WorldWideScience

Sample records for transplant medical community

  1. Trials and tribulations with electronic medication adherence monitoring in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison; Low, Jac Kee; Manias, Elizabeth; Dooley, Michael; Crawford, Kimberley

    2016-01-01

    Medication adherence in kidney transplantation is critical to prevent graft rejection. Testing interventions designed to support patients to take their prescribed medications following a kidney transplant require an accurate measure of medication adherence. In research, the available methods for measuring medication adherence include self-report, pill counts, prescription refill records, surrogate measures of medication adherence and medication bottles with a microchip-embedded cap to record bottle openings. Medication bottles with a microchip-embedded cap are currently regarded as the gold standard measure. This commentary outlines the challenges in measuring medication adherence using electronic medication monitoring of kidney transplant patients recruited from five sites. The challenges included obtaining unanimous stakeholder support for using this method, agreement on an index medication to measure, adequate preparation of the patient and training of pharmacy staff, and how to analyze data when periods of time were not recorded using the electronic adherence measure. Provision of this information will enable hospital and community pharmacists to implement approaches that promote the effective use of this adherence measure for optimal patient outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The transplant team's support of kidney transplant recipients to take their prescribed medications: a collective responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison; Low, Jac Kee; Manias, Elizabeth; Crawford, Kimberley

    2016-08-01

    To obtain an understanding of how health professionals support the kidney transplant patient to take their medications as prescribed long term. Kidney transplantation requires stringent adherence to complex medication regimens to prevent graft rejection and to maintain general well-being. Medication nonadherence is common in kidney transplantation, emerging in the first few months post-transplantation, leading to poor patient outcomes. Exploratory qualitative design. Five focus groups were conducted with a total of seven renal nurse transplant coordinators, two renal transplant nurse unit managers, seven nephrologists, seven pharmacists, four social workers, and one consumer representative representing all five hospitals offering adult kidney transplantation in Victoria, Australia in 2014. The views of two general practitioners who were unable to attend the focus groups were incorporated into the data set. All data underwent thematic analysis. Analysis revealed that adherence was a collective responsibility involving the whole of the transplant team and the patient via education blitz in hospital, identifying and managing nonadherence, promotion of self-advocacy, and the partnership between the patient and health professional. Patients were directed how to take their complex medications to be self-empowered, yet the partnership between the patient and health professional limited the patient's voice. Although medication adherence was a collective responsibility, communication was often one-way chiefly as a result of staffing and time constraints, hindering effective partnerships necessary for medication adherence. Expert skills in communication and adherence counselling are necessary to identify barriers affecting medication adherence. Patients need to be systematically screened, prepared and supported long-term within an accommodating healthcare system for the reality of caring for their transplanted kidney. Kidney transplant recipients require systematic

  3. Liver Transplant: Complications/Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Transplant: Complications/Medications Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For Veterans and the Public Veterans and the Public Home Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Hepatitis C Home Getting ...

  4. Transplant ethics under scrutiny - responsibilities of all medical professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trey, Torsten; Caplan, Arthur L; Lavee, Jacob

    2013-02-01

    In this text, we present and elaborate ethical challenges in transplant medicine related to organ procurement and organ distribution, together with measures to solve such challenges. Based on internationally acknowledged ethical standards, we looked at cases of organ procurement and distribution practices that deviated from such ethical standards. One form of organ procurement is known as commercial organ trafficking, while in China the organ procurement is mostly based on executing prisoners, including killing of detained Falun Gong practitioners for their organs. Efforts from within the medical community as well as from governments have contributed to provide solutions to uphold ethical standards in medicine. The medical profession has the responsibility to actively promote ethical guidelines in medicine to prevent a decay of ethical standards and to ensure best medical practices.

  5. Medication-taking among adult renal transplant recipients: barriers and strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Elisa J.; Gallant, Mary; Sehgal, Ashwini R.; Conti, David; Siminoff, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    Medication adherence is essential for the survival of kidney grafts, however, the complexity of the medication-taking regimen makes adherence difficult. Little is known about barriers to medication-taking and strategies to foster medication-taking. This cross-sectional study involved semi-structured interviews with 82 kidney transplant recipients approximately 2 months post-transplant on medication-related adherence, barriers to medication-taking, and strategies to foster medication-taking. A...

  6. Medical crowdfunding for organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Wesley M; Peters, Jillian L; Eltorai, Adam E M; Kalagara, Saisanjana; Osband, Adena J; Daniels, Alan H

    2018-04-23

    An increasing number of patients and families are utilizing online crowdfunding to support their medical expenses related to organ transplantation. The factors influencing the success of crowdfunding campaigns are poorly understood. Crowdfunding campaigns were abstracted from a popular crowdfunding web site. Campaigns were included if they were actively accepting donations to fund medical expenses related to transplantation of selected organs. The primary outcome measure was total amount raised among successful campaigns receiving at least one donation. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed on various campaign characteristics. A total of 850 campaigns were analyzed. Kidney transplant campaigns were most common (40.5%), followed by liver (33.3%), lung (12.2%), heart (11.3%), and multiorgan (2.7%). 69.1% of campaigns received any donation, and among these, the mean amount raised was $3664 (median $1175). The following factors were significantly associated with amount raised: more positive emotional sentiment in the campaign description (+2.6% per AFINN unit, P < .001), longer campaign description length (+2.4% per 100 characters, P = .001), higher goal amount (+0.6% per $1000 of goal amount, P = .004), and third-person description perspective (+131% vs first person, P < .001). Physicians will likely encounter medical crowdfunding with increasing frequency as it continues to grow in popularity among their patients. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Twitter Use in the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sagar S; Majhail, Navneet S

    2018-02-01

    Social media has revolutionized the access and exchange of information in healthcare. The microblogging platform Twitter has been used by blood and marrow transplant physicians over the last several years with increasing enthusiasm. We review the adoption of Twitter in the transplant community and its implications on clinical care, education, and research. Twitter allows instantaneous access to the latest research publications, developments at national and international meetings, networking with colleagues, participation in advocacy, and promoting available clinical trials. Additionally, Twitter serves as a gateway for resources dedicated to education and support for patients undergoing transplantation. We demonstrate the utilization and various applications in using Twitter among hematopoietic cell transplant healthcare professionals, patients, and other affiliated stakeholders. Professionalism concerns with clinician use of such social media platforms, however, also exist. Overall, Twitter has enhanced and increased the opportunities for engagement in the transplant community.

  8. Transplant ethics under scrutiny – responsibilities of all medical professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trey, Torsten; Caplan, Arthur L.; Lavee, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    In this text, we present and elaborate ethical challenges in transplant medicine related to organ procurement and organ distribution, together with measures to solve such challenges. Based on internationally acknowledged ethical standards, we looked at cases of organ procurement and distribution practices that deviated from such ethical standards. One form of organ procurement is known as commercial organ trafficking, while in China the organ procurement is mostly based on executing prisoners, including killing of detained Falun Gong practitioners for their organs. Efforts from within the medical community as well as from governments have contributed to provide solutions to uphold ethical standards in medicine. The medical profession has the responsibility to actively promote ethical guidelines in medicine to prevent a decay of ethical standards and to ensure best medical practices. PMID:23444249

  9. Emotional functioning, barriers, and medication adherence in pediatric transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick King, Megan L; Mee, Laura L; Gutiérrez-Colina, Ana M; Eaton, Cyd K; Lee, Jennifer L; Blount, Ronald L

    2014-04-01

    This study assessed relationships among internalizing symptoms, barriers to medication adherence, and medication adherence in adolescents with solid organ transplants. The sample included 72 adolescents who had received solid organ transplants. Multiple mediator models were tested via bootstrapping methods. Bivariate correlations revealed significant relationships between barriers and internalizing symptoms of depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress, as well as between internalizing symptoms and medication adherence. Barriers indicative of adaptation to the medication regimen (e.g., forgetting, lack of organization) were related to medication adherence and mediated the relationship between internalizing symptoms and medication adherence. These findings indicate that barriers may serve as a more specific factor in the relationship between more general, pervasive internalizing symptoms and medication adherence. Results may help guide areas for clinical assessment, and the focus of interventions for adolescent transplant recipients who are experiencing internalizing symptoms and/or who are nonadherent to their medication regimen.

  10. Predictive patterns of early medication adherence in renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevins, Thomas E; Robiner, William N; Thomas, William

    2014-10-27

    Patients' adherence with posttransplant immunosuppression is known to affect renal transplant outcomes. Prospectively, individual medication adherence patterns in 195 kidney transplant recipients were quantified with electronic medication monitors. Monitored drugs were mycophenolate mofetil, sirolimus, or azathioprine. Monitoring began at hospital discharge and continued an average of 15±8 months. Patient follow-up for clinical outcomes averaged 8±3 years. Each month's adherence percentage was calculated as the sum of daily adherence percents, divided by the number of evaluable days. During the first 3 months after transplantation, patients (n=44) with declining medication adherence, defined as dropping by 7% or higher (equal to missing 2 days) between months 1 and 2, later experienced lower mean medication adherence for months 6 to 12, 73% versus 92% respectively (Padherence, they also had more frequent (P=0.034) and earlier (P=0.065) acute rejection episodes. This was additionally associated with more frequent (P=0.017) and earlier (P=0.046) death-censored graft loss.In addition, daily medication adherence, expressed as the percentage of doses taken, decreased as the number of prescribed daily doses increased. During the first 3 months after transplantation, adherence with four doses per day averaged 84%, compared to 91% for patients on twice-daily dosing (P=0.024) and 93.5% for patients on once-daily dosing (P=0.008). Early declining medication nonadherence is associated with adverse clinical outcomes. This pattern is detectable during the first 2 months after transplantation. Early detection of nonadherence provides opportunities to target interventions toward patients at the highest risk for adverse behaviors and events.

  11. Nephrologists' management of patient medications in kidney transplantation: results of an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Kimberley; Low, Jac Kee; Manias, Elizabeth; Walker, Rowan; Toussaint, Nigel D; Mulley, William; Dooley, Michael; Ierino, Francesco L; Hughes, Peter; Goodman, David J; Williams, Allison

    2015-10-01

    Medication adherence is essential in kidney transplant recipients to reduce the risk of rejection and subsequent allograft loss. The aim of this study was to delineate what 'usual care' entails, in relation to medication management, for adult kidney transplant recipients. An online survey was developed to explore how nephrologists promote and assess medication adherence, the management of prescriptions, the frequency of clinic appointments and the frequency of clinical screening tests. Nephrologists from all acute kidney transplant units in Victoria, Australia, were invited to participate. Data were collected between May and June 2014. Of 60 nephrologists invited to participate, 22 completed the survey (response rate of 36.6%). Respondents had a mean age of 49.1 ± 10.1 years, with a mean of 20.1 ± 9.9 years working in nephrology and 14 were men. Descriptive analysis of responses showed that nephrologists performed frequent screening for kidney graft dysfunction that may indicate medication non-adherence, maintained regular transplant clinic visits with patients and emphasized the importance of medication education. However, time constraints during consultations impacted on extensive patient education and the long-term medication follow-up support was often delivered by the renal transplant nurse coordinator or pharmacist. This study highlighted that nephrologists took an active approach in the medication management of kidney transplant recipients, which may assist with facilitating long-term graft survival. Ultimately, promoting medication adherence needs to be patient centred, involving an interdisciplinary team of nephrologists, pharmacists and renal transplant nurse coordinators, working together with the patient to establish optimal adherence. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Prevalence and correlates of medication non-adherence among kidney transplant recipients more than 6 months post-transplant: a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Francis L; Chandwani, Sheenu; Kurtyka, Karen M; Zacker, Christopher; Chisholm-Burns, Marie A; Demissie, Kitaw

    2013-01-01

    Background Among kidney transplant recipients, non-adherence with immunosuppressive medications frequently precedes allograft loss. We sought to determine the prevalence and correlates of medication non-adherence among kidney transplant recipients. Methods We performed a single-center, cross-sectional study of kidney transplant recipients who were at least 6 months post-transplant. We measured self-reported adherence using the Immunosuppressive Therapy Adherence Scale (ITAS, which is scored f...

  13. Pharmacist's Role in Improving Medication Adherence in Transplant Recipients With Comorbid Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorassani, Farah; Tellier, Shannon; Tsapepas, Demetra

    2018-01-01

    Medication nonadherence rates are high in both the transplant and psychiatric populations. The consequence of medication nonadherence posttransplant is graft rejection and psychiatric decompensation, highlighting the importance of optimizing adherence to medication regimens. Pharmacists may work with transplant patients with psychiatric comorbidity to improve medication adherence through identifying patient-specific barriers and recommending an appropriate intervention. Multiple evidence-based practices for improving nonadherence have been detailed in the transplant and psychiatric population. Medication adherence aids, medication management, patient education, and motivational interviewing are all strategies that may be used to improve adherence. Selecting which interventions to make will be based on the reasons for a patient's nonadherence. Most patients benefit from medication management, patient education, and medication adherence aids. Selection of medication adherence aids may be based on patient demographics, technology literacy, and preference. Motivational interviewing may be considered in patients with intentional nonadherence relating to a lack of insight into their illness or the importance of taking medication. Pharmacists may promote adherence and potentially improve patient outcomes in transplant recipients with comorbid psychiatric disorders through assisting patients with designing a tailored medication adherence plan.

  14. Medication Adherence After Renal Transplantation-a Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebafka, Anne

    2016-12-01

    Whether or not patients follow the advice given by their healthcare professional is commonly referred to as adherence. In the case of kidney transplantation, transplant recipients need to take immunosuppressive drugs on a regular basis to prevent rejection of their transplant. However, medication adherence can be problematic for many patients. This critical appraisal of evidence aimed to gain insights into factors contributing to adherence and non-adherence in recipients of kidney transplants, and to explore patients' perceptions regarding adherence to immunosuppression. A comprehensive literature search was performed using Medline, PsycInfo, the Joanna Briggs Institute, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library. Included were primary research studies or reviews of primary research, independent of their research paradigms, on adult kidney or kidney/pancreas transplant recipients published in English or German. Children or adolescents were not considered. No time-frame was applied RESULTS: Fifty-two papers were included in the review. All extracted findings of included papers were organised according to the five factors influencing medication-taking behaviour as defined by the World Health Organisation: social and economic factors; therapy-related factors; patient-related factors; condition-related factors; healthcare team and system-related factors. Reasons for non-adherence after kidney transplantations are diverse. Attention is attracted by the fact that potentially modifiable factors such as social support, experiences on dialysis, side effects, features of the treatment regimen, intentions and beliefs, forgetfulness and mental health issues play a greater role than other factors in the development of medication non-adherence. Factors not related to patient characteristics seem to be under researched. © 2016 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  15. Nuclear medical investigations of renal transplants in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chocholka, T.G.K.

    1981-01-01

    Within the frame of this study it was investigated if it is possible - by means of nuclear medicine - to assess transplant function after xenogenic (heterologic) renal transplantation, to early diagnose complications and to observe organ function in follow-up examinations. The examination comprised camera-function-scintiscanning (=CFS), i.e. camera-sequence-scintiscanning (=CSS) and radio-isotope-nephrography (=RING), and the clearance measurement, which were carried out in parallel, as one operation. The clearance measurement based on tissue activity decrease graphs, which were registered by means of a body probe. Hippuran iodine 131 was used as radiopharmaceutical which usually is eliminated by the kidneys. In 112 examinations 33 dogs, who had received a fox kidney transplant, were investigated, starting on the day of surgical intervention until the transplant dysfunction was confirmed. These dogs had been treated in advance with immunosuppressive agents: a control group of 8 dogs, who received renal transplants of dingos, were not treated with immunosuppressants. The CFS as simultaneous realisation of CSS and of RING and the clearance measurement by means of hippuran iodine 131 achieved the examination aims. CSS permitted a sufficient survey over the individual functional phases. RING allows the early diagnosis of complications due to transplantation. The nuclear medical findings of camera-functional-scintiscanning and of clearance measurement show correspondence and they correspond also well to those findings resulting from traditional examination techniques which were applied in parallel. This procedure distinguishes itself not only by the diagnostic liability of nuclear medical examination methods, but also by its uncomplicated application, which permits the careful treatment of the dogs. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Attitudes to Medication after Kidney Transplantation and Their Association with Medication Adherence and Graft Survival: A 2-Year Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam Tielen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Nonadherence to medication is a common problem after kidney transplantation. The aim of this study was to explore attitudes towards medication, adherence, and the relationship with clinical outcomes. Method. Kidney recipients participated in a Q-methodological study 6 weeks after transplantation. As a measure of medication adherence, respondents completed the Basel Assessment of Adherence to Immunosuppressive Medications Scale (BAASIS©-interview. Moreover, the intrapatient variability in the pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus was calculated, which measures stability of drug intake. Data on graft survival was retrieved from patient records up to 2 years after transplantation. Results. 113 renal transplant recipients (19–75 years old participated in the study. Results revealed three attitudes towards medication adherence—attitude 1: “confident and accurate,” attitude 2: “concerned and vigilant,” and attitude 3: “appearance oriented and assertive.” We found association of attitudes with intrapatient variability in pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus, but not with self-reported nonadherence or graft survival. However, self-reported nonadherence immediately after transplantation was associated with lower two-year graft survival. Conclusion. These preliminary findings suggest that nonadherence shortly after kidney transplantation may be a risk factor for lower graft survival in the years to follow. The attitudes to medication were not a risk factor.

  17. Medication Adherence in Kidney Transplant Recipients in an Urban Indian Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, U R; Taraphder, A; Hazra, A; Das, T

    2017-01-01

    Medication nonadherence is a known problem after renal transplantation and can vary from one setting to another. Since it can lead to negative outcomes, it is important to develop intervention strategies to enhance adherence in a given setting using determinants identified through exploratory studies. We explored nonadherence in renal transplant recipients. A longitudinal survey was done with adult renal transplant recipients at a tertiary care public and two private hospitals of Kolkata. Subjects were followed-up for 1 year. After screening for medication adherence status by the four-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, those admitting to potential nonadherence were probed further. A patient was deemed to be nonadherent if failing to take medicines on appointed time (doses missed or delayed by more than 2 h) more than three times in any month during the observation period. A pretested questionnaire was used to explore potential determinants of nonadherence. Data of 153 patients recruited over a 2-year were analyzed. The extent of nonadherence with immunosuppressant regimens was about 31% overall; 44% in the public sector and 19% in the private sector ( P transplant recipients in the Indian setting. Strategies to improve medication adherence can be planned by relevant stakeholders on the basis of these findings.

  18. Awareness on organ transplantation among health care professionals and medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahedul Karim Ahmad

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This cross sectional study was conducted in different medical college hospitals of Dhaka city during the months of Jan-March 2009. The objective of this study was to find out the awareness level on organ transplantation amongst the teachers, doctors and nurses working in these medical college hospitals and 1st to 5th year students. A structured questionnaire was given to the respondents. The total number of respondents was 462 of which 103 (22.3% were doctors, 268 (58% were medical students and 91 (19.7% were nurses. Among the study group 31.4% knew that there was an organ transplantation law in Bangladesh and 16.5% said that there was no such law whereas 52.2% had no idea whatsoever about the law. Of the respondents 33.8% were willing to donate their organs after death, 41.6% did not want to donate and 24.2% were not sure. This study revealed that there was a lack of understanding regarding the religious views on organ transplantation. Only 37.1% of respondents thought that were was no religious objection to organ transplantation whereas 27.1% felt that there was religious objection while 35.7% were not sure. The study shows that there is significant lack of awareness regarding organ transplantation issues among the health care professionals and medical students in Bangladesh. The dictates of religion on this matter were also not clear to most of the respondents. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2009; 3(2: 55-58

  19. Too poor for transplant: finance and insurance issues in transplant ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurentine, Kyle Alexander; Bramstedt, Katrina A

    2010-06-01

    Donor organs are a scarce gift. Additionally, transplantation is very expensive and the United States lacks universal health insurance for all citizens. These facts combine to make personal finance and insurance some of the criteria for wait listing at US transplant centers. Previous research has shown that the poor and the uninsured (as well as women and nonwhites) are less likely to receive a transplant. Living donor candidates are also limited by the US insurance system. To determine the effect of finance and insurance variables on access to transplant and living donation. A qualitative descriptive study of ethics consultation data contained in a research registry approved by the institutional review board at California Pacific Medical Center. This study analyzes research registry data from a large community hospital in Northern California that serves patients from California, Oregon, and Nevada. The registry data are derived from transplant ethics consultations occurring between January 1, 2007, and June 30, 2009. This study explores the restriction of access to transplantation and of participation in living donation. More than a quarter of all transplant ethics consultation reports described the restriction of transplant-related treatment for reasons rooted in finance or insurance. Individuals on the recipient side and on the donor side were hindered with regard to access. Insurance status and personal ability to pay significantly affect access to transplantation in the United States, and this theme is a frequent feature of ethics consultations at California Pacific Medical Center.

  20. Family strategies for achieving medication adherence in pediatric kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingerski, Lisa; Perrazo, Lauren; Goebel, Jens; Pai, Ahna L H

    2011-01-01

    Although nonadherence is well documented and strategies for adherence have been shown to be critical to overcoming barriers and improving overall adherence rates, it is unknown how family strategy use is related to adherence in the pediatric renal transplant population. The aims of this study were to assess (a) the strategies used by adolescents with kidney transplants and their caregivers to adhere to the posttransplant oral medication regimen and (b) the relationship of these strategies to objective adherence rates. Semistructured interviews to assess self-management were administered to 17 adolescents (14-18 years) and 17 caregivers. Adherence to oral immunosuppressant medication, measured via electronic monitors, was determined also for a subset of 13 dyads. Common strategies endorsed by families included the following: making it part of the routine (88.2%), verbal reminders by caregiver (82.4%), caregiver verifying medication was taken (76.5%), placing medication in a convenient location (76.5%), and using a pillbox (70.6%). A greater number of family-endorsed strategies were correlated with higher levels of adherence. Of those strategies spontaneously endorsed, only caregiver reminders to take medication and caregiver verification that medications were taken were related significantly to higher adherence rates. The findings highlight the importance of identification and use of specific strategies to improve adherence rates of pediatric renal transplant recipients and emphasize the need for continued caregiver involvement in the promotion of adherence to the treatment regimen.

  1. Symptom Experience Associated With Immunosuppressive Medications in Chinese Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Sha; Zhang, Shuping; Zhang, Wenxin; Lin, Xiaohong; Shang, Yabin; Peng, Xiao; Liu, Hongxia

    2015-09-01

    Kidney transplant recipients require lifelong treatment with immunosuppressive medications to avoid graft rejection and graft loss. Symptoms experienced may influence recipients' perceived quality of life and medication adherence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the symptom experience associated with immunosuppressive medications in adult kidney transplant recipients and to explore the association between the symptom experience and adherence to immunosuppressive medications. A cross-sectional design was used. The study was conducted in a general hospital in China from October 2013 to September 2014. A total of 231 recipients with a follow-up of at least 1 year after kidney transplantation were included. Symptom experience associated with immunosuppressive medications was measured by the 13-item Symptom Experience of Immunosuppressive-related Side Effects Scale. Self-reported adherence to immunosuppressive medications was assessed using the Adherence with Immunosuppressive Medication Scale. Ridit analysis was used to rank symptom distress items. A proportion of 60.6% of recipients were male; the time after kidney transplantation was arbitrarily divided into a short-term cohort (1-4 years) and a long-term cohort (4-16 years) according to the median duration of follow-up (4 years). High blood pressure, hair loss, and tiredness were the three most distressing symptoms over all items of the whole sample. High blood pressure was the most distressing symptom for the 1- to 4-year cohort and the 4- to 16-year cohort. For men high blood pressure was the most distressing symptom, whereas for women hair loss was the most distressing symptom. Recipients in the 4- to 16-year cohort perceived a higher level of symptom distress compared with those in the 1- to 4-year cohort, especially in excess hair growth and difficulty sleeping. A negative relationship was found between symptom distress and adherence to immunosuppressive medications (r = -.541, p = .000). Recipients

  2. Psychosocial aspects of medication nonadherence after kidney transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Moors-Tielen (Mirjam)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ Patients have to take immunosuppressive medication after kidney transplantation to prevent rejection of the graft. This thesis investigated patients’ adherence behavior, attitudes and beliefs about the immunosuppressive regime. The research questions were (1) What is

  3. Non-adherence to immunosuppressive medications in kidney transplantation: intent vs. forgetfulness and clinical markers of medication intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griva, Konstadina; Davenport, Andrew; Harrison, Michael; Newman, Stanton P

    2012-08-01

    Although adherence to immunosupressive medication after transplantation is important to maximize good clinical outcomes it remains suboptimal and not well-understood. The purpose of this study was to examine intentional and unintentional non-adherence to immunosuppression medication in kidney transplant patients. A cross-sectional sample of N=218 patients [49.6 ± 12.3 years] recruited in London, UK (1999-2002) completed measures of medication beliefs, quality-of-life, depression, and transplantation-specific emotions. Adherence was measured with self-report and serial immunosuppressive assays. Intentional non-adherence was low (13.8 %) yet 62.4 % admitted unintentional non-adherence and 25.4 % had sub-target immunosuppressive levels. The risk of sub-target serum immunosuppressive levels was greater for patients admitting unintentional non-adherence (OR=8.4; p=0.004). Dialysis vintage, doubts about necessity, and lower worry about viability of graft explained R(2)=16.1 to 36 % of self-report non-adherence. Depression was related only to intentional non-adherence. Non-adherence is common in kidney transplantation. Efforts to increase adherence should be implemented by targeting necessity beliefs, monitoring depression, and promoting strategies to decrease forgetfulness.

  4. Medication understanding, non-adherence, and clinical outcomes among adult kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzer, Rachel E; Serper, Marina; Reese, Peter P; Przytula, Kamila; Koval, Rachel; Ladner, Daniela P; Levitsky, Josh M; Abecassis, Michael M; Wolf, Michael S

    2016-10-01

    We sought to evaluate the prevalence of medication understanding and non-adherence of entire drug regimens among kidney transplantation (KT) recipients and to examine associations of these exposures with clinical outcomes. Structured, in-person interviews were conducted with 99 adult KT recipients between 2011 and 2012 at two transplant centers in Chicago, IL; and Atlanta, GA. Nearly, one-quarter (24%) of participants had limited literacy as measured by the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine test; patients took a mean of 10 (SD=4) medications and 32% had a medication change within the last month. On average, patients knew what 91% of their medications were for (self-report) and demonstrated proper dosing (via observed demonstration) for 83% of medications. Overall, 35% were non-adherent based on either self-report or tacrolimus level. In multivariable analyses, fewer months since transplant and limited literacy were associated with non-adherence (all Padherence, and hospitalization could help target appropriate self-care interventions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Medication adherence in kidney transplant recipients in an urban Indian setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U R Adhikari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Medication nonadherence is a known problem after renal transplantation and can vary from one setting to another. Since it can lead to negative outcomes, it is important to develop intervention strategies to enhance adherence in a given setting using determinants identified through exploratory studies. We explored nonadherence in renal transplant recipients. A longitudinal survey was done with adult renal transplant recipients at a tertiary care public and two private hospitals of Kolkata. Subjects were followed-up for 1 year. After screening for medication adherence status by the four-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, those admitting to potential nonadherence were probed further. A patient was deemed to be nonadherent if failing to take medicines on appointed time (doses missed or delayed by more than 2 h more than three times in any month during the observation period. A pretested questionnaire was used to explore potential determinants of nonadherence. Data of 153 patients recruited over a 2-year were analyzed. The extent of nonadherence with immunosuppressant regimens was about 31% overall; 44% in the public sector and 19% in the private sector (P < 0.001. Nonadherence with other medication was around 19% in both the sectors. Several potential demographic, socioeconomic and psychosocial determinants of nonadherence were identified on univariate analysis. However, logistic regression analysis singled out only the economic status. This study had updated the issue of nonadherence in renal transplant recipients in the Indian setting. Strategies to improve medication adherence can be planned by relevant stakeholders on the basis of these findings.

  6. Attitudes towards medication non-adherence in elderly kidney transplant patients: A Q methodology study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Moors-Tielen (Mirjam); N.J.A. van Exel (Job); M.C. Buren; L. Maasdam; W. Weimar (Willem)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Non-adherence to the post-transplant regime is a common problem in kidney transplant patients and may lead to rejection or even graft failure. This study investigated attitudes towards the post-transplant regime of immunosuppressive medication among the ever growing

  7. Renal Transplant Recipients: The Factors Related to Immunosuppressive Medication Adherence Based on the Health Belief Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Pen-Chen; Yeh, Mei Chang; Lai, Ming-Kuen; Liu, Hsueh-Erh

    2017-10-01

    Kidney transplant failures are caused primarily by lack of adherence to immunosuppressive medication regimens by patients after transplantation. A number of studies have indicated that health-related beliefs are an effective predictor of health-related behavior. The aim of this study is to understand the influence of the personal characteristics and health-related beliefs of patients on adherence to treatment with immunosuppressive medication based on the Health Belief Model. This cross-sectional study distributed questionnaires to patients who had been recruited via purposive sampling at one medical center in Taipei. All of the potential participants had undergone kidney transplantation at least 6 months previously. The self-developed questionnaire collected data in three areas: personal characteristics, health-related beliefs regarding transplant rejection, and adherence to the immunosuppressive medication regimen. One hundred twenty-two valid questionnaires were received. The collected data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, independent t test, one-way analysis of variance, Pearson's correlation, and multiple regression. Participants who had received dialysis treatment or had experienced rejection perceived susceptibility to rejection more strongly than those who had not. Participants who had undergone transplantation in Taiwan, had experienced more drug-related symptoms, or had contracted severe to extremely severe infections in the past showed lower rates of adherence to treatment with immunosuppressive medication. Adherence to medication regimens correlated negatively with length of time since transplantation. Length of time since transplantation, drug-related symptoms, perceived susceptibility to rejection, and perceived benefits of treatment were identified as major predictors of adherence to immunosuppressive medication regimens. The results partially conformed to the concepts of the Health Belief Model. Perceived susceptibility to rejection and

  8. Medication adherence among adolescent solid-organ transplant recipients: A survey of healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Pooja; Steinberg, Elizabeth A; Kelly, Sarah L; Buchanan, Cindy; Rawlinson, Alana Resmini

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess healthcare provider perspectives on barriers to medication adherence and to discover recommendations for interventions among providers of pediatric solid-organ transplant patients. An anonymous online survey was administered to a multidisciplinary pool of pediatric transplant providers from February 2015 to March 2016. It consisted of 15 questions regarding transplant providers' attitudes, clinical practice, and beliefs pertaining to medication adherence among teenage solid-organ transplant recipients. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were coded and categorized into themes. One hundred ten surveys were completed by providers specializing in pediatric heart, kidney, liver, lung, and/or intestinal transplantation. Commonly cited reasons for poor adherence were forgetting/poor planning (94%), the desire to be normal (86%), lack of support (86%), and poor parental monitoring (79%). Suggestions to improve adherence included increasing peer and family support, providing education, and incorporating technology into adherence regimens. Barriers to adherence in transplant patients are recognized by providers and are both similar to and disparate from patient and family identified barriers published in the literature. Providers recognize the importance of education, social support, and technologically driven interventions on improving outcomes in the transplant population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The prevalence, risk factors, and outcomes of medication trade-offs in kidney and liver transplant recipients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serper, Marina; Reese, Peter P; Patzer, Rachel R; Levitsky, Josh; Wolf, Michael S

    2017-11-25

    High out-of-pocket medication costs negatively impact adherence in transplantation. We evaluated the association of "medication trade-offs"-defined as choosing to spend money on other expenses over medications-with medication nonadherence and transplant outcomes. From 2011 to 2012, we performed a prospective study of 201 transplanted recipients (n = 103 liver, n = 98 kidney and) at two large US transplant centers. Structured interviews assessed socio-demographics, medication adherence, and medication trade-offs. Multivariable models assessing risk factors for medications trade-offs and the association between medications trade-offs and post-transplant hospital admissions were performed. A total of 17% of patients reported medication trade-offs; the most common trade-offs were inability to afford a prescription in the past 12 months and making choices between prescriptions and food. In multivariable analysis, insurance type (RR: 2.97, 95% CI: 1.19-7.40), limited health literacy (RR: 2.64, 95% CI: 1.23-5.64), and ≥3 comorbid conditions (RR: 2.48, 95% CI: 1.09-5.62; all P trade-offs. Patients with trade-offs were more likely to report nonadherence to medications (mean adherence: 77 ± 23% with trade-offs vs. 89 ± 19% without trade-offs, P trade-offs was associated with post-transplant hospital admissions (RR 1.64, 95% CI 1.14-2.35, P < 0.01). Assessments of financial barriers are warranted in clinical practice to identify nonadherence and improve post-transplant outcomes. © 2017 Steunstichting ESOT.

  10. An observational study of health literacy and medication adherence in adult kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demian, Maryam N; Shapiro, R Jean; Thornton, Wendy Loken

    2016-12-01

    There is a high prevalence of non-adherence to immunosuppressants in kidney transplant recipients. Although limited health literacy is common in kidney recipients and is linked to adverse outcomes in other medical populations, its effect on medication adherence in kidney transplant recipients remains poorly understood. The objective was to investigate the effect of lower health literacy on immunosuppressant adherence. Kidney recipients who were at least 6 months post-transplant and outpatients of Vancouver General Hospital in B.C., Canada were recruited through invitation letters. A total of 96 recipients completed the Health Literacy Questionnaire, which provides a multifactorial profile of self-reported health literacy and the Transplant Effects Questionnaire-Adherence subscale measuring self-reported immunosuppressant adherence. Hierarchical linear regression was used to analyze the association between health literacy and adherence after controlling for identified risk factors of non-adherence. Our sample was on average 53 years old, 56% male and 9 years post-transplant. Kidney recipients reported low levels of health literacy on scales measuring active health management and critical appraisal of information and 75% reported non-perfect adherence. Worse adherence was associated with poorer overall health literacy (Δ R 2 = 0.08, P = 0.004) and lower scores on six of nine of the health literacy factors. Poorer health literacy is associated with lower immunosuppressant adherence in adult kidney transplant recipients suggesting the importance of considering a recipient's level of health literacy in research and clinical contexts. Medication adherence interventions can target the six factors of health literacy identified as being risk factors for lower medication adherence.

  11. Psychosocial Variables Associated with Immunosuppressive Medication Non-Adherence after Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Felicia Scheel

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionNon-adherence to immunosuppressive medication is regarded as an important factor for graft rejection and loss after successful renal transplantation. Yet, results on prevalence and relationship with psychosocial parameters are heterogeneous. The main aim of this study was to investigate the association of immunosuppressive medication non-adherence and psychosocial factors.MethodsIn 330 adult renal transplant recipients (≥12 months posttransplantation, health-related quality of life, depression, anxiety, social support, and subjective medication experiences were assessed, and their associations with patient-reported non-adherence was evaluated.Results33.6% of the patients admitted to be partially non-adherent. Non-adherence was associated with younger age, poorer social support, lower mental, but higher physical health-related quality of life. There was no association with depression and anxiety. However, high proportions of clinically relevant depression and anxiety symptoms were apparent in both adherent and non-adherent patients.ConclusionIn the posttransplant follow-up, kidney recipients with lower perceived social support, lower mental and higher physical health-related quality of life, and younger age can be regarded as a risk group for immunosuppressive medication non-adherence. In follow-up contacts with kidney transplant patients, physicians may pay attention to these factors. Furthermore, psychosocial interventions to optimize immunosuppressive medication adherence can be designed on the basis of this information, especially including subjectively perceived physical health-related quality of life and fostering social support seems to be of importance.

  12. Stress, coping and adherence to immunosuppressive medications in kidney transplantation: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Daniela Cristina Sampaio de; Marsicano, Elisa Oliveira; Grincenkov, Fabiane Rossi Dos Santos; Colugnati, Fernando Antônio Basile; Lucchetti, Giancarlo; Sanders-Pinheiro, Helady

    2016-01-01

    : Adherence to medication is a key issue relating to outcomes from transplantation and it is influenced by several factors, such as stress and coping strategies. However, these factors have been poorly explored. We aimed to compare stress and coping strategies between adherent and nonadherent renal transplant recipients who were receiving immunosuppression. : We conducted a comparative, cross-sectional and observational study at a university-based transplantation clinic in Juiz de Fora, Brazil. :Fifty patients were recruited and classified as adherent or nonadherent following administration of the Basel Assessment of Adherence to Immunosuppressive Medications Scale. Stress was evaluated using the Lipp Stress Symptom Inventory for Adults and coping strategies were assessed using the Ways of Coping Scale. : The study included 25 nonadherent patients and 25 controls with a mean age of 44.1 ± 12.8 years and median post-transplantation time of 71.8 months. Stress was present in 50% of the patients. Through simple logistic regression, nonadherence was correlated with palliative coping (OR 3.4; CI: 1.02-11.47; P transplantation patients and should be considered among the strategies for reducing nonadherence.

  13. Adaptation of copper community tolerance levels after biofilm transplantation in an urban river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechner, Lise C; Versace, François; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine; Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Hélène

    2012-01-15

    The Water Framework Directive requires the development of biological tools which can act as early-warning indicators of a sudden increase (accidental pollution) or decrease (recovery due to prevention) of the chemical status of aquatic systems. River biofilms, which respond quickly to modifications of environmental parameters and also play a key part in the functioning of aquatic ecosystems, are therefore good candidates to monitor an increase or a decrease of water pollution. In the present study, we investigated the biological response of biofilms transplanted either upstream (recovery) or downstream (deterioration of exposure levels) the urban area of Paris (France). Both modifications of Cu community tolerance levels and of global bacterial and eukaryotic community structure using automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) fingerprints were examined 15 and 30 days after the transplantation. Cu tolerance levels of the heterotrophic component of biofilms were assessed using a short-term toxicity test based on β-glucosidase (heterotrophic) activity. Cu tolerance increased for biofilms transplanted upstream to downstream Paris (5-fold increase on day 30) and conversely decreased for biofilms transplanted downstream to upstream (8-fold decrease on day 30). ARISA fingerprints revealed that bacterial and eukaryotic community structures of transplanted biofilms were closer to the structures of biofilms from the transplantation sites (or sites with similar contamination levels) than to biofilms from their sites of origin. Statistical analysis of the data confirmed that the key factor explaining biofilm Cu tolerance levels is the sampling site and not the site of origin. It also showed that Cu tolerance levels are related to the global urban contamination (both metals and nutrients). The study shows that biofilms adapt fast to modifications of their surroundings. In particular, community tolerance varies quickly and reflects the new exposure levels only 15

  14. Intestine Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After the transplant Preventing rejection Post-transplant medications Types of immunosuppressants Switching immunosuppressants Side effects Other medications Generic and brand name drugs Post-transplant tests Infections and immunity Lifestyle changes Health concerns Back to work or ...

  15. An observational study of health literacy and medication adherence in adult kidney transplant recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Demian, Maryam N.; Shapiro, R. Jean; Thornton, Wendy Loken

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a high prevalence of non-adherence to immunosuppressants in kidney transplant recipients. Although limited health literacy is common in kidney recipients and is linked to adverse outcomes in other medical populations, its effect on medication adherence in kidney transplant recipients remains poorly understood. The objective was to investigate the effect of lower health literacy on immunosuppressant adherence. Methods Kidney recipients who were at least 6 months post-transp...

  16. Transplanting the Body: Preliminary Ethical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lantz Fleming

    2017-11-01

    A dissociated area of medical research warrants bioethical consideration: a proposed transplantation of a donor's entire body, except head, to a patient with a fatal degenerative disease. The seeming improbability of such an operation can only underscore the need for thorough bioethical assessment: Not assessing a case of such potential ethical import, by showing neglect instead of facing the issue, can only compound the ethical predicament, perhaps eroding public trust in ethical medicine. This article discusses the historical background of full-body transplantation, documents the seriousness of its current pursuit, and builds an argument for why prima facie this type of transplant is bioethically distinct. Certainly, this examination can only be preliminary, indicating what should be a wide and vigorous discussion among practitioners and ethicists. It concludes with practical suggestions for how the medical and bioethics community may proceed with ethical assessment.

  17. Attitudes towards medication non-adherence in elderly kidney transplant patients: a Q methodology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielen, Mirjam; van Exel, N Job A; van Buren, Marleen C; Maasdam, Louise; Weimar, Willem

    2011-05-01

    Non-adherence to the post-transplant regime is a common problem in kidney transplant patients and may lead to rejection or even graft failure. This study investigated attitudes towards the post-transplant regime of immunosuppressive medication among the ever growing population of elderly kidney recipients. Q methodology was used to explore attitude profiles. Participants (> 65 years) were asked to rank-order opinion statements on issues associated with (non-)adherence. The rankings were subject to by-person factor analysis, and the resulting factors were interpreted and described as attitudes. Twenty-six elderly renal transplant recipients participated in the study. All passed the Mini-Mental State Examination. Two attitude profiles were found: (i) satisfied and easy-going (attitude A), and (ii) reserved and concerned (attitude B). Elderly patients with attitude A want to enjoy the new life following their kidney transplant, are not very concerned about having to recommence dialysis, now and then even forget their regime, and do not really worry about it. Elderly patients with attitude B feel more insecure about their kidney transplant, are fairly concerned over issues like rejection or going back on dialysis, and try to adapt their way of life to the regime. One-third of these elderly patients forget their medication at least once a month, but there was no difference between attitude groups. Attitudes about the post-transplant regime differ among elderly patients, implying different needs for assistance, monitoring and risk of non-adherence to the regime. The proportion of elderly patients who forget their medication is considerable, but may be much higher among those with mild and severe cognitive limitations.

  18. Discrepancies between beliefs and behavior: a prospective study into immunosuppressive medication adherence after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Emma K; Tielen, Mirjam; Laging, Mirjam; Timman, Reinier; Beck, Denise K; Khemai, Roshni; van Gelder, Teun; Weimar, Willem

    2015-02-01

    Nonadherence to immunosuppressive medication after kidney transplantation is a behavioral issue and as such it is important to understand the psychological factors that influence this behavior. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which goal cognitions, illness perceptions, and treatment beliefs were related to changes in self-reported immunosuppressive medication adherence up to 18 months after transplantation. Interviews were conducted with patients in the outpatient clinic 6 weeks (T1; n=113), 6 months (T2; n=106), and 18 months (T3; n=84) after transplantation. Self-reported adherence was measured using the Basel Assessment of Adherence to Immunosuppressive Medications Scale Interview. Psychological concepts were measured using the Brief Illness Perceptions Questionnaire, Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire, and questions on the importance of adherence as a personal goal, conflict with other goals, and self-efficacy for goal attainment. Nonadherence significantly increased over time to 31% at T3. Perceived necessity of medication, perceived impact of transplant on life (consequences) and emotional response to transplantation significantly decreased over time. Participants who reported low importance of medication adherence as a personal goal were more likely to become nonadherent over time. Illness perceptions can be described as functional and supportive of adherence which is inconsistent with the pervasive and increasing nonadherence observed. There appears therefore to be a discrepancy between beliefs about adherence and actual behavior. Promoting (intrinsic) motivation for adherence goals and exploring the relative importance in comparison to other personal goals is a potential target for interventions.

  19. A questionnaire based assessment of numbers, motivation and medical care of UK patients undergoing liver transplant abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr Winter, Ben; Odedra, Anand; Green, Steve

    Medical tourism, where patients travel abroad intentionally to access medical treatment, is a growing trend. Some of these patients travel to undergo organ transplantation. This study aims to quantify the number of UK patients who undergo liver transplantation abroad, assessing their motivations and management. Questionnaires were sent to all seven UK liver transplant units enquiring about liver patients receiving transplant abroad. Included were questions on destination, motivation, and pre and post-transplant care. Responses were received from six of the seven transplant centres (86%). A total of 12 patients were identified as having undergone liver transplantation overseas. The top destinations were India, China and Egypt. Four units responded to questions regarding pre-transplant screening. One unit reported Hepatitis B and C screening not taking place. Four units responded to questions regarding post-transplant antimicrobial therapy. This revealed examples of patients inappropriately not receiving valganciclovir, co-trimoxazole, anti-fungal treatment and Hepatitis B immunoglobulins. UK patients are undergoing liver transplant abroad, albeit in small numbers. Pre and post-transplant management of these patients is of a lower standard than that provided to those undergoing transplantation in the UK. Information transfer between overseas and UK based transplant teams is poor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Intensified pharmaceutical care is improving immunosuppressive medication adherence in kidney transplant recipients during the first post-transplant year: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joost, Robert; Dörje, Frank; Schwitulla, Judith; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Hugo, Christian

    2014-08-01

    Medication adherence is critical for transplant patients because the consequences of non-adherence can result in allograft loss and may be life threatening. A prospective study with 74 renal transplant recipients using a sequential control group design was performed to investigate the impact of a pharmaceutical intensified care programme led by a clinical pharmacist on daily drug adherence during the first year after renal transplantation. Thirty-nine patients of the control group received the already established standardized drug and transplant training, while 35 patients of the intensified care group (ICG) received additional inpatient and outpatient pharmaceutical care and counselling by a dedicated clinical pharmacist. Applied interventions were clustered and classified using the behaviour change technique taxonomy according to Michie. Adherence to immunosuppressive drug therapy was monitored up to 1 year using a medication event monitoring system, pill count (PC), drug holiday (DH) occurrence, Morisky questionnaire and self-report. Sixty-seven patients (35 of the standard care and 32 of the ICG) were analysed. Implementation of DA was significantly (P = 0.014) improved in patients of the ICG (91%) compared with SCG (75%) during the first year after transplantion. Daily adherence measures were already improved within 30-40 days after start of intensified patient care and continued throughout the study period. Intensified care patients also showed significantly better results for taking adherence (P = 0.006), PC (P = 0.008) and DHs (P = 0.001). The additional, intensified pharmaceutical care improved patients' medication adherence remarkably, suggesting that the applied additional care programme has the potential to improve outcomes after organ transplantation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  1. Transplant experiments uncover Baltic Sea basin-specific responses in bacterioplankton community composition and metabolic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindh, Markus V; Figueroa, Daniela; Sjöstedt, Johanna; Baltar, Federico; Lundin, Daniel; Andersson, Agneta; Legrand, Catherine; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenically induced changes in precipitation are projected to generate increased river runoff to semi-enclosed seas, increasing loads of terrestrial dissolved organic matter and decreasing salinity. To determine how bacterial community structure and functioning adjust to such changes, we designed microcosm transplant experiments with Baltic Proper (salinity 7.2) and Bothnian Sea (salinity 3.6) water. Baltic Proper bacteria generally reached higher abundances than Bothnian Sea bacteria in both Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea water, indicating higher adaptability. Moreover, Baltic Proper bacteria growing in Bothnian Sea water consistently showed highest bacterial production and beta-glucosidase activity. These metabolic responses were accompanied by basin-specific changes in bacterial community structure. For example, Baltic Proper Pseudomonas and Limnobacter populations increased markedly in relative abundance in Bothnian Sea water, indicating a replacement effect. In contrast, Roseobacter and Rheinheimera populations were stable or increased in abundance when challenged by either of the waters, indicating an adjustment effect. Transplants to Bothnian Sea water triggered the initial emergence of particular Burkholderiaceae populations, and transplants to Baltic Proper water triggered Alteromonadaceae populations. Notably, in the subsequent re-transplant experiment, a priming effect resulted in further increases to dominance of these populations. Correlated changes in community composition and metabolic activity were observed only in the transplant experiment and only at relatively high phylogenetic resolution. This suggested an importance of successional progression for interpreting relationships between bacterial community composition and functioning. We infer that priming effects on bacterial community structure by natural episodic events or climate change induced forcing could translate into long-term changes in bacterial ecosystem process rates.

  2. Stressors and coping resources of Australian kidney transplant recipients related to medication taking: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Jac Kee; Crawford, Kimberley; Manias, Elizabeth; Williams, Allison

    2017-06-01

    To understand the stressors related to life post kidney transplantation, with a focus on medication adherence, and the coping resources people use to deal with these stressors. Although kidney transplantation offers enhanced quality and years of life for patients, the management of a kidney transplant post surgery is a complex process. A descriptive exploratory study. Participants were recruited from five kidney transplant units in Victoria, Australia. From March-May 2014, patients who had either maintained their kidney transplant for ≥8 months or had experienced a kidney graft loss due to medication nonadherence were interviewed. All audio-recordings of interviews were transcribed verbatim and underwent Ritchie and Spencer's framework analysis. Participants consisted of 15 men and 10 women aged 26-72 years old. All identified themes were categorised into: (1) Causes of distress and (2) Coping resources. Post kidney transplantation, causes of distress included the regimented routine necessary for graft maintenance, and the everlasting fear of potential graft rejection, contracting infections and developing cancer. Coping resources used to manage the stressors were first, a shift in perspective about how easy it was to manage a kidney transplant than to be dialysis-dependent and second, receiving external help from fellow patients, family members and health care professionals in addition to using electronic reminders. An individual well-equipped with coping resources is able to deal with stressors better. It is recommended that changes, such as providing regular reminders about the lifestyle benefits of kidney transplantation, creating opportunities for patients to share their experiences and promoting the usage of a reminder alarm to take medications, will reduce the stress of managing a kidney transplant. Using these findings to make informed changes to the usual care of a kidney transplant recipient is likely to result in better patient outcomes. © 2016 John

  3. Pre-liver transplant psychosocial evaluation predicts post-transplantation outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Ariel A; Rowe, Mina; Eid, Ahmad; Bluth, Keren; Merhav, Hadar; Khalaileh, Abed; Safadi, Rifaat

    2018-08-01

    Psychosocial factors greatly impact the course of patients throughout the liver transplantation process. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients who underwent liver transplantation at Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center between 2002 and 2012. A composite psychosocial score was computed based on the patient's pre-transplant evaluation. Patients were divided into two groups based on compliance, support and insight: Optimal psychosocial score and Non-optimal psychosocial score. Post-liver transplantation survival and complication rates were evaluated. Out of 100 patients who underwent liver transplantation at the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center between 2002 and 2012, 93% had a complete pre-liver transplant psychosocial evaluation in the medical record performed by professional psychologists and social workers. Post-liver transplantation survival was significantly higher in the Optimal group (85%) as compared to the Non-optimal group (56%, p = .002). Post-liver transplantation rate of renal failure was significantly lower in the Optimal group. No significant differences were observed between the groups in other post-transplant complications. A patient's psychosocial status may impact outcomes following transplantation as inferior psychosocial grades were associated with lower overall survival and increased rates of complications. Pre-liver transplant psychosocial evaluations are an important tool to help predict survival following transplantation.

  4. Attitudes towards medication non-adherence in elderly kidney transplant patients: A Q methodology study

    OpenAIRE

    Moors-Tielen, Mirjam; Exel, Job; Buren, M.C.; Maasdam, L.; Weimar, Willem

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Non-adherence to the post-transplant regime is a common problem in kidney transplant patients and may lead to rejection or even graft failure. This study investigated attitudes towards the post-transplant regime of immunosuppressive medication among the ever growing population of elderly kidney recipients.Methods. Q methodology was used to explore attitude profiles. Participants (> 65 years) were asked to rank-order opinion statements on issues associated with (non-)ad...

  5. After the Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After the transplant Preventing rejection Post-transplant medications Types of immunosuppressants Switching immunosuppressants Side effects Other medications Generic and brand name drugs Post-transplant tests Infections and immunity Lifestyle changes Health concerns Back to work or ...

  6. Transplant experiments uncover Baltic Sea basin-specific responses in bacterioplankton community composition and metabolic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus V Lindh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenically induced changes in precipitation are projected to generate increased river runoff to semi-enclosed seas, intensifying loads of terrestrial dissolved organic matter and decreasing salinity. To determine how bacterial community structure and functioning adjust to such changes, we designed microcosm transplant experiments with Baltic Proper (salinity 7.2 and Bothnian Sea (salinity 3.6 water. Baltic Proper bacteria generally reached higher abundance than Bothnian Sea bacteria in both Baltic Proper and Bothnian Sea water, indicating a higher adaptability. Moreover, Baltic Proper bacteria growing in Bothnian Sea water consistently showed highest bacterial production and beta-glucosidase activity. These metabolic responses were accompanied by basin-specific changes in bacterial community structure. For example, Baltic Proper Pseudomonas and Limnobacter populations increased markedly in relative abundance in Bothnian Sea water, indicating replacement. In contrast, Roseobacter and Rheinheimera populations were stable or increased in abundance when challenged by either of the waters, indicating adjustment. Transplants to Bothnian Sea water triggered the initial emergence of particular Burkholderiaceae populations, and transplants to Baltic Proper water triggered Alteromonadaceae populations. Notably, in the subsequent re-transplant experiment, the original triggering, or priming effect, resulted in further increases to dominance of these populations. Correlated changes in community composition and metabolic activity were observed only in the transplant experiment, and only at relatively high phylogenetic resolution. This suggested an importance of successional progression for interpreting relationships between bacterial community composition and functioning. We infer that priming effects on bacterial community structure by natural episodic events or climate change induced forcing could translate into long-term changes in bacterial

  7. A survey of medical students to assess their exposure to and knowledge of renal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weale Andrew R

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the field of renal transplantation there is a lack of qualified and trainee surgeons and a shortage of donated organs. Any steps to tackle these issues should, in part, be aimed at future doctors. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to final year students at a single medical school in the UK to assess their exposure to and knowledge of renal transplantation. Results Although 46% of responding students had examined a transplant recipient, only 14% had ever witnessed the surgery. Worryingly, 9% of students believed that xenotransplantation commonly occurs in the UK and 35% were unable to name a single drug that a recipient may need to take. Conclusions This survey demonstrates a lack of exposure to, and knowledge of, the field of renal transplantation. Recommendations to address the problems with the recruitment of surgeons and donation of organs, by targeting medical students are made.

  8. Technology and outcomes assessment in lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusen, Roger D

    2009-01-15

    Lung transplantation offers the hope of prolonged survival and significant improvement in quality of life to patients that have advanced lung diseases. However, the medical literature lacks strong positive evidence and shows conflicting information regarding survival and quality of life outcomes related to lung transplantation. Decisions about the use of lung transplantation require an assessment of trade-offs: do the potential health and quality of life benefits outweigh the potential risks and harms? No amount of theoretical reasoning can resolve this question; empiric data are needed. Rational analyses of these trade-offs require valid measurements of the benefits and harms to the patients in all relevant domains that affect survival and quality of life. Lung transplant systems and registries mainly focus outcomes assessment on patient survival on the waiting list and after transplantation. Improved analytic approaches allow comparisons of the survival effects of lung transplantation versus continued waiting. Lung transplant entities do not routinely collect quality of life data. However, the medical community and the public want to know how lung transplantation affects quality of life. Given the huge stakes for the patients, the providers, and the healthcare systems, key stakeholders need to further support quality of life assessment in patients with advanced lung disease that enter into the lung transplant systems. Studies of lung transplantation and its related technologies should assess patients with tools that integrate both survival and quality of life information. Higher quality information obtained will lead to improved knowledge and more informed decision making.

  9. Prevalence and correlates of medication non-adherence among kidney transplant recipients more than 6 months post-transplant: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Francis L; Chandwani, Sheenu; Kurtyka, Karen M; Zacker, Christopher; Chisholm-Burns, Marie A; Demissie, Kitaw

    2013-12-01

    Among kidney transplant recipients, non-adherence with immunosuppressive medications frequently precedes allograft loss. We sought to determine the prevalence and correlates of medication non-adherence among kidney transplant recipients. We performed a single-center, cross-sectional study of kidney transplant recipients who were at least 6 months post-transplant. We measured self-reported adherence using the Immunosuppressive Therapy Adherence Scale (ITAS, which is scored from 0 to 12, where higher scores indicate increased adherence) and barriers to adherence using the Immunosuppressive Therapy Barriers Scale (ITBS). We also used validated scales to measure perceived stress, health literacy, anxiety, depression, and interpersonal support. The 252 patients included in the study were 59.9% male, 27.0% Black, and at a median of 2.9 years post-transplant (interquartile range [IQR] 1.4-5.8). On the ITAS, 59.1% scored a perfect 12, 26.6% scored 10-11, and 14.3% scored 0-9. In univariate models, non-adherence (defined as ITAS score ≤9) was significantly associated with increased scores on scales for perceived stress (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.01-1.25) and depression (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.02-1.28), and with more self-reported barriers to adherence on the ITBS (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.08-1.22). After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, stress and depression were not associated with non-adherence. Higher scores on the ITBS (corresponding to more self-described barriers to adherence) were associated with lower scores on the ITAS (P adherence. Among prevalent kidney transplant recipients, a minority is non-adherent. Practical barriers to adherence may serve as promising targets for future interventions.

  10. Attitudes and beliefs of South African medical students toward organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobnach, Sanju; Borkum, Megan; Millar, Alastair J W; Hoffman, Ross; Muller, Elmi; McCurdie, Fiona; Kahn, Delawir

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and analyse the attitudes and beliefs of medical students regarding organ donation, procurement, and transplantation. Medical students at the University of Cape Town were prospectively surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire. There were 346 study participants; the mean age was 21 (range 18-33) yr, 38% were male and 62% was female. Only 8% of respondents were registered donors; clinical and white students constituted the majority of this group. Of the 315 "non-donors," the main reason for not donating was "I have not really thought about organ donation" (59%). Most students (91%) would accept an artificial organ; and 87% and 52% of students would accept human and animal organs respectively. Muslim students (11%, preincarnation (18%, p=0.00) were less willing to accept human or animal organs. About 95% of respondents stated that they would like to learn more about transplantation and would keep information about it in their practice but only 18% of respondents knew where to find information for potential donors and recipients. Most students have a favorable attitude toward organ transplantation; religion and belief systems impact on willingness to receive organs. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. New Organ Allocation System for Combined Liver-Kidney Transplants and the Availability of Kidneys for Transplant to Patients with Stage 4-5 CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asch, William S; Bia, Margaret J

    2017-05-08

    A new proposal has been created for establishing medical criteria for organ allocation in recipients receiving simultaneous liver-kidney transplants. In this article, we describe the new policy, elaborate on the points of greatest controversy, and offer a perspective on the policy going forward. Although we applaud the fact that simultaneous liver-kidney transplant activity will now be monitored and appreciate the creation of medical criteria for allocation in simultaneous liver-kidney transplants, we argue that some of the criteria proposed, especially those for allocating a kidney to a liver recipient with AKI, are too liberal. We call on the nephrology community to follow the consequences of this new policy and push for a re-examination of the longstanding policy of allocating kidneys to multiorgan transplant recipients before all other candidates. The charge to protect our system of equitable organ allocation is very challenging, but it is a challenge that we must embrace. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  12. Stress, coping and adherence to immunosuppressive medications in kidney transplantation: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cristina Sampaio de Brito

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE : Adherence to medication is a key issue relating to outcomes from transplantation and it is influenced by several factors, such as stress and coping strategies. However, these factors have been poorly explored. We aimed to compare stress and coping strategies between adherent and nonadherent renal transplant recipients who were receiving immunosuppression. DESIGN AND SETTING : We conducted a comparative, cross-sectional and observational study at a university-based transplantation clinic in Juiz de Fora, Brazil. METHODS :Fifty patients were recruited and classified as adherent or nonadherent following administration of the Basel Assessment of Adherence to Immunosuppressive Medications Scale. Stress was evaluated using the Lipp Stress Symptom Inventory for Adults and coping strategies were assessed using the Ways of Coping Scale. RESULTS : The study included 25 nonadherent patients and 25 controls with a mean age of 44.1 ± 12.8 years and median post-transplantation time of 71.8 months. Stress was present in 50% of the patients. Through simple logistic regression, nonadherence was correlated with palliative coping (OR 3.4; CI: 1.02-11.47; P < 0.05 and had a marginal trend toward significance with more advanced phases of stress (OR 4.7; CI: 0.99-22.51; P = 0.053. CONCLUSION :Stress and coping strategies may have implications for understanding and managing nonadherent behavior among transplantation patients and should be considered among the strategies for reducing nonadherence.

  13. Attitudes to medication after kidney transplantation and their association with medication adherence and graft survival: a 2-year follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Moors-Tielen (Mirjam); N.J.A. van Exel (Job); M. Hol - Laging (Mirjam); D.K. Beck (Denise); R. Khemai (Roshni); T. van Gelder (Teun); M.G.H. Betjes (Michiel); W. Weimar (Willem); E.K. Massey (Emma)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Nonadherence to medication is a common problem after kidney transplantation. The aim of this study was to explore attitudes towards medication, adherence, and the relationship with clinical outcomes. Method. Kidney recipients participated in a Q-methodological study 6 weeks

  14. The psychosocial implications of pre-emptive transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, B R

    1991-01-01

    Pre-emptive (primary) renal transplantation is occurring with greater frequency as pediatric transplant centers attempt to initiate renal replacement therapy at a time best designed to optimize growth and development in children. Psychosocial benefits of performing pre-emptive transplant are highlighted by an intervention before the child has symptoms of uremia and, thus, develops a self-image as a "sick patient with end-stage renal disease", avoidance of dependence on machine technology, avoidance of a change in parenting that may occur with fears about dialysis, and maintenance of an orientation toward future goals. In addition, the child will likely have less loss of school time and less disturbance in previously established social patterns. Difficulties that may be enhanced in pre-emptive transplantation arise from potentially decreased involvement of the child and family in the medical (transplant) care system prior to transplantation. The two major issues of concern are: (1) optimal education regarding patient (family) responsibility toward quality care of the graft recipient; (2) the accurate assessment of coping skills coupled with the development of optimum psychosocial support from the health care workers and community support services. The provision of a good educational and supportive program is time consuming and financially draining. We must develop creative approaches to these areas in order to enhance each child's opportunity for family and community interaction, as well as physical well-being.

  15. Effectiveness of YouTube as a Source of Medical Information on Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, He-Ming; Hu, Zhong-Kai; Zheng, Xiao-Lin; Yuan, Zhao-Shun; Xu, Zhao-Bin; Yuan, Ling-Qing; Perez, Vinicio A De Jesus; Yuan, Ke; Orcholski, Mark; Liao, Xiao-Bo

    2013-11-21

    In this digital era, there is a growing tendency to use the popular Internet site YouTube as a new electronic-learning (e-learning) means for continuing medical education. Heart transplantation (HTx) remains the most viable option for patients with end-stage heart failure or severe coronary artery disease. There are plenty of freely accessible YouTube videos providing medical information about HTx. The aim of the present study is to determine the effectiveness of YouTube as an e-learning source on HTx. In order to carry out this study, YouTube was searched for videos uploaded containing surgical-related information using the four keywords: (1) "heart transplantation", (2) "cardiac transplantation", (3) "heart transplantation operation", and (4) "cardiac transplantation operation". Only videos in English (with comments or subtitles in English language) were included. Two experienced cardiac surgeons watched each video (N=1800) and classified them as useful, misleading, or recipients videos based on the HTx-relevant information. The kappa statistic was used to measure interobserver variability. Data was analyzed according to six types of YouTube characteristics including "total viewership", "duration", "source", "days since upload", "scores" given by the viewers, and specialized information contents of the videos. A total of 342/1800 (19.00%) videos had relevant information about HTx. Of these 342 videos, 215 (62.8%) videos had useful information about specialized knowledge, 7/342 (2.0%) were found to be misleading, and 120/342 (35.1%) only concerned recipients' individual issues. Useful videos had 56.09% of total viewership share (2,175,845/3,878,890), whereas misleading had 35.47% (1,375,673/3,878,890). Independent user channel videos accounted for a smaller proportion (19% in total numbers) but might have a wider impact on Web viewers, with the highest mean views/day (mean 39, SD 107) among four kinds of channels to distribute HTx-related information. You

  16. Organ Transplantation in Iran; Current State and Challenges with a View on Ethical Consideration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Kiani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Organ transplantation is a new issue in medical science. It is an important achievement and a sign of the progression and ability of medical centers around the world. Governments, populations, the medical community and people involved in culture, art, and media all have a decisive role in the culture of organ donation, which is the only way to guarantee that the healthy organs of a brain-dead person can continue to work and save the lives of people in need of organ transplantation. The brain death phenomenon and its possible application in organ transplantation, while offering new hope for the salvation of a number of patients, has led to many ethical, cultural, and legal issues. Ethical issues in organ transplantation are very complicated due to many social factors such as religion, culture, and traditions of the affected communities. The ethical and legal points of removing organs from the body of a living or cadaveric source, the definition of brain death, the moral and legal conditions of the donor and the recipient, and the financial relationship between them and many others, are all critical issues in organ transplantation. While there may be no available explicit solution to these issues, they should be rigorously considered by the experts. Efforts to systematically eliminate barriers and solve problems in organ transplantation, can not only reduce the costs of maintaining brain-dead patients and encourage patients that need organ transplantation but can also prevent immoral and illegal activities. In this paper, we have reviewed the most important and current challenges in organ transplantation with a view to the ethical considerations, and we have suggested some strategies to extend it in Iran.

