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Sample records for transplantation pbsctfrom haploidentical

  1. Strategies in Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Adults

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    Ulaş D. Bayraktar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Haploidentical related donors are alternative stem cell sources for patients without human leukocyte antigen (HLA-matched related or unrelated donors. Immediate access to the donor, availability for patients with rare haplotypes, ease of stem cell procurement, and lack of a requirement for a physical cord blood bank or an extensive HLA database render this type of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation particularly attractive despite the high histoincompatibility barrier between the recipient and the haploidentical graft. In this review, we answer the following questions: 1 What are the current transplant strategies used to overcome the histoincompatibility barrier in haploidentical stem cell transplantation and their clinical results? 2 How should we choose the donor when there is more than one available haploidentical donor? 3 How does transplantation from haploidentical donors compare to that from umbilical cord blood?

  2. Current status of haploidentical stem cell transplantation for leukemia

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    Huang Xiao-jun

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has made tremendous progress over the past 20 years and has become a feasible option for leukemia patients without a HLA identical sibling donor. The early complications of severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD, graft failure and delayed engraftment, as well as disease recurrence have limited the use of this approach. Newer strategies have been applied and overcome some of the problems, including the use of T-cell depleted graft, "mega" dose of stem cells, intensive post-transplant immunosuppression and manipulation of the graft. These have decreased the transplant related mortality and GVHD associated with haploidentical transplantation, however, the major problems of disease relapse and infection, which related to late immune reconstitution, limit the development of haploidentical HSCT. Future challenges remain in improving post-transplant immune reconstitution and finding the best approach to reduce the incidence and severity of GVHD, while preserving graft-versus-leukemia effect to prevent the recurrence of underlying malignancy.

  3. Haploidentical Transplantation in Children with Acute Leukemia: The Unresolved Issues

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    Sarita Rani Jaiswal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT remains a curative option for children with high risk and advanced acute leukemia. Yet availability of matched family donor limits its use and although matched unrelated donor or mismatched umbilical cord blood (UCB are viable options, they fail to meet the global need. Haploidentical family donor is almost universally available and is emerging as the alternate donor of choice in adult patients. However, the same is not true in the case of children. The studies of haploidentical HSCT in children are largely limited to T cell depleted grafts with not so encouraging results in advanced leukemia. At the same time, emerging data from UCBT are challenging the existing paradigm of less stringent HLA match requirements as perceived in the past. The use of posttransplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCY has yielded encouraging results in adults, but data in children is sorely lacking. Our experience of using PTCY based haploidentical HSCT in children shows inadequacy of this approach in younger children compared to excellent outcome in older children. In this context, we discuss the current status of haploidentical HSCT in children with acute leukemia in a global perspective and dwell on its future prospects.

  4. Haploidentical transplant with posttransplant cyclophosphamide vs matched unrelated donor transplant for acute myeloid leukemia

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    Zhang, Mei-Jie; Bacigalupo, Andrea A.; Bashey, Asad; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Aljitawi, Omar S.; Armand, Philippe; Antin, Joseph H.; Chen, Junfang; Devine, Steven M.; Fowler, Daniel H.; Luznik, Leo; Nakamura, Ryotaro; O’Donnell, Paul V.; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Pingali, Sai Ravi; Porter, David L.; Riches, Marcie R.; Ringdén, Olle T. H.; Rocha, Vanderson; Vij, Ravi; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Champlin, Richard E.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Fuchs, Ephraim J.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    We studied adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after haploidentical (n = 192) and 8/8 HLA-matched unrelated donor (n = 1982) transplantation. Haploidentical recipients received calcineurin inhibitor (CNI), mycophenolate, and posttransplant cyclophosphamide for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis; 104 patients received myeloablative and 88 received reduced intensity conditioning regimens. Matched unrelated donor transplant recipients received CNI with mycophenolate or methotrexate for GVHD prophylaxis; 1245 patients received myeloablative and 737 received reduced intensity conditioning regimens. In the myeloablative setting, day 30 neutrophil recovery was lower after haploidentical compared with matched unrelated donor transplants (90% vs 97%, P = .02). Corresponding rates after reduced intensity conditioning transplants were 93% and 96% (P = .25). In the myeloablative setting, 3-month acute grade 2-4 (16% vs 33%, P < .0001) and 3-year chronic GVHD (30% vs 53%, P < .0001) were lower after haploidentical compared with matched unrelated donor transplants. Similar differences were observed after reduced intensity conditioning transplants, 19% vs 28% (P = .05) and 34% vs 52% (P = .002). Among patients receiving myeloablative regimens, 3-year probabilities of overall survival were 45% (95% CI, 36-54) and 50% (95% CI, 47-53) after haploidentical and matched unrelated donor transplants (P = .38). Corresponding rates after reduced intensity conditioning transplants were 46% (95% CI, 35-56) and 44% (95% CI, 0.40-47) (P = .71). Although statistical power is limited, these data suggests that survival for patients with AML after haploidentical transplantation with posttransplant cyclophosphamide is comparable with matched unrelated donor transplantation. PMID:26130705

  5. T cell depleted haploidentical transplantation: positive selection

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    Franco Aversa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Interest in mismatched transplantation arises from the fact that a suitable one-haplotype mismatched donor is immediately available for virtually all patients, particularly for those who urgently need an allogenic transplant. Work on one haplotype-mismatched transplants has been proceeding for over 20 years all over the world and novel transplant techniques have been developed. Some centres have focused on the conditioning regimens and post transplant immune suppression; others have concentrated on manipulating the graft which may be a megadose of extensively T celldepleted or unmanipulated progenitor cells. Excellent engraftment rates are associated with a very low incidence of acute and chronic GVHD and regimen-related mortality even in patients who are over 50 years old. Overall, event-free survival and transplant-related mortality compare favourably with reports on transplants from sources of stem cells other than the matched sibling.

  6. T-cell-replete haploidentical transplantation versus autologous stem cell transplantation in adult acute leukemia: a matched pair analysis

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    Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Labopin, Myriam; Piemontese, Simona; Arcese, William; Santarone, Stella; Huang, He; Meloni, Giovanna; Ferrara, Felicetto; Beelen, Dietrich; Sanz, Miguel; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Ciceri, Fabio; Mailhol, Audrey; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Adult patients with acute leukemia in need of a transplant but without a genoidentical donor are usually considered upfront for transplantation with stem cells from any other allogeneic source, rather than autologous stem cell transplantation. We used data from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and performed a matched pair analysis on 188 T-cell-replete haploidentical and 356 autologous transplants done from January 2007 to December 2012, using age, diagnosis, disease status, cytogenetics, and interval from diagnosis to transplant as matching factors. “Haploidentical expert” centers were defined as having reported more than five haploidentical transplants for acute leukemia (median value for the study period). The median follow-up was 28 months. Multivariate analyses, including type of transplant categorized into three classes (“haploidentical regular”, “haploidentical expert” and autologous), conditioning intensity (reduced intensity versus myeloablative conditioning) and the random effect taking into account associations related to matching, showed that non-relapse mortality was higher following haploidentical transplants in expert (HR: 4.7; P=0.00004) and regular (HR: 8.98; Ptransplants was lower in expert centers (HR:0.39; P=0.0003) but in regular centers was similar to that for autologous transplants. Leukemia-free survival and overall survival rates were higher following autologous transplantation than haploidentical transplants in regular centers (HR: 1.63; P=0.008 and HR: 2.31; P=0.0002 respectively) but similar to those following haploidentical transplants in expert centers. We conclude that autologous stem cell transplantation should presently be considered as a possible alternative to haploidentical transplantation in regular centers that have not developed a specific expert program. PMID:25637051

  7. Delayed immune recovery following sequential orthotopic liver transplantation and haploidentical stem cell transplantation in erythropoietic protoporphyria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smiers, Frans J.; Van de Vijver, Els; Delsing, Bas J. P.; Lankester, Arjan C.; Ball, Lynne M.; Rings, Edmund H. H. M.; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Bredius, Robbert G. M.

    A nine-yr-old boy with EPP suffered from severe skin burns and liver failure caused by progressive cholestasis and fibrosis. OLT was performed without major complications. Four months following liver transplantation he underwent parental haploidentical HSCT. The myeloablative conditioning regimen

  8. Reduced-intensity transplantation for lymphomas using haploidentical related donors vs HLA-matched unrelated donors

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    Kanate, Abraham S.; Mussetti, Alberto; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A.; Ahn, Kwang W.; DiGilio, Alyssa; Beitinjaneh, Amer; Chhabra, Saurabh; Fenske, Timothy S.; Freytes, Cesar; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Hertzberg, Mark; Klyuchnikov, Evgeny; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Olsson, Richard; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Rezvani, Andrew; Riches, Marcie; Saad, Ayman; Slavin, Shimon; Smith, Sonali M.; Sureda, Anna; Yared, Jean; Ciurea, Stefan; Armand, Philippe; Salit, Rachel; Bolaños-Meade, Javier

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated 917 adult lymphoma patients who received haploidentical (n = 185) or HLA-matched unrelated donor (URD) transplantation either with (n = 241) or without antithymocyte globulin (ATG; n = 491) following reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. Haploidentical recipients received posttransplant cyclophosphamide-based graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, whereas URD recipients received calcineurin inhibitor-based prophylaxis. Median follow-up of survivors was 3 years. The 100-day cumulative incidence of grade III-IV acute GVHD on univariate analysis was 8%, 12%, and 17% in the haploidentical, URD without ATG, and URD with ATG groups, respectively (P = .44). Corresponding 1-year rates of chronic GVHD on univariate analysis were 13%, 51%, and 33%, respectively (P < .001). On multivariate analysis, grade III-IV acute GVHD was higher in URD without ATG (P = .001), as well as URD with ATG (P = .01), relative to haploidentical transplants. Similarly, relative to haploidentical transplants, risk of chronic GVHD was higher in URD without ATG and URD with ATG (P < .0001). Cumulative incidence of relapse/progression at 3 years was 36%, 28%, and 36% in the haploidentical, URD without ATG, and URD with ATG groups, respectively (P = .07). Corresponding 3-year overall survival (OS) was 60%, 62%, and 50% in the 3 groups, respectively, with multivariate analysis showing no survival difference between URD without ATG (P = .21) or URD with ATG (P = .16), relative to haploidentical transplants. Multivariate analysis showed no difference between the 3 groups in terms of nonrelapse mortality (NRM), relapse/progression, and progression-free survival (PFS). These data suggest that reduced-intensity conditioning haploidentical transplantation with posttransplant cyclophosphamide does not compromise early survival outcomes compared with matched URD transplantation, and is associated with significantly reduced risk of chronic GVHD. PMID:26670632

  9. IMMUNITY TO INFECTIONS AFTER HAPLOIDENTICAL HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

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    Franco Aversa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The advantage of using a Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA-mismatched related donor is that almost every patient who does not have a HLA-identical donor or who urgently needs hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT has at least one family member with whom shares one haplotype (haploidentical and who is promptly available as a donor. The major challenge of haplo-HSCT is intense bi-directional alloreactivity leading to high incidences of graft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Advances in graft processing and in pharmacologic prophylaxis of GVHD have reduced these risks and have made haplo-HSCT a viable alternative for patients lacking a matched donor. Indeed, the haplo-HSCT  has spread to centers worldwide even though some centers have preferred an approach based on T cell depletion of G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs, others have focused on new strategies for GvHD prevention, such as G-CSF priming of bone marrow and robust post-transplant immune suppression or post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PTCY. Today, the graft can be a megadose of T-cell depleted PBPCs or standard dose of unmanipulated bone marrow and/or PBPCs.  Although haplo-HSCT modalities are based mainly on high intensity conditioning regimens, recently introduced reduced intensity regimens (RIC   showed promise in decreasing early transplant-related mortality (TRM, and extending the opportunity of HSCT to an elderly population with more comorbidities. Infections are still mostly responsible for toxicity and non-relapse mortality due to prolonged immunosuppression related, or not, to GVHD. Future challenges lie in determining the safest preparative conditioning regimen, minimizing GvHD and promoting rapid and more robust immune reconstitution.

  10. Fever after peripheral blood stem cell infusion in haploidentical transplantation with post-transplant cyclophosphamide.

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    Arango, Marcos; Combariza, Juan F

    2017-06-01

    Noninfection-related fever can occur after peripheral blood stem cell infusion in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with post-transplant cyclophosphamide. The objective of this study was to analyze the incidence of fever and characterize some clinical features of affected patients. A retrospective case-series study with 40 patients who received haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was carried out. Thirty-three patients (82.5%) developed fever; no baseline characteristic was associated with its development. Median time to fever onset was 25.5h (range, 9.5-100h) and median peak temperature was 39.0°C (range, 38.1-40.5°C). Not a single patient developed hemodynamic or respiratory compromise that required admission to the intensive care unit. Fever was not explained by infection in any case. Ninety-one percent of the febrile episodes resolved within 96h of cyclophosphamide administration. No significant difference in overall survival, event-free survival, or graft versus host disease-free/relapse-free survival was found in the group of febrile individuals after peripheral blood stem cell infusion. Fever after peripheral blood stem cell infusion in this clinical setting was common; it usually subsides with cyclophosphamide administration. The development of fever was not associated with an adverse prognosis. Copyright © 2017 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Guidelines from the Francophone society of marrow transplantation and cellular therapy (SFGM-TC)].

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    Nguyen, Stéphanie; Chalandon, Yves; Lemarie, Claude; Simon, Sophie; Masson, Dominique; Dhedin, Nathalie; Suarez, Felipe; Renaud, Barbara; Charbonnier, Amandine; Yafour, Nabil; François, Sylvie; Duléry, Rémy; Blaise, Didier; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Rubio, Marie-Thérèse

    2016-11-01

    Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is being increasingly used due to improvement of the transplantation procedures allowing a reduction of graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) and of transplant-related mortality (TRM). Such improvements have been particularly observed after administration of T-replete HSCT graft associated to an in vivo T cell depletion by the administration of high-doses of cyclophosphamide (HD-Cy) after transplantation. Here, we have analyzed the results of haplo-identical T replete HSC transplants, in particular, when performed with post-transplant HD-Cy in order to provide recommendations for the clinical practice. Criteria of choice for a haploidentical donor by priority order are absence of donor-specific antibodies (DSA) and to prioritize: CMV seronegative recipient/donor couples, ABO matching in case of deserythrocytation, male donor for a male recipient, the youngest donor. There is no clear argument in favor of the use of bone marrow versus peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) after non myeloablative conditioning regimen, while after ablative conditioning PBSC seem to be associated with higher risks of GVHD without obvious impact on survival. Results of haploidentical HSCT, confirmed by several groups, are interesting in lymphomas (in particular Hodgkin disease) and for acute leukemia. Outcomes of patients rely on age, disease status at transplant and conditioning intensity. At equivalent disease risk, results of haploidentical HSCT seem comparable to those of HLA matched HSCT, raising the question of the classification of such transplants as alternatives. In all cases, we recommend to include patients in prospective clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Upfront haploidentical transplant for acquired severe aplastic anemia: registry-based comparison with matched related transplant

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    Lan-Ping Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haploidentical donor (HID hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is an alternative treatment method for severe aplastic anemia (SAA patients lacking suitable identical donors and those who are refractory to immunosuppressive therapy (IST. The current study evaluated the feasibility of upfront haploidentical HSCT in SAA patients. Methods We conducted a multicenter study based on a registry database. One hundred fifty-eight SAA patients who underwent upfront transplantation between June 2012 and September 2015 were enrolled. Results Eighty-nine patients had haploidentical donors (HIDs, and 69 had matched related donors (MRDs for HSCT. The median times for myeloid engraftment in the HID and MRD cohorts were 12 (range, 9–20 and 11 (range, 8–19 days, with a cumulative incidence of 97.8 and 97.1% (P = 0.528, respectively. HID recipients had an increased cumulative incidence of grades II–IV acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD (30.3 vs. 1.5%, P < 0.001, grades III–IV aGVHD (10.1 vs. 1.5%, P = 0.026, and chronic GVHD (cGVHD (30.6 vs. 4.4%, P < 0.001 at 1 year but similar extensive cGVHD (3.4 vs. 0%, P = 0.426. The three-year estimated overall survival (OS rates were 86.1 and 91.3% (P = 0.358, while the three-year estimated failure-free survival (FFS rates were 85.0 and 89.8% (P = 0.413 in the HID and MRD cohorts, respectively. In multivariate analysis, survival outcome for the entire population was significantly adversely associated with increased transfusions and poor performance status pre-SCT. We did not observe differences in primary engraftment and survival outcomes by donor type. Conclusions Haploidentical SCT as upfront therapy was an effective and safe option for SAA patients, with favorable outcomes in experienced centers.

  13. Similar Transplant Outcomes for AML/MDS Patients with Haploidentical versus 10/10 HLA Matched Unrelated and Related Donors

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    Di Stasi, Antonio; Milton, Denái R.; Poon, LM; Hamdi, Amir; Rondon, Gabriela; Chen, Julianne; Pingali, Sai R.; Konopleva, Marina; Kongtim, Piyanuch; Alousi, Amin; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H.; Ahmed, Sairah; Bashir, Qaiser; Al-atrash, Gheath; Oran, Betul; Hosing, Chitra M.; Kebriaei, Partow; Popat, Uday; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Lee, Dean A.; de Lima, Marcos; Rezvani, Katayoun; Khouri, Issa F.; Champlin, Richard E.; Ciurea, Stefan O.

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) has been performed primarily with an HLA matched donor. Outcomes of haploidentical transplantation have recently improved, and a comparison between these donor sources in a uniform cohort of patients has not been performed. We evaluated outcomes of 227 patients with AML/MDS treated with melphalan-based conditioning. Donors were matched related (MRD) (N=87, 38%), matched unrelated (MUD) (N=108, 48%), or haploidentical (N=32, 14%). No significant differences were found between haploidentical and MUD transplant outcomes; however, there was a trend for improved outcomes in the MRD group with a 3-year progression-free survival for patients in remission of 57%, 45% and 41% for MRD, MUD and haploidentical, respectively (P=0.417). Recovery of T-cell subsets was similar for all groups. These results suggest that haploidentical donors can safely extend transplantation for AML/MDS patients without an HLA matched donor. Prospective studies comparing haploidentical and MUD transplants are warranted. PMID:25263628

  14. Immunoselection and clinical use of T regulatory cells in HLA-haploidentical stem cell transplantation.

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    Di Ianni, Mauro; Falzetti, Franca; Carotti, Alessandra; Terenzi, Adelmo; Del Papa, Beatrice; Perruccio, Katia; Ruggeri, Loredana; Sportoletti, Paolo; Rosati, Emanuela; Marconi, Pierfrancesco; Falini, Brunangelo; Reisner, Yair; Velardi, Andrea; Aversa, Franco; Martelli, Massimo F

    2011-09-01

    Haploidentical transplantation, with extensive T cell depletion to prevent GvHD, is associated with a high incidence of infection-related deaths. The key challenge is to improve immune recovery with allogeneic donor T cells without triggering GvHD. As T regulatory cells (Tregs) controlled GvHD in pre-clinical studies, the present study evaluated the impact of an infusion of donor CD4/CD25 + Tregs, followed by an inoculum of donor mature T cells (Tcons) and positively immunoselected CD34 + cells in the setting of haploidentical stem cell transplantation. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled in this study (22 AML; 5 ALL; 1 NHL). All received immunoselected Tregs (CliniMACS, Miltenyi Biotec) followed by positively immunoselected CD34 + cells together with Tcons 4 days later. No GvHD prophylaxis was administered. 26/28 patients engrafted. No acute GvHD developed in 24/26 patients; 2 developed ≥ grade II acute GvHD. No patient has developed chronic GvHD. CD4 and CD8 counts rapidly increased after transplant. Episodes of CMV reactivation were significantly fewer than in controls. In the setting of haploidentical transplantation infusion of Tregs makes administration of a high dose of T cells feasible. This strategy provides a long-term protection from GvHD and robust immune reconstitution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Donor Specific Anti-HLA Antibody and Risk of Graft Failure in Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation

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    Piyanuch Kongtim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT using HLA-half matched related donors (haploidentical have recently improved due to better control of alloreactive reactions in both graft-versus-host and host-versus-graft directions. The recognition of the role of humoral rejection in the development of primary graft failure in this setting has broadened our understanding about causes of engraftment failure in these patients, helped us better select donors for patients in need of AHSCT, and developed rational therapeutic measures for HLA sensitized patients to prevent this unfortunate event, which is usually associated with a very high mortality rate. With these recent advances the rate of graft failure in haploidentical transplantation has decreased to less than 5%.

  16. [The outcome of thirteen patients with nonmalignant hematologic diseases treated with HLA haploidentical stem cell transplantation].

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    Tao, Yuan; Wu, Bingyi; Du, Qingfeng; Sun, Can; Lin, Xia; Huang, Yuxian; Tu, Sanfang; Song, Chaoyang; Lu, Zhigang; Chen, Tuzhen; Sun, Caixia

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haploidentical stem cell transplantation in nonmalignant hematologic diseases. To analyze the outcome of 13 patients with nonmalignant hematologic diseases who underwent HLA haploidentical stem cell transplantation from September 2001 to October 2013. Thirteen patients including 9 of severe aplastic anemia, 3 of severe β thalassemia, 1 of congenital pure red cell aplastic anemia underwent HLA haploidentical stem cell transplantation. Three HLA loci mismatched in 4 cases, two HLA loci mismatched in 8 cases and one HLA locus mismatched in 1 case. The conditioning regime consisted of Fludarabine (30 mg×m(-2)×d(-1)×5 d ), Busulfan(0.8 mg×kg(-1)×6h(-1)×4 d), Cyclophosphamide (60 mg×kg(-1)×d(-1)×2 d ), rabbit anti-human lymphocyte globulin ( 2.5 mg×kg(-1)×d(-1)×5 d ). To prevent from graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), cyclosporin A and short term methotrexate (MTX) were used. All patients were successfully engrafted. The incidence of grade 1-2 acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) was 3/13, and that of grade 3-4 was 1/13. The cumulative incidence of total chronic GVHD (cGVHD) was 3/13. Eleven patients survived free of disease at a median follow-up period of 13 months (2-145). HLA haploidentical stem cell transplantation is an effective and safe therapy for nonmalignant hematologic diseases.

  17. Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Expanding the Horizon for Hematologic Disorders

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    Mohammad Faizan Zahid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advent of targeted therapies and novel agents, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only curative modality in the management of hematologic disorders. The necessity to find an HLA-matched related donor is a major obstacle that compromises the widespread application and development of this field. Matched unrelated donors and umbilical cord blood have emerged as alternative sources of donor stem cells; however, the cost of maintaining donor registries and cord blood banks is very high and even impractical in developing countries. Almost every patient has an HLA haploidentical relative in the family, meaning that haploidentical donors are potential sources of stem cells, especially in situations where cord blood or matched unrelated donors are not easily available. Due to the high rates of graft failure and graft-versus-host disease, haploidentical transplant was not considered a feasible option up until the late 20th century, when strategies such as “megadose stem cell infusions” and posttransplantation immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide showed the ability to overcome the HLA disparity barrier and significantly improve the rates of engraftment and reduce the incidence and severity of graft-versus-host disease. Newer technologies of graft manipulation have also yielded the same effects in addition to preserving the antileukemic cells in the donor graft.

  18. Successful haploidentical stem cell transplantation with prophylactic administration of liposomal amphotericin B after invasive pulmonary zygomycosis

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    Testuro Ochi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A 54-year-old woman with acute myeloid leukemia (AML achieved complete remission by induction chemotherapy, but developed zygomycosis after consolidation therapy. As zygomycosis could not be cured by liposomal amphotericin B and micafungin, left lower lobectomy was performed. As AML relapsed 7 months after onset, she received haploidentical stem cell transplantation under administration of liposomal amphotericin B. Despite experiencing severe acute graft-versus-host disease, she remains alive with no relapse of either zygomycosis or AML. Keywords: Zygomycosis, Acute myeloid leukemia, Liposomal amphotericin B, Stem cell transplantation

  19. Tregs prevent GVHD and promote immune reconstitution in HLA-haploidentical transplantation.

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    Di Ianni, Mauro; Falzetti, Franca; Carotti, Alessandra; Terenzi, Adelmo; Castellino, Flora; Bonifacio, Elisabetta; Del Papa, Beatrice; Zei, Tiziana; Ostini, Roberta Iacucci; Cecchini, Debora; Aloisi, Teresa; Perruccio, Katia; Ruggeri, Loredana; Balucani, Chiara; Pierini, Antonio; Sportoletti, Paolo; Aristei, Cynthia; Falini, Brunangelo; Reisner, Yair; Velardi, Andrea; Aversa, Franco; Martelli, Massimo F

    2011-04-07

    Hastening posttransplantation immune reconstitution is a key challenge in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). In experimental models of mismatched HSCT, T-regulatory cells (Tregs) when co-infused with conventional T cells (Tcons) favored posttransplantation immune reconstitution and prevented lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In the present study, we evaluated the impact of early infusion of Tregs, followed by Tcons, on GVHD prevention and immunologic reconstitution in 28 patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies who underwent HLA-haploidentical HSCT. We show for the first time in humans that adoptive transfer of Tregs prevented GVHD in the absence of any posttransplantation immunosuppression, promoted lymphoid reconstitution, improved immunity to opportunistic pathogens, and did not weaken the graft-versus-leukemia effect. This study provides evidence that Tregs are a conserved mechanism in humans.

  20. A comparison between allogeneic stem cell transplantation from unmanipulated haploidentical and unrelated donors in acute leukemia

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    Simona Piemontese

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the absence of a HLA-matched related or matched unrelated donor, allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT from mismatched unrelated donors or haploidentical donors are potential alternatives for patients with acute leukemia with an indication to allo-SCT. The objective of this study was to compare the outcome of allo-SCT from T cell-replete haploidentical (Haplo versus matched (MUD 10/10 or mismatched unrelated donor at a single HLA-locus (MMUD 9/10 for patients with acute leukemia in remission. Methods Two hundred sixty-five adult patients with de novo acute leukemia in first or second remission that received a Haplo-SCT between January 2007 and December 2013 were compared with 2490 patients receiving a MUD 10/10 and 813 receiving a MMUD 9/10. Propensity score weighted analysis was conducted in order to control for disease risk imbalances between the groups. Results The weighted 3-year non-relapse mortality and relapse incidence were 29 and 30% for Haplo, 21 and 29% for MUD 10/10, and 29 and 25% for MMUD 9/10, respectively. The weighted 3-year leukemia-free survival (LFS and overall survival (OS were 41 and 46% for Haplo, 50 and 56% for MUD 10/10, and 46 and 48% for MMUD 9/10, respectively. Using weighted Cox model, both LFS and OS were significantly higher in transplants from MUD 10/10 compared from those in Haplo but not different between transplants from MMUD 9/10 and Haplo. The type of donor was not significantly associated with neither acute nor chronic graft-versus-host disease. Conclusions Patients with acute leukemia in remission have better outcomes if transplanted from a MUD 10/10. We did not find any significant difference in outcome between transplants from MMUD 9/10 and Haplo, suggesting that both can be equally used in the absence of a 10/10 MUD. Key point 1 Better outcomes using fully (10/10 matched unrelated donor for allo-SCT in acute leukemia in remission. Key point 2 Similar outcomes after allo

  1. Reduced toxicity, myeloablative HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide for sickle cell disease.

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    Wiebking, Volker; Hütker, Sebastian; Schmid, Irene; Immler, Stefanie; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Albert, Michael H

    2017-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers the possibility of cure for sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Unfortunately, the probability of finding an HLA-matched donor for SCD patients is low. HSCT from HLA-haploidentical donors using reduced intensity conditioning, unmanipulated bone marrow and post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (ptCy) has resulted in negligible toxicity but high rates of graft rejection. We hypothesized that combining ptCy with a myeloablative reduced toxicity conditioning including serotherapy to increase immune ablation would allow for better engraftment. In a pilot approach, we treated three patients with SCD (5, 8, and 20 years old) lacking a matched donor. All patients had severe disease-related complications despite standard treatment. They received unmanipulated bone marrow from parental HLA-haploidentical donors. Conditioning consisted of alemtuzumab 0.2 mg/kg/day on days -9 and -8, fludarabine 30 mg/m 2 /day on days -7 to -3, treosulfan 14 g/m 2 /day on days -7 to -5, thiotepa 2 × 5 mg/kg/day on day -4, and cyclophosphamide 14.5 mg/kg/day on days -3 and -2. GVHD prophylaxis was performed using cyclophosphamide 2 × 50 mg/kg on days +3 and +4 and mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus from day +5. After a follow-up of 11, 14, and 30 months, all three patients are alive and well, off immunosuppression, and without symptoms of SCD. One patient experienced mild skin GVHD grade I, none showed chronic GVHD. Asymptomatic CMV reactivation was seen in two patients. HLA-haploidentical HSCT can extend the donor pool for patients with SCD. Whether intensification of the conditioning regimen and intensive immunosuppression leads to improvement in engraftment rates while still allowing a favorable toxicity profile deserves further investigation.

  2. Similar transplantation outcomes for acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome patients with haploidentical versus 10/10 human leukocyte antigen-matched unrelated and related donors.

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    Di Stasi, Antonio; Milton, Denái R; Poon, L M; Hamdi, Amir; Rondon, Gabriela; Chen, Julianne; Pingali, Sai R; Konopleva, Marina; Kongtim, Piyanuch; Alousi, Amin; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H; Ahmed, Sairah; Bashir, Qaiser; Al-atrash, Gheath; Oran, Betul; Hosing, Chitra M; Kebriaei, Partow; Popat, Uday; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Lee, Dean A; de Lima, Marcos; Rezvani, Katayoun; Khouri, Issa F; Champlin, Richard E; Ciurea, Stefan O

    2014-12-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) has been performed primarily with an HLA-matched donor. Outcomes of haploidentical transplantation have recently improved, and a comparison between donor sources in a uniform cohort of patients has not been performed. We evaluated outcomes of 227 patients with AML/MDS treated with melphalan-based conditioning. Donors were matched related (MRD) (n = 87, 38%), matched unrelated (MUD) (n = 108, 48%), or haploidentical (n = 32, 14%). No significant differences were found between haploidentical and MUD transplantation outcomes; however, there was a trend for improved outcomes in the MRD group, with 3-year progression-free survival for patients in remission of 57%, 45%, and 41% for MRD, MUD, and haploidentical recipients, respectively (P = .417). Recovery of T cell subsets was similar for all groups. These results suggest that haploidentical donors can safely extend transplantation for AML/MDS patients without an HLA-matched donor. Prospective studies comparing haploidentical and MUD transplantation are warranted. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. How do we choose the best donor for T-cell-replete, HLA-haploidentical transplantation?

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    Ying-Jun Chang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In haploidentical stem cell transplantations (haplo-SCT, nearly all patients have more than one donor. A key issue in the haplo-SCT setting is the search for the best donor, because donor selection can significantly impact the incidences of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease, transplant-related mortality, and relapse, in addition to overall survival. In this review, we focused on factors associated with transplant outcomes following unmanipulated haplo-SCT with anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG or after T-cell-replete haplo-SCT with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT/Cy. We summarized the effects of the primary factors, including donor-specific antibodies against human leukocyte antigens (HLA; donor age and gender; killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-ligand mismatches; and non-inherited maternal antigen mismatches. We also offered some expert recommendations and proposed an algorithm for selecting donors for unmanipulated haplo-SCT with ATG and for T-cell-replete haplo-SCT with PT/Cy.

  4. [The role of different KIR haplotypes in haplo-identical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

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    Bao, Xiaojing; He, Jun; Wang, Miao; Yuan, Xiaoni; Li, Yang; Zhang, Tengteng; Li, Lingjie; Chen, Luyao; Wu, Depei

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of different immunoglobulin- like receptor (KIR)haplotypes in haplo- identical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Killer cell KIR genotyping was performed on 468 individuals from 156 unrelated families by PCR-SSP. A total of 624 KIR haplotypes from the parents were used for haplotype analysis. Ninety-two patients received haplo-identical HSCT from one of the parents. The family study showed segregation of one A haplotype and at least 20 unique B haplotypes. The frequency of haplotype A was 72.92% (455/624). The most commonly observed haplotypes in group B were B1, B2, and B3, present at a frequency of 10.26%, 5.77%, and 4.48%, respectively. Compared to KIR gene matched donors (n=17), grafts from KIR gene mismatched donors (n= 14) had a positive effect on survival after haplo- identical HSCT for AML/MDS patients (OS: 88.2%vs 42.9%,P=0.015; RFS: 88.2%vs 35.7%,P=0.007). No effect was observed for ALL/NHL patients (OS: 76.0%vs 75.0%,P=0.727; RFS: 68.0%vs 65.0%,P=0.866). A significantly lower survival rate was observed for transplants from AA (n=52) and AB1/AB2 donors (n=15), compared to other group Bx donors (n=25) (OS: 53.3%vs 96.0%,P=0.017; RFS: 53.3%vs 92.0%,P=0.019). Meanwhile, the risk of relapse was much higher in AA group (n=52) compared to Bx group (n=40) (25.0%vs 5.0%,P=0.009). A higher risk of TRM was observed in AB1/AB2 group (P=0.012). In addition, transplant from donors carried Cen-B was associated with an increased survival compared with Cen-A homozygous donors (OS: 94.7%vs 68.5%,P=0.036; RFS: 89.5%vs 64.4%,P=0.045). Overall, KIR genotyping and haplotype analyses should be useful for selection of the most optimal donors with favorable KIR gene grafts. KIR gene mismatch donors should be preferred for AML/MDS patients. Selecting donors carried Cen- B and avoiding the selection of donors of KIR genotype AA/AB1/AB2 was strongly advisable for haplo-identical HSCT.

  5. Reduced intensity conditioning, combined transplantation of haploidentical hematopoietic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells in patients with severe aplastic anemia.

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    Xiao-Hong Li

    Full Text Available We examined if transplantation of combined haploidentical hematopoietic stem cells (HSC and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC affected graft failure and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD in patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA. Patients with SAA-I (N = 17 received haploidentical HSCT plus MSC infusion. Stem cell grafts used a combination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF-primed bone marrow and G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells of haploidentical donors and the culture-expanded third-party donor-derived umbilical cord MSCs (UC-MSCs, respectively. Reduced intensity conditioning consisted of fludarabine (30 mg/m2·d+cyclosphamide (500 mg/m2·d+anti-human thymocyte IgG. Transplant recipients also received cyclosporin A, mycophenolatemofetil, and CD25 monoclonal antibody. A total of 16 patients achieved hematopoietic reconstitution. The median mononuclear cell and CD34 count was 9.3×10(8/kg and 4.5×10(6/kg. Median time to ANC was >0.5×10(9/L and PLT count >20×10(9/L were 12 and 14 days, respectively. Grade III-IV acute GVHD was seen in 23.5% of the cases, while moderate and severe chronic GVHD were seen in 14.2% of the cases. The 3-month and 6-month survival rates for all patients were 88.2% and 76.5%, respectively; mean survival time was 56.5 months. Combined transplantation of haploidentical HSCs and MSCs on SAA without an HLA-identical sibling donor was safe, effectively reduced the incidence of severe GVHD, and improved patient survival.

  6. Myeloablative Conditioning with PBSC Grafts for T Cell-Replete Haploidentical Donor Transplantation Using Posttransplant Cyclophosphamide

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    Scott R. Solomon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Relapse is the main cause of treatment failure after nonmyeloablative haploidentical transplant (haplo-HSCT. In an attempt to reduce relapse, we have developed a myeloablative (MA haplo-HSCT approach utilizing posttransplant cyclophosphamide (PT/Cy and peripheral blood stem cells as the stem cell source. We summarize the results of two consecutive clinical trials, using a busulfan-based (n=20 and a TBI-based MA preparative regimen (n=30, and analyze a larger cohort of 64 patients receiving MA haplo-HSCT. All patients have engrafted with full donor chimerism and no late graft failures. Grade III-IV acute GVHD and moderate-severe chronic GVHD occurred in 23% and 30%, respectively. One-year NRM was 10%. Predicted three-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and relapse were 53%, 53%, and 26%, respectively, in all patients and 79%, 74%, and 9%, respectively, in patients with a low/intermediate disease risk index (DRI. In multivariate analysis, DRI was the most significant predictor of survival and relapse. Use of TBI (versus busulfan had no significant impact on survival but was associated with significantly less BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis. We contrast our results with other published reports of MA haplo-HSCT PT/Cy in the literature and attempt to define the comparative utility of MA haplo-HSCT to other methods of transplantation.

  7. A Two-Step Haploidentical Versus a Two-Step Matched Related Allogeneic Myeloablative Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation.

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    Gaballa, Sameh; Palmisiano, Neil; Alpdogan, Onder; Carabasi, Matthew; Filicko-O'Hara, Joanne; Kasner, Margaret; Kraft, Walter K; Leiby, Benjamin; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo; O'Hara, William; Pro, Barbara; Rudolph, Shannon; Sharma, Manish; Wagner, John L; Weiss, Mark; Flomenberg, Neal; Grosso, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Haploidentical stem cell transplantation (SCT) offers a transplantation option to patients who lack an HLA-matched donor. We developed a 2-step approach to myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients with haploidentical or matched related (MR) donors. In this approach, the lymphoid and myeloid portions of the graft are administered in 2 separate steps to allow fixed T cell dosing. Cyclophosphamide is used for T cell tolerization. Given a uniform conditioning regimen, graft T cell dose, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis strategy, we compared immune reconstitution and clinical outcomes in patients undergoing 2-step haploidentical versus 2-step MR SCT. We retrospectively compared data on patients undergoing a 2-step haploidentical (n = 50) or MR (n = 27) peripheral blood SCT for high-risk hematological malignancies and aplastic anemia. Both groups received myeloablative total body irradiation conditioning. Immune reconstitution data included flow cytometric assessment of T cell subsets at day 28 and 90 after SCT. Both groups showed comparable early immune recovery in all assessed T cell subsets except for the median CD3/CD8 cell count, which was higher in the MR group at day 28 compared with that in the haploidentical group. The 3-year probability of overall survival was 70% in the haploidentical group and 71% in the MR group (P = .81), while the 3-year progression-free survival was 68% in the haploidentical group and 70% in the MR group (P = .97). The 3-year cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality was 10% in the haploidentical group and 4% in the MR group (P = .34). The 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 21% in the haploidentical group and 27% in the MR group (P = .93). The 100-day cumulative incidence of overall grades II to IV acute GVHD was higher in the haploidentical group compared with that in the MR group (40% versus 8%, P step haploidentical and MR SCT recipients. Copyright © 2016 American Society

  8. Combination of a Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplant With Umbilical Cord Blood for Cerebral X-Linked Adrenoleukodystrophy.

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    Jiang, Hua; Jiang, Min-Yan; Liu, Sha; Cai, Yan-Na; Liang, Cui-Li; Liu, Li

    2015-08-01

    Childhood cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects central nervous system myelin and the adrenal cortex. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the best available curative therapy if performed during the early stages of disease. Only 30% of patients who might benefit from a hematopoietic stem cell transplant will have a full human leukocyte antigen-matched donor, which is considered to be the best choice. We present a 5-year-old boy with cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy whose brain magnetic resonance imaging severity score was 7 and who needed an immediate transplantation without an available full human leukocyte antigen-matched donor. We combined haploidentical and umbilical cord blood sources for transplantation and saw encouraging results. After transplantation, the patient showed neurological stability for 6 months and the level of very long chain fatty acids had decreased. By 1 year, the patient appeared to gradually develop cognition, motor, and visual disturbances resulting from possible mix chimerism. Transplantation of haploidentical stem cells combined with the infusion of umbilical cord blood is a novel approach for treating cerebral X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy. It is critical to monitor posttransplant chimerism and carry out antirejection therapy timely for a beneficial clinical outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. BKV-specific T cells in the treatment of severe refractory haemorrhagic cystitis after HLA-haploidentical haematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pello, Oscar M; Innes, Andrew J; Bradshaw, Anne; Finn, Sally-Anne; Uddin, Shab; Bray, Emma; Olavarria, Eduardo; Apperley, Jane F; Pavlů, Jiří

    2017-06-01

    Haemorrhagic cystitis caused by BK virus (BKV) is a known complication of allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and is relatively common following HLA-haploidentical transplantation. Adoptive immunotransfer of virus-specific T cells from the donor is a promising therapeutic approach, although production of these cells is challenging, particularly when dealing with low-frequency T cells such as BKV-specific T cells. Here, we present a patient who, following haploidentical HCT, developed severe BKV haemorrhagic cystitis, resistant to standard therapy. He responded well to adoptive transfer of donor cells enriched in BKV-specific T cells using the new second-generation CliniMACS Prodigy and the Cytokine Capture System from Miltenyi Biotec. Treatment led to full resolution of both the symptoms and viraemia without unwanted complications. Our observations suggest that use of products enriched with BKV-specific T cells generated using this system is safe and efficient in HLA-haploidentical HCT where BKV cystitis can be a serious complication. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation without total body irradiation for pediatric acute leukemia: a single-center experience

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    Mu YS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yanshun Mu,* Maoquan Qin,* Bin Wang, Sidan Li, Guanghua Zhu, Xuan Zhou, Jun Yang, Kai Wang, Wei Lin, Huyong Zheng Beijing Key Laboratory of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, National Key Discipline of Pediatrics, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Major Diseases in Children, Ministry of Education, Hematology Oncology Center, Beijing Children’s Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is a promising method for therapy of pediatric patients with acute leukemia. However, less availability of matched donors limited its wide application. Recently, haploidentical HSCT has become a great resource. Here, we have retrospectively reported our experience of 20 pediatric patients with acute leukemia who underwent haploidentical HSCT without total body irradiation (TBI myeloablative regimen in our center from November 2007 to June 2014. All the patients attained successful HSCT engraftment in terms of myeloid and platelet recovery. Thirteen patients developed grade I–IV acute graft-versus-host disease (a-GVHD. The incidence of grade I–II a-GVHD, grade III–IV a-GVHD, and chronic GVHD (c-GVHD was 45%, 20%, and 25%, respectively. The mean myeloid and platelet recovery time was 13.20±2.41 and 19.10±8.37 days. The median follow-up time was 43.95±29.26 months. During the follow-up, three patients died. The overall survival (OS rate was 85%. The present study indicated that haploidentical HSCT without TBI myeloablative regimen significantly improved the OS rate of pediatric patients with acute leukemia. Keywords: haploidentical, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, myeloablative regimen, total body irradiation, acute leukemia, pediatric

  11. Comparable Outcomes for Hematologic Malignancies after HLA-Haploidentical Transplantation with Posttransplantation Cyclophosphamide and HLA-Matched Transplantation

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    Shannon R. McCurdy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of high-dose posttransplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy has made HLA-haploidentical (haplo blood or marrow transplantation (BMT a cost effective and safe alternative donor transplantation technique, resulting in its increasing utilization over the last decade. We review the available retrospective comparisons of haplo BMT with PTCy and HLA-matched BMT in adults with hematologic malignancies. The examined studies demonstrate no difference between haplo BMT with PTCy and HLA-matched BMT with regard to acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD, nonrelapse mortality, and overall survival. Chronic GVHD occurred less frequently after haplo BMT with PTCy compared with HLA-matched BMT utilizing standard GVHD prophylaxis. In addition, patients with a high risk of relapse by the disease risk index had a suggestion of improved progression-free and overall survival after haplo BMT with PTCy when compared with a historical cohort of HLA-matched BMT in one analysis. Furthermore, in Hodgkin lymphoma relapse and progression-free survival were improved in the haplo BMT with PTCy compared with the HLA-matched BMT cohort. These findings support the use of this transplantation platform when HLA-matched related donors (MRDs are unavailable and suggest that clinical scenarios exist in which haplo BMT may be preferred to HLA-matched BMT, which warrant further investigation.

  12. Parental haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for hematologic diseases: a report of 45 cases

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    Xi-xi XIANG

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective  The present report describes the clinical effects of parental haploidentical hematopoietic stem celltransplantation (hi-allo-HSCT in the treatment of hematologic diseases. Methods  A total of 45 patients received parental hiallo-HSCT from July 2007 to January 2011. The therapeutic effects and complications were observed. Results  Engraftment was successful in a total of 43 patients. Implantation failed in 2 patients. The incidence of the graft versus host disease (GVHD was 62.2%. The incidence of acute GVHD was 40.0%, and chronic GVHD occurred in 22.2% of the patients. The incidence of GVHD was lower when the father was the donor compared with the mother was the donor. The incidence of GVHD was related to the age of the donor and the number of HLA matching sites. In addition, infections observed in the present study were mainly blood-borne with cytomegalovirus as the invader and lung infections. During the follow-up period of 6 months to 4 years, six patients died in the 43 patients with successful implantation. The major cause of death was infection and a relapse of their original disease. The disease free survival (DFS rate was 86.7%. Seven patients additionally received umbilical cord blood, their efficacy in the transplantation seemed better than those who received parental stem cells only, as hematopoietic reconstruction was faster and the incidence of GVHD accounted for only 7.14% of the total incidence rate. Conclusions  Parental hi-allo-HSCT is an effective treatment for hematologic diseases. A young male donor with more HLA matching sites is recommended to prevent GVHD and infection. The combination of parental hi-allo-HSCT and umbilical cord blood transplantation could result in positive effects with faster hematopoietic reconstruction and a lower incidence of GVHD.

  13. Innovative Platforms for Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation: The Role of Unmanipulated Donor Graft

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    Fabio Ciceri, Marco Bregni, Jacopo Peccatori

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We exploited the dual positive effects of rapamycin to prevent GvHD and control malignant cells upon infusion of unmanipulated grafts from family haploidentical donors to patients affected by advanced hematological malignancies. Preliminary results on 45 patients show the feasibility of this platform with an appreciable low rate of GvHD.

  14. Impact of ABO incompatibility on patients' outcome after haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia - a report from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaani, Jonathan; Savani, Bipin N; Labopin, Myriam; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Ciceri, Fabio; Arcese, William; Tischer, Johanna; Koc, Yener; Bruno, Benedetto; Gülbas, Zafer; Blaise, Didier; Maertens, Johan; Ehninger, Gerhard; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-06-01

    A significant proportion of hematopoietic stem cell transplants are performed with ABO-mismatched donors. The impact of ABO mismatch on outcome following transplantation remains controversial and there are no published data regarding the impact of ABO mismatch in acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving haploidentical transplants. Using the European Blood and Marrow Transplant Acute Leukemia Working Group registry we identified 837 patients who underwent haploidentical transplantation. Comparative analysis was performed between patients who received ABO-matched versus ABO-mismatched haploidentical transplants for common clinical outcome variables. Our cohort consisted of 522 ABO-matched patients and 315 ABO-mismatched patients including 150 with minor, 127 with major, and 38 with bi-directional ABO mismatching. There were no significant differences between ABO matched and mismatched patients in terms of baseline disease and clinical characteristics. Major ABO mismatching was associated with inferior day 100 engraftment rate whereas multivariate analysis showed that bi-directional mismatching was associated with increased risk of grade II-IV acute graft- versus -host disease [hazard ratio (HR) 2.387; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22-4.66; P =0.01). Non-relapse mortality, relapse incidence, leukemia-free survival, overall survival, and chronic graft- versus -host disease rates were comparable between ABO-matched and -mismatched patients. Focused analysis on stem cell source showed that patients with minor mismatching transplanted with bone marrow grafts experienced increased grade II-IV acute graft- versus -host disease rates (HR 2.03; 95% CI: 1.00-4.10; P =0.04). Patients with major ABO mismatching and bone marrow grafts had decreased survival (HR=1.82; CI 95%: 1.048 - 3.18; P =0.033). In conclusion, ABO incompatibility has a marginal but significant clinical effect in acute myeloid leukemia patients undergoing haploidentical transplantation. Copyright© Ferrata

  15. Haploidentical bone marrow transplants for haematological malignancies using non-myeloablative conditioning therapy and post-transplant immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide: results from a single Australian centre.

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    Bilmon, I A; Kwan, J; Gottlieb, D; Kerridge, I; McGurgan, M; Huang, G; George, B; Hertzberg, M; Bradstock, K F

    2013-02-01

    To demonstrate safety and efficacy of haploidentical bone marrow transplantation with non-myeloablative conditioning and high-dose post-transplant cyclophosphamide in adult patients with leukaemia or lymphoma. Human leukocyte antigen haploidentical bone marrow transplantation is a treatment option in patients with haematological malignancies who have no available human leukocyte antigen-matched donor but is limited by conditioning regimen toxicity, graft failure, relapse and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Twelve patients, median age of 51 years, underwent transplantation with T cell replete bone marrow from a haplotype-matched relative. The conditioning regimen consisted of cyclophosphamide, fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation. Post-transplant immunosuppression consisted of a single dose of cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg on day 3, followed by oral tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. Outcomes reported are overall survival, engraftment and chimerism, toxicity, and clinical outcome. All patients had neutrophil recovery (median 14.5 days), and 11 of 12 had platelet engraftment (median 17 days). Two patients had autologous reconstitution. Seven of nine assessable patients had complete donor chimerism. Four patients had grades II-III GvHD, and none had grade IV GvHD. Four patients developed limited stage chronic GvHD. Five patients with acute myeloid leukaemia relapsed. Two patients died of nonrelapse causes, both from other malignancies, and five patients remain alive and relapse free. Median overall survival was 324 days (range 88-1163). This regimen is feasible and well tolerated in older patients with high-risk leukaemia or lymphoma, with minimal short-term toxicity and low rates of GvHD. The proportion of disease-free survivors indicates a graft-versus-malignancy effect is present in survivors. © 2012 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  16. Comparison of Outcomes of HLA-Matched Related, Unrelated, or HLA-Haploidentical Related Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation following Nonmyeloablative Conditioning for Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroughs, Lauri M.; O’Donnell, Paul V.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storer, Barry E.; Luznik, Leo; Symons, Heather J.; Jones, Richard J.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Maris, Michael B.; Blume, Karl G.; Niederwieser, Dietger W.; Bruno, Benedetto; Maziarz, Richard T.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Petersen, Finn B.; Storb, Rainer; Fuchs, Ephraim J.; Maloney, David G.

    2008-01-01

    We compared the outcome of nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) based on donor cell source. Ninety patients with HL were treated with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by HCT from HLA-matched related, n = 38, unrelated, n = 24, or HLA-haploidentical related, n = 28 donors. Patients were heavily pretreated with a median of 5 regimens and most patients had failed autologous HCT (92%) and local radiation therapy (83%). With a median follow-up of 25 months, 2-year overall survivals, progression-free survivals (OS)/(PFS), and incidences of relapsed/progressive disease were 53%, 23%, and 56% (HLA-matched related), 58%, 29%, and 63% (unrelated), and 58%, 51%, and 40% (HLA-haploidentical related), respectively. Nonrelapse mortality (NRM) was significantly lower for HLA-haploidentical related (P =.02) recipients compared to HLA-matched related recipients. There were also significantly decreased risks of relapse for HLA-haploidentical related recipients compared to HLA-matched related (P = .01) and unrelated (P = .03) recipients. The incidences of acute grades III–IV and extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD, cGVHD) were 16%/50% (HLA-matched related), 8%/63% (unrelated), and 11%/35% (HLA-haploidentical related). These data suggested that salvage allogeneic HCTusing nonmyeloablative conditioning provided antitumor activity in patients with advanced HL; however, disease relapse/progression continued to be major problems. Importantly, alternative donor stem cell sources are a viable option. PMID:18940683

  17. Autoimmune hematological diseases following haploidentical donor hematopoietic stem cell transplant compared with matched sibling and unrelated donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Weiran; Fan, Zhiping; Huang, Fen; Xu, Na; Xuan, Li; Yu, Guopan; Jiang, Qianli; Zhou, Hongsheng; Lin, Ren; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Jing; Liu, Qifa

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune hematological diseases (AHDs) occur more frequently than other autoimmune complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) and are often refractory to treatment. This study was to analyze the incidence and risk factors of AHDs as well as their response to treatment. Four hundred and forty-five adult malignant hematopoietic disorders underwent allo-HSCT were enrolled in this retrospective study, including 124 haploidentical donor (HRD), 140 unrelated donor (MUD) and 181 HLA-matched sibling donor (MSD) transplants. Twelve patients developed AHDs, including 6 autoimmune hemolytic anemia and 6 Evans syndrome. Evans syndrome all occurred in HRD transplants. The 3-year cumulative incidence of AHDs was 4.0 ± 1.3%, and HRD had higher incidence than MUD (8.7 ± 3.0% vs 1.8 ± 1.2%, P = 0.012) and MSD (8.7 ± 3.0% vs 3.5 ± 2.6%, P = 0.004 ). The steroids combined with Cyclosporine A were acted as the first line treatment, and the response rate was 73%. No patients experienced recurrence at a median follow up of 313 days after stopping treatment. HRD transplants (vs MUD: HR, 5.87; CI, 1.24 to 27.73; p = 0.026 and vs MSD: HR, 7.70; CI, 1.63 to 36.44; P = 0.010) and concurrent chronic graft versus host disease (HR, 3.76; CI, 1.18 to 11.92; P = 0.025) were risk factors for AHDs. PMID:28460445

  18. Autoimmune hematological diseases following haploidentical donor hematopoietic stem cell Transplant compared with matched sibling and unrelated donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Weiran; Fan, Zhiping; Huang, Fen; Xu, Na; Xuan, Li; GuopanYu; Jiang, Qianli; Zhou, Hongsheng; Lin, Ren; Zhang, Xin; Sun, Jing; Liu, Qifa

    2017-04-18

    Autoimmune hematological diseases (AHDs) occur more frequently than other autoimmune complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) and are often refractory to treatment. This study was to analyze the incidence and risk factors of AHDs as well as their response to treatment . Four hundred and forty-five adult malignant hematopoietic disorders underwent allo-HSCT were enrolled in this retrospective study, including 124 haploidentical donor (HRD), 140 unrelated donor (MUD) and 181 HLA-matched sibling donor (MSD) transplants. Twelve patients developed AHDs, including 6 autoimmune hemolytic anemia and 6 Evans syndrome. Evans syndrome all occurred in HRD transplants. The 3-year cumulative incidence of AHDs was 4.0 ± 1.3%, and HRD had higher incidence than MUD (8.7 ± 3.0% vs 1.8 ± 1.2%, P = 0.012) and MSD (8.7 ± 3.0% vs 3.5 ± 2.6%, P = 0.004 ). The steroids combined with Cyclosporine A were acted as the first line treatment, and the response rate was 73%. No patients experienced recurrence at a median follow up of 313 days after stopping treatment. HRD transplants (vs MUD: HR, 5.87; CI, 1.24 to 27.73; p = 0.026 and vs MSD: HR, 7.70; CI, 1.63 to 36.44; P = 0.010) and concurrent chronic graft versus host disease (HR, 3.76; CI, 1.18 to 11.92; P = 0.025) were risk factors for AHDs.

  19. Recipient-donor KIR ligand matching prevents CMV reactivation post-haploidentical T cell-replete transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiang-Yu; Luo, Xue-Yi; Yu, Xing-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Han, Ting-Ting; Chang, Ying-Jun; Huo, Ming-Rui; Xu, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Kai-Yan; Li, Dan; Jiang, Zheng-Fan; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2017-06-01

    Licensed natural killer (NK) cells have been demonstrated to have anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) activity. We prospectively analysed the human leucocyte antigen typing of donor-recipient pairs and the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) typing of donors for 180 leukaemia patients to assess the predictive roles of licensed NK cells on CMV reactivation post-T-cell-replete haploidentical stem cell transplantation. Multivariate analysis showed that donor-recipient KIR ligand graft-versus-host or host-versus-graft direction mismatch was associated with increased refractory CMV infection (Hazard ratio = 2·556, 95% confidence interval, 1·377-4·744, P = 0·003) post-transplantation. Donor-recipient KIR ligand matching decreased CMV reactivation [51·65% (46·67, 56·62%) vs. 75·28% (70·87, 79·69%), P = 0·012], refractory CMV infection [17·58% (13·77, 21·40%) vs. 35·96% (31·09, 40·82%), P = 0·004] and CMV disease [3·30% (1·51, 5·08%) vs. 11·24% (8·04, 14·43%), P = 0·024] by day 100 post-transplantation. In addition, the percentage of γ-interferon expression on donor-derived NK cells was significantly higher in the recipients among the recipient-donor pairs with a KIR ligand match compared with that in the recipients among the pairs with a KIR ligand graft-versus-host or host-versus-graft direction mismatch on days 30 and 100 post-transplantation (P = 0·036 and 0·047, respectively). These findings have suggested that donor-recipient KIR ligand matching might promote the NK cell licensing process, thereby increasing NK cell-mediated protection against CMV reactivation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Haploidentical Transplantation Without In Vitro T-Cell Depletion Results in Outcomes Equivalent to Those of Contemporaneous Matched Sibling and Unrelated Donor Transplantation for Acute Leukemia

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    Yu, Sijian; Fan, Qian; Sun, Jing; Fan, Zhiping; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Qianli; Huang, Fen; Xuan, Li; Dai, Min; Zhou, Hongsheng; Liu, Hui; Liu, Qi-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to determine whether HLA-haploidentical-related donor (HRD) transplant can achieve equivalent outcomes and have stronger GVL compared to HLA-matched sibling donor (MSD) and HLA-matched unrelated donor (MUD) transplants. A total of 355 consecutive patients with acute leukemia undergoing allogeneic transplant at our single institute between March 2008 and March 2014 were enrolled in this retrospective investigation. Of the 355 patients, 96 cases received HRD, 153 MSD, and 106 MUD transplants. HRD transplant was associated with higher incidences of grade II to IV aGVHD (40.6%) compared with MSD (23.5%, P = 0.002) and MUD transplants (34.0%, P = 0.049), whereas incidences of grade III to IV aGVHD (11.4%, 7.8%, 10.5%, respectively; P = 0.590) and cGVHD (29.5%, 24.0%, 29.5%, respectively; P = 0.538) did not differ among 3 groups. Five-year relapse rates were 19.2%, 26.8%, and 23.0% in 3 groups, respectively (P = 0.419). However, of 206 high-risk patients, the relapse rate in HRD transplant was lower than in MSD transplant (23.8% vs 41.9%, P = 0.026). Multivariate analysis showed that HRD had beneficial impact on relapse (for MSD: P = 0.006). Five-year transplant-related mortality was lower in MSD transplant compared with those in HRD (17.3% vs 26.4%, P = 0.041) and MUD transplants (17.3% vs 24.1%, P = 0.037). Five-year overall survival were 60.4%, 64.6%, and 61.0%, respectively, in HRD, MSD, and MUD groups (P = 0.371); 5-year disease-free survival were 59.6%, 58.8%, and 54.9%, respectively (P = 0.423). Our results suggest that HRD transplant results in outcomes equivalent to MSD and MUD transplants. HRD might carry a superior GVL effect compared to MSD for high-risk patients. PMID:26986108

  1. Ex vivo expansion of highly purified NK cells for immunotherapy after haploidentical stem cell transplantation in children.

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    Koehl, U; Esser, R; Zimmermann, S; Tonn, T; Kotchetkov, R; Bartling, T; Sörensen, J; Grüttner, H-P; Bader, P; Seifried, E; Martin, H; Lang, P; Passweg, J R; Klingebiel, T; Schwabe, D

    2005-01-01

    Allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells are known to show medium to high cytotoxic activity against HLA-nonidentical leukemia or tumor cells. For a possible benefit of post transplant treatment with NK cells after haploidentical stem cell transplantation (haplo-SCT) we developed a clinical scale procedure for NK cell processing observing Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). Allogeneic donor NK cells were selected from 15 unstimulated leukaphereses using two rounds of immunomagnetic T cell depletion, followed by an NK cell enrichment step. CD56 (+)CD3 (-) NK cells were stimulated and expanded in vitro according to GMP. Quality control of NK cell purity, residual T cells and cytotoxic activity was done by multi-coloured flow cytometric analyses. Purification led to an absolute number of 234-1 237 x 10 (6) CD56 (+)CD3 (-) NK cells from leukapheresis harvests with a median purity of 95 % and a 4 to 6(1/2) log depletion of T cells. After two weeks stimulation with IL-2 a five-fold expansion of NK cells with a T cell contamination below 0.1 % was reached. Median cell viability was 95 % after purification and 99 % after expansion. The IL-2 stimulated NK cells showed a highly increased lytic activity against the MHC-I deficient K562 cells compared to freshly isolated NK cells and a medium cytotoxicity against patients' leukemic cells. Clinical scale enrichment and activation of allogeneic donor NK cells is feasible. High dose NK cell application may be a new treatment option for pediatric patients with leukemia or solid tumors in case of minimal residual disease or unbalanced chimerism post haplo-SCT as we could show for the first three patients .

