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Sample records for transparent phosphorescent oleds

  1. Novel Smart Windows Based on Transparent Phosphorescent OLEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian D' Andrade; Stephen Forest

    2006-09-15

    In this program, Universal Display Corporation (UDC) and Princeton University developed the use of white transparent phosphorescent organic light emitting devices (PHOLEDs{trademark}) to make low-cost ''transparent OLED (TOLED) smart windows'', that switch rapidly from being a highly efficient solid-state light source to being a transparent window. PHOLEDs are ideal for large area devices, and the UDC-Princeton team has demonstrated white PHOLEDs with efficiencies of >24 lm/W at a luminance of 1,000 cd/m{sup 2}. TOLEDs have transparencies >70% over the visible wavelengths of light, but their transparency drops to less than 5% for wavelengths shorter than 350 nm, so they can also be used as ultraviolet (UV) light filters. In addition to controlling the flow of UV radiation, TOLEDs coupled with an electromechanical or electrically activated reflecting shutter on a glass window can be employed to control the flow of heat from infrared (IR) radiation by varying the reflectance/transparency of the glass for wavelengths greater than 800nm. One particularly attractive shutter technology is reversible electrochromic mirrors (REM). Our goal was therefore to integrate two innovative concepts to meet the U.S. Department of Energy goals: high power efficiency TOLEDs, plus electrically controlled reflectors to produce a ''smart window''. Our efforts during this one year program have succeeded in producing a prototype smart window shown in the Fig. I, below. The four states of the smart window are pictured: reflective with lamp on, reflective with lamp off, transparent with lamp on, and transparent with lamp off. In the transparent states, the image is an outdoor setting viewed through the window. In the reflective states, the image is an indoor setting viewed via reflection off the window. We believe that the integration of our high efficiency white phosphorescent TOLED illumination source, with electrically activated shutters represents

  2. Efficient Phosphorescent OLEDS Based on Vacuum Deposition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thereby, we demonstrate high-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes by incorporating a double emission layer {i.e. both doped with the green phosphorescent dye tris(phenylpyridine)iridium [Ir(ppy)3]} into p-i-n-type device structure based on vacuum deposition technology. The intrinsic and doped transports layers are ...

  3. Improvements of phosphorescent white OLEDs performance for lighting application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghee; Chu, Hye Yong; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Song, Ki-Im; Lee, Su Jin

    2008-10-01

    We developed white OLED device with high power efficiency, in which blue and orange phosphorescent emitters were used. By introduction of multi-functional interlayer which has partial doping of orange dopant inside EBL, we report WOLEDs with peak external efficiencies up to (14.1% EQE, 31.3 Im/W) without light out-coupling technique. At 1000 cd/m2, the performance achieved was 11.9% EQE, 18.7 Im/W with CIE = (0.39, 0.44). We also found that WOLED performances are related with doping ratio of the orange dopant that was inserted inside EBL.

  4. High Efficancy Integrated Under-Cabinet Phosphorescent OLED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Hack

    2001-10-31

    In this two year program Universal Display Corporation (UDC) together with the University of Michigan, Teknokon, developed and delivered an energy efficient phosphorescent OLED under cabinet illumination system. Specifically the UDC team goal was in 2011 to deliver five (5) Beta level OLED under cabinet lighting fixtures each consisting of five 6-inch x 6-inch OLED lighting panels, delivering over 420 lumens, at an overall system efficacy of >60 lm/W, a CRI of >85, and a projected lifetime to 70% of initial luminance to exceed 20,000 hours. During the course of this program, the Team pursued the commercialization of these OLED based under cabinet lighting fixtures, to enable the launch of commercial OLED lighting products. The UDC team was ideally suited to develop these novel and efficient solid state lighting fixtures, having both the technical experience and commercial distribution mechanisms to leverage work performed under this contract. UDC's business strategy is to non-exclusively license its PHOLED technology to lighting manufacturers, and also supply them with our proprietary PHOLED materials. UDC is currently working with several licensees who are manufacturing OLED lighting panels using our technology. During this 2 year program, we further developed our high efficiency white Phosphorescent OLEDs from the first milestone, achieving a 80 lm/W single pixel to the final milestone, achieving an under-cabinet PHOLED lighting system that operates at 56 lm/W at 420 lumens. Each luminaire was comprised of ten 15cm x 7.5cm lighting modules mounted in outcoupling enhancement lenses and a control module. The lamps modules are connected together using either plugs or wires with plugs on each end, allowing for unlimited configurations. The lamps are driven by an OLED driver mounted in an enclosure which includes the AC plug. As a result of advancements gained under this program, the path to move OLED lighting panels from development into manufacturing has been

  5. Single side Emitting Transparent OLED lamp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lifka, H.; Verschuren, C.A.; Bruls, D.M.; Tanase, C.

    2011-01-01

    Transparent OLEDs offer great potential for novel applications. Preferably, the light should be emitted from one side only. This can bedone to some extent by modifying electrode thicknesses, but at the cost of reduced transparency. Here, we demonstrate a new approach tomake single side emissive

  6. Highly efficient fully transparent inverted OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J.; Winkler, T.; Hamwi, S.; Schmale, S.; Kröger, M.; Görrn, P.; Johannes, H.-H.; Riedl, T.; Lang, E.; Becker, D.; Dobbertin, T.; Kowalsky, W.

    2007-09-01

    One of the unique selling propositions of OLEDs is their potential to realize highly transparent devices over the visible spectrum. This is because organic semiconductors provide a large Stokes-Shift and low intrinsic absorption losses. Hence, new areas of applications for displays and ambient lighting become accessible, for instance, the integration of OLEDs into the windshield or the ceiling of automobiles. The main challenge in the realization of fully transparent devices is the deposition of the top electrode. ITO is commonly used as transparent bottom anode in a conventional OLED. To obtain uniform light emission over the entire viewing angle and a low series resistance, a TCO such as ITO is desirable as top contact as well. However, sputter deposition of ITO on top of organic layers causes damage induced by high energetic particles and UV radiation. We have found an efficient process to protect the organic layers against the ITO rf magnetron deposition process of ITO for an inverted OLED (IOLED). The inverted structure allows the integration of OLEDs in more powerful n-channel transistors used in active matrix backplanes. Employing the green electrophosphorescent material Ir(ppy) 3 lead to IOLED with a current efficiency of 50 cd/A and power efficiency of 24 lm/W at 100 cd/m2. The average transmittance exceeds 80 % in the visible region. The on-set voltage for light emission is lower than 3 V. In addition, by vertical stacking we achieved a very high current efficiency of more than 70 cd/A for transparent IOLED.

  7. Extended OLED operational lifetime through phosphorescent dopant profile management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Zhang, Yifan

    2017-05-30

    This disclosure relates, at least in part, an organic light emitting device, which in some embodiments comprises an anode; a cathode; a first emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode, the first emissive layer comprising an electron transporting compound and a phosphorescent emissive dopant compound; and wherein the phosphorescent emissive dopant compound has a concentration gradient, in the emissive layer, which varies from the cathode side of the first emissive layer to the anode side of the emissive layer.

  8. High-performance blue phosphorescent OLEDs using energy transfer from exciplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, Yuki; Sasabe, Hisahiro; Pu, Yong-Jin; Kido, Junji

    2014-03-12

    An efficient energy transfer from an exciplex between a sulfone and an arylamine derivatives to a blue phosphorescent emitter enables OLED performances among the best, of over 50 lm W(-1) at 100 cd m(-2) . The formation of the exciplex realizes a barrier-free hole-electron recombination pathway, thereby leading to high OLED performances with an extremely low driving voltage of 2.9 V at 100 cd m(-2) . © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Polystyrene Backbone Polymers Consisting of Alkyl-Substituted Triazine Side Groups for Phosphorescent OLEDs

    OpenAIRE

    Salert, Beatrice Ch. D.; Wedel, Armin; Grubert, Lutz; Eberle, Thomas; Anémian, Rémi; Krueger, Hartmut

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis of new electron-transporting styrene monomers and their corresponding polystyrenes all with a 2,4,6-triphenyl-1,3,5-triazine basic structure in the side group. The monomers differ in the alkyl substitution and in the meta-/paralinkage of the triazine to the polymer backbone. The thermal and spectroscopic properties of the new electron-transporting polymers are discussed in regard to their chemical structures. Phosphorescent OLEDs were prepared using the obta...

  10. Creation of a U.S. Phosphorescent OLED Lighting Panel Manufacturing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hack, Michael

    2013-09-30

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) has pioneered high efficacy phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED™) technology to enable the realization of an exciting new form of high quality, energy saving solid-date lighting. In laboratory test devices, we have demonstrated greater than 100 lm/W conversion efficacy. In this program, Universal Display will demonstrate the scalability of its proprietary UniversalPHOLED technology and materials for the manufacture of white OLED lighting panels that meet commercial lighting targets. Moser Baer Technologies will design and build a U.S.- based pilot facility. The objective of this project is to establish a pilot phosphorescent OLED (PHOLED) manufacturing line in the U.S. Our goal is that at the end of the project, prototype lighting panels could be provided to U.S. luminaire manufacturers for incorporation into products to facilitate the testing of design concepts and to gauge customer acceptance, so as to facilitate the growth of the embryonic U.S. OLED lighting industry. In addition, the team will provide a cost of ownership analysis to quantify production costs including OLED performance metrics which relate to OLED cost such as yield, materials usage, cycle time, substrate area, and capital depreciation. This project was part of a new DOE initiative designed to help establish and maintain U.S. leadership in this program will support key DOE objectives by showing a path to meet Department of Energy Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap cost targets, as well as meeting its efficiency targets by demonstrating the energy saving potential of our technology through the realization of greater than 76 lm/W OLED lighting panels by 2012.

  11. Transient electroluminescence on pristine and degraded phosphorescent blue OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Quan; Blom, Paul W. M.; May, Falk; Heimel, Paul; Zhang, Minlu; Eickhoff, Christian; Heinemeyer, Ute; Lennartz, Christian; Crǎciun, N. Irina

    2017-11-01

    In state-of-the-art blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (PHOLED) device architectures, electrons and holes are injected into the emissive layer, where they are carried by the emitting and hole transporting units, respectively. Using transient electroluminescence measurements, we disentangle the contribution of the electrons and holes on the transport and efficiency of both pristine and degraded PHOLEDs. By varying the concentration of hole transporting units, we show that for pristine PHOLEDs, the transport is electron dominated. Furthermore, degradation of the PHOLEDs upon electrical aging is not related to the hole transport but is governed by a decrease in the electron transport due to the formation of electron traps.

  12. Degradation of phosphorescent blue organic light-emitting diodes (OLED); Degradation der phosphoreszenten blauen organischen Leuchtdioden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Chien-Shu

    2011-07-01

    Phosphorescent organic materials harvest singlet and triplet excitons through inter-system crossing and improve the efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). This improvement increases the potential of OLEDs, particularly white phosphorescent OLEDs (PHOLEDs), for lighting application. Although much progress has been made in the development of white PHOLEDs, the lifetime of phosphorescent emitters, especially the blue emitter, still needs to be improved. This thesis discusses the developments of blue PHOLEDs and investigations of degradation mechanisms. For development of blue PHOLEDs, two phosphorescent blue emitters were investigated: commercially available FIrpic and B1 provided by BASF. By varying the matrix and blocker materials, diode efficiency and lifetime have been investigated and improved. Blue PHOLEDs with emitter B1 show better efficiency and lifetime than devices with FIrpic. From lifetime measurement with constant DC current density, intrinsic degradation including luminance loss and voltage increase on both FIrpic and B1 PHOLEDs was observed. Photoluminescence measurement shows degradation in the emitting layers. To investigate the degradation of emitter layers, single-carrier devices with emitter systems or pure matrix materials were fabricated. Degradation on these devices was investigated by applying constant DC current, UV-irradiation and combination of both. We found that due to excited states (excitons), FIrpic molecules become unstable and polarons would enhance the degradation of FIrpic during DC operation and UV-excitation. To investigate the impact the exciton formation and exciton decay have on the degradation of FIrpic molecules, red phosphorescent emitter Ir(MDQ){sub 2}(acac) was doped in blue emitter layer TCTA:20% FIrpic. The doping concentration of Ir(MDQ){sub 2}(acac) was much lower than FIrpic to ensure that most of the exciton formation occurred on FIrpic molecules. Lower triplet energy of Ir(MDQ){sub 2}(acac) molecules

  13. Polystyrene Backbone Polymers Consisting of Alkyl-Substituted Triazine Side Groups for Phosphorescent OLEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Ch. D. Salert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the synthesis of new electron-transporting styrene monomers and their corresponding polystyrenes all with a 2,4,6-triphenyl-1,3,5-triazine basic structure in the side group. The monomers differ in the alkyl substitution and in the meta-/paralinkage of the triazine to the polymer backbone. The thermal and spectroscopic properties of the new electron-transporting polymers are discussed in regard to their chemical structures. Phosphorescent OLEDs were prepared using the obtained electron-transporting polymers as the emissive layer material in blend systems together with a green iridium-based emitter 13 and a small molecule as an additional cohost with wideband gap characteristics (CoH-001. The performance of the OLEDs was characterized and discussed in regard to the chemical structure of the new electron-transporting polymers.

  14. Efficient blue and green phosphorescent OLEDs with host material containing electronically isolated carbazolyl fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigalevicius, Saulius; Tavgeniene, Daiva; Krucaite, Gintare; Blazevicius, Dovydas; Griniene, Raimonda; Lai, Yi-Ning; Chiu, Hao-Hsuan; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2018-05-01

    Dry process-able host materials are well suited to realize high performance phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) with precise deposition of organic layers. We demonstrate in this study high efficiency green and blue phosphorescent OLED devices by employing 3-[bis(9-ethylcarbazol-3-yl)methyl]-9-hexylcarbazole based host material. By doping a typical green emitter of fac tris(2-phenylpyridine)iridium (Ir (ppy)3) in the compound the resultant dry-processed green device exhibited superior performance with low turn on voltage of 3.0 V and with peak efficiencies of 11.4%, 39.9 cd/A and 41.8 lm/W. When blue emitter of bis [2-(4,6-difluorophenyl)pyridinato-C2,N](picolinato)iridium (III) was used, the resultant blue device showed turn on voltage of 2.9 V and peak efficiencies of 9.4%, 21.4 cd/A and 21.7 lm/W. The high efficiencies may be attributed to the host possessing high triplet energy level, effective host-to-guest energy transfer and effective carrier injection balance.

  15. Thermally Cross-Linkable Hole Transport Materials for Solution Processed Phosphorescent OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beom Seok; Kim, Ohyoung; Chin, Byung Doo; Lee, Chil Won

    2018-04-01

    Materials for unique fabrication of a solution-processed, multi-layered organic light-emitting diode (OLED) were developed. Preparation of a hole transport layer with a thermally cross-linkable chemical structure, which can be processed to form a thin film and then transformed into an insoluble film by using an amine-alcohol condensation reaction with heat treatment, was investigated. Functional groups, such as triplenylamine linked with phenylcarbazole or biphenyl, were employed in the chemical structure of the hole transport layer in order to maintain high triplet energy properties. When phenylcarbazole or biphenyl compounds continuously react with triphenylamine under acid catalysis, a chemically stable thin film material with desirable energy-level properties for a blue OLED could be obtained. The prepared hole transport materials showed excellent surface roughness and thermal stability in comparison with the commercial reference material. On the solution-processed model hole transport layer, we fabricated a device with a blue phosphorescent OLED by using sequential vacuum deposition. The maximum external quantum, 19.3%, was improved by more than 40% over devices with the commercial reference material (11.4%).

  16. Spirobifluorene Core-Based Novel Hole Transporting Materials for Red Phosphorescence OLEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanaskanda Braveenth

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Two new hole transporting materials, named HTM 1A and HTM 1B, were designed and synthesized in significant yields using the well-known Buchwald Hartwig and Suzuki cross- coupling reactions. Both materials showed higher decomposition temperatures (over 450 °C at 5% weight reduction and HTM 1B exhibited a higher glass transition temperature of 180 °C. Red phosphorescence-based OLED devices were fabricated to analyze the device performances compared to Spiro-NPB and NPB as reference hole transporting materials. Devices consist of hole transporting material as HTM 1B showed better maximum current and power efficiencies of 16.16 cd/A and 11.17 lm/W, at the same time it revealed an improved external quantum efficiency of 13.64%. This efficiency is considerably higher than that of Spiro-NPB and NPB-based reference devices.

  17. Recombination region improvement for reduced efficiency roll-off in phosphorescent OLEDs with dual emissive layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhu; Zhou, Shunliang [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu 610054 (China); Hu, Song [Chengdu Institute of Optics and Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610209 (China); Yu, Junsheng, E-mail: jsyu@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2014-10-15

    High-performance phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs) by using dual-emissive-layer (DEL) structure to reduce efficiency roll-off were fabricated. The DEL was comprised of a hole-transport-type host of N, N′-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N, N′-bis(phenyl)-benzidine (NPB) and a bipolar host of 4,4′-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP), which were both doped with an orange phosphorescent dopant of bis[2-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-benzothiazolato-N,C2′]iridium (acetylacetonate) [(t-bt){sub 2}Ir(acac)]. After the optimization of doping concentration of the first emissive layer (FEL), the device with DEL exhibited 11% lower roll-off power efficiency than single emissive layer devices (SED) when the luminance increased from 1000 cd/m{sup 2} to 10,000 cd/m{sup 2}. The hole–electron recombination zone in DEL was illuminated by inserting an ultrathin fluorescent probe of 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-tert-butyl-6 (1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidin-4-yl-vinyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB) in different emissive regions. The performance improvement was attributed to the optimization of energy barrier and the expansion of exciton formation zone within the DEL. - Highlights: • PhOLEDs by using a dual-emissive-layer structure to reduce efficiency roll-off were fabricated. • The DED exhibited 11% lower efficiency roll-off, 57% lower turn-on voltage, and 174% higher brightness than SED. • A DCJTB fluorescent probe was inserted at different positions of DED to investigate the expansion of exciton formation zone.

  18. 3,3′-Bicarbazole-Based Host Molecules for Solution-Processed Phosphorescent OLEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungwoon Kim

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs are attractive due to their low-cost, large area displays, and lighting features. Small molecules as well as polymers can be used as host materials within the solution-processed emitting layer. Herein, we report two 3,3′-bicarbazole-based host small molecules, which possess a structural isomer relationship. 9,9′-Di-4-n-butylphenyl-9H,9′H-3,3′-bicarbazole (BCz-nBuPh and 9,9′-di-4-t-butylphenyl-9H,9′H-3,3′-bicarbazole (BCz-tBuPh exhibited similar optical properties within solutions but different photoluminescence within films. A solution-processed green phosphorescent OLED with the BCz-tBuPh host exhibited a high maximum current efficiency and power efficiency of 43.1 cd/A and 40.0 lm/W, respectively, compared to the device with the BCz-nBuPh host.

  19. Novel Low Cost Organic Vapor Jet Printing of Striped High Efficiency Phosphorescent OLEDs for White Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mike Hack

    2008-12-31

    In this program, Universal Display Corporation and University of Michigan proposed to integrate three innovative concepts to meet the DOE's Solid State Lighting (SSL) goals: (1) high-efficiency phosphorescent organic light emitting device (PHOLED{trademark}) technology, (2) a white lighting design that is based on a series of red, green and blue OLED stripes, and (3) the use of a novel cost-effective, high rate, mask-less deposition process called organic vapor jet printing (OVJP). Our PHOLED technology offers up to four-times higher power efficiency than other OLED approaches for general lighting. We believe that one of the most promising approaches to maximizing the efficiency of OLED lighting sources is to produce stripes of the three primary colors at such a pitch (200-500 {mu}m) that they appear as a uniform white light to an observer greater than 1 meter (m) away from the illumination source. Earlier work from a SBIR Phase 1 entitled 'White Illumination Sources Using Striped Phosphorescent OLEDs' suggests that stripe widths of less than 500 {mu}m appear uniform from a distance of 1m without the need for an external diffuser. In this program, we intend to combine continued advances in this PHOLED technology with the striped RGB lighting design to demonstrate a high-efficiency, white lighting source. Using this background technology, the team has focused on developing and demonstrating the novel cost-effective OVJP process to fabricate these high-efficiency white PHOLED light sources. Because this groundbreaking OVJP process is a direct printing approach that enables the OLED stripes to be printed without a shadow mask, OVJP offers very high material utilization and high throughput without the costs and wastage associated with a shadow mask (i.e. the waste of material that deposits on the shadow mask itself). As a direct printing technique, OVJP also has the potential to offer ultra-high deposition rates (> 1,000 Angstroms/second) for any size or

  20. Highly efficient orange and warm white phosphorescent OLEDs based on a host material with a carbazole-fluorenyl hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaoyang; Huang, Yun; Tao, Silu; Yang, Xiaoxia; Wu, Chuan; Wei, Huaixin; Chan, Mei-Yee; Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2014-06-01

    A new carbazole-fluorenyl hybrid compound, 3,3'(2,7-di(naphthaline-2-yl)-9H-fluorene-9,9-diyl)bis(9-phenyl-9H-carbazole) (NFBC) was synthesized and characterized. The compound exhibits blue-violet emission both in solution and in film, with peaks centered at 404 and 420 nm. In addition to the application as a blue emitter, NFBC is demonstrated to be a good host for phosphorescent dopants. By doping Ir(2-phq)3 in NFBC, a highly efficient orange organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with a maximum efficiency of 32 cd A(-1) (26.5 Lm W(-1)) was obtained. Unlike most phosphorescent OLEDs, the device prepared in our study shows little efficiency roll-off at high brightness and maintains current efficiencies of 31.9 and 26.8 cd A(-1) at a luminance of 1000 and 10,000 cd m(-2), respectively. By using NFBC simultaneously as a blue fluorescence emitter and as a host for a phosphorescent dopant, a warm white OLED with a maximum efficiency of 22.9 Lm W(-1) (21.9 cd A(-1)) was also obtained. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Enhancement of efficiency and stability of phosphorescent OLEDs based on heterostructured light-emitting layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Byung Doo, E-mail: bdchin@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering and Center for Photofunctional Energy Materials, Dankook University, Jukjeon-dong, Suji-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 448-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-23

    The light-emitting efficiency and stability of a phosphorescent organic light-emitting device (OLED), whose emission characteristics are strongly dominated not only by the energy transfer but also by the charge carrier trapping influenced by heterostructured emissive layers, are studied. The variation of the material combination of the heterostructured emitter, both for mixed and double layer configuration, affects the charge injection behaviour, luminous efficiency and stability. Both double and mixed emitter configurations yield low-voltage and high-efficiency behaviour (51 lm W{sup -1} at 1000 cd m{sup -2}; 30 lm W{sup -1} at 10 000 cd m{sup -2}). Such an improvement in power efficiency at elevated brightness is sufficiently universal, while the enhancement of device half-lifetime is rather sensitive to the circumstantial layout of heterostructural emitters. With an optimal mixture of hole-transport type and electron-transport type, a half-lifetime of more than 2500 h at 4000 cd m{sup -2} is obtained, which is 8 times the half-lifetime of control devices with a single emitter structure. The origin and criterion for enhancement of efficiency and lifetime are discussed in terms of the carrier transport behaviour with a specific device architecture.