  17. Differences in Medication Adherence between Living and Deceased Donor Kidney Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denhaerynck, K; Schmid-Mohler, G; Kiss, A; Steiger, J; Wüthrich, R P; Bock, A; De Geest, S

    2014-01-01

    Literature review suggests that adherence to immunosuppressive drugs may be lower in recipients of living than of deceased donor kidney grafts, possibly because of profile differences. To compare the level of immunosuppressive adherence levels between patients with deceased and living (-related; -unrelated) donor grafts in Switzerland. Using data from two similar cross-sectional studies at two transplant centers in Switzerland, the level of adherence between the two groups was compared. Medication adherence was assessed by self-report or electronic monitoring. Possible explanatory factors included age, beliefs regarding immunosuppressive drugs, depressive symptomatology, pre-emptive transplantation, and the number of transplants received, were also considered. Data were analyzed using logistic regression analysis. Unadjusted non-adherence odds were 2 to 3 times higher in living-related than deceased donor transplantation (ORs: 2.09-3.05; padherence in recipients of living-related donor kidneys, possibly owing to differences in patient profile (ie, health beliefs regarding their immunosuppressive needs), knowledge of which may enhance adherence if addressed.

  18. Prevalence and correlates of medication non-adherence among kidney transplant recipients more than 6 months post-transplant: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Among kidney transplant recipients, non-adherence with immunosuppressive medications frequently precedes allograft loss. We sought to determine the prevalence and correlates of medication non-adherence among kidney transplant recipients. Methods We performed a single-center, cross-sectional study of kidney transplant recipients who were at least 6 months post-transplant. We measured self-reported adherence using the Immunosuppressive Therapy Adherence Scale (ITAS, which is scored from 0 to 12, where higher scores indicate increased adherence) and barriers to adherence using the Immunosuppressive Therapy Barriers Scale (ITBS). We also used validated scales to measure perceived stress, health literacy, anxiety, depression, and interpersonal support. Results The 252 patients included in the study were 59.9% male, 27.0% Black, and at a median of 2.9 years post-transplant (interquartile range [IQR] 1.4-5.8). On the ITAS, 59.1% scored a perfect 12, 26.6% scored 10–11, and 14.3% scored 0–9. In univariate models, non-adherence (defined as ITAS score ≤9) was significantly associated with increased scores on scales for perceived stress (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.01-1.25) and depression (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.02-1.28), and with more self-reported barriers to adherence on the ITBS (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.08-1.22). After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, stress and depression were not associated with non-adherence. Higher scores on the ITBS (corresponding to more self-described barriers to adherence) were associated with lower scores on the ITAS (P adherence. Conclusions Among prevalent kidney transplant recipients, a minority is non-adherent. Practical barriers to adherence may serve as promising targets for future interventions. PMID:24289809

  19. Law and medical ethics in organ transplantation surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Tom; Wheeler, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article in the series describes how UK law and medical ethics have evolved to accommodate developments in organ transplantation surgery. August committees have formulated definitions of the point of death of the person which are compatible with the lawful procurement of functioning vital organs from cadavers. Some of the complexities of dead donor rules are examined. Live donors are a major source of kidneys and the laws that protect them are considered. Financial inducements and other incentives to donate erode the noble concept of altruism, but should they be unlawful? PMID:20501013

  20. About the Operation: Heart Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After the transplant Preventing rejection Post-transplant medications Types of immunosuppressants Switching immunosuppressants Side effects Other medications Generic and brand name drugs Post-transplant tests Infections and immunity Lifestyle changes Health concerns Back to work or ...

  1. Organ Transplantation: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After the transplant Preventing rejection Post-transplant medications Types of immunosuppressants Switching immunosuppressants Side effects Other medications Generic and brand name drugs Post-transplant tests Infections and immunity Lifestyle changes Health concerns Back to work or ...

  2. Post-transplant Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... others in similar situations. Get a feeling of security and belonging. Learn about transplant-related issues. Get help in dealing with emotions and stress. Share helpful information with other patients. Patient brochures What Every Patient Needs to Know ...

  3. MAGIC Study: Aims, Design and Methods using SystemCHANGE™ to Improve Immunosuppressive Medication Adherence in Adult Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Cynthia L; Moore, Shirley; Hathaway, Donna; Cheng, An-Lin; Chen, Guoqing; Goggin, Kathy

    2016-07-16

    Among adult kidney transplant recipients, non-adherence to immunosuppressive medications is the leading predictor of poor outcomes, including rejection, kidney loss, and death. An alarming one-third of kidney transplant patients experience medication non-adherence even though the problem is preventable. Existing adherence interventions have proven marginally effective for those with acute and chronic illnesses and ineffective for adult kidney transplant recipients. Our purpose is to describe the design and methods of the MAGIC (Medication Adherence Given Individual SystemCHANGE™) trial We report the design of a randomized controlled trial with an attention-control group to test an innovative 6-month SystemCHANGE™ intervention designed to enhance immunosuppressive medication adherence in adult non-adherent kidney transplant recipients from two transplant centers. Grounded in the Socio-Ecological Model, SystemCHANGE™ seeks to systematically improve medication adherence behaviors by identifying and shaping routines, involving supportive others in routines, and using medication taking feedback through small patient-led experiments to change and maintain behavior. After a 3-month screening phase of 190 eligible adult kidney transplant recipients, those who are adherent as measured by electronic monitoring, will be randomized into a 6-month SystemCHANGE™ intervention or attention-control phase, followed by a 6-month maintenance phase without intervention or attention. Differences in adherence between the two groups will be assessed at baseline, 6 months (intervention phase) and 12 months (maintenance phase). Adherence mediators (social support, systems-thinking) and moderators (ethnicity, perceived health) are examined. Patient outcomes (creatinine/blood urea nitrogen, infection, acute/chronic rejection, graft loss, death) and cost effectiveness are to be examined. Based on the large effect size of 1.4 found in our pilot study, intervention shows great promise

  4. [Kidney transplantation: consecutive one thousand transplants at National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition Salvador Zubirán in Mexico City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino-Vazquez, Lluvia Aurora; Sánchez-Ugarte, Regina; Morales-Buenrostro, Luis Eduardo

    2011-09-01

    The National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition Salvador Zubiran (INCMNSZ) is a specialty hospital for adults and a teaching hospital, which performed the first kidney transplant in 1967; in 1971 it began the formal program of renal transplantation. Recently, it was performed the kidney transplant number 1000, so this article presents the information of these thousand kidney transplants, with special emphasis on survival. Retrospective cohort study which included 1000 consecutive transplants performed at the INCMNSZ between 1967 and June 2011. It describes the general characteristics of kidney transplant recipients, transplant-related variables, initial immunosuppression and complications. Descriptive statistics were used. The survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier method. It shows the patient survival, graft survival censored for death with functional graft and total graft survival (uncensored). Patient survival at 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, and 20 years was 94.9, 89.6, 86.8, 76.9, 66.1, and 62.2%, respectively. Graft survival censored for death with functional graft at 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, and 20 years was 93.1, 87.1, 83.5, 73.9, 62.7, and 52.5% respectively. Risk factors associated with poorer graft survival were younger age of the recipient, transplant during the first period (1967-1983), and a HLA mismatch. Patient and graft survival have improved over time through the use of better immunosuppression and use of induction therapy. Identification of risk factors affecting graft survival, allows each center to set their strategies to improve the patient's outcome.

  5. Payment and Care for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Patients: Toward a Specialized Medical Home for Complex Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, James L; McClellan, Mark B; Majhail, Navneet S; Hari, Parameswaran N; Bredeson, Christopher N; Maziarz, Richard T; LeMaistre, Charles F; Lill, Michael C; Farnia, Stephanie H; Komanduri, Krishna V; Boo, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    the Accreditation of Cell Therapy. Payers have built on these community-established programs and use public outcomes and program accreditation as standards necessary for inclusion in specialty care networks and contracts. Although HCT centers have not been described as medical homes, most HCT providers have already developed the structures that address critical requirements of MACRA for medical homes. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of Transplant Waitlist Outcomes for Pediatric Candidates Supported by Ventricular Assist Devices Versus Medical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Sabrina P; Oron, Assaf P; Kemna, Mariska S; Albers, Erin L; McMullan, D Michael; Chen, Jonathan M; Law, Yuk M

    2018-05-01

    Ventricular assist devices have gained popularity in the management of refractory heart failure in children listed for heart transplantation. Our primary aim was to compare the composite endpoint of all-cause pretransplant mortality and loss of transplant eligibility in children who were treated with a ventricular assist device versus a medically managed cohort. This was a retrospective cohort analysis. Data were obtained from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. The at-risk population (n = 1,380) was less than 18 years old, either on a ventricular assist device (605 cases) or an equivalent-severity, intensively medically treated group (referred to as MED, 775 cases). None. The impact of ventricular assist devices was estimated via Cox proportional hazards regression (hazard ratio), dichotomizing 1-year outcomes to "poor" (22%: 193 deaths, 114 too sick) versus all others (940 successful transplants, 41 too healthy, 90 censored), while adjusting for conventional risk factors. Among children 0-12 months old, ventricular assist device was associated with a higher risk of poor outcomes (hazard ratio, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.5-3.0; p comparative study of ventricular assist devices versus medical therapy in children. Age is a significant modulator of waitlist outcomes for children with end-stage heart failure supported by ventricular assist device, with the impact of ventricular assist devices being more beneficial in adolescents.

  7. De novo malignancy is associated with renal transplant tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Meng-Kun; Yang, Ching-Yao; Lee, Chih-Yuan; Yeh, Chi-Chuan; Hu, Rey-Heng; Lee, Po-Huang

    2011-04-01

    Despite the objections to transplant tourism raised by the transplant community, many patients continue travel to other countries to receive commercial transplants. To evaluate some long-term complications, we reviewed medical records of 215 Taiwanese patients (touring group) who received commercial cadaveric renal transplants in China and compared them with those of 321 transplant recipients receiving domestic cadaveric renal transplants (domestic group) over the same 20-year period. Ten years after transplant, the graft and patient survival rates of the touring group were 55 and 81.5%, respectively, compared with 60 and 89.3%, respectively, of the domestic group. The difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. The 10-year cumulative cancer incidence of the touring group (21.5%) was significantly higher than that of the domestic group (6.8%). Univariate and multivariate stepwise regression analyses (excluding time on immunosuppression, an uncontrollable factor) indicated that transplant tourism was associated with significantly higher cancer incidence. Older age at transplantation was associated with a significantly increased cancer risk; however, the risk of de novo malignancy significantly decreased with longer graft survival. Thus, renal transplant tourism may be associated with a higher risk of post-transplant malignancy, especially in patients of older age at transplantation. © 2011 International Society of Nephrology

  8. Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Graft-versus-host disease: A potential risk when stem cells come from donors If you receive a transplant ... medications and blood products into your body. Collecting stem cells for transplant If a transplant using your own ...

  9. Assessment of potential heart donors: A statement from the French heart transplant community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorent, Richard; Gandjbakhch, Estelle; Goéminne, Céline; Ivanes, Fabrice; Sebbag, Laurent; Bauer, Fabrice; Epailly, Eric; Boissonnat, Pascale; Nubret, Karine; Amour, Julien; Vermes, Emmanuelle; Ou, Phalla; Guendouz, Soulef; Chevalier, Philippe; Lebreton, Guillaume; Flecher, Erwan; Obadia, Jean-François; Logeart, Damien; de Groote, Pascal

    2018-02-01

    Assessment of potential donors is an essential part of heart transplantation. Despite the shortage of donor hearts, donor heart procurement from brain-dead organ donors remains low in France, which may be explained by the increasing proportion of high-risk donors, as well as the mismatch between donor assessment and the transplant team's expectations. Improving donor and donor heart assessment is essential to improve the low utilization rate of available donor hearts without increasing post-transplant recipient mortality. This document provides information to practitioners involved in brain-dead donor management, evaluation and selection, concerning the place of medical history, electrocardiography, cardiac imaging, biomarkers and haemodynamic and arrhythmia assessment in the characterization of potential heart donors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. SIMULTANEOUS PANCREAS-KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION: EARLY POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Sh. Khubutia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: evaluation of the incidence of early postoperative complications after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation.Materials and methods. The analysis of early postoperative complications after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation is presented in the paper, the most rational diagnostic algorithms, non-surgical and surgical complications’ treatment; the outcomes of the SPKT are reported.Results. 15,6% of patients experienced surgical complications, 12,5% – immunological complications, 12,5% – infectious complications, 6,25% – complications of the immunosuppressive therapy. 1-year patient survival after SPKT was 91,4%; pancreas graft survival – 85,7%; kidney graft survival – 88,6%.Conclusion. The incidence of early postoperative complications after simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation remains signifi cant in spite of progressive improvement of simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation due to surgical technique improvement, introduction of new antibacterial and immunosuppressive agents. Data, we recovered, fully correspond to the data obtained from the global medical community.

  11. Electronically-measured adherence to immunosuppressive medications and kidney function after deceased donor kidney transplantation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israni, Ajay K.; Weng, Francis L.; Cen, Ye-Ying; Joffe, Marshall; Kamoun, Malek; Feldman, Harold I.

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-adherence with immunosuppressive medications can result in allograft rejection and eventually allograft loss. Methods In a racially diverse population, we utilized microelectronic cap monitors to determine the association of adherence with a single immunosuppressive medication and kidney allograft outcomes post-transplantation. This prospective cohort study enrolled 243 patients from eight transplant centers to provide adherence and kidney allograft outcomes data. To determine the association of adherence with change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), we fit mixed effects models with the outcome being change in eGFR over time. We also fit Cox proportional hazards models to determine the association of adherence with time to persistent 25% and 50% decline in eGFR. Results The distribution of adherence post-transplant was as follows: 164 (68%), 49 (20%) and 30 (12%) had >85–100%, 50–85% and adherence, respectively. 79 (33%) and 36 (15%) of the subjects experienced a persistent 25% decline in eGFR or allograft loss and 50% decline in eGFR or allograft loss during follow-up. Adherence was not associated with acute rejection or 25% decline or 50% decline in eGFR. In the adjusted and unadjusted model, adherence and black race were not associated with change in eGFR over time. Conclusions Non-adherence with a single immunosuppressive medication, was not associated with kidney allograft outcomes. PMID:20977496

  12. Electronically measured adherence to immunosuppressive medications and kidney function after deceased donor kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israni, Ajay K; Weng, Francis L; Cen, Ye-Ying; Joffe, Marshall; Kamoun, Malek; Feldman, Harold I

    2011-01-01

    Non-adherence with immunosuppressive medications can result in allograft rejection and eventually allograft loss. In a racially diverse population, we utilized microelectronic cap monitors to determine the association of adherence with a single immunosuppressive medication and kidney allograft outcomes post-transplantation. This prospective cohort study enrolled 243 patients from eight transplant centers to provide adherence and kidney allograft outcomes data. To determine the association of adherence with change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), we fit mixed effects models with the outcome being change in eGFR over time. We also fit Cox proportional hazards models to determine the association of adherence with time to persistent 25% and 50% decline in eGFR. The distribution of adherence post-transplant was as follows: 164 (68%), 49 (20%), and 30 (12%) had >85-100%, 50-85%, and adherence, respectively. Seventy-nine (33%) and 36 (15%) of the subjects experienced a persistent 25% decline in eGFR or allograft loss and 50% decline in eGFR or allograft loss during follow-up. Adherence was not associated with acute rejection or 25% decline or 50% decline in eGFR. In the adjusted and unadjusted model, adherence and black race were not associated with change in eGFR over time. Non-adherence with a single immunosuppressive medication was not associated with kidney allograft outcomes. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. A compilation of consumers' stories: the development of a video to enhance medication adherence in newly transplanted kidney recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Jac Kee; Crawford, Kimberley; Manias, Elizabeth; Williams, Allison

    2016-04-01

    To describe the design, development and evaluation of a consumer-centred video, which was underpinned by the Theory of Planned Behaviour and it was created to educate newly transplanted kidney recipients about the importance of medication adherence. Kidney transplantation is a treatment whereby medication adherence is critical to ensure long-term kidney graft success. To date, many interventions aimed to improve medication adherence in kidney transplantation have been conducted but consumers remain largely uninvolved in the interventional design. Qualitative sequential design. Twenty-two participants who had maintained their kidney transplant for at least 8 months and three participants who had experienced a kidney graft loss due to non-adherence were interviewed from March-May 2014 in Victoria, Australia. These interviews were independently reviewed by two researchers and were used to guide the design of the story plot and to identify storytellers for the video. The first draft of the video was evaluated by a panel of seven experts in the field, one independent educational expert and two consumers using Lynn's content validity questionnaire. The content of the video was regarded as highly relevant and comprehensive, which achieved a score of >3·7 out of a possible 4. The final 18-minute video comprised 15 sections. Topics included medication management, the factors affecting medication adherence and the absolute necessity of adherence to immunosuppressive medications for graft survival. This paper has demonstrated the feasibility of creating a consumer-driven video that supports medication adherence in an engaging way. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Attitude of medical professionals regarding controversial issues in kidney donation/transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Almeida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a dire need to evaluate new strategies to bridge the wide kidney demand-supply gap. The current study examined the attitude of medical professionals regarding controversial issues pertaining to transplantation. A questionnaire, presenting controversial issues related to kidney transplantation, in an agree-disagree format with supporting reasons, was employed. The research was exploratory. Data were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The sample comprised 140 doctors from Mumbai (mean = 38.1 years, standard deviation = 17.95; Males = 44.3%, Females = 55.7%. Whereas 47.1% of the participants felt that live donors should be given incentives for kidney donation, others (52.9% disagreed, fearing commercialization and illegal activities. The eligibility of patients with HIV/hepatitis for a transplant was denied by 52.9% because of poor outcomes, with the others (47.1% maintaining that these individuals too had a right to live. A substantial majority (90.7% of the participants maintained that organ donors should be given priority in the event of a future need for an organ because their previous humane act should be rewarded (47.1%. Most of the participants (91.4% felt that individuals from the higher socioeconomic strata should not receive preference for kidney transplantation. A majority (77.1% of them were also against kidney selling getting legalized. Compulsory possession of a donor card elicited mixed responses, with some accepting (56.4%, but others rejecting (43.6% this idea as donation was perceived to be a voluntary act (33.6%. While compulsory kidney donation found favor with 44.3%, it found disfavor with others (55.7%. This study will benefit transplant healthcare personnel to formulate new policies in relation to kidney donation/transplantation.

  15. Is there an association between immunosuppressant therapy medication adherence and depression, quality of life, and personality traits in the kidney and liver transplant population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorevski, Elizabeth; Succop, Paul; Sachdeva, Jyoti; Cavanaugh, Teresa M; Volek, Paul; Heaton, Pamela; Chisholm-Burns, Marie; Martin-Boone, Jill E

    2013-01-01

    To measure the association of transplant patients' personality, depression, and quality of life with medication adherence in kidney and liver transplant recipients. A cross-sectional study of liver and kidney transplant recipients greater than 1 year post-transplant was conducted. Patients' adherence with medications was assessed using the Immunosuppressive Therapy Adherence Scale. Personality and depression were assessed using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory Scale and Patient Health Questionnaire 9, respectively. Quality of life was assessed using the Short Form-36, and functional status was determined using the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale. A total of 86 kidney and 50 liver transplant patients completed the surveys. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated an association between depression and adherence with immunosuppressive medications in kidney transplant recipients. Kidney transplant patients who exhibited "low openness" scores were 91% more likely to be nonadherent. Kidney transplant patients' physical functional status was strongly associated with nonadherence, and for each point increase in functionality the patients' adherence increased by 4%. In the liver sample, age was associated with adherence. For every year increase in age, adherence increased by 7%. The presence of low openness as a personality trait, poor physical functional status, and depression were associated with adherence in the kidney transplant population. In the liver transplant population, younger age was associated with nonadherence.

  16. Interventions to improve medication adherence in adult kidney transplant recipients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Jac Kee; Williams, Allison; Manias, Elizabeth; Crawford, Kimberley

    2015-05-01

    In kidney transplantation, adherence to immunosuppressive therapy is paramount for long-term graft survival. This systematic review aimed to assess the effectiveness of interventions to improve medication adherence in adult kidney transplantation. Eight electronic databases were searched from inception to November 2013. Only primary intervention studies, which reported measurement of adherence to immunosuppressive medications after kidney transplantation, were included. The quality of all studies was assessed using the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials and Transparent Reporting of Evaluations with Non-randomized Designs checklists. A synthesis was undertaken to tease out the domains targeted by interventions: (i) educational/cognitive, (ii) counselling/behavioural, (iii) psychologic/affective and (iv) financial support. For each study, key information, such as population, location, methods of measurements, comparison group, type of intervention and outcomes, were extracted and tabulated. Twelve intervention studies were identified. Quality of studies ranged from 16.0 to 80.5%. Effective interventions were implemented for 3, 6 and 12 months. Medication adherence rates were greatly enhanced when multidimensional interventions were implemented whereas one-off feedback from a nurse and financial assistance programmes offered little improvement. Dose administration aids when used in conjunction with self-monitoring also improved adherence. The number of patients who had a drug holiday (at least 1-day interval without a dose) was higher in a once-daily regimen than a twice-daily regimen. The findings of this review suggest an intervention targeting behavioural risk factors or a combination of behavioural, educational and emotional changes is effective in enhancing medication adherence. Effectiveness of an intervention may be further enhanced if patients are encouraged to participate in the development process. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University

  17. Community-acquired carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii urinary tract infection just after marriage in a renal transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Y; Atalay, H; Turkmen, K; Biyik, Z; Genc, N; Yeksan, M

    2011-12-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is common in renal transplant recipients and may worsen allograft and patient survival. Many risk factors such as age, female gender, immunosuppression, comorbidity, deceased-donor kidney transplantation, and uretheral catheterization are involved in development of UTI. Acinetobacter baumannii has rarely been reported as a causative agent for development of UTI. Here, we present an unusual case of a renal transplant recipient who developed community-acquired carbapenem-resistent A. baumannii UTI. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Management of Candida infections in liver transplant recipients: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingegowda PB

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pushpalatha B Lingegowda,1–3 Tan Ban Hock1,2,4,5 1Department of Infectious Diseases, Singapore General Hospital, 2DUKE-NUS Graduate Medical School, 3Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 4SingHealth Internal Medicine Residency Program, 5Faculty of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore Abstract: Liver transplantation has emerged as a widely accepted lifesaving therapeutic option for many patients with a variety of liver diseases. Improved surgical and medical management has led to significant improvements in post-transplant survival rates with a 1 year and 5 year patient survival of 87% and 73%, respectively. A high mortality rate due to infections during the first post-transplant year persists. Invasive candidiasis is recognized as a significant problem associated with high morbidity and mortality. Recent surveillance data has helped to understand the changes in the epidemiology and the evolving trends in the use of antifungal agents for prophylaxis and treatment combined with the challenges of managing these invasive fungal infections, which has led the transplant community to explore the best management strategies. The emergence of resistant fungi and excess costs in managing these invasive fungal infections has added to the complexities of management. In this context, current perspectives in the management of Candida infections in liver transplant recipients will be reviewed. Keywords: Candida infections, management, liver transplant

  19. The Chinese community patient’s life satisfaction, assessment of community medical service, and trust in community health delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the Chinese government put a lot of effort into promoting the community patient’s life satisfaction, there still lacked the holistic and systematic approaches to promote the community patient’s life satisfaction in various regions of China. On the basis of the literature, it was found that both the community patient’s assessment of community medical service and trust in community health delivery system were important considerations when the community patient comprehensively evaluated community medical service to generate life satisfaction. So this study was set up to test whether and to what extent the community patient’s assessments of various major aspects of community medical service/various major aspects of the community patient’s trust in community health delivery system influenced life satisfaction in whole China/in various regions of China. Methods In order to explore the situation of China’s community health delivery system before 2009 and provide a reference for China’s community health delivery system reform, the data that could comprehensively and accurately reflect the community patient’s life satisfaction, assessment of community medical service, and trust in community health delivery system in various regions of China was needed, so this study collaborated with the National Bureau of Statistics of China to carry out a large-scale 2008 national community resident household survey (N = 3,306) for the first time in China. And the specified ordered probit models were established to analyze the dataset from this household survey. Results Among major aspects of community medical service, the medical cost (particularly in developed regions), the doctor-patient communication (particularly in developed regions), the medical facility and hospital environment (particularly in developed regions), and the medical treatment process (particularly in underdeveloped regions) were all key considerations (ppatient’s life

  20. Multimethod Assessment of Medication Nonadherence and Barriers in Adolescents and Young Adults With Solid Organ Transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Cyd K; Gutierrez-Colina, Ana M; Quast, Lauren F; Liverman, Rochelle; Lee, Jennifer L; Mee, Laura L; Reed-Knight, Bonney; Cushman, Grace; Chiang, Gloria; Romero, Rene; Mao, Chad; Garro, Rouba; Blount, Ronald L

    2018-03-17

    To (a) examine levels of medication nonadherence in adolescent and young adult (AYA) solid organ transplant recipients based on AYA- and caregiver proxy-reported nonadherence to different medication types and the medication-level variability index (MLVI) for tacrolimus, and (b) examine associations of adherence barriers and AYA and caregiver emotional distress symptoms with reported nonadherence and the MLVI. The sample included 47 AYAs (M age = 16.67 years, SD = 1.74; transplant types: 25% kidney, 47% liver, 28% heart) and their caregivers (94 total participants). AYAs and caregivers reported on AYAs' adherence barriers and their own emotional functioning. Nonadherence was measured with AYA self- and caregiver proxy-report and the MLVI for tacrolimus. The majority of AYAs and caregivers denied nonadherence, with lower rates of nonadherence reported for antirejection medications. In contrast, 40% of AYAs' MLVI values indicated nonadherence to tacrolimus. AYAs and caregivers who verbally acknowledged nonadherence had more AYA barriers and greater caregiver emotional distress symptoms compared with those who denied nonadherence. AYAs with MLVIs indicating nonadherence had more barriers than AYAs with MLVIs indicating adherence. Multimethod nonadherence evaluations for AYA transplant recipients should assess objective nonadherence using the MLVI, particularly in light of low reported nonadherence rates for antirejection medications. Assessments should include adherence barriers measures, given associations with the MLVI, and potentially prioritize assessing barriers over gauging nonadherence via self- or proxy-reports. Caregiver emotional distress symptoms may also be considered to provide insight into family or environmental barriers to adherence.

  1. Symptom experience associated with immunosuppressive drugs after liver transplantation in adults : possible relationship with medication non-compliance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drent, Gerda; Moons, P.; De Geest, S.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Haagsma, E. B.

    2008-01-01

    Symptom experience (occurrence and perceived distress) associated with side effects of immunosuppressive medications in organ transplant patients may well be associated with poorer quality of life and medication non-compliance. The aims of this study were: first, to assess symptom experience in

  2. Improving medication safety and cardiovascular risk factor control to mitigate disparities in African-American kidney transplant recipients: Design and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Cole

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a lack of data analyzing the influence of cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factor control on graft survival disparities in African-American kidney transplant recipients. Studies in the general population indicate that CVD risk factor control is poor in African-Americans, leading to higher rates of renal failure and major acute cardiovascular events. However, with the exception of hypertension, there is no data demonstrating similar results within transplant recipients. Recent analyses conducted by our investigator group indicate that CVD risk factors, especially diabetes, are poorly controlled in African-American recipients, which likely impacts graft loss. This study protocol describes a prospective interventional clinical trial with the goal of demonstrating improved medication safety and CVD risk factor control in adult solitary kidney transplant recipients at least one-year post-transplant with a functioning graft. This is a prospective, interventional, 6-month, pharmacist-led and technology enabled study in adult kidney transplant recipients with the goal of improving CVD risk factor outcomes by improving medication safety and patient self-efficacy. This papers describes the issues related to racial disparities in transplant, the details of this intervention and how we expect this intervention to improve CVD risk factor control in kidney transplant recipients, particularly within African-Americans.

  3. Types of Cancer Associated with Transplant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After the transplant Preventing rejection Post-transplant medications Types of immunosuppressants Switching immunosuppressants Side effects Other medications Generic and brand name drugs Post-transplant tests Infections and immunity Lifestyle changes Health concerns Back to work or ...

  4. Factors relevant to medication non-adherence in kidney transplant: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaiche, Stephanie; Décaudin, Bertrand; Dharancy, Sébastien; Noel, Christian; Odou, Pascal; Hazzan, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Background Medication non-adherence is a major issue after transplant that can lead to misdiagnosis, rejection, poor health affecting quality of life, graft loss or death. Several estimations of adherence and related factors have previously been described but conclusions leave doubt as to the most accurate assessment method. Aim of the review To identify the factors most relevant to medication non-adherence in kidney transplant in current clinical practice. Method This systematic review is registered in the PROSPERO data base and follows the Prisma checklist. Articles in English in three databases from January 2009 to December 2014 were analysed. A synthesis was made to target adherence assessment methods, their prevalence and significance. Results Thirty-seven studies were analysed rates of non-adherence fluctuating from 1.6 to 96%. Assessment methods varied from one study to another, although self-reports were mainly used. It appears that youth (≤50 years old), male, low social support, unemployment, low education, ≥3 months post graft, living donor, ≥6 comorbidities, ≥5 drugs/d, ≥2 intakes/d, negative beliefs, negative behavior, depression and anxiety were the factors significantly related to non-adherence. Conclusion As there are no established guidelines, consideration should be given to more than one approach to identify medication non-adherence although self-reports should remain the cornerstone of adherence assessment.

  5. Self-reported non-adherence and beliefs about medication in a Swedish kidney transplant population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennerling, Annette; Forsberg, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Patients' non-adherence to immunosuppressant treatment after organ transplantation may lead to organ failure, graft loss and death. Non-adherence among Swedish kidney transplant recipients has not previously been studied. Hence the aim of this study was to explore non-adherence among Swedish kidney transplant recipients by using self-report instruments as well as testing the hypothesis that there is a difference in self-reported symptoms, beliefs about medicine and social support between respondents with or without self reported non-adherence. In the present cross sectional study 250 renal transplant recipients participated by replying to a questionnaire. Two validated instruments were included, one on beliefs about medicine (the BMQ©), the other on nonadherence (the BAASIS©). Only 46 % never failed to follow the medical treatment with respect to taking the drugs, dosage or timing (>2 hrs from prescribed time). Timing was the most frequently reported deviation (48 %). Forty-seven patients (16 %) had failed taking at least one dose of the prescribed immunosuppressants during the past four weeks. Four individuals had reduced the prescribed doses. Only one reported taking a 'drug holiday'. Nine participants reported stronger concerns than necessities for immunosuppressive medication. For the BMQ the necessity scores were extremely high while the scores for concern were low. Risk behaviour identified by the BAASIS had no association in risk attitudes as identified in the BMQ. The only factor relating to non-adherence was lack of social support (p=0.022). In general adherence was high. Identification of the exceptions remains a challenge.

  6. Cardiac transplantation in South Carolina: 300 transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumbley, A J; Odom, Sylvia; Van Bakel, Adrian B; Pereira, Naveen; Ikonomidis, John S; Bradley, Scott; Kratz, John M; Sade, Robert M; Uber, Walt; Stroud, Martha R; Crawford, Fred A

    2006-02-01

    For nearly 20 years, the Medical University's Heart Transplant Program has been providing the citizens of South Carolina with excellent results with a minimum of delay. We present here the results of our first 300 heart transplants, spanning the first 18 years of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the Medical University. Overall survival has been very good, with one, five and ten year survival rates in the adults being 92 +/- 2%, 78 +/- 3%, and 58 +/- 4%. The children's group showed survival rates of 94 +/- 5%, 79 +/- 11%, and 79 +/- 11% over the same lengths of time. Most recently, the federally sponsored Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (www.ustransplant.org, July 2005) reports for MUSC a one-year survival of 97.67% and three-year survival of 90.74%; both leading the Southeast. We attribute this success to the dedicated work of health care workers at all levels who believe in attention to detail and that the patient always comes first. It is our hope that we will be able to continue to provide expert, state-of-the-art, cardiac transplant services long into the future, while continuing to expand our heart failure management program as dictated by further developments in this rapidly evolving specialty.

  7. Depression and Liver Transplant Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, William; Welle, Nicole; Sutley, Kristen; Thurber, Steven

    Patients who underwent liver transplantation and experienced clinical depression have heretofore evinced lower survival rates when compared to nondepressed counterparts. To investigate the hypothesis that transplant patients who seek and obtain medical treatment for depression would circumvent the prior reduced survival findings. A total of 765 patients with liver transplants were scrutinized for complications following transplantation. Further, 104 patients experienced posttransplant depression as manifested by diagnosis and treatment by medical personnel. Survival analyses were conducted comparing hazard and survival curves for these selected individuals and the remainder of transplant patients. Contrary to prior data and consistent with the aforementioned hypothesis, median survival durations, survival curves, and hazard functions (controlling for age and prolonged posttransplant survival for the depressed patients were better. The improved survival for the depressed patients may simply be related to an amelioration of depressed symptoms via antidepressant medications. However, this interpretation would only be congruent with reduced hazard, not elevated survival, beyond the norm (median) for other transplant participants. Assuming the reliability and generalization of our findings, perhaps a reasonable and compelling interpretation is that combined with the effectiveness of antidepressant medications, the seeking and receiving treatment for depression is a type of proxy measure of a more global pattern of adherence to recommended posttransplant medical regimens. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Facilitators and barriers of medication adherence in pediatric liver and kidney transplant recipients: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Anouck; Decorte, Anneloes; Levtchenko, Elena; Knops, Noel; Dobbels, Fabienne

    2014-12-01

    Many young transplant patients (≤11 years old) struggle to take their immunosuppressive and co-medications correctly, yet it remains unclear which factors positively or negatively affect medication adherence. Research studies on determinants in this age group are scarce, have methodological flaws, and focus exclusively on immunosuppressants or on barriers rather than on facilitators. This study used a consecutive mixed-methods (qualitative + quantitative) design. Semistructured interviews with parents of 10 pediatric liver or kidney transplant recipients 2 to 11 years old on adherence facilitators and barriers were conducted, complemented by quantification of adherence to the immunosuppressants and co-medications, and completion of the "immunosuppressive medication adherence barriers" self-report instrument. A median of 19 (range, 10-29) barriers was reported: the most commonly encountered were forgetfulness (70%), vomiting (70%), bad taste (60%), and interruptions in routine (60%). Parents reported a median of 15 facilitators (range, 6-26), including using practical aids (100%), having medication with you at all times (100%), having to take fewer medications (80%), and experiencing fewer regimen changes over time (80%). No clear distinction between immunosuppressants or co-medications was made. This study provides several new insights based on peer experience to support future patients and their parents in medication adherence.

  9. Is there an association between immunosuppressant therapy medication adherence and depression, quality of life, and personality traits in the kidney and liver transplant population?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorevski E

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Gorevski,1 Paul Succop,1 Jyoti Sachdeva,1 Teresa M Cavanaugh,1 Paul Volek,1 Pamela Heaton,1 Marie Chisholm-Burns,2 Jill E Martin-Boone1 1University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA, 2University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy, Memphis, TN, USA Objectives: To measure the association of transplant patients' personality, depression, and quality of life with medication adherence in kidney and liver transplant recipients. Methods: A cross-sectional study of liver and kidney transplant recipients greater than 1 year post-transplant was conducted. Patients’ adherence with medications was assessed using the Immunosuppressive Therapy Adherence Scale. Personality and depression were assessed using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory Scale and Patient Health Questionnaire 9, respectively. Quality of life was assessed using the Short Form-36, and functional status was determined using the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale. Results: A total of 86 kidney and 50 liver transplant patients completed the surveys. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated an association between depression and adherence with immunosuppressive medications in kidney transplant recipients. Kidney transplant patients who exhibited “low openness” scores were 91% more likely to be nonadherent. Kidney transplant patients’ physical functional status was strongly associated with nonadherence, and for each point increase in functionality the patients adherence increased by 4%. In the liver sample, age was associated with adherence. For every year increase in age, adherence increased by 7%. Conclusion: The presence of low openness as a personality trait, poor physical functional status, and depression were associated with adherence in the kidney transplant population. In the liver transplant population, younger age was associated with nonadherence. Keywords: adherence, transplant, liver, kidney

  10. Nuclear medical examinations of patients with transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratz, K.F.; Schober, O.; Schwarzrock, R.; Ringe, B.; Haverich, A.; Medizinische Hochschule Hannover; Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

    1987-01-01

    Present experience concerning the contribution of nuclear medicine to the follow-up of transplanted organs, such as kidneys, livers, and hearts, is based on analyses of the course of more than 1100 transplanted kidneys, 200 orthotopic livers, and 100 orthotopic transplanted hearts. In the kidneys, 99m Tc-DTPA is used to assess both perfusion and glomerular filtration rate, e.g. rejection and acute tubular necrosis. In combination with ultrasound nuclear medicine procedures serve in the detection of surgical complications, e.g. urinary leakage, vascular occlusion. In the follow-up of liver transplanted patients cholescintigraphy with 99m Tc-DISPA (or JODIDA) is a test for the patency and integrity of bile ducts or hepaticoenterostomy in the grafted patient, e.g. bile leakage, stenosis. The nutritive hepatic flow is estimated by colloid uptake measurements 99m Tc-MMS and the corresponding RES function. Despite inherent limitations the arterial-to-total perfusion ratio is measured with 99m Tc-DTPA, e.g. rejection, vascular problem. Rejection monitoring in orthotopic transplanted hearts includes routine MUGA (multiple gated blood acquisition) studies. The left ventricular ejection fraction is of major value compared to regional parameters of mortality (Fourier analysis) e.g. rejection, infection. 111 In-oxine granulocyte scans and methods for the detection of bleeding are of minor importance and relevance in the follow-up of transplanted organs. The article discusses the value of the diagnostic procedures in terms of statistical parameters, such as sensitivity, specifity, and accuracy. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Transplant tourism: a growing phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, David J

    2009-03-01

    Medical tourism is increasing owing to high costs of care, lack of availability or long waits for procedures, and improvements in technology and standards of care in many countries. Transplant tourism is one example of medical tourism that has been attracting increasing attention because of concerns over poor treatment and outcomes of both donors and recipients. Most such cases involve vended kidneys obtained from vulnerable populations, and both donors and recipients receive inferior care by US standards. This commentary discusses a paper by Gill et al. that compared outcomes of 33 transplant tourists with those of patients transplanted at a US center. Fewer complications and better outcomes were seen in patients transplanted in the US center than among transplant tourists. Large transplant centers with long waiting times are increasingly likely to see patients return newly transplanted from overseas; such patients require urgent attention, with particular consideration to infectious complications.

  12. Improving medication adherence among kidney transplant recipients: Findings from other industries, patient engagement, and behavioral economics—A scoping review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, Shelley R; Parente, Stephen T; Pruett, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    The immune system is a powerful barrier to successful organ transplantation, but one that has been routinely thwarted through modern pharmacotherapeutics. Despite the benefits of immunosuppressive therapy, medication non-adherence leads to an increased risk of graft rejection, higher hospital utilization and costs, and poor outcomes. We conduct a scoping review following Arksey and O’Malley’s five-stage framework methodology to identify established or novel interventions that could be applied to kidney transplant recipients to improve medication adherence. As the desired outcome is a behavior (taking a pill), we assess three areas: behavioral-focused interventions in other industries, patient engagement theories, and behavioral economic principles. Search strategies included mining business, social sciences, and medical literature with additional guidance from six consultative interviews. Our review suggests that no intervention stands out as superior or likely to be more effective than any other intervention; yet promising strategies and interventions were identified across all three areas examined. Based on our findings, we believe there are five strategies that transplant centers and other organizations can implement to improve medication adherence: (1) Build a foundation of trust; (2) Employ multiple interventions; (3) Stratify the population; (4) Develop collaborative partnerships; and (5) Embed medication adherence into the organization’s culture. The effectiveness of these interventions will need to be investigated further, but we believe they are a step in the right direction for organizations to consider in their efforts to improve medication adherence. PMID:26835016

  13. Improving medication adherence among kidney transplant recipients: Findings from other industries, patient engagement, and behavioral economics—A scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley R Oberlin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune system is a powerful barrier to successful organ transplantation, but one that has been routinely thwarted through modern pharmacotherapeutics. Despite the benefits of immunosuppressive therapy, medication non-adherence leads to an increased risk of graft rejection, higher hospital utilization and costs, and poor outcomes. We conduct a scoping review following Arksey and O’Malley’s five-stage framework methodology to identify established or novel interventions that could be applied to kidney transplant recipients to improve medication adherence. As the desired outcome is a behavior (taking a pill, we assess three areas: behavioral-focused interventions in other industries, patient engagement theories, and behavioral economic principles. Search strategies included mining business, social sciences, and medical literature with additional guidance from six consultative interviews. Our review suggests that no intervention stands out as superior or likely to be more effective than any other intervention; yet promising strategies and interventions were identified across all three areas examined. Based on our findings, we believe there are five strategies that transplant centers and other organizations can implement to improve medication adherence: (1 Build a foundation of trust; (2 Employ multiple interventions; (3 Stratify the population; (4 Develop collaborative partnerships; and (5 Embed medication adherence into the organization’s culture. The effectiveness of these interventions will need to be investigated further, but we believe they are a step in the right direction for organizations to consider in their efforts to improve medication adherence.

  14. Improving medication adherence among kidney transplant recipients: Findings from other industries, patient engagement, and behavioral economics-A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, Shelley R; Parente, Stephen T; Pruett, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    The immune system is a powerful barrier to successful organ transplantation, but one that has been routinely thwarted through modern pharmacotherapeutics. Despite the benefits of immunosuppressive therapy, medication non-adherence leads to an increased risk of graft rejection, higher hospital utilization and costs, and poor outcomes. We conduct a scoping review following Arksey and O'Malley's five-stage framework methodology to identify established or novel interventions that could be applied to kidney transplant recipients to improve medication adherence. As the desired outcome is a behavior (taking a pill), we assess three areas: behavioral-focused interventions in other industries, patient engagement theories, and behavioral economic principles. Search strategies included mining business, social sciences, and medical literature with additional guidance from six consultative interviews. Our review suggests that no intervention stands out as superior or likely to be more effective than any other intervention; yet promising strategies and interventions were identified across all three areas examined. Based on our findings, we believe there are five strategies that transplant centers and other organizations can implement to improve medication adherence: (1) Build a foundation of trust; (2) Employ multiple interventions; (3) Stratify the population; (4) Develop collaborative partnerships; and (5) Embed medication adherence into the organization's culture. The effectiveness of these interventions will need to be investigated further, but we believe they are a step in the right direction for organizations to consider in their efforts to improve medication adherence.

  15. Gerundium: A Comprehensive Public Educational Program on Organ Donation and Transplantation and Civil Law in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, D Á; Mihály, S; Rajczy, K; Zsom, L; Zádori, G; Fedor, R; Eszter, K; Enikő, B; Asztalos, L; Nemes, B

    2015-09-01

    Organ transplantation has become an organized, routine, widely used method in the treatment of several end-stage diseases. Kidney transplantation means the best life-quality and longest life expectancy for patients with end-stage renal diseases. Transplantation is the only available long-term medical treatment for patients with end-stage liver, heart, and lung diseases. Despite the number of transplantations increasing worldwide, the needs of the waiting lists remain below expectations. One of the few methods to increase the number of transplantations is public education. In cooperation with the University of Debrecen Institute for Surgery Department of Transplantation, the Hungarian National Blood Transfusion Service Organ Coordination Office, and the Local Committee Debrecen of Hungarian Medical Students' International Relations Committee (HuMSIRC), the Gerundium, a new educational program, has been established to serve this target. Gerundium is a special program designed especially for youth education. Peer education means that age-related medical student volunteers educate their peers during interactive unofficial sessions. Volunteers were trained during specially designed training. Medical students were honored by HuMSIRC, depending on their activity on the basis of their own regulations. Uniform slides and brochures to share were designed. Every Hungarian secondary school was informed. The Local Committee Budapest of HuMSIRC also joined the program, which helps to expand our activity throughout Hungary. The aim of the program is public education to help disperse disapproval, if presented. As a multiple effect, our program promotes medical students to have better skills in the field of transplantation, presentation, and communication skills. Our program is a voluntary program with strong professional support and is free of charge for the community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ten-Year Experience of Renal Transplantation at the Northwest National Medical Center, Sonora Mexico: A Survival Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, M A; Laguna-Teniente, I R

    2016-03-01

    To improve survival after kidney transplantation, it is important to identify the variables that affect it. The aim of this work was to determine the survival of renal grafts from living and cadaveric donors and the survival of patients with graft failure in a tertiary medical unit in northwest Mexico. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients who received transplants since 2004 at the center. Database and medical records of patients were reviewed. The data were captured in a database previously designed in the SPSS v21.1 program for statistical processing. A descriptive analysis with frequencies and percentages and numeric variables measure of central tendency and dispersion was conducted. The survival analysis was made with the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate the graft survive. A total of 412 transplantations were performed during the 2004-2013 period. We analyzed 331 records, and the 10-year survival rates of donor allografts from living and cadaveric donors were 86.64% and 72.78%, respectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Liver Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  18. Ethnocentrism is an unacceptable rationale for health care policy: a critique of transplant tourism position statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R W

    2008-06-01

    Medical tourism has emerged as a global health care phenomenon, valued at $60 billion worldwide in 2006. Transplant tourism, unlike other more benign forms of medical tourism, has become a flashpoint within the transplant community, underscoring the uneasy relationships among science, religion, politics, ethics and international health care policies concerning the commercialization of transplantation. Numerous professional associations have drafted or issued position statements condemning transplant tourism. Often the criticism is misdirected. The real issue concerns both the source and circumstances surrounding the procurement of donor organs, including commercialization. Unfortunately, many of the position statements circulated to date represent an ethnocentric and decidedly western view of transplantation. As such, the merits of culturally insensitive policy statements issued by otherwise well-intended transplant professionals, and the organizations they represent, must be evaluated within the broader context of foreign relations and diplomacy, as well as cultural and ethical relativity. Having done so, many persons may find themselves reluctant to endorse statements that have produced a misleading social desirability bias, which, to a great extent, has impeded more thoughtful and inclusive deliberations on the issues. Therefore, instead of taking an official position on policy matters concerning the commercial aspects of transplantation, international professional associations should offer culturally respectful guidance.

  19. Understanding kidney transplant patients' treatment choices: The interaction of emotion with medical and social influences on risk preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Jean; Morgan, Myfanwy

    2016-04-01

    Following renal transplantation patients experience on-going immunosuppressant medication to reduce the risk of graft rejection. Over the long term the side effects of immunosuppressive drugs may affect graft survival and significantly increase risks of cancers, stroke and cardiovascular disease. To reduce these risks research is underway to develop a biomarker test to identify those patients who are likely to be 'tolerant' to their graft and therefore able to reduce immunosuppression. Biomarker tests may however incorrectly identify some patients as tolerant, thus jeopardising their graft. Following a quantitative assessment of risk preferences we undertook a qualitative study to investigate the range of influences that shaped the substantial variations found in the level of risk transplant recipients were hypothetically willing to take. In-depth interviews were carried out in the United Kingdom between May 2013 and July 2014 with 24 transplant recipients all of whom had stable kidney graft function. These interviews identified a range of factors that patients take into account when making risk assessments, including familial views, trust and the ritual of 'gift exchange' that permeates the social space of kidney transplantation. Our data support the notion that emotion is not part of a linear process, preceding and separate to reason, but is intertwined with personal understanding and perception of risk and involves a complex interplay between different influences on decision-making. Our data also support Lupton's view that risk judgements are shared and collective rather than located within the individual and suggests that patient choice rather than involving a purely rational weighing of medical benefit is often based on influences that may not accord with the framework nor intention of medical professionals and medical research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A kidney transplantation model in a low-resource country: an experience from Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Syed Adibul Hasan; Naqvi, Syed Ali Anwar; Zafar, Mirza Naqi; Akhtar, Syed Fazal

    2013-05-01

    Pakistan is a low-resource country with a population of 185 million where expenditure on health is 1.3% of the gross national product. The estimated incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is 100 per million of the population. The paucity and high costs of renal replacement therapy render more than 90% of the ESRD population disenfranchised from replacement therapy. Our center, which is a government sector organization, established as an integrated dialysis and living related renal transplant program in the 1980s, where all services were provided free of cost to all patients with life-long follow-up care including medications. The model was based on a concept of community/government partnership where the contributions to funds vary between 40% and 60% for each partner. The model has been self sustaining for 25 years, with an annual budget of $28 million in 2010. Presently, over 600 patients are dialyzed each day and each week, 7-10 patients have received live related transplants. The overall 1- and 5-year graft survival rate of 3150 transplants is 92% and 85%, respectively. Free dialysis and transplantation established our institute as a focus of transplantation in the country. This model therefore allowed the institute to have a vital role in the campaign against transplant tourism and in the promulgation of the transplant law. It shows that in low-resource countries, specialized centers in the government sector can, with community support, provide high-quality ESRD care to the disenfranchised population.

  1. Identifying Barriers to Preemptive Kidney Transplantation in a Living Donor Transplant Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan A. Helmick, MD

    2018-04-01

    Conclusions. Even among a patient population that is primarily white, educated, and has a spouse or first-degree relative donor, PreKTx rates remain concerningly low. Increased time between diagnosis or education and transplant are predictors of PreKTx. Greater emphasis on transplant education earlier in the stages of chronic kidney disease and community outreach from transplant centers may help to increase the rate of PreKTx.

  2. Immunosuppressive medication adherence in kidney transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalić, Jelena; Veličković-Radovanović, Radmila; Mitić, Branka; Paunović, Goran; Cvetković, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    To assess the degree of immunosuppressive medication adherence in kidney transplant patients (KTPs) and to determine if there is a difference in the rate of adherence to tacrolimus (Tac), cyclosporine (CsA) and sirolimus (Sir). From a total of 63 KTPs treated at the Clinic of Nephrology, Clinical Centre Niš, Serbia, 60 participated in the study by responding to questionnaires. They were divided into the adherence group (n = 43) and the nonadherence group (n = 17) according to their degree of adherence which was measured using a validated survey form, the simplified medication adherence questionnaire. The KTP adherence to the different immunosuppressive regimens (Tac, CsA and Sir) was compared. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student t test. Adherence was observed in 43 (71.7%) patients, and only 17 (28.3%) did not follow the prescribed therapy. The estimated glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower in the nonadherence group (38.52 ± 18.22 ml/min) than in the adherence group (52.43 ± 16.91 ml/min, p adherers and the nonadherers (6.30 ± 2.06 vs. 5.0 ± 1.52 ng/ml, p adherence. Nonadherence was associated with worse graft function and a lower Tac level. Knowledge about the degree of adherence could help the early identification of nonadherent patients and the development of strategies to improve this. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Transplant tourism: Outcomes of United States residents who undergo kidney transplantation overseas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Muna T; Kasiske, Bertram L; Rosenberg, Mark E

    2006-12-27

    Although international commerce in kidney transplantation is a reality, little is known about U.S. residents who travel abroad for kidney transplantation. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes of patients who were evaluated at the University of Minnesota Medical Center or Hennepin County Medical Center, but then surreptitiously underwent kidney transplantation overseas. We identified 10 patients who underwent kidney transplantation outside the United States between September 16, 2002 and June 30, 2006 and then returned for care in our programs. Eight were transplanted in Pakistan (all Somali), one was transplanted in China (Chinese), and one was transplanted in Iran (Iranian). All but one had a living donor. Mean age was 36.8+/-12.5 years with median follow-up of 2.0 years (range 0.4-3.7). Three patients communicated their intent to travel abroad before transplantation. Induction immunosuppressive therapy (if any) was available in 3/10, and initial maintenance immunosuppression was known in 5/10. Complications were primarily infectious, with six potentially life-threatening infections in four patients. At last follow-up, mean serum creatinine was 1.13+/-0.34 mg/dL, acute rejection occurred in 2/10, 1/10 grafts failed due to acute rejection, and 9/10 patients were alive. Kidney function and graft survival were generally good after surreptitious overseas kidney transplantation. Major problems included incomplete perioperative information communicated to the posttransplant care facility and a high incidence of posttransplant infections. Longer follow-up and detailed cost analysis are needed to better understand the implications of the growing phenomenon of transplant tourism.

  4. Reaching out: medical students leading in local communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Aidan; O'Hare, Niamh; Corr, Michael; Sterling, Margaret; Gormley, Gerard J

    2015-06-01

    Queen's University Red Cross is a medical student-led volunteer group with a key aim of promoting social change within local communities and empowering young people to aspire to higher education. We describe 'The Personal Development Certificate', a 12-week community development programme devised by third-year medical students at Queen's University Belfast to target young people who are lacking educational motivation, are disengaged at home or are marginalised through social circumstances. Community-based education is of increasing importance within undergraduate and postgraduate medical education in the UK, and further afield. We evaluated the perceived improvements in key skills such as teamwork, leadership, communication, and problem solving in students following participation in this programme, and the extent to which their attitude and appreciation of community-based medicine changed. [Students] appreciated the opportunity to translate a series of classroom-learned skills to real-life environments Following facilitation of this community-based initiative, all students reported a perceived improvement in the acquired skill sets. Students made strong links from this programme to previous clinical experiences and appreciated the opportunity to translate a series of classroom-learned skills to real-life environments and interactions. The students' appreciation and understanding of community-based medicine was the single most improved area of our evaluation. We have demonstrated that medical students possess the skills to develop and facilitate their own educational projects. Non-clinical, student-led community projects have the potential to be reproduced using recognised frameworks and guidelines to complement the current undergraduate medical curriculum. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Self-efficacy beliefs, locus of control, religiosity and non-adherence to immunosuppressive medications in kidney transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Andresa Nascimento; Moratelli, Lucas; Tavares, Paula Liziero; Marsicano, Elisa De Oliveira; Pinhati, Renata Romanholi; Colugnati, Fernando Antonio Basile; Lucchetti, Giancarlo; Sanders-Pinheiro, Helady

    2016-11-01

    Adherence to immunosuppressive medication is essential for favourable kidney transplant outcomes. The present study aims to investigate how self-efficacy beliefs, health locus of control and religiosity are associated with adherence to immunosuppressives in post kidney transplant recipients. This is a cross-sectional study with 88 recipients with more than 1 year after transplantation. Three methods were used to classify patients as adherent or non-adherent: Basel Assessment of Adherence Scale for Immunosuppressives - BAASIS, the collateral report and blood levels of immunosuppressive medications. Self-efficacy, health locus of control, and religiosity were evaluated applying General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale, Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale and Duke University Religion Index, respectively. Non-adherence was modelled by uni- and multivariated analysis. Sixty-three percent of the patients were male, age 47.2 ± 12.9 years, and median post-transplant time 108.71 (49.0-266.0) months. We found 70.5% of patients were non-adherent through at least one method. Adherent patients presented higher self-efficacy scores (45.1 ± 4.9 vs 38.3 ± 8.6; P locus of control (OR 1.23, IC 1.04-1.45, P = 0.016) and lower intrinsic religiosity (OR 0.56, IC 0.38-0.84, P = 0.006). Our study showed that self-efficacy, chance locus of control, and intrinsic religiosity were associated with non-adherence to immunosuppressives. A broader perception of the kidney transplant patient´s integrality can help health professionals to design strategies to promote adherence in this population. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  6. The global diffusion of organ transplantation: trends, drivers and policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Sarah L; Hirth, Richard; Mahíllo, Beatriz; Domínguez-Gil, Beatriz; Delmonico, Francis L; Noel, Luc; Chapman, Jeremy; Matesanz, Rafael; Carmona, Mar; Alvarez, Marina; Núñez, Jose R; Leichtman, Alan

    2014-11-01

    Rising incomes, the spread of personal insurance, lifestyle factors adding to the burden of illness, ageing populations, globalization and skills transfer within the medical community have increased worldwide demand for organ transplantation. The Global Observatory on Donation and Transplantation, which was built in response to World Health Assembly resolution WHA57.18, has conducted ongoing documentation of global transplantation activities since 2007. In this paper, we use the Global Observatory's data to describe the current distribution of - and trends in - transplantation activities and to evaluate the role of health systems factors and macroeconomics in the diffusion of transplantation technology. We then consider the implications of our results for health policies relating to organ donation and transplantation. Of the World Health Organization's Member States, most now engage in organ transplantation and more than a third performed deceased donor transplantation in 2011. In general, the Member States that engage in organ transplantation have greater access to physician services and greater total health spending per capita than the Member States where organ transplantation is not performed. The provision of deceased donor transplantation was closely associated with high levels of gross national income per capita. There are several ways in which governments can support the ethical development of organ donation and transplantation programmes. Specifically, they can ensure that appropriate legislation, regulation and oversight are in place, and monitor donation and transplantation activities, practices and outcomes. Moreover, they can allocate resources towards the training of specialist physicians, surgeons and transplant coordinators, and implement a professional donor-procurement network.

  7. The global diffusion of organ transplantation: trends, drivers and policy implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, Richard; Mahíllo, Beatriz; Domínguez-Gil, Beatriz; Delmonico, Francis L; Noel, Luc; Chapman, Jeremy; Matesanz, Rafael; Carmona, Mar; Alvarez, Marina; Núñez, Jose R; Leichtman, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Rising incomes, the spread of personal insurance, lifestyle factors adding to the burden of illness, ageing populations, globalization and skills transfer within the medical community have increased worldwide demand for organ transplantation. The Global Observatory on Donation and Transplantation, which was built in response to World Health Assembly resolution WHA57.18, has conducted ongoing documentation of global transplantation activities since 2007. In this paper, we use the Global Observatory’s data to describe the current distribution of – and trends in – transplantation activities and to evaluate the role of health systems factors and macroeconomics in the diffusion of transplantation technology. We then consider the implications of our results for health policies relating to organ donation and transplantation. Of the World Health Organization’s Member States, most now engage in organ transplantation and more than a third performed deceased donor transplantation in 2011. In general, the Member States that engage in organ transplantation have greater access to physician services and greater total health spending per capita than the Member States where organ transplantation is not performed. The provision of deceased donor transplantation was closely associated with high levels of gross national income per capita. There are several ways in which governments can support the ethical development of organ donation and transplantation programmes. Specifically, they can ensure that appropriate legislation, regulation and oversight are in place, and monitor donation and transplantation activities, practices and outcomes. Moreover, they can allocate resources towards the training of specialist physicians, surgeons and transplant coordinators, and implement a professional donor-procurement network. PMID:25378744

  8. Beyond vertical integration--Community based medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Emma Margaret

    2006-11-01

    The term 'vertical integration' is used broadly in medical education, sometimes when discussing community based medical education (CBME). This article examines the relevance of the term 'vertical integration' and provides an alternative perspective on the complexities of facilitating the CBME process. The principles of learner centredness, patient centredness and flexibility are fundamental to learning in the diverse contexts of 'community'. Vertical integration as a structural concept is helpful for academic organisations but has less application to education in the community setting; a different approach illuminates the strengths and challenges of CBME that need consideration by these organisations.

  9. Perceptions of health status, medication side effects and depression after successful renal transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamran, F.; Masood, A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the perceptions of health status and depression among Renal Transplant Recipients (RTRs). Stydy Design: A longitudinal research design was used. Methods: Recipients’ perceived health status (PHS) was measured by a self-developed questionnaire that reflected the symptom severity and frequency of common immunosuppressant side effects. Depression levels were assessed using Beck Depression Inventory B.D.I II) .The sample population comprised of RTRs with a successful and healthy renal transplant recruited from private and government sector renal units in Lahore, Pakistan. Results: Recipients with poorer perceptions of health status tend to be more depressed as indicated by significant negative correlations between PHS and depression. However, further regression analysis found both constructs as significant predictors of each other, raising a question of causal direction. A cross lagged correlation analysis indicated that PHS appears to be a stronger predictor of depression comparatively. Most recipients tend to have positive perceptions of their health status (M = 30.84, S.D = 3.64) with minimum to moderate level of depression (M = 9.50, S.D = 4.00), It is found that a positive perception of health status is associated with lowered depression. Conclusion: Most recipients’ with a healthy kidney transplant tend to report a positive perception of their health status despite adverse medication side effects. However, the perceived health status is significantly associated with consequent feeling of depression. The study confirms the efficacy and positive health outcomes of renal transplantation in Pakistan. (author)

  10. Reported Nonadherence to Immunosuppressive Medication in Young Adults After Heart Transplantation: A Retrospective Analysis of a National Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Dmitry; McConnell, Patrick I; Galantowicz, Mark; Tobias, Joseph D; Hayes, Don

    2017-02-01

    Young adult heart transplantation (HTx) recipients experience high mortality risk attributed to increased nonadherence to immunosuppressive medication in this age window. This study sought to test whether a high-risk age window in HTx recipients persisted in the absence of reported nonadherence. Heart transplantation recipients aged 2 to 40 years, transplanted between October 1999 and January 2007, were identified in the United Network for Organ Sharing database. Multivariable survival analysis was used to estimate influences of age at transplantation and attained posttransplant age on mortality hazard among patients stratified by center report of nonadherence to immunosuppression that compromised recovery. Three thousand eighty-one HTx recipients were included, with univariate analysis demonstrating peak hazards of mortality and reported nonadherence among 567 patients transplanted between ages 17 and 24 years. Multivariable analysis adjusting for reported nonadherence demonstrated lower mortality among patients transplanted at younger (hazards ratio, 0.813; 95% confidence interval, 0.663-0.997; P = 0.047) or older (hazards ratio, 0.835; 95% confidence interval, 0.701-0.994; P = 0.042) ages. Peak mortality hazard at ages 17 to 24 years was confirmed in the subgroup of patients with no nonadherence reported during follow-up. This result was replicated using attained age after HTx as the time metric, with younger and older ages predicting improved survival in the absence of reported nonadherence. Late adolescence and young adulthood coincide with greater mortality hazard and greater chances of nonadherence to immunosuppressive medication after HTx, but the elevation of mortality hazard in this age range persists in the absence of reported nonadherence. Other causes of the high-risk age window for post-HTx mortality should be demonstrated to identify opportunities for intervention.