  2. Thymic function recovery after unrelated donor cord blood or T-cell depleted HLA-haploidentical stem cell transplantation correlates with leukemia relapse

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    Clave, Emmanuel; Lisini, Daniela; Douay, Corinne; Giorgiani, Giovanna; Busson, Marc; Zecca, Marco; Moretta, Francesca; Acquafredda, Gloria; Brescia, Letizia P.; Locatelli, Franco; Toubert, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    Use of alternative donors/sources of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), such as cord blood (CB) or HLA-haploidentical (Haplo)-related donors, is associated with a significant delay in immune reconstitution after transplantation. Long-term T-cell immune reconstitution largely relies on the generation of new T cells in the recipient thymus, which can be evaluated through signal joint (sj) and beta T-cell-Receptor Excision Circles (TREC) quantification. We studied two groups of 33 and 24 children receiving, respectively, HSC Transplantation (HSCT) from an HLA-haploidentical family donor or an unrelated CB donor, for both malignant (46) and non-malignant disorders (11). Relative and absolute sj and beta-TREC values indicated comparable thymic function reconstitution at 3 and 6 months after the allograft in both groups. Compared to children with non-malignant disorders, those with hematological malignancies had significantly lower pre-transplantation TREC counts. Patients who relapsed after HSCT had a significantly less efficient thymic function both before and 6 months after HSCT with especially low beta-TREC values, this finding suggesting an impact of early intra-thymic T-cell differentiation on the occurrence of leukemia relapse. PMID:23459761

  3. COMPARISON OF THREE DISTINCT PROPHYLACTIC AGENTS AGAINST INVASIVE FUNGAL INFECTIONS IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING HAPLO-IDENTICAL HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION AND POST-TRANSPLANT CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Elcheikh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, invasive fungal infections (IFI have remained an important problem in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT. The optimal approach for prophylactic antifungal therapy has yet to be determined. We conducted a retrospective, bi-institutional comparative clinical study, and compared the efficacy and safety of micafungin 50mg/day (iv with those of fluconazole (400mg/day or itraconazole 200mg/day (iv as prophylaxis for adult patients with various haematological diseases receiving haplo-identical allogeneic stem cell transplantation (haplo. Overall, 99 patients were identified; 30 patients received micafungin, and 69 patients received fluconazole or itraconazole. After a median follow-up of 13 months (range: 5-23, Proven or probable IFIs were reported in 3 patients (10% in the micafungin group and 8 patients (12% in the fluconazole or itraconazole group. Fewer patients in the micafungin group had invasive aspergillosis (1 [3%] vs. 5 [7%], P=0.6. A total of 4 (13% patients in the micafungin group and 23 (33% patients in the fluconazole or itraconazole group received empirical antifungal therapy (P = 0.14. No serious adverse events related to treatment were reported by patients and there was no treatment discontinuation because of drug-related adverse events in both groups. Despite the retrospective design of the study and limited sample, it contributes reassuring data to confirm results from randomised clinical trials, and to define a place for micafungin in prophylaxis after haplo.

  4. HLA-haploidentical transplantation with regulatory and conventional T-cell adoptive immunotherapy prevents acute leukemia relapse.

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    Martelli, Massimo F; Di Ianni, Mauro; Ruggeri, Loredana; Falzetti, Franca; Carotti, Alessandra; Terenzi, Adelmo; Pierini, Antonio; Massei, Maria Speranza; Amico, Lucia; Urbani, Elena; Del Papa, Beatrice; Zei, Tiziana; Iacucci Ostini, Roberta; Cecchini, Debora; Tognellini, Rita; Reisner, Yair; Aversa, Franco; Falini, Brunangelo; Velardi, Andrea

    2014-07-24

    Posttransplant relapse is still the major cause of treatment failure in high-risk acute leukemia. Attempts to manipulate alloreactive T cells to spare normal cells while killing leukemic cells have been unsuccessful. In HLA-haploidentical transplantation, we reported that donor-derived T regulatory cells (Tregs), coinfused with conventional T cells (Tcons), protected recipients against graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The present phase 2 study investigated whether Treg-Tcon adoptive immunotherapy prevents posttransplant leukemia relapse. Forty-three adults with high-risk acute leukemia (acute myeloid leukemia 33; acute lymphoblastic leukemia 10) were conditioned with a total body irradiation-based regimen. Grafts included CD34(+) cells (mean 9.7 × 10(6)/kg), Tregs (mean 2.5 × 10(6)/kg), and Tcons (mean 1.1 × 10(6)/kg). No posttransplant immunosuppression was given. Ninety-five percent of patients achieved full-donor type engraftment and 15% developed ≥grade 2 acute GVHD. The probability of disease-free survival was 0.56 at a median follow-up of 46 months. The very low cumulative incidence of relapse (0.05) was significantly better than in historical controls. These results demonstrate the immunosuppressive potential of Tregs can be used to suppress GVHD without loss of the benefits of graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) activity. Humanized murine models provided insights into the mechanisms underlying separation of GVL from GVHD, suggesting the GVL effect is due to largely unopposed Tcon alloantigen recognition in bone marrow. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  5. Haploidentical versus Matched-Sibling Transplant in Adults with Philadelphia-Negative High-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Biologically Phase III Randomized Study.

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    Wang, Yu; Liu, Qi-Fa; Xu, Lan-Ping; Liu, Kai-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Ma, Xiao; Wu, Mei-Qing; Wu, De-Pei; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-07-15

    Although matched-sibling donor (MSD) hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) has an established role in the management of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in first complete remission (CR1), the effect of haploidentical donor (HID) HSCT as post-remission treatment for this portion of patients is not defined. Transplantation outcomes from HIDs or MSDs were compared in a disease-specific, biologically phase III randomized, multicenter study. Between July 2010 and December 2013, 210 patients with Philadelphia-negative high-risk ALL in CR1 were assigned to undergo unmanipulated HIDs (121 patients) or MSDs HSCT (89 patients) according to donor availability on an intent-to-treat (ITT) basis. Overall, 24 of the 210 patients had lost transplant eligibility. Therefore, 186 of 210 (88%) patients were finally transplanted from MSD (n = 83) or HID (n = 103). Based on the ITT principle, the 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) did not differ between HID and MSD groups [61%, 95% confidence interval (CI), 52%-70%; vs. 60%, CI, 49%-71%; P = 0.91] from CR, neither did DFS differ between the two groups (68%, CI, 58%-78%; vs. 64%, CI, 52%-76%; P = 0.56) from time of the graft, with cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality of 13% (CI, 7%-19%) and 11% (CI, 4%-18%; P = 0.84) and relapse rates of 18% (CI, 10%-26%) and 24% (CI, 14%-34%; P = 0.30), respectively. Haploidentical HSCT achieves outcomes similar to those of MSD-HSCT for Philadelphia-negative high-risk ALL patients in CR1. Such transplantation could be a valid alternative as post-remission treatment for high-risk ALL patients in CR1 lacking an identical donor. Clin Cancer Res; 22(14); 3467-76. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Impact of HLA allele mismatch at HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1 on outcomes in haploidentical stem cell transplantation.

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    Huo, Ming-Rui; Pei, Xu-Ying; Li, Dan; Chang, Ying-Jun; Xu, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2018-01-15

    The impact of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele mismatch on transplant outcomes in haploidentical stem cell transplantation (haplo-SCT) has not been established. We retrospectively studied 595 patients with hematologic malignancy who received haplo-SCT. The impact of multiple HLA allele mismatches (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1) and each HLA allele mismatch on transplant outcomes was analyzed. Greater number of HLA allele disparity does not appear worsen outcome. As for each HLA locus, HLA-A mismatch correlated with decreased rate of platelet engraftment (HR 0.740, P = .003); HLA-B mismatch independently correlated with decreased relapse rate (HR 0.494, P = .032) and improved disease-free survival and overall survival (HR 0.514, P = .003; HR 0.494, P = .002, respectively); HLA-C mismatch appeared to be protective for transplant-related mortality (TRM) (HR 0.567, P = .039); HLA-DRB1 mismatch was associated with increased cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) (HR 1.942, P = .002). No associations of any HLA mismatch with delayed neutrophil engraftment or increased cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD were observed. Our data indicated that high degree of HLA allele mismatches did not adversely affect transplant outcomes in haplo-SCT and each HLA allele mismatch had different effect.

  7. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte therapy with donor T cells prevents and treats adenovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infections after haploidentical and matched unrelated stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christin, Anne; Myers, Gary D.; Liu, Hao; Cruz, Conrad R.; Hanley, Patrick J.; Kennedy-Nasser, Alana A.; Leung, Kathryn S.; Gee, Adrian P.; Krance, Robert A.; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Heslop, Helen E.; Rooney, Cliona M.; Bollard, Catherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Viral infection or reactivation remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We now show that infusions of single cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) lines (5 × 106-1.35 × 108 cells/m2) with specificity for 2 commonly detected viruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and adenovirus, can be safely administered to pediatric transplantation recipients receiving partially human leukocyte antigen–matched and haploidentical stem cell grafts (n = 13), without inducing graft-versus-host disease. The EBV-specific component of the CTLs expanded in vivo and persisted for more than 12 weeks, but the adenovirus-specific component only expanded in vivo in the presence of concomitant adenoviral infection. Nevertheless, adenovirus-specific T cells could be detected for at least 8 weeks in peripheral blood, even in CTL recipients without viral infection, provided the adenovirus-specific component of their circulating lymphocytes was first expanded by exposure to adenoviral antigens ex vivo. After infusion, none of these 13 high-risk recipients developed EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease, while 2 of the subjects had resolution of their adenoviral disease. Hence, bispecific CTLs containing both EBV- and adenovirus-specific T cells can safely reconstitute an antigen responsive “memory” population of CTLs after human leukocyte antigen–mismatched stem cell transplantation and may provide antiviral activity. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00590083. PMID:19700662

  8. Antithymocyte globulin improves the survival of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome undergoing HLA-matched unrelated donor and haplo-identical donor transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Liu, Hong; Zhou, Jin-Yi; Zhang, Tong-Tong; Jin, Song; Zhang, Xiang; Chen, Su-Ning; Li, Wei-Yang; Xu, Yang; Miao, Miao; Wu, De-Pei

    2017-01-01

    Significant advances have been achieved in the outcomes of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) after both HLA-matched sibling donor transplants (MSDT) and non-MSDT, the latter including HLA-matched unrelated donor (MUDT) and haplo-identical donor transplants (HIDT). In this retrospective study, we analyzed the data of 85 consecutive patients with MDS who received allogeneic HSCT between Dec 2007 and Apr 2014 in our center. These patients comprised 38 (44.7%) who received MSDT, 29 (34.1%) MUDT, and 18 (21.2%) HIDT. The median overall survival (OS) was 60.2 months, the probabilities of OS being 63%, 57%, and 48%, at the first, second, and fifth year, respectively. Median OS post-transplant (OSPT) was 57.2 months, the probabilities of OSPT being 58%, 55%, and 48% at the first, second, and fifth year, respectively. The survival of patients receiving non-MSDT was superior to that of MSDT, median OSPT being 84.0 months and 23.6 months, respectively (P = 0.042); the findings for OS were similar (P = 0.028). We also found that using ATG in conditioning regimens significantly improved survival after non-MSDT, with better OS and OSPT (P = 0.016 and P = 0.025). These data suggest that using ATG in conditioning regimens may improve the survival of MDS patients after non-MSDT. PMID:28262717

  9. Transient hemolysis due to anti-D and anti-A1 produced by engrafted donor's lymphocytes after allogeneic unmanipulated haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailén, Rebeca; Kwon, Mi; Pérez-Corral, Ana María; Pascual, Cristina; Buño, Ismael; Balsalobre, Pascual; Serrano, David; Gayoso, Jorge; Díez-Martín, José Luis; Anguita, Javier

    2017-10-01

    Development of de novo alloantibodies against recipient's red blood cell (RBC) antigens by engrafted donor's lymphocytes is a known phenomenon in the setting of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). This situation is usually clinically insignificant. We report a case of early clinically relevant hemolytic anemia in a blood group A 1 D+ patient, due to a limited production of anti-D and anti-A 1 produced by nonpreviously sensitized newly engrafted donor's immune system. A 31-year-old Caucasian woman, blood group A 1 , D+, with Hodgkin's lymphoma, received an unmanipulated haploidentical allogeneic peripheral blood HSCT after a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen. Donor blood group was A 2 B, D-. The patient had an uneventful course until Day +34, when she developed clinically significant hemolytic anemia with a positive direct antiglobulin test. Anti-D and anti-A 1 produced by the donor-engrafted lymphocytes were detected both in serum and in eluate. The hemolysis produced an accelerated group change, turning the patient's ABO group into A 2 B 2 weeks after the detection of the alloantibodies. As the residual patient's RBCs progressively disappeared, anti-D and anti-A 1 production decreased and were not detected in serum by Day +41. This case illustrates that de novo alloantibody production against ABO and D antigens by the newly engrafted donor's lymphocytes can occasionally cause clinically significant anemia. To our knowledge, this is the first case reported of clinically significant hemolytic anemia due to a transient anti-D anti-A 1 alloimmunization after T-cell-repleted haploidentical HSCT. © 2017 AABB.

  10. Comparison of outcomes in hematological malignancies treated with haploidentical or HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplantation following myeloablative conditioning: A meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dangui Chen

    Full Text Available Haploidentical and human leukocyte antigen (HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem transplantation are two main ways used in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT. In recent years, remarkable progress has been made in haploidentical allo-HSCT (HID-SCT, and some institutions found HID-SCT had similar outcomes as HLA-identical sibling allo-HSCT (ISD-SCT. To clarify if HID-SCT has equal effects to ISD-SCT in hematologic malignancies, we performed this meta-analysis.Relevant articles published prior to February 2017 were searched on PubMed. Two reviewers assessed the quality of the included studies and extracted data independently. Odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated for statistical analysis.Seven studies including 1919 patients were included. The rate of platelet engraftment is significantly lower after HID-SCT versus ISD-SCT while there is no difference in neutrophil engraftment (OR = 2.58, 95% CI = 1.70-3.93, P < 0.00001. The risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD is significantly higher after HID-SCT versus ISD-SCT (OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.42-2.49, P < 0.00001, but the relapse rate is lower in HID-SCT group (OR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.55-0.90, P = 0.005. The incidence rates of overall survival (OS and disease-free-survival/leukemia-free survival/relapse-free survival (DFS/LFS/RFS after ISD-SCT are all significantly superior to HID-SCT (OR = 1.32, 95% CI = 1.08-1.62, P = 0.006; OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.03-1.52, P = 0.02. There is no significant difference in transplantation related mortality (TRM rate after HID-SCT and ISD-SCT.After myeloablative conditioning, patients receiving ISD-SCT have a faster engraftment, lower acute GVHD and longer life expectancy compared to HID-SCT with GVHD prophylaxis (cyclosporine A, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil and antithymoglobulin; CsA + MTX + MMF + ATG. Currently, HID-SCT with GVHD prophylaxis (CsA + MTX + MMF + ATG may not replace ISD-SCT when HLA

  11. Comparison of outcomes in hematological malignancies treated with haploidentical or HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem cell transplantation following myeloablative conditioning: A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dan; Xu, Peipei; Chen, Bing

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Haploidentical and human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling hematopoietic stem transplantation are two main ways used in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). In recent years, remarkable progress has been made in haploidentical allo-HSCT (HID-SCT), and some institutions found HID-SCT had similar outcomes as HLA-identical sibling allo-HSCT (ISD-SCT). To clarify if HID-SCT has equal effects to ISD-SCT in hematologic malignancies, we performed this meta-analysis. Methods Relevant articles published prior to February 2017 were searched on PubMed. Two reviewers assessed the quality of the included studies and extracted data independently. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for statistical analysis. Results Seven studies including 1919 patients were included. The rate of platelet engraftment is significantly lower after HID-SCT versus ISD-SCT while there is no difference in neutrophil engraftment (OR = 2.58, 95% CI = 1.70–3.93, P SCT versus ISD-SCT (OR = 1.88, 95% CI = 1.42–2.49, P SCT group (OR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.55–0.90, P = 0.005). The incidence rates of overall survival (OS) and disease-free-survival/leukemia-free survival/relapse-free survival (DFS/LFS/RFS) after ISD-SCT are all significantly superior to HID-SCT (OR = 1.32, 95% CI = 1.08–1.62, P = 0.006; OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.03–1.52, P = 0.02). There is no significant difference in transplantation related mortality (TRM) rate after HID-SCT and ISD-SCT. Conclusion After myeloablative conditioning, patients receiving ISD-SCT have a faster engraftment, lower acute GVHD and longer life expectancy compared to HID-SCT with GVHD prophylaxis (cyclosporine A, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil and antithymoglobulin; CsA + MTX + MMF + ATG). Currently, HID-SCT with GVHD prophylaxis (CsA + MTX + MMF + ATG) may not replace ISD-SCT when HLA-identical sibling donor available. PMID:29381772

  12. Unmanipulated haploidentical stem cell transplantation in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a study on behalf of the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT

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    Nicole Santoro

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT is the most effective post-remission treatment for adults with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. The aim of the study was to analyze results of unmanipulated haploidentical allo-SCT (haplo-SCT for adults with ALL and to identify prognostic factors. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis on 208 adults transplanted in EBMT centers from 2007 to 2014. Results Median age at haplo-SCT was 32 years and median follow-up, 31 months. Forty-four percent of the patients were in first complete remission (CR1. Stem cell source was the bone marrow (BM for 43% and peripheral blood (PB for 57% of patients. Myeloablative conditioning (MAC was used for 66% and reduced intensity regimen (RIC for 34% of patients. GVHD prophylaxis was based on post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PT-Cy for 118 (57% or on anti-thymocyte-globulin (ATG for 90 (43% plus standard prophylaxis. One hundred eighty-four (92% patients achieved engraftment. Cumulative incidence (CI of grade II–IV acute-graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD was 31%, grade III–IV 11%, and chronic GVHD 29%. Non-relapse mortality (NRM and relapse-incidence (RI were 32 and 37%, respectively. Overall survival (OS, leukemia-free survival (LFS, and GVHD-free, relapse-free-survival (GRFS at 3 years were 33, 31, and 26%. For patients in CR1, OS, LFS, and GRFS were 52, 47, and 40%, respectively. Disease status was the main factor associated with transplant outcomes. Use of BM was independently associated with improvement in NRM, acute GVHD, GRFS, LFS, and OS. Conclusions Unmanipulated haplo-SCT may be considered a valid option for adult patients with high-risk ALL lacking HLA identical donor preferably in early disease status.

  13. Results of a 2-Arm, Phase 2 Clinical Trial Using Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide for the Prevention of Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Haploidentical Donor and Mismatched Unrelated Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaballa, Sameh; Ge, Isabell; Fakih, Riad El; Brammer, Jonathan E.; Kongtim, Piyanuch; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Wang, Sa A.; Lee, Dean; Petropoulos, Demetrios; Cao, Kai; Rondon, Gabriela; Chen, Julianne; Hammerstrom, Aimee; Lombardi, Lindsey; Alatrash, Gheath; Korbling, Martin; Oran, Betul; Kebriaei, Partow; Ahmed, Sairah; Shah, Nina; Rezvani, Katayoun; Marin, David; Bashir, Qaiser; Alousi, Amin; Nieto, Yago; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Hosing, Chitra; Popat, Uday; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Khouri, Issa; Champlin, Richard E.; Ciurea, Stefan O.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND High-dose, post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has improved outcomes in haploidentical (HAPLO) stem cell transplantation (SCT). However, it remains unclear whether this strategy is effective in SCT from 1-antigen human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched unrelated donors (9/10 MUD) and how the outcomes of these patients compare with those of haploidentical transplantation recipients. METHODS A parallel, 2-arm, nonrandomized phase 2 clinical trial was conducted of melphalan-based reduced-intensity conditioning with PTCy, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil to prevent GVHD in patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies who underwent HAPLO (n = 60) or 9/10 MUD (n = 46) SCT. RESULTS The 1-year overall and progression-free survival rates were 70% and 60%, respectively, in the HAPLO arm and 60% and 47%, respectively, in the 9/10 MUD arm. The day +100 cumulative incidence of grade II to IV acute GVHD and grade III to IV acute GVHD was 28% and 3%, respectively, in the HAPLO arm and 33% and 13%, respectively, in the 9/10 MUD arm. The 2-year cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 24% in the HAPLO arm and 19% in the 9/10 MUD arm. The 1-year cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality was 21% in the HAPLO arm and 31% in the 9/10 MUD arm, and the 1-year relapse rate was 19% in the HAPLO arm and 25% in the 9/10 MUD arm. CONCLUSIONS Although this was a nonrandomized study and could not serve as a direct comparison between the 2 groups, the authors conclude that PTCy-based GVHD prophylaxis is effective for both HAPLO and 9/10 MUD SCTs. Prospective randomized trials will be required to compare the efficacies of alternative donor options for patients lacking HLA-matched donors. PMID:27404668

  14. Design of a cost-effectiveness analysis alongside a randomized trial of transplantation using umbilical cord blood versus HLA-haploidentical related bone marrow in advanced hematologic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Joshua A; Bensink, Mark E; O'Donnell, Paul V; Fuchs, Ephraim J; Eapen, Mary; Ramsey, Scott D

    2014-03-01

    BMT CTN 1101 is a Phase III randomized controlled trial evaluating the comparative effectiveness of double unrelated umbilical cord blood (dUCB) versus HLA-haploidentical related donor bone marrow (haplo-BM) donor cell sources for blood or bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in patients with hematologic malignancies. Herein, we present the rationale, design and methods of the first cost-effectiveness analysis to be conducted alongside a BMT trial. Consenting patients will provide health insurance information to allow calculation of direct medical costs from reimbursement records, and will provide out-of-pocket costs, time costs and health-related quality of life measures through an online survey. These outcomes will inform a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing dUCB and haplo-BM donor cell sources from patient, payer and societal perspectives. Novel approaches may significantly change the cost, outcomes or availability of BMT. The results of this analysis will be the first to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the comparative effectiveness of these approaches from multiple perspectives.

  15. Adoptive transfer of pp65-specific T cells for the treatment of chemorefractory cytomegalovirus disease or reactivation after haploidentical and matched unrelated stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuchtinger, Tobias; Opherk, Kathrin; Bethge, Wolfgang A; Topp, Max S; Schuster, Friedhelm R; Weissinger, Eva M; Mohty, Mohamad; Or, Reuven; Maschan, Michael; Schumm, Michael; Hamprecht, Klaus; Handgretinger, Rupert; Lang, Peter; Einsele, Hermann

    2010-11-18

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease and infection refractory to antiviral treatment after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is associated with a high mortality. Adoptive transfer of CMV-specific T cells could reconstitute viral immunity after SCT and could protect from CMV-related complications. However, logistics of producing virus-specific T-cell grafts limited the clinical application. We treated 18 patients after allo-SCT from human leukocyte antigen-mismatched/haploidentical or human leukocyte antigen-matched unrelated donors with polyclonal CMV-specific T cells generated by ex vivo stimulation with pp65, followed by isolation of interferon-γ-producing cells. Patients with CMV disease or viremia refractory to antiviral chemotherapy or both were eligible for adoptive T-cell transfer and received a mean of 21 × 10³/kg pp65-specific T cells. In 83% of cases CMV infection was cleared or viral burden was significantly reduced, even in cases of CMV encephalitis (n = 2). Viral control was associated with in vivo expansion of CMV-specific T lymphocytes in 12 of 16 evaluable cases, resulting in reconstitution of antiviral T-cell responses, without graft-versus-host disease induction or acute side effects. Our findings indicate that the infusion of low numbers of CMV-specific T cells is safe, feasible, and effective as a treatment on demand for refractory CMV infection and CMV disease after allo-SCT.

  16. Rapid Recovery of CD3+CD8+ T Cells on Day 90 Predicts Superior Survival after Unmanipulated Haploidentical Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

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    Deng-Mei Tian

    Full Text Available Rapid immune reconstitution after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT is significantly associated with lower infection, relapse and possibly secondary malignancy rates. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of peripheral lymphocyte subsets, especially CD3+CD8+ cytotoxic T cell recovery, in predicting transplant outcomes, including the overall survival (OS and non-relapse mortality (NRM rates after unmanipulated haploidentical blood and marrow transplantation (HBMT.Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 214 HBMT recipients with hematological malignancies. The peripheral lymphocyte subsets (CD3+ T cells, CD3+CD4+ helper T cells, CD3+CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, and CD19+ B cells were analyzed by flow cytometry at days 30, 60, 90, 180, 270 and 360 after HBMT.The CD3+CD8+ cytotoxic T cell recovery at day 90 (CD3+CD8+-90 was correlated with bacterial infection (P = 0.001, NRM (P = 0.001, leukemia-free survival (LFS, P = 0.005, and OS (P = 0.001 at a cutoff value of 375 cells/μL CD3+CD8+ T cells. The incidence of bacterial infection in patients with the CD3+CD8+-90 at ≥375 cells/μL was significantly lower than that of cases with the CD3+CD8+-90 at <375 cells/μL after HBMT (14.6% versus 41.6%, P<0.001. Multivariate analysis showed the rapid recovery of CD3+CD8+ T cells at day 90 after HBMT was strongly associated with a lower incidence of NRM (HR = 0.30; 95% CI: 0.15-0.60; P = 0.000 and superior LFS (HR = 0.51; 95% CI: 0.32-0.82; P = 0.005 and OS (HR = 0.38; 95% CI: 0.23-0.63; P = 0.000.The results suggest that the rapid recovery of CD3+CD8+ cytotoxic T cells at day 90 following HBMT could predict superior transplant outcomes.

  17. Selective Depletion of αβ T Cells and B Cells for Human Leukocyte Antigen-Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. A Three-Year Follow-Up of Procedure Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Pira, Giuseppina; Malaspina, David; Girolami, Elia; Biagini, Simone; Cicchetti, Elisabetta; Conflitti, Gianpiero; Broglia, Manuel; Ceccarelli, Stefano; Lazzaro, Stefania; Pagliara, Daria; Meschini, Antonella; Bertaina, Alice; Montanari, Mauro; Locatelli, Franco

    2016-11-01

    HLA-haploidentical family donors represent a valuable option for children requiring allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Because graft-versus-host diseases (GVHD) is a major complication of HLA-haploidentical HSCT because of alloreactive T cells in the graft, different methods have been used for ex vivo T cell depletion. Removal of donor αβ T cells, the subset responsible for GVHD, and of B cells, responsible for post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorders, have been recently developed for HLA-haploidentical HSCT. This manipulation preserves, in addition to CD34 +  progenitors, natural killer, γδ T, and monocytes/dendritic cells, contributing to anti-leukemia activity and protection against infections. We analyzed depletion efficiency and cell yield in 200 procedures performed in the last 3 years at our center. Donors underwent CD34 +   hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) peripheral blood mobilization with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Poor CD34 +  cell mobilizers (48 of 189, 25%) received plerixafor in addition to G-CSF. Aphereses containing a median of 52.5 × 10 9 nucleated cells and 494 × 10 6 CD34 +  HSC were manipulated using the CliniMACS device. In comparison to the initial product, αβ T cell depletion produced a median 4.1-log reduction (range, 3.1 to 5.5) and B cell depletion led to a median 3.4-log reduction (range, 2.0 to 4.7). Graft products contained a median of 18.5 × 10 6 CD34 +  HSC/kg recipient body weight, with median values of residual αβ T cells and B cells of 29 × 10 3 /kg and 33 × 10 3 /kg, respectively. Depletion efficiency monitored at 6-month intervals demonstrated steady performance, while improved recovery of CD34 +  cells was observed after the first year (P = .0005). These data indicate that αβ T cell and B cell depletion of HSC grafts from HLA-haploidentical donors was efficient and reproducible. Copyright © 2016 The American Society for Blood and Marrow

  18. Curative or pre-emptive adenovirus-specific T cell transfer from matched unrelated or third party haploidentical donors after HSCT, including UCB transplantations: a successful phase I/II multicenter clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongsheng Qian

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, the most widely used potentially curable cellular immunotherapeutic approach in the treatment of hematological malignancies, is limited by life-threatening complications: graft versus host disease (GVHD and infections especially viral infections refractory to antiviral drugs. Adoptive transfer of virus-specific T cells is becoming an alternative treatment for infections following HSCT. We report here the results of a phase I/II multicenter study which includes a series of adenovirus-specific T cell (ADV-VST infusion either from the HSCT donor or from a third party haploidentical donor for patients transplanted with umbilical cord blood (UCB. Methods Fourteen patients were eligible and 11 patients received infusions of ADV-VST generated by interferon (IFN-γ-based immunomagnetic isolation from a leukapheresis from their original donor (42.9% or a third party haploidentical donor (57.1%. One patient resolved ADV infection before infusion, and ADV-VST could not reach release or infusion criteria for two patients. Two patients received cellular immunotherapy alone without antiviral drugs as a pre-emptive treatment. Results One patient with adenovirus infection and ten with adenovirus disease were infused with ADV-VST (mean 5.83 ± 8.23 × 103 CD3+IFN-γ+ cells/kg up to 9 months after transplantation. The 11 patients showed in vivo expansion of specific T cells up to 60 days post-infusion, associated with adenovirus load clearance in ten of the patients (91%. Neither de novo GVHD nor side effects were observed during the first month post-infusion, but GVHD reactivations occurred in three patients, irrespective of the type of leukapheresis donor. For two of these patients, GVHD reactivation was controlled by immunosuppressive treatment. Four patients died during follow-up, one due to refractory ADV disease. Conclusions Adoptive transfer of rapidly isolated ADV

  19. Infusion-related febrile reaction after haploidentical stem cell transplantation in children is associated with higher rates of engraftment syndrome and acute graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Kai-Yan; Chen, Huan; Chen, Yu-Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Feng-Rong; Han, Wei; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Wang, Yu; Yan, Chen-Hua; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Sun, Yu-Qian; Xu, Lan-Ping

    2015-12-01

    The clinical significance and prognostic impact of IRFR in pediatric recipients of haploidentical SCT are not clearly understood. Therefore, we attempted to determine how IRFR affects clinical outcomes in children. Clinical data from 100 consecutive pediatric patients (60 boys and 40 girls; median age, 12 yr [range, 2-18 yr] after haploidentical SCT between January 2010 and December 2012 were collected retrospectively. IRFR was described as unexplained fever (>38 °C) within 24 h after the infusion of haploidentical PBSCs. Thirty-eight (38.0%) cases met the criteria for IRFR. ES was found in 24 (63.2%) of the 38 children with IRFR, with the median time of developing ES of +9 (7-16) days, while only 15 (25.4%) of the 59 children without IRFR were found with ES (p children after haploidentical SCT. Thirty-eight children comprised the IRFR group, and 59 were in the control (non-IRFR) group. High incidence of ES was observed in children with the occurrence of IRFR. Similarly, the incidence of stage I-IV and II-IV aGVHD was significantly higher in the febrile group. Multivariate analysis showed IRFR to be the risk factor for ES and aGVHD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Tolerance induction between two different strains of parental mice prevents graft-versus-host disease in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to F1 mice

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    Guo, Yixian; Zhang, Lanfang; Wan, Suigui; Sun, Xuejing; Wu, Yongxia [Department of Hematology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Yu, Xue-Zhong [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Xia, Chang-Qing, E-mail: cqx65@yahoo.com [Department of Hematology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Injection of UVB-irradiated iDCs induces alloantigen tolerance. • This alloantigen tolerance may be associated regulatory T cell induction. • Tolerant mice serve as bone marrow donors reduces GVHD to their F1 recipients in allo-HSCT. • Tolerance is maintained in F1 recipients for long time post HSCT. - Abstract: Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Haplo-HSCT) has been employed worldwide in recent years and led to favorable outcome in a group of patients who do not have human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched donors. However, the high incidence of severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major problem for Haplo-HSCT. In the current study, we performed a proof of concept mouse study to test whether induction of allogeneic tolerance between two different parental strains was able to attenuate GVHD in Haplo-HSCT to the F1 mice. We induced alloantigen tolerance in C3H mice (H-2k) using ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiated immature dendritic cells (iDCs) derived from the cultures of Balb/c bone marrow cells. Then, we performed Haplo-HSCT using tolerant C3H mice as donors to F1 mice (C3H × Balb/c). The results demonstrated that this approach markedly reduced GVHD-associated death and significantly prolonged the survival of recipient mice in contrast to the groups with donors (C3H mice) that received infusion of non-UVB-irradiated DCs. Further studies showed that there were enhanced Tregs in the tolerant mice and alloantigen-specific T cell response was skewed to more IL-10-producing T cells, suggesting that these regulatory T cells might have contributed to the attenuation of GVHD. This study suggests that it is a feasible approach to preventing GVHD in Haplo-HSCT in children by pre-induction of alloantigen tolerance between the two parents. This concept may also lead to more opportunities in cell-based immunotherapy for GVHD post Haplo-HSCT.

  1. Invariant NKT cell reconstitution in pediatric leukemia patients given HLA-haploidentical stem cell transplantation defines distinct CD4+ and CD4- subset dynamics and correlates with remission state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lalla, Claudia; Rinaldi, Anna; Montagna, Daniela; Azzimonti, Laura; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Sangalli, Laura M; Paganoni, Anna Maria; Maccario, Rita; Di Cesare-Merlone, Alessandra; Zecca, Marco; Locatelli, Franco; Dellabona, Paolo; Casorati, Giulia

    2011-04-01

    Immune reconstitution plays a crucial role on the outcome of patients given T cell-depleted HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (hHSCT) for hematological malignancies. CD1d-restricted invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are innate-like, lipid-reactive T lymphocytes controlling infections, cancer, and autoimmunity. Adult mature iNKT cells are divided in two functionally distinct CD4(+) and CD4(-) subsets that express the NK receptor CD161 and derive from thymic CD4(+)CD161(-) precursors. We investigated iNKT cell reconstitution dynamics in 33 pediatric patients given hHSCT for hematological malignancies, with a follow-up reaching 6 y posttransplantation, and correlated their emergence with disease relapse. iNKT cells fully reconstitute and rapidly convert into IFN-γ-expressing effectors in the 25 patients maintaining remission. CD4(+) cells emerge earlier than the CD4(-) ones, both displaying CD161(-) immature phenotypes. CD4(-) cells expand more slowly than CD4(+) cells, though they mature with significantly faster kinetics, reaching full maturation by 18 mo post-hHSCT. Between 4 and 6 y post-hHSCT, mature CD4(-) iNKT cells undergo a substantial expansion burst, resulting in a CD4(+)HLA-haploidentical patients failing to reconstitute these cells might represent a novel therapeutic option to prevent leukemia recurrence.

  2. Donor-specific anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies were associated with primary graft failure after unmanipulated haploidentical blood and marrow transplantation: a prospective study with randomly assigned training and validation sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ying-Jun; Zhao, Xiang-Yu; Xu, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Yu; Han, Wei; Chen, Huan; Wang, Feng-Rong; Mo, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Huo, Ming-Rui; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Y, Kong; Liu, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-07-10

    Small studies suggest an association of donor-specific anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies (DSAs) with primary graft failure (GF) following haploidentical stem cell transplantation, but primary graft rejection (GR) was not discriminated from primary poor graft function (PGF). In this study, we aimed to determine the association of DSAs with primary GF, including GR and PGF, in patients who underwent unmanipulated haploidentical blood and marrow transplantation. A total of 345 subjects were prospectively recruited and randomly selected as training group (n = 173) and validation group (n = 172). Patient plasma/serum was screened. For HLA antibody positive samples with a median fluorescent intensity (MFI) >500, DSAs were further tested using a LABScreen Single Antigen Kit (One Lambda). A total of 342 patients (99.1%) achieved sustained myeloid engraftment. The median times to neutrophil engraftment and platelet engraftment were 13 days (range, 8-28 days) and 18 days (range, 6-330 days), respectively. The cumulative incidence of primary GF was 6.4 ± 1.3% and included GR (0.9 ± 0.5%) and PGF (5.5 ± .2%). Of the 345 cases tested, 39 (11.3%) were DSA positive. Multivariate models showed that DSAs (MFI ≥ 10,000) were correlated to primary GR (P < 0.001) and that DSAs (MFI ≥ 2000) were strongly associated with primary PGF (P = 0.005). All patients were classified into three groups for analysis. Group A included cases that were DSA negative and those with a DSA MFI <2000 (n = 316), group B included cases with a 2000 ≤ MFI < 10,000 (n = 19), and group C included cases with a MFI ≥ 10,000 (n = 10). The DSAs were associated with an increased incidence of the primary GF (3.2 vs. 31.6 vs. 60%, for groups A, B, and C, respectively, P < 0.001), transplant-related mortality (TRM) rate (17.2 vs. 14.7 vs. 33.3%, for groups A, B, and C, respectively, P = 0.022), and inferior overall survival (OS, 77.3 vs. 85.3 vs. 44.4%, for groups A, B, and C

  3. Homeostatic γδ T Cell Contents Are Preserved by Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Priming and Correlate with the Early Recovery of γδ T Cell Subsets after Haploidentical Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Zhilei; Xu, Lan-Ping; Fu, Qiang; Huo, Mingrui; Liu, Long; Zhao, Xiaosu; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Jiangying

    2018-02-01

    Emerging evidence from graft manipulations and immunotherapeutic treatments has highlighted a favorable effect of γδ T cells in the setting of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT). However, γδ T cell subsets and their distinct features in the allograft have not been characterized. Additionally, whether homeostatic γδ T cell fractions are influenced by treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) remains elusive. We initially compared the phenotypes of γδ T cell subsets, including CD27 + , CD27 - , Vδ1 + , Vδ2 + , Vδ1 + CD27 + , Vδ1 + CD27 - , Vδ2 + CD27 + , and Vδ2 + CD27 - cells, in the peripheral blood of 20 healthy donors before and after G-CSF mobilization. The effects of G-CSF on the cytokine production capacities of γδ T cell subsets were also detected. Moreover, the correlation between donor homeostatic γδ T cell content and the early recoveries of γδ T cell subgroups after haploidentical HSCT was investigated in 40 pairs of donors and recipients. We found that both the proportions and IFN-γ secretion capacities of peripheral γδ T cell subsets were preserved in G-CSF-primed grafts. Homeostatic Vδ1 and Vδ2 proportions of donors significantly correlated with the early recoveries of Vδ1 and Vδ2 cells after haploidentical HSCT. Interestingly, a higher day 30 Vδ1 concentration was associated with a lower incidence of cytomegalovirus reactivation in recipients. These results not only clarify the preservation of γδ T cell phenotypes and functional features by G-CSF mobilization but also suggest the importance of homeostatic γδ T cell content for immune recovery after alloHSCT. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with high-risk hematologic malignancies: outcomes with two different strategies for GvHD prevention. Ex vivo T-cell depletion and post-transplant cyclophosphamide: 10 years of experience at a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufort, G; Castillo, L; Pisano, S; Castiglioni, M; Carolina, P; Andrea, I; Simon, E; Zuccolo, S; Schelotto, M; Morosini, F; Pereira, I; Amarillo, P; Silveira, A; Guerrero, L; Ferreira, V; Tiscornia, A; Mezzano, R; Lemos, F; Boggia, B; Quarnetti, A; Decaro, J; Dabezies, A

    2016-10-01

    Forty patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies, median age 9 years, underwent haploidentical-HSCT from April 2005 to April 2015. Seventeen patients were transplanted with CD3-depleted PBSCs by negative selection (TCD group) following a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen (RIC), and 23 patients received T-cell-replete PBSCs followed by post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT-Cy group) after myeloablative conditioning (n=16) or RIC (n=7). Outcomes are reported for the TCD and PT-Cy recipients, respectively. Engraftment was achieved in 88% versus 100%. Median time to neutrophils>500/μL was 10 days versus 15 days. Platelets>20 000/μL occurred at a median of 16 days versus 20 days, respectively. Transplant-related mortality (TRM) was 24% versus 26% at 1 year. The cumulative incidence (CI) of grade III-IV acute GvHD was 7% versus 5%, and chronic GvHD 9% versus 53% (P=0.029). Relapse at 2 years was 31% versus 24%. Actuarial overall survival rates at 2 years were 47% versus 48%. Causes of death were infections (n=3), sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (n=4), acute GvHD (n=2) and relapse (n=9). These results indicate that haploidentical-HSCT is feasible in Uruguay. The TRM rate is of concern and should be the focus of continuing attention. Chronic GvHD risk was higher in the PT-Cy approach, so modifications are justified.

  5. Unmanipulated haploidentical in comparison with matched unrelated donor stem cell transplantation in patients 60 years and older with acute myeloid leukemia: a comparative study on behalf of the ALWP of the EBMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Nicole; Labopin, Myriam; Giannotti, Federica; Ehninger, Gerard; Niederwieser, Dietger; Brecht, Arne; Stelljes, Matthias; Kröger, Nicolaus; Einsele, Herman; Eder, Matthias; Hallek, Michael; Glass, Bertram; Finke, Jürgen; Ciceri, Fabio; Mohty, Mohamad; Ruggeri, Annalisa; Nagler, Arnon

    2018-04-16

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is both more common and with more biologically aggressive phenotype in the elderly. Allogenic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is the best treatment option in fit patients. Either HLA-matched unrelated donor (MUD) or haploidentical (Haplo) donor are possible alternative for patients in need. We retrospectively compared non-T-cell-depleted Haplo (n = 250) to 10/10 MUD (n = 2589) in AML patients ≥ 60 years. Median follow-up was 23 months. Disease status at transplant differs significantly between the two groups (p < 10 -4 ). Reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) was administrated to 73 and 77% of Haplo and MUD, respectively (p = 0.23). Stem cell source was the bone marrow (BM) in 52% of the Haplo and 6% of MUD (p < 10 -4 ). Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was most frequently used in MUD (p < 10 -4 ) while post-Tx cyclophosphamide (PT-Cy) was given in 62% of Haplo. Engraftment was achieved in 90% of the Haplo vs 97% of MUD (p < 10 -4 ). In multivariate analysis, no significant difference was found between Haplo and MUD for acute (a)graft versus host disease (GVHD) grade II-IV, relapse incidence (RI), non-relapse mortality (NRM), leukemia free survival (LFS), graft-versus-host-free-relapse free survival (GRFS), and overall survival (OS). Extensive chronic (c)GVHD was significantly higher for MUD as compared to Haplo (HR 2, p = 0.01, 95% CI 1.17-3.47). A propensity score analysis confirmed the higher risk of extensive cGVHD for MUD without differences for other outcomes. Allo-SCT from both Haplo and MUD are valid option for AML patients ≥ 60 years of age with similar results. Transplantation from MUD was associated with higher extensive cGVHD. Our findings suggest that Haplo is a suitable and attractive graft source for patients≥ 60 with AML in need of allo-SCT.

  6. HLA-Matched Sibling versus Unrelated versus Haploidentical Related Donor Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Patients Aged Over 60 Years with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Single-Center Donor Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devillier, Raynier; Legrand, Faezeh; Rey, Jérôme; Castagna, Luca; Fürst, Sabine; Granata, Angela; Charbonnier, Aude; Harbi, Samia; d'Incan, Evelyne; Pagliardini, Thomas; Faucher, Catherine; Lemarie, Claude; Saillard, Colombe; Calmels, Boris; Mohty, Bilal; Maisano, Valerio; Weiller, Pierre-Jean; Chabannon, Christian; Vey, Norbert; Blaise, Didier

    2018-02-12

    Haploidentical related donor (HRD) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) was developed as a valid option for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the absence of a matched donor. However, many investigators are reluctant to consider the use of this alternative in elderly patients, anticipating high morbidity. Here, we report a single-center comparison of HRD versus matched sibling donor (MSD) and unrelated donor (UD) allo-HSCT for patients with AML aged ≥60 years. Ninety-four patients (MSD: n = 31; UD: n = 30; HRD: n = 33) were analyzed. The median age was 65 (range, 60 to 73) years. We observed a higher cumulative incidence of grade 3 to 4 acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after UD allo-HSCT (MSD versus UD versus HRD: 3% versus 33% versus 6%, respectively; P = .006). Two-year cumulative incidence of moderate or severe chronic GVHD was 17%, 27%, and 16% in the MSD, UD, and HRD groups, respectively (P = .487). No difference was observed in the 2-year cumulative incidence of relapse or nonrelapse mortality (NRM) (relapse: MSD versus UD versus HRD: 32% versus 25% versus 25%, respectively; P = .411; NRM: MSD versus UD versus HRD: 19% versus 27% versus 24%, respectively; P = .709). At 2 years, progression-free survival, overall survival, and GVHD- and relapse-free survival were 48%, 50%, and 39%, respectively, in the MSD group; 48%, 51%, and 23%, respectively, in the UD group; and 50%, 52%, and 32%, respectively, in the HRD group, without statistically significant differences between the groups. We conclude that HRD allo-HSCT is highly feasible and no less efficient than MSD or UD allo-HSCT in patients with AML aged ≥60 years. Thus, the absence of a HLA-identical donor should not limit the consideration of allo-HSCT for the treatment of AML. Copyright © 2018 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Alternative donor transplantation--"mixing and matching": the role of combined cord blood and haplo-identical donor transplantation (haplo-cord SCT) as a treatment strategy for patients lacking standard donors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongtao; van Besien, Koen

    2015-03-01

    In the past decade, haplo-cord stem cell transplantation (SCT) using myeloablative or reduced intensive conditioning regimens has been shown to result in reliable and fast engraftment of neutrophils and platelets comparable to HLA-matched donors and much faster than after cord stem cell transplant. Haplo-cord SCT also has a low incidence of early non-relapse mortality, low incidences of acute and chronic graft-vs-host disease (GVHD), and excellent graft-vs-leukemia (GVL) effects. Favorable long-term outcomes for high-risk patients with hematologic malignancies have been reported, including older patients. Haplo-cord SCT will likely overcome the limitations of cell dose during cord stem cell selection and might significantly expand the use of cord stem cell transplant in the adult population. The comparable survival outcomes of matched related donor (MRD), matched unrelated donor (MUD), and haplo-cord stem cell transplant strongly argue that haplo-cord SCT should be considered as effective alternative stem cell transplant for high-risk patients lacking standard donors. Further improvement in supportive care and incorporation of a better understanding of the human fetal immune development into the haplo-cord SCT are required to further improve this strategy.

  8. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for leukocyte adhesion deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qasim, Waseem; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Davies, E Graham

    2009-01-01

    after matched family donor and unrelated donor transplants were similar, with 11 of 14 matched family donor and 12 of 14 unrelated donor recipients alive; mortality was greatest after haploidentical transplants, after which 4 of 8 children did not survive. Twenty-seven transplant recipients were alive...

  9. Haploidentical hematopoietic SCT increases graft-versus-tumor effect against renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budak-Alpdogan, T; Sauter, C T; Bailey, C P; Biswas, C S; Panis, M M; Civriz, S; Flomenberg, N; Alpdogan, O

    2013-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) has been shown to be an effective treatment option for advanced renal cell cancer (RCC). However, tumor resistance/relapse remains as the main post transplant issue. Therefore, enhancing graft-versus-tumor (GVT) activity without increasing GVHD is critical for improving the outcome of HSCT. We explored the GVT effect of haploidentical-SCT (haplo-SCT) against RCC in murine models. Lethally irradiated CB6F1 (H2K(b/d)) recipients were transplanted with T-cell-depleted BM cells from B6CBAF1 (H2K(b/k)) mice. Haplo-SCT combined with a low-dose haploidentical (HI) T-cell infusion (1 × 10(5)) successfully provided GVT activity without incurring GVHD. This effect elicited murine RCC growth control and consequently displayed a comparative survival advantage of haplo-SCT recipients when compared with MHC-matched (B6D2F1CB6F1) and parent-F1 (B6CB6F1) transplant recipients. Recipients of haplo-SCT had an increase in donor-derived splenic T-cell numbers, T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ-secreting donor-derived T-cells, a critical aspect for anti-tumor activity. The splenocytes from B6CBAF1 mice had a higher cytotoxicity against RENCA cells than the splenocytes from B6 and B6D2F1 donors after tumor challenge. These findings suggest that haplo-SCT might be an innovative immunotherapeutic platform for solid tumors, particularly for renal cell carcinoma.

  10. TRANSPLANTATION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    stage kidney disease. There is good evidence that transplantation improves both the quality and quantity of life in renal transplant recipients when compared with dialysis.1,2. Living donor kidney transplantation has gained popularity, not only owing ...

  11. Responses to recipient and donor B cells by genetically donor T cells from human haploidentical chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiff, S.; Sampson, H.; Buckley, R.

    1986-01-01

    Following administration of haploidentical stem cells to infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), mature T cells of donor karyotype appear later in the recipient without causing graft-versus-host disease. To investigate the effect of the host environment on the responsiveness of these genetically donor T cells, blood B and T lymphocytes from 6 SCID recipients, their parental donors and unrelated controls were purified by double SRBC rosetting. T cells were stimulated by irradiated B cells at a 1:1 ratio in 6 day cultures. Engrafted T cells of donor karyotype gave much smaller responses to irradiated genetically recipient B cells than did fresh donor T cells. Moreover, engrafted T cells of donor karyotype from two of the three SCIDs who are longest post-transplantation responded more vigorously (14,685 and 31,623 cpm) than fresh donor T cells (5141 and 22,709 cpm) to donor B cells. These data indicate that T lymphocytes which have matured from donor stem cells in the recipient microenvironment behave differently from those that have matured in the donor

  12. Mismatched related and unrelated donors for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for adults with hematologic malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Mary; O’Donnell, Paul; Brunstein, Claudio G.; Wu, Jun; Barowski, Kate; Mendazibal, Adam; Fuchs, Ephraim J.

    2014-01-01

    Two parallel phase II trials in adults with hematologic malignancies demonstrated comparable survival after reduced intensity conditioning and transplantation of either two HLA-mismatched umbilical cord blood units or bone marrow from HLA-haploidentical relatives. Donor choice is often subject to physician practice and institutional preference. Despite clear preliminary evidence of equipoise between HLA-haploidentical related donor and double unrelated donor UCB transplantation, the actual prospect of being randomized between these two very different donor sources is daunting to patients and their treating physicians alike. Under these circumstances it is challenging to conduct a phase III randomized trial in which patients are assigned to the umbilical cord blood or haploidentical bone marrow arms. Therefore, we aimed to provide an evidence-based review and recommendations for selecting donors for adults without an HLA-matched sibling or an HLA-matched adult unrelated donor. PMID:24862638

  13. Transplantation and innate immunity: the lesson of natural killer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moretta Lorenzo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Natural killer cells have been demonstrated to play a major role in mediating an anti-leukemia effect in patients given a T-cell depleted allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from an HLA-haploidentical family donor. In particular, donor-derived natural killer cells, which are alloreactive (i.e. KIR/HLA mismatched towards recipient cells, significantly contribute to the eradication of leukemia blasts escaping the preparative regimen to transplantation. A recent study on high-risk pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia refractory to chemotherapy further highlighted the importance of donors with alloreactive natural killer cells in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, as it demonstrated that these cells can emerge starting from the fourth-fifth month after the allograft and persist for many months. This study represents a major breakthrough in the cure of otherwise fatal leukemias, providing information on the best criteria for choosing the optimal donor.

  14. Efficacy and safety of micafungin for prophylaxis of invasive fungal infections in patients undergoing haplo-identical hematopoietic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Cheikh, J; Venton, G; Crocchiolo, R; Fürst, S; Faucher, C; Granata, A; Oudin, C; Coso, D; Bouabdallah, R; Vey, N; Duran, S; Fougereau, E; Berger, P; Chabannon, C; Blaise, D

    2013-11-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) such as candidiasis and mold infections have caused significant morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients in recent years. Micafungin, a new echinocandin, inhibits fungal cell wall β-glucan synthesis, with potent activity against most species of Candida and Aspergillus. The aim of this observational study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of micafungin in prophylaxis of IFIs in 26 high-risk adult patients with various hematological diseases receiving haplo-identical Allo-SCT. Only two patients had a history of possible aspergillosis before transplant treated by voriconazole. The patients received a median of four lines (2-7) of treatment before Allo-SCT. Thirteen patients (50%) received at least one prior Auto-SCT; and eight patients (31%) received a previous Allo-SCT. Patients received a median of 29 infusions (range, 15-85) of micafungin (50 mg/day i.v. as a 1-h infusion). The treatment was initiated at the beginning of the transplant conditioning regimen until the hospital discharge. None of our patients discontinued the treatment for drug-related adverse events. Micafungin was not associated with any hepatotoxicity. Only one patient (4%) discontinued the treatment because of early disease progression. In all patients no Candida and/or Aspergillus species was documented after 3 and 6 months from transplant. None of our patients presented a positive galactomannan antigenemia >0.5. Nine patients (35%) presented a CMV reactivation. Four patients presented an acute GVHD grade II and two patients presented a chronic GVHD. The median follow-up was 11 months (3-23). At the last follow-up, there were 20 patients (77%) who were alive; four patients (12%) died because of disease progression and two patients because of graft failure. Micafungin has a good safety and tolerability profile, with an efficacy in preventing IFI in this high-risk population. Our data provide support for an efficacy study in a

  15. Haploidentical Allogeneic Transplant With Post-transplant Infusion of Regulatory T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-03

    Leukemia, Acute; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

  16. Antitumor enhancement by adoptive transfer of tumor antigen primed, inactivated MHC-haploidentical lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guilan; Zhou, Chunxia; Wang, Dongmei; Ma, Wenbo; Liu, Binlei; Zhang, Shuren

    2014-02-01

    The present study investigated the antitumor effects by adoptive transfer of tumor antigen primed, inactivated MHC-haploidentical lymphocytes in TC-1 lung cancer mouse model. Our studies revealed that the inactivated MHC-haploidentical effecter cells display the antitumor activity in vitro and target the tumor in vivo. After adoptive transferring these effecter cells, the Th1 cytokines such as IL-2 and IFN-γ are elevated in the serum; the recipient tumor-specific cytotoxic T-cells and natural killer cells are activated; tumor specific memory T cells are induced; tumor growth is inhibited and mouse survival is prolonged. The results indicate that MHC-haploidentical lymphocytes provide both effecter cells which can target the tumor cells through the identical MHC molecules and an adjuvant effects through the unmatched allogeneic MHC molecules which induces endogenous innate and adaptive antitumor immune responses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. HLA-DP and bone marrow transplantation: DP-incompatibility and severe acute graft versus host disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Platz, P; Jakobsen, B K

    1987-01-01

    Thirteen recipients of HLA-haploidentical, DR compatible bone marrow (BM) and the corresponding BM donors were HLA-DP typed using primed lymphocyte typing (PLT). Severe acute GVHD (greater than or equal to grade 2) developed within 3 months after BM-transplantation in all of eight recipients of DP...... in 88 recipients of HLA-identical BM (p less than 0.0001). In contrast, there was no difference in acute GVHD between recipients of haploidentical, DR and DP compatible BM and recipients of HLA-identical BM. The data presented here provide strong evidence for the first time that HLA-DP antigens play...

  18. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarelli, Guido; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid

    2012-01-01

    The globally widespread single-gene disorders β-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia (SCA) can only be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HSCT treatment of thalassemia has substantially improved over the last two decades, with advancements in preventive strategies, control of transplant-related complications, and preparative regimens. A risk class–based transplantation approach results in disease-free survival probabilities of 90%, 84%, and 78% for class 1, 2, and 3 thalassemia patients, respectively. Because of disease advancement, adult thalassemia patients have a higher risk for transplant-related toxicity and a 65% cure rate. Patients without matched donors could benefit from haploidentical mother-to-child transplantation. There is a high cure rate for children with SCA who receive HSCT following myeloablative conditioning protocols. Novel non-myeloablative transplantation protocols could make HSCT available to adult SCA patients who were previously excluded from allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:22553502

  19. Kaposi Sarcoma After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant: A Rare Complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzi, Mani; Vojdani, Reza; Haghighinejad, Hourvash

    2018-01-02

    Kaposi sarcoma is a multicentric angioproliferative neoplasm of lymphatic endothelium-derived cells. Although this malignancy is relatively frequent after solid-organ transplant, it is extremely rare after bone marrow transplantation. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is associated with severe prolonged immunosuppression; however, a few cases of Kaposi sarcoma after hematopoietic stem cell transplant were previously reported. Here, we report a case of Kaposi sarcoma after haploidentical allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The patient was a known case of acute myelogenous leukemia and underwent transplant after relapse. Four months posttransplant, she presented with 3 dark blue or purplish small nodules on her face above the upper lip. Histopathologic study confirmed Kaposi sarcoma. Serum antibody against human herpes virus type 8 was positive. After discontinuation of immunosuppressive medication and cryotherapy for local control, Kaposi sarcoma skin nodules healed with residual pigmented skin lesions. The patient is currently in complete remission for Kaposi sarcoma and cured from acute myelogenous leukemia 36 months after stem cell transplant. Only 14 cases of Kaposi sarcoma after hematopoietic cell transplant have been previously reported in the literature (11 after allogeneic and 3 after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant). According to our knowledge from literature review, this case is the first report of Kaposi sarcoma after a haploidentical HLA match transplant.

  20. [Treatment of relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma after autologous stem cell transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illés, Árpád; Simon, Zsófia; Udvardy, Miklós; Magyari, Ferenc; Jóna, Ádám; Miltényi, Zsófia

    2017-08-01

    Approximately 10-30% of Hodgkin lymphoma patients relapses or experience refractory disease after first line treatment. Nowadays, autologous stem cell transplantation can successfully salvage half of these patients, median overall survival is only 2-2.5 years. Several prognostic factors determine success of autologous stem cell transplantation. Result of transplantation can be improved considering these factors and using consolidation treatment, if necessary. Patients who relapse after autologous transplantation had worse prognosis, treatment of this patient population is unmet clinical need. Several new treatment options became available in the recent years (brentuximab vedotin and immuncheckpoint inhibitors). These new treatment options offer more chance for cure in relapsed/refractory Hodgkin patients. Outcome of allogenic stem cell transplantation can be improved by using haploidentical donors. New therapeutic options will be discussed in this review. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(34): 1338-1345.

  1. Lower incidence of acute GVHD is associated with the rapid recovery of CD4+CD25+CD45RA+ regulatory T cells in patients who received haploidentical allografts from NIMA-mismatched donors: A retrospective (development) and prospective (validation) cohort-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Zhao, Xiang-Yu; Xu, Lan-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Han, Wei; Chen, Huan; Wang, Feng-Rong; Mo, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Y, Kong; Liua, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Yu, Xue-Zhong; Chang, Ying-Jun

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effects of non-inherited maternal antigen (NIMA) on clinical outcomes and immune recovery, especially of regulatory T cells (Tregs), in patients who underwent unmanipulated haploidentical transplantation. A retrospective cohort (n = 57) and a prospective cohort (n = 88) were included. All patients received haploidentical allografts from sibling donors. Reconstitution of immune subsets, including Tregs, was determined using multicolor flow cytometry. In the retrospective cohort, the cumulative incidence of grades II-IV acute GVHD in patients with NIMA-mismatched donors was significantly lower than that of cases with NIPA-mismatched donors (14.8% vs. 43.30%, p = 0.018). Patients with higher percentages of CD4 + CD25 + CD45RA + T cells (naive Tregs) within CD4 + T cells recovered on day 30 (≥1.55%) experienced a significantly lower incidence of grades II-IV acute GVHD than that of cases with lower percentages of naive Tregs (<1.55%) (13.8% vs. 46.4%, p = 0.010). Multivariate analysis showed that NIMA mismatch and the percentages of naive Tregs were associated with the incidence of grades II-IV acute GVHD [ p = 0.050, and 0.031, respectively]. In the prospective cohort, the association of NIMA mismatch [HR = 0.365, 95% CI, 0.169-0.786, p = 0.010] or higher percentages of naive Tregs recovered on day 30 (≥1.55%) [HR = 0.114, 95% CI, 0.027-0.479, p = 0.003] with a lower cumulative incidence of grades II-IV acute GVHD was further demonstrated. No effects of NIMA mismatch on chronic GVHD, transplant-related mortality, relapse, disease-free survival, or overall survival were found. Our results confirmed the role of NIMA mismatch in acute GVHD and provided the first demonstration, based on clinical data, that recovered Tregs may be involved in the effects of NIMA on acute GVHD in a haploidentical transplant setting.

  2. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation activity worldwide in 2012 and a SWOT analysis of the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Group including the global survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederwieser, D; Baldomero, H; Szer, J; Gratwohl, M; Aljurf, M; Atsuta, Y; Bouzas, L F; Confer, D; Greinix, H; Horowitz, M; Iida, M; Lipton, J; Mohty, M; Novitzky, N; Nunez, J; Passweg, J; Pasquini, M C; Kodera, Y; Apperley, J; Seber, A; Gratwohl, A

    2016-06-01

    Data on 68 146 hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCTs) (53% autologous and 47% allogeneic) gathered by 1566 teams from 77 countries and reported through their regional transplant organizations were analyzed by main indication, donor type and stem cell source for the year 2012. With transplant rates ranging from 0.1 to 1001 per 10 million inhabitants, more HSCTs were registered from unrelated 16 433 donors than related 15 493 donors. Grafts were collected from peripheral blood (66%), bone marrow (24%; mainly non-malignant disorders) and cord blood (10%). Compared with 2006, an increase of 46% total (57% allogeneic and 38% autologous) was observed. Growth was due to an increase in reporting teams (18%) and median transplant activity/team (from 38 to 48 HSCTs/team). An increase of 167% was noted in mismatched/haploidentical family HSCT. A Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats (SWOT) analysis revealed the global perspective of WBMT to be its major strength and identified potential to be the key professional body for patients and authorities. The limited data collection remains its major weakness and threat. In conclusion, global HSCT grows over the years without plateauing (allogeneic>autologous) and at different rates in the four World Health Organization regions. Major increases were observed in allogeneic, haploidentical HSCT and, to a lesser extent, in cord blood transplantation.

  3. Cord Blood Chimerism And Relapse After Haplo-Cord Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Besien, Koen; Koshy, Nebu; Gergis, Usama; Mayer, Sebastian; Cushing, Melissa; Rennert, Hannah; Slotky, Ronit; Mark, Tomer; Pearse, Roger; Rossi, Adriana; Phillips, Adrienne; Vasovic, Liljana; Ferrante, Rosanna; Hsu, Michael; Shore, Tsiporah

    2018-01-01

    Haplo-cord stem cell transplantation combines the infusion of CD34 selected hematopoietic progenitors from a haplo-identical donor with an umbilical cord blood graft from an unrelated donor and allows faster count recovery, with low rates of disease recurrence and chronic GVHD. But the contribution of the umbilical cord blood graft to long-term transplant outcome remains unclear. We analyzed 39 recipients of haplo-cord transplants with AML and MDS, engrafted and in remission at 2 months. Median age was 66 (18-72) and all had intermediate, high, or very high risk disease. Less than 20% UCB chimerism in the CD33 lineage was associated with an increased rate of disease recurrence (54% vs 11% Pdisease recurrence (46% vs 12%, P=0.007) Persistent haplo-chimerism in the CD3 lineage was associated with an increased rate of disease recurrence (40% vs 15%, P=0.009) Chimerism did not predict for treatment related mortality. The cumulative incidence of acute GVHD by day 100 was 43%. The cumulative incidence of moderate/severe chronic GVHD was only 5%. Engraftment of the umbilical cord blood grafts provides powerful GVL effects which protect against disease recurrence and is associated with low risk of chronic GVHD. Engraftment of CD34 selected haplo-identical cells can lead to rapid development of circulating T-cells, but when these cells dominate, GVL-effects are limited and rates of disease recurrence are high. PMID:27333804

  4. Alternative Donor Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelli Bejanyan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT is a potentially curative therapy for adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, but its use for consolidation therapy after first remission with induction chemotherapy used to be limited to younger patients and those with suitable donors. The median age of AML diagnosis is in the late 60s. With the introduction of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC, many older adults are now eligible to receive allo-HCT, including those who are medically less fit to receive myeloablative conditioning. Furthermore, AML patients commonly have no human leukocyte antigen (HLA-identical or medically suitable sibling donor available to proceed with allo-HCT. Technical advances in donor matching, suppression of alloreactivity, and supportive care have made it possible to use alternative donors, such as unrelated umbilical cord blood (UCB and partially HLA-matched related (haploidentical donors. Outcomes after alternative donor allo-HCT are now approaching the outcomes observed for conventional allo-HCT with matched related and unrelated donors. Thus, with both UCB and haploidentical donors available, lack of donor should rarely be a limiting factor in offering an allo-HCT to adults with AML.