  2. Red phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs) based on a heteroleptic cyclometalated Iridium (III) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepeltier, Marc [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR 8180 CNRS, Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin en Yvelines, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France); Dumur, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.dumur@univ-amu.fr [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, ICR, UMR 7273, F-13397 Marseille (France); Wantz, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.wantz@ims-bordeaux.fr [University of Bordeaux, IMS, UMR 5218, F-33400 Talence (France); CNRS, IMS, UMR 5218, F-33400 Talence (France); Vila, Neus; Mbomekallé, Israel [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles, UMR 8180 CNRS, Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin en Yvelines, 45 avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles Cedex (France); Bertin, Denis; Gigmes, Didier [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, ICR, UMR 7273, F-13397 Marseille (France); Mayer, Cédric R., E-mail: cmayer@lisv.uvsq.fr [Laboratoire d’Ingénierie des Systèmes de Versailles LISV – EA 4048, Université de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, 10/12 avenue de l’Europe, 78140 Vélizy (France)

    2013-11-15

    Highly efficient red-emitting Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (PhOLEDs) based on a neutral vacuum-sublimatable heteroleptic iridium (III) complex have been designed and studied. Heteroleptic complex Ir(piq){sub 2}(acac) was prepared in one step with acetylacetone (acac) as the ancillary ligand. Electronic and spectroscopic properties of Ir(piq){sub 2}(acac) were investigated by UV–visible absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Electrophosphorescent devices comprising Ir(piq){sub 2}(acac) as dopant of TCTA exhibited outstanding electroluminescence performance with a current efficiency of 10.0 cd A{sup −1}, a maximum power efficiency of 7.2 lm W{sup −1} and a maximal brightness of 3540 cd m{sup −2} was reached at 8.0 V. CIE coordinates close to the standard red of the national television system committee were obtained (0.67, 0.33). -- Highlights: • A saturated red OLED has been prepared. • High power efficiency and brightness were obtained. • Thickness of the device was determined as a parameter determining the overall performance. • CIE coordinates close to the standard red of the national television system committee were obtained.

  3. Improvement of efficiency roll-off in blue phosphorescence OLED using double dopants emissive layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Seung Il; Yoon, Ju An; Kim, Nam Ho; Kim, Jin Wook; Kang, Jin Sung; Moon, Chang-Bum [Department of Green Energy & Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Young, E-mail: wykim@hoseo.edu [Department of Green Energy & Semiconductor Engineering, Hoseo University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    Blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) were fabricated using double dopants FIrpic and FIr6 in emissive layer (EML) with structure of ITO/NPB (700 Å)/mCP:FIrpic-8%:FIr6-x% (300 Å)/TPBi (300 Å)/Liq (20 Å)/Al (1200 Å). We optimized concentration of the second dopant FIr6 in the presence of a fixed FIrpic to observe its effect on electrical performance of PHOLED device. 24.8 cd/A of luminous efficiency was achieved by the device with dopant ratio of 8%FIrpic:4%FIr6 in EML. Efficiency roll-off was also improved 20% compared to the PHOLED device singly dopped with FIrpic or FIr6 only. Second doping proved its effect in stabilizing charge balance in EML and enhancing energy transfer of triplet excitons between two dopants. - Highlights: • We fabricated blue PHOLED with double blue phosphorescent dopants in single EML. • Efficiency roll-off was improved by using double dopant in single EML. • The host–dopant transfer is discussed by analyzing the photo-absorption and photoluminescence. • The spectroscopic analysis using multi-peak fits with a Gaussian function.

  4. Spectroscopic mapping and selective electronic tuning of molecular orbitals in phosphorescent organometallic complexes – a new strategy for OLED materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal R. Ewen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of molecular electronic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes requires fundamental knowledge about the structural and electronic properties of the employed molecules as well as their interactions with neighboring molecules or interfaces. We show that highly resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM and spectroscopy (STS are powerful tools to correlate the electronic properties of phosphorescent complexes (i.e., triplet emitters with their molecular structure as well as the local environment around a single molecule. We used spectroscopic mapping to visualize several occupied and unoccupied molecular frontier orbitals of Pt(II complexes adsorbed on Au(111. The analysis showed that the molecules exhibit a peculiar localized strong hybridization that leads to partial depopulation of a dz² orbital, while the ligand orbitals are almost unchanged. We further found that substitution of functional groups at well-defined positions can alter specific molecular orbitals without influencing the others. The results open a path toward the tailored design of electronic and optical properties of triplet emitters by smart ligand substitution, which may improve the performance of future OLED devices.

  5. Simultaneous Enhancement of Efficiency and Stability of Phosphorescent OLEDs Based on Efficient Förster Energy Transfer from Interface Exciplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Cai, Minghan; Zhang, Yunge; Bin, Zhengyang; Zhang, Deqiang; Duan, Lian

    2016-02-17

    Exciplex forming cohosts have been widely adopted in phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs), achieving high efficiency with low roll-off and low driving voltage. However, the influence of the exciplex-forming hosts on the lifetimes of the devices, which is one of the essential characteristics, remains unclear. Here, we compare the influence of the bulk exciplex and interface exciplex on the performances of the devices, demonstrating highly efficient orange PHOLEDs with long lifetime at low dopant concentration by efficient Förster energy transfer from the interface exciplex. A bipolar host, (3'-(4,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-(1,1'-biphenyl)-3-yl)-9-carbazole (CzTrz), was adopted to combine with a donor molecule, tris(4-(9H-carbazol-9-yl)phenyl)amine (TCTA), to form exciplex. Devices with energy transfer from the interface exciplex achieve lifetime almost 2 orders of magnitude higher than the ones based on bulk exciplex as the host by avoiding the formation of the donor excited states. Moreover, a highest EQE of 27% was obtained at the dopant concentration as low as 3 wt % for a device with interface exciplex, which is favorable for reducing the cost of fabrication. We believe that our work may shed light on future development of ideal OLEDs with high efficiency, long-lifetime, low roll-off and low cost simultaneously.

  6. Transparent conductive oxides and alternative transparent electrodes for organic photovoltaics and OLEDs; Transparente leitfaehige Elektroden. Oxide und alternative Materialien fuer die organische Photovoltaik und OLEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Meskamp, Lars; Sachse, Christoph; Kim, Yong Hyun; Furno, Mauro [Technische Univ. Dresden (DE). Inst. fuer Angewandte Photophysik (IAPP); May, Christian [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Photonische Mikrosysteme (IPMS), Dresden (Germany); Leo, Karl [Technische Univ. Dresden (DE). Inst. fuer Angewandte Photophysik (IAPP); Fraunhofer Institut fuer Photonische Mikrosysteme (IPMS), Dresden (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    Organic, photoactive devices, such as OLEDs or organic solar cells, currently use indium tin oxide (ITO) as transparent electrode. Whereas ITO is industry-proven for many years and shows very good electrical and optical properties, its application for low-cost and flexible devices might not be optimal. For such applications innovative technologies such as network-based metal nanowire or carbon nanotube electrodes, graphene, conductive polymers, metal thin-films and alternative transparent conductive oxides emerge. Although some of these technologies are rather experimental and far from application, some of them have the potential to replace ITO in selected applications. (orig.)

  7. Easily controlled dye doped phosphorescent OLEDs with evaporation rate in single furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoudi, Malek; Janghouri, Mohammad; Mohajerani, Ezeddin, E-mail: e-mohajerani@sbu.ac.ir

    2015-04-15

    Electrical and optical characteristic, surface morphology and energy transfer of Ir(ppy){sub 3}:PtTPP were studied as a function of thermal evaporation rate. We have investigated the effect of various evaporation rates for mixture of dyes using single furnace method. When the deposition rate increased from 0.5 to 5 Ǻ/s, the luminescence efficiency, current density and energy transfer of OLED increased. AFM measurements showed that the surface roughness of the Ir(ppy){sub 3}:PtTPP films decreased with increasing deposition rates. These blends show excellent red emitting guest–host system with easier deposition rate control. - Highlights: • Thermal evaporation rate is used to control the doping by using single furnace. • The advantages of using single furnace are discussed. • It is shown that the evaporation rate also affects the surface roughness.

  8. Flexible white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes based on multilayered graphene/PEDOT:PSS transparent conducting film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiaoxiao; Li, Fushan, E-mail: fushanli@hotmail.com; Wu, Wei; Guo, Tailiang, E-mail: gtl_fzu@hotmail.com

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • A double-layered graphene/PEDOT:PSS film was fabricated by spray-coating. • A white flexible phosphorescent OLED was fabricated based on this film. • The white flexible OLED presented pure white light emission. • The flexible OLEDs showed a stable white emission during bending test. - Abstract: A double-layered graphene/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) conductive film was prepared, in which the PEDOT:PSS layer was obtained by using spray-coating technique. A flexible white phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices based on the graphene/PEDOT:PSS conductive film was fabricated. Phosphorescent material tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium (Ir(ppy){sub 3}) and the fluorescent dye 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnapthacene (Rubrene) were co-doped into 4,4′-N,N′-dicarbazole-biphenyl (CBP) host. N,N′-diphenyl-N,N′-bis(1-naphthyl)-(1,1′-biphenyl)-4,4′-diamine (NPB) and 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen) were used as hole-transporting and electron-transporting layer, respectively, and 4,4′-bis(2,2′-diphenylvinyl)-1,1′-biphenyl (DPVBi) was used as blue light-emitting layer. The device presented pure white light emission with a Commission Internationale De I’Eclairage coordinates of (0.31, 0.33) and exhibited an excellent light-emitting stability during the bending cycle test with a radius of curvature of 10 mm.

  9. Flexible white phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes based on multilayered graphene/PEDOT:PSS transparent conducting film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaoxiao; Li, Fushan; Wu, Wei; Guo, Tailiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A double-layered graphene/PEDOT:PSS film was fabricated by spray-coating. • A white flexible phosphorescent OLED was fabricated based on this film. • The white flexible OLED presented pure white light emission. • The flexible OLEDs showed a stable white emission during bending test. - Abstract: A double-layered graphene/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) conductive film was prepared, in which the PEDOT:PSS layer was obtained by using spray-coating technique. A flexible white phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices based on the graphene/PEDOT:PSS conductive film was fabricated. Phosphorescent material tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium (Ir(ppy) 3 ) and the fluorescent dye 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnapthacene (Rubrene) were co-doped into 4,4′-N,N′-dicarbazole-biphenyl (CBP) host. N,N′-diphenyl-N,N′-bis(1-naphthyl)-(1,1′-biphenyl)-4,4′-diamine (NPB) and 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen) were used as hole-transporting and electron-transporting layer, respectively, and 4,4′-bis(2,2′-diphenylvinyl)-1,1′-biphenyl (DPVBi) was used as blue light-emitting layer. The device presented pure white light emission with a Commission Internationale De I’Eclairage coordinates of (0.31, 0.33) and exhibited an excellent light-emitting stability during the bending cycle test with a radius of curvature of 10 mm

  10. Modifying the organic/electrode interface in Organic Solar Cells (OSCs) and improving the efficiency of solution-processed phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Teng [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    thin LiF layer serves typically as the electron injection layer in OLEDs and electron collection interlayer in the OSCs. However, several reports showed that it can also assist in holeinjection in OLEDs. Here we first demonstrate that it assists hole-collection in OSCs, which is more obvious after air-plasma treatment, and explore this intriguing dual role. For OLEDs, we focus on solution processing methods to fabricate highly efficient phosphorescent OLEDs. First, we investigated OLEDs with a polymer host matrix, and enhanced charge injection by adding hole- and electron-transport materials into the system. We also applied a hole-blocking and electron-transport material to prevent luminescence quenching by the cathode. Finally, we substituted the polymer host by a small molecule, to achieve more efficient solution processed small molecular OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is cost-effective in comparison to the more common vacuum thermal evaporation. All these studies help us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OSCs and OLEDs’ performance and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiencies of OSCs and OLEDs. With better efficiency and longer lifetime, the OSCs and OLEDs will be competitive with their inorganic counterparts.

  11. De Novo Design of Boron-Based Host Materials for Highly Efficient Blue and White Phosphorescent OLEDs with Low Efficiency Roll-Off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Miao-Miao; Huang, Chen-Chao; Yuan, Yi; Cui, Lin-Song; Li, Yong-Xi; Wang, Bo; Jiang, Zuo-Quan; Fung, Man-Keung; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2016-08-10

    Borane is an excellent electron-accepting species, and its derivatives have been widely used in a variety of fields. However, the use of borane derivatives as host materials in OLEDs has rarely reported because the device performance is generally not satisfactory. In this work, two novel spiro-bipolar hosts with incorporated borane were designed and synthesized. The strategies used in preparing these materials were to increase the spatial separation of the highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMOs) in the molecules, tune the connecting positions of functional groups, and incorporate specific functional groups with desirable thermal stability. Based on these designs, phosphorescent OLEDs with borane derivatives as hosts and with outstanding device performances were obtained. In particular, devices based on SAF-3-DMB/FIrpic exhibited an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of >25%. More encouragingly, the device was found to have quite a low efficiency roll-off, giving an efficiency of >20% even at a high brightness of 10000 cd/m(2). Furthermore, the EQE of the three-color-based (R + G + B) white OLED employing SAF-3-DMB as a host was also as high as 22.9% with CIE coordinates of (x, y) = (0.40, 0.48). At a brightness of 5000 cd/m(2), there was only a 3% decrease in EQE from its maximum value, implying a very low efficiency roll-off.

  12. Application of Developed APCVD Transparent Conducting Oxides and Undercoat Technologies for Economical OLED Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, Gary S.; Bluhm, Martin; Coffey, James; Korotkov, Roman; Polsz, Craig; Salemi, Alexandre; Smith, Robert; Smith, Ryan; Stricker, Jeff; Xu, Chen; Shirazi, Jasmine; Papakonstantopulous, George; Carson, Steve; Hartmann, Sören; Jessen, Frank; Krogmann, Bianaca; Rickers, Christoph; Ruske, Manfred; Schwab, Holger; Bertram, Dietrich

    2011-01-02

    Economics is a key factor for application of organic light emitting diodes (OLED) in general lighting relative to OLED flat panel displays that can handle high cost materials such as indium tin oxide (ITO) or Indium zinc oxide (IZO) as the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) on display glass. However, for OLED lighting to penetrate into general illumination, economics and sustainable materials are critical. The issues with ITO have been documented at the DOE SSL R&D and Manufacturing workshops for the last 5 years and the issue is being exaserbated by export controls from China (one of the major sources of elemental indium). Therefore, ITO is not sustainable because of the fluctuating costs and the United States (US) dependency on other nations such as China. Numerous alternatives to ITO/IZO are being evaluated such as Ag nanoparticles/nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and other metal oxides. Of these other metal oxides, doped zinc oxide has attracted a lot of attention over the last 10 years. The volume of zinc mined is a factor of 80,000 greater than indium and the US has significant volumes of zinc mined domestically, resulting in the ability for the US to be self-sufficient for this element that can be used in optoelectonic applications. The costs of elemental zinc is over 2 orders of magnitude less than indium, reflecting the relative abundance and availablility of the elements. Arkema Inc. and an international primary glass manufacturing company, which is located in the United States, have developed doped zinc oxide technology for solar control windows. The genesis of this DOE SSL project was to determine if doped zinc oxide technology can be taken from the commodity based window market and translate the technology to OLED lighting. Thus, Arkema Inc. sought out experts, Philips Lighting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) and National Renewable Research Laboratories (NREL), in OLED devices and brought them into the project. This project had a

  13. Application of Developed APCVD Transparent Conducting Oxides and Undercoat Technologies for Economical OLED Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Bluhm; James Coffey; Roman Korotkov; Craig Polsz; Alexandre Salemi; Robert Smith; Ryan Smith; Jeff Stricker; Chen Xu; Jasmine Shirazi; George Papakonstantopulous; Steve Carson; Claudia Goldman; Soren Hartmann; Frank Jessen; Bianca Krogmann; Christoph Rickers; Manfred Ruske; Holger Schwab; Dietrich Bertram

    2011-01-02

    Economics is a key factor for application of organic light emitting diodes (OLED) in general lighting relative to OLED flat panel displays that can handle high cost materials such as indium tin oxide (ITO) or Indium zinc oxide (IZO) as the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) on display glass. However, for OLED lighting to penetrate into general illumination, economics and sustainable materials are critical. The issues with ITO have been documented at the DOE SSL R&D and Manufacturing workshops for the last 5 years and the issue is being exacerbated by export controls from China (one of the major sources of elemental indium). Therefore, ITO is not sustainable because of the fluctuating costs and the United States (US) dependency on other nations such as China. Numerous alternatives to ITO/IZO are being evaluated such as Ag nanoparticles/nanowires, carbon nanotubes, graphene, and other metal oxides. Of these other metal oxides, doped zinc oxide has attracted a lot of attention over the last 10 years. The volume of zinc mined is a factor of 80,000 greater than indium and the US has significant volumes of zinc mined domestically, resulting in the ability for the US to be self-sufficient for this element that can be used in optoelectronic applications. The costs of elemental zinc is over 2 orders of magnitude less than indium, reflecting the relative abundance and availability of the elements. Arkema Inc. and an international primary glass manufacturing company, which is located in the United States, have developed doped zinc oxide technology for solar control windows. The genesis of this DOE SSL project was to determine if doped zinc oxide technology can be taken from the commodity based window market and translate the technology to OLED lighting. Thus, Arkema Inc. sought out experts, Philips Lighting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) and National Renewable Research Laboratories (NREL), in OLED devices and brought them into the project. This project had a

  14. An Indium-Free Anode for Large-Area Flexible OLEDs: Defect-Free Transparent Conductive Zinc Tin Oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales-Masis, M.; Dauzou, F.; Jeangros, Q.; Dabirian, A.; Lifka, H.; Gierth, R.; Ruske, M.; Moet, D.; Hessler-Wyser, A.; Ballif, C.

    2016-01-01

    Flexible large-area organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) require highly conductive and transparent anodes for efficient and uniform light emission. Tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) is the standard anode in industry. However, due to the scarcity of indium, alternative anodes that eliminate its use are

  15. Efficiency enhancement of flexible OLEDs by using nano-corrugated substrates and conformal Ag transparent anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Luo, Yu; Feng, Xueming; Pei, Yuechen; Lu, Bingheng; Cheng, Shenggui

    2018-05-01

    In flexible OLEDs (FOLEDs), the traditional ITO anode has disadvantages such as refractive-index mismatches among substrate and other functional layers, leads to light loss of nearly 80%, meanwhile, its brittle nature and lack in raw materials hinder its further applications. We investigated an efficient FOLED using a semi-transparent silver (Ag) anode, whereas the device was built on a nano-corrugated flexible polycarbonate (PC) substrate prepared by thermal nanoimprint lithography. The corrugations were well preserved on each layer of the device, both the micro-cavity effect and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes of light loss were effectively suppressed. As a result, the current efficiency of the FOLED using a conformal corrugated Ag anode enhanced by 100% compared with a planar Ag anode device, and enhanced by 13% with conventional ITO device. In addition, owing to the quasi-periodical arrangements of the corrugations, the device achieved broad spectra and Lambertian angular emission. The Ag anode significantly improved the bending properties of the OLED as compared to the conventional ITO device, leading to a longer lifetime in practical use. The proposed manufacturing strategy will be useful for fabricating nano corrugations on plastic substrate of FOLED in a cost-effective and convenient manner.

  16. Efficiency enhancement of flexible OLEDs by using nano-corrugated substrates and conformal Ag transparent anodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In flexible OLEDs (FOLEDs, the traditional ITO anode has disadvantages such as refractive-index mismatches among substrate and other functional layers, leads to light loss of nearly 80%, meanwhile, its brittle nature and lack in raw materials hinder its further applications. We investigated an efficient FOLED using a semi-transparent silver (Ag anode, whereas the device was built on a nano-corrugated flexible polycarbonate (PC substrate prepared by thermal nanoimprint lithography. The corrugations were well preserved on each layer of the device, both the micro-cavity effect and surface plasmon polariton (SPP modes of light loss were effectively suppressed. As a result, the current efficiency of the FOLED using a conformal corrugated Ag anode enhanced by 100% compared with a planar Ag anode device, and enhanced by 13% with conventional ITO device. In addition, owing to the quasi-periodical arrangements of the corrugations, the device achieved broad spectra and Lambertian angular emission. The Ag anode significantly improved the bending properties of the OLED as compared to the conventional ITO device, leading to a longer lifetime in practical use. The proposed manufacturing strategy will be useful for fabricating nano corrugations on plastic substrate of FOLED in a cost-effective and convenient manner.

  17. Investigation of phosphorescent blue organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Chien-Shu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany); Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Krause, Ralf [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Kozlowski, Fryderyk; Hunze, Arvid [Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Kowalsky, Wolfgang [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Recently, rapid development of phosphorescent materials has significantly improved the efficiency of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). By using efficient phosphorescent emitter materials white OLEDs with high power efficiency values could be demonstrated. But especially blue phosphorescent devices, due to stability issues, need to be further investigated und optimized. In this work, blue OLED devices based on the phosphorescent emitter FIrpic were investigated. Single-carrier hole-only as well as electron-only devices were fabricated and characterized to study the impact of charge carriers on device performance.

  18. Degradation of phosphorescent blue organic light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Chien-Shu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany); Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Steinbacher, Frank [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Krause, Ralf; Hunze, Arvid [Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Kowalsky, Wolfgang [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Development of phosphorescent materials has significantly improved the efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). By using efficient red, green and blue phosphorescent emitter materials high efficient white OLEDs can be achieved. However, due to low stability of blue phosphorescent materials the lifetime of phosphorescent white OLEDs remains an issue. As a result, degradation of blue phosphorescent materials needs to be further investigated and improved. In this work, blue OLED devices based on the phosphorescent emitter FIrpic were investigated. Single-carrier hole-only as well as electron-only devices were fabricated. For investigation of degradation process the devices were stressed with electrical current and UV-light to study the impact of charge carriers as well as excitons and exciton-polaron quenching on the stability of the blue dye.

  19. Principles of phosphorescent organic light emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaev, Boris; Baryshnikov, Gleb; Agren, Hans

    2014-02-07

    Organic light-emitting device (OLED) technology has found numerous applications in the development of solid state lighting, flat panel displays and flexible screens. These applications are already commercialized in mobile phones and TV sets. White OLEDs are of especial importance for lighting; they now use multilayer combinations of organic and elementoorganic dyes which emit various colors in the red, green and blue parts of the visible spectrum. At the same time the stability of phosphorescent blue emitters is still a major challenge for OLED applications. In this review we highlight the basic principles and the main mechanisms behind phosphorescent light emission of various classes of photofunctional OLED materials, like organic polymers and oligomers, electron and hole transport molecules, elementoorganic complexes with heavy metal central ions, and clarify connections between the main features of electronic structure and the photo-physical properties of the phosphorescent OLED materials.