  11. Towards Improving the Transfer of Care of Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, J S; Wright, A J; Delmonico, F L; Newell, K A

    2017-01-01

    Kidney transplant recipients require specialized medical care and may be at risk for adverse health outcomes when their care is transferred. This document provides opinion-based recommendations to facilitate safe and efficient transfers of care for kidney transplant recipients including minimizing the risk of rejection, avoidance of medication errors, ensuring patient access to immunosuppressant medications, avoidance of lapses in health insurance coverage, and communication of risks of donor disease transmission. The document summarizes information to be included in a medical transfer document and includes suggestions to help the patient establish an optimal therapeutic relationship with their new transplant care team. The document is intended as a starting point towards standardization of transfers of care involving kidney transplant recipients. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  12. Medicine as a Community of Practice: Implications for Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruess, Richard L; Cruess, Sylvia R; Steinert, Yvonne

    2018-02-01

    The presence of a variety of independent learning theories makes it difficult for medical educators to construct a comprehensive theoretical framework for medical education, resulting in numerous and often unrelated curricular, instructional, and assessment practices. Linked with an understanding of identity formation, the concept of communities of practice could provide such a framework, emphasizing the social nature of learning. Individuals wish to join the community, moving from legitimate peripheral to full participation, acquiring the identity of community members and accepting the community's norms.Having communities of practice as the theoretical basis of medical education does not diminish the value of other learning theories. Communities of practice can serve as the foundational theory, and other theories can provide a theoretical basis for the multiple educational activities that take place within the community, thus helping create an integrated theoretical approach.Communities of practice can guide the development of interventions to make medical education more effective and can help both learners and educators better cope with medical education's complexity. An initial step is to acknowledge the potential of communities of practice as the foundational theory. Educational initiatives that could result from this approach include adding communities of practice to the cognitive base; actively engaging students in joining the community; creating a welcoming community; expanding the emphasis on explicitly addressing role modeling, mentoring, experiential learning, and reflection; providing faculty development to support the program; and recognizing the necessity to chart progress toward membership in the community.

  13. Community-oriented Curriculum Design for Medical Humanities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duu-Jian Tsai

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Various recent surveys in Taiwan show physicians' decreasing satisfaction and increasing frustration with their working environment. Their major complaints are stress, long hours, salary, management's disrespect, and lack of trust from patients and society. To move towards restoration of social trust, this paper proposes incorporating the concept of “doctor as mediator in the changing relationship with patients” into the medical curriculum, as will be described in detail. This paper argues that structured community service for medical students facilitates self-learning, and will not only motivate them to develop good clinical and communication skills, but will also lead them to realize that the essence of medicine must be social trust. These effects have been seen after several years of an experimental curriculum involving more than 800 students. A program using methodology for community empowerment has been realized in a two-stage curriculum design. Students' self-assessment of achievements in these courses included further improvement in communication skills, courage to express own position, appropriate planning in advance, management of human resources, ability to deal with limited space and time, and experience of a profoundly moving learning process. In conclusion, community-based curriculum designs that facilitate self-learning for medical students should be the key element of reformed humanities education in Taiwan medical schools. Moreover, medical humanities continues to be a key element contributing to ongoing intellectual movements in Taiwan for building civil society and rooting democracy in the community.

  14. Medical Waste Management in Community Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Rezapour, Ramin; Saadati, Mohammad; Seifi, Samira; Amini, Behnam; Varmazyar, Farahnaz

    2018-02-01

    Non-standard management of medical waste leads to irreparable side effects. This issue is of double importance in health care centers in a city which are the most extensive system for providing Primary Health Care (PHC) across Iran cities. This study investigated the medical waste management standards observation in Tabriz community health care centers, northwestern Iran. In this triangulated cross-sectional study (qualitative-quantitative), data collecting tool was a valid checklist of waste management process developed based on Iranian medical waste management standards. The data were collected in 2015 through process observation and interviews with the health center's staff. The average rate of waste management standards observance in Tabriz community health centers, Tabriz, Iran was 29.8%. This case was 22.8% in dimension of management and training, 27.3% in separating and collecting, 31.2% in transport and temporary storage, and 42.9% in sterilization and disposal. Lack of principal separation of wastes, inappropriate collecting and disposal cycle of waste and disregarding safety tips (fertilizer device performance monitoring, microbial cultures and so on) were among the observed defects in health care centers supported by quantitative data. Medical waste management was not in a desirable situation in Tabriz community health centers. The expansion of community health centers in different regions and non-observance of standards could predispose to incidence the risks resulted from medical wastes. So it is necessary to adopt appropriate policies to promote waste management situation.

  15. Treatment of relapsing Clostridium difficile infection using fecal microbiota transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathak R

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rahul Pathak,1 Hill Ambrose Enuh,1 Anish Patel,1 Prasanna Wickremesinghe21Department of Internal Medicine, New York Medical College, Internal Medicine Program at Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, NY, USA; 2Department of Gastrointestinal Medicine, New York Medical College, Internal Medicine Program at Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, NY, USABackground: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI has become a global concern over the last decade. In the United States, CDI escalated in incidence from 1996 to 2005 from 31 to 64/100,000. In 2010, there were 500,000 cases of CDI with an estimated mortality up to 20,000 cases a year. The significance of this problem is evident from the hospital costs of over 3 billion dollars annually. Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT was first described in 1958 and since then about 500 cases have been published in literature in various small series and case reports. This procedure has been reported mainly from centers outside of the United States and acceptance of the practice has been difficult. Recently the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA labeled FMT as a biological drug; as a result, guidelines will soon be required to help establish it as a mainstream treatment. More US experience needs to be reported to popularize this procedure here and form guidelines.Method: We did a retrospective review of our series of patients with relapsing CDI who were treated with FMT over a 3-year period. We present our experience with FMT at a community hospital as a retrospective review and describe our procedure.Results: There were a total of 12 patients who underwent FMT for relapsing C. difficile. Only one patient failed to respond and required a second FMT. There were no complications associated with the transplant and all patients had resolution of symptoms within 48 hours of FMT.Conclusion: FMT is a cheap, easily available, effective therapy for recurrent CDI; it can be safely performed in a

  16. Bone Marrow Transplantation: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... marrow transplant - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Bone Marrow Transplantation ... transplant - slideshow Graft-versus-host disease Related Health Topics Bone Marrow Diseases Stem Cells National Institutes of ...

  17. Thoracic organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Richard N; Barr, Mark L; McCullough, Keith P; Egan, Thomas; Garrity, Edward; Jessup, Mariell; Murray, Susan

    2004-01-01

    This article presents an overview of factors associated with thoracic transplantation outcomes over the past decade and provides valuable information regarding the heart, lung, and heart-lung waiting lists and thoracic organ transplant recipients. Waiting list and post-transplant information is used to assess the importance of patient demographics, risk factors, and primary cardiopulmonary disease on outcomes. The time that the typical listed patient has been waiting for a heart, lung, or heart-lung transplant has markedly increased over the past decade, while the number of transplants performed has declined slightly and survival after transplant has plateaued. Waiting list mortality, however, appears to be declining for each organ and for most diseases and high-severity subgroups, perhaps in response to recent changes in organ allocation algorithms. Based on perceived inequity in organ access and in response to a mandate from Health Resources and Services Administration, the lung transplant community is developing a lung allocation system designed to minimize deaths on the waiting list while maximizing the benefit of transplant by incorporating post-transplant survival and quality of life into the algorithm. Areas where improved data collection could inform evolving organ allocation and candidate selection policies are emphasized.

  18. Community action research track: Community-based participatory research and service-learning experiences for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimpel, Nora; Kindratt, Tiffany; Dawson, Alvin; Pagels, Patti

    2018-04-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) and service-learning are unique experiential approaches designed to train medical students how to provide individualized patient care from a population perspective. Medical schools in the US are required to provide support for service-learning and community projects. Despite this requirement, few medical schools offer structured service-learning. We developed the Community Action Research Track (CART) to integrate population medicine, health promotion/disease prevention and the social determinants of health into the medical school curriculum through CBPR and service-learning experiences. This article provides an overview of CART and reports the program impact based on students' participation, preliminary evaluations and accomplishments. CART is an optional 4‑year service-learning experience for medical students interested in community health. The curriculum includes a coordinated longitudinal program of electives, community service-learning and lecture-based instruction. From 2009-2015, 146 CART students participated. Interests in public health (93%), community service (73%), primary care (73%), CBPR (60%) and community medicine (60%) were the top reasons for enrolment. Significant improvements in mean knowledge were found when measuring the principles of CBPR, levels of prevention, determining health literacy and patient communication strategies (all p's Projects were disseminated by at least 65 posters and four oral presentations at local, national and international professional meetings. Six manuscripts were published in peer-reviewed journals. CART is an innovative curriculum for training future physicians to be community-responsive physicians. CART can be replicated by other medical schools interested in offering a longitudinal CBPR and service-learning track in an urban metropolitan setting.

  19. Use of hematopoietic cell transplants to achieve tolerance in patients with solid organ transplants

    OpenAIRE

    Strober, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The goals of tolerance in patients with solid organ transplants are to eliminate the lifelong need for immunosuppressive (IS) drugs and to prevent graft loss due to rejection or drug toxicity. Tolerance with complete withdrawal of IS drugs has been achieved in recipients of HLA-matched and mismatched living donor kidney transplants in 3 medical centers using hematopoietic cell transplants to establish mixed or complete chimerism.

  20. Employment 12 months after kidney transplantation: An in-depth bio-psycho-social analysis of the Swiss Transplant Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitta Danuser

    Full Text Available Return to work with or after a chronic disease is a dynamic process influenced by a variety of interactions between personal, work, societal and medical resources or constraints. The aim of this study was to identify predictors for employment 12 months after transplantation in kidney patients, applying a bio-psycho-social model.All kidney patients followed in the Swiss Transplant Cohort between May 2008 and December 2012, aged 18 to 65 were assessed before, 6 and 12 months after transplantation.Of the 689 included patients, 56.2% worked 12 months post- transplantation compared to 58.9% pre-transplantation. Age, education, self-perceived health (6 months post- transplantation, pre- transplantation employment and receiving an organ from a living donor are significant predictors of employment post- transplantation. Moreover, while self-perceived health increased post- transplantation, depression score decreased only among those employed 12 months post- transplantation. Pre- transplantation employment status was the main predictor for post- transplantation employment (OR = 18.6 and was associated with sex, age, education, depression and duration of dialysis. An organ from a living donor (42.1% was more frequent in younger patients, with higher education, no diabetes and shorter waiting time to surgery.Transplantation did not increase employment in end-stage kidney disease patients but helped maintaining employment. Pre-transplantation employment has been confirmed to be the most important predictor of post-transplantation employment. Furthermore, socio-demographic and individual factors predicted directly and indirectly the post-transplantation employment status. With living donor, an additional predictor linked to social factors and the medical procedure has been identified.

  1. Other women's wombs: uterus transplants and gestational surrogacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, John A.

    2016-01-01

    The birth of a child after uterus transplant from a living donor in Sweden in October, 2013 has spurred reproductive and transplant physicians in Europe and North America to investigate whether uterus transplants, from living or cadaveric donors, will be a safe and effective therapy for women with uterine insufficiency. While progress with uterus transplant depends on medical factors, there are also important ethical and legal concerns. Uterus transplant is essential for women without access to surrogacy. It may also be sought by infertile women who dislike surrogacy. This article examines medical, ethical, legal, and policy issues that arise with womb transplant, including the role of surrogacy policies that make them necessary. The conclusion is that there is a clear ethical path for either surrogacy or uterus transplant to be used by women with uterine insufficiency. PMID:27774233

  2. Other women's wombs: uterus transplants and gestational surrogacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, John A

    2016-04-01

    The birth of a child after uterus transplant from a living donor in Sweden in October, 2013 has spurred reproductive and transplant physicians in Europe and North America to investigate whether uterus transplants, from living or cadaveric donors, will be a safe and effective therapy for women with uterine insufficiency. While progress with uterus transplant depends on medical factors, there are also important ethical and legal concerns. Uterus transplant is essential for women without access to surrogacy. It may also be sought by infertile women who dislike surrogacy. This article examines medical, ethical, legal, and policy issues that arise with womb transplant, including the role of surrogacy policies that make them necessary. The conclusion is that there is a clear ethical path for either surrogacy or uterus transplant to be used by women with uterine insufficiency.

  3. The New Zealand Liver Transplant Unit: Auckland District Health Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Stephen R; Evans, Helen M; Gane, Edward J

    2014-01-01

    New Zealand is a geographically isolated country with 4.55 million inhabitants. It has endemic hepatitis B (HBV) infection that is especially evident in Maori and Pacific Island communities and impacts indications for liver transplantation. The country has a socialised medical system that allows for full coverage of the assessment for, and completion of liver transplants in suitable recipients. Between February 1998 and December 2014, the New Zealand Liver Transplant Unit (NZLTU) had performed 595 liver transplants in 568 patients, indicating a crude re-transplant rate of 4.8%. Overall 1, 5, and 10 year patient survival rates for all adult (96%, 89%, and 81%, respectively) and pediatric (93%, 92%, and 92%, respectively) recipients compare very favourably with international outcomes from Europe and the United States. Eligibility criteria could be modestly expanded if deceased donor rates improved from the current level of around 10 per million of population per year. This somewhat meagre supply of deceased donor organs, along with significant waiting list attrition, has necessitated the use of living donors, which have been used in more than 50 recipients to date. Despite these limitations, the NZLTU has contributed to improvements in the outcome of transplantation for HBV and hepatitis C through the development of effective antiviral prophylaxis regimes. Furthermore, innovative changes have been made to the manner in which pediatric patients are transitioned to the adult service.

  4. The Economics of Organ Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altınörs, Nur; Haberal, Mehmet

    2018-03-01

    To determine the cost effectiveness of transplantation, we analyzed the financial economics of the organ and tissue transplant process. We compared the cost of this process with traditional modalities for treating endstage liver and kidney disease. Medical, surgical, legal, social, ethical, and religious issues are important in organ transplant procedures. Government, health insurance companies, and uninsured individuals are affected by the financial economics of organ transplantation. The distribution of financial burden differs among countries and is dependent on the unique circumstances of each country.

  5. Community perceptions of a rural medical school: a pilot qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestel D

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Debra Nestel,1 Katherine Gray,1 Margaret Simmons,1 Shane A Pritchard,1 Rumana Islam,1 Wan Q Eng,1 Adrian Ng,1 Tim Dornan2 1Gippsland Medical School/School of Rural Health, Monash University, Clayton, Australia; 2School of Health Professions Education, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Background: This paper explores local community perceptions of a relatively new rural medical school. For the purposes of this paper, community engagement is conceptualized as involvement in planning, delivering, and evaluating the medical program. Although there are several reviews of patient involvement in medical curricula development, this study was designed to pilot an approach to exploring the perspectives of well members of the community in the transition of institutional policy on community engagement to one medical school. Methods: An advertisement in the local newspaper invited volunteers to participate in a telephone interview about the new medical school. An independent researcher external to the medical school conducted the interviews using a topic guide. Audio recordings were not made, but detailed notes including verbatim statements were recorded. At least two research team members analyzed interview records for emergent themes. Human research ethics approval was obtained. Results: Twelve interviews were conducted. Participants offered rich imaginings on the role of the school and expectations and opportunities for students. Most participants expressed strong and positive views, especially in addressing long-term health workforce issues. It was considered important that students live, mix, and study in the community. Some participants had very clear ideas about the need of the school to address specified needs, such as indigenous health, obesity, aging, drug and alcohol problems, teenage pregnancy, ethnic diversity, and working with people of low socioeconomic status. Conclusion: This study has initiated a dialogue with potential

  6. Use of hematopoietic cell transplants to achieve tolerance in patients with solid organ transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strober, Samuel

    2016-03-24

    The goals of tolerance in patients with solid organ transplants are to eliminate the lifelong need for immunosuppressive (IS) drugs and to prevent graft loss due to rejection or drug toxicity. Tolerance with complete withdrawal of IS drugs has been achieved in recipients of HLA-matched and mismatched living donor kidney transplants in 3 medical centers using hematopoietic cell transplants to establish mixed or complete chimerism. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Time-in-a-bottle (TIAB): a longitudinal, correlational study of patterns, potential predictors, and outcomes of immunosuppressive medication adherence in adult kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Cynthia L; Ashbaugh, Catherine; Peace, Leanne; Cetingok, Muammer; Hamburger, Karen Q; Owens, Sarah; Coffey, Deanna; Webb, Andrew W; Hathaway, Donna; Winsett, Rebecca P; Madsen, Richard; Wakefield, Mark R

    2013-01-01

    This study examined patterns, potential predictors, and outcomes of immunosuppressive medication adherence in a convenience sample of 121 kidney transplant recipients aged 21 yr or older from three kidney transplant centers using a theory-based, descriptive, correlational, longitudinal design. Electronic monitoring was conducted for 12 months using electronic monitoring. Participants were persistent in taking their immunosuppressive medications, but execution, which includes both taking and timing, was poor. Older age was the only demographic variable associated with medication adherence (r = 0.25; p = 0.005). Of the potential predictors examined, only medication self-efficacy was associated with medication non-adherence, explaining about 9% of the variance (r = 0.31, p = 0.0006). The few poor outcomes that occurred were not significantly associated with medication non-adherence, although the small number of poor outcomes may have limited our ability to detect a link. Future research should test fully powered, theory-based, experimental interventions that include a medication self-efficacy component. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Transplant experiments uncover Baltic Sea basin-specific responses in bacterioplankton community composition and metabolic activities

    OpenAIRE

    Lindh, Markus V.; Figueroa, Daniela; Sjöstedt, Johanna; Baltar, Federico; Lundin, Daniel; Andersson, Agneta; Legrand, Catherine; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenically induced changes in precipitation are projected to generate increased river runoff to semi-enclosed seas, intensifying loads of terrestrial dissolved organic matter and decreasing salinity. To determine how bacterial community structure and functioning adjust to such changes, we designed microcosm transplant experiments with Baltic Proper (salinity 7.2) and Bothnian Sea (salinity 3.6) water. Baltic Proper bacteria generally reached higher abundance than Bothnian Sea bacteria ...

  9. Uterine transplantation: Review in human research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre-Inhofer, A; Rafii, A; Carbonnel, M; Revaux, A; Ayoubi, J M

    2018-06-01

    Uterine transplantation is the solution to treat absolute uterine fertility. In this review, we present the historical, medical, technical, psychological and ethical perspectives in human uterine transplantation research. We reviewed the PubMed database following PRISMA guidelines and added data presented by several research teams during the first international congress on uterine transplantation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  10. Organ transplantation: legal, ethical and islamic perspective in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakari, Abubakar A; Abbo Jimeta, Umar S; Abubakar, Mohammed A; Alhassan, Sani U; Nwankwo, Emeka A

    2012-07-01

    Organ transplantation dates back to the ancient times and since then it has become one of the important developments in modern medicine; saving the lives, as well as improving the quality of life of many patients. As the demand for organ transplantation far exceeds the organ availability, the transplant program is often saddled with complex legal and ethical issues. This review article highlights the legal and ethical issues that might arise regarding organ transplantation and appraises the existing legal frame work governing organ transplantation in Nigeria. Information on legal, cultural, religious and medical ethical issues regarding organ transplantation in Nigeria was obtained by searching the PubMed and Google Scholar, conference proceedings, seminar paper presentations, law library and other related publications were collated and analyzed. In decision making for organ transplantation, the bioethical principles like autonomy, beneficence and justice must be employed. It was believed by Catholic theologians that to mutilate one living person to benefit another violates the principle of Totality. Among Muslim scholars and researchers, there are those who throw legal support as to its permissibility while the other group sees it as illegal. Organ/tissues transplantation is considered a medical intervention that touches on the fundamental rights of the donor or the recipient. Where there is an unlawful infringement of the right of such persons in any way may be regarded as against Section 34 of the 1999 Nigerian Constitution dealing with right to dignity of the human person. Worldwide, the researchers and government bodies have agreed on informed consent for organ/tissue donation and for recipient should be obtained without coercion before embarking on such medical treatment Worldwide organ transplantation has become the best medical treatment for patients with end stage organ failure. However, there is no law/legislation backing organ/tissues transplantation in

  11. Organ Transplantation: Legal, Ethical and Islamic Perspective in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakari, Abubakar A; Abbo Jimeta, Umar S; Abubakar, Mohammed A; Alhassan, Sani U; Nwankwo, Emeka A

    2012-01-01

    Organ transplantation dates back to the ancient times and since then it has become one of the important developments in modern medicine; saving the lives, as well as improving the quality of life of many patients. As the demand for organ transplantation far exceeds the organ availability, the transplant program is often saddled with complex legal and ethical issues. This review article highlights the legal and ethical issues that might arise regarding organ transplantation and appraises the existing legal frame work governing organ transplantation in Nigeria. Information on legal, cultural, religious and medical ethical issues regarding organ transplantation in Nigeria was obtained by searching the PubMed and Google Scholar, conference proceedings, seminar paper presentations, law library and other related publications were collated and analyzed. In decision making for organ transplantation, the bioethical principles like autonomy, beneficence and justice must be employed. It was believed by Catholic theologians that to mutilate one living person to benefit another violates the principle of Totality. Among Muslim scholars and researchers, there are those who throw legal support as to its permissibility while the other group sees it as illegal. Organ/tissues transplantation is considered a medical intervention that touches on the fundamental rights of the donor or the recipient. Where there is an unlawful infringement of the right of such persons in any way may be regarded as against Section 34 of the 1999 Nigerian Constitution dealing with right to dignity of the human person. Worldwide, the researchers and government bodies have agreed on informed consent for organ/tissue donation and for recipient should be obtained without coercion before embarking on such medical treatment Worldwide organ transplantation has become the best medical treatment for patients with end stage organ failure. However, there is no law/legislation backing organ/tissues transplantation in

  12. Registry of Hospital das Clínicas of the University of São Paulo Medical School: first official solid organ and tissue transplantation report - 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Azeka

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to report a single center experience of organ and tissue transplantation INTRODUCTION: This is the first report of organ and tissue transplantation at the Hospital das Clínicas of the University of Sao Paulo Medical School. METHODS: We collected data from each type of organ transplantation from 2002 to 2007. The data collected were patient characteristics and actuarial survival Kaplan-Meier curves at 30 days, one year, and five years RESULTS: There were a total of 3,321 transplants at our institution and the 5-year survival curve ranged from 53% to 88%. CONCLUSION: This report shows that solid organ and tissue transplants are feasible within the institution and allow us to expect that the quality of transplantation will improve in the future.

  13. Medication adherence in the transition of adolescent kidney transplant recipients to the adult care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akchurin, Oleh M; Melamed, Michal L; Hashim, Becky L; Kaskel, Frederick J; Del Rio, Marcela

    2014-08-01

    Non-adherence is common in adolescent and young adult kidney transplant recipients, leading to adverse graft outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine whether adherence to immunosuppressant medications changes during transition from a pediatric to an adult program within the same transplant center. Adherence was assessed for a period of two yr before and two yr after the transfer. Subtherapeutic trough levels of serum tacrolimus and level variability were used as measures of adherence. Twenty-five patients were transitioned between 1996 and 2011 at the median age of 22.3 [IQR 21.6-23.0] yr. Young adults 21-25 yr of age (n = 26) and non-transitioned adolescents 17-21 yr of age (currently followed in the program, n = 24 and those that lost their grafts prior to the transfer, 22) formed the comparison groups. In the transitioned group, adherence prior to the transfer was not significantly different from the adherence after the transfer (p = 0.53). The rate of non-adherence in the group of non-transitioned adolescents who lost their grafts (68%) was significantly higher than in the transitioned group (32%, p = 0.01). In the group of young adults, adherence was not significantly different from the transitioned group (p = 0.27). Thus, transition was not associated with differences in medication adherence in this single-center study. Large-scale studies are needed to evaluate the national data on medication adherence after transfer. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. An observational study evaluating tacrolimus dose, exposure, and medication adherence after conversion from twice- to once-daily tacrolimus in liver and kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckman, Lars; Persson, Carl-Axel

    2014-03-17

    Immunosuppression regimens in transplantation medicine are complex. Drugs with extended release action have simplified medication dosing without affecting efficacy. This prospective, observational, multicenter study, conducted in a routine medical practice setting, evaluated changes in tacrolimus daily dose and trough levels and patient-reported medication adherence at day 90 after 1:1 (mg: mg) conversion to once-daily tacrolimus in adult liver and kidney transplant recipients. Data from 224 recipients of a liver (n=19) or kidney (n=205) transplant, average age 51±14.5 years, were evaluated. The mean change in tacrolimus daily dose was +0.04 mg/day. Dose remained stable after conversion in 62.5%, was lower in 15.6%, and higher in 22% of patients. Trough level after conversion was lower in 62.6% and higher in 36.5%; generally, levels were 12.8% lower than pre-conversion levels. No acute rejection, graft loss, or serious safety events were observed. Two deaths occurred due to myocardial infarction. Conversion helped 19% to less frequently forget medications and 55% reported no difference in remembering to take the once-daily dose after conversion. The change in dosing frequency was identified as "better" for 55%. Tacrolimus daily dose remained stable while trough levels were significantly lower after conversion to once-daily dosing. Safety and efficacy were maintained; reduced dosing frequency had no apparent influence on patient-reported medication adherence.

  15. Email medication counseling services provided by Finnish community pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjanoksa-Mäntylä, Marika K; Kulovaara, Heidi; Bell, J Simon; Enäkoski, Marianne; Airaksinen, Marja S

    2008-12-01

    The importance of email as a mode of communication between medication users and pharmacists is likely to increase. However, little is known about the email medication counseling practices of community pharmacies. To determine the prevalence of email medication counseling services in Finland and to assess the accuracy and comprehensiveness of responses by pharmacies providing the opportunity for email medication counseling to inquiries related to use of antidepressants. An inventory was made of all Finnish community pharmacies that provided the opportunity for email medication counseling. Data related to the accuracy and comprehensiveness of responses were collected, using a virtual pseudo-customer method with 3 scenarios related to common concerns of patients on antidepressants. Two inquiries were emailed to each pharmacy that provided the opportunity for email medication counseling in January and February 2005. The responses were content analyzed by 2 researchers, using a prestructured scoring system. Almost one-third (30%, n = 182) of Finnish community pharmacies maintained a working Web site, and 94% of those provided the opportunity for email medication counseling. An online "ask-the-pharmacist" service was offered by 13% (n = 23) of the pharmacies with a Web site. Pharmacies responded to 54% of the email inquiries sent by the virtual pseudo-customers. The response rate and the content score ratio between mean and maximum scores varied among the scenarios. The content score ratio was highest for the scenarios concerning the adverse effects of fluoxetine (0.53, n = 55) and interactions with mirtazapine (0.52, n = 63) and lowest for the scenario related to sexual dysfunction and weight gain associated with citalopram (0.38, n = 52). Community pharmacies are potential providers of email medication counseling services. However, more attention should be directed to responding to consumer inquiries and to the content of these responses.

  16. [Liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Maurizio; Mirante, Vincenzo Giorgio; Rapaccini, Gian Ludovico; Gasbarrini, Giovanni

    2004-01-01

    Liver transplantation represents the first choice treatment for patients with fulminant acute hepatitis and for patients with chronic liver disease and advanced functional failure. Patients in the waiting list for liver transplantation are classified according to the severity of their clinical conditions (evaluated using staging systems mostly based on hematochemical parameters related to liver function). This classification, together with the blood group and the body size compatibility, remains the main criterion for organ allocation. The main indications for liver transplantation are cirrhosis (mainly HCV-, HBV- and alcohol-related) and hepatocellular carcinoma emerging in cirrhosis in adult patients, biliary atresia and some inborn errors of metabolism in pediatric patients. In adults the overall 5-year survival ranges between 60 and 70%, in both American and European series. Even better results have been reported for pediatric patients: in fact, the 5-year survival rate for children ranges between 70 and 80% in the main published series. In this study we evaluated the main medical problems correlated with liver transplantation such as immunosuppressive treatment, acute and chronic rejection, infectious complications, the recurrence of the liver disease leading to transplantation, and cardiovascular and metabolic complications.

  17. [Heart transplant in "Nuevo Leon": the first 33 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Garza, Eduardo; Molina Gamboa, Julio; Decanini Arcaute, Horacio; Ibarra Flores, Marcos; Torres García, Myrella; Macías Hidalgo, Carlos; González Oviedo, Roberto; de la Fuente Magallanes, Felipe de Jesús; Elizondo Sifuentes, Lius Angel; Villarreal Arredondo, Miguel Angel; Ortega Durán, Oscar; Martínez Bermúdez, Pedro; García Castillo, Armando; Becerra García, Oralia; Martínez Rodríguez, Diana; Contreras Lara, Carmen; Olivares de la Cerda, María de Consuelo; Treviño Treviño, Alfonso

    2006-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the most important causes of death worldwide. Heart transplant is the last effective alternative when the medical and surgical treatments have failed in patients with end stage heart failure, giving them an 80% one year survival rate. Unfortunately, during the outcome, the heart transplant patients can develop complications such as graft rejection and opportunistic infections because of the use of immunosuppressive therapy. In the present article we report the experience with 33 heart transplant patients. Our program not only has successfully transplanted patients with advanced age but, for the first time in Latin America we have transplanted patients assisted with the ambulatory Thoratec TLC II system. Even with limited resources, we have managed the same complications than other heart transplant programs, our 82% one year survival rate is similar than reports in medical literature.

  18. Attitude and Impact Factors Toward Organ Transplantation and Donation Among Transplantation Nurses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, J-F; Wang, C-Y; He, G-P; Ming, Y-Z; Wan, Q-Q; Liu, J; Gong, L-N; Liu, L-F

    Health workers' awareness and knowledge of transplantation medicine can improve people's sensitivity and reduce their degree of opposition to donations. The medical literature contains numerous examples of attitudes toward organ transplantation and donation aimed at university students or medical staff members, but rarely for transplantation nurses. The purposes of the study were to investigate the attitudes toward organ transplantation and donation among transplantation nurses and to explore the impact factors. The study was conducted in 37 transplantation surgery wards in 22 hospitals using cross-sectional approach. SPSS (International Business Machines Corporation, Armonk, New York, USA) 7.0 software was used to analysis descriptive and inferential statistics for data. Five hundred thirty-six effective questionnaires were received and the effective rate was 89.33%. Nurses' mean age was 28.40 years with a mean service length of 6.54 years. Among these nurses, 66.6% and 78.0% were willing to accept organ transplantation surgery for themselves and their relatives, respectively. Of these nurses, 33.4% would donate their organs after death; whereas 39.9% were uncertain. Only 38.2% were willing to register in the national organ donation system. Of these nurses, 28.2% were willing to sign the organ donation consent forms when their relatives became potential organ donors, and 45.7% were uncertain. Eight independent variables that affected nurses' attitudes toward donating their organs from most to least significant were: ratio of nurse to bed, title, employment form, age, length of service, position, monthly income, and the highest educational degree earned. Pearson correlation analysis showed a significant correlation among nurses' attitudes toward organ transplantation, organ donation, and online registration. The attitude toward donation and transplantation in the hospitals was not too optimistic, and an improvement in the training regarding transplantation and

  19. Shortage of psychotropic medications in community pharmacies in Saudi Arabia: Causes and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ruthia, Yazed Sulaiman; Mansy, Wael; Barasin, Mohammad; Ghawaa, Yazeed Mohammad; AlSultan, Mohammed; Alsenaidy, Mohammad A; Alhawas, Solaiman; AlGhadeer, Sultan

    2017-07-01

    Background: Patients with mental disorders, such as depression and anxiety, who seek medical care in private psychiatric clinics in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, have recently expressed concerns to doctors about difficulty in filling psychotropic medications, such as Amitriptyline and Aripiprazole, at retail community pharmacies. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a shortage of some commonly prescribed psychotropic medications in retail community pharmacies in Saudi Arabia, and if so, to explore the possible reasons behind the shortage of these medications. Methods: The availability of 28 commonly prescribed psychotropic medications was checked in multiple retail community pharmacies in 4 different regions of Saudi Arabia. Further, potential reasons behind the shortage of some psychotropic medications in retail community pharmacies were also explored. Results: Amitriptyline, Amoxapine, Aripiprazole, Bupropion, Buspirone, Duloxetine, Haloperidol, Hydroxyzine, Lithium, Prochlorperazine, Procyclidine, Promethazine, Thioridazine, Trazodone, and Trifluoperazine were unavailable in over half of the 248 community pharmacies surveyed. Four possible reasons behind the shortage of these medications were reported by 31 pharmacists working in different retail community pharmacies' purchasing departments, with a majority (58.06%) reporting the primary reason for a shortage of these medications that they are slow-moving items with low profit margins. Conclusions: The findings of this study should expedite the reform process in both the Ministry of Health and the Saudi Food and Drug Authority (SFDA) to publish and enforce an essential list of medications for retail community pharmacies, which should include the most commonly prescribed psychotropic medications.

  20. Opportunities to deter transplant tourism exist before referral for transplantation and during the workup and management of transplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Jagbir; Diec, Olivier; Landsberg, David N; Rose, Caren; Johnston, Olwyn; Keown, Paul A; Gill, John S

    2011-05-01

    Transplant tourism is a global issue, and physicians in the developed world may be in a position to actively deter this practice. To examine such opportunities, we identified 93 residents of British Columbia, Canada who had a kidney graft through tourism and determined their previous interactions with our transplant programs. These patients were mainly ethnic minorities (90%) who traveled to their country of origin for transplantation. Many tourists were transplanted early in their disease course, with 27 having a preemptive transplant. Among the 65 tourists referred for transplant, 33 failed to complete the evaluation. All tourists who completed an evaluation were placed on a waiting list in British Columbia and, after waiting a median of 2 years, pursued tourism. Most of these patients (62%) had a potential living donor, but none had an approved donor, with 13 donors found medically unsuitable, 8 ABO incompatible, and 12 who did not complete their evaluation. Thus, strategies to deter tourism should start before the development of end-stage renal disease and should be part of pretransplant workup and wait-list management, focusing on patients not progressing through their evaluation, those with a declined living donor, and those facing longer wait times, as these groups appear to be at higher risks for transplant tourism. Further studies are needed to identify individuals at risk for transplant tourism and to define effective strategies to deter these individuals.

  1. Improving medication adherence: a framework for community pharmacy-based interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pringle J

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Janice Pringle,1 Kim C Coley2 1Program Evaluation and Research Unit, Department of Pharmacy and Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Department of Pharmacy and Therapeutics, School of Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: Evidence supports that patient medication adherence is suboptimal with patients typically taking less than half of their prescribed doses. Medication nonadherence is associated with poor health outcomes and higher downstream health care costs. Results of studies evaluating pharmacist-led models in a community pharmacy setting and their impact on medication adherence have been mixed. Community pharmacists are ideally situated to provide medication adherence interventions, and effective strategies for how they can consistently improve patient medication adherence are necessary. This article suggests a framework to use in the community pharmacy setting that will significantly improve patient adherence and provides a strategy for how to apply this framework to develop and test new medication adherence innovations. The proposed framework is composed of the following elements: 1 defining the program's pharmacy service vision, 2 using evidence-based, patient-centered communication and intervention strategies, 3 using specific implementation approaches that ensure fidelity, and 4 applying continuous evaluation strategies. Within this framework, pharmacist interventions should include those services that capitalize on their specific skill sets. It is also essential that the organization's leadership effectively communicates the pharmacy service vision. Medication adherence strategies that are evidence-based and individualized to each patient's adherence problems are most desirable. Ideally, interventions would be delivered repeatedly over time and adjusted when patient's adherence circumstances change. Motivational interviewing principles are particularly well

  2. Evaluating distributed medical education: what are the community's expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, Chris; Bates, Joanna; Hanlon, Neil; Snadden, David

    2009-05-01

    This study aimed to explore community members' perceptions of present and future impacts of the implementation of an undergraduate medical education programme in an underserved community. We conducted semi-structured interviews with eight key informants representing the health, education, business, economy, media and political sectors. A two-stage approach was used. In the first stage, the interviews were analysed to identify sector-specific impacts informants perceived as already occurring or which they hoped to see in the future. The transcripts were then re-analysed to determine any underlying themes that crossed sectors. Community leaders described impacts that were already occurring in all sectors and also described changes in the community itself. Four underlying themes emerged: an increase in pride and status; partnership development; community self-efficacy, and community development. These underlying themes appear to characterise the development of social capital in the community. The implementation of distributed undergraduate medical education programmes in rural and underserved communities may impact their host communities in ways other than the production of a rural doctor workforce. Further studies to quantify impacts in diverse sectors and to explore possible links with social capital are needed.

  3. Community perceptions of a rural medical school : a pilot qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nestel, Debra; Gray, Katherine; Simmons, Margaret; Pritchard, Shane A; Islam, Rumana; Eng, Wan Q; Ng, Adrian; Dornan, Tim

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This paper explores local community perceptions of a relatively new rural medical school. For the purposes of this paper, community engagement is conceptualized as involvement in planning, delivering, and evaluating the medical program. Although there are several reviews of patient

  4. Organ transplantation: Legal, ethical and Islamic perspective in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakar A Bakari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ transplantation dates back to the ancient times and since then it has become one of the important developments in modern medicine; saving the lives, as well as improving the quality of life of many patients. As the demand for organ transplantation far exceeds the organ availability, the transplant program is often saddled with complex legal and ethical issues. This review article highlights the legal and ethical issues that might arise regarding organ transplantation and appraises the existing legal frame work governing organ transplantation in Nigeria. Information on legal, cultural, religious and medical ethical issues regarding organ transplantation in Nigeria was obtained by searching the PubMed and Google Scholar, conference proceedings, seminar paper presentations, law library and other related publications were collated and analyzed. In decision making for organ transplantation, the bioethical principles like autonomy, beneficence and justice must be employed. It was believed by Catholic theologians that to mutilate one living person to benefit another violates the principle of Totality. Among Muslim scholars and researchers, there are those who throw legal support as to its permissibility while the other group sees it as illegal. Organ/tissues transplantation is considered a medical intervention that touches on the fundamental rights of the donor or the recipient. Where there is an unlawful infringement of the right of such persons in any way may be regarded as against Section 34 of the 1999 Nigerian Constitution dealing with right to dignity of the human person. Worldwide, the researchers and government bodies have agreed on informed consent for organ/tissue donation and for recipient should be obtained without coercion before embarking on such medical treatment Worldwide organ transplantation has become the best medical treatment for patients with end stage organ failure. However, there is no law/legislation backing organ

  5. Challenges around Access to and Cost of Life-Saving Medications after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Medicare Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnia, Stephanie; Ganetsky, Alex; Silver, Alicia; Hwee, Theresa; Preussler, Jaime; Griffin, Joan; Khera, Nandita

    2017-08-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an expensive, medically complicated, and potentially life-threatening therapy for multiple hematologic and nonhematologic disorders with a prolonged trajectory of recovery. Similar to financial issues in other cancer treatments, adverse financial consequences of HCT are emerging as an important issue and may be associated with poor quality of life and increased distress in HCT survivors. Prescription medicine coverage for HCT for Medicare and some Medicaid beneficiaries, especially in the long-term, remains suboptimal because of inadequate payer formularies or prohibitive copays. With an increasing number of older patients undergoing HCT and improvement in the overall survival after HCT, the problem of financial burden faced by Medicare beneficiaries with fixed incomes is going to worsen. In this article, we describe the typical financial burden borne by HCT recipients based on estimated copayment amounts attached to the categories of key medications as elucidated through 2 case studies. We also suggest some possible solutions for consideration to help these patients and families get through the HCT by minimizing the financial burden from essential medications needed during the post-HCT period. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. "Resuscitation" of marginal liver allografts for transplantation with machine perfusion technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jay A; Guarrera, James V

    2014-08-01

    As the rate of medically suitable donors remains relatively static worldwide, clinicians have looked to novel methods to meet the ever-growing demand of the liver transplant waiting lists worldwide. Accordingly, the transplant community has explored many strategies to offset this deficit. Advances in technology that target the ex vivo "preservation" period may help increase the donor pool by augmenting the utilization and improving the outcomes of marginal livers. Novel ex vivo techniques such as hypothermic, normothermic, and subnormothermic machine perfusion may be useful to "resuscitate" marginal organs by reducing ischemia/reperfusion injury. Moreover, other preservation techniques such as oxygen persufflation are explored as they may also have a role in improving function of "marginal" liver allografts. Currently, marginal livers are frequently discarded or can relegate the patient to early allograft dysfunction and primary non-function. Bench to bedside advances are rapidly emerging and hold promise for expanding liver transplantation access and improving outcomes. Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Issues with prescribed medications in Aboriginal communities: Aboriginal health workers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrosi, Kim; Taylor, Susan J; Aslani, Parisa

    2006-01-01

    The health of Indigenous Australians remains appalling. The causes of this situation are multi-factorial, however one contributing factor is poor medication compliance within Aboriginal populations. Anecdotal evidence provided by Aboriginal health workers in western New South Wales (NSW), Australia, has suggested that there are problems associated with the use of prescribed medications within the Aboriginal community. Aboriginal health workers form a core component of the Aboriginal health service sector and they have an in-depth knowledge of the community and its healthcare provision, as well as a familiarity with clinic patients and families. As such they are an important group whose opinions and beliefs about medication use in the Aboriginal population should be investigated. While there have been studies on the issues of prescribing in Aboriginal communities and access to medications, limited investigation into the use of prescribed medicines in Aboriginal communities and the role of the pharmacist in that process, has taken place. Therefore, this research aimed to identify the type of and reasons for inappropriate use of prescribed medications within Aboriginal communities serviced by the Mid Western Area Health Service (since incorporated into the Greater West Area Health Service) as perceived by the Aboriginal health workers in the area, and to explore strategies in conjunction with those Aboriginal health workers to address identified issues. Qualitative, in-depth interviews were held with 11 Aboriginal health workers employed in Community Health Centres and hospitals in the Mid Western Area Health service of NSW. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were content analysed for emerging themes. The interviews explored the beliefs, perceptions and experiences of the Aboriginal health workers regarding prescribed medication use, the role of the pharmacist, and identification of future strategies to improve medication use in

  8. Bone marrow transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arrange medical leave from work Take care of bank or financial statements Arrange care of pets Arrange ... Bleeding during cancer treatment Bone marrow transplant - discharge Central venous catheter - dressing change Central venous catheter - flushing ...

  9. Nonadherence to immunosuppressive therapy in kidney transplant recipients: can technology help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerini, Erika; Bruno, Fulvio; Citterio, Franco; Schena, Francesco P

    2016-10-01

    End-stage kidney disease is a life-threatening condition that compels patients to accept either dialysis or transplant. Kidney transplantation is the best choice for patients with end-stage kidney disease because it ensures higher quality of life and longer survival rates than other choices, with less cost for the healthcare system. However, in order for renal recipients to maintain the functioning graft they must take lifelong immunosuppressive medications, with possible side effects and low medication adherence. It is known that low medication adherence in kidney transplant recipients may cause poor outcomes, chronic graft rejection, and graft failure. In this review, the authors give an overview of nonadherence in the transplant setting. In addition, they analyze the role of different technologies as an aid to improve adherence, with a focus on mobile-phone based solutions to monitor and enhance kidney transplant recipient compliance.

  10. [Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in transplant patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Júlio Cezar Uili; Contieri, Fabiana L C; de Freitas, Alexandre Coutinho Teixeira; da Silva, Fernanda Cristina; Kozak, Vanessa Nascimento; da Silva Junior, Alzemir Santos

    2010-02-01

    This study reviews our experience with laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the treatment of cholelithiasis in transplant patients. Demographic data, medications used, and operative and postoperative data of all transplant recipients who were subjected to laparoscopic cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis at our hospital were obtained. A total of 15 transplant patients (13 renal transplantation and 2 bone marrow transplantation) underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. All patients were admitted to the hospital on the day of the operation. The immunosuppressive regimen was not modified during hospitalization. Clinical presentation of cholelithiasis was biliary colicky (n=12), acute cholecystitis (n=2), and jaundice (n=1). The operation was uneventful in all patients. Postoperative complications were nausea and vomiting in 2 patients, prolonged tracheal intubation in 1, wound infection in 1 and large superficial hematoma in 1 patient. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is associated to a low morbidity and mortality and good postoperative outcome in transplant patients with uncomplicated cholecystitis.

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Organ Transplantation: Immunomodulatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells for application in organ transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Crop, Meindert

    2010-01-01

    textabstractKidney transplantation is the only effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease. Transplantation of a donor organ, however, leads to recognition of the foreign donor antigens by the recipient’s immune system, resulting in rejection of the graft. In addition, ischemia-reperfusion injury leads to the initiation of immune responses. To prevent graft rejection, transplant recipients need to use life-long immunosuppressive medication. These drugs, however, can lead to ...

  12. The University of Maryland Medical System invests in its community's minorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimpff, S C; Rapoport, M I; O'Keefe, S L; Grote, D A; Snow, L K

    1996-06-01

    As a private, non-state-owned teaching hospital adjacent to a predominately low income African American community in Baltimore, the University of Maryland Medical System (hereafter called the Medical System) in partnership with the state's medical school has historically provided excellent medical care to the community's residents regardless of their ability to pay. Nevertheless, executive leadership recognized that the Medical System needed to be even more socially and economically responsible to the minority community by investing more of the system's resources in that community. Doing so would improve the economic strength of the community, and this strength would help the Medical System to continue to thrive and expand its business in Baltimore City. Therefore, in the late 1980s, the Medical System created a program that focuses on greater inclusion of minorities particularly African Americans, in personnel, construction, purchasing, and community outreach. In the area of personnel, recruitment efforts have focused on increasing the representation of minorities, particularly African Americans, in management and residency positions. The result has been the creation of a more supportive environment for minority personnel throughout the organization as well as for minority patients and vendors who have dealings with the medical system. In the area of construction, minority development efforts have included the establishment of a flexible bid-award policy and a partnership with the minority business community. As a result, total construction dollars spent with minority-owned firms increased from $2 million to $18 million over seven years, and the portion of these dollars spent with African American-owned firms increased sixfold. In the area of purchased goods and services, more creative approaches to improving minority participation have been necessary. These have included partnering minority distributors with major suppliers and literally assisting in the creation

  13. Intellectual and Academic Outcomes After Pediatric Liver Transplantation: Relationship with Transplant-Related Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Soheil; Porter, Melanie; Barton, Belinda; Stormon, Michael

    2018-05-09

    As survival rates for pediatric liver transplantation continue to increase, research attention is turning towards long-term functional consequences, with particular interest in whether medical and transplant-related factors are implicated in neurocognitive outcomes. The relative importance of different factors is unclear, due to a lack of methodological uniformity, inclusion of differing primary diagnoses, variable transplant policies, and organ availability in different jurisdictions. This cross-sectional, single-site study sought to address various methodological limitations in the literature and the paucity of studies conducted outside of North America and Western Europe by examining the intellectual and academic outcomes of Australian pediatric liver transplant recipients (N = 40). Participants displayed significantly poorer intellectual and mathematical abilities compared to the normative population. Greater time on the transplant waitlist was a significant predictor of poorer verbal intelligence, working memory, mathematical abilities and reading, but only when considering the subgroup of children with biliary atresia. These findings support reducing the time children wait for a transplant as a priority. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Social world of organ transplantation, trafficking, and policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Farhan Navid; Purkayastha, Bandana

    2016-05-01

    Although success of organ transplants reflects advances in medical procedures, the success has generated debates about the ethical standards and policies that govern transplants, especially the acquisition of organs for transplants. We focus on laws, policies, and organ trafficking to highlight the interdisciplinary perspectives that can shape our understanding of transplantation as a social phenomenon. We discuss international policies and country-specific legislation from Pakistan to point to gaps and their implications for protecting vulnerable people who are exploited for organ removal. International collaboration and the legal framework need to be strengthened to fight the menace globally and to deal with the cases of organ trafficking within the legal ambit of human trafficking so that the rights of victims are upheld by states, justice systems, and ultimately medical establishments and practitioners.

  15. Assessing pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic risks in candidates for kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Angela Q; Tichy, Eric M; Rogers, Christin C; Campara, Maya; Ensor, Christopher; Doligalski, Christina T; Gabardi, Steven; Descourouez, Jillian L; Doyle, Ian C; Trofe-Clark, Jennifer

    2015-05-15

    Pharmacotherapy concerns and other factors with a bearing on patient selection for kidney transplantation are discussed. The process of selecting appropriate candidates for kidney transplantation involves multidisciplinary assessment to evaluate a patient's mental, social, physical, financial, and medical readiness for successful surgery and good posttransplantation outcomes. Transplantation pharmacists can play important roles in the recognition and stratification of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic risks in prospective kidney transplant recipients and the identification of issues that require a mitigation strategy. Key pharmacotherapy-related issues and considerations during the risk assessment process include (1) anticoagulation concerns, (2) cytochrome P-450 isoenzyme-mediated drug interactions, (3) mental health-related medication use, (4) chronic pain-related medication use, (5) medication allergies, (6) use of hormonal contraception and replacement therapy, (7) prior or current use of immunosuppressants, (8) issues with drug absorption, (9) alcohol use, (10) tobacco use, (11) active use of illicit substances, and (12) use of herbal supplements. Important areas of nonpharmacologic risk include vaccine delivery, infection prophylaxis and treatment, and socially related factors such as nonadherent behavior, communication barriers, and financial, insurance, or transportation challenges that can compromise posttransplantation outcomes. Consensus opinions of practitioners in transplantation pharmacy regarding the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic factors that should be considered in assessing candidates for kidney transplantation are presented. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [History of kidney transplantation surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timsit, M O; Kleinclauss, F; Thuret, R

    2016-11-01

    To perform a state of the art about the history of kidney transplantation. An exhaustive systematic review of the scientific literature was performed in the Medline database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) and Embase (http://www.embase.com) using different associations of the following keywords (MESH): kidney transplantation, history, vascular anastomosis. From the first vascular ligations to the discovery of ciclosporin, the history of organ transplantation was made of surgical bets and medical discoveries, such as blood group, HLA-system, immunity, etc. The audacity of some surgeons led to the onset of renal transplantation as the treatment of choice for end stage renal disease. This article aims to describe the first surgical methods for vascular anastomosis and renal transplantation. Through a comprehensive search within the archives of the French National Library, the authors provide a precise description of the first renal transplantations performed, the technique that have been used and their authors. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Nurturing Medical Professionalism in the Surgical Community

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    teaching community in a Kenyan context on how ... buttressed by the Mezirow's theory of transformative learning, especially .... programs with the other institutions, or like other medical ... “A career day where they bring different professionals:.

  18. Challenging hepatitis C-infected liver transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver M

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Madeleine Oliver,1 Christopher Chiodo Ortiz,2 Jorge Ortiz31University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, OH, 2Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA, 3Department of Transplant Surgery, University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH, USA Abstract: Caring for liver transplant patients suffering from chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a challenging task for transplant surgeons and primary physicians alike. HCV is the leading cause of liver transplantation in the USA and comes with a myriad of complications that increase morbidity and mortality. This review focuses on patient follow-up, spanning from before the liver transplant occurs to the patient's long-term health. Pretransplant, both donor and recipient variables, must be carefully chosen to ensure optimal surgical success. Risk factors must be identified and HCV viral load must be reduced to a minimum. In addition to standard transplant complications, HCV patients suffer from additional problems, such as fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis and widespread viremia. Physicians must focus on the balance of immunosuppressive and antiviral medications, while considering possible side effects from these potent drugs. Over the years following surgery, physicians must identify any signs of failing liver health, as HCV-positive patients have an increased risk for cirrhosis and certain life-threatening malignancies. Keywords: liver transplant, hepatitis C virus, postoperative, cirrhosis, donor and recipient variables, viremia

  19. Perspectives of Older Kidney Transplant Recipients on Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinter, Jule; Hanson, Camilla S; Chapman, Jeremy R; Wong, Germaine; Craig, Jonathan C; Schell, Jane O; Tong, Allison

    2017-03-07

    Older kidney transplant recipients are susceptible to cognitive impairment, frailty, comorbidities, immunosuppression-related complications, and chronic graft failure, however, there has been limited focus on their concerns and expectations related to transplantation. This study aims to describe the perspectives of older kidney transplant recipients about their experience of kidney transplantation, self-management, and treatment goals to inform strategies and interventions that address their specific needs. Face-to-face semistructured interviews were conducted with 30 kidney transplant recipients aged 65-80 years from five renal units in Australia. Transcripts were analyzed thematically. Six themes were identified: restoring vitality of youth (with subthemes of revived mindset for resilience, embracing enjoyment in life, drive for self-actualization); persisting through prolonged recovery (yielding to aging, accepting functional limitations, pushing the limit, enduring treatment responsibilities); imposing sicknesses (combatting devastating comorbidities, painful restrictions, emerging disillusionment, anxieties about accumulating side effects, consuming treatment burden); prioritizing graft survival (privileged with a miracle, negotiating risks for longevity, enacting a moral duty, preserving the last opportunity); confronting health deterioration (vulnerability and helplessness, narrowing focus to immediate concerns, uncertainty of survival); and value of existence (purpose through autonomy, refusing the burden of futile treatment, staying alive by all means). Older kidney transplant recipients felt able to enjoy life and strived to live at their newly re-established potential and capability, which motivated them to protect their graft. However, some felt constrained by slow recuperation and overwhelmed by unexpected comorbidities, medication-related side effects, and health decline. Our findings suggest the need to prepare and support older recipients for self

  20. Factors that determine self-reported immunosuppressant adherence in kidney transplant recipients: a correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Li-Chueh; Yang, Ya-Chen; Huang, Hsiu-Li; Chiang, Yang-Jen; Tsai, Yu-Hsia

    2017-01-01

    To determine the factors related to immunosuppressant therapy adherence in kidney transplant recipients in Taiwan. Adherence to immunosuppressant treatment is critical after kidney transplantation. Thus, the factors associated with self-reported medication adherence in kidney transplant recipients warrant investigation. The study used a cross-sectional and correlation design. A convenience sample of 145 kidney transplant recipients was included. Structured questionnaires were used to collect data during 2012-2013. Multivariate linear regression was used to examine the factors related to immunosuppressant therapy adherence. Over half of the participants were female (54·5%), mean age was 45·5 years, and mean year after transplant was 7·4. The mean score for medication adherence was 29·73 (possible score range 7-35). The results of the multivariate linear regression analysis showed that gender (male), low income with a high school or college education, years after transplantation and concerns about medication taking were negatively associated with adherence. Medication self-efficacy was positively associated with adherence. Therapy-related factors, partnerships with healthcare professionals and having private healthcare insurance did not significantly relate to immunosuppressant therapy adherence. Kidney transplant recipients demonstrated a high level of adherence. Strategies to enhance patients' self-efficacy and alleviate concerns about medication may promote medication adherence. Male patients, those with a lower income and those with a higher education level, should be a focus of efforts to maintain adherence to the medication regimen. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Key issues in transplant tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoh, Jacob A

    2012-02-24

    Access to organ transplantation depends on national circumstances, and is partly determined by the cost of health care, availability of transplant services, the level of technical capacity and the availability of organs. Commercial transplantation is estimated to account for 5%-10% (3500-7000) of kidney transplants performed annually throughout the world. This review is to determine the state and outcome of renal transplantation associated with transplant tourism (TT) and the key challenges with such transplantation. The stakeholders of commercial transplantation include: patients on the waiting lists in developed countries or not on any list in developing countries; dialysis funding bodies; middlemen, hosting transplant centres; organ-exporting countries; and organ vendors. TT and commercial kidney transplants are associated with a high incidence of surgical complications, acute rejection and invasive infection which cause major morbidity and mortality. There are ethical and medical concerns regarding the management of recipients of organs from vendors. The growing demand for transplantation, the perceived failure of altruistic donation in providing enough organs has led to calls for a legalised market in organ procurement or regulated trial in incentives for donation. Developing transplant services worldwide has many benefits - improving results of transplantation as they would be performed legally, increasing the donor pool and making TT unnecessary. Meanwhile there is a need to re-examine intrinsic attitudes to TT bearing in mind the cultural and economic realities of globalisation. Perhaps the World Health Organization in conjunction with The Transplantation Society would set up a working party of stakeholders to study this matter in greater detail and make recommendations.

  2. Healthcare professionals can assist patients with managing post-kidney transplant expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Kimberley; Low, Jac Kee; Manias, Elizabeth; Williams, Allison

    2017-11-01

    Kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment option for end-stage kidney disease. However, transplantation is not a cure and the prospective recipient needs to carefully evaluate the risks and benefits of receiving a transplant before agreeing to have the transplant. The objective of this commentary is to demonstrate that many kidney transplant recipients have unrealistic expectations of what life after transplantation involves. After monitoring participants in a randomised controlled trial through the first 12 months post-transplantation, we question whether patients understood the impact of receiving a transplant. In our study, participants were not prepared for the considerable time and effort involved in adhering to their medications. Participants felt challenged by the constant hospital, pathology and pharmacy visits; they were fearful that their transplant could reject; and they struggled with adapting to their new way of living. This paper offers new insights into understanding the life of patients post transplantation and the challenges of informing patients about the consequences of kidney transplantation. Understanding the challenges faced by new transplant recipients can help health professionals educate patients about life post-transplantation so patients have a genuine understanding of what they are consenting to, which is likely to enhance medication adherence and ultimately, graft success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of non-adherence in patients undergoing dialysis and kidney transplantation: United States transplantation practice patterns survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, A; Babakhani, A; Salifu, M O; Jindal, R M

    2014-06-01

    We performed a survey of United States transplantation centers to evaluate practice patterns in the assessment of nonadherence before and after kidney transplantation. An electronically administered, anonymous survey was sent to 181 United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) approved transplantation centers in 2012. Seventy-nine centers completed our survey. Of them, 51.3% had a protocol to evaluate medication/dialysis adherence before the listing; most common (36.4%) was the Simplified Medication Adherence Questionnaire. As an alternative to a questionnaire, the most common measure of nonadherence was the number of missed hemodialysis sessions (77.0%). The most common reason for poor adherence to dialysis regimens was difficulty with transportation (81.3%). Also, 94.4% noted the lack of a questionnaire to evaluate adherence to medications but relied on drug levels (73.4%) and self report. Only 12.9% used a questionnaire for the measurement of quality of life (Karnofsky performance scale). Of the participating centers, 27.1% used a formal cognitive testing for potential living donors. A social worker was used by most centers for nonadherent patients. Respondents indicated that patients (in the pretransplantation state) were more compliant with dialysis than with medication regimens. Finally, 37.7% of respondents noted graft failure due to medication nonadherence in 15% to 29% of their patients. There was a significant variability in the methods of screening for nonadherence while the patient was on dialysis, during pretransplantation work up, and during post-transplantation follow-up examinations. We recommend that there should be a standardized technique to evaluate nonadherence to facilitate focused clinical trials to improve adherence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Budget impact analysis of conversion from cyclosporine to sirolimus as immunosuppressive medication in renal transplantation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroutan N

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Naghmeh Foroutan,1 Hamid R Rasekh,1 Jamshid Salamzadeh,1 Hamid R Jamshidi,1 Mohsen Nafar2 1Department of Pharmacoeconomics and Pharmaceutical Management, School of Pharmacy, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, 2Department of Kidney Transplantation, Urinary Nephrology Research Center (UNRC, Shahid Labbafinejad Medical Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine budget impact of conversion from cyclosporine (CsA to sirolimus (SRL in renal transplant therapy (RTT from the perspective of insurance organizations in Iran. Methods: An Excel-based model was developed to determine cost of RTT, comparing current CsA based therapy to an mTOR inhibitor-based therapy regimen. Total cost included both cost of immunosuppressive agents and relative adverse events. The inputs were derived from database of Ministry of Health and insurance organizations, hospital and pharmacy based registries, and available literature that were varied through a one-way sensitivity analysis. According to the model, there were almost 17,000 patients receiving RTT in Iran, out of which about 2,200 patients underwent the operation within the study year. The model was constructed based on the results of a local RCT, in which test and control groups received CsA, SRL, and steroids over the first 3 months posttransplantation and, from the fourth month on, CsA, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF, and steroids were used in the CsA group and SRL, MMF, and steroids were administered in the SRL group, respectively. Results: The estimated cost of RTT with CsA was US$4,850,000 versus US$4,300,000 receiving SRL. These costs corresponded to the cost saving of almost US$550,000 for the payers. Conclusion: To evaluate the financial consequence of adding mTOR inhibitors to the insurers’ formulary, in the present study, a budget impact analysis was conducted on sirolimus. Fewer cases of costly adverse events along with

  5. An Asian perspective on organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Michael Cheng-tek

    2009-01-01

    The organ transplantation seems to have become a route practice of modern medical treatment when a patient's organ fails providing that she/he can afford the cost and a suitable organ is found. This practice, however, was not without scepticism and reservation at least to some Asians, for instance, Japan has been reluctant to launch a brave search for organs to save any patient whose organs fail. The western world including Vatican has seen donating one's organ for transplantation to save others as an act of love. Compassion is one of the main teachings in Asian tradition too, therefore culturally, Asians should be in favour of this modern medical treatment. But the ancient teachings of Asia also call for respecting parents by carefully safeguarding the gift of body that they gave and abiding in Tao to follow the flow of nature. What will the Asian ancient sages say to this new modern medical technology? This article will examine the teachings of Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism to find out how they respond to the procedures of organ transplantation.