  5. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Activity Worldwide in 2012 and a SWOT Analysis of the Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Group (WBMT) including the global survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederwieser, Dietger; Baldomero, Helen; Szer, Jeff; Gratwohl, Michael; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Bouzas, Luis Fernando; Confer, Dennis; Greinix, Hildegard; Horowitz, Mary; Iida, Minako; Lipton, Jeff; Mohty, Mohamad; Novitzky, Nicolas; Nunez, José; Passweg, Jakob; Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Kodera, Yoshihisa; Apperley, Jane; Seber, Adriana; Gratwohl, Alois

    2016-01-01

    Data on 68,146 hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT) (53% autologous and 47% allogeneic) gathered by 1566 teams from 77 countries and reported through their regional transplant organizations were analyzed by main indication, donor type and stem cell source for the year 2012. With transplant rates ranging from 0.1 to 1001 per 10 million inhabitants, more HSCT were registered from unrelated 16,433 than related 15,493 donors. Grafts were collected from peripheral blood (66%), bone marrow (24%; mainly non-malignant disorders) and cord blood (10%). Compared to 2006, an increase of 46% total (57% allogeneic and 38% autologous) was observed. Growth was due to an increase in reporting teams (18%) and median transplant activity/team (from 38 to 48 HSCT/team). An increase of 67% was noted in mismatched/haploidentical family HSCT. A SWOT analysis revealed the global perspective of WBMT to be its major strength and identified potential to be the key professional body for patients and authorities. The limited data collection remains its major weakness and threat. In conclusion, global HSCT grows over the years without plateauing (allogeneic>autologous) and at different rates in the four WHO regions. Major increases were observed in allogeneic, haploidentical HSCT and, to a lesser extent, in cord blood. PMID:26901703

  7. Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogonek, Justyna; Kralj Juric, Mateja; Ghimire, Sakhila; Varanasi, Pavankumar Reddy; Holler, Ernst; Greinix, Hildegard; Weissinger, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The timely reconstitution and regain of function of a donor-derived immune system is of utmost importance for the recovery and long-term survival of patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Of note, new developments such as umbilical cord blood or haploidentical grafts were associated with prolonged immunodeficiency due to delayed immune reconstitution, raising the need for better understanding and enhancing the process of immune reconstitution and finding strategies to further optimize these transplant procedures. Immune reconstitution post-HSCT occurs in several phases, innate immunity being the first to regain function. The slow T cell reconstitution is regarded as primarily responsible for deleterious infections with latent viruses or fungi, occurrence of graft-versus-host disease, and relapse. Here we aim to summarize the major steps of the adaptive immune reconstitution and will discuss the importance of immune balance in patients after HSCT. PMID:27909435

  8. Kidney Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Menu Search Home Prevention Kidney Disease Patients Organ Donation & Transplantation Professionals Events Advocacy Donate A to Z Health ... Tests for Transplant Care After Kidney Transplant Common Organ Donation and Transplantation Terms The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) is the ...

  9. Rhabdomyolysis due to Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole Administration following a Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Augustyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis, a syndrome of muscle necrosis, is a life-threatening event. Here we describe the case of a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia who underwent a haploidentical stem cell transplant and subsequently developed rhabdomyolysis after beginning trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX prophylaxis therapy. Rechallenge with TMP/SMX resulted in a repeat episode of rhabdomyolysis and confirmed the association. Withdrawal of TMP/SMX led to sustained normalization of creatine kinase levels in the patient. A high index of suspicion is necessary to identify TMP/SMX as the cause of rhabdomyolysis in immunocompromised patients.

  10. Incidence of extramedullary relapse after haploidentical SCT for advanced AML/myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, S; Ikegame, K; Kaida, K; Taniguchi, K; Kato, R; Inoue, T; Fujioka, T; Tamaki, H; Okada, M; Soma, T; Ogawa, H

    2012-05-01

    Extramedullary (EM) relapse of leukemia after allo-SCT in patients with AML/myelodysplastic syndrome has been increasingly reported. The reduced effectiveness of the GVL effect in EM sites, as compared with BM, has been suggested to underlie this problem. We retrospectively analyzed the pattern of relapse after haploidentical SCT (haplo-SCT), performed as the first or second SCT. Among 38 patients who received haplo-SCT as their first SCT, the cumulative incidences of BM and EM relapse at 3 years were 40.5 and 10.9%, respectively. Among 19 patients who received haplo-SCT as their second SCT, the cumulative incidences of BM and EM relapse were 30.9 and 31.9%, respectively. Moreover, most of the patients who underwent repeat haplo-SCT for the treatment of EM relapse had further EM relapse at other sites. Post-relapse survival did not differ significantly with different patterns of relapse. The frequent occurrence of EM relapse after haplo-SCT, particularly when performed as a second SCT, suggests that the potent GVL effect elicited by an HLA disparity also occurs preferentially in BM. Our findings emphasize the need for a treatment strategy for EM relapse that recognizes the reduced susceptibility of EM relapse to the GVL effect.

  11. Allogenic bone narrow transplantation in sickle-cell diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Pinto Simões

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Sickle-cell diseases are the most common inherited hemoglobinopathies worldwide. Improvement in survival has been seen in the last decades with the introduction of careful screening and prevention of complications and the introduction of hydroxyurea. Stem-cell transplantation is currently the only curative option for these patients and has been indicated for patients with neurological events, repeated vaso-occlusive crisis, any organ damage or presence of red blood cell antibodies. Related bone-marrow or cord-blood transplant has shown an overall survival of more than 90% with a disease-free survival of 90% in 1,000 patients transplanted in the last decades. The use of unrelated donors unfortunately has not shown the same good results, but better typing methods and improved support may improve the outcome with this source of stem cells in the future. In Brazil, only recently stem cell transplant from related donors has been included in the procedures performed in the public health system. The use of related bone marrow or cord blood and a myeloablative conditioning regimen are considered standard of care for patients with sickle-cell diseases. Transplants with non-myeloablative regimens, unrelated donors or haploidentical donors should be performed only in controlled clinical trials.

  12. Kidney Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type matches or is compatible to your own. Blood-type incompatible transplants are also possible but require additional medical treatment before and after transplant to reduce the risk of organ rejection. These are known as ABO incompatible kidney transplants. ...

  13. Kidney transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... place a healthy kidney into a person with kidney failure . ... Renal transplant; Transplant - kidney ... Becker Y, Witkowski P. Kidney and pancreas transplantation. In: Townsend CM ... Urology . 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016: ...

  14. Development of Augmented Leukemia/Lymphoma-Specific T-Cell Immunotherapy for Deployment with Haploidentical, Hematompoietic Progenitor-Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    adsorbed (105/well) CD19R+ and CD19Rneg Jurkat cells as detected by 1:500 dilution of HRP-conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG (Santa Cruz Biotechnology...Confocal microscopy. Jurkat parental and CD19R+ Jurkat cells were stained with the hybridoma clone mAb 2D3, at a 1:50 dilution for 15 min at 4jC, washed in...selected by flow cytometry that selectively bound to CD19R+ Jurkat cells, but not parental Jurkat cells. The binding of 2D3 can be blocked using a Fc

  15. Comparison of outcomes after unrelated cord blood and unmanipulated haploidentical stem cell transplantation in adults with acute leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruggeri, A; Labopin, M; Sanz, G

    2015-01-01

    with delayed engraftment and higher graft failure in both AML and ALL recipients. In multivariate analysis, UCBT was associated with lower incidence of chronic graft-vs-host disease both in the AML group (hazard ratio (HR)=0.63, P=0.008) and in the ALL group (HR=0.58, P=0.01). Not statistically significant...... no statistically differences on main outcomes after unmanipulated Haplo and UCBT, and both approaches are valid for acute leukemia patients lacking a HLA matched donor. Both strategies expand the donor pool for patients in need....

  16. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Primary Immunodeficiency Patients in the Black Sea Region of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldıran, Alişan; Çeliksoy, Mehmet Halil; Borte, Stephan; Güner, Şükrü Nail; Elli, Murat; Fışgın, Tunç; Özyürek, Emel; Sancak, Recep; Oğur, Gönül

    2017-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a promising curative therapy for many combined primary immunodeficiencies and phagocytic disorders. We retrospectively reviewed pediatric cases of patients diagnosed with primary immunodeficiencies and scheduled for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 22 patients (median age, 6 months; age range, 1 month to 10 years) with various diagnoses who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The patient diagnoses included severe combined immunodeficiency (n=11), Chediak-Higashi syndrome (n=2), leukocyte adhesion deficiency (n=2), MHC class 2 deficiency (n=2), chronic granulomatous syndrome (n=2), hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (n=1), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (n=1), and Omenn syndrome (n=1). Of the 22 patients, 7 received human leukocyte antigen-matched related hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, 12 received haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and 2 received matched unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The results showed that 5 patients had graft failure. Fourteen patients survived, yielding an overall survival rate of 67%. Screening newborn infants for primary immunodeficiency diseases may result in timely administration of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  17. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Primary Immunodeficiency Patients in the Black Sea Region of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alişan Yıldıran

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a promising curative therapy for many combined primary immunodeficiencies and phagocytic disorders. We retrospectively reviewed pediatric cases of patients diagnosed with primary immunodeficiencies and scheduled for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 22 patients (median age, 6 months; age range, 1 month to 10 years with various diagnoses who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The patient diagnoses included severe combined immunodeficiency (n=11, Chediak-Higashi syndrome (n=2, leukocyte adhesion deficiency (n=2, MHC class 2 deficiency (n=2, chronic granulomatous syndrome (n=2, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (n=1, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (n=1, and Omenn syndrome (n=1. Of the 22 patients, 7 received human leukocyte antigen-matched related hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, 12 received haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and 2 received matched unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The results showed that 5 patients had graft failure. Fourteen patients survived, yielding an overall survival rate of 67%. Screening newborn infants for primary immunodeficiency diseases may result in timely administration of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  18. Hair transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this procedure: Scarring Unnatural-looking tufts of new hair growth It is possible that the transplanted hair will ... Most hair transplants result in excellent hair growth within several ... may be needed to create best results. The replaced hairs are ...

  19. Transplant rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shortness of breath and less ability to exercise (heart transplant) Yellow skin color and easy bleeding (liver transplant) ... accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health ...

  20. Intestine Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to know FAQ Living donation What is living donation? Organs Types Being a living donor First steps Being ... Nursing Care of the Renal Transplant Recipient." UNOS Donation and Transplantation Nursing Curriculum . 1996 This Web site is intended ...

  1. Islet Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be successful. However, transplanting islet cells has several advantages over transplanting a pancreas. First, unlike the pancreas ... Email: Sign Up Thank you for signing up ' + ' '); $('.survey-form').show(); }, success: function (data) { $('#survey-errors').remove(); $('. ...

  2. A Depleting Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody as Isolated Conditioning for Bone Marrow Transplantation in the Rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Jäger

    Full Text Available A monoclonal antibody (mAb against the leukocyte common antigen CD45 (RT7 in rats could facilitate bone marrow transplantation (BMT. This study in rats evaluates a depletive rat anti-RT7a mAb as isolated tool for BMT conditioning without using irradiation or any chemotherapeutic / immunosuppressive agent.The model used a CD45 di-allelic polymorphism (RT7a/RT7b. The anti-RT7a mAb was intravenously administered to LEW.1W rats (RT1uRT7a at 5, 10 and 15 mg/kg. 1x108 BM cells of MHC syngeneic (RT1u, MHC disparate (RT1l or MHC haploidentical (RT1u/l donors were transplanted. All BM donor strains carried the RT7b allele so that their CD45+ cells were not affected by the anti-RT7a mAb. Recipients were monitored for reconstitution and donor-chimerism in blood leukocytes.mAb dosages of 5 or 10 mg/kg were myelosuppressive, whereas 15 mg/kg was myeloablative. Multi-lineage donor-chimerism at day 100 indicated engraftment of MHC syngeneic BM after any used mAb dosage (5 mg/kg: 46+/-7%; 10 mg/kg: 62+/-5%; 15 mg/kg: 80+/-4%. MHC disparate BM resulted in autologous reconstitution after conditioning by 10 mg/kg of the mAb and caused transient chimerism ending up in death associated with aplasia after conditioning by 15 mg/kg of the mAb. MHC haploidentical BM (F1 to parental engrafted only after conditioning by 15 mg/kg (chimerism at day 100: 78+/-7%. Abandonment of α/β TCR+ cell depletion from BM grafts impaired the engraftment process after conditioning using 15 mg/kg of the mAb in the MHC syngeneic setting (2 of 6 recipients failed to engraft and the MHC haploidentical setting (3 of 6 recipients failed.This depletive anti-RT7a mAb is myelosuppressive and conditions for engraftment of MHC syngeneic BM. The mAb also facilitates engraftment of MHC haploidentical BM, if a myeloablative dose is used. RT7b expressing, BM-seeded α/β TCR+ cells seem to impair the engraftment process after myeloablative mAb conditioning.

  3. Reduction of Relapse after Unrelated Donor Stem Cell Transplantation by KIR-Based Graft Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Silke; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2017-01-01

    Besides donor T cells, natural killer (NK) cells are considered to have a major role in preventing relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). After T-cell-depleted haploidentical HSCT, a strong NK alloreactivity has been described. These effects have been attributed to killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). Abundant reports suggest a major role of KIR not only on outcome after haploidentical HSCT but also in the unrelated donor setting. In this review, we give a brief overview of the mechanism of NK cell activation, nomenclature of KIR haplotypes, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) groups, and distinct models for prediction of NK cell alloreactivity. It can be concluded that KIR-ligand mismatch seems to provoke adverse effects in unrelated donor HSCT with reduced overall survival and increased risk for high-grade acute graft-versus-host disease. The presence of activating KIR, as seen in KIR haplotype B, as well as the patient’s HLA C1/x haplotype might reduce relapse in myeloid malignancies. PMID:28228753

  4. Carinal transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, H; Shirakusa, T

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current techniques of management of carinal lesions are not always satisfactory. Carinal transplantation, if feasible, would be valuable in certain circumstances. METHODS AND RESULTS: Carinal transplantation experiments were performed in dogs. In early cross transplant experiments there were problems in controlling ventilation and in obtaining satisfactory anastomoses, and the animals failed to live for even a few days. In seven subsequent experiments the carinal graft was removed...

  5. Liver Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition Clinical Trials Primary Biliary Cholangitis Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Wilson Disease Liver Transplant View or Print All Sections Definition & ...

  6. Corneal Transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortdal, Jesper Østergaard

    Corneal transplantation has been performed for more than 100 years. Until 15 years ago the state-of-the art type of transplantation was penetrating keratoplasty, but since the start of this millennium, newly designed surgical techniques have developed considerably. Today, the vast majority of ker...

  7. Heart transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hospital for 7 to 21 days after a heart transplant. The first 24 to 48 hours will likely be in ... follow your self-care instructions. Biopsies of the heart muscle are ... after transplant, and then less often after that. This helps ...

  8. Lung transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... transplant surgery include: You are placed on the heart-lung machine. One or both of your lungs are removed. For people who are having a double lung transplant, most or all of the steps from the first side are completed before the second side is ...

  9. Carinal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, H; Shirakusa, T

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current techniques of management of carinal lesions are not always satisfactory. Carinal transplantation, if feasible, would be valuable in certain circumstances. METHODS AND RESULTS: Carinal transplantation experiments were performed in dogs. In early cross transplant experiments there were problems in controlling ventilation and in obtaining satisfactory anastomoses, and the animals failed to live for even a few days. In seven subsequent experiments the carinal graft was removed from one dog and transplanted into a second dog. Two dogs lived for over four months with immunosuppression. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that carinal transplantation can succeed if (1) the calibre of the graft is matched with that of the recipient; (2) there is an abundant blood supply to the graft; (3) appropriate immunosuppression is provided; (4) ventilation is adequate during surgery. Images PMID:1465758

  10. Risk and prevention of graft failure in patients with preexisting donor-specific HLA antibodies undergoing unmanipulated haploidentical SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, S; Maruya, E; Taniguchi, K; Kaida, K; Kato, R; Inoue, T; Fujioka, T; Tamaki, H; Ikegame, K; Okada, M; Soma, T; Hayashi, K; Fujii, N; Onuma, T; Kusunoki, Y; Saji, H; Ogawa, H

    2012-04-01

    A role of donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSA) in graft failure after SCT has been suggested, but the relevance of DSA in unmanipulated haploidentical SCT (haplo-SCT) remains unknown. We prospectively examined HLA antibodies using the Luminex-based single Ag assay for 79 adult patients undergoing unmanipulated haplo-SCT. Among them, 16 (20.2%) were HLA Ab-positive, including five patients with antibodies not corresponding to donor HLA Ags and 11 DSA-positive patients. Of the 11 DSA-positive patients, five received treatments to decrease DSA levels, including two, who received plasma exchange and rituximab, two who received platelet transfusions from healthy-related donors having DSA-corresponding HLA Ags and one who received bortezomib. Platelet transfusion was the most simple and effective treatment option for class I DSA. The cumulative incidence of neutrophil recovery was significantly lower in pretransplant (post-treatment) DSA-positive patients than in DSA-negative patients (61.9 vs 94.4%, P=0.026). Notably, three of five patients with high levels of DSA had graft failure. Donors should be selected on the basis of an evaluation of HLA antibodies. If haplo-SCT from donors with HLA Ags that correspond to high levels of DSA must be performed, then recipients should be treated for DSA to improve the chances of successful donor engraftment.

  11. Clinical evaluation of haploidentical hematopoietic combined with human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells in severe aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lixin; Liu, Zhouyang; Wu, Yamei; Yang, Xueliang; Cao, Yongbin; Li, Xiaohong; Yan, Bei; Li, Songwei; Da, Wanming; Wu, Xiaoxiong

    2018-03-01

    This study not only evaluated the clinical effects of treatment using haploidentical hematopoietic stem cells (haplo-HSCs) combined with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) in patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA), but also investigated the factors related to graft versus host disease (GVHD). Cotransplantation of haplo-HSCs and UC-MSCs was performed in 24 SAA patients. The conditioning regimens consisted of rabbit anti-human T-lymphocyte immunoglobulin (ATG), cyclophosphamide, and fludarabine with or without busulfan. GVHD was prevented using cyclosporine A, ATG, anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody, and mycophenolate material. The incidence of acute GVHD was 50%. The incidence of severe acute GVHD was not related to gender, age, donor-recipient relations, and patient/donor pair, while patient/donor pair (r = 0.541, P = 0.022) was significantly correlated with incidence of chronic GVHD. Upon follow-up for a median of 13 months, 5 of the 24 patients (20.8%) were dead. The survival rates at 3 and 6 months in all patients were 87.5% (21/24) and 83.3% (20/24), respectively. Cotransplantation of haplo-HSCs combined with UC-MSCs was an effective and safe approach for the treatment of patients with SAA. The appropriate conditioning regimen and early treatment for infection also played a critical role in the success of HSCT.

  12. Clinical Relevance of Natural Killer Cells Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne M Palmer, Kamalakannan Rajasekaran, Monica S Thakar, Subramaniam Malarkannan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are one of the first cells to recover following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, and are believed to play an important role in facilitating engraftment or preventing post-transplant infection and tumor recurrence. Recent studies have provided novel insights into the mechanisms by which NK cells mediate these highly clinically relevant immunological functions. In particular, the ability of NK cells to reduce the risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD and increase the graft versus leukemia effect (GVL in the setting of human leukocyte antigen (HLA-haploidentical HSCT highlights their clinical potentials. NK cells also mediate anti-viral protection, in particular against cytomegalovirus (CMV, an infection that causes significant morbidity and mortality following transplant. Another crucial function of NK cells is providing protection against bacterial infections at the mucosal barriers. NK cells achieve this by promoting anti-microbial defenses and regeneration of epithelial cells. These recent exciting findings provide a strong basis for the formulation of novel NK cell-based immunotherapies. In this review, we summarize the recent advances related to the mechanisms, functions, and future clinical prospects of NK cells that can impact post-transplant outcomes.

  13. Major Histocompatibility Complex and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Beyond the Classical HLA Polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Bertaina

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT represents a curative treatment for many patients with hematological malignant or non-malignant disorders. Evaluation of potential donors for HSCT includes a rigorous assessment of the human leukocyte antigens (HLA match status of family members, and the identification of suitable unrelated donors. Genes encoding transplantation antigens are placed both within and outside the major histocompatibility complex (MHC. The human MHC is located on the short arm of chromosome 6 and contains a series of genes encoding two distinct types of highly polymorphic cell surface glycoproteins. Donors for HSCT are routinely selected based on the level of matching for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1 loci. However, disease relapse, graft-versus-host-disease, and infection remain significant risk factors of morbidity and mortality. In the same breath, in high-risk patients, graft-versus-leukemia effects inherent in HLA mismatching play a substantial immunological role to limit the recurrence of post-transplant disease. The definition of a suitable donor is ever changing, shaped not only by current typing technology, but also by the specific transplant procedure. Indeed, a more complete understanding of permissible HLA mismatches and the role of Killer Immunoglobulin-like receptors’ genes increases the availability of HLA-haploidentical and unrelated donors.

  14. Major Histocompatibility Complex and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Beyond the Classical HLA Polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaina, Alice; Andreani, Marco

    2018-02-22

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) represents a curative treatment for many patients with hematological malignant or non-malignant disorders. Evaluation of potential donors for HSCT includes a rigorous assessment of the human leukocyte antigens (HLA) match status of family members, and the identification of suitable unrelated donors. Genes encoding transplantation antigens are placed both within and outside the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The human MHC is located on the short arm of chromosome 6 and contains a series of genes encoding two distinct types of highly polymorphic cell surface glycoproteins. Donors for HSCT are routinely selected based on the level of matching for HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1 loci. However, disease relapse, graft-versus-host-disease, and infection remain significant risk factors of morbidity and mortality. In the same breath, in high-risk patients, graft-versus-leukemia effects inherent in HLA mismatching play a substantial immunological role to limit the recurrence of post-transplant disease. The definition of a suitable donor is ever changing, shaped not only by current typing technology, but also by the specific transplant procedure. Indeed, a more complete understanding of permissible HLA mismatches and the role of Killer Immunoglobulin-like receptors' genes increases the availability of HLA-haploidentical and unrelated donors.

  15. Organ Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here for a deeper conversation on this topic led by Hastings Director of Research Josephine Johnston. Sorry, ... accept people without insurance. Transplant teams rarely consider anyone over 75 years of age. Some centers exclude ...

  16. Hair Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Hair Transplants Before (left) and after (right) - top ...

  17. Cornea Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Swelling of the cornea Signs and symptoms of cornea rejection In some cases, your body's immune system ... the risks of the procedure. Finding a donor cornea Most corneas used in cornea transplants come from ...

  18. Liver Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Liver Transplant Back In ...

  19. Kidney-Pancreas Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Menu Search Home Prevention Kidney Disease Patients Organ Donation & Transplantation Professionals Events Advocacy Donate A to Z Health ... Tests for Transplant Care After Kidney Transplant Common Organ Donation and Transplantation Terms The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) is the ...

  20. Co-infusion of haplo-identical CD19-chimeric antigen receptor T cells and stem cells achieved full donor engraftment in refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Cai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elderly patients with relapsed and refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL have poor prognosis. Autologous CD19 chimeric antigen receptor-modified T (CAR-T cells have potentials to cure patients with B cell ALL; however, safety and efficacy of allogeneic CD19 CAR-T cells are still undetermined. Case presentation We treated a 71-year-old female with relapsed and refractory ALL who received co-infusion of haplo-identical donor-derived CD19-directed CAR-T cells and mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC following induction chemotherapy. Undetectable minimal residual disease by flow cytometry was achieved, and full donor cell engraftment was established. The transient release of cytokines and mild fever were detected. Significantly elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase, alanine transaminase, bilirubin and glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase were observed from days 14 to 18, all of which were reversible after immunosuppressive therapy. Conclusions Our preliminary results suggest that co-infusion of haplo-identical donor-derived CAR-T cells and mobilized PBSCs may induce full donor engraftment in relapsed and refractory ALL including elderly patients, but complications related to donor cell infusions should still be cautioned. Trial registration Allogeneic CART-19 for Elderly Relapsed/Refractory CD19+ ALL. NCT02799550

  1. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for thalassemia major in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Mathews

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT is the only currently available curative treatment for thalassemia major. Since it was first done in 1981, several thousand patients have benefited from it and it is now possible to offer this treatment in different parts of the world with good results. With better risk stratification and supportive care, the results of allo-SCT are now very good even in high risk patients who have significant iron overload related organ dysfunction. The improvements have mainly been in the conditioning strategies with less toxic myeloablation and management of the complications of SCT. However, several challenges remain. Transplant related complications still cause significant morbidity and mortality. There is data to show that the results of transplantation as best if done in well transfused and chelated patients <7 years of age. As only a third of the patients will have a matched related donor, there is need for investigating SCT with alternative donors. Experience with SCT for thalassemia major from matched unrelated donors or haplo-identical donors is still limited but needs further exploration. Adequate management needs to be provided post-SCT for all pre-existing complications particularly iron chelation to prevent further organ dysfunction. Systematic follow-up is needed to measure long term outcomes. The biggest challenges in India are the cost of this treatment and access to centres capable of providing this treatment. With greater support from the government, health insurance and philanthropic programs, there has been a rapid increase in the number of SCTs for thalassemia major in India. The number centres providing this treatment are also increasing making this curative treatment more widely available in India.

  2. Cadaveric transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokal R

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation is already the optimum treatment for terminal renal failure. Donor organ shortage means that there are large number of patients on dialysis awaiting this treatment. This has in some countries led to unacceptable unscrupulous practices of live non-related graft donation. The outcome of graft and patient after transplantation has improved significantly based on a better understanding of immunopathology, immunosuppression and tissue typing. The future is promising and xenografting may well solve the organ shortage but undoubtedly will raise other issues.

  3. Pancreas transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snider, J.F.; Hunter, D.W.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Letourneau, J.G.

    1989-01-01

    Pancreas transplantation can be complicated by vascular thrombosis, stenosis, or anastomotic leak, complications that predispose to transplant pancreatectomy. The relative roles of noninvasive radiologic studies in such vascular complications have been correlated with angiographic or pathologic data. The results of 54 scintigraphic studies, 25 CT studies, 16 sonograms, and 23 color Doppler examinations have been correlated with those of 40 angiograms and 28 pathologic studies in a population of 185 recipients. CT (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 75%; accuracy, 92%) and US (sensitivity, 88%; specificity, 80%; accuracy, 85%) were most helpful in noninvasive screening for vascular complications, while angiography remains nearly definite in the radiographic diagnosis of these problems

  4. Cerebral Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Demonstrates Long-Term Effect of Bone Marrow Transplantation in α-Mannosidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Else R; Lund, Allan M; Thomsen, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    α-Mannosidosis, OMIM #248500, is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by acidic α-mannosidase deficiency. Treatment options include bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and, possibly in the future, enzyme replacement therapy. Brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) enables non......-invasive monitoring of cerebral treatment effect. Accumulated cerebral mannose-containing oligosaccharides were demonstrated by MRS in a patient who at age 2 years and 11 months received a BMT from a haploidentical non-carrier sibling. The cerebral mannose-containing oligosaccharides had disappeared as early as 9......½ months after BMT. MRS furthermore demonstrated the persistent treatment effect at regular intervals up to 5½ years after BMT. MRS is a non-invasive tool that can demonstrate the effect of BMT treatment. Likewise, MRS may be used to demonstrate the cerebral effect of other potential treatments...

  5. Reappraising the timing of transplant for indolent non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capria, Saveria; Barberi, Walter; Perrone, Salvatore; Ferretti, Antonietta; Salaroli, Adriano; Annechini, Giorgia; D'Elia, Gianna Maria; Foà, Robin; Pulsoni, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    Indolent non-Hodgkin lymphomas (iNHL) remain incurable with standard approaches. The timing of autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) is changing following the introduction of new drugs that can potentially defer the transplant, improved reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) and haploidentical allogeneic SCT (allo-SCT). The most relevant aspects concerning the role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the management of iNHL are discussed. Literature search methodology included examination of PubMed index and meeting presentations. Expert commentary: ASCT is not currently employed as consolidation in first-line, being reserved to patients with refractory/relapsed disease. The curative potential of graft-versus-lymphoma (GVL) after RIC allo-SCT could be particularly beneficial in patients with iNHL relapsing after ASCT. This scenario could be modified in the near future by better definition of high-risk patients at diagnosis, by the improvement of minimal residual disease (MRD) evaluation and by the introduction of new drugs in the therapeutic algorithm.

  6. [Hematopoietic reconstitution and prognosis of different types of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe aplastic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Wu, Depei; Hu, Shaoyan; Jin, Song; Wang, Xiuli; Miao, Miao; Chen, Jia; Han, Yue; Tang, Xiaowen; Qiu, Huiying; Sun, Aining; Jin, Zhengming; Fu, Chengcheng; Ma, Xiao; Chen, Feng

    2015-08-01

    To compare the differences between hematopoietic reconstitution and longterm prognosis of patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) after HLA- matched sibling donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(MSD-HSCT), Haploidentical HSCT(Haplo-HSCT), unrelated donor allogeneic HSCT(UD-HSCT)and umbilical cord blood HSCT(UCB-HSCT). In this retrospective study, 63 patients with SAA who received HSCT in the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University between May 2008 and December 2013 were enrolled. The subjects were divided into 4 groups according to the transplantation types. The hematopoietic reconstitution, the incidence of acute graft-versushost disease(aGVHD)and 5- year survival rate after transplantation were compared. All 53 subjects who received MSD-HSCT, Haplo-HSCT and UD-HSCT achieved hematopoietic reconstitution. Of them, the recovery of neutrophil and platelet were not significantly different(P0.05). MSD-HSCT, Haplo-HSCT and UD-HSCT had no statistically significance in terms of hematopoietic reconstitution or prognosis. Although hematopoietic reconstitution of UCB-HSCT was lower than other transplantation types, but no significant difference in overall prognosis. So if HLA-matched sibling donor is not available, SAA patients can choose Haplo- HSCT, UD - HSCT or UCB- HSCT with comparable efficacy to MSD- HSCT, as an alternative therapy.

  7. Eyebrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, G D

    2001-04-01

    Reconstruction of the eyebrow has historically been accomplished with temporal scalp pedicle flap formation or free composite scalp grafts. These two techniques may be associated with substantial morbidity and a false, overly dense eyebrow appearance. Hair transplantation of the eyebrows has been described with excellent results, but is relatively underreported in the literature. To determine whether modern techniques of micrograft hair transplantation can suitably re-create an aesthetic eyebrow in a case of iatrogenic eyebrow alopecia. A 33-year-old woman with iatrogenic eyebrow alopecia underwent four sessions of eyebrow micrograft hair transplantation to re-create both eyebrows. Suitable aesthetic eyebrows were re-created in a symmetric fashion with proper hair orientation. The process was time consuming and tedious, but highly effective. Eyebrow transplantation is a suitable alternative to pedicle flap formation and composite scalp grafting. It is a straightforward procedure that can be performed in the office under local anesthesia with minimal attendant morbidity. The result may be superior to that seen with more involved eyebrow replacement procedures.

  8. Intestine transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeja Pintar

    2011-02-01

    Conclusion: Intestine transplantation is reserved for patients with irreversible intestinal failure due to short gut syndrome requiring total paranteral nutrition with no possibility of discontinuation and loss of venous access for patient maintenance. In these patients complications of underlying disease and long-term total parenteral nutrition are present.

  9. Heart Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  10. Transplant Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altınörs, Nur; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to review and discuss the great variety of ethical issues related to organ donation, organ procurement, transplant activities, and new ethical problems created as a result of technologic and scientific developments. An extensive literature survey was made, and expert opinions were obtained. The gap between demand and supply of organs for transplant has yielded to organ trafficking, organ tourism, and commercialism. This problem seems to be the most important issue, and naturally there are ethical dilemmas related to it. A wide number of ideas have been expressed on the subject, and different solutions have been proposed. The struggle against organ trafficking and commercialism should include legislation, efforts to increase deceased-donor donations, and international cooperation. China's policy to procure organs from prisoners sentenced to death is unethical, and the international community should exert more pressure on the Chinese government to cease this practice. Each particular ethical dilemma should be taken separately and managed.

  11. Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Graft-versus-host disease: A potential risk when stem cells come from donors If you receive a transplant ... medications and blood products into your body. Collecting stem cells for transplant If a transplant using your own ...

  12. Sirolimus, Tacrolimus, Thymoglobulin and Rituximab as Graft-versus-Host-Disease Prophylaxis in Patients Undergoing Haploidentical and HLA Partially Matched Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-26

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Graft Versus Host Disease; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

  13. Transplante uterino

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Margarida Teixeira Farias Meira de, 1992-

    2016-01-01

    Trabalho Final do Curso de Mestrado Integrado em Medicina, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Lisboa, 2016 A infertilidade de causa uterina afecta cerca de 3-5% da população geral, sendo a adopção e a gestação de substituição as únicas opções para estes casais atingirem a parentalidade, dado que é um problema ainda sem tratamento. Nas últimas décadas, foram realizados diversos estudos animais com o objectivo de demonstrar a viabilidade, segurança e eficácia do transplante uterino como ...

  14. Monitoring of pathogen-specific T-cell immune reconstitution after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, Shigeo; Kapp, Markus; Einsele, Hermann

    2013-09-17

    The clinical outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been significantly improved during the last decades with regard to the reduction in organ failure, infection, and severe acute graft-versus-host disease. However, severe complications due to infectious diseases are still one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic HSCT, in particular in patients receiving haploidentical HSCT or cord blood transplant due to a slow and often incomplete immune reconstitution. In order to improve the immune control of pathogens without an increased risk of alloreactivity, adoptive immunotherapy using highly enriched pathogen-specific T cells offers a promising approach. In order to identify patients who are at high risk for infectious diseases, several monitoring assays have been developed with potential for the guidance of immunosuppressive drugs and adoptive immunotherapy in clinical practice. In this article, we aim to give a comprehensive overview regarding current developments of T-cell monitoring techniques focusing on T cells against viruses and fungi. In particular, we will focus on rather simple, fast, non-labor-intensive, cellular assays which could be integrated in routine clinical screening approaches.

  15. Alloreactive natural killer cells for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia: from stem cell transplantation to adoptive immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana eRuggeri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer cells express activating and inhibitory receptors which recognize MHC class I alleles, termed Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIRs. Preclinical and clinical data from haploidentical T-cell depleted stem cell transplantation have demonstrated that alloreactive KIR-L mismatched natural killer cells play a major role as effectors against acute myeloid leukemia. Outside the transplantation setting, several reports have proven the safety and feasibility of natural killer cell infusion in acute myeloid leukemia patients and, in some cases, provided evidence that transferred NK cells are functionally alloreactive and may have a role in disease control. Aim of the present work is to briefly summarize the most recent advances in the field by moving from the first preclinical and clinical demonstration of donor NK alloreactivity in the transplantation setting to the most recent attempts of exploiting the use of alloreactive NK cell infusion as a means of adoptive immunotherapy against acute myeloid leukemia. Altogether, these data highlight the pivotal role of NK cells for the development of novel immunological approaches in the clinical management of acute myeloid leukemia.

  16. Organ transplantation in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Matri, Aziz; Ben Abdallah, Taieb

    2015-04-01

    Kidney transplants were first performed in Tunisia in 1986, and transplants soon extended to other organs including the heart, liver, and pancreas. Live-related donor and deceased-donor kidney transplants were both began in the summer of 1986. An organ procurement and transplant law was passed in March 1991, and the National Centre for Advancement of Organ Transplantation was created in 1995. The number of transplantation units has increased to 7 throughout the country, and the yearly transplant number has progressively increased to 139 in 2010, including 20% from deceased kidney donors. Despite these gains, the need continues to grow. Heart transplants began in January 1993, and Tunisia and Jordan are currently the only Arab countries where it is practiced. However, only 16 patients have received a heart transplant as of 2004, and the number of recipients has decreased in the past 10 years. Liver transplants are rare in other Arab countries, but began in Tunisia in January 1998. Over 10 years, 38 patients benefited from this procedure. After a few years of stagnation, the number of liver transplants is increasing. While all types of transplantation are needed, kidney transplantation is a priority in Tunisia. The target is to perform 400 transplants annually, which would require a long-term strategy to provide full financial coverage using the National Health Insurance Funds in both the public and private sectors.

  17. Transplante de intestino delgado Small intestine transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Henrique Ferreira Galvão

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Avanços da biotecnologia e o desenvolvimento de novas drogas imunossupressoras melhoraram os resultados do transplante de intestino delgado. Esse transplante é atualmente indicado para casos especiais da falência intestinal. OBJETIVO: A presente revisão realça os recentes desenvolvimentos na área do transplante de intestino delgado. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Mais de 600 publicações de transplante de intestino delgado foram revisadas. O desenvolvimento da pesquisa, novas estratégias de imunossupressão, monitorização do enxerto e do receptor, e avanços na técnica cirúrgica são discutidos. RESULTADOS: Realizaram-se cerca de 700 transplante de intestino delgado em 55 centros: 44% intestino-fígado, 41% enxerto intestinal isolado e 15% transplante multivisceral. Rejeição e infecção são as principais limitações desse transplante. Sobrevida de 5 anos na experiência internacional é de 46% para o transplante de intestino isolado, 43% para o intestino-fígado e de cerca de 30% para o transplante multivisceral. Sobrevidas prolongadas são mais freqüentes nos centros com maior experiência. Em série de 165 transplantes intestinais na Universidade de Pittsburgh, PA, EUA, foi relatada sobrevida do paciente maior do que 75% no primeiro ano, 54% em 5 anos e 42% em 10 anos. Mais de 90% desses pacientes assumem dieta oral irrestrita. CONCLUSÃO: O transplante de intestino delgado evoluiu de estratégia experimental para uma alternativa viável no tratamento da falência intestinal permanente. Promover o refinamento da terapia imunossupressora, do manejo e prevenção de infecções, da técnica cirúrgica e da indicação e seleção adequada dos pacientes é crucial para melhorar a sobrevida desse transplante.BACKGROUND: Significant progress has been made in clinical small bowel transplantation over the last decade mainly due advances in biotechnology and new immunosuppressive regiments. This transplantation has now been indicated

  18. [Promoting Living Kidney Transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2016-04-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best approach for treating patients with end stage renal disease, offering patients the best chance of returning to normal health. While the techniques used in kidney transplantation surgery are mature and highly successful, there is a severe shortage of donor organs. Statistics show a serious imbalance between organ donations and patients on the waiting list for organ transplantation. Moreover, evidence from empirical studies has shown a better transplantation outcome for patients who receive living donor transplantation than for those who receive organs from cadavers. Although using relatives as donors offers an effective way to reduce the problem of organ shortage, this strategy faces many challenges and many other factors affect the promotion of living donor transplantation. This article elaborates how cultural and psychological factors, kidney transplantation awareness, and ethics and laws impact upon living kidney donations and then proposes coping strategies for promoting living kidney transplantation.

  19. BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION. AUTOLOGOUS TRANSPLANTS: Oct 1986 - Dec 2007. Multiple Myeloma 90. NHL 39. Hodgkins lymphoma 19. AML 36. APML 9. ALL 2. Amyloidosis 2. Granulocytic Sarcoma 1.

  20. Life After Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... however you can Daughter's dying wish became mother's motivation Be The Match Blog Stories Anna, transplant recipient ... Jobs Job application FAQs E-Verify Career events Employee benefits About us Bea, transplant recipient Be The ...

  1. Choosing a Transplant Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... however you can Daughter's dying wish became mother's motivation Be The Match Blog Stories Anna, transplant recipient ... Jobs Job application FAQs E-Verify Career events Employee benefits About us Bea, transplant recipient Be The ...

  2. Treatment Before Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... however you can Daughter's dying wish became mother's motivation Be The Match Blog Stories Anna, transplant recipient ... Jobs Job application FAQs E-Verify Career events Employee benefits About us Bea, transplant recipient Be The ...

  3. Cord Blood and Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... however you can Daughter's dying wish became mother's motivation Be The Match Blog Stories Anna, transplant recipient ... Jobs Job application FAQs E-Verify Career events Employee benefits About us Bea, transplant recipient Be The ...

  4. Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for advanced systemic mastocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustun, Celalettin; Reiter, Andreas; Scott, Bart L; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Damaj, Gandhi; Kreil, Sebastian; Shanley, Ryan; Hogan, William J; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Shore, Tsiporah; Baurmann, Herrad; Stuart, Robert; Gruhn, Bernd; Doubek, Michael; Hsu, Jack W; Tholouli, Eleni; Gromke, Tanja; Godley, Lucy A; Pagano, Livio; Gilman, Andrew; Wagner, Eva Maria; Shwayder, Tor; Bornhäuser, Martin; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B; Böhm, Alexandra; Vercellotti, Gregory; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Schmid, Christoph; Rabitsch, Werner; Pullarkat, Vinod; Legrand, Faezeh; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Saber, Wael; Barrett, John; Hermine, Olivier; Hagglund, Hans; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Popat, Uday; Alyea, Edwin P; Devine, Steven; Deeg, H Joachim; Weisdorf, Daniel; Akin, Cem; Valent, Peter

    2014-10-10

    Advanced systemic mastocytosis (SM), a fatal hematopoietic malignancy characterized by drug resistance, has no standard therapy. The effectiveness of allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (alloHCT) in SM remains unknown. In a global effort to define the value of HCT in SM, 57 patients with the following subtypes of SM were evaluated: SM associated with clonal hematologic non-mast cell disorders (SM-AHNMD; n = 38), mast cell leukemia (MCL; n = 12), and aggressive SM (ASM; n = 7). Median age of patients was 46 years (range, 11 to 67 years). Donors were HLA-identical (n = 34), unrelated (n = 17), umbilical cord blood (n = 2), HLA-haploidentical (n = 1), or unknown (n = 3). Thirty-six patients received myeloablative conditioning (MAC), and 21 patients received reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC). Responses in SM were observed in 40 patients (70%), with complete remission in 16 patients (28%). Twelve patients (21%) had stable disease, and five patients (9%) had primary refractory disease. Overall survival (OS) at 3 years was 57% for all patients, 74% for patients with SM-AHNMD, 43% for those with ASM, and 17% for those with MCL. The strongest risk factor for poor OS was MCL. Survival was also lower in patients receiving RIC compared with MAC and in patients having progression compared with patients having stable disease or response. AlloHCT was associated with long-term survival in patients with advanced SM. Although alloHCT may be considered as a viable and potentially curative therapeutic option for advanced SM in the meantime, given that this is a retrospective analysis with no control group, the definitive role of alloHCT will need to be determined by a prospective trial. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  5. Blood and Bone MarrowTransplant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics / Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Also known as Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant , Hematopoietic Cell Transplant , Autologous Transplant , Allogeneic Transplant A blood or bone marrow ...

  6. Organ Transplants in Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baigenzhin, Abay; Doskaliyev, Zhaksylyk; Tuganbekova, Saltanat; Zharikov, Serik; Altynova, Sholpan; Gaipov, Abduzhappar

    2015-11-01

    The Republic of Kazakhstan is one of the fastest developing countries in the world and has a health care system that is unique in Central Asia. Its organ transplant services are also developing rapidly. We aimed to analyze and briefly report on the current status of organ transplant in the Republic of Kazakhstan. We analyzed organ transplant activities in that country for the period 2012 to 2014. All data were collected from the official database of the National Transplant Coordinating Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. At the end of 2014, the number of transplant centers had increased to 10, three of which could perform multiorgan transplants; during the same period, the number of deceased-donor organ-donating hospitals increased up to 37. By 2013, the transplant activity rate for all centers had reached 9.22 per million population. During the previous 3 years (2012-2014), there was a 3-fold increase in the number of living donors and an 18-fold increase in the number of kidney transplants. Between 2012 and 2014, the number of living-donor liver transplants increased from 17 to 25, and the number of deceased-donor transplants increased from 3 to 7. During the last 3 years (2012-2014), the number of heart transplants increased to 7 cases. During the last 3 years (2012-2014), Kazakhstan achieved a significant improvement in the organization of its transplant services, and a noticeable upward trend in the system continues.

  7. Single-centre experience of allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplant in paediatric patients in Cape Town, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A van Eyssen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplant (Allo-HSCT is a specialised and costly intervention, associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It is used to treat a broad range of paediatric conditions. South Africa (SA is an upper middle-income country with limitations on healthcare spending. The role of paediatric Allo-HSCT in this setting is reviewed. Objectives. To review paediatric patients who underwent Allo-HSCT at the Groote Schuur Hospital/University of Cape Town Private Academic Hospital transplant unit in Cape Town, South Africa, and received post-transplant care at Red Cross War Memorial Children’s Hospital, over the period January 2006 - December 2014 in respect of indications for the transplant, donor sources, conditioning regimens, treatment-related morbidity and overall survival (OS. Methods. A retrospective analysis of patient records was performed and a database was created in Microsoft Access. Descriptive analyses of relevant demographic, clinical and laboratory data were performed. Summary statistics of demographic and clinical parameters were derived with Excel. OS was calculated from the date of transplant to the date of an event (death or last follow-up using the Kaplan-Meier method in Statistica. Results. A total of 48 children received Allo-HSCT: 24 for haematological malignancies, 20 for non-oncological haematological conditions, 3 for immune disorders and 1 for adrenoleukodystrophy. There were 28 boys (median age 7.5 years and 20 girls (8.5 years. There were 31 sibling matched peripheral-blood stem cell (PBSC transplants and 1 maternal haploidentical PBSC transplant. Stem cells were mobilised from bone marrow into peripheral blood by administering granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to donors. PBSCs were harvested by apheresis. Eight patients received 10/10 HLA-matched grafts from unrelated donors. Six were PBSC grafts and 2 were bone marrow grafts. Three of the unrelated PBSC grafts were from

  8. Single-centre experience of allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplant in paediatric patients in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eyssen, A; Novitsky, N; De Wit, P; Schlaphoff, T; Thomas, V; Pillay, D; Hendricks, M; Davidson, A

    2017-02-27

    Allogeneic haemopoietic stem cell transplant (Allo-HSCT) is a specialised and costly intervention, associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It is used to treat a broad range of paediatric conditions. South Africa (SA) is an upper middle-income country with limitations on healthcare spending. The role of paediatric Allo-HSCT in this setting is reviewed. To review paediatric patients who underwent Allo-HSCT at the Groote Schuur Hospital/University of Cape Town Private Academic Hospital transplant unit in Cape Town, South Africa, and received post-transplant care at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, over the period January 2006 - December 2014 in respect of indications for the transplant, donor sources, conditioning regimens, treatment-related morbidity and overall survival (OS). A retrospective analysis of patient records was performed and a database was created in Microsoft Access. Descriptive analyses of relevant demographic, clinical and laboratory data were performed. Summary statistics of demographic and clinical parameters were derived with Excel. OS was calculated from the date of transplant to the date of an event (death) or last follow-up using the Kaplan-Meier method in Statistica. A total of 48 children received Allo-HSCT: 24 for haematological malignancies, 20 for non-oncological haematological conditions, 3 for immune disorders and 1 for adrenoleukodystrophy. There were 28 boys (median age 7.5 years) and 20 girls (8.5 years). There were 31 sibling matched peripheral-blood stem cell (PBSC) transplants and 1 maternal haploidentical PBSC transplant. Stem cells were mobilised from bone marrow into peripheral blood by administering granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to donors. PBSCs were harvested by apheresis. Eight patients received 10/10 HLA-matched grafts from unrelated donors. Six were PBSC grafts and 2 were bone marrow grafts. Three of the unrelated PBSC grafts were from SA donors. Eight transplants used umbilical cord blood

  9. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: a report from the Societe Francaise de Greffe de Moelle et de Therapie Cellulaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sophie; Labopin, Myriam; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Delaunay, Jacques; Dhedin, Nathalie; Deconinck, Eric; Michallet, Mauricette; Robin, Marie; De Revel, Thierry; Bernard, Marc; Vey, Norbert; Lioure, Bruno; Lapusan, Simona; Tabrizi, Reza; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Huynh, Anne; Beguin, Yves; Socié, Gérard; Dreyfus, François; Fenaux, Pierre; Mohty, Mohamad

    2013-05-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) is a severe disease for which allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) remains the only potentially curative treatment. We describe a retrospective study determining prognostic factors for outcome after allo-SCT in consecutive 73 patients with CMML reported to the SFGM-TC registry between 1992 and 2009. At diagnosis, median age was 53 yrs, and 36% patients had palpable splenomegaly (SPM). 48, 13, and 9 patients had good, intermediate, and poor risk karyotype, respectively, according to IPSS, 61% patients had CMML-1, and 39% had CMML-2. 41/31/1 cases had an HLA-identical sibling, an unrelated and haploidentical donor, respectively. 43 patients received reduced-intensity conditioning. With a median follow-up of 23 month, acute grade 2-4 and chronic GVHD developed in 21 and 25 patients, respectively. The 3-year OS, NRM (non-relapse mortality),EFS, and CIR (cumulative incidence of relapse) were 32%, 36%, 29% and 35%, respectively. OS was not influenced by the CR status, marrow blasts% at allo-SCT, prior treatments, and cGVHD. Using multivariate analysis, year of transplant transplantation is a valid treatment option for patients with CMML, and its outcome has improved with YOT > 2004. Splenomegaly seems to be a negative factor of OS and EFS in this series. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Pediatric Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, Nidhi; Yazigi, Nada

    2017-06-01

    Excellent outcomes over the last 3 decades have made liver transplantation the treatment of choice for many advanced liver disorders. This success also opened liver transplantation to new indications such as liver tumors and metabolic disorders. The emergence of such new indications for liver transplantation is bringing a new stream of patients along with disease-specific challenges. The cumulative number of liver transplant recipients is peaking, requiring novel systems of health care delivery that meet the needs of this special patient population. This article reviews updates and new development in pediatric liver transplantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Immune reconstitution after allogeneic transplantation and expanding options for immunomodulation: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seggewiss, Ruth; Einsele, Hermann

    2010-05-13

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has advanced to a common procedure for treating also older patients with malignancies and immunodeficiency disorders by redirecting the immune system. Unfortunately, cure is often hampered by relapse of the underlying disease, graft-versus-host disease, or severe opportunistic infections, which account for the majority of deaths after HSCT. Enhancing immune reconstitution is therefore an area of intensive research. An increasing variety of approaches has been explored preclinically and clinically: the application of cytokines, keratinocyte growth factor, growth hormone, cytotoxic lymphocytes, and mesenchymal stem cells or the blockade of sex hormones. New developments of allogeneic HSCT, for example, umbilical cord blood or haploidentical graft preparations leading to prolonged immunodeficiency, have further increased the need to improve immune reconstitution. Although a slow T-cell reconstitution is regarded as primarily responsible for deleterious infections with viruses and fungi, graft-versus-host disease, and relapse, the importance of innate immune cells for disease and infection control is currently being reevaluated. The groundwork has been prepared for the creation of individualized therapy partially based on genetic features of the underlying disease. We provide an update on selected issues of development in this fast evolving field; however, we do not claim completeness.

  12. MRI of pancreatic transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studniarek, M.; Deschamps, P.Y.; Finas, B.; Pinet, A.

    1993-01-01

    The value of MRI in assessing pancreatic transplants was studied in 37 patients. Sixty-seven MRI examinations were performed in patients with an uncomplicated transplant, 14 in patients with poorly functioning transplant, and 10 in patients with a non-functioning graft. On the basis of 54 follow-up studies, it was shown that the volume of the graft decreased systematically during the 8 months after transplantation. On T1-weighted images the normal transplant was poorly delineated, with an almost homogeneous isointense or slightly hyperintense structure when compared with either renal transplant cortex or muscle. On T2-weighted images the organ was isointense or slightly hypointense compared with fat and hyperintense compared with muscle. T2-weighted delayed echo time image (TR = 2000 ms, TE = 150-200 ms) showed transplanted pancreas as well-delineated, hypointense and with a lobulated structure. This structure was characteristic of normal whole pancreatic grafts. Patent transplant vessels were seen as tubular structures of low signal intensity on T2-weighted short echo time images (TR = 2000 ms, TE = 50 ms). In the 10 patients with a non-functioning pancreatic transplant there were: 4 cases of focal intraparenchymal abnormalities, 6 cases in which the lobular structure was absent, and 4 cases of absence of patent graft main vessels (3 thromboses). There was no configuration of signal intensity of pancreatic parenchyma on MRI which could be considered typical for normal or non-functioning transplant. (orig.)

  13. Infusion of leukocytes from HLA haplo-identical familial donors as an adjuvant in the HLH-2004 protocol to treat the virus-associated adult hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a retrospective study of 26 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Dai, Zhiming; Yang, Nan; Wang, Jin; He, Aili; Wang, Jianli; Zhang, Yang; Meng, Shan; Wang, Baiyan; Sun, Rong; Zhang, Wanggang

    2018-02-01

    Adult hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a fatal disease with poor survival and a limited role of drug therapies. To help to recognize virus and enhance survival, we infused leukocytes derived from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplo-identical familial donors to patients. We retrospectively investigated 26 adult virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (VAHS) patients' medical records from 2006-2017. Eleven of the 26 patients accepted relatives' derived leukocytes infusions in addition to drug therapies recommended in the HLH-2004 protocol. The leukocyte doses ranged from 0.75 to 3.30×10 8 per kilogram of body weight. The other 15 patients accepted immunosuppressive and supportive therapies referred to in the HLH-2004 protocol. We compared the treatment outcomes of the two groups of patients. Patients in the cell infusion group had a lower viral load (P = 0.023) and better laboratory results and prolonged overall survival (60.44 vs. 20.18 weeks, P = 0.047). A factor that might relate to overall survival is platelet count (P = 0.032), except for the leukocyte infusions (P = 0.012). For patients without acceptable donors, infusions of leukocytes from HLA haplo-identical familial donors could be a feasible treatment to prolong overall survival as an adjuvant to drug therapies.

  14. Thoracic organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Richard N; Barr, Mark L; McCullough, Keith P; Egan, Thomas; Garrity, Edward; Jessup, Mariell; Murray, Susan

    2004-01-01

    This article presents an overview of factors associated with thoracic transplantation outcomes over the past decade and provides valuable information regarding the heart, lung, and heart-lung waiting lists and thoracic organ transplant recipients. Waiting list and post-transplant information is used to assess the importance of patient demographics, risk factors, and primary cardiopulmonary disease on outcomes. The time that the typical listed patient has been waiting for a heart, lung, or heart-lung transplant has markedly increased over the past decade, while the number of transplants performed has declined slightly and survival after transplant has plateaued. Waiting list mortality, however, appears to be declining for each organ and for most diseases and high-severity subgroups, perhaps in response to recent changes in organ allocation algorithms. Based on perceived inequity in organ access and in response to a mandate from Health Resources and Services Administration, the lung transplant community is developing a lung allocation system designed to minimize deaths on the waiting list while maximizing the benefit of transplant by incorporating post-transplant survival and quality of life into the algorithm. Areas where improved data collection could inform evolving organ allocation and candidate selection policies are emphasized.

  15. NK cells and other innate lymphoid cells in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eVacca

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells play a major role in the T-cell depleted haploidentical haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT to cure high-risk leukemias. NK cells belong to the expanding family of innate lymphoid cells (ILC. At variance with NK cells, the other ILC populations (ILC1/2/3 are non-cytolytic, while they secrete different patterns of cytokines. ILC provide host defences against viruses, bacteria and parasites, drive lymphoid organogenesis, and contribute to tissue remodelling. In haplo-HSCT patients, the extensive T-cell depletion is required to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD but increases risks of developing a wide range of life-threatening infections. However, these patients may rely on innate defences that are reconstituted more rapidly than the adaptive ones. In this context, ILC may represent important players in the early phases following transplantation. They may contribute to tissue homeostasis/remodelling and lymphoid tissue reconstitution. While the reconstitution of NK cell repertoire and its role in haplo-HSCT have been largely investigated, little information is available on ILC. Of note, CD34+ cells isolated from different sources of HSC, may differentiate in vitro towards various ILC subsets. Moreover, cytokines released from leukemia blasts (e.g. IL-1β may alter the proportions of NK cells and ILC3, suggesting the possibility that leukemia may skew the ILC repertoire. Further studies are required to define the timing of ILC development and their potential protective role after HSCT.

  16. Kidney transplantation after previous liver transplantation: analysis of the organ procurement transplant network database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonwa, Thomas A; McBride, Maureen A; Mai, Martin L; Wadei, Hani M

    2011-07-15

    Patients after liver transplant have a high incidence of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). We investigated kidney transplantation after liver transplantation using the Organ Procurement Transplant Network database. The Organ Procurement Transplant Network database was queried for patients who received kidney transplantation after previous liver transplantation. These patients were compared with patients who received primary kidney transplantation alone during the same time period. Between 1997 and 2008, 157,086 primary kidney transplants were performed. Of these, 680 deceased donor kidney transplants and 410 living donor kidney transplants were performed in previous recipients of liver transplants. The number of kidney after liver transplants performed each year has increased from 37 per year to 124 per year in 2008. The time from liver transplant to kidney transplant increased from 8.2 to 9.0 years for living donor transplants and from 5.4 to 9.6 years for deceased donor. The 1, 3, and 5 year actuarial graft survival in both living donor kidney after liver transplant and deceased donor kidney after liver transplant are less than the kidney transplant alone patients. However, the death-censored graft survivals are equal. The patient survival is also less but is similar to what would be expected in liver transplant recipients who did not have ESRD. In 2008, kidney after liver transplantation represented 0.9% of the total kidney alone transplants performed in the United States. Kidney transplantation is an appropriate therapy for selected patients who develop ESRD after liver transplantation.

  17. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Edmonton, Canada, reported their findings in the New England Journal of Medicine . Their transplant protocol, known as the Edmonton protocol, has since been adapted by transplant centers around the world and continues ... new combination of immunosuppressive medications, also called anti-rejection ...

  18. Liver transplantation : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdonk, R. C.; Van den Berg, A. P.; Slooff, M. J. H.; Porte, R. J.; Haagsma, E. B.

    2007-01-01

    Liver transplantation has been an accepted treatment for end-stage liver disease since the 1980s. Currently it is a highly successful treatment for this indication. The aim of this review is to give a general update on recent developments in the field of liver transplantation. In the last decades

  19. Rehabilitation following hand transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Ericka; Benjamin, Marie-Jose; Sisk, Geoffroy; Sampson, Christian E; Carty, Matthew; Pribaz, Julian J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Talbot, Simon G

    2014-03-01

    Hand allotransplantation can restore motor, sensory and cosmetic functions to upper extremity amputees. Over 70 hand transplant operations have been performed worldwide, but there is little published regarding post-hand transplant rehabilitation. The Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) Hand Transplantation Team's post-hand transplant rehabilitation protocol is presented here. The protocol must be modified to address each transplant recipient's unique needs. It builds on universally used modalities of hand rehabilitation such as splinting, edema and scar management, range of motion exercises, activities of daily living training, electrical stimulation, cognitive training and strengthening. The BWH hand transplant rehabilitation protocol consists of four phases with distinct goals, frequency, and modalities. (1) Pre-operative: functional assessments are completed and goals and expectations of transplantation are established. (2) Initial post-operative (post-operative weeks 1-2): hand protection, minimization of swelling, education, and discharge. (3) Intermediate (post-operative weeks 2-8): therapy aims to prevent and/or decrease scar adhesion, increase tensile strength, flexibility and function, and prevent joint contractures. (4) Late (from 8 weeks forward): maximization of function and strength, and transition to routine activities. The frequency of rehabilitation therapy decreases gradually from the initial to late phases. Rehabilitation therapy after hand transplantation follows a progressive increase in activity in parallel with wound healing and nerve regeneration. Careful documentation of progress and outcomes is essential to demonstrate the utility of interventions and to optimize therapy protocols.

  20. Customizing Fair Use Transplants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K. Yu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, policymakers and commentators across the world have called for the introduction of copyright reform based on the fair use model in the United States. Thus far, Israel, Liberia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka and Taiwan have adopted the fair use regime or its close variants. Other jurisdictions such as Australia, Hong Kong and Ireland have also advanced proposals to facilitate such adoption. This article examines the increasing efforts to transplant fair use into the copyright system based on the U.S. model. It begins by briefly recapturing the strengths and weaknesses of legal transplants. The article then scrutinizes the ongoing effort to transplant fair use from the United States. Specifically, it identifies eight modalities of transplantation. This article concludes with five lessons that can be drawn from studying the ongoing transplant efforts.