  20. Extremely high efficiency phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes with horizontal emitting dipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwon-Hyeon; Moon, Chang-Ki; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2014-10-01

    We present the factors influencing the orientation of the phosphorescent dyes in phosphorescent OLEDs. And, we report that an OLED containing a phosphorescent emitter with horizontally oriented dipoles in an exciplex-forming co-host that exhibits an extremely high EQE of 32.3% and power efficiency of 142 lm/W, the highest values ever reported in literature. Furthermore, we experimentally and theoretically correlated the EQE of OLEDs to the PL quantum yield and the horizontal dipole ratio of phosphorescent dyes using three different dyes.

  1. Synthesis, Properties, Calculations and Applications of Small Molecular Host Materials Containing Oxadiazole Units with Different Nitrogen and Oxygen Atom Orientations for Solution-Processable Blue Phosphorescent OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hua; Wu, Hongyu; Chen, Liangyuan; Ma, Songhua; Zhou, Kaifeng; Yan, Guobing; Shen, Jiazhong; Chen, Dongcheng; Su, Shi-Jian

    2018-03-01

    A series of new small molecules based on symmetric electron-acceptor of 1,3,4-oxadiazole moiety or its asymmetric isomer of 1,2,4-oxadiazole unit were successfully synthesized and applied to solution-processable blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes for the first time, and their thermal, photophysical, electrochemical properties and density functional theory calculations were studied thoroughly. Due to the high triplet energy levels ( E T, 2.82-2.85 eV), the energy from phosphorescent emitter of iridium(III) bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinate- N,C2']picolinate (FIrpic) transfer to the host molecules could be effectively suppressed and thus assuring the emission of devices was all from FIrpic. In comparison with the para-mode conjugation in substitution of five-membered 1,3,4-oxadiazole in 134OXD, the meta-linkages of 1,2,4-isomer appending with two phenyl rings cause the worse conjugation degree and the electron delocalization as well as the lower electron-withdrawing ability for the other 1,2,4-oxadiazole-based materials. Noting that the solution-processed device based on 134OXD containing 1,3,4-oxadiazole units without extra vacuum thermal-deposited hole/exciton-blocking layer and electron-transporting layer showed the highest maximum current efficiency (CEmax) of 8.75 cd/A due to the excellent charge transporting ability of 134OXD, which far surpassed the similar devices based on other host materials containing 1,2,4-oxadiazole units. Moreover, the device based on 134OXD presented small efficiency roll-off with current efficiency (CE) of 6.26 cd/A at high brightness up to 100 cd/m2. This work demonstrates different nitrogen and oxygen atom orientations of the oxadiazole-based host materials produce major impact on the optoelectronic characteristics of the solution-processable devices.

  2. Electron-Rich 4-Substituted Spirobifluorenes: Toward a New Family of High Triplet Energy Host Materials for High-Efficiency Green and Sky Blue Phosphorescent OLEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinton, Cassandre; Thiery, Sébastien; Jeannin, Olivier; Tondelier, Denis; Geffroy, Bernard; Jacques, Emmanuel; Rault-Berthelot, Joëlle; Poriel, Cyril

    2017-02-22

    We report herein a detailed structure-properties relationship study of the first examples of electron-rich 4-substituted spirobifluorenes for organic electronic applications, namely, 4-phenyl-N-carbazole-spirobifluorene (4-PhCz-SBF) and 4-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)-spirobifluorene (4-Ph(OMe) 3 -SBF). The incorporation of the electron-rich moieties in the ortho position of the biphenyl linkage (position C4) induces unique properties, very different from those previously described in the literature for this family of semiconductors. Both dyes can be readily synthesized, possess high triplet energies and excellent thermal stability, and their HOMO energy levels are highly increased compared to those of other 4-substituted SBFs. We also provide in this work the first rationalization of the peculiar fluorescence of 4-substituted SBFs. Finally, the present dyes have been successfully incorporated as host in green and blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes with high performance either for the green (EQE of 20.2%) or the blue color (EQE of 9.6%). These performances are, to the best of our knowledge, among the highest reported to date for 4-substituted SBF derivatives.

  3. Enhanced Electron Affinity and Exciton Confinement in Exciplex-Type Host: Power Efficient Solution-Processed Blue Phosphorescent OLEDs with Low Turn-on Voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Xinxin; Sun, Kaiyong; Sun, Yueming; Huang, Bin; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-27

    A benzimidazole/phosphine oxide hybrid 1,3,5-tris(1-(4-(diphenylphosphoryl)phenyl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)benzene (TPOB) was newly designed and synthesized as the electron-transporting component to form an exciplex-type host with the conventional hole-transporting material tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenyl)amine (TCTA). Because of the enhanced triplet energy and electron affinity of TPOB, the energy leakage from exciplex-state to the constituting molecule was eliminated. Using energy transfer from exciplex-state, solution-processed blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) achieved an extremely low turn-on voltage of 2.8 V and impressively high power efficiency of 22 lm W(-1). In addition, the efficiency roll-off was very small even at luminance up to 10 000 cd m(-2), which suggested the balanced charge transfer in the emission layer. This study demonstrated that molecular modulation was an effective way to develop efficient exciplex-type host for high performanced PHOLEDs.

  4. Phosphorescence as a probe of exciton formation and energy transfer in organic light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldo, M.; Segal, M.

    2004-01-01

    The development of highly efficient phosphorescent molecules has approximately quadrupled the quantum efficiency of organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). By harnessing triplet as well as singlet excitons, efficient molecular phosphorescence has also enabled novel studies of exciton physics in organic semiconductors. In this review, we will summarize recent progress in understanding exciton formation and energy transfer using phosphorescent molecular probes. Particular emphasis is given to two topics of current interest: energy transfer in blue phosphorescent OLEDs, and quantifying the formation ratio of singlet to triplet excitons in small-molecular weight materials and polymers. (orig.)

  5. OLEDs for lighting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Elsbergen, V.; Boerner, H.; Löbl, H.-P.; Goldmann, C.; Grabowski, S. P.; Young, E.; Gaertner, G.; Greiner, H.

    2008-08-01

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) provide potential for power-efficient large area light sources that combine revolutionary properties. They are thin and flat and in addition they can be transparent, colour-tuneable, or flexible. We review the state of the art in white OLEDs and present performance data for three-colour hybrid white OLEDs on indexmatched substrates. With improved optical outcoupling 45 lm/W are achieved. Using a half-sphere to collect all the light that is in the substrate results in 80 lm/W. Optical modelling supports the experimental work. For decorative applications features like transparency and colour tuning are very appealing. We show results on transparent white OLEDs and two ways to come to a colour-variable OLED. These are lateral separation of different colours in a striped design and direct vertical stacking of the different emitting layers. For a striped colour tuneable OLED 36 lm/W are achieved in white with improved optical outcoupling.

  6. Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Devices: Working Principle and Iridium Based Emitter Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil J. W. List

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Even though organic light-emitting device (OLED technology has evolved to a point where it is now an important competitor to liquid crystal displays (LCDs, further scientific efforts devoted to the design, engineering and fabrication of OLEDs are required for complete commercialization of this technology. Along these lines, the present work reviews the essentials of OLED technology putting special focus on the general working principle of single and multilayer OLEDs, fluorescent and phosphorescent emitter materials as well as transfer processes in host materials doped with phosphorescent dyes. Moreover, as a prototypical example of phosphorescent emitter materials, a brief discussion of homo- and heteroleptic iridium(III complexes is enclosed concentrating on their synthesis, photophysical properties and approaches for realizing iridium based phosphorescent polymers.

  7. Comparison study of transparent RF-sputtered ITO/AZO and ITO/ZnO bilayers for near UV-OLED applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie, Mahdiyar Nouri; Manavizadeh, Negin; Abadi, Ehsan Mohammadi Nasr; Nadimi, Ebrahim; Boroumand, Farhad Akbari

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid inorganic/organic light-emitting diodes have attracted much attention in the field of luminescent electronics due to the desired incorporation of high optoelectronic features of inorganic materials with the processability and variety of organic polymers. To generate and emit a near ultraviolet (N-UV) ray, wide band gap semiconductors can be applied in the organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). In this paper, zinc oxide (ZnO) and aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films are deposited by radio frequency (RF) sputtering above the ITO electrode and poly [2-methoxy-5-(2-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene-vinylene] (MEH-PPV) conjugated polymer is utilized as a complementary p-type semiconductor in OLED structure. The impact of ZnO and AZO thickness on the structural, electrical, optical and morphological properties of ITO/AZO and ITO/ZnO bilayers are scrutinized and compared. Results show that with the enlargement of both ZnO and AZO film thickness, the physical properties are gradually improved resulting in the better quality of transparent conducting thin film. The average electrical resistivity of 8.4 × 10-4 and 1.1 × 10-3 Ω-cm, average sheet resistance of 32.9 and 42.3 Ω/sq, average transmittance of 88.3 and 87.3% and average FOM of 1.0 × 104 and 7.4 × 103 (Ω-cm)-1 are obtained for ITO/AZO and ITO/ZnO bilayers, respectively. Moreover, comparing the results indicates that the strain and the stress within the ITO/AZO bilayer are decreased nearly 19% with respect to ITO/ZnO bilayer which yield higher quality of crystal. Consequently, the physical properties of ITO/AZO bilayer is found to be superior regarding ITO/ZnO bilayer. For fabricated UV-OLEDs, the turn-on voltages, the characteristic energy (Et) and the total concentration of traps (Nt) for the devices with the structures of ITO/ZnO/MEH-PPV/Al and ITO/AZO/MEH-PPV/Al are obtained 12 and 14 V, 0.108 and 0.191 eV, 9.33 × 1016 and 5.22 × 1016 cm-3, respectively. Furthermore, according to the electroluminescence

  8. Theoretical investigation of the degradation mechanisms in host and guest molecules used in OLED active layers

    KAUST Repository

    Winget, Paul; Hong, Minki; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    systems. We identify degradation pathways and define new strategies to guide the synthesis of stable materials for OLED applications for both phosphorescent emitters and organic host materials. The chemical reactivity of these molecules in the active

  9. Phosphorescent systems based on iridium(III) complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulbricht, C.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorescent iridium(III)-based complexes are experiencing a growing interest in a number of research fields. Aside from lighting and display technologies (i.e. OLEDs and LECs), they find use in various applications such as biolabeling, sensors, solar cells and water splitting. In particular, the

  10. Green-emitting MADF complex for OLED applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimes, Kody; Zhu, Zhi-Qiang; Holloway, Sean; Li, Jian

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we demonstrated an exceptional palladium complex that exhibits both phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence for use as an efficient emitter in OLEDs. Devices employing PdN3N achieved external quantum efficiencies in excess of 22% and remarkable device operational lifetime to 90% initial luminance estimated at over 30,000 h at a practical luminance of 100 cd/m2. Further tuning of the phosphorescent and delayed fluorescent emission should have a great impact in the development of efficient and stable emitters for deep blue or white OLEDs.

  11. Oles Have

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boris, Stefan Darlan

    2015-01-01

    Landskabsarkitekts Ole Mouritsens Have Tjørnegaard er fotograferet gennem et år af Stefan Darlan Boris. Fotografierne er ledsaget af teksten Vejrhaven.......Landskabsarkitekts Ole Mouritsens Have Tjørnegaard er fotograferet gennem et år af Stefan Darlan Boris. Fotografierne er ledsaget af teksten Vejrhaven....

  12. Optical characterization of OLED emitter properties by radiation pattern analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaemmich, Michael

    2011-09-08

    Researches in both, academia and industry are investigating optical loss channels in OLED layered systems by means of optical simulation tools in order to derive promising concepts for a further enhancement of the overall device performance. Besides other factors, the prospects of success of such optimization strategies rely severely on the credibility of the optical input data. The present thesis provides a guideline to measure the active optical properties of OLED emitter materials in situ by radiation pattern analyses. Reliable and widely applicable methods are introduced to determine the internal electroluminescence spectrum, the profile of the emission zone, the dipole emitter orientation, and the internal luminescence quantum efficiency of emissive materials from the optical far field emission of OLEDs in electrical operation. The proposed characterization procedures are applied to sets of OLEDs containing both, fluorescent polymeric materials as well as phosphorescent small-molecular emitters, respectively. On the one hand, quite expected results are obtained. On the other hand, several novel and truly surprising results are found. Most importantly, this thesis contains the first report of a non-isotropic, mainly parallel emitter orientation in a phosphorescent small-molecular guest-host system (Ir(MDQ)2(acac) in a-NPD). Due to the latter result, emitter orientation based optimization of phosphorescent OLEDs seems to be within reach. Since parallel dipoles emit preferably into air, the utilization of smart emissive materials with advantageous molecular orientation is capable to boost the efficiency of phosphorescent OLEDs by 50%. Materials design, the influence of the matrix material and the substrate, as well as film deposition conditions are just a few parameters that need to be studied further in order to exploit the huge potential of the dipole emitter orientation in phosphorescent OLEDs.

  13. Transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyverbom, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    This article challenges the view of transparency as a matter of providing openness, insight, and clarity by conceptualizing it as a form of visibility management. We tend to think of transparency as a process of ensuring accountability through the timely and public disclosure of information...

  14. Transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyverbom, Mikkel; Albu, Oana Brindusa

    2017-01-01

    Transparency is an increasingly prominent research topic in many scholarly disciplines and offers valuable insights for organizational communication. This entry provides an overview of the historical background and identifies some themes that presently inform the transparency literature. The entry...... then outlines the most important dimensions of the concept of transparency by highlighting two paradigmatic positions underpinning contemporary research in this area: namely, informational approaches that focus on the sharing of information and the perceived quality of that information and social process...... orientations that explore the dynamics of transparency in organizational settings. The entry highlights emergent methodological and conceptual insights concerning transparency as a dynamic and paradoxical social process with performative characteristics – an approach that remains underexplored....

  15. Transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, A.; Mason, M.

    2015-01-01

    Transparency, as information disclosure, is becoming a widely accepted norm and set of practices in global climate governance. Disclosure of climate-related information is mainly seen as a way to monitor and/or reward various actors’ climate mitigation actions, thereby contributing, at least in

  16. Transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFee, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Citizens now expect access to information, particularly from public institutions like local school districts. They demand input and accountability. Cultural and technological changes, such as the Internet, make it possible for districts to comply. Yet transparency--the easily seen and understood actions of a school district and the thinking behind…

  17. Nano-honeycomb structured transparent electrode for enhanced light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xiao-Bo; Qian, Min; Wang, Zhao-Kui, E-mail: zkwang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn; Liao, Liang-Sheng, E-mail: zkwang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China)

    2015-06-01

    A universal nano-sphere lithography method has been developed to fabricate nano-structured transparent electrode, such as indium tin oxide (ITO), for light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Perforated SiO{sub 2} film made from a monolayer colloidal crystal of polystyrene spheres and tetraethyl orthosilicate sol-gel is used as a template. Ordered nano-honeycomb pits on the ITO electrode surface are obtained by chemical etching. The proposed method can be utilized to form large-area nano-structured ITO electrode. More than two folds' enhancement in both current efficiency and power efficiency has been achieved in a red phosphorescent OLED which was fabricated on the nano-structured ITO substrate.

  18. Employing exciton transfer molecules to increase the lifetime of phosphorescent red organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindla, Florian; Boesing, Manuel; van Gemmern, Philipp; Bertram, Dietrich; Keiper, Dietmar; Heuken, Michael; Kalisch, Holger; Jansen, Rolf H.

    2011-04-01

    The lifetime of phosphorescent red organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) is investigated employing either N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(1-naphthylphenyl)-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPB), TMM117, or 4,4',4″-tris(N-carbazolyl)-triphenylamine (TCTA) as hole-conducting host material (mixed with an electron conductor). All OLED (organic vapor phase deposition-processed) show similar efficiencies around 30 lm/W but strongly different lifetimes. Quickly degrading OLED based on TCTA can be stabilized by doping exciton transfer molecules [tris-(phenyl-pyridyl)-Ir (Ir(ppy)3)] to the emission layer. At a current density of 50 mA/cm2 (12 800 cd/m2), a lifetime of 387 h can be achieved. Employing exciton transfer molecules is suggested to prevent the degradation of the red emission layer in phosphorescent white OLED.

  19. Top emitting white OLEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, Patricia; Luessem, Bjoern; Leo, Karl [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, George-Baehr-Strasse 1, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Top emitting organic light emitting diodes (TOLEDs) provide a number of interesting opportunities for new applications, such as the opportunity to fabricate ITO-free devices by using opaque substrates. This makes it possible to manufacture low cost OLEDs for signage and lighting applications. A general top emitting device consists of highly reflecting metal contacts as anode and semitransparent cathode, the latter one for better outcouling reasons. In between several organic materials are deposited as charge transporting, blocking, and emission layers. Here, we show a top emitting white organic light emitting diode with silver electrodes arranged in a p-i-n structure with p- and n-doped charge transport layers. The centrical emission layer consists of two phosphorescent (red and green) and one fluorescent (blue) emitter systems separated by an ambipolar interlayer to avoid mutual exciton quenching. By adding an additional dielectric capping layer on top of the device stack, we achieve a reduction of the strong microcavity effects which appear due to the high reflection of both metal electrodes. Therefore, the outcoupled light shows broad and nearly angle-independent emission spectra, which is essential for white light emitting diodes.

  20. Lifetime enhanced phosphorescent organic light emitting diode using an electron scavenger layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seokhwan; Kim, Ji Whan; Lee, Sangyeob, E-mail: sy96.lee@samsung.com [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., 130 Samsung-ro, Suwon, Gyeonggi 443-803 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-27

    We demonstrate a method to improve lifetime of a phosphorescent organic light emitting diode (OLED) using an electron scavenger layer (ESL) in a hole transporting layer (HTL) of the device. We use a bis(1-(phenyl)isoquinoline)iridium(III)acetylacetonate [Ir(piq){sub 2}(acac)] doped HTL to stimulate radiative decay, preventing thermal degradation in HTL. The ESL effectively prevented non-radiative decay of leakage electron in HTL by converting non-radiative decay to radiative decay via a phosphorescent red emitter, Ir(piq){sub 2}(acac). The lifetime of device (t{sub 95}: time after 5% decrease of luminance) has been increased from 75 h to 120 h by using the ESL in a phosphorescent green-emitting OLED.

  1. Effective electroluminescent materials for OLED applications based on lanthanide 1.3-diketonates bearing pyrazole moiety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taydakov, Ilya V. [D. Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Miusskaya pl. 9, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation); P. N. Lebedev Institute of Physics of RAS, Leninskiy pr-t, 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Akkuzina, Alina A.; Avetisov, Roman I.; Khomyakov, Andrew V.; Saifutyarov, Rasim R. [D. Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Miusskaya pl. 9, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation); Avetissov, Igor Ch., E-mail: igor_avetisov@mail.ru [D. Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Miusskaya pl. 9, 125047 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    A series of new pyrazole substituted 1.3-diketones bearing fluorinated alkyl groups were prepared and systematically explored as a ligands for the preparation of luminescent complexes with Eu(III) ion. First triplet levels energy values (T1) of above mentioned ligands were determined by low temperature (77K) phosphorescent spectra measurements of Gd(III) complexes. It was found that 4,4,5,5,6,6,6-heptafluoro-1-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)hexane-1,3-dione is a superior ligand for synthesis of highly luminescent Eu (III) complexes with 1.10-phenanthroline or similar Lewis bases as auxiliary ligands. The complexes are sufficiently thermal stable, transparent, volatile in high vacuum and soluble in common solvents which make possible to produce OLEDs by dry and wet technology. OLED structures fabricated on the base of the above Eu(III) complexes demonstrated the higher energy efficacy comparing to the standard Eu(TTA){sub 3}(Phen) phosphor.

  2. High-performance hybrid white organic light-emitting devices without interlayer between fluorescent and phosphorescent emissive regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ning; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Yongbiao; Chen, Yonghua; Yang, Dezhi; Zhao, Fangchao; Chen, Jiangshan; Ma, Dongge

    2014-03-12

    By using mixed hosts with bipolar transport properties for blue emissive layers, a novel phosphorescence/fluorescence hybrid white OLED without using an interlayer between the fluorescent and phosphorescent regions is demonstrated. The peak EQE of the device is 19.0% and remains as high as 17.0% at the practical brightness of 1000 cd m(-2) . © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Efficient non-doped phosphorescent orange, blue and white organic light-emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yongming; Yu, Jing; Cao, Hongtao; Zhang, Letian; Sun, Haizhu; Xie, Wenfa

    2014-10-01

    Efficient phosphorescent orange, blue and white organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) with non-doped emissive layers were successfully fabricated. Conventional blue phosphorescent emitters bis [4,6-di-fluorophenyl]-pyridinato-N,C2'] picolinate (Firpic) and Bis(2,4-difluorophenylpyridinato) (Fir6) were adopted to fabricate non-doped blue OLEDs, which exhibited maximum current efficiency of 7.6 and 4.6 cd/A for Firpic and Fir6 based devices, respectively. Non-doped orange OLED was fabricated utilizing the newly reported phosphorescent material iridium (III) (pbi)2Ir(biq), of which manifested maximum current and power efficiency of 8.2 cd/A and 7.8 lm/W. The non-doped white OLEDs were achieved by simply combining Firpic or Fir6 with a 2-nm (pbi)2Ir(biq). The maximum current and power efficiency of the Firpic and (pbi)2Ir(biq) based white OLED were 14.8 cd/A and 17.9 lm/W.

  4. Progress of OLED devices with high efficiency at high luminance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Carmen; Ingram, Grayson; Lu, Zhenghong

    2014-03-01

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) have progressed significantly over the last two decades. For years, OLEDs have been promoted as the next generation technology for flat panel displays and solid-state lighting due to their potential for high energy efficiency and dynamic range of colors. Although high efficiency can readily be obtained at low brightness levels, a significant decline at high brightness is commonly observed. In this report, we will review various strategies for achieving highly efficient phosphorescent OLED devices at high luminance. Specifically, we will provide details regarding the performance and general working principles behind each strategy. We will conclude by looking at how some of these strategies can be combined to produce high efficiency white OLEDs at high brightness.

  5. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Multifunctional Phosphorescent Dendrimers with Iridium-Complex Core and Charge-Transporting Dendrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Toshimitsu; Shirasawa, Nobuhiko; Suzuki, Toshiyasu; Tokito, Shizuo

    2005-06-01

    We report a novel class of light-emitting materials for use in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs): multifunctional phosphorescent dendrimers that have a phosphorescent core and dendrons based on charge-transporting building blocks. We synthesized first-generation and second-generation dendrimers consisting of a fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine)iridium [Ir(ppy)3] core and hole-transporting phenylcarbazole-based dendrons. Smooth amorphous films of these dendrimers were formed by spin-coating them from solutions. The OLEDs using the dendrimer exhibited bright green or yellowish-green emission from the Ir(ppy)3 core. The OLEDs using the film containing a mixture of the dendrimer and an electron-transporting material exhibited higher efficiency than those using the neat dendrimer film. The external quantum efficiency of OLEDs using the film containing a mixture of the first-generation dendrimer and an electron-transporting material was as high as 7.6%.

