT IN A CHRONIC COMPLETE QUADRIPLEGIC PATIENT. NEURO-ANATOMICAL OUTCOME AFTER ONE YEAR. Transferencia de núcleos de células madre: Transplante embriónico autólogo intraesp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don F Du Toit

    2016-03-01

    en la escala ASIA aumentaron de 29/112 a 64/112 a los 6 meses después del tratamiento y se ganó al menos un nivel de la escala ASIA. Conclusión: En comparación con los hallazgos iniciales, se documentó mejoría neurológica cuantificada en la cintura escapular y las extremidades superiores, entre 6 y 12 meses después del trasplante celular autólogo intralesional con SCNT en un caso de cuadriplejia crónica. The scientific literature reports that about 180,000 cases of spinal-cord injuries (SCI occur yearly in the world. Recent publications show neurological benefit in selected quadriplegics undergoing intra-lesion transplantation of autologous cultured bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Objectives: This case-study reports level–III objective evidence and partial neurological clinical recovery in a 32-year old-male with chronic complete quadriplegia that underwent somatic nuclear cell transfer (SCNT and embryonic cell therapy for traumatic spinal-cord injury (SCI sustained 6-years previously. The research question was: “Can autologous SCNT cell-therapy improve extremity motor and sensory impairment in chronic quadriplegia?” The hypothesis tested: “SCNT cell-therapy is unable to improve severe motor and sensory impairment in selected persons with chronic complete quadriplegia and unable to improve functional outcome or independence”. Material and methods: Cell-transplantation was by neuro-surgical implantation into the damaged cervical cord 6-years after SCI that rendered the patient a complete quadriplegic confirmed on neurological examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Neurologic assessment, restoration of dermatomes and myotomes were evaluated post-procedurally for 12-months together with MRI, and American Spinal Injury Association grading (ASIA. Results: Neurological improvement was asymmetrically improved in the shoulder girdle, upper extremity bilaterally and trunk without dramatic change in leg-function at 12-months. ASIA

  16. Using the cost-effectiveness of allogeneic islet transplantation to inform induced pluripotent stem cell-derived β-cell therapy reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibald, Peter R T; Williams, David J

    2015-11-01

    In the present study a cost-effectiveness analysis of allogeneic islet transplantation was performed and the financial feasibility of a human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived β-cell therapy was explored. Previously published cost and health benefit data for islet transplantation were utilized to perform the cost-effectiveness and sensitivity analyses. It was determined that, over a 9-year time horizon, islet transplantation would become cost saving and 'dominate' the comparator. Over a 20-year time horizon, islet transplantation would incur significant cost savings over the comparator (GB£59,000). Finally, assuming a similar cost of goods to islet transplantation and a lack of requirement for immunosuppression, a human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived β-cell therapy would dominate the comparator over an 8-year time horizon.

  17. Pathological classification of human iPSC-derived neural stem/progenitor cells towards safety assessment of transplantation therapy for CNS diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugai, Keiko; Fukuzawa, Ryuji; Shofuda, Tomoko; Fukusumi, Hayato; Kawabata, Soya; Nishiyama, Yuichiro; Higuchi, Yuichiro; Kawai, Kenji; Isoda, Miho; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Hashimoto-Tamaoki, Tomoko; Kohyama, Jun; Iwanami, Akio; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Eiji; Matsumoto, Morio; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-09-19

    The risk of tumorigenicity is a hurdle for regenerative medicine using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Although teratoma formation is readily distinguishable, the malignant transformation of iPSC derivatives has not been clearly defined due to insufficient analysis of histology and phenotype. In the present study, we evaluated the histology of neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) generated from integration-free human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived iPSCs (iPSC-NSPCs) following transplantation into central nervous system (CNS) of immunodeficient mice. We found that transplanted iPSC-NSPCs produced differentiation patterns resembling those in embryonic CNS development, and that the microenvironment of the final site of migration affected their maturational stage. Genomic instability of iPSCs correlated with increased proliferation of transplants, although no carcinogenesis was evident. The histological classifications presented here may provide cues for addressing potential safety issues confronting regenerative medicine involving iPSCs.

  18. Efficacy and safety of induction therapy with alemtuzumab in kidney transplantation: a meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHOU Zhang-fei; ZHOU Qin; CAI Jie-ru; CHENG Jun; HE Qiang; WU Jian-yong; CHEN Jiang-hua

    2009-01-01

    Background Alemtuzumab, a humanized CD52 monoclonal antibody, with its profound lymphocyte depletion property, was expected to be a promising induction therapy agent for kidney transplantation (KTx). However, currently no consensus is available about its efficacy and safety. The aim of this meta-anaiysis was to make a profound review and an objective appraisal of this issue. Methods Relevant papers were searched, essentially in the PubMed database and the Cochrane library. After a thorough review, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the outcome of KTx using alemtuzumab induction therapy (test group) with a control group were collected according to the inclusion criteria. Data of general characteristic of studies and major outcomes of Ktx were extracted and meta-analyses were performed with RevMan 4.2 software. The odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence intervals (CI) was the principle measurement of effect. Results Five RCTs were included. The chi square test showed no significant between-study heterogeneity, thus fixed effect model was employed. Sub-group analysis with studies including alemtuzumab induction followed by a tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive regimen showed that the acute rejection rate (ARR) was lower relative to the control (OR=0.59, 95% CI 0.34-1.01, P=0.05). However, meta-analysis with all included studies revealed that neither ARR nor patient/graft survival rates differ significantly between the test and the control group, but the cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection rate was higher in the test group (OR 2.50, 95% CI 1.22-5.12, P=0.01 ). A great number of the test group recipients safely remained on a regimen that was steroid-free and with a reduced dose of conventional immunosuppressive drugs. Conclusions Alemtuzumab induction therapy for KTx was an effective and safe protocol in the tested follow-up period. Steroid avoidance and a dose reduction of conventional immunosuppressive drugs after alemtuzumab induction therapy may have clinical

  19. Is there an association between immunosuppressant therapy medication adherence and depression, quality of life, and personality traits in the kidney and liver transplant population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorevski, Elizabeth; Succop, Paul; Sachdeva, Jyoti; Cavanaugh, Teresa M; Volek, Paul; Heaton, Pamela; Chisholm-Burns, Marie; Martin-Boone, Jill E

    2013-01-01

    To measure the association of transplant patients' personality, depression, and quality of life with medication adherence in kidney and liver transplant recipients. A cross-sectional study of liver and kidney transplant recipients greater than 1 year post-transplant was conducted. Patients' adherence with medications was assessed using the Immunosuppressive Therapy Adherence Scale. Personality and depression were assessed using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory Scale and Patient Health Questionnaire 9, respectively. Quality of life was assessed using the Short Form-36, and functional status was determined using the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale. A total of 86 kidney and 50 liver transplant patients completed the surveys. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated an association between depression and adherence with immunosuppressive medications in kidney transplant recipients. Kidney transplant patients who exhibited "low openness" scores were 91% more likely to be nonadherent. Kidney transplant patients' physical functional status was strongly associated with nonadherence, and for each point increase in functionality the patients' adherence increased by 4%. In the liver sample, age was associated with adherence. For every year increase in age, adherence increased by 7%. The presence of low openness as a personality trait, poor physical functional status, and depression were associated with adherence in the kidney transplant population. In the liver transplant population, younger age was associated with nonadherence.

  20. Involved field radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease autologous bone marrow transplantation regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezner, Richard D.; Nademanee, Auayporn; Niland, Joyce C.; Vora, Nayana; Forman, Stephen J.

    1995-01-01

    From 1986 through 1992, involved-field radiation therapy (IF-RT) was administered to 29 of 86 patients with recurrent Hodgkin's disease (HD) who received a high-dose cyclophosphamide/etoposide regimen with autologous bone marrow transplantation (A-BMT). Patients without a significant history of prior RT received total body irradiation (TBI), initially as a single dose 5-7.5 Gy, and subsequently with fractionated TBI (F-TBI) delivering 12 Gy. Previously irradiated patients received a high-dose BCNU regimen instead of TBI. IF-RT was employed selectively, usually for sites of bulky disease (> 5 cm). IF-RT doses were typically 20 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction for TBI patients and 30-40 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction for non-TBI Patients. Fatal complications developed in four patients while second malignancies have developed in two. The region which received IF-RT was the site of first recurrence in only two cases (7%). With a median follow-up of 28 months, the two-year disease-free survival rate was 44%. For the 22 patients treated by either F-TBI or high-dose BCNU, the 2-year disease-free survival rate was 50% with a median follow up of 29 months. Selective use of IF-RT may increase the chances of complete remission and disease free survival in HD patients with a history of bulky disease

  1. Impact of Drug Therapy, Radiation Dose, and Dose Rate on Renal Toxicity Following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Jonathan C.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a radiation dose response and to determine the dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors that influence the incidence of late renal toxicity following total body irradiation (TBI). Methods and Materials: A comprehensive retrospective review was performed of articles reporting late renal toxicity, along with renal dose, fractionation, dose rate, chemotherapy regimens, and potential nephrotoxic agents. In the final analysis, 12 articles (n = 1,108 patients), consisting of 24 distinct TBI/chemotherapy conditioning regimens were included. Regimens were divided into three subgroups: adults (age ≥18 years), children (age <18 years), and mixed population (both adults and children). Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors significantly associated with late renal complications. Results: Individual analysis was performed on each population subgroup. For the purely adult population, the only significant variable was total dose. For the mixed population, the significant variables included total dose, dose rate, and the use of fludarabine. For the pediatric population, only the use of cyclosporin or teniposide was significant; no dose response was noted. A logistic model was generated with the exclusion of the pediatric population because of its lack of dose response. This model yielded the following significant variables: total dose, dose rate, and number of fractions. Conclusion: A dose response for renal damage after TBI was identified. Fractionation and low dose rates are factors to consider when delivering TBI to patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. Drug therapy also has a major impact on kidney function and can modify the dose-response function

  2. Autologous stem cell transplantation in refractory Asherman′s syndrome: A novel cell based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeta Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : There is substantial evidence that adult stem cell populations exist in human endometrium, and hence it is suggested that either endogenous endometrial stem/progenitor cells can be activated or bone marrow derived stem cells can be transplanted in the uterine cavity for endometrial regeneration in Asherman′s syndrome (AS. Aims and Objectives : The objective was to evaluate the role of sub-endometrial autologous stem cell implantation in women with refractory AS in attaining menstruation and fertility. Setting : Tertiary care referral center. DESIGN: Prospective case series. Materials and Methods : Six cases of refractory AS with failed standard treatment option of hysteroscopic adhesiolysis in the past were included. Mononuclear stem cells (MNCs were implanted in sub-endometrial zone followed by exogenous oral estrogen therapy. Endometrial thickness (ET was assessed at 3, 6, and 9 months. RESULTS: Descriptive statistics and statistical analysis of study variables was carried out using STATA version 9.0. The mean MNC count was 103.3 × 106 (±20.45 with mean CD34+ count being 203,642 (±269,274. Mean of ET (mm at 3 months (4.05 ± 1.40, 6 months (5.46 ± 1.36 and 9 months (5.48 ± 1.14 were significantly (P < 0.05 increased from pretreatment level (1.38 ± 0.39. Five out of six patients resumed menstruation. Conclusion : The autologous stem cell implantation leads to endometrial regeneration reflected by restoration of menstruation in five out of six cases. Autologous stem cell implantation is a promising novel cell based therapy for refractory AS.

  3. Development and Validation of Predictive Models of Cardiac Mortality and Transplantation in Resynchronization Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Arrais Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: 30-40% of cardiac resynchronization therapy cases do not achieve favorable outcomes. Objective: This study aimed to develop predictive models for the combined endpoint of cardiac death and transplantation (Tx at different stages of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT. Methods: Prospective observational study of 116 patients aged 64.8 ± 11.1 years, 68.1% of whom had functional class (FC III and 31.9% had ambulatory class IV. Clinical, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic variables were assessed by using Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier curves. Results: The cardiac mortality/Tx rate was 16.3% during the follow-up period of 34.0 ± 17.9 months. Prior to implantation, right ventricular dysfunction (RVD, ejection fraction < 25% and use of high doses of diuretics (HDD increased the risk of cardiac death and Tx by 3.9-, 4.8-, and 5.9-fold, respectively. In the first year after CRT, RVD, HDD and hospitalization due to congestive heart failure increased the risk of death at hazard ratios of 3.5, 5.3, and 12.5, respectively. In the second year after CRT, RVD and FC III/IV were significant risk factors of mortality in the multivariate Cox model. The accuracy rates of the models were 84.6% at preimplantation, 93% in the first year after CRT, and 90.5% in the second year after CRT. The models were validated by bootstrapping. Conclusion: We developed predictive models of cardiac death and Tx at different stages of CRT based on the analysis of simple and easily obtainable clinical and echocardiographic variables. The models showed good accuracy and adjustment, were validated internally, and are useful in the selection, monitoring and counseling of patients indicated for CRT.

  4. Knock-Out and Transgenic Strategies to Improve Neural Transplantation Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isacson, Ole

    2001-01-01

    .... To enhance axonal growth leading to optimal functional recovery by neuronal transplants, we employed transgenic bcl-2 overexpressing donor cells and similar molecules influencing the growth of axons...

  5. Knock-out and Transgenic Strategies to Improve Neural Transplantation Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isacson, Ole

    2000-01-01

    .... In our second objective of enhancing axonal growth leading to optimal functional recovery by neuronal transplants, we employed transgenic bcl-2 overexpressing donor cells and similar molecules...

  6. Clearance of hepatitis C virus after living-donor liver transplantation in spite of residual viremia on end date of interferon therapy before transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Hamasaki, Keisuke; Honda, Takuya; Shibata, Hidetaka; Akahoshi, Mana; Eguchi, Susumu; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Kanematsu, Takashi; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2007-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) therapy is the only treatment strategy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection after liver transplantation (LT), but prophylactic and treatable IFN therapy after LT has been shown to be insufficient due to the adverse effects of IFN and rivabirin. In this paper, we describe the disappearance of HCV after LT without IFN therapy in the presence of residual viremia on the day of LT. We herein report our findings since this is considered an important case for the anti-HCV strategy of post LT. A 60-year old woman with LC and HCC was referred to Nagasaki University Hospital in August 2004. After she underwent LT on February 18, 2005, we injected peg-IFN-α-2a the 11th time at 18 wk and HCV-RNA was still positive in the serum at LT. The serum HCV-RNA was negative one month after operation and subsequently dissolved 15 mo after operation without IFN therapy. As a result, we speculate that if HCV-RNA is positive while HCV core antigen is negative before LT, then it may lead to clearance of HCV after LT. Therefore long acting peg-IFN-α-2a is thus considered a potentially effective agent for the treatment of HCV-related cirrhosis before LT. PMID:17696240

  7. Effects of Healing Touch and Relaxation Therapy on Adult Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant: A Feasibility Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Der-Fa; Hart, Laura K; Lutgendorf, Susan K; Oh, Hyunkyoung; Silverman, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell transplant (SCT), considered the current standard of care for adults with advanced cancers, can lead to substantial deconditioning and diminished well-being. Attending to life quality of SCT recipients is now viewed as essential. The objective of this study was to identify the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of healing touch (HT) and relaxation therapy (RT) with patients undergoing SCT. A randomized prospective design compared 13 SCT patients who received HT daily while hospitalized to 13 similar SCT patients who received daily RT. The clinical outcomes of the 2 groups were also compared with retrospective clinical data of 20 patients who received SCT during the same year. The mean age of participants was 57 years, with 54% receiving autologous and 46% receiving allogeneic transplants. All patients assigned to the HT group completed the protocol. Only 60% of the relaxation group completed the intervention. Both interventions produced improvement in psychosocial measures and a shorter hospital length of stay (LOS) than the historical group. Differential results for LOS were related to the type of transplant received. The LOS differences were not statistically significant but could be clinically significant. Healing touch was a better tolerated modality by this population. Future research is needed to validate the LOS advantage of the HT and RT interventions, explore the differences in effect found with different transplant types, and identify patients who can tolerate RT. The LOS reduction could result in decreased cost. Second, mood and function improvements support quality of life during SCT treatment.

  8. Clinical experience with thymoglobulin and antithymocyte globulin-Fresenius as induction therapy in renal transplant patients: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicora, Federico; Mos, Fernando; Paz, Marta; Roberti, Javier

    2013-10-01

    We describe our experiences with, and compare the outcomes of, 2 groups of renal transplant patients treated with thymoglobulin or antithymocyte globulin-Fresenius as induction therapy at transplant to reduce the incidence of acute rejection and prevent delayed allograft function. Twenty-four recipients of deceased-donor or living-donor kidney transplants received thymoglobulin, and 23 patients received antithymocyte globulin-Fresenius. Patient and graft survival and efficacy and safety were assessed at 3 months. The demographic characteristics of both groups were comparable, but the predominant donor type was significantly different. Incidence of complications, delayed graft function, and creatinine concentrations were comparable in both groups. At 3 months after the transplant, patient survival rate was 92% in the thymoglobulin group and 96% in the antithymocyte globulin-Fresenius group (P > .05), and death-censored graft survival rate for both groups was not significantly different. Average hematocrit and lymphocyte, neutrophil, and platelet counts were comparable in both groups at 3 months' follow-up. Average white blood count at 1 month was significantly different between the groups: at 5.62 ± 2.45 × 103 cells/mm³ in the thymoglobulin group and 7.85 ± 4.10 × 103 cells/mm³ in the ATG-F group (P Fresenius were generally comparable.

  9. Effective Prolonged Therapy with Voriconazole in a Lung Transplant Recipient with Spondylodiscitis Induced by Scedosporium apiospermum

    OpenAIRE

    Luijk, B.; Ekkelenkamp, M. B.; De Jong, P. A.; Kwakkel-van Erp, J. M.; Grutters, J. C.; van Kessel, D. A.; van de Graaf, E. A.

    2011-01-01

    Scedosporium/Pseudallescheria species are frequently seen in cystic fibrosis patients. However, disseminated forms after lung transplantation in these patients are rarely seen, but often with poor outcome. In this case report we describe a lung transplant recipient with cystic fibrosis who developed a spondylodiscitis that was caused by Scedosporium apiospermu...

  10. Nonadherence to immunosuppressive therapy in kidney transplant recipients: can technology help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerini, Erika; Bruno, Fulvio; Citterio, Franco; Schena, Francesco P

    2016-10-01

    End-stage kidney disease is a life-threatening condition that compels patients to accept either dialysis or transplant. Kidney transplantation is the best choice for patients with end-stage kidney disease because it ensures higher quality of life and longer survival rates than other choices, with less cost for the healthcare system. However, in order for renal recipients to maintain the functioning graft they must take lifelong immunosuppressive medications, with possible side effects and low medication adherence. It is known that low medication adherence in kidney transplant recipients may cause poor outcomes, chronic graft rejection, and graft failure. In this review, the authors give an overview of nonadherence in the transplant setting. In addition, they analyze the role of different technologies as an aid to improve adherence, with a focus on mobile-phone based solutions to monitor and enhance kidney transplant recipient compliance.

  11. Gleaning Insights from Fecal Microbiota Transplantation and Probiotic Studies for the Rational Design of Combination Microbial Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Lauren E.; Anderson, Sarah E.; Corbett, Anita H.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Beneficial microorganisms hold promise for the treatment of numerous gastrointestinal diseases. The transfer of whole microbiota via fecal transplantation has already been shown to ameliorate the severity of diseases such as Clostridium difficile infection, inflammatory bowel disease, and others. However, the exact mechanisms of fecal microbiota transplant efficacy and the particular strains conferring this benefit are still unclear. Rationally designed combinations of microbial preparations may enable more efficient and effective treatment approaches tailored to particular diseases. Here we use an infectious disease, C. difficile infection, and an inflammatory disorder, the inflammatory bowel disease ulcerative colitis, as examples to facilitate the discussion of how microbial therapy might be rationally designed for specific gastrointestinal diseases. Fecal microbiota transplantation has already shown some efficacy in the treatment of both these disorders; detailed comparisons of studies evaluating commensal and probiotic organisms in the context of these disparate gastrointestinal diseases may shed light on potential protective mechanisms and elucidate how future microbial therapies can be tailored to particular diseases. PMID:27856521

  12. Orchestration of transplantation tolerance by regulatory dendritic cell therapy or in-situ targeting of dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Adrian E; Thomson, Angus W

    2014-08-01

    Extensive research in murine transplant models over the past two decades has convincingly demonstrated the ability of regulatory dendritic cells (DCregs) to promote long-term allograft survival. We review important considerations regarding the source of therapeutic DCregs (donor or recipient) and their mode of action, in-situ targeting of DCregs, and optimal therapeutic regimens to promote DCreg function. Recent studies have defined protocols and mechanisms whereby ex-vivo-generated DCregs of donor or recipient origin subvert allogeneic T-cell responses and promote long-term organ transplant survival. Particular interest has focused on how donor antigen is acquired, processed and presented by autologous dendritic cells, on the stability of DCregs, and on in-situ targeting of dendritic cells to promote their tolerogenic function. New evidence of the therapeutic efficacy of DCregs in a clinically relevant nonhuman primate organ transplant model and production of clinical grade DCregs support early evaluation of DCreg therapy in human graft recipients. We discuss strategies currently used to promote dendritic cell tolerogenicity, including DCreg therapy and in-situ targeting of dendritic cells, with a view to improved understanding of underlying mechanisms and identification of the most promising strategies for therapeutic application.

  13. Era of liver transplantation: combined anatomic splenectomy and anticoagulant therapy in prevention of portal vein thrombosis after splenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongwei, Chen; Zhang, Liang; Maoping, Li; Yong, Zhang; Chengyou, Du; Dewei, Li

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a common complication following splenectomy in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension, which also brings difficulties to future possible liver transplantation. This paper retrospectively analyzes the preventive effect of combined anatomic splenectomy and early anticoagulant therapy on post-splenectomy portal vein thrombosis in patients with portal hypertension. We retrospectively analyzed 136 patients who underwent splenectomy at our hospital between January 2010 and December 2013 due to liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Patient conditions, such as coagulation function, splenic and portal vein thrombosis, intra-abdominal hemorrhage, pancreatic leakage and intra-abdominal infections, are observed postoperatively. Despite the presence of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension in patients, early postoperative anticoagulant therapy has no significant impact on coagulation function and intra-abdominal hemorrhage of these patients (p > 0.05). Anatomic splenectomy can reduce the occurrence of complications such as postoperative bleeding, pancreatic leakage and intra-abdominal infections (p splenectomy and early postoperative anticoagulant therapy can reduce post-splenectomy portal vein thrombosis in patients with portal hypertension, and is conducive to the future liver transplantation therapy may be needed by the patients.

  14. Effect of cotransplantation of hematopoietic stem cells and embryonic AGM stromal cells on hematopoietic reconstitution in mice after bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Si; Sun Hanying; Liu Wenli

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of cotransplantation of hematopoietic stem cells and stromal cells derived from aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region on hematopoietic reconstitution in mice after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Methods: The typical mice model of syngeneic BMT was established and the mice were randomly divided into 4 groups: the control group, the BMT group, the group of cotransplantation of HSC with AGM stromal cells (the cotransplantation group) and the ligustrazine group (the LT group). On days 3, 7, 10, 14, 21 and 28 after BMT, the peripheral blood cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC) were counted, and histology changes of bone marrow were detected. Results: The levels of peripheral WBC, RBC, platelet, and BMMNC in the contransplantation group were significantly higher than those in the single BMT group and the LT group (P<0.05). Conclusions: Cotransplantation with AGM stromal cells could significantly promote hematopoietic reconstruction in mice after BMT. (authors)

  15. Non-transplant therapies for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and Child-Pugh-Turcotte class B cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, Alessandro; Bolondi, Luigi

    2017-02-01

    Underlying liver cirrhosis is present in most patients with hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver transplantation is the only treatment strategy to cure both diseases. All other hepatocellular carcinoma treatment strategies have to take into account residual liver function that concurs with the patient's prognosis and might limit their feasibility. In patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and Child-Pugh-Turcotte class B (CPT-B), owing to borderline liver function, any intervention might be offset by liver function deterioration. In this setting, the decision for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment requires a comprehensive assessment of liver function, not restricted to the CPT classification, in addition to a careful evaluation of the prognostic effect of hepatocellular carcinoma compared with cirrhosis. In this Review, we provide an overview of the literature regarding the benefits and harms of non-transplant therapies in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and CPT-B cirrhosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. An injectable spheroid system with genetic modification for cell transplantation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Satoshi; Itaka, Keiji; Nomoto, Takahiro; Endo, Taisuke; Matsumoto, Yu; Ishii, Takehiko; Kataoka, Kazunori

    2014-03-01

    The new methodology to increase a therapeutic potential of cell transplantation was developed here by the use of three-dimensional spheroids of transplanting cells subsequent to the genetic modification with non-viral DNA vectors, polyplex nanomicelles. Particularly, spheroids in regulated size of 100-μm of primary hepatocytes transfected with luciferase gene were formed on the micropatterned culture plates coated with thermosensitive polymer, and were recovered in the form of injectable liquid suspension simply by cooling the plates. After subcutaneously transplanting these hepatocyte spheroids, efficient transgene expression was observed in host tissue for more than a month, whereas transplantation of a single-cell suspension from a monolayer culture resulted in an only transient expression. The spheroid system contributed to the preservation of innate functions of transplanted hepatocytes in the host tissue, such as albumin expression, thereby possessing high potential for expressing transgene. Intravital observation of transplanted cells showed that those from spheroid cultures had a tendency to localize in the vicinity of blood vessels, making a favorable microenvironment for preserving cell functionality. Furthermore, spheroids transfected with erythropoietin-expressing DNA showed a significantly higher hematopoietic effect than that of cell suspensions from monolayer cultures, demonstrating high potential of this genetically-modified spheroid transplantation system for therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cell Therapy in Organ Transplantation: Our Experience on the Clinical Translation of Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloufar Safinia

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Solid organ transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage organ dysfunction. Despite improvements in short-term outcome, long-term outcome is suboptimal due to the increased morbidity and mortality associated with the toxicity of immunosuppressive regimens and chronic rejection (1–5. As such, the attention of the transplant community has focused on the development of novel therapeutic strategies to achieve allograft tolerance, a state whereby the immune system of the recipient can be re-educated to accept the allograft, averting the need for long-term immunosuppression. Indeed, reports of “operational” tolerance, whereby the recipient is off all immunosuppressive drugs and maintaining good graft function, is well documented in the literature for both liver and kidney transplantations (6–8. However, this phenomenon is rare and in the setting of liver transplantation has been shown to occur late after transplantation, with the majority of patients maintained on life-long immunosupression to prevent allograft rejection (9. As such, significant research has focused on immune regulation in the context of organ transplantation with regulatory T cells (Tregs identified as cells holding considerable promise in this endeavor. This review will provide a brief introduction to human Tregs, their phenotypic and functional characterization and focuses on our experience to date at the clinical translation of Treg immunotherapy in the setting of solid organ transplantation.

  18. Therapy for Cerebral Palsy by Human Umbilical Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplantation Combined With Basic Rehabilitation Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che Zhang MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cerebral palsy (CP is the most common cause leading to childhood disability. Human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs transplantation is a promising alternative considering the safety and efficacy in current reports. This report represents a case of hUCB-MSCs transplantation combined with basic rehabilitation treatment beginning as early as age 6 months with follow-up as long as 5 years. Methods. A 6-year-old female patient was diagnosed with CP at age 6 months. The patient accepted 4 infusions of intravenous hUCB-MSCs in each course and received 4 courses of transplantation totally. A series of assessments were performed before the first transplantation, including laboratory tests, CDCC Infant Mental Development Scale, and Gross Motor Function Measure-88 (GMFM-88. Then annual assessments using the GMFM-88, Ashworth spasm assessment, and comprehensive function assessment scale were made in addition to the annual laboratory tests. In addition, electroencephalography and brain magnetic resonance imaging were conducted before transplantation and in the follow-up phase. Rehabilitation and safety follow-up have been ongoing for 5 years up to date. Results. There was no complaint about adverse effects during hospitalization or postoperative follow-up. Motor function recovered to normal level according to the evaluation of scales. Language function improved significantly. Linguistic rehabilitation therapy was enhanced for further improvement. Conclusions. The clinical application of hUC-MSCs combined with basic rehabilitation treatment was effective and safe for improving motor and comprehensive function in a patient with CP.

  19. Comparison of Teratoma Formation between Embryonic Stem Cells and Parthenogenetic Embryonic Stem Cells by Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Tao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With their properties of self-renewal and differentiation, embryonic stem (ES cells hold great promises for regenerative therapy. However, teratoma formation and ethical concerns of ES cells may restrict their potential clinical applications. Currently, parthenogenetic embryonic stem (pES cells have attracted the interest of researchers for its self-renewing and pluripotent differentiation while eliciting less ethic concerns. In this study, we established a model with ES and pES cells both stably transfected with a double-fusion reporter gene containing renilla luciferase (Rluc and red fluorescent protein (RFP to analyze the mechanisms of teratoma formation. Transgenic Vegfr2-luc mouse, which expresses firefly luciferase (Fluc under the promoter of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Vegfr2-luc, was used to trace the growth of new blood vessel recruited by transplanted cells. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI of Rluc/Fluc provides an effective tool in estimating the growth and angiogenesis of teratoma in vivo. We found that the tumorigenesis and angiogenesis capacity of ES cells were higher than those of pES cells, in which VEGF/VEGFR2 signal pathway plays an important role. In conclusion, pES cells have the decreased potential of teratoma formation but meanwhile have similar differentiating capacity compared with ES cells. These data demonstrate that pES cells provide an alternative source for ES cells with the risk reduction of teratoma formation and without ethical controversy.

  20. Combination of ablative fractional laser and daylight-mediated photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis in organ transplant recipients – a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togsverd-Bo, Katrine; Lei, Ulrikke; Erlendsson, A M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) for actinic keratoses (AK) is hampered by pain during illumination and inferior efficacy in organ-transplant recipients (OTR). OBJECTIVES: We assessed ablative fractional laser (AFL)-assisted daylight photodynamic therapy (PDT) (AFL-dPDT) compared...

  1. Will Post-Transplantation Cell Therapies for Pediatric Patients Become Standard of Care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankester, Arjan C.; Locatelli, Franco; Bader, Peter; Rettinger, Eva; Egeler, Maarten; Katewa, Satyendra; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Nierkens, Stefan; Schultz, Kirk; Handgretinger, Rupert; Grupp, Stephan A.; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Bollard, Catherine M.

    Although allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative approach for many pediatric patients with hematologic malignancies and some nonmalignant disorders, some critical obstacles remain to be overcome, including relapse, engraftment failure, graft-versus-host disease

  2. Genetic modification of cells for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yi; Drobinskaya, Irina; Kolossov, Eugen; Chen, Chunguang; Linn, Thomas

    2008-01-14

    Progress in gene therapy has produced promising results that translate experimental research into clinical treatment. Gene modification has been extensively employed in cell transplantation. The main barrier is an effective gene delivery system. Several viral vectors were utilized in end-stage differentiated cells. Recently, successful applications were described with adenovirus-associated vectors. As an alternative, embryonic stem cell- and stem cell-like systems were established for generation of tissue-specified gene-modified cells. Owing to the feasibility for genetic manipulations and the self-renewing potency of these cells they can be used in a way enabling large-scale in vitro production. This approach offers the establishment of in vitro cell culture systems that will deliver sufficient amounts of highly purified, immunoautologous cells suitable for application in regenerative medicine. In this review, the current technology of gene delivery systems to cells is recapitulated and the latest developments for cell transplantation are discussed.

  3. Is there an association between immunosuppressant therapy medication adherence and depression, quality of life, and personality traits in the kidney and liver transplant population?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorevski E

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Gorevski,1 Paul Succop,1 Jyoti Sachdeva,1 Teresa M Cavanaugh,1 Paul Volek,1 Pamela Heaton,1 Marie Chisholm-Burns,2 Jill E Martin-Boone1 1University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA, 2University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy, Memphis, TN, USA Objectives: To measure the association of transplant patients' personality, depression, and quality of life with medication adherence in kidney and liver transplant recipients. Methods: A cross-sectional study of liver and kidney transplant recipients greater than 1 year post-transplant was conducted. Patients’ adherence with medications was assessed using the Immunosuppressive Therapy Adherence Scale. Personality and depression were assessed using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory Scale and Patient Health Questionnaire 9, respectively. Quality of life was assessed using the Short Form-36, and functional status was determined using the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale. Results: A total of 86 kidney and 50 liver transplant patients completed the surveys. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated an association between depression and adherence with immunosuppressive medications in kidney transplant recipients. Kidney transplant patients who exhibited “low openness” scores were 91% more likely to be nonadherent. Kidney transplant patients’ physical functional status was strongly associated with nonadherence, and for each point increase in functionality the patients adherence increased by 4%. In the liver sample, age was associated with adherence. For every year increase in age, adherence increased by 7%. Conclusion: The presence of low openness as a personality trait, poor physical functional status, and depression were associated with adherence in the kidney transplant population. In the liver transplant population, younger age was associated with nonadherence. Keywords: adherence, transplant, liver, kidney

  4. Normal cholesterol levels with lovastatin (Mevinolin) therapy in a child with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia following liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    East, C.; Grundy, S.M.; Bilheimer, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    Patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia produce no normal low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, and as a result, LDL accumulates in plasma, causing severe premature atherosclerosis. Two years ago, liver transplantation was performed in a child with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, restoring LDL receptor activity to about 60% of normal and reducing the LDL cholesterol level by 81%. However, the patient's lipoprotein levels remained significantly elevated for her age and sex. Treatment with lovastatin (mevinolin) one year after transplantation produced a marked improvement in the patient's lipoprotein profile. The total and LDL cholesterol levels fell 40% and 49%, respectively, to values within the normal range. The level of very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol fell 41%, and the level of total triglycerides declined 28%. While lovastatin therapy decreased the production rate of LDL by 35%, it did not affect the LDL fractional clearance rate. Thus, the combination of liver transplantation and lovastatin restored total and LDL cholesterol levels to normal in this patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

  5. Pegylated interferon alpha-2a and ribavirin combination therapy in HCV liver transplant recipients. Experience of 7 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, Speranta; Gheorghe, Liana; Hrehoret, Doina; Becheanu, Gabriel; Herlea, Vlad; Popescu, Irinel

    2008-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) related cirrhosis represents the leading indication for liver transplantation (LT) worldwide and HCV reinfection is the rule among transplant recipients. Combination therapy with interferon and ribavirin is the treatment of choice for established recurrent hepatitis C. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the combination of pegylated interferon alpha-2a and ribavirin in LT recipients with histological recurrence of hepatitis C. Seven LT recipients with chronic hepatitis C recurrence were treated with peginterferon alpha-2a with an initial intended dose of 180 microg/week and an intended dose of ribavirin 800-1000 mg/day for at least 12 months and followed-up for at least 24 weeks. Early virological response rate was 57.1%. Three patients (42.8%) had end of treatment virological response and all had also sustained viral response (SVR). Five patients had end of treatment biological response, out of which 4 had also sustained biochemical response. Three patients had both SVR and sustained biochemical response. Four patients had end of treatment histological response, out of which 3 patients had also SVR. Cytopenia was the most common adverse event: anemia (57.1%), leucopenia/neutropenia (71.4%), thrombocytopenia (42.8%). Combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin can be safely and successfully used in liver transplant recipients.

  6. Efficacy of interventions for adherence to the immunosuppressive therapy in kidney transplant recipients: a meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yichen; Zhou, Yifan; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Jian; Lin, Jun

    2017-10-01

    Immunosuppressive treatment regimens are complex and require ongoing self-management. Medication adherence can be difficult to achieve for several reasons. The current meta-analysis and systematic review investigated whether adherence interventions improved immunosuppressive treatment adherence in kidney transplant recipients. Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar were searched until October 17, 2016 using the following search terms: kidney transplantation, compliance, adherence, and immunosuppressive therapy. Randomized controlled trials and two-arm prospective, retrospective, and cohort studies were included. The primary outcomes were adherence rate and adherence score. Eight studies were included with a total for 546 patients. Among participants receiving intervention, the adherence rate was significantly higher than the control group (pooled OR=2.366, 95% CI 1.222 to 4.578, p=0.011). Participants in the intervention group had greater adherence scores than those in the control group (pooled standardized difference in means =1.706, 95% CI 0.346 to 3.065, p=0.014). Sensitivity analysis indicated that findings for adherence rate were robust. However, for adherence score, the significance of the association disappeared after removing one of the studies indicating the findings may have been overly influenced by this one study. Intervention programs designed to increase immunosuppressive adherence in patients with kidney transplant improve treatment adherence. Copyright © 2017 American Federation for Medical Research.

  7. Simultaneous splenectomy during liver transplantation augments anti-viral therapy in patients infected with hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Heng-Cheng; Hsieh, Chung-Bao; Hsu, Kuo-Feng; Fan, Hsiu-Lung; Hsieh, Tsai-Yuan; Chen, Teng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous splenectomy in liver transplantation (LT) is selectively indicated because of splenoportal venous thromboses and increased sepsis. Therefore, its impact should be further investigated. Of the 160 liver transplant patients, only 40 underwent simultaneous splenectomy. Clinicopathologic characteristics and outcomes were compared between the splenectomy and non-splenectomy group using retrospective analysis. Although the groups were similar and had no significant difference in the intra- and postoperative data, non-splenectomy group had more male patients. However, splenectomy group showed significantly higher platelet and leukocyte counts at 1 month and 6 months after the transplantation and higher hepatitis C virus anti-viral therapy completion. Furthermore, 3 patients developed portal or splenic vein thrombosis during the postoperative follow-up, but the overall survival rate did not significantly differ between these groups. Simultaneous splenectomy in LT can be safely performed, particularly in patients with hepatitis C virus cirrhosis, small-for-size grafts, hypersplenism, and ABO blood group incompatible (ABO - incompatible) LT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The fate of mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into immunocompetent neonatal mice: implications for skeletal gene therapy via stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyibizi, Christopher; Wang, Sujing; Mi, Zhibao; Robbins, Paul D

    2004-06-01

    To explore the feasibility of skeletal gene and cell therapies, we transduced murine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with a retrovirus carrying the enhanced green fluorescent protein and zeocin-resistance genes prior to transplantation into 2-day-old immunocompetent neonatal mice. Whole-body imaging of the recipient mice at 7 days post-systemic cell injection demonstrated a wide distribution of the cells in vivo. Twenty-five days posttransplantation, most of the infused cells were present in the lung as assessed by examination of the cells cultured from the lungs of the recipient mice. The cells persisted in lung and maintained a high level of gene expression and could be recovered from the recipient mice at 150 days after cell transplantation. A significant number of GFP-positive cells were also present in the bones of the recipient mice at 35 days post-cell transplantation. Recycling of the cells recovered from femurs of the recipient mice at 25 days posttransplantation by repeated injections into different neonatal mice resulted in the isolation of a clone of cells that was detected in bone and cartilage, but not in lung and liver after systemic injection. These data demonstrate that MSCs persist in immunocompetent neonatal mice, maintain a high level of gene expression, and may participate in skeletal growth and development of the recipient animals.

  9. Monoclonal antibody-purged bone marrow transplantation therapy for multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K C; Andersen, J; Soiffer, R; Freedman, A S; Rabinowe, S N; Robertson, M J; Spector, N; Blake, K; Murray, C; Freeman, A

    1993-10-15

    Forty patients with plasma cell dyscrasias underwent high-dose chemoradiotherapy and either anti-B-cell monoclonal antibody (MoAb)-treated autologous, anti-T-cell MoAb-treated HLA-matched sibling allogeneic or syngeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The majority of patients had advanced Durie-Salmon stage myeloma at diagnosis, all were pretreated with chemotherapy, and 17 had received prior radiotherapy. At the time of BMT, all patients demonstrated good performance status with Karnofsky score of 80% or greater and had less than 10% marrow tumor cells; 34 patients had residual monoclonal marrow plasma cells and 38 patients had paraprotein. Following high-dose chemoradiotherapy, there were 18 complete responses (CR), 18 partial responses, one non-responder, and three toxic deaths. Granulocytes greater than 500/microL and untransfused platelets greater than 20,000/microL were noted at a median of 23 (range, 12 to 46) and 25 (range, 10 to 175) days posttransplant (PT), respectively, in 24 of the 26 patients who underwent autografting. In the 14 patients who received allogeneic or syngeneic grafts, granulocytes greater than 500/microL and untransfused platelets greater than 20,000/microL were noted at a median of 19 (range, 12 to 24) and 16 (range, 5 to 32) days PT, respectively. With 24 months median follow-up for survival after autologous BMT, 16 of 26 patients are alive free from progression at 2+ to 55+ months PT; of these, 5 patients remain in CR at 6+ to 55+ months PT. With 24 months median follow-up for survival after allogeneic and syngeneic BMT, 8 of 14 patients are alive free from progression at 8+ to 34+ months PT; of these, 5 patients remain in CR at 8+ to 34+ months PT. This therapy has achieved high response rates and prolonged progression-free survival in some patients and proven to have acceptable toxicity. However, relapses post-BMT, coupled with slow engraftment post-BMT in heavily pretreated patients, suggest that such treatment strategies

  10. Succesful therapy of viral leukemia by transplantation of histocompatibly unmatched marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meredith, R.F.; OKunewick, J.P.; Kuhnert, P.M.; Brozovich, B.J.; Weaver, E.V.

    1978-01-01

    The therapeutic effectiveness on murine viral-leukemia of allogeneic or hybrid hematopoietic cells transplanted from leukemia-virus resistant donors was evaluated and compared with that of syngeneic cells. Transplantation of syngeneic cells gave no protection to the viral-leukemic mice. Transplantation of spleen cells from allogeneic donors resulted in early deaths of both leukemic and non-leukemic recipients. Transplantation of hybrid spleen cells resulted in no long-term survival of the leukemic mice. However, there were a number of long-term survivors among the leukemic recipients of allogeneic or hybrid marrow cells. Engraftment of allogeneic marrow resulted in a large number of survivors. Hybrid marrow recipients showed an even better survival, but some leukemia relapses. Tests of the longterm survivors revealed that even though they gave no evidence of leukemia they still harbored the active virus. This suggests that the mechanism of protection may be related to some inherent characteristic of the donor cells rendering them refractory to viral transformation. A difference in graft-versus-host (GvH) response between the leukemic and control mice was also found after transplantation of allogeneic cells. While all of the controls died of GvH reaction, none of the leukemic recipients showed severe GvH response, suggesting a possible effect of the leukemia on histocompatibility. No GvH reaction was found with hybrid marrow engraftment, although some of the leukemic recipients reconstituted with F 1 cells did die of leukemic relapse. (author)

  11. Role of Alternative Donor Allogeneic Transplants in the Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmariah, Hany; Pratz, Keith W

    2017-07-01

    Adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is often associated with a poor prognosis, with allogeneic transplantation representing the greatest chance of cure for eligible patients. Historically, the preferred donor source is a human leukocyte antigen-matched blood relative, although only approximately 30% of patients have access to such a donor. Alternative donor sources, including matched unrelated donors, umbilical cord blood, and haploidentical related donors, are available for almost every patient and are increasingly being used for patients without a matched related donor. Survival outcomes with these alternative donor sources now approximate those of matched related donor transplants. Given the safety and success of alternative donor transplants, comparative trials are needed to reassess the optimal donor source for patients with AML. This review summarizes the available data on these alternative donor transplants. Further investigation is needed to contemporize donor selection algorithms, but, in the current era, donor availability should no longer preclude a patient's eligibility for an allogeneic blood or marrow transplant. Copyright © 2017 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  12. Differences in Attitudes Toward Immunosuppressant Therapy in a Multi-ethnic Sample of Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantiner, Melissa; Rosenthal-Asher, Deborah; Tedla, Fasika; Salifu, Moro; Cukor, Judith; Wyka, Katarzyna; Hartono, Choli; Serur, David; de Boccardo, Graciela; Cukor, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    Barriers for renal transplant patients to immunosuppressant medication adherence are poorly understood, despite the high rate and toll of non-adherence. We sought to assess factors that contribute to barriers to immunosuppressive medication adherence in an ethnically diverse sample of 312 renal transplant patients recruited from three transplant centers across New York City. Transplant patients who were at least 6 months post-transplant completed questionnaires while waiting for their medical appointment. Ethnic differences were observed on barriers to immunosuppressant adherence. Black and Hispanic participants reported significantly more barriers to adherence compared to Caucasian participants. Differences in perception about the potential harm and necessity of immunosuppressant medications also were present. Using hierarchical multiple regression, age and income were significant predictors of reported barriers to adherence, even while controlling for ethnicity. The most robust predictor of reported barriers was the perception of the medication cost-benefit differential, i.e., the balance between concerns about immunosuppressant medications and their perceived helpfulness (B = - 0.5, p adherence. Future interventions targeting non-adherence should aim to reduce the barriers to adherence by addressing perceived risks and benefits of taking immunosuppressant medication.