  1. Antifungal prophylaxis of patients undergoing allogenetic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in China: a multicenter prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Gao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antifungal prophylaxis is currently regarded as the gold standard in situations with allo-genetic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT. However, the epidemiological information regarding prophylaxis of invasive fungal diseases (IFDs is not clear in China. Methods We report the first large-scale (1053 patients observational study of the prophylaxis and management of IFDs among patients with allo-HSCT in China. Results The incidence rates of IFD after primary antifungal prophylaxis (PAP, secondary antifungal prophylaxis (SAP, and non-prophylaxis were 22.7 vs. 38.6 vs. 68.6 %, respectively (P = 0.0000. The median time from transplantation to IFD was 45 days in PAP patients, 18 days in SAP patients, and 12 days in non-prophylaxis patients. Aspergillus spp. represents the most common type of fungal infection. Independent risk factors for IFD in allo-HSCT patients with PAP were age, having human leukocyte antigen (HLA-haploidentical or matched unrelated donor, decreased albumin levels, and the use of itraconazole as the prophylactic antifungal agent. Among SAP transplant recipients, there was no significant risk factor for IFDs. The incidence rates of overall survival (OS in the PAP, SAP, and no prophylaxis groups were 85.07, 78.80, and 74.82, respectively (P = 0.01. Conclusions This observational study indicates that prophylaxis of IFD is helpful to reduce the incidence of IFDs and improve the OS of patients after allo-HSCT.

  2. Bioethics of Organ Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    As the ability to transplant organs and tissues has grown, the demand for these procedures has increased as well—to the point at which it far exceeds the available supply creating the core ethical challenge for transplantation—rationing. The gap between supply and demand, although large, is worse than it appears to be. There are two key steps to gaining access to a transplant. First, one must gain access to a transplant center. Then, those waiting need to be selected for a transplant. Many potential recipients do not get admitted to a program. They are deemed too old, not of the right nationality, not appropriate for transplant as a result of severe mental impairment, criminal history, drug abuse, or simply because they do not have access to a competent primary care physician who can refer them to a transplant program. There are also financial obstacles to access to transplant waiting lists in the United States and other nations. In many poor nations, those needing transplants simply die because there is no capacity or a very limited capacity to perform transplants. Although the demand for organs now exceeds the supply, resulting in rationing, the size of waiting lists would quickly expand were there to suddenly be an equally large expansion in the number of organs available for transplantation. Still, even with the reality of unavoidable rationing, saving more lives by increasing organ supply is a moral good. Current public policies for obtaining organs from cadavers are not adequate in that they do not produce the number of organs that public polls of persons in the United States indicate people are willing to donate. PMID:24478386

  3. Syngeneic transplantation in aplastic anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerull, Sabine; Stern, Martin; Apperley, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is usually treated with immunosuppression or allogeneic transplant, depending on patient and disease characteristics. Syngeneic transplant offers a rare treatment opportunity with minimal transplant-related mortality, and offers an insight into disease mechanisms. We present here...... a retrospective analysis of all syngeneic transplants for aplastic anemia reported to the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Between 1976 and 2009, 88 patients received 113 transplants. Most transplants (n=85) were preceded by a conditioning regimen, 22 of these including anti-thymocyte globulin...

  4. [Surgical techniques of organ transplants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froněk, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    The list of surgical procedures of solid organ transplantations appears very interesting and colorful, even with overlap among techniques. Liver transplantation is a life-saving procedure in a majority of cases, the liver can be transplanted as a full or partial graft. The liver graft can be split for two recipients; it can also be reduced for a small recipient if splitting is not indicated. Kidney transplantation is the most common solid organ transplant procedure, the majority of kidney grafts come from brain-dead donors whereas the number of live donor transplants is increasing, also thanks to paired donation and blood group incompatible transplantation methods. The small bowel and multivisceral transplantation are rare procedures; they serve selected patients with short bowel syndrome, some patients with retroperitoneal tumors or with extensive visceral thrombosis. Solid organ transplants are well established treatment methods with good and proven outcomes. A majority of patients can return to a normal life after their transplants.

  5. Donor transplant programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Bakar Sulaiman

    1999-01-01

    The transplantation of organs and tissues from one human to another human has become an essential and well established form of therapy for many types of organ and tissue failure. In Malaysia, kidney, cornea and bone marrow transplantation are well established. Recently, liver, bone and heart transplanation have been performed. Unfortunately, because of the lack of cadaveric organ donation, only a limited number of solid organ transplantation have been performed. The cadaveric organ donor rate in Malaysia is low at less than one per million population. The first tissue transplanted in Malaysia was the cornea which was performed in the early 1970s. At that time and even now the majority of corneas came from Sri Lanka. The first kidney transplant was performed in 1975 from a live related donor. The majority of the 629 kidney transplants done at Hospital Kuala Lumpur to date have been from live related donors. Only 35 were from cadaver donors. Similarly, the liver transplantation programme which started in 1995 are from live related donors. A more concerted effort has been made recently to increase the awareness of the public and the health professionals on organ and tissue donation. This national effort to promote organ and tissue donation seems to have gathered momentum in 1997 with the first heart transplant successfully performed at the National Heart Institute. The rate of cadaveric donors has also increased from a previous average of I to 2 per year to 6 per year in the last one year. These developments are most encouraging and may signal the coming of age of our transplantati on programme. The Ministry of Health in conjunction with various institutions, organizations and professional groups, have taken a number of proactive measures to facilitate the development of the cadaveric organ donation programme. Efforts to increase public awareness and to overcome the negative cultural attitude towards organ donation have been intensified. Equally important are efforts

  6. [Pregnancy after renal transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, H; Bichler, A; Ortner, A

    1981-12-01

    Since the number of women with renal cadaver transplantation is increasing, the obstetrician seems himself more often confronted with the situation: pregnancy after renal transplantation. The purpose of this paper is to report about our own case, to give a review of international studies written on this subject, and to inform the obstetrician, the surgeon and the pediatrician about the following points: - Common aspects of renal transplantation in fertile women and the information to be given to the patient. - Selection criteria and anticonception. - Pregnancy assessment and delivery - Pediatric problems.

  7. Pancreatic islet transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrêa-Giannella Maria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No formulation of exogenous insulin available to date has yet been able to mimic the physiological nictemeral rhythms of this hormone, and despite all engineering advancements, the theoretical proposal of developing a mechanical replacement for pancreatic β cell still has not been reached. Thus, the replacement of β cells through pancreas and pancreatic islet transplantation are the only concrete alternatives for re-establishing the endogenous insulin secretion in type 1 diabetic patients. Since only 1 to 1.5% of the pancreatic mass corresponds to endocrine tissue, pancreatic islets transplantation arises as a natural alternative. Data from the International Islet Transplant Registry (ITR from 1983 to December 2000 document a total of 493 transplants performed around the world, with progressively worse rates of post-transplant insulin independence. In 2000, the "Edmonton Protocol" introduced several modifications to the transplantation procedure, such as the use of a steroid-free immunosuppression regimen and transplantation of a mean islet mass of 11,000 islet equivalents per kilogram, which significantly improved 1-year outcomes. Although the results of a 5-year follow-up in 65 patients demonstrated improvement in glycemic instability in a significant portion of them, only 7.5% of the patients have reached insulin independence, indicating the need of further advances in the preservation of the function of transplanted islet. In addition to the scarcity of organs available for transplantation, islets transplantation still faces major challenges, specially those related to cell loss during the process of islet isolation and the losses related to the graft site, apoptosis, allorejection, autoimmunity, and immunosuppression. The main strategies to optimize islet transplantation aim at improving all these aspects. Conclusion Human islet transplantation should be regarded as an intervention that can decrease the frequency of

  8. Bone marrow transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cure your illness. If the transplant is a success, you can go back to most of your ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  9. Kidney Transplantation in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Einollahi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Kidney transplantation in patients with end stage renal diseaseis preferred to dialysis because transplantation provides a betterquality of life and improved survival. However, the gapbetween the supply and demand for a renal allograft is wideningand the waiting time is increasing. Iranian protocol, a controlledtransplant program supported by the government forliving unrelated donors, was initiated for solving the problemof organ shortage. Although this system might experiencechallenges, clearly it has advantages over other organ procurementsystems primarily that thousands in need do not diewhile waiting for a compatible donor.In the present review I discuss the history of renal transplantationin Iran, "Iranian model" protocol, the situation ofIran’s kidney transplantation from either living or deceaseddonors compared with the Middle East countries, and our experiencesof unrelated renal transplantation.

  10. Rabies in Transplant Recipients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-09-19

    Dr. Richard Franka, a CDC scientist, discusses rabies in organ transplant recipients.  Created: 9/19/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 9/19/2016.

  11. Frailty and Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exterkate, Leonie; Slegtenhorst, Bendix R.; Kelm, Matthias; Seyda, Midas; Schuitenmaker, Jeroen M.; Quante, Markus; Uehara, Hirofumi; El Khal, Abdala; Tullius, Stefan G.

    Consequences of aging are gaining clinical relevance. In transplantation, aging and immunosenescence impact treatment and outcomes. The impact of aging, however, will critically depend on distinguishing healthy, chronological aging from biological aging that may result into frailty. Approximately

  12. Liver transplant - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100090.htm Liver transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The liver is in the right upper abdomen. The liver ...

  13. Imaging in transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankier, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    This book covers all topics related to the imaging of organ transplantation. An introductory section addresses such issues as organ procurement, patient selection, immune responses, and ethical and economic considerations. The main part of the book then offers in-depth coverage of heart, renal, liver, lung, bone marrow and pancreatic and intestinal transplantation. Each of these topics is discussed firstly in a clinical chapter and then in a radiological chapter. The clinical chapters detail the epidemiology, clinical background, and surgical procedures, as well as any clinically relevant issues of which the radiologist should be aware. The radiological chapters describe and depict the imaging manifestations of specific organ transplantations, document the normal radiological appearance of transplanted organs and consider both early and late complications. This is a unique, superbly illustrated volume that will be of great assistance to all who work in this field. (orig.)

  14. International Transplant Nurses Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The term "clinical ladder" refers to a "grading structure which facilitates career progression and associated differentiation of ... 20-1589538 Copyright © 2006 - 2014 International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS). No materials, including graphics, may be reused, ...

  15. Experimental uterus transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesson, Liza; Enskog, Anders

    2014-11-01

    Today, most causes of infertility are successfully treated. Yet there is still a subgroup of female infertility affecting around 4%, which so far is untreatable because of an absolute uterine factor. To acquire motherhood, these women are today referred to either adoption or surrogacy. Research in the field of uterus transplantation has been evaluated in different animal models for decades and has presently reached a human clinical application as a possible treatment for absolute uterine factor infertility. Organ transplantation is no longer reserved to those with a life-threatening disease and neither is organ transplantation together with concurrent immunosuppression prohibiting pregnancy. Uterus transplantation involves four parties - recipient, donor, partner of recipient and future child - and is a subject of ethical controversies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) Acute myeloid leukemia - adult Aplastic anemia Bone marrow transplant Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) Graft-versus-host disease Hodgkin lymphoma Multiple myeloma Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Patient ...

  17. Fecal microbiota transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/pubmed/26344412 . Surawicz CM, Brandt LJ. Probiotics and fecal microbiota transplantation. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  18. Livebirth after uterus transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännström, Mats; Johannesson, Liza; Bokström, Hans; Kvarnström, Niclas; Mölne, Johan; Dahm-Kähler, Pernilla; Enskog, Anders; Milenkovic, Milan; Ekberg, Jana; Diaz-Garcia, Cesar; Gäbel, Markus; Hanafy, Ash; Hagberg, Henrik; Olausson, Michael; Nilsson, Lars

    2015-02-14

    Uterus transplantation is the first available treatment for absolute uterine infertility, which is caused by absence of the uterus or the presence of a non-functional uterus. Eleven human uterus transplantation attempts have been done worldwide but no livebirth has yet been reported. In 2013, a 35-year-old woman with congenital absence of the uterus (Rokitansky syndrome) underwent transplantation of the uterus in Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. The uterus was donated from a living, 61-year-old, two-parous woman. In-vitro fertilisation treatment of the recipient and her partner had been done before transplantation, from which 11 embryos were cryopreserved. The recipient and the donor had essentially uneventful postoperative recoveries. The recipient's first menstruation occurred 43 days after transplantation and she continued to menstruate at regular intervals of between 26 and 36 days (median 32 days). 1 year after transplantation, the recipient underwent her first single embryo transfer, which resulted in pregnancy. She was then given triple immunosuppression (tacrolimus, azathioprine, and corticosteroids), which was continued throughout pregnancy. She had three episodes of mild rejection, one of which occurred during pregnancy. These episodes were all reversed by corticosteroid treatment. Fetal growth parameters and blood flows of the uterine arteries and umbilical cord were normal throughout pregnancy. The patient was admitted with pre-eclampsia at 31 full weeks and 5 days, and 16 h later a caesarean section was done because of abnormal cardiotocography. A male baby with a normal birthweight for gestational age (1775 g) and with APGAR scores 9, 9, 10 was born. We describe the first livebirth after uterus transplantation. This report is a proof-of-concept for uterus transplantation as a treatment for uterine factor infertility. Furthermore, the results show the feasibility of live uterus donation, even from a postmenopausal donor. Jane and

  19. Faecal microbiota transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Simon M D; Hansen, Mette Mejlby; Erikstrup, Christian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is currently being established as a second-line treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. FMT is further being considered for other infectious and inflammatory conditions. Safe and reproducible methods for donor screening, laborat......BACKGROUND: Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is currently being established as a second-line treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection. FMT is further being considered for other infectious and inflammatory conditions. Safe and reproducible methods for donor screening...

  20. Immunosuppression in lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffert, Jenna L; Raza, Kashif

    2014-08-01

    Lung transplantation can be a life-saving procedure for those with end-stage lung diseases. Unfortunately, long term graft and patient survival are limited by both acute and chronic allograft rejection, with a median survival of just over 6 years. Immunosuppressive regimens are employed to reduce the rate of rejection, and while protocols vary from center to center, conventional maintenance therapy consists of triple drug therapy with a calcineurin inhibitor (cyclosporine or tacrolimus), antiproliferative agents [azathioprine (AZA), mycophenolate, sirolimus (srl), everolimus (evl)], and corticosteroids (CS). Roughly 50% of lung transplant centers also utilize induction therapy, with polyclonal antibody preparations [equine or rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG)], interleukin 2 receptor antagonists (IL2RAs) (daclizumab or basiliximab), or alemtuzumab. This review summarizes these agents and the data surrounding their use in lung transplantation, as well as additional common and novel therapies in lung transplantation. Despite the progression of the management of lung transplant recipients, they continue to be at high risk of treatment-related complications, and poor graft and patient survival. Randomized clinical trials are needed to allow for the development of better agents, regimens and techniques to address above mentioned issues and reduce morbidity and mortality among lung transplant recipients.

  1. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftheria Hatzimichael

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Eleftheria Hatzimichael1, Mark Tuthill21Department of Haematology, Medical School of Ioannina, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; 2Department of Medical Oncology, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College National Health Service Trust, London, UKAbstract: More than 25,000 hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs are performed each year for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, immune-deficiency illnesses, congenital metabolic defects, hemoglobinopathies, and myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes. Before transplantation, patients receive intensive myeloablative chemoradiotherapy followed by stem cell “rescue.” Autologous HSCT is performed using the patient’s own hematopoietic stem cells, which are harvested before transplantation and reinfused after myeloablation. Allogeneic HSCT uses human leukocyte antigen (HLA-matched stem cells derived from a donor. Survival after allogeneic transplantation depends on donor–recipient matching, the graft-versus-host response, and the development of a graft versus leukemia effect. This article reviews the biology of stem cells, clinical efficacy of HSCT, transplantation procedures, and potential complications.Keywords: hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, complications

  2. Indian transplant registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Shroff

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An ′Indian transplant registry′ has been established over the past two years due to the efforts of the Indian Society of Organ Transplantation. This society is about 20 years old with over 450 members who are doctors and basic scientist. The registry is currently in the first phase of its development and can be partly viewed at www.transplantindia.com. The endeavor has been undertaken with the objective of having a centralized repository of information of the various transplants that are being undertaken in India. In its first phase of the registry ′Fast Fact′ retrospective short datasets are being captured that include the essential details of the transplant programme. The fast fact data includes the number of transplant done yearly, the sex ratio and type of transplant. So far thirteen major institutional data has been entered in the registry. In the second phase of the registry, over twenty fields are likely to be captured and all member institutions would be encouraged to enter the data prospectively. In the third phase data would be derived with ongoing audit features.. The society and its members have supported the formation of the registry and are enthusiastic about its potential.

  3. Long term follow up of patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation and transfusion of HSV-Tk transduced T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Weissinger

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT is one of the curative treatments for hematologic malignancies, but is hampered by severe complications, such as acute or chronic graft-versus-host-disease (aGvHD; cGvHD and infections. CD34-selcetion of stem cells reduces the risk of aGvHD, but also leads to increased infectious complications and relapse. Thus, we studied the efficacy, safety and feasibility of transfer of gene modified donor T-cells shortly after allo-HSCT in two clinical trials between 2002 and 2007 and here we compare the results to unmodified donor leukocyte transfusion (DLI. The aim of these trials was to provide patients with the protection of T-cells after T-cell-depleted allo-HSCT in the matched or mismatched donor setting with an option to delete transduced T-cells, if severe aGvHD occurred within the trial period. Donor-T-cells were transduced with the replication-deficient retrovirus SFCMM-3, expressing HSV-Tk and the truncated LNGFR for selection of transduced cells. Transduced cells were transfused either after day +60 (matched donors or on day +42 (haploidentical donors.Nine patients were included in the first trial (MHH; 2002 until 2007 2 were included in TK007 (2005-2009 and 6 serve as a control group for outcome after haploidentical transplantation without HSV-TK-transduced DLI. Three patients developed acute GvHD, two had grade I of the skin, one had aGvHD on day +131 (post-HSCT; +89 post-HSV-Tk DLI grade II, which was successfully controlled by ganciclovir (GCV. Donor chimerism was stabilized after transfusion of the transduced cells in all patients treated. Functionality of HSV-Tk gene expressing T-cells was shown by loss of bcr-abl gene expression as well as by control of cytomegalovirus-reactivation. To date, 6patients have relapsed and died, 2 after a second HSCT without T-cell depletion or administration of unmodified T-cells. Eleven patients (7 post-HSV-Tk DLI are alive and well to date.

  4. Immune System and Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Badri Man

    2017-01-01

    The immune system recognises a transplanted kidney as foreign body and mounts immune response through cellular and humoral mechanisms leading to acute or chronic rejection, which ultimately results in graft loss. Over the last five decades, there have been significant advances in the understanding of the immune responses to transplanted organs in both experimental and clinical transplant settings. Modulation of the immune response by using immunosuppressive agents has led to successful outcomes after kidney transplantation. The paper provides an overview of the general organisation and function of human immune system, immune response to kidney transplantation, and the current practice of immunosuppressive therapy in kidney transplantation in the United Kingdom.

  5. Overview of marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation is now an accepted form of therapy for many hematologic disorders including aplastic anemia, genetically determined diseases and malignant diseases, particularly leukemia, and for rescue of patients given intensive chemoradiotherapy for malignant disease. The donor may be a healthy identical twin, a family member or even an unrelated person. Selection is made on the basis of human leukocyte antigen tissue typing. Intensive chemoradiotherapy is used to suppress patients' immune systems to facilitate engraftment and destroy diseased marrow. Transfusion of platelets, erythrocytes and granulocytes (or all of these), antibiotic coverage and protection from infection are necessary during the pancytopenic period. Survival rates vary considerably depending on a patient's disease, clinical state and age. Patients with aplastic anemia transplanted early in the course of their disease have a survival rate of approximately 80%. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia are usually transplanted in a second or subsequent remission and have a survival rate of 25% to 40%. Patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia in remission have survivals ranging from 45% to 70%. More than 200 patients in the chronic phase of chronic granulocytic leukemia have been transplanted with survival ranging from 50% to 70%. Complications of marrow transplantation include marrow graft rejection, graft-versus-host disease, immunologic insufficiency and the possibility of recurrence of the leukemia. 14 references

  6. Heart Transplantation in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-Young; Oh, Byung-Hee

    2017-04-25

    Heart transplantation (HTx) is the effective way to improve quality of life as well as survival in terminal heart failure (HF) patients. Since the first heart transplant in 1968 in Japan and in earnest in 1987 at Taiwan, HTx has been continuously increasing in Asia. Although the current percentage of heart transplants from Asia comprises only 5.7% of cases in the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) registry, the values were under-reported and soon will be greatly increased. HTx in Asia shows comparable with or even better results compared with ISHLT registry data. Several endemic infections, including type B hepatitis, tuberculosis, and cytomegalovirus, are unique aspects of HTx in Asia, and need special attention in transplant care. Although cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is considered as a leading cause of death after HTx globally, multiple observations suggest less prevalence and benign nature of CAV among Asian populations. Although there are many obstacles such as religion, social taboo or legal process, Asian countries will keep overcoming obstacles and broaden the field of HTx.

  7. Uterus transplantation and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännström, Mats

    2017-05-01

    Uterus transplantation is today the only available treatment for absolute uterine factor infertility which is caused by either congenital/surgical uterine absence or that a present uterus is non-functioning. Structured animal-based research, from rodents to nonhuman primates, was the scientific basis for a successful introduction of uterus transplantation as a clinical procedure. The patient groups for uterus transplantation, the preclinical research and data from the published human cases will be covered herein. During recent years the concept of bioengineering of organs and tissues has emerged. Creation of a bioengineered uterus is in the initial research state, with experiments performed in rodents. The research that has been performed to create a bioengineered uterus will be summarized. In conclusion, uterus transplantation is now a clinical experimental procedure for treatment of uterine factor infertility. In parallel to the establishment of this combined assisted reproduction technique and transplantation procedure as a routine clinical procedure, we predict that uterus bioengineering will develop further towards introduction within the human setting, but that this process will take several years.

  8. Everolimus in kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper JE

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available James E Cooper¹, Uwe Christians², Alexander C Wiseman¹¹Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, Transplant Center, ²iC42 Integrated Solutions in Systems Biology for Clinical Research and Development, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USAAbstract: Everolimus is a novel target of rapamycin (mTOR-I analog that has recently been approved in combination with cyclosporine A and steroids for use in the prevention of organ rejection in kidney transplant recipients. Compared with rapamycin, everolimus is characterized by a shorter half-life and improved bioavailability. Prior to US Food and Drug Administration approval, a number of Phase II and III clinical trials were undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of everolimus in combination with calcineurin inhibitors for preventing acute rejection and promoting allograft survival in kidney transplant recipients. In this report, we review the pharmacokinetic properties of everolimus, the clinical efficacy studies that led to its approval for use in kidney transplantation, as well as reported data on patient safety and tolerability associated with its use.Keywords: mTOR inhibitors, kidney transplantation, everolimus

  9. Predicting Alloreactivity in Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Geneugelijk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte Antigen (HLA mismatching leads to severe complications after solid-organ transplantation and hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. The alloreactive responses underlying the posttransplantation complications include both direct recognition of allogeneic HLA by HLA-specific alloantibodies and T cells and indirect T-cell recognition. However, the immunogenicity of HLA mismatches is highly variable; some HLA mismatches lead to severe clinical B-cell- and T-cell-mediated alloreactivity, whereas others are well tolerated. Definition of the permissibility of HLA mismatches prior to transplantation allows selection of donor-recipient combinations that will have a reduced chance to develop deleterious host-versus-graft responses after solid-organ transplantation and graft-versus-host responses after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Therefore, several methods have been developed to predict permissible HLA-mismatch combinations. In this review we aim to give a comprehensive overview about the current knowledge regarding HLA-directed alloreactivity and several developed in vitro and in silico tools that aim to predict direct and indirect alloreactivity.

  10. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth / For Teens / Stem Cell Transplants What's ... Take to Recover? Coping Print What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  11. Heart transplantation from older donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Poptsov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current situation of the shortage of suitable donor organs, heart transplantation from older donors is one of the ways to increase the performance of more heart transplants, particularly, in patients with urgent need of transplantation. While planning a heart transplantation from older donor one should consider increased risk of early cardiac allograft dysfunction, preexisting coronary artery disease, accelerated transplant vasculopathy which may adversely affect early and long-term survival of recipients. Subject to careful selection of donor–recipient pairs, effective prevention and treatment of early cardiac allograft dysfunction, pre-existing atherosclerosis and transplant vasculopathy the early and long-term survival of heart transplant recipients from older donors is comparable to heart transplantation from young donors.

  12. About the Operation: Heart Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to know FAQ Living donation What is living donation? Organs Types Being a living donor First steps Being ... Nursing Care of the Renal Transplant Recipient.” UNOS Donation and Transplantation Nursing Curriculum . 1996 This Web site is intended ...

  13. Gut microbiota and allogeneic transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weilin; Xu, Shaoyan; Ren, Zhigang; Jiang, Jianwen; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-08-23

    The latest high-throughput sequencing technologies show that there are more than 1000 types of microbiota in the human gut. These microbes are not only important to maintain human health, but also closely related to the occurrence and development of various diseases. With the development of transplantation technologies, allogeneic transplantation has become an effective therapy for a variety of end-stage diseases. However, complications after transplantation still restrict its further development. Post-transplantation complications are closely associated with a host's immune system. There is also an interaction between a person's gut microbiota and immune system. Recently, animal and human studies have shown that gut microbial populations and diversity are altered after allogeneic transplantations, such as liver transplantation (LT), small bowel transplantation (SBT), kidney transplantation (KT) and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HTCT). Moreover, when complications, such as infection, rejection and graft versus host disease (GVHD) occur, gut microbial populations and diversity present a significant dysbiosis. Several animal and clinical studies have demonstrated that taking probiotics and prebiotics can effectively regulate gut microbiota and reduce the incidence of complications after transplantation. However, the role of intestinal decontamination in allogeneic transplantation is controversial. This paper reviews gut microbial status after transplantation and its relationship with complications. The role of intervention methods, including antibiotics, probiotics and prebiotics, in complications after transplantation are also discussed. Further research in this new field needs to determine the definite relationship between gut microbial dysbiosis and complications after transplantation. Additionally, further research examining gut microbial intervention methods to ameliorate complications after transplantation is warranted. A better understanding of the

  14. Solid organ donation and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlow, Bryant

    2012-01-01

    Medical imaging plays a key role in solid organ donation and transplantation. In addition to confirming the clinical diagnosis of brain death, imaging examinations are used to assess potential organ donors and recipients, evaluate donated organs, and monitor transplantation outcomes. This article introduces the history, biology, ethics, and institutions of organ donation and transplantation medicine. The article also discusses current and emerging imaging applications in the transplantation field and the controversial role of neuroimaging to confirm clinically diagnosed brain death.

  15. Radionuclide evaluation of renal transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hong; Zhao Deshan

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclide renal imaging and plasma clearance methods can quickly quantitate renal blood flow and function in renal transplants. They can diagnose acute tubular necrosis and rejection, renal scar, surgical complications such as urine leaks, obstruction and renal artery stenosis after renal transplants. At the same time they can assess the therapy effect of renal transplant complications and can also predict renal transplant survival from early post-operative function studies

  16. Gaming the Liver Transplant Market

    OpenAIRE

    Jason Snyder

    2010-01-01

    The liver transplant waiting list is designed to allocate livers to the sickest patients first. Before March 1, 2002, livers were allocated to patients based on objective clinical indicators and subjective factors. In particular, a center placing a prospective transplant recipient in the intensive care unit (ICU) leads to a higher position on the liver transplant waiting list. After March 1, 2002, a policy reform mandated that priority on the liver transplant waiting list no longer be influen...

  17. Tolerogenic therapies in transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia K Page

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the concept of immunologic tolerance was discovered in the 1940s, the pursuit of tolerance induction in human transplantation has led to a rapid development of pharmacologic and biologic agents. Short-term graft survival remains an all-time high, but successful withdrawal of immunosuppression to achieve operational tolerance rarely occurs outside of liver transplantation. Collaborative efforts through the NIH sponsored Immune Tolerance Network and the European Commission sponsored Reprogramming the Immune System for Establishment of Tolerance consortia have afforded researchers opportunity to evaluate the safety and efficacy of tolerogenic strategies, investigate mechanisms of tolerance, and identify molecular and genetic markers that distinguish the tolerance phenotype. In this article, we review traditional and novel approaches to inducing tolerance for organ transplantation, with an emphasis on their translation into clinical trials.

  18. Lung transplantation for cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adler, Frederick R; Aurora, Paul; Barker, David H; Barr, Mark L; Blackwell, Laura S; Bosma, Otto H; Brown, Samuel; Cox, D R; Jensen, Judy L; Kurland, Geoffrey; Nossent, George D; Quittner, Alexandra L; Robinson, Walter M; Romero, Sandy L; Spencer, Helen; Sweet, Stuart C; van der Bij, Wim; Vermeulen, J; Verschuuren, Erik A M; Vrijlandt, Elianne J L E; Walsh, William; Woo, Marlyn S; Liou, Theodore G

    2009-01-01

    Lung transplantation is a complex, high-risk, potentially life-saving therapy for the end-stage lung disease of cystic fibrosis (CF). The decision to pursue transplantation involves comparing the likelihood of survival with and without transplantation as well as assessing the effect of wait-listing

  19. Pancreatic transplant imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuh, W.T.C.; Wiese, J.A.; Abu-Yousef, M.M.; Rezai, K.; Sato, Y.; Kao, S.C.S.; Hunsicker, L.G.; Corry, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two MR studies, 162 radionuclide scintigraphic studies, and 57 sonographic studies were performed on 15 pancreatic transplant patients for evaluation of suspected graft rejection. The results of these studies were correlated with clinical presentations, laboratory data, and pathologic specimens when available. Radionuclide studies provide excellent information for estimating graft size and for evaluation of perfusion. Sonography is valuable for evaluation of the gland texture and peripancreatic abnormalities. MR provides useful information regarding parenchymal changes in rejection and response of the graft to treatment. These three imaging modalities are therefore complementary in the evaluation of pancreatic transplantation

  20. Bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storb, R.; Santos, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation has been increasingly used to treat patients with severe combined immunodeficiency diseases, severe aplastic anemia, and malignant hematologic diseases, especially leukemia. At the Workshop a number of problems were discussed, e.g., conditioning regimens aimed at overcoming the problem of marrow graft rejection and reducing the incidence of recurrent leukemia, prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), possible mechanisms involved in stable graft-host tolerance, graft-versus-leukemia effect in mice, and finally, the possible use of autologous marrow transplantation

  1. Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Paul J

    2011-08-01

    Allograft thrombosis is a devastating early complication of renal transplantation that ultimately leads to allograft loss. We report here on our experience of nine cases of immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis at a single centre between January 1990 and June 2009. The mean age was 42.9 years at time of transplant. For seven patients, the allograft thrombosis was their first kidney transplant and seven of the nine cases had a deceased donor transplant. The initial transplants functioned for a mean of 1.67 days and the patients received a second allograft at a mean of 3.1 days after graft failure. All of the re-transplants worked immediately. Four allografts failed after a mean of 52.5 months (2-155 months). Two of these died with a functioning allograft, one failed owing to chronic allograft nephropathy and one owing to persistent acute cellular rejection. The remaining five patients still have a functioning allograft after a mean of 101.8 months (7-187 months). One year allograft and patient survival after re-transplantation were 87.5% and 100% respectively (after 5 years, both were 57%). Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis can be a success. It may be considered in selected cases after allograft thrombosis.

  2. Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Paul J

    2012-02-01

    Allograft thrombosis is a devastating early complication of renal transplantation that ultimately leads to allograft loss. We report here on our experience of nine cases of immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis at a single centre between January 1990 and June 2009. The mean age was 42.9 years at time of transplant. For seven patients, the allograft thrombosis was their first kidney transplant and seven of the nine cases had a deceased donor transplant. The initial transplants functioned for a mean of 1.67 days and the patients received a second allograft at a mean of 3.1 days after graft failure. All of the re-transplants worked immediately. Four allografts failed after a mean of 52.5 months (2-155 months). Two of these died with a functioning allograft, one failed owing to chronic allograft nephropathy and one owing to persistent acute cellular rejection. The remaining five patients still have a functioning allograft after a mean of 101.8 months (7-187 months). One year allograft and patient survival after re-transplantation were 87.5% and 100% respectively (after 5 years, both were 57%). Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis can be a success. It may be considered in selected cases after allograft thrombosis.

  3. Clazakizumab in Highly-HLA Sensitized Patients Awaiting Renal Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-26

    Kidney Failure, Chronic; End-Stage Renal Disease; Transplant Glomerulopathy; Transplant;Failure,Kidney; Kidney Transplant Failure and Rejection; Antibody-mediated Rejection; Kidney Transplant; Complications

  4. Sporotrichosis in Renal Transplant Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Gewehr

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current report describes two renal transplant recipients who presented with sporotrichosis. In addition, the authors review the general aspects of sporotrichosis in renal transplant recipients reported in the literature. Sporotrichosis is a rare fungal infection in transplant patients and has been reported primarily in renal transplant recipients not treated with antifungal prophylaxis. Extracutaneous forms of sporotrichosis without skin manifestations and no previous history of traumatic injuries have been described in such patients and are difficult to diagnose. Renal transplant recipients with sporotrichosis described in the present report were successfully treated with antifungal therapy including amphotericin B deoxycholate, lipid amphotericin B formulations, fluconazole and itraconazole.

  5. Immune Exhaustion and Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Fueyo, A; Markmann, J F

    2016-07-01

    Exhaustion of lymphocyte function through chronic exposure to a high load of foreign antigen is well established for chronic viral infection and antitumor immunity and has been found to be associated with a distinct molecular program and characteristic cell surface phenotype. Although exhaustion has most commonly been studied in the context of CD8 viral responses, recent studies indicate that chronic antigen exposure may affect B cells, NK cells and CD4 T cells in a parallel manner. Limited information is available regarding the extent of lymphocyte exhaustion development in the transplant setting and its impact on anti-graft alloreactivity. By analogy to the persistence of a foreign virus, the large mass of alloantigen presented by an allograft in chronic residence could provide an ideal setting for exhausting donor-reactive T cells. The extent of T cell exhaustion occurring with various allografts, the kinetics of its development, whether exhaustion is influenced positively or negatively by different immunosuppressants, and the impact of exhaustion on graft survival and tolerance development remains a fertile area for investigation. Harnessing or encouraging the natural processes of exhaustion may provide a novel means to promote graft survival and transplantation tolerance. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  6. Organ Harvesting and Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskette, Kimberly G.; Ritz, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Humans and animals need healthy organs to live. Due to medical conditions and accidents, some organs fail to function properly. For these reasons, the medical community has experimented and can now perform successful organ transplants, allowing patients to continue to live their lives. Many countries have medical programs where individuals can…

  7. Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains immature cells, called stem cells. The ... platelets, which help the blood to clot. A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that replaces a ...

  8. American Society of Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that thrives by connecting organisations seeking to fill positions and transplant professionals searching for career opportunities. Patient Information Patient Information It’s all about healthy living The AST has put together a list of resources for patients and patient families. Contact ...

  9. REPEAT KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Sushkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, kidney transplantation is the best approach of renal replacement therapy for the majority of patients with end-stage renal disease that significantly improves the quality and length of life. Advances in the field of organ donation, immunosuppression, transplant surgery and immunology have improved short-term graft and patient survival. But the long-term graft survival remains static over last two decades. The disparity between low graft and high patient long-term survival led to increasing number of transplant recipients with failed grafts. Repeat renal transplant is presumed to be a good option for many patients losing their grafts, but it is associated with higher complication rates. Unfortunately, there are no evidence-based recommendations or guidelines for renal retransplantation procedure. This review is based on 100 scientifi c publications related to various aspects of the kidney retransplantation and provides the recent data on this matter.

  10. Body image in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pasquale, C; Pistorio, M L; Sorbello, M; Parrinello, L; Corona, D; Gagliano, M; Giuffrida, G; Giaquinta, A; Sinagra, N; Zerbo, D; Veroux, P; Veroux, M

    2010-05-01

    Psychologic disturbances are becoming more common in kidney transplantation, owing to effects of immunosuppressive therapy. In this study, we explored the incidence and specifity of psychopathology among kidney transplant patients. Twenty kidney transplant recipients underwent the Machover Draw-A-person test to detect significant variables (V1=V6) hypothetically related to chronologic age, education, years from transplantation, and gender differences. Emotional coarctation (V1) in the sense of "mental rigidity," "egocentrism," and "hypercontrol" were present in all transplant recipients (100%), followed by difficulty in interpersonal relationships (V3; 70%) and anxiety (V5; 70%). This research confirmed the hypothesis that transplantation can display a potential risk to the psychologic balance of the patient. Psychologic evaluation may be a fundamental step together with surgical aspects and management of immunosuppression to achieve well-being of kidney transplant recipients. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tissue transplantation in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemionow, Maria; Agaoglu, Galip

    2007-04-01

    The functional and aesthetic outcome following application of conventional reconstructive procedures or prosthetic materials is not satisfactory, especially in patients who have severe deformities and disabilities. Since the first successful hand transplantation in France in 1998, composite tissue allograft transplantation has gained a great deal of interest in the field of plastic surgery. It is obvious that composite tissue allograft transplantation will improve patients' life quality, but this might be at the expense of decreasing life expectancy. Currently, the main obstacle for composite tissue allograft transplantation is the use of life-long immunosuppression therapy because of their well-known side effects. In addition, the ethical, social, and psychologic issues are raised when discussing face transplantation. The long-term results of the recently performed partial face transplantations will be critical to judge the future applications of partial or total face transplantation.

  12. Early laparotomy after lung transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Pia; Zemtsovski, Mikhail; Perch, Michael

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal complications after lung transplantation have been reported with incidence rates ranging from 3% to 51%, but the reasons are poorly understood. We aimed to investigate the correlations between pulmonary diseases leading to lung transplantation and early gastrointestinal...... complications requiring laparotomy after transplantation with outcomes for patients at increased risk. METHODS: In this study we performed a retrospective analysis of data of patients who underwent lung transplantation at our institution from 2004 to 2012. The study period was limited to the first 90 days after...... transplantation. RESULTS: Lung transplantation was performed in 258 patients, including 51 patients with α1-anti-trypsin deficiency (A1AD). Seventy-eight patients (30%) had an X-ray of the abdomen, and 23 patients (9%) required laparotomy during the first 90 days after transplantation. Patients with A1AD...

  13. GRACE Accelerometer data transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandikova, T.; McCullough, C. M.; Kruizinga, G. L. H.

    2017-12-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has recently celebrated its 15th anniversary. The aging of the satellites brings along new challenges for both mission operation and science data delivery. Since September 2016, the accelerometer (ACC) onboard GRACE-B has been permanently turned off in order to reduce the battery load. The absence of the information about the non-gravitational forces acting on the spacecraft dramatically decreases the accuracy of the monthly gravity field solutions. The missing GRACE-B accelerometer data, however, can be recovered from the GRACE-A accelerometer measurement with satisfactory accuracy. In the current GRACE data processing, simple ACC data transplant is used which includes only attitude and time correction. The full ACC data transplant, however, requires not only the attitude and time correction, but also modeling of the residual accelerations due to thruster firings, which is the most challenging part. The residual linear accelerations ("thruster spikes") are caused by thruster imperfections such as misalignment of thruster pair, force imbalance or differences in reaction time. The thruster spikes are one of the most dominant high-frequency signals in the ACC measurement. The shape and amplitude of the thruster spikes are unique for each thruster pair, for each firing duration (30 ms - 1000 ms), for each x,y,z component of the ACC linear acceleration, and for each spacecraft. In our approach, the thruster spike model is an analytical function obtained by inverse Laplace transform of the ACC transfer function. The model shape parameters (amplitude, width and time delay) are estimated using Least squares method. The ACC data transplant is validated for days when ACC data from both satellites were available. The fully transplanted data fits the original GRACE-B measurement very well. The full ACC data transplant results in significantly reduced high frequency noise compared to the simple ACC transplant (i.e. without

  14. Liver Transplantation Update: 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Serkan; Gurakar, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    The first liver transplantation (LT) was performed by Thomas E Starzl five decades ago, and yet it remains the only therapeutic option offering gold standard treatment for end-stage liver disease (ESLD) and acute liver failure (ALF) and certain early-stage liver tumors. Post-liver transplantation survival has also dramatically improved over the last few decades despite increasing donor and recipient age and more frequent use of marginal organs to overcome the organ shortage. Currently, the overall 1 year survival following LT in the United States is reported as 85 to 90%, while the 10 years survival rate is ~50% (http://www.unos.org). The improvements are mainly due to progress in surgical techniques, postoperative intensive care, and the advent of new immunosuppressive agents. There are a number of factors that influence the outcomes prior to transplantation. Since 2002, the model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score has been considered a predicting variable. It has been used to prioritize patients on the transplant waiting list and is currently the standard method used to assess severity in all etiologies of cirrhosis. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common standard MELD exception because the MELD does not necessarily reflect the medical urgency of patients with HCC. The criteria for candidates with HCC for receiving LT have evolved over the past decade. Now, patients with HCC who do not meet the traditional Milan (MC) or UCSF criteria for LT often undergo downstaging therapy I an effort to shrink the tumor size. The shortage of donor organs is a universal problem. In some countries, the development of a deceased organ donation program has been prevented due to socioeconomic, cultural, legal and other factors. Due to the shortage of cadaveric donors, several innovative techniques have been developed to expand the organ donor pool, such as split liver grafts, marginal- or extended-criteria donors, live donor liver transplantation (LDLT), and the use

  15. Key issues in transplant tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2012-02-24

    Access to organ transplantation depends on national circumstances, and is partly determined by the cost of health care, availability of transplant services, the level of technical capacity and the availability of organs. Commercial transplantation is estimated to account for 5%-10% (3500-7000) of kidney transplants performed annually throughout the world. This review is to determine the state and outcome of renal transplantation associated with transplant tourism (TT) and the key challenges with such transplantation. The stakeholders of commercial transplantation include: patients on the waiting lists in developed countries or not on any list in developing countries; dialysis funding bodies; middlemen, hosting transplant centres; organ-exporting countries; and organ vendors. TT and commercial kidney transplants are associated with a high incidence of surgical complications, acute rejection and invasive infection which cause major morbidity and mortality. There are ethical and medical concerns regarding the management of recipients of organs from vendors. The growing demand for transplantation, the perceived failure of altruistic donation in providing enough organs has led to calls for a legalised market in organ procurement or regulated trial in incentives for donation. Developing transplant services worldwide has many benefits - improving results of transplantation as they would be performed legally, increasing the donor pool and making TT unnecessary. Meanwhile there is a need to re-examine intrinsic attitudes to TT bearing in mind the cultural and economic realities of globalisation. Perhaps the World Health Organization in conjunction with The Transplantation Society would set up a working party of stakeholders to study this matter in greater detail and make recommendations.

  16. Key issues in transplant tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2012-01-01

    Access to organ transplantation depends on national circumstances, and is partly determined by the cost of health care, availability of transplant services, the level of technical capacity and the availability of organs. Commercial transplantation is estimated to account for 5%-10% (3500-7000) of kidney transplants performed annually throughout the world. This review is to determine the state and outcome of renal transplantation associated with transplant tourism (TT) and the key challenges with such transplantation. The stakeholders of commercial transplantation include: patients on the waiting lists in developed countries or not on any list in developing countries; dialysis funding bodies; middlemen, hosting transplant centres; organ-exporting countries; and organ vendors. TT and commercial kidney transplants are associated with a high incidence of surgical complications, acute rejection and invasive infection which cause major morbidity and mortality. There are ethical and medical concerns regarding the management of recipients of organs from vendors. The growing demand for transplantation, the perceived failure of altruistic donation in providing enough organs has led to calls for a legalised market in organ procurement or regulated trial in incentives for donation. Developing transplant services worldwide has many benefits - improving results of transplantation as they would be performed legally, increasing the donor pool and making TT unnecessary. Meanwhile there is a need to re-examine intrinsic attitudes to TT bearing in mind the cultural and economic realities of globalisation. Perhaps the World Health Organization in conjunction with The Transplantation Society would set up a working party of stakeholders to study this matter in greater detail and make recommendations. PMID:24175191

  17. Irradiation for xenogeneic transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halperin, E.C.; Knechtle, S.J.; Harland, R.C.; Yamaguchi, Yasua; Sontag, M.; Bollinger, R.R.; Duke Univ., Durham, NC

    1990-01-01

    Xenogeneic transplantation (XT) is the transplantation of organs or tissues from a member of one species to a member of another. Mammalian species frequently have circulating antibody which is directed against the foreign organ irrespective of known prior antigen exposure. This antibody may lead to hyperacute rejection once it ensues so efforts must be directed towards eliminating the pre-existing antibody. In those species in which hyperacute rejection of xenografts does not occur, cell-mediated refection, similar to allograft rejection, may occur. It is in the prevention of this latter form of refection that radiation is most likely to be beneficial in XT. Both total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and selective lyphoid irradiation (LSI) have been investigated for use in conjunction with XT. TLI has contributed to the prolongation of pancreatic islet-cell xenografts from hamsters to rats. TLI has also markedly prolonged the survival of cardiac transplants from hamsters to rats. A more modest prolongation of graft survival has been seen with the use of TLI in rabbit-to-rat exchanges. Therapy with TLI, cyclosporine, and splenectomy has markedly prolonged the survival of liver transplants from hamsters to rats, and preliminary data suggest that TLI may contribute to the prolongation of graft survival in the transplantation of hearts from monkeys to baboons. SLI appears to have prolonged graft survival, when used in conjunction with anti-lymphocyte globulin, in hamster-to-rat cardiac graft exchanges. The current state of knowledge of the use of irradiaiton in experimental XT is reviewed. (author). 38 refs.; 1 fig.; 5 tabs

  18. Pediatric kidney transplantation: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Amit Sharma, Rajesh Ramanathan, Marc Posner, Robert A Fisher Hume-Lee Transplant Center, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Abstract: Pediatric kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment for children with end-stage renal disease. The most common indications for transplantation in children are renal developmental anomalies, obstructive uropathy, and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Living donor kidney transplants are often performed pre-emptively and offer excellent graft function. Policy changes in deceased-donor kidney allocation have increased the proportion of such transplants in pediatric recipients. Adequate pretransplant workup along with evaluation of urologic abnormalities is imperative in achieving good outcomes. Overall, patient and graft outcomes after kidney transplantation have improved, with five-year deceased donor and living donor graft survivals of 78.8% and 84.3%, respectively. Improvements in induction and maintenance immunosuppression have contributed to the gradual improvement in outcomes. Unique challenges in pediatric recipients include increased graft thrombosis, adverse growth, and abnormal development relating to immunosuppression, increased rejection due to nonadherence, increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections, and post-transplant malignancy. This review focuses on the current practices and outcomes in pediatric kidney transplantation in North America. We discuss the indications for transplantation, the evaluation process, some key surgical and immunologic considerations, and the common risk factors for graft dysfunction. Keywords: pediatric kidney transplantation, end-stage renal disease, dialysis, organ donors, immunosuppression

  19. Stem Cell Transplantation from Bench to Bedside

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Stem Cell Transplantation from Bench to Bedside · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Principles of an allogeneic stem cell transplant · Principle of an allogeneic stem cell transplant · Principle of an autologous Stem Cell Transplant · Slide 8 · Conditioning · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Stem Cell Transplantation · Slide 13.

  20. Stem Cell Transplantation from Bench to Bedside

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... 1986 - DEC 2007) Allogenic transplant · BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION VELLORE OCT 1986- DEC 2007 Allogenic transplant · BMT-CMCH Vellore: Miscellaneous Indications – Dec 2006 · BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION · INDICATIONS FOR BMT CMC (OCT 1986 - DEC 2007) Autologous Transplant.

  1. Transplant Information Portal for Patient Management in Organ Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Godo, Ferenc; Nagy, Geza; Fehervari, Imre; Markovics, Gyula; Brugal, Gerard

    2001-01-01

    The RETRANSPLANT (HC 4028 & IN 4028) project sponsored by European Commission - Directorate General XIII, Telecommunications, Information Market and Exploitation of Research, Telematics Application for Health, aimed to develop a portal to bridge the various and geographically dispersed institutions playing a role in the complex process of organ collection from a donor and transplantation into one or several recipients. The generic model used was kidney transplantation and the information and communication technologies developed so far networked dialysis centers, organ transplant surgery clinics, tissue typing laboratories, organizations coordinating recipient to donor selection, and other health care facilities for organ transplant services in the Central and Eastern European Countries using XML technologies.

  2. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Vase, Maja Ølholm; Kampmann, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) incidence is difficult to determine, mainly because both early and other lesions may go unrecognized and unregistered. Few studies have included systematic pathology review to maximize case identification and decide more accurately PTLD frequency...... after long-term post-transplantation follow-up. A retrospective population-based cohort study including all kidney transplant recipients at two Danish centres (1990-2011; population covered 3.1 million; 2175 transplantations in 1906 patients). Pathology reports were reviewed for all patient biopsies...

  3. Tuberculosis After Renal Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbouch, Samia; Hajji, Meriam; Helal, Imed; Ounissi, Mondher; Bacha, Mohammed Mongi; Ben Hamida, Fathi; Abderrahim, Ezzedine; Ben Abdallah, Taieb

    2017-02-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the leading infections after renal transplant, particularly in developing countries where the incidence and prevalence in the general population are high. Diagnosis requires bacteriologic and histologic confirmation. Interactions among the antitubercular drugs and the immunosuppressive agents have to be considered while prescribing, and surveillance for adverse effects is required. Although rare, case reports are available on extrapulmonary tuberculosis in allograft recipients. Here, we present a 25-year-old kidney transplant recipient who was diagnosed with lymph node tuberculosis under uncommon circumstances but who had a good outcome. This case report illustrates the difficulties in diagnosis of tuberculosis, changes in therapeutic protocols, and prognostic factors and highlights the effects of infectious complications with immunosuppressive therapy in this particular patient population.

  4. Small intestinal transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, E M

    2012-02-03

    The past few years have witnessed a considerable shift in the clinical status of intestinal transplantation. A great deal of experience has been gained at the most active centers, and results comparable with those reported at a similar stage in the development of other solid-organ graft programs are now being achieved by these highly proficient transplant teams. Rejection and its inevitable associate, sepsis, remain ubiquitous, and new immunosuppressant regimes are urgently needed; some may already be on the near horizon. The recent success of isolated intestinal grafts, together with the mortality and morbidity attendant upon the development of advanced liver disease related to total parenteral nutrition, has prompted the bold proposal that patients at risk for this complication should be identified and should receive isolated small bowel grafts before the onset of end-stage hepatic failure. The very fact that such a suggestion has begun to emerge reflects real progress in this challenging field.

  5. Bortezomib in Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Raghavan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Although current therapies for pretransplant desensitization and treatment of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR have had some success, they do not specifically deplete plasma cells that produce antihuman leukocyte antigen (HLA antibodies. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma (a plasma cell neoplasm, induces plasma cell apoptosis. In this paper we review the current body of literature regarding the use of this biological agent in the field of transplantation. Although limited experience with bortezomib may seem to show promise in the realm of transplant recipients desensitization and treatment of AMR, there is also experience that may suggest otherwise. Bortezomib's role in desensitization protocols and treatment of AMR will be defined better as more clinical data and trials become available.

  6. Pediatric Liver Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM Dehghani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The goals of post-transplant management are to manage and treat postoperative complications, and develop a balanced long-term immunotherapy regimen that minimizes infection and side effects but controls rejection. While modern immunosuppressant regimes have reduced rates of graft loss due to rejection, they impart major risks for infection, growth failure, metabolic complications, and malignancy. There is significantly more post-transplant morbidity and mortality from infection than from rejection, particularly in infants. This has led to a trend toward minimization of immunosuppression, which is supported by evidence that some rejection facilitates graft tolerance and thus is not necessarily always harmful. Post-transplant complications are divided into those that occur in the first 3–12 months (“early”, and these are relatively common, and those occurring after 12 months (“late”, which are generally uncommon. Most “early” complications relate to surgical issues, and/or immunosuppression, most notably infection, vascular complications of the graft, and biliary leaks. Infection is the most common cause of post-transplant mortality. Rejection does occur but usually responds to treatment with steroid pulse dosing, and appears not to contribute to either graft or patient mortality. “Late” complications include biliary strictures, which are uncommon and generally respond to percutaneous biliary dilatation and stent procedures. Most late complications are primarily related to the effects of long-term immunosuppression, notably infections such as EBV and associated PTLD, and side effects of immunosuppression such as renal dysfunction, hypertension, and immune dysregulation.  

  7. Post liver transplant tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Luis Vaz; Gandara, Judit; Pires, João; Duarte, Raquel; Calvário, Fernando; Dominguez, Miguel; Carvalho, Aurora; Seca, Rui

    2009-01-01

    We report on a patient diagnosed with disseminated (hepatic and pulmonary) tuberculosis in the context of immunosuppression following liver transplant. During the administration of anti-tuberculosis drugs an abrupt elevation of liver enzymes was detected leading us to suspect drug toxicity rather than graft rejection. Nevertheless, careful surveillance and adjustment of serum levels of immunosuppressant drugs permitted continuance of tuberculosis treatment with no further side effects.

  8. [Coping in transplantated patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles-Correia, Diogo; Mega, Inês; Barbosa, António; Barroso, Eduardo; Monteiro, Estela

    2008-01-01

    The theoretical model of coping mechanisms (CM), is based on a discussion between it's main determinant factors: individual and situational (related to the 2 approaches of coping: dispositional and constitutional). Actually the most used classification of CM is based on the division of CM in two main dimensions: coping focused on emotions and coping focused on problem resolution. It is essential that classification methods of CM have in consideration the coexistence of stable dispositional elements with a situational variability. Some instruments to evaluate CM are introduced, based on different theories. Coping can influence health threw different mechanisms (neuroendocrine system, health threatening behaviours and adherence) and is included in two of the more important theoretical models applied to health (Moos & Schafer's and Leventhal's). Based on a systematic literature review we concluded that the most prevalent CM in pre transplantation period are acceptance, active coping, seeking support, and the less used are self-blame and avoidance. In post transplantation period the more prevalent CM continue to be active coping and seeking support associated to confrontation, selfconfidence, religion and coping focused in the problem. Evasive, emotive and fatalistic CM are associated to less control sensed by patients. Confrontation is associated to a better quality of life and avoidance to a reduction of quality of life and higher depression levels and denial to non-adherence increase. Control sensed by patients, CM related to the expression of emotions and denial change threw clinical evolution of transplanted patients.

  9. [Innate immunity and transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponticelli, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity is the first barrier against pathogen infection and has also the important function of activating the adaptive immunity. The receptors of innate immunity, such as toll-like receptors and other receptors, recognize as danger signals the molecular patterns of pathogens as well as those of endogenous molecules released by dying cells. The information is transmitted to adapter proteins that, through a chain of kinases that translate the signal to transcription factors regulating inflammatory genes. In the inflammatory milieu dendritic cells become mature, intercept the antigen and migrate to lymphoid organs where they present the antigen to naïve T cells. Complement also exerts an important role of bridge between innate and adaptive immunity. In donor-deceased kidney transplantation, the innate immunity is triggered in the donor by brain death and is aggravated by the cold ischemia and even more by reperfusion. Once activated, innate immunity produces a local inflammatory environment leading to dendritic cell maturation and complement activation. Dendritic cells present the alloantigen to T cells and induce their differentiation towards effector Th1 and Th17 while inhibiting Th2 and T regulatory cells. A main goal of the current research in transplantation is to obtain an immunological tolerance. Experimental studies showed the possibility of inducing operative tolerance in murine models and even in primates with the infusion of regulatory dendritic cells. However, there are no data with this technique in clinical transplantation.

  10. Allogeneic transplantation in multiple myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Majolino,Ignazio; Severino,Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    In this review the authors present a state of art tretment of multiple myeloma.High dose chemo-radiotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been show to be superior a conventional chemotherapy and a double transplantation. The authors discuss too, the allogeneic transplantation with reduced intensity conditioning, allogeneic versus tandem autologous, results the patients long term outcome and a approach about the use of donor lymphocytes, anti thimocyte glob...

  11. HLA in bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Kimiyoshi

    1989-01-01

    It has been well understood that human major histocompatibility antigen system, HLA is the most important role in the allo transplantation. Therefore, the structure of HLA genes was presented by the recent information (1987). Moreover, their functions in vitro and in vivo also were described. Finally, bone marrow transplantation and HLA network system in Japan against HLA mismatched case was proposed. It is eagerly expected that functional and clinical bone marrow transplantation in Japan could be succeeded. (author)

  12. BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION CMC (Oct 1986 – Dec 2007)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION CMC (Oct 1986 – Dec 2007). Allogeneic transplants. Total Transplant 717. I – Transplant 683. II – Transplant 31. III – Transplant 3. Autologous transplants (1992-2007) 198. (Autologous failure proceeded to Allogeneic transplant ...

  13. Transfusion Support of the Transplant Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Nisbet-Brown, Eric

    1988-01-01

    Organ transplant has become a much more common procedure in recent years. Data suggest that blood transfusions prior to transplant can affect allograph survival. The author discusses blood transfusion in kidney and liver transplantation.

  14. Transfusion support of the transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet-Brown, E

    1988-11-01

    Organ transplant has become a much more common procedure in recent years. Data suggest that blood transfusions prior to transplant can affect allograph survival. The author discusses blood transfusion in kidney and liver transplantation.

  15. The Economics of Organ Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altınörs, Nur; Haberal, Mehmet

    2018-03-01

    To determine the cost effectiveness of transplantation, we analyzed the financial economics of the organ and tissue transplant process. We compared the cost of this process with traditional modalities for treating endstage liver and kidney disease. Medical, surgical, legal, social, ethical, and religious issues are important in organ transplant procedures. Government, health insurance companies, and uninsured individuals are affected by the financial economics of organ transplantation. The distribution of financial burden differs among countries and is dependent on the unique circumstances of each country.

  16. Megakaryocytopoiesis in Stem Cell Transplantation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cohen, IIsaac

    1998-01-01

    Mobilized peripheral blood progenitor cell transplant, used to reconstitute hematopoiesis following high-dose chemotherapy in breast cancer patients, is associated with a requisite period of profound thrombocytopenia...

  17. Biomarkers in solid organ transplantation: establishing personalized transplantation medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Technological advances in molecular and in silico research have enabled significant progress towards personalized transplantation medicine. It is now possible to conduct comprehensive biomarker development studies of transplant organ pathologies, correlating genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic information from donor and recipient with clinical and histological phenotypes. Translation of these advances to the clinical setting will allow assessment of an individual patient's risk of allograft damage or accommodation. Transplantation biomarkers are needed for active monitoring of immunosuppression, to reduce patient morbidity, and to improve long-term allograft function and life expectancy. Here, we highlight recent pre- and post-transplantation biomarkers of acute and chronic allograft damage or adaptation, focusing on peripheral blood-based methodologies for non-invasive application. We then critically discuss current findings with respect to their future application in routine clinical transplantation medicine. Complement-system-associated SNPs present potential biomarkers that may be used to indicate the baseline risk for allograft damage prior to transplantation. The detection of antibodies against novel, non-HLA, MICA antigens, and the expression of cytokine genes and proteins and cytotoxicity-related genes have been correlated with allograft damage and are potential post-transplantation biomarkers indicating allograft damage at the molecular level, although these do not have clinical relevance yet. Several multi-gene expression-based biomarker panels have been identified that accurately predicted graft accommodation in liver transplant recipients and may be developed into a predictive biomarker assay. PMID:21658299

  18. Split-liver transplantation : An underused resource in liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogiers, Xavier; Sieders, Egbert

    2008-01-01

    Split-liver transplantation is an efficient tool to increase the number of liver grafts available for transplantation. More than 15 years after its introduction only the classical splitting technique has reached broad application. Consequently children are benefiting most from this possibility.

  19. CCR5 Δ32 homozygous cord blood allogeneic transplantation in a patient with HIV: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Rafael F; Salgado, María; Sánchez-Ortega, Isabel; Arnan, Montserrat; Canals, Carmen; Domingo-Domenech, Eva; Fernández-de-Sevilla, Alberto; González-Barca, Eva; Morón-López, Sara; Nogues, Nuria; Patiño, Beatriz; Puertas, Maria Carmen; Clotet, Bonaventura; Petz, Lawrence D; Querol, Sergio; Martinez-Picado, Javier

    2015-06-01

    Allogeneic donor CCR5 Δ32 homozygous haemopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) provides the only evidence to date of long-term control of HIV infection. However, availability of conventional CCR5 Δ32 homozygous donors is insufficient to develop this as a therapeutic strategy further. We present a 37-year-old patient with HIV-1 infection and aggressive lymphoma who had disease progression after five lines of radiochemotherapy including an autologous HCT, and in the absence of matched sibling donors, received an allogeneic HCT with four of six HLA-matched CCR5 Δ32 homozygous cord blood cells (StemCyte, Covina, CA), supported with purified CD34+ cells from a haploidentical sibling. Blood or tissue samples were obtained before and weekly after HCT to monitor transplant and HIV infection, including chimerism analysis, CCR5 genotyping and viral tropism, viral isolation and sequence, viral reservoir analysis, immune activation and proliferation, and ex-vivo cell infectivity assays. Combined antiretroviral therapy continued during the procedure. The patient's HIV was CCR5-tropic by genotypic and phenotypic analyses. Baseline latent reservoir tests showed HIV DNA copies in bulk and resting CD4 T cells and in gut-associated lymphoid tissue, CD4 T-cell-associated HIV RNA, replication competent viral size of 2·1 copies per 10(7) CD4 T cells, and single copy assay of 303 copies per mL. After HCT, plasma HIV DNA load was undetectable by ultrasensitive analyses. Upon cord blood full chimerism, the patient's CCR5 Δ32 homozygous CD4 T cells responded to proliferation and activation stimuli and became resistant to infection by the patient's viral isolate and by laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strains. Death related to lymphoma progression regretfully prevented long-term monitoring of the patient's viral reservoir. CCR5 Δ32 homozygous cord blood reconstitution can successfully eliminate HIV-1 and render the allogeneic graft recipient's T lymphocytes resistant to HIV infection. Thus

  20. Transplant tourism among kidney transplant patients in Eastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, U H

    2017-07-05

    Transplant tourism entails movement of recipient, donor or both to a transplant centre outside their country of residence. This has been reported in many countries; and has variously been associated with organ trade. The objective of this study is to determine the frequency and pattern of transplant tourism among transplant patients in Eastern Nigeria. This is a non randomized cross sectional study. All kidney transplant patients who presented at Enugu State University Teaching Hospital Parklane Enugu and Hilton Clinics Port Harcourt in Nigeria were recruited. The clinical parameters including the transplant details of all the patients were documented. The data obtained was analysed using SPSS package. A total of one hundred and twenty six patients were studied, 76.2% were males with M:F ratio of 3.2:1 and mean age of 46.9 ± 13.3 years. Fifty four and 58.7% of the patients were managed in a tertiary hospital and by a nephrologist respectively before referral for kidney transplant. Only 15.8% of the patients had their kidney transplant without delay: finance, lack of donor, logistics including delay in obtaining travelling documents were the common causes of the delay. Ninety percent of the patients had their transplant in India with majority of them using commercial donors. India was also the country with cheapest cost ($18,000.00). 69.8% were unrelated donors, 68.2% were commercial donors and 1.6% of the donors were spouse. All the commercial donors received financial incentives and each commercial donor received mean of 7580 ± 1280 dollars. Also 30.2% of the related donors demanded financial incentive. Transplant tourism is prevalent in eastern Nigeria.