  6. Recovery Act: Low Cost Integrated Substrate for OLED Lighting Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benton, Scott [PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bhandari, Abhinav [PPG Industries, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-12-26

    PPG pursued the development of an integrated substrate, including the anode, external, and internal extraction layers. The objective of PPG's program was to achieve cost reductions by displacing the existing expensive borosilicate or double-side polished float glass substrates and developing alternative electrodes and scalable light extraction layer technologies through focused and short-term applied research. One of the key highlights of the project was proving the feasibility of using PPG's high transmission Solarphire® float glass as a substrate to consistently achieve organic lightemitting diode (OLED) devices with good performance and high yields. Under this program, four low-cost alternatives to the Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) anode were investigated using pilot-scale magnetron sputtered vacuum deposition (MSVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technologies. The anodes were evaluated by fabricating small and large phosphorescent organic lightemitting diode (PHOLED) devices at Universal Display Corporation (UDC). The device performance and life-times comparable to commercially available ITO anodes were demonstrated. A cost-benefit analysis was performed to down-select two anodes for further low-cost process development. Additionally, PPG developed and evaluated a number of scalable and compatible internal and external extraction layer concepts such as scattering layers on the outside of the glass substrate or between the transparent anode and the glass interface. In one external extraction layer (EEL) approach, sol-gel sprayed pyrolytic coatings were deposited using lab scale equipment by hand or automated spraying of sol-gel solutions on hot glass, followed by optimizing of scattering with minimal absorption. In another EEL approach, PPG tested large-area glass texturing by scratching a glass surface with an abrasive roller and acid etching. Efficacy enhancements of 1.27x were demonstrated using white PHOLED devices for 2.0mm substrates which are

  7. High-efficiency orange and tandem white organic light-emitting diodes using phosphorescent dyes with horizontally oriented emitting dipoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunghun; Shin, Hyun; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2014-09-03

    Tandem white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) using horizontally oriented phosphorescent dyes in an exciplex-forming co-host are presented, along with an orange OLED. A high external quantum efficiency of 32% is achieved for the orange OLED at 1000 cd m(-2) and the tandem WOLEDs exhibit a high maximum EQE of 54.3% (PE of 63 lm W(-1)). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. OLEDs : Technology's next generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2001-10-01

    Major advances in organic light emitting device (OLED) technology are bringing some science fiction concepts to the brink of reality. At the moment. OLED technology is being developed for the flat panel display industry. Liquid crystal display dominates the market for wristwatches and cellular phones for example, while the cathode ray tube plays the same role for television sets and desktop computers. Both have limitations when it comes to meeting the needs of the next generation of smart products. The attributes required include high brightness, low power consumption, high definition, full colour, wide preview angle, fast response time and portability, and low cost. OLED has the potential to meet all those requirements. Universal Display Corporation (UDC) was founded, and specializes in the development and commercialization of OLED technology. A partnership was established early with Princeton University professors, and no fewer than 20 researchers are working on OLED technology projects at both Princeton University and the University of Southern California. To date, 35 patents have been issued, and 60 others are pending. A joint development agreement was reached with Sony Corporation this year for high efficiency active matrix OLEDs to be used in large area monitor applications. OLED technology is based on vacuum-deposited organic small molecule materials that emit very bright light when electrically stimulated. Three advances in the technology were briefly discussed: TOLED{sup TM} for Transparent OLED, SOLED{sup TM} for Stacked OLED, and FOLED{sup TM} for Flexible OLED. A list detailing the various potential uses for the technology was also included in this paper. 3 figs.

  9. Study of different roles phosphorescent material played in different positions of organic light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keke, Gu; Jian, Zhong; Jiule, Chen; Yucheng, Chen; Ming, Deng

    2013-09-01

    Phosphorescent materials are crucial to improve the luminescence and efficiency of organic light emitting diodes (OLED), because its internal quantum efficiency can reach 100%. So the studying of optical and electrical properties of phosphorescent materials is propitious for the further development of phosphorescent OLED. Phosphorescent materials were generally doped into different host materials as emitting components, not only played an important role in emitting light but also had a profound influence on carrier transport properties. We studied the optical and electrical properties of the blue 4,4'-bis(2,2-diphenylvinyl)-1,1'-biphenyl (DPVBi)-based devices, adding a common yellow phosphorescent material bis[2-(4- tert-butylphenyl)benzothiazolato- N,C2'] iridium(acetylacetonate) [( t-bt)2Ir(acac)] in different positions. The results showed ( t-bt)2Ir(acac) has remarkable hole-trapping ability. Especially the ultrathin structure device, compared to the device without ( t-bt)2Ir(acac), had increased the luminance by about 60%, and the efficiency by about 97%. Then introduced thin 4,4'-bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) host layer between DPVBi and ( t-bt)2Ir(acac), and got devices with stable white color.

  10. Thin Film Packaging Solutions for High Efficiency OLED Lighting Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-06-30

    The objective of the 'Thin Film Packaging Solutions for High Efficiency OLED Lighting Products' project is to demonstrate thin film packaging solutions based on SiC hermetic coatings that, when applied to glass and plastic substrates, support OLED lighting devices by providing longer life with greater efficiency at lower cost than is currently available. Phase I Objective: Demonstrate thin film encapsulated working phosphorescent OLED devices on optical glass with lifetime of 1,000 hour life, CRI greater than 75, and 15 lm/W. Phase II Objective: Demonstrate thin film encapsulated working phosphorescent OLED devices on plastic or glass composite with 25 lm/W, 5,000 hours life, and CRI greater than 80. Phase III Objective: Demonstrate 2 x 2 ft{sup 2} thin film encapsulated working phosphorescent OLED with 40 lm/W, 10,000 hour life, and CRI greater than 85. This report details the efforts of Phase III (Budget Period Three), a fourteen month collaborative effort that focused on optimization of high-efficiency phosphorescent OLED devices and thin-film encapsulation of said devices. The report further details the conclusions and recommendations of the project team that have foundation in all three budget periods for the program. During the conduct of the Thin Film Packaging Solutions for High Efficiency OLED Lighting Products program, including budget period three, the project team completed and delivered the following achievements: (1) a three-year marketing effort that characterized the near-term and longer-term OLED market, identified customer and consumer lighting needs, and suggested prototype product concepts and niche OLED applications lighting that will give rise to broader market acceptance as a source for wide area illumination and energy conservation; (2) a thin film encapsulation technology with a lifetime of nearly 15,000 hours, tested by calcium coupons, while stored at 16 C and 40% relative humidity ('RH'). This encapsulation technology

  11. OLED displays and lighting

    CERN Document Server

    Koden, Mitsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have emerged as the leading technology for the new display and lighting market. OLEDs are solid-state devices composed of thin films of organic molecules that create light with the application of electricity. OLEDs can provide brighter, crisper displays on electronic devices and use less power than conventional light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or liquid crystal displays (LCDs) used today. This book covers both the fundamentals and practical applications of flat and flexible OLEDs.

  12. Integrated Plastic Substrates for OLED Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaynor, Whitney

    2015-08-01

    OLED lighting has immense potential as aesthetically pleasing, energy-efficient general illumination. Unlike other light sources, such as incandescents, fluorescents, and inorganic LEDs, OLEDs naturally emit over a large-area surface. They are glare free, do not need to be shaded, and are cool to the touch, requiring no heatsink. The best efficiencies and lifetimes reported are on par with or better than current forms of illumination. However, the cost for OLED lighting remains high – so much so that these products are not market competitive and there is very low consumer demand. We believe that flexible, plastic-based devices will highlight the advantages of aesthetically-pleasing OLED lighting systems while paving the way for lowering both materials and manufacturing costs. These flexible devices require new development in substrate and support technology, which was the focus of the work reported here. The project team, led by Sinovia Technologies, has developed integrated plastic substrates to serve as supports for flexible OLED lighting. The substrates created in this project would enable large-area, flexible devices and are specified to perform three functions. They include a barrier to protect the OLED from moisture and oxygen-related degradation, a smooth, highly conductive transparent electrode to enable large-area device operation, and a light scattering layer to improve emission efficiency. Through the course of this project, integrated substrates were fabricated, characterized, evaluated for manufacturing feasibility and cost, and used in white OLED demonstrations to test their impact on flexible OLED lighting. Our integrated substrates meet or exceed the DOE specifications for barrier performance in water vapor and oxygen transport rates, as well as the transparency and conductivity of the anode film. We find that these integrated substrates can be manufactured in a completely roll-to-roll, high throughput process and have developed and demonstrated

  13. An Exciplex Host for Deep-Blue Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyoungcheol; Shin, Hyun; Kim, Kwon-Hyeon; Yoo, Seung-Jun; Huh, Jin-Suk; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2017-11-01

    The use of exciplex hosts is attractive for high-performance phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs) and thermally activated delayed fluorescence OLEDs, which have high external quantum efficiency, low driving voltage, and low efficiency roll-off. However, exciplex hosts for deep-blue OLEDs have not yet been reported because of the difficulties in identifying suitable molecules. Here, we report a deep-blue-emitting exciplex system with an exciplex energy of 3.0 eV. It is composed of a carbazole-based hole-transporting material (mCP) and a phosphine-oxide-based electron-transporting material (BM-A10). The blue PhOLEDs exhibited maximum external quantum efficiency of 24% with CIE coordinates of (0.15, 0.21) and longer lifetime than the single host devices.

  14. Mixing of phosphorescent and exciplex emission in efficient organic electroluminescent devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherpak, Vladyslav; Stakhira, Pavlo; Minaev, Boris; Baryshnikov, Gleb; Stromylo, Evgeniy; Helzhynskyy, Igor; Chapran, Marian; Volyniuk, Dmytro; Hotra, Zenon; Dabuliene, Asta; Tomkeviciene, Ausra; Voznyak, Lesya; Grazulevicius, Juozas Vidas

    2015-01-21

    We fabricated a yellow organic light-emitting diode (OLED) based on the star-shaped donor compound tri(9-hexylcarbazol-3-yl)amine, which provides formation of the interface exciplexes with the iridium(III) bis[4,6-difluorophenyl]-pyridinato-N,C2']picolinate (FIrpic). The exciplex emission is characterized by a broad band and provides a condition to realize the highly effective white OLED. It consists of a combination of the blue phosphorescent emission from the FIrpic complex and a broad efficient delayed fluorescence induced by thermal activation with additional direct phosphorescence from the triplet exciplex formed at the interface. The fabricated exciplex-type device exhibits a high brightness of 38 000 cd/m(2) and a high external quantum efficiency.

  15. Surface Plasmon Enhanced Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazan, Guillermo; Mikhailovsky, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the proposed work was to develop the fundamental understanding and practical techniques for enhancement of Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes (PhOLEDs) performance by utilizing radiative decay control technology. Briefly, the main technical goal is the acceleration of radiative recombination rate in organometallic triplet emitters by using the interaction with surface plasmon resonances in noble metal nanostructures. Increased photonic output will enable one to eliminate constraints imposed on PhOLED efficiency by triplet-triplet annihilation, triplet-polaron annihilation, and saturation of chromophores with long radiative decay times. Surface plasmon enhanced (SPE) PhOLEDs will operate more efficiently at high injection current densities and will be less prone to degradation mechanisms. Additionally, introduction of metal nanostructures into PhOLEDs may improve their performance due to the improvement of the charge transport through organic layers via multiple possible mechanisms ('electrical bridging' effects, doping-like phenomena, etc.). SPE PhOLED technology is particularly beneficial for solution-fabricated electrophosphorescent devices. Small transition moment of triplet emitters allows achieving a significant enhancement of the emission rate while keeping undesirable quenching processes introduced by the metal nanostructures at a reasonably low level. Plasmonic structures can be introduced easily into solution-fabricated PhOLEDs by blending and spin coating techniques and can be used for enhancement of performance in existing device architectures. This constitutes a significant benefit for a large scale fabrication of PhOLEDs, e.g. by roll-to-roll fabrication techniques. Besides multieexciton annihilation, the power efficacy of PhOLEDs is often limited by high operational bias voltages required for overcoming built-in potential barriers to injection and transport of electrical charges through a device. This problem is especially

  16. Phosphorescent cyclometalated complexes for efficient blue organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuri, Yoshiyuki; Oshiyama, Tomohiro; Ito, Hiroto; Hiyama, Kunihisa; Kita, Hiroshi

    2014-10-01

    Phosphorescent emitters are extremely important for efficient organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), which attract significant attention. Phosphorescent emitters, which have a high phosphorescence quantum yield at room temperature, typically contain a heavy metal such as iridium and have been reported to emit blue, green and red light. In particular, the blue cyclometalated complexes with high efficiency and high stability are being developed. In this review, we focus on blue cyclometalated complexes. Recent progress of computational analysis necessary to design a cyclometalated complex is introduced. The prediction of the radiative transition is indispensable to get an emissive cyclometalated complex. We summarize four methods to control phosphorescence peak of the cyclometalated complex: (i) substituent effect on ligands, (ii) effects of ancillary ligands on heteroleptic complexes, (iii) design of the ligand skeleton, and (iv) selection of the central metal. It is considered that novel ligand skeletons would be important to achieve both a high efficiency and long lifetime in the blue OLEDs. Moreover, the combination of an emitter and a host is important as well as the emitter itself. According to the dependences on the combination of an emitter and a host, the control of exciton density of the triplet is necessary to achieve both a high efficiency and a long lifetime, because the annihilations of the triplet state cause exciton quenching and material deterioration.

  17. Controlling excitons. Concepts for phosphorescent organic LEDs at high brightness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reineke, Sebastian

    2009-11-15

    This work focusses on the high brightness performance of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The use of phosphorescent emitter molecules in OLEDs is essential to realize internal electron-photon conversion efficiencies of 100 %. However, due to their molecular nature, the excited triplet states have orders of magnitude longer time constants compared to their fluorescent counterparts which, in turn, strongly increases the probability of bimolecular annihilation. As a consequence, the efficiencies of phosphorescent OLEDs decline at high brightness - an effect known as efficiency roll-off, for which it has been shown to be dominated by triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA). In this work, TTA of the archetype phosphorescent emitter Ir(ppy){sub 3} is investigated in time-resolved photoluminescence experiments. For the widely used mixed system CBP:Ir(ppy){sub 3}, host-guest TTA - an additional unwanted TTA channel - is experimentally observed at high excitation levels. By using matrix materials with higher triplet energies, this effect is efficiently suppressed, however further studies show that the efficiency roll-off of Ir(ppy)3 is much more pronounced than predicted by a model based on Foerster-type energy transfer, which marks the intrinsic limit for TTA. These results suggest that the emitter molecules show a strong tendency to form aggregates in the mixed film as the origin for enhanced TTA. Transmission electron microscopy images of Ir(ppy){sub 3} doped mixed films give direct proof of emitter aggregates. Based on these results, two concepts are developed that improve the high brightness performance of OLEDs. In a first approach, thin intrinsic matrix interlayers are incorporated in the emission layer leading to a one-dimensional exciton confinement that suppresses exciton migration and, consequently, TTA. The second concept reduces the efficiency roll-off by using an emitter molecule with slightly different chemical structure, i.e. Ir(ppy){sub 2

  18. Recent development of organic light-emitting diode utilizing energy transfer from exciplex to phosphorescent emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Satoshi; Shitagaki, Satoko; Ohsawa, Nobuharu; Inoue, Hideko; Suzuki, Kunihiko; Nowatari, Hiromi; Takahashi, Tatsuyoshi; Hamada, Takao; Watabe, Takeyoshi; Yamada, Yui; Mitsumori, Satomi

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) utilizing energy transfer from an excited complex (exciplex) comprising donor and acceptor molecules to a phosphorescent dopant. An exciplex has a very small energy gap between the lowest singlet and triplet excited states (S1 and T1). Thus, both S1 and T1 energies of the exciplex can be directly transferred to the T1 of the phosphorescent dopant by adjusting the emission energy of the exciplex to the absorption-edge energy of the dopant. Such an exciplex‒triplet energy transfer (ExTET) achieves high efficiency at low drive voltage because the electrical excitation energy of the exciplex approximates the T1 energy of the dopant. Furthermore, the efficiency of the reverse intersystem crossing (RISC) of the exciplex does not affect the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the ExTET OLED. The RISC of the exciplex is inhibited when the T1 energy of either donor or acceptor molecules is close to or lower than that of the exciplex itself. Even in this case, however, the ExTET OLED maintains its high efficiency because the T1 energy of each component of the exciplex or the T1 energy of the exciplex itself can be transferred to the dopant. We also varied the emission colors of ExTET OLEDs from sky-blue to red by introducing various phosphorescent dopants. These devices achieved high EQEs (≍30%), low drive voltages (≍3 V), and extremely long lifetimes (e.g., 1 million hours for the orange OLED) at a luminance of 1,000 cd/m2.

  19. White OLED devices and processes for lighting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Nobuhiro; Tsuji, Hiroya; Ito, Norihiro; Matsuhisa, Yuko; Houzumi, Shingo; Nishimori, Taisuke

    2010-05-01

    In these days, the basic performances of white OLEDs are dramatically improved and application of OLEDs to "Lighting" is expected to be true in the near future. We have developed various technologies for OLED lighting with the aid of the Japanese governmental project, "High-efficiency lighting based on the organic light-emitting mechanism." In this project, a white OLED with high efficiency (37 lm/W) and high quality emission characteristics (CRI of 95 with a small variation of chromaticity in different directions and chromaticity just on the black-body radiation curve) applicable to "Lighting" was realized by a two-unit structure with a fluorescent deep blue emissive unit and a phosphorescent green and red emissive unit. Half-decay lifetime of this white OLED at 1,000 cd/m2 was over 40,000 h. A heat radiative, thin encapsulation structure (less than 1 mm) realized a very stable emission at high luminance of over 3,000 cd/m2. A new deposition source with a hot-wall and a rate controllable valve was developed. Thickness uniformity within +/- 3% at high deposition rate of over 8 nm/s, high material utilization of over 70 %, and repeatable deposition rate controllability were confirmed.

  20. Polymer OLED White Light Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homer Antoniadis; Vi-En Choong; Stelios Choulis; Brian Cumpston; Rahul Gupta; Mathew Mathai; Michael Moyer; Franky So

    2005-12-19

    OSRAM Opto Semiconductors (OSRAM) successfully completed development, fabrication and characterization of the large area, polymer based white light OLED prototype at their OLED Research and Development (R&D) facility in San Jose, CA. The program, funded by the Department of Energy (DOE), consisted of three key objectives: (1) Develop new polymer materials and device architectures--in order to improve the performance of organic light emitters. (2) Develop processing techniques--in order to demonstrate and enable the manufacturing of large area, white light and color tunable, solid state light sources. (3) Develop new electronics and driving schemes for organic light sources, including color-tunable light sources. The key performance goals are listed. A world record efficiency of 25 lm/W was established for the solution processed white organic device from the significant improvements made during the project. However, the challenges to transfer this technology from an R&D level to a large tile format such as, the robustness of the device and the coating uniformity of large area panels, remain. In this regard, the purity and the blend nature of the materials are two factors that need to be addressed in future work. During the first year, OSRAM's Materials and Device group (M&D) worked closely with the major polymer material suppliers to develop the polymer emissive technology. M&D was successful in demonstrating a 7-8 lm/W white light source which was based on fluorescent materials. However, it became apparent that the major gains in efficiency could only be made if phosphorescent materials were utilized. Thus, in order to improve the performance of the resulting devices, the focus of the project shifted towards development of solution-processable phosphorescent light emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) and device architectures. The result is a higher efficiency than the outlined project milestone.

  1. Red organic light emitting devices with reduced efficiency roll-off behavior by using hybrid fluorescent/phosphorescent emission structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Tianhang; Choy, Wallace C.H., E-mail: chchoy@eee.hku.h

    2010-11-01

    Organic light emitting device (OLED) with a fluorescence-interlayer-phosphorescence emissive structure (FIP EML) is proposed to solve efficiency roll-off issue effectively. By doping fluorescent emitter of 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyl-6-(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl) -4H-pyran (DCJTB) and phosphorescent emitter of tris(1-phenylisoquinolinolato-C2,N)iridium(III) (Ir(piq){sub 3}) into the different regions of emission zone to form FIP EML in red OLED, an improvement of more than 20% in luminance efficiency roll-off compared with that of typical phosphorescent OLED with single EML in 10-500 mA/cm{sup 2} range has been obtained. Detailed mechanisms have been studied. Such improvement should be attributed to the distinct roles of the two emitters, where DCJTB mainly used to influence the carrier transport leading to an improved balance of charge carriers while Ir(piq){sub 3} functions as the radiative decay sites for most generated excitons. Meanwhile, with the help of the formation of FIP EML, the redistribution of excitons in recombination zone, the suppression of non-radiative exciton quenching processes and the elimination of energy transfer loss also contribute to the enhancement of efficiency roll-off. The method proposed here may provide a route to develop efficient OLED for high luminance applications.

  2. High Brightness OLED Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, Jeffrey [OLEDWorks LLC; Kondakova, Marina [OLEDWorks LLC; Boroson, Michael [OLEDWorks LLC; Hamer, John [OLEDWorks LLC

    2016-05-25

    In this work we describe the technology developments behind our current and future generations of high brightness OLED lighting panels. We have developed white and amber OLEDs with excellent performance based on the stacking approach. Current products achieve 40-60 lm/W, while future developments focus on achieving 80 lm/W or higher.

  3. Low roll-off and high efficiency orange OLEDs using green and red dopants in an exciplex forming co-host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunghun; Kim, Kwon-Hyeon; Yoo, Seung-Jun; Park, Young-Seo; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2013-09-01

    We present high efficiency orange emitting OLEDs with low driving voltage and low roll-off of efficiency using an exciplex forming co-host by (1) co-doping of green and red emitting phosphorescence dyes in the host and (2) red and green phosphorescent dyes doped in the host as separate red and green emitting layers. The orange OLEDs achieved a low turn-on voltage of 2.4 V and high external quantum efficiencies (EQE) of 25.0% and 22.8%, respectively. Moreover, the OLEDs showed low roll-off of efficiency with an EQE of over 21% and 19.6% at 10,000 cd/m2, respectively. The devices displayed good orange color with very little color shift with increasing luminance. The transient electroluminescence of the OLEDs indicated that both energy transfer and direct charge trapping took place in the devices.

  4. High efficiency and stable white OLED using a single emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). School of Mechanical, Aerospace, Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2016-01-18

    The ultimate objective of this project was to demonstrate an efficient and stable white OLED using a single emitter on a planar glass substrate. The focus of the project is on the development of efficient and stable square planar phosphorescent emitters and evaluation of such class of materials in the device settings. Key challenges included improving the emission efficiency of molecular dopants and excimers, controlling emission color of emitters and their excimers, and improving optical and electrical stability of emissive dopants. At the end of this research program, the PI has made enough progress to demonstrate the potential of excimer-based white OLED as a cost-effective solution for WOLED panel in the solid state lighting applications.