  13. First-line treatment for severe aplastic anemia in children: bone marrow transplantation from a matched family donor versus immunosuppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Nao; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Yabe, Hiromasa; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Yagasaki, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Ken-Ichiro; Kudo, Kazuko; Morimoto, Akira; Ohga, Shouichi; Muramatsu, Hideki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Koji; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Ohara, Akira; Kojima, Seiji

    2014-12-01

    The current treatment approach for severe aplastic anemia in children is based on studies performed in the 1980s, and updated evidence is required. We retrospectively compared the outcomes of children with acquired severe aplastic anemia who received immunosuppressive therapy within prospective trials conducted by the Japanese Childhood Aplastic Anemia Study Group or who underwent bone marrow transplantation from an HLA-matched family donor registered in the Japanese Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Registry. Between 1992 and 2009, 599 children (younger than 17 years) with severe aplastic anemia received a bone marrow transplant from an HLA-matched family donor (n=213) or immunosuppressive therapy (n=386) as first-line treatment. While the overall survival did not differ between patients treated with immunosuppressive therapy or bone marrow transplantation [88% (95% confidence interval: 86-90) versus 92% (90-94)], failure-free survival was significantly inferior in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy than in those undergoing bone marrow transplantation [56% (54-59) versus 87% (85-90); Paplastic anemia. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  14. Evolution of β-Cell Replacement Therapy in Diabetes Mellitus: Islet Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahansouz, Cyrus; Jahansouz, Cameron; Kumer, Sean C.; Brayman, Kenneth L.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 23.6 million people in the United States are affected. Of these individuals, 5 to 10% have been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), an autoimmune disease. Although it often appears in childhood, T1DM may manifest at any age, leading to significant morbidity and decreased quality of life. Since the 1960s, the surgical treatment for diabetes mellitus has evolved to become a viable alternative to insulin administration, beginning with pancreatic transplantation. While islet cell transplantation has emerged as another potential alternative, its role in the treatment of T1DM remains to be solidified as research continues to establish it as a truly viable alternative for achieving insulin independence. In this paper, the historical evolution, procurement, current status, benefits, risks, and ongoing research of islet cell transplantation are explored. PMID:22013505

  15. Association of SNPs with the efficacy and safety of immunosuppressant therapy after heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lázaro, Ignacio; Herrero, María José; Jordán-De Luna, Consuelo; Bosó, Virginia; Almenar, Luis; Rojas, Luis; Martínez-Dolz, Luis; Megías-Vericat, Juan E; Sendra, Luis; Miguel, Antonio; Poveda, José L; Aliño, Salvador F

    2015-01-01

    Studying the possible influence of SNPs on efficacy and safety of calcineurin inhibitors upon heart transplantation. In 60 heart transplant patients treated with tacrolimus or cyclosporine, we studied a panel of 36 SNPs correlated with a series of clinical parameters during the first post-transplantation year. The presence of serious infections was correlated to ABCB1 rs1128503 (p = 0.012), CC genotype reduced the probability of infections being also associated with lower blood cyclosporine concentrations. Lower renal function levels were found in patients with rs9282564 AG (p = 0.003), related to higher blood cyclosporine blood levels. A tendency toward increased graft rejection (p = 0.05) was correlated to rs2066844 CC in NOD2/CARD15, a gene related to lymphocyte activation. Pharmacogenetics can help identify patients at increased risk of clinical complications. Original submitted 30 January 2015; revision submitted 27 March 2015.

  16. Unrelated alternative donor transplantation for severe acquired aplastic anemia: a study from the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapies and the EBMT Severe Aplastic Anemia Working Party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devillier, Raynier; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Kulasekararaj, Austin; D'aveni, Maud; Clément, Laurence; Chybicka, Alicja; Vigouroux, Stéphane; Chevallier, Patrice; Koh, Mickey; Bertrand, Yves; Michallet, Mauricette; Zecca, Marco; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Ljungman, Per; Bernard, Marc; Loiseau, Pascale; Dubois, Valérie; Maury, Sébastien; Socié, Gérard; Dufour, Carlo; Peffault de Latour, Regis

    2016-07-01

    Unrelated allogeneic transplantation for severe aplastic anemia is a treatment option after immunosuppressive treatment failure in the absence of a matched sibling donor. Age, delay between disease diagnosis and transplantation, and HLA matching are the key factors in transplantation decisions, but their combined impact on patient outcomes remains unclear. Using the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapies registry, we analyzed all consecutive patients (n=139) who underwent a first allogeneic transplantation for idiopathic severe aplastic anemia from an unrelated donor between 2000 and 2012. In an adjusted multivariate model, age over 30 years (Hazard Ratio=2.39; P=0.011), time from diagnosis to transplantation over 12 months (Hazard Ratio=2.18; P=0.027) and the use of a 9/10 mismatched unrelated donor (Hazard Ratio=2.14; P=0.036) were independent risk factors that significantly worsened overall survival. Accordingly, we built a predictive score using these three parameters, considering patients at low (zero or one risk factors, n=94) or high (two or three risk factors, n=45) risk. High-risk patients had significantly shorter survival (Hazard Ratio=3.04; Paplastic anemia. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  17. Combination antifungal therapy and surgery for the treatment of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Toffolutti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year old boy, affected by severe aplastic anemia, developed a probable pulmonary invasive aspergillosis (IA early after a second unrelated allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT. He was treated promptly with the combination of liposomal amphotericin B and caspofungin. Despite the initial stabilization, the patient deteriorated and the antifungal therapy was switched to voriconazole and caspofungin. The patient gradually improved and was discharged home on day +29 post-HSCT on oral voriconazole. On day +119, a sudden episode of hemoptysis occurred and a right superior lobectomy was decided to remove the residual aspergilloma. The patient is now alive and well more than 24 months from HSCT. This case demonstrated that antifungal combination therapy and surgery are valid options to cure pulmonary IA even in patients at high-risk and severely immunosuppressed.

  18. Intraoperative anti-thymocyte globulin-Fresenius (ATG-F) administration as induction immunosuppressive therapy in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Jaoude, Maroun M; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2003-07-01

    We reviewed 43 adult kidney transplant patients (32 males and 11 females, 14-68 years of age) performed at our center between July 1999 and February 2002. Donors (39 males and 4 females) comprised two cadaverics, five living-related and 36 living-unrelated; age 18-44 years. Indications for kidney transplantation (KT) were: chronic glomerulonephritis (8), re-transplantation (4) and chronic pyelonephritis (3); kidney disease was unknown in 15 cases. ATG-F was given as a single intra-operative bolus induction therapy in 26 patients; extended ATG-F dose was given in 17 patients because of a high sensitization status, slow graft function (SGF) or development of calcineurin inhibitors toxicity. ATG-F was stopped in seven out of 17 patients because of thrombocytopenia or severe anemia. ATG-F-related fever occurred in six patients. Acute rejection (AR) occurred in eight patients (18%) 5-11 days post-KT. ATG-F was given in three steroid-resistant AR. Infection occurred in 19 patients (44%) for a total of 32 infectious episodes comprising 24 bacterial infections (nine urinary, seven catheter-related and three respiratory), six viral infections (five CMV and one herpes) and two fungal infections (one pulmonary aspergillosis and one catheter-related candidiasis). The hospital stay was 8-75 days for a median of 13 days. The mean serum creatinine upon discharge, at 1 and 6 months after KT were: 2.04+/-0.37, 1.43+/-0.16 and 1.29+/-0.08, respectively. One patient lost his graft on day 9 because of graft microthrombi related to Factor V-Leiden mutation. The 6 months actuarial patient and graft survival were 100 and 97.6%, respectively. ATG-F as a bolus therapy is an effective and safe induction treatment in KT.

  19. [Ethical aspects of human embryonic stem cell use and commercial umbilical cord blood stem cell banking. Ethical reflections on the occasion of the regulation of the European Council and Parliament on advanced therapy medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virt, G

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of the European Council and Parliament on advanced therapy medicinal products also includes therapies with human embryonic stem cells. The use of these stem cells is controversially and heavily discussed. Contrary to the use of adult stem cells, medical and ethical problems concerning the use of human embryonic stem cells persists, because this use is based on the destruction of human life at the very beginning. The regulation foresees, therefore, subsidiarity within the European Member States. Although there are no ethical problems in principle with the use of stem cells from the umbilical cord blood, there are social ethical doubts with the banking of these stem cells for autologous use without any currently foreseeable medical advantage by commercial blood banks. Also in this case subsidiarity is valid.

  20. Intracerebral neural stem cell transplantation improved the auditory of mice with presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongmiao; Chen, Jichuan; Wang, Yinan; Zhang, Shichang; Zhang, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-based regenerative therapy is a potential cellular therapeutic strategy for patients with incurable brain diseases. Embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs) represent an attractive cell source in regenerative medicine strategies in the treatment of diseased brains. Here, we assess the capability of intracerebral embryonic NSCs transplantation for C57BL/6J mice with presbycusis in vivo. Morphology analyses revealed that the neuronal rate of apoptosis was lower in the aged group (10 months of age) but not in the young group (2 months of age) after NSCs transplantation, while the electrophysiological data suggest that the Auditory Brain Stem Response (ABR) threshold was significantly decreased in the aged group at 2 weeks and 3 weeks after transplantation. By contrast, there was no difference in the aged group at 4 weeks post-transplantation or in the young group at any time post-transplantation. Furthermore, immunofluorescence experiments showed that NSCs differentiated into neurons that engrafted and migrated to the brain, even to sites of lesions. Together, our results demonstrate that NSCs transplantation improve the auditory of C57BL/6J mice with presbycusis.

  1. Successful Posaconazole Therapy of Disseminated Alternariosis due to Alternaria infectoria in a Heart Transplant Recipient

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lysková, P.; Kubánek, M.; Hubka, Vít; Sticová, E.; Voska, L.; Kautznerová, D.; Kolařík, Miroslav; Hamal, P.; Vašáková, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 182, 3-4 (2017), s. 297-303 ISSN 0301-486X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Heart transplantation * Phaeohyphomycosis * Pulmonary infection Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 1.710, year: 2016

  2. Successful autologous Stem Cell transplantation in a woman with Severe Systemic Sclerosis, refractory to immunosuppressive therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, Elsa; Arbelaez, Ana M; Avila P, Luz M; Benjamin O, Juan Manuel

    2009-01-01

    The following case presents a 49 year-old patient with diffuse SSc and poor evolution given by rapidly progressive of severe skin and lung involvement, who had undergone autologous stem cell transplantation in December 2008. Sustained improvement of skin thickening and of major organ involvement was achieved at six months.

  3. Mitomycin-treated undifferentiated embryonic stem cells as a safe and effective therapeutic strategy in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana eAcquarone

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is an incurable progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Clinical presentation of PD stems largely from the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway, motivating experimental strategies aimed at replacing dopaminergic innervation by cellular therapy. Transplantation of dopaminergic neurons derived from embryonic stem cells significantly improves motor functions in rodent and non-human primate models of PD. However, protocols to generate dopaminergic neurons from embryonic stem cells generally meet with low efficacy and high risk of teratoma development upon transplantation. To address these issues, we have pre-treated undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs with the DNA alkylating agent mitomycin C (MMC before transplantation. MMC treatment of cultures prevented tumor formation in a 12-week follow-up after mESCs were injected in nude mice. In 6-OH-dopamine-lesioned mice, intrastriatal injection of MMC-treated mESCs markedly improved motor function without tumor formation for as long as 15 months. Furthermore, we show that halting mitotic activity of undifferentiated mESCs induces a four-fold increase in dopamine release following in vitro differentiation. Our findings indicate that treating mESCs with mitomycin C prior to intrastriatal transplant is an effective strategy that could be further investigated as a novel alternative for treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  4. A novel approach to severe acute pancreatitis in sequential liver-kidney transplantation: the first report on the application of VAC therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanus, Giacomo; Boetto, Riccardo; D'Amico, Francesco; Gringeri, Enrico; Vitale, Alessandro; Carraro, Amedeo; Bassi, Domenico; Scopelliti, Michele; Bonsignore, Pasquale; Burra, Patrizia; Angeli, Paolo; Feltracco, Paolo; Cillo, Umberto

    2011-03-01

    This work is the first report of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy applied as a life-saving surgical treatment for severe acute pancreatitis occurring in a sequential liver- and kidney-transplanted patient who had percutaneous biliary drainage for obstructive "late-onset" jaundice. Surgical exploration with necrosectomy and sequential laparotomies was performed because of increasing intra-abdominal pressure with hemodynamic instability and intra-abdominal multidrug-resistant sepsis, with increasingly difficult abdominal closure. Repeated laparotomies with VAC therapy (applying a continuous negative abdominal pressure) enabled a progressive, successful abdominal decompression, with the clearance of infection and definitive abdominal wound closure. The application of a negative pressure is a novel approach to severe abdominal sepsis and laparostomy management with a view to preventing compartment syndrome and fatal sepsis, and it can lead to complete abdominal wound closure. © 2010 The Authors. Transplant International © 2010 European Society for Organ Transplantation.

  5. Embryonic Cell Grafts in a Culture Model of Spinal Cord Lesion: Neuronal Relay Formation is Essential for Functional Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Tscherter

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Presently there exists no cure for spinal cord injury. However, transplantation of embryonic tissue into spinal cord lesions resulted in axon outgrowth across the lesion site and some functional recovery, fostering hope for future stem cell therapies. Although in vivo evidence for functional recovery is given, the exact cellular mechanism of the graft support remains elusive: either the grafted cells provide a permissive environment for the host tissue to regenerate itself or the grafts actually integrate functionally into the host neuronal network reconnecting the separated spinal cord circuits. We tested the two hypotheses in an in vitro spinal cord lesion model that is based on propagation of activity between two rat organotypic spinal cord slices in culture. Transplantation of dissociated cells from E14 rat spinal cord or forebrain re-established the relay of activity over the lesion site and, thus, provoked functional regeneration. Combining patch-clamp recordings from transplanted cells with network activity measurements from the host tissue on multi-electrode arrays we here show that neurons differentiate from the grafted cells and integrate into the host circuits. Optogenetic silencing of neurons developed from transplanted embryonic mouse forebrain cells provides clear evidence that they replace the lost neuronal connections to relay and synchronize activity between the separated spinal cord circuits. In contrast, transplantation of neurospheres induced neither the differentiation of mature neurons from the grafts nor an improvement of functional regeneration. Together these findings suggest, that the formation of neuronal relays from grafted embryonic cells is essential to re-connect segregated spinal cord circuits.

  6. Bio-engineering inslulin-secreting cells from embryonic stem cells: a review of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, E; Sepulcre, M P; Enseñat-Waser, R; Maestre, I; Reig, J A; Soria, B

    2003-07-01

    According to the Edmonton protocol, human islet transplantation can result in insulin independency for periods longer than 3 years. However, this therapy for type 1 diabetes is limited by the scarcity of cadaveric donors. Owing to the ability of embryonic stem cells to expand in vitro and differentiate into a variety of cell types, research has focused on ways to manipulate these cells to overcome this problem. It has been demonstrated that mouse embryonic stem cells can differentiate into insulin-containing cells, restoring normoglycaemia in diabetic mice. To this end, mouse embryonic stem cells were transfected with a DNA construct that provides resistance to neomycin under the control of the regulatory regions of the human insulin gene. However, this protocol has a very low efficiency, needing improvements for this technology to be transferred to human stem cells. Optimum protocols will be instrumental in the production of an unlimited source of cells that synthesise, store and release insulin in a physiological manner. The review focuses on the alternative source of tissue offered by embryonic stem cells for regenerative medicine in diabetes and some key points that should be considered in order for a definitive protocol for in vitro differentiation to be established.

  7. Chronic digitalis therapy in patients before heart transplantation is an independent risk factor for increased posttransplant mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivinius R

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rasmus Rivinius,1 Matthias Helmschrott,1 Arjang Ruhparwar,2 Ann-Kathrin Rahm,1,3 Fabrice F Darche,1 Dierk Thomas,1 Tom Bruckner,4 Philipp Ehlermann,1 Hugo A Katus,1 Andreas O Doesch1,5 1Department of Cardiology, Angiology and Pneumology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, 2Department of Cardiac Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, 3Faculty of Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 4Institute for Medical Biometry and Informatics, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 5Asklepios Klinik Bad Salzungen GmbH, Department of Pneumology and Oncology, Bad Salzungen, Germany Objectives: Digitalis therapy (digoxin or digitoxin in patients with heart failure is subject to an ongoing debate. Recent data suggest an increased mortality in patients receiving digitalis. This study investigated the effects of chronic digitalis therapy prior to heart transplantation (HTX on posttransplant outcomes.Patients and methods: This was a retrospective, observational, single-center study. It comprised 530 adult patients who were heart-transplanted at Heidelberg University Hospital between 1989 and 2012. Patients with digitalis prior to HTX (≥3 months were compared to those without (no or <3 months of digitalis. Patients with digitalis were further subdivided into patients receiving digoxin or digitoxin. Primary outcomes were early posttransplant atrial fibrillation and mortality.Results: A total of 347 patients (65.5% had digitalis before HTX. Of these, 180 received digoxin (51.9% and 167 received digitoxin (48.1%. Patients with digitalis before HTX had a significantly lower 30-day (P=0.0148 and 2-year (P=0.0473 survival. There was no significant difference between digoxin and digitoxin in 30-day (P=0.9466 or 2-year (P=0.0723 survival. Multivariate analysis for posttransplant 30-day mortality showed pretransplant digitalis therapy as an independent risk factor (hazard ratio =2.097, CI: 1.036–4.248, P=0.0397. Regarding atrial

  8. Surveillance of polyomavirus BK in relation to immunosuppressive therapy in kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Costa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reactivation of polyomavirus BK in kidney transplant recipients has been associated to the development of nephropathy (polyomavirus-associated nephropathy, PVAN, possibly leading to the loss of the transplanted organ. Immunosuppression is the condicio sine qua non for the onset of PVAN; however, a lower incidence of BK viremia has been reported with low-level tacrolimus based immunosuppressive protocols in comparison to cyclosporine A.Aim of this study was to compare the two immunosuppressive protocols. Methods. Virological monitoring of BK was performed in 468 consecutive renal transplant patients over a period of 3 years (2370 urine e 2370 serum specimens: in particular, 1780 specimens from 362 patients treated with tacrolimus and 590 from 106 treated with cyclosporine A. Results. BK viremia was evidenced in 124 (7.0% and 12 (2.0% specimens from 40 (11.0% and 11 (10.4% patients treated with tacrolimus and cyclosporine A, respectively; similarly, BK viruria in 289 (16.2% and 58 (9.8% specimens from 67 (18.5% and 27 (25.5% patients, being the difference of incidence highly significant (p <0.0001 for both viremia and viruria at comparison between specimens and not significant for patients. No case of PVAN was diagnosed at histophatology evaluation. Conclusions. The incidence of viremia and viruria was similar to that previously reported. Our results evidenced that with low-level tacrolimus-based protocols the overall incidence of reactivation in renal transplant patients is not significantly different and there is no increased risk of PVAN, nevertheless the higher incidence of episodes of reactivation.

  9. Effect of cyclosporine therapy in transplanted patients-diagnostic values of tubular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todor Gruev

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of cyclosporine A (CsA into the clinical practice has resulted in a major improvement in the short-term outcomes of solid organ transplantation and treatment of autoimune diseases. Chronic ScA nephrotoxicity has been described in kidneys of recepients of renal and other organ allografts. However, the exact mechanism underlying the development of fibrosis in chronic CsA nephrotoxicity has remained poorly understood. Evaluation with the validation data set showed that noninvasive urine protein differentiation might be a useful diagnostic strategy in nephrology. Over the past decade numerous studies in patients after transplantation have demonstrated that renal tubular cell injury after a toxic insult, results in sloughing of tubular debris and cell into the tubular lumen with eventual obstruction of tubular flow, increased intratubular pressure and backleak of glomerular filtrate out of the tubule. Urinary enzymes and low molecular proteins have been recommended as useful markers for the detection of changes in the kidney tissue in cases after renal transplantation. The aim of our study was to monitor the concentration and eventual nephrotoxic effect of Cyclosporine A using the concentration of low molecular proteins α-1-microglobulin and β−2-microglobulin, serum Cystatin C, as well as the concentration of isoform of GST-α and π.

  10. Use of Renal Replacement Therapy May Influence Graft Outcomes following Liver Transplantation for Acute Liver Failure: A Propensity-Score Matched Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Stephen R; Oniscu, Gabriel C; Devey, Luke; Simpson, Kenneth J; Wigmore, Stephen J; Harrison, Ewen M

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is associated with a poor prognosis in acute liver failure but little is known of outcomes in patients undergoing transplantation for acute liver failure who require renal replacement therapy. A retrospective analysis of the United Kingdom Transplant Registry was performed (1 January 2001-31 December 2011) with patient and graft survival determined using Kaplan-Meier methods. Cox proportional hazards models were used together with propensity-score based full matching on renal replacement therapy use. Three-year patient and graft survival for patients receiving renal replacement therapy were 77.7% and 72.6% compared with 85.1% and 79.4% for those not requiring renal replacement therapy (Prenal replacement therapy was a predictor of both patient death (hazard ratio (HR) 1.59, 95% CI 1.01-2.50, P = 0.044) but not graft loss (HR 1.39, 95% CI 0.92-2.10, P = 0.114). In groups fully matched on baseline covariates, those not receiving renal replacement therapy with a serum creatinine greater than 175 μmol/L had a significantly worse risk of graft failure than those receiving renal replacement therapy. In patients being transplanted for acute liver failure, use of renal replacement therapy is a strong predictor of patient death and graft loss. Those not receiving renal replacement therapy with an elevated serum creatinine may be at greater risk of early graft failure than those receiving renal replacement therapy. A low threshold for instituting renal replacement therapy may therefore be beneficial.

  11. Pancreas transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, J.; Phillips, R.R.; Boardman, P.; Gleeson, F.V.; Anderson, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Cadaveric, whole pancreas transplantation has proved an effective therapy in the treatment of long-standing type 1 diabetes mellitus and is capable of achieving an insulin-independent eugyclaemic state. As a result, this procedure is being increasingly performed. However, the surgical procedure is complex and unfamiliar to many radiologists. Imaging with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gives excellent results and can be used confidently to diagnose vascular, enteric, and immune-mediated complications. We present a review of the normal post-transplantation appearance and the features of early and late complications.

  12. Pancreas transplants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, J.; Phillips, R.R.; Boardman, P.; Gleeson, F.V. [Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom); Anderson, E.M. [Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Headington, Oxford (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ewan.anderson@orh.nhs.uk

    2009-07-15

    Cadaveric, whole pancreas transplantation has proved an effective therapy in the treatment of long-standing type 1 diabetes mellitus and is capable of achieving an insulin-independent eugyclaemic state. As a result, this procedure is being increasingly performed. However, the surgical procedure is complex and unfamiliar to many radiologists. Imaging with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gives excellent results and can be used confidently to diagnose vascular, enteric, and immune-mediated complications. We present a review of the normal post-transplantation appearance and the features of early and late complications.

  13. Effects of single-agent bortezomib as post-transplant consolidation therapy on multiple myeloma-related bone disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sezer, Orhan; Beksac, Meral; Hajek, Roman

    2017-01-01

    This phase II study explored the effects of bortezomib consolidation versus observation on myeloma-related bone disease in patients who had a partial response or better after frontline high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation. Patients were randomized to receive four 35-day cycles...... from baseline to end of treatment in bone mineral density (BMD). End-of-treatment rates (bortezomib versus observation) of complete response/stringent complete response were 22% vs. 11% (P = 0·19), very good partial response or better of 80% vs. 68% (P = 0·17), and progressive disease of 8% vs. 23% (P...... with observation, bortezomib appeared to have little impact on bone metabolism/health, but was associated with trends for improved myeloma response and survival....

  14. Febrile neutropenia in paediatric peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, in vitro sensitivity data and clinical response to empirical antibiotic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, S.H.; Nasim, S.; Ahmed, A.; Irfan, M.; Ishaque, A.; Farzana, T.; Panjwani, V.K.; Taj, M.; Shamsi, T.S.

    2006-01-01

    To find the in-vitro sensitivity data and clinical response in order to determine the changes required in empiric antibiotic therapy for management of febrile neutropenia in paediatric patients undergoing peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. All patients were treated according to institutional protocol for febrile neutropenia. Empirical antibiotics include Ceftriaxone and Amikacin. In non-responders, changes made included Imipenem and Amikacin, Piperacillin Tazobactum/Tiecoplanin or Vancomycin/Cloxacilin/Ceftazidime. In non-responders, amphotaracin was added until recovery. Out of 52 patients, 5 did not develop any fever; in the remaining 47 patients there were 57 episodes of febrile neutropenia. The mean days of febrile episodes were 4.71 (range 3-8). Fever of unknown origin (FUO) occurred in 31 (54.3%) episodes. Microbiologically documented infection (MDI) occurred in 17 (29.8%) episodes of fever. Clinically documented infection (CDI) occurred in 9 (15.7%) episodes. Gram-negative organisms were isolated in 10 while gram-positive organisms in 7. Klebseilla, S. aureus were the most common isolates. Empirical therapy was effective in 12 of the 33 (36%) episodes. Out of 28, 26 (92%) responded to Imipenem/Amikacin as second line therapy while those who received any other second line combination, only 11 out of 22 (50%) showed response. Systemic Amphotericin was used in 4 patients, 2 responded. Infection related mortality rate was 4%. (author)

  15. High-dose therapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation for Hodgkin's disease patients with relapses potentially treatable by radical radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezner, Richard D.; Nademanee, Auayporn; Forman, Stephen J.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective review evaluated the results of autologous bone marrow transplantation (A-BMT) for patients with relapsed Hodgkin's disease (HD) who were potentially treatable by radical radiation therapy (RRT). Methods and Materials: Evaluated patient cases met the following criteria: initial treatment with chemotherapy (with or without involved field radiation therapy 20 Gy to spinal cord); HD at time of salvage therapy limited to lymph nodes, Waldeyer's ring, liver, spleen, direct extension sites, and/or one lung. Results: There were 23 A-BMT patients treated between 1986 and 1991 who fulfilled the criteria. Three (13%) patients died from treatment-related complications and eight (35%) developed nonfatal Grade 3-4 complications. The 3-year actuarial disease-free survival rate was 61%. The 3-year disease-free survival rate was 55% for the nine patients with at least one prior disease-free interval (DFI) > 12 months, 67% for nine patients with DFI 0.10). These results are comparable to retrospective studies of RRT results in selected relapsed HD patients. Conclusions: Long-term disease-free survival is frequently possible with either A-BMT or RRT appropriately selected relapsed HD patients. In considering treatment options, important prognostic factors include initial stage of disease, number of prior relapses, DFI, and extent of relapsed disease

  16. Transplantation of umbilical cord blood-derived cells for novel indications in regenerative therapy or immune modulation: a scoping review of clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iafolla, Marco A J; Tay, Jason; Allan, David S

    2014-01-01

    Although used mainly for transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells in the treatment of blood disorders, umbilical cord blood (UCB)-based therapies are now being used increasingly for novel applications in nonhematopoietic diseases and as a form of cellular regenerative therapy or immune modulation. We performed a systematic scoping review by searching Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for published articles, and we searched www.clinicaltrials.com and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform to describe the breadth of published studies and ongoing clinical activity in umbilical cord-based cellular therapy for regenerative therapy and immune modulation. The most commonly published area of expertise in the use of UCB-derived cellular transplantation for novel indications is for neurological disorders and this remains the most active area of study in ongoing registered trials. An increasingly broad range of disorders, however, are reflected in ongoing registered trials, which suggests greater activity, interest, and investment in UCB-derived cellular therapy. Interestingly, adult patients compose the majority of patients reported in published reports and registered ongoing clinical studies continue to enroll predominantly adult subjects. Geographically, Asian countries appear most active in UCB-derived cellular therapy and our analysis of ongoing studies suggests this trend will likely continue. Regular assessment of published and ongoing activity in UCB transplantation for emerging novel indications will be critical for informing UCB banking establishments and funding agencies to guide changes in banking practices related to emerging trends in cell therapy. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. In vitro generation of three-dimensional substrate-adherent embryonic stem cell-derived neural aggregates for application in animal models of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargus, Gunnar; Cui, Yi-Fang; Dihné, Marcel; Bernreuther, Christian; Schachner, Melitta

    2012-05-01

    In vitro-differentiated embryonic stem (ES) cells comprise a useful source for cell replacement therapy, but the efficiency and safety of a translational approach are highly dependent on optimized protocols for directed differentiation of ES cells into the desired cell types in vitro. Furthermore, the transplantation of three-dimensional ES cell-derived structures instead of a single-cell suspension may improve graft survival and function by providing a beneficial microenvironment for implanted cells. To this end, we have developed a new method to efficiently differentiate mouse ES cells into neural aggregates that consist predominantly (>90%) of postmitotic neurons, neural progenitor cells, and radial glia-like cells. When transplanted into the excitotoxically lesioned striatum of adult mice, these substrate-adherent embryonic stem cell-derived neural aggregates (SENAs) showed significant advantages over transplanted single-cell suspensions of ES cell-derived neural cells, including improved survival of GABAergic neurons, increased cell migration, and significantly decreased risk of teratoma formation. Furthermore, SENAs mediated functional improvement after transplantation into animal models of Parkinson's disease and spinal cord injury. This unit describes in detail how SENAs are efficiently derived from mouse ES cells in vitro and how SENAs are isolated for transplantation. Furthermore, methods are presented for successful implantation of SENAs into animal models of Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, and spinal cord injury to study the effects of stem cell-derived neural aggregates in a disease context in vivo.

  18. Generation of Transplantable Beta Cells for Patient-Specific Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojie Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation offers a potential cure for type 1 diabetes, but it is challenged by insufficient donor tissue and side effects of current immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, alternative sources of insulin-producing cells and isletfriendly immunosuppression are required to increase the efficiency and safety of this procedure. Beta cells can be transdifferentiated from precursors or another heterologous (non-beta-cell source. Recent advances in beta cell regeneration from somatic cells such as fibroblasts could circumvent the usage of immunosuppressive drugs. Therefore, generation of patient-specific beta cells provides the potential of an evolutionary treatment for patients with diabetes.

  19. Liver transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatic transplant; Transplant - liver; Orthotopic liver transplant; Liver failure - liver transplant; Cirrhosis - liver transplant ... The donated liver may be from: A donor who has recently died and has not had liver injury. This type of ...

  20. Hair Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Skin Experts Skin Treatments Hair Transplants Share » HAIR TRANSPLANTS Before (left) and after (right) - front of ... transplant. Photo courtesy of N. Sadick What are hair transplants? In punch transplanting, a plug containing hair ...

  1. Pre-transplant donor-specific T-cell alloreactivity is strongly associated with early acute cellular rejection in kidney transplant recipients not receiving T-cell depleting induction therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Crespo

    Full Text Available Preformed T-cell immune-sensitization should most likely impact allograft outcome during the initial period after kidney transplantation, since donor-specific memory T-cells may rapidly recognize alloantigens and activate the effector immune response, which leads to allograft rejection. However, the precise time-frame in which acute rejection is fundamentally triggered by preformed donor-specific memory T cells rather than by de novo activated naïve T cells is still to be established. Here, preformed donor-specific alloreactive T-cell responses were evaluated using the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay in a large consecutive cohort of kidney transplant patients (n = 90, to assess the main clinical variables associated with cellular sensitization and its predominant time-frame impact on allograft outcome, and was further validated in an independent new set of kidney transplant recipients (n = 67. We found that most highly T-cell sensitized patients were elderly patients with particularly poor HLA class-I matching, without any clinically recognizable sensitizing events. While one-year incidence of all types of biopsy-proven acute rejection did not differ between T-cell alloreactive and non-alloreactive patients, Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis indicated the first two months after transplantation as the highest risk time period for acute cellular rejection associated with baseline T-cell sensitization. This effect was particularly evident in young and highly alloreactive individuals that did not receive T-cell depletion immunosuppression. Multivariate analysis confirmed preformed T-cell sensitization as an independent predictor of early acute cellular rejection. In summary, monitoring anti-donor T-cell sensitization before transplantation may help to identify patients at increased risk of acute cellular rejection, particularly in the early phases after kidney transplantation, and thus guide decision-making regarding the use of induction

  2. Impact of everolimus: update on immunosuppressive therapy strategies and patient outcomes after renal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio Tedesco-Silva Jr

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Helio Tedesco-Silva Jr, Claudia Rosso Felipe, Tainá Veras de Sandes Freitas, Marina Pontello Cristeli, Carolina Araújo Rodrigues, José Osmar Medina PestanaNephrology Division, Hospital do Rim e Hipertensão, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Everolimus is an immunosuppressive agent used for the prophylaxis of acute rejection after kidney transplantation. Everolimus inhibits the activity of the serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, a key enzyme that controls cell growth and metabolism, producing cell cycle arrest from the G1 to S phase. As a consequence, everolimus has antiproliferative and antineoplastic effects. Everolimus is a drug with a narrow therapeutic index. The pharmacokinetics of everolimus indicates a need for twice-daily dosing. Intra- and interindividual variability and drug–drug interactions suggest the need for therapeutic drug monitoring to maximize the efficacy/toxicity ratio. The good correlation between exposure (area under the concentration–time curve and trough concentration indicates that monitoring of everolimus trough concentrations is an adequate strategy after kidney transplantation. Everolimus is indicated for low- to moderate-risk de novo kidney transplant candidates. There are no conclusive studies thus far indicating that everolimus can be used in high-risk patients, such as sensitized patients, retransplants, and African Americans. In de novo kidney transplant recipients, the recommended initial dose of everolimus is 0.75 mg twice daily, adjusted to maintain blood trough concentrations of 3–8 ng/mL, in combination with progressive reduction in blood trough cyclosporine concentrations to 25–50 ng/mL. In combination with reduced trough blood tacrolimus concentrations of 4–7 ng/mL the recommended initial dose of everolimus is 1.5 mg twice daily, adjusted to maintain trough blood concentrations of 3–8 ng/mL. Everolimus can also be used as a conversion strategy

  3. Comparison of daclizumab, an interleukin 2 receptor antibody, to anti-thymocyte globulin-Fresenius induction therapy in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Jaoude, Maroun M; Ghantous, Imad; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2003-07-01

    The efficacy and safety of daclizumab and anti-thymocyte globulin-Fresenius (ATG-F) as induction therapy in kidney transplantation (KT) were investigated in 45 KT performed in our center between March and May 2002. Group II (n=10) received daclizumab as induction therapy, and Group I (n=35) were induced with a single intraoperative bolus therapy of ATG-F. All patients were at low-risk, and the recipient and donor demographics, as well the immunosuppression regimen employed were comparable in both groups. Drug safety, assessed by the occurrence of side effects, was almost comparable in the two groups, except for more thrombocytopenia in Group II (P<0.0004). Acute rejection (AR) occurred in 10% in Group I and 11.4% in Group II (P=NS). There were more infections in Group II (42.8%) than in Group I (10%) (P<0.009). Bacterial and viral infections were more common in Group II (69 and 23%) than in Group I (10 and 0%) (P<0.05). The hospital stay was similar in both groups. Mean serum creatinine levels upon discharge, at 1, 3 and 6 months were: 1.23+/-0.11, 1.21+/-0.06, 1.25+/-0.11 and 1.35+/-0.08 in Group I and 2.18+/-0.43, 1.49+/-0.16, 1.49+/-0.16 and 1.35+/-0.08 in Group II, respectively. While better serum creatinine levels were observed in Group I upon discharge (P<0.048), this was due to the presence of more sensitized patients in Group II. The 6 months actuarial patient and graft survival were identical in both groups (100 and 100%, respectively). Although both daclizumab and ATG-F were effective and safe as induction therapy in KT, less bacterial and viral infections and lower early serum creatinine levels were noted in daclizumab-treated patients.

  4. Embryonic vaccines against cancer: an early history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Bradley G; Mitchell, Robert A; Harandi, Amir; Eaton, John W

    2009-06-01

    Almost 100 years have passed since the seminal observations of Schöne showing that vaccination of animals with fetal tissue would prevent the growth of transplantable tumors. Many subsequent reports have affirmed the general idea that immunologic rejection of transplantable tumors, as well as prevention of carcinogenesis, may be affected by vaccination with embryonic/fetal material. Following a decade of intense research on this phenomenon during approximately 1964-1974, interest appears to have waned. This earlier experimental work may be particularly pertinent in view of the rising interest in so-called cancer stem cells. We believe that further work - perhaps involving the use of embryonic stem cells as immunogens - is warranted and that the results reviewed herein support the concept that vaccination against the appearance of cancers of all kinds is a real possibility.

  5. Piperacillin-tazobactam vs. imipenem-cilastatin as empirical therapy in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients with febrile neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yu; Li, Jian; Yuan, Lei; Zhao, Xiaoli; Wang, Quanshun; Yu, Li; Zhou, Daobin; Huang, Wenrong

    2016-03-01

    This randomized, dual-center study compared the efficacy and safety of piperacillin-tazobactam (PTZ) and imipenem-cilastatin (IMP) in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients with febrile neutropenia. HSCT recipients with febrile neutropenia were randomized into two groups receiving either PTZ or IMP as initial empiric antibiotic. Endpoints were defervescence rate after empiric antibiotic for 48 h, success at end of therapy, and side effects. Defervescence within 48 h after empiric antibiotic was observed in 46 patients with PTZ (75.4%) and 59 patients with IMP (95.2%) (p = 0.002). Ten patients (10/46) in the PTZ group and two patients (2/59) in the IMP group switched empiric antibiotics due to recurrent fever (p = 0.005). Success of initial antibiotic with modification was achieved in 34 patients with PTZ (55.7%) and 53 patients with IMP (85.5%) at the end of therapy (p = 0.001). To treat the bacteremia, seven of 10 patients in the PTZ group and one of eight patients in the IMP group needed to switch the empiric antibiotic (p = 0.025). Compared with PTZ, IMP had more gastrointestinal adverse events (p = 0.045). This study demonstrates that IMP had better efficacy than PTZ as an empiric antibiotic for febrile neutropenia in the HSCT setting, but with more gastrointestinal side reactions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Cell-Based Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Kitada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell transplantation is a strategy with great potential for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and many types of stem cells, including neural stem cells and embryonic stem cells, are considered candidates for transplantation therapy. Mesenchymal stem cells are a great therapeutic cell source because they are easy accessible and can be expanded from patients or donor mesenchymal tissues without posing serious ethical and technical problems. They have trophic effects for protecting damaged tissues as well as differentiation ability to generate a broad spectrum of cells, including dopamine neurons, which contribute to the replenishment of lost cells in Parkinson's disease. This paper focuses mainly on the potential of mesenchymal stem cells as a therapeutic cell source and discusses their potential clinical application in Parkinson's disease.

  7. Imaging of hepatic toxicity of systemic therapy in a tertiary cancer centre: chemotherapy, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, molecular targeted therapies, and immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandrino, F; Tirumani, S H; Krajewski, K M; Shinagare, A B; Jagannathan, J P; Ramaiya, N H; Di Salvo, D N

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this review is to familiarise radiologists with the spectrum of hepatic toxicity seen in the oncology setting, in view of the different systemic therapies used in cancer patients. Drug-induced liver injury can manifest in various forms, and anti-neoplastic agents are associated with different types of hepatotoxicity. Although chemotherapy-induced liver injury can present as hepatitis, steatosis, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, and chronic parenchymal damages, molecular targeted therapy-associated liver toxicity ranges from mild liver function test elevation to fulminant life-threatening acute liver failure. The recent arrival of immune checkpoint inhibitors in oncology has introduced a new range of immune-related adverse events, with differing mechanisms of liver toxicity and varied imaging presentation of liver injury. High-dose chemotherapy regimens for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation are associated with sinusoidal obstruction syndrome. Management of hepatic toxicity depends on the clinical scenario, the drug in use, and the severity of the findings. In this article, we will (1) present the most common types of oncological drugs associated with hepatic toxicity and associated liver injuries; (2) illustrate imaging findings of hepatic toxicities and the possible differential diagnosis; and (3) provide a guide for management of these conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. First-Line Matched Related Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Compared to Immunosuppressive Therapy in Acquired Severe Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinemann, Frank; Grouven, Ulrich; Kröger, Nicolaus; Bartel, Carmen; Pittler, Max H.; Lange, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acquired severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is a rare and progressive disease characterized by an immune-mediated functional impairment of hematopoietic stem cells. Transplantation of these cells is a first-line treatment option if HLA-matched related donors are available. First-line immunosuppressive therapy may be offered as alternative. The aim was to compare the outcome of these patients in controlled trials. Methods A systematic search was performed in the bibliographic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, and The Cochrane Library. To show an overview of various outcomes by treatment group we conducted a meta-analysis on overall survival. We evaluated whether studies reported statistically significant factors for improved survival. Results 26 non-randomized controlled trials (7,955 patients enrolled from 1970 to 2001) were identified. We did not identify any RCTs. Risk of bias was high except in 4 studies. Young age and recent year of treatment were identified as factors for improved survival in the HSCT group. Advanced age, SAA without very severe aplastic anemia, and combination of anti-lymphocyte globulin with cyclosporine A were factors for improved survival in the IST group. In 19 studies (4,855 patients), summary statistics were sufficient to be included in meta-analysis. Considerable heterogeneity did not justify a pooled estimate. Adverse events were inconsistently reported and varied significantly across studies. Conclusions Young age and recent year of treatment were identified as factors for improved survival in the transplant group. Advanced age, SAA without very severe aplastic anemia, and combination of anti-lymphocyte globulin with cyclosporine A were factors for improved survival in the immunosuppressive group. Considerable heterogeneity of non-randomized controlled studies did not justify a pooled estimate. Adverse events were inconsistently reported and varied significantly across studies. PMID:21541024

  9. Renal function in heart transplant patients after switch to combined mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor and calcineurin inhibitor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmschrott M

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Matthias Helmschrott,1 Rasmus Rivinius,1 Thomas Bruckner,2 Hugo A Katus,1 Andreas O Doesch1 1Department of Cardiology, Angiology, Pneumology, 2Institute for Medical Biometry and Informatics, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Background: A calcineurin inhibitor (CNI-based immunosuppression combined with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTORs seems to be attractive in patients after heart transplantation (HTX in special clinical situations, for example, in patients with adverse drug effects of prior immunosuppression. Previous studies in patients after HTX detected advantageous effects regarding renal function of a tacrolimus (TAC-based vs cyclosporine-A (CSA-based immunosuppression (in combination with mycophenolate mofetil. However, data regarding renal function after HTX in mTOR/CNI patients remain limited. Aim: Primary end point of the present study was to analyze renal function in HTX patients 1 year after switch to an mTOR/CNI-based immunosuppression. Methods: Data of 80 HTX patients after change to mTOR/CNI-based immunosuppression were retrospectively analyzed. Renal function was assessed by measured serum creatinine and by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR calculated from Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. Results: Twenty-nine patients received mTOR/CSA-based treatment and 51 patients received mTOR/TAC-based therapy. At time of switch and at 1-year follow-up, serum creatinine and eGFR did not differ significantly between both study groups (all P=not statistically significant. Analysis of variances with repeated measurements detected a similar change of renal function in both study groups. Conclusion: The present study detected no significant differences between both mTOR/CNI study groups, indicating a steady state of renal function in HTX patients after switch of immunosuppressive regimen. Keywords: heart transplantation, cyclosporine A, tacrolimus, risk factors

  10. C1 Inhibitor in Acute Antibody-Mediated Rejection Nonresponsive to Conventional Therapy in Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viglietti, D; Gosset, C; Loupy, A; Deville, L; Verine, J; Zeevi, A; Glotz, D; Lefaucheur, C

    2016-05-01

    Complement inhibitors have not been thoroughly evaluated in the treatment of acute antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). We performed a prospective, single-arm pilot study to investigate the potential effects and safety of C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) Berinert added to high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) for the treatment of acute ABMR that is nonresponsive to conventional therapy. Kidney recipients with nonresponsive active ABMR and acute allograft dysfunction were enrolled between April 2013 and July 2014 and received C1-INH and IVIG for 6 months (six patients). The primary end point was the change in eGFR at 6 months after inclusion (M+6). Secondary end points included the changes in histology and DSA characteristics and adverse events as evaluated at M+6. All patients showed an improvement in eGFR between inclusion and M+6: from 38.7 ± 17.9 to 45.2 ± 21.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (p = 0.0277). There was no change in histological features, except a decrease in the C4d deposition rate from 5/6 to 1/6 (p = 0.0455). There was a change in DSA C1q status from 6/6 to 1/6 positive (p = 0.0253). One deep venous thrombosis was observed. In a secondary analysis, C1-INH patients were compared with a similar historical control group (21 patients). C1-INH added to IVIG is safe and may improve allograft function in kidney recipients with nonresponsive acute ABMR. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  11. [Information and consent forms for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation donors and recipients: Guidelines from the Franchophone society of bone marrow transplantation and cellular therapy (SFGM-TC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Bénédicte; Thibert, Jean-Baptiste; Bancillon, Nelly; Desbos, Anna; Fawaz, Abir; Fournier, Isabelle; Genty, Carole; Issarni, Dominique; Leveille, Sandrine; Premel, Christelle; Polomeni, Alice; Renault, Myriam; Tarillon, Sylvie; Wallart, Anne; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Bordessoule, Dominique

    2016-11-01

    Within the context of the SFGM-TC's 6th workshop series on the harmonization of clinical practices, our workshop proposes a standardization of the informed consent process for hematopoietic stem cell donors and recipients leading up to an autologous or allogenic transplantation. All informed consent was for bone marrow or peripheral stem cell donors, and mononuclear/lymphocyte donors according to usual procedures. The informed consent for autologous and allogenic related or unrelated adults and pediatric transplantation patients have been included. A first step has been conducted for collecting in advance the informed consent forms used routinely in all francophone transplantation centers. In a second step, a comprehensive version has been re-written by a multidisciplinary team. For the purposes of understanding the risks and advantages, language has been carefully considered and streamlined. In the third step, texts were sent to stem cell transplantation experts, experts at the French biomedical agency (agence de la biomédecine [ABM]), law specialists, members of the ethical committee of the French society of hematology and several transplant recipients to be edited and proofread. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Hyperosmolar nonketotic hyperglycemic coma induced by methylprednisolone pulse therapy for acute rejection after liver transplantation: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou J

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jian Zhou,* Weiqiang Ju,* Xiaopeng Yuan, Xiaofeng Zhu, Dongping Wang, Xiaoshun HeOrgan Transplant Center, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Hyperosmolar nonketotic hyperglycemic coma (HNKHC is a serious, rare complication induced by methylprednisolone (MP pulse therapy for acute rejection after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT. Herein, we report an unusual case of a 58-year-old woman who experienced acute rejection at 30 months after OLT, only one case in which HNKHC resulted in MP pulse therapy for acute rejection in all 913 recipients in our center. The general morbidity of HNKHC was 1.09‰ in this study. HNKHC is characterized by rapid onset, rapid progression, and a lack of specific clinical manifestations. High-dose MP management was a clear risk factor. The principle of treatment included rapid rehydration, low-dose insulin infusion, and correcting disorders of electrolytes and acidosis. In conclusion, clinicians considering MP pulse therapy after OLT should be alert to the occurrence of HNKHC. Keywords: liver transplantation, complications, hyperosmolar nonketotic hyperglycemic coma, methylprednisolone pulse therapy, principle of treatment

  13. State-of-the-art implantable cardiac assist device therapy for heart failure: bridge to transplant and destination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S J; Kushwaha, S S; McGregor, C G A

    2012-01-01

    Congestive heart failure is associated with poor quality of life (QoL) and low survival rates. The development of state-of-the-art cardiac devices holds promise for improved therapy in patients with heart failure. The field of implantable cardiac assist devices is changing rapidly with the emergence of continuous-flow pumps (CFPs). The important developments in this field, including pertinent clinical trials, registry reports, innovative research, and potential future directions are discussed in this paper.