  6. Role of gastroesophageal reflux disease in lung transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathorn, Kelly E; Chan, Walter W; Lo, Wai-Kit

    2017-01-01

    Lung transplantation is one of the highest risk solid organ transplant modalities. Recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and lung transplant outcomes, including acute and chronic rejection. The aim of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology, evaluation, and management of GERD in lung transplantation, as informed by the most recent publications in the field. The pathophysiology of reflux-induced lung injury includes the effects of aspiration and local immunomodulation in the development of pulmonary decline and histologic rejection, as reflective of allograft injury. Modalities of reflux and esophageal assessment, including ambulatory pH testing, impedance, and esophageal manometry, are discussed, as well as timing of these evaluations relative to transplantation. Finally, antireflux treatments are reviewed, including medical acid suppression and surgical fundoplication, as well as the safety, efficacy, and timing of such treatments relative to transplantation. Our review of the data supports an association between GERD and allograft injury, encouraging a strategy of early diagnosis and aggressive reflux management in lung transplant recipients to improve transplant outcomes. Further studies are needed to explore additional objective measures of reflux and aspiration, better compare medical and surgical antireflux treatment options, extend follow-up times to capture longer-term clinical outcomes, and investigate newer interventions including minimally invasive surgery and advanced endoscopic techniques. PMID:28507913

  7. Review fantastic medical implications of 3D-printing in liver surgeries, liver regeneration, liver transplantation and drug hepatotoxicity testing: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Zhang; Xiong, Nan-Yan; Zhao, Li-Zhen; Hu, Jin-Tian; Kong, De-Cheng; Yuan, Jiang-Yong

    2018-06-07

    The epidemiological trend in liver diseases becomes more serious worldwide. Several recent articles published by International Journal of Surgery in 2018 particularly emphasized the encouraging clinical benefits of hepatectomy, liver regeneration and liver transplantation, however, there are still many technical bottlenecks underlying these therapeutic approaches. Remarkably, a few preliminary studies have shown some clues to the role of three-dimensional (3D) printing in improving traditional therapy for liver diseases. Here, we concisely elucidated the curative applications of 3D-printing (no cells) and 3D Bio-printing (with hepatic cells), such as 3D-printed patient-specific liver models and devices for medical education, surgical simulation, hepatectomy and liver transplantation, 3D Bio-printed hepatic constructs for liver regeneration and artificial liver, 3D-printed liver tissues for evaluating drug's hepatotoxicity, and so on. Briefly, 3D-printed liver models and bioactive tissues may facilitate a lot of key steps to cure liver disorders, predictably bringing promising clinical benefits. This work further provides novel insights into facilitating treatment of hepatic carcinoma, promoting liver regeneration both in vivo and in vitro, expanding transplantable liver resources, maximizing therapeutic efficacy as well as minimizing surgical complications, medical hepatotoxicity, operational time, economic costs, etc. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Conhecimento e opinião de estudantes de medicina sobre doação e transplante de órgãos Attitude and opinion of medical students about organ donation and transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio H.F. Galvao

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Analisar o conhecimento e a opinião de estudantes de medicina sobre doação e transplante de órgãos. MÉTODOS: Trezentos e quarenta e sete estudantes responderam, voluntariamente, questionário com 17 perguntas sobre doação e transplante de órgãos. Eles foram avaliados globalmente, para verificar tendências gerais, e agrupados de acordo com o seu ano no curso médico (primeiro ao sexto, para avaliar diferenças entre os períodos. Alunos do quinto e sexto ano foram reunidos em um só grupo. Os resultados foram analisados pelo teste Qui quadrado. RESULTADOS: A intenção de ser doador post mortem foi de 89% e intervivo de 90%, contudo, apenas 62% sabiam dos riscos da doação intervivo. Entre os 347 estudantes, 70% admitiram conhecimento regular, ruim ou péssimo do assunto, 90,2% consideraram importante o tema transplante para a graduação médica, 76,9% consideraram o consentimento informado/expresso como o melhor critério de doação e 64,3% optaram pela gravidade da doença do paciente como melhor forma de alocação. O entendimento sobre transplante aumentou conforme o avanço no curso de graduação. Estudantes do quarto, quinto e sexto ano adotaram atitude negativa, em comparação aos dos anos iniciais, quanto à doação de órgãos para pacientes alcoólatras, não doadores, usuários de drogas ilícitas, estrangeiros e criminosos. CONCLUSÃO: Este trabalho demonstrou grande interesse e atitude positiva dos estudantes de medicina sobre doação e transplante de órgãos, embora a maioria tenha declarado conhecimento deficiente sobre o tema. Observamos também atitude negativa dos estudantes do quarto, quinto e sexto ano médico em relação à doação para alcoólatras, não doadores, usuários de drogas ilícitas, estrangeiros e criminosos.We analyzed the opinion and understanding of medical students about organ donation and transplantation. METHODS: 347 students voluntarily completed a questionnaire with 17

  9. Community experience of a Pacific Immersion Programme for medical students in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauiliu, Melbourne; Sopoaga, Faafetai; Ekeroma, Alec

    2013-06-14

    To obtain the views of the Pacific community about their involvement in a Pacific Immersion Programme, to determine the programme's viability as a resource for medical education. The Pacific Immersion Programme run by the Dunedin School of Medicine had four attachments (March, April, June and September) with local Pacific communities in 2011. Community focus groups were held the week immediately after each attachment. There were two focus group sessions for each attachment, one obtained the views of adults and the other of young people. Focus groups consisted of eight participants recruited through community coordinators and were facilitated by trained research assistants. Sessions were audio recorded and analysed using a thematic framework. Sixty-four members of the community participated in the focus groups. Eight themes emerged from the discussions. The community agreed the Pacific Immersion Programme strengthened community cohesion through efforts to engage the students. There was shared learning and created opportunities for engagement between medical students and the community's younger generation. The Pacific families shared with the students about their health and context through storytelling, dancing and singing and cultural ceremonies. Participants hoped students achieved what they wanted from the programme and the experience was useful for their work in the future. Community based medical education is a unique and useful approach for teaching medical students about the health of a minority community. The purpose of the paper is to highlight the impacts on participating communities. Nurturing established relationships and providing mutual benefits for both partners will ensure this opportunity will be available as a learning resource for future medical students.

  10. Examining Sense of Community among Medical Professionals in an Online Graduate Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadriye O. Lewis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the number of online degree programs continues to grow, one of the greatest challenges is developing a sense of community among learners who do not convene at the same time and place. This study examined the sense of community among medical professionals in an online graduate program for healthcare professionals. We took the sample from a fully online program delivered jointly by a state university and a local children's hospital in the Midwest. We administered Rovai's Classroom Community Survey with 11 additional demographic questions. We also utilized online interviews to further explore students’ understanding of sense of community. A bi-factor model was fitted to the online sense of community survey data. Using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA and univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA we identified potential group differences. The qualitative data were analyzed thematically in a recursive and iterative process. Study results suggested that a dominant factor existed: sense of community with two sub-domain factors including sense of learning and sense of connectedness. No significant differences in sense of community with regard to gender, native language, or area of medical practice were detected. However, results showed a difference in sense of community between the three courses examined. This study is the first to examine the sense of community among online medical professionals. Since our findings are in contrast to those of previous studies, this opens the door to additional studies around the possible differences between the community characteristics and needs of medical professionals as online students.

  11. Adherence to immunosuppression in adult lung transplant recipients : Prevalence and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, Otto H.; Vermeulen, Karin M.; Verschuuren, Erik A.; Erasmus, Michiel E.; van der Bij, Wim

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adherence to medication is a favourable with regard to survival after kidney, heart and liver transplantation. Little is known about adherence to medication in lung transplant recipients. To determine the prevalence of adherence and identify risk factors of non-adherence (NA) we

  12. Is there an association between immunosuppressant therapy medication adherence and depression, quality of life, and personality traits in the kidney and liver transplant population?

    OpenAIRE

    Gorevski, Elizabeth; Succop, Paul; Sachdeva, Jyoti; Cavanaugh, Teresa M; Volek, Paul; Heaton, Pamela; Chisholm-Burns, Marie; Martin-Boone, Jill E

    2013-01-01

    Elizabeth Gorevski,1 Paul Succop,1 Jyoti Sachdeva,1 Teresa M Cavanaugh,1 Paul Volek,1 Pamela Heaton,1 Marie Chisholm-Burns,2 Jill E Martin-Boone1 1University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA, 2University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy, Memphis, TN, USA Objectives: To measure the association of transplant patients' personality, depression, and quality of life with medication adherence in kidney and liver transplant recipients. Methods: A cross-sectional study of liver and kidney t...

  13. Interventions in a heart transplant recipient with a histrionic personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C; Chakraburtty, A; Nelson, D; Paradis, I; Kesinger, S; Bak, K; Litsey, A; Paris, W

    1999-06-01

    Organ transplantation is a psychosocially demanding process. Patients must undergo a comprehensive evaluation to await a donor organ that may never become available. After transplantation, recipients must deal with the acceptance of a new organ and comply with a medical regimen that includes numerous medications, follow-up exams, and procedures. Emotional well-being is monitored throughout the transplant process. However, despite the best of efforts and thorough pretransplant bio-psycho-social evaluations, it is possible for patients to have significant psychopathology that remains undetected. Following the stress of transplantation, such patients may present with exacerbation of symptomatology, which has the potential to negatively affect compliance and long-term outcome.

  14. Barriers and facilitators of medication reconciliation processes for recently discharged patients from community pharmacists' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennelty, Korey A; Chewning, Betty; Wise, Meg; Kind, Amy; Roberts, Tonya; Kreling, David

    2015-01-01

    Community pharmacists play a vital part in reconciling medications for patients transitioning from hospital to community care, yet their roles have not been fully examined in the extant literature. The objectives of this study were to: 1) examine the barriers and facilitators community pharmacists face when reconciling medications for recently discharged patients; and 2) identify pharmacists' preferred content and modes of information transfer regarding updated medication information for recently discharged patients. Community pharmacists were purposively and conveniently sampled from the Wisconsin (U.S. state) pharmacist-based research network, Pharmacy Practice Enhancement and Action Research Link (PEARL Rx). Community pharmacists were interviewed face-to-face, and transcriptions from audio recordings were analyzed using directed content analysis. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) guided the development of questions for the semi-structured interviews. Interviewed community pharmacists (N = 10) described the medication reconciliation process to be difficult and time-consuming for recently discharged patients. In the context of the TPB, more barriers than facilitators of reconciling medications were revealed. Themes were categorized as organizational and individual-level themes. Major organizational-level factors affecting the medication reconciliation process included: pharmacy resources, discharge communication, and hospital resources. Major individual-level factors affecting the medication reconciliation process included: pharmacists' perceived responsibility, relationships, patient perception of pharmacist, and patient characteristics. Interviewed pharmacists consistently responded that several pieces of information items would be helpful when reconciling medications for recently discharged patients, including the hospital medication discharge list and stop-orders for discontinued medications. The TPB was useful for identifying barriers and facilitators of

  15. Depression and anxiety following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuba, K; Esser, P; Mehnert, A

    2017-01-01

    In this prospective multicenter study, we investigated the course of depression and anxiety during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) until 5 years after transplantation adjusting for medical information. Patients were consulted before HSCT (n=239), at 3 months (n=150), 12 months (n=102...

  16. Positive implications from socially accountable, community-engaged medical education across two Philippines regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Torres; Cristobal, Fortunato; Siega-Sur, Jusie; Ross, Simone; Neusy, Andre-Jacques; Halili, Servando; Reeve, Carole

    2018-02-01

    Hundreds of millions of people worldwide lack access to quality health services, largely because of geographic and socioeconomic maldistribution of qualified practitioners. This study describes differences between the practice locations of Philippines medical graduates from two 'socially accountable, community-engaged' health professional education (SAHPE) schools and the practice locations of graduates from two 'conventionally trained' medical schools located in the same respective geographic regions. Licensed medical graduates were currently practising in the Philippines and had been practising for at least 6 months. Graduates were from two Philippines SAHPE schools (Ateneo de Zamboanga University-School of Medicine (ADZU-SOM) on the Zamboanga Peninsula (n=212) and the University of the Philippines Manila-School of Health Sciences (SHS-Palo) in Eastern Visayas (n=71), and from two 'conventional' medical schools Methods: Current graduate practice locations in municipalities or cities were linked with their respective population size and socioeconomic income class, and geocoded using Geographical Information System software onto a geospatial map of the Philippines. Bivariate analysis compared the population size and socioeconomic class of communities where the SAHPE medical graduates practised to communities where 'conventional' medical school graduates practised. Thirty-one percent of ADZU-SOM medical graduates practised in communities play a significant role in graduates choosing to practice in rural and/or economically disadvantaged communities. Governments experiencing medical workforce maldistributions similar to those in the Philippines should consider SAHPE as a potentially cost-effective strategy in recruiting and retaining health graduates to underserved areas.

  17. Assessing Transplant Attitudes: Understanding Minority Men's Perspectives on the Multifarious Barriers to Organ Donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, Bryan D; Naelitz, Bryan D; Jackson, Brielle; Howard, Mariah; Nowacki, Amy; Modlin, Charles S

    2017-08-01

    African Americans comprise 11 % of living organ donors, yet constitute 34 % of the kidney transplant waiting list. There are many barriers to organ donation among minorities that include decreased awareness of transplantation, cultural mistrust of the medical community, financial concerns, and fear of the transplant operation. This study investigates the societal misconceptions and demographic health factors that correlate with minority participation in organ and tissue donation. A 57 question Health and Wellness survey was designed to assess participants' demographic information, medical history, professional background, and opinions regarding organ transplantation. Participants were also asked to complete Quality Metric's Short Form-8 (SF-8) survey to assess physical health, mental health, and quality-of-life. Three hundred twenty-six surveys were administered to minority men. The majority of men were identified as African American, and 55 % were below the age of 40. Though 44 % of participants were willing to donate, only 27 % were registered as organ and tissue donors. Minorities who held misconceptions about organ donation-including the belief that they were too old or unhealthy to donate, for example-had lower general, physical, and mental health scores than those who did not (p = Minorities aware of the shortage for organs or who know a registered donor, an organ recipient, a dialysis patient, or someone on the waiting list were more willing to donate organs. Improving the general, physical, and mental health of minorities, coupled with an active educational outreach program, could result in a greater percentage of minorities registering and willing to be organ and tissue donors.

  18. Differences in Attitudes Toward Immunosuppressant Therapy in a Multi-ethnic Sample of Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantiner, Melissa; Rosenthal-Asher, Deborah; Tedla, Fasika; Salifu, Moro; Cukor, Judith; Wyka, Katarzyna; Hartono, Choli; Serur, David; de Boccardo, Graciela; Cukor, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    Barriers for renal transplant patients to immunosuppressant medication adherence are poorly understood, despite the high rate and toll of non-adherence. We sought to assess factors that contribute to barriers to immunosuppressive medication adherence in an ethnically diverse sample of 312 renal transplant patients recruited from three transplant centers across New York City. Transplant patients who were at least 6 months post-transplant completed questionnaires while waiting for their medical appointment. Ethnic differences were observed on barriers to immunosuppressant adherence. Black and Hispanic participants reported significantly more barriers to adherence compared to Caucasian participants. Differences in perception about the potential harm and necessity of immunosuppressant medications also were present. Using hierarchical multiple regression, age and income were significant predictors of reported barriers to adherence, even while controlling for ethnicity. The most robust predictor of reported barriers was the perception of the medication cost-benefit differential, i.e., the balance between concerns about immunosuppressant medications and their perceived helpfulness (B = - 0.5, p adherence. Future interventions targeting non-adherence should aim to reduce the barriers to adherence by addressing perceived risks and benefits of taking immunosuppressant medication.

  19. Community-based medical education: is success a result of meaningful personal learning experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Len; Walters, Lucie; Rosenthal, David

    2014-01-01

    Community-based medical education (CBME) is the delivery of medical education in a specific social context. Learners become a part of social and medical communities where their learning occurs. Longitudinal integrated clerkships (LICs) are year-long community-based placements where the curriculum and clinical experience is typically delivered by primary care physicians. These programs have proven to be robust learning environments, where learners develop strong communication skills and excellent clinical reasoning. To date, no learning model has been offered to describe CBME. The characteristics of CBME are explored by the authors who suggest that the social and professional context provided in small communities enhances medical education. The authors postulate that meaningfulness is engendered by the authentic context, which develops over time. These relationships with preceptors, patients and the community provide meaningfulness, which in turn enhances learning. The authors develop a novel learning model. They propose that the context-rich environment of CBME allows for meaningful relationships and experiences for students and that such meaningfulness enhances learning.

  20. Exploring the usage of a mobile phone application in transplanted patients to encourage medication compliance and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti-Yabur, Alana; Rizzo, Amanda; Hayde, Nicole; Watkins, Anthony C; Rocca, Juan P; Graham, Jay A

    2017-10-01

    Medication non-adherence in transplant patients is a grave problem that results in increased rejection episodes, graft loss and significant morbidity. The efficacy of users and non-users of a mobile phone application (mobile app) in promoting medication adherence was investigated. The Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire (BMQ) and Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) were used in these cohorts to assess the predilection for poor adherence. Serum tacrolimus, creatinine levels, and rejection episodes were also recorded. Lastly, the patients were tested on their recall of their immunosuppression. Overall, patients had extremely negative beliefs about medication reflected in their tendency toward higher predicted rates of non-adherence. Interestingly, though not significant, app users had higher rates of medication recollection. The high-risk nature of this population demands efforts to abrogate non-adherence. Caregivers are charged with the responsibility to offer patients a feasible option to safeguard treatment compliance. Mobile apps are a potentially powerful tool, which can be used to decrease non-adherence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictors of medication adherence and smoking cessation among smokers under community corrections supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropsey, Karen L; Clark, C Brendan; Stevens, Erin N; Schiavon, Samantha; Lahti, Adrienne C; Hendricks, Peter S

    2017-02-01

    Individuals in the U.S. criminal justice system now represent over 12% of all current U.S. smokers. With smoking banned in most U.S. jails and prisons, the cessation focus for this population has shifted to individuals who are under community correction supervision (e.g., probation, parole). The aim of this study was to examine predictors of successful smoking cessation among criminal justice individuals supervised in the community. Five hundred participants under community corrections supervision were randomized to receive either four sessions of smoking cessation counseling or no counseling in conjunction with 12weeks of bupropion treatment plus brief physician advice to quit. Logistic regression analyses examined associations of smoking variables with medication adherence and successful abstinence. Mediation analysis evaluated the indirect effects of medication adherence on smoking abstinence. The strongest associate of medication adherence was previous use of bupropion, while the strongest associate of smoking abstinence was medication adherence. Mediation analysis indicated that previous use of bupropion indirectly increased cessation rates through the pathway of increased medication adherence. These results highlight the importance of medication adherence for smoking cessation among community corrections smokers. Providing exposure to medication may be a promising intervention to increase medication adherence and subsequent cessation rates in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Face time: educating face transplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamparello, Brooke M; Bueno, Ericka M; Diaz-Siso, Jesus Rodrigo; Sisk, Geoffroy C; Pomahac, Bohdan

    2013-01-01

    Face transplantation is the innovative application of microsurgery and immunology to restore appearance and function to those with severe facial disfigurements. Our group aims to establish a multidisciplinary education program that can facilitate informed consent and build a strong knowledge base in patients to enhance adherence to medication regimes, recovery, and quality of life. We analyzed handbooks from our institution's solid organ transplant programs to identify topics applicable to face transplant patients. The team identified unique features of face transplantation that warrant comprehensive patient education. We created a 181-page handbook to provide subjects interested in pursuing transplantation with a written source of information on the process and team members and to address concerns they may have. While the handbook covers a wide range of topics, it is easy to understand and visually appealing. Face transplantation has many unique aspects that must be relayed to the patients pursuing this novel therapy. Since candidates lack third-party support groups and programs, the transplant team must provide an extensive educational component to enhance this complex process. As face transplantation continues to develop, programs must create sound education programs that address patients' needs and concerns to facilitate optimal care.

  3. The ghost of fouling communities past: the effect of original community on subsequent recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Emily A; Swain, Geoffrey W

    2014-01-01

    Biofouling on ships has been linked to the spread of invasive species, which has been identified as one of the current primary threats to the environment. Previous research on antifouling coatings suggested that the quantity of fouling, as well as community composition, on biocidal coatings was modified by prior fouling settlement. The experiment reported in this paper was designed to determine how preconditioning affected the rate and composition of subsequent fouling on transplanted silicone coatings. A series of 10 × 20 cm panels coated with Intersleek 700 or DC3140 were placed at three locations in Florida (Ponce Inlet, Sebastian Inlet, and Port of Miami), which were characterized by distinct fouling communities. Panels were immersed for four months, cleaned, and reciprocally transplanted among the three sites. Fouling community composition and coverage were characterized at bimonthly intervals both before and after transplantation. The original fouling community affected the subsequent fouling composition and recolonization by tunicates, sea anemones, barnacles, sponges, hydroids, and arborescent bryozoans. The community-level effects were short-term, lasting 2-4 months, but specific responses lasted up to 14 months post-transplant.

  4. Community Pharmacist Attitudes on Medication Synchronization Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Witry

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medication synchronization is a service offered by an increasing number of community pharmacies that aligns refilling of a patient’s multiple medications. Purported benefits include increased adherence and improved dispensing efficiency. Objective: To assess community pharmacist agreement with a set of declarative statements about medication synchronization programs and to identify variation related to pharmacist characteristics. Methods: In 2015, a cross-sectional survey was mailed to 1,000 pharmacists from 5 Midwestern U.S. states using 4-contacts and an online option. Respondents used a 7-point Likert scale to agree or disagree with 5 statements about medication synchronization. Demographic and workplace characteristics were collected. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and factor analysis. Multiple linear regression tested the relationship between pharmacist characteristics and a 4-item attitude composite. Results: There were 258 usable responses for a response rate of 28.8%. About half (45.0% reported their pharmacy offered medication synchronization. Most pharmacists (82.6% agreed this service has a positive impact on patient adherence but 57% agreed that a “significant change to workflow” was or would be required. Pharmacist agreement that the program provides financial benefits to the pharmacy was higher than agreement that the service provides more opportunities for patient interactions (p<0.001. In the multiple regression analysis, having a PharmD and working at a pharmacy offering Medication Therapy Management were associated with more positive scores on the medication synchronization benefits composite whereas working in a staff role (rather than a manager/owner was lower. No demographic predictors were significantly associated with agreeing that a significant change to workflow would be required for implementation. Conclusions: Pharmacists generally were positive about medication synchronization

  5. Transplant recipients are vulnerable to coverage denial under Medicare Part D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Lisa M; Maldonado, Angela Q; Lentine, Krista L; Schnitzler, Mark A; Zhang, Zidong; Hess, Gregory P; Garrity, Edward; Kasiske, Bertram L; Axelrod, David A

    2018-02-15

    Transplant immunosuppressants are often used off-label because of insufficient randomized prospective trial data to achieve organ-specific US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. Transplant recipients who rely on Medicare Part D for immunosuppressant drug coverage are vulnerable to coverage denial for off-label prescriptions, unless use is supported by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)-approved compendia. An integrated dataset including national transplant registry data and 3 years of dispensed pharmacy records was used to identify the prevalence of immunosuppression use that is both off-label and not supported by CMS-approved compendia. Numbers of potentially vulnerable transplant recipients were identified. Off-label and off-compendia immunosuppression regimens are frequently prescribed (3-year mean: lung 66.5%, intestine 34.2%, pancreas 33.4%, heart 21.8%, liver 16.5%, kidney 0%). The annual retail cost of these at-risk medications exceeds $30 million. This population-based study of transplant immunosuppressants vulnerable to claim denials under Medicare Part D coverage demonstrates a substantial gap between clinical practice, current FDA approval processes, and policy mandates for pharmaceutical coverage. This coverage barrier reduces access to life-saving medications for patients without alternative resources and may increase the risk of graft loss and death from medication nonadherence. © 2018 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  6. Long-Term Follow-Up of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Treatment of Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection in a Dual Solid Organ Transplant Recipient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bilal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile infection is one of the most frequent causes of healthcare-associated infections, and its rates are also increasing in the community. Mounting evidence suggests that fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT may be effective; however, as there is paucity of data regarding the use of FMT in patients with solid organ transplants, we present a case of successful FMT in a patient with dual solid organ transplant.

  7. Attitude of University of Nigeria Medical Students to Community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: A study was carried out among 136 final year medical students of University of Nigeria Enugu Campus, to verify their attitude to Community Medicine as well as selection of the course for future specialization. Methods: The study was a cross sectional descriptive one involving all final year medical students of the ...

  8. Collaboration between Hospital and Community Pharmacists to Improve Medication Management from Hospital to Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Kristeller

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to determine if a model for patient-centered care that integrates medication management between hospital and community pharmacists is feasible and can improve medication adherence. Design: This was a randomized, non-blinded, interventional study of 69 patients discharged from a hospital to home. Process measures include the number and type of medication-related discrepancies or problems identified, patient willingness to participate, the quality and quantity of interactions with community pharmacists, hospital readmissions, and medication adherence. Setting: A 214-bed acute care hospital in Northeastern Pennsylvania and seventeen regional community pharmacies. Patients: Enrolled patients were hospitalized with a primary or secondary diagnosis of heart failure or COPD, had a planned discharge to home, and agreed to speak to one of seventeen community pharmacists within the study network (i.e., a network community pharmacist following hospital discharge. Intervention: Information about a comprehensive medication review completed by the hospital pharmacist was communicated with the network community pharmacist to assist with providing medication therapy management following hospital discharge. Results: Of 180 patients eligible for the study, 111 declined to participate. Many patients were reluctant to talk to an additional pharmacist, however if the patient’s pharmacist was already within the network of 17 pharmacies, they usually agreed to participate. The study enrolled 35 patients in the intervention group and 34 in the control group. An average of 6 medication-related problems per patient were communicated to the patient’s network community pharmacist after discharge. In the treatment group, 44% of patients had at least one conversation with the network community pharmacist following hospital discharge. There was no difference in post-discharge adherence between the groups (Proportion of Days

  9. Data Transmission and Access Protection of Community Medical Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunbao Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of Internet of Things (IoT technologies, Community Medical Internet of Things (CMIoT is a new medical information system and generates massive multiple types of medical data which contain all kinds of user identity data, various types of medical data, and other sensitive information. To effectively protect users’ privacy, we propose a secure privacy data protection scheme including transmission protection and access control. For the uplink transmission data protection, bidirectional identity authentication and fragmented multipath data transmission are used, and for the downlink data protection, fine grained access control and dynamic authorization are used. Through theoretical analysis and experiment evaluation, it is proved that the community medical data can be effectively protected in the transmission and access process without high performance loss.

  10. [What the family doctor must know about lung transplant (Part 1)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurbano, L; Zurbano, F

    2017-09-01

    Lung transplant is a therapeutic, medical-surgical procedure indicated for pulmonary diseases (except lung cancer), that are terminal and irreversible with current medical treatment. More than 3,500 lung transplants have been performed in Spain, with a rate of over 6 per million and increasing. In this review, an analysis is made of the types of transplants, their indications and contraindications, the procedures, immunosuppressive treatments, their side effects and medical interactions, current prophylaxis. A list of easily accessible literature references is also include, the majority being by national authors. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Tacrolimus in preventing transplant rejection in Chinese patients – optimizing use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li CJ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chuan-Jiang Li,1,* Liang Li2,* 1Department of Surgery, Nanfang Hospital, 2Department of Medical Genetics, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *The authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Tacrolimus is a product of fermentation of Streptomyces, and belongs to the family of calcineurin inhibitors. It is a widely used immunosuppressive drug for preventing solid-organ transplant rejection. Compared to cyclosporine, tacrolimus has greater immunosuppressive potency and a lower incidence of side effects. It has been accepted as first-line treatment after liver and kidney transplantation. Tacrolimus has specific features in Chinese transplant patients; its in vivo pharmacokinetics, treatment regimen, dose and administration, and adverse-effect profile are influenced by multiple factors, such as genetics and the spectrum of primary diseases in the Chinese population. We reviewed the clinical experience of tacrolimus use in Chinese liver- and kidney-transplant patients, including the pharmacology of tacrolimus, the immunosuppressive effects of tacrolimus versus cyclosporine, effects of different factors on tacrolimus metabolism on Chinese patients, personalized medicine, clinical safety profile, and patient satisfaction and adherence. This article provides guidance for the rational and efficient use of tacrolimus in Chinese organ-transplant patients. Keywords: tacrolimus, liver transplantation, kidney transplant, Chinese, personalized medicine

  12. The incidence of post-transplant cancer among kidney transplant recipients is associated with the level of tacrolimus exposure during the first year after transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Shelly; Rahamimov, Ruth; Green, Hefziba; Fox, Benjamin D; Mor, Eytan; Gafter, Uzi; Chagnac, Avry; Rozen-Zvi, Benaya

    2017-07-01

    Immunosuppressive therapy plays a major role in the development of post-transplant cancer. In this nested case-control study of kidney transplant recipients (KTRs), we investigated whether the incidence of post-transplant cancer is associated with the level of tacrolimus exposure over time. We screened the Rabin Medical Center database for adults who received kidney transplants between 2001 and 2014 and developed post-transplant cancer (excluding basal and squamous cell skin cancers). They were matched against KTRs without cancer. All patients received a maintenance immunosuppressive treatment with tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and corticosteroids. The degree of exposure to tacrolimus was estimated as the time-weighted average (tTWA) value of tacrolimus blood levels. The tTWA was calculated as the area under the curve divided by time at 1, 6, and 12 months after transplantation and at time of cancer diagnosis. Thirty-two cases were matched against 64 controls. tTWA values above 11 ng/mL at 6 and 12 months after transplantation were associated with odds ratio (OR) of 3.1 (95% CI 1.1-9) and 11.7 (95% CI = 1.3-106), respectively, for post-transplant cancer; and with OR of 5.2 (95% CI 1.3-20.5) and 14.1 (95% CI = 1.5-134.3), respectively, for cancer diagnosed more than 3 years after transplantation. Exposure to a tacrolimus time-weighted average level above 11 ng/mL at 6 or 12 months after kidney transplantation is associated with an increased risk of developing cancer.

  13. 76 FR 7855 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Community Medical Foundation for Patient...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Community Medical Foundation for Patient Safety AGENCY: Agency for... Medical Foundation for Patient Safety, of its status as a Patient Safety Organization (PSO). The Patient... notification from Community Medical Foundation for Patient Safety, PSO number P0029, to voluntarily relinquish...

  14. Recurrence of Intravenous Talc Granulomatosis following Single Lung Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C Cook

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced pulmonary disease is an unusual consequence of the intravenous injection of oral medications, usually developing over a period of several years. A number of patients with this condition have undergone lung transplantation for respiratory failure. However, a history of drug abuse is often considered to be a contraindication to transplantation in the context of limited donor resources. A patient with pulmonary talc granulomatosis secondary to intravenous methylphenidate injection who underwent successful lung transplantation and subsequently presented with recurrence of the underlying disease in the transplanted lung 18 months after transplantation is reported.

  15. Estimating the risks of acquiring a kidney abroad: a meta-analysis of complications following participation in transplant tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anker, Ashley E; Feeley, Thomas H

    2012-01-01

    A meta-analysis of odds ratios comparing the risks of participating in transplant tourism by acquiring a kidney abroad to the risks associated with domestic kidney transplant was undertaken. Comparison across 12 medical outcomes indicates transplant tourists are significantly more likely to contract cytomegalovirus, hepatitis B, HIV, post-transplantation diabetes mellitus, and wound infection than those receiving domestic kidney transplant. Results also indicate that domestic kidney transplant recipients experience significantly higher one-yr patient- and graft-survival rates. Analyses are supplemented by independent comparisons of outcomes and provide practitioners with weighted estimates of the proportion of transplant recipients experiencing 15 medical outcomes. Practitioners are encouraged to caution patients of the medical risks associated with transplant tourism. Despite the illegal and unethical nature of transplant tourism, additional efforts are indicated to eliminate the organ trade and to educate wait-listed patients about the risks of transplant tourism. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Adherence to immunosuppressive therapy following liver transplantation: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ramon Antônio; Turrini, Ruth Natália Teresa; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2016-08-29

    to investigate the evidence available in the literature on non-adherence to immunosuppressive therapy among patients undergoing liver transplantation. integrative literature review, including research whose sample consisted of patients aged over 18 years undergoing liver transplantation. It excluded those containing patients undergoing multiple organ transplants. For the selection of articles, Medline / Pubmed, CINAHL, LILACS, Scopus and Embase were searched. The search period corresponded to the initial date of indexation of different bases, up to the deadline of February 10, 2015, using controlled and uncontrolled descriptors: liver transplantation, hepatic transplantation, liver orthotopic transplantation, medication adherence, medication non-adherence, medication compliance and patient compliance. were located 191 investigations, 10 of which met the objectives of the study and were grouped into four categories, namely: educational process and non-adherence; non-adherence related to the number of daily doses of immunosuppressive medications; detection methods for non-adherence and side effects of therapy. there were risk factors related to the health service, such as control and reduction of the number of doses; related to the individual, such as being male, divorced, alcohol or other substances user, exposed to low social support and being mentally ill. investigar as evidências disponíveis na literatura sobre a não adesão à terapêutica imunossupressora entre pacientes submetidos ao transplante de fígado. revisão integrativa da literatura, que incluiu investigações cuja amostra era composta por pacientes com idade igual ou superior a 18 anos, submetidos a transplante de fígado. Excluíram-se as que continham pacientes submetidos a transplantes de múltiplos órgãos. Para a seleção dos artigos foram consultadas as bases Medline/Pubmed, CINAHL, LILACS, Scopus e Embase. O período de busca determinado correspondeu à data inicial de indexação das

  17. Attitudes to Organ Donation and Knowledge of Donation and Transplantation among University of Auckland Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey Harbour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims • To explore organ donation and transplantation knowledge and attitudes among medical students at the University of Auckland. • To understand students' perception of the extent of training received prior to and during the medical program. Method A validated web-based questionnaire consisting of 42 questions in five categories was anonymously administered to all enrolled medical students at the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, in September 2012. Results In all, 419 out of 989 (42% Year 2–6 students responded. A total of 99.3% of medical students supported organ donation, but knowledge was limited (mean score 7.54/15±2.26. A total of 38% of students reported having participated in organ donation learning. A total of 96% of students believed that organ donation information should be available in primary care settings. A total of 69% of students reported that if a patient asked a question about organ donation that they did not know the answer to, they also would not know where to source the correct information from. Conclusion This study demonstrates that although medical students support organ donation, they lack the knowledge required to facilitate informative discussions with patients. Enhanced organ donation education in medical programs may enable students to develop skills and knowledge allowing them to better discuss donation with patients.

  18. Framing risks and benefits of medical tourism: a content analysis of medical tourism coverage in Korean American community newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Jungmi; Oh, Kyeung Mi

    2015-01-01

    This study examines Korean American community newspapers' representation of risks and benefits involved with medical tourism offered in Korea. Using framing theory, this research attempts to explain Korean Americans' highly positive perceptions and high willingness to use health and medical services in Korea through medical tourism rather than using such services in the United States. The result of content analyses indicated that Korean American community newspapers are rarely engaged in risk communication and lack sufficient information about potential risks of medical tourism while emphasizing diverse benefits. Korean ethnic media, as the primary source of health communication for Korean Americans, should provide more reliable health and medical information for the population's appropriate health management.

  19. The ASCENT (Allocation System Changes for Equity in Kidney Transplantation) Study: a Randomized Effectiveness-Implementation Study to Improve Kidney Transplant Waitlisting and Reduce Racial Disparity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzer, Rachel E; Smith, Kayla; Basu, Mohua; Gander, Jennifer; Mohan, Sumit; Escoffery, Cam; Plantinga, Laura; Melanson, Taylor; Kalloo, Sean; Green, Gary; Berlin, Alex; Renville, Gary; Browne, Teri; Turgeon, Nicole; Caponi, Susan; Zhang, Rebecca; Pastan, Stephen

    2017-05-01

    The United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) implemented a new Kidney Allocation System (KAS) in December 2014 that is expected to substantially reduce racial disparities in kidney transplantation among waitlisted patients. However, not all dialysis facility clinical providers and end stage renal disease (ESRD) patients are aware of how the policy change could improve access to transplant. We describe the ASCENT (Allocation System Changes for Equity in KidNey Transplantation) study, a randomized controlled effectiveness-implementation study designed to test the effectiveness of a multicomponent intervention to improve access to the early steps of kidney transplantation among dialysis facilities across the United States. The multicomponent intervention consists of an educational webinar for dialysis medical directors, an educational video for patients and an educational video for dialysis staff, and a dialysis-facility specific transplant performance feedback report. Materials will be developed by a multidisciplinary dissemination advisory board and will undergo formative testing in dialysis facilities across the United States. This study is estimated to enroll ~600 U.S. dialysis facilities with low waitlisting in all 18 ESRD Networks. The co-primary outcomes include change in waitlisting, and waitlist disparity at 1 year; secondary outcomes include changes in facility medical director knowledge about KAS, staff training regarding KAS, patient education regarding transplant, and a medical director's intent to refer patients for transplant evaluation. The results from the ASCENT study will demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of a multicomponent intervention designed to increase access to the deceased-donor kidney waitlist and reduce racial disparities in waitlisting.

  20. Attitude of the Saudi community towards heart donation, transplantation, and artificial hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHabeeb, Waleed; AlAyoubi, Fakhr; Tash, Adel; AlAhmari, Leenah; AlHabib, Khalid F

    2017-07-01

    To understand the attitudes of the Saudi population towards heart donation and transplantation. Methods: A survey using a questionnaire addressing attitudes towards organ transplantation and donation was conducted across 18 cities in Saudi Arabia between September 2015 and March 2016.  Results: A total of 1250 respondents participated in the survey. Of these, approximately 91% agree with the concept of organ transplantation but approximately 17% do not agree with the concept of heart transplantation; 42.4% of whom reject heart transplants for religious reasons. Only 43.6% of respondents expressed a willingness to donate their heart and approximately 58% would consent to the donation of a relative's organ after death. A total of 59.7% of respondents believe that organ donation is regulated and 31.8% fear that the doctors will not try hard enough to save their lives if they consent to organ donation. Approximately 77% believe the heart is removed while the donor is alive; although, the same proportion of respondents thought they knew what brain death meant. Conclusion: In general, the Saudi population seem to accept the concept of transplantation and are willing to donate, but still hold some reservations towards heart donation.

  1. Transplantation: fantasy, fiction and fact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Reginald

    2004-03-01

    Today organ transplantation is considered a routine surgical procedure. The idea of transferring tissues from one person to another has been inspiring to the minds of artists depicting the Saints Cosmos and Damian and also writers such as Mary Shelley. Early attempts at tissue transplantation were unsuccessful but in the last 50 years medical research has brought it into reality. The present paper looks at the subject from the realms of fantasy through the works of fiction and finally into everyday fact.

  2. Challenges in renal transplantation in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nono, Ibrahiem H; Telha, Khaled A; Al-Alimy, Gamil M; Ghilan, Abdulilah M; Abu Asba, Nagieb W; Al-Zkri, Abdo M; Al-Adimi, Abdulilah M; Al-Ba'adani, Tawfiq H

    2015-02-16

    Background Renal replacement therapy was first introduced in Yemen in 1978 in the form of hemodialysis. Twenty years later, the first renal transplantation was performed. Kidney transplantations were started in socially and financially challenging circumstances in Yemen in 1998. A structured program was established and has been functioning regularly since 2005. A pediatric transplantation program was started in 2011. Material and Methods This was a prospective study of 181 transplants performed at the Urology and Nephrology Center between May 1998 and 2012. All transplants were from living related donors. The immunosuppressive protocol consisted initially of double therapy with steroid and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). Subsequently, triple therapy with addition of a calcineurin inhibitor was introduced. Primary graft function was achieved in 176 (97.2%) recipients. Results Cold ischemia time was 48-68 min. Episodes of acute rejection in 12 patients were treated with high-dose steroids. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was used in cases of vascular or steroid-resistant rejection in 2 patients. The post-transplant complications, either surgical or medical, were comparable to those recorded in the literature. Conclusions Renal transplantation is a good achievement in our country. The patients and graft survival rates are comparable to other reports.

  3. The impact of learning communities on interpersonal relationships among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champaloux, Eve Privman; Keeley, Meg G

    2016-01-01

    Medical students at the University of Virginia (UVA) are mentored and learn within the framework of a four college learning community. Uniquely, these learning communities are used to organize the third-year clerkship rotations. Students were surveyed after their first pre-clinical year and after their clerkship year to determine what the effect of the learning community was on their social and educational interpersonal relationships. Students knew a higher percentage of their college mates after completing their third-year clerkships within the framework of the college system. Students chose peers from within the college system for social and educational interpersonal scenarios statistically more often than what would be expected at random. Small group learning environments that were not formed within the framework of the college system at UVA did not have the same effect on interpersonal relationships, indicating that learning communities are uniquely able to provide a context for relationship building. Students felt more positively about the social and educational effects of the college system after the clerkship year, with a corresponding increase in the strength of their interpersonal bonds with their college peers. This work is the first to investigate the effects of learning communities on interpersonal relationships among medical students and finds that learning communities positively impact both social and educational medical student bonds.

  4. Self-medication in Central Saudi Arabia. Community pharmacy consumers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljadhey, Hisham; Assiri, Ghada A; Mahmoud, Mansour A; Al-Aqeel, Sinaa; Murray, Michael

    2015-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of self-medication and assess the knowledge, attitudes, and perception of consumers toward self-medication. This cross-sectional survey was conducted over 4 weeks in May 2011 in Riyadh city, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Community pharmacies within 5 areas of the city (North, South, West, East, and Middle) were randomly selected for the study. All consumers were approached to participate in the study, with the exception of those buying cosmetic and medicinal equipments. A validated self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. A total of 538 out of 707 consumers attending community pharmacies in Riyadh city, agreed to participate in the study. Most responders were male (73%), 23-33 years old (35%), and college graduates (42%). A total of 285 medications were bought without a prescription. Of these, 149 (49%) medications should be dispensed by prescription only, and 155 (51%) were over the counter medications. The most common prescription medications dispensed without prescriptions were antibiotics (22%) and analgesics/antipyretics (19%). The most common reasons for buying medications without a prescription were that the symptoms were too minor to visit a doctor (54%), time saving (40%), and minor illnesses for which the participants knew the required treatment (40%). Overall, most participants had poor knowledge, and negative perceptions regarding self-medication. More than 68% of participants did not know whether the medicine they bought is a prescription-only or over the counter medication. Irresponsible self-medication is common in Saudi Arabia. Future studies should focus on improving the consumers' awareness of self-medication and the proper use of medications.

  5. Viral infections in transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razonable, R R; Eid, A J

    2009-12-01

    Solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients are uniquely predisposed to develop clinical illness, often with increased severity, due to a variety of common and opportunistic viruses. Patients may acquire viral infections from the donor (donor-derived infections), from reactivation of endogenous latent virus, or from the community. Herpes viruses, most notably cytomegalovirus and Epstein Barr virus, are the most common among opportunistic viral pathogens that cause infection after solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The polyoma BK virus causes opportunistic clinical syndromes predominantly in kidney and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. The agents of viral hepatitis B and C present unique challenges particularly among liver transplant recipients. Respiratory viral illnesses due to influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza virus may affect all types of transplant recipients, although severe clinical disease is observed more commonly among lung and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Less common viral infections affecting transplant recipients include those caused by adenoviruses, parvovirus B19, and West Nile virus. Treatment for viruses with proven effective antiviral drug therapies should be complemented by reduction in the degree of immunosuppression. For others with no proven antiviral drugs for therapy, reduction in the degree of immunosuppression remains as the sole effective strategy for management. Prevention of viral infections is therefore of utmost importance, and this may be accomplished through vaccination, antiviral strategies, and aggressive infection control measures.

  6. Predicting and preventing readmissions in kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covert, Kelly L; Fleming, James N; Staino, Carmelina; Casale, Jillian P; Boyle, Kimberly M; Pilch, Nicole A; Meadows, Holly B; Mardis, Caitlin R; McGillicuddy, John W; Nadig, Satish; Bratton, Charles F; Chavin, Kenneth D; Baliga, Prabhakar K; Taber, David J

    2016-07-01

    A lack of research exploring post-transplant process optimization to reduce readmissions and increasing readmission rates at our center from 2009 to 2013 led to this study, aimed at assessing the effect of patient and process factors on 30-d readmission rates after kidney transplantation. This was a retrospective case-control study in adult kidney transplant recipients. Univariate and multivariate analyses were utilized to assess patient and process determinants of 30-d readmissions. 384 patients were included; 30-d readmissions were significantly associated with graft loss and death (p = 0.001). Diabetes (p = 0.049), pharmacist identification of poor understanding or adherence, and prolonged time on hemodialysis prior to transplant were associated with an increased risk of 30-d readmissions. After controlling for risk factors, readmission rates were only independently predicted by pharmacist identification of patient lack of understanding or adherence regarding post-transplant medications and dialysis exposure for more than three yr (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.10-4.71, p = 0.026 and OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.22, 3.70, respectively), both of which were significantly modified by history of diabetes. Thirty-d readmissions are attributable to both patient and process-level factors. These data suggest that a lack of post-transplant medication knowledge in high-risk patients drives early hospital readmission. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Medication adherence beliefs of U.S community pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witry, Matthew J

    2018-05-01

    There is increasing attention on the role of community pharmacists in improving medication adherence. There is a need to better understand pharmacist attitudes and experiences related to this role. To assess community pharmacist perceptions of patient reasons for non-adherence, characterize the adherence beliefs of community pharmacists, and test if there are demographic predictors of pharmacists' self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and role beliefs related to intervening on medication non-adherence. A cross-sectional survey was mailed using a 4-contact approach to 1000 pharmacists practicing in 5 Midwestern U.S. States. The survey included seven domains to address the study objectives. Descriptive statistics were calculated for demographic items, coefficient alphas tested the internal consistency of scales, and multiple regression was used to test the relationship between demographics and scale means. There were 261 usable responses giving a 29% response rate. Pharmacists perceived forgetting and instructions changing without a new prescription to be the most common reasons for late refills. A minority of pharmacists agreed that non-adherence involves a deliberate decision or that negative medication beliefs were common reasons for late refills. Pharmacists were confident, had positive outcome expectations, and positive role beliefs related to interacting with patients who have adherence issues. Barriers to adherence intervention included difficulties with follow-up and documentation. Also, over half of the pharmacists reported that discussing adherence makes patients defensive. Pharmacists had positive attitudes toward intervening on medication non-adherence although barriers to intervention are present. Pharmacists perceived non-intentional reasons for late refills to be more prevalent than intentional reasons. Pharmacists may benefit from additional non-adherence communication training and support targeted at identifying a broader range of non

  8. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL): the impact of medical and demographic variables upon pediatric recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Lisa; Weiss, Rebecca; Wei, Ying; Satwani, Prakash; Bhatia, Monica; George, Diane; Garvin, James; Morris, Erin; Harrison, Lauren; Cairo, Mitchell S; Sands, Stephen A

    2011-12-15

    The trajectory of Heath-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) in pediatric recipients who have undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), as well as the demographic and medical factors that predict HRQoL, has lagged behind the adult research. A prospective longitudinal study of HRQoL in pediatric HSCT recipients was conducted with 95 patients at the Columbia University Medical Center between 2002 and 2009. Both children and parents completed the PedsQL 4.0 prior to HSCT and at days 100, 180, and 365-post-HSCT. The majority of patients and their parents reported linear improvements in HRQoL in the first year post-transplant; however, a portion of patients were in the at-risk group at each time point. Latent growth modeling was utilized to examine demographic and medical factors that predicted initial HRQoL and its trajectory. Older age at transplant significant predicted lowered HRQoL at baseline for self- and parent-report. Female gender significantly impacted lowered self-reported physical HRQoL over time. Ethnicity was a significant predictor of HRQoL at baseline and over time for self- and parent-report, with African-American children reporting the highest HRQoL; whereas, the worst decline in psychosocial HRQoL was often reported by parents and children of Asian descent. This research identifies the significant impact of ethnicity upon HRQoL following pediatric HSCT. It is likely that an individual's pre-morbid experiences and expectations, particularly with regard to culture, behaviors, and values, influence the parent and child's perceptions and expectations of the HSCT process. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Rituximab: An emerging therapeutic agent for kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Kahwaji

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Kahwaji, Chris Tong, Stanley C Jordan, Ashley A VoComprehensive Transplant Center, Transplant immunology Laboratory, HLA Laboratory, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Rituximab (anti-CD20, anti-B-cell is now emerging as an important drug for modification of B-cell and antibody responses in solid-organ transplant recipients. Its uses are varied and range from facilitating desensitization and ABO blood group-incompatible transplantation to the treatment of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD, and recurrent glomerular diseases in the renal allograft. Despite these uses, prospective randomized trials are lacking. Only case reports exist in regards to its use in de novo and recurrent diseases in the renal allograft. Recent reports suggests that the addition of rituximab to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG may have significant benefits for desensitization and treatment of AMR and chronic rejection. Current dosing recommendations are based on data from United States Food and Drug Administration-approved indications for treatment of B-cell lymphomas and rheumatoid arthritis. From the initial reported experience in solid organ transplant recipients, the drug is well tolerated and not associated with increased infectious risks. However, close monitoring for viral infections is recommended with rituximab use. The occurrence of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML has been reported with rituximab use. However, this is rare and not reported in the renal transplant population. Here we will review current information regarding the effectiveness of rituximab as an agent for desensitization of highly human leukocyte antigen-sensitized and ABO-incompatible transplant recipients and its use in treatment of AMR. In addition, the post-transplant use of rituximab for treatment of PTLD and for recurrent and de novo glomerulonephritis in the allograft will be discussed. In

  10. Japanese-style intensive medical care improves prognosis for acute liver failure and the perioperative management of liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, K; Watanabe, T; Maruoka, N; Kuroki, Y; Takahashi, H; Yoshiba, M

    2010-12-01

    The Japanese style of intensive medical care for acute liver failure has yielded high survival rates. The care system comprises artificial liver support (ALS) together with treatment for the underlying disease. Plasma exchange in combination with high-volume hemodiafiltration using an high performance membrane has become the standard ALS system. It is safe, efficiently removing more low and middle molecular weight toxic substances than other methods because of the large volumes of buffer (more than 200 L per session), resulting in recovery from coma in patients with severe fulminant hepatitis, a status comparable with the ahepatic state. This ALS is therefore an effective tool to sustain patients with fulminant hepatitis in a favorable condition until liver function recovers or liver transplantation becomes available. The accompanying treatment for underlying disease serves to limit the liver destruction that hampers regeneration. The treatment has remarkably improved the prognosis for patients with subacute types of fulminant hepatitis, which generally carry a less favorable prognosis than the acute type. This treatment system thus provides more time for physicians to assess the indications for liver transplantation as well as giving the patient a greater chance of undergoing transplantation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. THE ISLAMIC ETHICS OF MITOCHONDRIA TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Iman Bouzenita

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Biotechnology has opened a new chapter with the advent of mitochondria transplantation for cell-based therapy. Mitochondrial transplantation was successfully led to birth; however, cytoplasmic transplantation has caused apprehension, since the mixing of human ooplasm from two different maternal sources may generate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA heteroplasmy in the offspring. Islamic legal verdicts on human cloning and somatic cell transfer have been overweighing explicit as to its prohibition, due to the change of creation, mixing of lineage and other evaluations. Is mitochondria transplantation equivalent to human cloning in that genetic information is proliferated and does it, therefore, take the same legal rule? Are there possible benefits (masalih for medical treatment that may render mitochondria transplantation permissible, or are possible harms (mafasid overweighing? Or is it a completely different procedure, taking a different rule? The paper will investigate into these questions and discuss the dimensions of Islamic ethics on the issue.

  12. Bioartificial liver and liver transplantation: new modalities for the treatment of liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DING Yitao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The main features of liver failure are extensive necrosis of hepatocytes, rapid disease progression, and poor prognosis, and at present, there are no effective drugs and methods for the treatment of liver failure. This article summarizes four treatment methods for liver failure, i.e., medical treatment, cell transplantation, liver transplantation, and artificial liver support therapy, and elaborates on the existing treatment methods. The current medical treatment regimen should be optimized; cell transplantation has not been used in clinical practice; liver transplantation is the most effective method, but it is limited by donor liver shortage and high costs; artificial liver can effectively remove toxic substances in human body. Therefore, this article puts forward artificial liver as a transition for liver transplantation; artificial liver can buy time for liver regeneration or liver transplantation and prolong patients′ survival time and thus has a promising future. The new treatment modality of bioartificial liver combined with liver transplantation may bring good news to patients with liver failure.

  13. Teaching Advanced Leadership Skills in Community Service (ALSCS) to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Adam O; Calleson, Diane; Bearman, Rachel; Steiner, Beat D; Frasier, Pamela Y; Slatt, Lisa

    2009-06-01

    Inadequate access to health care, lack of health insurance, and significant health disparities reflect crises in health care affecting all of society. Training U.S. physicians to possess not only clinical expertise but also sufficient leadership skills is essential to solve these problems and to effectively improve health care systems. Few models in the undergraduate medical curriculum exist for teaching students how to combine needed leadership competencies with actual service opportunities.The Advanced Leadership Skills in Community Service (ALSCS) selective developed in response to the shortage of leadership models and leadership training for medical students. The ALSCS selective is designed specifically to increase students' leadership skills, with an emphasis on community service. The selective integrates classroom-based learning, hands-on application of learned skills, and service learning. More than 60 medical students have participated in the selective since inception. Short-term outcomes demonstrate an increase in students' self-efficacy around multiple dimensions of leadership skills (e.g., fundraising, networking, motivating others). Students have also successfully completed more than a dozen leadership and community service projects. The selective offers an innovative model of a leadership-skills-based course that can have a positive impact on leadership skill development among medical school students and that can be incorporated into the medical school curriculum.

  14. Impact of a regional distributed medical education program on an underserved community: perceptions of community leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Patricia; Lovato, Chris Y; Hanlon, Neil; Poole, Gary; Bates, Joanna

    2013-06-01

    To describe community leaders' perceptions regarding the impact of a fully distributed undergraduate medical education program on a small, medically underserved host community. The authors conducted semistructured interviews in 2007 with 23 community leaders representing, collectively, the education, health, economic, media, and political sectors. They reinterviewed six participants from a pilot study (2005) and recruited new participants using purposeful and snowball sampling. The authors employed analytic induction to organize content thematically, using the sectors as a framework, and they used open coding to identify new themes. The authors reanalyzed transcripts to identify program outcomes (e.g., increased research capacity) and construct a list of quantifiable indicators (e.g., number of grants and publications). Participants reported their perspectives on the current and anticipated impact of the program on education, health services, the economy, media, and politics. Perceptions of impact were overwhelmingly positive (e.g., increased physician recruitment), though some were negative (e.g., strains on health resources). The authors identified new outcomes and confirmed outcomes described in 2005. They identified 16 quantifiable indicators of impact, which they judged to be plausible and measureable. Participants perceive that the regional undergraduate medical education program in their community has broad, local impacts. Findings suggest that early observed outcomes have been maintained and may be expanding. Results may be applicable to medical education programs with distributed or regional sites in similar rural, remote, and/or underserved regions. The areas of impact, outcomes, and quantifiable indicators identified will be of interest to future researchers and evaluators.

  15. Magnetic resonance of the renal transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauquil, P.; Hiesse, C.; Say, C.; Verdier, J.P.; Cauquil, M.; Brunet, A.M.; Galindo, R.; Tessier, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for renal insufficiency. Progress of surgical techniques and immuno-suppression have lead to better results. One year graft survival rate are 80% in most series. In this article, the role of imaging in renal transplantation, is defined. In surgical complications (fluid collections, obstruction, vascular insufficiency) non invasive radiology and interventionnal radiologic procedures have a great impact. Despite the perspectives of duplex and magnetic resonance, sensibility and specificity are not yet specified in medical complications: rejection, acute tubular necrosis, infection, drug toxicity. Association of these lesions is frequent and complicate analysis of results. Finally, transplant biopsy is still necessary to confirm the diagnosis [fr

  16. The Community Preceptor Crisis: Recruiting and Retaining Community-Based Faculty to Teach Medical Students-A Shared Perspective From the Alliance for Clinical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christner, Jennifer G; Dallaghan, Gary Beck; Briscoe, Gregory; Casey, Petra; Fincher, Ruth Marie E; Manfred, Lynn M; Margo, Katherine I; Muscarella, Peter; Richardson, Joshua E; Safdieh, Joseph; Steiner, Beat D

    2016-01-01

    Community-based instruction is invaluable to medical students, as it provides "real-world" opportunities for observing and following patients over time while refining history taking, physical examination, differential diagnosis, and patient management skills. Community-based ambulatory settings can be more conducive to practicing these skills than highly specialized, academically based practice sites. The Association of American Medical Colleges and other national medical education organizations have expressed concern about recruitment and retention of preceptors to provide high-quality educational experiences in community-based practice sites. These concerns stem from constraints imposed by documentation in electronic health records; perceptions that student mentoring is burdensome resulting in decreased clinical productivity; and competition between allopathic, osteopathic, and international medical schools for finite resources for medical student experiences. In this Alliance for Clinical Education position statement, we provide a consensus summary of representatives from national medical education organizations in 8 specialties that offer clinical clerkships. We describe the current challenges in providing medical students with adequate community-based instruction and propose potential solutions. Our recommendations are designed to assist clerkship directors and medical school leaders overcome current challenges and ensure high-quality, community-based clinical learning opportunities for all students. They include suggesting ways to orient community clinic sites for students, explaining how students can add value to the preceptor's practice, focusing on educator skills development, recognizing preceptors who excel in their role as educators, and suggesting forms of compensation.

  17. The Swiss Transplant Cohort Study's framework for assessing lifelong psychosocial factors in solid-organ transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geest, Sabina; Burkhalter, Hanna; Berben, Lut; Bogert, Laura Jane; Denhaerynck, Kris; Glass, Tracy R; Goetzmann, Lutz; Kirsch, Monika; Kiss, Alexander; Koller, Michael T; Piot-Ziegler, Chantal; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno

    2013-09-01

    Understanding outcomes after transplant requires a biopsychosocial model that includes biomedical and psychosocial factors. The latter, to date, are assessed only in a limited way as part of transplant registries or cohort studies. The Swiss Transplant Cohort Study (STCS) is a nationwide open cohort study (starting May 2008) to systematically and prospectively assess psychosocial factors. This article describes the framework underpinning STCS's psychosocial assessment. The STCS framework was adapted from the multidimensional conceptual perspective of Dew et al to describe transplant psychosocial domains and specific outcomes by adding a time perspective, a system perspective, and interaction among domains. We propose a multidimensional, multilevel biopsychosocial framework representing mutually influencing domains from before to after transplant, and exemplify each domain by factors included in STCS and their measurement. The transplant patient, centrally positioned, is described by clinical and sociodemographic characteristics (eg, socioeconomic status, educational, professional, and relationship status). The following psychosocial domains further describe the patient: (1) physical/functional (eg, perceived health status, sleep quality, daytime sleepiness), (2) psychological (eg, depression, stress), (3) behavioral (eg, medication adherence, smoking, drug use, physical activity, sun protection), (4) social (eg, work capacity/return to work), and (5) global quality of life. Factors associated with health care system level (eg, trust in transplant team) are also included in the model. The STCS's psychosocial framework provides a basis for studying the interplay of biomedical, sociodemographic, psychosocial, behavioral, and health care system factors in view of transplant outcomes and therefore has the potential to guide biopsychosocial transplant research.

  18. Psychological rejection of the transplanted organ and graft dysfunction in kidney transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Látos M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Melinda Látos,1 György Lázár,1 Zoltán Horváth,1 Victoria Wittmann,1 Edit Szederkényi,1 Zoltán Hódi,1 Pál Szenohradszky,1 Márta Csabai2 1Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, 2Psychology Institute, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary Abstract: Interdisciplinary studies suggest that the mental representations of the transplanted organ may have a significant effect on the healing process. The objective of this study was to examine the representations of the transplanted organ and their relationship with emotional and mood factors, illness perceptions, and the functioning of the transplanted organ. One hundred and sixty-four kidney transplant patients were assessed using the Spielberger Anxiety Inventory, the Beck’s Depression Scale, the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory, the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, and the Transplanted Organ Questionnaire. Medical parameters were collected from the routine clinical blood tests (serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate levels and biopsy results. Our most outstanding results suggest that kidney-transplanted patients’ illness representations are associated with health outcomes. The Transplanted Organ Questionnaire “psychological rejection” subscale was connected with higher serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate levels. Logistic regression analysis showed that psychological rejection subscale, Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, and Posttraumatic Growth Questionnaire total scores were associated with graft rejection. These results may serve as a basis for the development of complex treatment interventions, which could help patients to cope with the bio-psycho-social challenges of integrating the new organ as part of their body and self. Keywords: anxiety, depression, illness representations, posttraumatic growth, psychological rejection, renal transplantation

  19. The doctor-patient relationship in living donor kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovitch, Gabriel M

    2007-11-01

    A therapeutic and effective doctor-patient relationship and patient-doctor relationship is at the core of all successful medical care. The medical and psychological evaluation of a potential kidney donor serves to protect the long-term health of both the donor and the potential recipient. Careful assessment of risk and donor education is at the core of donor evaluation and the decision to progress with donation requires refined clinical judgment by the medical team and critical thinking by the donor. Increasing pressure to increase the numbers of living donor transplants and suggestions by some that the process should be commercialized make it timely to consider the nature of the relationship between the doctor and the patient in the unusual circumstance of living donation. A high rate of complications in recipients of purchased kidneys and a lack of knowledge of the fate of paid donors have been reported. Commercialization of transplantation undermines the therapeutic doctor-patient relationship and threatens the healthy development of the international transplant endeavor.

  20. [Towards a new Tunisian Medical Code of Deontology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aissaoui, Abir; Haj Salem, Nidhal; Chadly, Ali

    2010-06-01

    The Medical Code of Deontology is a legal text including the physician's duties towards his patients, colleagues, auxiliaries and the community. Considering the scientific, legal and social changes, the deontology code should be revised periodically. The first Tunisian Medical Code of Deontology (TMCD) was promulgated in 1973 and abrogated in 1993 by the new Code. This version has never been reviewed and does not seem to fit the current conditions of medical practice. The TMCD does not contain texts referring to information given to the patient, pain control, palliative care and management of the end of life as well as protection of medical data. Furthermore, the TMCD does not include rules related to tissues and organs transplantation and medical assisted human reproduction in accordance with Tunisian legal texts. We aim in this paper at analyzing the insufficiencies of the TMCD and suggesting modifications in order to update it.

  1. Does hypertension remain after kidney transplantation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Pourmand

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a common complication of kidney transplantation with the prevalence of 80%. Studies in adults have shown a high prevalence of hypertension (HTN in the first three months of transplantation while this rate is reduced to 50- 60% at the end of the first year. HTN remains as a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, lower graft survival rates and poor function of transplanted kidney in adults and children. In this retrospective study, medical records of 400 kidney transplantation patients of Sina Hospital were evaluated. Patients were followed monthly for the 1st year, every two months in the 2nd year and every three months after that. In this study 244 (61% patients were male. Mean ± SD age of recipients was 39.3 ± 13.8 years. In most patients (40.8% the cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD was unknown followed by HTN (26.3%. A total of 166 (41.5% patients had been hypertensive before transplantation and 234 (58.5% had normal blood pressure. Among these 234 individuals, 94 (40.2% developed post-transplantation HTN. On the other hand, among 166 pre-transplant hypertensive patients, 86 patients (56.8% remained hypertensive after transplantation. Totally 180 (45% patients had post-transplantation HTN and 220 patients (55% didn't develop HTN. Based on the findings, the incidence of post-transplantation hypertension is high, and kidney transplantation does not lead to remission of hypertension. On the other hand, hypertension is one of the main causes of ESRD. Thus, early screening of hypertension can prevent kidney damage and reduce further problems in renal transplant recipients.