  5. Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes Implementing Platinum Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecton, Jeremy Exton

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are a promising approach for display and solid state lighting applications. However, further work is needed in establishing the availability of efficient and stable materials for OLEDs with high external quantum efficiency's (EQE) and high operational lifetimes. Recently, significant improvements in the internal quantum efficiency or ratio of generated photons to injected electrons have been achieved with the advent of phosphorescent complexes with the ability to harvest both singlet and triplet excitons. Since then, a variety of phosphorescent complexes containing heavy metal centers including Os, Ni, Ir, Pd, and Pt have been developed. Thus far, the majority of the work in the field has focused on iridium based complexes. Platinum based complexes, however, have received considerably less attention despite demonstrating efficiency's equal to or better than their iridium analogs. In this study, a series of OLEDs implementing newly developed platinum based complexes were demonstrated with efficiency's or operational lifetimes equal to or better than their iridium analogs for select cases. In addition to demonstrating excellent device performance in OLEDs, platinum based complexes exhibit unique photophysical properties including the ability to form excimer emission capable of generating broad white light emission from a single emitter and the ability to form narrow band emission from a rigid, tetradentate molecular structure for select cases. These unique photophysical properties were exploited and their optical and electrical properties in a device setting were elucidated. Utilizing the unique properties of a tridentate Pt complex, Pt-16, a highly efficient white device employing a single emissive layer exhibited a peak EQE of over 20% and high color quality with a CRI of 80 and color coordinates CIE(x=0.33, y=0.33). Furthermore, by employing a rigid, tetradentate platinum complex, PtN1N, with a narrow band emission into a

  6. Solution-Processed Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Ultralow Driving Voltage and Very High Power Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Shumeng; Wang, Xingdong; Yao, Bing; Zhang, Baohua; Ding, Junqiao; Xie, Zhiyuan; Wang, Lixiang

    2015-01-01

    To realize power efficient solution-processed phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (s-PhOLEDs), the corresponding high driving voltage issue should be well solved. To solve it, efforts have been devoted to the exploitation of novel host or interfacial materials. However, the issues of charge trapping of phosphor and/or charge injection barrier are still serious, largely restraining the power efficiency (PE) levels. Herein, with the utilization of an exciplex-forming couple 4, 4?, 4? -...

  7. Phosphorescence lifetimes of organic light-emitting diodes from two-component time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kühn, Michael [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Kaiserstraße 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Weigend, Florian, E-mail: florian.weigend@kit.edu [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Kaiserstraße 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut für Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2014-12-14

    “Spin-forbidden” transitions are calculated for an eight-membered set of iridium-containing candidate molecules for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) using two-component time-dependent density functional theory. Phosphorescence lifetimes (obtained from averaging over relevant excitations) are compared to experimental data. Assessment of parameters like non-distorted and distorted geometric structures, density functionals, relativistic Hamiltonians, and basis sets was done by a thorough study for Ir(ppy){sub 3} focussing not only on averaged phosphorescence lifetimes, but also on the agreement of the triplet substate structure with experimental data. The most favorable methods were applied to an eight-membered test set of OLED candidate molecules; Boltzmann-averaged phosphorescence lifetimes were investigated concerning the convergence with the number of excited states and the changes when including solvent effects. Finally, a simple model for sorting out molecules with long averaged phosphorescence lifetimes is developed by visual inspection of computationally easily achievable one-component frontier orbitals.

  8. Efficiency Control in Iridium Complex-Based Phosphorescent Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boucar Diouf

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Key factors to control the efficiency in iridium doped red and green phosphorescent light emitting diodes (PhOLEDs are discussed in this review: exciton confinement, charge trapping, dopant concentration and dopant molecular structure. They are not independent from each other but we attempt to present each of them in a situation where its specific effects are predominant. A good efficiency in PhOLEDs requires the triplet energy of host molecules to be sufficiently high to confine the triplet excitons within the emitting layer (EML. Furthermore, triplet excitons must be retained within the EML and should not drift into the nonradiative levels of the electron or hole transport layer (resp., ETL or HTL; this is achieved by carefully choosing the EML’s adjacent layers. We prove how reducing charge trapping results in higher efficiency in PhOLEDs. We show that there is an ideal concentration for a maximum efficiency of PhOLEDs. Finally, we present the effects of molecular structure on the efficiency of PhOLEDs using red iridium complex dopant with different modifications on the ligand to tune its highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO energies.

  9. Color in the corners: ITO-free white OLEDs with angular color stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, Whitney; Hofmann, Simone; Christoforo, M Greyson; Sachse, Christoph; Mehra, Saahil; Salleo, Alberto; McGehee, Michael D; Gather, Malte C; Lüssem, Björn; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Peumans, Peter; Leo, Karl

    2013-08-07

    High-efficiency white OLEDs fabricated on silver nanowire-based composite transparent electrodes show almost perfectly Lambertian emission and superior angular color stability, imparted by electrode light scattering. The OLED efficiencies are comparable to those fabricated using indium tin oxide. The transparent electrodes are fully solution-processable, thin-film compatible, and have a figure of merit suitable for large-area devices. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. High-efficiency green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes with double-emission layer and thick N-doped electron transport layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobuki, Shunichiro, E-mail: shunichiro.nobuki.nb@hitachi.com [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., 7-1-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi-city, Ibaraki 319-1292 (Japan); Wakana, Hironori; Ishihara, Shingo [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., 7-1-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi-city, Ibaraki 319-1292 (Japan); Mikami, Akiyoshi [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, 7-1 Ohgigaoka, Nonoichimachi, Ishikawa 921-8501 (Japan)

    2014-03-03

    We have developed green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with high external quantum efficiency of 59.7% and power efficiency of 243 lm/W at 2.73 V at 0.053 mA/cm{sup 2}. A double emission layer and a thick n-doped electron transport layer were adopted to improve the exciton recombination factor. A high refractive index hemispherical lens was attached to a high refractive index substrate for extracting light trapped inside the substrate and the multiple-layers of OLEDs to air. Additionally, we analyzed an energy loss mechanism to clarify room for the improvement of our OLEDs including the charge balance factor. - Highlights: • We developed high efficiency green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (OLED). • Our OLED had external quantum efficiency of 59.7% and power efficiency of 243 lm/W. • A double emission layer and thick n-doped electron transport layer were adopted. • High refractive index media (hemispherical lens and substrate) were also used. • We analyzed an energy loss mechanism to clarify the charge balance factor of our OLED.

  11. Enhancement of efficiencies for tandem green phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices with a p-type charge generation layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byung Soo; Jeon, Young Pyo; Lee, Dae Uk; Kim, Tae Whan, E-mail: twk@hanayng.ac.kr

    2014-10-15

    The operating voltage of the tandem green phosphorescent organic light-emitting device with a 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile layer was improved by 3% over that of the organic light-emitting device with a molybdenum trioxide layer. The maximum brightness of the tandem green phosphorescent organic light-emitting device at 21.9 V was 26,540 cd/m{sup 2}. The dominant peak of the electroluminescence spectra for the devices was related to the fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium emission. - Highlights: • Tandem OLEDs with CGL were fabricated to enhance their efficiency. • The operating voltage of the tandem OLED with a HAT-CN layer was improved by 3%. • The efficiency and brightness of the tandem OLED were 13.9 cd/A and 26,540 cd/m{sup 2}. • Efficiency of the OLED with a HAT-CN layer was lower than that with a MoO{sub 3} layer. - Abstract: Tandem green phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices with a 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile or a molybdenum trioxide charge generation layer were fabricated to enhance their efficiency. Current density–voltage curves showed that the operating voltage of the tandem green phosphorescent organic light-emitting device with a 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile layer was improved by 3% over that of the corresponding organic light-emitting device with a molybdenum trioxide layer. The efficiency and the brightness of the tandem green phosphorescent organic light-emitting device were 13.9 cd/A and 26,540 cd/m{sup 2}, respectively. The current efficiency of the tandem green phosphorescent organic light-emitting device with a 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile layer was lower by 1.1 times compared to that of the corresponding organic light-emitting device with molybdenum trioxide layer due to the decreased charge generation and transport in the 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile layer resulting from triplet–triplet exciton annihilation.

  12. Light Management in Flexible OLEDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkema, S.; Pendyala, R.K.; Geurts, C.G.C.; Helgers, P.L.J.; Levell, J.W.; Wilson, J.S.; MacKerron, D.

    2014-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are a promising lighting technology. In particular OLEDs fabricated on plastic foils are believed to hold the future. These planar devices are subject to various optical losses, which requires sophisticated light management solutions. Flexible OLEDs on plastic

  13. Fluorescence and phosphorescence of rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarev, Stanislav L., E-mail: bondarev@imaph.bas-net.by [Minsk State Higher Radioengineering College, 220005 Minsk (Belarus); Knyukshto, Valeri N. [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 220072 Minsk (Belarus)

    2013-10-15

    Rutin is one of the most promising flavonoid from a pharmacological and biochemical point of view. Here we have explored its spectroscopic and photophysical properties at room temperature and 77 K using steady-state absorption-luminescence methods and pulse spectroscopy equipment. By excitation into the absorption band 1 of rutin in methanol at room temperature the normal Stokes' shifted fluorescence with a maximum at 415 nm and quantum yield of 2×10{sup −4} was revealed. However, by excitation into the bands 2 and 3 any emission wasn’t observed. At 77 K in ethanol glass we have observed fluorescence at 410 nm and phosphorescence at 540 nm for the first time. As a result the adequate energetic scheme including the lowest electronic excited singlet at 26000 cm{sup −1} and triplet at 19600 cm{sup −1} states was proposed. -- Highlights: • Rutin fluorescence and phosphorescence at 77 K were revealed for the first time. • Room temperature fluorescence is determined by maximum at 415 nm and yield of 2×10{sup −4}. • Violation of Vavilov–Kasha rule by excitation into the absorption bands 2 and 3. • Fluorescence and phosphorescence in rutin are caused by the allowed π, π{sup (⁎)} transitions.

  14. OLEDs for lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Herbert

    2006-04-01

    Today, organic light emitting diodes are used in small to medium displays in portable electronic equipment like MP3 players and mobile phones. Their thin form factor, together with good readability due to low angular dependence of the emission makes them attractive for these applications. The rapid progress in the last years has lifted the performance of OLEDs to a level where one can seriously start to consider applications in lighting markets. Whereas it is obvious that first applications will be in less demanding niche markets, clearly the most interesting target is the general illumination market. In this report, first applications requirements will be described, followed by a brief review of state of the art monochrome OLEDs. The main part deals with the various ways in which monochrome devices can be combined into white ones, giving examples of existing solutions. The conclusion is that for the white OLED design, there no clear winner yet. Given the rapid progress in material and device development, one can expect that within a few years white OLEDs will be available which can start to penetrate the general lighting market.

  15. New Optoelectronic Technology Simplified for Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre F. S. Guedes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED, using an optically transparent substrate material and organic semiconductor materials, has been widely utilized by the electronic industry when producing new technological products. The OLED are the base Poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene, PEDOT, and Polyaniline, PANI, were deposited in Indium Tin Oxide, ITO, and characterized by UV-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-Vis, Optical Parameters (OP and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. In addition, the thin film obtained by the deposition of PANI, prepared in perchloric acid solution, was identified through PANI-X1. The result obtained by UV-Vis has demonstrated that the Quartz/ITO/PEDOT/PANI-X1 layer does not have displacement of absorption for wavelengths greaters after spin-coating and electrodeposition. Thus, the spectral irradiance of the OLED informed the irradiance of 100 W/m2, and this result, compared with the standard Light Emitting Diode (LED, has indicated that the OLED has higher irradiance. After 1000 hours of electrical OLED tests, the appearance of nanoparticles visible for images by SEM, to the migration process of organic semiconductor materials, was present, then. Still, similar to the phenomenon of electromigration observed in connections and interconnections of microelectronic devices, the results have revealed a new mechanism of migration, which raises the passage of electric current in OLED.

  16. High performance inkjet printed phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes based on small molecules commonly used in vacuum processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Sung-Hoon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jang-Joo, E-mail: jjkim@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyong-Jun, E-mail: hkim@kongju.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kongju National University, Cheonan, 330-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-30

    High efficiency phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are realized by inkjet printing based on small molecules commonly used in vacuum processes in spite of the limitation of the limited solubility. The OLEDs used the inkjet printed 5 wt.% tris(2-phenylpyridine)iridium(III) (Ir(ppy){sub 3}) doped in 4,4 Prime -Bis(carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) as the light emitting layer on various small molecule based hole transporting layers, which are widely used in the fabrication of OLEDs by vacuum processes. The OLEDs resulted in the high power and the external quantum efficiencies of 29.9 lm/W and 11.7%, respectively, by inkjet printing the CBP:Ir(ppy){sub 3} on a 40 nm thick 4,4 Prime ,4 Double-Prime -tris(carbazol-9-yl)triphenylamine layer. The performance was very close to a vacuum deposited device with a similar structure. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effective inkjet printed organic light emitting diode (OLED) technique is explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solution process on commonly used hole transporting material (HTM) is demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Triplet energy overlap of HTM and emitting material is the key to the performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple inkjet printed OLED provides the high current efficiency of 40 cd/A.

  17. Solution-processed small molecules as mixed host for highly efficient blue and white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Chen, Jiangshan; Shi, Changsheng; Ma, Dongge

    2012-12-01

    The widely used hole-transporting host 4,4',4″-tris(N-carbazolyl)-triphenylamine (TCTA) blended with either a hole-transporting or an electron-transporting small-molecule material as a mixed-host was investigated in the phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) fabricated by the low-cost solution-process. The performance of the solution-processed OLEDs was found to be very sensitive to the composition of the mixed-host systems. The incorporation of the hole-transporting 1,1-bis[(di-4-tolylamino)phenyl]cyclohexane (TAPC) into TCTA as the mixed-host was demonstrated to greatly reduce the driving voltage and thus enhance the efficiency due to the improvement of hole injection and transport. On the basis of the mixed-host of TCTA:TAPC, we successfully fabricated low driving voltage and high efficiency blue and white phosphorescent OLEDs. A maximum forward viewing current efficiency of 32.0 cd/A and power efficiency of 25.9 lm/W were obtained in the optimized mixed-host blue OLED, which remained at 29.6 cd/A and 19.1 lm/W at the luminance of 1000 cd/m(2) with a driving voltage as low as 4.9 V. The maximum efficiencies of 37.1 cd/A and 32.1 lm/W were achieved in a single emissive layer white OLED based on the TCTA:TAPC mixed-host. Even at 1000 cd/m(2), the efficiencies still reach 34.2 cd/A and 23.3 lm/W and the driving voltage is only 4.6 V, which is comparable to those reported from the state-of-the-art vacuum-evaporation deposited white OLEDs.

  18. Comparison of light out-coupling enhancements in single-layer blue-phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes using small-molecule or polymer hosts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yung-Ting [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617, Taiwan (China); Liu, Shun-Wei [Department of Electronic Engineering, Mingchi University of Technology, New Taipei, Taiwan 24301, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Chih-Hsien; Lee, Chih-Chien [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei, Taiwan 10607, Taiwan (China); Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Wei, Pei-Kuen [Research Center for Applied Science Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan 11527, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kuan-Yu [Chilin Technology Co., LTD, Tainan City, Taiwan 71758, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yi-Ting; Wu, Min-Fei; Chen, Chin-Ti, E-mail: cchen@chem.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: chihiwu@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan 11529, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chih-I, E-mail: cchen@chem.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: chihiwu@cc.ee.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-07

    Single-layer blue phosphorescence organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with either small-molecule or polymer hosts are fabricated using solution process and the performances of devices with different hosts are investigated. The small-molecule device exhibits luminous efficiency of 14.7 cd/A and maximum power efficiency of 8.39 lm/W, which is the highest among blue phosphorescence OLEDs with single-layer solution process and small molecular hosts. Using the same solution process for all devices, comparison of light out-coupling enhancement, with brightness enhancement film (BEF), between small-molecule and polymer based OLEDs is realized. Due to different dipole orientation and anisotropic refractive index, polymer-based OLEDs would trap less light than small molecule-based OLEDs internally, about 37% better based simulation results. In spite of better electrical and spectroscopic characteristics, including ambipolar characteristics, higher carrier mobility, higher photoluminescence quantum yield, and larger triplet state energy, the overall light out-coupling efficiency of small molecule-based devices is worse than that of polymer-based devices without BEF. However, with BEF for light out-coupling enhancement, the improved ratio in luminous flux and luminous efficiency for small molecule based device is 1.64 and 1.57, respectively, which are significantly better than those of PVK (poly-9-vinylcarbazole) devices. In addition to the theoretical optical simulation, the experimental data also confirm the origins of differential light-outcoupling enhancement. The maximum luminous efficiency and power efficiency are enhanced from 14.7 cd/A and 8.39 lm/W to 23 cd/A and 13.2 lm/W, respectively, with laminated BEF, which are both the highest so far for single-layer solution-process blue phosphorescence OLEDs with small molecule hosts.

  19. Comparison of light out-coupling enhancements in single-layer blue-phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes using small-molecule or polymer hosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yung-Ting; Liu, Shun-Wei; Yuan, Chih-Hsien; Lee, Chih-Chien; Ho, Yu-Hsuan; Wei, Pei-Kuen; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Lee, Yi-Ting; Wu, Min-Fei; Chen, Chin-Ti; Wu, Chih-I

    2013-01-01

    Single-layer blue phosphorescence organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) with either small-molecule or polymer hosts are fabricated using solution process and the performances of devices with different hosts are investigated. The small-molecule device exhibits luminous efficiency of 14.7 cd/A and maximum power efficiency of 8.39 lm/W, which is the highest among blue phosphorescence OLEDs with single-layer solution process and small molecular hosts. Using the same solution process for all devices, comparison of light out-coupling enhancement, with brightness enhancement film (BEF), between small-molecule and polymer based OLEDs is realized. Due to different dipole orientation and anisotropic refractive index, polymer-based OLEDs would trap less light than small molecule-based OLEDs internally, about 37% better based simulation results. In spite of better electrical and spectroscopic characteristics, including ambipolar characteristics, higher carrier mobility, higher photoluminescence quantum yield, and larger triplet state energy, the overall light out-coupling efficiency of small molecule-based devices is worse than that of polymer-based devices without BEF. However, with BEF for light out-coupling enhancement, the improved ratio in luminous flux and luminous efficiency for small molecule based device is 1.64 and 1.57, respectively, which are significantly better than those of PVK (poly-9-vinylcarbazole) devices. In addition to the theoretical optical simulation, the experimental data also confirm the origins of differential light-outcoupling enhancement. The maximum luminous efficiency and power efficiency are enhanced from 14.7 cd/A and 8.39 lm/W to 23 cd/A and 13.2 lm/W, respectively, with laminated BEF, which are both the highest so far for single-layer solution-process blue phosphorescence OLEDs with small molecule hosts

  20. A Novel Lighting OLED Panel Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enyang Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel OLED (organic light emitting diode lighting panel, which uses a special layout design, can reduce the photolithography cycles and process costs and is more reliable. It only needs two steps of photolithography cycles, which include an ITO (InSnO compound transparent oxide pattern and insulator pattern. There is no need for the metal bus pattern of the ordinary design. The OLED device structure is a type of red–green–blue (RGB-stacked emitting layer that has a good color index and greater adjustability, which improves the performance of the device. This novel design has the same equipment and material requirement compared to the ordinary design, and it is very beneficial in terms of high volume and low-cost production. It uses a hyper driving method because the entire OLED lighting panel is divided into many sub-emitting units; if one of the sub-emitting units is burned out, it has no effect on the adjacent sub-emitting unit, so the reliability is markedly better than the ordinary design.

  1. Manufacturing Process for OLED Integrated Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Cheng-Hung [Vitro Flat Glass LLC, Cheswick, PA (United States). Glass Technology Center

    2017-03-31

    The main objective of this project was to develop a low-cost integrated substrate for rigid OLED solid-state lighting produced at a manufacturing scale. The integrated substrates could include combinations of soda lime glass substrate, light extraction layer, and an anode layer (i.e., Transparent Conductive Oxide, TCO). Over the 3+ year course of the project, the scope of work was revised to focus on the development of a glass substrates with an internal light extraction (IEL) layer. A manufacturing-scale float glass on-line particle embedding process capable of producing an IEL glass substrate having a thickness of less than 1.7mm and an area larger than 500mm x 400mm was demonstrated. Substrates measuring 470mm x 370mm were used in the OLED manufacturing process for fabricating OLED lighting panels in single pixel devices as large as 120.5mm x 120.5mm. The measured light extraction efficiency (calculated as external quantum efficiency, EQE) for on-line produced IEL samples (>50%) met the project’s initial goal.

  2. Blue phosphorescent mono-cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Ho Wan; Yang, Yoon A; Kim, Young Sik [Hongik University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    New deep blue phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes comprised of one cyclometalate, two phosphines trans to each other and two cis-ancillary ligands, such as Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)(PPh{sub 2}Me){sub 2}(H)(Cl), Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)(PPh{sub 2}Me){sub 2}(H)(NCMe){sup +}, and Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)(PPh{sub 2}Me){sub 2}(H)(CN), [F{sub 2}Meppy = 2-(2', 4'- difluorophenyl)-4-methyl-pyridine] were synthesized and studied to tune the phosphorescence wavelength to the deep blue region and to enhance the luminescence efficiencies. We investigated the strong field effects of ancillary ligands to gain insight into the factors responsible for the emission color change and the different luminescence efficiency. Reducing the molecular weight of the phosphine ligand with PPh{sub 2}Me leads to more efficient deep-blue organic light-emitting devices (OLED) by thermal processing instead of through solution processing. The electron-withdrawing difluoro group substituted on the phenyl ring, the electron-donating methyl group on the pyridyl ring, and the cyano strong field ancillary ligand increased the HOMO-LUMO gap and achieved a hypsochromic shift in the emission color. As a result, the maximum emission spectra of Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)-(PPh{sub 2}Me){sub 2}(H)(Cl), Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)(PPh{sub 2}Me){sub 2}(H)(NCMe){sup +}, and Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)(PPh{sub 2}Me){sub 2-}(H)(CN) were in the ranges of 440.5, 437, 436 nm, respectively.

  3. Blue phosphorescent mono-cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Ho Wan; Yang, Yoon A; Kim, Young Sik

    2010-01-01

    New deep blue phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes comprised of one cyclometalate, two phosphines trans to each other and two cis-ancillary ligands, such as Ir(F 2 Meppy)(PPh 2 Me) 2 (H)(Cl), Ir(F 2 Meppy)(PPh 2 Me) 2 (H)(NCMe) + , and Ir(F 2 Meppy)(PPh 2 Me) 2 (H)(CN), [F 2 Meppy = 2-(2', 4'- difluorophenyl)-4-methyl-pyridine] were synthesized and studied to tune the phosphorescence wavelength to the deep blue region and to enhance the luminescence efficiencies. We investigated the strong field effects of ancillary ligands to gain insight into the factors responsible for the emission color change and the different luminescence efficiency. Reducing the molecular weight of the phosphine ligand with PPh 2 Me leads to more efficient deep-blue organic light-emitting devices (OLED) by thermal processing instead of through solution processing. The electron-withdrawing difluoro group substituted on the phenyl ring, the electron-donating methyl group on the pyridyl ring, and the cyano strong field ancillary ligand increased the HOMO-LUMO gap and achieved a hypsochromic shift in the emission color. As a result, the maximum emission spectra of Ir(F 2 Meppy)-(PPh 2 Me) 2 (H)(Cl), Ir(F 2 Meppy)(PPh 2 Me) 2 (H)(NCMe) + , and Ir(F 2 Meppy)(PPh 2 Me) 2- (H)(CN) were in the ranges of 440.5, 437, 436 nm, respectively.