  1. Mediastinitis after cardiac transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noedir A. G. Stolf

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assessment of incidence and behavior of mediastinitis after cardiac transplantation. METHODS: From 1985 to 1999, 214 cardiac transplantations were performed, 12 (5.6% of the transplanted patients developed confirmed mediastinitis. Patient's ages ranged from 42 to 66 years (mean of 52.3±10.0 years and 10 (83.3% patients were males. Seven (58.3% patients showed sternal stability on palpation, 4 (33.3% patients had pleural empyema, and 2 (16.7% patients did not show purulent secretion draining through the wound. RESULTS: Staphylococcus aureus was the infectious agent identified in the wound secretion or in the mediastinum, or both, in 8 (66.7% patients. Staphylococcus epidermidis was identified in 2 (16.7% patients, Enterococcus faecalis in 1 (8.3% patient, and the cause of mediastinitis could not be determined in 1 (8.3% patient. Surgical treatment was performed on an emergency basis, and the extension of the débridement varied with local conditions. In 2 (16.7% patients, we chose to leave the surgical wound open and performed daily dressings with granulated sugar. Total sternal resection was performed in only 1 (8.3% patient. Out of this series, 5 (41.7% patients died, and the causes of death were related to the infection. Autopsy revealed persistence of mediastinitis in 1 (8.3% patient. CONCLUSION: Promptness in diagnosing mediastinitis and precocious surgical drainage have changed the natural evolution of this disease. Nevertheless, observance of the basic precepts of prophylaxis of infection is still the best way to treat mediastinitis.

  2. Kidney transplantation in obese patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Minh-Ha; Foster, Clarence E; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Ichii, Hirohito

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimated that in 2014, over 600 million people met criteria for obesity. In 2011, over 30% of individuals undergoing kidney transplant had a body mass index (BMI) 35 kg/m2 or greater. A number of recent studies have confirmed the relationship between overweight/obesity and important comorbidities in kidney transplant patients. As with non-transplant surgeries, the rate of wound and soft tissue complications are increased following transplant as is the incidence of delayed graft function. These two issues appear to contribute to longer length of stay compared to normal BMI. New onset diabetes after transplant and cardiac outcomes also appear to be increased in the obese population. The impact of obesity on patient survival after kidney transplantation remains controversial, but appears to mirror the impact of extremes of BMI in non-transplant populations. Early experience with (open and laparoscopic) Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy support excellent weight loss (in the range of 50%-60% excess weight lost at 1 year), but experts have recommended the need for further studies. Long term nutrient deficiencies remain a concern but in general, these procedures do not appear to adversely impact absorption of immunosuppressive medications. In this study, we review the literature to arrive at a better understanding of the risks related to renal transplantation among individuals with obesity. PMID:27011911

  3. Neuromuscular diseases after cardiac transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateen, Farrah J.; van de Beek, Diederik; Kremers, Walter K.; Daly, Richard C.; Edwards, Brooks S.; McGregor, Christopher G. A.; Wijdicks, Eelco F. M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac transplantation is a therapeutic option in end-stage heart failure. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) disease is known to occur in cardiac transplant recipients but has not been fully characterized. METHODS: This retrospective cohort review reports the PNS-related concerns of 313

  4. Organs for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-03

    The British government has printed 10 million organ donor cards--as well as posters, car stickers, and leaflets--for distribution in a campaign to increase the number of organ transplants in the United Kingdom. Norman Fowler, Secretary of State for Social Services, suggested at a February 22, 1984, press conference that signing of donor cards might become a family occasion, so that all concerned would know of a person's wishes in the event of sudden death. He made it clear that the government has no plans to introduce a system of presumed consent for organ donation. Mr. Fowler also announced a commitment of additional government funds for renal services.

  5. Transplantation immunity in annelids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, S.; Miller, Barbara J.; Cooper, E. L.

    1971-01-01

    The oligochaete annelids Lumbricus terrestris and Eisenia foetida were used to demonstrate adoptive transfer of transplantation immunity. Eisenia grafts were used as sensitizing antigen and test grafts. Host Lumbricus injected with coelomic fluid containing coelomocytes from Lumbricus donors previously sensitized to Eisenia grafts rejected test grafts in an accelerated fashion. The rejection time was shorter and significantly different from that of worms injected with saline or coelomocytes from unsensitized worms. Coelomocytes resemble various vertebrate leucocytes and immunocytes and seem equivalent to a hypothetical invertebrate precursor wandering cell which recognizes and reacts to antigen. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:5558033

  6. [Fecal microbiota transplantation: review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbut, F; Collignon, A; Butel, M-J; Bourlioux, P

    2015-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has gained an increasing medical interest, since the recognition of the role of disturbed microbiota in the development of various diseases. To date, FMT is an established treatment modality for multiple recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (RCDI), despite lack of standardization of the procedure. Persisting normalization of the disturbed colonic microbiota associated with RCDI seems to be responsible for the therapeutic effect of FMT. For other diseases, FMT should be considered strictly experimental, only offered to patients in an investigational clinical setting. Although the concept of FMT is appealing, current expectations should be damped until future evidence arises. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Liver transplantation for nontransplant physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amany AbdelMaqsod Sholkamy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the nontransplant physicians who manage hepatic patients (internists and hepatologists keep asking about liver transplantation. The purpose of this article is to highlight important topics a nontransplant colleague may require in his practice. There are many topics in this respect; however, three most important topics need to be highlighted; those are; the time of referral to transplantation, the indications and contraindications and the metabolic issues regarding a transplanted patient. Still, there are no clear guidelines for the management of many of the metabolic issues regarding liver transplanted patients. And this why, collaborative efforts of transplant and nontransplant physicians are needed to conduct multicenter, long term randomized controlled trials and proper follow up programs.

  8. ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Karoline; Titlestad, Kjell; Baudier, Francois

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Kidney transplantation is the optimal treatment for many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Due to shortage of donor kidneys in Denmark, there is a need to expand the possibilities for donation. At the Odense University Hospital (OUH), we have introduced ABO......-incompatible kidney transplantation. We used antigenspecific immunoadsorptions to remove blood group antibodies and anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab) to inhibit the antibody production. The aim of introducing the ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation at the OUH was to increase the rate of living donor kidney...... transplantation without increasing rejection or mortality rates. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospective evaluation. Eleven patients received ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. The patients were followed for 3-26 months. RESULTS: One patient had an antibody-mediated rejection, one patient suffered T...

  9. Socioeconomic aspects of heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R W

    1995-03-01

    Heart transplantation is an established treatment modality for end-stage cardiac disease. Unfortunately, relative to other health care priorities, heart transplantation has fallen into disrepute. Efforts to reform the health care system have focused on three fundamental issues--cost, quality, and access. On each count, heart transplantation is vulnerable to criticism. Managed care is an incremental approach to health care reform that imposes fiscal constraint on providers. This constraint is expressed in the form of capitation which, in turn, requires providers to assume risk and accept economic responsibility for clinical decisions. While the need for transplantation is considerable, there are both clinical and economic factors limiting the overall level of activity. In 1993, over 2200 heart transplants were performed in the United States on people who were dying of end-stage cardiac disease. The total demand for heart transplantation was estimated to be about 5900 persons, which was not met due to an insufficient supply of donor hearts. Absent donors, the fiscal consequences of heart transplantation are minimized. In 1993, actuaries estimated that the total charge per heart transplant was $209,100. By designating centers based on price and quality considerations, managed care plans have reduced this per procedure expense to less than $100,000. While the benefits of transplantation are noteworthy, there are still concerns. Sixty percent of patients report that they are able to work, but only 30% do so. Employers hope to improve upon this record by expanding the designated center approach. In conclusion, the future of heart transplantation is unclear. Opportunities for innovation are limited, although the management of heart failure is an area of increased interest.

  10. Post-transplantation Malignancy After Kidney Transplantation in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keles, Y; Tekin, S; Duzenli, M; Yuksel, Y; Yücetin, L; Dosemeci, L; Sengul, A; Demirbaş, A; Tuncer, M

    2015-06-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best treatment option for end-stage renal disease patients. Increased incidence of post-transplantation malignancy can be caused by immunosuppressive drugs and some oncogenic infections. The aim of this study is to show the incidence of post-transplantation malignancy in patients who had surgery and were followed up in the Organ Transplant Center, Medical Park Antalya, Antalya, Turkey. The study was based on 2100 kidney transplantation patients who had surgery between May 2008 and December 2012 and also on 1900 patients who had surgery by members of our team in other centers and who were followed up routinely. In all of our patients, the type of malignancy, the time that malignancy developed, immunosuppressive regimens, and viral status (Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus) were investigated. Malignancy was developed in 30 patients (60% of them were male, median age was 52.1 years). Post-transplantation malignancy development time was a median of 5.1 years. The types of malignancies were as follows: non-melanoma skin cancer in 12 patients (40%), urogenital cancer in 7 patients (24%), breast cancer in 4 patients (14%), lymphoproliferative disease in 3 patients (10%), thyroid cancer in 2 patients (6%), and lung cancer in 2 patients (6%). In this study, we did not find any increased post-transplantation malignancy risk in our patients. This finding could be due to the low-dosage immunosuppressive protocols that we used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Limbal stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandes Merle

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The past two decades have witnessed remarkable progress in limbal stem cell transplantation. In addition to harvesting stem cells from a cadaver or a live related donor, it is now possible to cultivate limbal stem cells in vitro and then transplant them onto the recipient bed. A clear understanding of the basic disease pathology and a correct assessment of the extent of stem cell deficiency are essential. A holistic approach towards management of limbal stem cell deficiency is needed. This also includes management of the underlying systemic disease, ocular adnexal pathology and dry eye. Conjunctival limbal autografts from the healthy contralateral eye are performed for unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, tissue may be harvested from a cadaver or a living related donor; prolonged immunosuppression is needed to avoid allograft rejection in such cases. This review describes the surgical techniques, postoperative treatment regimes (including immunosuppression for allografts, the complications and their management. The short and long-term outcomes of the various modalities reported in the literature are also described.

  12. Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Rodrigo; Young, Lionel W.; Ledesma-Medina, Jocyline; Cienfuegos, Javier; Gartner, J. Carlton; Bron, Klaus M.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    The postoperative diagnostic imaging examinations of 44 children who underwent 59 orthotopic liver transplantations were reviewed. The imaging modalities used for the evaluation of suspected complications include plain roentgenography, ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), nuclear scintigraphy, arteriography, percutaneous and operative cholangiography, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The main postoperative complications included ischemia, thrombosis (hepatic artery and portal vein), infarction, obstruction or leakage of the biliary anastomosis, hepatic and perihepatic infection, and allograft rejection. US, the most frequently used abdominal imaging modality, was best suited for detection of biliary duct dilatation, fluid collections in or around the transplanted liver, and hepatic arterial, inferior vena caval, and portal vein thrombosis. CT was especially helpful in corroborating findings of infection and in locating abscesses. Technetium 99m sulfur colloid (early- and late-phase imaging) provided a sensitive, although nonspecific, means of assessing allograft vascularization and morphology. Angiography showed vascularity most clearly, and cholangiography was the most useful In the assessment of bile duct patency. A diagnostic imaging algorithm is proposed for evaluation of suspected complications. PMID:3901104

  13. Organ transplantation in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Wayne; Nour, Bakr

    2010-09-01

    Concern has increasingly been expressed about the growing number of reports of medical personnel participating in the transplantation of human organs or tissues taken from the bodies of executed prisoners, handicapped patients, or poor persons who have agreed to part with their organs for commercial purposes. Such behavior has been universally considered as ethically and morally reprehensible, yet in some parts of the world the practice continues to flourish. The concept of justice demands that every person have an equal right to life, and to protect this right, society has an obligation to ensure that every person has equal access to medical care. Regrettably, the Egyptian system does not legally recognize brain death and continues to allow the buying and selling of organs. For more than 30 years in Egypt, the ability to pay has determined who receives an organ and economic need has determined who will be the donor. As transplant professionals, it is important that we advocate on behalf of all patients, potential recipients, and donors and for those who are left out and not likely to receive a donor organ in an economically based system. Current issues associated with this debate are reviewed and recommendations about how to address them in Egypt are discussed.

  14. Challenges in Organ Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Beyar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Organ transplantation has progressed tremendously with improvements in surgical methods, organ preservation, and pharmaco-immunologic therapies and has become a critical pathway in the management of severe organ failure worldwide. The major sources of organs are deceased donors after brain death; however, a substantial number of organs come from live donations, and a significant number can also be obtained from non-heart-beating donors. Yet, despite progress in medical, pharmacologic, and surgical techniques, the shortage of organs is a worldwide problem that needs to be addressed internationally at the highest possible levels. This particular field involves medical ethics, religion, and society behavior and beliefs. Some of the critical ethical issues that require aggressive interference are organ trafficking, payments for organs, and the delicate balance in live donations between the benefit to the recipient and the possible harm to the donor and others. A major issue in organ transplantation is the definition of death and particularly brain death. Another major critical factor is the internal tendency of a specific society to donate organs. In the review below, we will discuss the various challenges that face organ donation worldwide, and particularly in Israel, and some proposed mechanisms to overcome this difficulty.

  15. Challenges in organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyar, Rafael

    2011-04-01

    Organ transplantation has progressed tremendously with improvements in surgical methods, organ preservation, and pharmaco-immunologic therapies and has become a critical pathway in the management of severe organ failure worldwide. The major sources of organs are deceased donors after brain death; however, a substantial number of organs come from live donations, and a significant number can also be obtained from non-heart-beating donors. Yet, despite progress in medical, pharmacologic, and surgical techniques, the shortage of organs is a worldwide problem that needs to be addressed internationally at the highest possible levels. This particular field involves medical ethics, religion, and society behavior and beliefs. Some of the critical ethical issues that require aggressive interference are organ trafficking, payments for organs, and the delicate balance in live donations between the benefit to the recipient and the possible harm to the donor and others. A major issue in organ transplantation is the definition of death and particularly brain death. Another major critical factor is the internal tendency of a specific society to donate organs. In the review below, we will discuss the various challenges that face organ donation worldwide, and particularly in Israel, and some proposed mechanisms to overcome this difficulty.

  16. Challenges in Organ Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyar, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Organ transplantation has progressed tremendously with improvements in surgical methods, organ preservation, and pharmaco-immunologic therapies and has become a critical pathway in the management of severe organ failure worldwide. The major sources of organs are deceased donors after brain death; however, a substantial number of organs come from live donations, and a significant number can also be obtained from non-heart-beating donors. Yet, despite progress in medical, pharmacologic, and surgical techniques, the shortage of organs is a worldwide problem that needs to be addressed internationally at the highest possible levels. This particular field involves medical ethics, religion, and society behavior and beliefs. Some of the critical ethical issues that require aggressive interference are organ trafficking, payments for organs, and the delicate balance in live donations between the benefit to the recipient and the possible harm to the donor and others. A major issue in organ transplantation is the definition of death and particularly brain death. Another major critical factor is the internal tendency of a specific society to donate organs. In the review below, we will discuss the various challenges that face organ donation worldwide, and particularly in Israel, and some proposed mechanisms to overcome this difficulty. PMID:23908807

  17. Facial transplantation surgery introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eun, Seok-Chan

    2015-06-01

    Severely disfiguring facial injuries can have a devastating impact on the patient's quality of life. During the past decade, vascularized facial allotransplantation has progressed from an experimental possibility to a clinical reality in the fields of disease, trauma, and congenital malformations. This technique may now be considered a viable option for repairing complex craniofacial defects for which the results of autologous reconstruction remain suboptimal. Vascularized facial allotransplantation permits optimal anatomical reconstruction and provides desired functional, esthetic, and psychosocial benefits that are far superior to those achieved with conventional methods. Along with dramatic improvements in their functional statuses, patients regain the ability to make facial expressions such as smiling and to perform various functions such as smelling, eating, drinking, and speaking. The ideas in the 1997 movie "Face/Off" have now been realized in the clinical field. The objective of this article is to introduce this new surgical field, provide a basis for examining the status of the field of face transplantation, and stimulate and enhance facial transplantation studies in Korea.

  18. [Metabolic syndrome after kidney transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedbálková, Marta; Svojanovský, Jan; Trnavský, Karel; Kuman, Milan; Jarkovský, Jiří; Karpíšek, Michal; Souček, Miroslav

    2014-03-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Higher risk of the metabolic syndrome and its components in patients after kidney transplantation is caused by immunosuppressive therapy. THE AIM OF OUR STUDY was to evaluate the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its components in kidney transplant recipients and to analyse their influence on allograft function and albuminuria. In the study we monitored 69 patients after cadaveric kidney transplantation. The prevalence of the meta-bolic syndrome was 61.3 % 3 years after kidney transplantation. The prevalence of new onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation was 27 % and that of abdominal obesity 59.7 % of patients. The age of kidney transplant recipients with the metabolic syndrome was higher than of these without it, but not statistically significant. The age of kidney transplant recipients with new onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation was significantly higher, 54.0 (35.0; 69.0) years, than in patients without it, 45.5 (27.0; 60.0) years, OR (95% IS) 1.116 (1.031; 1.207), p = 0.006.The number of components of the metabolic syndrome was negatively correlated with the graft function (rs -0,275, p = 0,031). In patients with impaired renal function with estimated glomerular filtration (using MDRD equation) metabolic syndrome and hypertriglyceridaemia was significantly higher. Chronic allograft dysfunction was predicted by donor age, delayed allograft function, rejection, low level of HDL-cholesterol, hypertriglyceridaemia and hyperuricaemia. Hyperuricaemia was the only significant predictor of allograft dysfunction independently of the presence of delayed allograft function, rejection episodes and donor age. The metabolic syndrome, elevation of apolipoprotein B and nonHDL-cholesterol and increased systolic blood pressure were associated with albuminuria. Higher levels of apolipoprotein B and total cholesterol were independent predictors of increased albumin-creatinine ratio. Obesity

  19. Breast Reconstruction After Solid Organ Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonce, Stephanie L; Giles, Brian; McLaughlin, Sarah A; Perdikis, Galen; Waldorf, James; Lemaine, Valerie; TerKonda, Sarvam

    2015-09-01

    Solid organ transplant patients frequently develop posttransplant malignancies including breast cancer. They may desire breast reconstruction after mastectomy, which could potentially be complicated by their transplant status, immunosuppressive regimen, and previous operations. We review our experience with patients who have undergone solid organ transplant and subsequent breast reconstruction after mastectomy After institutional review board approval, we queried our prospective breast reconstruction and solid organ transplant databases for corresponding patients. Inclusion criteria comprised breast reconstruction after solid organ transplant. A chart review was conducted of identified patients. Seventeen patients were identified: 1 pulmonary transplant, 4 cardiac transplants, 2 liver transplants, 1 pancreas transplant, 2 combined kidney/pancreas transplants, and 7 kidney transplants. Indications for mastectomy included posttransplant malignancy and prophylaxis. Median time from transplant to completion of reconstruction was 186 months (range, 11-336 months). Median age at transplant was 34.5 years (range, 21-65 years) with the median age of the patients at reconstructive surgery 51.5 years (range, 34-71 years). Median body mass index was 25.3 (range, 21.3-46.5). No significant complications were noted after reconstructive surgery. All patients were on full immunosuppression at time of reconstruction. Breast reconstruction is a viable option for transplant patients after mastectomy and should not be refused based on their transplant status. Close coordination with the transplant team and careful preoperative planning is essential for optimal outcomes.

  20. Allogeneic and Autologous Bone-Marrow Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Deeg, H. Joachim

    1988-01-01

    The author of this paper presents an overview of the current status of bone marrow transplantation, including indications, pre-transplant considerations, the transplant procedure, acute and delayed transplant-related problems, results currently attainable, and a short discussion of possible future developments.

  1. Infrastructure, logistics and regulation of transplantation: UNOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbach, Julie K

    2013-12-01

    Organ transplantation has evolved into the standard of care for patients with end-stage organ failure. Despite considering increasingly complex transplant recipients for organs recovered from donors with increasing comorbid conditions, 1-year patient survival following kidney transplantation is 97% in the United States, whereas liver transplant recipient 1-year survival is 90%. There were 16,485 kidney recipients in the United States in 2012, and 6256 patients who underwent liver transplantation. The intent of this review is to highlight the logistics required for transplantation as well as reviewing the current oversight of transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pediatric organ donation and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Jennifer K; Myrick, Craig W; Meyers, Rebecka L; Bratton, Susan L; Nakagawa, Thomas A

    2013-06-01

    There is increasing unmet need for solid organ donation. Alternative donor sources, such as donation after circulatory determination of death (DCDD), are needed. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of DCDD on trends in pediatric organ donation and transplantation. Data were obtained from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network for US organ recipients and donors from 2001 to 2010 stratified according to age, organ, and deceased donor type (DCDD or donation after neurologic determination of death). Additional data included transplant wait-list removals due to death. From 2001 to 2010, pediatric organ transplant recipients increased from 1170 to 1475. Organs from DCDD donors were transplanted into children infrequently but increased from 1 to 31. Pediatric donation after neurologic determination of death decreased by 13% whereas DCDD increased by 174% (50 to 137). Recipients of pediatric grafts decreased from 3042 to 2751. Adults receiving grafts from pediatric donors decreased from 2243 to 1780; children receiving pediatric grafts increased from 799 to 971. Transplant recipients receiving pediatric DCDD grafts were few but increased annually from 50 to 128 adults and 0 to 9 children. Pediatric candidates dying waiting for an organ decreased from 262 to 110. From 2001 to 2010, children received more solid organ transplants and fewer children died waiting. Organ recovery from pediatric and adult DCDD donors increased. The number of pediatric recipients of DCDD grafts remains small. Adults primarily receive the direct benefit from pediatric DCDD but other changes in organ allocation have directly benefited children.

  3. Marrow grafts between phenotypically DLA-identical and haploidentical unrelated dogs: additional antigens controlling engraftment are not detected by cell-mediated lympholysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeg, H.J. (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA); Storb, R.; Raff, R.F.; Weiden, P.L.; DeRose, S.; Thomas, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    Bone marrow transplants with low marrow cell doses (less than or equal to4 X 10/sup 8/ cells/kg) from unrelated donors were carried out in 16 dogs conditioned with 9 Gy (900 rad) of total body irradiation. No immunosuppression was given after grafting. Eleven donor-recipient pairs were phenotypically identical (group 1) for the known antigens of the canine major histocompatibility complex (DLA) and in five the donor was homozygous and the recipient heterozygous for DLA (group 2), as determined by serological histocompatibility typing and mixed leukocyte cultures including homozygous cell typing. In addition, lymphocytes from donors and recipients in group 1 were mutually nonreactive in cell-mediated lympholysis; lymphocytes from recipients in group 2 were not cytotoxic against donor cells. Eight dogs rejected their grafts and eight showed sustained engraftment; of these, four died from graft-versus-host disease. The incidence of rejection was higher than in DLA-identical littermates but lower than in DLA-nonidentical unrelated or littermate dogs. These results indicate that antigens different from the recognized alleles at DLA are involved in the control of engraftment. These antigens most likely represent the expression of unrecognized differences within DLA or are coded for by a locus different from but linked to DLA-A, B, C or D; they are not recognized in the cell-mediated lympholysis assay.

  4. Heart transplantation and arterial elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colvin-Adams M

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Monica Colvin-Adams,1 Nonyelum Harcourt,1 Robert LeDuc,2 Ganesh Raveendran,1 Yassir Sonbol,3 Robert Wilson,1 Daniel Duprez11Cardiovascular Division, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 2Division of Biostatistics University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 3Cardiovascular Division, St Luke's Hospital System, Sugar Land, TX, USAObjective: Arterial elasticity is a functional biomarker that has predictive value for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in nontransplant populations. There is little information regarding arterial elasticity in heart transplant recipients. This study aimed to characterize small (SAE and large (LAE artery elasticity in heart transplant recipients in comparison with an asymptomatic population free of overt cardiovascular disease. A second goal was to identify demographic and clinical factors associated with arterial elasticity in this unique population.Methods: Arterial pulse waveform was registered noninvasively at the radial artery in 71 heart transplant recipients between 2008 and 2010. SAEs and LAEs were derived from diastolic pulse contour analysis. Comparisons were made to a healthy cohort of 1,808 participants selected from our prevention clinic database. Multiple regression analyses were performed to evaluate associations between risk factors and SAE and LAE within the heart transplant recipients.Results: LAE and SAE were significantly lower in heart transplant recipients than in the normal cohort (P <0.01 and P < 0.0001, respectively. Female sex and history of ischemic cardiomyopathy were significantly associated with reduced LAE and SAE. Older age and the presence of moderate cardiac allograft vasculopathy were also significantly associated with reduced SAE. Transplant duration was associated with increased SAE.Conclusion: Heart transplants are associated with peripheral endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness, as demonstrated by a significant reduction in SAE and LAE when compared with a

  5. Hepatitis C and liver transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert S.

    2005-08-01

    Liver transplantation is a life-saving therapy to correct liver failure, portal hypertension and hepatocellular carcinoma arising from hepatitis C infection. But despite the successful use of living donors and improvements in immunosuppression and antiviral therapy, organ demand continues to outstrip supply and recurrent hepatitis C with accelerated progression to cirrhosis of the graft is a frequent cause of graft loss and the need for retransplantation. Appropriate selection of candidates and timing of transplantation, coupled with better pre- and post-transplant antiviral therapy, are needed to improve outcomes.

  6. Airway Complications After Lung Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Laura; Machuzak, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Airway complications remain a significant source of morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation. The incidence of complications is wide-ranging depending on the definition of the event, and there is still no universally accepted grading system for airway findings after transplantation. Additionally, although surgical technique and organ preservation have improved, other modifiable risk factors remain unclear. The management is as wide-ranging as the definitions. A multimodality approach is often needed with airway stenting reserved for refractory cases and stent management by a transplant team with expertise in placement and management of long-term complications." Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Antibody induction therapy for lung transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Møller, Christian H; Penninga, Ida Elisabeth Irene

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplantation has become a valuable and well-accepted treatment option for most end-stage lung diseases. Lung transplant recipients are at risk of transplanted organ rejection, and life-long immunosuppression is necessary. Clear evidence is essential to identify an optimal, safe...... and effective immunosuppressive treatment strategy for lung transplant recipients. Consensus has not yet been achieved concerning use of immunosuppressive antibodies against T-cells for induction following lung transplantation....

  8. Pre- and post- transplantation lung cancer in heart transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pricopi, Ciprian; Rivera, Caroline; Varnous, Shaida; Arame, Alex; Le Pimpec Barthes, Françoise; Riquet, Marc

    2015-05-01

    Heart transplantation after lung cancer surgery can be questionable because of the high risk of cancer recurrence. We report the results of two patients. The first underwent right lobectomy in 2008 for pT1N0 adenocarcinoma, heart-transplantation in 2010, and surgery for synchronous adenocarcinoma and squamous-cell carcinoma in 2012. The second underwent left segmentectomy for pT1aN0 adenosquamous carcinoma and transplantation in 1995 and then surgery for pT1aN1 adenocarcinoma in 2013. Posttransplantation lung cancer histologic analysis results were different in both cases, demonstrating the absence of metastatic recurrence. Thus, early stage lung cancer might not be a contraindication to heart transplantation, nor are long delays be necessary before registering on a waiting list. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The UNOS renal transplant registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecka, J M

    2001-01-01

    The shortage of cadaver kidneys relative to increasing demand for transplantation has lead to a remarkable rise in transplantation from living donors. Based upon data reported to UNOS, the number of living donor kidneys transplanted in 2000 (5,106) nearly equaled the number of cadaver kidneys from preferred donors aged 6-50. HLA-mismatched siblings, offspring, spouses and other genetically unrelated donors accounted for nearly 80% of increased living donor transplantation during 1994-2000. Despite the increased use of poorly HLA-matched living donor kidneys, the actuarial 10-year graft survival rates for transplants between 1988-2000 were clustered between 53-57% for HLA-mismatched living donor grafts, except for offspring-to-parent transplants (49%) when the recipients were generally older. The 10-year survival rate for 96,053 cadaver grafts was 38% during the same period. The 5-year graft survival rates for more recent (1996-2000) cadaver donor transplants were 66%, 62% and 56% for recipients of first, second and multiple grafts, respectively (p < 0.001). The comparable results among recipients of living donor kidneys were 67%, 66% and 59% (p = ns). The 5-year graft survival rates for HLA-matched first grafts were 7% higher than those for HLA-mismatched transplants when the kidney was from a living or cadaver donor. HLA-identical sibling transplants provided the best long-term graft survival (85% at 5 years and a 32 year half-life). Even with improved crossmatch tests and stronger immunosuppression, sensitization was associated with 8% lower graft survival at 5 years and with a higher rate of late graft loss among first cadaver kidney recipients. Sensitization also was associated with an increase in delayed graft function from 22% of unsensitized first transplant recipients to as much as 36% among multiply retransplanted patients. Recipient race was a key factor in long-term graft survival of both living and cadaver donor kidneys. The rate of late graft loss was

  10. Perspectives of Older Kidney Transplant Recipients on Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Jule; Hanson, Camilla S; Chapman, Jeremy R; Wong, Germaine; Craig, Jonathan C; Schell, Jane O; Tong, Allison

    2017-03-07

    Older kidney transplant recipients are susceptible to cognitive impairment, frailty, comorbidities, immunosuppression-related complications, and chronic graft failure, however, there has been limited focus on their concerns and expectations related to transplantation. This study aims to describe the perspectives of older kidney transplant recipients about their experience of kidney transplantation, self-management, and treatment goals to inform strategies and interventions that address their specific needs. Face-to-face semistructured interviews were conducted with 30 kidney transplant recipients aged 65-80 years from five renal units in Australia. Transcripts were analyzed thematically. Six themes were identified: restoring vitality of youth (with subthemes of revived mindset for resilience, embracing enjoyment in life, drive for self-actualization); persisting through prolonged recovery (yielding to aging, accepting functional limitations, pushing the limit, enduring treatment responsibilities); imposing sicknesses (combatting devastating comorbidities, painful restrictions, emerging disillusionment, anxieties about accumulating side effects, consuming treatment burden); prioritizing graft survival (privileged with a miracle, negotiating risks for longevity, enacting a moral duty, preserving the last opportunity); confronting health deterioration (vulnerability and helplessness, narrowing focus to immediate concerns, uncertainty of survival); and value of existence (purpose through autonomy, refusing the burden of futile treatment, staying alive by all means). Older kidney transplant recipients felt able to enjoy life and strived to live at their newly re-established potential and capability, which motivated them to protect their graft. However, some felt constrained by slow recuperation and overwhelmed by unexpected comorbidities, medication-related side effects, and health decline. Our findings suggest the need to prepare and support older recipients for self

  11. Historical Overview of Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markmann, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Except for legends and claims of miracles, most histories of transplantation cover only the last 60 years because there were no earlier successes. However, the story of even this era has been documented in such rich detail that a full account would fill several volumes. Thus, this brief summary must be limited to highly selected “landmarks.” Some landmarks had an immediate impact, but the importance of others went unrecognized for decades. Some findings that deserved landmark status were overlooked or forgotten, whereas others of no biological significance had major impact. Placing these events in perspective is challenging. Several of transplantation’s pioneers are still alive, and most of the others are within living memory. Virtually all of them have produced their own accounts. For the most part, they agree on what the “landmarks” are, but their differences in emphasis and perspective make an interesting story. PMID:23545575

  12. What Is a Heart Transplant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for death and transplantation in children with dilated car... Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn more about getting to NIH Get Email Alerts Receive automatic alerts about NHLBI related news and highlights from ...

  13. Organ Transplantation: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some cases, but not always. There is no advantage to listing at more than one transplant center ... Subscribe to enews Follow Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Instagram Google+ Contact 700 N. 4th Street Richmond, VA ...

  14. The history of liver transplantation in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moray, Gökhan; Arslan, Gülnaz; Haberal, Mehmet

    2014-03-01

    Liver transplantation is the definitive treatment for end-stage liver diseases. The first successful liver transplant was performed in the United States by Thomas Starzl in 1967. The first successful solid organ transplant in Turkey was a living-related kidney transplant performed by Dr. Haberal in 1975. After much effort by Dr. Haberal, the Turkish parliament enacted a law about organ transplantation in 1979. After clinical and experimental studies, the first liver transplant in Turkey was performed by Dr. Haberal in 1988. The first successful partial living-donor liver transplant in children in Turkey was performed by the same team on March 15, 1990. On April 24, 1990, the first living-donor liver transplant was performed on a child in Turkey using a left lateral segment by Dr. Haberal and coworkers. On May 16, 1992, Dr. Haberal performed a simultaneous living-donor liver and kidney transplantation to an adult from the same donor. There currently are 30 liver transplantation centers in Turkey. According to data from the Ministry of Health, there presently are 2065 patients in Turkey who are waiting for a liver transplantation. From January 2002 to June 2013, there were 6091 liver transplants performed in Turkey (4020 living-donor [66% ] and 2071 deceased donor liver transplants [34% ]). From January 2011 to June 2013, there were 2514 patients who had liver transplants in Turkey, and 437 patients (17%) died. The number of liver transplants per year in Turkey reached 1000 transplants in 2012 and more than 1150 transplants in 2013 (15.1/million/y). Therefore, Turkey has one of the highest volumes of liver transplantation per population worldwide, with 90% survival within 1 year after transplantation.

  15. [BK virus and renal transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hang; Shi, Yi; Li, Chao-yang; Wang, Jian-li

    2009-06-01

    BK virus (BKV) is a subtype of papovaviridae. The latent and asymptomatic infection of BKV is common among healthy people. The incidence of BKV re-activation in renal transplant recipients ranges 10%-68%. About 1%-7% of renal transplant recipients will suffer from BKV-associated nephropathy (BKVAN), and half of them will experience graft failure. This paper summarizes the re-activation mechanism of BKV as well as the risk factors, pathology, diagnosis, and treatment of BKVAN.

  16. Nutritional status and liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, Manuela; Giusto, Michela; Giannelli, Valerio; Lucidi, Cristina; Riggio, Oliviero

    2011-12-01

    Chronic liver disease has a profound effect on nutritional status and undernourishment is almost universally present in patients with end-stage liver disease undergoing liver transplantation. In the last decades, due to epidemiological changes, a trend showing an increase in patients with end-stage liver disease and associated obesity has also been reported in developed countries. Nutrition abnormalities may influence the outcome after transplantation therefore, the importance to carefully assess the nutritional status in the work-up of patients candidates for liver transplantation is widely accepted. More attention has been given to malnourished patients as they represent the greater number. The subjective global nutritional assessment and anthropometric measurements are recognized in current guidelines to be adequate in identifying those patients at risk of malnutrition. Cirrhotic patients with a depletion in lean body mass and fat deposits have an increased surgical risk and malnutrition may impact on morbidity, mortality and costs in the post-transplantation setting. For this reason an adequate calorie and protein intake should always be ensured to malnourished cirrhotic patient either through the diet, or using oral nutritional supplements or by enteral or parenteral nutrition although studies supporting the efficacy of nutritional supplementation in improving the clinical outcomes after transplantation are still scarce. When liver function is restored, an amelioration in the nutritional status is expected. After liver transplantation in fact dietary intake rapidly normalizes and fat mass is progressively regained while the recovery of muscle mass can be slower. In some patients unregulated weight gain may lead to over-nutrition and may favor metabolic disorders (hypertension, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia). This condition, defined as 'metabolic syndrome', may play a negative role on the overall survival of liver transplant patients. In this report we review

  17. Computed tomography after liver transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuy, D.E.; Costello, P.

    1992-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation is commonly performed at many institutions around the world. The care of these critically ill patients has heavily relied upon cross-sectional imaging, specifically CT. CT is of enormous benefit in the postoperative management of the various complications which is common in this group of patients. This article reviews the role of CT and its respective strengths and weaknesses, in the adult liver transplant recipient. (orig.) [de

  18. ABO-incompatible heart transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, M; Michaud, N; Chinnappan, I; Klein, T; Mettler, B

    2015-04-01

    A month-old baby girl with blood type O positive received a donor heart organ from a donor with blood type B. This was the first institutional ABO-incompatible heart transplant. Infants listed for transplantation may be considered for an ABO-incompatible heart transplant based on their antibody levels and age. The United Network of Organ Sharing (UNOS) protocol is infants under 24 months with titers less than or equal to 1:4.(1) This recipient's anti-A and anti-B antibodies were monitored with titer assays to determine their levels; antibody levels less than 1:4 are acceptable pre-transplant in order to proceed with donor and transplant arrangements.1 Immediately prior to initiating cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), a complete whole body exchange transfusion of at least two-times the patient's circulating blood volume was performed with packed red blood cells (pRBC), fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and 25% albumin. Titer assays were sent two minutes after initiation of full CPB and then hourly until the cross-clamp was removed. Institutionally, reperfusion of the donor heart is not restored until the antibody level from the titer assay is known and reported as less than 1:4; failing to achieve an immulogically tolerant recipient will provide conditions for hyperacute rejection. The blood collected during the transfusion exchange was immediately processed through a cell saver so the pRBC's could be re-infused to the patient during CPB, as necessary. The remainder of the transplant was performed in the same fashion as an ABO-compatible heart transplant. The patient has shown no signs of rejection following transplantation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Getting More Organs for Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Judd B. Kessler; Alvin E. Roth

    2014-01-01

    Organs for transplantation are a scarce resource. Paying to increase the supply of organs is illegal in much of the world. We review efforts to increase transplantation by increasing the supply of available organs from living and deceased donors. Progress has been made in increasing the availability of living donor kidneys through kidney exchange. Recent legislation in Israel aims at encouraging deceased donation by awarding priority for receiving organs to registered donors. We also explore ...

  20. Physical Activity and Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Bellizzi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation is burdened by high cardiovascular risk because of increased prevalence of traditional and disease-specific cardiovascular risk factors and, consequently, patients are affected by greater morbidity and mortality. In renal transplanted patients, healthy lifestyle and physical activity are recommended to improve overall morbidity and cardiovascular outcomes. According to METs (Metabolic Equivalent Task; i.e. the amount of energy consumed while sitting at rest, physical activities are classified as sedentary (<3.0 METs, of moderate-(3.0 to 5.9 METs or vigorous-intensity (≥6.0 METs. Guidelines suggest for patients with chronic kidney disease an amount of physical activity of at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity five times per week (min 450 MET-minutes/week. Data on physical activity in renal transplanted patients, however, are limited and have been mainly obtained by mean of non-objective methods. Available data suggest that physical activity is low either at the start or during renal transplantation and this may be associated with poor patient and graft outcomes. Therefore, in renal transplanted patients more data on physical activity obtained with objective, accelerometer-based methods are needed. In the meanwhile, physical activity have to be considered as an essential part of the medical care for renal transplanted recipients.

  1. Ethics of facial transplantation revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Kathy L; Siemionow, Maria Z

    2014-04-01

    There have been 26 cases of facial transplantation reported, and three deaths, 11.5%. Mortality raises the issue of risk versus benefit for face transplantation, a procedure intended to improve quality of life, rather than saving life. Thus, one of the most innovative surgical procedures has opened the debate on the ethical, legal, and philosophical aspects of face transplantation. Morbidity in face transplant recipients includes infections and metabolic consequences. No graft loss caused by technical failure, hyperacute, or chronic graft rejection or graft-versus-host disease has been reported. One case of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder, 3.45% and one case of lymphoma in an HIV-positive recipient were reported. Psychological issues in candidates can include chronic pain, mood disorders, preexisting psychotic disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and substance abuse. Early publications on ethical aspects of face transplantation focused mainly on informed consent. Many other ethical issues have been identified, including lack of coercion, donor family consent and confidentiality, respect for the integrity of the donor's body, and financial promotion of the recipient and transplant team, as well as the cost to society for such a highly technical procedure, requiring lifelong immunosuppression.

  2. ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Karoline; Titlestad, Kjell; Baudier, Francois

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Kidney transplantation is the optimal treatment for many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Due to shortage of donor kidneys in Denmark, there is a need to expand the possibilities for donation. At the Odense University Hospital (OUH), we have introduced ABO-incompatible ......INTRODUCTION: Kidney transplantation is the optimal treatment for many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Due to shortage of donor kidneys in Denmark, there is a need to expand the possibilities for donation. At the Odense University Hospital (OUH), we have introduced ABO......-incompatible kidney transplantation. We used antigenspecific immunoadsorptions to remove blood group antibodies and anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab) to inhibit the antibody production. The aim of introducing the ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation at the OUH was to increase the rate of living donor kidney...... transplantation without increasing rejection or mortality rates. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Retrospective evaluation. Eleven patients received ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation. The patients were followed for 3-26 months. RESULTS: One patient had an antibody-mediated rejection, one patient suffered T...

  3. Renal transplant scintigraphy (Part 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, Ghee

    2005-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the most effective mode of renal replacement therapy for correction of renal failure. Renal donors can either be: a. a deceased person - the kidneys being removed when brain death or absence of cerebral cortical function / perfusion is confirmed - the cadaveric kidney is packed in ice and nutrient solution and transplanted within 24 hours of removal ('cold ischemia') ob. a living donor - the donor may or may not be related to the recipient. Due to the limited length of the renal vessels and ureter of the donor kidney, it is implanted close to the bladder of the recipient. The donor vessels are anastomosed to the iliac artery and vein of the recipient. Transplant variants: a. 2 kidneys maybe transplanted because: - an old donor with less kidney reserve from atrophy due to age or disease (e.g. hypertension) - an infant donor when both kidneys are removed en bloc, b. Donor kidneys with more than 1 artery, vein or ureter. c. Donor horse shoe kidney d. Combined renal and pancreas transplant for type I diabetics -a short segment of duodenum transplanted with the pancreas maybe implanted into the bladder. Copyright (2005) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine

  4. Geriatric issues in renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bia, M J

    1999-01-01

    There are an increasing amount of data which are compelling us to consider the issue of age in dealing with decisions regarding both renal transplant recipients and donors. These geriatric issues in transplantation can be summarized as follows: (1) The explosion of a geriatric population of patients with ESRD, in association with data showing a survival advantage of transplantation over wait-listed dialysis patients, demands an increase in expertise in transplantating patients over 60 years old. (2) The critical shortage in cadaveric organ supply is creating a variety of solutions including expanding the donor pool with older kidneys in which long term survival may be shorter than in kidneys from younger donors. (3) The donor shortage, in association with data demonstrating improved survival of living related and unrelated donor transplants, is generating an increased number of older (> 60 years old) individuals who want to donate to a relative, spouse or friend. Future efforts should be directed toward continued research designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of these trends. We also need to provide improved training in geriatrics for nephrologists so that we and transplant surgeons can deliver better medical care to an aging population of patients with ESRD.

  5. Inflammatory Response in Islet Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar A. Kanak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation is a promising beta cell replacement therapy for patients with brittle type 1 diabetes as well as refractory chronic pancreatitis. Despite the vast advancements made in this field, challenges still remain in achieving high frequency and long-term successful transplant outcomes. Here we review recent advances in understanding the role of inflammation in islet transplantation and development of strategies to prevent damage to islets from inflammation. The inflammatory response associated with islets has been recognized as the primary cause of early damage to islets and graft loss after transplantation. Details on cell signaling pathways in islets triggered by cytokines and harmful inflammatory events during pancreas procurement, pancreas preservation, islet isolation, and islet infusion are presented. Robust control of pre- and peritransplant islet inflammation could improve posttransplant islet survival and in turn enhance the benefits of islet cell transplantation for patients who are insulin dependent. We discuss several potent anti-inflammatory strategies that show promise for improving islet engraftment. Further understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response will provide the basis for developing potent therapeutic strategies for enhancing the quality and success of islet transplantation.

  6. Immunization practices among pediatric transplant hepatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Amy G; Kempe, Allison; Beaty, Brenda L; Sundaram, Shikha S

    2016-12-01

    Vaccination of pediatric liver transplant candidates and recipients represents an opportunity to decrease infectious complications following transplant. Although vaccine recommendations exist, studies have shown that many transplant candidates and recipients are under-immunized. The goals of this study were to assess among pediatric transplant hepatologists: (i) current immunization practices before and after transplantation, (ii) involvement of an ID physician in the transplant evaluation, and (iii) perceptions about vaccine safety and barriers to immunization. An 80-item e-mail survey of pediatric transplant hepatologists at centers in the United States and Canada participating in the SPLIT consortium was conducted from December 2014 to March 2015. The overall response rate was 80% (73/91), representing 97% (32/33) of SPLIT centers. Fifty percent of programs routinely involved an ID physician in the transplant evaluation. Administration of palivizumab was routinely considered by 48% of hepatologists pre-transplant and by 41% post-transplant. Live vaccines were recommended by 26% of hepatologists after transplant. About 10% of hepatologists reported concern that live vaccines after transplant could induce rejection. There is wide variation in immunization practices among transplant hepatologists. Specific evidence-based protocols are needed to guide immunization practices in transplant candidates and recipients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. How is organ transplantation depicted in internal medicine and transplantation journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Céline; Duplantie, Andrée; Chabot, Yves; Doucet, Hubert; Fortin, Marie-Chantal

    2013-10-02

    In their book Spare Parts, published in 1992, Fox and Swazey criticized various aspects of organ transplantation, including the routinization of the procedure, ignorance regarding its inherent uncertainties, and the ethos of transplant professionals. Using this work as a frame of reference, we analyzed articles on organ transplantation published in internal medicine and transplantation journals between 1995 and 2008 to see whether Fox and Swazey's critiques of organ transplantation were still relevant. Using the PubMed database, we retrieved 1,120 articles from the top ten internal medicine journals and 4,644 articles from the two main transplantation journals (Transplantation and American Journal of Transplantation). Out of the internal medicine journal articles, we analyzed those in which organ transplantation was the main topic (349 articles). A total of 349 articles were randomly selected from the transplantation journals for content analysis. In our sample, organ transplantation was described in positive terms and was presented as a routine treatment. Few articles addressed ethical issues, patients' experiences and uncertainties related to organ transplantation. The internal medicine journals reported on more ethical issues than the transplantation journals. The most important ethical issues discussed were related to the justice principle: organ allocation, differential access to transplantation, and the organ shortage. Our study provides insight into representations of organ transplantation in the transplant and general medical communities, as reflected in medical journals. The various portrayals of organ transplantation in our sample of articles suggest that Fox and Swazey's critiques of the procedure are still relevant.

  8. Pharmacological bridge to cardiac transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisance, D; Dubois Rande, J L; Deleuze, P H; Hillion, M L; Duval, A M; Tavolaro, O; Romano, P; Castaigne, A; Tarral, A; Cachera, J P

    1989-01-01

    From September 1985 to August 1988, 32 patients were referred from various intensive care units throughout Paris for urgent cardiac transplantation or for a mechanical bridge to transplantation. At time of admission, under maximal sympathomimetic therapy, the cardiac index (CI) was 1.81 +/- 0.26 l/min per m2, the pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP 31 +/- 7 mmHg), systemic vascular resistances (SVR) 2053 +/- 469 dynes s cm-5. In 25, diuresis was less than 25 ml/h. Five were anuric. Prior to any final decision, a new inotropic agent, enoximone, was infused in addition to previous treatment as a 10 min bolus iv 1.5-2 mg/kg every 8 h. In 3, the situation further deteriorated, leading to a Jarvik 7-70 implantation within 12 h. In 29 however, within 3 h, the Cl increased to 2.69 +/- 0.56 as SVR dropped to 1410 +/- 453 and PCWP to 18 +/- 7. Diuresis increased to more than 100 ml/h in all. This permitted an indepth evaluation of the transplant candidates leading to contraindications to transplantation in 16. Nine patients could be weaned off iv enoximone. Four of these are still living (NYHA class III) with a follow up of 6-17 months. In 11, transplantation was performed within 2 days. Four died within a month, 2 with multiple organ failure. One patient died after 5 months. Six are back to normal life, NYHA class I (follow up 10 months-2.5 years). This protocol suggests that in patients with extreme heart failure, immediate survival may be increased by iv enoximone therapy, permitting a better selection of the recipients, more efficient pre-transplantation intensive care and consequently a decrease in the indications for a temporary mechanical bridge to a staged transplantation.

  9. Urinary stones following renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H; Cheigh, J S; Ham, H W

    2001-06-01

    The formation of urinary tract stones following renal transplantation is a rare complication. The clinical features of stones after transplantation differ from those of non-transplant patients. Renal colic or pain is usually absent and rarely resembles acute rejection. We retrospectively studied 849 consecutive kidney transplant patients in The Rogosin Institute/The Weill-Cornell Medical Center, New York who were transplanted between 1980 and 1997 and had functioning grafts for more than 3 months, to determine the incidence of stone formation, composition, risk factors and patient outcome. At our center, urinary stones were diagnosed in 15 patients (1.8%) of 849 functioning renal grafts for 3 or more months. Of the 15 patients, 10 were males and 5 were females in their third and fourth decade. Eight patients received their transplant from living donors and 7 from cadaveric donors. The stones were first diagnosed between 3 and 109 months after transplantation (mean 17.8 months) and 5 patients had recurrent episodes. The stones were located in the bladder in 11 cases (73.3%), transplanted kidney in 3 cases and in multiple sites in one case. The size of stones varied from 3.4 mm to 40 mm (mean 12 mm). The composition of stones was a mixed form of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate in 5 cases and 4 patients had infected stones consisting of struvite or mixed form of struvite and calcium phosphate. Factors predisposing to stone formation included tertiary hyperparathyroidism (n = 8), hypercalciuria (n = 5), recurrent urinary tract infection (n = 5), hypocitraturia (n = 4), and obstructive uropathy (n = 2). Many cases had more than one risk factor. Clinically, painless hematuria was observed in 6 patients and dysuria without bacteriuria in 5 patients. None had renal colic or severe pain at any time. There were no changes in graft function at diagnosis and after removal of stones. Five patients passed stones spontaneously and 8 patients underwent cystoscopy for stone

  10. Prospective evaluation of allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation from matched related and matched unrelated donors in younger adults with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia: German-Austrian trial AMLHD98A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenk, Richard F; Döhner, Konstanze; Mack, Silja; Stoppel, Michael; Király, Franz; Götze, Katharina; Hartmann, Frank; Horst, Heinz A; Koller, Elisabeth; Petzer, Andreas; Grimminger, Wolfgang; Kobbe, Guido; Glasmacher, Axel; Salwender, Hans; Kirchen, Heinz; Haase, Detlef; Kremers, Stephan; Matzdorff, Axel; Benner, Axel; Döhner, Hartmut

    2010-10-20

    To assess the impact of allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) from matched related donors (MRDs) and matched unrelated donors (MUDs) on outcome in high-risk patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) within a prospective multicenter treatment trial. Between 1998 and 2004, 844 patients (median age, 48 years; range, 16 to 62 years) with AML were enrolled onto protocol AMLHD98A that included a risk-adapted treatment strategy. High risk was defined by the presence of unfavorable cytogenetics and/or by no response to induction therapy. Two hundred sixty-seven (32%) of 844 patients were assigned to the high-risk group. Of these 267 patients, 51 patients (19%) achieved complete remission but had adverse cytogenetics, and 216 patients (81%) had no response to induction therapy. Allogeneic HSCT was actually performed in 162 (61%) of 267 high-risk patients, after a median time of 147 days after diagnosis. Graft sources were as follows: MRD (n = 62), MUD (n = 89), haploidentical donor (n = 10), and cord blood (n = 1). The 5-year overall survival rates were 6.5% (95% CI, 3.1% to 13.6%) for patients (n = 105) not proceeding to HSCT and 25.1% (95% CI, 19.1% to 33.0%; from date of transplantation) for patients (n = 162) receiving HSCT. Multivariable analysis including allogeneic HSCT as a time-dependent covariable revealed that allogeneic HSCT significantly improved outcome; there was no difference in outcome between allogeneic HSCT from MRD and MUD. Allogeneic HSCT in younger adults with high-risk AML has a significant beneficial impact on outcome, and allogeneic HSCT from MRD and MUD yields similar results.

  11. The ethics of uterus transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catsanos, Ruby; Rogers, Wendy; Lotz, Mianna

    2013-02-01

    Human uterus transplantation (UTx) is currently under investigation as a treatment for uterine infertility. Without a uterus transplant, the options available to women with uterine infertility are adoption or surrogacy; only the latter has the potential for a genetically related child. UTx will offer recipients the chance of having their own pregnancy. This procedure occurs at the intersection of two ethically contentious areas: assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and organ transplantation. In relation to organ transplantation, UTx lies with composite tissue transplants such as face and limb grafts, and shares some of the ethical concerns raised by these non-life saving procedures. In relation to ART, UTx represents one more avenue by which a woman may seek to meet her reproductive goals, and as with other ART procedures, raises questions about the limits of reproductive autonomy. This paper explores the ethical issues raised by UTx with a focus on the potential gap between women's desires and aspirations about pregnancy and the likely functional outcomes of successful UTx. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Robotic renal transplantation: Current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Sood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Kidney transplantation (KT has traditionally been performed by open renal transplantation, but recently, a few groups including our own have described a minimally invasive approach to KT. We aim to discuss the current status of robotic kidney transplantation (RKT and describe our technique of RKT with regional hypothermia. Material and Methods: We used the search terms "minimally invasive" OR "robotic" OR "robot assisted" AND "kidney transplantation." Papers written in English and concerning technical and/or clinical outcomes following minimally invasive kidney transplantation were selected. Three hundred and eighteen unique articles were retrieved and nine were relevant. Comparative outcomes data following RKT with regional hypothermia versus open KT (OKT from our own group were also included. Findings: Nine papers, so far, have evaluated the role of robotic approach in KT and have conclusively established the feasibility, safety, and reproducibility of RKT, although these studies have been performed by experienced robotic surgeons/teams. The contemporary published series note that rejection rates were similar in RKT and OKT patients. Mean serum creatinine at 6 months in RKT and OKT patients was equivalent, across the three series. Most of the studies also note a dramatic reduction in the wound-related complication rates. Conclusion: RKT appears to be a safe surgical alternative to the standard open approach of KT. RKT is associated with reduced postoperative pain, analgesic requirement, and better cosmesis. RKT, although in its infancy, appears to be associated with lower complication rates.

  13. Nutritional Therapy in Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hammad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein-energy malnourishment is commonly encountered in patients with end-stage liver disease who undergo liver transplantation. Malnutrition may further increase morbidity, mortality and costs in the post-transplantation setting. The importance of carefully assessing the nutritional status during the work-up of patients who are candidates for liver replacement is widely recognized. The metabolic abnormalities induced by liver failure render the conventional assessment of nutritional status to be challenging. Preoperative loss of skeletal muscle mass, namely, sarcopenia, has a significant detrimental impact on post-transplant outcomes. It is essential to provide sufficient nutritional support during all phases of liver transplantation. Oral nutrition is preferred, but tube enteral nutrition may be required to provide the needed energy intake. Herein, the latest currently employed perioperative nutritional interventions in liver transplant recipients are thoroughly illustrated including synbiotics, micronutrients, branched-chain amino acid supplementation, immunonutrition formulas, fluid and electrolyte balance, the offering of nocturnal meals, dietary counselling, exercise and rehabilitation.

  14. Immunization after renal transplantation: current clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk, G. H.; Lammers, A. J. J.; Brinkman, R. J.; Lombarts, M. J. M. H.; van Vugt, M.; van der Pant, K. A. M. I.; ten Berge, I. J. M.; Bemelman, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of potent immunosuppressive drugs and increased travel by renal transplant recipients (RTR) has augmented the risk for infectious complications. Immunizations and changes in lifestyle are protective. The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Transplant Work Group has developed

  15. Organ Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Organ Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Top of Page Preventing fungal infections in organ transplant patients Fungi are difficult to avoid because they ...

  16. Current development of liver transplantation in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHENG Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As the only effective way for the treatment of end-stage liver disease, liver transplantation has been developed rapidly in China over recent years. The latest developments of liver transplantation in China are reviewed, including establishment of selection criteria for the liver cancer recipients of liver transplantation——Hangzhou Criteria; latest application of salvage liver transplantation and downstaging therapy in liver transplantation for liver cancer; progress in liver transplantation combined with artificial liver support system for treatment of severe acute liver failure; breakthrough in technology innovation of living donor liver transplantation and organ donation and transplantation after cardiac death in China. Facing the problem of organ shortage, a scientific and standardized organ donation system should be established in line with the national conditions of China, so as to benefit the people and further improve the reputation of China in the international organ transplant community.

  17. Archives: Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 17 of 17 ... Archives: Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation. Journal Home > Archives: Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  18. Primary sclerosing cholangitis and liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klompmaker, IJ; Haagsma, EB; Jansen, PLM; Slooff, MJH

    1996-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis is a chronic disease, strongly associated with ulcerative colitis and cholangiocarcinoma. Ulcerative colitis itself does not influence the liver transplant results. However; intensified screening after liver transplantation for carcinoma of the colon may be necessary.

  19. What Is a Bone Marrow Transplant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... however you can Daughter's dying wish became mother's motivation Be The Match Blog Stories Anna, transplant recipient ... Jobs Job application FAQs E-Verify Career events Employee benefits About us Bea, transplant recipient Be The ...

  20. Urological complications in pediatric renal transplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuininga, J.E.; Feitz, W.F.J.; Dael, K.C. van; Gier, R.P.E. de; Cornelissen, E.A.M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this study, we evaluated the urological complications and their consequences after renal transplantation in children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective study was performed concerning urological complications after kidney transplantation in children at the University Medical Center

  1. Urological complications in pediatric renal transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuininga, JE; Feitz, WFJ; van Dael, KCML; de Gier, RPE

    Objective: In this study, we evaluated the urological complications and their consequences after renal transplantation in children. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was performed concerning urological complications after kidney transplantation in children at the University Medical Center

  2. Liver transplantation: history, outcomes and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; de Rezende, Marcelo Bruno; Evangelista, Andréia Silva; Guardia, Bianca Della; Matielo, Celso Eduardo Lourenço; Neves, Douglas Bastos; Pandullo, Fernando Luis; Felga, Guilherme Eduardo Gonçalves; Alves, Jefferson André da Silva; Curvelo, Lilian Amorim; Diaz, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Rusi, Marcela Balbo; Viveiros, Marcelo de Melo; de Almeida, Marcio Dias; Pedroso, Pamella Tung; Rocco, Rodrigo Andrey; Meira, Sérgio Paiva

    2015-01-01

    In 1958 Francis Moore described the orthotopic liver transplantation technique in dogs. In 1963, Starzl et al. performed the first liver transplantation. In the first five liver transplantations no patient survived more than 23 days. In 1967, stimulated by Calne who used antilymphocytic serum, Starzl began a successful series of liver transplantation. Until 1977, 200 liver transplantations were performed in the world. In that period, technical problems were overcome. Roy Calne, in 1979, used the first time cyclosporine in two patients who had undergone liver transplantation. In 1989, Starzl et al. reported a series of 1,179 consecutives patients who underwent liver transplantation and reported a survival rate between one and five years of 73% and 64%, respectively. Finally, in 1990, Starzl et al. reported successful use of tacrolimus in patents undergoing liver transplantation and who had rejection despite receiving conventional immunosuppressive treatment. Liver Transplantation Program was initiated at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein in 1990 and so far over 1,400 transplants have been done. In 2013, 102 deceased donors liver transplantations were performed. The main indications for transplantation were hepatocellular carcinoma (38%), hepatitis C virus (33.3%) and alcohol liver cirrhosis (19.6%). Of these, 36% of patients who underwent transplantation showed biological MELD score > 30. Patient and graft survival in the first year was, 82.4% and 74.8%, respectively. A major challenge in liver transplantation field is the insufficient number of donors compared with the growing demand of transplant candidates. Thus, we emphasize that appropriated donor/receptor selection, allocation and organ preservation topics should contribute to improve the number and outcomes in liver transplantation. PMID:25993082

  3. Bone marrow transplantation after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, M.; Blaha, M.; Merka, V.

    1990-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation after irradiation is successful in only a part of the affected patients. The Chernobyl accident added to our knowledge: BMT can save life after whole-body irradiation with a dose exceeding 7-8 Gy. A timely decision on transplantation after a nuclear accident is difficult to make (rapid determination of homogeneity and type of radiation and the total dose. HL-A typing in lymphopenia, precise identification of radiation damage to other target organs, etc.). Further attention is to be paid to the treatment. Transplantations in case of malignities (especially hematologic ones) and other diseases will add to our knowledge and will lead to more simple procedures. (author). 3 figs., 1 tab., 12 refs

  4. Heart transplantation for Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Ana Rita; Prieto, David; Antunes, Pedro; Franco, Fátima; Antunes, Manuel J

    2017-11-01

    Chagas disease is an endemic disease in Latin America that is increasingly found in non-endemic areas all over the world due to the flow of migrants from Central and South America. We present the case of a Brazilian immigrant in Portugal who underwent orthotopic heart transplantation for end-stage Chagas cardiomyopathy. Immunosuppressive therapy included prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. Twelve months after the procedure she is asymptomatic, with good graft function, and with no evidence of complications such as graft rejection, opportunistic infections, neoplasms or reactivation of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. By reporting the first case in Portugal of heart transplantation for Chagas cardiomyopathy, we aim to increase awareness of Chagas disease as an emerging global problem and of Chagas cardiomyopathy as a serious complication for which heart transplantation is a valuable therapeutic option. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Value of radionuclide studies in cardiac transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flotats, A.; Carrio, I.