  14. Association of elevated pretransplant sCD30 levels with graft loss in 206 patients treated with modern immunosuppressive therapies after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Falko M; Rebmann, Vera; Witzke, Oliver; Philipp, Thomas; Broelsch, Christoph E; Grosse-Wilde, Hans

    2007-03-27

    Recent reports suggest that high pretransplant serum levels of soluble CD30 (sCD30) are a risk factor for rejections after kidney transplantation. The aim of our study was to elucidate the predictive value of pretransplant sCD30 levels for kidney transplantation outcome in a single-center patient cohort that has been treated with modern immunosuppressive therapies after transplantation. We retrospectively analyzed sCD30 in multiple pretransplant sera from 206 patients, of whom 174 were transplanted with a cadaveric kidney and 32 patients received an allograft from a living donor. Renal function after transplantation was estimated by measuring serum creatinine and by rejection diagnosis. We could demonstrate a statistically significant association between increased pretransplant sCD30 values and graft failures (P=0.005). Receiver operating curve analysis revealed a cutoff value of 124 U/mL pretransplant sCD30. A multivariate analysis confirmed pretransplant sCD30 values >124 U/mL (P=0.011) and rejection episodes (PsCD30 levels and the incidence of graft failure, but we could not confirm that the development of rejection episodes is correlated with pretransplant sCD30 values.

  15. Surgical therapy by sandwich transplantation using a dermal collagen-elastin matrix and full thickness split grafts and gait rehabilitation with individualized orthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Painful callosities of the feet (PCOF are a rare complaint in children with severe impairment of mobility and quality of life. There is no medical treatment available.We investigated the usefulness of a recently developed combined transplant technique-the sandwich transplantation with dermal collagen-elastin template in this rare condition. A 14-year-old boy suffered from PCOF for several years without any improvement by topical therapy, dermabrasion, and oral retinoids. He was unable to walk normally and suffered from severe pain. We performed a complete deep excision of the hyperkeratotic plantar tissue in general anaesthesia in combination with sandwich transplantation in the same setting. Dry sheets of collagen-elastin matrix (1 mm thickness were placed on the soft tissue defects and covered by full-thickness mesh graft transplants from the upper leg. An individualized orthosis was produced for gait rehabilitation. Two weeks after surgery the gait-related pain was reduced remarkably. Using the orthosis, the boy was able to walk pain-free even on staircase. Surgery of PCOF with sandwich transplantation and gait rehabilitation appears to be a promising strategy for this rare condition.

  16. [Transplantation in diabetes type 1--current problems and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasikowa, Renata; Noczyńska, Anna; Basiak, Aleksander

    2004-01-01

    Diabetes type 1 is, as we know, a chronic progressive disease, which requires a substitutional therapy with insulin for the whole life. The cause is a definite destruction of the pancreatic beta cells. For many years there have been intensive investigations on the possibility to obtain a complete, persistent withdrawal of the symptoms. Substitution of the destroyed, not active cells, could take place after transplantation of the whole pancreas, transplantation of pancreatic islets or transplantation of stem cells. This is now the only method which may cause an independence from exogenous insulin, persistent normoglycemia, normal HbA1c level, without risk of hypoglycemia. Pancreas and islets transplantations, however, are connected till now with the necessity of an immunosuppressive therapy for the whole life, with the toxicity of the drugs, incidence of frequent infections and malignancy. Pancreas transplantation is a serious surgical intervention, connected with numerous risks and complications, considerably less risk appears in islet cell transplantations. Since 2000 exclusively islet cell transplantations have been performed. One of the leading centers is Edmonton, where professor Shapiro prepared the so called. Edmonton protocol which is characterized by using corticosteroid-free immunosuppressive drugs, islet cells from two or more donors, repeated till the attainment of insulin dependence. A problem now is that the islets are obtained from cadavers. Therefore intensive research is conducted for alternative sources of beta cells. At this moment it is mostly preferred for receiving a sufficient number of insulin producing cells to develop stem cells with a subsequent differentiation to insulin producing cells. The mentioned cells have an unlimited ability of reproduction, in this case also immunosuppressive therapy is not necessary. Alternative sources of beta cells are cells achieved on the genetic engineering, embryonic or adult somatic stem cells. It is

  17. Stereotactic Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy as a Bridge to Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Clinical Outcome and Pathologic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, Alan W.; Chawla, Sheema; Qu, Zhenhong; Kashyap, Randeep; Milano, Michael T.; Hezel, Aram F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to determine efficacy, safety, and outcome of stereotactic hypofractionated radiation therapy (SHORT) as a suitable bridging therapy for patients awaiting liver transplantation (LT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We also examined histological response to radiation in the resected or explanted livers. Methods and Materials: Between August 2007 and January 2009, 18 patients with 21 lesions received SHORT. A median total dose of 50 Gy was delivered in 10 fractions. Three patients underwent either chemoembolization (n = 1) or radiofrequency ablation (n = 2) prior to SHORT. Radiographic response was based on computed tomography evaluation at 3 months after SHORT. Histological response as a percentage of tumor necrosis was assessed by a quantitative morphometric method. Results: Six of 18 patients were delisted because of progression (n = 3) or other causes (n = 3). Twelve patients successfully underwent major hepatic resection (n = 1) or LT (n = 11) at a median follow-up of 6.3 months (range, 0.6–11.6 months) after completion of SHORT. No patient developed gastrointestinal toxicity Grade ≥3 or radiation-induced liver disease. Ten patients with 11 lesions were evaluable for pathological response. Two lesions had 100% necrosis, three lesions had ≥50% necrosis, four lesions had ≤50% necrosis, and two lesions had no necrosis. All patients were alive after LT and/or major hepatic resection at a median follow-up of 19.6 months. Conclusions: SHORT is an effective bridging therapy for patients awaiting LT for HCC. It provides excellent in-field control with minimal side effects, helps to downsize or stabilize tumors prior to LT, and achieves good pathological response.

  18. [Experience with high-dose immunosuppressive therapy followed by transplantation of autologous stem hematopoietic cells in patients with multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiev, V A; Makarov, S V; Aleksandrova, I Ia; Dolgikh, G T; Lipshina, S R; Stukalova, T A; Trushina, O A; Fedorova, E Iu; Lipina, L N; Sivak, V F; Korenev, P P; Murashov, B F

    2002-01-01

    To assess efficiency of immunosuppressive therapy and subsequent autologous transplantation of stem blood cells (SBC) in patients with multiple sclerosis. The trial enrolled 23 patients (4 men and 19 women) with multiple sclerosis (MS) lasting for 3 to 12 years. The age of the patients ranged from 18 to 44 years. The index of the progression was above 1 in all the patients. A remitting, primary-progredient, secondary-progredient course was diagnosed in 3, 3 and 17 patients, respectively. Posttransplantation follow-up was 1 to 1.5 years. The degree of the neurological deficiency (0-6 scores) was estimated by the scale of functional systems damage. Lymphocyte subpopulations were evaluated by enzyme immunoassay according to expression of membrane antigens CD3, CD4, CD8, CD16, CD20, CD25, CD56, CD95 using monoclonal antibodies ICO (Biomedspectr), humoral immunity--by serum levels of IgA, IgM and IgG. SBC mobilization was conducted for 5 days by subcutaneous introduction of neipogen (Roche) in a dose 8.7-10 mcg/kg. Preparation of SBC was made on Haemonetics blood separator on mobilization day 4-5. Cryopreservation was carried out in programmed freezer (Cryomed) with 7% dimethylsulphoxide as a cryoprotector. Pretransplantation conditioning was conducted according to the schemes BEAM + antilymphocytic globulin (protocol N 1) and fludar + melfalan + ALG (protocol N 2). In posttransplantation period most of the patients achieved a fall in intensity of motor and coordination disorders. No recovery of cranial nerve function was observed. The protocols of pretransplantation preparation were compared by efficiency and organic toxicity. Indications to immunosuppressive therapy in MS patients were defined, pathogenetic validation of the immunosuppressive therapy was attempted.

  19. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Is an Effective Salvage Therapy for Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Presenting with Advanced Disease or Failing Treatment with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Anish P; Barnett, Michael J; Broady, Raewyn C; Hogge, Donna E; Song, Kevin W; Toze, Cynthia L; Nantel, Stephen H; Power, Maryse M; Sutherland, Heather J; Nevill, Thomas J; Abou Mourad, Yasser; Narayanan, Sujaatha; Gerrie, Alina S; Forrest, Donna L

    2015-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains the only known curative therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML); however, it is rarely utilized given the excellent long-term results with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment. The purpose of this study is to examine HSCT outcomes for patients with CML who failed TKI therapy or presented in advanced phase and to identify predictors of survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM). Fifty-one patients with CML underwent HSCT for advanced disease at diagnosis (n = 15), TKI resistance as defined by the European LeukemiaNet guidelines (n = 30), TKI intolerance (n = 2), or physician preference (n = 4). At a median follow-up of 71.9 months, the 8-year overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), relapse, and NRM were 68%, 46%, 41%, and 23%, respectively. In univariate analysis, predictors of OS included first chronic phase (CP1) disease status at HSCT (P = .0005), European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation score 1 to 4 (P = .04), and complete molecular response (CMR) to HSCT (P treatment to optimize transplantation outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Kidney transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... always take your medicine as directed. Alternative Names Renal transplant; Transplant - kidney Patient Instructions Kidney removal - discharge Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow Kidneys Kidney transplant - ...

  1. Labeling human embryonic stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes for tracking with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda, Rosalinda T.; Daldrup-Link, Heike [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Stanford School of Medicine, Pediatric Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Boddington, Sophie; Wendland, Mike; Mandrussow, Lydia [University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Henning, Tobias D. [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Cologne (Germany); Liu, Siyuan [National Institutes of Health, Language Section, Voice, Speech and Language Branch, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) can generate cardiomyocytes (CM), which offer promising treatments for cardiomyopathies in children. However, challenges for clinical translation result from loss of transplanted cell from target sites and high cell death. An imaging technique that noninvasively and repetitively monitors transplanted hESC-CM could guide improvements in transplantation techniques and advance therapies. To develop a clinically applicable labeling technique for hESC-CM with FDA-approved superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) by examining labeling before and after CM differentiation. Triplicates of hESC were labeled by simple incubation with 50 {mu}g/ml of ferumoxides before or after differentiation into CM, then imaged on a 7T MR scanner using a T2-weighted multi-echo spin-echo sequence. Viability, iron uptake and T2-relaxation times were compared between groups using t-tests. hESC-CM labeled before differentiation demonstrated significant MR effects, iron uptake and preserved function. hESC-CM labeled after differentiation showed no significant iron uptake or change in MR signal (P < 0.05). Morphology, differentiation and viability were consistent between experimental groups. hESC-CM should be labeled prior to CM differentiation to achieve a significant MR signal. This technique permits monitoring delivery and engraftment of hESC-CM for potential advancements of stem cell-based therapies in the reconstitution of damaged myocardium. (orig.)

  2. Labeling human embryonic stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes for tracking with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, Rosalinda T.; Daldrup-Link, Heike; Boddington, Sophie; Wendland, Mike; Mandrussow, Lydia; Henning, Tobias D.; Liu, Siyuan

    2011-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) can generate cardiomyocytes (CM), which offer promising treatments for cardiomyopathies in children. However, challenges for clinical translation result from loss of transplanted cell from target sites and high cell death. An imaging technique that noninvasively and repetitively monitors transplanted hESC-CM could guide improvements in transplantation techniques and advance therapies. To develop a clinically applicable labeling technique for hESC-CM with FDA-approved superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) by examining labeling before and after CM differentiation. Triplicates of hESC were labeled by simple incubation with 50 μg/ml of ferumoxides before or after differentiation into CM, then imaged on a 7T MR scanner using a T2-weighted multi-echo spin-echo sequence. Viability, iron uptake and T2-relaxation times were compared between groups using t-tests. hESC-CM labeled before differentiation demonstrated significant MR effects, iron uptake and preserved function. hESC-CM labeled after differentiation showed no significant iron uptake or change in MR signal (P < 0.05). Morphology, differentiation and viability were consistent between experimental groups. hESC-CM should be labeled prior to CM differentiation to achieve a significant MR signal. This technique permits monitoring delivery and engraftment of hESC-CM for potential advancements of stem cell-based therapies in the reconstitution of damaged myocardium. (orig.)

  3. Amnion: a potent graft source for cell therapy in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seong Jin; Soncini, Maddalena; Kaneko, Yuji; Hess, David C; Parolini, Ornella; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2009-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is a new field primarily based on the concept of transplanting exogenous or stimulating endogenous stem cells to generate biological substitutes and improve tissue functions. Recently, amnion-derived cells have been reported to have multipotent differentiation ability, and these cells have attracted attention as a novel cell source for cell transplantation therapy. Cells isolated from amniotic membrane can differentiate into all three germ layers, have low immunogenicity and anti-inflammatory function, and do not require the destruction of human embryos for their isolation, thus circumventing the ethical debate commonly associated with the use of human embryonic stem cells. Accumulating evidence now suggests that the amnion, which had been discarded after parturition, is a highly potent transplant material in the field of regenerative medicine. In this report, we review the current progress on the characterization of MSCs derived from the amnion as a remarkable transplantable cell population with therapeutic potential for multiple CNS disorders, especially stroke.

  4. Effects of vildagliptin (Galvus®) therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus after heart transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueler, Ibrahim; Mueller, Susanne; Helmschrott, Matthias; Oeing, Christian U; Erbel, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz; Gleißner, Christian; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Ehlermann, Philipp; Dengler, Thomas J; Katus, Hugo A; Doesch, Andreas O

    2013-01-01

    Background Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a common comorbidity in patients after heart transplantation (HTx) and is associated with adverse long-term outcomes. Methods The retrospective study reported here analyzed the effects of vildagliptin therapy in stable patients post-HTx with T2DM and compared these with control patients for matched-pairs analysis. A total of 30 stable patients post-HTx with T2DM were included in the study. Fifteen patients (mean age 58.6 ± 6.0 years, mean time post-HTx 4.9 ± 5.3 years, twelve male and three female) were included in the vildagliptin group (VG) and 15 patients were included in the control group (CG) (mean age 61.2 ± 8.3 years, mean time post-HTx 7.2 ± 6.6 years, all male). Results Mean glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in the VG was 7.4% ± 0.7% before versus 6.8% ± 0.8% after 8 months of vildagliptin therapy (P = 0.002 vs baseline). In the CG, HbA1c was 7.0% ± 0.7% versus 7.3% ± 1.2% at follow-up (P = 0.21). Additionally, there was a significant reduction in mean blood glucose in the VG, from 165.0 ± 18.8 mg/dL to 147.9 ± 22.7 mg/dL (P = 0.002 vs baseline), whereas mean blood glucose increased slightly in the CG from 154.7 ± 19.7 mg/dL to 162.6 ± 35.0 mg/dL (P = 0.21). No statistically significant changes in body weight (from 83.3 ± 10.8 kg to 82.0 ± 10.9 kg, P = 0.20), total cholesterol (1.5%, P = 0.68), or triglyceride levels (8.0%, P = 0.65) were seen in the VG. No significant changes in immunosuppressive drug levels or dosages were observed in either group. Conclusion Vildagliptin therapy significantly reduced HbA1c and mean blood glucose levels in post-HTx patients in this study with T2DM and did not have any negative effects on lipid profile or body weight. Thus, vildagliptin therapy presented an interesting therapeutic approach for this selected patient cohort. PMID:23630415

  5. Patterns of failure following bone marrow transplantation for metastatic breast cancer: the role of consolidative local therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Amit B.; Hartsell, William F.; Ghalie, Richard; Kaizer, Herbert

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the patterns of failure and the role of local therapy in conjunction with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for metastatic or recurrent breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 1986 and November 1991, 46 patients with hormone unresponsive metastatic or recurrent breast cancer underwent high dose chemotherapy (HDC) with hematopoietic stem cell support. The most commonly used preparative regimen consisted of thiotepa (750 mg/m 2 ), cisplatin (150 mg/m 2 ), and cyclophosphamide (120 mg/kg) followed by autologous BMT. Consolidative surgery or irradiation was considered in patients whose cancer responded to BMT and had localized sites of disease. Results: Six patients (13%) died of BMT-related complications. Of the remaining 40 patients, 22 were candidates for consolidative therapy, and 18 of those patients received consolidative irradiation (17 patients) or surgery (1 patient) to one or more sites. At median follow-up of 27 months (range, 20-78), 12 of 18 (67%) patients have continuous local control at the 22 consolidated sites (1 of 4 controlled at chest wall sites, 7 of 8 at regional nodal sites, 7 of 7 at localized bone sites, and 1 of 3 at lung/mediastinal sites). Toxicity of consolidative irradiation was mainly limited to myelosuppression in 6 of 17 patients. Two patients did not complete the consolidative local therapy, one because of hematologic toxicity and one because of rapid systemic tumor progression during treatment. Conclusion: In patients with localized areas of extravisceral metastases, consolidative irradiation is feasible with acceptable hematologic toxicity. Consolidative irradiation can result in continuous local control, especially in isolated bone metastases and in regional nodal sites; however, the advantage is less clear in patients undergoing consolidative irradiation for chest wall failures. Because distant visceral metastases still remain a major site of failure after this HDC

  6. Impact of laser therapy on the condition of oral cavity mucosa in chemotherapy treated patients who underwent bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Krzysztof Bąk

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Patological disorders within oral mucosa (so called mucositis are the most common stomatological complications among chemotherapy treated leukemic patients scheduled for bone marrow transplantation. Early diagnosis of such oral disorders leads to numerous side effects, decreasing quality of life and systemic complications is required. Furthermore, most patients require analgesic treatment, very often using narcotic pain medications. Presently the largest role of prevention and treatment of mucositis is preventative dentistry along with maintaining strict oral hygiene. This course of action aims to reduce pain and prevention of infections. Investigation of novel non-invasive therapeutic methods that could improve treatment outcomes seems justified. Among the most promising methods, the Low-level Laser Therapy (LLLT treatment demonstrates many beneficial effects for patients suffering from chemotherapy complications. It promotes mucosal healing and helps improve patients' quality of life. These advantages may be a result of a LLLT anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect. LLLT also promotes tissue regeneration through chemical changes in cells (cell repair. In recent clinical studies conducted on a group of patients with oral mucositis, the significant acceleration of mentioned disorders regression was noted. Moreover, reduction of pain after application of LLLT was recorded. Discussed in the article LLLT is easily accessible for clinical practice . Mentioned arguments justify a wider use of such a tool in non-invasive treatment of acute oral cavity inflammation.

  7. Perioperative single high dose ATG-Fresenius S administration as induction immunosuppressive therapy in cadaveric renal transplantation--preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsel, R; Chmura, A; Włodarczyk, Z; Wyzgał, J; Cieciura, T; Lagiewska, B; Pliszczyński, J; Korczak, G; Lazowski, T; Paczek, L; Wałaszewski, J; Lao, M; Rowiński, W

    1999-01-01

    Monoclonal and polyclonal antilymphocyte antibodies have been used successfully in organ transplantation as induction therapy and in the treatment of acute graft rejection. Used for induction the medication is generally given for the first 7-10 days. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of single high dose (9 mg/kg) ATG Fresenius S given perioperatively, before revascularization, to kidney allograft recipients. During last twelve months seventy six, first cadaveric kidney adult recipients were included into the study in two centers (center A-64, center B-12). All patients received triple drug immunosuppression (Neoral, steroids and Cellcept which was replaced by azathioprine after 4 months), and were randomized to receive ATG or not. The follow-up period ranged from 1 month up to 1 year. The preliminary results are very promising, the rejection rate in bolus group was significantly lower than in control. No significant side effects or serious adverse events in both groups were observed.

  8. Intravenous immunoglobulins and rituximab therapy for severe transplant glomerulopathy in chronic antibody-mediated rejection: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelet, Thomas; Nodimar, Celine; Taupin, Jean-Luc; Lepreux, Sebastien; Moreau, Karine; Morel, Delphine; Guidicelli, Gwendaline; Couzi, Lionel; Merville, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    Outcome of patients with transplant glomerulopathy (TG) is poor. Using B-cell targeting molecules represent a rational strategy to treat TG during chronic antibody-mediated rejection. In this pilot study, 21 patients with this diagnosis received four doses of intravenous immunoglobulins and two doses of rituximab (IVIG/RTX group). They were retrospectively compared with a untreated control group of 10 patients. At 24 months post-biopsy, graft survival was similar and poor between the treated and the untreated group, 47% vs. 40%, respectively, p = 0.69. This absence of response of IVIG/RTX treatment was observed, regardless the phenotype of TG. Baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and decline in eGFR during the first six months after the treatment were risk factors associated with 24-month graft survival. The IVIG/RTX therapy had a modest effect on the kinetics of donor-specific alloantibodies at M24, compared to the untreated group, not associated with an improvement in graft survival. The mean number of adverse events per patient was higher in the IVIG/RTX group than in the control group (p = 0.03). Taken together, IVIG/RTX treatment for severe TG during chronic antibody-mediated rejection does not seem to change the natural history of TG and is associated with a high incidence of adverse events. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Role of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Before Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: Retrospective Evaluation of Pathologic Response and Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannina, Edward Michael; Cardenes, Higinia Rosa; Lasley, Foster D.; Goodman, Benjamin; Zook, Jennifer; Althouse, Sandra; Cox, John Alvin; Saxena, Romil; Tector, Joseph; Maluccio, Mary

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the results of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with early-stage, localized hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent definitive orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Methods and Materials: The subjects of this retrospective report are 38 patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent SBRT per institutional phase 1 to 2 eligibility criteria, before definitive OLT. Pre-OLT radiographs were compared with pathologic gold standard. Analysis of treatment failures and deaths was undertaken. Results: With median follow-up of 4.8 years from OLT, 9 of 38 patients (24%) recurred, whereas 10 of 38 patients (26%) died. Kaplan-Meier estimates of 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival are 77% and 74%, respectively. Sum longest dimension of tumors was significantly associated with disease-free survival (hazard ratio 1.93, P=.026). Pathologic response rate (complete plus partial response) was 68%. Radiographic scoring criteria performed poorly; modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors produced highest concordance (κ = 0.224). Explants revealed viable tumor in 74% of evaluable patients. Treatment failures had statistically larger sum longest dimension of tumors (4.0 cm vs 2.8 cm, P=.014) and non–statistically significant higher rates of lymphovascular space invasion (44% vs 17%), cT2 disease (44% vs 21%), ≥pT2 disease (67% vs 34%), multifocal tumors at time of SBRT (44% vs 21%), and less robust mean α-fetoprotein response (−25 IU/mL vs −162 IU/mL). Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy before to OLT is a well-tolerated treatment providing 68% pathologic response, though 74% of explants ultimately contained viable tumor. Radiographic response criteria poorly approximate pathology. Our data suggest further stratification of patients according to initial disease burden and treatment response.

  10. Photodynamic therapy is more effective than imiquimod for actinic keratosis in organ transplant recipients: a randomized intraindividual controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togsverd-Bo, K; Halldin, C; Sandberg, C; Gonzalez, H; Wennberg, A M; Sørensen, S S; Wulf, H C; Haedersdal, M

    2018-04-01

    Actinic keratoses (AKs) in solid organ transplant recipients (OTRs) are difficult-to-treat premalignancies and comparison of topical therapies is therefore warranted. In an intraindividual study to compare the efficacy and safety of field treatment with methyl aminolaevulinate photodynamic therapy (MAL-PDT) and imiquimod (IMIQ) for AKs in OTRs. OTRs (n = 35) with 572 AKs (grade I-III) in two similar areas on the face, scalp, dorsal hands or forearms were included. All patients received one MAL-PDT and one IMIQ session (three applications per week for 4 weeks) in each study area according to randomization. Treatments were repeated after 2 months (IMIQ) and 3 months (PDT) in skin with incomplete AK response. Outcome measures were complete lesion response (CR), skin reactions, laboratory results and treatment preference. The majority of study areas received two treatment sessions (PDT n = 25 patients; IMIQ n = 29 patients). At 3 months after two treatments, skin treated with PDT achieved a higher rate of CR (AK I-III median 78%; range 50-100) compared with IMIQ-treated skin areas (median 61%, range 33-100; P AKs were seen in PDT-treated skin vs. IMIQ-treated skin (0·7 vs. 1·5 AKs, P = 0·04). Patients developed more intense inflammatory skin reactions following PDT, which resolved more rapidly compared with IMIQ (median 10 days vs. 18 days, P 47) and cosmesis (P > 0·30) were similar for PDT and IMIQ. Compared with IMIQ, PDT treatment obtained a higher rate of AK clearance at 3-month follow-up and achieved shorter-lasting, but more intense, short-term skin reactions. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  11. Role of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Before Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: Retrospective Evaluation of Pathologic Response and Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannina, Edward Michael, E-mail: emmannina@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Slidell Memorial Hospital Regional Cancer Center, Slidell, Louisiana (United States); Cardenes, Higinia Rosa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Schneck Medical Center, Seymour, Indiana (United States); Lasley, Foster D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mercy Hospital, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Goodman, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Francis Healthcare, Cape Girardeau, Missouri (United States); Zook, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Community Hospital Anderson, Anderson, Indiana (United States); Althouse, Sandra [Department of Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Cox, John Alvin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbus Regional, Columbus, Indiana (United States); Saxena, Romil [Department of Pathology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Tector, Joseph [Department of Surgery, University of Alabama-Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Maluccio, Mary [Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze the results of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with early-stage, localized hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent definitive orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Methods and Materials: The subjects of this retrospective report are 38 patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent SBRT per institutional phase 1 to 2 eligibility criteria, before definitive OLT. Pre-OLT radiographs were compared with pathologic gold standard. Analysis of treatment failures and deaths was undertaken. Results: With median follow-up of 4.8 years from OLT, 9 of 38 patients (24%) recurred, whereas 10 of 38 patients (26%) died. Kaplan-Meier estimates of 3-year overall survival and disease-free survival are 77% and 74%, respectively. Sum longest dimension of tumors was significantly associated with disease-free survival (hazard ratio 1.93, P=.026). Pathologic response rate (complete plus partial response) was 68%. Radiographic scoring criteria performed poorly; modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors produced highest concordance (κ = 0.224). Explants revealed viable tumor in 74% of evaluable patients. Treatment failures had statistically larger sum longest dimension of tumors (4.0 cm vs 2.8 cm, P=.014) and non–statistically significant higher rates of lymphovascular space invasion (44% vs 17%), cT2 disease (44% vs 21%), ≥pT2 disease (67% vs 34%), multifocal tumors at time of SBRT (44% vs 21%), and less robust mean α-fetoprotein response (−25 IU/mL vs −162 IU/mL). Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy before to OLT is a well-tolerated treatment providing 68% pathologic response, though 74% of explants ultimately contained viable tumor. Radiographic response criteria poorly approximate pathology. Our data suggest further stratification of patients according to initial disease burden and treatment response.

  12. A case of toxic epidermal necrolysis initially affecting the skin site of radiation therapy for an intra-cranial post-transplantation lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanoue, Toshihide; Egawa, Kiyofumi; Fukushima, Satoshi; Wakasugi, Syoji; Ono, Tomomichi; Yoshida, Shinsuke; Kouchi, Masato; Nishi, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of post-transplantation lymphoma (intra-cranial EBV-related malignant lymphoma) who developed toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) during concomitant phenobarbital administration and radiotherapy. The erythema exsudativum multiforme-like eruption first appeared on the site of radiation and extended to approximately 35% of the body surface. After stopping radiation therapy and all medications, including immunosuppressant, anticonvulsant, and diuretic drugs, treatment was successfully administered by systemic corticosteroids including semi-pulse therapy (500 mg of methylpredonisolone sodium succinate for 3 days). (author)

  13. Immune System and Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Badri Man

    2017-01-01

    The immune system recognises a transplanted kidney as foreign body and mounts immune response through cellular and humoral mechanisms leading to acute or chronic rejection, which ultimately results in graft loss. Over the last five decades, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the immune responses to transplanted organs in both experimental and clinical transplant settings. Modulation of the immune response by using immunosuppressive agents has led to successful outcomes after kidney transplantation. The paper provides an overview of the general organisation and function of human immune system, immune response to kidney transplantation, and the current practice of immunosuppressive therapy in kidney transplantation in the United Kingdom.

  14. Sirolimus as an alternative to anticalcineurin therapy in heart transplantation: experience of a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Valls, M; Gonzalez-Vilchez, F; de Prada, J A Vazquez; Ruano, J; Ruisanchez, C; Martin-Duran, R

    2005-11-01

    We report a series of 26 heart transplant recipients with renal impairment in which sirolimus was used as the basic immunosuppresive drug (without associated calcineurin inhibitors) to avoid further nephrotoxicity. Sirolimus (trough levels 10 to 12 ng/mL, average daily dose 3 mg) was used in two settings: de novo in 7 patients with significant preexistent renal impairment and as a chronic conversion in 19 stable patients with established renal failure (creatinine level >2 mg/dL). In all de novo patients (n = 7), the renal function significantly improved. Creatinine fell from 2.95 +/- 0.9 mg/dL to 1.41 +/- 0.4 mg/dL at follow-up (P = .0017). One patient died suddenly of a massive pulmonary embolism. Only one patient experienced histologic but reversible rejection. In one patient, anemia and diarrhea prompted sirolimus withdrawal. Five patients had infectious episodes: three bacterial pneumonias, one mediastinitis, and two CMV infections. In the chronic conversion group (n = 19), the improvement was mostly limited to patients with moderate renal failure (creatinine < or =2.5 mg/dL) in which creatinine fell from 2.24 +/- 0.2 to 1.9 +/- 0.27 mg/dL, P = .009). When basal creatinine was over 2.5 mg/dL, only one third of the patients improved after conversion. Two patients died: terminal renal failure and cerebrovascular accident. There were no clinical episodes of rejection. Secondary effects prompted the discontinuation of sirolimus in five patients: two definite and one possible interstitial pneumonitis and two cases of anemia). The symptoms resolved after sirolimus withdrawal. Six patients had infection: four pneumonias, one sepsis, and one cutaneous abscess. Sirolimus is an interesting alternative to calcineurin inhibitors in selected patients with renal impairment. It prevents renal failure in de novo recipients at high risk of catastrophic renal damage and ameliorates renal dysfunction in chronic patients with moderate renal dysfunction. Given the high incidence of

  15. Autologous stem cell transplantation for patients aged 60 years or older with refractory or relapsed classical Hodgkin's lymphoma: a retrospective analysis from the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapies (SFGM-TC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatoullas, A; Brice, P; Gueye, M S; Mareschal, S; Chevallier, P; Bouabdallah, R; Nguyenquoc, S; Francois, S; Turlure, P; Ceballos, P; Monjanel, H; Bourhis, J-H; Guillerm, G; Mohty, M; Biron, P; Cornillon, J; Belhadj, K; Bonmati, C; Dilhuydy, M-S; Huynh, A; Bernard, M; Chrétien, M-L; Peffault de Latour, R; Tilly, H

    2016-07-01

    This report retrospectively analyzed the outcome of 91 patients aged 60 years or older with refractory/relapsed (R/R) classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL) who underwent autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) between 1992 and 2013 and were reported to the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapies registry. The median age at transplant was 63 years. The majority of patients exhibited disease chemosensitivity to salvage treatment (57 complete responses, 30 partial responses, 1 progressive disease and 3 unknown). The most frequent conditioning regimen consisted of BCNU, cytarabine, etoposide, melphalan (BEAM) chemotherapy (93%). With a median follow-up of 54 months, 5-year estimates of overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) for the entire group were 67 and 54%, respectively. Despite the missing data, in univariate analysis, the number of salvage chemotherapy lines (1-2 versus ⩾3) significantly influenced the OS, unlike the other prognostic factors (stage III-IV at relapse, disease status before ASCT and negative positron emission tomography (PET) scan) encountered in younger patients. In spite of its limitations, this retrospective study with a long-term follow-up suggests that ASCT is a valid treatment option for chemosensitive R/R cHL in selected elderly patients, with an acceptable rate of toxicity.

  16. The role of antiviral and immunoglobulin therapy in the prevention of Epstein-Barr virus infection and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease following solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, M; Reyes, J; Webber, S; Rowe, D

    2001-06-01

    The recognition of the importance of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, including EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD), has led to a new focus on the prevention of this problem. This paper reviews the scientific rationale behind, and clinical experience with, the use of chemoprophylaxis (using acyclovir or ganciclovir) and immunoprophylaxis (using intravenous immunoglobulin) in the prevention of EBV/PTLD. While some centers have already introduced the use of one or both of these agents as standard prophylaxis against the development of this complication, published data in support of these protocols are currently lacking. Well designed clinical trials are necessary to evaluate the potential role of both antiviral and immunoglobulin agents in the prevention of EBV/PTLD in organ transplant recipients.

  17. Radionuclide evaluation of renal transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hong; Zhao Deshan

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclide renal imaging and plasma clearance methods can quickly quantitate renal blood flow and function in renal transplants. They can diagnose acute tubular necrosis and rejection, renal scar, surgical complications such as urine leaks, obstruction and renal artery stenosis after renal transplants. At the same time they can assess the therapy effect of renal transplant complications and can also predict renal transplant survival from early post-operative function studies

  18. Differentiation and functional incorporation of embryonic stem cell-derived GABAergic interneurons in the dentate gyrus of mice with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisano, Xu; Litvina, Elizabeth; Tagliatela, Stephanie; Aaron, Gloster B; Grabel, Laura B; Naegele, Janice R

    2012-01-04

    Cell therapies for neurological disorders require an extensive knowledge of disease-associated neuropathology and procedures for generating neurons for transplantation. In many patients with severe acquired temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the dentate gyrus exhibits sclerosis and GABAergic interneuron degeneration. Mounting evidence suggests that therapeutic benefits can be obtained by transplanting fetal GABAergic progenitors into the dentate gyrus in rodents with TLE, but the scarcity of human fetal cells limits applicability in patient populations. In contrast, virtually limitless quantities of neural progenitors can be obtained from embryonic stem (ES) cells. ES cell-based therapies for neurological repair in TLE require evidence that the transplanted neurons integrate functionally and replace cell types that degenerate. To address these issues, we transplanted mouse ES cell-derived neural progenitors (ESNPs) with ventral forebrain identities into the hilus of the dentate gyrus of mice with TLE and evaluated graft differentiation, mossy fiber sprouting, cellular morphology, and electrophysiological properties of the transplanted neurons. In addition, we compared electrophysiological properties of the transplanted neurons with endogenous hilar interneurons in mice without TLE. The majority of transplanted ESNPs differentiated into GABAergic interneuron subtypes expressing calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin, calbindin, or calretinin. Global suppression of mossy fiber sprouting was not observed; however, ESNP-derived neurons formed dense axonal arborizations in the inner molecular layer and throughout the hilus. Whole-cell hippocampal slice electrophysiological recordings and morphological analyses of the transplanted neurons identified five basic types; most with strong after-hyperpolarizations and smooth or sparsely spiny dendritic morphologies resembling endogenous hippocampal interneurons. Moreover, intracellular recordings of spontaneous EPSCs indicated that

  19. Amniotic fluid stem cells: a promising therapeutic resource for cell-based regenerative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, Ivana; Pantalone, Andrea; Tete, Stefano; Salini, Vincenzo; Borlongan, Cesar V; Hess, David; Stuppia, Liborio

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells have been proposed as a powerful tool in the treatment of several human diseases, both for their ability to represent a source of new cells to replace those lost due to tissue injuries or degenerative diseases, and for the ability of produce trophic molecules able to minimize damage and promote recovery in the injured tissue. Different cell types, such as embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells, human fetal tissues and genetically engineered cell lines, have been tested for their ability to replace damaged cells and to restore the tissue function after transplantation. Amniotic fluid -derived Stem cells (AFS) are considered a novel resource for cell transplantation therapy, due to their high renewal capacity, the "in vitro" expression of embryonic cell lineage markers, and the ability to differentiate in tissues derived from all the three embryonic layers. Moreover, AFS do not produce teratomas when transplanted into animals and are characterized by a low antigenicity, which could represent an advantage for cell transplantation or cell replacement therapy. The present review focuses on the biological features of AFS, and on their potential use in the treatment of pathological conditions such as ischemic brain injury and bone damages.

  20. Treating Diet-Induced Diabetes and Obesity with Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Progenitor Cells and Antidiabetic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Bruin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived pancreatic progenitor cells effectively reverse hyperglycemia in rodent models of type 1 diabetes, but their capacity to treat type 2 diabetes has not been reported. An immunodeficient model of type 2 diabetes was generated by high-fat diet (HFD feeding in SCID-beige mice. Exposure to HFDs did not impact the maturation of macroencapsulated pancreatic progenitor cells into glucose-responsive insulin-secreting cells following transplantation, and the cell therapy improved glucose tolerance in HFD-fed transplant recipients after 24 weeks. However, since diet-induced hyperglycemia and obesity were not fully ameliorated by transplantation alone, a second cohort of HFD-fed mice was treated with pancreatic progenitor cells combined with one of three antidiabetic drugs. All combination therapies rapidly improved body weight and co-treatment with either sitagliptin or metformin improved hyperglycemia after only 12 weeks. Therefore, a stem cell-based therapy may be effective for treating type 2 diabetes, particularly in combination with antidiabetic drugs.

  1. Reversal of Type 1 Diabetes in Mice by Brown Adipose Tissue Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardana, Subhadra C.; Piston, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Current therapies for type 1 diabetes (T1D) involve insulin replacement or transplantation of insulin-secreting tissue, both of which suffer from numerous limitations and complications. Here, we show that subcutaneous transplants of embryonic brown adipose tissue (BAT) can correct T1D in streptozotocin-treated mice (both immune competent and immune deficient) with severely impaired glucose tolerance and significant loss of adipose tissue. BAT transplants result in euglycemia, normalized glucose tolerance, reduced tissue inflammation, and reversal of clinical diabetes markers such as polyuria, polydipsia, and polyphagia. These effects are independent of insulin but correlate with recovery of the animals’ white adipose tissue. BAT transplants lead to significant increases in adiponectin and leptin, but with levels that are static and not responsive to glucose. Pharmacological blockade of the insulin receptor in BAT transplant mice leads to impaired glucose tolerance, similar to what is seen in nondiabetic animals, indicating that insulin receptor activity plays a role in the reversal of diabetes. One possible candidate for activating the insulin receptor is IGF-1, whose levels are also significantly elevated in BAT transplant mice. Thus, we propose that the combined action of multiple adipokines establishes a new equilibrium in the animal that allows for chronic glycemic control without insulin. PMID:22315305

  2. Molecular Diagnostics, Targeted Therapy, and the Indication for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Oyekunle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the panel of known molecular mutations in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL has been continuously increased. In Philadelphia-positive ALL, deletions of the IKZF1 gene were identified as prognostically adverse factors. These improved insights in the molecular background and the clinical heterogeneity of distinct cytogenetic subgroups may allow most differentiated therapeutic decisions, for example, with respect to the indication to allogeneic HSCT within genetically defined ALL subtypes. Quantitative real-time PCR allows highly sensitive monitoring of the minimal residual disease (MRD load, either based on reciprocal gene fusions or immune gene rearrangements. Molecular diagnostics provided the basis for targeted therapy concepts, for example, combining the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib with chemotherapy in patients with Philadelphia-positive ALL. Screening for BCR-ABL1 mutations in Philadelphia-positive ALL allows to identify patients who may benefit from second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors or from novel compounds targeting the T315I mutation. Considering the central role of the molecular techniques for the management of patients with ALL, efforts should be made to facilitate and harmonize immunophenotyping, cytogenetics, and molecular mutation screening. Furthermore, the potential of high-throughput sequencing should be evaluated for diagnosis and follow-up of patients with B-lineage ALL.

  3. Clinical evaluation of bone marrow transplantation using total body irradiation and induction chemotherapy. Treatment results during twelve years at our hospital and some problems on the therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Toshiki; Koga, Sukehiko; Kikukawa, Kaoru; Okamoto, Masataka; Miyazaki, Hitoshi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Esaki, Kohji

    2000-01-01

    We performed sixty patients with hematological malignancies the total body irradiation prior to bone marrow transplantation (TBI-BMT) from 1988 to 2000. We delivered our each patient hyperfractionated TBI consisting of 2 fractions of 3 Gy per day for 2 consecutive days following induction chemotherapy. It proved that TBI-BMT was a valuable treatment method for hematological malignancies which have poor prognosis. About the cumulative survival rate, patients of first remission were better outcome than patients beyond second remission. However, the therapy remained some problems which were the prophylaxis of GVHD for HLA-matched unrelated recipients. And we have to consider a new maintenance procedure to prevent relapse from transplanted donor cell. (author)

  4. Radioimmunotherapy of indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with Yttrium-90 labeled anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy does not preclude subsequent chemotherapy or autologous hematologic stem cell transplantation therapy in most patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiseman, G.A.; Witzig, T.E.; Ansell, S.M.; Ristow, K.M.