  4. Efficient fluorescence/phosphorescence white organic light-emitting diodes with ultra high color stability and mild efficiency roll-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaoyang; Tao, Silu; Huang, Yun; Yang, Xiaoxia; Ding, Xulin; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-11-01

    Efficient fluorescence/phosphorescence hybrid white organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with single doped co-host structure have been fabricated. Device using 9-Naphthyl-10 -(4-triphenylamine)anthrancene as the fluorescent dopant and Ir(ppy)3 and Ir(2-phq)3 as the green and orange phosphorescent dopants show the luminous efficiency of 12.4% (17.6 lm/W, 27.5 cd/A) at 1000 cd/m2. Most important to note that the efficiency-brightness roll-off of the device was very mild. With the brightness rising up to 5000 and 10 000 cd/m2, the efficiency could be kept at 11.8% (14.0 lm/W, 26.5 cd/A) and 11.0% (11.8 lm/W, 25.0 cd/A). The Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates and color rending index (CRI) were measured to be (0.45, 0.48) and 65, respectively, and remained the same in a large range of brightness (1000-10 000 cd/m2), which is scarce in the reported white OLEDs. The performance of the device at high luminance (5000 and 10 000 cd/m2) was among the best reported results including fluorescence/phosphorescence hybrid and all-phosphorescent white OLEDs. Moreover, the CRI of the white OLED can be improved to 83 by using a yellow-green emitter (Ir(ppy)2bop) in the device.

  5. OLED Lighting Products: Capabilities, Challenges, Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Leon, F. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-05-31

    A report that focuses on the potential for architectural OLED lighting – describing currently available OLED products as well as promised improvements, and addressing the technology and market hurdles that have thus far prevented wider use of OLEDs.

  6. Device Engineering and Degradation Mechanism Study of All-Phosphorescent White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lisong

    As a possible next-generation solid-state lighting source, white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have the advantages in high power efficiency, large area and flat panel form factor applications. Phosphorescent emitters and multiple emitting layer structures are typically used in high efficiency WOLEDs. However due to the complexity of the device structure comprising a stack of multiple layers of organic thin films, ten or more organic materials are usually required, and each of the layers in the stack has to be optimized to produce the desired electrical and optical functions such that collectively a WOLED of the highest possible efficiency can be achieved. Moreover, device degradation mechanisms are still unclear for most OLED systems, especially blue phosphorescent OLEDs. Such challenges require a deep understanding of the device operating principles and materials/device degradation mechanisms. This thesis will focus on achieving high-efficiency and color-stable all-phosphorescent WOLEDs through optimization of the device structures and material compositions. The operating principles and the degradation mechanisms specific to all-phosphorescent WOLED will be studied. First, we investigated a WOLED where a blue emitter was based on a doped mix-host system with the archetypal bis(4,6-difluorophenyl-pyridinato-N,C2) picolinate iridium(III), FIrpic, as the blue dopant. In forming the WOLED, the red and green components were incorporated in a single layer adjacent to the blue layer. The WOLED efficiency and color were optimized through variations of the mixed-host compositions to control the electron-hole recombination zone and the dopant concentrations of the green-red layers to achieve a balanced white emission. Second, a WOLED structure with two separate blue layers and an ultra-thin red and green co-doped layer was studied. Through a systematic investigation of the placement of the co-doped red and green layer between the blue layers and the material

  7. Application of exciplex in the fabrication of white organic light emitting devices with mixed fluorescent and phosphorescent layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Dan; Duan, Yahui; Yang, Yongqiang [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Hu, Nan [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130012 (China); Wang, Xiao [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Sun, Fengbo [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130012 (China); Duan, Yu, E-mail: duanyu@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science & Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, a highly efficient fluorescent/phosphorescent white organic light-emitting device (WOLED) was fabricated using exciplex light emission. The hole-transport material 4,4',4''-tris(N-carbazolyl)triphenylamine (TCTA), and electron-transport material, 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen), were mixed to afford a blue-emitting exciplex. The WOLED was fabricated with a yellow phosphorescent dye, Ir(III) bis(4-phenylthieno [3,2-c] pyridinato-N,C{sup 2'}) acetylacetonate (PO-01), combined with the exciplex. In this structure, the energy can be efficiently transferred from the blend layer to the yellow phosphorescent dye, thus improving the efficiency of the utilization of the triplet exciton. The maximum power efficiency of the WOLED reached a value 9.03 lm/W with an external quantum efficiency of 4.3%. The Commission Internationale de I'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates (x,y) of the device were from (0.39, 0.45) to (0.27, 0.31), with a voltage range of 4–9 V. - Highlights: • An exciplex/phosphorescence hybrid white OLED was fabricated for the first time with blue/orange complementary emitters. • By using exciplex as the blue emitter, non-radiative triplet-states on the exciplex can be harvested for light-emission by transferring them to low triplet-state phosphors.

  8. Application of exciplex in the fabrication of white organic light emitting devices with mixed fluorescent and phosphorescent layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Dan; Duan, Yahui; Yang, Yongqiang; Hu, Nan; Wang, Xiao; Sun, Fengbo; Duan, Yu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a highly efficient fluorescent/phosphorescent white organic light-emitting device (WOLED) was fabricated using exciplex light emission. The hole-transport material 4,4',4''-tris(N-carbazolyl)triphenylamine (TCTA), and electron-transport material, 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen), were mixed to afford a blue-emitting exciplex. The WOLED was fabricated with a yellow phosphorescent dye, Ir(III) bis(4-phenylthieno [3,2-c] pyridinato-N,C 2' ) acetylacetonate (PO-01), combined with the exciplex. In this structure, the energy can be efficiently transferred from the blend layer to the yellow phosphorescent dye, thus improving the efficiency of the utilization of the triplet exciton. The maximum power efficiency of the WOLED reached a value 9.03 lm/W with an external quantum efficiency of 4.3%. The Commission Internationale de I'Eclairage (CIE) color coordinates (x,y) of the device were from (0.39, 0.45) to (0.27, 0.31), with a voltage range of 4–9 V. - Highlights: • An exciplex/phosphorescence hybrid white OLED was fabricated for the first time with blue/orange complementary emitters. • By using exciplex as the blue emitter, non-radiative triplet-states on the exciplex can be harvested for light-emission by transferring them to low triplet-state phosphors

  9. Highly efficient and heavily-doped organic light-emitting devices based on an orange phosphorescent iridium complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shunliang; Wang, Qi [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu 610054 (China); Li, Ming [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610064 (China); Lu, Zhiyun, E-mail: luzhiyun@scu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu, 610064 (China); Yu, Junsheng, E-mail: jsyu@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Heavily doped and highly efficient phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices (PhOLEDs) had been fabricated by utilizing an orange iridium complex, bis[2-(3′,5′-di-tert-butylbiphenyl-4-yl)benzothiazolato-N,C{sup 2'}]iridium(III) (acetylacetonate) [(tbpbt){sub 2}Ir(acac)], as a phosphor. When the doping concentration of [(tbpbt){sub 2}Ir(acac)] reached as high as 15 wt%, the PhOLEDs exhibited a power efficiency, current efficiency, and external quantum efficiency of 24.5 lm/W, 32.1 cd/A, 15.7%, respectively, implying a promising quenching-resistant characteristics of this novel phosphor. Furthermore, the efficient white PhOLEDs had been obtained by employing (tbpbt){sub 2}Ir(acac) as a self-host orange emitter, indicating that (tbpbt){sub 2}Ir(acac) could serve as a promising phosphor to fabricate white organic light-emitting devices with simplified manufacturing process. - Highlights: • Efficient phosphorescent devices were fabricated. • Optimized phosphor doping ratio reached as high as 15 wt%. • The results proved a promising quench-resistant property of the phosphor. • Efficient white devices based on this phosphor as self-host layer had been realized.

  10. Highly efficient and heavily-doped organic light-emitting devices based on an orange phosphorescent iridium complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Shunliang; Wang, Qi; Li, Ming; Lu, Zhiyun; Yu, Junsheng

    2014-01-01

    Heavily doped and highly efficient phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices (PhOLEDs) had been fabricated by utilizing an orange iridium complex, bis[2-(3′,5′-di-tert-butylbiphenyl-4-yl)benzothiazolato-N,C 2' ]iridium(III) (acetylacetonate) [(tbpbt) 2 Ir(acac)], as a phosphor. When the doping concentration of [(tbpbt) 2 Ir(acac)] reached as high as 15 wt%, the PhOLEDs exhibited a power efficiency, current efficiency, and external quantum efficiency of 24.5 lm/W, 32.1 cd/A, 15.7%, respectively, implying a promising quenching-resistant characteristics of this novel phosphor. Furthermore, the efficient white PhOLEDs had been obtained by employing (tbpbt) 2 Ir(acac) as a self-host orange emitter, indicating that (tbpbt) 2 Ir(acac) could serve as a promising phosphor to fabricate white organic light-emitting devices with simplified manufacturing process. - Highlights: • Efficient phosphorescent devices were fabricated. • Optimized phosphor doping ratio reached as high as 15 wt%. • The results proved a promising quench-resistant property of the phosphor. • Efficient white devices based on this phosphor as self-host layer had been realized

  11. Color-tunable and stable-efficiency white organic light-emitting diode fabricated with fluorescent-phosphorescent emission layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Su-Hua; Shih, Po-Jen; Wu, Wen-Jie; Huang, Yi-Hua

    2013-01-01

    White organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) were fabricated for color-tunable lighting applications. Fluorescent and phosphorescent hybrid emission layers (EMLs) were used to enhance the luminance and stability of the devices, which have blue-EML/CBP interlayer/green-EML/phosphorescent-sensitized-EML/red-EML structures. The influence of the composition and structure of the EMLs on the electroluminescence properties of the devices were investigated from the viewpoint of their emission spectra. The possible exciton harvesting, diffusion, transport, and annihilation processes occurring in the EMLs were also evaluated. A maximum luminance intensity of 7400 cd/m 2 and a highly stable current efficiency of 3.2 cd/A were obtained. Good color tunability was achieved for the white OLEDs; the chromatic coordinates linearly shifted from pure white (0.300, 0.398) to cold white (0.261, 0.367) when the applied voltage was varied from 10 to 14 V. -- Highlights: • Exciton harvesting, diffusion, transport, and annihilation processes were evaluated. • The electroluminescence properties were investigated from the viewpoint of the emission spectra. • Good color tunability and stable-efficiency were achieved for the white OLEDs

  12. Ole Bornedals Danmarksfilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kim Toft

    2016-01-01

    Dette kapitel sætter fokus på den politiske reception af 1864. Først viser jeg, hvordan der er en række interessante ligheder mellem Poul Henningensens Danmark (1935) og 1864; ligheder, der ikke som sådan er indholdsmæssige ud over, at både Danmark og 1864 tematiserer nogle nationale synspunkter;...... diskuterer jeg, hvorvidt Ole Bornedal selv kan siges at være kulturradikal, og i så fald på hvilken måde....

  13. Transparent Electrodes for Efficient Optoelectronics

    KAUST Repository

    Morales-Masis, Monica

    2017-03-30

    With the development of new generations of optoelectronic devices that combine high performance and novel functionalities (e.g., flexibility/bendability, adaptability, semi or full transparency), several classes of transparent electrodes have been developed in recent years. These range from optimized transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), which are historically the most commonly used transparent electrodes, to new electrodes made from nano- and 2D materials (e.g., metal nanowire networks and graphene), and to hybrid electrodes that integrate TCOs or dielectrics with nanowires, metal grids, or ultrathin metal films. Here, the most relevant transparent electrodes developed to date are introduced, their fundamental properties are described, and their materials are classified according to specific application requirements in high efficiency solar cells and flexible organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). This information serves as a guideline for selecting and developing appropriate transparent electrodes according to intended application requirements and functionality.

  14. Transparent Electrodes for Efficient Optoelectronics

    KAUST Repository

    Morales-Masis, Monica; De Wolf, Stefaan; Woods-Robinson, Rachel; Ager, Joel W.; Ballif, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    With the development of new generations of optoelectronic devices that combine high performance and novel functionalities (e.g., flexibility/bendability, adaptability, semi or full transparency), several classes of transparent electrodes have been developed in recent years. These range from optimized transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), which are historically the most commonly used transparent electrodes, to new electrodes made from nano- and 2D materials (e.g., metal nanowire networks and graphene), and to hybrid electrodes that integrate TCOs or dielectrics with nanowires, metal grids, or ultrathin metal films. Here, the most relevant transparent electrodes developed to date are introduced, their fundamental properties are described, and their materials are classified according to specific application requirements in high efficiency solar cells and flexible organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). This information serves as a guideline for selecting and developing appropriate transparent electrodes according to intended application requirements and functionality.

  15. Light management in flexible OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkema, Stephan; Pendyala, Raghu K.; Geurts, Christian G. C.; Helgers, Paul L. J.; Levell, Jack W.; Wilson, Joanne S.; MacKerron, Duncan

    2014-10-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are a promising lighting technology. In particular OLEDs fabricated on plastic foils are believed to hold the future. These planar devices are subject to various optical losses, which requires sophisticated light management solutions. Flexible OLEDs on plastic substrates are as prone to losses related to wave guiding as devices on glass. However, we determined that OLEDs on plastic substrates are susceptible to another loss mode due to wave guiding in the thin film barrier. With modeling of white polymer OLEDs fabricated on PEN substrates, we demonstrate that this loss mode is particularly sensitive to polarized light emission. Furthermore, we investigated how thin film barrier approaches can be combined with high index light extraction layers. Our analysis shows that OLEDs with a thin film barrier consisting of an inorganic/organic/inorganic layer sequence, a low index inorganic negatively affects the OLED efficiency. We conclude that high index inorganics are more suitable for usage in high efficiency flexible OLEDs.

  16. Comparative study of graphene and its derivative materials as an electrode in OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anshika; Kumar, Brijesh

    2018-04-01

    In current scenario, the organic materials have given a revolutionary evolution in the electronics industry. As, the organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) have almost replaced the conventional technologies due to the use of organic based materials. However, the next generations OLEDs are intensively desired nowadays for high definition display technology. There are various concern involved in the successful design of OLEDs. Electrodes are one of the electrical conductors, which play a vital role in the construction of OLEDs. The performance of OLED is majorly affected by the material used for electrodes. Due to the requirement of transparent, flexible and inexpensive anodes in bottom emissive OLEDs, ITO was replaced by graphene material. Graphene is a single layer 2-dimensional transparent carbon allotrope which showed prodigious potential to escalate the device performance. Although graphene demonstrated impressive characteristics in various applications, it showed unfavorable work function for many other devices. Thus, derivative materials of graphene such as graphene oxide, graphane and β - graphdiyne were synthesized by several researchers. By comparing graphene and its derivatives as an anode of OLEDs, it has been found that graphene oxide showed the preeminent performance among all. In this paper, all the comparisons are investigated by using a standard device constructed by piling layers of anode/ m_MTDATA/ NPB/ Alq3: QAD/ Alq3/ cathode in TCAD ATLAS device simulator.

  17. Theoretical investigation of the degradation mechanisms in host and guest molecules used in OLED active layers

    KAUST Repository

    Winget, Paul

    2014-10-08

    A feature of OLEDs that has to date received little attention is the prediction of the stability of the molecules involved in the electrical and optical processes. Here, we present computational results intended to aid in the development of stable systems. We identify degradation pathways and define new strategies to guide the synthesis of stable materials for OLED applications for both phosphorescent emitters and organic host materials. The chemical reactivity of these molecules in the active layers of the devices is further complicated by the fact that, during operation, they can be either oxidized or reduced (as they localize a hole or an electron) in addition to forming both singlet and triplet excitons. © (2014) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  18. Carrier Injection and Transport in Blue Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Device with Oxadiazole Host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-Lung Chiu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the carrier injection and transport characteristics in iridium(IIIbis[4,6-(di-fluorophenyl-pyridinato-N,C2']picolinate (FIrpic doped phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs with oxadiazole (OXD as the bipolar host material of the emitting layer (EML. When doping Firpic inside the OXD, the driving voltage of OLEDs greatly decreases because FIrpic dopants facilitate electron injection and electron transport from the electron-transporting layer (ETL into the EML. With increasing dopant concentration, the recombination zone shifts toward the anode side, analyzed with electroluminescence (EL spectra. Besides, EL redshifts were also observed with increasing driving voltage, which means the electron mobility is more sensitive to the electric field than the hole mobility. To further investigate carrier injection and transport characteristics, FIrpic was intentionally undoped at different positions inside the EML. When FIrpic was undoped close to the ETL, driving voltage increased significantly which proves the dopant-assisted-electron-injection characteristic in this OLED. When the undoped layer is near the electron blocking layer, the driving voltage is only slightly increased, but the current efficiency is greatly reduced because the main recombination zone was undoped. However, non-negligible FIrpic emission is still observed which means the recombination zone penetrates inside the EML due to certain hole-transporting characteristics of the OXD.

  19. Exciplex-Forming Cohost for High Efficiency and High Stability Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chun-Jen; Lee, Chih-Chien; Chen, Ying-Hao; Biring, Sajal; Kumar, Gautham; Yeh, Tzu-Hung; Sen, Somaditya; Liu, Shun-Wei; Wong, Ken-Tsung

    2018-01-17

    An exciplex forming cohost system is employed to achieve a highly efficient organic light-emitting diode (OLED) with good electroluminescent lifetime. The exciplex is formed at the interfacial contact of a conventional star-shaped carbazole hole-transporting material, 4,4',4″-tris(N-carbazolyl)-triphenylamine (TCTA), and a triazine electron-transporting material, 2,4,6-tris[3-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)phenyl]-1,3,5-triazine (3P-T2T). The excellent combination of TCTA and 3P-T2T is applied as the cohost of a common green phosphorescent emitter with almost zero energy loss. When Ir(ppy) 2 (acac) is dispersed in such exciplex cohost system, OLED device with maximum external quantum efficiency of 29.6%, the ultrahigh power efficiency of 147.3 lm/W, and current efficiency of 107 cd/A were successfully achieved. More importantly, the OLED device showed a low-efficiency roll-off and an operational lifetime (τ 80 ) of ∼1020 min with the initial brightness of 2000 cd/m 2 , which is 56 times longer than the reference device. The significant difference of device stability was attributed to the degradation of exciplex system for energy transfer process, which was investigated by the photoluminescence aging measurement at room temperature and 100 K, respectively.

  20. OLEDs for lighting: new approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Anil R.; Foust, Donald F.; Nealon, William F.; Heller, Christian M.

    2004-02-01

    OLED technology has improved to the point where it is now possible to envision developing OLEDs as a low cost solid state light source. In order to realize this, significant advances have to be made in device efficiency, lifetime at high brightness, high throughput fabrication, and the generation of illumination quality white light. In this talk, the requirements for general lighting will be reviewed and various approaches to meeting them will be outlined. Emphasis will be placed on a new monolithic series-connected OLED design architecture that promises scalability without high fabrication cost or design complexity.

  1. Enhanced life time and suppressed efficiency roll-off in phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes with multiple quantum well structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ja-Ryong Koo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate red phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs with multiple quantum well structures which confine triplet exciton inside an emitting layer (EML region. Five types of OLEDs, from a single to five quantum wells, are fabricated with charge control layers to produce high efficiencies, and the performance of the devices is investigated. The improved quantum efficiency and lifetime of the OLED with four quantum wells, and its suppressed quantum efficiency roll-off of 17.6%, can be described by the increased electron–hole charge balance owing to the bipolar property as well as the efficient triplet exciton confinement within each EML, and by prevention of serious triplet–triplet and/or triplet–polaron annihilation as well as the Förster self-quenching due to charge control layers.

  2. Analysis of chemical degradation mechanism of phosphorescent organic light emitting devices by laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabelo de Moraes, Ines; Scholz, Sebastian; Luessem, Bjoern; Leo, Karl [Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) have attracted much interest for their potential application in full color flat-panel displays and as an alternative lighting source. However, low efficiency, and the short operation lifetime, in particular in the case of blue emitting devices, are the major limitations for the current OLEDs commercialization. In order to overcome these limitations, a deep knowledge about the aging and the degradation mechanism is required. Our work focuses on the chemical degradation mechanism of different iridium based emitter materials like FIrpic (light blue) and Ir(ppy)3 (green), commonly used in OLEDs. For this purpose, the devices were aged by electrical driving until the luminance reached 6% of the initial luminance. The laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to determine specific degradation pathways.

  3. Exciplex-Forming Co-Host-Based Red Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Long Operational Stability and High Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Shin, Hyun; Kim, Jae-Min; Kim, Kwon-Hyeon; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2017-02-01

    The use of exciplex forming cohosts and phosphors incredibly boosts the efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by providing a barrier-free charge injection into an emitting layer and a broad recombination zone. However, most of the efficient OLEDs based on the exciplex forming cohosts has suffered from the short operational lifetime. Here, we demonstrated phosphorescent OLEDs (PhOLEDs) having both high efficiency and long lifetime by using a new exciplex forming cohost composed of N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine (NPB) and (1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyl)tris(benzene-3,1-diyl))tris(diphenylphosphine oxide) (PO-T2T). The red-emitting PhOLEDs using the exciplex forming cohost achieved a maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 34.1% and power efficiency of 62.2 lm W 1- with low operating voltages and low efficiency roll-offs. More importantly, the device demonstrated a long lifetime around 2249 h from 1000 cd m -2 to 900 cd m -2 (LT 90 ) under a continuous flow of constant current. The efficiencies of the devices are the highest for red OLEDs with an LT 90 > 1000 h.

  4. Maailmaparandajad / Ole Ry, Susanne Andres

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ry, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Terapeudid Ole Ry ja Susanne Andres räägivad Dr David Berceli loodud TRE (Tension & Trauma Releasing Exercises) harjutuste kasutamise kogemusest erinevate psüühiliste traumade ja pingetega klientide tervise parandamisel

  5. High Power Efficiency Solution-Processed Blue Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Exciplex-Type Host with a Turn-on Voltage Approaching the Theoretical Limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Xinxin; Sun, Kaiyong; Sun, Yueming; Huang, Bin; Ye, Shanghui; Yang, Min; Jiang, Wei

    2015-11-18

    Three solution-processable exciplex-type host materials were successfully designed and characterized by equal molar blending hole transporting molecules with a newly synthesized electron transporting material, which possesses high thermal stability and good film-forming ability through a spin-coating technique. The excited-state dynamics and the structure-property relationships were systematically investigated. By gradually deepening the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level of electron-donating components, the triplet energy of exciplex hosts were increased from 2.64 to 3.10 eV. Low temperature phosphorescence spectra demonstrated that the excessively high triplet energy of exciplex would induce a serious energy leakage from the complex state to the constituting molecule. Furthermore, the low energy electromer state, which only exists under the electroexcitation, was found as another possible channel for energy loss in exciplex-based phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). In particular, as quenching of the exciplex-state and the triplet exciton were largely eliminated, solution-processed blue phosphorescence OLEDs using the exciplex-type host achieved an extremely low turn-on voltage of 2.7 eV and record-high power efficiency of 22.5 lm W(-1), which were among the highest values in the devices with identical structure.