  2. Diabetes Screening and Prevention in a High-Risk, Medically Isolated Border Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann V. Millard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionA project in a Texas border community setting, Prevention Organized against Diabetes and Dialysis with Education and Resources (POD2ER, offered diabetes prevention information, screening, and medical referrals. The setting was a large, longstanding flea market that functions as a shopping mall for low-income people. The priority population included medically underserved urban and rural Mexican Americans. Components of the program addressed those with diabetes, prediabetes, and accompanying relatives and friends.BackgroundPeople living in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV face challenges of high rates of type 2 diabetes, lack of knowledge about prevention, and inadequate access to medical care. Recent statistics from actual community-wide screenings indicate a high diabetes prevalence, 30.7% among adults in the LRGV compared with 12.3% nationwide.MethodsA diverse team composed of public health faculty, students, a physician, a community health worker, and community volunteers conceived and developed the project with a focus on cultural and economic congruence and a user-friendly atmosphere. The program provided screening for prediabetes and diabetes with a hemoglobin A1c test. Screening was offered to those who were at least 25 years of age and not pregnant. When results indicated diabetes, a test for kidney damage was offered (urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. A medical appointment at a community clinic within a week was provided to those who tested positive for diabetes and lacked a medical home. Health education modules addressed all family members.DiscussionThe project was successful in recruiting 2,332 high-risk people in 26 months in a community setting, providing clinic referrals to those without a doctor, introducing them to treatment, and providing diabetes prevention information to all project participants. Implications for research and practice are highlighted.ConclusionThis study shows that a regular access point in

  3. The Effectiveness of the Community Medicine Undergraduate Program in Medical Schools on Enabling Medical Graduates to Work in the Health Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Jabbari Bayrami

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The main mission of medical schools is to train competent medical trainees for providing primary health care services, management of health care team and improving the health status of the population. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the undergraduate program of community medicine department among the graduates as general (family physicians in health system of East Azerbaijan, North-West of` Iran. Methods: In this cross- sectional study all family physicians of East Azerbaijan province were included. A questionnaire on the views of graduates about the effectiveness of community medicine undergraduate program was used for gathering data. Data were analyzed by T-test, ANOVA, and Pearson correlation. Results: Performance of community medicine department in creating competency for providing effective health services among physicians was 2.13 and management competency was 1.96 out of 4. To teach the necessary skills to meet the professional needs in Primary Health Care (PHC, Tabriz Community Medicine Department was better compared to Azad and other medical schools (p<0.001. Conclusions: The results of the study showed that the community medicine program in undergraduate medical education was effective for future career of physicians in the health system. There is a need to revise the health management courses in community medicine program.

  4. A 6-YEAR EXPERIENCE OF HEART TRANSPLANTATION IN FEDERAL ALMAZOV NORTH-WEST MEDICAL RESEARCH CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Shlyakhto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To estimate the results of 6-year experience of heart transplantation (HT in Federal Almazov North-West Medical Research Centre. Methods. From 2010 to 2015 we have performed 65 HT. Mean age was 44.3 ± 14 years old (from 10 to 64 years old. We used biventricular assist device (BIVAD, Berlin Heart Excor support in 7 heart transplant candidates before HT. 19 patients (29% received thymoglobulin, whereas 46 patients (71% had basiliximab to induce immunosuppression.Results. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation machines were implanted in 5 patients (7.7% after HT due to acute right ventricular failure. Suture annuloplasty (the Batista procedure for tricuspid valve repair was carried out in 3 cases (4.6%. Venovenous hemodiafi ltration was used in 11 patients (16.9%. A total of 598 endomyocardial biopsies (EMB were performed after HT. Evidence of cellular rejection (R1 and R2 was presented in 286 biopsies (48%. The 30-day in-hospital mortality rate was 3.1%. The 6-month survival rate after HT was 92%, 1-year – 91% and overall survival for the 6-year period of observation – 89.2%. Maximum observation period was 71 months.Conclusions. The 6-year experience of HT in our Center has shown a high level of survival. BIVAD Excor support can be effectively used as a «bridge» to HT. Prevention of graft loss due to acute rejection in heart transplant recipients can be achieved only through regular EMB monitoring. The rate of viral infection increased in 2 months after HT.

  5. Psychosocial and financial aspects of lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, T L; Aguiar, L J

    1996-09-01

    This article summarizes the many psychosocial phases a patient will encounter during his or her transplantation experience and the ways the social worker can assist during this time. These include supportive services such as facilitating support groups and orientation programs, counseling, and crisis intervention. Also of importance is the financing of lung transplantation and its many associated costs, such as immunosuppressive medications and temporary housing. With the rise in managed care, the role of the transplant financial coordinator is of increasing importance from both a fiscal perspective and customer service standpoint for both the patient and the institution.

  6. Travel for transplantation in iran: pros and cons regarding Iranian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossareh, Shahrzad; Broumand, Behrooz

    2015-04-01

    Transplant tourism is one of the main unacceptable aspects of medical tourism, implicating travel to another country to receive an allograft. Organ shortages in wealthier countries have persuaded patients to preclude organ waiting lists and travel to other countries for getting organs especially kidneys. On the other hand, in many countries, there is no transplant program, and hemodialysis is expensive. Hence, patients with end-stage kidney disease may have to travel to get a kidney allograft for the sake of their lives. In Iran, a legal compensated and regulated living unrelated donor kidney transplant program has been adopted since 1988, in which recipients are matched with liveunrelated donors through the Iran Kidney Foundation and the recipients are compensated dually by the government and the recipient. In this model regulations were adopted to prevent transplant tourism: foreigners were not allowed to receive a kidney from Iranian donors or donate a kidney to Iranian patients; however, they could be transplanted from donors of their own nationality, after full medical workup, with the authorization of the Ministry of Health. This was first considered as a humanitarian assistance to patients of the countries with no transplant program and limited and low quality dialysis. However, the policy of "foreign nationality transplant" gradually established a spot where residents of many countries, where living-unrelated donor transplant was illegal, could bring their donors and be transplanted mainly in private hospitals, with high incentives for the transplant teams. By June 2014, six hundred eight foreign nationality kidney transplants were authorized by Ministry of Health for citizens for 17 countries. In this review, we examine the negative aspects of transplant for foreign citizens in Iran and the reasons that changed "travel for transplant" to "transplant tourism " in our country and finally led us to stop the program after more than 10 years.

  7. Gut Microbial Community Structure and Complications Following Kidney Transplantation: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John R.; Muthukumar, Thangamani; Dadhania, Darshana; Toussaint, Nora C.; Ling, Lilan; Pamer, Eric; Suthanthiran, Manikkam

    2014-01-01

    Background The gut microbiome plays a role in the regulation of the immune system. Methods We prospectively enrolled 26 kidney transplant recipients and collected serial fecal specimens (N=85) during the first three months of transplantation. We characterized bacterial composition by PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA V4-V5 variable region and deep sequencing using the Illumina® MiSeq platform. Results An increase in the relative abundance of Proteobacteria was observed in the post-transplantation specimens compared to pre-transplantation specimens (P=0.04, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). In patients with post-transplant diarrhea, the mean(±SD) Shannon diversity index was lower in those with diarrhea (N=6) than those without diarrhea (N=9) (2.5±0.3 vs. 3.4±0.8, P=0.02, Wilcoxon rank-sum test). Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) showed clear separation between the two groups, and linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEfSe) method revealed that Bacteroides, Ruminococcus, Coprococcus, and Dorea were significantly lower in the patients with diarrhea. PCoA analysis also showed clear separation between the acute rejection (AR) group (N=3) and the no AR group (N=23) and LEfSe method revealed several significant differences between the two groups. Fecal abundance of Enterococcus was associated with Enterococcus urinary tract infection (UTI). The median Enterococcus fecal abundance was 24% (Range: 8% to 95%) in the 3 patients with Enterococcus UTI compared to 0% in the 23 patients without Enterococcus UTI (Interquartile range: 0.00% to 0.08%)(P=0.005, Wilcoxon rank-sum test). Conclusions Our pilot study identified significant alterations in the gut microbiota following kidney transplantation. Moreover, distinct microbiota structures were observed in allograft recipients with post-transplant diarrhea, AR, and Enterococcus UTI. PMID:25289916

  8. Liver transplantation for Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Andreea M; Medici, Valentina

    2012-01-27

    The aim of this paper is to review the current status of liver transplantation (LT) for Wilson disease (WD), focusing on indications and controversies, especially in patients with neuropsychiatric disease, and on identification of acute liver failure (ALF) cases related to WD. LT remains the treatment of choice for patients with ALF, as initial presentation of WD or when anti-copper agents are stopped, and for patients with chronic liver disease progressed to cirrhosis, unresponsive to chelating medications or not timely treated with copper chelating agents. The indication for LT in WD remains highly debated in patients with progressive neurological deterioration and failure to improve with appropriate medical treatment. In case of Wilsonian ALF, early identification is key as mortality is 100% without emergency LT. As many of the copper metabolism parameters are believed to be less reliable in ALF, simple biochemical tests have been proposed for diagnosis of acute WD with good sensitivity and specificity. LT corrects copper metabolism and complications resulting from WD with excellent 1 and 5 year survival. Living related liver transplantation represents an alternative to deceased donor LT with excellent long-term survival, without disease recurrence. Future options may include hepatocyte transplantation and gene therapy. Although both of these have shown promising results in animal models of WD, prospective human studies are much needed to demonstrate their long-term beneficial effects and their potential to replace the need for medical therapy and LT in patients with WD.

  9. Achieving blood pressure control among renal transplant recipients by integrating electronic health technology and clinical pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliozzi, Daniel R; Zullo, Andrew R; Collins, Christine; Elsaid, Khaled A

    2015-11-15

    The implementation and outcomes of a program combining electronic home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) and pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) services in a renal transplantation clinic are described. Patients enrolled in the program were provided with a computer-enabled blood pressure monitor. A dedicated renal transplantation pharmacist was integrated into the renal transplantation team under a collaborative care practice agreement. The collaborative care agreement allowed the pharmacist to authorize medication additions, deletions, and dosage changes. Comprehensive disease and blood pressure education was provided by a clinical pharmacist. In the pretransplantation setting, the pharmacist interviewed the renal transplant candidate and documents allergies, verified the patient's medication profile, and identified and assessed barriers to medication adherence. A total of 50 renal transplant recipients with at least one recorded home blood pressure reading and at least one year of follow-up were included in our analysis. A significant reduction in mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure values were observed at 30, 90, 180, and 360 days after enrollment in the program (p services implemented in a renal transplant clinic was associated with sustained improvements in blood pressure control. Incorporation of a pharmacist in the renal transplant clinic resulted in the detection and resolution of medication-related problems. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A community-based approach for integrating geriatrics and gerontology into undergraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Iveris L; Mora, Jorge Camilo

    2012-01-01

    Medical school accreditation requirements require educational opportunities in geriatrics. Twenty-six minimum graduating competencies in geriatrics have recently been identified for medical students. The authors describe how these competencies are being integrated into a new medical curriculum through coursework and community-based experiences. This approach is intended to expose students to older adults from diverse communities and adequately prepare students to address the complex and individual needs of these patients. Initial results indicate proficiency in the minimum geriatric competencies covered. The growth and diversity of the older adult population makes it important to integrate and evaluate geriatrics education in undergraduate medical education.

  11. Patient-provider communication about medication use at the community pharmacy counter.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, M. van; Blom, L.; Koopman, L.; Philbert, D.; Koster, E.; Bouvy, M.; Dijk, L. van

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objectives of this study were to, first, describe the information exchanged between pharmacy staff and patients about prescribed medication at the community pharmacy counter, and second, to investigate to what extent this met professional medication counselling guidelines. Methods:

  12. Recipient ineligibility after liver transplantation assessment: a single centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Aman; Hernandez-Alejandro, Roberto; Marotta, Paul; Uhanova, Julia; Chandok, Natasha

    2013-06-01

    Candidacy for liver transplantation is determined through standardized evaluation. There are limited data on the frequency and reasons for denial of transplantation after assessment; analysis may shed light on the short-term utility of the assessment. We sought to describe the frequency and reasons for ineligibility for liver transplantation among referred adults. We studied all prospectively followed recipient candidates at a single centre who were deemed unsuitable for liver transplantation after assessment. Inclusion criteria were age 18 years and older and completion of a standard liver transplantation evaluation over a 3-year period. Patients were excluded if they had a history of prior assessment or liver transplantation within the study period. Demographic and baseline clinical data and reasons for recipient ineligibility were recorded. In all, 337 patients underwent their first liver transplantation evaluation during the study period; 166 (49.3%) fulfilled inclusion criteria. The mean age was 55.4 years, and 106 (63.9%) were men. The 3 most common reasons for denial of listing were patient too well (n = 82, 49.4%), medical comorbidities and/or need for medical optimization (n = 43, 25.9%) and need for addiction rehabilitation (n = 28, 16.9%). Ineligibility for transplantation after assessment was common, occurring in nearly half of the cohort. Most denied candidates could be identified with more discriminate screening before the resource-intensive assessment; however, the assessment likely provides unforeseen positive impacts on patient care.

  13. No association between infections, HLA type and other transplant-related factors and risk of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in solid organ transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingvar, Åsa; Ekström Smedby, Karin; Lindelöf, Bernt; Fernberg, Pia; Bellocco, Rino; Tufveson, Gunnar; Höglund, Petter; Adami, Johanna

    2012-11-01

    Recipients of solid organ transplants are at a markedly increased risk of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We investigated potential associations between post-transplant infections, HLA type, and other transplant-related factors and risk of SCC, taking immuno-suppressive treatment into account. A population-based case-control study was conducted. All patients who developed SCC during follow-up (1970-1997) were eligible as cases (n = 207). Controls (n = 189) were individually matched to the cases on age and calendar period of transplantation. Detailed exposure information was collected through an extensive, blinded review of medical records. Odds ratios were computed with conditional logistic regression. There were no significant associations with any infectious agents, or with number and timing of infections, specific HLA-type, donor characteristics, or other transplant characteristics and risk of post-transplant SCC. These results suggest that risk of post-transplant SCC is neither closely related to specific post-transplant infectious disorders, nor to the infectious load or specific HLA types.

  14. Transplantation: a religio-ethical imperative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Bakar Abdul Majeed; Abu Bakar Yang; Wan Roslili Abdul Majid

    1999-01-01

    Transplantation as a mode of treatment for serious and life-dementing diseases is expected to progress, and in all probability, will show better prospects for success in the future. Though medical considerations are paramount subjective judgments often come into play. Even now, complex moral and ethical questions on transplantation are being raised. Therefore, religious authorities and ethicists, must provide the practitioners and society with balanced and well-founded views on these matters. Some of the issues of transplantation discussed in this paper are the rights of per-sons to donate their own organs and tissues, the determination of death and the sourcing of cadaveric organs and tissues, and the selection of recipients for scarce organs and tissues. These are first viewed from the prevalent general theories of ethics, such as utilitarianism.Then, the religious perspectives of these issues are looked at. The Islamic usul-fikh or the fundamentals of Islamic jurisprudence, through which Muslim jurists reach their fatwas or nilings, are discussed briefly. The historical background of the Islamic jurists views on organ and tissue donation and transplantation is reviewed, while the recent fatwas are highlighted.The Islamic teachings and fatwas allow all types of organ and tissue transplantation, if certain required conditions are met. The permission is granted based on three principles of the Islamic law, namely, o f choosing the lesser of the two evils if neither is avoidable , o f necessities overruling prohibitions', and o f seeking remedy for every illness . The preconditions attached to the fatwas are; that the life of the potential recipient is in grave danger and the transplantation has a high probability of success, death of cadaveric donors is ascertained by the required medical criteria, the life of donor is not jeopardised m any way, there is no commercialisation of organs and tissues, and permission for the removal of organs and tissues granted by the

  15. Efficacy and flexibility impact perceived adherence barriers in pediatric kidney post-transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Shanna M; Goebel, Jens W; Pai, Ahna L H

    2011-03-01

    The alarming rates of medication nonadherence and its detrimental effect on long-term graft survival in pediatric kidney transplantation has called attention to identifying modifiable factors that promote better adherence and subsequent transplant outcomes. In a sample of 45 adolescent kidney transplant recipients (14.7 ± 3.3 years, 77.8% Caucasian, 39.5% female) and their primary caregivers, study aims included: 1) identifying sociodemographic and medical correlates of both caregiver- and patient-reported general family functioning (i.e., efficacy, flexibility, and communication) and 2) determining the unique contributions of these family functioning indices to perceived posttransplant adherence barriers. During a routine clinic visit, caregivers completed a sociodemographic form and questionnaire on general family functioning. Both caregivers and the adolescents completed a measure on perceived medication adherence barriers. Data identified household income and family structure as persistent correlates of family functioning. Familial efficacy and flexibility contributed significant variance to perceived adherence barriers. Family-based interventions enhancing modifiable family factors, such as flexibility and efficacy, in overcoming medication adherence barriers would likely promote more optimal health outcomes in the pediatric kidney transplant population. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  16. En bloc kidney transplantation: ultrasonography assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenal, F.; Ganado, T.; Merino, M.S.; Contreras, E.; Hernandez, J.; Prats, D.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of our study is to assess the utility of ultrasonography in the study of the complications associated with en bloc kidney transplantation. Twenty-three recipients of double transplants from donors under the age of 3 years were studied. Ultrasound (mode B: pulsed Doppler and color Doppler) was performed within the first three postoperative days and was repeated at 6 and 12 months. The morphology of the graft and renal blood flow were assessed, and the indices of pulsatility, resistance and acceleration were measured. Four patients required graft explanation: three due to massive hemorrhagic infarction and one due to venous thrombosis. Vascular complications were detected in five transplants (21.7%), urological complications in four (17.4%) and medical complications in two (8.7%). The most common vascular complication was unilateral renal artery stenosis. Color Doppler ultrasound diagnosed all the medical and urological complications and three of the five cases of vascular pathology (60%). Renal size was seen to be increased during the first postoperative year. The ultrasonographic study is more difficult to perform in en bloc kidney transplantation than in single kidney grafting: however, given its marked sensitivity in the detection of postransplantation complications. Doppler ultrasound is the imaging technique of choice in the determination of the cause of deteriorated kidney function. (Author) 15 refs

  17. Administrative relationships between medical schools and community preceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, A D; Sutton, L D; Gold, J

    2001-02-01

    To determine the current administrative relationships between medical schools and community preceptors, with special emphasis on arrangements for academic appointment, review, and promotion. In 1999, administrative contacts at all 126 U.S. allopathic medical schools were mailed a ten-item questionnaire to elicit information concerning the current practices of the schools regarding community preceptors, who were defined as volunteer or part-time physician faculty, primarily practicing at non-university-owned facilities, who contribute to medical students' and/or residents' education in various specified ways. Responses were received from 71 (56%) of the schools; they were in general a representative sample of U.S. medical schools. The numbers of preceptors per school ranged from 40 to 3,500. Sixty-seven percent of reporting schools identified clinical departments as the main administrative interface with preceptors. Only three schools used a central office; none exclusively used a regionalized system. Forty-four schools (63.8%) reported using formal written criteria for all preceptor appointments. Sixty-six schools (93%) used consistent academic titling systems, with 83.3% using titles including the word "clinical." Thirty-three schools (47.8%) reported that their departments conducted regular preceptor reviews; an additional 28 reported reviews by some departments. Preceptors were eligible for promotion at 94.4% of the responding schools. At 46.8%, specific promotion criteria exist; four schools were developing such criteria. Preceptors' interest in academic promotion was perceived to be moderate or low. A substantial proportion of U.S. medical schools have taken action to recognize preceptors as a unique faculty group. The comments received indicate that this is an active area of development in faculty affairs policy.

  18. Post-transplant outcomes in pediatric ventricular assist device patients: A PediMACS-Pediatric Heart Transplant Study linkage analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, David L; Pruitt, Elizabeth; Cantor, Ryan S; Godown, Justin; Lane, John; Turrentine, Mark W; Law, Sabrina P; Lantz, Jodie L; Kirklin, James K; Bernstein, Daniel; Blume, Elizabeth D

    2017-12-13

    Pediatric ventricular assist device (VAD) support as bridge to transplant has improved waitlist survival, but the effects of pre-implant status and VAD-related events on post-transplant outcomes have not been assessed. This study is a linkage analysis between the PediMACS and Pediatric Heart Transplant Study databases to determine the effects of VAD course on post-transplant outcomes. Database linkage between October 1, 2012 and December 31, 2015 identified 147 transplanted VAD patients, the primary study group. The comparison cohort was composed of 630 PHTS patients without pre-transplant VAD support. The primary outcome was post-transplant survival, with secondary outcomes of post-transplant length of stay, freedom from infection and freedom from rejection. At implant, the VAD cohort was INTERMACS Profile 1 in 33 (23%), Profile 2 in 89 (63%) and Profile 3 in 14 (10%) patients. The VAD cohort was older, larger, and less likely to have congenital heart disease (p < 0.0001). However, they had greater requirements for inotrope and ventilator support and increased liver and renal dysfunction (p < 0.0001), both of which normalized at transplant after device support. Importantly, there were no differences in 1-year post-transplant survival (96% vs 93%, p = 0.3), freedom from infection (81% vs 79%, p = 0.9) or freedom from rejection (71% vs 74%, p = 0.87) between cohorts. Pediatric VAD patients have post-transplant outcomes equal to that of medically supported patients, despite greater pre-implant illness severity. Post-transplant survival, hospital length of stay, infection and rejection were not affected by patient acuity at VAD implantation or VAD-related complications. Therefore, VAD as bridge to transplant mitigates severity of illness in children. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Deceased organ donation for transplantation: Challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girlanda, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Organ transplantation saves thousands of lives every year but the shortage of donors is a major limiting factor to increase transplantation rates. To allow more patients to be transplanted before they die on the wait-list an increase in the number of donors is necessary. Patients with devastating irreversible brain injury, if medically suitable, are potential deceased donors and strategies are needed to successfully convert them into actual donors. Multiple steps in the process of deceased organ donation can be targeted to increase the number of organs suitable for transplant. In this review, after describing this process, we discuss current challenges and potential strategies to expand the pool of deceased donors. PMID:27683626

  20. Data Transmission and Access Protection of Community Medical Internet of Things

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xunbao; Chen, Fulong; Ye, Heping; Yang, Jie; Zhu, Junru; Zhang, Ziyang; Huang, Yakun

    2017-01-01

    On the basis of Internet of Things (IoT) technologies, Community Medical Internet of Things (CMIoT) is a new medical information system and generates massive multiple types of medical data which contain all kinds of user identity data, various types of medical data, and other sensitive information. To effectively protect users’ privacy, we propose a secure privacy data protection scheme including transmission protection and access control. For the uplink transmission data protection, bidirect...

  1. The medical community's need for a BRC policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    The quality of medical care in the United States is among the best in the world. The use of radioactive materials in medicine has led to advances in biomedical research, medical diagnostic procedures, and therapeutic procedures. Radioactive materials in medicine offer modalities that would not otherwise be available. With advances in nuclear medicine, positron emission tomography, and monoclonal antibodies, it is clear that the use of radioactive materials in medicine will be prevalent for quite some time into the future. Disposal of both by-product and naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive material below-regulatory-concern (BRC) waste has been occurring for years. It is a safe and effective method for disposing of this medical radioactive waste. Without an effective, nationwide BRC policy, the medical community may be forced to send this waste to a LLW landfill, which is unnecessary and extremely costly. These additional costs for waste disposal will divert needed money for medical research programs and increase the cost of medical care while providing no increased protection of the public

  2. Interferência e estudo fitossociológico da comunidade infestante na cultura da beterraba transplantada = Interference and phytosociological study of weed communities on transplanted beets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Bianco de Carvalho

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available O trabalho teve como objetivo o estudo fitossociológico e a determinação dos períodos críticos de interferência da comunidade infestante na cultura da beterraba transplantada. Os tratamentos consistiram em períodos semanais crescentes de convivênciae de controle da comunidade infestante, a partir da segunda semana após o transplante das mudas. A comunidade infestante foi avaliada por meio do número de indivíduos e da massa seca acumulada correspondente, para cada população de planta daninha e período avaliado. A cultura foi colhida 91 dias após o transplante das mudas, quando se avaliou o diâmetro transversal e a produtividade comercial das raízes. As principais plantas daninhas encontradas foram Amaranthus viridis, Coronopus didymus, Galinsoga parviflora, Nicandraphysaloides e Solanum americanum. As populações encontradas apresentaram alta similaridade entre si. O período anterior à interferência e o período total de prevenção à interferência foram 51 e 35 dias após o transplante das mudas, respectivamente. A produção da beterraba mantida no limpo foi 44,92 t ha-1, e a redução devido à interferência das plantas daninhas por todo o ciclo foi mais de 70%.The objective of this research was to study the phytosociological andcritical interference periods of weed communities on transplanted beets. The treatments consisted of increasing weekly weedy/weed-free periods, starting at the second week after seedling transplanting. The weed community was evaluated based on the number ofindividuals and their corresponding accumulated dry mass, for each weed population and evaluated period. The beets were harvested 91 days after transplanting, followed by evaluation of the cross-sectional diameter and marketable yield. The weed communitieswere composed mainly of Amaranthus viridis, Coronopus didymus, Galinsoga parviflora, Nicandra physaloides and Solanum americanum, and the populations were very similar. The period before weed

  3. [The work of Moscow communities of Sisters of Charity in own medical institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorin, K V

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses the medical activities of Moscow communities of Sisters of Charity in curative and educational institutions organized by the communities themselves. The social ministration of communities on the territory of Moscow is considered.

  4. The new chimaera: the industrialization of organ transplantation. International Forum for Transplant Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilney, N L; Guttmann, R D; Daar, A S; Hoffenberg, R; Kennedy, I; Lock, M; Radcliffe-Richards, J; Sells, R A

    2001-03-15

    Clinical organ transplantation has evolved through advances in patient care in parallel with investigations in associated biologies. It has developed from a cottage industry to an important medical specialty driven increasingly by the availability of newer and more effective immunosuppressive drugs, and dependent on consistently close collaborations between university-based clinical scientists and the pharmaceutical industry. Particularly during the past decade, however, this industry has undergone striking changes, consolidating into huge multi-national corporations, each competing for patients, their doctors, and for support of the allied hospitals. Because of the growth of "Big Pharma," the relationship between academia and industry has changed. There have been many advantages to such mutually dependent interactions. A combination of university-based expertise and the specialized knowledge and resources of industry have produced important scientific gains in drug development. Commercial sponsorship of applied research has been crucial. The orchestration of multicenter controlled clinical drug trials has provided invaluable information about the effectiveness of newer agents. But there are also disadvantages of increasing concern. Indeed, the power of "Big Pharma" in many medical fields including transplantation is such that presentation of data can be delayed, adverse results withheld, and individual investigations hampered. Clinical trials may be protracted to stifle competition. Monetary considerations may transcend common sense. Several measures to enhance the clinical relationship between the pharmaceutical industry and those involved with organ transplantation are suggested, particularly the use of third party advisors in the production of clinical trials, support for more basic research and in the dissemination of results. In this way, the increasingly problematic phenomenon of commercialization of the field of transplantation can be tempered and

  5. Attitude toward learning of community medicine: A cross-sectional study among medical school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Japhereena Murugavel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community medicine strives to protect and promote the health and well-being of the community through primary health care approach. However the preference of community medicine as career among medical school students and curriculum of community medicine is pivotal. Aim: The study intended to find the attitude towards learning of community medicine and also to assess the preference of post graduation specialty among medical school students. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study conducted at a teaching hospital located in Tamil Nadu, South India. The study questionnaire was administered to a total of 500 study participants and the data collected were analyzed using SPSS IBM version 21.0. Results: Almost 97% were of the opinion that community medicine subject is mandatory. Eighty three percent were interested in learning the principles. Only 21.8% students wanted to pursue post graduation in community medicine. Lack of attraction in terms of scientific technical interest, workplace conditions, and research potential has been reported for being not interested. Conclusion: Majority enjoyed to learn principles of community medicine at undergraduate curriculum but only few preferred to opt community medicine as post graduate specialty. Therefore there is a room to influence the medical students positively towards learning community medicine in curriculum.

  6. Hair transplantation: Standard guidelines of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patwardhan Narendra

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Hair transplantation is a surgical method of hair restoration. Physician qualification : The physician performing hair transplantation should have completed post graduation training in dermatology; he should have adequate background training in dermatosurgery at a centre that provides education training in cutaneous surgery. In addition, he should obtain specific hair transplantation training or experience at the surgical table(hands on under the supervision of an appropriately trained and experienced hair transplant surgeon. In addition to the surgical technique, training should include instruction in local anesthesia and emergency resuscitation and care. Facility : Hair transplantation can be performed safely in an outpatient day case dermatosurgical facility. The day case theatre should be equipped with facilities for monitoring and handling emergencies. A plan for handling emergencies should be in place and all nursing staff should be familiar with the emergency plan. It is preferable, but not mandatory to have a standby anesthetist. Indication for hair transplantation is pattern hair loss in males and also in females. In female pattern hair loss, investigations to rule out any underlying cause for hair loss such as anemia and thyroid deficiency should be carried out. Hair transplantation can also be performed in selected cases of scarring alopecia, eyebrows and eye lashes, by experienced surgeons. Preoperative counseling and informed consent :Detailed consent form listing details about the procedure and possible complications should be signed by the patient. The consent form should specifically state the limitations of the procedure and if more procedures are needed for proper results, it should be clearly mentioned. Patient should be provided with adequate opportunity to seek information through brochures, computer presentations, and personal discussions. Need for concomitant medical therapy should be emphasized. Patients should understand

  7. Four-Way Kidney Exchange Transplant With Desensitization Increases Access to Living-Donor Kidney Transplant: First Report From India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kute, Vivek B; Patel, Himanshu V; Shah, Pankaj R; Modi, Pranjal R; Shah, Veena R; Kasat, Govind S; Patil, Mayur V; Patel, Jaydeep C; Kumar, Deepak P; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2017-09-26

    This study reports our experience of the first 4-way kidney exchange transplant combined with desensitization in India, which allows increased access to living-donor kidney transplant for sensitized patients. Four-way kidney exchange transplant procedures were approved by the ethics committee of our institution and the Organ Transplantation Authorization Committee of state governments of India (as per the Transplantation of Human Organs Act of India). The protocols conformed to Declaration of Istanbul principles and the ethical guidelines of the 1975 Helsinki Declaration. Written informed consent was obtained from patients, donors, and their guardians. In April 2016, our transplant team completed simultaneous 4-way kidney exchange transplant procedures without any medical (rejection and infections) or surgical complications. Reasons for being included for kidney exchange transplant were ABO incom-patible (2 recipients) and sensitization (2 recipients). All 4 recipients had stable graft function with no proteinuria and donor-specific antibody at 11-month follow-up on standard triple immunosup-pression. Patient and graft survival rates were both 100%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first single-center report of 4-way kidney exchange transplant combined with desensitization from India. This procedure has the potential to expand living-donor kidney transplant in disadvantaged groups (eg, sensitized patients). Recipients who are hard to match due to high panel reactive antibody and difficult to desensitize due to strong donor-specific antibodies can receive a transplant with a combination of kidney exchange and desensitization. Our study suggests that 4-way kidney exchange transplant can be performed in developing countries (India) similar to that shown in programs in developed countries with team work, kidney exchange registry, and counseling.

  8. Skin cancer in immunosuppressed transplant patients:Vigilance matters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ozan Unlu; Emir Charles Roach; Alexis Okoh; May Olayan; Bulent Yilmaz; Didem Uzunaslan; Abdullah Shatnawei

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a widely-accepted, definitivetherapy of irreversible liver diseases including hepatitisC, alcoholic liver disease and metabolic liver disease.After transplantation, patients generally use a varietyof immunosuppressive medications for the rest of theirlives to prevent rejection of transplanted liver. Mortalityafter LT is mainly caused by recurrence of alcoholichepatitis which is mostly seen in the patients whoresume heavy drinking. On the other hand, de-novomalignancies after LT are not seldom. Skin cancers makeup 13.5% of the de-novo malignancies seen in thesepatients. Malignancies tend to affect survival earlier inthe course with a 53% risk of death at 5 years afterdiagnosis. We aimed to report a case who underwentLT secondary to alcoholic liver disease and developedsquamous cell carcinoma of the skin eighteen yearsafter transplantation. In summary, transplant recipientsare recommended to be educated on self examinationfor skin cancer; health care providers should be furthersuspicious during routine dermatological examinations ofthe transplant patients and biopsies of possible lesionsfor skin cancer is warranted even many years aftertransplantation.

  9. Young transplant surgeons and NIH funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englesbe, M J; Sung, R S; Segev, D L

    2011-02-01

    Transplant surgeons have historically been instrumental in advancing the science of transplantation. However, research in the current environment inevitably requires external funding, and the classic career development pathway for a junior investigator is the NIH K award. We matched transplant surgeons who completed fellowships between 1998 and 2004 with the NIH funding database, and also queried them regarding research effort and attitudes. Of 373 surgeons who completed a fellowship, only 6 (1.8%) received a K award; of these, 3 subsequently obtained R-level funding. An additional 5 individuals received an R-level grant within their first 5 years as faculty without a K award, 3 of whom had received a prior ASTS-sponsored award. Survey respondents reported extensive research experience during their training (78.8% spent median 24 months), a high proportion of graduate research degrees (36%), and a strong desire for more research time (78%). However, they reported clinical burdens and lack of mentorship as their primary perceived barriers to successful research careers. The very low rate of NIH funding for young transplant surgeons, combined with survey results that indicate their desire to participate in research, suggest institutional barriers to access that may warrant attention by the ASTS and the transplant surgery community. ©2010 The Authors Journal compilation©2010 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  10. Analysis of differences in outcome of two European liver transplant centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemes, B; Polak, W; Ther, G; Hendriks, H; Kobori, L; Porte, RJ; Sarvary, E; de Jong, KP; Doros, A; Gerlei, Z; van den Berg, AP; Fehervari, [No Value; Gorog, D; Peeters, PM; Jaray, J; Slooff, MJH

    Authors analyzed the differences in the outcome of two European liver transplant centers differing in case volume and experience. The first was the Transplantation and Surgical Clinic, Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary (SEB) and the second the University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen,

  11. Patient-provider communication about medication use at the community pharmacy counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Marloes; Blom, Lyda; Koopman, Laura; Philbert, Daphne; Koster, Ellen; Bouvy, Marcel; van Dijk, Liset

    2016-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to, first, describe the information exchanged between pharmacy staff and patients about prescribed medication at the community pharmacy counter, and second, to investigate to what extent this met professional medication counselling guidelines. Pharmaceutical encounters were videotaped in four community pharmacies in the Netherlands. Patients were included if they collected a prescription for their own use. An observation protocol, including the MEDICODE checklist, was used to analyse the video recordings. A distinction was made between first and repeat prescriptions. One hundred fifty-three encounters were videotaped. When dispensing first prescriptions, pharmacy staff provided most information on instructions how to use the medication (83.3%), form of the medication (71.4%) and treatment duration (42.9%). Topics for repeat prescriptions (such as the effects of the medication and the incidence of observed adverse effects) were rarely discussed. Pharmacy staff rarely encouraged patients to ask questions. Pharmacy staff members provided little medication-related information at the counter, especially for repeat prescriptions, did not encourage active patient participation, and thereby did not adhere to the guidelines of their professional organisation. Further research is needed to understand the reasons for this. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  12. The dilemma of "to be or not to be": developing electronically e-health & cloud computing documents for overseas transplant patients from Taiwan organ transplant health professionals' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, F-J; Fan, Y-W; Chiu, C-M; Shih, F-Ji; Wang, S-S

    2012-05-01

    The development of mutually accessible e-health documents (ehD) and cloud computing (CC) for overseas organ transplant health professionals (OTHP) in two medical parties (domestic and overseas) would ensure better quality of care. This project attempted to compare pro and con arguments from the perspective of Taiwan's OTHP. A sample was obtained from three leading medical centers in Taiwan. Eighty subjects including transplant surgeons (n = 20), registered nurses (RN; n = 30), coordinating nurses (OTCN; n = 15), and e-health information and communication technologies experts (ehICTs; n = 15) participated in this research. The pros of developing ehD were: (1) better and continuous care through communication and cooperation in two parties (78%); (2) better collaborative efforts between health professionals, information technology experts in two medical parties is (74%); (3) easier retrieval and communication of personal health documents with the trustworthy OTHP in the different countries (71%); and (4) CC may help develop transplant patients medical cloud based on the collaboration between medical systems in political parties of Taiwan and mainland China (69%). The cons of developing ehD and CC included: (1) inadequate knowledge of benefits and manuals of developing ehD and CC (75%); (2) no reliable communication avenues in developing ehD and CC (73%); (3) increased workload in direct care and documentation in developing new ehD and CC (70%); (4) lack of coaching and accreditation systems in medical, electronic, and law aspects to settle discrepancies in medical diagnosis and treatment protocols between two parties (68%); and (5) lacking systematic ehD and CC plans developed by interdisciplinary teams in two parties (60%). In this initial phase, the establishment of an interdisciplinary team including transplant leaders, transplant surgeon, RN, OTCN, ehICTs, and law experts from two parties might be helpful in working out developing plans with careful monitoring

  13. Young Adult Kidney Transplant Recipients: Nonadherent and Happy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Emma K; Meys, Karlijn; Kerner, Roy; Weimar, Willem; Roodnat, Joke; Cransberg, Karlien

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate (a) the extent to which age at first renal replacement therapy, achievement of developmental milestones, satisfaction of psychological needs, and coping were related to subjective well-being and medication adherence among young adult kidney transplant recipients; and (b) the relationship between subjective well-being and immunosuppressive medication adherence. A cross-sectional, interview study was conducted among renal transplant patients aged 20 to 30 years. In addition to sociodemographic and medical characteristics, concepts measured were: subjective well-being (Positive And Negative Affect Schedule; Satisfaction With Life Scale), medication adherence (Basel Assessment of Adherence to Immunosuppressive Medication Scale), dispositional coping (Brief COPE), achievement of developmental milestones (Course of Life Questionnaire), and satisfaction of psychological needs (Basic Psychological Needs Scale). Sixty-two patients participated (66% men; mean age, 26 years). Sixty-five percent were classified as nonadherent in the past month. In contrast, subjective self-rated overall adherence was high. None of the variables measured were related to nonadherence. Higher feelings of competence and autonomy, and timely achievement of social and psychosexual developmental milestones were related to higher subjective well-being. Well-being and adherence did not differ according to age at diagnosis or first renal replacement therapy. Two thirds of participants were classified as nonadherent which conflicts with participants' own high rating of medication adherence. This emphasizes the need for continued adherence support among young adult transplant recipients; however, no targets for interventions were found in this study. Potential targets for interventions aimed at improving well-being include competence and autonomy.

  14. Innovation in Indigenous Health and Medical Education: The Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education (LIME) Network as a Community of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazel, Odette; Ewen, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    The Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education (LIME) Network aims to improve the quality and effectiveness of Indigenous health in medical education as well as best practice in the recruitment, retention, and graduation of Indigenous medical students. In this article we explore the utility of Etienne Wenger's "communities of practice" (CoP) concept in providing a theoretical framework to better understand the LIME Network as a form of social infrastructure to further knowledge and innovation in this important area of health care education reform. The Network operates across all medical schools in Australia and New Zealand. Utilizing a model of evaluation of communities of practice developed by Fung-Kee-Fung et al., we seek to analyze the outcomes of the LIME Network as a CoP and assess its approach and contribution to improving the implementation of Indigenous health in the medical curriculum and the graduation of Indigenous medical students. By reflecting on the Network through a community of practice lens, this article highlights the synthesis between the LIME Network and Wenger's theory and provides a framework with which to measure Network outputs. It also posits an opportunity to better capture the impact of Network activities into the future to ensure that it remains a relevant and sustainable entity.

  15. Predicting adherence to health care recommendations using health promotion behaviours in kidney transplant recipients within 1-5 years post-transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Su-Yueh; Fetzer, Susan J; Lee, Po-Chang; Chen, Ching-Huey

    2011-12-01

    This study examined health promotion behaviours of kidney transplant recipients, 1-5 years after transplant and identified the risk factors predicting non-adherence to post-transplant recommendations. Non-adherence to health care recommendations and health promotion behaviours is one of the top three reasons for graft loss following kidney transplantation. A cross-sectional study. Kidney transplant recipients (n=101) in southern Taiwan completed a self reported survey, the Kidney Transplant Health Promotion Behavior and Healthcare Provider Support survey. Kidney transplant patients had better adherence with medication and least adherence with regular exercise health promotion behaviours. Age, post kidney transplant time, health care provider support and financial satisfaction accounted for 37·2% of the explained variance in monitoring and management for rejection and infection. Marital status, post kidney transplant time and gender accounted for 16·2% of the explained variance in infection prevention. Age was the sole predictor of exercise (odds ratio=1·08, p=0·025). Health promotion behaviours declined with time and perceived healthcare provider support decreased at the third (p=0·04) post kidney transplant year. In this study, young, single, males were identified as requiring specific strategies to improve post kidney transplant health promotion behaviours. The need for health promotion must be continually reinforce by healthcare providers throughout the lifespan of a kidney transplant recipient. Understanding the changes of health behaviours of post kidney transplant recipients and their risk factors, healthcare providers can be more aware of the needs of patients in maintaining health promotion behaviours. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Four decades of kidney transplantation in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonzo, Jorge P

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the background, beginnings, development, evolution and outcomes of kidney transplantation in Cuba. Nephrology as a medical specialty in Cuba began in 1962 and was formalized in 1966. Conditions were created to implement renal replacement therapy (including transplants), bring nephrology care to the entire country and train human resources who would assume this responsibility, making Cuba one of the first countries with a comprehensive program for renal patient care. After three unsuccessful cadaveric-donor kidney transplantations in 1968-69, the ensuing history of kidney transplantation can be summarized in the following three stages. 1970-1975: In January 1970, cadaveric-donor kidney transplantation began at the Nephrology Institute. That year, 17 kidney transplantations were performed; four of these patients lived with functional kidneys for 15-25 years; 10-year graft survival was 23.5% (Kaplan-Meier survival curve); HLA typing began in 1974. By December 1975, 170 grafts had been done in three hospitals. 1976-1985: Seven transplantation centers performed 893 grafts during this period. HLA-DR typing was introduced in 1976 and the National Histocompatibility Laboratory Network was founded in 1978. The first related living-donor kidney transplantation was done in 1979. 1986-2011: The National Kidney Transplantation Coordinating Center and the National Kidney Transplantation Program were created in 1986; the first combined kidney-pancreas transplantation was performed the same year. In 1990, cyclosporine and the Cuban monoclonal antibody IOR-T3 were introduced for immunosuppression to prevent rejection, as were other Cuban products (hepatitis B vaccine and recombinant human erythropoietin) for transplant patients. By December 2011, the cumulative number of transplants was 4636 (384 from related living donors). With over 40 years of experience, kidney transplantation is now well established in Cuba; it is free and universally accessible, on the

  17. Bilateral Psoas Haematomata Complicating Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob A. Akoh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The challenge in managing patients undergoing renal transplantation is how to achieve optimum levels of anticoagulation to avoid both clotting and postoperative bleeding. We report a rare case of severe postoperative retroperitoneal bleeding including psoas haematomata complicating renal transplantation. Case Report. SM, a 55-year-old female, had a past history of aortic valve replacement, cerebrovascular event, and thoracic aortic aneurysm and was on long-term warfarin that was switched to enoxaparin 60 mg daily a week prior to her living donor transplantation. Postoperatively, she was started on a heparin infusion, but this was complicated by a large retroperitoneal bleed requiring surgical evacuation on the first postoperative day. Four weeks later, she developed features compatible with acute femoral neuropathy and a CT scan revealed bilateral psoas haematomata. Following conservative management, she made steady progress and was discharged home via a community hospital 94 days after transplantation. At her last visit 18 months after transplantation, she had returned to full fitness with excellent transplant function. Conclusion. Patients in established renal failure who require significant anticoagulation are at increased risk of bleeding that may involve prolonged hospitalisation and more protracted recovery and patients should be carefully counselled about this.

  18. Stakeholder views of rural community-based medical education: a narrative review of the international literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somporn, Praphun; Ash, Julie; Walters, Lucie

    2018-03-30

    Rural community-based medical education (RCBME), in which medical student learning activities take place within a rural community, requires students, clinical teachers, patients, community members and representatives of health and government sectors to actively contribute to the educational process. Therefore, academics seeking to develop RCBME need to understand the rural context, and the views and needs of local stakeholders. The aim of this review is to examine stakeholder experiences of RCBME programmes internationally. This narrative literature review of original research articles published after 1970 utilises Worley's symbiosis model of medical education as an analysis framework. This model proposes that students experience RCBME through their intersection with multiple clinical, social and institutional relationships. This model seeks to provide a framework for considering the intersecting relationships in which RCBME programmes are situated. Thirty RCBME programmes are described in 52 articles, representing a wide range of rural clinical placements. One-year longitudinal integrated clerkships for penultimate-year students in Anglosphere countries were most common. Such RCBME enables students to engage in work-integrated learning in a feasible manner that is acceptable to many rural clinicians and patients. Academic results are not compromised, and a few papers demonstrate quality improvement for rural health services engaged in RCBME. These programmes have delivered some rural medical workforce outcomes to communities and governments. Medical students also provide social capital to rural communities. However, these programmes have significant financial cost and risk student social and educational isolation. Rural community-based medical education programmes are seen as academically acceptable and can facilitate symbiotic relationships among students, rural clinicians, patients and community stakeholders. These relationships can influence students' clinical

  19. Post-Transplant Diabetes Mellitus: Causes, Treatment, and Impact on Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaswamy, Vijay; Boerner, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a frequent consequence of solid organ transplantation. PTDM has been associated with greater mortality and increased infections in different transplant groups using different diagnostic criteria. An international consensus panel recommended a consistent set of guidelines in 2003 based on American Diabetes Association glucose criteria but did not exclude the immediate post-transplant hospitalization when many patients receive large doses of corticosteroids. Greater glucose monitoring during all hospitalizations has revealed significant glucose intolerance in the majority of recipients immediately after transplant. As a result, the international consensus panel reviewed its earlier guidelines and recommended delaying screening and diagnosis of PTDM until the recipient is on stable doses of immunosuppression after discharge from initial transplant hospitalization. The group cautioned that whereas hemoglobin A1C has been adopted as a diagnostic criterion by many, it is not reliable as the sole diabetes screening method during the first year after transplant. Risk factors for PTDM include many of the immunosuppressant medications themselves as well as those for type 2 diabetes. The provider managing diabetes and associated dyslipidemia and hypertension after transplant must be careful of the greater risk for drug-drug interactions and infections with immunosuppressant medications. Treatment goals and therapies must consider the greater risk for fluctuating and reduced kidney function, which can cause hypoglycemia. Research is actively focused on strategies to prevent PTDM, but until strategies are found, it is imperative that immunosuppression regimens are chosen based on their evidence to prolong graft survival, not to avoid PTDM. PMID:26650437

  20. Cost analysis of living donor kidney transplantation in China: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenyu; Zhang, Lei; Han, Shu; Zhu, Youhua; Wang, Liming; Zhou, Meisheng; Zeng, Li

    2012-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most cost-effective option for the treatment of end-stage renal disease, but the financial aspects of kidney transplantation have not yet been fully investigated. The purpose of this study was to determine the hospital cost of living donor kidney transplantation in China and to identify factors associated with the high cost. Demographic and clinical data of 103 consecutive patients who underwent living donor kidney transplantation from January 2007 to January 2011 at our center were reviewed, and detailed hospital cost of initial admission for kidney transplantation was analyzed. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was computed to determine predictors affecting the total hospital cost. The median total hospital cost was US $10,531, of which 69.2% was for medications, 13.2% for surgical procedures, 11.4% for para clinics, 3.7% for accommodations, 0.5% for nursing care, and 2.0% for other miscellaneous medical services. A multivariate stepwise logistic regression model for overall cost of transplantation revealed that the length of hospital stay, induction therapy, steroid-resistant rejection, maintenance therapy, infection status and body weight were independent predictors affecting the total hospitalization cost. Although the cost of living donor kidney transplantation in China is much lower than that in developed countries, it is a heavy burden for both the government and the patients. As medications formed the greater proportion of the total hospitalization cost, efforts to reduce the cost of drugs should be addressed.

  1. The first clinical liver transplantation of Brazil revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchella, T; Machado, M C C

    2004-05-01

    The first clinical orthotopic liver transplantation in Brazil was performed on August 5, 1968. The patient was awake after surgery and died on the seventh postoperative day due to subdural hematoma, bronchopneumonia, renal failure, and graft rejection. The report of this case is important to understand the evolution of clinical liver transplantation in Brazil, where this procedure is now routinely carried out in many medical centers.

  2. Outcomes of Kidney Transplantations Under the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation's Type Z Benefit Package at the National Kidney and Transplant Institute, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamugas, G E P; Arakama, M-H I; Danguilan, R A; Ledesma, D

    2016-04-01

    Under the Universal Health Care Program of the Department of Health, the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PHIC) launched the Case Type Z benefit package for kidney transplantation, providing the largest amount (USD $13,300.00) for any single medical procedure. The objective of this study was to describe under the PHIC Case Type Z Benefit Package for kidney transplantation at the National Kidney and Transplant Institute and kidney transplantation outcomes under this package. Included in the benefit were standard risk recipients between 10 and 70 years of age with at least 1 human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR match with the donor, panel-reactive antibody (PRA) less than 20%, and absence of donor-specific antibody (DSA). Previous transplantations, malignancy, hepatitis B and C, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positivity, cytomegalovirus (CMV) R-/D+, congestive heart failure, and liver cirrhosis were exclusion criteria. Patients were evaluated by a medical social worker according to their family's financial status. Since June 2012, a total of 261 patients have received the benefit, with 44 under service, 37 with fixed co-pay and 180 with variable co-pay. Of the living donor kidney transplants, 98% had immediate graft function, with 2.3% (6/261) acute rejection rates at 1 year. The total cost of hospitalization was within the benefit for living donor kidney transplants (less than USD 8000.00) but exceeded it in all cases of deceased donor kidney transplants. The successful use of and excellent outcomes under the Case Type Z benefit demonstrated how collaboration among government agencies, health care providers, and pharmaceutical companies could result in a program that improved the access to health care for Filipino patients with end-stage renal disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Incidence of and risk factors for skin cancer after heart transplant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brewer, Jerry D.; Colegio, Oscar R.; Phillips, P. Kim; Roenigk, Randall K.; Jacobs, M. Amanda; van de Beek, Diederik; Dierkhising, Ross A.; Kremers, Walter K.; McGregor, Christopher G. A.; Otley, Clark C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the incidence, tumor burden, and risk factors for nonmelanoma and other skin cancer types in this heart transplant cohort. DESIGN: Retrospective review of patient medical records. SETTING: Tertiary care center. Patients All heart transplant recipients at Mayo Clinic from 1988

  4. Post-transplant distal limb syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Florencia Borghi Torzillo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The post-transplant distal limb syndrome is a not well known entity, with a prevalence of 5% in patients with renal transplant. Its diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms, bone scintigraphy and MRI, it has a benign course and the patient recovers without sequel. We present the case of a 37-year-old male, with medical history of hypertension, Berger's disease in 1999 that required dialysis three times a week for four years (2009-2013 and renal transplant in 2013. The patient consults on January 2014 referring severe pain in both feet, with sudden onset; he remembers the exact date of the beginning of the pain and denies trauma, pain prevents ambulation. The bone scintigraphy shows pathological uptake in both feet with no difference between the two. Although there is no treatment for this disease, it has a benign course

  5. Identifying medication-related needs of HIV patients: foundation for community pharmacist-based services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yardlee Kauffman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients living with HIV/AIDS have complex medication regimens. Pharmacists within community pharmacy settings can have a role managing patients living with HIV/AIDS. Patients' perspectives surrounding implementation about community pharmacist-based services is needed as limited information is available. Objective: To identify medication-related needs of HIV-infected patients who receive prescriptions from a community pharmacy. To determine patient perspectives and knowledge of community pharmacist-based services. Methods: A qualitative research study involving in-depth, semi-structured interviews with patients was conducted. Inclusion criteria included: HIV positive men and women at least 18 years of age who receive care at a HIV clinic, currently take medication(s and use a community pharmacy for all prescription fills. Patients were recruited from one urban and one rural health center. Patients answered questions about their perceptions and knowledge about the role and value of pharmacy services and completed a demographic survey. The recordings of the interviews were transcribed verbatim and were analyzed using principles of Grounded Theory. Results: Twenty-nine interviews were conducted: 15 participants from the urban site and 14 from the rural site. Five main themes emerged including: patients experience ongoing and varying medication-related needs; patients desire a pharmacist who is caring, knowledgeable and integrated with health care providers; patients expect ready access to drug therapy; patients value an individualized patient encounter, and patients need to be informed that a pharmacist-service exists. Conclusion: Patients with HIV value individualized and personal encounters with pharmacists at time intervals that are convenient for the patient. Patients felt that a one-on-one encounter with a pharmacist would be most valuable when initiating or modifying medication therapy. These patient perspectives can be useful for

  6. Autopsy issues in German Federal Republic transplantation legislation until 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweikardt, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the relevance of autopsy issues for German Federal Republic transplantation legislation until 1997 against the background of legal traditions and the distribution of constitutional legislative powers. It is based on Federal Ministry of Justice records and German Parliament documents on transplantation legislation. Transplantation and autopsy legislation started with close ties in the 1970s. Viewing transplantation legislation as relevant for future autopsy regulation contributed to the decision to stall transplantation legislation, because the interests of the federal government and the medical profession converged to avoid subsequent restrictions on the practice of conducting autopsies and procuring tissues for transplantation. Sublegal norms were insufficient for the prosecution of the organ trade and area-wide transplantation regulation after the reunification of Germany. In contrast to autopsy issues, legislative power for transplantation issues was extended to the federal level by an amendment to the constitution, allowing decision making for Germany as a whole.

  7. The Global Role of Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Garcia Garcia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available World Kidney Day on March 8 th 2012 provides a chance to reflect on the success of kidney transplantation as a therapy for end stage kidney disease that surpasses dialysis treatments both for the quality and quantity of life that it provides and for its cost effectiveness. Anything that is both cheaper and better, but is not actually the dominant therapy, must have other drawbacks that prevent replacement of all dialysis treatment by transplantation. The barriers to universal transplantation as the therapy for end stage kidney disease include the economic limitations which, in some countries place transplantation, appropriately, at a lower priority than public health fundamentals such as clean water, sanitation and vaccination. Even in high income countries the technical challenges of surgery and the consequences of immunosuppression restrict the number of suitable recipients, but the major finite restrictions on kidney transplantation rates are the shortage of donated organs and the limited medical, surgical and nursing workforces with the required expertise. These problems have solutions which involve the full range of societal, professional, governmental and political environments. World Kidney Day is a call to deliver transplantation therapy to the one million people a year who have a right to benefit.

  8. Italy-Greece cooperation for transplantation of medically urgent Greek patients: is it an effective, efficient model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peritore, D; Pretagostini, R; Di Ciaccio, P; Fiaschetti, P; Gabbrielli, F; Oliveti, A; Stabile, D; Ricci, A; Vaia, F; Nanni Costa, A

    2012-09-01

    In 2005 the Italian National Transplant Centre (CNT) signed a cooperation agreement with the Hellenic Transplant Organization (HTO) fostering the transfer and transplantation of urgent Greek liver patients at Italian transplantation centers. So as to not reduce access to transplantation for Italian patients, the agreement provided compensation for organs allocated to Greek transplant recipients. The aim of this study was to analyze the flow of patients from Greece to Italy and the number of received livers to consider the possibility to extend this kind of agreement to other countries, so that this should not penalize Italian recipients. The agreement provides the possibility for Greek patients affected by acute disease to be transferred to Italian transplantation centers participating in the agreement. Until 2008 livers transplanted into Greek recipients were returned through a preferential offer of surplus Greek organs, whereas from 2009 an obligation of payback was introduced. During the reviewed period requests for transfer, transferred patients, and number of patients who later underwent transplantation in Italy were 56, 26, and 23, respectively. Livers offered by the Greek organization that were accepted, transferred, and transplanted in Italy have been 82, 50, and 44, respectively. According to our analysis, the cooperation has had as positive impact for both Greece, which has difficulties transplanting urgent recipient because of the low number of donors, and for Italy, which is not penalized by the use of an organ in a Greek recipients, but is also rewarded for helpfulness. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The impact of medication synchronization on quality care criteria in an independent community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Jessica L; Garofoli, Gretchen K; Elswick, Betsy M

    To determine the impact of a comprehensive medication synchronization program in an independent community pharmacy by (1) evaluating changes in Electronic Quality Improvement Platform for Plans and Pharmacies (EQuIPP) scores and (2) examining the change in monthly prescription volume. Independent community pharmacy in Morgantown, WV. Waterfront Family Pharmacy is a single-location independent community pharmacy located in Morgantown, WV. The pharmacy consists of four full-time pharmacists and is the primary practice site for one community pharmacy PGY-1 resident. The pharmacy provides a variety of clinical services, including vaccine administration, medication therapy management, and diabetes education services. In September 2014, Waterfront Family Pharmacy started a comprehensive medication synchronization program. Change in Electronic Quality Improvement Platform for Plans and Pharmacies (EQuIPP) scores and change in monthly prescription volume. At the end of 6 months there was improvement in all targeted EQuIPP scores. There was a 7% improvement in proportion of days covered (PDC) for cholesterol-reducing agents, a 9.5% improvement in PDC for oral glycemic agents, a 1.2% improvement in PDC for renin-angiotensin system antagonists, and a 1.8% reduction in the use of high-risk medications in the elderly. There was also an average increase in monthly prescription volume of 4.8% over the first 6 months after the implementation of the comprehensive medication synchronization program. The implementation of a comprehensive medication synchronization program in an independent community pharmacy may result in benefits including improved EQuIPP scores and increased prescription volume. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prediction of medication non-adherence and associated outcomes in pediatric kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, James; Pilch, N; Oliver, M; Jordan, C; Fleming, J; Meadows, H; Baliga, P; Nadig, S; Twombley, K; Shatat, I; Taber, D

    2015-08-01

    Studies have continued to evaluate risk factors associated with post-transplant non-adherence in pediatric patients. However, many of these studies fail to evaluate how risk factors can be utilized to predict MNA. The aims of this study were to (i) determine salient risk factors associated with MNA to develop an adequate predictive risk model and (ii) assess transplant outcomes based on the presence of MNA in a large, diverse cohort of pediatric KTX recipients. One hundred and seventy-five solitary pediatric KTX recipients transplanted from 1999 to 2013 were included. AA, males, older patients, those who lived in urban environments, had legal issues, and lived shorter distances from the transplant center were more likely to have MNA. Using logistic regression, a parsimonious model applying nine risk factors together was developed for predicting MNA, demonstrating a PPV of 69% and a NPV of 81%. Patients with MNA had more than twice the risk of biopsy proven acute rejection, 1.6 times the risk of hospitalization, and 1.8 times the risk of graft loss. Utilization of a predictive model to determine risk of MNA after pediatric KTX may offer clinicians the ability to efficiently and effectively monitor MNA following transplant. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Slaves of the state – medical internship and community service in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owing to a chronic shortage of medical staff in South Africa, sleep-deprived medical interns and community service doctors work up to 200 hours of overtime per month under the state's commuted overtime policy. Nurses moonlight in circumvention of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act. For trainee doctors, overtime ...

  12. Alcohol consumption, new onset of diabetes after transplantation, and all-cause mortality in renal transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, Dorien M.; Agarwal, Pramod K.; Ramirez, Jessica L. Pinto; van der Heide, Jaap J. Homan; Corpeleijn, Eva; Gans, Reinold O. B.; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Renal transplant recipients (RTR) are often advised to refrain from alcohol because of possible interaction with their immunosuppressive medication. Although moderate alcohol consumption is associated with reduced risk of diabetes and mortality in the general population, this is unknown

  13. Physical rehabilitation for lung transplant candidates and recipients: An evidence-informed clinical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickerson, Lisa; Rozenberg, Dmitry; Janaudis-Ferreira, Tania; Deliva, Robin; Lo, Vincent; Beauchamp, Gary; Helm, Denise; Gottesman, Chaya; Mendes, Polyana; Vieira, Luciana; Herridge, Margaret; Singer, Lianne G; Mathur, Sunita

    2016-01-01

    Physical rehabilitation of lung transplant candidates and recipients plays an important in optimizing physical function prior to transplant and facilitating recovery of function post-transplant. As medical and surgical interventions in lung transplantation have evolved over time, there has been a demographic shift of individuals undergoing lung transplantation including older individuals, those with multiple co-morbidites, and candidates with respiratory failure requiring bridging to transplantation. These changes have an impact on the rehabilitation needs of lung transplant candidates and recipients. This review provides a practical approach to rehabilitation based on research and clinical practice at our transplant centre. It focuses on functional assessment and exercise prescription during an uncomplicated and complicated clinical course in the pre-transplant, early and late post-transplant periods. The target audience includes clinicians involved in pre- and post-transplant patient care and rehabilitation researchers. PMID:27683630

  14. Guardians of 'the gift': the emotional challenges of heart and lung transplant professionals in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Anja M B

    2017-04-01

    This paper deals with the emotional challenges encountered by doctors and nurses caring for heart and lung transplant patients. Organ transplantation enables body parts from the dead to become usable in patients with no other life-saving option. These exchanges are not possible without transplant professionals carefully selecting, guiding and interacting with organ recipients before, during and after the transplant. Based on anthropological fieldwork at a Danish heart and lung transplant unit, the paper explores how doctors and nurses experience and handle the emotional challenges of their working life. By focusing on the everyday life of the transplant unit which, contrary to public understanding of transplant miracles, is sometimes characterised by sad cases and devastation, this paper argues that transplant professionals operate in the presence of death. Medically and emotionally they are at risk. They must take the difficult decisions of whether to admit critically ill patients onto the organ waiting list; face the distress of post-transplant sufferings and deaths; and deal with organ recipients who do not behave according to post-transplant recommendations. Drawing on a familiar metaphor for donated organs, it is suggested that transplant doctors and nurses are 'guardians of the gift'. Attention to the emotional burdens and rewards of this particular position enables new understandings of the practices of transplant medicine, of gift exchange theory, and of the role of emotion in medical practice.

  15. Defining death: organ transplants, tradition and technology in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, E A

    1988-01-01

    This article explores Japanese attitudes about brain death and organ transplantation. First, ancient burial customs and death-related rituals associated with Shinto and Buddhism are examined. Next, contemporary attitudes towards the dead are discussed in the context of current controversies surrounding brain death and organ transplantation. Finally, an attempt is made to link the traditional Japanese views of death with modern medical dilemmas.

  16. Imaging chronic renal disease and renal transplant in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmichael, Jim; Easty, Marina

    2010-01-01

    At Great Ormond Street Hospital we have the highest number of paediatric renal transplant patients in Europe, taking cases from across the United Kingdom and abroad. Our caseload includes many children with rare complicating medical problems and chronic renal failure related morbidity. This review aims to provide an overview of our experience of imaging children with chronic renal failure and transplants. (orig.)

  17. Transplant Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altınörs, Nur; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to review and discuss the great variety of ethical issues related to organ donation, organ procurement, transplant activities, and new ethical problems created as a result of technologic and scientific developments. An extensive literature survey was made, and expert opinions were obtained. The gap between demand and supply of organs for transplant has yielded to organ trafficking, organ tourism, and commercialism. This problem seems to be the most important issue, and naturally there are ethical dilemmas related to it. A wide number of ideas have been expressed on the subject, and different solutions have been proposed. The struggle against organ trafficking and commercialism should include legislation, efforts to increase deceased-donor donations, and international cooperation. China's policy to procure organs from prisoners sentenced to death is unethical, and the international community should exert more pressure on the Chinese government to cease this practice. Each particular ethical dilemma should be taken separately and managed.

  18. Treating gout in kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroletti, Steven; Bencivenga, Gina Ann; Gabardi, Steven

    2004-06-01

    To review the etiology, treatment, and preventive strategies of hyperuricemia and gout in kidney transplant recipients. Primary literature was obtained via Medline (1966-June 2003). Studies evaluating treatment and prevention of hyperuricemia and gout in kidney transplantation were considered for evaluation. English-language studies were selected for inclusion. Approximately 14,000 kidney transplantations were performed in the United States in 2003, and of those transplant recipients, nearly 13% will experience a new onset of gout. The prevalence of hyperuricemia is even greater. There are several mechanisms by which hyperuricemia and gout develop in kidney transplant recipients. Medication-induced hyperuricemia and renal dysfunction are 2 of the more common mechanisms. Prophylactic and treatment options include allopurinol, colchicine, corticosteroids, and, if absolutely necessary, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. It is generally recommended to decide whether the risks of prophylactic therapy and treatment outweigh the benefits. Often, the risk of adverse events associated with agents to treat these ailments tends to outweigh the benefits; therefore, treatment is usually reserved for symptomatic episodes of acute gout. Practitioners must also decide if changes in immunosuppressive regimens may be of benefit on a patient-by-patient basis.