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Yttrium-90 (Y-90) labeled anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (ibritumomab tiuxetan or Zevalin TM ) is a novel therapy for patients with relapsed CD20+ B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Patients treated with Zevalin radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are limited from higher doses due to transient and reversible platelet and neutrophil suppression. Patients with indolent NHL who relapse or are refractory to chemotherapy have a 70-80% overall response rate and a 20-30% complete response rate when treated with Zevalin RIT. Therefore additional treatment is required in a minority of patients shortly after Zevalin therapy and in many others at relapse. Relapsed patients are generally treated with chemotherapy alone or high dose chemotherapy followed by autologous transplantation. We wanted to evaluate the ability of patients to tolerate subsequent therapy given at relapse following Zevalin RIT. Methods: We had 58 patients who relapsed after receiving Zevalin RIT and later received additional therapy. The clinical records and lab results were reviewed and compared with a matched control group of patients treated prior to Zevalin availability who received chemotherapy without prior Zevalin RIT. Results: The toxicity in 58 patients treated with Zevalin RIT and subsequent therapy was not significantly different from the control group who did not receive Zevalin RIT. Patients had a median of two subsequent therapies (range, 1-7) after Zevalin. Twenty eight percent required blood cell growth factor support with subsequent chemotherapy and 2 patients required reductions from the standard chemotherapy doses due to prolonged myelosuppression. Eight patients subsequently had successful autologous hematologic stem cell transplant with cells collected after Zevalin. Thirteen of the 58 patients (28%) treated with standard dose chemotherapy were hospitalized for neutropenic fever or thrombocytopenia. Conclusions: Chemotherapy or high dose chemotherapy with autologous transplantation

  5. Stem cell and gene therapies for diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calne, Roy Y; Gan, Shu Uin; Lee, Kok Onn

    2010-03-01

    In this Perspectives article, we comment on the progress in experimental stem cell and gene therapies that might one day become a clinical reality for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. Research on the ability of human embryonic stem cells to differentiate into islet cells has defined the developmental stages and transcription factors involved in this process. However, the clinical applications of human embryonic stem cells are limited by ethical concerns, as well as the potential for teratoma formation. As a consequence, alternative forms of stem cell therapies, such as induced pluripotent stem cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, have become an area of intense study. Finally, gene therapy shows some promise for the generation of insulin-producing cells. Here, we discuss two of the most frequently used approaches: in vitro gene delivery into cells which are then transplanted into the recipient and direct delivery of genes in vivo.

  6. Immunosuppressive therapy after solid-organ transplantation: does the INTERMED identify patients at risk of poor adherence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaud L

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lack of adherence to medication is a trigger of graft rejection in solid-organ transplant (SOT recipients. Objective: This exploratory study aimed to assess whether a biopsychosocial evaluation using the INTERMED instrument before transplantation could identify SOT recipients at risk of suboptimal post-transplantation adherence to immunosuppressant drugs. We hypothesized that complex patients (INTERMED>20 might have lower medication adherence than noncomplex patients (INTERMED≤20. Methods: Each patient eligible for transplantation at the University Hospital of Lausanne, Switzerland, has to undergo a pre-transplantation psychiatric evaluation. In this context the patient was asked to participate in our study. The INTERMED was completed pre-transplantation, and adherence to immunosuppressive medication was monitored post-transplantation by electronic monitors for 12 months. The main outcome measure was the implementation and persistence to two calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporine and tacrolimus, according to the dichotomized INTERMED score (>20 or ≤20. Results: Among the 50 SOT recipients who completed the INTERMED, 32 entered the study. The complex (N=11 and noncomplex patients (N=21 were similar in terms of age, sex and transplanted organ. Implementation was 94.2% in noncomplex patients versus 87.8% in complex patients (non-significant p-value. Five patients were lost to follow-up: one was non-persistent, and four refused electronic monitoring. Of the four patients who refused monitoring, two were complex and withdrew early, and two were noncomplex and withdrew later in the study. Conclusion: Patients identified as complex pre-transplant by the INTERMED tended to deviate from their immunosuppressant regimen, but the findings were not statistically significant. Larger studies are needed to evaluate this association further, as well as the appropriateness of using a nonspecific biopsychosocial instrument such as INTERMED in highly

  7. Donor lymphocyte infusion in bone marrow transplantation therapy Infusão de linfócitos de doador na terapia ao transplante de medula óssea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Mackinnon

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The dose escalation of chemo-radiotherapy that is achievable with stem cell transplantation is often insufficient to eradicate malignancy, and an associated immune-mediated graft-versus-malignancy effect may be equally important for many diseases. The most directly compelling evidence for its presence has been provided by the efficacy of donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI in generating anti-tumor responses, particularly for relapsed chronic-phase CML. Response rates and durability appear lower with myeloma and AML/MDS, and minimal with ALL. There is relatively little data on indolent lymphoid malignancies. Issues that remain to be resolved include the precise nature of the effector cells and their target antigens, the best strategies for separating graft-versus-malignancy from graft-versus-host disease (GVHD and their effect on the durability of responses, and the role of adjuvant chemotherapy/cytokines. Similar issues surround routine combination with nonmyeloablative transplantation protocols and preliminary data suggests that GVHD may continue to provide a major obstacle.A quimioterapia seqüencial e transplante de células progenitoras, habitualmente são insuficientes para erradicar a neoplástica e uma associação do efeito enxerto contra o tumor imune mediado pode ser importante para o controle de muitas doenças uma evidencia deste efeito é proporcionado pela eficácia da infusão de lifócitos de doadores com a finalidade de gerar respostas anti-tumoral particularmente na leucemia mielóide crônica. A freqüência de respostas, durabilidade aparentaram ser pequenas no mieloma e na LM1/SMD e mínima na LLA. Existem de dos insuficientes nos linfomas indolentes. Vários aspectos necessitam ser esclarecidos incluindo a natureza presença das células efetoras e os antígenos alvos, e as melhores estratégias para separar o enxerto-versus-tumor da doença enxerto contra o hospedeiro, e o seu efeito na durabilidade das respostas e o seu papel

  8. Extensive virologic and immunologic characterization in an HIV-infected individual following allogeneic stem cell transplant and analytic cessation of antiretroviral therapy: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Nathan W; Rizza, Stacey; Litzow, Mark R; Hua, Stephane; Lee, Guinevere Q; Einkauf, Kevin; Chun, Tae-Wook; Rhame, Frank; Baker, Jason V; Busch, Michael P; Chomont, Nicolas; Dean, Patrick G; Fromentin, Rémi; Haase, Ashley T; Hampton, Dylan; Keating, Sheila M; Lada, Steven M; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Natesampillai, Sekar; Richman, Douglas D; Schacker, Timothy W; Wietgrefe, Stephen; Yu, Xu G; Yao, Joseph D; Zeuli, John; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Badley, Andrew D

    2017-11-01

    Notwithstanding 1 documented case of HIV-1 cure following allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT), several subsequent cases of allo-SCT in HIV-1 positive individuals have failed to cure HIV-1 infection. The aim of our study was to describe changes in the HIV reservoir in a single chronically HIV-infected patient on suppressive antiretroviral therapy who underwent allo-SCT for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We prospectively collected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by leukapheresis from a 55-year-old man with chronic HIV infection before and after allo-SCT to measure the size of the HIV-1 reservoir and characterize viral phylogeny and phenotypic changes in immune cells. At day 784 post-transplant, when HIV-1 was undetectable by multiple measures-including PCR measurements of both total and integrated HIV-1 DNA, replication-competent virus measurement by large cell input quantitative viral outgrowth assay, and in situ hybridization of colon tissue-the patient consented to an analytic treatment interruption (ATI) with frequent clinical monitoring. He remained aviremic off antiretroviral therapy until ATI day 288, when a low-level virus rebound of 60 HIV-1 copies/ml occurred, which increased to 1,640 HIV-1 copies/ml 5 days later, prompting reinitiation of ART. Rebounding plasma HIV-1 sequences were phylogenetically distinct from proviral HIV-1 DNA detected in circulating PBMCs before transplantation. The main limitations of this study are the insensitivity of reservoir measurements, and the fact that it describes a single case. allo-SCT led to a significant reduction in the size of the HIV-1 reservoir and a >9-month-long ART-free remission from HIV-1 replication. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that the origin of rebound virus was distinct from the viruses identified pre-transplant in the PBMCs.

  9. The Power and the Promise of Cell Reprogramming: Personalized Autologous Body Organ and Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belen Alvarez Palomo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Reprogramming somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs or direct reprogramming to desired cell types are powerful and new in vitro methods for the study of human disease, cell replacement therapy, and drug development. Both methods to reprogram cells are unconstrained by the ethical and social questions raised by embryonic stem cells. iPSC technology promises to enable personalized autologous cell therapy and has the potential to revolutionize cell replacement therapy and regenerative medicine. Potential applications of iPSC technology are rapidly increasing in ambition from discrete cell replacement applications to the iPSC assisted bioengineering of body organs for personalized autologous body organ transplant. Recent work has demonstrated that the generation of organs from iPSCs is a future possibility. The development of embryonic-like organ structures bioengineered from iPSCs has been achieved, such as an early brain structure (cerebral organoids, bone, optic vesicle-like structures (eye, cardiac muscle tissue (heart, primitive pancreas islet cells, a tooth-like structure (teeth, and functional liver buds (liver. Thus, iPSC technology offers, in the future, the powerful and unique possibility to make body organs for transplantation removing the need for organ donation and immune suppressing drugs. Whilst it is clear that iPSCs are rapidly becoming the lead cell type for research into cell replacement therapy and body organ transplantation strategies in humans, it is not known whether (1 such transplants will stimulate host immune responses; and (2 whether this technology will be capable of the bioengineering of a complete and fully functional human organ. This review will not focus on reprogramming to iPSCs, of which a plethora of reviews can be found, but instead focus on the latest developments in direct reprogramming of cells, the bioengineering of body organs from iPSCs, and an analysis of the immune response induced by i

  10. Long-term reversibility of renal dysfunction associated to light chain deposition disease with bortezomib and dexamethasone and high dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás J. González-López

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A 63-year-old woman presented with progressive renal insufficiency, until a glomerular filtration rate (GFR of 12 mL/min. A renal biopsy demonstrated glomerular deposition of immunoglobulin k light chain. The presence of a small population of monoclonal plasmacytes producing an only light k monoclonal component was demonstrated and Bortezomib and Dexamethasone (BD was provided as initial therapy. After seven courses of therapy, renal function improved without dialysis requirements up to a GFR 31 mL/min. Under hematological complete response (HCR the patient underwent high dose of melphalan (HDM and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant. Fifty-four months later the patient remains in HCR and the GFR has progressively improved up to 48 mL/min. This report describes a notably renal function improvement in a patient with Light Chain Deposition Disease after therapy with BD followed by HDM, which can support this treatment as a future option for these patients.

  11. Human neural stem cell replacement therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by spinal transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Hefferan

    clinically-adequate treatment, cell-replacement/gene therapy strategies will likely require both spinal and supraspinal targets.

  12. Graphene for enhanced embryonic stem cell photo-transfection efficiency

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthunzi, P

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to their pluripotency properties, embryonic stem (ES) cells possess great potential in regenerative therapy. Since reported a promising tissue engineering scaffold material, here, graphene is demonstrated to significantly improve the ES cell...

  13. Effects of vildagliptin (Galvus® therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus after heart transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gueler I

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Gueler,1 Susanne Mueller,1 Matthias Helmschrott,1 Christian U Oeing,1 Christian Erbel,1 Lutz Frankenstein,1 Christian Gleißner,1 Arjang Ruhparwar,2 Philipp Ehlermann,1 Thomas J Dengler,3 Hugo A Katus,1 Andreas O Doesch1 1Department of Cardiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 2Department of Cardiac Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 3Department of Cardiology, SLK-Kliniken Heilbronn, Bad Friedrichshall, Germany Background: Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a common comorbidity in patients after heart transplantation (HTx and is associated with adverse long-term outcomes. Methods: The retrospective study reported here analyzed the effects of vildagliptin therapy in stable patients post-HTx with T2DM and compared these with control patients for matched-pairs analysis. A total of 30 stable patients post-HTx with T2DM were included in the study. Fifteen patients (mean age 58.6 ± 6.0 years, mean time post-HTx 4.9 ± 5.3 years, twelve male and three female were included in the vildagliptin group (VG and 15 patients were included in the control group (CG (mean age 61.2 ± 8.3 years, mean time post-HTx 7.2 ± 6.6 years, all male. Results: Mean glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c in the VG was 7.4% ± 0.7% before versus 6.8% ± 0.8% after 8 months of vildagliptin therapy (P = 0.002 vs baseline. In the CG, HbA1c was 7.0% ± 0.7% versus 7.3% ± 1.2% at follow-up (P = 0.21. Additionally, there was a significant reduction in mean blood glucose in the VG, from 165.0 ± 18.8 mg/dL to 147.9 ± 22.7 mg/dL (P = 0.002 vs baseline, whereas mean blood glucose increased slightly in the CG from 154.7 ± 19.7 mg/dL to 162.6 ± 35.0 mg/dL (P = 0.21. No statistically significant changes in body weight (from 83.3 ± 10.8 kg to 82.0 ± 10.9 kg, P = 0.20, total cholesterol (1.5%, P = 0.68, or triglyceride levels (8.0%, P = 0.65 were seen in the VG. No significant changes in immunosuppressive drug levels or dosages were observed in either group

  14. The role and future challenges for recombinant growth hormone therapy to promote growth in children after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, Halima S; Mahan, John D

    2011-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease can severely impair linear growth in children. For many children, growth improves after renal transplantation, but for some, growth velocity remains low and for others, catch-up growth is insufficient to compensate for the deficit imparted by renal disease in the preceding years. Inadequate final adult height after renal transplant is multifactorial and can adversely affect the quality of life (QOL), psychosocial development and long term prospects for these children as they grow into adulthood. Growth failure after renal transplant requires thorough evaluation and its management in renal transplant recipients can involve improved nutritional intake, correction of metabolic acidosis, treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism, steroid-sparing immunosuppression and/or use of recombinant human growth hormone (rGH). Treatment with rGH after renal transplant has been evaluated by a limited number of clinical trials suggesting efficacy and safety for this treatment strategy. Several important clinical questions regarding rGH use in children post-renal transplant remain unanswered. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Intestine Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After the transplant Preventing rejection Post-transplant medications Types of immunosuppressants Switching immunosuppressants Side effects Other medications Generic and brand name drugs Post-transplant tests Infections and immunity Lifestyle changes Health concerns Back to work or ...

  16. Sporotrichosis in Renal Transplant Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Gewehr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current report describes two renal transplant recipients who presented with sporotrichosis. In addition, the authors review the general aspects of sporotrichosis in renal transplant recipients reported in the literature. Sporotrichosis is a rare fungal infection in transplant patients and has been reported primarily in renal transplant recipients not treated with antifungal prophylaxis. Extracutaneous forms of sporotrichosis without skin manifestations and no previous history of traumatic injuries have been described in such patients and are difficult to diagnose. Renal transplant recipients with sporotrichosis described in the present report were successfully treated with antifungal therapy including amphotericin B deoxycholate, lipid amphotericin B formulations, fluconazole and itraconazole.

  17. [Information booklet for related hematopoietic stem cell donors: Guidelines from the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polomeni, Alice; Tardieu, Laure; Ainaoui, Malika; Andrianne, Christelle; Bancillon, Nelly; Chapel, Valerie; Chevallier, Nathalie; Evrard, Solène; Fournier, Isabelle; Gargallo, Guillaume; Godin, Sandrine; Issarni, Dominique; Le Bars, Laetitia; Renaud, Barbara; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Wallart, Anne; De Bentzmann, Natacha

    2017-12-01

    Providing information to living donors is first and foremost a legal obligation as well as an ethical one, not to mention necessary to health care provision. It's been shown that quality of information concerning the procedure's practical aspects, scheduling of clinical tests and examinations, withdrawing stem cells for the donation, post-donation symptoms, and support provided by healthcare teams, directly impacts the donor's quality of experience. Taking this into consideration our group decided it was essential to create an informational support for donors in the form of a booklet to be provided in different hematopoietic stem cell transplant centers across France. In September 2016 in Lille, France, the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC) organized the 7th allergenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation clinical practices harmonization workshops. As part of these workshops, our group worked collectively to develop a basis of indispensable information to be included in the booklet and presented using clear and accessible language. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Use of tacrolimus in rescue therapy of acute and chronic rejection in liver transplantation Uso de tacrolimus na terapia de resgate de rejeições agudas e crônicas no transplante de fígado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio Ferreira Coelho

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To study the indications and results of tacrolimus as rescue therapy for acute cellular or chronic rejection in liver transplantation. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighteen liver transplant recipients who underwent rescue therapy with tacrolimus between March 1995 and August 1999 were retrospectively studied. The treatment indication, patients, and graft situation were recorded as of October 31st, 1999. The response to tacrolimus was defined as patient survival with a functional graft and histological reversal of acute cellular, or for chronic rejection, bilirubin serum levels decreasing to up to twice the upper normal limit. RESULTS: Fourteen cases (77.8% presented a good response. The response rate for the different indications was: (1 acute cellular + sepsis - 0/1 case; (2 recurrent acute cellular - 1/1 case; (3 OKT3-resistant acute cellular - 2/2 cases; (4 steroid-resistant acute cellular + active viral infection - 3/3 cases; (5 chronic rejection - 8/11 cases (72.7% response rate. The 4 patients who did not respond died. CONCLUSION: Tacrolimus rescue therapy was successful in most cases of acute cellular and chronic rejection in liver transplantation.OBJETIVO: Estudar os critérios de indicação e o resultado do uso de tacrolimus na terapia de resgate de rejeições agudas ou crônicas no transplante de fígado. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODO: Foram estudados 18 pacientes transplantados de fígado, submetidos a terapia de resgate com tacrolimus entre março de 1995 e agosto de 1999. Foram registradas a indicação do tratamento e a situação de pacientes e enxertos em 31/10/1999. Considerou-se "respondendores" pacientes vivos, com enxerto funcionante e regressão histológica da terapia de resgate de rejeições agudas, ou com bilirrubina até 2 vezes o valor normal, no caso de terapia de resgate de rejeições crônicas. RESULTADO: Observou-se resposta em 14 casos (77,8%. A taxa de resposta nas diferentes indicações foi: (1 terapia de resgate

  19. CNS embryonal tumours: WHO 2016 and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, J C; Hawkins, C; Pietsch, T; Jacques, T S

    2018-02-01

    Embryonal tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) present a significant clinical challenge. Many of these neoplasms affect young children, have a very high mortality and therapeutic strategies are often aggressive with poor long-term outcomes. There is a great need to accurately diagnose embryonal tumours, predict their outcome and adapt therapy to the individual patient's risk. For the first time in 2016, the WHO classification took into account molecular characteristics for the diagnosis of CNS tumours. This integration of histological features with genetic information has significantly changed the diagnostic work-up and reporting of tumours of the CNS. However, this remains challenging in embryonal tumours due to their previously unaccounted tumour heterogeneity. We describe the recent revisions made to the 4th edition of the WHO classification of CNS tumours and review the main changes, while highlighting some of the more common diagnostic testing strategies. © 2017 British Neuropathological Society.

  20. Personalized Medicine: Cell and Gene Therapy Based on Patient-Specific iPSC-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yao; Chan, Lawrence; Nguyen, Huy V; Tsang, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    Interest in generating human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for stem cell modeling of diseases has overtaken that of patient-specific human embryonic stem cells due to the ethical, technical, and political concerns associated with the latter. In ophthalmology, researchers are currently using iPS cells to explore various applications, including: (1) modeling of retinal diseases using patient-specific iPS cells; (2) autologous transplantation of differentiated retinal cells that undergo gene correction at the iPS cell stage via gene editing tools (e.g., CRISPR/Cas9, TALENs and ZFNs); and (3) autologous transplantation of patient-specific iPS-derived retinal cells treated with gene therapy. In this review, we will discuss the uses of patient-specific iPS cells for differentiating into retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, uncovering disease pathophysiology, and developing new treatments such as gene therapy and cell replacement therapy via autologous transplantation.

  1. Human embryonic stem cell derived islet progenitors mature inside an encapsulation device without evidence of increased biomass or cell escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Kaitlyn; Hao, Ergeng; Lahmy, Reyhaneh; Itkin-Ansari, Pamela

    2014-05-01

    There are several challenges to successful implementation of a cell therapy for insulin dependent diabetes derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC). Among these are development of functional insulin producing cells, a clinical delivery method that eliminates the need for chronic immunosuppression, and assurance that hESC derived tumors do not form in the patient. We and others have shown that encapsulation of cells in a bilaminar device (TheraCyte) provides immunoprotection in rodents and primates. Here we monitored human insulin secretion and employed bioluminescent imaging (BLI) to evaluate the maturation, growth, and containment of encapsulated islet progenitors derived from CyT49 hESC, transplanted into mice. Human insulin was detectable by 7 weeks post-transplant and increased 17-fold over the course of 8 weeks, yet during this period the biomass of encapsulated cells remained constant. Remarkably, by 20 weeks post-transplant encapsulated cells secreted sufficient levels of human insulin to ameliorate alloxan induced diabetes. Further, bioluminescent imaging revealed for the first time that hESCs remained fully contained in encapsulation devices for up to 150 days, the longest period tested. Collectively, the data suggest that encapsulated hESC derived islet progenitors hold great promise as an effective and safe cell replacement therapy for insulin dependent diabetes. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Experimental study on therapy of acute radiation sickness with transplantation of allogeneic peripheral blood hemopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Enpu; Bi Jianjin; Zhan Aiqin

    1995-01-01

    In the study, 10 beagles were used. All the dogs were irradiated with 6.5 Gy of γ-rays from a 60 Co source (dose rate, 95.6-107.9 R/min) and divided into three groups. All the three dogs in the control group died, having survived 7.5 days on the average after irradiation. In the second group, four dogs were transplanted with allogeneic peripheral blood hemopoietic stem cells (PBHSC) without removing T lymphocytes. The results of sex chromosome tests after irradiation and transplantation showed that the cells were of donor type. All the four dogs died of severe graft versus-host disease (GVHD) and survived 41.6 days on the average after irradiation. In the third group, three dogs received transplantation of allogeneic PBHSC without T lymphocytes. Two of them died, and the third developed mild GVHD and survived over 4 years

  3. Retinoic acid postconsolidation therapy for high-risk neuroblastoma patients treated with autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinemann, Frank; van Dalen, Elvira C; Enk, Heike; Berthold, Frank

    2017-08-25

    Neuroblastoma is a rare malignant disease and mainly affects infants and very young children. The tumours mainly develop in the adrenal medullary tissue, with an abdominal mass as the most common presentation. About 50% of patients have metastatic disease at diagnosis. The high-risk group is characterised by metastasis and other features that increase the risk of an adverse outcome. High-risk patients have a five-year event-free survival of less than 50%. Retinoic acid has been shown to inhibit growth of human neuroblastoma cells and has been considered as a potential candidate for improving the outcome of patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. This review is an update of a previously published Cochrane Review. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of additional retinoic acid as part of a postconsolidation therapy after high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), compared to placebo retinoic acid or to no additional retinoic acid in people with high-risk neuroblastoma (as defined by the International Neuroblastoma Risk Group (INRG) classification system). We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library (2016, Issue 11), MEDLINE in PubMed (1946 to 24 November 2016), and Embase in Ovid (1947 to 24 November 2016). Further searches included trial registries (on 22 December 2016), conference proceedings (on 23 March 2017) and reference lists of recent reviews and relevant studies. We did not apply limits by publication year or languages. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating additional retinoic acid after HDCT followed by HSCT for people with high-risk neuroblastoma compared to placebo retinoic acid or to no additional retinoic acid. Primary outcomes were overall survival and treatment-related mortality. Secondary outcomes were progression-free survival, event-free survival, early toxicity, late toxicity, and health-related quality of life. We used standard

  4. Decreased frequency of peripheral CD4(+) CD161(+) Th(17) -precursor cells in kidney transplant recipients on long-term therapy with Belatacept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondran, Florian Wolfgang Rudolf; Timrott, Kai; Kollrich, Sonja; Klempnauer, Juergen; Schwinzer, Reinhard; Becker, Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Clinical trials have pointed out the promising role of co-stimulation blocker Belatacept for improvement of graft function and avoidance of undesired side-effects associated with calcineurin-inhibitors (CNI). However, due to the worldwide limited availability of appropriate patients, almost no data exist to assess the effects of sustained application of this immunomodulator on the recipient's immune system. The aim of this study was to reveal specific alterations in the composition of immunologic subpopulations potentially involved in development of tolerance or chronic graft rejection following long-term Belatacept therapy. For this, peripheral lymphocyte subsets of kidney recipients treated with Belatacept (n=5; average 7.8years) were determined by flow-cytometry and compared with cells from matched patients on CNI (n=9) and healthy controls (n=10). T cells capable of producing IL-17 and serum levels of soluble CD30 were quantified. Patients on CNI showed a higher frequency of CD4(+) CD161(+) Th(17) -precursors and IL-17-producing CD4(+) T cells than Belatacept patients and controls. Significantly higher serum levels of soluble CD30 were observed in CNI patients, indicating a possible involvement of the CD30/CD30L-system in Th(17) -differentiation. No differences were found concerning CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(low) FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. In conclusion, patients on therapy with Belatacept did not show a comparable Th(17) -profile to that seen in individuals with chronic intake of CNI. The distinct effects of Belatacept on Th(17) -immunity might prove beneficial for the long-term outcome following kidney transplantation. © 2012 The Authors. Transplant International © 2012 European Society for Organ Transplantation.

  5. Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Hepatic Endoderm and Its Role in Bioartificial Liver Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver carries out a range of functions essential for bodily homeostasis. The impairment of liver functions has serious implications and is responsible for high rates of patient morbidity and mortality. Presently, liver transplantation remains the only effective treatment, but donor availability is a major limitation. Therefore, artificial and bioartificial liver devices have been developed to bridge patients to liver transplantation. Existing support devices improve hepatic encephalopathy to a certain extent; however their usage is associated with side effects. The major hindrance in the development of bioartificial liver devices and cellular therapies is the limited availability of human hepatocytes. Moreover, primary hepatocytes are difficult to maintain and lose hepatic identity and function over time even with sophisticated tissue culture media. To overcome this limitation, renewable cell sources are being explored. Human embryonic stem cells are one such cellular resource and have been shown to generate a reliable and reproducible supply of human hepatic endoderm. Therefore, the use of human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic endoderm in combination with tissue engineering has the potential to pave the way for the development of novel bioartificial liver devices and predictive drug toxicity assays.

  6. Human and murine very small embryonic-like cells represent multipotent tissue progenitors, in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, Aaron M; Sun, Hongli; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Jung, Younghun; Wang, Jingcheng; Mishra, Anjali; Jiang, Yajuan; O'Neill, David W; Krebsbach, Paul H; Rodgerson, Denis O; Taichman, Russell S

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the lineage progression of human and murine very small embryonic-like (HuVSEL or MuVSEL) cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, HuVSEL and MuVSEL cells differentiated into cells of all three embryonic germ layers. HuVSEL cells produced robust mineralized tissue of human origin compared with controls in calvarial defects. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the HuVSEL cells gave rise to neurons, adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts within the calvarial defects. MuVSEL cells were also able to differentiate into similar lineages. First round serial transplants of MuVSEL cells into irradiated osseous sites demonstrated that ∼60% of the cells maintained their VSEL cell phenotype while other cells differentiated into multiple tissues at 3 months. Secondary transplants did not identify donor VSEL cells, suggesting limited self renewal but did demonstrate VSEL cell derivatives in situ for up to 1 year. At no point were teratomas identified. These studies show that VSEL cells produce multiple cellular structures in vivo and in vitro and lay the foundation for future cell-based regenerative therapies for osseous, neural, and connective tissue disorders.

  7. Efficacy of cryotherapy associated with laser therapy for decreasing severity of melphalan-induced oral mucositis during hematological stem-cell transplantation: a prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula Eduardo, Fernanda; Bezinelli, Leticia Mello; da Graça Lopes, Roberta Marques; Nascimento Sobrinho, Jairo Jose; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Correa, Luciana

    2015-09-01

    Melphalan followed by hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is the standard treatment for multiple myeloma and other hematopoietic neoplasms. However, high doses of melphalan cause severe oral mucositis (OM). The objective was to verify the efficacy of cryotherapy plus laser therapy on reduction of OM severity. HSCT patients undergoing melphalan chemotherapy (n = 71) were randomly divided into two groups according to OM treatment: oral cryotherapy performed with ice chips for 1 h 35 min followed by low-level laser therapy (InGaAIP, 660 nm, 40 mW, 6 J/cm(2) ) (n = 54) and laser therapy alone with the same protocol (n = 17). A control group (n = 33) was composed of HSCT patients treated with melphalan who received no specific treatment for OM. OM scores and clinical information were collected from D0 to D + 11. The cryotherapy/laser therapy group showed the lowest OM scores (maximum Grade I) and the lowest mean number of days (8 days) with OM in comparison with the other groups (p cryotherapy with laser therapy was effective in reducing OM severity in HSCT patients who underwent melphalan conditioning. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Hepatic veno-occlusive disease in pediatric stem cell transplantation: impact of pre-emptive antithrombin III replacement and combined antithrombin III/defibrotide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussmann, Ursula; Fischer, Joachim; Eber, Stefan; Scherer, Franziska; Seger, Reinhard; Gungor, Tayfun

    2006-06-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) remains a serious complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Based on a protective effect of antithrombin III (ATIII) on endothelial cells, we assessed the incidence of VOD after pre-emptive ATIII replacement and the outcome of VOD after combined high dose defibrotide (DF) and ATIII therapy. This prospective case series comprised two phases. In the first phase 71 children did not receive any specific VOD prophylaxis or therapy (controls). In the second phase 91 children were given pre-emptive ATIII replacement in case of decreased ATIII activity (defibrotide (60 mg/day) and ATIII replacement therapy were combined. The severity of VOD was determined according to the degree of multiple organ dysfunction. The incidence of VOD was similar in both groups (13/71, 18% vs. 14/91, 15%). All 14 patients in the second group who developed VOD showed decreased ATIII activity not more than 1 day prior to the clinical diagnosis of VOD. The resulting short duration of pre-emptive ATIII therapy failed to prevent VOD (OR 0.96). None of the patients (n=72) maintaining normal ATIII levels developed VOD. All 14 patients with VOD who received combined therapy achieved complete remission and 93 % (13/14) survived until day +100, compared to six survivors (46%) in the first group. Pre-emptive ATIII administration did not alter the incidence of VOD. Combination treatment with ATIII and defibrotide was safe and yielded excellent remission and survival rates.

  9. Effect of Immunoglobulin Therapy on the Rate of Infections in Multiple Myeloma Patients Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation and or Treated with Immunomodulatory Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhossain A. Khalafallah

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available There are few data available regarding the prevalence of infection in multiple myeloma (MM patients in conjunction with newer generations of immunomodulatory drugs (thalidomide, bortezomib, lenalidomide or post autologous stem cell transplantation.  We retrospectively analyzed 47 patients with MM from March 2006 to June 2009 at our institution. All patients received thalidomide and steroid therapy for at least 6 months. Nine patients received bortezomib and 11 lenalidomide subsequently to thalidomide, because of disease progression and 22 patients underwent autologous stem cell transplantation.   The median age was 64 years (range 37-86, with a female–to-male ratio of 18:29. The median residual-serum IgG-level at time of infection was 3.2 g/L, IgA 0.3 g/L and IgM 0.2 g/L. Most patients suffered from recurrent moderate to severe infections. All patients except 3 received intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG therapy with a significant decline of the rate of infection thereafter. Our analysis shows that IVIG appears to be an effective strategy to prevent infection in MM patients. Further studies to confirm these findings are warranted.

  10. Late acute humoral rejection in low-risk renal transplant recipients induced with an interleukin-2 receptor antagonist and maintained with standard therapy: preliminary communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, J; Contreras, L; Zehnder, C; Pinto, V; Elberg, M; Araneda, S; Herzog, C; Calabran, L; Aguiló, J; Ferrario, M; Buckel, E; Fierro, J A

    2011-01-01

    Low-risk renal transplant recipients treated with standard immunosuppressive therapy including interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) antagonist show a low incidence of early rejection episodes but few reports have examined the incidence and severity of late rejection processes. This study evaluated retrospectively cellular and antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) among 42 recipients selected because they showed low panel-reactive-antibodies, short cold ischemia time, no delayed graft function, and therapy including basiliximab (Simulect) induction. The mean observation time was 6.6 years. Sixty-seven percent of donors were deceased. Ten-year patient and death-censored graft survivals were 81% and 78%, respectively. Seven patients lost their kidneys due to nonimmunologic events. The seven recipients who experienced cellular rejection episodes during the first posttransplant year had them reversed with steroids. Five patients displayed late acute AMR causing functional deterioration in four cases including 1 graft loss. De novo sensitization occurred in 48% of recipients including patients without clinical rejection. In conclusion, long-term follow-up of kidney transplant recipients selected by a low immunologic risk showed a persistent risk of de novo sensitization evolving to acute AMR in 11% of cases. Although immunologic events were related to late immunosuppressive reduction, most graft losses were due to nonimmunologic factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Synaptic integration of transplanted interneuron progenitor cells into native cortical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, MacKenzie A; Baraban, Scott C

    2016-08-01

    Interneuron-based cell transplantation is a powerful method to modify network function in a variety of neurological disorders, including epilepsy. Whether new interneurons integrate into native neural networks in a subtype-specific manner is not well understood, and the therapeutic mechanisms underlying interneuron-based cell therapy, including the role of synaptic inhibition, are debated. In this study, we tested subtype-specific integration of transplanted interneurons using acute cortical brain slices and visualized patch-clamp recordings to measure excitatory synaptic inputs, intrinsic properties, and inhibitory synaptic outputs. Fluorescently labeled progenitor cells from the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) were used for transplantation. At 5 wk after transplantation, MGE-derived parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons received excitatory synaptic inputs, exhibited mature interneuron firing properties, and made functional synaptic inhibitory connections to native pyramidal cells that were comparable to those of native PV+ interneurons. These findings demonstrate that MGE-derived PV+ interneurons functionally integrate into subtype-appropriate physiological niches within host networks following transplantation. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Oral vasodilator therapy in patients with moderate to severe portopulmonary hypertension as a bridge to liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raevens, Sarah; De Pauw, Michel; Reyntjens, Koen; Geerts, Anja; Verhelst, Xavier; Berrevoet, Frederik; Rogiers, Xavier; Troisi, Roberto I; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Colle, Isabelle

    Portopulmonary hypertension (POPH) is a part of group 1 pulmonary hypertension (pulmonary hypertension associated with portal hypertension). Liver transplantation (LTx) may be curative, but is usually restricted to patients with mild-to-moderate POPH. The presence of severe POPH may be a

  13. Psychosocial Changes Associated with Participation in Art Therapy Interventions for Siblings of Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jo; Packman, Wendy; Huffman, Lynne C.; Horn, Biljana; Cowan, Morton; Amylon, Michael D.; Kahn, Colleen; Cordova, Matt; Moses, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an accepted medical treatment for many serious childhood diseases. HSCT is a demanding procedure that creates both physical and emotional challenges for patients and their family members. Research has demonstrated that siblings of children undergoing HSCT are at risk for developing psychosocial…

  14. Resultados iniciais da oxigenoterapia hiperbárica empacientes em lista de espera para o transplante hepático Preliminary results of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on patients on the waiting list for liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Kreimer

    2011-03-01

    benefited with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. AIM: To evaluate clinical and laboratorial data regarding liver function in cirrhotic patients selected for liver transplantation, submitted to hyperbaric oxygen therapy. METHOD: A prospective interventional study was designed, wherein 10 patients were randomized amongst cirrhotic patients selected for liver transplantation. The ages ranged from 20 to 65 years, and all patients presented with a MELD score greater than 15. All patients were submitted to nine sessions of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, on alternated days with the duration of 60 minutes per session, with oxygen atmosphere of 100% and a 2,8 ATM pressure. Dependent parameters included were biochemical and hematologic laboratory values, evaluated before and after hyperbaric oxygen therapy sessions, besides clinical parameters, evaluated considering the Child-Turcotte-Pugh and the MELD scores. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS (Statistcal Package for Social Sciences. RESULTS: Three patients (30% reported decrease in the number and intensity of encephalopathy. There were no cases of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and gastrointestinal bleeding, and there were no increases on the severity of ascitis. Two patients reported improvement on pruritus, and four improvement on the general status for few weeks following hyperbaric oxygen sessions. CONCLUSION: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy may improve liver function in cirrhosis, and may help to control complications related to liver failure on the preoperative evaluation for liver transplantation.

  15. [Transplantation-associated infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würzner, R

    2004-01-01

    Transplantation-associated infections are caused by an infected transplanted organ or the endogenic or exogenic environment of the recipient in a state of induced immunodeficiency. The best therapy would be to reconstitute the immunodeficiency, but this is usually impossible as it endangers the transplanted organ. Thus, a specific, standardised anti-infectious therapy is needed even in the absence of clearly identified micro-organisms [bacteria (in two thirds gram-positive rods), parasites (in central Europe predominantly Toxoplasma), fungi (especially Candida spp. or Aspergillus spp.) or viruses (such as Parvovirus B19 and Cytomegalovirus)]. Origins of infection (e.g., hygiene), types of infection (e.g., reactivation), typical localisations, diagnostic tools (e.g., blood cultures, antigenic tests, PCR, CT, advantages and disadvantages of antibody assays) and possible therapies are briefly discussed. The take home messages are to avoid economy measures in microbial diagnostics and to use CMV-seronegative donors whenever possible.

  16. Induction Therapy With Antithymocyte Globulin in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Transplantation Is Associated With Decreased Coronary Plaque Progression as Assessed by Intravascular Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarbal, Babak; Cheng, Richard; Vanichsarn, Christopher; Patel, Jignesh K; Czer, Lawrence S; Chang, David H; Kittleson, Michelle M; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2016-01-01

    Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is used as induction therapy after cardiac transplant for enhancing immunosuppression and delaying the initiation of nephrotoxic drugs. It is unknown if ATG induction is associated with decreased coronary plaque progression by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Patients transplanted between March 2010 and December 2012 with baseline and 1-year IVUS were included. All patients transplanted were included in a secondary analysis. Change in plaque progression was measured in a blinded fashion on matched coronary segments and contrasted between patients induced with ATG and those who were not. One hundred and three patients were included in IVUS arms. Mean age at transplant was 55.8 ± 12.6 years, and 33.0% were female. Patients induced with ATG were more sensitized (54.3% versus 14.3%). Plaque progression was attenuated in patients who received ATG by changes in maximal intimal area (1.0 ± 1.2 versus 2.3 ± 2.6 mm(2); P = 0.001), maximal percent stenosis (6.3 ± 7.9 versus 12.8 ± 12.3%; = 0.003), maximal intimal thickness (0.2 ± 0.2 versus 0.3 ± 0.3 mm; P = 0.035), and plaque volume (0.5 ± 0.7 versus 1.0 ± 1.3 mm(3)/mm; P = 0.016). Rapid plaque progression by maximal percent stenosis (≥ 20%) occurred less frequently in the ATG arm (4.3% versus 26.3; P = 0.003). Survival (P = 0.242) and any treated rejection (P = 0.166) were not statistically different between groups. Patients receiving ATG had a higher rate of first-year infection (P = 0.003), perhaps related to increased intravenous antibiotic use immediately postoperatively, and a trend toward more biopsy-proven rejection (P = 0.073). Induction therapy with ATG is associated with reduced first-year coronary plaque progression as assessed by IVUS, despite an increased prevalence of sensitized patients with a trend toward more rejection. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Cytotect®CP as salvage therapy in patients with CMV infection following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: a multicenter retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuliman, Tamim; Kitel, Caroline; Dulery, Rémy; Guillaume, Thierry; Larosa, Fabrice; Cornillon, Jérôme; Labussière-Wallet, Helene; Médiavilla, Clémence; Belaiche, Stéphanie; Delage, Jeremy; Alain, Sophie; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim

    2018-04-13

    Cytomegalovirus is one of the main contributing factors to high mortality rates in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). The main factors of treatment failure are both drug resistance and intolerance. In some cases, Cytotect®CP CMV-hyperimmune globulin is used as salvage therapy. This study aims to investigate the safety and efficacy of Cytotect®CP as a salvage therapy in patients with CMV infection after allo-HCT. Twenty-three consecutive patients received Cytotect®CP for CMV infection after prior CMV therapy. At the time of Cytotect®CP introduction, 17 patients (74%) had developed acute GVHD and 15 patients (64%) were receiving steroid treatment; Cytotect®CP was used as monotherapy (n = 7) and in combination (n = 16). Overall, response was observed in 18 patients (78%) with a median time of 15 days (range: 3-51). Of the 18 responders, 4 experienced CMV reactivation, while 5 responders died within 100 days of beginning treatment. Of these 5 deaths, 4 were due to causes unrelated to CMV. Estimated 100-day OS from the introduction of Cytotect®CP was 69.6%. No statistically significant difference was observed in 100-day OS between responders and non-responders (73.7% vs 50.0%, p = 0.258). Cytotect®CP as salvage therapy is effective and well-tolerated. Given its safety profile, early treatment use should be considered.

  18. Survey of expert opinions and related recommendations regarding bridging therapy using hypomethylating agents followed by allogeneic transplantation for high-risk MDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sang Kyun; Moon, Joon Ho

    2015-08-01

    According to current guidelines on therapeutic strategies for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), cytoreductive therapies before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) are not widely recommended for patients with high-risk MDS or refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB) who are eligible for allogeneic SCT because of controversial evidence on the role of such therapies. Yet, while treatment with hypomethylating agents (HMAs) has a critical limitation in eradicating MDS clones, the use of HMA treatment as a bridge to allogeneic SCT has become a focus with the hope of improving the SCT outcome based on the chance of achieving complete remission or reducing the blast percentage safely and effectively before allogeneic SCT. However, a consensus needs to be established on the use of HMAs as a bridging therapy for high-risk MDS or RAEB. Thus, the Korean AML/MDS working party group surveyed 34 Korean MDS experts on their bridging therapies for high-risk MDS. Accordingly, this paper presents the survey questionnaire and resulting data, along with a summary of the consensus and related recommendations regarding strategies using HMA treatment and allogeneic SCT based on reported studies and the current survey results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Generation of hematopoietic lineage cells from embryonic like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Reza Khamisipour

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epigenetic reprogramming of somatic cells into embryonic stem cells has attracted much attention, because of the potential for stem cell transplantation and compatibility with recipient. However, the therapeutic application of either nuclear transfer or nuclear fusion of somatic cell has been hindered by technical complications as well as ethical objections. Recently, a new method is reported whereby ectopic expression of embryonic specific transcription factors was shown to induce fibroblasts to become embryonic like SCs (induced pluripotent stem cells. A major limitation of this method is the use of potentially harmful genome integrating viruses such as reto- or lentivirus. The main aim of this investigation was generation of human hematopoietic stem cells from induced fibroblasts by safe adenovectors carrying embryonically active genes. Material and Methods: Isolated fibroblasts from foreskin were expanded and recombinant adenoviruses carrying human Sox2, Oct4, Klf4, cMyc genes were added to culture. After formation of embryonic like colonies and cell expansion, they were transferred to embryonic media without bFGF, and embryoid bodies were cultured on stromal and non-stromal differentiation media for 14 days. Results: Expression of CD34 gene and antigenic markers, CD34, CD38 & CD133 in stromal culture showed significant difference with non-differentiation and non-stromal media. Conclusion: These findings show high hematopoietic differentiation rate of Adeno-iPS cells in stromal culture and no need to use growth factors. While, there was no difference between non-differentiation and non-stromal media.

  20. Embryoid bodies formation and differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells in collagen/Matrigel scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Zhang, Ye; Lin, Qiuxia; Liu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Haibin; Duan, Cuimi; Wang, Yanmeng; Hao, Tong; Wu, Kuiwu; Wang, Changyong

    2010-07-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have the potential to develop into any type of tissue and are considered as a promising source of seeding cells for tissue engineering and transplantation therapy. The main catalyst for ES cells differentiation is the growth into embryoid bodies (EBs), which are utilized widely as the trigger of in vitro differentiation. In this study, a novel method for generating EBs from mouse ES cells through culture in collagen/Matrigel scaffolds was successfully established. When single ES cells were seeded in three dimensional collagen/Matrigel scaffolds, they grew into aggregates gradually and formed simple EBs with circular structures. After 7 days' culture, they formed into cystic EBs that would eventually differentiate into the three embryonic germ layers. Evaluation of the EBs in terms of morphology and potential to differentiate indicated that they were typical in structure and could generate various cell types; they were also able to form into tissue-like structures. Moreover, with introduction of ascorbic acid, ES cells differentiated into cardiomyocytes efficiently and started contracting synchronously at day 19. The results demonstrated that collagen/Matrigel scaffolds supported EBs formation and their subsequent differentiation in a single three dimensional environment. Copyright 2010 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology and the Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The cell cycle as a brake for β-cell regeneration from embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badawy, Ahmed; El-Badri, Nagwa

    2016-01-13

    The generation of insulin-producing β cells from stem cells in vitro provides a promising source of cells for cell transplantation therapy in diabetes. However, insulin-producing cells generated from human stem cells show deficiency in many functional characteristics compared with pancreatic β cells. Recent reports have shown molecular ties between the cell cycle and the differentiation mechanism of embryonic stem (ES) cells, assuming that cell fate decisions are controlled by the cell cycle machinery. Both β cells and ES cells possess unique cell cycle machinery yet with significant contrasts. In this review, we compare the cell cycle control mechanisms in both ES cells and β cells, and highlight the fundamental differences between pluripotent cells of embryonic origin and differentiated β cells. Through critical analysis of the differences of the cell cycle between these two cell types, we propose that the cell cycle of ES cells may act as a brake for β-cell regeneration. Based on these differences, we discuss the potential of modulating the cell cycle of ES cells for the large-scale generation of functionally mature β cells in vitro. Further understanding of the factors that modulate the ES cell cycle will lead to new approaches to enhance the production of functional mature insulin-producing cells, and yield a reliable system to generate bona fide β cells in vitro.