  6. Effect of Stepwise Doping on Lifetime and Efficiency of Blue and White Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Song Eun; Lee, Ho Won; Lee, Seok Jae; Koo, Ja-ryong; Lee, Dong Hyung; Yang, Hyung Jin; Kim, Hye Jeong; Yoon, Seung Soo; Kim, Young Kwan

    2015-02-01

    We investigated a light emission mechanism of blue phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes (PHOLEDs), using a stepwise doping profile of 2, 8, and 14 wt.% within the emitting layer (EML). We fabricated several blue PHOLEDs with phosphorescent blue emitter iridium(III) bis[(4,6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C2]picolinate doped in N,N'-dicarbazolyl-3,5-benzene as a p-type host material. A blue PHOLED with the highest doping concentration as part of the EML close to an electron transporting layer showed a maximum luminous efficiency of 20.74 cd/A, and a maximum external quantum efficiency of 10.52%. This can be explained by effective electron injection through a highly doped EML side. Additionally, a white OLED based on the doping profile was fabricated with two thin red EMLs within a blue EML maintaining a thickness of 30 nm for the entire EML. Keywords: Blue Phosphorescent Organic Light Emitting Diodes, Stepwise Doping Structure, Charge Trapping Effect.

  7. OLED microdisplays technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Templier, François

    2014-01-01

    Microdisplays are displays requiring optical magnification and OLEDs (Organic Light-Emitting Diode) are self-emitting displays where each pixel includes a LED made of organic material, in general composed of small-molecule organic material. This title reviews in detail how OLED microdisplays are made as well as how they are used. All aspects from theory to application will be addressed: basic principles, display design, display fabrication, operation and performances, present and future applications. The book will be useful to anyone interested in this rapidly developing field, such as studen

  8. Ole Rømer-Observatoriet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Hans; Knudsen, Ole J.; Nielsen, Axel V.

    Siden 1911 har der ligget et astronomisk observatorium i Århus. Ole Rømer-Observatoriet blev efter en turbulent start drevet af kommunen, indtil Aarhus Universitet i 1956 overtog det. Der har fra tid til anden været både kontroverser og trusler om lukning, men arbejdet på observatoriet har også...... fortæller museumsinspektør Hans Buhl og planetarieleder Ole J. Knudsen, begge Steno Museet, de næste 95 år af observatoriets brogede historie....

  9. Studies on the photodegradation of red, green and blue phosphorescent OLED emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Schmidbauer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The photodegradation behavior of four well-established iridium emitters was investigated. Irradiation of the samples in different solvents and under atmospheric as well as inert conditions helped to identify several pathways that can contribute to the deterioration of these compounds. Degradation via singlet oxygen or the excited states of the emitters as well as the detrimental influence of halogenated solvents are discussed for the different investigated iridium complexes. Some of the resulting degradation products could be identified by using LC–MS or other analytical techniques. The results show how even small structural changes can have a huge influence on rate and mechanism of the photodegradation. The observations from this study may help to better understand degradation processes occurring during the handling of the materials, but also during device processing and operation.

  10. White-light phosphorescence emission from a single molecule: application to OLED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolink, Henk J; De Angelis, Filippo; Baranoff, Etienne; Klein, Cédric; Fantacci, Simona; Coronado, Eugenio; Sessolo, Michele; Kalyanasundaram, K; Grätzel, Michael; Nazeeruddin, Md K

    2009-08-21

    A simple mononuclear cyclometallated iridium(iii) complex exhibits white photo- and electro- luminescence in the wavelength range from 440 to 800 nm, which originates from a single emitting excited state of mixed character.

  11. White-light phosphorescence emission from a single molecule: application to OLED

    OpenAIRE

    Bolink, Henk; De Angelis, Filippo; Baranoff, Etienne; Klein, Cedric; Fantacci, Simona; Coronado Miralles, Eugenio; Sessolo, Michele; Kalyanasundaram, K.; Grätzel, Michael; Nazeeruddin, Md. K.

    1999-01-01

    A simple mononuclear cyclometallated iridium(III) complex exhibits white photo- and electro- luminescence in the wavelength range from 440 to 800 nm, which originates from a single emitting excited state of mixed character. Bolink Henk, ; Coronado Miralles, Eugenio,

  12. Ole Søndergaards skriftdesign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlers, Steen Erik

    2005-01-01

    Grafikeren Ole Søndergaard (f. 1937) er oprindeligt uddannet som skiltemaler. Senere blev han elev af navnkundige skriftformgiver, Kunstakademiets første designprofessor, arkitekturen Gunnar Biilmann Petersen. I 1970'erne etablerede Ole Søndergaard, efter nogle år som medarbejder på Naur Klints...... tegnestue, egen tegnestue i Helsingør. Tegnestuen har i årenes løb stået for mangfoldige grafiske arbejder, hvor Ole Søndergaard ofte selv har tegnet de anvendte logo- og skilteskrifter. Skriftfamilien FF Signa, der fra 2000 er blevet udgivet på FontShop International, er Søndergaards første komplette...... digitale skriftfamilie - med mangfoldige anvendelsemuligheder. Forud ligger adskillige års arbejde, bl.a. støttet af Statens Kunstfond. Artiklen beskriver Biilmanns skole, Ole Søndergaards "før-digitale" alfabeter til bl.a. Helsingør Kommune og Knud Rasmussen-monumentet (på Strandvejen ved Klampenborg nord...

  13. Highly efficient phosphorescent blue and white organic light-emitting devices with simplified architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chih-Hao, E-mail: chc@saturn.yzu.edu.tw [Department of Photonics Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan 32003 (China); Ding, Yong-Shung; Hsieh, Po-Wei; Chang, Chien-Ping; Lin, Wei-Chieh [Department of Photonics Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li, Taiwan 32003 (China); Chang, Hsin-Hua, E-mail: hhua3@mail.vnu.edu.tw [Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, Vanung University, Chung-Li, Taiwan 32061 (China)

    2011-09-01

    Blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices (PhOLEDs) with quantum efficiency close to the theoretical maximum were achieved by utilizing a double-layer architecture. Two wide-triplet-gap materials, 1,3-bis(9-carbazolyl)benzene and 1,3,5-tri[(3-pyridyl)-phen-3-yl]benzene, were employed in the emitting and electron-transport layers respectively. The opposite carrier-transport characteristics of these two materials were leveraged to define the exciton formation zone and thus increase the probability of recombination. The efficiency at practical luminance (100 cd/m{sup 2}) was as high as 20.8%, 47.7 cd/A and 31.2 lm/W, respectively. Furthermore, based on the design concept of this simplified architecture, efficient warmish-white PhOLEDs were developed. Such two-component white organic light-emitting devices exhibited rather stable colors over a wide brightness range and yielded electroluminescence efficiencies of 15.3%, 33.3 cd/A, and 22.7 lm/W in the forward directions.

  14. Design rules for charge-transport efficient host materials for phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Falk; Al-Helwi, Mustapha; Baumeier, Björn; Kowalsky, Wolfgang; Fuchs, Evelyn; Lennartz, Christian; Andrienko, Denis

    2012-08-22

    The use of blue phosphorescent emitters in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) imposes demanding requirements on a host material. Among these are large triplet energies, the alignment of levels with respect to the emitter, the ability to form and sustain amorphous order, material processability, and an adequate charge carrier mobility. A possible design strategy is to choose a π-conjugated core with a high triplet level and to fulfill the other requirements by using suitable substituents. Bulky substituents, however, induce large spatial separations between conjugated cores, can substantially reduce intermolecular electronic couplings, and decrease the charge mobility of the host. In this work we analyze charge transport in amorphous 2,8-bis(triphenylsilyl)dibenzofuran, an electron-transporting material synthesized to serve as a host in deep-blue OLEDs. We show that mesomeric effects delocalize the frontier orbitals over the substituents recovering strong electronic couplings and lowering reorganization energies, especially for electrons, while keeping energetic disorder small. Admittance spectroscopy measurements reveal that the material has indeed a high electron mobility and a small Poole-Frenkel slope, supporting our conclusions. By linking electronic structure, molecular packing, and mobility, we provide a pathway to the rational design of hosts with high charge mobilities.

  15. Highly efficient phosphorescent blue and white organic light-emitting devices with simplified architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Ding, Yong-Shung; Hsieh, Po-Wei; Chang, Chien-Ping; Lin, Wei-Chieh; Chang, Hsin-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices (PhOLEDs) with quantum efficiency close to the theoretical maximum were achieved by utilizing a double-layer architecture. Two wide-triplet-gap materials, 1,3-bis(9-carbazolyl)benzene and 1,3,5-tri[(3-pyridyl)-phen-3-yl]benzene, were employed in the emitting and electron-transport layers respectively. The opposite carrier-transport characteristics of these two materials were leveraged to define the exciton formation zone and thus increase the probability of recombination. The efficiency at practical luminance (100 cd/m 2 ) was as high as 20.8%, 47.7 cd/A and 31.2 lm/W, respectively. Furthermore, based on the design concept of this simplified architecture, efficient warmish-white PhOLEDs were developed. Such two-component white organic light-emitting devices exhibited rather stable colors over a wide brightness range and yielded electroluminescence efficiencies of 15.3%, 33.3 cd/A, and 22.7 lm/W in the forward directions.

  16. Gated Detection Measurements of Phosphorescence Lifetimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yordan Kostov

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost, gated system for measurements of phosphorescence lifetimes is presented. An extensive description of the system operating principles and metrological characteristics is given. Remarkably, the system operates without optical filtering of the LED excitation source. A description of a practical system is also given and its performance is discussed. Because the device effectively suppresses high-level background fluorescence and scattered light, it is expected to find wide-spread application in bioprocess, environmental and biomedical fields.

  17. Electroluminescence of organic light-emitting diodes consisting of an undoped (pbi)2Ir(acac) phosphorescent layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xia; Yu, Junsheng; Zhao, Juan; Jiang, Yadong

    2011-11-01

    The electroluminescence (EL) characteristics of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with an undoped bis(1,2-dipheny1-1H-benzoimidazole) iridium (acetylacetonate) [(pbi)2Ir(acac)] emissive layer (EML) of various film thicknesses were studied. The results showed that the intensity of green light emission decreased rapidly with the increasing thickness of (pbi)2Ir(acac), which was relevant to the triplet excimer emission. It suggested that the concentration quenching of monomer emission in the undoped (pbi)2Ir(acac) film was mainly due to the formation of triplet excimer and partly due to the triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) and triplet-polaron annihilation (TPA). A green OLED with a maximum luminance of 26,531 cd/m2, a current efficiency of 36.2 cd/A, and a power efficiency of 32.4 lm/W was obtained, when the triplet excimer emission was eliminated. Moreover, the white OLED with low efficiency roll-off was realized due to the broadened recombination zone and reduced quenching effects in the EML when no electron blocking layer was employed.

  18. Improved electron injection and transport by use of baking soda as a low-cost, air-stable, n-dopant for solution-processed phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earmme, Taeshik; Jenekhe, Samson A.

    2013-06-01

    Sodium bicarbonate (baking soda, NaHCO3) is found to be an efficient low-cost, air-stable, and environmentally friendly n-dopant for electron-transport layer (ETL) in solution-processed phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs). A 2.0-fold enhancement in power efficiency of blue PhOLEDs is observed by use of NaHCO3-doped 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen) ETL. The bulk conductivity of NaHCO3-doped BPhen film is increased by 5 orders of magnitude. Enhanced performance of PhOLEDs is similarly observed by use of NaHCO3-doped 1,3,5-tris(m-pyrid-3-yl-phenyl)benzene ETL. These results demonstrate that sodium bicarbonate is an effective n-dopant in organic electronics.

  19. Study of the electroluminescence of highly stereoregular poly(N-pentenyl-carbazole) for blue and white OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, R.; Botta, A.; Pragliola, S.; Rubino, A.; Venditto, V.; Velardo, A.; Aprano, S.; Maglione, M. G.; Prontera, C. T.; De Girolamo Del Mauro, A.; Fasolino, T.; Minarini, C.

    2017-06-01

    The electroluminescence (EL) of isotactic and syndiotactic poly(N-pentenyl-carbazole) (PPK), achieved by coordination polymerization, is studied in order to investigate the interrelation between the polymer tacticity and their physical-chemical properties. The use of these polymers in organic light-emitting diode (OLED) fabrication is also explored. Thermal and x-ray diffraction analyses of PPKs show that the isotactic stereoisomer is semicrystalline, whereas the syndiotactic one is amorphous. Optical analysis of both stereoisomers, carried out on film samples, reveals the presence of two different excimers: ‘sandwich-like’ and ‘partially overlapping’. Nevertheless, the emission intensity ratio between ‘sandwich-like’ and ‘partially overlapping’ excimers is higher in the isotactic than in the syndiotactic stereoisomer. Using the synthesized polymers as OLED emitting layers, the influence of the polymer tacticity on the EL properties of the device is highlighted. In detail, while blue OLEDs are obtained by using the syndiotactic stereoisomer, OLEDs with a multilayer structure fabricated with the isotactic stereoisomer emit white light. The contribution of three different emissions (fluorescence, phosphorescence and electromer emissions) with comparable intensities to the detected white light is discussed.

  20. Highly Simplified Reddish Orange Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Incorporating a Novel Carrier- and Exciton-Confining Spiro-Exciplex-Forming Host for Reduced Efficiency Roll-off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Zhang, Ye-Xin; Wang, Bo; Huang, Chen-Chao; Murtaza, Imran; Meng, Hong; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2017-01-25

    A novel exciplex-forming host is applied so as to design highly simplified reddish orange light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with low driving voltage, high efficiency, and an extraordinarily low efficiency roll-off, by combining N,N-10-triphenyl-10H-spiro [acridine-9,9'-fluoren]-3'-amine (SAFDPA) with 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bphen) doped with trivalent iridium complex bis(2-methyldibenzo[f,h]quinoxaline) (acetylacetonate)iridium(III) (Ir(MDQ) 2 (acac)). The reddish orange OLEDs achieve a strikingly high power efficiency (PE) of 31.80 lm/W with an ultralow threshold voltage of 2.24 V which is almost equal to the triplet energy level of the phosphorescent reddish orange emitting dopant. The power efficiency of the device with the exciplex-forming host is enhanced, achieving 36.2% mainly owing to the lower operating voltage by the novel exciplex forming cohost, compared with the reference device (23.54 lm/W). Moreover, the OLEDs show extraordinarily low current efficiency (CE) roll-off to 1.41% at the brightness from 500 to 5000 cd/m 2 with a maximal CE of 32.87 cd/A (EQE max = 11.01%). The devices display a good reddish orange color (CIE of (0.628, 0.372) at 500 cd/m 2 ) nearly without color shift with increasing brightness. Co-host architecture phosphorescent OLEDs show a simpler device structure, lower working voltage, and a better efficiency and stability than those of the reference devices without the cohost architecture, which helps to simplify the OLED structure, lower the cost, and popularize OLED technology.

  1. Effect of host polymer blends to phosphorescence emission | Alias ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Each polymer was blended with the same ratio composition. The influences of host polymer composition to the phosphorescence emission were observed under pulsed UV excitation source of Xenon lamp. The results shows that there were changing in the phosphorescence emission and life time with difference host ...

  2. A tunable lighting system integrated by inorganic and transparent organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-jing; Zhang, Tao; Jin, Ya-fang; Liu, Shi-shen; Yuan, Shi-dong; Cui, Zhao; Zhang, Li; Wang, Wei-hui

    2014-05-01

    A tunable surface-emitting integrated lighting system is constructed using a combination of inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and transparent organic LEDs (OLEDs). An RB two-color LED is used to supply red and blue light emission, and a green organic LED is used to supply green light emission. Currents of the LED and OLED are tuned to produce a white color, showing different Commission Internationale d'Eclairage (CIE) chromaticity coordinates and correlated color temperatures with a wide adjustable range. Such an integration can compensate for the lack of the LED's luminance uniformity and the transparent OLED's luminance intensity.

  3. Full-color OLED on silicon microdisplay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Amalkumar P.

    2002-02-01

    eMagin has developed numerous enhancements to organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology, including a unique, up- emitting structure for OLED-on-silicon microdisplay devices. Recently, eMagin has fabricated full color SVGA+ resolution OLED microdisplays on silicon, with over 1.5 million color elements. The display is based on white light emission from OLED followed by LCD-type red, green and blue color filters. The color filters are patterned directly on OLED devices following suitable thin film encapsulation and the drive circuits are built directly on single crystal silicon. The resultant color OLED technology, with hits high efficiency, high brightness, and low power consumption, is ideally suited for near to the eye applications such as wearable PCS, wireless Internet applications and mobile phone, portable DVD viewers, digital cameras and other emerging applications.

  4. OVPD-processed OLED for general lighting

    OpenAIRE

    Bösing, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Due to continuous advancements of materials for organic light emitting diodes (OLED) a new field of application currently opens up for OLED technology: General lighting. A significant reduction of OLED production cost might be achieved by employing organic vapor phase deposition (OVPD). OVPD is a novel process for depositing organic thin films from the gas phase. In contrast to the well established process of vacuum thermal evaporation (VTE), OVPD allows to achieve much higher deposition rate...

  5. Shedding light on the photophysical properties of newly designed platinum(II) complexes by adding substituents on functionalized ligands as highly efficient OLED emitters from a theoretical viewpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jieqiong [Institute of Environmental and Analytical Sciences, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan 475004 (China); Wang, Li, E-mail: chemwangl@henu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental and Analytical Sciences, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan 475004 (China); Wang, Xin [Institute of Environmental and Analytical Sciences, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan 475004 (China); He, Chaozheng, E-mail: hecz2013@nynu.edu.cn [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Normal University, Nanyang 473061 (China); Zhang, Jinglai, E-mail: zhangjinglai@henu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental and Analytical Sciences, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan 475004 (China)

    2015-08-01

    The phosphorescent properties of three synthesized and three new designed platinum(II) complexes are focused on in this work. To reveal their structure–property relationships, a density functional theory/time-dependent density functional theory (DFT/TDDFT) investigation is performed on the geometric and electronic structures, absorption and emission spectra. The electroluminescent (EL) properties are evaluated by the ionization potential (IP), electron affinity (EA), and reorganization energy (λ). Furthermore, the radiative rate constant (k{sub r}) is qualitatively elucidated by various factors including the strength of the SOC interaction between the higher-lying singlet excited states (S{sub n}) and the T{sub 1} state, the oscillator strength (f) of the S{sub n} states that can couple with the T{sub 1} state, and the energy separation between the coupled states. A combined analysis of various elements that could affect the phosphorescent efficiency is beneficial to exploring efficient triplet phosphors in OLEDs. Consequently, complexes Pt-1 and 1 would be more suitable blue-emitting phosphorescent materials with balance of EL properties and acceptable quantum yields. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The absorption and phosphorescence spectra of Pt(II) complexes are investigated. • Their Φ{sub em}, IP, EA, and reorganization energy are compared. • Three new Pt(II) complexes are designed.

  6. Highly Simplified Tandem Organic Light-Emitting Devices Incorporating a Green Phosphorescence Ultrathin Emitter within a Novel Interface Exciplex for High Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Zhou, Jun-Gui; Huang, Chen-Chao; Zhang, Lei; Fung, Man-Keung; Murtaza, Imran; Meng, Hong; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2017-03-29

    Herein we report a novel design philosophy of tandem OLEDs incorporating a doping-free green phosphorescent bis[2-(2-pyridinyl-N)phenyl-C](acetylacetonato)iridium(III) (Ir(ppy) 2 (acac)) as an ultrathin emissive layer (UEML) into a novel interface-exciplex-forming structure of 1,1-bis[(di-4-tolylamino)phenyl]cyclohexane (TAPC) and 1,3,5-tri(p-pyrid-3-yl-phenyl)benzene (TmPyPB). Particularly, relatively low working voltage and remarkable efficiency are achieved and the designed tandem OLEDs exhibit a peak current efficiency of 135.74 cd/A (EQE = 36.85%) which is two times higher than 66.2 cd/A (EQE = 17.97%) of the device with a single emitter unit. This might be one of the highest efficiencies of OLEDs applying ultrathin emitters without light extraction. Moreover, with the proposed structure, the color gamut of the displays can be effectively increased from 76% to 82% NTSC if the same red and blue emissions as those in the NTSC are applied. A novel form of harmonious fusion among interface exciplex, UEML, and tandem structure is successfully realized, which sheds light on further development of ideal OLED structure with high efficiency, simplified fabrication, low power consumption, low cost, and improved color gamut, simultaneously.

  7. Electron-transporting layer doped with cesium azide for high-performance phosphorescent and tandem white organic light-emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yaoyao; Chen, Xingming; Jin, Yu; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Ye; Lin, Wenyan; Yang, Huishan

    2017-07-01

    Cesium azide was employed as an effective n-dopant in the electron-transporting layer (ETL) of organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) owing to its low deposition temperature and high ambient stability. By doping cesium azide onto 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, a green phosphorescent OLED having best efficiencies of 66.25 cd A-1, 81.22 lm W-1 and 18.82% was realized. Moreover, the efficiency roll-off from 1000 cd m-2 to 10 000 cd m-2 is only 12.9%, which is comparable with or even lower than that of devices utilizing the co-host system. Physical mechanisms for the improvement of device performance were studied in depth by analyzing the current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics of the electron-only devices. In particular, by comparing the J-V characteristics of the electron-only devices instead of applying the complicated ultraviolet photoelectron spectrometer measurements, we deduced the decrease in barrier height for electron injection at the ETL/cathode contact. Finally, an efficient tandem white OLED utilizing the n-doped layer in the charge generation unit (CGU) was constructed. As far as we know, this is the first report on the application of this CGU for fabricating tandem white OLEDs. The emissions of the tandem device are all in the warm white region from 1213 cd m-2 to 10870 cd m-2, as is beneficial to the lighting application.

  8. Phosphorescence white organic light-emitting diodes with single emitting layer based on isoquinolinefluorene-carbazole containing host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Ja Ryong; Lee, Seok Jae; Hyung, Gun Woo; Kim, Bo Young; Shin, Hyun Su; Lee, Kum Hee; Yoon, Seung Soo; Kim, Woo Young; Kim, Young Kwan

    2013-03-01

    We have demonstrated a stable phosphorescent white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) using an orange emitter, Bis(5-benzoyl-2-(4-fluorophenyl)pyridinato-C,N) iridium(III)acetylacetonate [(Bz4Fppy)2Ir(III)acac] doped into a newly synthesized blue host material, 2-(carbazol-9-yl)-7-(isoquinolin-1-yl)-9,9-diethylfluorene (CzFliq). When 1 wt.% (Bz4Fppy)2Ir(III)acac was doped into emitting layer, it was realized an improved EL performance and a pure white color in the OLED. The optimum WOLED showed maximum values as a luminous efficiency of 10.14 cd/A, a power efficiency of 10.24 Im/W, a peak external quantum efficiency 4.07%, and Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage coordinates of (0.34, 0.39) at 8 V.