  19. Side Effects of Transplant Immunosuppressive Therapy in Post Renal Transplant Recipients, Mazandaran, Northern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abazar Akbarzadeh Pasha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Post-kidney transplant survival relies on patient adherence to the intake of immunosuppressive medication. This study was performed to investigate complications associated with immunosuppressive therapy in renal transplantation. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 188 transplanted patients in Shahid Beheshti hospital of Babol in 2013. Check list and demographic questionnaire for data collecting were used. Then the data using were analyzed in SPSS.18 software by using chi-square test. Results A total of 188 transplanted patients, 115 (61.2% was male and mean age was 12.9 ± 42.9 years. 181 (96.3% of the subjects had at least one complication. The most common complication in 142 cases (75.5% was “excessive hair growth” and after this complication “increased blood sugar” had higher frequency and 119 (63.3% had this complication. Severe form of gingival overgrowth in women was significantly that more than men (22 (30.1, 14 (12.2, P = 0.004, and the other side effect was not significant difference between men and women or different age groups (P > 0.05 Conclusions Finding show that nearly all transplanted recipients suffered from one complication which need to recognize, control and treatment. It suggested that period visiting for early diagnosis and education to patient was recommend.

  20. Graft survival rate of renal transplantation during a period of 10 years in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Shahbazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kidney transplantation is a preferred treatment for many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD and is far more profitable than hemodialysis. Analyzing renal transplantation data can help to evaluate the effectiveness of transplantation interventions. The aim of this study was to determine the organ survival rate after kidney transplantation during a period of 10 years (March 2001-March 2011 among transplanted patients in Arak, Markazi Province, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this historical cohort study, all recipients of kidney transplantation from Arak, Markazi Province, Iran who had medical records in Valiasr Hospital and "charity for kidney patients" of Arak, Markazi Province, Iran during a period of 10 years from March 2001 to March 2011 were included. Data collected by using checklists were completed from patients′ hospital records. Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine the graft cumulative survival rate, log-rank test to compare survival curves in subgroups, and Cox regression model to define the hazard ratio and for ruling out the intervening factors. Statistical analysis was conducted by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS 20 and Stata 11. Results: Mean duration of follow-up was 55.43 ± 42.02 months. By using the Kaplan-Meier method, the cumulative probability of graft survival at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 years was 99.1, 97.7, 94.3, 85.7, and 62.1%, respectively. The number of dialysis by controlling the effect of other variables had a significant association with the risk of graft failure [hazard ratios and 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.47 (1.02-2.13]. Conclusion: This study showed that the graft survival rate was satisfactory in this community and was similar to the results of single-center studies in the world. Dialysis time after transplantation was a significant predictor of survival in the recipients of kidney transplantation that should be considered.

  1. Serum vitamin D levels in kidney transplant recipients: the importance of an immunosuppression regimen and sun exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Ophir; Aharon, Michal; Safadi, Rifaat; Elhalel, Michal Dranitzki

    2013-10-01

    Vitamin D deficiency was shown to be prevalent among renal transplant recipients in northern countries, but little is known regarding risk factors. To test vitamin D levels in kidney transplant recipients residing closer to the equator, compare them to levels in liver transplant recipients and hemodialysis patients, and identify possible risk factors. In a cross-sectional study 103 kidney transplant recipients, 27 liver transplant recipients and 50 hemodialysis patients followed at our institute were tested for vitamin D levels. Demographic data, medical history and current treatment were recorded from the medical files. Inadequate vitamin D levels (Vitamin D levels were higher among dialysis patients than transplant recipients, though deficiency rates were similar. No association was found between kidney function and vitamin deficiency. Deficiency was associated with higher prednisone doses, use of mycophenolate sodium, tacrolimus, and iron supplements, or lower doses of vitamin D supplementation. Despite potential higher ultraviolet B exposure, inadequate vitamin D levels were prevalent in our study group. Importantly, some immunosuppressive medications were associated with vitamin D deficiency and high doses of vitamin D were associated with less deficiency.

  2. Bowman’s layer transplantation: evidence to date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma B

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Bhavana Sharma,1 Aditi Dubey,2 Gaurav Prakash,3 Rasik B Vajpayee4–6 1Department of Ophthalmology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Bhopal, India; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Gandhi Medical College, Bhopal, India; 3Cornea and Refractive Surgery Services, NMC Eye Care, New Medical Center Specialty Hospital, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; 4Vision Eye Institute, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 5Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 6North West Academic Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Surgical management of keratoconus (KC has undergone a paradigm shift in the last two decades and component corneal transplantation technique of deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty has established itself as a modality of choice for management of advanced cases of KC. Every now and then, new minimalist modalities are being innovated for the management of KC. On the same lines, a new technique, Bowman’s layer transplantation, for surgical management of moderate to advanced KC has been reported in recent years. The procedure has shown to be beneficial in reducing ectasia in advanced KC with minimal intraoperative and postoperative complications. In this review, we intend to describe available information and literature with reference to this new surgical technique – Bowman’s layer transplantation. Keywords: keratoconus, Bowman’s Layer, keratoplasty, post PRK haze, component keratoplasty

  3. [The history of kidney transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Michèle

    2016-12-01

    Medical advances which have marked the history of transplantation include the work of Jean Dausset on the HLA system from 1952, brain death described in 1959 and prolonged organ preservation. This article looks back at the major turning points. Copyright © 2016. Publié par Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. A guide to understanding and implementing risk evaluation and mitigation strategies in organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven; Tichy, Eric M

    2013-03-01

    To review the components of the Congressional mandate for risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMS) managed by the Food and Drug Administration and assess their impact on health care providers practicing within the organ transplant arena. A non-date-limited search of MEDLINE and EMBASE (January 2007-June 2012) was conducted by using the following search terms: risk evaluation and mitigation strategies, REMS, and organ transplant, including a query of the individual organs. Information from the Federal Register and the Food and Drug Administration was also evaluated. REMS are strategies implemented to manage known or potential risks associated with medications and to ensure ongoing pharmacovigilance throughout the life of a pharmaceutical product. Elements of REMS programs may consist of 3 levels: a medication guide, communication plan, and elements to assure safe use. A medication guide is used to help prevent serious adverse events, aid in patients' decision making, and enhance medication adherence. Communication plans help educate health care providers and encourage adherence with REMS. The elements to assure safe use is a restrictive process implemented when it is deemed necessary to ensure safe access for patients to products with known serious risks. In transplant medicine, REMS currently exist for belatacept (medication guide and communication plan) and the mycophenolic acid derivatives (medication guide and elements to assure safe use). REMS are another step in the evolution of the development and marketing of pharmaceutical agents. Use of REMS in solid-organ transplant is becoming common. Transplant clinicians must provide required patient education and become involved with other aspects of REMS implementation to reduce the serious risks of pharmaceuticals and to improve patients' outcomes.

  5. Physicians attitudes toward living non-related renal transplantation (LNRRT). The Living non-Related Renal Transplant Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    Renal transplantation is considered now the definitive treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Unfortunately, the worldwide shortage of kidneys remains the most important obstacle to transplantation. In developing countries, including those of the Middle East, the shortage is even more dramatic. Despite great efforts to establish and maintain successful transplant centers, the number of kidneys that have been transplanted in the last few years has actually declined. The lack of a dependable kidney source played well into the hands of unscrupulous entrepreneurs who started brokerage of organs for profit. In this practice, patients with ESRD travel to India and other countries to purchase kidneys from living genetically non-related poor donors. Patient care was therefore relegated to the laws of the marketplace and both patients and donors were exploited to maximize profit. Additionally, reported results of this type of transplantation were inferior to those of other types of transplantation. Not unexpectedly, these issues have created intense controversy among transplant physicians and the general public in which moral, ethical and medical issues were debated. To investigate these issues, we conducted a large multicenter study in Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Egypt. In the first phase of this study, we surveyed 50 institutions regarding their attitude toward LNRRT, of which 22 responded. The results of our survey clearly show that patients with ESRD take the initiative in seeking LNRRT despite physician discouragement and significant financial burden.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Ethical issues in organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouna, George M

    2003-01-01

    Clinical organ transplantation has been recognized as one of the most gripping medical advances of the century as it provides a way of giving the gift of life to patients with terminal failure of vital organs, which requires the participation of other fellow human beings and of society by donating organs from deceased or living individuals. The increasing incidence of vital organ failure and the inadequate supply of organs, especially from cadavers, has created a wide gap between organ supply and organ demand, which has resulted in very long waiting times to receive an organ as well as an increasing number of deaths while waiting. These events have raised many ethical, moral and societal issues regarding supply, the methods of organ allocation, the use of living donors as volunteers including minors. It has also led to the practice of organ sale by entrepreneurs for financial gains in some parts the world through exploitation of the poor, for the benefit of the wealthy. The current advances in immunology and tissue engineering and the use of animal organs, xenotransplantation, while offering very promising solutions to many of these problems, also raise additional ethical and medical issues which must be considered by the medical profession as well as society. This review deals with the ethical and moral issues generated by the current advances in organ transplantation, the problem of organ supply versus organ demand and the appropriate allocation of available organs. It deals with the risks and benefits of organ donation from living donors, the appropriate and acceptable methods to increase organ donation from the deceased through the adoption of the principle of 'presumed consent', the right methods of providing acceptable appreciation and compensation for the family of the deceased as well as volunteer and altruistic donors, and the duties and responsibilities of the medical profession and society to help fellow humans. The review also deals with the appropriate

  7. Curative bone marrow transplantation in erythropoietic protoporphyria after reversal of severe cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlin, Staffan; Aschan, Johan; Björnstedt, Mikael; Broomé, Ulrika; Harper, Pauline

    2007-01-01

    We report the case of a middle-age patient presenting with severe progressive protoporphyric cholestasis. To halt further progression of liver disease, medical treatment was given aimed at different mechanisms possibly causing cholestasis in erythropoietic protoporphyria. Within eighty days, liver biochemistry completely normalized and liver histology markedly improved. Bone marrow transplantation was performed to prevent relapse of cholestatic liver disease by correcting the main site of protoporphyrin overproduction. Thirty-three months after cholestatic presentation and ten months after bone marrow transplantation, liver and porphyrin biochemistry remains normal. The patient is in excellent condition and photosensitivity is absent. The theoretical role of each treatment used to successfully reverse cholestasis and the role of bone marrow transplantation in erythropoietic protoporphyria are discussed. Medical treatment can resolve hepatic abnormalities in protoporphyric cholestasis. Bone marrow transplantation achieves phenotypic reversal and may offer protection from future protoporphyric liver disease.

  8. Use of a computerized medication shared decision making tool in community mental health settings: impact on psychotropic medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Bradley D; Kogan, Jane N; Mihalyo, Mark J; Schuster, James; Deegan, Patricia E; Sorbero, Mark J; Drake, Robert E

    2013-04-01

    Healthcare reform emphasizes patient-centered care and shared decision-making. This study examined the impact on psychotropic adherence of a decision support center and computerized tool designed to empower and activate consumers prior to an outpatient medication management visit. Administrative data were used to identify 1,122 Medicaid-enrolled adults receiving psychotropic medication from community mental health centers over a two-year period from community mental health centers. Multivariate linear regression models were used to examine if tool users had higher rates of 180-day medication adherence than non-users. Older clients, Caucasian clients, those without recent hospitalizations, and those who were Medicaid-eligible due to disability had higher rates of 180-day medication adherence. After controlling for sociodemographics, clinical characteristics, baseline adherence, and secular changes over time, using the computerized tool did not affect adherence to psychotropic medications. The computerized decision tool did not affect medication adherence among clients in outpatient mental health clinics. Additional research should clarify the impact of decision-making tools on other important outcomes such as engagement, patient-prescriber communication, quality of care, self-management, and long-term clinical and functional outcomes.

  9. Lung Transplantation in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 00:00 Lung Transplantation in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension Consensus Statements Issued by the Scientific Leadership Council ... a treatment option for selected patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) when medical therapy is no longer effective. ...

  10. Educating the medical community through a teratology newsletter.

    OpenAIRE

    Guttmacher, A E; Allen, E F

    1993-01-01

    To educate a geographically and professionally diverse group of health care providers about teratology in an economic and efficient manner, we developed a locally written and distributed teratology newsletter. Response to the newsletter, from readers as well as from our staff and funding agencies, suggests that such a newsletter can be a valuable tool in educating medical communities about teratology.

  11. Educating the medical community through a teratology newsletter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmacher, A E; Allen, E F

    1993-01-01

    To educate a geographically and professionally diverse group of health care providers about teratology in an economic and efficient manner, we developed a locally written and distributed teratology newsletter. Response to the newsletter, from readers as well as from our staff and funding agencies, suggests that such a newsletter can be a valuable tool in educating medical communities about teratology. PMID:8434594

  12. A Community-Led Medical Response Effort in the Wake of Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraushar, Matthew L; Rosenberg, Rebecca E

    2015-08-01

    On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy made landfall in the neighborhood of Red Hook in Brooklyn, New York. The massive tidal surge generated by the storm submerged the coastal area, home to a population over 11,000 individuals, including the largest public housing development in Brooklyn. The infrastructure devastation was profound: the storm rendered electricity, heat, water, Internet, and phone services inoperative, whereas local ambulatory medical services including clinics, pharmacies, home health agencies, and other resources were damaged beyond functionality. Lacking these services or lines of communication, medically fragile individuals became isolated from the hospital and 911-emergency systems without a preexisting mechanism to identify or treat them. Medically fragile individuals primarily included those with chronic medical conditions dependent on frequent and consistent monitoring and treatments. In response, the Red Hook community established an ad hoc volunteer medical relief effort in the wake of the storm, filling a major gap that continues to exist in disaster medicine for low-income urban environments. Here we describe this effort, including an analysis of the medically vulnerable in this community, and recommend disaster risk reduction strategies and resilience measures for future disaster events.

  13. A retrospective review of fall risk factors in the bone marrow transplant inpatient service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Cory M; Grate, Lisa M; McBride, Ali; Devine, Steven; Andritsos, Leslie A

    2018-06-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare medications and potential risk factors between patients who experienced a fall during hospitalization compared to those who did not fall while admitted to the Blood and Marrow Transplant inpatient setting at The James Cancer Hospital. Secondary objectives included evaluation of transplant-related disease states and medications in the post-transplant setting that may lead to an increased risk of falls, post-fall variables, and number of tests ordered after a fall. Methods This retrospective, case-control study matched patients in a 2:1 ratio of nonfallers to fallers. Data from The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center (OSUWMC) reported fall events and patient electronic medical records were utilized. A total of 168 adult Blood and Marrow Transplant inpatients with a hematological malignancy diagnosis were evaluated from 1 January 2010 to 30 September 2012. Results Univariable and multivariable conditional logistic regression models were used to assess the relationship between potential predictor variables of interest and falls. Variables that were found to be significant predictors of falls from the univariable models include age group, incontinence, benzodiazepines, corticosteroids, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, and number of days status-post transplant. When considered for a multivariable model age group, corticosteroids, and a cancer diagnosis of leukemia were significant in the final model. Conclusion Recent medication utilization such as benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, corticosteroids, and antidepressants placed patients at a higher risk of experiencing a fall. Other significant factors identified from a multivariable analysis found were patients older than age 65, patients with recent corticosteroid administration and a cancer diagnosis of leukemia.

  14. Development and evaluation of a community immersion program during preclinical medical studies: a 15-year experience at the University of Geneva Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chastonay P

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available P Chastonay,1,2 V Zesiger,1 A Klohn,1 L Soguel,3 E K Mpinga,1,4 NV Vu,2 L Bernheim5 1Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, 2Unit of Development and Research in Medical Education, University of Geneva, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, 3Nutrition and Dietetics Department, University of Applied Sciences, Geneva, 4Swiss School of Public Health, Zurich, 5Department of Neurosciences, University of Geneva, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland Background: Significant changes in medical education have occurred in recent decades because of new challenges in the health sector and new learning theories and practices. This might have contributed to the decision of medical schools throughout the world to adopt community-based learning activities. The community-based learning approach has been promoted and supported by the World Health Organization and has emerged as an efficient learning strategy. The aim of the present paper is to describe the characteristics of a community immersion clerkship for third-year undergraduate medical students, its evolution over 15 years, and an evaluation of its outcomes. Methods: A review of the literature and consensus meetings with a multidisciplinary group of health professionals were used to define learning objectives and an educational approach when developing the program. Evaluation of the program addressed students' perception, achievement of learning objectives, interactions between students and the community, and educational innovations over the years. Results: The program and the main learning objectives were defined by consensus meetings among teaching staff and community health workers, which strengthened the community immersion clerkship. Satisfaction, as monitored by a self-administered questionnaire in successive cohorts of students, showed a mean of 4.4 on a five-point scale. Students also mentioned community immersion clerkship as a unique community experience. The learning objectives were reached by a

  15. Spanish Adaptation and Validation of the Transplant Effects Questionnaire (TxEQ-Spanish in Liver Transplant Recipients and Its Relationship to Posttraumatic Growth and Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Á. Pérez-San-Gregorio

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The valid assessment of the impact of transplantation on psychological well-being is highly relevant to optimize treatment. However, to date there is no standardized instrument available in Spain. The Transplant Effects Questionnaire (TxEQ evaluates the specific problems associated with organ transplantation, such as worry about transplant, guilt regarding the donor, disclosure of having undergone transplantation, adherence to medical treatment and responsibility toward the donor, family, friends, or medical staff. Against this backdrop the English original version of the TxEQ was translated into Spanish and validated in a sample of 240 liver transplant recipients. Participants also filled in the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI, and the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12v.2. Confirmatory factor analysis of the TxEQ-Spanish revealed a five-factor structure equivalent to the English original version, and satisfactory internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha: worry α = 0.82, guilt α = 0.77, disclosure α = 0.91, adherence α = 0.82, responsibility α = 0.83. Results showed that better mental quality of life was associated with higher adherence and disclosure, as well as less worry and guilt. Higher posttraumatic growth was significantly associated with worry, guilt, and responsibility. Interestingly, the most powerful predictor of posttraumatic growth was worry. Analysis of variance showed an interaction effect of PTG and mental quality of life on adherence, with medium PTG being associated with significantly stronger adherence in participants with better mental quality of life. In conclusion our study could successfully adapt and validate the Spanish version of the TxEQ in a large sample of liver transplant recipients. Our findings show a complex relationship between emotional reactions to transplantation, mental quality of life, and posttraumatic growth, which give further insight into inner processes supporting psychological well

  16. Needs, Acceptability, and Value of Humanitarian Medical Assistance in Remote Peruvian Amazon Riverine Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Juan F.; Halsey, Eric S.; Bayer, Angela M.; Beltran, Martin; Razuri, Hugo R.; Velasquez, Daniel E.; Cama, Vitaliano A.; Graf, Paul C. F.; Quispe, Antonio M.; Maves, Ryan C.; Montgomery, Joel M.; Sanders, John W.; Lescano, Andres G.

    2015-01-01

    Much debate exists regarding the need, acceptability, and value of humanitarian medical assistance. We conducted a cross-sectional study on 457 children under 5 years from four remote riverine communities in the Peruvian Amazon and collected anthropometric measures, blood samples (1–4 years), and stool samples. Focus groups and key informant interviews assessed perspectives regarding medical aid delivered by foreigners. The prevalence of stunting, anemia, and intestinal parasites was 20%, 37%, and 62%, respectively. Infection with multiple parasites, usually geohelminths, was detected in 41% of children. The prevalence of intestinal parasites both individual and polyparasitism increased with age. Participants from smaller communities less exposed to foreigners expressed lack of trust and fear of them. However, participants from all communities were positive about foreigners visiting to provide health support. Prevalent health needs such as parasitic infections and anemia may be addressed by short-term medical interventions. There is a perceived openness to and acceptability of medical assistance delivered by foreign personnel. PMID:25846293

  17. Budd-Chiari syndrome and liver transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Nobuhisa; Sugawara, Yasuhiko; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Summary Budd-Chiari syndrome involves obstruction of hepatic venous outflow tracts at various levels from small hepatic veins to the inferior vena cava and is the result of thrombosis or its fibrous sequelae. There is a conspicuous difference in its etiology in the West and the East. Myeloproliferative disease predominates in the West and obstruction of the vena cava predominates in the East. The clinical presentation and clinical manifestations are so varied that it should be suspected in any patient with acute or chronic liver dysfunction. It should be treated with step-wise management. First-line therapy should be anticoagulation with medical treatment of the underlying illness, and interventional revascularization and TIPS are indicated in the event of a lack of response to medical therapy. Liver transplantation may be indicated as a rescue treatment or for fulminant cases with promising results. This step-by-step strategy has achieved a 5-year transplant-free survival rate of 70% and a 5-year overall survival rate of 90%. Living donor liver transplantation can also be used for patients with Budd-Chiari syndrome if deceased donor livers are scarce, but it requires a difficult procedure particularly with regard to venous outflow reconstruction. PMID:25674385

  18. [Adherence to treatment after kidney transplantation as quality indicator of the information received: Longitudinal study of 2 years follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Requena, G; Cantarell, M C; Moreso, F; Parramon, G; Seron, D

    Transplantation is an optimal form of treatment for end-stage renal disease, but requires lifelong adherence to immunosuppressive therapy. The aim of this study was to longitudinally assess the adherence to treatment after kidney transplant, as well as to compare the amount of information about the treatment received at one month and 18 months post-transplantation, and its influence on adherence to treatment. The Self-Reported Measure of Medication Adherence was administered at month (T1), 6 months (T2), 12 months (T3), 18 months (T4), and 24 months (T5) post-transplantation. Survey about aspects of knowledge and attitudes about medication, was administered at one month and 18 months post-transplant. Measures of central tendency and non-parametric tests were used to compare the data. The study included a total of 73 patients with a median age of 57 years. The percentage of patients non-adherent to medication was 9.6% (T1), 22.5% (T2), 29.2% (T3), 29.8% (T4), and 28.1% (T5). One month after transplantation "not consulting with the doctor on forgetting to take medication (P=.034) significantly influenced the non-adherence to treatment. At 18 months post- transplantation, none of the issues raised on medication knowledge had an influence on non-adherence to treatment. Longer times since transplantation increased the non-adherence to treatment. Some issues regarding the information of treatment influenced the non-adherence in the immediate transplant period, but not in the follow-up. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. The role of the pharmacist in the management of kidney transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J Wiegel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacists may play a key role on the multidisciplinary transplant team. This article describes the development and current status of pharmacists in the management of transplant recipients in the United States. Traditionally, pharmacists played an important support role in transplant medicine. This role has been expanded to include direct patient care for the avoidance, detection, and/or treatment of side effects from the polypharmacy necessary in the management of these complex patients. Pharmacists provide pre- and post-transplant education to transplant recipients to enhance adherence to complicated medical regimens and thereby reduce readmission to hospital and unscheduled, costly visits to urgent care centers and/or hospital emergency departments.

  20. Renal Impairment and Complication After Kidney Transplant at Queen Rania Abdulla Children's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almardini, Reham Issa; Salita, Ghazi Mohamad; Farah, Mahdi Qasem; Katatbeh, Issa Ahmad; Al-Rabadi, Katibh

    2017-02-01

    Kidney transplant is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease, but it is not without complications. We review the medical cause of significant renal impairment and complications that developed after kidney transplant in pediatric patients who required hospital admission and intervention and/or who were followed between 2007 and 2016. A retrospective noninterventional chart review study was conducted in pediatric patients who received a kidney transplant and/or followed at the nephrology clinic at Queen Rania Abdulla Children's Hospital between 2007 and 2016. In this study, 101 pediatric patients received a total of 103 transplants. Forty-eight patients (47%) experienced deterioration of kidney function out of a total of 53 episodes of complications; 37 of these episodes occurred early (0-6 mo after transplant), and 26 episodes occurred late. The causes of kidney function deterioration were surgical complications, acute tubular necrosis, cell- or antibody-mediated rejection, diabetes mellitus, urinary leak, recurrence of original disease, and chronic allograft nephropathy. Thirteen patients experienced graft loss; 50% of these losses were secondary to noncompliance to immunosuppressant medication treatment after transplant. A total of six patients died; 2 (23%) of these deaths occurred in the first week after transplant, whereas the other 4 patients died over a period of 10 years. Pediatric kidney transplant is not without complications; however, most of these complications are treatable and reversible. The most serious complications leading to graft loss and death occur early, in the first week after transplant. Improving immunosuppressant compliance after transplant would prevent 50% of graft losses.

  1. Expanding the clinical role of community pharmacy: A qualitative ethnographic study of medication reviews in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Sarah J; Miller, Fiona A; Abrahamyan, Lusine; Rac, Valeria E

    2018-03-01

    Medication reviews by community pharmacists are an increasingly common strategy to improve medication management for chronic conditions, and are part of wider efforts to make more effective use of community-based health professionals. To identify opportunities to optimize the medication review program in Ontario, Canada, we explored how providers and clients interpret and operationalize medication reviews within everyday community pharmacy practice. We conducted a qualitative ethnographic study at four pharmacies in Ontario, Canada, including non-participant observation of provider and client activities and interactions with specific attention to medication reviews, as well as brief ethnographic interviews with providers and clients, and in-depth, semi-structured interviews with providers. We report on 72h of field research, observation of 178 routine pharmacist-client interactions and 29 medication reviews, 62 brief ethnographic interviews with providers and clients, and 7 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with providers. We found that medication reviews were variably conducted across the dimensions of duration, provider type, location, and interaction style, and that local contexts and system-wide developments influence their meaning and practice. Medication reviews are exemplary of policy efforts to enhance the role of community pharmacies within health systems and the scope of practice of pharmacists as healthcare professionals. Our study highlights the importance of the local structure of community pharmacy practice and the clinical aspirations of pharmacists in the delivery of medication reviews. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Teaching community diagnosis to medical students: evaluation of a case study approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, C W

    1980-01-01

    A unique case study approach to training medical students in community diagnosis techniques was initiated at the Medical College of Ohio at Toledo. This paper describes the five elements of this teaching method: preliminary specification of target community and data base; group problem-solving requirement; specification of desired output; defined performance objectives; and regularly scheduled time for analysis. Experience with the case study method over two years was evaluated to identify specific strengths and weaknesses. The identified strengths include use of limited educational time to introduce community health problems, development of experience in a collegial team work setting, and specific awareness of the types of data useful to the analysis of community health service problems. Negative evaluations suggested that the method was not conducive to the development of skills in three areas: ability to establish the relative importance of health problems in communities; ability to identify an appropriate health system response to a community health problem from feasible alternatives; and ability to anticipate the community impact of health program modifications or improvements. Potential explanations for these deficiencies include: need for increased didactic support in the classroom for particular skill areas; need to establish a direct field experience in community diagnosis; inappropriateness of the data base used for evaluation of particular skills; and the probability that quantitative analysis, as used in this evaluation, may not be sufficient in and of itself to measure the outcome of a community diagnosis experience.

  3. Training a medical workforce to meet the needs of diverse minority communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopoaga, Faafetai; Zaharic, Tony; Kokaua, Jesse; Covello, Sahra

    2017-01-21

    The growing demand for a competent health workforce to meet the needs of increasingly diverse societies has been widely acknowledged. One medical school in New Zealand explored the integration of the commonly used patient-centred model approach, with an intersectional framework in the development of a cultural competency training programme. In the Pacific Immersion Programme, medical students in their fourth year of training are given the opportunity to learn about different factors that influence the health and health care of a minority community through immersion in that community. The programme objectives include enabling students to learn through experience living within the local community context, and supporting them to re-evaluate their own personal beliefs, assumptions and/or prior prejudices. This study evaluates the usefulness of this programme in the training of medical students to work in diverse communities. Two analytical approaches were used for evaluation. Deductive and inductive analyses were conducted on 235 reflective essays completed by three cohorts of students from 2011 to 2013 to ascertain the value of the programme for student learning. In addition, one cohort was invited to complete a pre and post-programme questionnaire. Overall, the students found the programme to be a valued learning environment. They found living within a Pacific family environment to be an eye opening experience. It increased students comfort level in cross cultural engagement and emphasised the importance of patient's perspectives in health care provision. Students' self-reported knowledge about Pacific cultural values, protocols, traditional beliefs and the main health challenges increased significantly after the programme. They appreciated learning directly from community members, and through observations about how culture, beliefs and the socio-economic environment influence peoples' health and wellbeing. Medical schools are required to train a competent health

  4. The role of E-mentorship in a virtual world for youth transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Kathryn; Fischer, Amy; Bouzaher, Alisha; Bers, Marina

    2010-01-01

    Because of geographic distances, many youth transplant recipients do not have the opportunity to meet and form relationships with peers who have undergone similar experiences. This article explores the role of E-mentorship in virtual environments. Most specifically, by analyzing data from a study conducted with the Zora virtual world with pediatric transplant recipients, suggestions and recommendations are given for conceiving the role of virtual mentors and allocating the needed resources. Zora is a graphical virtual world designed to create a community that offers psychoeducational support and the possibility of participating in virtual activities following a curriculum explicitly designed to address issues of school transition and medical adherence. Activities are designed to foster relationships, teach technological skills, and facilitate the formation of a support network of peers and mentors.This article addresses the research question, "What makes a successful E-mentorship model in virtual worlds for children with serious illnesses?" by looking at E-mentoring patterns such as time spent online, chat analysis, initiation of conversation, initiation of activities, and out-of-world contact.

  5. The roles of social support and psychological distress in lung transplant candidacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kristin M; Burker, Eileen J; White, Hayley C

    2011-09-01

    Social support appears to be an important component in lung transplantation. However, the relationship between social support, psychological distress, and listing status has not been evaluated in lung transplant candidates. To evaluate the relationships between depression, anxiety, and social support in patients with end-stage lung disease being evaluated for transplantation and determine (1) relationships between social support, depression, anxiety, and coping via seeking emotional and instrumental support; (2) whether social support explains a significant proportion of the variance in depression and anxiety; and (3) whether these factors were associated with whether a patient was listed for transplant. For this observational study, patients completed self-report questionnaires after their pretransplant evaluations. Listing status was subsequently obtained from medical records. Participants were patients with end-stage lung disease evaluated for transplantation at a major hospital. Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey, COPE Inventory, Beck Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Social support was associated with depression, anxiety, and seeking support (P values social support explained a significant proportion of the variance in depression (9%), state anxiety (8%), and trait anxiety (7%; all P values anxiety, trait anxiety, or availability of social support. Results highlight the important role that coping via seeking support plays in transplant candidacy.

  6. Organization and startup of The Gambia's new community-based medical programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, José A; Suárez, Lázaro V; Del Rosario, Odalis; Hechavarría, Suiberto; Quiñones, Judith

    2012-01-01

    The shortage of health professionals in developing countries and especially in their poorest regions imperils the vision of health for all. New training policies and strategies are needed urgently to address these shortages. The Gambia's new Community-Based Medical Programme is one such strategy. KEYWORDS Medical education, access to health care, healthcare disparities, health manpower, rural health, developing countries, The Gambia.

  7. Neuromyelitis optica in an adolescent after bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Fiona M; Kamihara, Junne; Gorman, Mark P

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system complications of bone marrow transplant are a common occurrence and the differential diagnosis is quite broad, including opportunistic infections, medications toxicities, graft versus host disease, and other autoimmune processes. We summarize previously reported cases of autoimmune myelitis in post-transplant patients and discuss a 17-year-old boy who presented with seronegative neuromyelitis optica after a bone marrow transplant for acute myeloid leukemia. Our patient had a marked improvement in symptoms after plasmapheresis. Including our patient, there have been at least eight cases of post-transplant autoimmune myelitis presented in the literature, and at least three of these are suspicious for neuromyelitis optica. Several of these patients had poor outcomes with persistent symptoms after the myelitis. Autoimmune processes such as neuromyelitis optica should be carefully considered in patients after transplant as aggressive treatment like early plasmapheresis may improve outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comradery, community, and care in military medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Michael L

    2011-10-01

    Medical ethics prohibits caregivers from discriminating and providing preferential care to their compatriots and comrades. In military medicine, particularly during war and when resources may be scarce, ethical principles may dictate priority care for compatriot soldiers. The principle of nondiscrimination is central to utilitarian and deontological theories of justice, but communitarianism and the ethics of care and friendship stipulate a different set of duties for community members, friends, and family. Similar duties exist among the small cohesive groups that typify many military units. When members of these groups require medical care, there are sometimes moral grounds to treat compatriot soldiers ahead of enemy or allied soldiers regardless of the severity of their respective wounds.

  9. Volume and outcome of organ transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banta, H.D.; Engel, G.L.; Schersten, T.

    1992-01-01

    In general, technically demanding medical procedures are associated with better outcomes when they are carried out in institutions and by physicians with higher volumes of practice. This paper examines the evidence for a volume-outcome relationship in the case of organ transplantation. Although few

  10. Transplanting the Body : Preliminary Ethical Considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miller, Lantz E.

    2017-01-01

    A dissociated area of medical research warrants bioethical consideration: a proposed transplantation of a donor’s entire body, except head, to a patient with a fatal degenerative disease. The seeming improbability of such an operation can only underscore the need for thorough bioethical assessment:

  11. Melanoma in Organ Transplant Recipients: Incidence, Outcomes and Management Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal R. Ali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of melanoma continues to increase year on year. With better surgical techniques and medical management, greater numbers of organ transplants are being performed annually with much longer graft survival. The authors review our current understanding of the incidence of melanoma amongst organ transplant recipients, outcomes compared to the immunocompetent population, and management strategies in this burgeoning group.

  12. Interdisciplinary Medication Adherence Program: The Example of a University Community Pharmacy in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelubre, Mélanie; Kamal, Susan; Genre, Noëllie; Celio, Jennifer; Gorgerat, Séverine; Hugentobler Hampai, Denise; Bourdin, Aline; Berger, Jerôme; Bugnon, Olivier; Schneider, Marie

    2015-01-01

    The Community Pharmacy of the Department of Ambulatory Care and Community Medicine (Policlinique Médicale Universitaire, PMU), University of Lausanne, developed and implemented an interdisciplinary medication adherence program. The program aims to support and reinforce medication adherence through a multifactorial and interdisciplinary intervention. Motivational interviewing is combined with medication adherence electronic monitors (MEMS, Aardex MWV) and a report to patient, physician, nurse, and other pharmacists. This program has become a routine activity and was extended for use with all chronic diseases. From 2004 to 2014, there were 819 patient inclusions, and 268 patients were in follow-up in 2014. This paper aims to present the organization and program's context, statistical data, published research, and future perspectives.

  13. Integrating Medication Therapy Management (MTM Services Provided by Community Pharmacists into a Community-Based Accountable Care Organization (ACO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Isetts

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: As the U.S. healthcare system evolves from fee-for-service financing to global population-based payments designed to be accountable for both quality and total cost of care, the effective and safe use of medications is gaining increased importance. The purpose of this project was to determine the feasibility of integrating medication therapy management (MTM services provided by community pharmacists into the clinical care teams and the health information technology (HIT infrastructure for Minnesota Medicaid recipients of a 12-county community-based accountable care organization (ACO. (2 Methods: The continuous quality improvement evaluation methodology employed in this project was the context + mechanism = outcome (CMO model to account for the fact that programs only work insofar as they introduce promising ideas, solutions and opportunities in the appropriate social and cultural contexts. Collaborations between a 12-county ACO and 15 community pharmacies in Southwest Minnesota served as the social context for this feasibility study of MTM referrals to community pharmacists. (3 Results: All 15 community pharmacy sites were integrated into the HIT infrastructure through Direct Secure Messaging, and there were 32 recipients who received MTM services subsequent to referrals from the ACO at 5 of the 15 community pharmacies over a 1-year implementation phase. (4 Conclusion: At the conclusion of this project, an effective electronic communication and MTM referral system was activated, and consideration was given to community pharmacists providing MTM in future ACO shared savings agreements.

  14. Abnormal bone and mineral metabolism in kidney transplant patients--a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprague, S.M.; Belozeroff, V.; Danese, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Abnormal bone and mineral metabolism is common in patients with kidney failure and often persists after successful kidney transplant. METHODS: To better understand the natural history of this disease in transplant patients, we reviewed the literature by searching MEDLINE...... within 2 months. Low levels of 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D typically did not reach normal values until almost 18 months after transplant. CONCLUSION: This review provides evidence demonstrating that abnormal bone and mineral metabolism exists in patients after kidney transplant and suggests the need...... for English language articles published between January 1990 and October 2006 that contained Medical Subject Headings and key words related to secondary or persistent hyperparathyroidism and kidney transplant. RESULTS: Parathyroid hormone levels decreased significantly during the first 3 months after...

  15. Change in donor profile influenced the percentage of organs transplanted from multiple organ donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meers, C; Van Raemdonck, D; Van Gelder, F; Van Hees, D; Desschans, B; De Roey, J; Vanhaecke, J; Pirenne, J

    2009-03-01

    We hypothesized that the change in donor profile over the years influenced the percentage of transplantations. We reviewed medical records for all multiple-organ donors (MODs) within our network. The percentage of transplanted organs was compared between 1991-1992 (A) and 2006-2007 (B). In period A, 156 potential MODs were identified compared with 278 in period B. Fifteen potential donors (10%) in period A and 114 (41%) in period B were rejected because they were medically not suitable (40% vs 75%) or there was no family consent (60% vs 25%). Of the remaining effective MODs (141 in period A and 164 in period B), mean (standard deviation = SD) age was 34 (5) years vs 49 (17) years (P organs transplanted in periods A vs B was kidneys, 97% vs 79%; livers, 64% vs 85%; hearts, 60% vs 26%; lungs, 7% vs 35%; and pancreas, 6% vs 13% (P organs (17%), mainly because of medical contraindications. The MOD profile changed to older age, fewer traumatic brain deaths, and longer ventilation time. We transplanted more livers, lungs, and pancreases but fewer kidneys and hearts.

  16. Ethics of Liver Transplantation: The Role of the Anesthesiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, James M

    2018-06-01

    Anesthesiologists have clearly established their place in the history of medical ethics. Our involvement goes back to 1966 when Henri Beecher published his landmark paper on research and informed consent. Participation in the ethics of transplantation is no less important than our previous work. Organ transplant has been life saving for many but also has given rise to many misunderstandings not just from the public but also among our own colleagues. These include methods of allocation and donation, the role that affluence may play in receiving an organ, the definition of death and donation after circulatory death. As perioperative physicians and important members of the transplant team, anesthesiologists are expected to participate in all aspects of care including ethical judgments. This article discusses some of the issues that seem to cause the most confusion and angst for those of us involved in both liver transplantation and in the procurement of organs. It will discuss the definition of death, donation after circulatory death, the anesthesiologists' role on the selection committee, living donor liver transplantation, and transplantation of patients with alcohol-related liver disease.

  17. Understanding risk evaluation and mitigation strategies in organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven

    2011-07-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Amendments Act of 2007 mandated that Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) be required of manufacturers. These REMS are strategies implemented to manage known or potential risks associated with drugs and to ensure ongoing pharmacovigilance throughout the life of a pharmaceutical product, including once the product becomes available as generic. The elements of an individual REMS program consist of three levels: medication guide or patient package insert, communication plan, and elements to assure safe use (ETASU). A medication guide or patient package insert is used to help prevent serious adverse events, aid in patient decision making, and enhance drug adherence. Communication plans are used to educate health care providers and to encourage their compliance with REMS. The ETASU is a restrictive process that is implemented when it is deemed necessary to ensure that patients have safe access to products with known serious risks that would otherwise be unavailable. To review the components of REMS and specifically assess their impact on health care providers practicing within the organ transplantation arena, a literature search of the MEDLINE database (January 2007-December 2010) was performed, and published materials from the FDA and its Web site were also reviewed. In transplantation, REMS programs exist for both everolimus (medication guide and communication plan) and sirolimus (medication guide). The FDA has stated that all mycophenolic acid derivatives will be subject to a proposed REMS that has not yet been approved; however, both branded mycophenolic acid agents already have approved medication guides. The REMS are a permanent fixture in the development and marketing of pharmaceutical agents, and their further implementation in solid organ transplantation is inevitable. Transplantation providers should take a proactive role in patient education and implementation of REMS within the therapeutic area

  18. Hair Transplantation in Migraine Headache Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ors, Safvet

    2017-09-01

    Migraine headache is a primary neurologic disease affecting millions of people worldwide. As a consequence, quality of life is diminished, productivity suffers (through loss of work force), and treatment costs are substantial. The occurrence rate in the general population is quite high, with women accounting for 3 of every 4 cases. Between January 2011 and May 2012, a total of 221 patients received hair transplants. Another 590 patients underwent hair transplantation between June 2012 and December 2016. Initially (first interval), patients were not questioned on migraine headaches in preoperative visits, but questioning was regularly done thereafter. Overall, 150 patients given transplants in the first period were surveyed by phone regarding preoperative migraine headaches. Aside from the 1 incidental discovery, no other instances of migraine emerged. Headache origins were occipital-frontal in 2 patients, occipital-temporal in 2 patients, and occipital-temporal-frontal in the 2 others. Donor/receiver areas in hair transplantation and migraine trigger zones shared locations. Headache frequencies ranged from 4 to 8 days per month (average, 6 days), and pain scores were 5-8 (10 being highest). Duration of pain was 3-5 hours (average, 4 hours). All six patients had used various medications, such as triptans, ergot, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, before hair transplantation. The 1 female patient was a 32-year-old seeking treatment for alopecia, with a 6-year history of migraine headaches. The male patients presenting with androgenetic alopecia (grade 4-5 by Norwood classification) had 6- to 20-year migrainous histories. After hair transplantation, each migraine sufferer was checked once in the first month and then once every 3 months. Those who could not appear in person after the first year were evaluated by phone every 3 months. Migraine headaches had ceased in all 6 patients, none of whom used medical treatments for migraines thereafter. The postoperative

  19. Contraception and fertility awareness among women with solid organ transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Valerie A; Davis, John S; Sayles, Harlan S; Wu, Serena S

    2013-10-01

    To assess the contraception and fertility counseling provided to women with solid organ transplants. A telephone survey of 309 women aged 19-49 years who had received a solid organ transplant at the University of Nebraska Medical Center was performed. Of the 309 eligible women, 183 responded. Patients were asked 19 questions regarding pretransplant and posttransplant fertility awareness and contraception counseling. Data were summarized using descriptive statistics. Patients had undergone a variety of solid organ transplantations: 40% kidney (n=73); 32% liver (n=59); 6% pancreas (n=11); 5% heart (n=9); 3% intestine (n=5); and 14% multiple organs (n=26). Before their transplantations, 79 women (44%) reported they were not aware that a woman could become pregnant after transplantation. Only 66 women aged 13 and older at the time of transplantation reported that a health care provider discussed contraception before transplantation. Approximately half of women surveyed were using a method of contraception. Oral contraceptive pills were the most commonly recommended method. Twenty-two of the 31 pregnancies after organ transplantation were planned, which is higher than that of the general population. Few women with transplants are educated regarding the effect of organ transplantation on fertility and are not routinely counseled about contraception or the potential for posttransplant pregnancy. Health care providers should incorporate contraceptive and fertility counseling as part of routine care for women with solid organ transplants. : II.

  20. [The Declaration of Istanbul on organ trafficking and transplant tourism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    A Summit Meeting that convened over 150 representatives of scientific and medical bodies from around the world was held in Istanbul from April 30 to May 2, 2008 to address the urgent and growing problem of organ sales, transplant tourism and trafficking in organ donors in the context of the global shortage of organs. Preparatory work for the meeting was undertaken by a Steering Committee convened by The Transplantation Society and the International Society of Nephrology in Dubai in December 2007. Participants at the Istanbul Summit were selected by the Steering Committee according to the following criteria: The country liaisons with The Transplantation Society representing virtually all countries with transplantation programs; representatives from international societies and the Vatican; key stakeholders in nephrology and transplantation; public policy experts in organ transplantation; and ethicists, anthropologists, sociologists, and legal academic well-recognized for their work on transplantation policy and practice. This Declaration represents the consensus of the Summit participants and is an authorized Spanish translation that will help disseminate this information among Mexican health professionals and interested readers.

  1. Anthropology, organ transplantation and the immune system: resituating commodity and gift exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierans, Ciara

    2011-11-01

    This article reflects on contributions from medical anthropology to our understanding of the bio-social and bio-political implications of renal transplantation. Taking up the idea of transplantation as a 'complex', a vast assemblage of people, places, practices and procedures which intersect medical, social and cultural domains, I point to a reliance in the anthropological literature on overly pre-determined conceptual frameworks, organised around a distinct polarisation between organ giving and receiving, where one side (supply) takes analytical, and indeed moral, precedence over the other (receipt). These frameworks tend to fail us when it comes to thinking about the wider social, cultural and political implications of transplant technologies. In an attempt to offer a less polarised view, I draw attention to the material and symbolic role of the immune system in transplantation and the ways in which it simultaneously shapes opportunities for procurement and the lived realities of recipiency. This helps us see the many complex ways in which suffering and inequality are constituted all along the variegated chains of supply and demand that are internal to, and made possible by, transplantation practices themselves. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Local graft irradiation in renal transplant rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Masashi; Kataoka, Masaaki; Itoh, Hisao

    1990-01-01

    From 1977 to 1988, of 142 renal transplantations, seven recipients (4.9%) received local graft irradiation following rejective reaction refractory to antirejection medical managements. Concurrent with the administration of pulsed high dose methylprednisolone and other antirejection medical managements, the graft was irradiated with a total dose of 6.0 Gy-150 cGy per fraction every other day at the midplane of the graft using two opposing portals of 4MX Linac. The fields were defined by palpation and echography. All patients had improvements in serum creatinine on the 10th day after beginning the irradiation. Four patients with peripheral lymphocytosis during the irradiation combined with pulsed high dose methylprednisolone improved in renal functions. On the other hand, out of 3 patients with lymphcytopenic changes, in two the transplanted graft was removed due to deteriorations, and the other patient is currently suffering from chronic rejection. Local graft irradiation can be useful in maintaining a rejective graft and reversing its functions in some patients whose rejective reaction failed to respond to the antirejection medical managements. (author)

  3. Urological management (medical and surgical of BK-virus associated haemorrhagic cystitis in children following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Vasdev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Haemorrhagic cystitis (HC is uncommon and in its severe form potentially life threatening complication of Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT in children. We present our single centre experience in the urological management of this clinically challenging condition. Patients and Methods: Fourteen patients were diagnosed with BK-Virus HC in our centre. The mean age at diagnosis was 8.8 years (range, 3.2-18.4 years. The mean number of days post-BMT until onset of HC was 20.8 (range, 1 – 51. While all patients tested urine positive for BKV at the clinical onset of HC, only four patients had viral quantification, with viral loads ranging from 97,000 to >1 billion/ml. 8 patients had clinical HC. Ten patients experienced acute GVHD (grade I: 6 patients, grade II: 3 patients, grade 4: 1 patient.Results: Four patients received medical management for their HC. Treatments included hyperhydration, MESNA, blood and platelet transfusion, premarin and oxybutynin (Table 6.  Two patients received both medical and surgical management which included cystoscopy with clot evacuation, bladder irrigation and supra-pubic catheter insertion. One patient received exclusive surgical management. Seven patients were treated conservatively. Conclusion: There is limited available evidence for other potential therapeutic strategies highlighting the need for more research into the pathophysiology of HSCT-associated HC. Commonly used interventions with possible clinical benefit (e.g. cidofovir, ciprofloxacin still require to be evaluated in multi-centre, high-quality studies. Potential future preventative and therapeutic options, such as modulation of conditioning, immunosuppression and engraftment, new antiviral and anti-inflammatory and less nephrotoxic agents need to be assessed.---------------------------Cite this article as:Vasdev N, Davidson A, Harkensee C, Slatter M, Gennery A, Willetts I, Thorpe A.Urological management (medical and surgical of BK

  4. Central nervous system complications after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the diversity of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation in terms of clinical manifestations and temporal course. Liver transplantation is a lifesaving option for end stage liver disease patients but post-transplantation neurologic complications can hamper recovery. Between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2010, patients who had undergone liver transplantation at a single tertiary university hospital were included. We reviewed their medical records and brain imaging data and classified central nervous system complications into four categories including vascular, metabolic, infectious and neoplastic. The onset of central nervous system complications was grouped into five post-transplantation intervals including acute (within 1 month), early subacute (1-3 months), late subacute (3-12 months), chronic (1-3 years), and long-term (after 3 years). During follow-up, 65 of 791 patients (8.2%) experienced central nervous system complications, with 30 occurring within 1 month after transplantation. Vascular etiology was the most common (27 patients; 41.5%), followed by metabolic (23; 35.4%), infectious (nine patients; 13.8%), and neoplastic (six patients). Metabolic encephalopathy with altered consciousness was the most common etiology during the acute period, followed by vascular disorders. An initial focal neurologic deficit was detected in vascular and neoplastic complications, whereas metabolic and infectious etiologies presented with non-focal symptoms. Our study shows that the etiology of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation changes over time, and initial symptoms can help to predict etiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nonadherence Behaviors and Some Related Factors in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, Pari; Shahgholian, Nahid; Ghadami, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the renal replacement therapy of choice for most patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), however, adherence to the recommended lifestyle is critical for a positive prognosis. The purpose of this study was to assess adherence to immunosuppressive therapy and lifestyle recommendations along with some related factors among kidney transplant patients. In this descriptive analytical study, all patients completed a questionnaire regarding medication intake and lifestyle recommendations (preventing of infection, self-monitoring, prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and sun protection). The participants were divided into 4 groups according to the level of adherence (good, partial, poor, and nonadherent) indicated in their responses. Most kidney recipients were adherent to their drug prescriptions, but were partial, poor, or nonadherent regarding lifestyle recommendations. Increased passage of time since transplantation and low family support and educational level resulted in nonadherence. Men showed greater adherence to medication intake than women. Patients with lower number of drugs and reported drug side-effects illustrated better adherence to medication intake. Women adhered to infection protection recommendations more than men, and older and married patients adhered to cardiovascular prevention recommendations more than others. However, younger patients showed greater adherence to self-monitoring recommendations, and singles, young individuals, and women were adherent to sun protection recommendations. Nonadherence is common among kidney transplant recipients. Thus, it is necessary to determine patients who are at risk of nonadherence and to introduce more educational programs to improve their adherence and their quality of life (QOL).

  6. The role of goal cognitions, illness perceptions and treatment beliefs in self-reported adherence after kidney transplantation: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Emma K; Tielen, Mirjam; Laging, Mirjam; Beck, Denise K; Khemai, Roshni; van Gelder, Teun; Weimar, Willem

    2013-09-01

    Nonadherence to immunosuppressive medication (IM) after kidney transplantation is related to poorer patient and graft outcomes; therefore research into modifiable factors associated with nonadherence is a priority. In this prospective cohort study we investigated whether changes in goal cognitions, illness perceptions, and treatment beliefs were related to self-reported medication adherence six months after kidney transplantation. Interviews were conducted with patients in the out-patient clinic six weeks (T1: n=113) and six months (T2: n=106) after transplantation. Self-reported adherence was measured using the Basel Assessment of Adherence to Immunosuppressive Medications Scale (BAASIS© Interview). The Brief Illness Perceptions Questionnaire, Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire and questions on goal cognitions were also administered at both time points. Self-reported nonadherence increased significantly between 6 weeks and 6 months after transplantation from 17% to 27%. Importance of medication adherence as a personal goal and self-efficacy to successfully carry out this goal decreased significantly over time. Perceived necessity of immunosuppressive medication was high but significantly decreased over time. Concerns about the medicines were low. There were no significant changes in illness perceptions or concerns over time. An increase in perceived graft longevity (timeline) was related to higher likelihood of nonadherence six months post-transplant. Furthermore, younger adult patients were more likely to be nonadherent six months after transplantation. The self-reported nonadherence levels found in this study so soon after transplantation demonstrate the need for early and continued intervention after kidney transplantation in order to maximise adherence and consequently clinical outcomes. Changes in (unrealistic) beliefs regarding the longevity of the graft may offer a potential target for intervention among nonadherent patients. © 2013.

  7. The ASEAN economic community and medical qualification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittrakulrat, Jathurong; Jongjatuporn, Witthawin; Jurjai, Ravipol; Jarupanich, Nicha; Pongpirul, Krit

    2014-01-01

    In the regional movement toward ASEAN Economic Community (AEC), medical professions including physicians can be qualified to practice medicine in another country. Ensuring comparable, excellent medical qualification systems is crucial but the availability and analysis of relevant information has been lacking. This study had the following aims: 1) to comparatively analyze information on Medical Licensing Examinations (MLE) across ASEAN countries and 2) to assess stakeholders' view on potential consequences of AEC on the medical profession from a Thai perspective. To search for relevant information on MLE, we started with each country's national body as the primary data source. In case of lack of available data, secondary data sources including official websites of medical universities, colleagues in international and national medical student organizations, and some other appropriate Internet sources were used. Feasibility and concerns about validity and reliability of these sources were discussed among investigators. Experts in the region invited through HealthSpace.Asia conducted the final data validation. For the second objective, in-depth interviews were conducted with 13 Thai stakeholders, purposely selected based on a maximum variation sampling technique to represent the points of view of the medical licensing authority, the medical profession, ethicists and economists. MLE systems exist in all ASEAN countries except Brunei, but vary greatly. Although the majority has a national MLE system, Singapore, Indonesia, and Vietnam accept results of MLE conducted at universities. Thailand adopted the USA's 3-step approach that aims to check pre-clinical knowledge, clinical knowledge, and clinical skills. Most countries, however, require only one step. A multiple choice question (MCQ) is the most commonly used method of assessment; a modified essay question (MEQ) is the next most common. Although both tests assess candidate's knowledge, the Objective Structured Clinical

  8. [Medical treatment support to tuberculous patients--from the standpoint of community support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-11-01

    A symposium with "Medical Treatment Support to Tuberculous Patients--From the standpoint of community support" as its theme was held at the 76th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis (April 20, 2001). "Once, It is infected with tuberculosis, one have to complete medication with a sensitive antituberculosis drug by observing the prescribed dose and duration for successful treatment". For this to be promoted community, it is necessary that (1) to manage patient's medication by medical facilities, (2) to support patient's medication by health center and (3) to support patient's living by welfare offices. Not that each facilities takes such responsibilities alone, but various community must fulfill them continuously in liaison with one another. On what measures should be taken to that end, reports based on practical examples from Nagoya City, Yokohama City and Kanagawa Prefecture have been compiled as follows. 1. It was in-office liaison by conference that supported the DOTS activities of health nurses. 2. It is cooperating, without health, medical treatment, and welfare going out, as follows. (1) A system for hospitals and clinics to carry out DOTS treatment consistently has been kept in good condition. (2) For a patient to take a drug in front of a nurse has become common, causing the patients to be motivated. (3) Assignment of MSW and nurses in charge of DOTS sent from hospitals has make it possible to offer or exchange information smoothly among those concerned. (4) A system for many persons concerned to support patients timely has been kept in good condition. This resulted in an increase in the cure rate of tuberculosis in the areas which have day laborers' lodgings. 3. By DOTS for in-patients, the number of self-discharges has decreased by 1/3, and the treatment completion rate was 94%. 4. In promotion of DOTS for the patients who have health problems other than tuberculosis, the role MSW plays is great. 5. As conditions for supporting DOTS

  9. Early post transplantation renal allograft perfusion failure due to intimal dissection of the renal artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khattab Omar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS is a recognized and potentially curable cause of post transplant arterial hypertension, allograft dysfunction, and graft loss. It usually occurs 3 months to 2 years after transplantation, but early or later presentations are not uncommon. We present a case of renal artery narrowing due to intimal dissection that was managed medically.

  10. Interdisciplinary Medication Adherence Program: The Example of a University Community Pharmacy in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Lelubre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Community Pharmacy of the Department of Ambulatory Care and Community Medicine (Policlinique Médicale Universitaire, PMU, University of Lausanne, developed and implemented an interdisciplinary medication adherence program. The program aims to support and reinforce medication adherence through a multifactorial and interdisciplinary intervention. Motivational interviewing is combined with medication adherence electronic monitors (MEMS, Aardex MWV and a report to patient, physician, nurse, and other pharmacists. This program has become a routine activity and was extended for use with all chronic diseases. From 2004 to 2014, there were 819 patient inclusions, and 268 patients were in follow-up in 2014. This paper aims to present the organization and program’s context, statistical data, published research, and future perspectives.

  11. The impact of socially-accountable, community-engaged medical education on graduates in the Central Philippines: Implications for the global rural medical workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siega-Sur, J L; Woolley, T; Ross, S J; Reeve, C; Neusy, A-J

    2017-10-01

    Developing and retaining a high quality medical workforce, especially within low-resource countries has been a world-wide challenge exacerbated by a lack of medical schools, the maldistribution of doctors towards urban practice, health system inequities, and training doctors in tertiary centers rather than in rural communities. To describe the impact of socially-accountable health professional education on graduates; specifically: their motivation towards community-based service, preparation for addressing local priority health issues, career choices, and practice location. Cross-sectional survey of graduates from two medical schools in the Philippines: the University of Manila-School of Health Sciences (SHS-Palo) and a medical school with a more conventional curriculum. SHS-Palo graduates had significantly (p < 0.05) more positive attitudes to community service. SHS-Palo graduates were also more likely to work in rural and remote areas (p < 0.001) either at district or provincial hospitals (p = 0.032) or in rural government health services (p < 0.001) as Municipal or Public Health Officers (p < 0.001). Graduates also stayed longer in both their first medical position (p = 0.028) and their current position (p < 0.001). SHS-Palo medical graduates fulfilled a key aim of their socially-accountable institution to develop a health professional workforce willing and able, and have a commitment to work in underserved rural communties.

  12. The efficacy and stability of an information and communication technology-based centralized monitoring system of adherence to immunosuppressive medication in kidney transplant recipients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hee-Yeon; Seong, Sook Jin; Choi, Ji-Young; Cho, Jang-Hee; Park, Sun-Hee; Kim, Chan-Duck; Yoon, Young-Ran; Kim, Hyung-Kee; Huh, Seung; Yoon, Se-Hee; Lee, Jong Soo; Kim, Yong-Lim

    2017-10-16

    Immunosuppression non-adherence in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) not only increases the risk of medical intervention due to acute rejection and graft loss but burdens the socioeconomic system in the form of increased healthcare costs. An aggressive preemptive effort by healthcare professionals, geared to ensure adherence to immunosuppressants in KTRs, is significant and imperative. This study was designed as a prospective, open-label, multicenter, randomized controlled study aimed at evaluating the efficacy and stability of an information and communication technology (ICT)-based centralized monitoring system in boosting medication adherence in KTRs. One hundred fourteen KTRs registered throughout the year 2017 to 2018 are randomized into either the ICT-based centralized home monitoring system or to ambulatory follow-up. The planned follow-up duration is 6 months. The ICT-based centralized home monitoring system described consists of a smart pill box equipped with personal identification system, a home monitoring system, an electronic Case Report Form (eCRF) system, and a comprehensive clinical trial management system (CTMS). It alerts both patients and medical staff with texts and pill box alarms if there is a dosage/dosing time error or a missed dose. Medication adherence and transplant outcomes for the follow-up period are compared between the two groups, while patient satisfaction as well as the stability and cost-effectiveness of the ICT-based monitoring system are to be evaluated. This on-going study is expected to determine if consistent use of the ICT-based centralized monitoring system described could maximize mediation adherence and subsequently enhance transplant outcomes in KTRs. Further, it would lay the foundation for successful implementation of this ICT-based monitoring system for effective management of medication adherence in KTRs. ClinicalTrials.gov, Identifier: NCT03136588 . Registered on 20 April 2017.

  13. Transplante de intestino delgado Small intestine transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Henrique Ferreira Galvão

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Avanços da biotecnologia e o desenvolvimento de novas drogas imunossupressoras melhoraram os resultados do transplante de intestino delgado. Esse transplante é atualmente indicado para casos especiais da falência intestinal. OBJETIVO: A presente revisão realça os recentes desenvolvimentos na área do transplante de intestino delgado. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Mais de 600 publicações de transplante de intestino delgado foram revisadas. O desenvolvimento da pesquisa, novas estratégias de imunossupressão, monitorização do enxerto e do receptor, e avanços na técnica cirúrgica são discutidos. RESULTADOS: Realizaram-se cerca de 700 transplante de intestino delgado em 55 centros: 44% intestino-fígado, 41% enxerto intestinal isolado e 15% transplante multivisceral. Rejeição e infecção são as principais limitações desse transplante. Sobrevida de 5 anos na experiência internacional é de 46% para o transplante de intestino isolado, 43% para o intestino-fígado e de cerca de 30% para o transplante multivisceral. Sobrevidas prolongadas são mais freqüentes nos centros com maior experiência. Em série de 165 transplantes intestinais na Universidade de Pittsburgh, PA, EUA, foi relatada sobrevida do paciente maior do que 75% no primeiro ano, 54% em 5 anos e 42% em 10 anos. Mais de 90% desses pacientes assumem dieta oral irrestrita. CONCLUSÃO: O transplante de intestino delgado evoluiu de estratégia experimental para uma alternativa viável no tratamento da falência intestinal permanente. Promover o refinamento da terapia imunossupressora, do manejo e prevenção de infecções, da técnica cirúrgica e da indicação e seleção adequada dos pacientes é crucial para melhorar a sobrevida desse transplante.BACKGROUND: Significant progress has been made in clinical small bowel transplantation over the last decade mainly due advances in biotechnology and new immunosuppressive regiments. This transplantation has now been indicated

  14. Phenotypic risk factors for new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODAT in renal transplant recipients

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    Katarzyna Hap

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available New-onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation (NODAT is defined as diabetes which developed after organ transplantation. NODAT occurs in approximately 16-20% of recipients one year after kidney transplantation and is the main factor for the increased mortality and morbidity, increased medical costs, progressive graft failure and decreased patients’ quality of life. Determination of phenotypic risk factors allows to define the scale of the risk of NODAT and can be helpful in detecting patients at risk of post-transplant diabetes. Overweight and obesity are well-known phenotypic risk factors that can be modified by lifestyle-change intervention. Adequate education about the principles of healthy lifestyle is one of the most important prevention factors. The medical staff should organize health education which should begin long before the planned transplantation, even at the stage of predialysis treatment or dialysis and be continued after transplantation. Early assessment of the risk of developing glucose metabolism disorders also allows the selection of immunosuppressive therapy less likely to affect carbohydrate metabolism. The article presents examples of simple risk scores and also principles of prevention and treatment of NODAT. The article presents the definition of NODAT, risk factors, especially overweight or obesity, risk scores and also principles of prevention and treatment of NODAT.