  2. Childhood Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childhood central nervous system embryonal tumors and pineal tumors are treated with surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue and targeted therapy. Learn more in this expert-reviewed summary.

  3. Impact of maintenance immunosuppressive therapy on the fecal microbiome of renal transplant recipients: Comparison between an everolimus- and a standard tacrolimus-based regimen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Zaza

    Full Text Available The gut microbiome is the full set of microbes living in the gastrointestinal tract and is emerging as an important dynamic/fluid system that, if altered by environmental, dietetic or pharmacological factors, could considerably influence drug response. However, the immunosuppressive drug-induced modifications of this system are still poorly defined.We employed an innovative bioinformatics approach to assess differences in the whole-gut microbial metagenomic profile of 20 renal transplant recipients undergoing maintenance treatment with two different immunosuppressive protocols. Nine patients were treated with everolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil (EVE+MMF group, and 11 patients were treated with a standard therapy with tacrolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil (TAC+MMF group.A statistical analysis of comparative high-throughput data demonstrated that although similar according to the degree of Shannon diversity (alpha diversity at the taxonomic level, three functional genes clearly discriminated EVE+MMF versus TAC+MMF (cutoff: log2 fold change≥1, FDR≤0.05. Flagellar motor switch protein (fliNY and type IV pilus assembly protein pilM (pilM were significantly enriched in TAC+MMF-treated patients, while macrolide transport system mrsA (msrA was more abundant in patients treated with EVE+MMF. Finally, PERMANOVA revealed that among the variables analyzed and included in our model, only the consumption of sugar significantly influenced beta diversity.Our study, although performed on a relatively small number of patients, showed, for the first time, specific immunosuppressive-related effects on fecal microbiome of renal transplant recipients and it suggested that the analysis of the gut microbes community could represent a new tool to better understand the effects of drugs currently employed in organ transplantations. However, multicenter studies including healthy controls should be undertaken to better address this objective.

  4. Impact of maintenance immunosuppressive therapy on the fecal microbiome of renal transplant recipients: Comparison between an everolimus- and a standard tacrolimus-based regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaza, Gianluigi; Dalla Gassa, Alessandra; Felis, Giovanna; Granata, Simona; Torriani, Sandra; Lupo, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The gut microbiome is the full set of microbes living in the gastrointestinal tract and is emerging as an important dynamic/fluid system that, if altered by environmental, dietetic or pharmacological factors, could considerably influence drug response. However, the immunosuppressive drug-induced modifications of this system are still poorly defined. We employed an innovative bioinformatics approach to assess differences in the whole-gut microbial metagenomic profile of 20 renal transplant recipients undergoing maintenance treatment with two different immunosuppressive protocols. Nine patients were treated with everolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil (EVE+MMF group), and 11 patients were treated with a standard therapy with tacrolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil (TAC+MMF group). A statistical analysis of comparative high-throughput data demonstrated that although similar according to the degree of Shannon diversity (alpha diversity) at the taxonomic level, three functional genes clearly discriminated EVE+MMF versus TAC+MMF (cutoff: log2 fold change≥1, FDR≤0.05). Flagellar motor switch protein (fliNY) and type IV pilus assembly protein pilM (pilM) were significantly enriched in TAC+MMF-treated patients, while macrolide transport system mrsA (msrA) was more abundant in patients treated with EVE+MMF. Finally, PERMANOVA revealed that among the variables analyzed and included in our model, only the consumption of sugar significantly influenced beta diversity. Our study, although performed on a relatively small number of patients, showed, for the first time, specific immunosuppressive-related effects on fecal microbiome of renal transplant recipients and it suggested that the analysis of the gut microbes community could represent a new tool to better understand the effects of drugs currently employed in organ transplantations. However, multicenter studies including healthy controls should be undertaken to better address this objective.

  5. Impact of maintenance immunosuppressive therapy on the fecal microbiome of renal transplant recipients: Comparison between an everolimus- and a standard tacrolimus-based regimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Gassa, Alessandra; Felis, Giovanna; Granata, Simona; Torriani, Sandra; Lupo, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Background The gut microbiome is the full set of microbes living in the gastrointestinal tract and is emerging as an important dynamic/fluid system that, if altered by environmental, dietetic or pharmacological factors, could considerably influence drug response. However, the immunosuppressive drug-induced modifications of this system are still poorly defined. Methods We employed an innovative bioinformatics approach to assess differences in the whole-gut microbial metagenomic profile of 20 renal transplant recipients undergoing maintenance treatment with two different immunosuppressive protocols. Nine patients were treated with everolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil (EVE+MMF group), and 11 patients were treated with a standard therapy with tacrolimus plus mycophenolate mofetil (TAC+MMF group). Results A statistical analysis of comparative high-throughput data demonstrated that although similar according to the degree of Shannon diversity (alpha diversity) at the taxonomic level, three functional genes clearly discriminated EVE+MMF versus TAC+MMF (cutoff: log2 fold change≥1, FDR≤0.05). Flagellar motor switch protein (fliNY) and type IV pilus assembly protein pilM (pilM) were significantly enriched in TAC+MMF-treated patients, while macrolide transport system mrsA (msrA) was more abundant in patients treated with EVE+MMF. Finally, PERMANOVA revealed that among the variables analyzed and included in our model, only the consumption of sugar significantly influenced beta diversity. Conclusions Our study, although performed on a relatively small number of patients, showed, for the first time, specific immunosuppressive-related effects on fecal microbiome of renal transplant recipients and it suggested that the analysis of the gut microbes community could represent a new tool to better understand the effects of drugs currently employed in organ transplantations. However, multicenter studies including healthy controls should be undertaken to better address this

  6. Cyclophosphamide, thalidomide, and dexamethasone as induction therapy for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients destined for autologous stem-cell transplantation: MRC Myeloma IX randomized trial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Gareth J.; Davies, Faith E.; Gregory, Walter M.; Bell, Sue E.; Szubert, Alexander J.; Navarro Coy, Nuria; Cook, Gordon; Feyler, Sylvia; Johnson, Peter R.E.; Rudin, Claudius; Drayson, Mark T.; Owen, Roger G.; Ross, Fiona M.; Russell, Nigel H.; Jackson, Graham H.; Child, J. Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Background Thalidomide is active in multiple myeloma and is associated with minimal myelosuppression, making it a good candidate for induction therapy prior to high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation. Design and Methods Oral cyclophosphamide, thalidomide, and dexamethasone was compared with infusional cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Results The post-induction overall response rate (≥ partial response) for the intent-to-treat population was significantly higher with cyclophosphamide-thalidomide-dexamethasone (n=555) versus cyclophosphamide-vincristine-doxorubicin-dexamethasone (n=556); 82.5% versus 71.2%; odds ratio 1.91; 95% confidence interval 1.44–2.55; P<0.0001. The complete response rates were 13.0% with cyclophosphamide-thalidomide-dexamethasone and 8.1% with cyclophos-phamide-vincristine-doxorubicin-dexamethasone (P=0.0083), with this differential response being maintained in patients who received autologous stem-cell transplantation (post-transplant complete response 50.0% versus 37.2%, respectively; P=0.00052). Cyclophosphamide-thalidomide-dexamethasone was non-inferior to cyclophosphamide-vincristine-doxorubicin-dexamethasone for progression-free and overall survival, and there was a trend toward a late survival benefit with cyclophosphamide-thalidomide-dexamethasone in responders. A trend toward an overall survival advantage for cyclophosphamide-thalidomide-dexamethasone over cyclophosphamide-vincristine-doxorubicin-dexamethasone was also observed in a subgroup of patients with favorable interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization. Compared with cyclophosphamide-vincristine-doxorubicin-dexamethasone, cyclophosphamide-thalidomide-dexamethasone was associated with more constipation and somnolence, but a lower incidence of cytopenias. Conclusions The cyclophosphamide-thalidomide-dexamethasone regimen showed improved response rates and was not inferior

  7. Coping-Infused Dialogue through Patient-Preferred Live Music: A Medical Music Therapy Protocol and Randomized Pilot Study for Hospitalized Organ Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Tyler James; Silverman, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Solid organ transplant patients often experience a variety of psychosocial stressors that can lead to distress and may hinder successful recovery. Using coping-infused dialogue (CID) through patient- preferred live music (PPLM) music therapy sessions may improve mood and decrease pain while also imparting psychoeducational knowledge concerning the identification of local and global problems and coping skills. The purpose of this pilot study was to develop a coping-based medical music therapy protocol that combines coping-infused dialogue (CID) with patient-preferred live music (PPLM) and measure the effects of the resulting CID-PPLM protocol on mood (positive and negative affect) and pain in hospitalized transplant patients. Our study used a pre-/posttest single-session wait-list control design. Participants (N=25) were randomly assigned to experimental (CID-PPLM) or control (usual care) conditions. Participants in the CID-PPLM condition received a single 30-minute session that integrated stressor identification and knowledge of coping skills (CID) with patient-preferred live music (PPLM). Results indicated no between-group differences at pretest and significant correlations between pre- and posttest measures. Concerning posttest ANCOVA analyses, there were significant between-group differences in positive affect, negative affect, and pain, with experimental participants having more favorable posttest scores than control participants. Effect sizes were in the medium-to-large range for positive affect (η2=.198), negative affect (η2=.422), and pain (η2=.303). CID through receptive PPLM may be an effective protocol for improving mood and decreasing pain in organ transplant recipients. MT interventions can be an important tool to develop rapport and enhance outcomes with patients. As greater engagement during interventions may have stronger treatment effects, we recommend future research examining patient engagement as a potential mediator of intervention effects

  8. A novel therapy to attenuate acute kidney injury and ischemic allograft damage after allogenic kidney transplantation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faikah Gueler

    Full Text Available Ischemia followed by reperfusion contributes to the initial damage to allografts after kidney transplantation (ktx. In this study we tested the hypothesis that a tetrapeptide EA-230 (AQGV, might improve survival and attenuate loss of kidney function in a mouse model of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI and ischemia-induced delayed graft function after allogenic kidney transplantation. IRI was induced in male C57Bl/6N mice by transient bilateral renal pedicle clamping for 35 min. Treatment with EA-230 (20-50mg/kg twice daily i.p. for four consecutive days was initiated 24 hours after IRI when acute kidney injury (AKI was already established. The treatment resulted in markedly improved survival in a dose dependent manner. Acute tubular injury two days after IRI was diminished and tubular epithelial cell proliferation was significantly enhanced by EA-230 treatment. Furthermore, CTGF up-regulation, a marker of post-ischemic fibrosis, at four weeks after IRI was significantly less in EA-230 treated renal tissue. To learn more about these effects, we measured renal blood flow (RBF and glomerular filtration rate (GFR at 28 hours after IRI. EA-230 improved both GFR and RBF significantly. Next, EA-230 treatment was tested in a model of ischemia-induced delayed graft function after allogenic kidney transplantation. The recipients were treated with EA-230 (50 mg/kg twice daily i.p. which improved renal function and allograft survival by attenuating ischemic allograft damage. In conclusion, EA-230 is a novel and promising therapeutic agent for treating acute kidney injury and preventing IRI-induced post-transplant ischemic allograft injury. Its beneficial effect is associated with improved renal perfusion after IRI and enhanced regeneration of tubular epithelial cells.

  9. Porcine embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane

    2008-01-01

    The development of porcine embryonic stem cell lines (pESC) has received renewed interest given the advances being made in the production of immunocompatible transgenic pigs. However, difficulties are evident in the production of pESCs in-vitro. This may largely be attributable to differences...

  10. Embryonic kidney function in a chronic renal failure model in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Eisuke; Yamanaka, Shuichiro; Kurihara, Sho; Tajiri, Susumu; Izuhara, Luna; Katsuoka, Yuichi; Yokote, Shinya; Matsumoto, Kei; Kobayashi, Eiji; Okano, Hirotaka James; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya; Yokoo, Takashi

    2017-08-01

    Rapid advancements have been made in alternative treatments for renal diseases. Our goal for renal regeneration is to establish a kidney graft derived from human embryonic tissues. In this study, we investigated the effects of host renal failure on the structure and activity of transplanted embryonic kidney and bladder, and found that diuretics effectively induced urine production in the transplanted kidney. Uremic conditions were reproduced using a 5/6 renal infarction rat model. An embryonic kidney plus bladder (embryonic day 15) was isolated from a pregnant Lewis rat and transplanted into the para-aortic area of a 5/6 renal-infarcted Lewis rat. Following growth, the embryonic bladder was successfully anastomosed to the host ureter. We assessed graft function in terms of survival rates and found no differences between normal (n = 5) and renal failure (n = 8) groups (median survival: 70.5 vs 74.5 h; p = 0.331) in terms of survival, indicating that the grafts prolonged rat survival, even under renal failure conditions. Furosemide (n = 9) significantly increased urine volume compared with saline-treated controls (n = 7; p < 0.05), confirming that the grafts were functional. We also demonstrated the possibilities of an in vivo imaging system for determining the viability of transplanted embryonic kidney with bladder. The results of this study demonstrate that transplanted embryonic kidney and bladder can grow and function effectively, even under uremic conditions.

  11. Enzyme Replacement Therapy and/or Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation at diagnosis in patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis type I: results of a European consensus procedure

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    de Ru, Minke H

    2011-08-10

    Abstract Background Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a lysosomal storage disorder that results in the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans causing progressive multi-organ dysfunction. Its clinical spectrum is very broad and varies from the severe Hurler phenotype (MPS I-H) which is characterized by early and progressive central nervous system (CNS) involvement to the attenuated Scheie phenotype (MPS I-S) with no CNS involvement. Indication, optimal timing, safety and efficacy of the two available treatment options for MPS I, enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), are subject to continuing debate. A European consensus procedure was organized to reach consensus about the use of these two treatment strategies. Methods A panel of specialists, including 8 specialists for metabolic disorders and 7 bone marrow transplant physicians, all with acknowledged expertise in MPS I, participated in a modified Delphi process to develop consensus-based statements on MPS I treatment. Fifteen MPS I case histories were used to initiate the discussion and to anchor decisions around either treatment mode. Before and at the meeting all experts gave their opinion on the cases (YES\\/NO transplantation) and reasons for their decisions were collected. A set of draft statements on MPS I treatment options composed by a planning committee were discussed and revised during the meeting until full consensus. Results Full consensus was reached on several important issues, including the following: 1) The preferred treatment for patients with MPS I-H diagnosed before age 2.5 yrs is HSCT; 2) In individual patients with an intermediate phenotype HSCT may be considered if there is a suitable donor. However, there are no data on efficacy of HSCT in patients with this phenotype; 3) All MPS I patients including those who have not been transplanted or whose graft has failed may benefit significantly from ERT; 4) ERT should be started at diagnosis and may be

  12. Steroid-sparing effect of extracorporeal photopheresis in the therapy of graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussowicz, M; Musiał, J; Mielcarek, M; Tomaszewska, A; Nasiłowska-Adamska, B; Kałwak, K; Gorczyńska, E; Mariańska, B; Chybicka, A

    2013-11-01

    Steroid-refractory graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a challenging therapeutic problem after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effect of extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP), and its impact on intensivity of immunosuppresive therapy in allogeneic HSCT patients. In this study 443 Therakos ECP procedures were performed in 21 patients after allogeneic HSCT with acute (aGVHD, 8 patients) or chronic (cGVHD, 13 patients) therapy-refractory GVHD. The median age at ECP onset was 20.5 years (range, 10-55). Venous access was provided by a nontunelized central venous catheter (12 patients) or 9.6-French portacath (9 patients). In the cGVHD group 9/13 patients were improved with a 4-year overall survival rate of 67.7%. ECP led to steroid discontinuation in 6 and substantial dose reduction in 5 patients. The prednisone dose equivalent per kilogram body weight decreased from 0.32 mg to 0.07 mg after therapy. Therapy of aGVHD led to complete or partial symptom remission in 3/9 subjects. The change in steroid dose in the aGVHD group was not significant, there were no long-term survivors. Portacath access was well tolerated and provided adequate blood flow rates. The ECP therapy significantly reduced the rates of remissions with steroid discontinuation among cGVHD but not aGVHD patients. Rare ECP-related complications were either catheter related or anticoagulation induced during ECP procedures. Photopheresis was a safe, effective method to treat steroid-resistant cGVHD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Survival of partially differentiated mouse embryonic stem cells in the scala media of the guinea pig cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Michael S; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M; Hardman, Jennifer; Coleman, Bryony; Shepherd, Robert K; de Silva, Michelle G

    2005-12-01

    The low regenerative capacity of the hair cells of the mammalian inner ear is a major obstacle for functional recovery following sensorineural hearing loss. A potential treatment is to replace damaged tissue by transplantation of stem cells. To test this approach, undifferentiated and partially differentiated mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were delivered into the scala media of the deafened guinea pig cochlea. Transplanted cells survived in the scala media for a postoperative period of at least nine weeks, evidenced by histochemical and direct fluorescent detection of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Transplanted cells were discovered near the spiral ligament and stria vascularis in the endolymph fluid of the scala media. In some cases, cells were observed close to the damaged organ of Corti structure. There was no evidence of significant immunological rejection of the implanted ES cells despite the absence of immunosuppression. Our surgical approach allowed efficient delivery of ES cells to the scala media while preserving the delicate structures of the cochlea. This is the first report of the survival of partially differentiated ES cells in the scala media of the mammalian cochlea, and it provides support for the potential of cell-based therapies for sensorineural hearing impairment.

  14. In Utero Hepatocellular Transplantation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Muñoz-Sáez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work represents a step forward in the experimental design of an in utero hepatocellular transplantation model in rats. We focused on the enrichment optimization of isolated fetal hepatocytes suspension, arranging the surgery methodology of in utero transplantation, monitoring the biodistribution of the transplanted hepatocytes, and assessing the success of the transplants. Rat fetuses have been transplanted at the 17th embryonic day (ED17 with fetal hepatocytes isolated from rats at the end of pregnancy (ED21. We assessed possible differences between lymphocyte population, CD4 positive, CD8 positive, double-positive T-cells, and anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukins 4 and 10 (IL4 and IL10 as well. Cellular viability reached the rates of 90–95%. Transplanted groups had a limited success. Transplanted hepatocytes were not able to pass through the hematoplacental barrier. The hepatocytes injected were primarily located in the liver. There was an upward trend in the whole amount of T CD4 and T CD8 cells. There was an increased IL4 in the transplanted groups observed in the pregnant rats. The possibility to induce tolerance in fetuses with a hepatocyte transplant in utero could be a key point to avoid the immunosuppression treatments which must be undergone by transplanted patients.

  15. Nicotinamide induces differentiation of embryonic stem cells into insulin-secreting cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaca, Pilar; Berna, Genoveva; Araujo, Raquel; Carneiro, Everardo M.; Bedoya, Francisco J.; Soria, Bernat; Martin, Franz

    2008-01-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, nicotinamide, induces differentiation and maturation of fetal pancreatic cells. In addition, we have previously reported evidence that nicotinamide increases the insulin content of cells differentiated from embryonic stem (ES) cells, but the possibility of nicotinamide acting as a differentiating agent on its own has never been completely explored. Islet cell differentiation was studied by: (i) X-gal staining after neomycin selection; (ii) BrdU studies; (iii) single and double immunohistochemistry for insulin, C-peptide and Glut-2; (iv) insulin and C-peptide content and secretion assays; and (v) transplantation of differentiated cells, under the kidney capsule, into streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic mice. Here we show that undifferentiated mouse ES cells treated with nicotinamide: (i) showed an 80% decrease in cell proliferation; (ii) co-expressed insulin, C-peptide and Glut-2; (iii) had values of insulin and C-peptide corresponding to 10% of normal mouse islets; (iv) released insulin and C-peptide in response to stimulatory glucose concentrations; and (v) after transplantation into diabetic mice, normalized blood glucose levels over 7 weeks. Our data indicate that nicotinamide decreases ES cell proliferation and induces differentiation into insulin-secreting cells. Both aspects are very important when thinking about cell therapy for the treatment of diabetes based on ES cells

  16. Donor transplant programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Bakar Sulaiman

    1999-01-01

    The transplantation of organs and tissues from one human to another human has become an essential and well established form of therapy for many types of organ and tissue failure. In Malaysia, kidney, cornea and bone marrow transplantation are well established. Recently, liver, bone and heart transplanation have been performed. Unfortunately, because of the lack of cadaveric organ donation, only a limited number of solid organ transplantation have been performed. The cadaveric organ donor rate in Malaysia is low at less than one per million population. The first tissue transplanted in Malaysia was the cornea which was performed in the early 1970s. At that time and even now the majority of corneas came from Sri Lanka. The first kidney transplant was performed in 1975 from a live related donor. The majority of the 629 kidney transplants done at Hospital Kuala Lumpur to date have been from live related donors. Only 35 were from cadaver donors. Similarly, the liver transplantation programme which started in 1995 are from live related donors. A more concerted effort has been made recently to increase the awareness of the public and the health professionals on organ and tissue donation. This national effort to promote organ and tissue donation seems to have gathered momentum in 1997 with the first heart transplant successfully performed at the National Heart Institute. The rate of cadaveric donors has also increased from a previous average of I to 2 per year to 6 per year in the last one year. These developments are most encouraging and may signal the coming of age of our transplantati on programme. The Ministry of Health in conjunction with various institutions, organizations and professional groups, have taken a number of proactive measures to facilitate the development of the cadaveric organ donation programme. Efforts to increase public awareness and to overcome the negative cultural attitude towards organ donation have been intensified. Equally important are efforts

  17. Redefining Strategies to Introduce Tolerance-Inducing Cellular Therapy in Human beings to Combat Autoimmunity and Transplantation Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brinke, Anja; Joosten, Irma; van Ham, S. Marieke; van Kooten, Cees; Prakken, Berent Jan

    2014-01-01

    Clinical translation of tolerance-inducing cell therapies requires a novel approach focused on innovative networks, patient involvement, and, foremost, a fundamental paradigm shift in thinking from both Academia, and Industry and Regulatory Agencies. Tolerance-inducing cell products differ

  18. Interventional therapy and complications after liver transplantation: the obstruction of the hepatic vein and inferior vena cava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Linsun; Shi Haibing; Zhao Linbo

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence rate of the obstruction of the hepatic vein or the inferior vena cava is very low. Obstruction can develop acutely as a result of technical problems or can present itself much later after the transplantation due to intimal hyperplasia or perianastomotic fibrosis. Clinically, the common presentations include hepatic dysfunction, liver engorgement, ascites, abdominal pain, etc. Percutaneous endovascular treatment with balloon dilation or stent placement is a safe and effective alternative treatment, which can keep the vessels open for a long period of time. Angioplasty can achieve technical success in restoring anastomotic patency almost to 100% of cases, but, unfortunately, restenosis occurs frequently. For, adult patients or pediatric patients with adult-sized hepatic veins, stenting seems to be the optimal choice. (authors)

  19. Problems Associated With Access to Renal Replacement Therapy: Experience of the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhar, Farida; Nizam, Naveeda; Fatima, Nazia; Siraj, Sana; Rizvi, Syed Adibul Hasan

    2017-02-01

    The prevalence of end-stage renal disease is increasing worldwide. It is also one of the main health problems in Pakistan. Currently, hemodialysis represents the main mode of treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease in this country. Despite 24-hour free dialysis at the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation (Karachi, Pakistan), a significant number of patients do not turn up for regular dialysis or miss regular sessions of dialysis. We conducted this study to identify and highlight the factors leading to poor compliance with regular hemodialysis treatment despite free dialysis treatment offered at our center. In 2014, 4565 patients with end-stage renal disease were registered at the Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation. Among these, 610 patients (13.4%) missed more than 2 sessions of dialysis and were included in the present study. Patients provided written informed consent before study participation. Data were collected from a questionnaire survey and analyzed by SPSS software (SPSS: An IBM Company, version 20.0, Chicago, IL, USA). Despite 24-hour dialysis facilities, the patient drop-out rate (779; 18%) was high. In addition, a significant minority of patients (610; 13.4%) was erratic in adherence to maintenance hemodialysis schedules, with > 2 missed appointments. The mean age of these 610 patients was 33.4 ± 7.4 years, and 345 patients (57%) were males. The main factors leading to poor compliance included cost of travel (33.2%), lack of affordable lodging and boarding facilities near dialysis center (30.9%), long distances from dialysis center (20.1%), and lack of family support (15.6%). This study shows that there is significant drop-out and poor compliance rates for regular dialysis despite free dialysis facilities.

  20. Good practices in health care "management experimentation models": insights from an international public-private partnership on transplantation and advanced specialized therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The research analyzes good practices in health care "management experimentation models," which fall within the broader range of the integrative public-private partnerships (PPPs). Introduced by the Italian National Healthcare System in 1991, the "management experimentation models" are based on a public governance system mixed with a private management approach, a patient-centric orientation, a shared financial risk, and payment mechanisms correlated with clinical outcomes, quality, and cost-savings. This model makes public hospitals more competitive and efficient without affecting the principles of universal coverage, solidarity, and equity of access, but requires higher financial responsibility for managers and more flexibility in operations. In Italy the experience of such experimental models is limited but successful. The study adopts the case study methodology and refers to the international collaboration started in 1997 between two Italian hospitals and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC - Pennsylvania, USA) in the field of organ transplants and biomedical advanced therapies. The research allows identifying what constitutes good management practices and factors associated with higher clinical performance. Thus, it allows to understand whether and how the management experimentation model can be implemented on a broader basis, both nationwide and internationally. However, the implementation of integrative PPPs requires strategic, cultural, and managerial changes in the way in which a hospital operates; these transformations are not always sustainable. The recognition of ISMETT's good management practices is useful for competitive benchmarking among hospitals specialized in organ transplants and for its insights on the strategies concerning the governance reorganization in the hospital setting. Findings can be used in the future for analyzing the cross-country differences in productivity among well-managed public hospitals.

  1. Abbreviated AUC monitoring of cyclosporine more adequately identified patients at risk for acute rejection during induction of immunosuppressive therapy after kidney transplantation than recommended C2 concentration values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troncoso, P; Ortiz, A M; Jara, A; Vilches, S

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring of cyclosporine (CsA) is critical during the induction of immunosuppressive therapy. Although most centers have incorporated C2 levels, our unit still uses an abbreviated AUC model which includes concentrations at C1, C2, and C6 post-dose (AUC(1-6)). The objective of this study was to compare both strategies of CsA monitoring during the first 30 days after kidney transplantation. The study included 89 recipients induced with CsA microemulsion and steroids. AUC(1-6) profiles were performed around days 3, 10, and 30 after transplantation with a target of 5500 to 6000 ng*h/mL considered therapeutic. For comparison purposes, a value of C2 >/= 1500 ng/mL was also considered therapeutic. Mean C2 and AUC(1-6) values were low dated with biopsy-proven acute rejection episodes (BPAR) during the study period. Twenty patients received living donor kidneys and overall there were 46 females. During this period, 253 AUC(1-6) were performed including 44 (17.4%) below the therapeutic range. When the analysis included only C2, 171 (67.6%) were below the therapeutic target (P AUC(1-6) at day 10 discriminated rejectors versus nonrejectors (5645 +/- 1390 and 8221 +/- 2502, respectively; P = .008). C2 was not significantly different at any time in either group. In this study, abbreviated AUC monitoring more adequately identified patients at risk for acute rejection than C2. Recommended C2 concentration levels need to be redefined in our patients.

  2. Association of the PPP3CA c.249G>A variant with clinical outcomes of tacrolimus-based therapy in kidney transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salgado PC

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Patricia C Salgado,1 Fabiana DV Genvigir,1 Claudia R Felipe,2 Helio Tedesco-Silva Jr,2 Jose O Medina-Pestana,2 Sonia Q Doi,3 Mario H Hirata,1 Rosario DC Hirata1 1Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analysis, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Sao Paulo, 2Division of Nephrology, Hospital do Rim, Federal University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 3School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA Background: The effects of genetic variants related to the pharmacodynamic mechanisms of immunosuppressive drugs on their therapeutic efficacy and safety have been poorly explored. This study was performed to investigate the influence of the PPP3CA c.249G>A variant on the clinical outcomes of kidney transplant recipients. Patients and methods: A total of 148 Brazilian patients received tacrolimus (TAC-based immunosuppressive therapy for 90 days post-kidney transplantation. The PPP3CA rs3730251 (c.249G>A polymorphism was determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data for CYP3A5 rs776746 (CYP3A5*3C; g.6986A>G were used to eliminate the confounding effects of this variant. Results: The PPP3CA c.249G>A SNP did not influence early TAC exposure, renal function, or other laboratory parameters, including levels of urea, creatinine, glucose, and lipids, and blood counts. This variant also did not account for the cumulative incidence of biopsy-confirmed acute rejection or delayed graft function. Regarding adverse events, PPP3CA c.249A allele carriers initially had a 3.05-fold increased probability of treatment-induced blood and lymphatic system disorders compared with c.249GG genotype individuals (95% confidence interval: 1.10–8.48, p=0.032. However, this result was not maintained after adjusting for body weight and CYP3A5*3C SNP status (p=0.086. Conclusion: The PPP3CA c.249G>A variant does not influence the clinical outcomes of Brazilian patients in the

  3. Transplantation of Human Pancreatic Endoderm Cells Reverses Diabetes Post Transplantation in a Prevascularized Subcutaneous Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Pepper

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Beta-cell replacement therapy is an effective means to restore glucose homeostasis in select humans with autoimmune diabetes. The scarcity of “healthy” human donor pancreata restricts the broader application of this effective curative therapy. “β-Like” cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC, with the capacity to secrete insulin in a glucose-regulated manner, have been developed in vitro, with limitless capacity for expansion. Here we report long-term diabetes correction in mice transplanted with hESC-derived pancreatic endoderm cells (PECs in a prevascularized subcutaneous site. This advancement mitigates chronic foreign-body response, utilizes a device- and growth factor-free approach, facilitates in vivo differentiation of PECs into glucose-responsive insulin-producing cells, and reliably restores glycemic control. Basal and stimulated human C-peptide secretion was detected throughout the study, which was abolished upon graft removal. Recipient mice demonstrated physiological clearance of glucose in response to metabolic challenge and safely retrieved grafts contained viable glucose regulatory cells.

  4. Analysis of S gene mutation of the hepatitis B virus in adult liver transplant recipients showing resistance to hepatitis B immunoglobulin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, G-C; Hwang, S; Ahn, C-S; Kim, K-H; Moon, D-B; Ha, T-Y; Song, G-W; Jung, D-H; Shin, Y W; Kim, S-H; Chang, K-H; Namgoong, J-M; Park, C-S; Park, H-W; Park, Y-H; Kang, S-H; Jung, B-H; Lee, S-G

    2013-10-01

    A considerable proportion of recipients of liver transplantations who are presented hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG) monotherapy for hepatitis B virus (HBV) prophylaxis develop HBIG resistance. In this study, we investigated the mutation patterns in the major hydrophilic region (MHR) of amino acid sequences 100 to 160. Using the gene sequence analyzer for amino acid sequences 0 to 226 in the S/pre-S region we analyzed blood samples of 15 patients showing HBIG resistance after high-dose HBIG prophylaxis. Various mutations in the MHR were observed in 14/15 samples: Gly145Arg mutation in 8/13 Adr subtype and 1/2 Ayw subtype samples (60%). The next most common mutation was Gly165Trp in 8/13 Adr subtype but neither of 2 Ayw subtype samples (53.3%). Concurrent antiviral resistance was noted in 5 patients: lamivudine (n = 5), or entecavir (n = 3), but not adefovir, suggesting the occurrence of simultaneous, antiviral cross-resistances. Two patients underwent retransplantation due to the progression of HBV infection despite vigorous antiviral therapy. At diagnosis of HBV recurrence, the mean HBV DNA load was 6.5 × 10(6) copies/mL; 4 patients showed paradoxical coexistence of anti-HBs and HBsAg. Currently, 2 subjects show low-level HBV DNA replication in peripheral blood, although the other 12 had no DNA replication after prolonged antiviral therapy. This study suggested that various mutations in the "a" determinant were associated with HBIG resistance. Since treatment failure to rescue antiviral therapy was often associated with delayed detection of HBV recurrence rather than concurrent antiviral resistance, frequent HBV surveillance using more sensitive screening tests, such as HBeAg and HBV DNA polymerase chain reaction assay, seems to be mandatory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic modification of embryonic stem cells with VEGF enhances cell survival and improves cardiac function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaoyan; Cao, Feng; Sheikh, Ahmad Y; Li, Zongjin; Connolly, Andrew J; Pei, Xuetao; Li, Ren-Ke; Robbins, Robert C; Wu, Joseph C

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac stem cell therapy remains hampered by acute donor cell death posttransplantation and the lack of reliable methods for tracking cell survival in vivo. We hypothesize that cells transfected with inducible vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF(165)) can improve their survival as monitored by novel molecular imaging techniques. Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were transfected with an inducible, bidirectional tetracycline (Bi-Tet) promoter driving VEGF(165) and renilla luciferase (Rluc). Addition of doxycycline induced Bi-Tet expression of VEGF(165) and Rluc significantly compared to baseline (p<0.05). Expression of VEGF(165) enhanced ES cell proliferation and inhibited apoptosis as determined by Annexin-V staining. For noninvasive imaging, ES cells were transduced with a double fusion (DF) reporter gene consisting of firefly luciferase and enhanced green fluorescence protein (Fluc-eGFP). There was a robust correlation between cell number and Fluc activity (R(2)=0.99). Analysis by immunostaining, histology, and RT-PCR confirmed that expression of Bi-Tet and DF systems did not affect ES cell self-renewal or pluripotency. ES cells were differentiated into beating embryoid bodies expressing cardiac markers such as troponin, Nkx2.5, and beta-MHC. Afterward, 5 x 10(5) cells obtained from these beating embryoid bodies or saline were injected into the myocardium of SV129 mice (n=36) following ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and echocardiography showed that VEGF(165) induction led to significant improvements in both transplanted cell survival and cardiac function (p<0.05). This is the first study to demonstrate imaging of embryonic stem cell-mediated gene therapy targeting cardiovascular disease. With further validation, this platform may have broad applications for current basic research and further clinical studies.

  6. Carcino-Embryonic Antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akute, O.

    1999-02-01

    Tumour marker analysis has increased our understanding of the presence of tumours in the body. Carcino-embryonic antigen, CEA, is one of the best studied tumour markers and has proved an ideal diagnostic adjuvant. It has helped in quantifying the amount of disease present in a patient and thence to make accurate prognosis on the various diagnosed ailments. At UCH, it is observed that there is an increase in cancer related ailments and therefore the need for early diagnosis is more compelling in our environment to mitigate future cost of managing advanced manifestation

  7. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: activities (2014 report) in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Introduction: Hematopoietic Stem Cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only curative therapy for ... Activities: The stem cell transplant centre at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital Edo ...

  8. Carinal transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, H; Shirakusa, T

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current techniques of management of carinal lesions are not always satisfactory. Carinal transplantation, if feasible, would be valuable in certain circumstances. METHODS AND RESULTS: Carinal transplantation experiments were performed in dogs. In early cross transplant experiments there were problems in controlling ventilation and in obtaining satisfactory anastomoses, and the animals failed to live for even a few days. In seven subsequent experiments the carinal graft was removed...

  9. Potential feasibility of dental stem cells for regenerative therapies: stem cell transplantation and whole-tooth engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Taka

    2011-07-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow are expected to be a somatic stem cell source for the development of new cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, dental clinicians are unlikely to carry out autologous cell/tissue collection from patients (i.e., marrow aspiration) as a routine procedure in their clinics; hence, the utilization of bone marrow stem cells seems impractical in the dental field. Dental tissues harvested from extracted human teeth are well known to contain highly proliferative and multipotent stem cell compartments and are considered to be an alternative autologous cell source in cell-based medicine. This article provides a short overview of the ongoing studies for the potential application of dental stem cells and suggests the utilization of 2 concepts in future regenerative medicine: (1) dental stem cell-based therapy for hepatic and other systemic diseases and (2) tooth replacement therapy using the bioengineered human whole tooth, called the "test-tube dental implant." Regenerative therapies will bring new insights and benefits to the fields of clinical medicine and dentistry.

  10. Artificial organs and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splendiani, G; Cipriani, S; Vega, A; Casciani, C U

    2003-05-01

    Nowadays artificial devices are not able to totally and undefinitely replace the loss of function of all vital organs and artificial organs can be used only to bridge the time to transplantation, which must be considered the first choice in the therapeutical approach for many chronic diseases. Since general population aging process is leading to an increase of organ demand, the gap between performed and requested transplantation is hard to fill. Xenotransplantation is nowadays only an experimental alternative solution and we have to do our best using available artificial organs to increase and improve the survival of patients waiting for transplantation. In this meeting we particularly dealt about organ function replacing therapy, especially regarding the kidney, heart, liver, pancreas and ear.

  11. Induction of angiogenesis in tissue-engineered scaffolds designed for bone repair: a combined gene therapy-cell transplantation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan; Starnes, Trevor; Khan, Yusuf M; Jiang, Tao; Wirtel, Anthony J; Deng, Meng; Lv, Qing; Nair, Lakshmi S; Doty, Steven B; Laurencin, Cato T

    2008-08-12

    One of the fundamental principles underlying tissue engineering approaches is that newly formed tissue must maintain sufficient vascularization to support its growth. Efforts to induce vascular growth into tissue-engineered scaffolds have recently been dedicated to developing novel strategies to deliver specific biological factors that direct the recruitment of endothelial cell (EC) progenitors and their differentiation. The challenge, however, lies in orchestration of the cells, appropriate biological factors, and optimal factor doses. This study reports an approach as a step forward to resolving this dilemma by combining an ex vivo gene transfer strategy and EC transplantation. The utility of this approach was evaluated by using 3D poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) sintered microsphere scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications. Our goal was achieved by isolation and transfection of adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) with adenovirus encoding the cDNA of VEGF. We demonstrated that the combination of VEGF releasing ADSCs and ECs results in marked vascular growth within PLAGA scaffolds. We thereby delineate the potential of ADSCs to promote vascular growth into biomaterials.

  12. Cyclophosphamide, thalidomide, and dexamethasone (CTD) as initial therapy for patients with multiple myeloma unsuitable for autologous transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Faith E.; Gregory, Walter M.; Russell, Nigel H.; Bell, Sue E.; Szubert, Alexander J.; Coy, Nuria Navarro; Cook, Gordon; Feyler, Sylvia; Byrne, Jenny L.; Roddie, Huw; Rudin, Claudius; Drayson, Mark T.; Owen, Roger G.; Ross, Fiona M.; Jackson, Graham H.; Child, J. Anthony

    2011-01-01

    As part of the randomized MRC Myeloma IX trial, we compared an attenuated regimen of cyclophosphamide, thalidomide, and dexamethasone (CTDa; n = 426) with melphalan and prednisolone (MP; n = 423) in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma ineligible for autologous stem-cell transplantation. The primary endpoints were overall response rate, progression-free survival, and overall survival (OS). The overall response rate was significantly higher with CTDa than MP (63.8% vs 32.6%; P < .0001), primarily because of increases in the rate of complete responses (13.1% vs 2.4%) and very good partial responses (16.9% vs 1.7%). Progression-free survival and OS were similar between groups. In this population, OS correlated with the depth of response (P < .0001) and favorable interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization profile (P < .001). CTDa was associated with higher rates of thromboembolic events, constipation, infection, and neuropathy than MP. In elderly patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (median age, 73 years), CTDa produced higher response rates than MP but was not associated with improved survival outcomes. We highlight the importance of cytogenetic profiling at diagnosis and effective management of adverse events. This trial was registered at International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number as #68454111. PMID:21652683

  13. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor and umbilical cord blood cell transplantation: Synergistic therapies for the treatment of traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Liska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is now characterized as a progressive, degenerative disease and continues to stand as a prevalent cause of death and disability. The pathophysiology of TBI is complex, with a variety of secondary cell death pathways occurring which may persist chronically following the initial cerebral insult. Current therapeutic options for TBI are minimal, with surgical intervention or rehabilitation therapy existing as the only viable treatments. Considering the success of stem-cell therapies in various other neurological diseases, their use has been proposed as a potential potent therapy for patients suffering TBI. Moreover, stem cells are highly amenable to adjunctive use with other therapies, providing an opportunity to overcome the inherent limitations of using a single therapeutic agent. Our research has verified this additive potential by demonstrating the efficacy of co-delivering human umbilical cord blood (hUCB cells with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF in a murine model of TBI, providing encouraging results which support the potential of this approach to treat patients suffering from TBI. These findings justify ongoing research toward uncovering the mechanisms which underlie the functional improvements exhibited by hUCB + G-CSF combination therapy, thereby facilitating its safe and effect transition into the clinic. This paper is a review article. Referred literature in this paper has been listed in the reference section. The datasets supporting the conclusions of this article are available online by searching various databases, including PubMed. Some original points in this article come from the laboratory practice in our research center and the authors' experiences.

  14. The primary role of zebrafish nanog is in extra-embryonic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, James A; Obbad, Kamal; Schier, Alexander F

    2018-01-09

    The role of the zebrafish transcription factor Nanog has been controversial. It has been suggested that Nanog is primarily required for the proper formation of the extra-embryonic yolk syncytial layer (YSL) and only indirectly regulates gene expression in embryonic cells. In an alternative scenario, Nanog has been proposed to directly regulate transcription in embryonic cells during zygotic genome activation. To clarify the roles of Nanog, we performed a detailed analysis of zebrafish nanog mutants. Whereas zygotic nanog mutants survive to adulthood, maternal-zygotic (MZ nanog ) and maternal mutants exhibit developmental arrest at the blastula stage. In the absence of Nanog, YSL formation and epiboly are abnormal, embryonic tissue detaches from the yolk, and the expression of dozens of YSL and embryonic genes is reduced. Epiboly defects can be rescued by generating chimeric embryos of MZ nanog embryonic tissue with wild-type vegetal tissue that includes the YSL and yolk cell. Notably, cells lacking Nanog readily respond to Nodal signals and when transplanted into wild-type hosts proliferate and contribute to embryonic tissues and adult organs from all germ layers. These results indicate that zebrafish Nanog is necessary for proper YSL development but is not directly required for embryonic cell differentiation. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. N-acetylcysteine-pretreated human embryonic mesenchymal stem cell administration protects against bleomycin-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiao; Zhu, Hong; Zhou, Wu-Gang; Guo, Xiao-Can; Wu, Min-Juan; Xu, Zhen-Yu; Jiang, Jun-feng; Shen, Ce; Liu, Hou-Qi

    2013-08-01

    The transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been reported to be a promising approach in the treatment of acute lung injury. However, the poor efficacy of transplanted MSCs is one of the serious handicaps in the progress of MSC-based therapy. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether the pretreatment of human embryonic MSCs (hMSCs) with an antioxidant, namely N-acetylcysteine (NAC), can improve the efficacy of hMSC transplantation in lung injury. In vitro, the antioxidant capacity of NAC-pretreated hMSCs was assessed using intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione assays and cell adhesion and spreading assays. In vivo, the therapeutic potential of NAC-pretreated hMSCs was assessed in a bleomycin-induced model of lung injury in nude mice. The pretreatment of hMSCs with NAC improved antioxidant capacity to defend against redox imbalances through the elimination of cellular ROS, increasing cellular glutathione levels, and the enhancement of cell adhesion and spreading when exposed to oxidative stresses in vitro. In addition, the administration of NAC-pretreated hMSCs to nude mice with bleomycin-induced lung injury decreased the pathological grade of lung inflammation and fibrosis, hydroxyproline content and numbers of neutrophils and inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and apoptotic cells, while enhancing the retention and proliferation of hMSCs in injured lung tissue and improving the survival rate of mice compared with results from untreated hMSCs. The pretreatment of hMSCs with NAC could be a promising therapeutic approach to improving cell transplantation and, therefore, the treatment of lung injury.