    2006-01-01

    Effective noninvasive evaluation of acute and chronic allograft rejection remains an important challenge in patients with cardiac transplantation. Radionuclide studies have demonstrated utility because of their ease of use, giving relevant information about the pathophysiology of the transplanted heart, along with valuable diagnostic and prognostic indicators. This article focuses on reviewing the pathophysiological changes of the transplanted heart and implications for radionuclide studies. (author)

  6. 42 CFR 441.35 - Organ transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Organ transplants. 441.35 Section 441.35 Public... Provisions § 441.35 Organ transplants. (a) FFP is available in expenditures for services furnished in connection with organ transplant procedures only if the State plan includes written standards for the...

  7. When Your Child Needs a Heart Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be sure to ask them questions if you don't understand something. What Happens Before Heart Transplant Surgery? If the transplant team decides that a heart transplant is the right treatment, your child will be placed on an organ waiting list . This list has the names of ...

  8. Improved cardiac function after renal transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, S. J.; Caplin, J. L.; Banim, S. O.; Baker, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    There are few reports of the outcome of renal transplantation in patients with severe left ventricular (LV) impairment. We describe three men with chronic disabling heart failure associated with LV dysfunction in whom a remarkable improvement in cardiac function followed renal transplantation. Transplantation may offer the prospect of successful rehabilitation in these circumstances. Undue pessimism as to the prognosis in such patients is unwarranted.

  9. Risk factors of post renal transplant hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahromi, Alireza Hamidian; Roozbeh, Jamshid; Raiss-Jalali, Ghanbar Ali; Dabaghmanesh, Alireza; Jalaeian, Hamed; Bahador, Ali; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Salehipour, Mehdi; Salahi, Heshmat; Malek-Hosseini, Ali

    2009-01-01

    It is well recognized that patients with end stage renal diseases (ESRD) have hyper-plastic parathyroid glands. In most patients, a decrease in parathyroid hormone (PTH) occurs by about 1 year after renal transplantation. However, some renal transplant recipients continue to have elevated level of PTH. We prospectively evaluated 121 patients undergoing renal transplantation between August 2000 and 2002. The duration of dialysis, calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), albumin, creatinine and iPTH levels were recorded prior to transplantation and three months and one year after transplantation. These 121 patients were on dialysis for an average period of 17.4 months prior to transplantation. An increase in the serum Ca and a decrease in serum P and iPTH level was seen in the patients after transplantation (P< 0.001). Hyperparathyroidism was in 12 (9.9%) and 7 (5.7%) patients three months and one year after transplantation respectively. Elderly patients and patients with longer duration on dialysis had an increased risk of developing post transplant hyperparathyroidism and hypercalcemia in the first year post transplant (P< 0.05). In conclusion age and duration on dialysis before transplantation seems to be important risk factors for post transplant hyperparathyroidism. (author)

  10. Pancreatic islet transplantation. Experimental and clinical aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yderstræde, Knud Bonnet

    1987-01-01

    transplantation, future models include microencapsulation and hybrid artificial devices, both of which provide immuno-isolation - thus the ability of allo- as well as xeno-transplantation. The obvious advantage of immuno-isolated islet transplant, as opposed to segmentally engrafted pancreas, is stressed...

  11. Cerebral Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Occurring after Renal Transplantation: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Jang Ho; Byun, Woo Mok; Kim, Hong Chul; Hwang, Min Su [Dept. of Radiology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a complication of organ transplantation and immunosuppression. A 36-year-old woman with a history of renal transplantation visited the hospital complaining of headache and on pathology was diagnosed with cerebral PTLD manifesting as multiple rim enhanced masses in both hemispheres. We report here a case of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder involving the cerebrum occurring after renal transplantation, and describe the MRI findings for this patient

  12. Cerebral Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Occurring after Renal Transplantation: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Jang Ho; Byun, Woo Mok; Kim, Hong Chul; Hwang, Min Su

    2012-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a complication of organ transplantation and immunosuppression. A 36-year-old woman with a history of renal transplantation visited the hospital complaining of headache and on pathology was diagnosed with cerebral PTLD manifesting as multiple rim enhanced masses in both hemispheres. We report here a case of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder involving the cerebrum occurring after renal transplantation, and describe the MRI findings for this patient

  13. How is organ transplantation depicted in internal medicine and transplantation journals

    OpenAIRE

    Durand, C?line; Duplantie, Andr?e; Chabot, Yves; Doucet, Hubert; Fortin, Marie-Chantal

    2013-01-01

    Background In their book Spare Parts, published in 1992, Fox and Swazey criticized various aspects of organ transplantation, including the routinization of the procedure, ignorance regarding its inherent uncertainties, and the ethos of transplant professionals. Using this work as a frame of reference, we analyzed articles on organ transplantation published in internal medicine and transplantation journals between 1995 and 2008 to see whether Fox and Swazey?s critiques of organ transplantation...

  14. VASCULAR COMPLICATIONS AFTER KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sh. Khubutia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: evaluation of the incidence and the pattern of vessel complications, efficacy of the prophylactic anticoagulation therapy after kidney transplantation. Materials and methods. From March 2007 till January 2013 421 patients: 230 men (54,6% and 191 women (45,4%; mean age 43,07 ± 11,62 undergone 429 kidney transplantations in the department of pancreas and kidney transplantation of the Scientific-Research Institute of Emergency Care named after N.V. Sklifosovsky. In order to evaluate the condition and the function of the kidney transplant ultrasound investigation (daily andacquisition(weekly wereused. In cases of kidney dysfunction and assumption of vessel complications we used computerized tomography. Besides, we used daily analysis of biochemical and clinical parameters of blood and urine. Results. The most common vessel complication was the thrombosis of the microvasculature of the kidney transplant due to acute humoral and combined rejection resistant to antirejection therapy (n = 9; 2,1%; in 4 cases there was a breakage of the transplant due to the acute rejection and the urgent transplantatectomy in an effort to save the patient; thrombosis of the transplantat artery occurred in 1 case (0,23%; we observed 2 cases (0,46% of the artery stenosis and 2 cases (0,46% of venous thrombosis. Conclusion. Summary frequency of vessel complications in our clinic, including thrombosis due to rejection, was 3,49%. It fully corresponds with data obtained from the global medical community. The incidence of great vessel thrombosis was less than 1% which indicates the adequate prophylactic anticoagulation therapy. For the benefit of early diacrisis of complications Doppler sonography is needed. In case of assumption of vessel complications urgent acquisition, computerized tomography and/ or angiography are to be held. 

  15. Ischemic Conditioning in Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veighey, Kristin; MacAllister, Raymond

    2017-07-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury is a composite of the injury sustained during a period of reduced or absent blood flow to a tissue or organ and the additional insult sustained on reperfusion, which limits the amount of tissue that can be salvaged. Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the predominant insult during kidney transplantation, contributing to graft dysfunction, increased rates of acute rejection, and reduced rejection-free graft survival. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic benefits of a cost-effective and low-risk intervention, ischemic preconditioning, and its potential for improving kidney function following transplantation.

  16. Ventilatory strategy during liver transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik; Grocott, Hilary P; Niemann, Mads

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As measured by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), cerebral oxygenation (ScO2) may be reduced by hyperventilation in the anhepatic phase of liver transplantation surgery (LTx). Conversely, the brain may be subjected to hyperperfusion during reperfusion of the grafted liver. We investig......BACKGROUND: As measured by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), cerebral oxygenation (ScO2) may be reduced by hyperventilation in the anhepatic phase of liver transplantation surgery (LTx). Conversely, the brain may be subjected to hyperperfusion during reperfusion of the grafted liver. We...

  17. Pacemaker Use Following Heart Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallidi, Hari R.; Bates, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: The incidence of permanent pacemaker implantation after orthotopic heart transplantation has been reported to be 2%-24%. Transplanted hearts usually exhibit sinus rhythm in the operating room following reperfusion, and most patients do not exhibit significant arrhythmias during the postoperative period. However, among the patients who do exhibit abnormalities, pacemakers may be implanted for early sinus node dysfunction but are rarely used after 6 months. Permanent pacing is often required for atrioventricular block. A different cohort of transplant patients presents later with bradycardia requiring pacemaker implantation, reported to occur in approximately 1.5% of patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate the indications for pacemaker implantation, compare the need for pacemakers following bicaval vs biatrial anastomosis, and examine the long-term outcomes of heart transplant patients who received pacemakers. Methods: For this retrospective, case-cohort, single-institution study, patients were identified from clinical research and administrative transplant databases. Information was supplemented with review of the medical records. Standard statistical techniques were used, with chi-square testing for categorical variables and the 2-tailed t test for continuous variables. Survival was compared with the use of log-rank methods. Results: Between January 1968 and February 2008, 1,450 heart transplants were performed at Stanford University. Eighty-four patients (5.8%) were identified as having had a pacemaker implanted. Of these patients, 65.5% (55) had the device implanted within 30 days of transplantation, and 34.5% (29) had late implantation. The mean survival of patients who had an early pacemaker implant was 6.4 years compared to 7.7 years for those with a late pacemaker implant (Ppacemaker implantation. Starting in 1997, a bicaval technique was used for implantation. The incidence of pacemaker implantation by technique was 2.0% for

  18. Measuring family management of transplant tasks: the transplant responsibility questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullgren, Kristin A; Hmiel, S Paul; Gevers, Anik

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about how parents and youth perceive their roles in post-transplant management and how this relates to post-transplant adherence. The goals of this study are to (1) describe a new measure, the TRQ, (2) to describe parent and child performance on the TRQ, and to (3) determine the relationship between the TRQ and adherence. We hypothesized that older youth would describe higher post-transplant self-care behaviors, parents would underestimate youth self-care, and greater parent involvement would be associated with better adherence. Participants included 59 parent-child dyads. Inclusion criteria included: (i) youth aged 7-18 yr and (ii) at least three months post-kidney or post-liver transplant. Parents and youth completed the TRQ, and adherence was measured by s.d. of sequential immunosuppressant blood levels. Youth perceived greater levels of self-care than their parents perceived. Older youth reportedly engaged in more self-care than younger youth. Less than 25% of the sample was non-adherent, and non-adherence was unrelated to performance on the TRQ. The TRQ may have utility as a clinical tool to address areas for improvement in youth self-care. The high degree of parental involvement likely explains the high degree of adherence in this sample. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. ABO-incompatibility in solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydberg, L

    2001-08-01

    The most important transplantation antigen system in solid organ transplantation is the ABO histo-blood group system. Crossing the ABO barrier in solid organ transplantation is usually not done except for emergency liver transplantations. Early experiences of crossing the ABO barrier in renal transplantation were very disappointing. In the 1970s, clinical trials were started transplanting kidneys of subgroup A2 into blood group O recipients. The tissues of the A2 subgroup expresses reduced amount of A antigens compared to subgroup A1 and the recipients had no special pretreatment and standard immunosuppression. A number of early graft losses were experienced but the trial also resulted in several long time surviving grafts. A few centres have adapted the concept of A2 to non A kidney transplantations with successful results, when the recipient anti-A titres are low or reduced prior to transplantation. In the early 1980s one group successfully transplanted A1 and B kidneys from living related donors across the ABO-barrier using an immunosuppressive protocol consisting of quadruple drugs and splenectomy and this protocol was adapted by a few other groups. In Japan, where cadaver donors are available in very limited number, the largest number of ABO-incompatible transplantations have been performed. Altogether more than 300 ABO-incompatible kidney transplantations have been performed in more than 40 centres since 1989. ABO-incompatible liver transplantations have been performed mainly in emergency cases and the results have generally been inferior to ABO-compatible grafts. In children below the age of three years, liver transplantations across the ABO-barrier have been quite successful especially with living related donors. Very few ABO-incompatible heart/heart-lung/lung-transplantations have been reported with a few successful cases, but the majority have been failures. Recently a series of ABO-incompatible heart transplants performed in small children have been

  20. Transplant tourism outcome: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Saad A; Nabi, Zahid G; Alkhafaji, Dania M; Askandrani, Sumaya A; Abdelsalam, Mohamed S; Shukri, Mohamed M; Eldali, Abdelmoneim M; Adra, Chaker N; Alkurbi, Lutfi A; Albaqumi, Mamdouh N

    2010-07-27

    Transplant tourism is the term used for patients who travel abroad for transplantation. Transplant tourism has always been surrounded with controversy regarding how these organs were obtained, the donor's care after transplantation, and the recipient outcome. Many authors have found that the outcome of the recipients in transplant tourism is inferior to those transplanted in their own countries. However, most these studies were small, with the latest one including only 33 patients. Here, we describe the outcome of 93 patients who were transplanted abroad compared with local transplantation. All transplant patients who were followed up at our Nephrology Clinic from 1998 until 2008 were identified using our data base system. We selected patients transplanted from 2003 and forward because the computerized system for laboratory and electronic records began operation that year. A total of 165 patients were identified (93 in the tourist group and 72 in the local one). Transplant tourists had a higher rate of acute rejection in the first year compared with local transplantation (27.9% vs. 9.9, P=0.005), higher mean creatinine at 6 months and 1 year (120 vs. 101 micromol/L, P=0.0007, 113 vs. 98 micromol/L, P=0.008). There was no statistical difference in graft or patient survival in 1 or 2 years after transplantation. However, transplant tourist had a higher rate of cytomegalovirus infection (15.1% vs. 5.6%, P=0.05) and hepatitis C seroconversion (7.5% vs. 0%, P=0.02). Transplant tourists had a more complex posttransplantation course with higher incidence of acute rejection and infectious complications.

  1. Microsurgical Composite Tissue Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Donald; Georgiade, Nicholas G.

    1978-01-01

    Since 1974, 69 patients with extensive defects have undergone reconstruction by microsurgical composite tissue transplantation. Using this method, donor composite tissue is isolated on its blood supply, removed to a distant recipient site, and the continuity of blood flow re-established by microvascular anastomoses. In this series, 56 patients (81%) were completely successful. There have been eight (12%) failures, primarily in the extremities. There have been five (7%) partial successes, (i.e., a microvascular flap in which a portion was lost requiring a secondary procedure such as a split thickness graft). In those patients with a severely injured lower extremity, the failure rate was the greatest. Most of these were arterial (six of seven). These failures occurred early in the series and were thought to be related to a severely damaged recipient vasculature. This problem has been circumvented by an autogenous interpositional vein graft, permitting more mobility of flap placement. In the upper extremity, all but one case were successful. Early motion was permitted, preventing joint capsular contractures and loss of function. Twenty-three cases in the head and neck region were successful (one partial success). This included two composite rib grafts to the mandible. Prolonged delays in reconstruction following extirpation of a malignancy were avoided. A rapid return to society following complete reconstruction was ensured. Nine patients presented for reconstruction of the breast and thorax following radical mastectomy. All were successfully reconstructed with this new technique except one patient. Its many advantages include immediate reconstruction without delayed procedures and no secondary deformity of the donor site. Healthy, well vascularized tissue can now be transferred to a previously irradiated area with no tissue loss. This new method offers many advantages to older methods of reconstruction. Length of hospital stay and immobilization are reduced. The

  2. Anesthesia for Kidney and Pancreas Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittel, Aaron M; Wagener, Gebhard

    2017-09-01

    Kidney transplants are the most common solid organ abdominal transplant and are occasionally performed simultaneously with pancreas transplants in diabetic patients. Preoperative evaluation of potential transplant recipients should focus on the potential for occult cardiovascular disease while also screening for other signs of end-organ dysfunction. Intraoperatively, it is of utmost importance to ensure adequate graft perfusion to limit the risk of postoperative graft dysfunction or rejection. Postoperative care of the kidney or pancreas transplant patient should focus on ensuring normalization of volume status, electrolyte concentrations, and glycemic control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. AUTOGENOUS TOOTH TRANSPLANTATION IN ADULT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    ABSTRACT. A case of autotransplantation of a tooth in a 26 year old female African cleft palate patient is reported. This case report emphasizes the possibility and success of autotransplantation in our centre, it also emphasizes that transplantation is only technique sensitive but less equipment sensitive. It further stresses.

  4. KIDNEY TRANSPLANT URODYNAMICS: NEUROPHYSIOLOGIC CONSIDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Berdichevskiy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By analyzing data from the literature and the results of own clinical the authors suggest the presence of its own physiological rhythmogenesis motility of the urinary system to ensure its functional viability after denervation in the process of donor kidney recоvery and its transplantation to the recipient. 

  5. Hepatitis A Virus in Transplants

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-05-17

    Dr. Monique Foster, a CDC epidemiologist, discusses an unusual case of hepatitis A virus in a transplant patient.  Created: 5/17/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/17/2017.

  6. Cancer rates after kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Ulrik; Bistrup, Claus; Marckmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated a 3-5-fold increased cancer risk in kidney allograft recipients compared with the general population. Our aim was to estimate cancer frequencies among kidney allograft recipients who were transplanted in 1997-2000 and who were immunosuppressed according to a more...

  7. Anesthesia care for liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaman, Michael J; Hevesi, Zoltan G

    2011-01-01

    Intraoperative transfusion practices for liver transplantation have evolved dramatically since the first transplants of the 1960s. It is important for today's clinicians to be current in their understanding of how transplant patients should be managed with regard to their coagulation profile, volume status, and general hemodynamic state. The anesthesia team is presented with the unique task of manipulating this tenuous balance in a rapid and precise manner when managing patients undergoing liver transplantation. Although significant progress has been made in reducing blood product administration, it is still common to encounter large volume blood loss in these cases. Increasingly, clinicians are challenged to justify transfusion practices with a stronger evidentiary base. The current state of the literature for transfusion guidelines and blood product management in this particular patient subset will be discussed, as well as a variety of means (both pharmacologic and otherwise) used to reduce the need for transfusion. The aim was to review the latest evidence on these topics, as well as to highlight areas that need further clarification regarding their role in the optimal care of these patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cancer rates after kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Ulrik; Bistrup, Claus; Marckmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated a 3-5-fold increased cancer risk in kidney allograft recipients compared with the general population. Our aim was to estimate cancer frequencies among kidney allograft recipients who were transplanted in 1997-2000 and who were immunosuppressed according to a more mod...

  9. Renal outcomes in pediatric liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosh, S M; Alonso, E M; Whitington, P F

    1997-10-01

    The outcomes of 294 orthotopic liver transplants performed in 221 children at The University of Chicago Children's Hospital between October 1984 and October 1992 have been retrospectively reviewed. Medical information for 281 transplant in 210 children was sufficient for inclusion in this analysis. The mean age at transplant was 4.1 +/- 5.0 yr. Forty-four percent of the children were male, and 16% of the transplants were living-related. Four children received combined liver-kidney transplants. Seventy-six percent of the children are currently alive. The incidence of acute renal failure occurring following transplantation and requiring dialysis was 6.2% with a mortality rate of 85%. Early postoperative hypertension was seen in 65% of the children and persistent hypertension of greater than 12 months duration was seen in 28%. Sixteen percent of children developed metabolic acidosis requiring sustained sodium bicarbonate supplementation. Aggregate and longitudinal analysis of serial calculated glomerular filtration rates revealed abnormal renal function in approximately one third of children at any given time period following transplantation. The renal dysfunction was unrelated to age at transplant, type of transplant, gender, previous transplants, rejection episodes, courses of nephrotoxic drugs, presence of hypertension, or cyclosporin dose. This review supports prior studies which document abnormal renal function following orthotopic liver transplantation in a significant proportion of children.

  10. Lung transplantation in children. Specific aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Galdó, Antonio; Solé Montserrat, Juan; Roman Broto, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Lung transplantation has become in recent years a therapeutic option for infantswith terminal lung disease with similar results to transplantation in adults.In Spain, since 1996 114 children lung transplants have been performed; this corresponds to3.9% of the total transplant number.The most common indication in children is cystic fibrosis, which represents between 70-80% of the transplants performed in adolescents. In infants common indications areinterstitial lung disease and pulmonary hypertension.In most children a sequential double lung transplant is performed, generally with the help ofextracorporeal circulation. Lung transplantation in children presents special challenges in monitoring and follow-up, especially in infants, given the difficulty in assessing lung function and performing transbronchial biopsies.There are some more specific complications in children like postransplant lymphoproliferative syndrome or a greater severity of respiratory virus infections .After lung transplantation children usually experiment a very important improvement in their quality of life. Eighty eight per cent of children have no limitations in their activity after 3 years of transplantation.According to the registry of the International Society for Heart & Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) survival at 5 years of transplantation is 54% and at 10 years is around 35%. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Haematopoietic Cell Transplants in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Robert Peter; Seber, Adriana; Bonfim, Carmem; Pasquini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic cell transplants are done by more than 1500 transplant centres in 75 countries, mostly for life-threatening haematological disorders. However, transplant technology and access are not uniformly-distributed worldwide. Most transplants are done in predominately Europe, North America and some Asian countries. We review transplants activity in Latin America, a geographic region with a population of more than 600 million persons living in countries with diverse economic and social development levels. The data indicate a 20-40-fold lower frequency of transplants in Latin America compared with Europe and North America. We show that although economics, infrastructure and expertise are important limitations, other variables also operate. Changes in several of these variables may substantially increase transplant activity in Latin America. PMID:26999468

  12. Pregnancy In Renal Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shahbazian

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:Correction of the uremic state by a functioning allograft often restores fertility in women of reproductive age. The rate of fertility significantly differs between industrial countries, developing and middle east countries.On the other hand the results of pregnancy in Kidney Transplantation (KTP patients are significantly better than hemodialysis patients,and pregnancy most often has no side effects on the function of the transplanted kidney.Objectives: The purpose of this study is to investigate the rate of fertility and results of pregnancy among KTP women, and the assessment of the function of transplanted kidneys during pregnancy among those who have received kidneys in Golestan Hospital from 1996 to 2003. Methods: All the transplanted women in child bearing age who were interested in accepting pregnancy were involved in this study. After pregnancy, all the patients were visited twice a month until the 32nd week of pregnancy and their histories were taken and regular clinical examination and necessary paraclinical assessments were carried out. After the 32nd week, they were visited weekly and other necessary assessments were done in addition to previous measures. Taking immunosuppressive drugs was continued with a minor dose reduction and consumption of harmful drugs like some antihypertensives was prohibited. Results: 16 out of 48 women who were at child bearing age and were interested in pregnancy got pregnant and totally 22 cases of pregnancy occurred. Four cases resulted in spontaneous or therapeutic abortion and 3 out of 18 remaining cases had intrauterine fetal death and the others had successful pregnancy. The most common complication was LBW and following that premature labor. Maternal complications were no more than the general population and the function of the transplanted kidney had no decline in most of the cases. Conclusion:Based on what was mentioned,it is concluded that successful KTP can increase the chance of

  13. Four decades of kidney transplantation in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonzo, Jorge P

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the background, beginnings, development, evolution and outcomes of kidney transplantation in Cuba. Nephrology as a medical specialty in Cuba began in 1962 and was formalized in 1966. Conditions were created to implement renal replacement therapy (including transplants), bring nephrology care to the entire country and train human resources who would assume this responsibility, making Cuba one of the first countries with a comprehensive program for renal patient care. After three unsuccessful cadaveric-donor kidney transplantations in 1968-69, the ensuing history of kidney transplantation can be summarized in the following three stages. 1970-1975: In January 1970, cadaveric-donor kidney transplantation began at the Nephrology Institute. That year, 17 kidney transplantations were performed; four of these patients lived with functional kidneys for 15-25 years; 10-year graft survival was 23.5% (Kaplan-Meier survival curve); HLA typing began in 1974. By December 1975, 170 grafts had been done in three hospitals. 1976-1985: Seven transplantation centers performed 893 grafts during this period. HLA-DR typing was introduced in 1976 and the National Histocompatibility Laboratory Network was founded in 1978. The first related living-donor kidney transplantation was done in 1979. 1986-2011: The National Kidney Transplantation Coordinating Center and the National Kidney Transplantation Program were created in 1986; the first combined kidney-pancreas transplantation was performed the same year. In 1990, cyclosporine and the Cuban monoclonal antibody IOR-T3 were introduced for immunosuppression to prevent rejection, as were other Cuban products (hepatitis B vaccine and recombinant human erythropoietin) for transplant patients. By December 2011, the cumulative number of transplants was 4636 (384 from related living donors). With over 40 years of experience, kidney transplantation is now well established in Cuba; it is free and universally accessible, on the

  14. [Deceased donation in renal transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuret, R; Kleinclauss, F; Terrier, N; Timsit, M O

    2016-11-01

    To review epidemiologic data's and medical results of deceased donation in renal transplantation. Relevant publications were identified through Medline (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) and Embase (http://www.embase.com) database using the following keywords, alone or in association, "brain death; cardiac arrest; deceased donation; organ procurement; transplantation". Articles were selected according to methods, language of publication and relevance. The reference lists were used to identify additional historical studies of interest. Both prospective and retrospective series, in French and English, as well as review articles and recommendations were selected. In addition, French national transplant and health agencies (http://www.agence-biomedecine.fr and http://www.has-sante.fr) databases were screened using identical keywords. A total of 2498 articles, 8 official reports and 17 newspaper articles were identified; after careful selection 157 publications were eligible for our review. Deceased donation may involve either brain death or non-heartbeating donors (NHBD). Organ shortage led to the procurement of organs from expanded-criteria donors, with an increased age at donation and extended vascular disease, leading to inferior results after transplantation and underlining the need for careful donor management during brain death or cardiac arrest. Evolution of French legislation covering bioethics allowed procurement from Maastricht categories II and recently III non-heartbeating donors. The increase of organ shortage emphasizes the need for a rigorous surgical technique during procurement to avoid loss of transplants. A history or current neoplasm in deceased-donors, requires attention to increase the pool of organs without putting the recipients at risk for cancer transmission. French NHBD program, especially from Maastricht category III, may stand for a potential source of valuable organs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Electroretinographic findings in transplant chorioretinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian T Chan-Kai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Brian T Chan-Kai1, Steven Yeh2, Richard G Weleber2, Peter J Francis2, Grazyna Adamus2, S Robert Witherspoon3, Andreas K Lauer11Cullen Eye Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas; 2Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon; 3Retina Institute of Texas, Dallas, Texas, USAAim: Transplant chorioretinopathy is a rare complication following solid organ or bone ­marrow transplantation and can result in severe vision loss. This series presents electroretinogram (ERG results in patients with this condition.Methods: Patients who presented with bilateral vision loss following bone marrow or solid organ transplantation were identified. A complete ophthalmologic examination, fundus ­photography, and fluorescein angiography (FA were performed. Full-field ERG was obtained in all patients and a multifocal ERG (mfERG was obtained in two patients.Results: Four patients were identified. All patients had bilateral vision loss and displayed a characteristic pattern of mottled hyperfluorescence on FA. Three patients developed ­progressive vision loss ranging from 20/60 to hand motions whereas one retained 20/40 vision. All patients exhibited moderate to severe cone dysfunction, while the degree of rod abnormalities was varied. Two patients with severe cone dysfunction showed mild clinical changes initially, but later developed progressive vision loss and chorioretinal atrophy.Conclusion: Transplant chorioretinopathy patients undergoing ERG testing show cone ­dysfunction with a variable degree of rod dysfunction. ERG abnormalities preceded the visual acuity and clinical changes in two patients, suggesting that ERG may be a helpful predictor of the clinical course in this rare disease.Keywords: transplant, chorioretinopathy, electroretinogram, ERG, mfERG

  16. Three-year post-transplant medicare payments in kidney transplant recipients: Associations with pre-transplant comorbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Machnicki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the influence of pre-transplant comorbidities on post-transplant expenditures. We estimated the associations between pre-transplant comorbidities and post-transplant Medicare costs, using several comorbidity classification systems. We included recipients of first-kidney deceased donor transplants from 1995 through 2002 for whom Medicare was the primary payer for at least one year pre-transplant (N = 25,175. We examined pre-transplant comorbidities as classified by International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9-CM codes from Medicare claims with the Clinical Cla-ssifications Software (CCS and Charlson and Elixhauser algorithms. Post-transplant costs were calcu-lated from payments on Medicare claims. We developed models considering Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN variables plus: 1 CCS categories, 2 Charlson, 3 Elixhauser, 4 num-ber of Charlson and 5 number of Elixhauser comorbidities, independently. We applied a novel regression methodology to account for censoring. Costs were estimated at individual and population levels. The comorbidities with the largest impact on mean Medicare payments included cardiovascular disease, ma-lignancies, cerebrovascular disease, mental conditions and functional limitations. Skin ulcers and infec-tions, rheumatic and other connective tissue disease and liver disease also contributed to payments and have not been considered or described previously. A positive graded relationship was found between costs and the number of pre-transplant comorbidities. In conclusion, we showed that expansion beyond the usually considered pre-transplant comorbidities with inclusion of CCS and Charlson or Elixhauser comorbidities increased the knowledge about comorbidities related to augmented Medicare payments. Our expanded methodology can be used by others to assess more accurately the financial implications of renal transplantation to Medicare and individual transplant centers.

  17. Perfect timing, no remorse, and kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, D A

    1998-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is usually delayed until a patient has reached end-stage renal failure. When a living donor is used, earlier transplantation may be feasible. By averting the final stages of renal failure, early transplantation spares the patient the more pronounced effects of uremia. Unfortunately, lack of precision in predicting the future course of a patient's disease creates a dilemma: the kidneys could remain viable longer than anticipated. In that case, an early transplantation that leads to serious complications or graft failure will have caused harm by truncating the period of time the patient could have been sustained by his or her native kidneys. The present article introduces a theorem that helps solve the dilemma of early kidney transplantation. The theorem states that the timing decision depends only on the current burden of a disease relative to the risks of transplantation-that the future rate of progression of the disease is immaterial. The generality of the theorem makes it applicable, in principle, to any degenerative disease that can be treated by engraftment. The article also introduces a formula for the optimal timing of transplantation that depends on only four factors--a patient's perceived quality of life before transplantation as a function of time, the mortality associated with a transplant operation, the graft survival curve, and the quality of life in the event of a graft failure. The theorem and related formula should be helpful to patients and physicians in selecting the best time for transplantation.

  18. Kidney transplantation at Tokyo Women's Medical University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Masashi; Ishida, Hideki; Omoto, Kazuya; Tanabe, Tatsu; Hattori, Motoshi; Hirano, Hajime; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2011-01-01

    The first case of kidney transplantation at our institution was carried out in 1971, and this first renal transplant recipient is still living with a functioning kidney. From 1971 through the end of 2011, more than 3000 cases of kidney transplantation have been carried out at our institution. Since 1983, cyclosporine-based immunosuppression has been employed at our center. During this period, most of the patients were treated with cyclosporine- or tacrolimus-based immunosuppression. The latest outcomes of kidney transplantation seem to have significantly improved compared to earlier periods. Since 2000, 10 year-graft survival is more than 90% in living donor kidney transplantation and 82% in deceased donor kidney transplantation. To resolve the serious problem of donor organ shortage, expansion of the donor pool by various options such as transplantation using extended criteria donation, donation after cardiac death, ABO-incompatible (ABO-ILKT) donors, or crossmatch-positive donors, has been carried out at our institution over the last decade. We performed the first case of ABO-ILKT in 1989, and have performed more than 400 cases at our institution as of 2011. We will describe our experience of kidney transplantation, including ABO-ILKT, sensitized recipients, pathological analysis, pediatric renal transplantation, laparoscopic donor nephrectomy, and recurrent glomerulonephritis. The data shows good outcomes, however, we still have many issues to resolve to improve long-term renal transplant outcome and to reduce complications.

  19. Acute rejection episodes after kidney transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamida, Fethi Ben; Barbouch, Samia; Helal, Imed; Kaaroud, Hayet; Fatma, Lilia Ben; Hedri, Hafedh; Abderrahim, Ezzeddine; Kheder, Adel; Bardi, Rafika; Abdallah, Taieb Ben; Ayed, Khaled; Maiz, Hedi Ben

    2009-01-01

    Obesity in nontransplant patients has been associated with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and proteinuria. To determine whether renal transplant recipients with an elevated BMI have worse long term graft survival, we prospectively studied 92 patients transplanted between April 1999 and July 2000. Weight (Wt) and height of the patients were recorded prior to transplantation and two weeks, one, two and three years post transplantation. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr) and blood pressure were checked monthly, while triglyceride, cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL) were obtained 3 monthly for 3 years post transplantation. Graft dysfunction was defined as serum Cr> 1.8 mg/dL. While BMI and Wt of the patients before transplantation did not show any significant correlation with chronic renal allograft dysfunction (CRAD), patients with higher Wt and BMI two weeks after transplantation showed an increased risk of developing CRAD during the three year post transplant independent of other risk factors (P< 0.05). Patients with greater Wt loss in the first two weeks post transplantation showed a decreased risk of developing CRAD in the following 3 years (P< 0.001). Our study suggests that high Wt and BMI are significantly associated with worse graft survival 3 years post renal transplantation. (author)

  20. In Utero Hepatocellular Transplantation in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Muñoz-Sáez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work represents a step forward in the experimental design of an in utero hepatocellular transplantation model in rats. We focused on the enrichment optimization of isolated fetal hepatocytes suspension, arranging the surgery methodology of in utero transplantation, monitoring the biodistribution of the transplanted hepatocytes, and assessing the success of the transplants. Rat fetuses have been transplanted at the 17th embryonic day (ED17 with fetal hepatocytes isolated from rats at the end of pregnancy (ED21. We assessed possible differences between lymphocyte population, CD4 positive, CD8 positive, double-positive T-cells, and anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukins 4 and 10 (IL4 and IL10 as well. Cellular viability reached the rates of 90–95%. Transplanted groups had a limited success. Transplanted hepatocytes were not able to pass through the hematoplacental barrier. The hepatocytes injected were primarily located in the liver. There was an upward trend in the whole amount of T CD4 and T CD8 cells. There was an increased IL4 in the transplanted groups observed in the pregnant rats. The possibility to induce tolerance in fetuses with a hepatocyte transplant in utero could be a key point to avoid the immunosuppression treatments which must be undergone by transplanted patients.

  1. How is organ transplantation depicted in internal medicine and transplantation journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In their book Spare Parts, published in 1992, Fox and Swazey criticized various aspects of organ transplantation, including the routinization of the procedure, ignorance regarding its inherent uncertainties, and the ethos of transplant professionals. Using this work as a frame of reference, we analyzed articles on organ transplantation published in internal medicine and transplantation journals between 1995 and 2008 to see whether Fox and Swazey’s critiques of organ transplantation were still relevant. Methods Using the PubMed database, we retrieved 1,120 articles from the top ten internal medicine journals and 4,644 articles from the two main transplantation journals (Transplantation and American Journal of Transplantation). Out of the internal medicine journal articles, we analyzed those in which organ transplantation was the main topic (349 articles). A total of 349 articles were randomly selected from the transplantation journals for content analysis. Results In our sample, organ transplantation was described in positive terms and was presented as a routine treatment. Few articles addressed ethical issues, patients’ experiences and uncertainties related to organ transplantation. The internal medicine journals reported on more ethical issues than the transplantation journals. The most important ethical issues discussed were related to the justice principle: organ allocation, differential access to transplantation, and the organ shortage. Conclusion Our study provides insight into representations of organ transplantation in the transplant and general medical communities, as reflected in medical journals. The various portrayals of organ transplantation in our sample of articles suggest that Fox and Swazey’s critiques of the procedure are still relevant. PMID:24219177

  2. Clinical experience in organ transplant from the Shiraz Transplant Center: 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikeghbalian, Saman; Aliakbarian, Mohsen; Kazemi, Kourosh; Shamsaee far, Alireza; Salehipour, Mahdi; Bahreini, Amin; Mehdi, Syed Heider; Salahi, Heshmatollah; Bahador, Ali; Malekhossein, Seyed Ali

    2012-08-01

    The Shiraz Organ Transplant Center, the largest transplant center in Iran, has expanded its program of organ transplant during recent years. This article seeks to summarize organ transplantation over the last 2 decades and evaluate its status as of 2011. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical records of all organ transplants performed in our center in 2011. We reviewed the patients' demographics, underlying disease, operation details as well as postoperative complications. During this period, 655 organ transplants including 345 liver, 297 kidney, 29 pancreas, and 11 intestine and multivisceral transplants were done. Among 345 liver transplants, 291 patients received a deceased-donor graft including 18 cases of split liver transplants while 54 patients received living-donor liver transplants. The 1-year graft and patient survival rates were 90.1% and 91%. In recent years, our program in organ transplants has expanded in number and variety of organs transplanted. This improvement is related to our multidisciplinary strategies to expand the donor pool and the experiences obtained during our transplant activities.

  3. [Transplant coordinator: organ donation process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gironés-Guillem, Purificación; Camaño-Puig, Ramón; Lillo-Crespo, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Spain is a leader in organ donations although it seems that this number does not increase in the same proportion that the waiting list and it is necessary to decrease the refusal situations, which are ~16%. Analytic study. We review the reports prepared by the coordinators of transplants archived at the hospital La Fe during the period between May 1, 2004 and December 31, 2007, resulting in conceptualization and categorization. Sixty-nine topics were obtained from the point of view of the family and 11 from the point of view of the interviewer. After its conceptualization, codification and classification, we proceeded to create an appropriate text. Certain guidelines may be offered that allow us to standardize the action of transplant coordinators during the interview and to be more effective.

  4. [Indications for micrograft hair transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhanna, P

    2002-05-01

    Advances in treatment of androgenetic alopecia have led to the development of novel medical or surgical therapies adapted to the severity of hair loss and balding. Follicular units or tiny micro-graft hair transplants are a fundamental technical progress. This technique leads to the simple and painless permanent restoration of hair in male and female baldness. It provides the patient with a group of 1 to 3 hairs, emerging from a single orifice. The difference between androgenic receptors of occipital areas and those of other areas explains the permanent nature of the implanted hair growth. The degree of male or female androgenetic alopecia can be determined according to Hamilton's static classification or Ludwig's Classification, or it can be measured and monitored more accurately with Bouhanna's Dynamic Multifactorial Classification. The current indications for micro-graft transplantation are

  5. [Living-donor kidney transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabi, A; Fonouni, H; Golriz, M; Schmied, B; Tahmasbirad, M; Weitz, J; Büchler, M W; Zeier, M; Schmidt, J

    2010-09-01

    Due to the existing organ shortage the option of a kidney transplantation (KTx) in patients with end-stage renal disease is not always possible despite the offer of this therapy. So far the required number of KTx could not be adequately achieved by organ donations from deceased persons. To solve this problem living donation KTx programs have already become established in many transplantation centers. In published reports it has been shown that with the living donation program better results could be achieved in terms of graft function and patient survival compared to cadaver donation KTx. Therefore, living donation KTx allows an optimal alternative to expand the organ pool. The aim of our study is to present the long-term results of our living donation KTx program regarding graft function and patient survival. Finally, the risks of living donation KTx will be discussed based on the reported experiences of other centers.

  6. Ethical issues in organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Richard B; Bernat, James L

    2012-01-01

    We discuss ethical issues of organ transplantation including the stewardship tension between physicians' duty to do everything possible for their patients and their duty to serve society by encouraging organ donation. We emphasize consideration of the role of the principles of justice, utility and equity in the just distribution of transplantable organ as scarce resources. We then consider ethical issues of determining death of the organ donor including the remaining controversies in brain death determination and the new controversies raised by circulatory death determination. We need uniformity in standards of death determination, agreement on the duration of asystole before death is declared, and consensus on the allowable circulatory interventions on the newly declared organ donor that are intended to improve organ function. We discuss the importance of maintaining the dead donor rule, despite the argument of some scholars to abandon it. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Calcification in nonfunctioning transplanted kidneys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Sánchez, R J; Fernández, E J; Peces, C

    2007-01-01

    Failed renal allografts often are left in situ in patients who revert to chronic dialysis therapy or who undergo retransplantation. These organs may be the site of massive calcification despite their lack of physiological function. Calcification of an endstage renal allograft is sometimes found incidentally. We report here two patients who developed extensive calcification of the renal graft, one was on chronic hemodialysis and the other had a second renal transplantation with normal renal function. The precise pathogenesis of calcification and the factors which determine its tissue localization are unclear. Factors postulated to promote the development of metastatic calcification include an elevated calcium phosphate product, severe secondary hyperparathyroidism, aluminium toxicity and duration of dialytic therapy. In some cases local factors related with the chronic inflammatory rejection process are probably involved as well. However, the exact relative contribution of these factors remains unresolved. Unless specific clinical indications are present, transplant nephrectomy is not necessary for calcified end-stage renal allografts.

  8. Parathyroid transplantation in thyroid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołkowski, Filip; Nawrot, Ireneusz

    2017-01-01

    Permanent hypoparathyroidism following thyroid surgery is rare. Its prevalence is reported to be below 1–2% if surgery is performed by experienced thyroid surgeons. Parathyroid identification and preservation in situ with good vascular supply is the mainstay of safe thyroid surgery. However, if the parathyroid glands are damaged, autotransplantation should be undertaken to preserve their function. Parathyroid transplantation can be considered in three distinct modes of application: (I) fresh parathyroid tissue autotransplantation during thyroidectomy in order to reduce the risk of permanent hypoparathyroidism; (II) cryopreserved parathyroid tissue autotransplantation in patients with permanent hypoparathyroidism; (III) parathyroid allotransplantation in patients with permanent hypoparathyroidism when cryopreserved parathyroid tissue is not available for grafting. Nowadays, allotransplantation of cultured parathyroid cells without immunosuppression should be taken into consideration in selected patients as an alternative to calcium and vitamin D3 supplementation in management of permanent hypoparathyroidism. This paper is aimed to provide a review of current status of various parathyroid transplantation techniques in thyroid surgery. PMID:29142845

  9. Hair transplantation in alopecia androgenetica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gurinderjit

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred patients suffering from male pattern baldness were given 3 to 4 sittings of hair transplantation at an interval of about 4 to 6 weeks each. They included 46 patients of type III baldness, 23 patients of type III (vertex baldness, and 31 patients of type IV baldness. It needed 3 sittings in type III as well as type III (vertex patients, whereas type IV patients needed 4 sittings for cosmetically acceptable results. Sixty percent patients of type III (including type III vertex showed excellent results; whereas 24 percent patients showed good response. Thirty-four percent patients of type IV got excellent cosmetic appearance; whereas, good results could be obtained in 17 percent patients. The reasons for poor results in certain patients were poor density of hair at donor sites and poor growth of hair in some of the transplanted plugs.

  10. Design of transplanting mechanism for system of rice intensification (SRI) transplanter in Kedah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, M. S.; Manan, M. S. Abdul; Khalil, A. N. M.; MdNaim, M. K.; Ahmad, R. N.

    2017-08-01

    There is a demand to develop transplanter specifically for system of rice intensification (SRI) cultivation in Malaysia. This SRI transplanter is different from conventional transplanter as it is required special requirements for transplanting. The work focused on transplanting mechanism design which can be later attached to SRI transplanter. The mechanical design was established using linkage mechanism, having a wheel that act as timing wheel that will control the distance between transplanted seedlings. The linkage mechanism also control the opening of the flapper that allow the seedling together with its nursery soil to be dropped, and control the stopper to prevent next seedling from sliding down the tray. The use of simple mechanism will have low cost for fabrication. The design was analysed using motion analysis software. Results show the design is perfectly good and can be fabricated without any problem. The animation successfully shows the perfect movement of the mechanism and transplanting process.

  11. The start of the transplant journey: Referral for pediatric solid organ transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellmer, Diana; Brosig, Cheryl; Wray, Jo

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the majority of the psychosocial transplant literature is on post-transplant outcomes but the transplant journey starts much earlier than this, at the point when transplantation is first considered and a referral for transplant evaluation is made. In this review we cover information regarding the meaning of the referral process for solid organ transplantation. We discuss various factors of the referral for transplantation including the impact of referral on the pediatric patient and the family, potential expectations and misconceptions held by pediatric patients and parents, the role of health literacy, decision making factors, and the informational needs of pediatric patients and parents. We elucidate steps that providers can take to enhance transplant referral and provide suggestions for much needed research within this area. PMID:24438194

  12. Hepatic Hemangiosarcoma : An Absolute Contraindication to Liver Transplantation-The European Liver Transplant Registry Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlando, Giuseppe; Adam, Rene; Mirza, Darius; Soderdahl, Goran; Porte, Robert J.; Paul, Andreas; Burroughs, Andrew K.; Seiler, Christian A.; Colledan, Michele; Graziadei, Ivo; Garcia Valdecasas, Juan-Carlos; Pruvot, Francois-Rene; Karam, Vincent; Lerut, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background. Liver transplantation (LT) is performed for hemangiosarcoma (HAS) despite disappointing results. Methods. Retrospective study of 14 males and 8 females reported to the European Liver Transplant Registry. In view of the difficult differential diagnosis between HAS and hemangioendothelioma

  13. Renal transplantation in Mapuche people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiles, R; Beltrán, R; Jerez, V; Droguett, M A; Mezzano, S; Ardiles, L

    2008-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated higher concentrations of some histocompatibility antigens in Mapuche people compared with non-Mapuche Chileans in the renal transplantation program. With the aim of evaluating whether those antigenic differences might induce differences in the outcomes of renal transplantation among patients belonging to that ethnic group, we reviewed HLA studies and at least 6 months follow-up of all patients with a first kidney transplant between 1980 and 2006. The 248 patients had a mean age of 37.6 years, 40% were females, and 48% had living related donors. The mean kidney follow-up was 90 months and patient follow-up was 106 months. Thirty-nine patients (16%) were classified as Mapuche, according to their surnames, including 16 women with overall mean age of 34.5 years, and 14 had been transplanted from a living related donor. Mapuche patients received organs with better HLA matching expressed as number of identities (3.4 +/- 0.1 versus 2.8 +/- 0.1 among non-Mapuche; P or = 3 compatibilities was significantly higher (Mapuche 38% versus non-Mapuche 22%; P Mapuche; and 83% and 65%, respectively, for non-Mapuche. Patient survival rates were 97% at 5 years and 86% at 10 years in the Mapuche group versus 91% and 79%, respectively, in the non-Mapuche group; both results were not significantly different. Our results showed similar outcomes of kidney and patient survivals among Mapuche people even when they received organs with better HLA matches.

  14. Parathyroid transplantation in thyroid surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Barczyński, Marcin; Gołkowski, Filip; Nawrot, Ireneusz

    2017-01-01

    Permanent hypoparathyroidism following thyroid surgery is rare. Its prevalence is reported to be below 1–2% if surgery is performed by experienced thyroid surgeons. Parathyroid identification and preservation in situ with good vascular supply is the mainstay of safe thyroid surgery. However, if the parathyroid glands are damaged, autotransplantation should be undertaken to preserve their function. Parathyroid transplantation can be considered in three distinct modes of application: (I) fresh ...

  15. [Impact of HLA mismatch on transplant outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Junya

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatch increases the risk of severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and transplant-related mortality. However, the variety of stem cell sources such as cord blood units or the improvements in GVHD prophylaxis makes the interpretation of HLA mismatch more complex. In unrelated transplantation, the locus of HLA mismatch has a great impact on the donor candidate selection, whereas in related transplantation, it has an impact on the intensity of GVHD prophylaxis because donor availability is limited. Anti-thymocyte globulin and post-transplant cyclophosphamide are attractive GVHD prophylactic agents to reduce the risk of immune-associated complications in HLA-mismatched transplantations. HLA mismatch has a reduced impact in adult cord blood transplantation. In this review article, the impact of HLA mismatch based on graft sources is discussed.

  16. An abridged photographic history of organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Ignazio R; Cirillo, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    Organ transplantation is one of the most remarkable therapeutic advances in modern medicine; it started as an experiment and has become a life-saving practice. We briefly describe the major milestones of this multidisciplinary clinical science, the challenges that it still faces, and we consider the crucial contribution that its example could set for other medical fields. A review of the literature was conducted and a selection of images was made to complete a brief history of organ transplantation, with a particular focus on liver transplantation. The largest problem affecting organ transplantation today is the shortage of organs. Attention should be given to preserving the peculiar high ethical value that characterizes the very nature of organ transplantation. Methods successfully adopted by organ transplantation during the past 60 years can inspire promising fields, such as stem cell research, and provide useful tools to face the ethical challenges posed by scientific discoveries.

  17. Quality measurement and improvement in liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Amit K; Talwalkar, Jayant

    2018-03-17

    There is growing interest in the quality of health care delivery in liver transplantation. Multiple stakeholders, including patients, transplant providers and their hospitals, payers, and regulatory bodies have an interest in measuring and monitoring quality in the liver transplant process, and understanding differences in quality across centers. This article aims to provide an overview of quality measurement and regulatory issues in liver transplantation performed within the United States. We review how broader definitions of health care quality should be applied to liver transplant care models, outline the status quo including regulatory agencies, public reporting mechanisms, and requirements around quality assurance and performance improvement (QAPI) activities. Additionally, we further discuss unintended consequences and opportunities for growth in quality measurement. Quality measurement and the integration of quality improvement strategies into liver transplant programs holds significant promise but multiple challenges to successful implementation must be addressed in order to optimize value. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a cardiac transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Seema R; Paranjape, Saloni

    2014-04-01

    An increasing number of cardiac transplants are being carried out around the world. With increasing longevity, these patients present a unique challenge to non-transplant anesthesiologists for a variety of transplant related or incidental surgeries. The general considerations related to a cardiac transplant recipient are the physiological and pharmacological problems of allograft denervation, the side-effects of immunosuppression, the risk of infection and the potential for rejection. A thorough understanding of the physiology of a denervated heart, need for direct vasoactive agents and post-transplant morbidities is essential in anesthetic management of such a patient. Here, we describe a case of a heart transplant recipient who presented for a cholecystectomy at our center.

  19. Pediatric heart allocation and transplantation in Eurotransplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jacqueline M; Thul, Josef; De Pauw, Michel; Delmo Walter, Eva; Strelniece, Agita; Green, Dave; de Vries, Erwin; Rahmel, Axel; Bauer, Juergen; Laufer, Guenther; Hetzer, Roland; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Meiser, Bruno

    2014-09-01

    Pediatric heart allocation in Eurotransplant (ET) has evolved over the past decades to better serve patients and improve utilization. Pediatric heart transplants (HT) account for 6% of the annual transplant volume in ET. Death rates on the pediatric heart transplant waiting list have decreased over the years, from 25% in 1997 to 18% in 2011. Within the first year after listing, 32% of all infants (heart transplant. Survival after transplantation improved over the years, and in almost a decade, the 1-year survival went from 83% to 89%, and the 3-year rates increased from 81% to 85%. Improved medical management of heart failure patients and the availability of mechanical support for children have significantly improved the prospects for children on the heart transplant waiting list. © 2014 Steunstichting ESOT.

  20. Food allergies developing after solid organ transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, J M; Nicholas, S K; Davis, C M

    2015-12-01

    The development of food allergy is an increasingly recognized form of morbidity after solid organ transplant. It occurs more commonly in liver transplant recipients, although it has also been reported in heart, lung, kidney, and intestinal transplants. Pediatric transplant recipients are more likely to develop symptoms compared to adults, and reports of frequency vary widely from 5% to 38% in pediatric liver transplant recipients. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed in the literature, although no single mechanism can yet account for all reported observations. As food allergy can have at worst potentially fatal consequences, and at best require lifestyle adjustment through food avoidance, it is important for recipients to be aware of the donor's food allergies and particularly in pediatrics, the possibility of completely de novo allergies. This review explores the recent reports surrounding food allergy after solid organ transplant, including epidemiology, proposed mechanisms, and implications for practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Law, religion and organ transplants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Slabbert

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently any organ donation in South Africa, whether from a living or a dead donor, is donated altruistically, which means that it is the free choice of the donor or the family of the deceased to donate organs. There is no financial compensation for the donor. Nearly all religions support altruistic organ donations as it serves or promotes life. But, despite the positive attitude of the followers of different faiths towards organ transplantations, there is a worldwide shortage of transplantable organs,especially kidneys. Many patients die while waiting for a transplant organ from an altruistic donor. The question may therefore be asked whether the different religions should not also support the clamouring for the financial rewarding of an organ donor. In this article the emphasis is on the Christian and Muslim faiths to try and fathom their position in this regard. In conclusion, however,we argue that financial compensation to donors, as a general practice, should be allowed irrespective of religious arguments, as the decision to donate altruistically or to receive compensation is an expression of personal autonomy.

  2. Pulmonary complications in renal transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jung Bin; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Lee, Seung Rho; Hahm, Chang Kok; Joo, Kyung Bin

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the radiographic and CT findings of pulmonary complications other than pulmonary edema arising from renal transplantation. Among 393 patients who had undergone renal transplantation at our hospital during a previous ten-year period, 23 with pulmonary complications other than pulmonary edema were included in this study. The complications involved were infection caused by CMV (n=6), bacteria (n=4), fungus (n=4), tuberculosis (n=2), varicella (n=1) or chlamydia (n=1), and malignancy involving lung cancer (n=4) or Kaposi's sarcoma (n=1). Two chest radiologists reviewed all images. The complications manifesting mainly as pulmonary nodules were lung cancer (4/4), tuberculosis (1/2), and Kaposi's sarcoma (1/1). Pulmonary consolidation was a main feature in bacterial infection (4/4), fungal infection (3/4), tuberculosis (1/2), chlamydial infection (1/1), and varicellar pneumonia (1/1). Ground-glass attenuation was a main CT feature in CMV pneumonia (4/6), and increased interstitial making was a predominant radiographic feature in CMV pneumonia (2/6). The main radiologic features described above can be helpful for differential diagnosis of the pulmonary complications of renal transplantation

  3. Troubling dimensions of heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shildrick, M; McKeever, P; Abbey, S; Poole, J; Ross, H

    2009-06-01

    Heart transplantation is now the accepted therapy for end-stage heart failure that is resistant to medical treatment. Families of deceased donors routinely are urged to view the heart as a "gift of life" that will enable the donor to live on by extending and sustaining the life of a stranger. In contrast, heart recipients are encouraged to view the organ mechanistically-as a new pump that was rendered a spare, reusable part when a generous stranger died. Psychosocial and psychoanalytic research, anecdotal evidence and first-person accounts indicate that after transplant, many recipients experience unexpected changes or distress that cannot be understood adequately using biomedical explanatory models alone. In this paper it is argued that phenomenological philosophy offers a promising way to frame an ongoing empirical study that asks recipients to reflect on what it is like to incorporate the heart of another person. Merleau-Ponty and others have posited that any change to the body inevitably transforms the self. Hence, it is argued in this paper that replacing failing hearts with functioning hearts from deceased persons must be considered much more than a complex technical procedure. Acknowledging the disturbances to embodiment and personal identity associated with transplantation may explain adverse outcomes that heretofore have been inexplicable. Ultimately, a phenomenological understanding could lead to improvements in the consent process, preoperative teaching and follow-up care.

  4. Liver transplantation for Wilson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Andreea M; Medici, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the current status of liver transplantation (LT) for Wilson disease (WD), focusing on indications and controversies, especially in patients with neuropsychiatric disease, and on identification of acute liver failure (ALF) cases related to WD. LT remains the treatment of choice for patients with ALF, as initial presentation of WD or when anti-copper agents are stopped, and for patients with chronic liver disease progressed to cirrhosis, unresponsive to chelating medications or not timely treated with copper chelating agents. The indication for LT in WD remains highly debated in patients with progressive neurological deterioration and failure to improve with appropriate medical treatment. In case of Wilsonian ALF, early identification is key as mortality is 100% without emergency LT. As many of the copper metabolism parameters are believed to be less reliable in ALF, simple biochemical tests have been proposed for diagnosis of acute WD with good sensitivity and specificity. LT corrects copper metabolism and complications resulting from WD with excellent 1 and 5 year survival. Living related liver transplantation represents an alternative to deceased donor LT with excellent long-term survival, without disease recurrence. Future options may include hepatocyte transplantation and gene therapy. Although both of these have shown promising results in animal models of WD, prospective human studies are much needed to demonstrate their long-term beneficial effects and their potential to replace the need for medical therapy and LT in patients with WD. PMID:22312450

  5. Nutritional consequences of renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplan, Vladimir; Valkovsky, Ivo; Teplan, Vladimir; Stollova, Milena; Vyhnanek, Frantisek; Andel, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Successful kidney transplantation leads to restoration of renal function. Some metabolic disorders from chronic renal failure may persist and new metabolic abnormalities can develop (obesity, diabetes, hypertension, bone disease, and anemia). Additionally, influence of immunosuppressive drugs (corticosteroids, cyclosporine A, tacrolimus, and rapamycin) may aggravate the course of diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Nutritional management of renal transplantation is divided into the pretransplant period, transplant surgery, and early and late posttransplant period. Patients in the pretransplant period in dialysis treatment may develop protein-energy malnutrition and negative nitrogen balance, with loss of lean body mass and fat deposits. Nutritional management in the early posttransplant period with a functioning kidney graft necessitates fluid and electrolyte balance control with protein intake of 1,2/kg BW/day and 30-35 kcal/kg BW/day. In a nonfunctioning kidney graft, dialysis treatment continues and the therapeutic dose of immunosuppressive drugs must be reduced. The principal objective in the late posttransplant period is the maintenance of optimal nutritional status. Nutrition is important in managing obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension. Other posttransplant conditions for which diet and/or nutritional supplements may be beneficial include hypomagnesemia, hypophosphatemia, hyperuricemia, hyperkalemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, chronic renal allograft failure, renal anemia, and renal bone disease.

  6. Pulmonary complications in renal transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung Bin; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Lee, Seung Rho; Hahm, Chang Kok; Joo, Kyung Bin [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-04-01

    To evaluate the radiographic and CT findings of pulmonary complications other than pulmonary edema arising from renal transplantation. Among 393 patients who had undergone renal transplantation at our hospital during a previous ten-year period, 23 with pulmonary complications other than pulmonary edema were included in this study. The complications involved were infection caused by CMV (n=6), bacteria (n=4), fungus (n=4), tuberculosis (n=2), varicella (n=1) or chlamydia (n=1), and malignancy involving lung cancer (n=4) or Kaposi's sarcoma (n=1). Two chest radiologists reviewed all images. The complications manifesting mainly as pulmonary nodules were lung cancer (4/4), tuberculosis (1/2), and Kaposi's sarcoma (1/1). Pulmonary consolidation was a main feature in bacterial infection (4/4), fungal infection (3/4), tuberculosis (1/2), chlamydial infection (1/1), and varicellar pneumonia (1/1). Ground-glass attenuation was a main CT feature in CMV pneumonia (4/6), and increased interstitial making was a predominant radiographic feature in CMV pneumonia (2/6). The main radiologic features described above can be helpful for differential diagnosis of the pulmonary complications of renal transplantation.

  7. Kaposi's sarcoma in organ transplant recipients. The Collaborative Transplantation Research Group of Ile de France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farge, D

    1993-01-01

    Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS) is a tumour of multicentric origin with increased frequency after organ transplantation. To date, only North American data from the Cincinnati Transplant Tumor Registry have given some information about this disease in organ transplant recipients, but its true prevalence still has to be determined. In order to analyze Kaposi's sarcoma after kidney, liver and heart transplantation, we performed a retrospective study using the oldest registry of organ transplant recipients in Europe. Among all 7923 organ transplant recipients recorded in the Groupe Collaboratif de Recherche en Transplantation de l'Ile de France (GCIF) registry from 1968 to 1990, we analyzed the prevalence and the clinical characteristics of Kaposi's sarcoma in 6229 kidney, 727 liver and 967 heart transplant recipients. In the subgroup of kidney transplant recipients, we assessed the role of cyclosporine on disease evolution. Overall prevalence of Kaposi's sarcoma after organ transplantation was 0.52%, but it was significantly higher among liver (1.24%) than among kidney (0.45%) and heart (0.41%) transplant recipients. Chronic hepatitis B surface antigen carriers were more frequent in liver than in kidney transplant recipients who developed Kaposi's sarcoma (66% vs 21%, p < 0.03). Following kidney transplantation, Kaposi's sarcoma was more severe in patients receiving cyclosporine (n = 16) when compared with those under conventional immunosuppression (n = 12). True prevalence of Kaposi's sarcoma among European transplant recipients is high (0.52%) and appeared significantly higher in liver compared with other organ transplant recipients. Cyclosporine seems to increase severity of the disease among kidney transplant recipient.

  8. The history of organ donation and transplantation in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghods, Ahad J

    2014-03-01

    The first kidney transplant in Iran was performed in 1967, and this was the first organ transplant in countries that are current members of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation. In 1988, in response to the long waiting list at the Iranian Ministry of Health for kidney transplant, a state-regulated living-unrelated donor kidney transplant program was adopted. By 1999, the kidney transplant waiting list in Iran was eliminated. In 1989, a fatwa (religious approval) from the Supreme Religious Leader was obtained that recognized brain death and allowed deceased-donor organ transplant. Subsequently, transplant centers began performing deceased-donor kidney, liver, and heart transplants. In 2000, the Brain Death and Organ Transplantation Act was passed by the Iranian parliament, legalizing deceased-donor organ transplant. The transplant team at Shiraz began performing more deceased-donor kidney and liver transplants and became a successful deceased-donor organ transplant model in the country. By the end of 2012, there were 34166 kidney (including 4436 deceased-donor) and 2021 liver (including 1788 deceased-donor), 482 heart, 147 pancreas, 63 lung, and several intestine and multiorgan transplants performed in Iran. In 2011, there were 2771 solid-organ transplants performed in Iran (37 transplants per million population), and Iran ranked as number 33 among the 50 most active countries worldwide. In 2011 and 2012, Iran was ahead of all country members of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation in performing deceased-donor kidney and liver transplants.