  15. [Medication use among community-dwelling older Icelanders. Population-based study in urban and rural areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdardottir, Arun K; Arnadottir, Solveig Asa; Gunnarsdottir, Elín Díanna

    2011-12-01

    To describe medication use among older community-dwelling Icelanders by collecting information on number of medicine, polypharmacy (>5 medications), and medications by ATC categories. Moreover, to explore the relationship between medication use and various influential factors emphasizing residency in urban and rural areas. Population-based, cross-sectional study. Participants were randomly selected from the National registry in one urban (n=118) and two rural (n=68) areas. 1) ≥ 65 years old, 2) community-dwelling, 3) able to communicate verbally. Information on medication use was obtained from each person's medication list and interviews. A questionnaire and five standardized instruments were used to assess the potential influencing factors. On average, participants used 3.9 medications and prevalence of polypharmacy was 41%. Men used 3.5 medications on average and women 4.4 (p=0.018). Compared to rural residents, urban residents had fewer medical diagnoses, better mobility, less pain, and fewer depressive symptoms. By controlling for the effects of these variables, more medications were associated with urban living (pbetter scores on health assessments.

  16. The Oral Cavity State in Renal Transplant Recipients

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    Kristina Grubišić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Patients with a solid organ transplant can have many different complications in the mouth, as a result of immunosuppression and side effects of drugs. The aim of this study was to examine the frequency and type of oral lesions in renal transplant patients, dental status, oral hygiene, oral lesions related to drugs which patients take and the time of transplantation as well as the frequency of patient’s visits to the dentist in the post-transplant period. Material and methods: The study was performed in a period of two years and included 100 subjects with a renal transplant during their regular control visits to the Department of Nephrology and Dialysis, Clinical Hospital Centre Zagreb and the Department of Oral Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb and 100 randomly selected control subjects at the Department of Endodontics and Restorative Dentistry, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb. Results: Results showed a significantly higher incidence of oral lesions in patients with renal transplant (31% compared to control subjects. The most frequent were erythematous (inflammatory changes, keratotic lesions and gingival hyperplasia. The average DMFT index was significantly lower in patients with renal transplant than in the control group. One third of patients had a subjective feeling of dry mouth. Oral hygiene was poor overall, and only a small number of subjects used the additional sustainers for oral hygiene. Most patients did not visit the dentist after the transplantation. Conclusion: Renal transplant patients need a comprehensive and regular dental care during the pre- and post-transplant period and a doctor of dental medicine should be part of a multidisciplinary team of medical specialists.

  17. Process evaluation of the RaDIANT community study: a dialysis facility-level intervention to increase referral for kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamoda, Reem E; Gander, Jennifer C; McPherson, Laura J; Arriola, Kimberly J; Cobb, Loren; Pastan, Stephen O; Plantinga, Laura; Browne, Teri; Hartmann, Erica; Mulloy, Laura; Zayas, Carlos; Krisher, Jenna; Patzer, Rachel E

    2018-01-15

    The Reducing Disparities in Access to kidNey Transplantation Community Study (RaDIANT) was an End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network 6-developed, dialysis facility-level randomized trial testing the effectiveness of a 1-year multicomponent education and quality improvement intervention in increasing referral for kidney transplant evaluation among selected Georgia dialysis facilities. To assess implementation of the RaDIANT intervention, we conducted a process evaluation at the conclusion of the intervention period (January-December 2014). We administered a 20-item survey to the staff involved with transplant education in 67 dialysis facilities randomized to participate in intervention activities. Survey items assessed facility participation in the intervention (fidelity and reach), helpfulness and willingness to continue intervention activities (sustainability), suggestions for improving intervention components (sustainability), and factors that may have influenced participation and study outcomes (context). We defined high fidelity to the intervention as completing 11 or more activities, and high participation in an activity as having at least 75% participation across intervention facilities. Staff from 65 of the 67 dialysis facilities completed the questionnaire, and more than half (50.8%) reported high adherence (fidelity) to RaDIANT intervention requirements. Nearly two-thirds (63.1%) of facilities reported that RaDIANT intervention activities were helpful or very helpful, with 90.8% of facilities willing to continue at least one intervention component beyond the study period. Intervention components with high participation emphasized staff and patient-level education, including in-service staff orientations, patient and family education programs, and patient educational materials. Suggested improvements for intervention activities emphasized addressing financial barriers to transplantation, with financial education materials perceived as most helpful among Ra

  18. Analysis of medication adherence-related notes from a service-oriented community pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witry, Matthew; Parry, Rachel; McDonough, Randal; Deninger, Michael

    2017-07-15

    Medication nonadherence is a significant public health problem. Community pharmacists are positioned to intervene, however, the process is not well understood. To classify and quantify the reasons for nonadherence documented by community pharmacists. A retrospective content analysis of pharmacist notes related to nonadherence at a service oriented community pharmacy in the Midwest United States. Notes from the site's dispensing custom documentation software were obtained from September 1, 2014 through February 28, 2015 that were labeled "compliance", either prompted by proportion of days covered calculations or entered as a drug therapy problem. A code list was iterated for the notes based on the literature and by reading the notes and generating descriptive codes. A reliability analysis was calculated for two coders. Notes were coded, check-coded, and discrepancies were resolved using a consensus process. Frequencies were calculated for each code and representative text was selected. Pharmacists documented 3491 notes as part of their continuous medication monitoring process. Nineteen codes were developed. The reliability for the coders had a Cohen's Kappa of 0.749. The majority of notes (61.4%) documented the pharmacist evaluated the refill and had no concerns or would continue to follow. Also documented were specific reasons for out of range PDCs not indicative of a nonadherence problem. Only 2.2% of notes specifically documented a nonadherence problem, such as forgetfulness or cost. While pharmacists encountered many false positive nonadherence alerts, following up with patients led to hundreds of discussions and clarifications about how patients use their medications at home. These results suggest a small minority of late refills are judged by pharmacists as indicative of an adherence problem, contrary to the prevailing literature. Pharmacists may benefit from modifying their approach to nonadherence interviewing and documentation as they seek to address

  19. Recipient Age and Mortality Risk after Liver Transplantation: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiu-Pin; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Lin, Jr-Rung; Liu, Fu-Chao; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present large population-based cohort study is to explore the risk factors of age-related mortality in liver transplant recipients in Taiwan. Basic information and data on medical comorbidities for 2938 patients who received liver transplants between July 1, 1998, and December 31, 2012, were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database on the basis of ICD-9-codes. Mortality risks were analyzed after adjusting for preoperative comorbidities and compared among age cohorts. All patients were followed up until the study endpoint or death. This study finally included 2588 adults and 350 children [2068 (70.4%) male and 870 (29.6%) female patients]. The median age at transplantation was 52 (interquartile range, 43-58) years. Recipients were categorized into the following age cohorts: recipients (≥60 years), especially dialysis patients, have a higher mortality rate, possibly because they have more medical comorbidities. Our findings should make clinicians aware of the need for better risk stratification among elderly liver transplantation candidates.

  20. Trismus in Face Transplantation Following Ballistic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezdorn, Nicco; Alhefzi, Muayyad; Perry, Bridget; Aycart, Mario A; Tasigiorgos, Sotirios; Bueno, Ericka M; Green, Jordan R; Pribaz, Julian J; Pomahac, Bohdan; Caterson, Edward J

    2018-06-01

    Trismus can be a challenging consequence of ballistic trauma to the face, and has rarely been described in the setting of face transplantation. Almost half of all current face transplant recipients in the world received transplantation to restore form and function after a ballistic injury. Here we report our experience and challenges with long standing trismus after face transplantation. We reviewed the medical records of our face transplant recipients whose indication was ballistic injury. We focused our review on trismus and assessed the pre-, peri- and postoperative planning, surgery and functional outcomes. Two patients received partial face transplantation, including the midface for ballistic trauma. Both patients suffered from impaired mouth opening, speech intelligibility, and oral competence. Severe scarring of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) required intraoperative release in both patients, and additional total condylectomy on the left side 6 months posttransplant for 1 patient. Posttransplant, both patients achieved an improvement in mouth opening; however, there was persistent trismus. One year after transplantation, range of motion of the jaw had improved for both patients. Independent oral food intake was possible 1 year after surgery, although spillage of liquids and mixed consistency solids persisted. Speech intelligibility testing showed impairments in the immediate postoperative period, with improvement to over 85% for both patients at 1 year posttransplant. Ballistic trauma to the face and subsequent reconstructive measures can cause significant scarring and covert injuries to structures such as the TMJ, resulting in long standing trismus. Meticulous individual planning prior to interventions such as face transplantation must take these into account. We encourage intraoperative evaluation of these structures as well as peri- and postoperative treatment when necessary. Due to the nature of the primary injury, functional outcomes after face

  1. SOME OF THE MECHANISMS OF EXTRACORPOREAL PHOTOCHEMOTHERAPY IN SOLID ORGAN TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vatazin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reducing the risk of kidney transplant rejection is a perspective trend in modern medical science. One of the promising methods for reducing the activity of immune conflict between the recipient and the donor organ and the achievement of partial immunological tolerance is photochemotherapy. This method is widely used in over- seas heart and lung Transplantation. Domestic experience of applying this method in renal transplant recipients is extremely small. In this review of literature a modern representation of the scientists on the mechanism of action of this method is presented. 

  2. Liver transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatic transplant; Transplant - liver; Orthotopic liver transplant; Liver failure - liver transplant; Cirrhosis - liver transplant ... The donated liver may be from: A donor who has recently died and has not had liver injury. This type of ...

  3. Hair Transplants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Skin Experts Skin Treatments Hair Transplants Share » HAIR TRANSPLANTS Before (left) and after (right) - front of ... transplant. Photo courtesy of N. Sadick What are hair transplants? In punch transplanting, a plug containing hair ...

  4. The impact of a person-centred community pharmacy mental health medication support service on consumer outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Sara S; Kelly, Fiona; Hattingh, H Laetitia; Fowler, Jane L; Mihala, Gabor; Wheeler, Amanda J

    2018-04-01

    Mental illness is a worldwide health priority. As medication is commonly used to treat mental illness, community pharmacy staff is well placed to assist consumers. To evaluate the effectiveness of a multifaceted, community pharmacy medication support service for mental health consumers. Pharmacists and pharmacy support staff in three Australian states were trained to deliver a flexible, goal-oriented medication support service for adults with mental illness over 3-6 months. Consumer-related outcome measures included perceptions of illness and health-related quality of life, medication beliefs, treatment satisfaction and medication adherence. Fifty-five of 100 trained pharmacies completed the intervention with 295 of the 418 recruited consumers (70.6% completion rate); 51.2% of consumers received two or more follow-ups. Significant improvements were reported by consumers for overall perceptions of illness (p Consumers also reported an increase in medication adherence (p = 0.005). A community pharmacy mental health medication support service that is goal-oriented, flexible and individualised, improved consumer outcomes across various measures. While further research into the cost-effectiveness and sustainability of such a service is warranted, this intervention could easily be adapted to other contexts.

  5. Surgical Thoracic Transplant Training: Super Fellowship-Is It Super?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makdisi, George; Makdisi, Tony; Caldeira, Christiano C; Wang, I-Wen

    2017-10-11

    The quality of training provided to thoracic transplant fellows is a critical step in the care of complex patients undergoing transplant. The training varies since it is not an accreditation council for graduate medical education accredited fellowship. A total of 104 heart or lung transplant program directors throughout the United States were sent a survey of 24 questions focusing on key aspects of training, fellowship training content and thoracic transplant job satisfaction. Out of the 104 programs surveyed 45 surveys (43%) were returned. In total, 26 programs offering a transplant fellowship were included in the survey. Among these programs 69% currently have fellows of which 56% are American Board of Thoracic Surgery board eligible. According to the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) requirements, 46% of the programs do not meet the requirements to be qualified as a primary heart transplant surgeon. A total of 23% of lung transplant programs also perform less than the UNOS minimum requirements. Only 24% have extra-surgical curriculum. Out of the participating programs, only 38% of fellows secured a job in a hospital setting for performing transplants. An astounding 77% of replies site an unpredictable work schedule as the main reason that makes thoracic transplant a less than favorable profession among new graduates. Long hours were also a complaint of 69% of graduates who agreed that their personal life is affected by excessive work hours. Annually, almost half of all thoracic transplant programs perform fewer than the UNOS requirements to be a primary thoracic surgeon. This results in a majority of transplant fellows not finding a suitable transplant career. The current and future needs for highly qualified thoracic transplant surgeons will not be met through our existing training mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Schizophrenia and Liver Transplantation: Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Restrepo B; Marle, Duque G; Carlos, Cardeño C

    2012-09-01

    Liver transplantation is a treatment available for many patients with liver cirrhosis who find in this treatment a way to improve life expectancy and quality of life. Paranoid schizophrenia affects 1% of the general population, produces psychotic symptoms, and runs a chronic course in some cases with significant deterioration in all areas of life. To discuss the case of a patient with liver cirrhosis diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia during the evaluation protocol for liver transplantation. Case report. We report the case of a 47-year-old woman with liver cirrhosis whose only alternative to improve life expectancy and quality of life was access to liver transplantation. During routine evaluations the liaison psychiatrist observed first-order psychotic symptoms and documented a life story that confirmed the presence of paranoid schizophrenia. Paranoid schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder common in the general population that can be a part of the medical comorbidities of patients requiring liver transplantation and is not an absolute contraindication to its completion. We are unaware of similar cases of liver transplantation in patients with schizophrenia in our country. We believe this is a big step on the road to overcome the stigma that mental illness imposes on patients. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Self-medication with antibiotics in the Republic of Srpska community pharmacies: pharmacy staff behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković-Peković, Vanda; Grubiša, Nataša

    2012-10-01

    Self-medication with antibiotics adds to the global risk of increased spread of bacterial resistance. Attitudes and behavior of health professionals also may reinforce self-medication with antibiotics. The aim of this study was to determine whether self-medication with antibiotics is possible in our community pharmacies and to what extent, and to evaluate the behavior and service of pharmacy health professionals regarding non-prescription antibiotic dispensation. An observational, cross-section study was conducted, and pseudo-patient methodology was used to establish the kind of professional service provided in case of patient's explicit demand to buy an antibiotic for treatment of self-diagnosed upper respiratory tract infection. Of the total 318 community pharmacies, 131 (41%) were visited and included in the study. Non-prescription antibiotics were dispensed in 76 (58%) pharmacies. Counseling and symptomatic therapy was offered in 88 (67%) pharmacies. In 25% of pharmacies, no symptomatic therapy was offered; instead, only an antibiotic was sold. Amoxicillin was sold in 85% of cases and, mostly, the one of 1.30 Euro per pack. Both oral and written use instructions were given in 78% cases, whereas none was given in 3% of cases. Self-medication with antibiotics occurs in our community pharmacies, despite being illegal. Pharmacy staff behavior can be a factor that puts patients at risk for self-medication with antibiotics. Community pharmacies are failing their tasks in enhancing rational use of antibiotics. Such a practice may be a consequence of weak enforcement and control over the legislation and professional standards. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Immunosuppressive therapy after solid-organ transplantation: does the INTERMED identify patients at risk of poor adherence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaud L

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lack of adherence to medication is a trigger of graft rejection in solid-organ transplant (SOT recipients. Objective: This exploratory study aimed to assess whether a biopsychosocial evaluation using the INTERMED instrument before transplantation could identify SOT recipients at risk of suboptimal post-transplantation adherence to immunosuppressant drugs. We hypothesized that complex patients (INTERMED>20 might have lower medication adherence than noncomplex patients (INTERMED≤20. Methods: Each patient eligible for transplantation at the University Hospital of Lausanne, Switzerland, has to undergo a pre-transplantation psychiatric evaluation. In this context the patient was asked to participate in our study. The INTERMED was completed pre-transplantation, and adherence to immunosuppressive medication was monitored post-transplantation by electronic monitors for 12 months. The main outcome measure was the implementation and persistence to two calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporine and tacrolimus, according to the dichotomized INTERMED score (>20 or ≤20. Results: Among the 50 SOT recipients who completed the INTERMED, 32 entered the study. The complex (N=11 and noncomplex patients (N=21 were similar in terms of age, sex and transplanted organ. Implementation was 94.2% in noncomplex patients versus 87.8% in complex patients (non-significant p-value. Five patients were lost to follow-up: one was non-persistent, and four refused electronic monitoring. Of the four patients who refused monitoring, two were complex and withdrew early, and two were noncomplex and withdrew later in the study. Conclusion: Patients identified as complex pre-transplant by the INTERMED tended to deviate from their immunosuppressant regimen, but the findings were not statistically significant. Larger studies are needed to evaluate this association further, as well as the appropriateness of using a nonspecific biopsychosocial instrument such as INTERMED in highly

  9. Financial considerations insurance and coverage issues in intestinal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Michael

    2004-12-01

    To increase healthcare workers' knowledge of reimbursement concerns. Chronological survey of transplants reimbursed at the University of Nebraska Medical Center from December 1997 to October 2003, which include accounts of 30 patients who received intestine transplants. Gross billed hospital charges for the past 30 transplantations ranged from dollars 112094 to dollars 667597. Length of stay ranged from 18 to 119 days. Charges include organ procurement fees. All 30 intestine transplants were reimbursed by third-party healthcare coverage; combination of coverage; and/or patient and family payments, which resulted in adherence to financial guidelines prearranged by the hospital. Financial guidelines are usually cost plus a percentage. Thirteen transplantations occurred after April 2001, when Medicare made a national coverage decision to reimburse this form of transplantation. Since then, obtaining surgical authorization and reimbursement is easier. Most insurance companies and state public health agencies accept intestinal transplantations as a form of treatment. Researching transplant coverage before evaluation is essential to be compensated adequately. Financial guidelines will secure the fiscal success of the program. Educating patients to insurance and entitlements may reduce the out-of-pocket cost to patients. Transplant financial coordinators coordinate these efforts for the facility. The best coverage option for the patient and transplant programs is a combination of commercial healthcare coverage, secondary entitlement program, and fund-raising. With length of stay ranging up to 119 days and a lifetime of posttransplant outpatient follow-up care, it is beneficial for the facility to also have a fundraising program to assist patients.

  10. Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Paul J

    2012-02-01

    Allograft thrombosis is a devastating early complication of renal transplantation that ultimately leads to allograft loss. We report here on our experience of nine cases of immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis at a single centre between January 1990 and June 2009. The mean age was 42.9 years at time of transplant. For seven patients, the allograft thrombosis was their first kidney transplant and seven of the nine cases had a deceased donor transplant. The initial transplants functioned for a mean of 1.67 days and the patients received a second allograft at a mean of 3.1 days after graft failure. All of the re-transplants worked immediately. Four allografts failed after a mean of 52.5 months (2-155 months). Two of these died with a functioning allograft, one failed owing to chronic allograft nephropathy and one owing to persistent acute cellular rejection. The remaining five patients still have a functioning allograft after a mean of 101.8 months (7-187 months). One year allograft and patient survival after re-transplantation were 87.5% and 100% respectively (after 5 years, both were 57%). Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis can be a success. It may be considered in selected cases after allograft thrombosis.

  11. Medication Exposure and Risk of Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection in Community-Dwelling Older People and Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haran, John P; Bradley, Evan; Howe, Emily; Wu, Xun; Tjia, Jennifer

    2018-02-01

    It is unclear how medication exposures differ in their association with recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI) in elderly nursing home (NH) residents and community-dwelling individuals. This study examined these exposures to determine whether the risk of rCDI differs according to living environment. Retrospective. Academic and community healthcare settings. Individuals aged 65 and older with CDI (N = 616). Information on participant characteristics and medications was extracted from the electronic medical record (EMR). We used separate extended Cox models according to living environment to identify the association between medication use and risk of rCDI. Of the 616 elderly adults treated for CDI, 24.1% of those living in the community and 28.1% of NH residents experienced recurrence within 1 year. For community-dwelling participants, the risk of rCDI was 1.6 times as high with antibiotic exposure and 2.5 times as high with acid-reducing medication exposure, but corticosteroid exposure was associated with a 39% lower risk of recurrence. For NH residents, the risk of rCDI was 2.9 times as high with acid-reducing medication exposure and 5.9 times as high with corticosteroid medication exposure. Antibiotic exposure was associated with an increased risk of recurrence only in community-dwelling participants (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.63, 95% confidence interval = 1.00-2.67). Risk of rCDI is greater with acid-reducing medication use than antibiotic use after initial CDI treatment, although the risk varied depending on living environment. Corticosteroid use is associated with greater risk of recurrence in NH residents but lower risk in community-dwelling elderly adults. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  12. Review of Natural History, Benefits and Risk Factors Pediatric Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoochehr Karjoo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Liver or hepatic transplantation (LT is the replacement of a diseased liver with part or whole healthy liver from another person (allograft. Human liver transplants were first performed by Thomas Starzl in the United States and Roy Calne in Cambridge, England in 1963 and 1967, respectively. Liver transplantation is a viable treatment option for end-stage liver disease and acute liver failure. Pediatric patients account for about 12.5% of liver transplant recipients. The most commonly used technique is orthotopic transplantation, in which the native liver is removed and replaced by the donor organ in the same anatomic location as the original liver. Cirrhosis, or liver injury, is a common reason why adults need liver transplants and children with bile duct disease issues are often the candidates. Survival statistics depend greatly on the age of donor, age of recipient, skill of the transplant center, compliance of the recipient, whether the organ came from a living or cadaveric donor and overall health of the recipient. Survival rates improve almost yearly, due to improved techniques and medications.

  13. Integrating team resource management program into staff training improves staff's perception and patient safety in organ procurement and transplantation: the experience in a university-affiliated medical center in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ya-Chi; Jerng, Jih-Shuin; Chang, Ching-Wen; Chen, Li-Chin; Hsieh, Ming-Yuan; Huang, Szu-Fen; Liu, Yueh-Ping; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2014-08-11

    The process involved in organ procurement and transplantation is very complex that requires multidisciplinary coordination and teamwork. To prevent error during the processes, teamwork education and training might play an important role. We wished to evaluate the efficacy of implementing a Team Resource Management (TRM) program on patient safety and the behaviors of the team members involving in the process. We implemented a TRM training program for the organ procurement and transplantation team members of the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH), a teaching medical center in Taiwan. This 15-month intervention included TRM education and training courses for the healthcare workers, focused group skill training for the procurement and transplantation team members, video demonstration and training, and case reviews with feedbacks. Teamwork culture was evaluated and all procurement and transplantation cases were reviewed to evaluate the application of TRM skills during the actual processes. During the intervention period, a total of 34 staff members participated the program, and 67 cases of transplantations were performed. Teamwork framework concept was the most prominent dimension that showed improvement from the participants for training. The team members showed a variety of teamwork behaviors during the process of procurement and transplantation during the intervention period. Of note, there were two potential donors with a positive HIV result, for which the procurement processed was timely and successfully terminated by the team. None of the recipients was transplanted with an infected organ. No error in communication or patient identification was noted during review of the case records. Implementation of a Team Resource Management program improves the teamwork culture as well as patient safety in organ procurement and transplantation.

  14. Nonadherence behaviors and some related factors in kidney transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pari Hedayati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kidney transplantation is the renal replacement therapy of choice for most patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD, however, adherence to the recommended lifestyle is critical for a positive prognosis. The purpose of this study was to assess adherence to immunosuppressive therapy and lifestyle recommendations along with some related factors among kidney transplant patients. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive analytical study, all patients completed a questionnaire regarding medication intake and lifestyle recommendations (preventing of infection, self-monitoring, prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD, and sun protection. The participants were divided into 4 groups according to the level of adherence (good, partial, poor, and nonadherent indicated in their responses. Results: Most kidney recipients were adherent to their drug prescriptions, but were partial, poor, or nonadherent regarding lifestyle recommendations. Increased passage of time since transplantation and low family support and educational level resulted in nonadherence. Men showed greater adherence to medication intake than women. Patients with lower number of drugs and reported drug side-effects illustrated better adherence to medication intake. Women adhered to infection protection recommendations more than men, and older and married patients adhered to cardiovascular prevention recommendations more than others. However, younger patients showed greater adherence to self-monitoring recommendations, and singles, young individuals, and women were adherent to sun protection recommendations. Conclusions: Nonadherence is common among kidney transplant recipients. Thus, it is necessary to determine patients who are at risk of nonadherence and to introduce more educational programs to improve their adherence and their quality of life (QOL.

  15. The logistics management and coordination in procurement phase of organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genç, Ruhet

    2008-12-01

    The number of organ transplantation surgeries has increased particularly in the last decade due to technological and scientific advances in medicine. Despite this increase, many patients, however, remain in waiting lists for transplantation surgery. Main reasons for these waiting lists are that there are limited number of organ donations and specifically problems in the management of organ transplantation activities. An efficient management of the allocation and transportation of organs (in other words, logistics management of organ transplantation) are thus extremely important. The aim of the paper is to review current practices of logistics management in the procurement phase of organ transplantation. It initially reviews the organizational structures of the international and national coordination centres, which are founded to coordinate organ transplantation activities and to enhance collaboration among physicians and medical staff. The paper, then, focuses on the possible managerial problems encountered during the procurement phase of organ transplantation. With this respect, common transportation difficulties from global and local perspective are also analyzed. This paper tries to take attention to a systematic regard of the organ transplantation from logistics point of view, thus providing applicable solutions to managerial problems in terms of allocation and transportation of organs.

  16. Ultrasound-guided biopsy of transplanted pancreas: evaluation of 20 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Vieira da Nóbrega

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the experience with percutaneous biopsies of pancreatic grafts guided by ultrasonography. Methods: Series of cases referred from outpatient’s clinic for biopsy of pancreas transplant, between December 2006 and March 2008. Data were collected from medical electronic records for age, sex and histopathology. The indication for the procedure was obtained from medical and laboratory records. Doppler ultrasonography was performed for control and to guide biopsy in real time. Rresults: Twenty patients referred for biopsy of their transplanted pancreas over a one-year period were evaluated. In one patient, biopsy was not performed for having no safe access for ultrasound. It was used 18 gauge needles, mostly automatic-cut type. The main indications were increased blood glucose and pancreatic enzyme levels as well as reduction of urinary amylase. The sonographic aspect of the pancreatic graft was normal in 18 cases. In all 19 biopsies performed, satisfactory samples for histopathological study were obtained. There were no complications. Cconclusions: This series of cases demonstrated low sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound in diagnosis of pancreatic transplants disorders, but showed to be very useful to guide transplanted pancreas biopsies. Although no complications occurred in this experience, the risk-benefit relation should always be assessed for every patient.

  17. Quality of life in recipients before and after liver transplantation in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordin, Yaprak S; Dicle, Aklime; Wellard, Sally

    2011-09-01

    Liver transplantation has become the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage liver disease. Most studies show a positive effect on quality of life after liver transplantation, but most studies are based on data from Western countries and little is known about quality of life in liver transplant recipients in Turkey or other developing countries. To investigate liver transplant recipients' quality of life and factors affecting it, before and 3 months after transplantation in western Turkey. Descriptive and comparative, with data collected prospectively. Two medical centers in Western Turkey. Sixty-five adult recipients of a liver transplant between May 15 and December 31,2007. Quality of life was measured by using the Nottingham Health Profile Turkish version, and sociodemographic and clinical data were collected from patients' records. Scores on all subscales of the Nottingham Health Profile differed significantly from before to after liver transplantation. The differences between the mean scores for quality of life before and after transplantation varied significantly with the patients' sex and disease severity.

  18. Physical activity levels early after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickerson, Lisa; Mathur, Sunita; Singer, Lianne G; Brooks, Dina

    2015-04-01

    Little is known of the early changes in physical activity after lung transplantation. The purposes of this study were: (1) to describe physical activity levels in patients up to 6 months following lung transplantation and (2) to explore predictors of the change in physical activity in that population. This was a prospective cohort study. Physical activity (daily steps and time spent in moderate-intensity activity) was measured using an accelerometer before and after transplantation (at hospital discharge, 3 months, and 6 months). Additional functional measurements included submaximal exercise capacity (measured with the 6-Minute Walk Test), quadriceps muscle torque, and health-related quality of life (measured with the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey 36 [SF-36] and the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire). Thirty-six lung transplant recipients (18 men, 18 women; mean age=49 years, SD=14) completed posttransplant measurements. Before transplant, daily steps were less than a third of the general population. By 3 months posttransplant, the largest improvement in physical activity had occurred, and level of daily steps reached 55% of the general population. The change in daily steps (pretransplant to 3 months posttransplant) was inversely correlated with pretransplant 6-minute walk distance (r=-.48, P=.007), daily steps (r=-.36, P=.05), and SF-36 physical functioning (SF-36 PF) score (r=-.59, P=.0005). The SF-36 PF was a significant predictor of the change in physical activity, accounting for 35% of the variation in change in daily steps. Only individuals who were ambulatory prior to transplant and discharged from the hospital in less than 3 months were included in the study. Physical activity levels improve following lung transplantation, particularly in individuals with low self-reported physical functioning. However, the majority of lung transplant recipients remain sedentary between 3 to 6 months following transplant. The role of exercise

  19. Producing "science/fictions" about the rural and urban poor: Community-based learning at a medical college in South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arur, Aditi Ashok

    This dissertation is an ethnographic case study of a community-based teaching program (CBTP) in public health at a medical college in South India that explored how the CBTP produced particular ways of seeing and understanding rural and urban poor communities. Drawing from critical, feminist, and postcolonial scholars, I suggest that the knowledge produced in the CBTP can be understood as "science/fictions", that is, as cultural texts shaped by transnational development discourses as well as medical teachers' and students' sociospatial imaginations of the rural and urban poor. I explored how these science/fictions mediated medical students' performative actions and interactions with a rural and an urban poor community in the context of the CBTP. At the same time, I also examined how knowledge produced in students' encounters with these communities disrupted their naturalized understandings about these communities, and how it was taken up to renarrativize science/fictions anew. Data collection and analyses procedures were informed by critical ethnographic and critical discourse analysis approaches. Data sources includes field notes constructed from observations of the CBTP, interviews with medical teachers and students, and curricular texts including the standardized national textbook of public health. The findings of this study illustrate how the CBTP staged the government and technology as central actors in the production of healthy bodies, communities, and environments, and implicitly positioned medical teachers and students as productive citizens of a modern nation while rural and urban poor communities were characterized sometimes as empowered, and at other times as not-yet-modern and in need of reform. However, the community also constituted an alternate pedagogical site of engagement in that students' encounters with community members disrupted students' assumptions about these communities to an extent. Nevertheless, institutionalized practices of assessment

  20. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis symptoms alleviated by renal transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Melchior

    2011-01-01

    are limited. Anecdotal reports have shown partial or complete resolution of NSF following successful renal transplantation early in the course of NSF. In this report, we describe alleviation of NSF symptoms in two women following successful renal transplantation more than 3 years after onset of NSF.......Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a rare, serious, and life-threatening disease of patients with severe renal impairment. Gadolinium-containing contrast agents have been shown to be the crucial trigger. There is no proven medical cure for the disease, and symptomatic treatment options...

  1. Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Phelan, Paul J

    2011-08-01

    Allograft thrombosis is a devastating early complication of renal transplantation that ultimately leads to allograft loss. We report here on our experience of nine cases of immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis at a single centre between January 1990 and June 2009. The mean age was 42.9 years at time of transplant. For seven patients, the allograft thrombosis was their first kidney transplant and seven of the nine cases had a deceased donor transplant. The initial transplants functioned for a mean of 1.67 days and the patients received a second allograft at a mean of 3.1 days after graft failure. All of the re-transplants worked immediately. Four allografts failed after a mean of 52.5 months (2-155 months). Two of these died with a functioning allograft, one failed owing to chronic allograft nephropathy and one owing to persistent acute cellular rejection. The remaining five patients still have a functioning allograft after a mean of 101.8 months (7-187 months). One year allograft and patient survival after re-transplantation were 87.5% and 100% respectively (after 5 years, both were 57%). Immediate re-transplantation following early kidney transplant thrombosis can be a success. It may be considered in selected cases after allograft thrombosis.

  2. Development and evaluation of a community immersion program during preclinical medical studies: a 15-year experience at the University of Geneva Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastonay, P; Zesiger, V; Klohn, A; Soguel, L; Mpinga, E K; Vu, Nv; Bernheim, L

    2013-01-01

    Significant changes in medical education have occurred in recent decades because of new challenges in the health sector and new learning theories and practices. This might have contributed to the decision of medical schools throughout the world to adopt community-based learning activities. The community-based learning approach has been promoted and supported by the World Health Organization and has emerged as an efficient learning strategy. The aim of the present paper is to describe the characteristics of a community immersion clerkship for third-year undergraduate medical students, its evolution over 15 years, and an evaluation of its outcomes. A review of the literature and consensus meetings with a multidisciplinary group of health professionals were used to define learning objectives and an educational approach when developing the program. Evaluation of the program addressed students' perception, achievement of learning objectives, interactions between students and the community, and educational innovations over the years. The program and the main learning objectives were defined by consensus meetings among teaching staff and community health workers, which strengthened the community immersion clerkship. Satisfaction, as monitored by a self-administered questionnaire in successive cohorts of students, showed a mean of 4.4 on a five-point scale. Students also mentioned community immersion clerkship as a unique community experience. The learning objectives were reached by a vast majority of students. Behavior evaluation was not assessed per se, but specific testimonies show that students have been marked by their community experience. The evaluation also assessed outcomes such as educational innovations (eg, students teaching other students), new developments in the curriculum (eg, partnership with the University of Applied Health Sciences), and interaction between students and the community (eg, student development of a website for a community health

  3. The complex use of religion in decisions on organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röcklinsberg, Helena

    2009-03-01

    Because of its existential character, organ transplantation is strongly connected to a person's view of life. This article describes how participants in a focus group use religious elements in decision-making on transplantation medicine in four European countries. Further these findings are related to two influential theologians: James Gustafson and Paul Ramsey, and their thinking on the role of religion in medical ethics. Both participants' and theologians' use of religious elements is complex, and show significant variety in regard to both content and form. Decisions in transplantation medicine would benefit from considering the complexity of religious views when striving for informed consent as participative involvement.

  4. Bone Marrow Transplantation for Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency-I: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-wahadneh, A.M.; Haddadin, I.; Hamouri, M.; Omari, K.; Ajellat, F.

    2006-01-01

    Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency type-I (LAD-I) is a rare autosomal recessive immunodeficiency syndrome leading recurrent bacterial and fungal infections. Bone marrow transplantation offers the only cure. In this report, we describe the course and outcome of bone marrow transplant in a 4-month-old female infant with LAD-I at King Hussein Medical Center, Jordan. A successful matched HLA-I related allogeneic bone marrow transplantation was performed. Engraftment was demonstrated on the 12th day. The patient developed GradeIII grafts versus host disease (GVHD), veno-occlusive disease of the liver and late onset hemorrhagic cystitis. She recovered with appropriate immune reconstitution. (author)

  5. Factors affecting medication adherence in community-managed patients with hypertension based on the principal component analysis: evidence from Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuji; Li, Xiaoju; Mao, Lu; Zhang, Mei; Li, Ke; Zheng, Yinxia; Cui, Wangfei; Yin, Hongpo; He, Yanli; Jing, Mingxia

    2018-01-01

    The analysis of factors affecting the nonadherence to antihypertensive medications is important in the control of blood pressure among patients with hypertension. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between factors and medication adherence in Xinjiang community-managed patients with hypertension based on the principal component analysis. A total of 1,916 community-managed patients with hypertension, selected randomly through a multi-stage sampling, participated in the survey. Self-designed questionnaires were used to classify the participants as either adherent or nonadherent to their medication regimen. A principal component analysis was used in order to eliminate the correlation between factors. Factors related to nonadherence were analyzed by using a χ 2 -test and a binary logistic regression model. This study extracted nine common factors, with a cumulative variance contribution rate of 63.6%. Further analysis revealed that the following variables were significantly related to nonadherence: severity of disease, community management, diabetes, and taking traditional medications. Community management plays an important role in improving the patients' medication-taking behavior. Regular medication regimen instruction and better community management services through community-level have the potential to reduce nonadherence. Mild hypertensive patients should be monitored by community health care providers.

  6. Teaching nutrition to medical students: a community-based problem-solving approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharji, S; Joseph, A; Abraham, S; Muliyil, J; John, K R; Ethirajan, N

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a community-based problem-solving educational programme which aims at teaching medical and other health science students the importance of nutrition and its application. Through community surveys students assess the nutritional status of children under five using different anthropometric methods. They understand the cultural beliefs and customs related to food fads and the reasons for them. They also acquire the skill to educate the community using the information gathered. They use epidemiological methods such as case control study to find associations between malnutrition and other causative factors. Feedback from students has been positive and evaluation of students' knowledge before and after the programme has shown significant improvement.

  7. Renal and obstetric outcomes in pregnancy after kidney transplantation: Twelve-year experience in a Singapore transplant center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwek, Jia Liang; Tey, Vanessa; Yang, Liying; Kanagalingam, Devendra; Kee, Terence

    2015-09-01

    Renal and obstetric outcomes in pregnancy after kidney transplantation in Singapore were last studied in 2002. A review of these outcomes in Singapore is now timely following advances in transplant and obstetric medicine. The aim was to evaluate the renal and obstetric outcomes in pregnancy after kidney transplantation in a Singapore tertiary center. Kidney transplant recipients who underwent pregnancy after transplantation at Singapore General Hospital between January 2001 and December 2012 were identified. Data on demographics, comorbidities and clinical outcomes were collected. There were 10 pregnancies identified in nine recipients. The median age of recipient at childbearing was 34.6 years (IQR, 32.8-36.8) and the median interval from transplantation to conception was 69 months (IQR, 38-97). There was no difference between the median pre-pregnancy estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (47.9 mL/min/1.73 m(2); IQR, 38.4-56.8) and median eGFR at time of last post-partum follow up (43.9 mL/min/1.73 m(2); IQR, 34.5-48.7, P = 0.549). Borderline allograft rejection occurred in one recipient (10.0%) 36 days after birth due to non-adherence to immunosuppressive medication, with subsequent allograft loss 37 months after birth. No mortalities were recorded during the study period. All the 10 pregnancies (100%) ended in singleton live births. Pre-eclampsia occurred in five pregnancies (50.0%), and there were seven (70.0%) preterm deliveries. The median gestational age was 35.4 weeks (IQR, 32.6-38.2) and the median birthweight was 2353 g (IQR, 1811-2648). Post-transplantation pregnancies ended successfully with no significant worsening of allograft function, but they were associated with risks to both recipients and newborns. © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  8. [Impact of Emotion Regulation and Emotional Arousal on Quality of Life and Adherence of Couples after Kidney Transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Luisa; Franke, Laura; Tkachenko, Daria; Schiffer, Mario; Zimmermann, Tanja

    2018-05-01

    Nonadherence to immunosuppressive medication increases the risk of graft failure. Maladaptive emotion regulation strategies (ERS) seem to be a risk factor for nonadherence, whereas for patients in relationships spousal support appears as a protective resource. Emotional arousal, objectively measured by the fundamental frequency (f 0 ) during spousal supportive communication is associated with supportive behavior. This study examined the relationship between beliefs about immunosuppressive medication, quality of life, ERS, emotions and emotional arousal, assessed during social support interactions of both spouses of N=50 couples after kidney transplantation. Maladaptive ERS of the transplant recipient were associated with lower mental quality of life of the partner, marginally higher own negative affect and lower beliefs about medication. Maladaptive ERS of the partner showed negative correlations with own mental quality of life. Regarding f 0 , gender differences were found. Higher f 0 of the male transplant recipient were associated with more maladaptive ERS of the female partner. Marginally significate correlations were found with lower own beliefs about medication. Higher f 0 of the wife of the male transplant recipient showed correlations with lower own positive affect, more negative affect of the male patient and lower beliefs about medication. Higher f 0 of female transplant recipients were associated with lower own maladaptive ERS and lower maladaptive ERS of the husband. The findings support the relevance of early interventions focusing on identifying and modifying maladaptive ERS for both the patient and partner. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Prevalence of drug-related problems in self-medication in Danish community pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bente Frøkjær

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug-related problems are known to be a major problem associated with pharmacotherapy. A broad range of studies, mainly in the area of prescription-only medicines, supports this fact. Only a few studies have evaluated drug-related problems with over-the-counter medicine and the role of community pharmacies in this. Purpose: To quantify drug-related problems in self-medication (use of over-the-counter medicine identified by community pharmacies in Denmark and to document the interventions by pharmacy staff in relation to the identified drug-related problems. Method: A descriptive study mapping drug-related problems in self-medication registered at the counter at a selected number of Danish community pharmacies. Results: Data for 3,868 consecutive customers with requests for over-the-counter (OTC medicines were registered at 39 community pharmacies. The pharmacies registered a total number of 4,324 OTC medicines requests, illustrating that a customer requested 1.1 OTC medicines on average. Drug-related problems (DRPs were identified for 813 customers, equivalent to DRPs for 21.0 % of all customers, presenting symptoms or requesting OTC medicines, and for 20 % of all over-the-counter medicines requests. 1,239 DRPs were registered, corresponding to an average of 1.5 DRPs per customer requesting OTC medicines. Community pharmacies estimated that they solved or partly solved 76.2 % of the detected DRPs; 73 % were solved without involving a general practitioner. Conclusions: DRPs were identified for 21.0 % of the pharmacy customers presenting a symptom or asking for an OTC medicine. The community pharmacy counselled the customers with DRPs more thoroughly than other customers by giving 2.4 pieces of professional advice, compared to an average of 2.1 to customers in general. It is not possible to determine the magnitude of the safety risk involved. Based on the most frequent categories of DRPs, there were risks of insufficient effect

  10. Prevalence of drug-related problems in self-medication in Danish community pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Rossing

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Drug-related problems are known to be a major problem associated with pharmacotherapy. A broad range of studies, mainly in the area of prescription-only medicines, supports this fact. Only a few studies have evaluated drug-related problems with over-the-counter medicine and the role of community pharmacies in this.Purpose: To quantify drug-related problems in self-medication (use of over-the-counter medicine identified by community pharmacies in Denmark and to document the interventions by pharmacy staff in relation to the identified drug-related problems.Method: A descriptive study mapping drug-related problems in self-medication registered at the counter at a selected number of Danish community pharmacies.Results: Data for 3,868 consecutive customers with requests for over-the-counter (OTC medicines were registered at 39 community pharmacies. The pharmacies registered a total number of 4,324 OTC medicines requests, illustrating that a customer requested 1.1 OTC medicines on average. Drug-related problems (DRPs were identified for 813 customers, equivalent to DRPs for 21.0 % of all customers, presenting symptoms or requesting OTC medicines, and for 20 % of all over-the-counter medicines requests. 1,239 DRPs were registered, corresponding to an average of 1.5 DRPs per customer requesting OTC medicines.Community pharmacies estimated that they solved or partly solved 76.2 % of the detected DRPs; 73 % were solved without involving a general practitioner.Conclusions: DRPs were identified for 21.0 % of the pharmacy customers presenting a symptom or asking for an OTC medicine. The community pharmacy counselled the customers with DRPs more thoroughly than other customers by giving 2.4 pieces of professional advice, compared to an average of 2.1 to customers in general. It is not possible to determine the magnitude of the safety risk involved. Based on the most frequent categories of DRPs, there were risks of insufficient effect, unintended

  11. Phyllosphere Microbiota Composition and Microbial Community Transplantation on Lettuce Plants Grown Indoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aerial surfaces of plants, or phyllosphere, are microbial habitats important to plant and human health. In order to accurately investigate microbial interactions in the phyllosphere under laboratory conditions, the composition of the phyllosphere microbiota should be representative of the diversity of microorganisms residing on plants in nature. We found that Romaine lettuce grown in the laboratory contained 10- to 100-fold lower numbers of bacteria than age-matched, field-grown lettuce. The bacterial diversity on laboratory-grown plants was also significantly lower and contained relatively higher proportions of Betaproteobacteria as opposed to the Gammaproteobacteria-enriched communities on field lettuce. Incubation of field-grown Romaine lettuce plants in environmental growth chambers for 2 weeks resulted in bacterial cell densities and taxa similar to those on plants in the field but with less diverse bacterial populations overall. In comparison, the inoculation of laboratory-grown Romaine lettuce plants with either freshly collected or cryopreserved microorganisms recovered from field lettuce resulted in the development of a field-like microbiota on the lettuce within 2 days of application. The survival of an inoculated strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was unchanged by microbial community transfer; however, the inoculation of E. coli O157:H7 onto those plants resulted in significant shifts in the abundance of certain taxa. This finding was strictly dependent on the presence of a field-associated as opposed to a laboratory-associated microbiota on the plants. Phyllosphere microbiota transplantation in the laboratory will be useful for elucidating microbial interactions on plants that are important to agriculture and microbial food safety. PMID:25118240

  12. Transplant in a patient with comorbid psychiatric illness: an ethical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyum, Eric N; Brown, Douglas; Zihni, Ahmed M; Keune, Jason D; Hong, Barry A; Kodner, Ira J; Ray, Shuddhadeb

    2014-11-01

    This article addresses a difficult ethical dilemma that transplant surgeons may potentially encounter: whether a patient with a psychiatric illness is a good candidate for a liver transplant. This case study illustrates the challenges involved when considering the ethical principles of patient self-determination, distributive justice of scarce medical resources, "social worth," and protection of vulnerable patient populations. Are patients with psychiatric illness able to provide consent for transplantation? Is it possible to avoid misallocating valuable donor organs and, at the same time, fairly allocate these resources? This article seeks to answer these questions and provide insight into this ethical dilemma.

  13. Community medicine in the medical curriculum: a statistical analysis of a professional examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, M J; Murdoch, R M; Stewart, G T

    1984-01-01

    This paper analyses the examination results of two cohorts of medical students at the University of Glasgow. It discusses the usefulness of Scottish higher grades as predictors of ability to pass examinations in medicine. Further correlations are made between the results from community medicine and other fourth- and fifth-year medical school examinations.

  14. Dual-energy CT-cholangiography in potential donors for living-related liver transplantation: Improved biliary visualization by intravenous morphine co-medication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, C.M.; Schwarzwaelder, C.B.; Stiller, W.; Schindera, S.T.; Heye, T.; Stampfl, U.; Bellemann, N.; Holzschuh, M.; Schmidt, J.; Weitz, J.; Grenacher, L.; Kauczor, H.U.; Radeleff, B.A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate whether intravenous morphine co-medication improves bile duct visualization of dual-energy CT-cholangiography. Materials and methods: Forty potential donors for living-related liver transplantation underwent CT-cholangiography with infusion of a hepatobiliary contrast agent over 40 min. Twenty minutes after the beginning of the contrast agent infusion, either normal saline (n = 20 patients; control group [CG]) or morphine sulfate (n = 20 patients; morphine group [MG]) was injected. Forty-five minutes after initiation of the contrast agent, a dual-energy CT acquisition of the liver was performed. Applying dual-energy post-processing, pure iodine images were generated. Primary study goals were determination of bile duct diameters and visualization scores (on a scale of 0 to 3: 0—not visualized; 3—excellent visualization). Results: Bile duct visualization scores for second-order and third-order branch ducts were significantly higher in the MG compared to the CG (2.9 ± 0.1 versus 2.6 ± 0.2 [P < 0.001] and 2.7 ± 0.3 versus 2.1 ± 0.6 [P < 0.01], respectively). Bile duct diameters for the common duct and main ducts were significantly higher in the MG compared to the CG (5.9 ± 1.3 mm versus 4.9 ± 1.3 mm [P < 0.05] and 3.7 ± 1.3 mm versus 2.6 ± 0.5 mm [P < 0.01], respectively). Conclusion: Intravenous morphine co-medication significantly improved biliary visualization on dual-energy CT-cholangiography in potential donors for living-related liver transplantation

  15. Dual-energy CT-cholangiography in potential donors for living-related liver transplantation: Improved biliary visualization by intravenous morphine co-medication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, C.M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Schwarzwaelder, C.B.; Stiller, W. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Schindera, S.T. [Department of Diagnostic, Interventional, and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital and University of Berne, Berne (Switzerland); Heye, T.; Stampfl, U.; Bellemann, N.; Holzschuh, M. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Schmidt, J.; Weitz, J. [Department of General, Abdominal and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Grenacher, L.; Kauczor, H.U.; Radeleff, B.A. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate whether intravenous morphine co-medication improves bile duct visualization of dual-energy CT-cholangiography. Materials and methods: Forty potential donors for living-related liver transplantation underwent CT-cholangiography with infusion of a hepatobiliary contrast agent over 40 min. Twenty minutes after the beginning of the contrast agent infusion, either normal saline (n = 20 patients; control group [CG]) or morphine sulfate (n = 20 patients; morphine group [MG]) was injected. Forty-five minutes after initiation of the contrast agent, a dual-energy CT acquisition of the liver was performed. Applying dual-energy post-processing, pure iodine images were generated. Primary study goals were determination of bile duct diameters and visualization scores (on a scale of 0 to 3: 0—not visualized; 3—excellent visualization). Results: Bile duct visualization scores for second-order and third-order branch ducts were significantly higher in the MG compared to the CG (2.9 ± 0.1 versus 2.6 ± 0.2 [P < 0.001] and 2.7 ± 0.3 versus 2.1 ± 0.6 [P < 0.01], respectively). Bile duct diameters for the common duct and main ducts were significantly higher in the MG compared to the CG (5.9 ± 1.3 mm versus 4.9 ± 1.3 mm [P < 0.05] and 3.7 ± 1.3 mm versus 2.6 ± 0.5 mm [P < 0.01], respectively). Conclusion: Intravenous morphine co-medication significantly improved biliary visualization on dual-energy CT-cholangiography in potential donors for living-related liver transplantation.

  16. Lied Transplant Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1143) evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the proposed Lied Transplant Center at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Statement in not required.

  17. Factors affecting medication adherence in community-managed patients with hypertension based on the principal component analysis: evidence from Xinjiang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang YJ

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Yuji Zhang,* Xiaoju Li,* Lu Mao, Mei Zhang, Ke Li, Yinxia Zheng, Wangfei Cui, Hongpo Yin, Yanli He, Mingxia Jing Department of Public Health, Shihezi University School of Medicine, Shihezi, Xinjiang, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: The analysis of factors affecting the nonadherence to antihypertensive medications is important in the control of blood pressure among patients with hypertension. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between factors and medication adherence in Xinjiang community-managed patients with hypertension based on the principal component analysis.Patients and methods: A total of 1,916 community-managed patients with hypertension, selected randomly through a multi-stage sampling, participated in the survey. Self-designed questionnaires were used to classify the participants as either adherent or nonadherent to their medication regimen. A principal component analysis was used in order to eliminate the correlation between factors. Factors related to nonadherence were analyzed by using a χ2-test and a binary logistic regression model.Results: This study extracted nine common factors, with a cumulative variance contribution rate of 63.6%. Further analysis revealed that the following variables were significantly related to nonadherence: severity of disease, community management, diabetes, and taking traditional medications.Conclusion: Community management plays an important role in improving the patients’ medication-taking behavior. Regular medication regimen instruction and better community management services through community-level have the potential to reduce nonadherence. Mild hypertensive patients should be monitored by community health care providers. Keywords: hypertension, medication adherence, factors, principal component analysis, community management, China

  18. Three-year post-transplant medicare payments in kidney transplant recipients: Associations with pre-transplant comorbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Machnicki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the influence of pre-transplant comorbidities on post-transplant expenditures. We estimated the associations between pre-transplant comorbidities and post-transplant Medicare costs, using several comorbidity classification systems. We included recipients of first-kidney deceased donor transplants from 1995 through 2002 for whom Medicare was the primary payer for at least one year pre-transplant (N = 25,175. We examined pre-transplant comorbidities as classified by International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9-CM codes from Medicare claims with the Clinical Cla-ssifications Software (CCS and Charlson and Elixhauser algorithms. Post-transplant costs were calcu-lated from payments on Medicare claims. We developed models considering Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN variables plus: 1 CCS categories, 2 Charlson, 3 Elixhauser, 4 num-ber of Charlson and 5 number of Elixhauser comorbidities, independently. We applied a novel regression methodology to account for censoring. Costs were estimated at individual and population levels. The comorbidities with the largest impact on mean Medicare payments included cardiovascular disease, ma-lignancies, cerebrovascular disease, mental conditions and functional limitations. Skin ulcers and infec-tions, rheumatic and other connective tissue disease and liver disease also contributed to payments and have not been considered or described previously. A positive graded relationship was found between costs and the number of pre-transplant comorbidities. In conclusion, we showed that expansion beyond the usually considered pre-transplant comorbidities with inclusion of CCS and Charlson or Elixhauser comorbidities increased the knowledge about comorbidities related to augmented Medicare payments. Our expanded methodology can be used by others to assess more accurately the financial implications of renal transplantation to Medicare and individual transplant centers.

  19. Characterization of Remitting and Relapsing Hyperglycemia in Post-Renal-Transplant Recipients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Boloori

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia following solid organ transplant is common among patients without pre-existing diabetes mellitus (DM. Post-transplant hyperglycemia can occur once or multiple times, which if continued, causes new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT.To study if the first and recurrent incidence of hyperglycemia are affected differently by immunosuppressive regimens, demographic and medical-related risk factors, and inpatient hyperglycemic conditions (i.e., an emphasis on the time course of post-transplant complications.We conducted a retrospective analysis of 407 patients who underwent kidney transplantation at Mayo Clinic Arizona. Among these, there were 292 patients with no signs of DM prior to transplant. For this category of patients, we evaluated the impact of (1 immunosuppressive drugs (e.g., tacrolimus, sirolimus, and steroid, (2 demographic and medical-related risk factors, and (3 inpatient hyperglycemic conditions on the first and recurrent incidence of hyperglycemia in one year post-transplant. We employed two versions of Cox regression analyses: (1 a time-dependent model to analyze the recurrent cases of hyperglycemia and (2 a time-independent model to analyze the first incidence of hyperglycemia.Age (P = 0.018, HDL cholesterol (P = 0.010, and the average trough level of tacrolimus (P<0.0001 are significant risk factors associated with the first incidence of hyperglycemia, while age (P<0.0001, non-White race (P = 0.002, BMI (P = 0.002, HDL cholesterol (P = 0.003, uric acid (P = 0.012, and using steroid (P = 0.007 are the significant risk factors for the recurrent cases of hyperglycemia.This study draws attention to the importance of analyzing the risk factors associated with a disease (specially a chronic one with respect to both its first and recurrent incidence, as well as carefully differentiating these two perspectives: a fact that is currently overlooked in the literature.

  20. Recommendations for the proper use of nonprescription cough suppressants and expectorants in solid-organ transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven; Carter, Danielle; Martin, Spencer; Roberts, Keri

    2011-03-01

    To describe the pharmacology and safety of oral over-the-counter cough suppressants and expectorants and to present recommendations for the use of these agents in solid-organ transplant recipients based on the potential for adverse drug reactions or drug-disease interactions. Data from journal articles and other sources describing the pharmacology and safety of over-the-counter cough suppressants and expectorants, drug-drug interactions with immunosuppressive agents, and drug-disease state interactions are reviewed. Potential and documented drug-drug interactions between immunosuppressive agents and over-the-counter cough medications guaifenesin, dextromethorphan, diphenhydramine, and codeine were evaluated on the basis of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles. Interactions between these cough medications and the physiological changes in the body following transplantation also were examined. Diphenhydramine requires additional monitoring when used to treat cough in transplant recipients owing to its anticholinergic properties and the potential for interactions with cyclosporine. Dextromethorphan can be used in most transplant recipients, although greater caution should be exercised if the patient has undergone liver transplant or has liver impairment. Guaifenesin can be used in transplant recipients but should be used with caution in patients receiving kidney or lung transplants and in patients with renal impairment. Codeine combined with guaifenesin is another option for cough and can be used in most transplant patients although those with reduced renal function should be monitored carefully for adverse events.

  1. A review of the imaging and intervention of liver transplant complications.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEvoy, S

    2010-09-01

    Liver transplantation has become a successful surgical solution to a variety of medical and oncological parenchymal liver diseases. As a result, these patients are being encountered more frequently within diagnostic imaging departments which may be remote from the transplant centre. Radiologists must therefore be proficient in identifying normal post-transplant anatomy which involves the anastomosis of four structures between the donor and recipient, namely the hepatic artery, the main portal vein, the retro-hepatic inferior vena cava and the extra-hepatic bile ducts. A number of potential complications can arise involving any or all of these structures, which can be potentially devastating and lead to graft failure. Radiologists must familiarise themselves with the normal post-operative appearances of liver transplantation and become competent in diagnosing post-transplant complications. Where possible, complications should be treated using interventional radiological techniques, thus avoiding the need for repeat surgical intervention or retransplantation.

  2. The need for endodontic treatment and systemic characteristics of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga-Diniz, Julia Mourão; Santa-Rosa, Caroline Christine; Martins, Renata de Castro; Silva, Maria Elisa Souza E; Vieira, Leda Quercia; Ribeiro Sobrinho, Antônio Paulino

    2017-07-03

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the epidemiological and clinical profiles of patients before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and the need for endodontic treatment. The subjects included 188 individuals enrolled in the dental care program for transplanted patients of the School of Dentistry, Federal University of Minas Gerais (Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, FO-UFMG) from March 2011 through March 2016. The patients were subjected to an HSCT conditioning dental regimen based on a thorough clinical and radiographic evaluation. Intraoral periapical and bite-wing X-rays were obtained, and after evaluation, specific dental treatment was planned and performed. The following demographic and clinical data were collected from the patients' medical records: age, gender, transplantation stage, primary disease, transplant type, medication used, complete blood count at the time of visit, and need for endodontic treatment. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov and the chi-square tests were used. Leukemia (31.3%) and multiple myeloma (17.9%) were the most prevalent primary diseases. Most patients were subjected to allogeneic-related transplantation (83.6%). Most patients exhibited platelet counts and hemoglobin concentrations below the reference values in the pre-transplantation stage, while the neutrophil and platelet counts and the hemoglobin levels were within the reference ranges in the post-transplantation stage. The proportions of individuals requiring endodontic treatment were similar between the pre- and post-transplantation groups: 24.3% and 24.7%, respectively. The systemic conditions of the patients referred for dental treatment were compromised.

  3. Piloting Psychology Annual Reviews as a Method of Measuring Psychological Distress and Quality of Life in Paediatric Renal Transplant Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade Bamford

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychosocial distress and poorer quality of life after renal transplantation are common in children and young people. This has implications for medication adherence and survival. Posttransplant psychology annual reviews were introduced in one Paediatric Renal Service in the UK as a means of measuring psychological distress and quality of life, as well as facilitating identification of patients and parents/carers who would benefit from psychological intervention. The process of completing posttransplant psychology annual reviews is discussed within this paper. The posttransplant psychology annual review appointments identified patients experiencing depression and/or anxiety and problems in quality of life. These assessments have led to appropriate referrals to, and engagement with, the renal psychology service as well as with community tier 3 child and adolescent mental health services. The posttransplant psychology annual review will continue to be completed at this UK site and discussions will be undertaken with other paediatric renal transplant services to consider whether these could be introduced at a national level to facilitate collection of longitudinal data regarding long-term psychosocial impact of paediatric renal transplantation and its effect on quality of life.

  4. The European community and its standardization efforts in medical informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheus, Rudy A.

    1992-07-01

    A summary of the CEN TC 251/4 ''Medical Imaging and Multi-Media'' activities will be given. CEN is the European standardization institute, TC 251 deals with medical informatics. Standardization is a condition for the wide scale use of health care and medical informatics and for the creation of a common market. In the last two years, three important categories-- namely, the Commission of the European Communities with their programs and the mandates, the medical informaticians through their European professional federation, and the national normalization institutes through the European committee--have shown to be aware of this problem and have taken actions. As a result, a number of AIM (Advanced Informatics in Medicine), CEC sponsored projects, the CEC mandates to CEN and EWOS, the EFMI working group on standardization, the technical committee of CEN, and the working groups and project teams of CEN and EWOS are working on the subject. On overview of the CEN TC 251/4 ''Medical Imaging and Multi-Media'' activities will be given, including their relation to other work.

  5. Evaluation of a community-based training to promote responsible self-medication in East Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiadi, Adji P; Wibowo, Yosi; Setiawan, Eko; Presley, Bobby; Mulyono, Ika; Wardhani, Ari S; Sunderland, Bruce

    2018-05-24

    To explore pharmacist/pharmacy staff trainers' perspectives on conducting community-based training to promote responsible self-medication, and to evaluate knowledge gained among community representatives participating in the training. Training was conducted in four districts/cities in East Java, Indonesia in 2016. A pre-test/post-test study was used to evaluate the knowledge of 129 community representatives (participants) before/after the training; pre-test and post-test scores as well as absolute gain were determined. Four focus group discussions with 20 pharmacist/pharmacy staff (trainers) were conducted after the training, and the data were thematically analysed. Overall mean test scores for community representatives significantly improved from 14.11 to 15.70 after the training (P < 0.001). The average total absolute gain was 1.85 (95% CI 1.29 to 2.39). To reach local communities, trainers suggested improvements to the content and structure of the module, training aids, trainer competency, approach and time allocation. Community-based training provides a potential strategy to improve community knowledge of medications. Findings from this study should inform strategies for a broader uptake amongst local communities in Indonesia. © 2018 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  6. The economic contribution of the Northern Ontario School of Medicine to communities participating in distributed medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenbirk, John C; Robinson, David R; Hill, Mary Ellen; Pong, Raymond W; Minore, Bruce; Adams, Ken; Strasser, Roger P; Lipinski, Joe

    2015-01-01

    The economic contribution of medical schools to major urban centres can be substantial, but there is little information on the contribution to the economy of participating communities made by schools that provide education and training away from major cities and academic health science centres. We sought to assess the economic contribution of the Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM) to northern Ontario communities participating in NOSM's distributed medical education programs. We developed a local economic model and used actual expenditures from 2007/08 to assess the economic contribution of NOSM to communities in northern Ontario. We also estimated the economic contribution of medical students or residents participating in different programs in communities away from the university campuses. To explore broader economic effects, we conducted semistructured interviews with leaders in education, health care and politics in northern Ontario. The total economic contribution to northern Ontario was $67.1 million based on $36.3 million in spending by NOSM and $1.0 million spent by students. Economic contributions were greatest in the university campus cities of Thunder Bay ($26.7 million) and Sudbury ($30.4 million), and $0.8-$1.2 million accrued to the next 3 largest population centres. Communities might realize an economic contribution of $7300-$103 900 per pair of medical learners per placement. Several of the 59 interviewees remarked that the dollar amount could be small to moderate but had broader economic implications. Distributed medical education at the NOSM resulted in a substantial economic contribution to participating communities.

  7. The interactive effects of soil transplant into colder regions and cropping on soil microbiology and biogeochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Feng; Xue, Kai; Sun, Bo; Zhang, Yuguang; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2015-03-01

    Soil transplant into warmer regions has been shown to alter soil microbiology. In contrast, little is known about the effects of soil transplant into colder regions, albeit that climate cooling has solicited attention in recent years. To address this question, we transplanted bare fallow soil over large transects from southern China (subtropical climate zone) to central (warm temperate climate zone) and northern China (cold temperate climate zone). After an adaptation period of 4 years, soil nitrogen components, microbial biomass and community structures were altered. However, the effects of soil transplant on microbial communities were dampened by maize cropping, unveiling a negative interaction between cropping and transplant. Further statistical analyses with Canonical correspondence analysis and Mantel tests unveiled annual average temperature, relative humidity, aboveground biomass, soil pH and NH4 (+) -N content as environmental attributes closely correlated with microbial functional structures. In addition, average abundances of amoA-AOA (ammonia-oxidizing archaea) and amoA-AOB (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) genes were significantly (P Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Successful orthotopic liver transplantation in an adult patient with sickle cell disease and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morey Blinder

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease can lead to hepatic complications ranging from acute hepatic crises to chronic liver disease including intrahepatic cholestasis, and iron overload. Although uncommon, intrahepatic cholestasis may be severe and medical treatment of this complication is often ineffective. We report a case of a 37 year-old male patient with sickle cell anemia, who developed liver failure and underwent successful orthotopic liver transplantation. Both pre and post-operatively, he was maintained on red cell transfusions. He remains stable with improved liver function 42 months post transplant. The role for orthotopic liver transplantation is not well defined in patients with sickle cell disease, and the experience remains limited. Although considerable challenges of post-transplant graft complications remain, orthotopic liver transplantation should be considered as a treatment option for sickle cell disease patients with end-stage liver disease who have progressed despite conventional medical therapy. An extended period of red cell transfusion support may lessen the post-operative complications.