  16. A Patient-Derived Xenograft Model of Parameningeal Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma for Preclinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jody E. Hooper

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (eRMS is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas in children and adolescents. Parameningeal eRMS is a variant that is often more difficult to treat than eRMS occurring at other sites. A 14-year-old female with persistent headaches and rapid weight loss was diagnosed with parameningeal eRMS. She progressed and died despite chemotherapy with vincristine, actinomycin-D, and cyclophosphamide plus 50.4 Gy radiation therapy to the primary tumor site. Tumor specimens were acquired by rapid autopsy and tumor tissue was transplanted into immunodeficient mice to create a patient-derived xenograft (PDX animal model. As autopsy specimens had an ALK R1181C mutation, PDX tumor bearing animals were treated with the pan-kinase inhibitor lestaurtinib but demonstrated no decrease in tumor growth, suggesting that single agent kinase inhibitor therapy may be insufficient in similar cases. This unique parameningeal eRMS PDX model is publicly available for preclinical study.

  17. β-Cell Replacement in Mice Using Human Type 1 Diabetes Nuclear Transfer Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Lina; Danzl, Nichole; Campbell, Sean R; Viola, Ryan; Williams, Damian; Xing, Yuan; Wang, Yong; Phillips, Neil; Poffenberger, Greg; Johannesson, Bjarki; Oberholzer, Jose; Powers, Alvin C; Leibel, Rudolph L; Chen, Xiaojuan; Sykes, Megan; Egli, Dieter

    2018-01-01

    β-Cells derived from stem cells hold great promise for cell replacement therapy for diabetes. Here we examine the ability of nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells (NT-ESs) derived from a patient with type 1 diabetes to differentiate into β-cells and provide a source of autologous islets for cell replacement. NT-ESs differentiate in vitro with an average efficiency of 55% into C-peptide-positive cells, expressing markers of mature β-cells, including MAFA and NKX6.1. Upon transplantation in immunodeficient mice, grafted cells form vascularized islet-like structures containing MAFA/C-peptide-positive cells. These β-cells adapt insulin secretion to ambient metabolite status and show normal insulin processing. Importantly, NT-ES-β-cells maintain normal blood glucose levels after ablation of the mouse endogenous β-cells. Cystic structures, but no teratomas, were observed in NT-ES-β-cell grafts. Isogenic induced pluripotent stem cell lines showed greater variability in β-cell differentiation. Even though different methods of somatic cell reprogramming result in stem cell lines that are molecularly indistinguishable, full differentiation competence is more common in ES cell lines than in induced pluripotent stem cell lines. These results demonstrate the suitability of NT-ES-β-cells for cell replacement for type 1 diabetes and provide proof of principle for therapeutic cloning combined with cell therapy. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  18. Overview of marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation is now an accepted form of therapy for many hematologic disorders including aplastic anemia, genetically determined diseases and malignant diseases, particularly leukemia, and for rescue of patients given intensive chemoradiotherapy for malignant disease. The donor may be a healthy identical twin, a family member or even an unrelated person. Selection is made on the basis of human leukocyte antigen tissue typing. Intensive chemoradiotherapy is used to suppress patients' immune systems to facilitate engraftment and destroy diseased marrow. Transfusion of platelets, erythrocytes and granulocytes (or all of these), antibiotic coverage and protection from infection are necessary during the pancytopenic period. Survival rates vary considerably depending on a patient's disease, clinical state and age. Patients with aplastic anemia transplanted early in the course of their disease have a survival rate of approximately 80%. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are usually transplanted in a second or subsequent remission and have a survival rate of 25% to 40%. Patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia in remission have survivals ranging from 45% to 70%. More than 200 patients in the chronic phase of chronic granulocytic leukemia have been transplanted with survival ranging from 50% to 70%. Complications of marrow transplantation include marrow graft rejection, graft-versus-host disease, immunologic insufficiency and the possibility of recurrence of the leukemia. 14 references

  19. Comparison of Nutrition-Related Adverse Events and Clinical Outcomes Between ICE (Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide) and MCEC (Ranimustine, Carboplatin, Etoposide, and Cyclophosphamide) Therapies as Pretreatment for Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Malignant Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imataki, Osamu; Arai, Hidekazu; Kume, Tetsuo; Shiozaki, Hitomi; Katsumata, Naomi; Mori, Mariko; Ishide, Keiko; Ikeda, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare nutrition-related adverse events and clinical outcomes of ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide regimen (ICE therapy) and ranimustine, carboplatin, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide regimen (MCEC therapy) instituted as pretreatment for autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Material/Methods We enrolled patients who underwent autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation between 2007 and 2012. Outcomes were compared between ICE therapy (n=14) and MCEC therapy (n=14) in relation to nutrient balance, engraftment day, and length of hospital stay. In both groups, we compared the timing of nutrition-related adverse events with oral caloric intake, analyzed the correlation between length of hospital stay and duration of parenteral nutrition, and investigated the association between oral caloric intake and the proportion of parenteral nutrition energy in total calorie supply. Five-year survival was compared between the groups. Results Compared with the MCEC group, the ICE group showed significant improvement in oral caloric intake, length of hospital stay, and timing of nutrition-related adverse events and oral calorie intake, but a delay in engraftment. Both groups showed a correlation between duration of parenteral nutrition and length of hospital stay (P=0.0001) and between oral caloric intake (P=0.0017) and parenteral nutrition energy sufficiency rate (r=−0.73, P=0.003; r=−0.76, P=0.002). Five-year survival was not significantly different between the groups (P=0.1355). Conclusions Our findings suggest that compared with MCEC therapy, ICE therapy improves nutrition-related adverse events and reduces hospital stay, conserving medical resources, with no significant improvement in long-term survival. The nutritional pathway may serve as a tool for objective evaluation of pretreatment for autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. PMID:29398693

  20. Thoracic radiation therapy (RT) before autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) in relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's disease (HD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, Richard W.; Gospodarowicz, Mary K.; Sutcliffe, Simon B.; Crump, Michael; Keating, Armand

    1997-01-01

    no TR deaths (mean 105 days; range 0-263 days) (p=0.026). Among 8 patients with ABMT within 30 days of thoracic RT, 6 died of TR deaths. Of 10 patients receiving unilateral (4 pts; 2-16 Gy, 2-15 Gy), or bilateral lung irradiation (6 pts; 2-5 Gy TBI, 1-15 Gy, 1-16 Gy, 1-17 Gy, 1-17.5 Gy), 4 died of TR death. In contrast, among the 35 patients without thoracic RT (26-no RT, 9-non-thoracic RT), there were only 2 TR deaths. The four patients with mantle RT post-ABMT had no serious pulmonary complications. Conclusions: The use of thoracic RT before HDCT and ABMT was associated with a high post-transplant mortality rate. It was most evident in patients who received thoracic RT within 30 days prior to ABMT, or when the target volume included large volume of lung. We recommend that the use of post-transplant RT be investigated to decrease TR mortality

  1. New diagnosis and therapy model for ischemic-type biliary lesions following liver transplantation--a retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-cai Zhang

    Full Text Available Ischemic-type biliary lesions (ITBLs are a major cause of graft loss and mortality after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT. Impaired blood supply to the bile ducts may cause focal or extensive damage, resulting in intra- or extrahepatic bile duct strictures or dilatations that can be detected by ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and cholangiography. However, the radiographic changes occur at an advanced stage, after the optimal period for therapeutic intervention. Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage (PTCD are the gold standard methods of detecting ITBLs, but these procedures cannot be used for continuous monitoring. Traditional methods of follow-up and diagnosis result in delayed diagnosis and treatment of ITBLs. Our center has used the early diagnosis and intervention model (EDIM for the diagnosis and treatment of ITBLs since February 2008. This model mainly involves preventive medication to protect the epithelial cellular membrane of the bile ducts, regular testing of liver function, and weekly monitor of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS to detect ischemic changes to the bile ducts. If the liver enzyme levels become abnormal or CEUS shows low or no enhancement of the wall of the hilar bile duct during the arterial phase, early ERCP and PTCD are performed to confirm the diagnosis and to maintain biliary drainage. Compared with patients treated by the traditional model used prior to February 2008, patients in the EDIM group had a lower incidence of biliary tract infection (28.6% vs. 48.6%, P = 0.04, longer survival time of liver grafts (24±9.6 months vs. 17±12.3 months, P = 0.02, and better outcomes after treatment of ITBLs.

  2. Lentivirus-Induced Dendritic Cells (iDC for Immune-Regenerative Therapies in Cancer and Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Stripecke

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Conventional dendritic cells (cDC are ex vivo differentiated professional antigen presenting cells capable of potently stimulating naïve T cells and with vast potential for immunotherapeutic applications. The manufacture of clinical-grade cDC is relatively complex and requires several days for completion. Clinical trials showed poor trafficking of cDC from subcutaneous injection sites to lymph nodes (LN, where DC can optimally stimulate naïve lymphocytes for long-lasting memory responses. We demonstrated in mouse and human systems that a single overnight ex vivo lentiviral (LV gene transfer into DC precursors for production of combination of cytokines and antigens was capable to induce autonomous self-differentiation of antigen-loaded DC in vitro and in vivo. These highly viable induced DC (iDC effectively migrated from the injected skin to LN, where they effectively activated de novo antigen-specific effector memory T cells. Two iDC modalities were validated in relevant animal models and are now in clinical development: Self-differentiated Myeloid-derived Antigen-presenting-cells Reactive against Tumors co-expressing GM-CSF/IL-4/TRP2 for melanoma immunotherapy in the autologous setting (SmartDCtrp2, and Self-differentiated Myeloid-derived Lentivirus-induced against human cytomegalovirus as an allogeneic matched adoptive cell after stem cell transplantation (SmyleDCpp65. The lentiviral vector design and packaging methodology has “evolved” continuously in order to simplify and optimize function and biosafety of in vitro and in vivo genetic reprogramming of iDC. Here, we address the challenges seeking for new creations of genetically programmed iDC and integrase-defective LV vaccines for immune regeneration.

  3. Genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells: recent advances in the gene therapy of inherited diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueren, Juan A; Guenechea, Guillermo; Casado, José A; Lamana, María Luisa; Segovia, José C

    2003-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells constitute a rare population of precursor cells with remarkable properties for being used as targets in gene therapy protocols. The last years have been particularly productive both in the fields of gene therapy and stem cell biology. Results from ongoing clinical trials have shown the first unquestionable clinical benefits of immunodeficient patients transplanted with genetically modified autologous stem cells. On the other hand, severe side effects in a few patients treated with gene therapy have also been reported, indicating the usefulness of further improving the vectors currently used in gene therapy clinical trials. In the field of stem cell biology, evidence showing the plastic potential of adult hematopoietic stem cells and data indicating the multipotency of adult mesenchymal precursor cells have been presented. Also, the generation of embryonic stem cells by means of nuclear transfer techniques has appeared as a new methodology with direct implications in gene therapy.

  4. Carinal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, H; Shirakusa, T

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current techniques of management of carinal lesions are not always satisfactory. Carinal transplantation, if feasible, would be valuable in certain circumstances. METHODS AND RESULTS: Carinal transplantation experiments were performed in dogs. In early cross transplant experiments there were problems in controlling ventilation and in obtaining satisfactory anastomoses, and the animals failed to live for even a few days. In seven subsequent experiments the carinal graft was removed from one dog and transplanted into a second dog. Two dogs lived for over four months with immunosuppression. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that carinal transplantation can succeed if (1) the calibre of the graft is matched with that of the recipient; (2) there is an abundant blood supply to the graft; (3) appropriate immunosuppression is provided; (4) ventilation is adequate during surgery. Images PMID:1465758

  5. Viral infections in transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razonable, R R; Eid, A J

    2009-12-01

    Solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients are uniquely predisposed to develop clinical illness, often with increased severity, due to a variety of common and opportunistic viruses. Patients may acquire viral infections from the donor (donor-derived infections), from reactivation of endogenous latent virus, or from the community. Herpes viruses, most notably cytomegalovirus and Epstein Barr virus, are the most common among opportunistic viral pathogens that cause infection after solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The polyoma BK virus causes opportunistic clinical syndromes predominantly in kidney and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. The agents of viral hepatitis B and C present unique challenges particularly among liver transplant recipients. Respiratory viral illnesses due to influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza virus may affect all types of transplant recipients, although severe clinical disease is observed more commonly among lung and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Less common viral infections affecting transplant recipients include those caused by adenoviruses, parvovirus B19, and West Nile virus. Treatment for viruses with proven effective antiviral drug therapies should be complemented by reduction in the degree of immunosuppression. For others with no proven antiviral drugs for therapy, reduction in the degree of immunosuppression remains as the sole effective strategy for management. Prevention of viral infections is therefore of utmost importance, and this may be accomplished through vaccination, antiviral strategies, and aggressive infection control measures.

  6. Patient survey to identify reasons for non-adherence and elicitation of quality of life concepts associated with immunosuppressant therapy in kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muduma, Gorden; Shupo, Francis C; Dam, Sophie; Hawken, Natalia A; Aballéa, Samuel; Odeyemi, Isaac; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Renal transplantation (RT) is considered the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease compared to dialysis, offering better health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and higher survival rates. However, immunosuppressants are essential for the long-term survival of kidney grafts and patients' non-adherence to their medication leads to poor outcomes. Immunosuppressants can also significantly alter patients' HRQoL because of their side effects and the complex chronic medication regimen they represent. To elicit key concepts related to adherence to immunosuppressant therapy (IT) and reasons for non-adherence in terms of patient reported outcomes, side effects, and the impact of the medication on HRQoL in RT population, including patient preference of once daily over twice-daily immunosuppressive regimen. Results were used to develop an IT-specific conceptual framework and provide suggestions for improving patients' adherence to IT. Interviews were conducted with three clinical experts to determine key concepts related to RT and immunosuppressants. Thirty-seven participants in four focus groups were asked to cite important concepts related to adherence and impact of IT on HRQoL and to rate them. Qualitative analysis was conducted to code participants' responses. Non-adherence among participants where admitted was unintentional. The reason for this included forgetfulness, interference with lifestyle, being asleep at the time the medication should be taken, change in routine, and impact of side effects. Overall, participants reported that the evening dose was more problematic to remember and that the exclusion of this dose could make them more adherent. Participants also reported that IT impacted on their HRQoL in a number of ways including: placing restrictions on their lifestyle, causing anxiety, or impairing their ability to work. This study provides qualitative evidence about the barriers to IT adherence and the components of HRQoL that are important from the

  7. Mouse androgenetic embryonic stem cells differentiated to multiple cell lineages in three embryonic germ layers in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramura, Takeshi; Onodera, Yuta; Murakami, Hideki; Ito, Syunsuke; Mihara, Toshihiro; Takehara, Toshiyuki; Kato, Hiromi; Mitani, Tasuku; Anzai, Masayuki; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Saeki, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kanji; Sagawa, Norimasa; Osoi, Yoshihiko

    2009-06-01

    The embryos of some rodents and primates can precede early development without the process of fertilization; however, they cease to develop after implantation because of restricted expressions of imprinting genes. Asexually developed embryos are classified into parthenote/gynogenote and androgenote by their genomic origins. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) derived from asexual origins have also been reported. To date, ESCs derived from parthenogenetic embryos (PgESCs) have been established in some species, including humans, and the possibility to be alternative sources for autologous cell transplantation in regenerative medicine has been proposed. However, some developmental characteristics, which might be important for therapeutic applications, such as multiple differentiation capacity and transplantability of the ESCs of androgenetic origin (AgESCs) are uncertain. Here, we induced differentiation of mouse AgESCs and observed derivation of neural cells, cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes in vitro. Following differentiated embryoid body (EB) transplantation in various mouse strains including the strain of origin, we found that the EBs could engraft in theoretically MHC-matched strains. Our results indicate that AgESCs possess at least two important characteristics, multiple differentiation properties in vitro and transplantability after differentiation, and suggest that they can also serve as a source of histocompatible tissues for transplantation.

  8. Growth in pediatric renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, A; Phadke, K

    2007-04-01

    One of the fundamental challenges in managing pediatric renal transplant recipient is to ensure normal growth and development. The goal of renal transplant is not just to prolong life but to optimize quality of life. Short stature during childhood may be associated with academic underachievement and development of comorbidities such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, learning disability, and mood disorders. The most important factors affecting growth are use of corticosteroids, allograft function, and age and height deficit at the time of transplant. Aggressive conservative management of chronic renal failure and early use of growth hormone therapy will help in optimizing height at time of transplant. Early transplant, steroid minimization or withdrawal, and growth hormone therapy will help in achieving normal adult height in a majority of renal post transplant population. Steroid avoidance to achieve good growth still needs to be validated.

  9. Intrinsic control of electroresponsive properties of transplanted mammalian brain neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, J; Yarom, Y

    1985-01-01

    The present study presents the first analysis of neurons in mammalian brain transplants based on intracellular recording. The results, obtained in brain slices including both donor and host tissue, showed that neuronal precursor cells in embryonic transplants retained their ability to complete...... their normal differentiation of cell-type-specific electroresponsive properties. Distortions in cell aggregation and synaptic connectivity did not affect this aspect of neuronal differentiation....

  10. Comparative study of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) as a treatment for retinal dystrophies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Marina; Fontrodona, Laura; Albert, Silvia; Ramirez, Diana Mora; Seriola, Anna; Salas, Anna; Muñoz, Yolanda; Ramos, David; Villegas-Perez, Maria Paz; Zapata, Miguel Angel; Raya, Angel; Ruberte, Jesus; Veiga, Anna; Garcia-Arumi, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Retinal dystrophies (RD) are major causes of familial blindness and are characterized by progressive dysfunction of photoreceptor and/or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. In this study, we aimed to evaluate and compare the therapeutic effects of two pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-based therapies. We differentiated RPE from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) and transplanted them into the subretinal space of the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat. Once differentiated, cells from either source of PSC resembled mature RPE in their morphology and gene expression profile. Following transplantation, both hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells maintained the expression of specific RPE markers, lost their proliferative capacity, established tight junctions, and were able to perform phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments. Remarkably, grafted areas showed increased numbers of photoreceptor nuclei and outer segment disk membranes. Regardless of the cell source, human transplants protected retina from cell apoptosis, glial stress and accumulation of autofluorescence, and responded better to light stimuli. Altogether, our results show that hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells survived, migrated, integrated, and functioned as RPE in the RCS rat retina, providing preclinical evidence that either PSC source could be of potential benefit for treating RD. PMID:27006969

  11. Comparative study of human embryonic stem cells (hESC and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC as a treatment for retinal dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Riera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal dystrophies (RD are major causes of familial blindness and are characterized by progressive dysfunction of photoreceptor and/or retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells. In this study, we aimed to evaluate and compare the therapeutic effects of two pluripotent stem cell (PSC-based therapies. We differentiated RPE from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs or human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs and transplanted them into the subretinal space of the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS rat. Once differentiated, cells from either source of PSC resembled mature RPE in their morphology and gene expression profile. Following transplantation, both hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells maintained the expression of specific RPE markers, lost their proliferative capacity, established tight junctions, and were able to perform phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments. Remarkably, grafted areas showed increased numbers of photoreceptor nuclei and outer segment disk membranes. Regardless of the cell source, human transplants protected retina from cell apoptosis, glial stress and accumulation of autofluorescence, and responded better to light stimuli. Altogether, our results show that hESC- and hiPSC-derived cells survived, migrated, integrated, and functioned as RPE in the RCS rat retina, providing preclinical evidence that either PSC source could be of potential benefit for treating RD.

  12. Patient survey to identify reasons for non-adherence and elicitation of quality of life concepts associated with immunosuppressant therapy in kidney transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muduma G

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorden Muduma,1 Francis C Shupo,2 Sophie Dam,3 Natalia A Hawken,3 Samuel Aballéa,3 Isaac Odeyemi,1 Mondher Toumi4 1Astellas Pharma Europe Ltd, Chertsey, 2Creativ-Ceutical Ltd, London, UK; 3Creativ-Ceutical Ltd, Paris, 4Public Health (EA 3279, Faculty of Medicine, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France Background: Renal transplantation (RT is considered the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease compared to dialysis, offering better health-related quality of life (HRQoL and higher survival rates. However, immunosuppressants are essential for the long-term survival of kidney grafts and patients’ non-adherence to their medication leads to poor outcomes. Immunosuppressants can also significantly alter patients’ HRQoL because of their side effects and the complex chronic medication regimen they represent. Purpose: To elicit key concepts related to adherence to immunosuppressant therapy (IT and reasons for non-adherence in terms of patient reported outcomes, side effects, and the impact of the medication on HRQoL in RT population, including patient preference of once daily over twice-daily immunosuppressive regimen. Results were used to develop an IT-specific conceptual framework and provide suggestions for improving patients’ adherence to IT. Materials and methods: Interviews were conducted with three clinical experts to determine key concepts related to RT and immunosuppressants. Thirty-seven participants in four focus groups were asked to cite important concepts related to adherence and impact of IT on HRQoL and to rate them. Qualitative analysis was conducted to code participants’ responses. Results: Non-adherence among participants where admitted was unintentional. The reason for this included forgetfulness, interference with lifestyle, being asleep at the time the medication should be taken, change in routine, and impact of side effects. Overall, participants reported that the evening dose was more problematic to remember

  13. Generation of Regionally Specified Neural Progenitors and Functional Neurons from Human Embryonic Stem Cells under Defined Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnete Kirkeby

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To model human neural-cell-fate specification and to provide cells for regenerative therapies, we have developed a method to generate human neural progenitors and neurons from human embryonic stem cells, which recapitulates human fetal brain development. Through the addition of a small molecule that activates canonical WNT signaling, we induced rapid and efficient dose-dependent specification of regionally defined neural progenitors ranging from telencephalic forebrain to posterior hindbrain fates. Ten days after initiation of differentiation, the progenitors could be transplanted to the adult rat striatum, where they formed neuron-rich and tumor-free grafts with maintained regional specification. Cells patterned toward a ventral midbrain (VM identity generated a high proportion of authentic dopaminergic neurons after transplantation. The dopamine neurons showed morphology, projection pattern, and protein expression identical to that of human fetal VM cells grafted in parallel. VM-patterned but not forebrain-patterned neurons released dopamine and reversed motor deficits in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

  14. Kidney Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that links the kidney to the bladder — is connected to your bladder. After the procedure After your ... three to eight weeks after transplant. No lifting objects weighing more than 10 pounds or exercise other ...

  15. Liver Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  16. Liver Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the primary problems with hepatitis C patients was universal recurrence of the virus after transplantation. However, with ... Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now ...

  17. Hair Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Hair Transplants Before (left) and after (right) - top ...

  18. Transplant rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Antibodies References Abbas AK, Lichtman AH, Pillai S. Transplantation immunology. In: Abbas AK, Lichtman AH, Pillai S, eds. Cellular and Molecular Immunology. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 17. ...

  19. Pancreas Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces the juices that ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. A pancreas transplant is surgery to place a healthy pancreas ...

  20. Embryonic duplications in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, S M

    1975-02-01

    Twenty-seven embryonic duplications were examined during a 3-year investigation into the causes of perinatal lamb mortality. Twenty of the 27 were anomalous twins with 19 being conjoined (diplopagus 9 and heteropagus 10). The various duplications were: haloacardius acephalus 1, diprosopus 2, dicephalus 2, dipypus 3, diprosopus dipygus 1, syncephalus dipygus 1, pygopagus parasiticus 1, heteropagus dipygus 3, melodidymus 6, polyury 4, penile duplication 2, and bilateral otognathia 1. Four lambs were living and the time of death of the others was: parturient 8, and post-parturient 15. Average dry weight of the lambs was 3.35 kg (range 1.59 to 5.45 kg). Breed distribution was: Merino 77.8%, Crossbred 14.8%, Dorset Horn 3.7%, and Corriedale 3.7%. The caudal region was involved in 10 of the conjoined twins (52.6%), anterior region in 7 (36.9%), and both anterior and caudal regions in 2 (10.5%). Associated defects were present in 70.4% of the 27 lambs, the most common being atresia ani.

  1. Stem Cell Transplants in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cell transplants are procedures that restore blood-forming stem cells in cancer patients who have had theirs destroyed by very high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Learn about the types of transplants and side effects that may occur.

  2. Integration and long distance axonal regeneration in the central nervous system from transplanted primitive neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiagang; Sun, Woong; Cho, Hyo Min; Ouyang, Hong; Li, Wenlin; Lin, Ying; Do, Jiun; Zhang, Liangfang; Ding, Sheng; Liu, Yizhi; Lu, Paul; Zhang, Kang

    2013-01-04

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in devastating motor and sensory deficits secondary to disrupted neuronal circuits and poor regenerative potential. Efforts to promote regeneration through cell extrinsic and intrinsic manipulations have met with limited success. Stem cells represent an as yet unrealized therapy in SCI. Recently, we identified novel culture methods to induce and maintain primitive neural stem cells (pNSCs) from human embryonic stem cells. We tested whether transplanted human pNSCs can integrate into the CNS of the developing chick neural tube and injured adult rat spinal cord. Following injection of pNSCs into the developing chick CNS, pNSCs integrated into the dorsal aspects of the neural tube, forming cell clusters that spontaneously differentiated into neurons. Furthermore, following transplantation of pNSCs into the lesioned rat spinal cord, grafted pNSCs survived, differentiated into neurons, and extended long distance axons through the scar tissue at the graft-host interface and into the host spinal cord to form terminal-like structures near host spinal neurons. Together, these findings suggest that pNSCs derived from human embryonic stem cells differentiate into neuronal cell types with the potential to extend axons that associate with circuits of the CNS and, more importantly, provide new insights into CNS integration and axonal regeneration, offering hope for repair in SCI.

  3. Kidney transplantation and hyperparathyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Vetchinnikova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful kidney transplantation eliminates endocrine and metabolic disorders that predispose to the development of hyperparathyroidism, the complication typical for the chronic kidney disease; but the process of recovery from mineral and bone disorders is slowed down. The highest incidence of post-transplant hyperparathyroidism is recorded in the first postoperative year. The risk factors for its development or persistence include the high blood levels of parathyroid hormone, calcium, phosphorus, and/or alkaline phosphatase, a prolonged dialysis therapy, severe hyperparathyroidism in the preoperative period, vitamin D deficiency, a suboptimal transplanted kidney function, and also the recipient's previous history of subtotal or incomplete parathyroidectomy. The characteristic clinical and laboratory signs of posttransplant hyperparathyroidism are bone lesions, kidney graft abnormalities, hypercalcemia, and hypophosphatemia. The diagnostic algorithm includes monitoring the markers of mineral and bone metabolism, determining the bone mineral density, and imaging of thyroid glands. Correction of post-transplant hyperparathyroidism is performed surgically or pharmacologically. The article specifies the indications to, the extent and timing of parathyroidectomy, discusses the use of native vitamin D formulations, its analogues, and calcimimetics.

  4. Responses of human embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Ying; Zhang, Ningzhe; Ellerby, Lisa M.; Davalos, Albert R.; Zeng, Xianmin; Campisi, Judith [Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Novato, CA 94945 (United States); Desprez, Pierre-Yves, E-mail: pydesprez@cpmcri.org [Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Novato, CA 94945 (United States); California Pacific Medical Center, Research Institute, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer hESCs and their progeny, NSCs and neurons, were exposed to ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upon irradiation, most hESCs died within 5-7 h. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surviving NSCs underwent senescence and displayed features of astrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surviving NSCs did not display the secretory phenotype expressed by pure astrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study is to better understand the stress-responses of hESCs and their progeny. -- Abstract: Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) hold promise for the treatment of many human pathologies. For example, hESCs and the neuronal stem cells (NSCs) and neurons derived from them have significant potential as transplantation therapies for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Two concerns about the use of hESCs and their differentiated derivatives are their ability to function and their ability to resist neoplastic transformation in response to stresses that inevitably arise during their preparation for transplantation. To begin to understand how these cells handle genotoxic stress, we examined the responses of hESCs and derived NSCs and neurons to ionizing radiation (IR). Undifferentiated hESCs were extremely sensitive to IR, with nearly all the cells undergoing cell death within 5-7 h. NSCs and neurons were substantially more resistant to IR, with neurons showing the most resistant. Of interest, NSCs that survived IR underwent cellular senescence and acquired astrocytic characteristics. Unlike IR-treated astrocytes, however, the NSC-derived astrocytic cells that survived IR did not display the typical pro-inflammatory, pro-carcinogenic senescence-associated secretory phenotype. These findings suggest distinct genotoxic stress-responses of hESCs and derived NSC and neuronal populations, and suggest that damaged NSCs, while failing to function, may not cause local inflammation.

  5. Responses of human embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Ying; Zhang, Ningzhe; Ellerby, Lisa M.; Davalos, Albert R.; Zeng, Xianmin; Campisi, Judith; Desprez, Pierre-Yves

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► hESCs and their progeny, NSCs and neurons, were exposed to ionizing radiation. ► Upon irradiation, most hESCs died within 5–7 h. ► Surviving NSCs underwent senescence and displayed features of astrocytes. ► Surviving NSCs did not display the secretory phenotype expressed by pure astrocytes. ► This study is to better understand the stress-responses of hESCs and their progeny. -- Abstract: Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) hold promise for the treatment of many human pathologies. For example, hESCs and the neuronal stem cells (NSCs) and neurons derived from them have significant potential as transplantation therapies for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Two concerns about the use of hESCs and their differentiated derivatives are their ability to function and their ability to resist neoplastic transformation in response to stresses that inevitably arise during their preparation for transplantation. To begin to understand how these cells handle genotoxic stress, we examined the responses of hESCs and derived NSCs and neurons to ionizing radiation (IR). Undifferentiated hESCs were extremely sensitive to IR, with nearly all the cells undergoing cell death within 5–7 h. NSCs and neurons were substantially more resistant to IR, with neurons showing the most resistant. Of interest, NSCs that survived IR underwent cellular senescence and acquired astrocytic characteristics. Unlike IR-treated astrocytes, however, the NSC-derived astrocytic cells that survived IR did not display the typical pro-inflammatory, pro-carcinogenic senescence-associated secretory phenotype. These findings suggest distinct genotoxic stress-responses of hESCs and derived NSC and neuronal populations, and suggest that damaged NSCs, while failing to function, may not cause local inflammation.

  6. Lung Transplantation in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 00:00 Lung Transplantation in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension Consensus Statements Issued by the Scientific Leadership Council ... a treatment option for selected patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) when medical therapy is no longer effective. ...

  7. Is there an association between immunosuppressant therapy medication adherence and depression, quality of life, and personality traits in the kidney and liver transplant population?

    OpenAIRE

    Gorevski, Elizabeth; Succop, Paul; Sachdeva, Jyoti; Cavanaugh, Teresa M; Volek, Paul; Heaton, Pamela; Chisholm-Burns, Marie; Martin-Boone, Jill E

    2013-01-01

    Elizabeth Gorevski,1 Paul Succop,1 Jyoti Sachdeva,1 Teresa M Cavanaugh,1 Paul Volek,1 Pamela Heaton,1 Marie Chisholm-Burns,2 Jill E Martin-Boone1 1University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA, 2University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy, Memphis, TN, USA Objectives: To measure the association of transplant patients' personality, depression, and quality of life with medication adherence in kidney and liver transplant recipients. Methods: A cross-sectional study of liver and kidney t...

  8. PARASITIC INFECTIONS IN HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isidro Jarque

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However, they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients.

  9. Imaging in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, A.; Steward, C.G.; Lyburn, I.D.; Grier, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is used to treat a wide range of malignant and non-malignant haematological conditions, solid malignancies, and metabolic and autoimmune diseases. Although imaging has a limited role before SCT, it is important after transplantation when it may support the clinical diagnosis of a variety of complications. It may also be used to monitor the effect of therapy and to detect recurrence of the underlying disease if the transplant is unsuccessful. We present a pictorial review of the imaging of patients who have undergone SCT, based upon 15 years experience in a large unit performing both adult and paediatric transplants

  10. Imaging in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, A.; Steward, C.G.; Lyburn, I.D.; Grier, D.J

    2003-03-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is used to treat a wide range of malignant and non-malignant haematological conditions, solid malignancies, and metabolic and autoimmune diseases. Although imaging has a limited role before SCT, it is important after transplantation when it may support the clinical diagnosis of a variety of complications. It may also be used to monitor the effect of therapy and to detect recurrence of the underlying disease if the transplant is unsuccessful. We present a pictorial review of the imaging of patients who have undergone SCT, based upon 15 years experience in a large unit performing both adult and paediatric transplants.

  11. From gristle to chondrocyte transplantation: treatment of cartilage injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Anders

    2015-10-19

    This review addresses the progress in cartilage repair technology over the decades with an emphasis on cartilage regeneration with cell therapy. The most abundant cartilage is the hyaline cartilage that covers the surface of our joints and, due to avascularity, this tissue is unable to repair itself. The cartilage degeneration seen in osteoarthritis causes patient suffering and is a huge burden to society. The surgical approach to cartilage repair was non-existing until the 1950s when new surgical techniques emerged. The use of cultured cells for cell therapy started as experimental studies in the 1970s that developed over the years to a clinical application in 1994 with the introduction of the autologous chondrocyte transplantation technique (ACT). The technology is now spread worldwide and has been further refined by combining arthroscopic techniques with cells cultured on matrix (MACI technology). The non-regenerating hypothesis of cartilage has been revisited and we are now able to demonstrate cell divisions and presence of stem-cell niches in the joint. Furthermore, cartilage derived from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells could be the base for new broader cell treatments for cartilage injuries and the future technology base for prevention and cure of osteoarthritis. © 2015 The Author(s).

  12. From gristle to chondrocyte transplantation: treatment of cartilage injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the progress in cartilage repair technology over the decades with an emphasis on cartilage regeneration with cell therapy. The most abundant cartilage is the hyaline cartilage that covers the surface of our joints and, due to avascularity, this tissue is unable to repair itself. The cartilage degeneration seen in osteoarthritis causes patient suffering and is a huge burden to society. The surgical approach to cartilage repair was non-existing until the 1950s when new surgical techniques emerged. The use of cultured cells for cell therapy started as experimental studies in the 1970s that developed over the years to a clinical application in 1994 with the introduction of the autologous chondrocyte transplantation technique (ACT). The technology is now spread worldwide and has been further refined by combining arthroscopic techniques with cells cultured on matrix (MACI technology). The non-regenerating hypothesis of cartilage has been revisited and we are now able to demonstrate cell divisions and presence of stem-cell niches in the joint. Furthermore, cartilage derived from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells could be the base for new broader cell treatments for cartilage injuries and the future technology base for prevention and cure of osteoarthritis. PMID:26416680

  13. [Liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Maurizio; Mirante, Vincenzo Giorgio; Rapaccini, Gian Ludovico; Gasbarrini, Giovanni

    2004-01-01

    Liver transplantation represents the first choice treatment for patients with fulminant acute hepatitis and for patients with chronic liver disease and advanced functional failure. Patients in the waiting list for liver transplantation are classified according to the severity of their clinical conditions (evaluated using staging systems mostly based on hematochemical parameters related to liver function). This classification, together with the blood group and the body size compatibility, remains the main criterion for organ allocation. The main indications for liver transplantation are cirrhosis (mainly HCV-, HBV- and alcohol-related) and hepatocellular carcinoma emerging in cirrhosis in adult patients, biliary atresia and some inborn errors of metabolism in pediatric patients. In adults the overall 5-year survival ranges between 60 and 70%, in both American and European series. Even better results have been reported for pediatric patients: in fact, the 5-year survival rate for children ranges between 70 and 80% in the main published series. In this study we evaluated the main medical problems correlated with liver transplantation such as immunosuppressive treatment, acute and chronic rejection, infectious complications, the recurrence of the liver disease leading to transplantation, and cardiovascular and metabolic complications.

  14. Synthetic niches for differentiation of human embryonic stem cells bypassing embryoid body formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yarong; Fox, Victoria; Lei, Yuning; Hu, Biliang; Joo, Kye-Il; Wang, Pin

    2014-07-01

    The unique self-renewal and pluripotency features of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) offer the potential for unlimited development of novel cell therapies. Currently, hESCs are cultured and differentiated using methods, such as monolayer culture and embryoid body (EB) formation. As such, achieving efficient differentiation into higher order structures remains a challenge, as well as maintaining cell viability during differentiation into homogeneous cell populations. Here, we describe the application of highly porous polymer scaffolds as synthetic stem cell niches. Bypassing the EB formation step, these scaffolds are capable of three-dimensional culture of undifferentiated hESCs and subsequent directed differentiation into three primary germ layers. H9 hESCs were successfully maintained and proliferated in biodegradable polymer scaffolds based on poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The results showed that cells within PLGA scaffolds retained characteristics of undifferentiated pluripotent stem cells. Moreover, the scaffolds allowed differentiation towards the lineage of interest by the addition of growth factors to the culture system. The in vivo transplantation study revealed that the scaffolds could provide a microenvironment that enabled hESCs to interact with their surroundings, thereby promoting cell differentiation. Therefore, this approach, which provides a unique culture/differentiation system for hESCs, will find its utility in various stem cell-based tissue-engineering applications. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Recombinant human laminin isoforms can support the undifferentiated growth of human embryonic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Takamichi; Futaki, Sugiko; Hasegawa, Kouichi; Kawasaki, Miwa; Sanzen, Noriko; Hayashi, Maria; Kawase, Eihachiro; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Nakatsuji, Norio; Suemori, Hirofumi

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are thought to be a promising cell source for cell transplantation therapy. For such a clinical application, the hESCs should be manipulated using appropriate and qualified materials. In this study, we examined the efficacy of recombinant human laminin (rhLM) isoforms on the undifferentiated growth of hESCs. We first determined the major integrins expressed on the hESCs to reveal the preference of the hESCs for rhLMs, and found that the hESCs mainly expressed integrin α6β1, which binds predominantly to laminin-111, -332 and -511/-521. When the hESCs were seeded onto rhLMs, the cells indeed adhered markedly to rhLM-332, and to rhLM-511 and rhLM-111 to a lesser extent. The hESCs proliferated on these three rhLMs for several passages while preserving their pluripotency. These results show that rhLM-111, -332, and -511 are good substrates to expand undifferentiated hESCs due to their high affinity to integrin α6β1 expressed on hESCs

  16. [Kidney transplantation epidemiology in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesse, Christian

    2013-11-01

    Kidney transplantation activity in France is among the most important worldwide: in 2011, 2976 transplants have been performed (47.5 per million population), and the number of patients living with a functional graft is estimated around 30,000, representing 44.7% of all patients (n = 67,270) treated for end-stage renal failure. However, the rate of preemptive kidney transplants remains very low, only 3.3% of incident patients starting renal replacement therapy. The analysis of demand showed a progressive increase in recent years, as demonstrated by the registration rate on the kidney transplantation waiting list, increasing by 5% yearly between 2006 and 2010, but with huge differences according to age categories and regional registration areas, reflecting discrepant appreciations in indications for kidney transplantation. The median waiting time between registration and transplantation increased progressively in recent years, reaching 22.3 months with considerable variations according to regional areas and transplantation teams. Kidney transplantation activity, while increasing continuously, is far to cover the rising demand, and inexorably patients accumulate on the waiting list (around 9000 patients were registered by January 2012). This situation is the consequence of insufficient organ procurement activity. The deceased organ procurement rate remained high: 1572 harvested donors in 2011 (24.1 per million population), but the proportion of older donors rose in recent years, to reach the rate of 26% of donors older than 65 years in 2011. The procurement activity of donors after cardiac arrest was reintroduced in 2006, but increased slowly: 65 transplants were performed in 2011 using kidney procured in non heart-beating donors. The living donor kidney transplantation activity has markedly increased recently: 302 living donor transplantations were performed in 2011, representing 10.1% of the kidney transplantations. Facing the predictable increase in the number of

  17. Label-free separation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and their cardiac derivatives using Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, J W; Lieu, D K; Huser, T R; Li, R A

    2008-09-08

    Self-renewable, pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can be differentiated into cardiomyocytes (CMs), providing an unlimited source of cells for transplantation therapies. However, unlike certain cell lineages such as hematopoietic cells, CMs lack specific surface markers for convenient identification, physical separation, and enrichment. Identification by immunostaining of cardiac-specific proteins such as troponin requires permeabilization, which renders the cells unviable and non-recoverable. Ectopic expression of a reporter protein under the transcriptional control of a heart-specific promoter for identifying hESC-derived CMs (hESC-CMs) is useful for research but complicates potential clinical applications. The practical detection and removal of undifferentiated hESCs in a graft, which may lead to tumors, is also critical. Here, we demonstrate a non-destructive, label-free optical method based on Raman scattering to interrogate the intrinsic biochemical signatures of individual hESCs and their cardiac derivatives, allowing cells to be identified and classified. By combining the Raman spectroscopic data with multivariate statistical analysis, our results indicate that hESCs, human fetal left ventricular CMs, and hESC-CMs can be identified by their intrinsic biochemical characteristics with an accuracy of 96%, 98% and 66%, respectively. The present study lays the groundwork for developing a systematic and automated method for the non-invasive and label-free sorting of (i) high-quality hESCs for expansion, and (ii) ex vivo CMs (derived from embryonic or adult stem cells) for cell-based heart therapies.

  18. Integration-deficient lentivectors: an effective strategy to purify and differentiate human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guanghua; Si-Tayeb, Karim; Corbineau, Sébastien; Vernet, Rémi; Gayon, Régis; Dianat, Noushin; Martinet, Clémence; Clay, Denis; Goulinet-Mainot, Sylvie; Tachdjian, Gérard; Tachdjian, Gérard; Burks, Deborah; Vallier, Ludovic; Bouillé, Pascale; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne; Weber, Anne

    2013-07-19

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) hold great promise for applications in regenerative medicine. However, the safety of cell therapy using differentiated hPSC derivatives must be improved through methods that will permit the transplantation of homogenous populations of a specific cell type. To date, purification of progenitors and mature cells generated from either embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells remains challenging with use of conventional methods. We used lentivectors encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by the liver-specific apoliprotein A-II (APOA-II) promoter to purify human hepatic progenitors. We evaluated both integrating and integration-defective lentivectors in combination with an HIV integrase inhibitor. A human embryonic stem cell line was differentiated into hepatic progenitors using a chemically defined protocol. Subsequently, cells were transduced and sorted at day 16 of differentiation to obtain a cell population enriched in hepatic progenitor cells. After sorting, more than 99% of these APOA-II-GFP-positive cells expressed hepatoblast markers such as α-fetoprotein and cytokeratin 19. When further cultured for 16 days, these cells underwent differentiation into more mature cells and exhibited hepatocyte properties such as albumin secretion. Moreover, they were devoid of vector DNA integration. We have developed an effective strategy to purify human hepatic cells from cultures of differentiating hPSCs, producing a novel tool that could be used not only for cell therapy but also for in vitro applications such as drug screening. The present strategy should also be suitable for the purification of a broad range of cell types derived from either pluripotent or adult stem cells.

  19. Autogenous transplantation of maxillary and mandibular molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Peter P

    2008-11-01

    Autogenous tooth transplantation has been used as a predictable surgical approach to correct malocclusion and replace edentulous areas. This article focuses on the surgical approach and technique for molar transplantation. Thirty-two patients aged between 11 and 25 years underwent 44 autogenous molar transplantations. The procedure involved transplantation of impacted or newly erupted third molars into the extraction sockets of nonrestorable molars and surgical removal and replacement of horizontally impacted molars into their proper vertical alignment. Five basic procedural concepts were applied: 1) atraumatic extraction, avoiding disruption of the root sheath and root buds; 2) apical contouring of bone at the transplantation site and maxillary sinus lift via the Summers osteotome technique, when indicated, for maxillary molars; 3) preparation of a 4-wall bony socket; 4) avoidance of premature occlusal interferences; and 5) stabilization of the tooth with placement of a basket suture. All 32 patients successfully underwent the planned procedure. To date, 2 patients have had localized infection that resulted in loss of the transplant. The remaining 42 transplants remain asymptomatic and functioning, with a mean follow-up period of 19 months. No infection, ankylosis, loss of the transplant, or root resorption has been noted. In addition, endodontic therapy has not been necessary on any transplanted teeth. Autogenous tooth transplantation has been discussed and described in the literature previously, with a primary focus on cuspid and bicuspid transplantation. The molar transplant is infrequently discussed in today's literature, possibly because of the preponderance of titanium dental implants. Autogenous molar transplantation is a viable procedure with low morbidity and excellent functional and esthetic outcomes. This report shows the successful transplantation of 42 of 44 molars in 32 patients with a mean follow-up period of 19 months.