  9. BK Virus-Hemorrhagic Cystitis Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation: Clinical Characteristics and Utility of Leflunomide Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Hoon Park

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: BK virus-hemorrhagic cystitis (BKV-HC is a potential cause of morbidity and mortality in patients having undergone allogeneic stem cell transplantation (Allo-SCT. We analyzed the clinical features of BKV-HC following Allo-SCT and reported the utility of leflunomide therapy for BKV-HC. Materials and methods: From January 2005 to June 2014, among the 69 patients underwent Allo-SCT in our institution, the patients who experienced BKV-HC were investigated retrospectively. Results: Hemorrhagic cystitis (HC was observed in 30 patients (43.5%, and among them, 18 patients (26.1% were identified as BKV-HC. The median age of the patients (12 males and 6 females was 45 years (range, 13-63. Patients received Allo-SCT from acute myeloid leukemia (n=11, aplastic anemia (n=4, myelodysplastic syndrome (n=2, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n=1.The donor types were a HLA-matched sibling donor for 6 patients, HLA-matched unrelated donor for 9, and a haploidentical familial donor for 2. The median onset and duration of BKV-HC was on day 21 (range, 7-97 after transplantation and 22 days (range, 6-107. Eleven patients (62.1% had grade I-II HC and seven patients (38.9% had grade III-IV (high-grade HC. Among the seven patients who had high-grade HC, one had complete response (CR, one partial response (PR, and five no response (NR. Among the five non-responders, one died of BKV-HC associated complications. The remaining four patients were treated with leflunomide, with achieving CR (n=2 and PR (n=2. The median duration from the start of leflunomide therapy to response was 13 days (range, 8–17 days. All patients tolerated the leflunomide treatment well, with three patients having mild gastrointestinal symptoms, including anorexia and abdominal bloating. Conclusion: BKV-HC was commonly observed in patients with HC following Allo-SCT. In high-grade BKV-HC patients who fail supportive care, leflunomide may be a feasible option without significant toxicity. Materials

  10. [Therapeutic education in the transplant patient's pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Laure; Dalmon, Pauline; Mosnier, Magali; Marceillac, Anne; Kamar, Nassim

    2016-12-01

    The success of a transplant in the long term depends to a large extent on the taking of immunosuppressant treatments and its follow-up. Therapeutic education plays an important role in the follow-up of transplant patients and in nurses' daily practice. It is integrated into the patient's pre-transplant care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Overview of adult congenital heart transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, David

    2018-01-01

    Transplantation for adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) is a growing clinical endeavor in the transplant community. Understanding the results and defining potential high-risk patient subsets will allow optimization of patient outcomes. This review summarizes the scope of ACHD transplantation, the mechanisms of late ventricular dysfunction, the ACHD population at risk of developing heart failure, the indications and potential contraindications for transplant, surgical considerations, and post-transplant outcomes. The findings reveal that 3.3% of adult heart transplants occur in ACHD patients. The potential mechanisms for the development of late ventricular dysfunction include a morphologic systemic right ventricle, altered coronary perfusion, and ventricular noncompaction. The indications for transplant in ACHD patients include systemic ventricular failure refractory medical therapy, Fontan patients failing from chronic passive pulmonary circulation, and progressive cyanosis leading to functional decline. Transplantation in ACHD patients can be quite complex and may require extensive reconstruction of the branch pulmonary arteries, systemic veins, or the aorta. Vasoplegia, bleeding, and graft right ventricular dysfunction can complicate the immediate post-transplant period. The post-transplant operative mortality ranges between 14% and 39%. The majority of early mortality occurs in ACHD patients with univentricular congenital heart disease. However, there has been improvement in operative survival in more contemporary studies. In conclusion, the experience with cardiac transplantation for ACHD patients with end-stage heart failure is growing, and high-risk patient subsets have been defined. Significant strides have been made in developing evidence-based guidelines of indications for transplant, and the intraoperative management of complex reconstruction has evolved. With proper patient selection, more aggressive use of mechanical circulatory support

  12. Cancer Risk After Pediatric Solid Organ Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanik, Elizabeth L; Smith, Jodi M; Shiels, Meredith S; Clarke, Christina A; Lynch, Charles F; Kahn, Amy R; Koch, Lori; Pawlish, Karen S; Engels, Eric A

    2017-05-01

    The effects of pediatric solid organ transplantation on cancer risk may differ from those observed in adult recipients. We described cancers in pediatric recipients and compared incidence to the general population. The US transplant registry was linked to 16 cancer registries to identify cancer diagnoses among recipients <18 years old at transplant. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated by dividing observed cancer counts among recipients by expected counts based on the general population rates. Cox regression was used to estimate the associations between recipient characteristics and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) risk. Among 17 958 pediatric recipients, 392 cancers were diagnosed, of which 279 (71%) were NHL. Compared with the general population, incidence was significantly increased for NHL (SIR = 212, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 188-238), Hodgkin's lymphoma (SIR = 19, 95% CI = 13-26), leukemia (SIR = 4, 95% CI = 2-7), myeloma (SIR = 229, 95% CI = 47-671), and cancers of the liver, soft tissue, ovary, vulva, testis, bladder, kidney, and thyroid. NHL risk was highest during the first year after transplantation among recipients <5 years old at transplant (SIR = 313), among recipients seronegative for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) at transplant (SIR = 446), and among intestine transplant recipients (SIR = 1280). In multivariable analyses, seronegative EBV status, the first year after transplantation, intestine transplantation, and induction immunosuppression were independently associated with higher NHL incidence. Pediatric recipients have a markedly increased risk for many cancers. NHL constitutes the majority of diagnosed cancers, with the highest risk occurring in the first year after transplantation. NHL risk was high in recipients susceptible to primary EBV infection after transplant and in intestine transplant recipients, perhaps due to EBV transmission in the donor organ. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Kidney transplant outcomes from older deceased donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pippias, Maria; Jager, Kitty J; Caskey, Fergus

    2018-01-01

    As the median age of deceased kidney donors rises, updated knowledge of transplant outcomes from older deceased donors in differing donor-recipient age groups is required. Using ERA-EDTA Registry data we determined survival outcomes of kidney allografts donated from the same older deceased donor ...... transplanted into differing donor-recipient age groups are better than previously reported. These allografts remain a valuable transplant resource, particularly for similar-aged recipients....

  14. Does hypertension remain after kidney transplantation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Pourmand

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a common complication of kidney transplantation with the prevalence of 80%. Studies in adults have shown a high prevalence of hypertension (HTN in the first three months of transplantation while this rate is reduced to 50- 60% at the end of the first year. HTN remains as a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, lower graft survival rates and poor function of transplanted kidney in adults and children. In this retrospective study, medical records of 400 kidney transplantation patients of Sina Hospital were evaluated. Patients were followed monthly for the 1st year, every two months in the 2nd year and every three months after that. In this study 244 (61% patients were male. Mean ± SD age of recipients was 39.3 ± 13.8 years. In most patients (40.8% the cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD was unknown followed by HTN (26.3%. A total of 166 (41.5% patients had been hypertensive before transplantation and 234 (58.5% had normal blood pressure. Among these 234 individuals, 94 (40.2% developed post-transplantation HTN. On the other hand, among 166 pre-transplant hypertensive patients, 86 patients (56.8% remained hypertensive after transplantation. Totally 180 (45% patients had post-transplantation HTN and 220 patients (55% didn't develop HTN. Based on the findings, the incidence of post-transplantation hypertension is high, and kidney transplantation does not lead to remission of hypertension. On the other hand, hypertension is one of the main causes of ESRD. Thus, early screening of hypertension can prevent kidney damage and reduce further problems in renal transplant recipients.

  15. Inguinal Herniation of a Transplant Kidney Ureter: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Pourafkari, Marina; Ghofrani, Mishka; Riahi, Majid

    2012-01-01

    Ureteral obstruction is relatively common after renal transplantation. A rare cause is the inguinal herniation of the transplant ureter. We report a case of late allograft renal transplant failure due to ureteral herniation as well as ureterovesical junction stenosis.

  16. Overcoming the shortage of transplantable organs: ethical and psychological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quante, Michael; Wiedebusch, Silvia

    2007-03-02

    The main ethical problem of organ transplantation is the shortage of transplantable organs. The substitute strategies currently under discussion endanger frust in transplantion medicine and thereby increase the problem. Thus ethically preferable alternatives to overcome the shortage are suggested.

  17. Design and Methods of the Korean Organ Transplantation Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeseok Yang, MD, PhD

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions. KOTRY, as a systematic Korean transplant cohort, is expected to provide important information on Asian organ transplantation. The processes used to establish KOTRY provide a good model for launching new nationwide transplant cohort studies.

  18. Central nervous system infections in heart transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Patel, Robin; Daly, Richard C.; McGregor, Christopher G. A.; Wijdicks, Eelco F. M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study central nervous system infections after heart transplantations. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Cardiac Transplant Program at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Patients Three hundred fifteen consecutive patients who underwent heart transplantation from January 1988

  19. Lung Transplantation for Ventilator-Dependent Respiratory Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeijden, J. Wytze; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Erasmus, Michiel E.; van der Bij, Wim; Verschuuren, Erik A.

    Introduction: Lung transplantation of patients on mechanical ventilation is controversial, but successful transplantation of these patients has been reported. This report describes our institutional experience with lung transplantation of mechanically Ventilated patients since 2003. Methods: A

  20. The impact of neurologic complications on outcome after heart transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Kremers, Walter; Daly, Richard C.; Edwards, Brooks S.; Clavell, Alfredo L.; McGregor, Christopher G. A.; Wijdicks, Eelco F. M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study neurologic complications after heart transplant. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Cardiac transplant program at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. PATIENTS: We retrospectively studied 313 patients who underwent heart transplant at Mayo Clinic Rochester from January 1,

  1. Pulmonary thromboembolism as a complication of lung transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anna Warncke; Mortensen, Jann; Berg, Ronan M G

    2017-01-01

    Post-transplantation mortality after lung transplantation (LTX) is higher than for other solid organ transplantations. Thoracic surgery is associated with increased risk of thromboembolic complications, and as LTX recipients lack the collateral bronchial circulation, pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE...

  2. The role of diet and physical activity in post-transplant weight gain after renal transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, Dorien M.; Kok, Trijntje; Dontje, Manon L.; Danchell, Eva I.; Navis, Gerjan; van Son, Willem J.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Corpeleijn, Eva

    Background Long-term survival of renal transplant recipients (RTR) has not improved over the past 20yr. The question rises to what extent lifestyle factors play a role in post-transplant weight gain and its associated risks after transplantation. Methods Twenty-six RTR were measured for body weight,

  3. Primary Liver Transplantation for Autoimmune Hepatitis : A Comparative Analysis of the European Liver Transplant Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schramm, Christoph; Bubenheim, Michael; Adam, Rene; Karam, Vincent; Buckels, John; O'Grady, John G.; Jamieson, Neville; Pollard, Stephen; Neuhaus, Peter; Manns, Michael M.; Porte, Robert; Castaing, Denis; Paul, Andreas; Traynor, Oscar; Garden, James; Friman, Styrbjorn; Ericzon, Bo-Goran; Fischer, Lutz; Vitko, Stefan; Krawczyk, Marek; Metselaar, Herold J.; Foss, Aksel; Kilic, Murat; Rolles, Keith; Burra, Patrizia; Rogiers, Xavier; Lohse, Ansgar W.

    The principal aim of this study was to compare the probability of and potential risk factors for death and graft loss after primary adult and pediatric liver transplantation in patients undergoing transplantation for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) to those in patients undergoing transplantation for

  4. Validation of the Dutch version of the transplant effects questionnaire in liver transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annema, Coby; Roodbol, Petrie F.; Stewart, Roy E.; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    Little is known about the extent to which transplant recipients face emotional problems with the receipt of a transplanted organ. The Transplant Effects Questionnaire (TxEQ) enables the quantification of these problems. This study evaluates the psychometric properties of the Dutch translation of the

  5. Imaging in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, A.; Steward, C.G.; Lyburn, I.D.; Grier, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is used to treat a wide range of malignant and non-malignant haematological conditions, solid malignancies, and metabolic and autoimmune diseases. Although imaging has a limited role before SCT, it is important after transplantation when it may support the clinical diagnosis of a variety of complications. It may also be used to monitor the effect of therapy and to detect recurrence of the underlying disease if the transplant is unsuccessful. We present a pictorial review of the imaging of patients who have undergone SCT, based upon 15 years experience in a large unit performing both adult and paediatric transplants

  6. Sociological and ethical issues in transplant commercialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Miran

    2009-04-01

    'Global transplant commercialism' (practices and policies involving international trade in organs from living vendors, e.g., 'transplant tourism') is currently subjected to unprecedented criticism. In parallel, the debate around 'local transplant commercialism' (practices and policies that confine trade in organs from living vendors to national markets or economic unions) is heating up. In an attempt to assess the potential outcomes of these trends, this article reviews and discusses some sociological and ethical issues, ending with a proposal for a reinvigorated anticommercialist strategy. The current international campaign against global transplant commercialism is conducted by an ad hoc alliance between strange bedfellows, proponents of local transplant commercialism on the one hand and opponents of any transplant commercialism on the other. Disparities in the rigor of the respective ethical discourses, the expanding list of precedents of legitimized commerce in the human body, and the political economy of transplantation, all suggest that the former have the upper hand. Recent achievements in the struggle against international organ trafficking may not herald the abolition of transplant commercialism but rather presage its reconfiguration in deglobalized forms. In light of such a prospect, those who wish to prevent the pervasive commodification of the human body from entering the gates of transplant medicine should consider devising a new, perhaps more radical, strategy.

  7. Alcoholic hepatitis: appropriate indication for liver transplantation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneekloth, Terry D; Niazi, Shehzad K; Simonetto, Douglas A

    2017-12-01

    The majority of liver transplantation centers have required patients with alcohol-induced liver disease to demonstrate a period of abstinence (generally 6 months' duration) to qualify for transplant listing. This requirement has excluded patients with alcoholic hepatitis from transplant consideration. Since 2011, several studies have examined the outcomes of patients undergoing liver transplantation with brief abstinence as a lifesaving intervention for alcoholic hepatitis. This review includes each of the recent studies and discusses their implications for general transplant practice. A Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System search revealed five published studies - three prospective and two retrospective - pertaining to liver transplantation for alcoholic hepatitis. Among patients with medication-nonresponsive alcoholic hepatitis, those who underwent transplantation had superior survival. Liver recipients with alcoholic hepatitis had comparable survival to those with 6 or more months of abstinence. Their relapse rates were not statistically different in the short term over those transplanted with longer abstinence, although some patients in each prospective cohort relapsed to drinking despite narrow inclusion criteria and extensive pretransplant staff reviews and posttransplant surveillance. Liver transplantation is a reasonable treatment consideration for highly selective cases of alcoholic hepatitis. Further research is needed to refine inclusion criteria, address posttransplant relapse prevention interventions, and monitor long-term outcomes.

  8. Bone marrow transplant – children - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. Guideline on dental management of pediatric patients receiving chemotherapy, hematopoietic cell transplantation, and/or radiation. Pediatr Dent . 2013 Sep- ...

  9. Small Bowel Transplantation: Current Clinical Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sigalet

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available With recent refinements in immunosuppression techniques, the first successful reports of small bowel transplantation in humans have now been made, increasing interest in bowel transplantation among clinicians and patients alike. This article reviews recent developments in understanding of the functional capabilities and requirements for effective immune suppression in bowel transplantation. Both experimental and clinical experience with transplantation are discussed, as are the areas which appear to offer the most promise for future developments. Finally guidelines for consideration of patient selection for this procedure are reviewed.

  10. Neurologic complications after solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senzolo, Marco; Marco, Senzolo; Ferronato, Cecilia; Cecilia, Ferronato; Burra, Patrizia; Patrizia, Burra

    2009-03-01

    Neurologic complications are common after solid organ transplantation and are associated with significant morbidity. Approximately one-third of transplant recipients experiences neurologic alterations with incidence ranging from 10% to 59%. The complications can be divided into such of those common to all types of transplant and others of those specific to transplanted organ. The most common complication seen with all types of transplanted organ is neurotoxicity attributable to immunosuppressive drugs, followed by seizures, opportunistic central nervous system (CNS) infections, cardiovascular events, encephalopathy and de novo CNS neoplasms. Amongst immunosuppressants, calcineurin inhibitors are the main drugs involved in neurotoxicity, leading to complications which ranges from mild symptoms, such as tremors and paresthesia to severe symptoms, such as disabling pain syndrome and leukoencephalopathy. Neurologic complications of liver transplantation are more common than that of other solid organ transplants (13-47%); encephalopathy is the most common CNS complication, followed by seizures; however, central pontine myelinolysis can appear in 1-8% of the patients leading to permanent disabilities or death. In kidney transplanted patients, stroke is the most common neurologic complication, whereas cerebral infarction and bleeding are more typical after heart transplantation. Metabolic, electrolyte and infectious anomalies represent common risk factors; however, identification of specific causes and early diagnosis are still difficult, because of patient's poor clinical status and concomitant systemic and metabolic disorders, which may obscure symptoms.

  11. Transplantation of Hearts Donated after Circulatory Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W. White

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac transplantation has become limited by a critical shortage of suitable organs from brain-dead donors. Reports describing the successful clinical transplantation of hearts donated after circulatory death (DCD have recently emerged. Hearts from DCD donors suffer significant ischemic injury prior to organ procurement; therefore, the traditional approach to the transplantation of hearts from brain-dead donors is not applicable to the DCD context. Advances in our understanding of ischemic post-conditioning have facilitated the development of DCD heart resuscitation strategies that can be used to minimize ischemia-reperfusion injury at the time of organ procurement. The availability of a clinically approved ex situ heart perfusion device now allows DCD heart preservation in a normothermic beating state and minimizes exposure to incremental cold ischemia. This technology also facilitates assessments of organ viability to be undertaken prior to transplantation, thereby minimizing the risk of primary graft dysfunction. The application of a tailored approach to DCD heart transplantation that focuses on organ resuscitation at the time of procurement, ex situ preservation, and pre-transplant assessments of organ viability has facilitated the successful clinical application of DCD heart transplantation. The transplantation of hearts from DCD donors is now a clinical reality. Investigating ways to optimize the resuscitation, preservation, evaluation, and long-term outcomes is vital to ensure a broader application of DCD heart transplantation in the future.

  12. False iliac artery aneurysm following renal transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levi, N; Sønksen, Jens Otto Reimers; Schroeder, T V

    1999-01-01

    We report a very rare case of a false iliac artery aneurysm following renal transplantation. The patient was a 51-year-old women who presented with a painful 10 x 10 cm pulsating mass in her left iliac fossa. The patient had received a second cadaveric renal transplantation 5 years previously....... The graft never functioned and transplant nephrectomy was performed 2 weeks later. A CT-scanning showed a 10 x 10 cm large aneurysm arising from the left external iliac artery. At operation a large false aneurysm was identified arising from the original transplant anastomotic site. Due to the extent...

  13. Pancreas transplant imaging: how I do it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolat, Parag P; Foley, W Dennis; Johnson, Christopher; Hohenwalter, Mark D; Quiroz, Francisco A

    2015-04-01

    Pancreas transplantation aims to restore physiologic normoglycemia in diabetic patients with glomerulopathy and avoid or delay the onset of diabetic retinopathy and arteriopathy. Simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant is the most common approach, using a cadaveric pancreas donation in conjunction with either cadaveric or live donor renal transplant. Alternative techniques include pancreas after kidney transplant, in which the pancreas transplant is performed some years after renal transplant. Pancreas transplant alone is utilized rarely in diabetic patients with compensated renal function. Pancreas grafts have vascular and enteric connections that vary in their anatomic approach, and understanding of this is critical for imaging with ultrasonography, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging techniques are directed to display the pancreatic transplant arterial and venous vasculature, parenchyma, and intestinal drainage pathway. Critical vascular information includes venous thrombosis (partial or complete), arterial occlusion, or aneurysm. Parenchymal abnormalities are nonspecific and occur in pancreatitis, graft rejection, and subsequent graft ischemia. Peripancreatic fluid collections include hematoma/seroma, pseudocyst, and abscess. The latter two are related to pancreatitis, duct disruption, or leak from the duodenojejunostomy. An understanding of transplant anatomy and complications will lead to appropriate use of imaging techniques to diagnose or exclude important complications.

  14. Diabetic Foot Complications Despite Successful Pancreas Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Kyo; Lee, Ho Seong; Park, Jungu; Ryu, Chang Hyun; Han, Duck Jong; Seo, Sang Gyo

    2017-06-01

    It is known that successful pancreas transplantation enables patients with diabetes to maintain a normal glucose level without insulin and reduces diabetes-related complications. However, we have little information about the foot-specific morbidity in patients who have undergone successful pancreas transplantation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and predisposing factors for foot complications after successful pancreas transplantation. This retrospective study included 218 patients (91 males, 127 females) who had undergone pancreas transplantation for diabetes. The mean age was 40.7 (range, 15-76) years. Diabetes type, transplantation type, body mass index, and diabetes duration before transplantation were confirmed. After pancreas transplantation, the occurrence and duration of foot and ankle complications were assessed. Twenty-two patients (10.1%) had diabetic foot complications. Fifteen patients (6.9%) had diabetic foot ulcer and 7 patients (3.2%) had Charcot arthropathy. Three patients had both diabetic foot ulcer and Charcot arthropathy. Three insufficiency fractures (1.4%) were included. Mean time of complications after transplantation was 18.5 (range, 2-77) months. Creatinine level 1 year after surgery was higher in the complication group rather than the noncomplication group ( P = .02). Complications of the foot and ankle still occurred following pancreas transplantation in patients with diabetes. Level III, comparative study.

  15. Evaluation of a Heart Transplant Candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook Jin; Kim, Kyung Hee; Hong, Suk Keun; Hankins, Shelley

    2017-11-04

    Heart transplantation is the best option for irreversible and critically advanced heart failure. However, limited donor pool, the risk of rejection, infection, and right ventricular dysfunction in short-term post-transplant period, as well as, the development of coronary allograft vasculopathy and malignancy in the long-term post-transplant period limits the utility of heart transplantation for all comers with advanced heart failure. Therefore, selection of appropriate candidates is very important for the best short and long-term prognosis. In this article, we discuss the principles of selection of candidates and compare to the recently updated International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) listing criteria with the goal of updating current clinical practice. We found that while most of the recommendations in the new listing criteria are continuous with the previous criteria, updated recommendations are made on the risk stratification models in choosing transplantation candidates. Recommendation on hepatic dysfunction is not directly included in the updated ISHLT listing criteria; however, adoption of the Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score and modified MELD scores in the evaluation of risk are suggested in recent studies. In conclusion, evaluation of patient selection for heart transplantation should be comprehensive and individualized with respect to indications and the risk of comorbidities of candidates. With the advancement of mechanical circulatory support (MCS), the selection of heart transplantation candidate is continuously evolving and widened. MCS as bridge to candidacy should be considered when the candidate has potentially reversible risk factors for transplantation.

  16. Transplantation of Hearts Donated after Circulatory Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher W.; Messer, Simon J.; Large, Stephen R.; Conway, Jennifer; Kim, Daniel H.; Kutsogiannis, Demetrios J.; Nagendran, Jayan; Freed, Darren H.

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac transplantation has become limited by a critical shortage of suitable organs from brain-dead donors. Reports describing the successful clinical transplantation of hearts donated after circulatory death (DCD) have recently emerged. Hearts from DCD donors suffer significant ischemic injury prior to organ procurement; therefore, the traditional approach to the transplantation of hearts from brain-dead donors is not applicable to the DCD context. Advances in our understanding of ischemic post-conditioning have facilitated the development of DCD heart resuscitation strategies that can be used to minimize ischemia-reperfusion injury at the time of organ procurement. The availability of a clinically approved ex situ heart perfusion device now allows DCD heart preservation in a normothermic beating state and minimizes exposure to incremental cold ischemia. This technology also facilitates assessments of organ viability to be undertaken prior to transplantation, thereby minimizing the risk of primary graft dysfunction. The application of a tailored approach to DCD heart transplantation that focuses on organ resuscitation at the time of procurement, ex situ preservation, and pre-transplant assessments of organ viability has facilitated the successful clinical application of DCD heart transplantation. The transplantation of hearts from DCD donors is now a clinical reality. Investigating ways to optimize the resuscitation, preservation, evaluation, and long-term outcomes is vital to ensure a broader application of DCD heart transplantation in the future. PMID:29487855

  17. Pre-transplant history of mental health concerns, non-adherence, and post-transplant outcomes in kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumabay, Franz Marie; Novak, Marta; Bansal, Aarushi; Mitchell, Margot; Famure, Olusegun; Kim, S Joseph; Mucsi, Istvan

    2018-02-01

    The association between pre-transplant mental health concerns and non-adherence and post-transplant outcomes after kidney transplantation is not fully established. We examined the relationship between a pre-transplant history of mental health concerns and non-adherence and post-transplant outcomes among kidney transplant recipients. In this retrospective single center cohort study of adult kidney transplant recipients (n=955) the associations between the history of mental health concerns or non-adherence and the time from kidney transplant to biopsy proven acute rejection; death-censored graft failure and total graft failure were examined using Cox proportional hazards models. Mean (SD) age was 51 (13) years, 61% were male and 27% had a history of diabetes. Twenty-two and 11% of patients had mental health concerns and non-adherence, respectively. Fifteen percent of the patients had acute rejection, 5.6% had death-censored graft failure and 13.0% had total graft failure. The history of mental health concerns was not associated with acute rejection, death-censored graft failure or total graft failure. Patients with versus without a history of non-adherence tended to have higher cumulative incidence of acute rejection (23.3% [95% CI: 16.1, 33.2] vs. 13.6% [95% CI: 11.4, 16.2]) and death-censored graft failure (15.0% [95% CI: 6.9, 30.8] vs. 6.4% [95% CI: 4.7, 8.7]) (log rank p=0.052 and p=0.086, respectively). These trends were not significant after multivariable adjustment. In summary, a history of pre-transplant mental health concerns or non-adherence is not associated with adverse outcomes in patients who completed transplant workup and received a kidney transplant. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of pre-transplant pulmonary hypertension on survival after heart transplantation: a UNOS registry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Kairav; Duval, Sue; Sharma, Alok; Adabag, Selcuk; Abidi, Kashan Syed; Taimeh, Ziad; Colvin-Adams, Monica

    2014-10-20

    Severe pre-transplant pulmonary hypertension (PH) has been associated with adverse short-term clinical outcomes after heart transplantation in relatively small single-center studies. The impact of pre-transplant PH on long-term survival after heart transplantation has not been examined in a large, multi-center cohort. Adults (≥18 years) who underwent first time heart transplantation in the United States between 1987 and 2012 were retrospectively identified from the United Network for Organ Sharing registry. Pre-transplant PH was classified as mild, moderate, or severe based on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), trans-pulmonary gradient (TPG), and pulmonary artery (PA) mean pressure. Primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Data from 26,649 heart transplant recipients (mean age 52±12 years; 76% male; 76% Caucasian) were analyzed. During a mean follow-up of 5.7±4.8 years, there were 10,334 (39%) deaths. Pre-transplant PH (PVR≥2.5 WU) was a significant predictor of mortality (hazard ratio 1.10, 95% confidence interval 1.05-1.14, ptransplant PH (mild/moderate vs. severe) did not affect short or long-term survival. Similarly, even in patients who were supported with either a left ventricular assist device or a total artificial heart prior to transplant, severe pre-transplant PH was not associated with worse survival when compared to patients with mild/moderate pre-transplant PH. Pre-transplant PH (PVR≥2.5 WU) is associated with a modest increase in mortality when compared to patients without pre-transplant PH. However, the severity of pre-transplant PH, assessed by PVR, TPG, or mean PA pressure, is not a discriminating factor for poor survival in patients listed for heart transplantation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Opportunities to deter transplant tourism exist before referral for transplantation and during the workup and management of transplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Jagbir; Diec, Olivier; Landsberg, David N; Rose, Caren; Johnston, Olwyn; Keown, Paul A; Gill, John S

    2011-05-01

    Transplant tourism is a global issue, and physicians in the developed world may be in a position to actively deter this practice. To examine such opportunities, we identified 93 residents of British Columbia, Canada who had a kidney graft through tourism and determined their previous interactions with our transplant programs. These patients were mainly ethnic minorities (90%) who traveled to their country of origin for transplantation. Many tourists were transplanted early in their disease course, with 27 having a preemptive transplant. Among the 65 tourists referred for transplant, 33 failed to complete the evaluation. All tourists who completed an evaluation were placed on a waiting list in British Columbia and, after waiting a median of 2 years, pursued tourism. Most of these patients (62%) had a potential living donor, but none had an approved donor, with 13 donors found medically unsuitable, 8 ABO incompatible, and 12 who did not complete their evaluation. Thus, strategies to deter tourism should start before the development of end-stage renal disease and should be part of pretransplant workup and wait-list management, focusing on patients not progressing through their evaluation, those with a declined living donor, and those facing longer wait times, as these groups appear to be at higher risks for transplant tourism. Further studies are needed to identify individuals at risk for transplant tourism and to define effective strategies to deter these individuals.

  20. TCC in Transplant Ureter--When and When Not to Preserve the Transplant Kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsburgh, J; Zakri, R H; Horsfield, C; Collins, R; Fairweather, J; O'Donnell, P; Koffman, G

    2016-02-01

    We present four cases of transitional cell carcinoma of the transplant ureter (TCCtu). In three cases, localized tumor resection and a variety of reconstructive techniques were possible. Transplant nephrectomy with cystectomy was performed as a secondary treatment in one locally excised case. Transplant nephroureterectomy was performed as primary treatment in one case. The role of oncogenic viruses and genetic fingerprinting to determine the origin of TCCtu are described. Our cases and a systematic literature review illustrate the surgical, nephrological, and oncological challenges of this uncommon but important condition. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  1. Carcinoma of the tongue in a renal transplant recipient: A rare post-transplant malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current immunosuppression improved long-term outcome of transplant patients, but it also increased the incidence of de novo malignancy. Organ transplant recipients have a threeto four-fold increased risk of developing carcinoma in comparison with the general population. Common malignancies encountered after transplantation include cancer of the skin, lips, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, ano-genital carcinoma and Kaposi sarcoma. Squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue is very rare. We report here a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue in an adult male patient who developed it 11 years post-transplant. He underwent right hemiglossectomy and his graft function remained stable.

  2. Sex inequality in kidney transplantation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaubel, D E; Stewart, D E; Morrison, H I; Zimmerman, D L; Cameron, J I; Jeffery, J J; Fenton, S S

    Men in the United States undergoing renal replacement therapy are more likely than women to receive a kidney transplant. However, the ability to pay may, in part, be responsible for this finding. To compare adult male and female transplantation rates in a setting in which equal access to medical treatment is assumed. Using data from the Canadian Organ Replacement Register, the rate of first transplantations was computed for the 20, 131 men and the 13,458 women aged 20 years or older who initiated renal replacement therapy between January 1, 1981, and December 31, 1996. Poisson regression analysis was used to estimate the male-female transplantation rate ratio, adjusting for age, race, province, calendar period, underlying disease leading to renal failure, and dialytic modality. Actuarial survival methods were used to compare transplantation probability for covariable-matched cohorts of men and women. Men experienced 20% greater covariable-adjusted kidney transplantation rates relative to women (rate ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.27). The sex disparity was stronger for cadaveric transplants (rate ratio, 1.23) compared with those from living donors (rate ratio, 1.10). The 5-year probability of receiving a transplant was 47% for men and 39% for women within covariable-matched cohorts (P<.001). The sex disparity in transplantation rates increased with increasing age. The sex effect was weaker among whites and Oriental persons (Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Cambodian, Laotian, Filipino, Malaysian, Indonesian, and Korean) and stronger among blacks, Asian Indians (Indian, Pakistani, and Sri Lankan), and North American Indians (aboriginal). Since survival probability and quality of life are superior for patients who undergo transplantation relative to those who undergo dialysis, an increased effort should be made to distribute kidneys available for transplantation more equitably by sex among patients undergoing renal replacement therapy.

  3. A commercial transplant network's perspective of value in solid organ transplantation: Strategizing for value in transplant care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Frank D; Wu, Charlotte; Bannister, Wade M; Bonagura, Anthony F; Laihinen, Bart; Axelrod, David A; Schnitzler, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Solid organ transplantation has been an area of great interest to commercial payers ever since it moved into mainstream medical care beginning in the 1980s. Over the years a system of evaluating transplant program performance based on volume and one year graft and patient survival has developed. While this system has served its purpose, there is an increasing realization from payers that a need exists for a more sophisticated way to evaluate quality and cost-effectiveness of these complex procedures. We report on the perspective of a large transplant network and its efforts to better understand the drivers of value over the entire continuum of care from referral through one year post-transplant. We evaluated members of a large commercial health plan who were referred for solid organ transplantation between January 1, 2010 and April 30, 2014. A total of 18,453 cases were evaluated for both clinical and economic outcomes. We report on two areas that can impact value over the entire continuum of care. Large variation in clinical practice and cost was noted. The observed variation was independent of inclusion in the transplant network's preferred network. The average pre-transplant and post-transplant costs for kidney, liver and heart transplantation cases at center level showed a variation of between 18 and 250% of the network's average. Clinical outcomes of median days on the waitlist, waitlist mortality and readmission within thirty days after transplant also showed wide variation. There was similar wide variation in cardiac evaluation of transplant candidates despite the existence of published recommendations. We demonstrated that pre-emptive renal transplantation is a high value strategy for this membership independent of donor source. In the studied population the data show wide variation in both clinical and economic parameters related to the transplant process in programs with statistically similar one year patient and graft survival. These results require

  4. Living related donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C L; Chen, Y S; Liu, P P; Chiang, Y C; Cheng, Y F; Huang, T L; Eng, H L

    1997-10-01

    Living related liver transplantation (LRLT) has been developed in response to the paediatric organ donor shortage. According to the International Living Donor Registry, 521 transplants had been performed in 515 patients between December 8 1988 and January 19 1996 in 30 centres worldwide. The overall actuarial patient and graft survival rates were 82.7 and 80%, respectively. Between June 17 1994 and November 30 1996, the authors performed 11 LRLT at the Chung Gung Memorial Hospital. The living donors consisted of 10 mothers and one father. The mean graft weight was 303 g and the mean graft recipient weight ratio was 2.2%. Donor hepatectomy was performed without vascular inflow occlusion. The intra-operative blood loss ranged from 30 mL to 120 mL with an average of 61 mL, and blood transfusion was not required in all donors both intra-operatively and during the postoperative period. Underlying diseases of the recipients were biliary atresia (n = 10) and glycogen storage disease (n = 1). The mean graft cold ischaemia time was 106 min, the mean second warm ischaemia time was 51 min and the mean interval between portal and arterial reperfusion was 81 min. The initial LRLT results were promising with all donors having been discharged without complication. The recipients experienced a few complications, all of which were manageable with early intervention. All 11 recipients are alive and well. These are encouraging results and the authors hope to expand the use of live donors for liver transplantation to cope with demand.

  5. Exploring pharmacodynamics of immunosuppresive agents in transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Vafadari (Ramin)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractSupported by advancements in technology, surgical techniques and immunosuppressive drugs, solid organ transplantation has become the preferred solution to end stage organ failure. The first solid organ transplantation was performed in 1954 under supervision of Joseph Murray in the Peter

  6. Diabetes Mellitus in the Transplanted Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasil ePeev

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is the most common cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD and end stage renal disease (ESRD. New onset diabetes mellitus after transplant (NODAT has been described in approximately 30 percent of non-diabetic kidney transplant recipients many years post transplantation. DM in patients with kidney transplantation constitutes a major comorbidity, and has significant impact on the patients and allografts’ outcome. In addition to the major comorbidity and mortality that result from cardiovascular and other DM complications, long standing DM after kidney transplant has significant pathological injury to the allograft, which results in lowering the allografts and the patients’ survivals. In spite of the cumulative body of data on diabetic nephropathy (DN in the native kidney, there has been very limited data on the DN in the transplanted kidney. In this review, we will shed the light on the risk factors that lead to the development of NODAT. We will also describe the impact of DM on the transplanted kidney, and the outcome of kidney transplant recipients with NODAT. Additionally, we will present the most acceptable data on management of NODAT.

  7. Issues in organ procurement, allocation, and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nierste, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Organ transplantation extends lives and improves health but presents complex ethical dilemmas for nurses caring for donors, recipients, and their families. This article overviews organ procurement and allocation, discusses ethical dilemmas in transplantation, and offers strategies from professional and biblical perspectives for coping with moral distress and maintaining compassionate care.

  8. Liver Transplantation in the Obese Cirrhotic Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Erin K; O'Leary, Jacqueline G; Te, Helen S; Rogal, Shari; Pillai, Anjana A; Al-Osaimi, Abdullah; Desai, Archita; Fleming, James N; Ganger, Daniel; Seetharam, Anil; Tsoulfas, Georgios; Montenovo, Martin; Lai, Jennifer C

    2017-10-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing prevalence of obesity in the transplant population, the optimal management of obese liver transplant candidates remains undefined. Setting strict body mass index cutoffs for transplant candidacy remains controversial, with limited data to guide this practice. Body mass index is an imperfect measure of surgical risk in this population, partly due to volume overload and variable visceral adiposity. Weight loss before transplantation may be beneficial, but it remains important to avoid protein calorie malnutrition and sarcopenia. Intensive lifestyle modifications appear to be successful in achieving weight loss, though the durability of these interventions is not known. Pretransplant and intraoperative bariatric surgeries have been performed, but large randomized controlled trials are lacking. Traditional cardiovascular comorbidities are more prevalent in obese individuals and remain the basis for pretransplant cardiovascular evaluation and risk stratification. The recent US liver transplant experience demonstrates comparable patient and graft survival between obese and nonobese liver transplant recipients, but obesity presents important medical and surgical challenges during and after transplant. Specifically, obesity is associated with an increased incidence of wound infections, wound dehiscence, biliary complications and overall infection, and confers a higher risk of posttransplant obesity and metabolic syndrome-related complications. In this review, we examine current practices in the obese liver transplant population, offer recommendations based on the currently available data, and highlight areas where additional research is needed.

  9. Social participation after successful kidney transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Mei, Sijrike F.; Van Sonderen, Eric L. P.; Van Son, Willem J.; De Jong, Paul E.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Van den Heuvel, Wim J. A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. To explore and describe the degree of social participation after kidney transplantation and to examine associated factors. Method. A cross-sectional study on 239 adult patients 1-7.3 years after kidney transplantation was performed via in-home interviews on participation in obligatory

  10. Medicine non-adherence in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison Fiona; Manias, Elizabeth; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Crawford, Kimberley

    2014-06-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease, the relative shortage of kidney donors and the economic- and health-related costs of kidney transplant rejection make the prevention of adverse outcomes following transplantation a healthcare imperative. Although strict adherence to immunosuppressant medicine regimens is key to preventing kidney rejection, evidence suggests that adherence is sub-optimal. Strategies need to be developed to help recipients of kidney transplants adhere to their prescribed medicines. This review has found that a number of factors contribute to poor adherence, for example, attitudes towards medicine taking and forgetfulness. Few investigations have been conducted, however, on strategies to enhance medicine adherence in kidney transplant recipients. Strategies that may improve adherence include pharmacist-led interventions (incorporating counselling, medicine reviews and nephrologist liaison) and nurse-led interventions (involving collaboratively working with recipients to understand their routines and offering solutions to improve adherence). Strategies that have shown to have limited effectiveness include supplying medicines free of charge and providing feedback on a participant's medicine adherence without any educational or behavioural interventions. Transplantation is the preferred treatment option for people with end-stage kidney disease. Medicine non-adherence in kidney transplantation increases the risk of rejection, kidney loss and costly treatments. Interventions are needed to help the transplant recipient take all their medicines as prescribed to improve general well-being, medicine safety and reduce healthcare costs. © 2014 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  11. Stem Cell Transplants in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cell transplants are procedures that restore blood-forming stem cells in cancer patients who have had theirs destroyed by very high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Learn about the types of transplants and side effects that may occur.

  12. Commercial kidney transplantation: Trends, outcomes and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Objective: Many experts believe that commercial organ transplants continue unabated despite international efforts to curb them. The aim was to determine the trends, outcomes and challenges of commercial living unrelated renal transplants (LURT) as seen in our institution. Materials and Methods: A ...

  13. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orchard, Paul J.; Fasth, Anders L.; Le Rademacher, Jennifer L.; He, Wensheng; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem M.; Boulad, Farid; Lund, Troy; Buchbinder, David K.; Kapoor, Neena; OBrien, Tracey A.; Perez, Miguel A Diaz; Veys, Paul A.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    We report the international experience in outcomes after related and unrelated hematopoietic transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis in 193 patients. Thirty-four percent of transplants used grafts from HLA-matched siblings, 13% from HLA-mismatched relatives, 12% from HLA-matched, and 41% from

  14. [Reproduction following kidney transplantation (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengst, P; Fischer, W; Scholz, D; May, G; Göbel, U

    1979-01-01

    Reported in this paper are the first two pregnancies and childbirths in the GDR following kidney transplantations. The point is made that pregnancy following kidney transplantation should remain to be a rare exception, though the courses were favourable in both cases described. Reference is made to most suitable forms of anticonception.

  15. Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and suppresses the patient’s immune system to prevent rejection of the transplant. Unlike traditional BMT or PBSCT, ... be given an injection of the donor’s white blood cells. This procedure is called a “ donor ... “tandem transplant” is a type of autologous transplant. This method is being studied ...

  16. Interprofessional communication in organ transplantation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion. Transplantation in Gauteng is characterised by aspects of good teamwork, and the importance of effective communication is acknowledged. Transplantation also faces some challenges in terms of interprofessional communication. Recommendations for mitigating some of the gaps include integrating a health ...

  17. Urinary tract infection in renal transplant recipients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Introduction: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the commonest bacterial infection occurring in renal transplant recipients, and it is associated with significant morbidity. This study aimed to assess the characteristics of all UTI episodes diagnosed in renal transplant patients who attended regularly for follow up in the ...

  18. Revisional bariatric surgery in a transplant patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Al Sabah

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Bariatric surgery is a safe and effective procedure to assist renal transplant patients in losing weight. In addition, it has proven to be effective in the management of the co-morbidities that are associated with renal failure. Our study was also able to prove that converting form an SG to a bypass in a transplant patient is a safe and feasible option.

  19. Graft loss after pediatric liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieders, E; Peeters, PMJG; TenVergert, EM; de Jong, KP; Porte, RJ; Zwaveling, JH; Bijleveld, CMA; Gouw, ASH; Slooff, MJH

    Objective To describe the epidemiology and causes of graft loss after pediatric liver transplantation and to identify risk factors. Summary Background Data Graft failure after transplantation remains an important problem. It results in patient death or retransplantation, resulting in lower survival

  20. Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Arab Journal of Nephrology and Transplantation is the official publication of the Arab Society of Nephrology and Renal Transplantation. It publishes original articles pertaining to various aspects of renal medicine, as well as editorials, reviews, case reports, short communications, guidelines and statistical data pertaining ...

  1. Hyperthyroidism in a renal transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Navascués, R A; Baltar, J; Laurés, A S; Ortega, F; Alvarez-Grande, J

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of toxic multinodular goiter with severe symptomatic hyperthyroidism in a female diagnosed 5 months after successful renal transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first well-documented case of hyperthyroidism in a renal transplant recipient that responded well to methimazole. Special attention should be made to the use of methimazole and the possible interaction with immunosuppressive drugs.

  2. Transplantation of the sensitized patient: histocompatibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Robert A; Leffell, Mary S; Zachary, Andrea A

    2013-01-01

    A component necessary for successful transplantation of the sensitized patient is timely and high quality support from the histocompatibility laboratory that helps guide selection of the best route to transplantation and the clinical care of the patient. Responsibilities of the laboratory include risk assessment, HLA typing, and accurate antibody characterization.

  3. Commercial kidney transplantation: Trends, outcomes and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim was to determine the trends, outcomes and challenges of commercial living unrelated renal transplants (LURT) as .... Commercial kidney transplants: Trends and outcomes. (22,2%), diabète post-greffe dans sept (15 .... (42.2%) with UTI as the commonest infection, which is in keeping with the known fact that UTI.

  4. Bile acids for liver-transplanted patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poropat, Goran; Giljaca, Vanja; Stimac, Davor

    2010-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become a widely accepted form of treatment for numerous end-stage liver diseases. Bile acids may decrease allograft rejection after liver transplantation by changing the expression of major histocompatibility complex class molecules in bile duct epithelium and central vein...

  5. Microwave treatment of xenogeneic cartilage transplants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, C. E.; Boon, M. E.; Visser, P. E.; Kok, L. P.

    1989-01-01

    Human rib cartilage was irradiated with microwaves according to six different methods and transplanted into rabbits. Untreated rib cartilage preserved in Cialit served as a control. After 12 and 40 wk of implantation, the microscopic appearance of these xenogeneic cartilage transplants was given a

  6. Solid organ transplants following hematopoietic stem cell transplant in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunin, Nancy; Guzikowski, Virginia; Rand, Elizabeth R; Goldfarb, Samuel; Baluarte, Jorge; Meyers, Kevin; Olthoff, Kim M

    2010-12-01

    SOT may be indicated for a select group of pediatric patients who experience permanent organ failure following HSCT. However, there is limited information available about outcomes. We identified eight children at our center who received an SOT following an HSCT. Patients were six months to 18 yr at HSCT. Diseases for which children underwent HSCT included thalassemia, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, Shwachman-Diamond/bone marrow failure, sickle cell disease (SCD), erythropoietic porphyria (EP), ALL, chronic granulomatous disease, and neuroblastoma. Time from HSCT to SOT was 13 days to seven yr (median, 27 months. Lung SOT was performed for two patients with BO, kidney transplants for three patients, and liver transplants for three patients (VOD, chronic GVHD). Seven patients are alive with functioning allografts 6-180 months from SOT. Advances in organ procurement, operative technique, immunosuppressant therapy, and infection control may allow SOT for a select group of patients post-HSCT. However, scarcity of donor organs available in a timely fashion continues to be a limiting factor. Children who have undergone HSCT and develop single organ failure should be considered for an SOT if there is a high likelihood of cure of the primary disease. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Clinical Significance of Pre- and Post-Transplant BAFF Levels in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Won Min

    Full Text Available It is well known that pre-transplant B cell activating factor (BAFF levels are associated with the development of de novo anti-HLA antibodies and antibody mediated rejection post-transplant. However, the clinical significance of BAFF values at allograft rejection has not been determined. In this study, we investigated the clinical significance of pre-transplant BAFF level as well as post-transplant BAFF levels measured when indication biopsy was done. We checked for anti-HLA antibodies in 115 kidney transplant recipients who required allograft biopsy due to an increase in serum creatinine. With the same serum specimen, we measured BAFF levels, and in 78 of these patients, pre-transplant BAFF and anti-HLA antibody levels were detected as well. Patients in each group were divided into tertiles according to BAFF levels. We investigated the relationship between BAFF levels and the occurrence of anti-HLA antibodies. Pre-transplant BAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, and also with early rejection (Tertile 3, 26.9% vs. Tertile 1, 11.5%; P<0.05. Post-transplant BAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, but did not show association with anti-HLA antibodies and positive donor-specific antibodies at the time of biopsy. We did not find any association between post-transplant BAFF levels and allograft biopsy results, Banff scores and microvascular inflammation scores. In conclusion, pre-transplant BAFF levels are associated with pre-transplant sensitization and are useful in predicting allograft rejection. But post-transplant BAFF levels measured at the time of indication biopsy are not associated with the appearance of de novo HLA-DSA, allograft rejection, biopsy findings and other allograft outcomes.

  8. Dialysis Facility Transplant Philosophy and Access to Kidney Transplantation in the Southeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gander, Jennifer; Browne, Teri; Plantinga, Laura; Pastan, Stephen O; Sauls, Leighann; Krisher, Jenna; Patzer, Rachel E

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the impact of dialysis facility treatment philosophy on access to transplant. The aim of our study was to determine the relationship between the dialysis facility transplant philosophy and facility-level access to kidney transplant waitlisting. A 25-item questionnaire administered to Southeastern dialysis facilities (n = 509) in 2012 captured the facility transplant philosophy (categorized as 'transplant is our first choice', 'transplant is a great option for some', and 'transplant is a good option, if the patient is interested'). Facility-level waitlisting and facility characteristics were obtained from the 2008-2011 Dialysis Facility Report. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between the dialysis facility transplant philosophy and facility waitlisting performance (dichotomized using the national median), where low performance was defined as fewer than 21.7% of dialysis patients waitlisted within a facility. Fewer than 25% (n = 124) of dialysis facilities reported 'transplant is our first option'. A total of 131 (31.4%) dialysis facilities in the Southeast were high-performing facilities with respect to waitlisting. Adjusted analysis showed that facilities who reported 'transplant is our first option' were twice (OR 2.0; 95% CI 1.0-3.9) as likely to have high waitlisting performance compared to facilities who reported that 'transplant is a good option, if the patient is interested'. Facilities with staff who had a more positive transplant philosophy were more likely to have better facility waitlisting performance. Future prospective studies are needed to further investigate if improving the kidney transplant philosophy in dialysis facilities improves access to transplantation.

  9. A transplant of real life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, V

    1993-10-01

    A case of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis leading to renal failure in a 4-year-old girl is described by her mother, with special emphasis on the problems resulting from recurrence of this disease, with graft loss in three successive kidney transplants. This report chronicles the gradual evolution from a family's initial heavy dependence upon medical solutions to their ultimate primary emphasis upon spiritual values, with medicine seen as the support toward achieving the child's psychological well-being and spiritual growth. The physician's role in balancing medical decision making, non-medical alternatives, and demands on limited and precious resources in such difficult cases is discussed.

  10. Pneumonia in renal transplant patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowie, D. M.; Marrie, T. J.; Janigan, D. T.; MacKeen, A. D.; Belitsky, P.; MacDonald, A. S.; Lannon, S. G.; Cohen, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    Between January 1976 and March 1982, 28 episodes of pneumonia occurred in 26 renal transplant patients. The overall mortality rate was 46%. Of the 16 patients with nosocomial pneumonia 9 (56%) died, whereas of the 12 patients with community-acquired pneumonia 4 (33%) died. In all 9 cases of unknown cause the response to empiric treatment was prompt, whereas in 4 of the 10 cases of monomicrobial pneumonia and 8 of the 9 cases of polymicrobial pneumonia the patient died. Cytomegalovirus was the...

  11. [Peritoneal dialysis and renal transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangon, N; Hadaya, K

    2013-01-16

    Individualized prescription of bicarbonate solutions allows one to control metabolic acidosis. Low sodium solutions improve sodium removal and may become available in the future. Varying dwell time and fill volume when intermittent APD is prescribed improves the efficiency of dialysis. Continuous flow peritoneal dialysis can dramatically improves the efficiency of dialysis. Normalized haemoglobin values by epoietin-beta in renal transplant recipients are associated with a better graft survival at 2 years. Switch from calcineurins inhibitors to sirolimus after the first squamous-cell carcinoma lead to significantly longer survival free of cutaneous carcinoma at 2 years. Eculizumab allowed successful prevention and treatment of atypical haemolytic and uremic syndrome episodes.

  12. Sirolimus experience in heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda-Dios, A; Lage, E; Sobrino, J M; Mogollón, M V; Guisado, A; Cabezón, S; Hinojosa, R; Hernández, A; Ordóñez, A

    2006-10-01

    Sirolimus is a potent, nonnephrotoxic immunosuppressant with antiproliferative activity in nonimmune cells. Recent data support the conversion in late renal failure secondary to calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs), with limited experience in de novo regimens in patients with predictive factors of postoperative renal impairment. We evaluated our experience of sirolimus-based immunosuppression administered to 25 heart transplant recipients. A retrospective analysis of 25 heart transplant recipients who received sirolimus included 17 conversions due to late CNI-related chronic renal dysfunction, six patients with a de novo regimen, and two patients who developed posttransplant pulmonary neoplasms. The conversion from CNI to sirolimus was started with 2 mg, with an average time after transplantation of 78 +/- 43 months and a mean baseline serum creatinine level of 2.1 +/- 0.45 mg/dL. The mean clinical follow-up was 17 +/- 9 months postconversion, and included echocardiography and laboratory studies. In the de novo group successive endomyocardial biopsies were performed during the first semester. Serum creatinine fell from 2.1 +/- 0.45 mg/dL to 1.8 +/- 0.51 mg/dL (P = .012). Mean sirolimus levels were 15 +/- 9 ng/mL (doses 2.2 +/- 0.4 mg). This improvement continued until 3 months (creatinine 1.5 +/- 0.35 P < .01)/sirolimus levels 11.7 +/- 5 ng/mL [1.9 +/- 0.7 mg]), with maintenance at 6 months (1.58 +/- 0.3 mg/dL/14 +/- 4 ng/mL [1.85 +/- 0.7 mg]) and 1-year postconversion (1.53 +/- 0.39 mg/dL; P = .019/10.7 +/- 2.5 ng/mL [1.5 +/- 0.7 mg]). De novo, after a mean follow-up of 13 months (range 3 to 35), sirolimus appeared to increase the incidence of a moderate histological grade of rejection without hemodynamic compromise. Side effects were common (63%), including peripheral edema, skin eruptions, and pericardial effusion. Only one patient discontinued treatment, due to intestinal intolerance. Four patients died during follow-up: two because of lung neoplasms and two because

  13. Life after a lung transplant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graarup, Jytte; Mogensen, Elin Lindberg; Missel, Malene

    2017-01-01

    and psychological challenges. The interviewees were happy to get another chance to live, although some of them suffered from medical side effects, postoperative complications and psychological problems. When asked about the future, interviewees stated that life could be described as (3) a balance of joy...... and challenges. They had received a new chance in life and were eager to fulfil their life hopes and dreams. At the same time, they were worried about the future. Having a lung transplant implies rules that have to be followed. What are the healthy choices they are supposed to make? And will there be a tomorrow...

  14. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekadja, Mohamed Amine; Brahimi, Mohamed; Osmani, Soufi; Yafour, Nabil; Krim, Amina; Serradj, Faiza; Talhi, Souad; Amani, Kamila; Bouhass, Rachid Amar

    2017-12-01

    Algeria is a country of 40.4 million inhabitants and half of which is under 30years. In Algeria, Health-care insurance covered, 90% of the population. Health care is free and it is supported by the Ministry of Health. 16 university hospitals exist in Algeria and only two (Algiers and Oran) practicing bone marrow transplant. Adult hematologic malignancies account for 10% (about 4000 new cases/year) of the malignancy affecting in most cases young patients under 65years of age. In 2016, 270 transplants were performed in total (Algiers+Oran), including 149 allografts (related donor transplants: 99%) and 121 autografts. 98% of transplants are done in adults and only 2% in children with cord blood transplants. In summary for the two transplant centers, the predominant types of transplantation performed are allogeneic transplant in 55% and autologous transplant in 45%. The particularity of EHU1st November in Oran, is the use of non-cryopreserved stem cells. Stem cell was mobilized using G-CSF alone and the grafts were kept in a conventional blood bank refrigerator at +4°C until reinfusion on day 0. The outcome with non-cryopreserved stem cells are the same as those with cryopreserved stem cells and we conclude that autologous transplant with non cryopreserved hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is a simple, effective and safe method and the cryopreservation is not necessary in our work conditions in developing countries. The projects are achieving the autograft in all University Hospitals with non cryopreserved HSC, achieving a center allograft in the east of the country and the development of bone marrow transplantation in children. Currently in Algeria, the number of transplantation is insufficient and the development of new transplant centers is essential. In the future, we hope to implement the National Society of Bone Marrow transplant and also the National recipient registry and Donor registry in Algeria. Copyright © 2017 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research

  15. Neurological complications of solid organ transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Pedroso

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Solid organ transplantation is a significant development in the treatment of chronic kidney, liver, heart and lung diseases. This therapeutic approach has increased patient survival and improved quality of life. New surgical techniques and immunosuppressive drugs have been developed to achieve better outcomes. However, the variety of neurological complications following solid organ transplantation is broad and carries prognostic significance. Patients may have involvement of the central or peripheral nervous system due to multiple causes that can vary depending on time of onset after the surgical procedure, the transplanted organ, and the intensity and type of immunosuppressive therapy. Neurological manifestations following solid organ transplantation pose a diagnostic challenge to medical specialists despite extensive investigation. This review aimed to provide a practical approach to help neurologists and clinicians assess and manage solid organ transplant patients presenting with acute or chronic neurological manifestations.

  16. Transplanting oligodendrocyte progenitors into the adult CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, R.J.M.; Blakemore, W.F.; Cambridge Univ.

    1997-01-01

    This review covers a number of aspects of the behaviour of oligodendrocyte progenitors following transplantation into the adult CNS. First, an account is given of the ability of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors, grown in tissue culture in the presence of PDGF and bFGF, to extensively remyelinate focal areas of persistent demyelination. Secondly, we describe how transplanted clonal cell lines of oligodendrocyte progenitors will differentiate in to astrocytes as will oligodendrocytes following transplantation into pathological environments in which both oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are absent, thereby manifesting the bipotentially demonstrable in vitro but not during development. Finally, a series of studies examining the migratory behaviour of transplanted oligodendrocyte progenitors (modelled using the oligodendrocyte progenitor cell line CG4) are described. (author)

  17. Antiradiation effect of thymus transplantation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Shiren; Liu Shouli; Su Yuanfu

    1985-01-01

    Thymus is an important organ of the immune system and is involved in the regulation of blood cell formation. Thymus transplantation can reconstitute the immune system to a certain extent in immunodeficiencies. The results of our primary experiment showed that thymus transplantation could increase the survival rate of lethally irradiated mice. The survival rate in the group with thymus transplanted in abdominal wall was higher than that in the group with the organ transplanted in peritoneum. In the recovery period, the labelling index of bone marrow cells in the former group was significantly higher than that in the controls. After 3 months of transplantation, no significant immunologic rejection was observed histologically either in the mice with syngenetic thymic graft or in the mice with homograft

  18. Cancer risk and mortality after kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Henriette; Wehberg, Sonja; Bistrup, Claus

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Kidney recipients receive immunosuppression to prevent graft rejection, and long-term outcomes such as post-transplant cancer and mortality may vary according to the different protocols of immunosuppression. METHODS: A national register-based historical cohort study was conducted......, the Danish National Cancer Registry and the Danish National Patient Register were used. A historical cohort of 1450 kidney recipients transplanted in 1995-2005 was followed up with respect to post-transplant cancer and death until 31 December 2011. RESULTS: Compared with Center 1 the adjusted post...... to examine whether post-transplant cancer and all-cause mortality differed between Danish renal transplantation centres using standard immunosuppressive protocols including steroids (Centres 2, 3, 4) or a steroid-free protocol (Centre 1). The Danish Nephrology Registry, the Danish Civil Registration System...

  19. Histoplasmosis hepatitis after orthotopic liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Laura; Galván, N Thao; Dhingra, Sadhna; Rana, Abbas; Goss, John A

    2017-12-01

    Histoplasmosis is an endemic mycosis in the Ohio and Mississippi River valleys and can cause disseminated infection in immunocompromised hosts. Disseminated histoplasmosis is often respiratory in nature and most cases in transplant patients occur within 2 years post-transplantation. A 32-year-old male on mycophenolate and tacrolimus who underwent an orthotopic liver transplantation 10 years prior presented with generalized body aches, fevers, mild congestion, dysuria and elevated transaminases. Liver biopsy revealed epithelioid granulomas with narrow-based budding yeast, suggesting histoplasma. Liver involvement in disseminated histoplasmosis is well characterized however the disease is usually pulmonary in origin. Only three other case reports describe isolated granulomatous hepatitis, and this is the first to our knowledge to occur in a liver transplant allograft. A high index of suspicion is essential for diagnosis and prompt treatment of histoplasmosis in transplant patients considering their immunocompromised state.

  20. The significance of renoscintigraphy for renal transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oei Hong Yoe.

    1981-01-01

    The aim of the study reported here was to evaluate the contribution of renoscintigraphy performed frequently and systematically, for differentiation between the various complications occurring after renal transplantation. Relevant complications of renal transplantation are described, with special attention to the diagnostic methods available at present, and the methods used for radionuclide investigations in renal transplantation are reviewed. The abnormalities seen on the sequential images in ten cases complicated by urine leakage or urinary tract obstruction are described. These are illustrated by the scintigrams and the corresponding radiograms. The results in eight patients whose transplant did not show Hippuran uptake are also described. Transplant failure in five of these eight patients was clearly demonstrated by perfusion scintigraphy. (Auth.)

  1. THE ISLAMIC ETHICS OF MITOCHONDRIA TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Iman Bouzenita

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Biotechnology has opened a new chapter with the advent of mitochondria transplantation for cell-based therapy. Mitochondrial transplantation was successfully led to birth; however, cytoplasmic transplantation has caused apprehension, since the mixing of human ooplasm from two different maternal sources may generate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA heteroplasmy in the offspring. Islamic legal verdicts on human cloning and somatic cell transfer have been overweighing explicit as to its prohibition, due to the change of creation, mixing of lineage and other evaluations. Is mitochondria transplantation equivalent to human cloning in that genetic information is proliferated and does it, therefore, take the same legal rule? Are there possible benefits (masalih for medical treatment that may render mitochondria transplantation permissible, or are possible harms (mafasid overweighing? Or is it a completely different procedure, taking a different rule? The paper will investigate into these questions and discuss the dimensions of Islamic ethics on the issue.