  9. Hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection among solid organ transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, J P; Wang, H E; Locke, J E; Mannon, R B; Safford, M M; Baddley, J W

    2015-11-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a considerable health issue in the United States and represents the most common healthcare-associated infection. Solid organ transplant recipients are at increased risk of CDI, which can affect both graft and patient survival. However, little is known about the impact of CDI on health services utilization posttransplantation. We examined hospital-onset CDI from 2012 to 2014 among transplant recipients in the University HealthSystem Consortium, which includes academic medical center-affiliated hospitals in the United States. Infection was five times more common among transplant recipients than among general medicine inpatients (209 vs 40 per 10 000 discharges), and factors associated with CDI among transplant recipients included transplant type, risk of mortality, comorbidities, and inpatient complications. Institutional risk-standardized CDI varied more than 3-fold across high-volume hospitals (infection ratio 0.54-1.82, median 1.04, interquartile range 0.78-1.28). CDI was associated with increased 30-day readmission, transplant organ complications, cytomegalovirus infection, inpatient costs, and lengths of stay. Total observed inpatient days and direct costs for those with CDI were substantially higher than risk-standardized expected values (40 094 vs 22 843 days, costs $198 728 368 vs $154 020 528). Further efforts to detect, prevent, and manage CDI among solid organ transplant recipients are warranted. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  10. Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer in Nonwhite Organ Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, Ellen N; Doyle, Alden; Shaver, Christine M; Miller, Brett; Abdelmalek, Mark; Cusack, Carrie Ann; Malat, Gregory E; Chung, Christina Lee

    2016-12-01

    Organ transplant recipients have a higher incidence of skin cancer. This risk is magnified over time and with continued exposure to immunosuppression. Skin cancer in nonwhite patients is associated with greater morbidity and mortality owing to diagnosis at a more advanced stage, which suggests that nonwhite organ transplant recipients are at even higher risk. To describe demographic and clinical factors and the incidence of skin cancer in nonwhite organ transplant recipients. We performed a retrospective medical record review of patients who were organ transplant recipients (154 were white and 259 nonwhite [black, Asian, Hispanic, Pacific Islander]) seen from November 1, 2011, to April 18, 2016 at an academic referral center. Variables were analyzed and compared between racial groups, including sex, age, race/ethnicity, Fitzpatrick type, type and location of skin cancer, type of organ transplanted, time to diagnosis of skin cancer after transplantation, and history of condyloma acuminata and/or verruca vulgaris. Most of the 413 patients (62.7%) evaluated were nonwhite organ transplant recipients; 264 were men, and 149 were women. Their mean (SD) age was 60.09 (13.59) years. Nineteen skin cancers were identified in 15 patients (5.8%) representing 3 racial/ethnic groups: black (6 patients), Asian (5), and Hispanic (4). All squamous cell carcinomas in blacks were diagnosed in the in situ stage, located on sun-protected sites, and occurred in patients whose lesions tested positive for human papilloma virus (HPV) and/or who endorsed a history of condyloma acuminata or verruca vulgaris. Most skin cancers in Asians were located on sun-exposed areas and occurred in individuals who emigrated from equatorial locations. Nonwhite organ transplant recipients are at risk for developing skin cancer posttransplantation. Follow-up in a specialized transplant dermatology center and baseline total-body skin examination should be part of posttransplantation care in all organ

  11. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Vase, Maja Ølholm; Kampmann, Jan

    2016-01-01

    after long-term post-transplantation follow-up. A retrospective population-based cohort study including all kidney transplant recipients at two Danish centres (1990-2011; population covered 3.1 million; 2175 transplantations in 1906 patients). Pathology reports were reviewed for all patient biopsies...

  12. The kindness of strangers: organ transplantation in a capitalist age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, T A

    2001-09-01

    The topic of organ transplantation is examined from the perspective of three authors: Robert Bellah, Jeremy Rifkin, and Margaret Jane Radin. Introduced by reflections on the development of the justification of organ transplantation within the Roman Catholic community and the various themes raised by the historical study in Richard Titmuss's The Gift Relationship, the paper examines how and in what ways the possible commodification of organs will affect our society and the impacts this may have on the supply of organs.

  13. Organ donation and transplantation within the Zulu culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.R. Bhengu

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Greater knowledge and technological advancement in the field of transplantation has increased the demand for organ donation beyond the supply of organs, especially among the black communities. This imbalance arises from the few sources of organs, limitations on the techniques of organ retrieval, disparities in the allocation of organs and socio-cultural factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which Zulu cultural norms and social structures influence an individual’s decision to donate an organ or to undergo transplantation. A qualitative approach using an ethno-nursing method was selected. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a transplant co-ordinator representing the professional sector, with traditional healers and religious leaders representing the folk sector, and with the general public representing the popular sector of the health care system. Both urban and rural settings were used. Conclusions arrived at showed that knowledge was lacking among Zulu speaking people about organ donation and transplantation and misconceptions about the topic were related to Zulu life patterns, beliefs about death, burial and life hereafter, and values and social structures. Recommendations with regard to the promotion of organ donation and transplantation among Zulu speaking people were made based on culture-sensitive and culture-congruent principles.

  14. Organ donation and transplantation within the Zulu culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhengu, B R; Uys, H H M

    2004-08-01

    Greater knowledge and technological advancement in the field of transplantation has increased the demand for organ donation beyond the supply of organs, especially among the black communities. This imbalance arises from the few sources of organs, limitations on the techniques of organ retrieval, disparities in the allocation of organs and socio-cultural factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which Zulu cultural norms and social structures influence an individual's decision to donate an organ or to undergo transplantation. A qualitative approach using an ethno-nursing method was selected. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a transplant co-ordinator representing the professional sector, with traditional healers and religious leaders representing the folk sector, and with the general public representing the popular sector of the health care system. Both urban and rural settings were used. Conclusions arrived at showed that knowledge was lacking among Zulu speaking people about organ donation and transplantation and misconceptions about the topic were related to Zulu life patterns, beliefs about death, burial and life hereafter, and values and social structures. Recommendations with regard to the promotion of organ donation and transplantation among Zulu speaking people were made based on culture-sensitive and culture-congruent principles.

  15. Ethical issues in organ and tissue transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouna, George M

    2003-12-01

    Clinical organ transplantation provides a way of giving the gift of life to patients with terminal failure of vital organs, which requires the participation of other fellow human beings and of society by donating organs from deceased or living individuals. The increasing incidence of vital organ failure and the inadequate supply of organs, especially from cadavers, has created a wide gap between organ supply and organ demand, which has resulted in very long waiting times to receive an organ as well as an increasing number of deaths while waiting. These events have raised many ethical, moral and societal issues regarding supply, the methods of organ allocation the use of living donors as volunteers including minors. It has also led to the practice of organ sale by entrepreneurs for financial gains in some parts the world through exploitation of the poor, for the benefit of the wealthy. The current advances in immunology and tissue engineering and the use of animal organs, xenotransplantation, while offering very promising solutions to many of these problems, also raise additional ethical and medical issues, which must be considered by the medical profession as well as society. This review deals with the ethical and moral issues generated by the current advances in organ transplantation, the problem of organ supply versus organ demand and the appropriate allocation of available organs. It deals with the risks and benefits of organ donation from living donors, the appropriate and acceptable methods to increase organ donation from the deceased through the adoption of the principle of 'presumed consent', the right methods of providing acceptable appreciation and compensation for the family of the deceased as well as volunteer and altruistic donors, and the duties and responsibilities of the medical profession and society to help fellow humans. The review also deals with the appropriate and ethically acceptable ways of utilizing the recent advances of stem cell

  16. Neisseria lactamica Causing a Lung Cavity and Skin Rash in a Renal Transplant Patient: First Report from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Hamid Changal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria lactamica, a commensal, has been very rarely reported to cause diseases in immunocompromised hosts. In medical literature, there is only one report of a cavitatory lung lesion caused by it. The patient was a kidney transplant recipient. Neisseria lactamica was found to be the cause of his pulmonary cavity and a desquamating rash on feet. With the rapidly spreading medical advance, more and more patients are getting organ transplants, so the population of immunocompromised people is on the rise. We expect more sinister and less expected organisms to cause diseases in patients who have organ transplants.

  17. Herpes simplex virus-2 transmission following solid organ transplantation: Donor-derived infection and transplantation from prior organ recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macesic, Nenad; Abbott, Iain J; Kaye, Matthew; Druce, Julian; Glanville, Allan R; Gow, Paul J; Hughes, Peter D; Korman, Tony M; Mulley, William R; O'Connell, Phillip J; Opdam, Helen; Paraskeva, Miranda; Pitman, Matthew C; Setyapranata, Stella; Rawlinson, William D; Johnson, Paul D R

    2017-10-01

    Owing to limited availability of donor organs, previous solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are increasingly considered as potential organ donors. We report donor-derived transmission of herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) to two clusters of SOT recipients with transmission from the original donor and an HSV-2-infected recipient who subsequently became a donor. We reviewed medical records of the donors and recipients in both clusters. Pre-transplant serology and virological features of HSV-2 were characterized. Genotyping of HSV-2 isolates to determine potential for donor transmission of HSV-2 through transplantation of organs from prior organ recipients was performed. A kidney-pancreas recipient died day 9 post transplant. Following confirmation of brain death, the lungs and recently transplanted kidney were donated to two further recipients. The liver was not retrieved, but biopsy confirmed HSV-2 infection. Testing on the original donor showed negative HSV-2 polymerase chain reaction and HSV immunoglobulin (Ig)M, but positive HSV-2 IgG. The liver recipient from the original donor developed HSV-2 hepatitis and cutaneous infection that responded to treatment with intravenous acyclovir. In the second cluster, lung and kidney recipients both developed HSV-2 viremia that was successfully treated with antiviral therapy. Genotyping of all HSV-2-positive samples showed 100% sequence homology for three recipients. Donor-derived HSV infection affected two clusters of recipients because of transplantation of organs from a prior organ recipient. HSV should be considered as a possible cause of illness in febrile SOT recipients in the immediate post-transplant period and may cause disseminated disease and re-infection in HSV-2-seropositive recipients. Testing of HSV serology and prophylaxis may be considered in SOT recipients not receiving cytomegalovirus prophylaxis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The role of narrative medicine in pregnancy after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donzelli, Gianpaolo; Paddeu, Erika Maria; D'Alessandro, Francesca; Nanni Costa, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Narrative medicine allows professionals from all fields of medical sciences to understand the patient's total experience of illness, and meet his/her needs in an empathetic environment. Narrative medicine helps spread holistic knowledge of a multitude of complex clinical conditions, including transplantation. To underline the role of narrative medicine in women who become pregnant after a liver transplant by using their narrations of this very special experience. We describe our study with narration and listening to the stories of three women expecting their first child after a liver transplant, by analysing the structure and role of narration in the context of relationships between patients and caregivers. The narrations were transcribed verbatim with the main plot analysed in order to address all the aspects of this rare clinical condition and the transition to parenthood. The women narrated this experience in three phases: transplantation, pregnancy and delivery, and post-partum. They described all phases of pregnancy as stressful but satisfying, whereas the fact of becoming a mother was perceived as a victory both as a woman and as a transplant patient. Our results suggest that narrative medicine represents a significant professional tool for caring for transplant patients during pregnancy.

  19. [[History of Community Health in Africa. The Swiss Medical Missionaries' Endeavour in South Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabika, Hines

    2015-01-01

    It was not Dutch settlers nor British colonizers who introduced public and community health practice in north-eastern South Africa but medical doctors of the Swiss mission in southern Africa. While the history of medical knowledge transfer into 19th-20th century Africa emphasises colonial powers, this paper shows how countries without colonies contributed to expand western medical cultures, including public health. The Swiss took advantage of the local authorities' negligence, and implemented their own model of medicalization of African societies, understood as the way of improving health standards. They moved from a tolerated hospital-centred medicine to the practice of community health, which was uncommon at the time. Elim hospital's physicians moved back boundaries of segregationist policies, and sometime gave the impression of being involved in the political struggle against Apartheid. Thus, Swiss public health activities could later be seen as sorts of seeds that were planted and would partly reappear in 1994 with the ANC-projected national health policy.

  20. Total body irradiation in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fundagul Andic

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Total body irradiation is used in conjunction with chemotherapy as a conditioning regimen in the treatment of many disease such as leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, aplastic anemia, multiple myeloma and lymphoma prior to the hematopoetic stem cell transplantation. The main purposes of the hematopoetic stem cell transplantation are eradication of the recipient bone marrow and any residual cancer cells, creation of space in the receipient bone marrow for donor hematopoetic stem cells, and immunosuppression to prevent rejection of donor stem cells in the case of an allotransplant. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(3.000: 398-410

  1. 75 FR 62487 - Compassionate Allowances for Cardiovascular Disease and Multiple Organ Transplants, Office of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ...] Compassionate Allowances for Cardiovascular Disease and Multiple Organ Transplants, Office of the Commissioner... cardiovascular disease and multiple organ transplants, as well as topics covered at the hearing by: (1) e-mail... considering ways to quickly identify diseases and other serious medical conditions that obviously meet the...

  2. Building a community of practice in rural medical education: growing our own together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenecker, Randall L; Schmitz, David

    2017-01-01

    This article chronicles the rise, decline, and recent resurgence of rural training track residency programs (RTTs) in the USA over the past 30 years and the emergence of a healthy community of practice in rural medical education. This has occurred during a time in the USA when federal and state funding of graduate medical education has been relatively stagnant and the rules around finance and accreditation of rural programs have been challenging. Many of the early family residency programs developed in the 1970s included a curricular focus on rural practice. However, by the 1980s, these programs were not yet producing the desired numbers of rural physicians. In response, in 1986, Maudlin and others at the family medicine residency in Spokane developed the first 1-2 RTT in Colville, Washington. In the 1990s, and by 2000, early news of success led to a peak of 35 active programs. However, over the next decade these programs experienced significant hardship due to a lack of funding and a general decline in student interest in family medicine. By 2010, only 25 programs remained. In 2010, in an effort to sustain the 1-2 RTT as a national strategy in training physicians for rural practice, a federally funded consortium of individuals and programs established the RTT Technical Assistance program (RTT TA). Building on the pattern of peer support and collaboration set by earlier groups, the RTT TA consortium expanded the existing community of practice in rural medical education in support of RTTs. In-person meetings, peer consultation and visitation, coordinated efforts at student recruitment, and collaborative rural medical education research were all elements of the consortium's strategy. Rather than anchoring its efforts in medical schools or hospitals, this consortium engaged as partners a wider variety of stakeholders. This included physician educators still living and practicing in rural communities ('local experts'), rural medical educator peers, program directors

  3. Imaging findings in children with proliferative disorders following multivisceral transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L. [Tufts Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Kim, Heung Bae [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Harris, Marian H.; Vargas, Sara O. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, David [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Boston, MA (United States); Lee, Edward Y. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Departments of Radiology and Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Multivisceral transplantation represents an important treatment option for children with intestinal failure. The attendant immunosuppression can lead to a spectrum of cellular proliferations including benign and malignant smooth muscle tumors and lymphoproliferative disorders, many related to cellular dysregulation from Epstein-Barr virus infection. The purpose of this study is to investigate the rates of post-transplantation proliferative disorders among children with multivisceral transplantation and to characterize the imaging and pathological features of these disorders. We identified all consecutive children who underwent multivisceral transplant from August 2004 to October 2011 with at least 27 months of clinical and imaging follow-up. We reviewed medical records to determine the underlying causes of the multivisceral transplant, age at transplantation, onset of neoplasm development, and outcome. Two pediatric radiologists reviewed all imaging studies independently and diagnosis of disease was made by consensus interpretation. Pathological specimens were reviewed for histopathological findings of post-transplantation neoplasm in this pediatric patient population. The study population consisted of 14 consecutive pediatric patients (7 boys and 7 girls; mean age 26 months, range 4-113 months). Of these 14 children, 4 (29%) developed histologically confirmed post-transplant neoplasms at a mean time of 2.4 years after multivisceral transplantation. Types of neoplasms included post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in three (21%) and Epstein-Barr-virus-associated smooth muscle tumor in two (14%). (One child developed both neoplasms following transplantation). Both children with smooth muscle tumor associated with Epstein-Barr virus presented with characteristic hypointense solid masses with peripheral rim enhancement on cross-sectional imaging studies. The mortality rate of children who developed post-transplant neoplasms was higher than that of those

  4. Imaging findings in children with proliferative disorders following multivisceral transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L.; Kim, Heung Bae; Harris, Marian H.; Vargas, Sara O.; Zurakowski, David; Lee, Edward Y.

    2015-01-01

    Multivisceral transplantation represents an important treatment option for children with intestinal failure. The attendant immunosuppression can lead to a spectrum of cellular proliferations including benign and malignant smooth muscle tumors and lymphoproliferative disorders, many related to cellular dysregulation from Epstein-Barr virus infection. The purpose of this study is to investigate the rates of post-transplantation proliferative disorders among children with multivisceral transplantation and to characterize the imaging and pathological features of these disorders. We identified all consecutive children who underwent multivisceral transplant from August 2004 to October 2011 with at least 27 months of clinical and imaging follow-up. We reviewed medical records to determine the underlying causes of the multivisceral transplant, age at transplantation, onset of neoplasm development, and outcome. Two pediatric radiologists reviewed all imaging studies independently and diagnosis of disease was made by consensus interpretation. Pathological specimens were reviewed for histopathological findings of post-transplantation neoplasm in this pediatric patient population. The study population consisted of 14 consecutive pediatric patients (7 boys and 7 girls; mean age 26 months, range 4-113 months). Of these 14 children, 4 (29%) developed histologically confirmed post-transplant neoplasms at a mean time of 2.4 years after multivisceral transplantation. Types of neoplasms included post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) in three (21%) and Epstein-Barr-virus-associated smooth muscle tumor in two (14%). (One child developed both neoplasms following transplantation). Both children with smooth muscle tumor associated with Epstein-Barr virus presented with characteristic hypointense solid masses with peripheral rim enhancement on cross-sectional imaging studies. The mortality rate of children who developed post-transplant neoplasms was higher than that of those

  5. Mucormycosis in a Renal Transplant Recipient: Case Report and Comprehensive Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamim Hamdi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare but devastating infection. We present a case of fatal disseminated mucormycosis infection in a renal transplant patient. Uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and immunosuppression are the major predisposing factors to infection with Mucorales. Mucorales are angioinvasive and can infect any organ system. Lungs are the predominant site of infection in solid organ transplant recipients. Prompt diagnosis is challenging and influences outcome. Treatment involves a combination of surgical and medical therapies. Amphotericin B remains the cornerstone in the medical management of mucormycosis, although other agents have been used. Newer agents are promising.

  6. The necessity of strengthening the cooperation between tissue banks and organ transplant organizations at national, regional, and international levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Pedraza, Jorge

    2013-12-01

    The donation of tissues and organs increases significantly when tissue banks and organ transplant organizations work together in the procurement of organs and tissues at donor sources (hospitals, coroners system, organ procurement agencies, and funeral homes, among others). To achieve this important goal, national competent health authorities should considered the establishment of a mechanism that promote the widest possible cooperation between tissue banks and organ transplant organizations with hospitals, research medical institutions, universities, and other medical institutions and facilities. One of the issues that can facilitate this cooperation is the establishment of a coding and traceability system that could identify all tissues and organs used in transplant activities carried out in any country. The promotion of national, regional, and international cooperation between tissue banks and organ transplant organizations would enable the sharing of relevant information that could be important for medical practice and scientific studies carried out by many countries, particularly for those countries with a weak health care system.

  7. Leveraging medical taxonomies to improve knowledge management within online communities of practice: The knowledge maps system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Samuel Alan; Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

    2017-05-01

    Online communities of practice contain a wealth of information, stored in the free text of shared communications between community members. The Knowledge Maps (KMaps) system is designed to facilitate Knowledge Translation in online communities through multi-level analyses of the shared messages of these communications. Using state-of-the-art semantic mapping technologies (Metamap) the contents of the messages shared within an online community are mapped to terms from the MeSH medical lexicon, providing a multi-level topic-specific summary of the knowledge being shared within the community. Using the inherent hierarchical structure of the lexicon important insights can be found within the community. The KMaps system was applied to two medical mailing lists, the PPML (archives from 2009-02 to 2013-02) and SURGINET (archives from 2012-01 to 2013-04), identifying 27,924 and 50,597 medical terms respectively. KMaps identified content areas where both communities found interest, specifically around Diseases, 22% and 24% of the total terms, while also identifying field-specific areas that were more popular: SURGINET expressed an interest in Anatomy (14% vs 4%) while the PPML was more interested in Drugs (19% vs 9%). At the level of the individual KMaps identified 6 PPML users and 9 SURGINET users that had noticeably more contributions to the community than their peers, and investigated their personal areas of interest. The KMaps system provides valuable insights into the structure of both communities, identifying topics of interest/shared content areas and defining content-profiles for individual community members. The system provides a valuable addition to the online KT process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Soil Respiration and Bacterial Structure and Function after 17 Years of a Reciprocal Soil Transplant Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Bolton, Harvey; Fansler, Sarah; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Liu, Chongxuan; McCue, Lee Ann; Smith, Jeffrey; Bailey, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    The effects of climate change on soil organic matter-its structure, microbial community, carbon storage, and respiration response-remain uncertain and widely debated. In addition, the effects of climate changes on ecosystem structure and function are often modulated or delayed, meaning that short-term experiments are not sufficient to characterize ecosystem responses. This study capitalized on a long-term reciprocal soil transplant experiment to examine the response of dryland soils to climate change. The two transplant sites were separated by 500 m of elevation on the same mountain slope in eastern Washington state, USA, and had similar plant species and soil types. We resampled the original 1994 soil transplants and controls, measuring CO2 production, temperature response, enzyme activity, and bacterial community structure after 17 years. Over a laboratory incubation of 100 days, reciprocally transplanted soils respired roughly equal cumulative amounts of carbon as non-transplanted controls from the same site. Soils transplanted from the hot, dry, lower site to the cooler and wetter (difference of -5°C monthly maximum air temperature, +50 mm yr-1 precipitation) upper site exhibited almost no respiratory response to temperature (Q10 of 1.1), but soils originally from the upper, cooler site had generally higher respiration rates. The bacterial community structure of transplants did not differ significantly from that of untransplanted controls, however. Slight differences in local climate between the upper and lower Rattlesnake locations, simulated with environmental control chambers during the incubation, thus prompted significant differences in microbial activity, with no observed change to bacterial structure. These results support the idea that environmental shifts can influence soil C through metabolic changes, and suggest that microbial populations responsible for soil heterotrophic respiration may be constrained in surprising ways, even as shorter- and

  9. Children sold for transplants: medical and legal aspects. Amnesty International--Danish Working Group for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasting, U; Christensen, J; Glending, S

    1998-11-01

    Over the last few decades there has been a substantially higher percentage of successful organ transplants but also a significant imbalance between the demand for and the supply of organs, creating the basis for a highly profitable black market trade in human organs. Sometimes there are reports that children have been kidnapped, only to reappear later lacking one kidney, or that they simply disappear and are subsequently killed to have all their transplantable organs removed for profit. The European Union feels that there is a need for action and that it has a duty to act in this field, especially for ethical reasons. There is now established close co-operation between the various European transplant organizations. The legal protection of children with regard to organ transplantation is not specifically mentioned in the existing conventions because this issue was not foreseen at the time of their preparation. However, the issue is covered in a broader sense by more general provisions. There are endless rumours surrounding this area. Members of various organizations who travel in the suspected countries say that the trafficking in children who are sold for transplantation is well known, but it is too difficult and very dangerous to catch the people involved. We have to conclude that it has been impossible to prove or disprove the rumours, but they are consistent and we all, especially in the health care professions, have an obligation to be keenly aware of how and where organs are obtained.

  10. Use of clinical practice guidelines to promote best practice when managing clinical interventions for liver transplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Maree

    2009-06-01

    Limited organ availability and an increasing demand for organ transplantation has extended transplant waiting times and thus increased morbidity and mortality for potential recipients on waiting lists. The Queensland Liver Transplant Service identified use of clinical practice guidelines developed from evidence-based practice as a strategic clinical management/workflow tool that could improve clinical outcomes for patients awaiting liver transplant. An extensive review of publications related to the management of advanced liver disease in potential transplant recipients was undertaken and the supporting evidence was identified. In all stages of development of the guidelines, the multidisciplinary collaborative team of clinicians used recommended principles from The Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation collaboration. The liver transplant recipient coordinator acted as facilitator for the project, identifying positive factors and resolving obstacles. Key focus areas in optimizing medical management before liver transplant were identified with the aim of preventing disease progression and complications that would jeopardize patients' outcome. Clinical practice guidelines were developed for each key area to optimize care by promoting appropriate timing of clinical interventions. Practices that required change to comply with identified best practice were investigated, and clinical practice for the outpatient medical management of potential liver transplant recipients with chronic liver disease were developed collaboratively. These guidelines have been accepted and are being implemented within the gastroenterology and hepatology department at the Princess Alexandra Hospital.

  11. The pipeline of physiology courses in community colleges: to university, medical school, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Jenny; Pape-Lindstrom, Pamela

    2016-12-01

    Community colleges are significant in the landscape of undergraduate STEM (science technology, engineering, and mathematics) education (9), including biology, premedical, and other preprofessional education. Thirty percent of first-year medical school students in 2012 attended a community college. Students attend at different times in high school, their first 2 yr of college, and postbaccalaureate. The community college pathway is particularly important for traditionally underrepresented groups. Premedical students who first attend community college are more likely to practice in underserved communities (2). For many students, community colleges have significant advantages over 4-yr institutions. Pragmatically, they are local, affordable, and flexible, which accommodates students' work and family commitments. Academically, community colleges offer teaching faculty, smaller class sizes, and accessible learning support systems. Community colleges are fertile ground for universities and medical schools to recruit diverse students and support faculty. Community college students and faculty face several challenges (6, 8). There are limited interactions between 2- and 4-yr institutions, and the ease of transfer processes varies. In addition, faculty who study and work to improve the physiology education experience often encounter obstacles. Here, we describe barriers and detail existing resources and opportunities useful in navigating challenges. We invite physiology educators from 2- and 4-yr institutions to engage in sharing resources and facilitating physiology education improvement across institutions. Given the need for STEM majors and health care professionals, 4-yr colleges and universities will continue to benefit from students who take introductory biology, physiology, and anatomy and physiology courses at community colleges. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  12. Life after a lung transplant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graarup, Jytte; Mogensen, Elin Lindberg; Missel, Malene

    2017-01-01

    and challenges. They had received a new chance in life and were eager to fulfil their life hopes and dreams. At the same time, they were worried about the future. Having a lung transplant implies rules that have to be followed. What are the healthy choices they are supposed to make? And will there be a tomorrow...... and psychological challenges. The interviewees were happy to get another chance to live, although some of them suffered from medical side effects, postoperative complications and psychological problems. When asked about the future, interviewees stated that life could be described as (3) a balance of joy...... physically and psychologically challenging. Interviewees were aware of the prognosis for patients following lung transplantation. They expressed feelings of worry and insecurity but still had hopes and dreams. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The patients are troubled by both physical and psychological...

  13. Pacemaker Use Following Heart Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallidi, Hari R.; Bates, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: The incidence of permanent pacemaker implantation after orthotopic heart transplantation has been reported to be 2%-24%. Transplanted hearts usually exhibit sinus rhythm in the operating room following reperfusion, and most patients do not exhibit significant arrhythmias during the postoperative period. However, among the patients who do exhibit abnormalities, pacemakers may be implanted for early sinus node dysfunction but are rarely used after 6 months. Permanent pacing is often required for atrioventricular block. A different cohort of transplant patients presents later with bradycardia requiring pacemaker implantation, reported to occur in approximately 1.5% of patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate the indications for pacemaker implantation, compare the need for pacemakers following bicaval vs biatrial anastomosis, and examine the long-term outcomes of heart transplant patients who received pacemakers. Methods: For this retrospective, case-cohort, single-institution study, patients were identified from clinical research and administrative transplant databases. Information was supplemented with review of the medical records. Standard statistical techniques were used, with chi-square testing for categorical variables and the 2-tailed t test for continuous variables. Survival was compared with the use of log-rank methods. Results: Between January 1968 and February 2008, 1,450 heart transplants were performed at Stanford University. Eighty-four patients (5.8%) were identified as having had a pacemaker implanted. Of these patients, 65.5% (55) had the device implanted within 30 days of transplantation, and 34.5% (29) had late implantation. The mean survival of patients who had an early pacemaker implant was 6.4 years compared to 7.7 years for those with a late pacemaker implant (Ppacemaker implantation. Starting in 1997, a bicaval technique was used for implantation. The incidence of pacemaker implantation by technique was 2.0% for

  14. [Chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuret, R; Timsit, M O; Kleinclauss, F

    2016-11-01

    To report epidemiology and characteristics of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients and renal transplant candidates, and to evaluate access to waiting list and results of renal transplantation. An exhaustive systematic review of the scientific literature was performed in the Medline database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) and Embase (http://www.embase.com) using different associations of the following keywords: "chronic kidney disease, epidemiology, kidney transplantation, cost, survival, graft, brain death, cardiac arrest, access, allocation". French legal documents have been reviewed using the government portal (http://www.legifrance.gouv.fr). Articles were selected according to methods, language of publication and relevance. The reference lists were used to identify additional historical studies of interest. Both prospective and retrospective series, in French and English, as well as review articles and recommendations were selected. In addition, French national transplant and health agencies (http://www.agence-biomedecine.fr and http://www.has-sante.fr) databases were screened using identical keywords. A total of 3234 articles, 6 official reports and 3 newspaper articles were identified; after careful selection 99 publications were eligible for our review. The increasing prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) leads to worsen organ shortage. Renal transplantation remains the best treatment option for ESRD, providing recipients with an increased survival and quality of life, at lower costs than other renal replacement therapies. The never-ending lengthening of the waiting list raises issues regarding treatment strategies and candidates' selection, and underlines the limits of organ sharing without additional source of kidneys available for transplantation. Allocation policies aim to reduce medical or geographical disparities regarding enrollment on a waiting list or access to an allotransplant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Medical students' and GP registrars' accommodation needs in the rural community: insight from a Victorian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gil-Soo; Wearne, Ben; O'Meara, Peter; McGrail, Matthew; Chesters, Janice

    2003-01-01

    Medical education in Australia is currently entering a new era, including support for the significant extension of medical students and general practitioner (GP) registrars' training programs in rural communities. This commitment to rural medical student and general practitioner recruitment and retention has made the provision of accommodation in rural communities a vital issue. This study has found that approximately half of all medical students on placement with rural GPs are currently accommodated with their GP supervisor or with other practice staff. This is a burden for many GPs and when the anticipated increase in the frequency and length of rural placements occurs what is currently a burden will become unsustainable. The changing gender and cultural demographics of medical students and rural general practitioners will also contribute to stresses on this accommodation system. It is important to have a systematic approach towards more appropriate and sustainable models of accommodation for both medical students and GP registrars.

  16. Measuring and monitoring equity in access to deceased donor kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, D E; Wilk, A R; Toll, A E; Harper, A M; Lehman, R R; Robinson, A M; Noreen, S A; Edwards, E B; Klassen, D K

    2018-05-07

    The Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network monitors progress toward strategic goals such as increasing the number of transplants and improving waitlisted patient, living donor, and transplant recipient outcomes. However, a methodology for assessing system performance in providing equity in access to transplants was lacking. We present a novel approach for quantifying the degree of disparity in access to deceased donor kidney transplants among waitlisted patients and determine which factors are most associated with disparities. A Poisson rate regression model was built for each of 29 quarterly, period-prevalent cohorts (January 1, 2010-March 31, 2017; 5 years pre-kidney allocation system [KAS], 2 years post-KAS) of active kidney waiting list registrations. Inequity was quantified as the outlier-robust standard deviation (SD w ) of predicted transplant rates (log scale) among registrations, after "discounting" for intentional, policy-induced disparities (eg, pediatric priority) by holding such factors constant. The overall SD w declined by 40% after KAS implementation, suggesting substantially increased equity. Risk-adjusted, factor-specific disparities were measured with the SD w after holding all other factors constant. Disparities associated with calculated panel-reactive antibodies decreased sharply. Donor service area was the factor most associated with access disparities post-KAS. This methodology will help the transplant community evaluate tradeoffs between equity and utility-centric goals when considering new policies and help monitor equity in access as policies change. © 2018 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  17. Community pharmacist collaboration with a patient-centered medical home: Establishment of a patient-centered medical neighborhood and payment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luder, Heidi R; Shannon, Pam; Kirby, James; Frede, Stacey M

    To determine the feasibility of a partnership between a community pharmacy and a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) by measuring the impact on office- and patient-level clinical outcomes. Kroger Pharmacy and a PCMH practice in Cincinnati, OH. The Kroger Co. is a large grocery store chain that operates 102 pharmacies in the Cincinnati-Dayton marketing area. The PCMH practice is an accredited PCMH office serving more than 9000 patients in the Cincinnati area. In a medical neighborhood, a PCMH coordinates care with other local specialty practices or partners. A partnership between the community pharmacy chain and the PCMH was established to create a medical neighborhood. The pharmacist spent 2 half-days per week at the PCMH. The pharmacist provided initial medication therapy management appointments in the PCMH and offered follow-up services in the office, the pharmacy, or both, depending on patient preference. The pharmacy received a capitated payment per patient per month for a predetermined number of 1000 high-risk patients. Office-level changes in clinical outcomes such as A1C, blood pressure, and lipid measures were collected and compared with those of a similar control office. In addition, patient-level outcomes such as change in A1C, blood pressure, lipids, and weight were measured. One hundred five patients were seen by the pharmacist during the study period, with 1.5% of the total managed at the office. There was a statistically significant increase in influenza vaccinations received. On a patient level, A1C and systolic blood pressure significantly improved. This project represents an exciting opportunity for community pharmacists to expand their scope of services through direct partnership with PCMHs and maintain a sustainable reimbursement structure. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Current concepts on cytomegalovirus infection after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Oh; Razonable, Raymund R

    2010-09-27

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common viral pathogen that negatively impacts on the outcome of liver transplantation. CMV cause febrile illness often accompanied by bone marrow suppression, and in some cases, invades tissues including the transplanted allograft. In addition, CMV has been significantly associated with an increased predisposition to allograft rejection, accelerated hepatitis C recurrence, and other opportunistic infections, as well as reduced overall patient and allograft survival. To negate the adverse effects of CMV on outcome, its prevention, whether through antiviral prophylaxis or preemptive therapy, is regarded as an essential component to the medical management of liver transplant patients. Two recent guidelines have suggested that antiviral prophylaxis or preemptive therapy are similarly effective in preventing CMV disease in modest-risk CMV-seropositive liver transplant recipients, while antiviral prophylaxis is the preferred strategy over preemptive therapy for the prevention of CMV disease in high-risk recipients [CMV-seronegative recipients of liver allografts from CMV-seropositive donors (D+/R-)]. However, antiviral prophylaxis has only delayed the onset of CMV disease in many CMV D+/R- liver transplant recipients, and at least in one study, such occurrence of late-onset primary CMV disease was significantly associated with increased mortality after liver transplantation. Therefore, optimized strategies for prevention are needed, and aggressive treatment of CMV infection and disease should be pursued. The standard treatment of CMV disease consists of intravenous ganciclovir or oral valganciclovir, and if feasible, one should also reduce the degree of immunosuppression. In one recent controlled clinical trial, valganciclovir was found to be as effective and safe as intravenous ganciclovir for the treatment of mild to moderate CMV disease in solid organ (including liver) transplant recipients. In this article, the authors review the

  19. A Randomized Trial of a Multicomponent Intervention to Promote Medication Adherence: The Teen Adherence in Kidney Transplant Effectiveness of Intervention Trial (TAKE-IT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Bethany J; Pai, Ahna L H; Zelikovsky, Nataliya; Amaral, Sandra; Bell, Lorraine; Dharnidharka, Vikas R; Hebert, Diane; Holly, Crystal; Knauper, Baerbel; Matsell, Douglas; Phan, Veronique; Rogers, Rachel; Smith, Jodi M; Zhao, Huaqing; Furth, Susan L

    2018-03-15

    Poor adherence to immunosuppressive medications is a major cause of premature graft loss among children and young adults. Multicomponent interventions have shown promise but have not been fully evaluated. Unblinded parallel-arm randomized trial to assess the efficacy of a clinic-based adherence-promoting intervention. Prevalent kidney transplant recipients 11 to 24 years of age and 3 or more months posttransplantation at 8 kidney transplantation centers in Canada and the United States (February 2012 to May 2016) were included. Adherence was electronically monitored in all participants during a 3-month run-in, followed by a 12-month intervention. Participants assigned to the TAKE-IT intervention could choose to receive text message, e-mail, and/or visual cue dose reminders and met with a coach at 3-month intervals when adherence data from the prior 3 months were reviewed with the participant. "Action-Focused Problem Solving" was used to address adherence barriers selected as important by the participant. Participants assigned to the control group met with coaches at 3-month intervals but received no feedback about adherence data. The primary outcomes were electronically measured "taking" adherence (the proportion of prescribed doses of immunosuppressive medications taken) and "timing" adherence (the proportion of doses of immunosuppressive medications taken between 1 hour before and 2 hours after the prescribed time of administration) on each day of observation. Secondary outcomes included the standard deviation of tacrolimus trough concentrations, self-reported adherence, acute rejection, and graft failure. 81 patients were assigned to intervention (median age, 15.5 years; 57% male) and 88 to the control group (median age, 15.8 years; 61% male). Electronic adherence data were available for 64 intervention and 74 control participants. Participants in the intervention group had significantly greater odds of taking prescribed medications (OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1

  20. Factors limiting deceased organ donation: focus groups' perspective from culturally diverse community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, L P

    2010-06-01

    In-depth understanding of cultural and religious factors limiting organ donation of three ethnic populations (Malay, Chinese, and Indian) in Southeast Asia is lacking. Identification of factors limiting organ donation among these three ethnic groups will provide insights into culturally appropriate strategies to promote acceptance of organ donation in a multiethnic Asian community. A total of 17 focus group discussions (105 participants) were conducted between September and December 2008. Participants were members of the general public aged 18 to 60 years, recruited through convenient sampling around the Klang Valley area of Malaysia. Although the majority had favorable attitudes toward deceased organ donation and transplantation, a diversity of myths and misinformation were unearthed from the discussions across the ethnic groups. These include perceived religious prohibition, cultural myths and misperceptions, fear of disfigurement, fear of surgery, distrust of the medical system, and family disapproval. Culture and religious beliefs played important prohibitive roles among those opposed to organ donations. There were distinctive ethnic differences in cultural and religious concerns regarding organ donation. Less-educated and rural groups appeared to have more misconceptions than the well-educated and the urban groups. Our findings may assist organ donation and transplantation organizations to reach diverse sociodemographic and ethnic communities with culture-specific information about organ donation. The involvement of community and religious leaders is critical in organ donation requests.

  1. Kidney transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... always take your medicine as directed. Alternative Names Renal transplant; Transplant - kidney Patient Instructions Kidney removal - discharge Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow Kidneys Kidney transplant - ...

  2. Pharmacoepidemiology of anemia in kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Kewalramani, Reshma; Rutstein, Mark; Gabardi, Steven; Vonvisger, Tania; Chandraker, Anil

    2004-05-01

    ABSTRACT. Anemia has long been known to be a complication of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and it has been linked to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although kidney transplant recipients (KTR) are prone to experiencing cardiovascular outcomes, little is known about the epidemiology of anemia in this population. With few exceptions, studies to date have not fully evaluated the associations between posttransplant anemia (PTA) and medications commonly used in KTR, particularly immunosuppressant drugs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB). The authors aimed to specifically investigate possible associations between these drugs and PTA. Detailed medical information was retrospectively collected on 374 consecutive KTR from our transplant clinic. Univariate/multivariate linear regression models were used to test for associations between hematocrit (HCT) and other covariates, and logistic regression models were used to detect independent predictors of PTA, defined as HCT <33%. The mean time since transplantation was 7.7 yr, and mean creatinine was 2.2 mg/dl. The prevalence of PTA was 28.6%. Ten percent of all patients were on erythropoietin therapy, but only 41.6% of patients whose HCT was <30 received this treatment. From multivariate analyses, the authors found that female gender and lower renal function were associated with lower HCT (both P < 0.001). Patients on ACEI had significantly lower HCT (P = 0.005) compared with patients without such treatment. In addition, a significant curvilinear dose-response relationship was found between ACEI dose and HCT. Among the immunosuppressant drugs, mycophenolate mofetil (P = 0.05) and tacrolimus (P = 0.02) were associated with a lower HCT. The authors conclude that PTA is prevalent and undertreated in KTR. Several medications that are possibly modifiable correlates of PTR deserve further study.

  3. What impact does community service learning have on medical students' appreciation of population health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essa-Hadad, J; Murdoch-Eaton, D; Rudolf, M C J

    2015-11-01

    The Bar Ilan Faculty of Medicine places public health as a priority in its medical curriculum, emphasizing its importance by strategically placing the required course as first on entry into medical school. Students are introduced to the importance of population health and community engagement through participatory community learning experiences. This study aims to examine how participatory community teaching methods impact students' understanding and attitudes towards community health. Mixed quantitative and qualitative design. 75 first year students completed the required public health course utilizing participatory community methods, including community visits, Team Based Learning, an ethnic forum, and lifestyle medicine. Evaluation comprised skills assessment through project work, analysis of reflective notes and comparison of assessment scores with students in the previous year who experienced a formal lecture-only based curriculum. Students acquired public health skills, including conducting a needs assessment, searching for research evidence and designing an evaluation framework. Reflective notes revealed in-depth understanding not only of course aims, but an appreciation of the social determinants of health and the local community. Test marks indicated public health knowledge reached a comparable standard (83 ± 7.3) to the previous year (85 ± 9.3; P = 0.431). Participatory community learning equips students with public health skills, knowledge, and enhanced understanding of communities. It offers a way to effectively teach public health, while emphasizing the extended role and societal responsibilities of doctors. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Creating a longitudinal integrated clerkship with mutual benefits for an academic medical center and a community health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poncelet, Ann Noelle; Mazotti, Lindsay A; Blumberg, Bruce; Wamsley, Maria A; Grennan, Tim; Shore, William B

    2014-01-01

    The longitudinal integrated clerkship is a model of clinical education driven by tenets of social cognitive theory, situated learning, and workplace learning theories, and built on a foundation of continuity between students, patients, clinicians, and a system of care. Principles and goals of this type of clerkship are aligned with primary care principles, including patient-centered care and systems-based practice. Academic medical centers can partner with community health systems around a longitudinal integrated clerkship to provide mutual benefits for both organizations, creating a sustainable model of clinical training that addresses medical education and community health needs. A successful one-year longitudinal integrated clerkship was created in partnership between an academic medical center and an integrated community health system. Compared with traditional clerkship students, students in this clerkship had better scores on Clinical Performance Examinations, internal medicine examinations, and high perceptions of direct observation of clinical skills.Advantages for the academic medical center include mitigating the resources required to run a longitudinal integrated clerkship while providing primary care training and addressing core competencies such as systems-based practice, practice-based learning, and interprofessional care. Advantages for the community health system include faculty development, academic appointments, professional satisfaction, and recruitment.Success factors include continued support and investment from both organizations' leadership, high-quality faculty development, incentives for community-based physician educators, and emphasis on the mutually beneficial relationship for both organizations. Development of a longitudinal integrated clerkship in a community health system can serve as a model for developing and expanding these clerkship options for academic medical centers.

  5. Skin Findings in Renal Transplantation Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Kartal

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It was aimed to identify skin findings those were seen in patients who undergone renal transplantation. Methods: Patients who have been followed in Erciyes University Nephrology Hospital renal transplantation outpatient clinic were included in the study. They were evaluated for dermatologic findings during routine controls. Age, gender, transplantation date, identity of organ donor, history of medications, dermatological history and dermatological findings during examination were recorded. Biopsy was performed when needed. Results: In total 94 patients, 25 female (26.6% and 69 male (73.4%, were recruited to the study. Mean age was 36±10 years. The most frequent skin finding was drug-related acne (n=20. Most common infectious disease was verruca (n=17. There were viral disease other than verruca such as herpes zoster (n=3, superficial mycosis such as onychomycosis (n=5, tinea versicolor, tinea pedis and bacterial skin disease (n=2, and paronychia (n=1 and pre-malign lesions such as actinic cheilitis and bowenoid papulosis. Besides these, stria (n=3, kserosis (n=2, cornu cutaneum, café-au-lait spots, sebaceous hyperplasia and seborrheic dermatitis, skin tag, hypertrichosis, unguis incarinatus and calcinosis were other skin findings those were seen. No malign skin lesion was observed in any of patients. Conclusion: Miscellaneous skin lesions should develop in patients those undergone renal transplantation due to long-term utilization of various immunosuppressive drugs.

  6. Islet product characteristics and factors related to successful human islet transplantation from the Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry (CITR) 1999-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A N; Naziruddin, B; Lockridge, A; Tiwari, M; Loganathan, G; Takita, M; Matsumoto, S; Papas, K; Trieger, M; Rainis, H; Kin, T; Kay, T W; Wease, S; Messinger, S; Ricordi, C; Alejandro, R; Markmann, J; Kerr-Conti, J; Rickels, M R; Liu, C; Zhang, X; Witkowski, P; Posselt, A; Maffi, P; Secchi, A; Berney, T; O'Connell, P J; Hering, B J; Barton, F B

    2014-11-01

    The Collaborative Islet Transplant Registry (CITR) collects data on clinical islet isolations and transplants. This retrospective report analyzed 1017 islet isolation procedures performed for 537 recipients of allogeneic clinical islet transplantation in 1999-2010. This study describes changes in donor and islet isolation variables by era and factors associated with quantity and quality of final islet products. Donor body weight and BMI increased significantly over the period (pIslet yield measures have improved with time including islet equivalent (IEQ)/particle ratio and IEQs infused. The average dose of islets infused significantly increased in the era of 2007-2010 when compared to 1999-2002 (445.4±156.8 vs. 421.3±155.4×0(3) IEQ; pIslet purity and total number of β cells significantly improved over the study period (pislets has remained consistently very high through this period, and differs substantially from nonclinical islets. In multivariate analysis of all recipient, donor and islet factors, and medical management factors, the only islet product characteristic that correlated with clinical outcomes was total IEQs infused. This analysis shows improvements in both quantity and some quality criteria of clinical islets produced over 1999-2010, and these parallel improvements in clinical outcomes over the same period. © 2014 The Authors. American Journal of Transplantation Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  7. Long-term use of amiodarone before heart transplantation significantly reduces early post-transplant atrial fibrillation and is not associated with increased mortality after heart transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivinius R

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Rasmus Rivinius,1 Matthias Helmschrott,1 Arjang Ruhparwar,2 Bastian Schmack,2 Christian Erbel,1 Christian A Gleissner,1 Mohammadreza Akhavanpoor,1 Lutz Frankenstein,1 Fabrice F Darche,1 Patrick A Schweizer,1 Dierk Thomas,1 Philipp Ehlermann,1 Tom Bruckner,3 Hugo A Katus,1 Andreas O Doesch1 1Department of Cardiology, Angiology and Pneumology, 2Department of Cardiac Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, 3Institute for Medical Biometry and Informatics, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Background: Amiodarone is a frequently used antiarrhythmic drug in patients with end-stage heart failure. Given its long half-life, pre-transplant use of amiodarone has been controversially discussed, with divergent results regarding morbidity and mortality after heart transplantation (HTX.Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term use of amiodarone before HTX on early post-transplant atrial fibrillation (AF and mortality after HTX.Methods: Five hundred and thirty patients (age ≥18 years receiving HTX between June 1989 and December 2012 were included in this retrospective single-center study. Patients with long-term use of amiodarone before HTX (≥1 year were compared to those without long-term use (none or <1 year of amiodarone. Primary outcomes were early post-transplant AF and mortality after HTX. The Kaplan–Meier estimator using log-rank tests was applied for freedom from early post-transplant AF and survival.Results: Of the 530 patients, 74 (14.0% received long-term amiodarone therapy, with a mean duration of 32.3±26.3 months. Mean daily dose was 223.0±75.0 mg. Indications included AF, Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome, ventricular tachycardia, and ventricular fibrillation. Patients with long-term use of amiodarone before HTX had significantly lower rates of early post-transplant AF (P=0.0105. Further, Kaplan–Meier analysis of freedom from early post-transplant AF showed significantly lower rates of AF in this

  8. Pancreatic Islet Cell Transplantation: A new era in transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Warnock, Garth L.; Rajotte, Ray V.

    1992-01-01

    Transplantation of insulin-producing tissue offers a physiologic approach to restoration of glycemic control. Whereas transplantation of vascularized pancreatic grafts has recently achieved encouraging results, pancreatic islet cell transplantation holds the promise of low morbidity and reduced requirements for agressive immunosuppression for recipients. Islet cell transplantation was recently demonstrated to induce euglycemia with insulin independence.

  9. Physician reported adherence to immunosuppressants in renal transplant patients: Prevalence, agreement, and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, Selma; Bertram, Anna; Zimmermann, Tanja; Schiffer, Mario; de Zwaan, Martina

    2015-11-01

    Adherence to immunosuppressants (IS) is crucial to prevent allograft rejection. Even though there is evidence that non-adherence to IS among kidney transplant recipients is common, it is rarely routinely assessed in clinical practice. Especially, little is known about how physicians estimate patients' adherence to IS medication. In a single center, cross-sectional study adult patients at least 1 year after kidney transplantation were asked to complete measures of adherence (BAASIS©, Transplant Effect Questionnaire) and of general psychopathology (anxiety, depression, perceived social support). Also the physicians were asked to estimate their patients' adherence. Medical data (time since transplantation, treatment for rejection, IS serum trough levels and target levels) were taken from the patients' charts. Physicians rated 22 of 238 (9.2%) patients as non-adherent. Physicians' estimations of non-adherence were lower compared to the results of the self-ratings and biopsy-proven rejections. No association was found between physicians' estimates and the variability of IS through levels. Significantly more women and patients who reported that their native language was not German were rated as non-adherent by the physicians. Also, physician-rated non-adherent patients reported significantly higher depression and anxiety scores as well as less social support compared to adherent patients. Our results suggest that physicians tend to underestimate patient non-adherence to IS medication. They appear to use observable cues such as sex, language skills, and elevated anxiety and depression scores in particular, to make inferences about an individual patient's adherence. Underestimation of medication non-adherence may impede physicians' ability to provide high quality care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Kidney Exchange to Overcome Financial Barriers to Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, M A; Dunn, T B; Kuhr, C S; Marsh, C L; Rogers, J; Rees, S E; Cicero, A; Reece, L J; Roth, A E; Ekwenna, O; Fumo, D E; Krawiec, K D; Kopke, J E; Jain, S; Tan, M; Paloyo, S R

    2017-03-01

    Organ shortage is the major limitation to kidney transplantation in the developed world. Conversely, millions of patients in the developing world with end-stage renal disease die because they cannot afford renal replacement therapy-even when willing living kidney donors exist. This juxtaposition between countries with funds but no available kidneys and those with available kidneys but no funds prompts us to propose an exchange program using each nation's unique assets. Our proposal leverages the cost savings achieved through earlier transplantation over dialysis to fund the cost of kidney exchange between developed-world patient-donor pairs with immunological barriers and developing-world patient-donor pairs with financial barriers. By making developed-world health care available to impoverished patients in the developing world, we replace unethical transplant tourism with global kidney exchange-a modality equally benefitting rich and poor. We report the 1-year experience of an initial Filipino pair, whose recipient was transplanted in the United states with an American donor's kidney at no cost to him. The Filipino donor donated to an American in the United States through a kidney exchange chain. Follow-up care and medications in the Philippines were supported by funds from the United States. We show that the logistical obstacles in this approach, although considerable, are surmountable. © 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  11. Prevalence and Modifiable Determinants of Non-Adherence in Adult Kidney Transplant Recipients in a German Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, Sandra; Morawa, Eva; Stößel, Lisa; Jank, Sabine; Vitinius, Frank; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Erim, Yesim

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence and the modifiable determinants of non-adherence in adult kidney transplant patients in follow-up care. In 74 patients at least six months post-transplant, self-reported adherence (Basel Assessment of Adherence to ImmunosuppressiveMedications Scale, BAASIS©), subjective experience and attitudes after transplantation (Medication Experience Scale for Immunosuppressants, MESI), and depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale,HADSD) were assessed. Non-adherence to any of the four BAASIS© items was 24.3%. For the sub-dimensions: dose taking, drug holidays, timing deviation more than two hours from prescribed time, and dose reduction, the non-adherence levelswere 9.5%, 0%,17.6% and 2.7%, respectively. Marital status, negative beliefs towards immunosuppressants, and prominent anxiety and depression were associated with non-adherence. Screening for adherence and its indicators is of substantial importance in communication with renal transplant recipients. After detecting non-adherence, supportive interventions can be offered to the patients.

  12. S.I. No 189 of 1988, European Communities (Medical Ionizing Radiation) Regulations, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    The Regulations provide that all those engaged in the use of ionizing radiation for medical (including dental) purposes must be competent in radiation protection and have appropriate training. They also specify that the exposure of a patient to ionizing radiation must be medically justified and the dose delivered must be as low as is reasonably achievable. The Regulations implement the provisions of the Directive of the Council of the European Communities No 84/466 Euratom of 3 September 1984 laying down basic measures for the radiation protection of persons undergoing medical examination or treatment [fr

  13. Patient-reported non-adherence and immunosuppressant trough levels are associated with rejection after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Jennifer; Reber, Sandra; Stoessel, Lisa; Waldmann, Elisabeth; Jank, Sabine; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Grundmann, Franziska; Vitinius, Frank; de Zwaan, Martina; Bertram, Anna; Erim, Yesim

    2017-03-29

    Different measures of non-adherence to immunosuppressant (IS) medication have been found to be associated with rejection episodes after successful transplantation. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether graft rejection after renal transplantation is associated with patient-reported IS medication non-adherence and IS trough level variables (IS trough level variability and percentage of sub-therapeutic IS trough levels). Patient-reported non-adherence, IS trough level variability, percentage of sub-therapeutic IS trough levels, and acute biopsy-proven late allograft rejections were assessed in 267 adult renal transplant recipients who were ≥12 months post-transplantation. The rate of rejection was 13.5%. IS trough level variability, percentage of sub-therapeutic IS trough levels as well as patient-reported non-adherence were all significantly and positively associated with rejection, but not with each other. Logistic regression analyses revealed that only the percentage of sub-therapeutic IS trough levels and age at transplantation remained significantly associated with rejection. Particularly, the percentage of sub-therapeutic IS trough levels is associated with acute rejections after kidney transplantation whereas IS trough level variability and patient-reported non-adherence seem to be of subordinate importance. Patient-reported non-adherence and IS trough level variables were not correlated; thus, non-adherence should always be measured in a multi-methodological approach. Further research concerning the best combination of non-adherence measures is needed.

  14. Indications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations and therapeutic strategies of accidental irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Produced by a group of experts, this document first discusses the issue of accidental irradiations in terms of medical management. They notably outline the peculiar characteristics of these irradiations with respect to therapeutic irradiations. They agreed on general principles regarding casualty sorting criteria and process, and their medical treatment (systematic hematopoiesis stimulation, allogeneic transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells). They discuss some practical aspects of these issues: casualty sorting within a therapeutic perspective (actions to be performed within 48 hours), therapeutic strategies (support therapy, use of cytokines, and therapy by hematopoietic stem cell transplant). They state a set of recommendations regarding the taking into care and diagnosis, therapeutic strategies, research perspectives, and teaching

  15. Collaborating with consumer and community representatives in health and medical research in Australia: results from an evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartu Anne E

    2011-05-01

    consumer representatives and researchers. The National Health and Medical Research Council in Australia expects researchers to work in partnership and involve consumer and community representatives in health and medical research, and to evaluate community and consumer participation. It is important to demonstrate whether consumer and community participation makes a difference to health and medical research.

  16. Collaborating with consumer and community representatives in health and medical research in Australia: results from an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Janet M; D'Antoine, Heather A; France, Kathryn E; McKenzie, Anne E; Henley, Nadine; Bartu, Anne E; Elliott, Elizabeth J; Bower, Carol

    2011-05-14

    Medical Research Council in Australia expects researchers to work in partnership and involve consumer and community representatives in health and medical research, and to evaluate community and consumer participation. It is important to demonstrate whether consumer and community participation makes a difference to health and medical research.

  17. Patient attitudes toward mobile phone-based health monitoring: questionnaire study among kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillicuddy, John William; Weiland, Ana Katherine; Frenzel, Ronja Maximiliane; Mueller, Martina; Brunner-Jackson, Brenda Marie; Taber, David James; Baliga, Prabhakar Kalyanpur; Treiber, Frank Anton

    2013-01-08

    Mobile phone based remote monitoring of medication adherence and physiological parameters has the potential of improving long-term graft outcomes in the recipients of kidney transplants. This technology is promising as it is relatively inexpensive, can include intuitive software and may offer the ability to conduct close patient monitoring in a non-intrusive manner. This includes the optimal management of comorbidities such as hypertension and diabetes. There is, however, a lack of data assessing the attitudes of renal transplant recipients toward this technology, especially among ethnic minorities. To assess the attitudes of renal transplant recipients toward mobile phone based remote monitoring and management of their medical regimen; and to identify demographic or clinical characteristics that impact on this attitude. After a 10 minute demonstration of a prototype mobile phone based monitoring system, a 10 item questionnaire regarding attitude toward remote monitoring and the technology was administered to the participants, along with the 10 item Perceived Stress Scale and the 7 item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale. Between February and April 2012, a total of 99 renal transplant recipients were identified and agreed to participate in the survey. The results of the survey indicate that while 90% (87/97) of respondents own a mobile phone, only 7% (7/98) had any prior knowledge of mobile phone based remote monitoring. Despite this, the majority of respondents, 79% (78/99), reported a positive attitude toward the use of a prototype system if it came at no cost to themselves. Blacks were more likely than whites to own smartphones (43.1%, 28/65 vs 20.6%, 7/34; P=.03) and held a more positive attitude toward free use of the prototype system than whites (4.25±0.88 vs 3.76±1.07; P=.02). The data demonstrates that kidney transplant recipients have a positive overall attitude toward mobile phone based health technology (mHealth). Additionally, the data demonstrates

  18. Community pharmacy-based medication therapy management services: financial impact for patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruisinger JF

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the direct financial impact for patients resulting from Medication Therapy Management (MTM interventions made by community pharmacists. Secondary objectives include evaluating the patient and physician acceptance rates of the community pharmacists’ recommended MTM interventions.Methods: This was a retrospective observational study conducted at 20 Price Chopper and Hen House grocery store chain pharmacies in the Kansas City metro area from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010. Study patients were Medicare Part D beneficiaries eligible for MTM services. The primary outcome was the change in patient out-of-pocket prescription medication expense as a result of MTM services.Results: Of 128 patients included in this study, 68% experienced no out-of-pocket financial impact on their medication expenses as a result of MTM services. A total of 27% of the patients realized a cost-savings (USD440.50 per year, (SD=289.69 while another 5% of patients saw a cost increase in out-of-pocket expense (USD255.66 per year, (SD=324.48. The net financial impact for all 128 patients who participated in MTM services was an average savings of USD102.83 per patient per year (SD=269.18, p<0.0001. Pharmacists attempted a total of 732 recommendations; 391 (53% were accepted by both the patient and their prescriber. A total of 341 (47% recommendations were not accepted because of patient refusal (290, 85% or prescriber refusal (51, 15%.Conclusions: Patient participation in MTM services reduces patient out-of-pocket medication expense. However, this savings is driven by only 32% of subjects who are experiencing a financial impact on out-of-pocket medication expense. Additionally, the majority of the pharmacists’ recommended interventions (53% were accepted by patients and prescribers.

  19. Current trends in immunosuppressive therapies for renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ruth-Ann; Gabardi, Steven

    2012-11-15

    Current trends in immunosuppressive therapies for renal transplant recipients are reviewed. The common premise for immunosuppressive therapies in renal transplantation is to use multiple agents to work on different immunologic targets. The use of a multidrug regimen allows for pharmacologic activity at several key steps in the T-cell replication process and lower dosages of each individual agent, thereby producing fewer drug-related toxicities. In general, there are three stages of clinical immunosuppression: induction therapy, maintenance therapy, and treatment of an established acute rejection episode. Only immunosuppressive therapies used for maintenance therapy are discussed in detail in this review. The most common maintenance immunosuppressive agents can be divided into five classes: (1) the calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) (cyclosporine and tacrolimus), (2) costimulation blockers (belatacept), (3) mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (sirolimus and everolimus), (4) antiproliferatives (azathioprine and mycophenolic acid derivatives), and (5) corticosteroids. Immunosuppressive regimens vary among transplantation centers but most often include a CNI and an adjuvant agent, with or without corticosteroids. Selection of appropriate immunosuppressive regimens should be patient specific, taking into account the medications' pharmacologic properties, adverse-event profile, and potential drug-drug interactions, as well as the patient's preexisting diseases, risk of rejection, and medication regimen. Advancements in transplant immunosuppression have resulted in a significant reduction in acute cellular rejection and a modest increase in long-term patient and graft survival. Because the optimal immunosuppression regimen is still unknown, immunosuppressant use should be influenced by institutional preference and tailored to the immunologic risk of the patient and adverse-effect profile of the drug.

  20. Infantile cystinosis: From dialysis to renal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel Jellouli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease characterised by the accumulation of the amino acid cystine in different organs and tissues. It is a multisystemic disease that can present with renal and extra-renal manifestations. In this report, we present the first case of transplanted nephropathic cystinosis in a Tunisian child. A 4-year-old Tunisian boy born to nonconsanguineous parents, was treated in our medical services in 1990 for cystinosis. Since the age of five months, he developed symptoms of severe weight loss, vomiting, dehydration, and polyuria. He manifested the Toni Debré Fanconi syndrome. Slit lamp examination of the anterior segment of both eyes revealed fine, shiny crystal-like deposits diffusely distributed in the corneal epithelium and the stroma. Our patient had renal failure. At the age of seven, he reached terminal chronic renal failure and was treated with peritoneal dialysis. Hemodialysis was started at the age of nine years. At the age of 13 years, he received a renal transplantation and was started on cysteamine 1999, five months after the renal transplantation. Currently, the patient is 28-year-old. The graft has survived 15 years after the transplantation. Renal functions were stable with a serum creatinine of 123 μmol/L at last follow-up.