  20. Four decades of kidney transplantation in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonzo, Jorge P

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the background, beginnings, development, evolution and outcomes of kidney transplantation in Cuba. Nephrology as a medical specialty in Cuba began in 1962 and was formalized in 1966. Conditions were created to implement renal replacement therapy (including transplants), bring nephrology care to the entire country and train human resources who would assume this responsibility, making Cuba one of the first countries with a comprehensive program for renal patient care. After three unsuccessful cadaveric-donor kidney transplantations in 1968-69, the ensuing history of kidney transplantation can be summarized in the following three stages. 1970-1975: In January 1970, cadaveric-donor kidney transplantation began at the Nephrology Institute. That year, 17 kidney transplantations were performed; four of these patients lived with functional kidneys for 15-25 years; 10-year graft survival was 23.5% (Kaplan-Meier survival curve); HLA typing began in 1974. By December 1975, 170 grafts had been done in three hospitals. 1976-1985: Seven transplantation centers performed 893 grafts during this period. HLA-DR typing was introduced in 1976 and the National Histocompatibility Laboratory Network was founded in 1978. The first related living-donor kidney transplantation was done in 1979. 1986-2011: The National Kidney Transplantation Coordinating Center and the National Kidney Transplantation Program were created in 1986; the first combined kidney-pancreas transplantation was performed the same year. In 1990, cyclosporine and the Cuban monoclonal antibody IOR-T3 were introduced for immunosuppression to prevent rejection, as were other Cuban products (hepatitis B vaccine and recombinant human erythropoietin) for transplant patients. By December 2011, the cumulative number of transplants was 4636 (384 from related living donors). With over 40 years of experience, kidney transplantation is now well established in Cuba; it is free and universally accessible, on the

  1. Bortezomib in Kidney Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Rajeev; Jeroudi, Abdallah; Achkar, Katafan; Gaber, A. Osama; Patel, Samir J.; Abdellatif, Abdul

    2010-01-01

    Although current therapies for pretransplant desensitization and treatment of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) have had some success, they do not specifically deplete plasma cells that produce antihuman leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma (a plasma cell neoplasm), induces plasma cell apoptosis. In this paper we review the current body of literature regarding the use of this biological agent in the field of transplantation. Although limited experience with bortezomib may seem to show promise in the realm of transplant recipients desensitization and treatment of AMR, there is also experience that may suggest otherwise. Bortezomib's role in desensitization protocols and treatment of AMR will be defined better as more clinical data and trials become available. PMID:20953363

  2. Mechanobiology of embryonic limb development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowlan, Niamh C; Murphy, Paula; Prendergast, Patrick J

    2007-04-01

    Considerable evidence exists to support the hypothesis that mechanical forces have an essential role in healthy embryonic skeletal development. Clinical observations and experimental data indicate the importance of muscle contractions for limb development. However, the influence of these forces is seldom referred to in biological descriptions of bone development, and perhaps this is due to the fact that the hypothesis that mechanical forces are essential for normal embryonic skeletal development is difficult to test and elaborate experimentally in vivo, particularly in humans. Computational modeling has the potential to address this issue by simulating embryonic growth under a range of loading conditions but the potential of such models has yet to be fully exploited. In this article, we review the literature on mechanobiology of limb development in three main sections: (a) experimental alteration of the mechanical environment, (b) mechanical properties of embryonic tissues, and (c) the use of computational models. Then we analyze the main issues, and suggest how experimental and computational fields could work closer together to enhance our understanding of mechanobiology of the embryonic skeleton.

  3. Irradiation for xenogeneic transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halperin, E.C.; Knechtle, S.J.; Harland, R.C.; Yamaguchi, Yasua; Sontag, M.; Bollinger, R.R. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA). Dept. of Radiology Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA). Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology)

    1990-05-01

    Xenogeneic transplantation (XT) is the transplantation of organs or tissues from a member of one species to a member of another. Mammalian species frequently have circulating antibody which is directed against the foreign organ irrespective of known prior antigen exposure. This antibody may lead to hyperacute rejection once it ensues so efforts must be directed towards eliminating the pre-existing antibody. In those species in which hyperacute rejection of xenografts does not occur, cell-mediated refection, similar to allograft rejection, may occur. It is in the prevention of this latter form of refection that radiation is most likely to be beneficial in XT. Both total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and selective lyphoid irradiation (LSI) have been investigated for use in conjunction with XT. TLI has contributed to the prolongation of pancreatic islet-cell xenografts from hamsters to rats. TLI has also markedly prolonged the survival of cardiac transplants from hamsters to rats. A more modest prolongation of graft survival has been seen with the use of TLI in rabbit-to-rat exchanges. Therapy with TLI, cyclosporine, and splenectomy has markedly prolonged the survival of liver transplants from hamsters to rats, and preliminary data suggest that TLI may contribute to the prolongation of graft survival in the transplantation of hearts from monkeys to baboons. SLI appears to have prolonged graft survival, when used in conjunction with anti-lymphocyte globulin, in hamster-to-rat cardiac graft exchanges. The current state of knowledge of the use of irradiaiton in experimental XT is reviewed. (author). 38 refs.; 1 fig.; 5 tabs.

  4. Irradiation for xenogeneic transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halperin, E.C.; Knechtle, S.J.; Harland, R.C.; Yamaguchi, Yasua; Sontag, M.; Bollinger, R.R.; Duke Univ., Durham, NC

    1990-01-01

    Xenogeneic transplantation (XT) is the transplantation of organs or tissues from a member of one species to a member of another. Mammalian species frequently have circulating antibody which is directed against the foreign organ irrespective of known prior antigen exposure. This antibody may lead to hyperacute rejection once it ensues so efforts must be directed towards eliminating the pre-existing antibody. In those species in which hyperacute rejection of xenografts does not occur, cell-mediated refection, similar to allograft rejection, may occur. It is in the prevention of this latter form of refection that radiation is most likely to be beneficial in XT. Both total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and selective lyphoid irradiation (LSI) have been investigated for use in conjunction with XT. TLI has contributed to the prolongation of pancreatic islet-cell xenografts from hamsters to rats. TLI has also markedly prolonged the survival of cardiac transplants from hamsters to rats. A more modest prolongation of graft survival has been seen with the use of TLI in rabbit-to-rat exchanges. Therapy with TLI, cyclosporine, and splenectomy has markedly prolonged the survival of liver transplants from hamsters to rats, and preliminary data suggest that TLI may contribute to the prolongation of graft survival in the transplantation of hearts from monkeys to baboons. SLI appears to have prolonged graft survival, when used in conjunction with anti-lymphocyte globulin, in hamster-to-rat cardiac graft exchanges. The current state of knowledge of the use of irradiaiton in experimental XT is reviewed. (author). 38 refs.; 1 fig.; 5 tabs

  5. Pancreas transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snider, J.F.; Hunter, D.W.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Letourneau, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    Pancreas transplantation can be complicated by vascular thrombosis, stenosis, or anastomotic leak, complications that predispose to transplant pancreatectomy. The relative roles of noninvasive radiologic studies in such vascular complications have been correlated with angiographic or pathologic data. The results of 54 scintigraphic studies, 25 CT studies, 16 sonograms, and 23 color Doppler examinations have been correlated with those of 40 angiograms and 28 pathologic studies in a population of 185 recipients. CT (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 75%; accuracy, 92%) and US (sensitivity, 88%; specificity, 80%; accuracy, 85%) were most helpful in noninvasive screening for vascular complications, while angiography remains nearly definite in the radiographic diagnosis of these problems

  6. Kidney transplant in diabetic patients: modalities, indications and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rangel Érika B

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is a disease of increasing worldwide prevalence and is the main cause of chronic renal failure. Type 1 diabetic patients with chronic renal failure have the following therapy options: kidney transplant from a living donor, pancreas after kidney transplant, simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant, or awaiting a deceased donor kidney transplant. For type 2 diabetic patients, only kidney transplant from deceased or living donors are recommended. Patient survival after kidney transplant has been improving for all age ranges in comparison to the dialysis therapy. The main causes of mortality after transplant are cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, infections and neoplasias. Five-year patient survival for type 2 diabetic patients is lower than the non-diabetics' because they are older and have higher body mass index on the occasion of the transplant and both pre- and posttransplant cardiovascular diseases prevalences. The increased postransplant cardiovascular mortality in these patients is attributed to the presence of well-known risk factors, such as insulin resistance, higher triglycerides values, lower HDL-cholesterol values, abnormalities in fibrinolysis and coagulation and endothelial dysfunction. In type 1 diabetic patients, simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant is associated with lower prevalence of vascular diseases, including acute myocardial infarction, stroke and amputation in comparison to isolated kidney transplant and dialysis therapy. Conclusion Type 1 and 2 diabetic patients present higher survival rates after transplant in comparison to the dialysis therapy, although the prevalence of cardiovascular events and infectious complications remain higher than in the general population.

  7. Motor skill delays in pre-school children with leukemia one year after treatment: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy as an important risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverna, Livia; Tremolada, Marta; Bonichini, Sabrina; Tosetto, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Messina, Chiara; Pillon, Marta

    2017-01-01

    CNS-directed therapies for the treatment of leukemia can adversely affect the acquisition of new skills, such as reading/writing and math. Two years after the end of treatments, children show gross and fine motor skill delays that may persist even when patients are considered healed. The goal of the present study was to assess motor skills difficulties in pre-school children with leukemia one year after treatment. Particular attention has been paid to those patients who had undergone Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) and to the relationship between motor delays and age bands. Participants were 60 children (median age of 5; inter quartile range: 3.07-5.76), including 31 females and 29 males, 91.7% of them were affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and 8.3% by acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Five children had undergone HCST. Parents were interviewed by Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) on children's motor skills and filled in the Italian Temperament Questionnaire (QUIT). VABS's total scores were converted into equivalent mental age scores (EMA). A score difference of at least three months between current age and equivalent mental age was considered a developmental delay. Non-parametric analyses were run to understand if HSCT treatment and a specific age band influence children's motor skills. Significant delays were found in global motor skills (56.7%) as well as in fine and gross motor domains. Mann Whitney U tests showed that children with HSCT were reported to have lower gross motor mean ranks (U = 62; p = 0.004; Mean rank = 15.40) than peers without HSCT (Mean rank = 31.87) and lower mean rank values on motor temperament scale (U = 9; p = 0.003; HSCT Mean rank = 4.75 versus no HSCT Mean rank = 27.81). Kruskal Wallis' tests identified the high risk treatment showing that HSCT experience negatively impacted the motor skills and temperamental motor activity of pre-school children one year after the diagnosis of leukemia.

  8. Motor skill delays in pre-school children with leukemia one year after treatment: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy as an important risk factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Taverna

    Full Text Available CNS-directed therapies for the treatment of leukemia can adversely affect the acquisition of new skills, such as reading/writing and math. Two years after the end of treatments, children show gross and fine motor skill delays that may persist even when patients are considered healed. The goal of the present study was to assess motor skills difficulties in pre-school children with leukemia one year after treatment. Particular attention has been paid to those patients who had undergone Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT and to the relationship between motor delays and age bands. Participants were 60 children (median age of 5; inter quartile range: 3.07-5.76, including 31 females and 29 males, 91.7% of them were affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, and 8.3% by acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Five children had undergone HCST. Parents were interviewed by Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS on children's motor skills and filled in the Italian Temperament Questionnaire (QUIT. VABS's total scores were converted into equivalent mental age scores (EMA. A score difference of at least three months between current age and equivalent mental age was considered a developmental delay. Non-parametric analyses were run to understand if HSCT treatment and a specific age band influence children's motor skills. Significant delays were found in global motor skills (56.7% as well as in fine and gross motor domains. Mann Whitney U tests showed that children with HSCT were reported to have lower gross motor mean ranks (U = 62; p = 0.004; Mean rank = 15.40 than peers without HSCT (Mean rank = 31.87 and lower mean rank values on motor temperament scale (U = 9; p = 0.003; HSCT Mean rank = 4.75 versus no HSCT Mean rank = 27.81. Kruskal Wallis' tests identified the high risk treatment showing that HSCT experience negatively impacted the motor skills and temperamental motor activity of pre-school children one year after the diagnosis of leukemia.

  9. Motor skill delays in pre-school children with leukemia one year after treatment: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy as an important risk factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonichini, Sabrina; Tosetto, Barbara; Basso, Giuseppe; Messina, Chiara; Pillon, Marta

    2017-01-01

    CNS-directed therapies for the treatment of leukemia can adversely affect the acquisition of new skills, such as reading/writing and math. Two years after the end of treatments, children show gross and fine motor skill delays that may persist even when patients are considered healed. The goal of the present study was to assess motor skills difficulties in pre-school children with leukemia one year after treatment. Particular attention has been paid to those patients who had undergone Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) and to the relationship between motor delays and age bands. Participants were 60 children (median age of 5; inter quartile range: 3.07–5.76), including 31 females and 29 males, 91.7% of them were affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and 8.3% by acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Five children had undergone HCST. Parents were interviewed by Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) on children’s motor skills and filled in the Italian Temperament Questionnaire (QUIT). VABS’s total scores were converted into equivalent mental age scores (EMA). A score difference of at least three months between current age and equivalent mental age was considered a developmental delay. Non-parametric analyses were run to understand if HSCT treatment and a specific age band influence children’s motor skills. Significant delays were found in global motor skills (56.7%) as well as in fine and gross motor domains. Mann Whitney U tests showed that children with HSCT were reported to have lower gross motor mean ranks (U = 62; p = 0.004; Mean rank = 15.40) than peers without HSCT (Mean rank = 31.87) and lower mean rank values on motor temperament scale (U = 9; p = 0.003; HSCT Mean rank = 4.75 versus no HSCT Mean rank = 27.81). Kruskal Wallis’ tests identified the high risk treatment showing that HSCT experience negatively impacted the motor skills and temperamental motor activity of pre-school children one year after the diagnosis of leukemia. PMID

  10. Neonatal Desensitization Supports Long-Term Survival and Functional Integration of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Rat Joint Cartilage Without Immunosuppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shufang; Jiang, Yang Zi; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Longkun; Tong, Tong; Liu, Wanlu; Mu, Qin; Liu, Hua; Ji, Junfeng; Ouyang, Hong Wei

    2013-01-01

    Immunological response hampers the investigation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) or their derivates for tissue regeneration in vivo. Immunosuppression is often used after surgery, but exhibits side effects of significant weight loss and allows only short-term observation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether neonatal desensitization supports relative long-term survival of hESC-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hESC-MSCs) and promotes cartilage regeneration. hESC-MSCs were injected on the day of birth in rats. Six weeks after neonatal injection, a full-thickness cylindrical cartilage defect was created and transplanted with a hESC-MSC-seeded collagen bilayer scaffold (group d+s+c) or a collagen bilayer scaffold (group d+s). Rats without neonatal injection were transplanted with the hESC-MSC-seeded collagen bilayer scaffold to serve as controls (group s+c). Cartilage regeneration was evaluated by histological analysis, immunohistochemical staining, and biomechanical test. The role of hESC-MSCs in cartilage regeneration was analyzed by CD4 immunostaining, cell death detection, and visualization of human cells in regenerated tissues. hESC-MSCs expressed CD105, CD73, CD90, CD29, and CD44, but not CD45 and CD34, and possessed trilineage differentiation potential. Group d+s+c exhibited greater International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) scores than group d+s or group s+c. Abundant collagen type II and improved mechanical properties were detected in group d+s+c. There were less CD4+ inflammatory cell infiltration and cell death at week 1, and hESC-MSCs were found to survive as long as 8 weeks after transplantation in group d+s+c. Our study suggests that neonatal desensitization before transplantation may be an efficient way to develop a powerful tool for preclinical study of human cell-based therapies in animal models. PMID:22788986

  11. Intestine transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeja Pintar

    2011-02-01

    Conclusion: Intestine transplantation is reserved for patients with irreversible intestinal failure due to short gut syndrome requiring total paranteral nutrition with no possibility of discontinuation and loss of venous access for patient maintenance. In these patients complications of underlying disease and long-term total parenteral nutrition are present.

  12. Kidney Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... happens after I go home? Once you are home from the hospital, the most important work begins—the follow-up. For your transplant to ... possible. Are there disadvantages to living donation? A ... returning to work and other activities. However, recent advances in surgery ( ...

  13. Lung Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Severity of the recipient's lung disease Recipient's overall health Likelihood that the transplant will be successful Immediately before ... will begin within days of your surgery. Your health care team will likely work with you to design an exercise program that's right for you. Your doctor may ...

  14. Corneal Transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard

    with less risk of rejection episodes. Besides covering updated chapters on penetrating keratoplasty, and anterior and posterior lamellar procedures, this textbook also gives a thorough overview of the history of corneal transplantation and a detailed presentation of the microstructural components...... and to assist fellows and corneal surgeons in their advice and selection of patients for the best surgical procedure considering benefi ts and risks....

  15. Heart Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  16. Fetal frontal cortex transplant (14C) 2-deoxyglucose uptake and histology: survival in cavities of host rat brain motor cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, F.R.; Gonzalez, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Fetal frontal neocortex from 18-day-old rat embryonic brain was transplanted into cavities in 30-day-old host motor cortex. Sixty days after transplantation, 5 of 15 transplanted rats had surviving fetal transplants. The fetal cortex transplants were physically attached to the host brain, completely filled the original cavity, and had numerous surviving cells including pyramidal neurons. Cell lamination within the fetal transplant was abnormal. The ( 14 C) 2-deoxyglucose uptake of all five of the fetal neocortex transplants was less than adjacent cortex and contralateral host motor-sensory cortex, but more than adjacent corpus callosum white matter. The results indicate that fetal frontal neocortex can be transplanted into damaged rat motor cortex. The metabolic rate of the transplants suggests they could be partially functional

  17. Stem cell therapy for retinal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, José Mauricio; Mendonça, Luisa; Brant, Rodrigo; Abud, Murilo; Regatieri, Caio; Diniz, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss about current knowledge about stem cell (SC) therapy in the treatment of retinal degeneration. Both human embryonic stem cell and induced pluripotent stem cell has been growth in culture for a long time, and started to be explored in the treatment of blinding conditions. The Food and Drug Administration, recently, has granted clinical trials using SC retinal therapy to treat complex disorders, as Stargardt’s dystrophy, and patients with geographic atrophy, providing good outcomes. This study’s intent is to overview the critical regeneration of the subretinal anatomy through retinal pigment epithelium transplantation, with the goal of reestablish important pathways from the retina to the occipital cortex of the brain, as well as the differentiation from pluripotent quiescent SC to adult retina, and its relationship with a primary retinal injury, different techniques of transplantation, management of immune rejection and tumorigenicity, its potential application in improving patients’ vision, and, finally, approaching future directions and challenges for the treatment of several conditions. PMID:25621115

  18. Stem Cell Therapies in Retinal Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aakriti Garg

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has long been considered a promising mode of treatment for retinal conditions. While human embryonic stem cells (ESCs have provided the precedent for regenerative medicine, the development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs revolutionized this field. iPSCs allow for the development of many types of retinal cells, including those of the retinal pigment epithelium, photoreceptors, and ganglion cells, and can model polygenic diseases such as age-related macular degeneration. Cellular programming and reprogramming technology is especially useful in retinal diseases, as it allows for the study of living cells that have genetic variants that are specific to patients’ diseases. Since iPSCs are a self-renewing resource, scientists can experiment with an unlimited number of pluripotent cells to perfect the process of targeted differentiation, transplantation, and more, for personalized medicine. Challenges in the use of stem cells are present from the scientific, ethical, and political realms. These include transplant complications leading to anatomically incorrect placement, concern for tumorigenesis, and incomplete targeting of differentiation leading to contamination by different types of cells. Despite these limitations, human ESCs and iPSCs specific to individual patients can revolutionize the study of retinal disease and may be effective therapies for conditions currently considered incurable.

  19. Inflammatory Response in Islet Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar A. Kanak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation is a promising beta cell replacement therapy for patients with brittle type 1 diabetes as well as refractory chronic pancreatitis. Despite the vast advancements made in this field, challenges still remain in achieving high frequency and long-term successful transplant outcomes. Here we review recent advances in understanding the role of inflammation in islet transplantation and development of strategies to prevent damage to islets from inflammation. The inflammatory response associated with islets has been recognized as the primary cause of early damage to islets and graft loss after transplantation. Details on cell signaling pathways in islets triggered by cytokines and harmful inflammatory events during pancreas procurement, pancreas preservation, islet isolation, and islet infusion are presented. Robust control of pre- and peritransplant islet inflammation could improve posttransplant islet survival and in turn enhance the benefits of islet cell transplantation for patients who are insulin dependent. We discuss several potent anti-inflammatory strategies that show promise for improving islet engraftment. Further understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response will provide the basis for developing potent therapeutic strategies for enhancing the quality and success of islet transplantation.

  20. Inflammatory Response in Islet Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanak, Mazhar A.; Kunnathodi, Faisal; Lawrence, Michael C.; Levy, Marlon F.

    2014-01-01

    Islet cell transplantation is a promising beta cell replacement therapy for patients with brittle type 1 diabetes as well as refractory chronic pancreatitis. Despite the vast advancements made in this field, challenges still remain in achieving high frequency and long-term successful transplant outcomes. Here we review recent advances in understanding the role of inflammation in islet transplantation and development of strategies to prevent damage to islets from inflammation. The inflammatory response associated with islets has been recognized as the primary cause of early damage to islets and graft loss after transplantation. Details on cell signaling pathways in islets triggered by cytokines and harmful inflammatory events during pancreas procurement, pancreas preservation, islet isolation, and islet infusion are presented. Robust control of pre- and peritransplant islet inflammation could improve posttransplant islet survival and in turn enhance the benefits of islet cell transplantation for patients who are insulin dependent. We discuss several potent anti-inflammatory strategies that show promise for improving islet engraftment. Further understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response will provide the basis for developing potent therapeutic strategies for enhancing the quality and success of islet transplantation. PMID:24883060

  1. Renal transplant scintigraphy (Part 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, Ghee

    2005-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the most effective mode of renal replacement therapy for correction of renal failure. Renal donors can either be: a. a deceased person - the kidneys being removed when brain death or absence of cerebral cortical function / perfusion is confirmed - the cadaveric kidney is packed in ice and nutrient solution and transplanted within 24 hours of removal ('cold ischemia') ob. a living donor - the donor may or may not be related to the recipient. Due to the limited length of the renal vessels and ureter of the donor kidney, it is implanted close to the bladder of the recipient. The donor vessels are anastomosed to the iliac artery and vein of the recipient. Transplant variants: a. 2 kidneys maybe transplanted because: - an old donor with less kidney reserve from atrophy due to age or disease (e.g. hypertension) - an infant donor when both kidneys are removed en bloc, b. Donor kidneys with more than 1 artery, vein or ureter. c. Donor horse shoe kidney d. Combined renal and pancreas transplant for type I diabetics -a short segment of duodenum transplanted with the pancreas maybe implanted into the bladder. Copyright (2005) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine

  2. Pediatric liver transplantation in 31 consecutive children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Zhong-yang; WANG Zi-fa; ZHU Zhi-jun; ZANG Yun-jin; ZHENG Hong; DENG Yong-lin; PAN Cheng; CHEN Xin-guo

    2008-01-01

    Background Although liver transplantation has become a standard therapy for end-stage liver diseases, the experience of pediatric liver transplantation is limited in China. In this article we report our experience in pediatric liver transplantation, and summarize its characters in their indications, surgical techniques, and postoperative managements. Methods Thirty-one children (≤18 years old) underwent liver transplantation in our centers. The mean age at transplantation was 12.4 years old (ranged from 5 months to 18 years) with 7 children being less than 4 years of age at transplantation. The most common diagnosis of patients who underwent liver transplantation were biliary atresia, Wilson's disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, glycogen storage disease, hepatoblastoma, urea cycle defects, fulminant hepatic failure, etc. The surgical procedures included 12 standard (without venovenous bypass), 6 pigyback, 6 reduced-size, 3 split, 3 living donor liver transplantation, and 1 Domino liver transplantation. The triple-drug (FK506, steroid, and mycophenolate mofetil) immunosuppressive regimen was used in most of patients. Patients were followed up for a mean of 21.8 months. Results Five of the 31 patients died during perioperative time; mortality rate was 16.1%. The reasons of death were infections, primary non-function, heart failure, and hypovolemic shock. Postoperative complications in 10 patients included biliary leakage, acute rejection, abdominal infection, hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, and pulmonary infection. Overall patient cumulative survival rate at 1-, 3-, and 5-year was 78.1%, 62.6%, 62.6%, respectively.Conclusions The most common indications of pediatric liver transplantation were congenital end-stage liver diseases. According to patients' age and body weight, standard, piggyback, reduced-size, split, or living donor liver transplantation should be performed. Pediatric liver transplantation especially requires higher

  3. Human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm alleviates diabetic pathology and improves reproductive outcome in C57BL/KsJ-Lep(db/+) gestational diabetes mellitus mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Baoheng; Wang, Lili; Li, Qin; Cao, Yalei; Dong, Xiujuan; Liang, Jun; Wu, Xiaohua

    2015-07-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus is a condition commonly encountered during mid to late pregnancy with pathologic manifestations including hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and fetal maldevelopment. The cause of gestational diabetes mellitus can be attributed to both genetic and environmental factors, hence complicating its diagnosis and treatment. Pancreatic progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells were shown to be able to effectively treat diabetes in mice. In this study, we have developed a system of treating diabetes using human embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic endoderm in a mouse model of gestational diabetes mellitus. Human embryonic stem cells were differentiated in vitro into pancreatic endoderm, which were then transplanted into db/+ mice suffering from gestational diabetes mellitus. The transplant greatly improved glucose metabolism and reproductive outcome of the females compared with the control groups. Our findings support the feasibility of using differentiated human embryonic stem cells for treating gestational diabetes mellitus patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [The legal and ethical aspects of nerve tissue transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sramka, M; Rattaj, M

    1992-01-01

    The authors have specified the following criteria for the withdrawal of embryonal tissue at their department: 1) only tissue from dead fetus is allowed to be used in neurotransplantation; 2) embryonal tissue is to be obtained after spontaneous abortions from volunteers or from women asking for artificial abortion; 3) the women should be informed about the curative purposes of embryonal tissue voluntary donorship and they must give a written consent; 4) decision on abortion should be separated from the use of embryonal tissue; 5) women should not know recipients; no payments should be made for tissue; 6) the donor is not permitted to impregnate in order to use embryos for research or clinical purposes; 7) sampling of BWR, HBsAG, anti-HIV, cytomegalovirus, herpes I and II is to be made for serologic examinations and that from the cervix for cultivation and sensitivity, as well as ultrasound verification of a germinal age is done in potential donors; 8) consent should be signed to embryonal brain transplantation by recipient or his legitimate deputy if the recipient is certifiable. The above criteria should protect both the donor and the recipient. The use of embryonal tissue cultures seems to be promising. In addition to legal and ethic problems, immunological problems and problems concerning the aseptic withdrawal of embryonal tissue are falling off.

  5. Islet alloautotransplantation: Allogeneic pancreas transplantation followed by transplant pancreatectomy and islet transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhoff, M F; Dubbeld, J; van Erkel, A R; van der Boog, P J M; Rabelink, T J; Engelse, M A; de Koning, E J P

    2018-04-01

    Simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplantation is an important treatment option for patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Due to complications, in up to 10% of patients, allograft pancreatectomy is necessary shortly after transplantation. Usually the donor pancreas is discarded. Here, we report on a novel procedure to rescue endocrine tissue after allograft pancreatectomy. A 39-year-old woman with T1D and ESRD who had undergone SPK transplantation required emergency allograft pancreatectomy due to bleeding at the vascular anastomosis. Islets were isolated from the removed pancreas allograft, and almost 480 000 islet equivalents were infused into the portal vein. The patient recovered fully. After 3 months, near-normal mixed meal test (fasting glucose 7.0 mmol/L, 2-hour glucose 7.5 mmol/L, maximal stimulated C-peptide 3.25 nmol/L, without insulin use in the preceding 36 hours) was achieved. Glycated hemoglobin while taking a low dose of long-acting insulin was 32.7 mmol/mol hemoglobin (5.3%). When a donor pancreas is lost after transplantation, rescue β cell therapy by islet alloautotransplantation enables optimal use of scarce donor pancreata to optimize glycemic control without additional HLA alloantigen exposure. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  6. The role of nanotechnology in induced pluripotent and embryonic stem cells research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lukui; Qiu, Rong; Li, Lushen

    2014-12-01

    This paper reviews the recent studies on development of nanotechnology in the field of induced pluripotent and embryonic stem cells. Stem cell therapy is a promising therapy that can improve the quality of life for patients with refractory diseases. However, this option is limited by the scarcity of tissues, ethical problem, and tumorigenicity. Nanotechnology is another promising therapy that can be used to mimic the extracellular matrix, label the implanted cells, and also can be applied in the tissue engineering. In this review, we briefly introduce implementation of nanotechnology in induced pluripotent and embryonic stem cells research. Finally, the potential application of nanotechnology in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is also discussed.

  7. Epstein-Barr virus DNA monitoring in serum and whole blood in pediatric liver transplant recipients who do or do not discontinue immunosuppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullberg-Lindh, C; Saalman, R; Olausson, M; Herlenius, G; Lindh, M

    2017-08-01

    The rate of PTLD can be reduced by weaned IS guided by monitoring of EBV DNA. In this single-center retrospective case series study, we analyzed how reduction in IS influenced EBV DNA levels in whole blood and serum in 30 children during the first year after liver transplantation, and how these levels were related to symptoms putatively due to EBV. Primary and reactivated EBV infection was seen in 18 (60%) and eight patients (27%), respectively. Thirteen patients (42%) developed chronic high load the first year post-transplant. IS was successfully discontinued in six patients the first year post-transplant and in another two patients within 3 years. EBV DNA levels were reduced, but persisted long term in all the eight patients who had IS completely withdrawn. There was no case of PTLD. In summary, EBV DNAemia and chronic high load were very common after pediatric liver transplantation. Liver graft tolerance facilitates radical reduction in IS treatment, which may prevent PTLD, but EBV DNAemia may persist long term after discontinued IS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Treatment outcomes and late toxicities in patients with embryonal central nervous system tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odagiri, Kazumasa; Omura, Motoko; Hata, Masaharu; Aida, Noriko; Niwa, Tetsu; Goto, Hiroaki; Ito, Susumu; Adachi, Masanori; Yoshida, Haruyasu; Yuki, Hiroko; Inoue, Tomio

    2014-01-01

    Standard treatment strategies for embryonal central nervous system (CNS) tumors have not yet been established. We treated these tumors using an original chemoradiation therapy protocol; the clinical outcomes and toxicities were retrospectively evaluated. Twenty-four patients were enrolled including sixteen with medulloblastoma, four with supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor (sPNET), three with atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor, and one with pineoblastoma. Immediately after diagnosis, all patients underwent surgery initially. They were then categorized as high- or average-risk groups independent of tumor type/pathogenesis. The average-risk group included patients who were aged ≥3 years at diagnosis, had non-metastatic disease at diagnosis (M0), and had undergone gross total resection. Other patients were categorized as the high-risk group; this group received more intensive treatment than the average-risk group, including high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation. All patients received craniospinal irradiation (CSI). The CSI dose was 23.4 Gy for M0 patients aged ≥5 years, 18 Gy for M0 patients aged <5 years, and 30–36 Gy for all patients with M + disease. The total dose to the primary tumor bed was 54 Gy. The median follow-up time was 73.5 (range, 19–118) months. The 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 71.1 and 88.9%, respectively in the average-risk group (n = 9) and 66.7 and 71.1%, respectively in the high-risk group (n = 15). The PFS and OS rates were not significantly different between the average- and high-risk groups. In patients with medulloblastoma only, these rates were also not significantly different between the average- and high-risk groups. Three of four patients with sPNET were disease free. The height standard deviation score (SDS) was significantly decreased at the last assessment relative to that at diagnosis (P < 0.0001). The latest median height SDS was -1.6 (range, 0

  9. Challenges in renal transplantation in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nono, Ibrahiem H; Telha, Khaled A; Al-Alimy, Gamil M; Ghilan, Abdulilah M; Abu Asba, Nagieb W; Al-Zkri, Abdo M; Al-Adimi, Abdulilah M; Al-Ba'adani, Tawfiq H

    2015-02-16

    Background Renal replacement therapy was first introduced in Yemen in 1978 in the form of hemodialysis. Twenty years later, the first renal transplantation was performed. Kidney transplantations were started in socially and financially challenging circumstances in Yemen in 1998. A structured program was established and has been functioning regularly since 2005. A pediatric transplantation program was started in 2011. Material and Methods This was a prospective study of 181 transplants performed at the Urology and Nephrology Center between May 1998 and 2012. All transplants were from living related donors. The immunosuppressive protocol consisted initially of double therapy with steroid and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Subsequently, triple therapy with addition of a calcineurin inhibitor was introduced. Primary graft function was achieved in 176 (97.2%) recipients. Results Cold ischemia time was 48-68 min. Episodes of acute rejection in 12 patients were treated with high-dose steroids. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was used in cases of vascular or steroid-resistant rejection in 2 patients. The post-transplant complications, either surgical or medical, were comparable to those recorded in the literature. Conclusions Renal transplantation is a good achievement in our country. The patients and graft survival rates are comparable to other reports.

  10. Combination of heterologous fibrin sealant and bioengineered human embryonic stem cells to improve regeneration following autogenous sciatic nerve grafting repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozafari, Roghayeh; Kyrylenko, Sergiy; Castro, Mateus Vidigal; Ferreira, Rui Seabra; Barraviera, Benedito; Oliveira, Alexandre Leite Rodrigues

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem, and the preferred surgical method for treating it is the end-to-end neurorrhaphy. When it is not possible due to a large nerve gap, autologous nerve grafting is used. However, these surgical techniques result in nerve regeneration at highly variable degrees. It is thus very important to seek complementary techniques to improve motor and sensory recovery. One promising approach could be cell therapy. Transplantation therapy with human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is appealing because these cells are pluripotent and can differentiate into specialized cell types and have self-renewal ability. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to find conditions under which functional recovery is improved after sciatic nerve neurorrhaphy. We assumed that hESC, either alone or in combination with heterologous fibrin sealant scaffold, could be used to support regeneration in a mouse model of sciatic nerve injury and repair via autografting with end-to-end neurorrhaphy. Five millimeters of the sciatic nerve of C57BL/6 J mice were transected off and rotated 180 degrees to simulate an injury, and then stumps were sutured. Next, we applied heterologous fibrin sealant and/or human embryonic stem cells genetically altered to overexpress fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) at the site of the injury. The study was designed to include six experimental groups comprising neurorrhaphy (N), neurorrhaphy + heterologous fibrin sealant (N + F), neurorrhaphy + heterologous fibrin sealant + doxycycline (N + F + D), neurorrhaphy + heterologous fibrin sealant + wild-type hESC (N + F + W), neurorrhaphy + heterologous fibrin sealant + hESC off (N + F + T), and neurorrhaphy + heterologous fibrin sealant + hESC on via doxycycline (N + F + D + T). We evaluated the recovery rate using Catwalk and von Frey functional recovery tests, as well as immunohistochemistry analysis. The experiments indicated that

  11. Transplant Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altınörs, Nur; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to review and discuss the great variety of ethical issues related to organ donation, organ procurement, transplant activities, and new ethical problems created as a result of technologic and scientific developments. An extensive literature survey was made, and expert opinions were obtained. The gap between demand and supply of organs for transplant has yielded to organ trafficking, organ tourism, and commercialism. This problem seems to be the most important issue, and naturally there are ethical dilemmas related to it. A wide number of ideas have been expressed on the subject, and different solutions have been proposed. The struggle against organ trafficking and commercialism should include legislation, efforts to increase deceased-donor donations, and international cooperation. China's policy to procure organs from prisoners sentenced to death is unethical, and the international community should exert more pressure on the Chinese government to cease this practice. Each particular ethical dilemma should be taken separately and managed.

  12. Role of SDF1/CXCR4 Interaction in Experimental Hemiplegic Models with Neural Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboru Suzuki

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Much attention has been focused on neural cell transplantation because of its promising clinical applications. We have reported that embryonic stem (ES cell derived neural stem/progenitor cell transplantation significantly improved motor functions in a hemiplegic mouse model. It is important to understand the molecular mechanisms governing neural regeneration of the damaged motor cortex after the transplantation. Recent investigations disclosed that chemokines participated in the regulation of migration and maturation of neural cell grafts. In this review, we summarize the involvement of inflammatory chemokines including stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF1 in neural regeneration after ES cell derived neural stem/progenitor cell transplantation in mouse stroke models.

  13. Lung Transplantation for Lymphangioleiomyomatosis in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Katsutoshi; Okada, Yoshinori; Akiba, Miki; Kondo, Takashi; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Okumura, Meinoshin; Chen, Fengshi; Date, Hiroshi; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Akinori; Yamasaki, Naoya; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Chida, Masayuki; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Hirai, Toyohiro; Seyama, Kuniaki; Mishima, Michiaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung transplantation has been established as the definitive treatment option for patients with advanced lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM). However, the prognosis after registration and the circumstances of lung transplantation with sirolimus therapy have never been reported. Methods In this national survey, we analyzed data from 98 LAM patients registered for lung transplantation in the Japan Organ Transplantation Network. Results Transplantation was performed in 57 patients as of March 2014. Survival rate was 86.7% at 1 year, 82.5% at 3 years, 73.7% at 5 years, and 73.7% at 10 years. Of the 98 patients, 21 had an inactive status and received sirolimus more frequently than those with an active history (67% vs. 5%, p<0.001). Nine of twelve patients who remained inactive as of March 2014 initiated sirolimus before or while on a waiting list, and remained on sirolimus thereafter. Although the statistical analysis showed no statistically significant difference, the survival rate after registration tended to be better for lung transplant recipients than for those who awaited transplantation (p = 0.053). Conclusions Lung transplantation is a satisfactory therapeutic option for advanced LAM, but the circumstances for pre-transplantation LAM patients are likely to alter with the use of sirolimus. PMID:26771878

  14. [Prerequisite for hematopoietic cellular therapy programs to set up chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy (CAR T-cells): Guidelines from the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Ferrand, Christophe; Chalandon, Yves; Ballot, Caroline; Castilla Llorente, Cristina; Deschamps, Marina; Gauthier, Jordan; Labalette, Myriam; Larghero, Jérôme; Maheux, Camille; Moreau, Anne-Sophie; Varlet, Pauline; Pétillon, Marie-Odile; Pinturaud, Marine; Rubio, Marie Thérèse; Chabannon, Christian

    2017-12-01

    CAR T-cells are autologous or allogeneic human lymphocytes that are genetically engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor targeting an antigen expressed on tumor cells such as CD19. CAR T-cells represent a new class of medicinal products, and belong to the broad category of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMPs), as defined by EC Regulation 2007-1394. Specifically, they are categorized as gene therapy medicinal products. Although CAR T-cells are cellular therapies, the organization for manufacturing and delivery is far different from the one used to deliver hematopoietic cell grafts, for different reasons including their classification as medicinal products. Currently available clinical observations were mostly produced in the context of trials conducted either in the USA or in China. They demonstrate remarkable efficacy for patients presenting advanced or poor-prognosis hematological malignancies, however with severe side effects in a significant proportion of patients. Toxicities can and must be anticipated and dealt with in the context of a full coordination between the clinical cell therapy ward in charge of the patient, and the neighboring intensive care unit. The present workshop aimed at identifying prerequisites to be met in order for French hospitals to get efficiently organized and fulfill sponsors' expectations before initiation of clinical trials designed to investigate CAR T-cells. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Introduction of a Quality Management System and Outcome After Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gratwohl, Alois; Brand, Ronald; Niederwieser, Dietger; Baldomero, Helen; Chabannon, Christian; Cornelissen, Jan; de Witte, Theo; Ljungman, Per; McDonald, Fiona; McGrath, Eoin; Passweg, Jakob; Peters, Christina; Rocha, Vanderson; Slaper-Cortenbach, Ineke; Sureda, Anna; Tichelli, Andre; Apperley, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Purpose A comprehensive quality management system called JACIE (Joint Accreditation Committee International Society for Cellular Therapy and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation), was introduced to improve quality of care in hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). We

  16. No major neurologic complications with sirolimus use in heart transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Kremers, Walter K.; Kushwaha, Sudhir S.; McGregor, Christopher G. A.; Wijdicks, Eelco F. M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether sirolimus therapy is associated with neurologic complications, including stroke, among heart transplant recipients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively studied patients who underwent heart transplant at Mayo Clinic's site in Rochester, MN, from January 1, 1988,

  17. After the Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After the transplant Preventing rejection Post-transplant medications Types of immunosuppressants Switching immunosuppressants Side effects Other medications Generic and brand name drugs Post-transplant tests Infections and immunity Lifestyle changes Health concerns Back to work or ...

  18. Choosing a Transplant Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... however you can Daughter's dying wish became mother's motivation Be The Match Blog Stories Anna, transplant recipient ... for transplant costs. Location – You might have to travel to receive a transplant. Consider how far the ...

  19. Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Graft-versus-host disease: A potential risk when stem cells come from donors If you receive a transplant ... medications and blood products into your body. Collecting stem cells for transplant If a transplant using your own ...

  20. Influenza in solid organ transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Spencer T; Torabi, Mina J; Gabardi, Steven

    2012-02-01

    To review available data describing the epidemiology, outcomes, prevention, and treatment of influenza virus in the solid organ transplant population and to evaluate the strengths and limitations of the current literature, with a focus on literature reviewing annual influenza strains and the recent pandemic novel influenza A/H1N1 strain. A systematic literature search (July 1980-June 2011) was performed via PubMed using the following key words: influenza, human; influenza; novel influenza A H1/N1; transplantation; solid organ transplantation; kidney transplant; renal transplant; lung transplant; heart transplant; and liver transplant. Papers were excluded if they were not written in English or were animal studies or in vitro studies. Data from fully published studies and recent reports from international conferences were included. The influenza virus presents a constant challenge to immunocompromised patients and their health care providers. The annual influenza strain introduces a highly infectious and pathogenic risk to solid organ transplant recipients. In 2009, the World Health Organization declared a pandemic as a result of a novel influenza A/H1N1 strain. The pandemic introduced an additional viral threat to solid organ transplant patients at increased risk for infectious complications. The mainstay for prevention of influenza infection in all at-risk populations is appropriate vaccination. Antiviral therapies against influenza for chemoprophylaxis and treatment of infection are available; however, dosing strategies in the solid organ transplant population are not well defined. The solid organ transplant population is at an increased risk of severe complications from influenza infection. Identifying risks, preventing illness, and appropriately treating active infection is essential in this patient population.

  1. Immune Reconstitution After Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Crohn’s Disease: Current Status and Future Directions. A Review on Behalf of the EBMT Autoimmune Diseases Working Party and the Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation In Refractory CD—Low Intensity Therapy Evaluation Study Investigators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Graham Pockley

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Patients with treatment refractory Crohn’s disease (CD suffer debilitating symptoms, poor quality of life, and reduced work productivity. Surgery to resect inflamed and fibrotic intestine may mandate creation of a stoma and is often declined by patients. Such patients continue to be exposed to medical therapy that is ineffective, often expensive and still associated with a burden of adverse effects. Over the last two decades, autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT has emerged as a promising treatment option for patients with severe autoimmune diseases (ADs. Mechanistic studies have provided proof of concept that auto-HSCT can restore immunological tolerance in chronic autoimmunity via the eradication of pathological immune responses and a profound reconfiguration of the immune system. Herein, we review current experience of auto-HSCT for the treatment of CD as well as approaches that have been used to monitor immune reconstitution following auto-HSCT in patients with ADs, including CD. We also detail immune reconstitution studies that have been integrated into the randomized controlled Autologous Stem cell Transplantation In refractory CD—Low Intensity Therapy Evaluation trial, which is designed to test the hypothesis that auto-HSCT using reduced intensity mobilization and conditioning regimens will be a safe and effective means of inducing sustained control in refractory CD compared to standard of care. Immunological profiling will generate insight into the pathogenesis of the disease, restoration of responsiveness to anti-TNF therapy in patients with recurrence of endoscopic disease and immunological events that precede the onset of disease in patients that relapse after auto-HSCT.

  2. The Global Role of Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Garcia Garcia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available World Kidney Day on March 8 th 2012 provides a chance to reflect on the success of kidney transplantation as a therapy for end stage kidney disease that surpasses dialysis treatments both for the quality and quantity of life that it provides and for its cost effectiveness. Anything that is both cheaper and better, but is not actually the dominant therapy, must have other drawbacks that prevent replacement of all dialysis treatment by transplantation. The barriers to universal transplantation as the therapy for end stage kidney disease include the economic limitations which, in some countries place transplantation, appropriately, at a lower priority than public health fundamentals such as clean water, sanitation and vaccination. Even in high income countries the technical challenges of surgery and the consequences of immunosuppression restrict the number of suitable recipients, but the major finite restrictions on kidney transplantation rates are the shortage of donated organs and the limited medical, surgical and nursing workforces with the required expertise. These problems have solutions which involve the full range of societal, professional, governmental and political environments. World Kidney Day is a call to deliver transplantation therapy to the one million people a year who have a right to benefit.