  2. Renal transplantation in high cardiovascular risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittar, Julio; Arenas, Paula; Chiurchiu, Carlos; de la Fuente, Jorge; de Arteaga, Javier; Douthat, Walter; Massari, Pablo U

    2009-10-01

    Current transplant success allows recipients with previous contraindications to transplant to have access to this procedure with more frequency and safety. The concept of high-risk patient has changed since the first stages of transplantation. In the first studies, the high-risk concept was based on probability of early graft failure or on a patient's clinical condition to cope with high perioperatory morbimortality. Later on, this concept implied immunological factors that were crucial to ensure transplant success because hypersensitized or polytransfused patients experienced a higher risk of acute rejection and subsequent graft loss. Afterward, the presence of various comorbidities would redefine the high-risk concept for renal transplant mainly considering recipient's clinical aspects. Currently, the change in epidemiological characteristics of patients starting dialysis causes that we now deal with a greater increase of elderly patients, diabetic patients, and patients with history of cardiovascular disease. Today, high-risk patients are those with clinical features that predict an increase in the risk of perioperative morbimortality or death with functioning graft. In this review, we will attempted to analyze currents results of renal transplant outcomes in terms of patients and graft survival in elderly patients, diabetic patients, and patients with previous cardiovascular disease from the most recent experiences in the literature and from experiences in our center. In any of the groups previously analyzed, survival offered by renal transplant is significantly higher compared to dialysis. Besides, these patients are the recipient group that benefit the most with the transplant because their mortality while remaining on dialysis is extremely high. Hence, renal transplantation should be offered more frequently to older patients, diabetic patients, and patients with pretransplant cardiac and peripheral vascular disease. A positive attitude toward renal

  3. Native kidney reincarnation following a failed transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansberg, R.; Roberts, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A 51-year-old woman with end stage renal failure secondary to Haemolytic Uraemic syndrome underwent a cadaveric renal transplant. A routine post transplant DTPA scan was performed which demonstrated satisfactory renal transplant perfusion and function. Incidental note was made of tracer uptake in the pelvis in the mid-line, which was suspected to be a uterine fibroid. This was confirmed on ultrasonography and at surgery. One week post transplantation the patient became acutely unwell and at laparotomy a perforated diverticular abscess was drained. Intraoperatively the transplant kidney was examined and the surgeon thought there was a area of infarction. This was confirmed on biopsy. As the patient's creatinine was rising a repeat DTPA study was performed. Perfusion and function of the transplant kidney was virtually absent while Doppler studies showed no flow. The patient however continued to produce urine and the creatinine was stable. Subsequently a mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG) 3 study was performed which again confirmed absent perfusion and function by the the transplanted kidney as well as the previous noted uterine fibroid. The native kidneys however demonstrated good perfusion and function. The patient's renal function remained stable and she did not require dialysis. A necrotic infarcted transplant kidney was removed uneventfully. This case illustrates the importance of imaging the native kidneys as well as the transplant kidney when there are puzzling clinical features. The presumed cause of the recovery of native renal function was the immunosuppression given for the transplant. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  4. Predictors of hyperparathyroidism in renal transplant recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houssaini, T.S.; Arrayahani, M.; Rhou, H.; Amar, Y.; Benamar, L.; Ouzeddoun, N.; Bayahia, R.

    2008-01-01

    The changes in parathyroid hormone secretion after successful renal transplantation remain to be clearly elucidated. Our study was aimed at identifying the predictors of hyperparathyroidism in renal transplant recipients. A retrospective single center study involving 37 renal transplant recipients, with a follow-up of at least one year, was performed. All transplants were performed using kidneys from living related donors. The average age of study patients was 30+-10 years, with a male-female ratio of 1.31. The mean duration on hemodialysis (HD) prior to transplantation was 25+-18 months. All the grafts but one were functional after a mean follow-up of 41+-21 months. We noted a rapid reduction of the mean parathyroid hormone (iPTH) level from 383+-265 pg/ml before transplantation to 125+-67 pg/ml at one year and 108+-66 pg/ml at two years after transplantation (p=0.01). Bivariate analysis revealed that the level of iPTH obtained during follow-up correlated with the duration on HD (p=0.03), the serum creatinine at 24-months (p=0.013), and to the level of iPTH in the first year post transplantation (P=<0.001). Other clinical or laboratory parameters were not predictive of hyperparathyroidism after kidney transplantation. Liner regression showed that only the serum creatinine at 24-months independently correlated with the level of iPTH at last follow-up (p=0.02). Our study suggests that short duration on HD and a functional graft are the main predictors of correction of hyperparathyroidism after renal transplantation. (author)

  5. [Eye banks and available transplants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slettedal, Jon Klokk; Drolsum, Liv; Ramstad, Hanne; Nicolaissen, Bjørn

    2008-04-17

    Eye banks have procured, processed and stored donor corneas for decades. In parallel, new techniques have emerged employing allogeneic transplantation of various cells and tissues from the eye banks. This progress is a consequence of increased knowledge of stem cells, cell kinetics and immunological aspects and improved techniques for cell culturing, tissue storage and microsurgery. Review article on available transplants for treating eye diseases, based on experience with eye banking, clinical ophthalmological practice, own research and literature retrieved from PubMed, Medline and www.google.com. Treatment techniques for eye diseases, which require biological material for grafting, need efficient eye banks for continuous supply of donor material of high quality. New Norwegian legislation, based on implementation of EU Directive 2004/23/EC, demands authorization of all eye banks. The EU Directive sets high and rigorous standards for quality and safety for donation, procurement, testing, processing, storage and distribution of tissues and cells. Well-run eye banks are of great importance for modern treatment of patients suffering from eye diseases and for progress and research in ophthalmology.

  6. [Biliary complications after liver transplant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lladó, Laura; Fabregat, Joan; Ramos, Emilio; Baliellas, Carme; Torras, Jaume; Rafecas, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    There have been biliary complications since the beginning of liver transplants, and is a topic of great interest due to its high incidence, as well as their influence on morbidity and mortality. The biliary fistula is currently uncommon and its management is straightforward. Anastomotic stenosis continues to have an incidence of 10-15%. Although the current treatment of choice is endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), surgical treatment (hepatico-jejunostomy) continues to have an important role. Non-anastomotic stenosis has an incidence of 5-10%, and is associated with ischaemic or immunological factors, and usually involves a re-transplant. Choledocholithiasis has an incidence of 5-10%, with the treatment of choice being ERCP. However the treatment of biliary complications should be individualised. We must take into account, liver function, the general health status of the patient, and the availability and experience of the team in the different therapeutic options. Copyright © 2011 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Changing Patterns of Foreigner Transplants in Korea and Overseas Organ Transplants Among Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hyung Joon; Kim, Hwi Won; Han, Miyeun; Jeon, Hee Jung; Kwon, Oh Jung; Ahn, Curie

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to estimate the numbers of foreign patients seeking organ transplantation (OT) in Korea and to examine the relationship between the trend of deceased donors in Korea and number of Korean patients seeking OT overseas since 2000. Data on foreigners who received a transplant in Korea were obtained from the Korean Network for Organ Sharing. Data on overseas transplants were obtained from 42 transplant centers surveyed through transplant coordinators. A total of 336 foreigners underwent OT (kidney transplantation [KT], 174; liver transplantation [LT], 162) in Korea between 2006 and 2016. The Mongolians were the most common foreigners who undergo KTs (32%), followed by the Chinese (18%), Americans (9%), and Emiratis (7%). Among foreigners undergoing LTs, the most common country of origin was Mongolia (39%), followed by United Arab Emirates (23%), China (13%), and the United States (6%). A total of 2206 Korean patients underwent overseas OT (KT, 977; LT, 1229) between 2000 and 2016. In 97% of overseas KT cases (n = 942) and 98% (n = 1205) of overseas LT cases, the transplantations were performed in China. The relationship between the number of deceased donors in Korea and the number of overseas transplants after 2006 indicates a highly negative correlation. (ρ = -0.988, P organ trafficking. National effort to achieve self-sufficiency by increasing activities for organ donations is one of the fundamental solutions to transplant tourism.

  8. Outcomes of Pediatric Kidney Transplantation in Recipients of a Previous Non-Renal Solid Organ Transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdani, G; Zhang, B; Liu, C; Goebel, J; Zhang, Y; Nehus, E

    2017-07-01

    Children who receive a non-renal solid organ transplant may develop secondary renal failure requiring kidney transplantation. We investigated outcomes of 165 pediatric kidney transplant recipients who previously received a heart, lung, or liver transplant using data from 1988 to 2012 reported to the United Network for Organ Sharing. Patient and allograft survival were compared with 330 matched primary kidney transplant (PKT) recipients. Kidney transplantation after solid organ transplant (KASOT) recipients experienced similar allograft survival: 5- and 10-year graft survival was 78% and 60% in KASOT recipients, compared to 80% and 61% in PKT recipients (p = 0.69). However, KASOT recipients demonstrated worse 10-year patient survival (75% KASOT vs. 97% PKT, p transplants performed from 2006 to 2012 were separately investigated. Since 2006, KASOT and PKT recipients had similar 5-year graft survival (82% KASOT vs. 83% PKT, p = 0.48), although 5-year patient survival of KASOT recipients remained inferior (90% KASOT vs. 98% PKT, p Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  9. Clinical Significance of Pre- and Post-Transplant BAFF Levels in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Ji Won; Kim, Kyoung Woon; Kim, Bo-Mi; Doh, Kyoung Chan; Choi, Min Seok; Choi, Bum Soon; Park, Cheol Whee; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Yong-Soo; Oh, Eun-Jee; Chung, Byung Ha

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that pre-transplant B cell activating factor (BAFF) levels are associated with the development of de novo anti-HLA antibodies and antibody mediated rejection post-transplant. However, the clinical significance of BAFF values at allograft rejection has not been determined. In this study, we investigated the clinical significance of pre-transplant BAFF level as well as post-transplant BAFF levels measured when indication biopsy was done. We checked for anti-HLA antibodies in 115 kidney transplant recipients who required allograft biopsy due to an increase in serum creatinine. With the same serum specimen, we measured BAFF levels, and in 78 of these patients, pre-transplant BAFF and anti-HLA antibody levels were detected as well. Patients in each group were divided into tertiles according to BAFF levels. We investigated the relationship between BAFF levels and the occurrence of anti-HLA antibodies. Pre-transplant BAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, and also with early rejection (Tertile 3, 26.9% vs. Tertile 1, 11.5%; PBAFF levels showed significant association with pre-transplant sensitization, but did not show association with anti-HLA antibodies and positive donor-specific antibodies at the time of biopsy. We did not find any association between post-transplant BAFF levels and allograft biopsy results, Banff scores and microvascular inflammation scores. In conclusion, pre-transplant BAFF levels are associated with pre-transplant sensitization and are useful in predicting allograft rejection. But post-transplant BAFF levels measured at the time of indication biopsy are not associated with the appearance of de novo HLA-DSA, allograft rejection, biopsy findings and other allograft outcomes.

  10. Impact of transplant nephrectomy on peak PRA levels and outcome after kidney re-transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittelbach-Helmrich, Dietlind; Pisarski, Przemyslaw; Offermann, Gerd; Geyer, Marcel; Thomusch, Oliver; Hopt, Ulrich Theodor; Drognitz, Oliver

    2014-06-24

    To determine the impact of transplant nephrectomy on peak panel reactive antibody (PRA) levels, patient and graft survival in kidney re-transplants. From 1969 to 2006, a total of 609 kidney re-transplantations were performed at the University of Freiburg and the Campus Benjamin Franklin of the University of Berlin. Patients with PRA levels above (5%) before first kidney transplantation were excluded from further analysis (n = 304). Patients with graft nephrectomy (n = 245, NE+) were retrospectively compared to 60 kidney re-transplants without prior graft nephrectomy (NE-). Peak PRA levels between the first and the second transplantation were higher in patients undergoing graft nephrectomy (P = 0.098), whereas the last PRA levels before the second kidney transplantation did not differ between the groups. Age adjusted survival for the second kidney graft, censored for death with functioning graft, were comparable in both groups. Waiting time between first and second transplantation did not influence the graft survival significantly in the group that underwent nephrectomy. In contrast, patients without nephrectomy experienced better graft survival rates when re-transplantation was performed within one year after graft loss (P = 0.033). Age adjusted patient survival rates at 1 and 5 years were 94.1% and 86.3% vs 83.1% and 75.4% group NE+ and NE-, respectively (P PRA levels that normalize before kidney re-transplantation. In patients without nephrectomy of a non-viable kidney graft timing of re-transplantation significantly influences graft survival after a second transplantation. Most importantly, transplant nephrectomy is associated with a significantly longer patient survival.

  11. Post Kidney Transplant Tuberculosis in Nigeria: A Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Tuberculosis has been reported to be one of the most serious bacterial infections after transplant and occur up to 20 times more frequently in transplant recipients than in the general population. Renal transplant is available in few centers in the country and the post transplant population is increasing, but to our ...

  12. Diverticulitis occurs early after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Eric S; Khalil, Hassan A; Lin, Anne Y; Russell, Marcia; Ardehali, Abbas; Ross, David; Yoo, James

    2014-08-01

    Lung transplantation recipients are at an increased risk for developing diverticulitis. However, the incidence and natural history of diverticulitis have not been well characterized. Our objective was to identify patient and transplant-related factors that may be associated with an increased risk of developing diverticulitis in this patient population. This is a retrospective single institution study. All patients who received a lung transplant between May 2008 and July 2013 were evaluated using an existing lung transplantation database. Patient-related factors, the incidence and timing of diverticulitis, and outcomes of medical and surgical management were measured. Of the 314 patients who received a lung transplant, 14 patients (4.5%) developed diverticulitis. All episodes (100%) of diverticulitis occurred within the first 2 y after transplantation. Eight patients (57%) required surgery with a mortality rate of 12.5%. Six patients (43%) were managed medically and did not require surgery with a mean follow-up period of 442 d. Diverticulitis is common after lung transplantation and occurs with a higher incidence compared with the general population. Diverticulitis occurs early in the posttransplant period, and the majority of patients require surgery. Patients who respond promptly to medical treatment may not require elective resection. A greater awareness of the risk of diverticulitis in the early posttransplant period may allow for earlier diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Challenges in renal transplantation in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nono, Ibrahiem H; Telha, Khaled A; Al-Alimy, Gamil M; Ghilan, Abdulilah M; Abu Asba, Nagieb W; Al-Zkri, Abdo M; Al-Adimi, Abdulilah M; Al-Ba'adani, Tawfiq H

    2015-02-16

    Background Renal replacement therapy was first introduced in Yemen in 1978 in the form of hemodialysis. Twenty years later, the first renal transplantation was performed. Kidney transplantations were started in socially and financially challenging circumstances in Yemen in 1998. A structured program was established and has been functioning regularly since 2005. A pediatric transplantation program was started in 2011. Material and Methods This was a prospective study of 181 transplants performed at the Urology and Nephrology Center between May 1998 and 2012. All transplants were from living related donors. The immunosuppressive protocol consisted initially of double therapy with steroid and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Subsequently, triple therapy with addition of a calcineurin inhibitor was introduced. Primary graft function was achieved in 176 (97.2%) recipients. Results Cold ischemia time was 48-68 min. Episodes of acute rejection in 12 patients were treated with high-dose steroids. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was used in cases of vascular or steroid-resistant rejection in 2 patients. The post-transplant complications, either surgical or medical, were comparable to those recorded in the literature. Conclusions Renal transplantation is a good achievement in our country. The patients and graft survival rates are comparable to other reports.

  14. Intestinal parasitic infections in renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azami, Mehdi; Sharifi, Mehran; Hejazi, Sayed Hossein; Tazhibi, Mehdi

    2010-01-01

    The impact of intestinal parasitic infection in renal transplant recipients requires careful consideration in the developing world. However, there have been very few studies addressing this issue in Iran. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in renal transplant recipients in Iran. Stool specimens from renal transplant recipients and control groups were obtained between June 2006 and January 2007. The samples screened for intestinal parasitic infections using direct smear, formalin-ether sedimentation, Sheather's flotation and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining methods. Out of 150 renal transplant recipients, 33.3% (50), and out of 225 control group, 20% (45) were infected with one or more type of intestinal parasites. The parasites detected among patients included Entamoeba coli (10.6%), Endolimax nana (8.7%), Giardia lamblia (7.4%), Blastocystis spp. (4.7%), Iodamoeba butschlii (0.7%), Chilomastix mesnili (0.7%) and Ascaris lumbricoides (0.7%). Multiple infections were more common among renal transplant recipients group (p < 0.05). This study highlights the importance of testing for intestinal parasites among Iranian renal transplant recipients. Routine examinations of stool samples for parasites would significantly benefit the renal transplant recipients by contributing to reduce severe infections.

  15. Lung Cancer in Renal Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozicic Mirela

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although the incidence of malignancy has increased after solid organ transplantation, data on lung cancer in this group of patients is scarce. The aim of this study was to determine clinical characteristics and outcome of patients who developed lung cancer after renal transplantation. Methods. Among a cohort of 1658 patients who received a transplant at our institution and were followedup between 1973 and 2014, five patients developed lung cancer. We analyzed risk factors, transplantation characteristics, treatment options and survival. Results. Lung cancer was diagnosed in 5 patients (0.3%. Time to diagnosis after the transplant procedure ranged from 26 to 156 months (mean 115 months. All of them had a smoking history. Tumors were classified as IIB (20%, IIIA (40%, and IV (40%. Histological types included adenocarcinoma (80% and there was one case of sarcomatoid carcinoma (20%. One patient had concomitant thyroid papillary carcinoma. Radiotherapy was applied in 2 patients, 2 underwent chemotherapy (erlotinib and combination of carboplatinum and etopozide in one patient each, and 2 died within one month after the diagnosis from disseminated malignant disease. Patients with stage IIIA survived 14 and 24 months after the diagnosis. The patient with sarcomatoid cancer underwent thoracotomy with a complete resection, lost his graft function and died 7 months after the diagnosis. Conclusion. Lung cancer is relatively rare malignancy in renal transplant recipients, but associated with high mortality. Smoking is a significant risk factor, thus smoking cessation should be promoted among renal transplant recipients, as well as regular screening for lung cancer.

  16. Technical pearls for swine lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Ashkan; Cobb, Jessica A; Staples, Edward D; Baz, Maher A; Beaver, Thomas M

    2011-11-01

    Since the advent of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP), there has been increased focus on swine models of lung transplantation; however, the anatomic differences between human and swine lungs and the technical challenges in performing porcine lung transplantation are not well described in the surgical literature. Surgically important anatomic variations are described, and the technical measures taken to address them during harvest and transplantation are introduced. There are three surgically important anatomic variations in pigs. First, the right cranial lobe bronchus arises directly from the trachea, which makes right lung transplantation technically challenging if not prohibitive. Second, the left hemi-azygos vein is fully developed and courses upward through the posterior mediastinum, where it crosses the left pulmonary hilum and drains directly into the coronary sinus. During transplantation, this vein is ligated and dissected away to expose the underlying left pulmonary hilar structures. Third, the right inferior pulmonary vein crosses the midline to drain into the left atrium immediately adjacent to the left inferior pulmonary vein. During donor lung preparation, the right inferior pulmonary vein is ligated distally from the left atrium, which leaves an adequate atrial cuff around the left sided pulmonary veins for later anastomosis. Experimental porcine lung transplantation is technically demanding. We have found recognition of the above described anatomical differences and technical nuances facilitate transplantation and provide reproducible results. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Optical Coherence Tomography in Kidney Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Peter M.; Wierwille, Jeremiah; Chen, Yu

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with both high mortality rates and an enormous economic burden [1]. The preferred treatment option for ESRD that can extend patients' lives and improve their quality of life is kidney transplantation. However, organ shortages continue to pose a major problem in kidney transplantation. Most kidneys for transplantation come from heart-beating cadavers. Although non-heart-beating cadavers represent a potentially large pool of donor kidneys, these kidneys are not often used due to the unknown extent of damage to the renal tubules (i.e., acute tubular necrosis or "ATN") induced by ischemia (i.e., lack of blood flow). Also, ischemic insult suffered by kidneys awaiting transplantation frequently causes ATN that leads to varying degrees of delayed graft function (DGF) after transplantation. Finally, ATN represents a significant risk for eventual graft and patient survival [2, 3] and can be difficult to discern from rejection. In present clinical practice, there is no reliable real-time test to determine the viability of donor kidneys and whether or not donor kidneys might exhibit ATN. Therefore, there is a critical need for an objective and reliable real-time test to predict ATN to use these organs safely and utilize the donor pool optimally. In this review, we provided preliminary data indicating that OCT can be used to predict the post-transplant function of kidneys used in transplantation.

  18. [Urinary lithiasis in renal transplant recipient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branchereau, J; Thuret, R; Kleinclauss, F; Timsit, M-O

    2016-11-01

    To report epidemiology and characteristics of urinary lithiasis and its management in kidney allograft at the time of organ procurement or after kidney transplantation. An exhaustive systematic review of the scientific literature was performed in the Medline database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) and Embase (http://www.embase.com) using different associations of the following keywords (MESH): urinary lithiasis, stone, kidney transplantation. Publications obtained were selected based on methodology, language, date of publication (last 10 years) and relevance. Prospective and retrospective studies, in English or French, review articles; meta-analysis and guidelines were selected and analyzed. This search found 58 articles. After reading, 37 were included in the text based on their relevance. Frequency of urinary lithiasis in renal transplant recipient is similar to those observed in the general population. Generally, urinary lithiasis of the graft is asymptomatic because of renal denervation after organ procurement and transplantation. Nevertheless, this situation may be at high risk due to the immunosuppressed state of the recipient with a unique functioning kidney. Most of the time, the diagnosis is incidental during routine post-transplantation follow-up. Management of urolithiasis in renal transplant recipient is similar to that performed in general population. Due to its potential severity in transplanted immunosuppressed patients with a sole kidney, urolithiasis requires expert urological management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Obesity and urologic complications after renal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Heshmatzadeh Behzadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although obesity has been associated with improved survival on dialysis, its short-and long-term effects on renal transplantation outcomes remain unclear. Herein, we evaluate the short-term and intermediate long-term effects of obesity on first-time renal transplant patients. A retrospective analysis was performed on 180 consecutive renal transplant recipients from living unrelated donors during 2006-2008 in a major transplantation center in Tehran, Iran. Among these, 34 (18% patients were found to be obese (body mass index ≥30 kg/m 2 . Obese patients were more likely to develop post-transplant renal artery stenosis (RAS (17.6% vs. 2.8%, P <0.001, hematoma (47.9% vs. 17.6, P = 0.009, surgical wound complications (64.7% vs. 9.6%, P <0.001 and renal vein thrombosis (2% vs. 0%, P <0.001. However, the incidence of delayed graft function, lymphocele, urologic complications of ureterovesical junction stenosis or urinary leakage, surgical complications of excessive bleeding or renal artery thrombosis and duration of hospitalization were similar between the two groups. The two-year patient and graft survival were also statistically not different. Renal transplantation in obese recipients is associated with a higher incidence of post-transplant RAS, hematoma, surgical wound complications and renal vein thrombosis, but similar two-year patient and graft survival.

  20. Study of dermatoses in kidney transplant patients*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Alexandre Moretti; da Rocha, Sheila Pereira; Reis Filho, Eugênio Galdino de Mendonça; Eid, Danglades Resende Macedo; Reis, Carmelia Matos Santiago

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The increasing in the number of kidney transplant recipients has favored, more frequently than before, the emergence of dermatoses and warranted their study through subsequent publications. OBJECTIVES to evaluate the frequency of dermatoses in kidney transplant recipients. METHODS kidney transplant recipients with suspected dermatoses between March 1st 2009 and June 30th 2010. RESULTS 53 patients (28 males and 25 females), aged between 22 and 69 (mean age = 45 years) were evaluated. Most of them came from the cities of Ceilândia, Samambaia and São Sebastião/DF, and had already been transplanted for 5 to 10 years before (37.7%); 62.3% were recipients of living donors and 83% were prednisone-treated. The most prevalent dermatoses were of fungal (45.3%) and viral (39.6%) etiologies. Among the non-melanoma malignant neoplasms, the basal cell carcinoma prevailed (six cases), in spite of the low incidence. Concerning fungal dermatoses, 12 cases of onychomycosis, five of pityriasis versicolor and four of pityrosporum folliculitis were reported. For diagnosis, in most cases (64.2%), laboratory examinations (mycological and histopathological) were performed. CONCLUSION cutaneous manifestations in kidney transplant recipients are generally secondary to immunosuppression. The infectious dermatoses, especially those of fungal origin, are frequently found in kidney transplant recipients and their occurrence increases progressively according to the time elapsed from the transplantation, which makes follow-up important. PMID:23793196

  1. Intestinal parasitic infections in renal transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Azami

    Full Text Available The impact of intestinal parasitic infection in renal transplant recipients requires careful consideration in the developing world. However, there have been very few studies addressing this issue in Iran. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in renal transplant recipients in Iran. Stool specimens from renal transplant recipients and control groups were obtained between June 2006 and January 2007. The samples screened for intestinal parasitic infections using direct smear, formalin-ether sedimentation, Sheather's flotation and modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining methods. Out of 150 renal transplant recipients, 33.3% (50, and out of 225 control group, 20% (45 were infected with one or more type of intestinal parasites. The parasites detected among patients included Entamoeba coli (10.6%, Endolimax nana (8.7%, Giardia lamblia (7.4%, Blastocystis spp. (4.7%, Iodamoeba butschlii (0.7%, Chilomastix mesnili (0.7% and Ascaris lumbricoides (0.7%. Multiple infections were more common among renal transplant recipients group (p < 0.05. This study highlights the importance of testing for intestinal parasites among Iranian renal transplant recipients. Routine examinations of stool samples for parasites would significantly benefit the renal transplant recipients by contributing to reduce severe infections.

  2. [Characteristics of Postoperative Malignancies after Lung Transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Satona; Chen-Yoshikawa, Toyofumi F; Hijiya, Kyoko; Hamaji, Masatsugu; Motoyama, Hideki; Aoyama, Akihiko; Date, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Patients after lung transplantation are at risk for postoperative malignancy mainly due to postoperative immunosuppression. Skin cancer and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) are common in Western countries. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 120 patients undergoing lung transplantation between April 2002 and July 2015 at Kyoto University. Postoperative malignancy developed in 14 patients(11.7%):PTLD in 8, gastric cancer in 2, breast cancer in 1, glioblastoma in 1, lung cancer in 1, and adenocarcinoma of unknown primary in 1. Seven patients(11.3%)and 7 patients (12.1%)were after living-donor lung transplantation( LDLLT) and cadaveric lung transplantation (CLT), respectively (p=1.00). The overall 5-year survival of patients with postoperative malignancy was 39.3%, which tended to be worse (p=0.059), compared to those without postoperative malignancy(71.4%). All postoperative malignancies were de novo malignancies without any recurrence of original malignancies. Postoperative malignancies occurred after LDLLT as well as after CLT, and seemed to have a negative impact on long-term outcome of lung transplant recipients. The majority was PTLD;however, skin cancer was not recognized, suggesting ethnic differences. We should be careful about postoperative malignancies in follow-up of the lung transplant recipients.

  3. Heart transplantation at the Deutsches Herzzentrum Berlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemann, Nicola E; Huebler, Michael; Lehmkuhl, Hans; Potapov, Evgenij V; Hetzer, Roland

    2010-01-01

    The Deutsches Herzzentrum Berlin is one of the largest transplant centers in Germany with more than 1700 transplant procedures, more than 170 being procedures in children, in patients from the beginning of life to 71 years of age. Survival rates during the early and intermediate follow-up are lower than in international data; however, long-term survival at 15 years or more is similar. Discrepant survival rates derive mainly from the organ shortage that resulted in the development of a different allocation system in Germany as compared to North America and in the increasing number of patients undergoing the bridge-to-transplant concept to move the patient to transplantability. Thus, the patient at highest risk of death while on the waiting list, who according to the ISHLT registry is also the patient at highest risk of death early post-transplant, is the candidate most likely to undergo transplantation in Germany. Unfortunately, the myth persists of solving the donor organ shortage by increasing the "fairness" of organ allocation. Major goals of our transplant program are: the introduction of non-invasive cellular rejection screening with the intramyocardial electrogram (IMEG) and echocardiography; to characterize microvasculopathy in biopsy as a novel and easily diagnosed marker for poor prognosis; to identify Quilty as a determinant for poor prognosis; to propose classifications for microvasculopathy and epicardial vasculopathy that consider the diffuse character of the disease; and to provide insights into the therapeutic options and potential clinical benefits of novel immunosuppressive strategies.

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection following Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karima Boubaker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Aims. Post-transplant tuberculosis (TB is a problem in successful long-term outcome of renal transplantation recipients. Our objective was to describe the pattern and risk factors of TB infection and the prognosis in our transplant recipients. Patients and Methods. This study was a retrospective review of the records of 491 renal transplant recipients in our hospital during the period from January 1986 to December 2009. The demographic data, transplant characteristics, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, treatment protocol, and long-term outcome of this cohort of patients were analyzed. Results. 16 patients (3,2% developed post-transplant TB with a mean age of 32,5 ± 12,7 (range: 13–60 years and a mean post-transplant period of 36,6months (range: 12,3 months–15,9 years. The forms of the diseases were pulmonary in 10/16 (62,6%, disseminated in 3/16 (18,7%, and extrapulmonary in 3/16 (18,7%. Graft dysfunction was observed in 7 cases (43,7% with tissue-proof acute rejection in 3 cases and loss of the graft in 4 cases. Hepatotoxicity developed in 3 patients (18,7% during treatment. Recurrences were observed in 4 cases after early stop of treatment. Two patients (12.5% died. Conclusion. Extra pulmonary and disseminated tuberculosis were observed in third of our patients. More than 9months of treatment may be necessary to prevent recurrence.

  5. [Psychological evaluation of uterus transplantation trial participants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmel, Roman; Pastor, Zlatko; Nováčková, Marta; Matěcha, Jan; Čekal, Miloš; Zámečníková, Renata; Froněk, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Uterus transplantation is a life-giving and quality-of-life enhancing transplantation. Life with transplanted uterus is a transitional phase of life for both recipients and their partners. Six deliveries of healthy children from five transplanted mothers out of 9 uterus transplantations in Sweden may encourage untimely hopes of thousands of women with absolute uterine factor infertility worldwide. Psychological evaluation might be included into all trials regarding new treatment methods and treatment procedures. Main psychological issues connected with the infertility treatment in women with absent uterus are clearly defined (especially in vitro fertilization, uterus transplantation, compliance with immunosuppressive treatment, ultrasound examinations of uterine vascular perfusion, rejection signs surveillance, embryo transfer, pregnancy, cesarean section, preterm delivery risk, puerperium, hysterectomy and immunosuppressive treatment termination). The role of psychological evaluation of participants before the admission to complicated treatment process is to choose those who will be able to cope all mentioned difficulties and unexpected complications including potential failure of the whole treatment without serious negative impact on their psychological situation. Up to now experience with psychological stability of our 7 uterus recipients and 3 uterus living donors are good although post-transplant period is especially in recipients connected with everyday psychological adaptation on the significant life changes. We are aware that psychological evaluation of our study participants will require further 3 years of follow up with publication of our results.

  6. Lymphoproliferative disorders in Oxford renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, W D; Gray, D W R; Dada, M A; Chetty, R; Gatter, K C; Davies, D R; Morris, P J

    2003-06-01

    Increased cancer incidence, particularly lymphoproliferative disease, is a complication of immunosuppression in organ transplantation. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs) occur frequently during the first year after transplantation, more so in North America than in Europe. This study audited and correlated the demographic, clinical, pathological, and outcome features of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs) in a large centre in Oxford, and assessed whether the time of onset fitted more with the European or North American pattern. There were 1383 renal transplants in the study period and 27 patients developed lymphoma: 26 NHLs and one Hodgkin's disease (1.95%). Four of the patients never received cyclosporin. The mean time of diagnosis after transplant was 46 months. Most tumours (21/27) presented extranodally. Management included reduction of immunosuppression, surgical excision, antiviral treatment, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Three patients presented in the first post-transplant year-0.34% of cyclosporin managed patients-similar to the North American incidence, although the incidence of extranodal late PTLDs was also high (mean onset, 36 months v 15 months international mean). Post-transplant lymphomas were the most common malignancy associated with death in transplant patients. PTLDs occurred in 2% of renal transplant patients, presenting both in the first year in association with cyclosporin use, as in North America, but also in subsequent years, giving an overall presentation time later than the international mean. The disease usually presented extranodally, accounting for the wide range of symptoms and signs. Despite awareness and active management, the disease contributed to death in more that 50% of patients with PTLDs.

  7. Colon Biopsy Findings of Renal Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taştepe, Firdevs Zeynep; Özgün, Gonca; Özdemir, Binnaz Handan; Tepeoğlu, Merih; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate colonic pathologies in renal transplant recipients. Patients with colon biopsies were selected from 1816 renal transplant recipients from January 1990 to December 2012 at Baskent University Hospital (Ankara, Turkey). Demographic and clinical findings with colon biopsies were examined. There were 84 patients who had colon biopsies after renal transplant. There were 57 male and 27 female patients (median age at renal transplant was 33 y). Chronic diarrhea was the most common clinical finding at the time of colon biopsy. The median interval from renal transplant to first colon biopsy was 48.1 ± 47.5 months. On microscopic evaluation, there were no pathologic changes in 17 patients. The remaining 67 patients had colitis (38 patients), polyps (17 patients), cytomegalovirus colitis (8 patients), and amyloidosis (4 patients). The mean interval between transplant and the diagnosis of colitis was 49.08 ± 42.6 months, amyloidosis was 47.5 ± 79.28 months, cytomegalovirus colitis was 5 ± 3.5 months, and polyps was 77.65 ± 58.8 months. There was a statistically significant difference between biopsy diagnosis and the time interval between transplant and colon biopsy (P colonic biopsies, 40 patients never had acute rejection episodes and 44 patients had at least 1 acute rejection episode. Seven of 8 patients with cytomegalovirus colitis, 19 of 38 with colitis, 3 of 4 with amyloidosis, and 5 of 17 with polyps had acute rejection episodes. In our report on colonic manifestations in renal transplant recipients, the most common colonic lesion was noninfectious colitis. Cytomegalovirus colitis is an important infection that affects immunosuppressed individuals, such as transplant recipients. Cytomegalovirus must be kept in mind, and thorough sectioning and immunohistochemical sta ining should be used if necessary in the presence of any clinical or histologic suspicion for infective colitis.

  8. Post-transplantation Infections in Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arze, S; Arze, L; Abecia, C

    2016-03-01

    Over 26 years, we found 46 infectious episodes in 350 kidney transplant recipients. Fifteen were urinary tract infections, recurrent in 4 patients. There were 8 cytomegalovirus infections, three of them fatal when intravenous (IV) ganciclovir was not available. Seven patients had a reactivation of tuberculosis (TB) in the pleura, cervical spine, lumbar spine, knee, ankle, skin and peritoneum, respectively, and were all resolved satisfactorily with conventional anti-TB therapy. Three patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with the use of acyclovir developed an extensive herpes zoster infection in the 1st 6 months after transplantation, which was resolved with the use of oral acyclovir, and 1 had a disseminated herpes simplex infection resolved with the use of IV acyclovir. Three patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with trimethoprim sulfa developed Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in the 1st 6 months after transplantation, which was fatal in one of them. In 2 patients, we found a Nocardia infection, confined to the lung, which was cured in one of the cases and systemic and fatal in the other. Two patients transplanted before routine prophylaxis with the use of nystatin developed esophageal candidiasis in the 1st 6 months after transplantation. One patient developed infective endocarditis in a stenotic bicuspid aortic valve and died 10 years later after another incident of infective endocarditis at the prosthetic aortic valve. Two patients developed an extensive condyloma at the penis, perianal region, and perineum owing to human papillomavirus, requiring extensive surgical resection and podophyllin applications. Another patient developed fatal post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disease due to Epstein-Barr virus infection 15 years after transplantation. One patient developed a severe and fatal mucocutaneous leishmaniasis with no response to conventional antimonial therapy. It is interesting to note that despite Chagas disease being endemic

  9. Gender Disparity in Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghibi Orode

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Gender discrimination in benefiting from medical treatment is a worldwide pro-blem. Kidney transplantation, as the ideal treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD, is not an exception. Considering the unique kidney donation patterns and different family styles in the Middle East, studying this problem in Iran seemed justifiable and necessary. In addition to comparing the numbers of female and male recipients, which has been done in other similar studies, considering the critical effect of waiting time on the outcome, we assessed and compared the waiting times also. The data of age, gender, nationality, donor type and waiting time before transplantation of 1426 (61.85% male, 38.14% female recipients who underwent transplantation in Imam Reza Hospital in the northeast of Iran from 1990 to 2003, was analyzed. Recipients were categorised into three groups based on donation patterns: those receiving kidney from live unrelated, live related and cadaver donors. The number of patients in each group was 1057 (61.96% male, 38.03% female, 232 (67.24% male, 32.75% female and 137 (51.82% male, 48.17% female respectively. The mean overall waiting time was 708 days. Comparing waiting time of male and female recipients in each of these groups did not show significant difference. In all categories of donors, females were less likely than males to be recipients. Furthermore, waiting time for females was longer than males when receiving kidney from sisters and children. For spousal donations, males were recipients more frequently than females although female recipients in this group waited less than their male counterparts to receive the kidney. Generally, our results are in accordance with results of similar researches. In all three mentioned groups, males com-prised the majority while the waiting time does not show significant difference between genders. We suggest some reasons for this phenomenon, of which the two main ones are: fewer females

  10. [Cardiac transplantation in an extreme emergency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisance, D; Hillion, M L; Deleuze, P H; Dervanian, P; Dubois-Randé, J L; Tavolaro, O; Benvenuti, C; Lemaire, F; Castaigne, A; Cachera, J P

    1989-01-01

    Urgent cardiac transplantation in very unstable patients, kept alive in intensive care unit, is a significant (34 percent) part of the Henri-Mondor's transplantation program. Nineteen patients received a donor graft from january 1986 to october 1988. Sixteen were bridged pharmacologically as 5 received a mechanical bridge. Time on waiting list ranged from 12 to 21 days. Six patients died in the first post-operative month. Death was due to uncontrolled preoperative problems in 5, donor graft failure in one. The survival rate at one year was 52 percent, to be opposed to 76 percent in stable patients. These figures must be considered when selecting the priority of the transplantation candidates.

  11. Generic tacrolimus in solid organ transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taube, D; Jones, G; O'Beirne, J

    2014-01-01

    The availability of a wide range of immunosuppressive therapies has revolutionized the management of patients who have undergone solid organ transplantation (SOT). However, the cost of immunosuppressive drugs remains high. This situation has led to the development of generic equivalents, which...... innovator tacrolimus drug (Prograf) in both healthy volunteers and kidney transplant patients. Clinical experience with this generic tacrolimus formulation has also been established in both de novo and conversion patients who have undergone kidney and liver transplantation, as well as in conversion of other...

  12. Psychosocial and financial aspects of lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, T L; Aguiar, L J

    1996-09-01

    This article summarizes the many psychosocial phases a patient will encounter during his or her transplantation experience and the ways the social worker can assist during this time. These include supportive services such as facilitating support groups and orientation programs, counseling, and crisis intervention. Also of importance is the financing of lung transplantation and its many associated costs, such as immunosuppressive medications and temporary housing. With the rise in managed care, the role of the transplant financial coordinator is of increasing importance from both a fiscal perspective and customer service standpoint for both the patient and the institution.

  13. Successful twin pregnancy after orthotopic liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coelho Júlio Cezar Uili

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Report of a case of successful twin pregnancy following liver transplantation. PATIENT AND METHOD: A 42-year-old nulliparous-woman was subjected to an orthotopic liver transplantation due to Budd-Chiari syndrome. Sixteen months after the transplantation, an ultrasonography revealed twin pregnancy. Her prenatal course was uneventful, except for mild arterial hypertension. The immunosuppressive agents used during pregnancy were cyclosporine and prednisone. RESULT: The patient gave birth to two healthy girls at 37 weeks of gestation. The patient's postpartum course was uneventful with normal liver and renal function tests. CONCLUSION: Following successful pregnancy, women may become pregnant and give birth to normal children, including twins

  14. The role of BAL in lung transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Verleden

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Broncho-alveolar lavage is an important diagnostic instrument in lung transplantation. It can give insight into the mechanisms of acute and chronic rejection, but can also be of interest to explore the possible effects of new therapies. This has particularly been the case with azithromycin as add-on therapy for chronic rejection.Furthermore BAL after lung transplantation is important to differentiate between infection and rejection and the changes in the cellular profile may be of prognostic significance. Key-words: Broncho-alveolar lavage, lung transplantation, neutrophils

  15. Liver transplantation for erythropoietic protoporphyria in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlin, Staffan; Stal, Per; Adam, Rene

    2011-01-01

    Liver transplantation is an established lifesaving treatment for patients with severe protoporphyric liver disease, but disease recurrence in the graft occurs for the majority of recipients. Severe burn injuries may occur when protective light filters are not used with surgical luminaires. Motor...... the postoperative course for 5 of the 31 patients (16.1%). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was performed for 3 patients to prevent graft loss due to disease recurrence. Prognostic markers are needed to identify patients prone to severe protoporphyric liver disease so that curative stem cell transplantation...

  16. The role of marketing in transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Art

    2007-06-01

    Although marketing has a well-established role in healthcare, few publications on the role of marketing in transplantation exist. In addition, the field of organ transplantation presents some unique marketing challenges because of the limited availability of organs. Marketing is essential to the success of transplantation services. An effective market planning process includes several steps: an assessment of the current program; analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats; a competitive analysis; the identification of target audiences; setting of marketing goals, strategies, and tactics; and developing methods for tracking and evaluation. Two often overlooked needs are to assess readiness for marketing and internal marketing.

  17. [Current status of lung transplantation in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Hiroshi

    2010-12-01

    Between October 1998 and May 2010, 158 lung transplants were performed in seven centers in Japan. Living-donor lobar lung transplantation (LDLLT) has been performed more than cadaveric lung transplantation (CLT) because of the difficulty in obtaining brain dead donors (n = 93 versus n = 65). The indications were quite unique in Japan where idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension was the most common indication, followed by lymphangioleiomyomatosis, idiopathic interstitial pneumonia and bronchiolitis obliterans. The 5-year survival rate was 81.4% in LDLLT and 68.6% in CLT (p = 0.104), which were much better than world average.

  18. Magnetic resonance of the renal transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauquil, P.; Hiesse, C.; Say, C.; Verdier, J.P.; Cauquil, M.; Brunet, A.M.; Galindo, R.; Tessier, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for renal insufficiency. Progress of surgical techniques and immuno-suppression have lead to better results. One year graft survival rate are 80% in most series. In this article, the role of imaging in renal transplantation, is defined. In surgical complications (fluid collections, obstruction, vascular insufficiency) non invasive radiology and interventionnal radiologic procedures have a great impact. Despite the perspectives of duplex and magnetic resonance, sensibility and specificity are not yet specified in medical complications: rejection, acute tubular necrosis, infection, drug toxicity. Association of these lesions is frequent and complicate analysis of results. Finally, transplant biopsy is still necessary to confirm the diagnosis [fr

  19. Perception of Hair Transplant for Androgenetic Alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bater, Kristin L; Ishii, Masaru; Joseph, Andrew; Su, Peiyi; Nellis, Jason; Ishii, Lisa E

    2016-12-01

    Hair transplant is among the most common cosmetic services sought by men, with more than 11 000 procedures performed in 2014. Despite its growing popularity, the effect of hair transplant on societal perceptions of youth, attractiveness, or facets of workplace and social success is unknown. To determine whether hair transplant improves observer ratings of age, attractiveness, successfulness, and approachability in men treated for androgenetic alopecia and to quantify the effect of hair transplant on each of these domains. A randomized controlled experiment was conducted from November 10 to December 6, 2015, using web-based surveys featuring photographs of men before and after hair transplant. One hundred twenty-two participants recruited through various social media platforms successfully completed the survey. Observers were shown 2 side-by-side images of each man and asked to compare the image on the left with the one on the right. Of 13 pairs of images displayed, 7 men had undergone a hair transplant procedure and 6 had served as controls. Observers evaluated each photograph using various metrics, including age, attractiveness, successfulness, and approachability. A multivariate analysis of variance was performed to understand the effect of hair transplant on observer perceptions. Planned posthypothesis testing was used to identify which variables changed significantly as a result of the transplant. Observer ratings of age (in number of years younger) and attractiveness, successfulness, and approachability (on a scale of 0 to 100; scores higher than 50 indicate a positive change). Of the 122 participants in the survey, 58 were men (47.5%); mean (range) age was 27.1 (18-52) years. The initial multivariate analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant multivariate effect for transplant (Wilks λ = 0.9646; P hair transplant on observers' perceptions of age (mean [SD] number of years younger, 3.6 [2.9] years; P hair transplant. Participants also

  20. Dual kidney transplantation with organs from extended criteria cadaveric donors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    D'Arcy, Frank T

    2009-10-01

    The critical shortage of kidneys available for transplantation has led to alternate strategies to expand the pool. Transplantation of the 2 kidneys into a single recipient using organs suboptimal for single kidney transplantation was suggested. We assessed results in 24 grafts allocated for dual kidney transplantation vs those in a control group of 44 designated for single kidney transplantation. Each group underwent pretransplant biopsy and recipients were age matched.

  1. Xenotransplantation and the future of human organ transplants

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Owen; Cann, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    A shortage of organ donors has been an issue since the inception of human organ transplantation. Despite attempts to increase the number of donated organs, the demand for transplants now far exceeds the number of organs available for transplantation. This continuing deficit has questioned whether current sources of organs for human transplantation are currently still viable and importantly for the predicated future increases in demand. Improvements with transplantation over the past few decad...

  2. Infection in the bone marrow transplant recipient and role of the microbiology laboratory in clinical transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    LaRocco, M T; Burgert, S J

    1997-01-01

    Over the past quarter century, tremendous technological advances have been made in bone marrow and solid organ transplantation. Despite these advances, an enduring problem for the transplant recipient is infection. As immunosuppressive regimens have become more systematic, it is apparent that different pathogens affect the transplant recipient at different time points in the posttransplantation course, since they are influenced by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic factors. An understanding of ...

  3. Too poor for transplant: finance and insurance issues in transplant ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurentine, Kyle Alexander; Bramstedt, Katrina A

    2010-06-01

    Donor organs are a scarce gift. Additionally, transplantation is very expensive and the United States lacks universal health insurance for all citizens. These facts combine to make personal finance and insurance some of the criteria for wait listing at US transplant centers. Previous research has shown that the poor and the uninsured (as well as women and nonwhites) are less likely to receive a transplant. Living donor candidates are also limited by the US insurance system. To determine the effect of finance and insurance variables on access to transplant and living donation. A qualitative descriptive study of ethics consultation data contained in a research registry approved by the institutional review board at California Pacific Medical Center. This study analyzes research registry data from a large community hospital in Northern California that serves patients from California, Oregon, and Nevada. The registry data are derived from transplant ethics consultations occurring between January 1, 2007, and June 30, 2009. This study explores the restriction of access to transplantation and of participation in living donation. More than a quarter of all transplant ethics consultation reports described the restriction of transplant-related treatment for reasons rooted in finance or insurance. Individuals on the recipient side and on the donor side were hindered with regard to access. Insurance status and personal ability to pay significantly affect access to transplantation in the United States, and this theme is a frequent feature of ethics consultations at California Pacific Medical Center.

  4. Diabete Melito Pós-Transplante em Receptores de Transplante Renal

    OpenAIRE

    Batista Peres, Luís Alberto; Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná/Renalclin Oeste; Ann, Hi Kyung; Renalclin Oeste; Camargo, Maurício; Renalclin Oeste; Rohde, Noris; Renalclin Oeste; Uscocovich, Vanessa; Renalclin Oeste; Biela, Rubia Bethania; Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná

    2009-01-01

    O diabete melito pós-transplante (DMPT) é uma complicação relativamente comum e sua ocorrência está relacionada principalmente ao uso de imunossupressores. Avaliar a incidência de diabete melito após o transplante renal na região Oeste do Estado do Paraná. Estudamos retrospectivamente os prontuários de todos os pacientes submetidos à transplante renal em Cascavel-PR. Foram realizados 256 transplantes no período de 14/09/1985 a 30/04/2008, sendo 58 com doador falecido e 198 com doador vivo. Fo...

  5. Appraisal of transplant-related stressors, coping strategies, and psychosocial adjustment following kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanti, Renato; Lombardo, Caterina; Luszczynska, Aleksandra; Poli, Luca; Bennardi, Linda; Giordanengo, Luca; Berloco, Pasquale Bartolomeo; Violani, Cristiano

    2017-10-01

    This study examined the relations between appraisal of transplant-related stressors, coping, and adjustment dimensions following kidney transplantation (KT). Two models were tested: (1) the main effects model proposing that stress appraisal and coping strategies are directly associated with adjustment dimensions; and (2) the moderating model of stress proposing that each coping strategy interacts with stress appraisal. Importantly, there is a lack of research examining the two models simultaneously among recipients of solid organ transplantation. A total of 174 KT recipients completed the questionnaires. Predictors of post-transplant adjustment included appraisal of transplant-related stressors and coping strategies (task-, emotion-, and avoidance-focused). Adjustment dimensions were psychological distress, worries about the transplant, feelings of guilt, fear of disclosure of transplant, adherence, and responsibility for the functioning of the new organ. The main and moderating effects were tested with regression analyses. Appraisal of transplant-related stressors and emotion-oriented coping were related to all adjustment dimensions, except of adherence and responsibility. Task-oriented coping was positively related to responsibility. Avoidance-oriented coping was negatively correlated with adherence. Only 1 out of 18 hypothesized interactive terms was significant, yielding a synergistic interaction between appraisal of transplant-related stressors and emotion-oriented coping on the sense of guilt. The findings have the potential to inform interventions promoting psychosocial adjustment among KT recipients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The Swiss Transplant Cohort Study's framework for assessing lifelong psychosocial factors in solid-organ transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geest, Sabina; Burkhalter, Hanna; Berben, Lut; Bogert, Laura Jane; Denhaerynck, Kris; Glass, Tracy R; Goetzmann, Lutz; Kirsch, Monika; Kiss, Alexander; Koller, Michael T; Piot-Ziegler, Chantal; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno

    2013-09-01

    Understanding outcomes after transplant requires a biopsychosocial model that includes biomedical and psychosocial factors. The latter, to date, are assessed only in a limited way as part of transplant registries or cohort studies. The Swiss Transplant Cohort Study (STCS) is a nationwide open cohort study (starting May 2008) to systematically and prospectively assess psychosocial factors. This article describes the framework underpinning STCS's psychosocial assessment. The STCS framework was adapted from the multidimensional conceptual perspective of Dew et al to describe transplant psychosocial domains and specific outcomes by adding a time perspective, a system perspective, and interaction among domains. We propose a multidimensional, multilevel biopsychosocial framework representing mutually influencing domains from before to after transplant, and exemplify each domain by factors included in STCS and their measurement. The transplant patient, centrally positioned, is described by clinical and sociodemographic characteristics (eg, socioeconomic status, educational, professional, and relationship status). The following psychosocial domains further describe the patient: (1) physical/functional (eg, perceived health status, sleep quality, daytime sleepiness), (2) psychological (eg, depression, stress), (3) behavioral (eg, medication adherence, smoking, drug use, physical activity, sun protection), (4) social (eg, work capacity/return to work), and (5) global quality of life. Factors associated with health care system level (eg, trust in transplant team) are also included in the model. The STCS's psychosocial framework provides a basis for studying the interplay of biomedical, sociodemographic, psychosocial, behavioral, and health care system factors in view of transplant outcomes and therefore has the potential to guide biopsychosocial transplant research.

  7. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network/Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients 2014 Data Report: Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Junchao; Wu, Guosheng; Qing, Annie; Everly, Matthew; Cheng, Elaine; Terasaki, Paul

    2014-01-01

    As of September 19, 2014, 2441 cases of intestinal transplantation have been performed in 46 centers (2400 deceased, 41 living). Eight centers did more than 100 transplants. Annual case numbers peaked in 2007 (N = 198) and steadily decreased to 109 cases in 2013. Short gut syndrome (68%) and functional bowel problems (15%) are two major indications for intestinal transplantation. The 3 major types of transplants involving the intestine include: isolated intestine transplant (I); simultaneous intestine, liver, and pancreas transplant (I+L+P); and, combined intestine and liver (I+L) transplant. Graft survival has significantly improved in recent years, mainly due to improved first year graft survival. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year graft survivals were: 74%, 42%,and 26%, respectively (I); 70%, 50%, and 40%, respectively (I+L+P); and 61%, 46%, and 40%, respectively (I+L). The longest graft survivals for I, l+L+P, and l+L were 19 years, 16 years, and 23 years, respectively. Steroids, Thymoglobulin, and rituximab are 3 major induction agents used in recent years. Prograf, steroids, and Cellcept are 3 major maintenance agents. Induction recipients (68% of all patients) had a significantly lower acute rejection rate than nonrecipients before discharge (60% versus 75%, p transplants, while 6% (N = 29) received ABO compatible transplants. ABO identical transplant recipients had a significantly higher 5-year graft survival rate than ABO compatible recipients (39% versus 21%, p transplants were lower than those of ABO identical transplants. However, the difference did not reach statistical significance (46% versus 49%, p = 0.07). The effect of ABO compatibility on graft outcome was further confirmed by Cox Analysis. ABO incompatible transplants are still rarely performed (N = 4) in intestine. In conclusion, annual case numbers of intestinal transplants have been decreasing, regardless of improved graft survival. ABO compatible intestinal transplants previously had a significantly

  8. The Effect of Transplant Education on Nurses Attitudes Toward Organ Donation and Advocacy for Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Haley; Alexander, Susan; Frith, Karen H; Ng, Yeow Chye

    2017-06-01

    Nurses are the largest group of health-care professionals, yet they are not uniformly educated regarding transplantation and organ donation. The future of transplantation hinges on education of this group. Before meaningful studies can be conducted, an instrument to measure attitudes and commitment to organ transplantation is needed. The purpose of this study was to examine content and construct validity as well as establish internal reliability of an investigator-developed online instrument to measure nurses' attitudes and commitment to organ transplantation by registered nurses. The online instrument was administered to registered nurses enrolled in transplantation electives at the University of Alabama in Huntsville and Vanderbilt University. Exploratory factor analysis revealed 4 components with eigenvalues over 1.0. The components were as follows: (1) desire to work in transplantation, (2) confidence in transplantation advocacy, (3) organ donation advocacy, and (4) procurement. Internal consistency of the revised instrument was established (α = .94). The Transplant-Registered Nurse (TXP-RN) instrument is a new instrument with excellent reliability and validity that can be used to measure attitudes and knowledge of American nurses about organ donation and transplantation. This important step is necessary before educational interventions can be accurately assessed.

  9. PHENOMENON OF DEMIKHOV. "Transplantation of vital organs In experiment" (1960. Transplantation immunity, artifi cial circulation in organ transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Glyantsev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article (the fourth of five presents the analysis of the 4th and 5th chapters from V.P.Demikhov's monograph "Transplantation of vital organs in experiment" (MedGIz Publisher, Moscow, 1960, where he described his studies of transplantation immunity in originally created models and his use of artificial blood-circulation systems in experimental organ transplantation. It has been shown that V.P.Demikhov changed his views on the tissue biological incompatibility in homoplastic transplants and turned from the Michurin-Pavlov's concepts (1946–1953 to natural-scientific views (1959. Meanwhile, his multiple attempts to study both the morphological and humoral immunological response to transplanted organs did not give conclusive results because of lacking the experience of such studies even in the country's leading scientists and due the imperfection of their techniques. Realizing that the retrieval of a beating heart from a human would have created further problems for its subsequent transplantation, V.P. Demikhov attempted to reanimate human hearts in corpses by means of extracorporeal devices to provide artificial circulation. Methodologically, those devices were based on S.S.Bryukhonenko's research and his "auto-injector" pump modified by V.P.Demikhov. However, by 1960, those studies had not come beyond the experiments.

  10. MR surface coil imaging of kidney transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gansbeke, D. Van; Segebarth, C.; Toussaint, C.

    1987-01-01

    MR appearance of the kidney transplant is evaluated on a series of 80 examinations performed on a supraconductive unit operating at 0.5 T. Normal function kidneys displayed a clearly delineated corticomedullary differentiation (CMD); the ratio between the thickness of cortex and medulla didn't exceed 0.6. The same appearance was observed in non complicated acute tubular necrosis. Complete loss of CMD was the major finding in acute rejection (74% of the cases), but it was not specific as it was also observed in chronic rejection and in acute glomerulonephritis. Cortex thickening was helpful for the detection of rejected transplants with visible CMD. The sensitivity of MR in the detection of acute rejection was 94%. Specificity of MR findings for acute rejection depended on the transplant age: it varied from 100% for examinations performed during the first 3 months after transplantation, to less than 50% for examinations of the second year [fr

  11. PROLONGED MASSIVE POLYURIA AFTER RENAL TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Chernyavskiy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical case of prolonged massive polyuria in patient after renal transplantation is represented in this article. Polyuria lasted for a forty days after kidney transplantation, the larges amount of urine output was 55 litres per day. Analysis of transplant biopsy revealed acute tubular necrosis, initial arteriolosclerosis and suspected acute rejection. Doppler ultrasound study and perfusion scintigraphy detected no pathology. At first we tried to decrease the volume of infusion and fluid intake. Also we performed pulse therapy with methylprednisolone. However, these efforts were not effective. Using of a large doses of «Minerin» (posterior pituitary antidiuretic factor allowed to decrease and stabilize the volume of urine output. The patient was discharge from clinic on day 42 after transplantation

  12. When Your Child Needs a Liver Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about the months ahead may fill you with dread and worry. Fortunately, most liver transplants are successful. ... toxins, producing bile (which helps to break down food during digestion), and storing energy in the form ...

  13. [Cadaveric kidney transplantation: a model with limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardell Bergadà, Jordi

    2005-01-01

    The first successful kidney transplant in Spain was performed in 1965. It's been forty years already and currently Spain is the country with the highest cadaver donation rates worldwide. The so-called Spanish model of transplantation is well known for its organization and excellent results. These results are the consequence of a perfect network organization. Furthermore, the organ procurement organization--Organización Nacional de Trasplantes--, regional coordinators, national health system hospital network, hospital transplant coordinators, and all professionals involved in the process of donation and transplantation have perfectly well defined functions and work with the common objective of optimizing resources and making the most of the opportunities. Provided that one of the main characteristics of the Spanish model is the possibility of adaptation to the moments necessities, we proceed to review and evaluate it from its beginning to current days.

  14. New aspects in hair transplantation for females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsner, U E; Lucas, M W

    1995-07-01

    In the overall spectrum of plastic surgery, hair transplantation for females still plays a marginal role. Previously applied standard methods (standard grafts) could not produce aesthetically satisfying results, so that many female patients who could have benefitted from an operation were discouraged from doing so. It was not until the method of using minigrafts exclusively to cover large areas of androgenetic alopecia in men was developed that acceptable treatment possibilities were also made available to women. The main applications of hair transplantation for females are: androgenetic alopecia, hereditary changes in the hairline, traumatic alopecia, and cosmetic indications. Since 1986 all female patients were exclusively treated with mini- and micrografts in one to two or three sessions. Performing hair transplantation calls for a high degree of sensitivity on the part of the surgeon with respect to the woman and her expectations. With the mini- and micrograft technique new aspects in hair transplantation for females can be offered.

  15. Liver transplantation in polycystic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, Paul S; Hillingsø, Jens; Kirkegaard, Preben

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is a rare, hereditary, benign disorder. Hepatic failure is uncommon and symptoms are caused by mass effects leading to abdominal distension and pain. Liver transplantation (LTX) offers fully curative treatment, but there is still some controversy about....../kidney transplantation. One patient had undergone kidney transplantation 10 years earlier. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 55 months. One patient who underwent combined transplantation died after 5.4 months because of multiorgan failure after re-LTX, and one patient, with well-functioning grafts, died of lymphoma after 7...... months. At present 12 patients are alive, relieved of symptoms and with good graft function. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that patients treated for PLD by LTX have a good long-term prognosis and excellent relief of symptoms and that LTX might be considered in severe cases of PLD, where conventional surgery...

  16. Heart Transplantation - Spectral and Bispectral Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Toledo, E

    2001-01-01

    .... 25 recordings were obtained from 13 male HT patients at time after transplant (TAT) ranging 0.5-65 months. We observed an interesting evolution with TAT in heart rate response to active standing...

  17. Belatacept for Maintenance Immunosuppression in Lung Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Hui PharmD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Belatacept is a novel immunosuppressant that blocks a T-cell costimulation pathway and is approved for use in adult kidney transplant recipients. Its safety and efficacy have not been established after lung transplantation. We present a case of a lung transplant recipient treated with belatacept. A 56-year-old man underwent bilateral lung retransplantation for bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS. In the third year posttransplant, he developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS attributed to tacrolimus. Tacrolimus was changed to sirolimus. One month later, he presented with worsening renal function and HUS attributed to sirolimus. Plasmapheresis and steroid pulse were initiated with clinical improvement, and sirolimus was switched to belatacept. He experienced no episodes of cellular rejection but developed recurrent BOS. Complications during treatment included anemia and recurrent pneumonias. The safety and efficacy of belatacept in lung transplantation remains unclear; further studies are needed.

  18. Liver transplantation in polycystic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, Paul S; Hillingsø, Jens; Kirkegaard, Preben

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Polycystic liver disease (PLD) is a rare, hereditary, benign disorder. Hepatic failure is uncommon and symptoms are caused by mass effects leading to abdominal distension and pain. Liver transplantation (LTX) offers fully curative treatment, but there is still some controversy about...... whether it is a relevant modality considering the absence of liver failure, relative organ shortage, perioperative risks and lifelong immunosuppression. The purpose of this study was to review our experience of LTX for PLD and to compare the survival with the overall survival of patients who underwent LTX....../kidney transplantation. One patient had undergone kidney transplantation 10 years earlier. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 55 months. One patient who underwent combined transplantation died after 5.4 months because of multiorgan failure after re-LTX, and one patient, with well-functioning grafts, died of lymphoma after 7...

  19. Renal-sparing strategies in cardiac transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Ross, Heather J

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Renal dysfunction due to calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) toxicity is a major clinical problem in cardiac transplantation. The aim of the article is to review the efficacy and safety of various renal sparing strategies in cardiac transplantation. RECENT FINDINGS: Small studies have...... documented that late initiation of CNI is safe in patients treated with induction therapy at the time of transplantation. Use of mycophenolate is superior when compared with azathioprine to allow for CNI reduction. More substantial reduction in CNI levels is safe and effective with the introduction...... of sirolimus or everolimus. However, studies that use very early CNI discontinuation have found an increased risk of allograft rejection, and this strategy requires further study before it can be routinely recommended. CNI discontinuation late after cardiac transplantation seems more effective than CNI...

  20. Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... includes places like chicken coops and caves. Wear gloves when handling materials such as soil, moss, or ... Cell Transplant Recipients. MMWR 2000;49:1-128. Top of Page Related Links Fungal Meningitis National Center ...