  3. [Melanoma in organ transplant patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévêque, L; Dalac, S; Dompmartin, A; Louvet, S; Euvrard, S; Catteau, B; Hazan, M; Schollhamer, M; Aubin, F; Dreno, B; Daguin, P; Chevrant-Breton, J; Frances, C; Bismuth, M J; Tanter, Y; Lambert, D

    2000-02-01

    The incidence of cutaneous melanoma has rapidly increased in the white population over the last decades. It has been estimated that the incidence doubles world-wide every 10 years. Different risk factors have been identified, including immunosuppression. The aim of our study-was to determine the relative risk of developing melanoma in the organ transplant population and the clinical and histological features of their melanomas. This retrospective study was conducted with the collaboration of 9 University Hospital Centers: Besançon, Brest, Caen, Dijon, Lille, Lyon, Nantes, Paris (Pitié-Salpétrière) and Rennes. A questionnaire was sent to the different departments of dermatology of these hospitals to obtain information on patients who had presented a melanoma after a transplantation between 1971 and 1997. During this period, there were 12,477 organ transplant recipients in the transplantation units of these 9 hospitals. Average follow-up for these patients was about 5 years and the average duration of immunosuppressive therapy was about 4.5 years. Among 12,477 organ transplant recipients, we found 17 cases of melanoma but no data could be obtain on one case: 14 occurred in renal transplant recipients and 3 in cardiac transplant recipients. Clinical and histological data were only available in 16 patients. The average time between transplantation and diagnosis of melanoma was 63 months, but it was 5 times shorter for 2 patients who had a past history of melanoma before transplantation. Two patients had a mucosal melanoma; for the cutaneous melanomas, 2 appeared on Dubreuilh melanosis, 2 were in situ melanomas, 7 were superficial spreading melanomas and 3 were nodular melanomas. The histological review of 11 cutaneous melanomas revealed a precursor nevus in 6 cases and a weak or no stroma reaction in 7/7 cases. Complete excision of the melanoma was performed in all patients except one with anorectal melanoma. Four patients died of visceral metastasis within a mean

  4. Beta-Cell Replacement: Pancreas and Islet Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niclauss, Nadja; Meier, Raphael; Bédat, Benoît; Berishvili, Ekaterine; Berney, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas and islet transplantation are 2 types of beta-cell replacement therapies for type 1 diabetes mellitus. Since 1966, when pancreas transplantation was first performed, it has evolved to become a highly efficient procedure with high success rates, thanks to advances in surgical technique and immunosuppression. Pancreas transplantation is mostly performed as simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation in patients with end-stage nephropathy secondary to diabetes. In spite of its efficiency, pancreas transplantation is still a major surgical procedure burdened by high morbidity, which called for the development of less invasive and hazardous ways of replacing beta-cell function in the past. Islet transplantation was developed in the 1970s as a minimally invasive procedure with initially poor outcomes. However, since the report of the 'Edmonton protocol' in 2000, the functional results of islet transplantation have substantially and constantly improved and are about to match those of whole pancreas transplantation. Islet transplantation is primarily performed alone in nonuremic patients with severe hypoglycemia. Both pancreas transplantation and islet transplantation are able to abolish hypoglycemia and to prevent or slow down the development of secondary complications of diabetes. Pancreas transplantation and islet transplantation should be seen as two complementary, rather than competing, therapeutic approaches for beta-cell replacement that are able to optimize organ donor use and patient care. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics / Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Also known as Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant , Hematopoietic ... person, called a donor, it is an allogeneic transplant. Blood or bone marrow transplants most commonly are used to treat ...

  6. THE ISLAMIC ETHICS OF MITOCHONDRIA TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Iman Bouzenita

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Biotechnology has opened a new chapter with the advent of mitochondria transplantation for cell-based therapy. Mitochondrial transplantation was successfully led to birth; however, cytoplasmic transplantation has caused apprehension, since the mixing of human ooplasm from two different maternal sources may generate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA heteroplasmy in the offspring. Islamic legal verdicts on human cloning and somatic cell transfer have been overweighing explicit as to its prohibition, due to the change of creation, mixing of lineage and other evaluations. Is mitochondria transplantation equivalent to human cloning in that genetic information is proliferated and does it, therefore, take the same legal rule? Are there possible benefits (masalih for medical treatment that may render mitochondria transplantation permissible, or are possible harms (mafasid overweighing? Or is it a completely different procedure, taking a different rule? The paper will investigate into these questions and discuss the dimensions of Islamic ethics on the issue.

  7. Management of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in adult solid organ transplant recipients - BCSH and BTS Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Anne; Bowles, Kristin; Bradley, J Andrew; Emery, Vincent; Featherstone, Carrie; Gupte, Girish; Marcus, Robert; Parameshwar, Jayan; Ramsay, Alan; Newstead, Charles

    2010-06-01

    A joint working group established by the Haemato-oncology subgroup of the British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH) and the British Transplantation Society (BTS) has reviewed the available literature and made recommendations for the diagnosis and management of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in adult recipients of solid organ transplants. This review details the therapeutic options recommended including reduction in immunosuppression (RIS), transplant organ resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Effective therapy should be instituted before progressive disease results in declining performance status and multi-organ dysfunction. The goal of treatment should be a durable complete remission with retention of transplanted organ function with minimal toxicity.

  8. Pentraxin 3 plasma levels at graft-versus-host disease onset predict disease severity and response to therapy in children given haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Dander, Erica; De Lorenzo, Paola; Bottazzi, Barbara; Quarello, Paola; Vinci, Paola; Balduzzi, Adriana; Masciocchi, Francesca; Bonanomi, Sonia; Cappuzzello, Claudia; Prunotto, Giulia; Pavan, Fabio; Pasqualini, Fabio; Sironi, Marina; Cuccovillo, Ivan; Leone, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD) remains a major complication of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, with a significant proportion of patients failing to respond to first-line systemic corticosteroids. Reliable biomarkers predicting disease severity and response to treatment are warranted to improve its management. Thus, we sought to determine whether pentraxin 3 (PTX3), an acute-phase protein produced locally at the site of inflammation, could represent a novel acute G...

  9. Pregnancy in renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouattar, T; Hakim, H; Rhou, H; Benamar, L; Bayahia, R; Ouzeddoun, N

    2009-06-01

    Renal transplantation with a well-functioning graft leads to a rapid restoration of endocrine and sexual functions. The aim of this study was to examine our experience with pregnancies among renal transplant patients, particularly with regard to their impact on graft function. We analyzed 10 pregnancies in 7 renal transplant recipients for long-term graft outcomes in terms of clinical and biological data. The mean patient age was 28.5 +/- 4 years. They all received a living donor kidney. The time between transplantation and the onset of pregnancy was 33.4 +/- 23.2 months. Regarding the immunosuppressive therapy, all patients received steroids and cyclosporine; 4 patients received in addition azathioprine and 2 received mycophenolate mofetil that was changed at 1 month before conception to azathioprine. There was no significant difference between the serum creatinine before and during pregnancy. We did not observe any acute rejection episode. Pregnancy complications were preclampsia in 1 case, hypertension in 1 case, urinary tract infection in 2 cases, and anemia in 80% of patients during the third trimester. Premature rupture of membranes occurred in 1 case and preterm delivery in 2 cases. Two cases of neonatal death were registered. Cesarean section was performed in 50% of cases. The follow-up revealed 2 cases of chronic rejection. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary for pregnancy which generally occurs at 2 years after kidney transplantation.

  10. Migratory potential of transplanted glial progenitors as critical factor for successful translation of glia replacement therapy: The gap between mice and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Rohit K; Bulte, Jeff W M; Walczak, Piotr; Janowski, Miroslaw

    2018-05-01

    Neurological disorders are a major threat to public health. Stem cell-based regenerative medicine is now a promising experimental paradigm for its treatment, as shown in pre-clinical animal studies. Initial attempts have been on the replacement of neuronal cells only, but glial progenitors (GPs) are now becoming strong alternative cellular therapeutic candidates to replace oligodendrocytes and astrocytes as knowledge accumulates about their important emerging role in various disease processes. There are many examples of successful therapeutic outcomes for transplanted GPs in small animal models, but clinical translation has proved to be challenging due to the 1,000-fold larger volume of the human brain compared to mice. Human GPs transplanted into the mouse brain migrate extensively and can induce global cell replacement, but a similar extent of migration in the human brain would only allow for local rather than global cell replacement. We review here the mechanisms that govern cell migration, which could potentially be exploited to enhance the migratory properties of GPs through cell engineering pre-transplantation. We furthermore discuss the (dis)advantages of the various cell delivery routes that are available, with particular emphasis on intra-arterial injection as the most suitable route for achieving global cell distribution in the larger brain. Now that therapeutic success has proven to be feasible in small animal models, future efforts will need to be directed to enhance global cell delivery and migration to make bench-to-bedside translation a reality. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Influence of overall treatment time in a fractionated total lymphoid irradiation as an immunosuppressive therapy in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waer, M.; Ang, K.K.; Vandeputte, M.; Van der Schueren, E.

    1982-01-01

    Three groups of C 57 /BL/Ka mice received total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) in a total dose of 34 Gy in three different fractionation schedules. The tolerance of all different schedules was excellent. No difference in the peripheral white blood cell and lymphocyte counts nor the degree of immunosuppression as measured by phytohaemaglutinin or concanavalin A induced blastogenesis and mixed lymphocyte reaction were observed at the end of the treatment and up to 200 days. When bone marrow transplantation was performed one day after the end of each schedule, chimerism without signs of graft versus host disease was induced in all the groups. However, from the results in a limited number of animals it seems that concentrated schedules were less effective for chimerism induction. It has been demonstrated that it is possible to reduce drastically the overall treatment time for TLI before bone marrow transplantation. Further investigations are necessary in order to determine the optimal time-dose-fractionation factors and the different perameters involved in the transplantation

  12. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singavi, Arun K; Harrington, Alexandra M; Fenske, Timothy S

    2015-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a serious complication after solid organ or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and include a range of diseases from benign proliferations to malignant lymphomas. Risk factors for developing PTLD include Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, recipient age, transplanted organ, type of immunosuppression, and genetics. Uncontrolled proliferation of EBV-infected B cells is implicated in EBV-positive PTLD, whereas the pathogenesis of EBV-negative PTLD may be similar to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the general population. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies PTLD into four categories: early lesions, polymorphic PTLD, monomorphic PTLD, and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL). Treatment is aimed at cure of PTLD, while maintaining transplanted organ function. However, there are no established guidelines for the treatment of PTLD. Immune suppression reduction (ISR) is the first line of treatment in most cases, with more recent data suggesting early use of rituximab. In more aggressive forms of PTLD, upfront chemotherapy may offer a better and more durable response. Sequential therapy using rituximab followed by chemotherapy has demonstrated promising results and may establish a standard of care. Novel therapies including anti-viral agents, adoptive immunotherapy, and monoclonal antibodies targeting cytokines require further study in the prevention and treatment of PTLD.

  13. Successful Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in a Patient with Severe Complicated Clostridium difficile Infection after Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Markus Schneider

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection (CDI represents one of the most common healthcare-associated infections. Due to increasing numbers of recurrences and therapy failures, CDI has become a major disease burden. Studies have shown that fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT can both be a safe and highly efficacious therapy for patients with therapy-refractory CDI. However, patients undergoing solid organ transplantation are at high risk for CDI due to long-term immunosuppression, previous antibiotic therapy, and proton pump inhibitor use. Additionally, these patients may be especially prone to adverse events related to FMT. Here, we report a successful FMT in a patient with severe therapy-refractory CDI after liver transplantation.

  14. Generic tacrolimus in solid organ transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taube, D; Jones, G; O'Beirne, J

    2014-01-01

    The availability of a wide range of immunosuppressive therapies has revolutionized the management of patients who have undergone solid organ transplantation (SOT). However, the cost of immunosuppressive drugs remains high. This situation has led to the development of generic equivalents, which...... innovator tacrolimus drug (Prograf) in both healthy volunteers and kidney transplant patients. Clinical experience with this generic tacrolimus formulation has also been established in both de novo and conversion patients who have undergone kidney and liver transplantation, as well as in conversion of other...

  15. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) after kidney transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fava, C.; Grosso, M.; Sandrone, M.; Malfi, B.; Segoloni, G.P.; Colla, L.

    1988-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis is a frequent complication of kidney transplantation (10%). Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) has recently been proposed as a potential therapeutic procedure. Twelve transplant patients with arterial stenosis underwent PTA. The procedure was successful in 10 cases (83.3%). Restenosis occurred in 2 patients (16.7%); both of them underwent PTA successfully. No complications occurred. A considerable improvement in glomerular filtration rate and a reduction in high blood pressure were observed in all patients after successful PTA. The authors belive PTA to be the therapy of choice in the treatment of arterial stenoses in kidney transplant patients

  16. Clinical Allogeneic and Autologous Islet Cell Transplantation: Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Matsumoto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation is categorized as a β-cell replacement therapy for diabetic patients who lack the ability to secrete insulin. Allogeneic islet cell transplantation is for the treatment of type 1 diabetes, and autologous islet cell transplantation is for the prevention of surgical diabetes after a total pancreatectomy. The issues of allogeneic islet cell transplantation include poor efficacy of islet isolation, the need for multiple donor pancreata, difficulty maintaining insulin independence and undesirable side effects of immunosuppressive drugs. Those issues have been solved step by step and allogeneic islet cell transplantation is almost ready to be the standard therapy. The donor shortage will be the next issue and marginal and/or living donor islet cell transplantation might alleviate the issue. Xeno-islet cell transplantation, β-cell regeneration from human stem cells and gene induction of the naïve pancreas represent the next generation of β-cell replacement therapy. Autologous islet cell transplantation after total pancreatectomy for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis with severe abdominal pain is the standard therapy, even though only limited centers are able to perform this treatment. Remote center autologous islet cell transplantation is an attractive option for hospitals performing total pancreatectomies without the proper islet isolation facilities.

  17. Generation of Corneal Keratocytes from Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertsenberg, Andrew J; Funderburgh, James L

    2016-01-01

    Human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESC) offer an important resource as a limitless supply of any differentiated cell type of the human body. Keratocytes, cells from the corneal stroma, may have the potential for restoration of vision in cell therapy and biomedical engineering applications, but these specialized cells are not readily expanded in vitro. Here we describe a two-part method to produce keratocytes from the H1 hESC cell line. The hESC cells, maintained and expanded in feeder-free culture medium are first differentiated to neural crest cells using the stromal-derived inducing activity (SDIA) of the PA6 mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line. The resulting neural crest cells are selected by their expression of cell-surface CD271 and subsequently cultured as 3D pellets in a defined differentiation medium to induce a keratocyte phenotype.

  18. Preceding immunosuppressive therapy with antithymocyte globulin and ciclosporin increases the incidence of graft rejection in children with aplastic anaemia who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from HLA-identical siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Ryoji; Yabe, Hiromasa; Hara, Junichi; Morimoto, Akira; Tsuchida, Masahiro; Mugishima, Hideo; Ohara, Akira; Tsukimoto, Ichiro; Kato, Koji; Kigasawa, Hisato; Tabuchi, Ken; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Ohga, Shoichi; Kojima, Seiji

    2006-12-01

    The incidence of graft rejection was determined in 66 children with acquired aplastic anaemia (AA) following bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from a related donor. Eleven of 65 evaluable patients experienced either early or late rejection. Multivariate analysis identified previous immunosuppressive therapy with antithymocyte-globulin (ATG) and ciclosporin (CsA) as a risk factor for graft rejection (relative risk: 16.6, P = 0.001). Patients who received ATG and CsA had a significantly lower probability of failure-free survival than those who did not (69.7 +/- 6.2% vs. 87.9 +/- 8.0%, P = 0.044). These results suggest that BMT should be instituted immediately in children with severe AA who have human leucocyte antigen-identical siblings.

  19. Face time: educating face transplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamparello, Brooke M; Bueno, Ericka M; Diaz-Siso, Jesus Rodrigo; Sisk, Geoffroy C; Pomahac, Bohdan

    2013-01-01

    Face transplantation is the innovative application of microsurgery and immunology to restore appearance and function to those with severe facial disfigurements. Our group aims to establish a multidisciplinary education program that can facilitate informed consent and build a strong knowledge base in patients to enhance adherence to medication regimes, recovery, and quality of life. We analyzed handbooks from our institution's solid organ transplant programs to identify topics applicable to face transplant patients. The team identified unique features of face transplantation that warrant comprehensive patient education. We created a 181-page handbook to provide subjects interested in pursuing transplantation with a written source of information on the process and team members and to address concerns they may have. While the handbook covers a wide range of topics, it is easy to understand and visually appealing. Face transplantation has many unique aspects that must be relayed to the patients pursuing this novel therapy. Since candidates lack third-party support groups and programs, the transplant team must provide an extensive educational component to enhance this complex process. As face transplantation continues to develop, programs must create sound education programs that address patients' needs and concerns to facilitate optimal care.

  20. Long-term effects of islet transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes-Walker, D Jane; Kay, Thomas W H

    2016-10-01

    Islet transplantation has made great progress in recent years. This is a remarkable technical feat but raises the question of what the long-term benefits and risks are for type I diabetes recipients. Graft survival continues to improve, and recent multicenter studies show that islet transplantation is particularly effective to prevent hypoglycemic events even in those who do not become insulin-independent and to achieve excellent glycemic control. Concerns include histocompatability leucocyte antigen (HLA) sensitization and other risks including from immunosuppression that islet transplantation shares with other forms of allotransplantation. Reversal of hypoglycemia unawareness and protection from severe hypoglycemia events are two of the main benefits of islet transplantation and they persist for the duration of graft function. Islet transplantation compares favorably with other therapies for those with hypoglycemia unawareness, although new technologies have not been tested head-to-head with transplantation. HLA sensitization increases with time after transplantation especially if immunosuppression is ceased and is a risk for those who may require future transplantation as well as being associated with loss of graft function.

  1. Current issues in allogeneic islet transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Charles A; Lawrence, Michael C; Naziruddin, Bashoo

    2017-10-01

    Transplantation of allogenic pancreatic islets is a minimally invasive treatment option to control severe hypoglycemia and dependence on exogenous insulin among type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients. This overview summarizes the current issues and progress in islet transplantation outcomes and research. Several clinical trials from North America and other countries have documented the safety and efficacy of clinical islet transplantation for T1D patients with impaired hypoglycemia awareness. A recently completed phase 3 clinical trial allows centres in the United States to apply for a Food and Drug Administration Biologics License for the procedure. Introduction of anti-inflammatory drugs along with T-cell depleting induction therapy has significantly improved long-term function of transplanted islets. Research into islet biomarkers, immunosuppression, extrahepatic transplant sites and potential alternative beta cell sources is driving further progress. Allogeneic islet transplantation has vastly improved over the past two decades. Success in restoration of glycemic control and hypoglycemic awareness after islet transplantation has been further highlighted by clinical trials. However, lack of effective strategies to maintain long-term islet function and insufficient sources of donor tissue still impose limitations to the widespread use of islet transplantation. In the United States, wide adoption of this technology still awaits regulatory approval and, importantly, a financial mechanism to support the use of this technology.

  2. Impact of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous transplantation as first-line therapy on the survival of high-risk diffuse large B cell lymphoma patients: a single-center study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inano, Shojiro; Iwasaki, Makoto; Iwamoto, Yoshihiro; Sueki, Yuki; Fukunaga, Akiko; Yanagita, Soshi; Arima, Nobuyoshi

    2014-02-01

    High-dose chemotherapy (HDT), together with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT), plays an important role in the treatment of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), especially as second-line therapy. However, its significance in up-front settings remains to be elucidated. In our institute, patients with DLBCL in both the high-intermediate and high international prognostic index (IPI) groups initially underwent CHOP/R-CHOP treatment followed by HDT/ASCT at upfront settings between 2002 and 2011. We retrospectively analyzed 25 patients who were all treated with upfront HDT/ASCT. We excluded one patient who failed to undergo transplantation because of primary refractory disease from the analysis. The median follow-up was 77 months (range 17-110 months). Five-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 91.7 and 79.2 %, respectively, which were higher than the equivalents in previous studies. The OS and PFS in the high-risk group were lower than those in the high-intermediate group. Treatment-related mortalities or fatal complication were not observed. Our results confirm that HDT/ASCT for high-risk aggressive lymphoma is a feasible and promising therapy, but patients with high IPI continued to have poor prognoses; improvements in treatment strategy are clearly needed. Since HDT/ASCT is an aggressive treatment option associated with long-term complications, we need to identify patient groups that will gain the maximum benefit from HDT/ASCT in the upfront setting.

  3. Population pharmacokinetics of busulfan in pediatric and young adult patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplant: a model-based dosing algorithm for personalized therapy and implementation into routine clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-Boyle, Janel R; Savic, Rada; Yan, Shirley; Bartelink, Imke; Musick, Lisa; French, Deborah; Law, Jason; Horn, Biljana; Cowan, Morton J; Dvorak, Christopher C

    2015-04-01

    Population pharmacokinetic (PK) studies of busulfan in children have shown that individualized model-based algorithms provide improved targeted busulfan therapy when compared with conventional dose guidelines. The adoption of population PK models into routine clinical practice has been hampered by the tendency of pharmacologists to develop complex models too impractical for clinicians to use. The authors aimed to develop a population PK model for busulfan in children that can reliably achieve therapeutic exposure (concentration at steady state) and implement a simple model-based tool for the initial dosing of busulfan in children undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. Model development was conducted using retrospective data available in 90 pediatric and young adult patients who had undergone hematopoietic cell transplantation with busulfan conditioning. Busulfan drug levels and potential covariates influencing drug exposure were analyzed using the nonlinear mixed effects modeling software, NONMEM. The final population PK model was implemented into a clinician-friendly Microsoft Excel-based tool and used to recommend initial doses of busulfan in a group of 21 pediatric patients prospectively dosed based on the population PK model. Modeling of busulfan time-concentration data indicates that busulfan clearance displays nonlinearity in children, decreasing up to approximately 20% between the concentrations of 250-2000 ng/mL. Important patient-specific covariates found to significantly impact busulfan clearance were actual body weight and age. The percentage of individuals achieving a therapeutic concentration at steady state was significantly higher in subjects receiving initial doses based on the population PK model (81%) than in historical controls dosed on conventional guidelines (52%) (P = 0.02). When compared with the conventional dosing guidelines, the model-based algorithm demonstrates significant improvement for providing targeted busulfan therapy in

  4. An economic assessment of contemporary kidney transplant practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, David A; Schnitzler, Mark A; Xiao, Huiling; Irish, William; Tuttle-Newhall, Elizabeth; Chang, Su-Hsin; Kasiske, Bertram L; Alhamad, Tarek; Lentine, Krista L

    2018-05-01

    Kidney transplantation is the optimal therapy for end-stage renal disease, prolonging survival and reducing spending. Prior economic analyses of kidney transplantation, using Markov models, have generally assumed compatible, low-risk donors. The economic implications of transplantation with high Kidney Donor Profile Index (KDPI) deceased donors, ABO incompatible living donors, and HLA incompatible living donors have not been assessed. The costs of transplantation and dialysis were compared with the use of discrete event simulation over a 10-year period, with data from the United States Renal Data System, University HealthSystem Consortium, and literature review. Graft failure rates and expenditures were adjusted for donor characteristics. All transplantation options were associated with improved survival compared with dialysis (transplantation: 5.20-6.34 quality-adjusted life-years [QALYs] vs dialysis: 4.03 QALYs). Living donor and low-KDPI deceased donor transplantations were cost-saving compared with dialysis, while transplantations using high-KDPI deceased donor, ABO-incompatible or HLA-incompatible living donors were cost-effective (<$100 000 per QALY). Predicted costs per QALY range from $39 939 for HLA-compatible living donor transplantation to $80 486 for HLA-incompatible donors compared with $72 476 for dialysis. In conclusion, kidney transplantation is cost-effective across all donor types despite higher costs for marginal organs and innovative living donor practices. © 2018 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  5. Pancreatic Islet Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Garth L.; Rajotte, Ray V.

    1992-01-01

    Transplantation of insulin-producing tissue offers a physiologic approach to restoration of glycemic control. Whereas transplantation of vascularized pancreatic grafts has recently achieved encouraging results, pancreatic islet cell transplantation holds the promise of low morbidity and reduced requirements for agressive immunosuppression for recipients. Islet cell transplantation was recently demonstrated to induce euglycemia with insulin independence. Imagesp1656-a PMID:21221366

  6. How the embryonic chick brain twists

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zi; Guo, Qiaohang; Dai, Eric; Forsch, Nickolas; Taber, Larry A.

    2016-01-01

    During early development, the tubular embryonic chick brain undergoes a combination of progressive ventral bending and rightward torsion, one of the earliest organ-level left–right asymmetry events in development. Existing evidence suggests that bending is caused by differential growth, but the mechanism for the predominantly rightward torsion of the embryonic brain tube remains poorly understood. Here, we show through a combination of in vitro experiments, a physical model of the embryonic m...

  7. Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocyte Heterogeneity and the Isolation of Immature and Committed Cells for Cardiac Remodeling and Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R. Boheler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent stem cells represent one promising source for cell replacement therapy in heart, but differentiating embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ESC-CMs are highly heterogeneous and show a variety of maturation states. In this study, we employed an ESC clonal line that contains a cardiac-restricted ncx1 promoter-driven puromycin resistance cassette together with a mass culture system to isolate ESC-CMs that display traits characteristic of very immature CMs. The cells display properties of proliferation, CM-restricted markers, reduced mitochondrial mass, and hypoxia-resistance. Following transplantation into rodent hearts, bioluminescence imaging revealed that immature cells, but not more mature CMs, survived for at least one month following injection. These data and comparisons with more mature cells lead us to conclude that immature hypoxia resistant ESC-CMs can be isolated in mass in vitro and, following injection into heart, form grafts that may mediate long-term recovery of global and regional myocardial contractile function following infarction.

  8. Exchange donor transplantation: ethical option for living renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürkan, A; Kaçar, S; Varılsuha, C; Tilif, S; Turunç, V; Doǧan, M; Dheir, H; Sahin, S

    2011-04-01

    Taking in consideration the opinion of our team, which necessitates obligation of a relative relation between donors and recipients (genetic or matrimonial), we performed donor exchanges as an ethical alternative in living donor transplantations. We reviewed the outcomes of our exchange series. Between July 2003 and August 2010 we performed 110 exchange donor transplantations in four hospitals: one four-way, two three-way, and 100 two-way cases. Donors were mostly spouses (n = 71) or mothers (n = 15). The mean age of the donors was 48.8 (range = 23-69) and the recipients 41.4 years (range = 5-66). Two were transplanted preemptively and the others had a mean dialysis duration of 43 months (range = 1-120). Among 110 patients, three compatible pairs joined the group voluntarily; 71, due to ABO incompatibility and 36, due to crossmatch positivity. Induction therapy was used in 92 patients. HLA mismatches (MM) were: one MM in three; two MM in three; three MM in 18, four MM in 36; five MM in 34; and six MM in 18. Among 90 patients tested for panel-reactive antibodies PRA, five showed class I and 10, class II positivity. In 11 patients, B-cell positivity was detected by flow cytometry. Delayed graft function (n = 2), acute rejection (n = 11), BK virus infection (n = 1), and cytomegalovirus infection (n = 3) were seen postoperatively. Three (2.7%) patients died due to sepsis. Five patients returned to dialysis program due to interstitial fibrosis tubular atrophy (IFTA) (n = 2), renal vein thrombosis (n = 1), de novo glomerulopathy (n = 1), or primary nonfunction (n = 1). The 1- and 5-year patient and graft survival rates were 96% and 96%, 95% and 89%, respectively. We believe that exchange donor transplantation is as successful as direct transplants; it is a good, ethical alternative to unrelated living transplantations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sequential Targeting of CD52 and TNF Allows Early Minimization Therapy in Kidney Transplantation: From a Biomarker to Targeting in a Proof-Of-Concept Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Viklicky

    Full Text Available There is high medical need for safe long-term immunosuppression monotherapy in kidney transplantation. Selective targeting of post-transplant alloantigen-(reactivated effector-T cells by anti-TNF antibodies after global T cell depletion may allow safe drug minimization, however, it is unsolved what might be the best maintenance monotherapy.In this open, prospective observational single-centre trial, 20 primary deceased donor kidney transplant recipients received 2x20 mg Alemtuzumab (d0/d1 followed by 5 mg/kg Infliximab (d2. For 14 days all patients received only tacrolimus, then they were allocated to either receive tacrolimus (TAC, n = 13 or sirolimus (SIR, n = 7 monotherapy, respectively. Protocol biopsies and extensive immune monitoring were performed and patients were followed-up for 60 months.TAC-monotherapy resulted in excellent graft survival (5yr 92%, 95%CI: 56.6-98.9 and function, normal histology, and no proteinuria. Immune monitoring revealed low intragraft inflammation (urinary IP-10 and hints for the development of operational tolerance signature in the TAC- but not SIR-group. Remarkably, the TAC-monotherapy was successful in all five presensitized (ELISPOT+ patients. However, recruitment into SIR-arm was stopped (after n = 7 because of high incidence of proteinuria and acute/chronic rejection in biopsies. No opportunistic infections occurred during follow-up.In conclusion, our novel fast-track TAC-monotherapy protocol is likely to be safe and preliminary results indicated an excellent 5-year outcome, however, a full-scale study will be needed to confirm our findings.EudraCT Number: 2006-003110-18.

  10. Commercial Kidney Transplantation: Attitude, Knowledge, Perception, and Experience of Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Rahbi, Fatma; Al Salmi, Issa

    2017-07-01

    Kidney transplantation is the gold standard for patients with end-stage kidney disease. In view of shortages of available organs, long wait times for possible transplantation, and strict regulation, many patients opt for commercial transplantation. This study elicits the reasons and motivations for patients with end-stage kidney disease to elect for commercial transplant. A questionnaire-based evaluation was conducted during the period from July 2015 until late December 2015. It consisted of 29 multiple choice questions and was distributed to all patients who underwent commercial kidney transplantation. One hundred and fifty patients were approached to participate and 106 agreed. Of the participants, 60% were male with an average age of 41.5 (SD 14.8) years and ranged from 18 to 83 years. The majority (82%) of our participants were educated ranging from primary to college level. The major reason (71%) for these participants to obtain commercial transplants was stated as the unavailability of a live related donor. Thirteen percent stated that they objected to getting a kidney donated from a family member, and 9% stated that they were worried about taking a kidney from a family member. Finally, 3% of participants stated that they needed prompt transplant and could not wait for a long time for transplant investigations and the workup associated with this program. The study showed that the most common underlying cause for seeking commercial transplantation is the unavailability of a national transplant program, particularly transplantation from deceased sources. All western ethical arguments turn out to become of vital importance in developing countries, because transplantation is the cheapest renal replacement therapy. However, it must be emphasized that commercial transplants should not be an alternative to building a national transplant initiative. The national diseased program must be a priority with full financial and administrative support. All government

  11. Other women's wombs: uterus transplants and gestational surrogacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The birth of a child after uterus transplant from a living donor in Sweden in October, 2013 has spurred reproductive and transplant physicians in Europe and North America to investigate whether uterus transplants, from living or cadaveric donors, will be a safe and effective therapy for women with uterine insufficiency. While progress with uterus transplant depends on medical factors, there are also important ethical and legal concerns. Uterus transplant is essential for women without access to surrogacy. It may also be sought by infertile women who dislike surrogacy. This article examines medical, ethical, legal, and policy issues that arise with womb transplant, including the role of surrogacy policies that make them necessary. The conclusion is that there is a clear ethical path for either surrogacy or uterus transplant to be used by women with uterine insufficiency. PMID:27774233

  12. Other women's wombs: uterus transplants and gestational surrogacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, John A

    2016-04-01

    The birth of a child after uterus transplant from a living donor in Sweden in October, 2013 has spurred reproductive and transplant physicians in Europe and North America to investigate whether uterus transplants, from living or cadaveric donors, will be a safe and effective therapy for women with uterine insufficiency. While progress with uterus transplant depends on medical factors, there are also important ethical and legal concerns. Uterus transplant is essential for women without access to surrogacy. It may also be sought by infertile women who dislike surrogacy. This article examines medical, ethical, legal, and policy issues that arise with womb transplant, including the role of surrogacy policies that make them necessary. The conclusion is that there is a clear ethical path for either surrogacy or uterus transplant to be used by women with uterine insufficiency.

  13. The effect of using the algorithm of restrictive intraoperative fluid therapy, early immune enteral nutrition, and early patient mobilization on orthotopic liver transplantation outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Dzyadz'ko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Major surgical procedures induce a number of pathophysiological responses, which may lead to a significant increase in perioperative complications, delayed recovery and rehabilitation, and longer hospital stays. Fast-track surgery, also known as enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS or as multimodal surgery, aims at decreasing the frequency of postoperative complications, creating optimal conditions for earlier postoperative recovery and return to normal life activities.The implementation of fast-track programs results in a reduced treatment duration without increase in readmissions. In this article, we have described our experience in the application of fast track program components to improve the outcomes after liver transplantation.

  14. Successful salvage therapy with Daptomycin for osteomyelitis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a renal transplant recipient with Fabry-Anderson disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polilli Ennio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Daptomycin is licensed in adults for the management of Staphylococcus aureus methicillin-resistant infections, including bone and skin complicated infections. We describe for the first time its use in a renal transplant recipient for Fabry-Anderson Disease with right heel osteomyelitis. The patient was unresponsive to first-line Teicoplanin and second-line Tigecycline, whereas he was successfully treated with third-line Daptomycin monotherapy at 4 mg/Kg/qd for 4 weeks. Local debridement was performed in advance of each line of treatment.

  15. Patient survey to identify reasons for non-adherence and elicitation of quality of life concepts associated with immunosuppressant therapy in kidney transplant recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Muduma, Gorden; Shupo, Francis C; Dam, Sophie; Hawken, Natalia A; Aball?a, Samuel; Odeyemi, Isaac; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Gorden Muduma,1 Francis C Shupo,2 Sophie Dam,3 Natalia A Hawken,3 Samuel Aballéa,3 Isaac Odeyemi,1 Mondher Toumi4 1Astellas Pharma Europe Ltd, Chertsey, 2Creativ-Ceutical Ltd, London, UK; 3Creativ-Ceutical Ltd, Paris, 4Public Health (EA 3279), Faculty of Medicine, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France Background: Renal transplantation (RT) is considered the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease compared to dialysis, offering better health-related quality of life (...

  16. Stem Cell-Based Therapies for Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Hao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, stem cell-based approaches have attracted more attention from scientists and clinicians due to their possible therapeutical effect on stroke. Animal studies have demonstrated that the beneficial effects of stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs, inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, neural stem cells (NSCs, and mesenchymal stem cell (MSCs might be due to cell replacement, neuroprotection, endogenous neurogenesis, angiogenesis, and modulation on inflammation and immune response. Although several clinical studies have shown the high efficiency and safety of stem cell in stroke management, mainly MSCs, some issues regarding to cell homing, survival, tracking, safety, and optimal cell transplantation protocol, such as cell dose and time window, should be addressed. Undoubtably, stem cell-based gene therapy represents a novel potential therapeutic strategy for stroke in future.

  17. Post-transplantation Infections in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arze, S; Arze, L; Abecia, C

    2016-03-01

    Over 26 years, we found 46 infectious episodes in 350 kidney transplant recipients. Fifteen were urinary tract infections, recurrent in 4 patients. There were 8 cytomegalovirus infections, three of them fatal when intravenous (IV) ganciclovir was not available. Seven patients had a reactivation of tuberculosis (TB) in the pleura, cervical spine, lumbar spine, knee, ankle, skin and peritoneum, respectively, and were all resolved satisfactorily with conventional anti-TB therapy. Three patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with the use of acyclovir developed an extensive herpes zoster infection in the 1st 6 months after transplantation, which was resolved with the use of oral acyclovir, and 1 had a disseminated herpes simplex infection resolved with the use of IV acyclovir. Three patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with trimethoprim sulfa developed Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in the 1st 6 months after transplantation, which was fatal in one of them. In 2 patients, we found a Nocardia infection, confined to the lung, which was cured in one of the cases and systemic and fatal in the other. Two patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with the use of nystatin developed esophageal candidiasis in the 1st 6 months after transplantation. One patient developed infective endocarditis in a stenotic bicuspid aortic valve and died 10 years later after another incident of infective endocarditis at the prosthetic aortic valve. Two patients developed an extensive condyloma at the penis, perianal region, and perineum owing to human papillomavirus, requiring extensive surgical resection and podophyllin applications. Another patient developed fatal post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease due to Epstein-Barr virus infection 15 years after transplantation. One patient developed a severe and fatal mucocutaneous leishmaniasis with no response to conventional antimonial therapy. It is interesting to note that despite Chagas disease being endemic

  18. Pituitary cell differentiation from stem cells and other cells: toward restorative therapy for hypopituitarism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Christophe; Vankelecom, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    The pituitary gland, key regulator of our endocrine system, produces multiple hormones that steer essential physiological processes. Hence, deficient pituitary function (hypopituitarism) leads to severe disorders. Hypopituitarism can be caused by defective embryonic development, or by damage through tumor growth/resection and traumatic brain injury. Lifelong hormone replacement is needed but associated with significant side effects. It would be more desirable to restore pituitary tissue and function. Recently, we showed that the adult (mouse) pituitary holds regenerative capacity in which local stem cells are involved. Repair of deficient pituitary may therefore be achieved by activating these resident stem cells. Alternatively, pituitary dysfunction may be mended by cell (replacement) therapy. The hormonal cells to be transplanted could be obtained by (trans-)differentiating various kinds of stem cells or other cells. Here, we summarize the studies on pituitary cell regeneration and on (trans-)differentiation toward hormonal cells, and speculate on restorative therapies for pituitary deficiency.

  19. Intestinal transplantation: The anesthesia perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Aparna

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal transplantation is a complex and challenging surgery. It is very effective for treating intestinal failure, especially for those patients who cannot tolerate parenteral nutrition nor have extensive abdominal disease. Chronic parental nutrition can induce intestinal failure associated liver disease (IFALD). According to United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) data, children with intestinal failure affected by liver disease secondary to parenteral nutrition have the highest mortality on a waiting list when compared with all candidates for solid organ transplantation. Intestinal transplant grafts can be isolated or combined with the liver/duodenum/pancreas. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) has defined intestinal donor criteria. Living donor intestinal transplant (LDIT) has the advantages of optimal timing, short ischemia time and good human leukocyte antigen matching contributing to lower postoperative complications in the recipient. Thoracic epidurals provide excellent analgesia for the donors, as well as recipients. Recipient management can be challenging. Thrombosis and obstruction of venous access maybe common due to prolonged parenteral nutrition and/or hypercoaguability. Thromboelastography (TEG) is helpful for managing intraoperative product therapy or thrombosis. Large fluid shifts and electrolyte disturbances may occur due to massive blood loss, dehydration, third spacing etc. Intestinal grafts are susceptible to warm and cold ischemia and ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). Post-reperfusion syndrome is common. Cardiac or pulmonary clots can be monitored with transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator. Vasopressors maybe used to ensure stable hemodynamics. Post-intestinal transplant patients may need anesthesia for procedures such as biopsies for surveillance of rejection, bronchoscopy, endoscopy, postoperative hemorrhage, anastomotic leaks, thrombosis of grafts etc. Asepsis

  20. Inhibition of Sirt1 promotes neural progenitors toward motoneuron differentiation from human embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yun; Wang, Jing [Department of Neurology, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Clinical Stem Cell Center, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Chen, Guian [Clinical Stem Cell Center, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Reproductive Medical Center, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Fan, Dongsheng, E-mail: dsfan@yahoo.cn [Department of Neurology, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Clinical Stem Cell Center, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Deng, Min, E-mail: dengmin1706@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Neurology, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Clinical Stem Cell Center, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Nicotinamide inhibit Sirt1. {yields} MASH1 and Ngn2 activation. {yields} Increase the expression of HB9. {yields} Motoneurons formation increases significantly. -- Abstract: Several protocols direct human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) toward differentiation into functional motoneurons, but the efficiency of motoneuron generation varies based on the human ESC line used. We aimed to develop a novel protocol to increase the formation of motoneurons from human ESCs. In this study, we tested a nuclear histone deacetylase protein, Sirt1, to promote neural precursor cell (NPC) development during differentiation of human ESCs into motoneurons. A specific inhibitor of Sirt1, nicotinamide, dramatically increased motoneuron formation. We found that about 60% of the cells from the total NPCs expressed HB9 and {beta}III-tubulin, commonly used motoneuronal markers found in neurons derived from ESCs following nicotinamide treatment. Motoneurons derived from ESC expressed choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), a positive marker of mature motoneuron. Moreover, we also examined the transcript levels of Mash1, Ngn2, and HB9 mRNA in the differentiated NPCs treated with the Sirt1 activator resveratrol (50 {mu}M) or inhibitor nicotinamide (100 {mu}M). The levels of Mash1, Ngn2, and HB9 mRNA were significantly increased after nicotinamide treatment compared with control groups, which used the traditional protocol. These results suggested that increasing Mash1 and Ngn2 levels by inhibiting Sirt1 could elevate HB9 expression, which promotes motoneuron differentiation. This study provides an alternative method for the production of transplantable motoneurons, a key requirement in the development of hESC-based cell therapy in motoneuron disease.

  1. Inhibition of Sirt1 promotes neural progenitors toward motoneuron differentiation from human embryonic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yun; Wang, Jing; Chen, Guian; Fan, Dongsheng; Deng, Min

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Nicotinamide inhibit Sirt1. → MASH1 and Ngn2 activation. → Increase the expression of HB9. → Motoneurons formation increases significantly. -- Abstract: Several protocols direct human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) toward differentiation into functional motoneurons, but the efficiency of motoneuron generation varies based on the human ESC line used. We aimed to develop a novel protocol to increase the formation of motoneurons from human ESCs. In this study, we tested a nuclear histone deacetylase protein, Sirt1, to promote neural precursor cell (NPC) development during differentiation of human ESCs into motoneurons. A specific inhibitor of Sirt1, nicotinamide, dramatically increased motoneuron formation. We found that about 60% of the cells from the total NPCs expressed HB9 and βIII-tubulin, commonly used motoneuronal markers found in neurons derived from ESCs following nicotinamide treatment. Motoneurons derived from ESC expressed choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), a positive marker of mature motoneuron. Moreover, we also examined the transcript levels of Mash1, Ngn2, and HB9 mRNA in the differentiated NPCs treated with the Sirt1 activator resveratrol (50 μM) or inhibitor nicotinamide (100 μM). The levels of Mash1, Ngn2, and HB9 mRNA were significantly increased after nicotinamide treatment compared with control groups, which used the traditional protocol. These results suggested that increasing Mash1 and Ngn2 levels by inhibiting Sirt1 could elevate HB9 expression, which promotes motoneuron differentiation. This study provides an alternative method for the production of transplantable motoneurons, a key requirement in the development of hESC-based cell therapy in motoneuron disease.

  2. Rho-associated kinase inhibitors promote the cardiac differentiation of embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ya-Ting; Yeih, Dong-Feng; Liang, Shu-Man; Chien, Chia-Ying; Yu, Yen-Ling; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Jan, Yee-Jee; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Sung, Li-Ying; Shyue, Song-Kun; Chen, Ming-Fong; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Wu, Kenneth K; Liou, Jun-Yang

    2015-12-15

    Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) plays an important role in maintaining embryonic stem (ES) cell pluripotency. To determine whether ROCK is involved in ES cell differentiation into cardiac and hematopoietic lineages, we evaluated the effect of ROCK inhibitors, Y-27632 and fasudil on murine ES and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell differentiation. Gene expression levels were determined by real-time PCR, Western blot analysis and immunofluorescent confocal microscopy. Cell transplantation of induced differentiated cells were assessed in vivo in a mouse model (three groups, n=8/group) of acute myocardial infarction (MI). The cell engraftment was examined by immunohistochemical staining and the outcome was analyzed by echocardiography. Cells were cultured in hematopoietic differentiation medium in the presence or absence of ROCK inhibitor and colony formation as well as markers of ES, hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and cells of cardiac lineages were analyzed. ROCK inhibition resulted in a drastic change in colony morphology accompanied by loss of hematopoietic markers (GATA-1, CD41 and β-Major) and expressed markers of cardiac lineages (GATA-4, Isl-1, Tbx-5, Tbx-20, MLC-2a, MLC-2v, α-MHC, cTnI and cTnT) in murine ES and iPS cells. Fasudil-induced cardiac progenitor (Mesp-1 expressing) cells were infused into a murine MI model. They engrafted into the peri-infarct and infarct regions and preserved left ventricular function. These findings provide new insights into the signaling required for ES cell differentiation into hematopoietic as well as cardiac lineages and suggest that ROCK inhibitors are useful in directing iPS cell differentiation into cardiac progenitor cells for cell therapy of cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence and correlates of medication non-adherence among kidney transplant recipients more than 6 months post-