  9. Strong ligand field effects of blue phosphorescent mono-cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Ho Wan; Jung, Kyung Yoon; Kim, Young Sik

    2010-01-01

    A series of mono-cyclometalated blue phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes with two phosphines trans to each other and two cis-ancillary ligands, such as Ir(F 2 Meppy)(PPhMe 2 ) 2 (H)(Cl), [Ir(F 2 Meppy)(PPhMe 2 ) 2 (H)(NCMe)] + and Ir(F 2 Meppy)(PPhMe 2 ) 2 -(H)(CN), [F 2 Meppy = 2-(2',4'-difluorophenyl)-4-methyl-pyridine] were synthesized and studied to tune the phosphorescence wavelength to the deep blue region and to enhance the luminescence efficiencies. We investigate the electron-withdrawing capabilities of ancillary ligands using the DFT and TD-DFT calculations on the ground and excited states of the three complexes to gain insight into the factors responsible for the emission color change and the different luminescence efficiency. Reducing the molecular weight of phosphine ligand with PPhMe 2 leads to a strategy of the efficient deep blue organic light-emitting devices (OLED) by thermal processing instead of the solution processing. The electron-withdrawing difluoro group substituted on the phenyl ring and the cyano strong field ancillary ligand in the trans position to the carbon atom of phenyl ring increased HOMO-LUMO gap and achieved the hypsochromic shift in emission color. As a result, the maximum emission spectra of Ir(F 2 Meppy)(PPhMe 2 ) 2 (H)(Cl), [Ir(F 2 Meppy)(PPhMe 2 ) 2 (H)-(NCMe)] + and Ir(F 2 Meppy)(PPh-Me 2 ) 2 (H)(CN) were in the ranges of 446, 440, 439 nm, respectively.

  10. Strong ligand field effects of blue phosphorescent mono-cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ham, Ho Wan [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Kyung Yoon [International Design School for Advanced Studies, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Sik, E-mail: youngkim@hongik.ac.k [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul, 121-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-01

    A series of mono-cyclometalated blue phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes with two phosphines trans to each other and two cis-ancillary ligands, such as Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)(PPhMe{sub 2}){sub 2}(H)(Cl), [Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)(PPhMe{sub 2}){sub 2}(H)(NCMe)]{sup +} and Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)(PPhMe{sub 2}){sub 2}-(H)(CN), [F{sub 2}Meppy = 2-(2',4'-difluorophenyl)-4-methyl-pyridine] were synthesized and studied to tune the phosphorescence wavelength to the deep blue region and to enhance the luminescence efficiencies. We investigate the electron-withdrawing capabilities of ancillary ligands using the DFT and TD-DFT calculations on the ground and excited states of the three complexes to gain insight into the factors responsible for the emission color change and the different luminescence efficiency. Reducing the molecular weight of phosphine ligand with PPhMe{sub 2} leads to a strategy of the efficient deep blue organic light-emitting devices (OLED) by thermal processing instead of the solution processing. The electron-withdrawing difluoro group substituted on the phenyl ring and the cyano strong field ancillary ligand in the trans position to the carbon atom of phenyl ring increased HOMO-LUMO gap and achieved the hypsochromic shift in emission color. As a result, the maximum emission spectra of Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)(PPhMe{sub 2}){sub 2}(H)(Cl), [Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)(PPhMe{sub 2}){sub 2}(H)-(NCMe)]{sup +} and Ir(F{sub 2}Meppy)(PPh-Me{sub 2}){sub 2} (H)(CN) were in the ranges of 446, 440, 439 nm, respectively.

  11. Hybrid white organic light-emitting devices based on phosphorescent iridium-benzotriazole orange-red and fluorescent blue emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Zhen-Yuan, E-mail: xiazhenyuan@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials and Institute of Fine Chemicals, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Su, Jian-Hua [Key Laboratory for Advanced Materials and Institute of Fine Chemicals, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Chang, Chi-Sheng; Chen, Chin H. [Display Institute, Microelectronics and Information Systems Research Center, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan 300 (China)

    2013-03-15

    We demonstrate that high color purity or efficiency hybrid white organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) can be generated by integrating a phosphorescent orange-red emitter, bis[4-(2H-benzotriazol-2-yl)-N,N-diphenyl-aniline-N{sup 1},C{sup 3}] iridium acetylacetonate, Ir(TBT){sub 2}(acac) with fluorescent blue emitters in two different emissive layers. The device based on deep blue fluorescent material diphenyl-[4-(2-[1,1 Prime ;4 Prime ,1 Double-Prime ]terphenyl-4-yl-vinyl)-phenyl]-amine BpSAB and Ir(TBT){sub 2}(acac) shows pure white color with the Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.33,0.30). When using sky-blue fluorescent dopant N,N Prime -(4,4 Prime -(1E,1 Prime E)-2,2 Prime -(1,4-phenylene)bis(ethene-2,1-diyl) bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(2-ethyl-6-methyl-N-phenylaniline) (BUBD-1) and orange-red phosphor with a color-tuning phosphorescent material fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium (Ir(ppy){sub 3} ), it exhibits peak luminance yield and power efficiency of 17.4 cd/A and 10.7 lm/W, respectively with yellow-white color and CIE color rendering index (CRI) value of 73. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An iridium-based orange-red phosphor Ir(TBT){sub 2}(acac) was applied in hybrid white OLEDs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Duel- and tri-emitter WOLEDs were achieved with either high color purity or efficiency performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peak luminance yield of tri-emitter WOLEDs was 17.4 cd/A with yellow-white color and color rendering index (CRI) value of 73.

  12. Hybrid white organic light-emitting devices based on phosphorescent iridium–benzotriazole orange–red and fluorescent blue emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Zhen-Yuan; Su, Jian-Hua; Chang, Chi-Sheng; Chen, Chin H.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that high color purity or efficiency hybrid white organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) can be generated by integrating a phosphorescent orange–red emitter, bis[4-(2H-benzotriazol-2-yl)-N,N-diphenyl-aniline-N 1 ,C 3 ] iridium acetylacetonate, Ir(TBT) 2 (acac) with fluorescent blue emitters in two different emissive layers. The device based on deep blue fluorescent material diphenyl-[4-(2-[1,1′;4′,1″]terphenyl-4-yl-vinyl)-phenyl]-amine BpSAB and Ir(TBT) 2 (acac) shows pure white color with the Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.33,0.30). When using sky-blue fluorescent dopant N,N′-(4,4′-(1E,1′E)-2,2′-(1,4-phenylene)bis(ethene-2,1-diyl) bis(4,1-phenylene))bis(2-ethyl-6-methyl-N-phenylaniline) (BUBD-1) and orange–red phosphor with a color-tuning phosphorescent material fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium (Ir(ppy) 3 ), it exhibits peak luminance yield and power efficiency of 17.4 cd/A and 10.7 lm/W, respectively with yellow-white color and CIE color rendering index (CRI) value of 73. - Highlights: ► An iridium-based orange–red phosphor Ir(TBT) 2 (acac) was applied in hybrid white OLEDs. ► Duel- and tri-emitter WOLEDs were achieved with either high color purity or efficiency performance. ► Peak luminance yield of tri-emitter WOLEDs was 17.4 cd/A with yellow-white color and color rendering index (CRI) value of 73.

  13. Ole Rømers mange talenter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kurt Møller

    2005-01-01

    Artiklen giver en oversigt over Ole Rømers videnskabelige liv som astronom, fysiker og matematiker samt hans betydning som kongelig embedsmand.......Artiklen giver en oversigt over Ole Rømers videnskabelige liv som astronom, fysiker og matematiker samt hans betydning som kongelig embedsmand....

  14. Hybrid phosphorescence and fluorescence native spectroscopy for breast cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimova, Alexandra; Katz, A; Sriramoju, Vidyasagar; Budansky, Yuri; Bykov, Alexei A; Zeylikovich, Roman; Alfano, R R

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence and phosphorescence measurements are performed on normal and malignant ex vivo human breast tissues using UV LED and xenon lamp excitation. Tryptophan (trp) phosphorescence intensity is higher in both normal glandular and adipose tissue when compared to malignant tissue. An algorithm based on the ratio of trp fluorescence intensity at 345 nm to phosphorescence intensity at 500 nm is successfully used to separate normal from malignant tissue types. Normal specimens consistently exhibited a low I(345)I(500) ratio (15). The ratio analysis correlates well with histopathology. Intensity ratio maps with a spatial resolution of 0.5 mm are generated in which local regions of malignancy could be identified.

  15. Development and Utilization of Host Materials for White Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Ching; Chen, Shaw

    2013-05-31

    Our project was primarily focused on the MYPP 2015 goal for white phosphorescent organic devices (PhOLEDs or phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes) for solid-state lighting with long lifetimes and high efficiencies. Our central activity was to synthesize and evaluate a new class of host materials for blue phosphors in the PhOLEDs, known to be a weak link in the device operating lifetime. The work was a collaborative effort between three groups, one primarily responsible for chemical design and characterization (Chen), one primarily responsible for device development (Tang) and one primarily responsible for mechanistic studies and degradation analysis (Rothberg). The host materials were designed with a novel architecture that chemically links groups with good ability to move electrons with those having good ability to move “holes” (positive charges), the main premise being that we could suppress the instability associated with physical separation and crystallization of the electron conducting and hole conducting materials that might cause the devices to fail. We found that these materials do prevent crystallization and that this will increase device lifetimes but that efficiencies were reduced substantially due to interactions between the materials creating new low energy “charge transfer” states that are non-luminescent. Therefore, while our proposed strategy could in principle improve device lifetimes, we were unable to find a materials combination where the efficiency was not substantially compromised. In the course of our project, we made several important contributions that are peripherally related to the main project goal. First, we were able to prepare the proposed new family of materials and develop synthetic routes to make them efficiently. These types of materials that can transport both electrons and holes may yet have important roles to play in organic device technology. Second we developed an important new method for controlling the

  16. Flexible transparent electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiryont, Hulya; Shannon, Kenneth C., III; Moorehead, David; Bratcher, Matthew

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents the properties of the EclipseTECTM transparent conductor. EclipseTECTM is a room temperature deposited nanostructured thin film coating system comprised of metal-oxide semiconductor elements. The system possesses metal-like conductivity and glass-like transparency in the visible region. These highly conductive TEC films exhibit high shielding efficiency (35dB at 1 to 100GHz). EclipseTECTM can be deposited on rigid or flexible substrates. For example, EclipseTECTM deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is extremely flexible that can be rolled around a 9mm diameter cylinder with little or no reduction in electrical conductivity and that can assume pre-extension states after an applied stress is relieved. The TEC is colorless and has been tailored to have high visible transmittance which matches the eye sensitivity curve and allows the viewing of true background colors through the coating. EclipseTECTM is flexible, durable and can be tailored at the interface for applications such as electron- or hole-injecting OLED electrodes as well as electrodes in flexible displays. Tunable work function and optical design flexibility also make EclipseTECTM well-suited as a candidate for grid electrode replacement in next-generation photovoltaic cells.

  17. Organizational Transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albu, Oana Brindusa; Flyverbom, Mikkel

    2018-01-01

    with the sharing of information and the perceived quality of the information shared. This narrow focus on information and quality, however, overlooks the dynamics of organizational transparency. To provide a more structured conceptualization of organizational transparency, this article unpacks the assumptions......Transparency is an increasingly prominent area of research that offers valuable insights for organizational studies. However, conceptualizations of transparency are rarely subject to critical scrutiny and thus their relevance remains unclear. In most accounts, transparency is associated...... that shape the extant literature, with a focus on three dimensions: conceptualizations, conditions, and consequences. The contribution of the study is twofold: (a) On a conceptual level, we provide a framework that articulates two paradigmatic positions underpinning discussions of transparency, verifiability...

  18. TRANSPARENT CONCRETE

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Sharma*, Dr. O.P. Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Transparent concrete is the new type of concrete introduced in todays world which carries special property of light transmitting due to presence of light Optical fibres. Which is also known as translucent concrete or light transmitting concrete, it is achieved by replacing coarse aggregates with transparent alternate materials (Optical fibres). The binding material in transparent concrete may be able to transmit light by using clear resins the concrete mix. The concrete used in industry in pr...

  19. Smart responsive phosphorescent materials for data recording and security protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huibin; Liu, Shujuan; Lin, Wenpeng; Zhang, Kenneth Yin; Lv, Wen; Huang, Xiao; Huo, Fengwei; Yang, Huiran; Jenkins, Gareth; Zhao, Qiang; Huang, Wei

    2014-04-07

    Smart luminescent materials that are responsive to external stimuli have received considerable interest. Here we report ionic iridium (III) complexes simultaneously exhibiting mechanochromic, vapochromic and electrochromic phosphorescence. These complexes share the same phosphorescent iridium (III) cation with a N-H moiety in the N^N ligand and contain different anions, including hexafluorophosphate, tetrafluoroborate, iodide, bromide and chloride. The anionic counterions cause a variation in the emission colours of the complexes from yellow to green by forming hydrogen bonds with the N-H proton. The electronic effect of the N-H moiety is sensitive towards mechanical grinding, solvent vapour and electric field, resulting in mechanochromic, vapochromic and electrochromic phosphorescence. On the basis of these findings, we construct a data-recording device and demonstrate data encryption and decryption via fluorescence lifetime imaging and time-gated luminescence imaging techniques. Our results suggest that rationally designed phosphorescent complexes may be promising candidates for advanced data recording and security protection.

  20. Highly efficient red phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes based on solution processed emissive layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Baiquan; Xu, Miao; Tao, Hong; Ying, Lei; Zou, Jianhua; Wu, Hongbin; Peng, Junbiao

    2013-01-01

    Highly efficient red phosphorescent organic polymer light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs) were fabricated based on a solution-processed small-molecule host 4,4′-bis(N-carbazolyl)-1,1′-biphenyl (CBP) by doping an iridium complex, tris(1-(2,6-dimethylphenoxy)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)phthalazine)iridium (III) (Ir(MPCPPZ) 3 ). A hole blocking layer 1,3,5-tri(1-phenyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)phenyl (TPBI) with a function of electron transport was thermally deposited onto the top of CBP layer. The diode with the structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS (50 nm)/CBP:Ir(MPCPPZ) 3 (55 nm)/TPBI (30 nm)/Ba (4 nm)/Al (120 nm) showed an external quantum efficiency (QE ext ) of 19.3% and luminous efficiency (LE) of 18.3 cd/A at a current density of 0.16 mA/cm 2 , and Commission International de I'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.607, 0.375). It was suggested that the diodes using TPBI layer exhibited nearly 100% internal quantum efficiency and one order magnitude enhanced LE or QE ext efficiencies. -- Highlights: • Efficient red PhOLEDs based on a solution-processed small-molecule host were fabricated. • By altering volume ratio of chloroform/chlorobenzene solvent, we got best film quality of CBP. • EQE of the diode was 19.3%, indicating nearly 100% internal quantum yield was achieved

  1. Color transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pire, B.; Ralston, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews the physics of color transparency and the unexpected energy dependence of recent measurements of high-energy fixed-angle elastic scattering in nuclear targets. The authors point out advantages of using transparency as a tool, introducing two concepts - spin and flavor flow filtering - that may be studied with nuclear targets. The special case of electroproduction is also considered

  2. OLED Fundamentals: Materials, Devices, and Processing of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blochwitz-Nimoth, Jan; Bhandari, Abhinav; Boesch, Damien; Fincher, Curtis R.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Gotthold, David W.; Greiner, Mark T.; Kido, Junji; Kondakov, Denis; Korotkov, Roman; Krylova, Valentina A.; Loeser, Falk; Lu, Min-Hao; Lu, Zheng-Hong; Lussem, Bjorn; Moro, Lorenza; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Rostovtsev, Vsevolod V.; Sasabe, Hisahiro; Silverman, Gary; Thompson, Mark E.; Tietze, Max; Tyan, Yuan-Sheng; Weaver, Michael; Xin , Xu; Zeng, Xianghui

    2015-05-26

    What is an organic light emitting diode (OLED)? Why should we care? What are they made of? How are they made? What are the challenges in seeing these devices enter the marketplace in various applications? These are the questions we hope to answer in this book, at a level suitable for knowledgeable non-experts, graduate students and scientists and engineers working in the field who want to understand the broader context of their work. At the most basic level, an OLED is a promising new technology composed of some organic material sandwiched between two electrodes. When current is passed through the device, light is emitted. The stack of layers can be very thin and has many variations, including flexible and/or transparent. The organic material can be polymeric or composed small molecules, and may include inorganic components. The electrodes may consist of metals, metal oxides, carbon nanomaterials, or other species, though of course for light to be emitted, one electrode must be transparent. OLEDs may be fabricated on glass, metal foils, or polymer sheets (though polymeric substrates must be modified to protect the organic material from moisture or oxygen). In any event, the organic material must be protected from moisture during storage and operation. A control circuit, the exact nature of which depends on the application, drives the OLED. Nevertheless, the control circuit should have very stable current control to generate uniform light emission. OLEDs can be designed to emit a single color of light, white light, or even tunable colors. The devices can be switched on and off very rapidly, which makes them suitable for displays or for general lighting. Given the amazing complexity of the technical and design challenges for practical OLED applications, it is not surprising that applications are still somewhat limited. Although organic electroluminescence is more than 50 years old, the modern OLED field is really only about half that age – with the first high

  3. Highly efficient and stable white organic light emitting diode base on double recombination zones of phosphorescent blue/orange emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok Jae; Koo, Ja Ryong; Lim, Dong Hwan; Park, Hye Rim; Kim, Young Kwan; Ha, Yunkyoung

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrated efficient and stable white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with double-emitting layers (D-EMLs), which were comprised of two emissive layers with a hole transport-type host of N,N'-dicarbazolyl-3,5-benzene (mCP) and a electron transport-type host of 2,2',2"-(1,3,5-benzenetryl)tris(1-phenyl)-1H-benzimidazol (TPBi) with blue/orange emitters, respectively. We fabricated two type white devices with single emitting layer (S-EML) and D-EML of orange emitter, maintaining double recombination zone of blue emitter. In addition, the device architecture was developed to confine excitons inside the D-EMLs and to manage triplet excitons by controlling the charge injection. As a result, light-emitting performances of white OLED with D-EMLs were improved and showed the steady CIE coordinates compared to that with S-EML of orange emitter, which demonstrated the maximum luminous efficiency and external quantum efficiency were 21.38 cd/A and 11.09%. It also showed the stable white emission with CIE(x,y) coordinates from (x = 0.36, y = 0.37) at 6 V to (x = 0.33, y = 0.38) at 12 V.

  4. Display process compatible accurate graphene patterning for OLED applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jin-Wook; Han, Jun-Han; Cho, Hyunsu; Moon, Jaehyun; Kwon, Byoung-Hwa; Cho, Seungmin; Yoon, Taeshik; Kim, Taek-Soo; Suemitsu, Maki; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Cho, Nam Sung

    2018-01-01

    Graphene film can be used as transparent electrodes in display and optoelectronic applications. However, achieving residue free graphene film pixel arrays with geometrical precision on large area has been a difficult challenge. By utilizing the liquid bridging concept, we realized photolithographic patterning of graphene film with dimensional correctness and absence of surface contaminant. On a glass substrate of 100  ×  100 mm2 size, we demonstrate our patterning method to fabricate an addressable two-color OLED module of which graphene film pixel size is 170  ×  300 µm2. Our results strongly suggest graphene film as a serviceable component in commercial display products. The flexible and foldable display applications are expected to be main beneficiaries of our method.

  5. Efficient green phosphorescent tandem organic light emitting diodes with solution processable mixed hosts charge generating layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talik, N.A.; Yeoh, K.H.; Ng, C.Y.B [Low Dimensional Research Center, Department of Physics, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); ItraMAS Corporation. Sdn. Bhd., 542A-B Mukim 1, Lorong Perusahaan Baru 2, Kawasan Perindustrian, Perai 13600, Penang (Malaysia); Yap, B.K. [Center of Microelectronic and Nanotechnology Engineering (CeMNE), College of Engineering, Universiti Tenaga Nasional, Jln. Uniten-Ikram, 4300 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Woon, K.L., E-mail: ph7klw76@um.edu.my [Low Dimensional Research Center, Department of Physics, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-10-15

    A novel solution processable charge generating layer (CGL) that consists of 1,4,5,8,9,11-hexaazatriphenylene hexacarbonitrile (HATCN{sub 6})/Poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK): 1,1-bis-(4-bis(4-tolyl)-aminophenyl) cyclohexene (TAPC) for a tandem green phosphorescent organic light emitting diode (PHOLED) is demonstrated. The use of orthogonal solvent to dissolve HATCN{sub 6} and PVK:TAPC is the key to overcome the interface erosion problem for the solution processed CGL. The current efficiency of the 2 wt% TAPC mixed with PVK is the highest at 24.2 cd/A, which is more than three-folds higher than that of the single device at 1000 cd/m{sup 2}. - Highlights: • A solution processable tandem OLED is built using a novel charge generating layer. • HATCN{sub 6} and PVK:TAPC are shown to be effective charge generating layers. • The turn on voltages for tandem devices are almost similar to single unit. • 2 wt% TAPC blended with PVK exhibits three-folds increase in efficiency.

  6. High Performance OLED Panel and Luminaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, Jeffrey [OLEDWorks LLC, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2017-02-20

    In this project, OLEDWorks developed and demonstrated the technology required to produce OLED lighting panels with high energy efficiency and excellent light quality. OLED panels developed in this program produce high quality warm white light with CRI greater than 85 and efficacy up to 80 lumens per watt (LPW). An OLED luminaire employing 24 of the high performance panels produces practical levels of illumination for general lighting, with a flux of over 2200 lumens at 60 LPW. This is a significant advance in the state of the art for OLED solid-state lighting (SSL), which is expected to be a complementary light source to the more advanced LED SSL technology that is rapidly replacing all other traditional forms of lighting.

  7. Emerging Transparent Conducting Electrodes for Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tze-Bin Song

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs have attracted much attention in recent years as next generation lighting and displays, due to their many advantages, including superb performance, mechanical flexibility, ease of fabrication, chemical versatility, etc. In order to fully realize the highly flexible features, reduce the cost and further improve the performance of OLED devices, replacing the conventional indium tin oxide with better alternative transparent conducting electrodes (TCEs is a crucial step. In this review, we focus on the emerging alternative TCE materials for OLED applications, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs, metallic nanowires, conductive polymers and graphene. These materials are selected, because they have been applied as transparent electrodes for OLED devices and achieved reasonably good performance or even higher device performance than that of indium tin oxide (ITO glass. Various electrode modification techniques and their effects on the device performance are presented. The effects of new TCEs on light extraction, device performance and reliability are discussed. Highly flexible, stretchable and efficient OLED devices are achieved based on these alternative TCEs. These results are summarized for each material. The advantages and current challenges of these TCE materials are also identified.

  8. CALiPER Report 24: OLED Luminaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Leon, F. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Davis, J. L. [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This report documents an initial investigation of OLED luminaires and summarizes the key features of those products. In addition to photometric testing of four commercial products in independent laboratories, PNNL examined many of the products through teardown testing (disassemblies to identify parts and functionality) in PNNL laboratories. Results of these tests as well as results of stress testing of several OLED luminaires at RTI International have been included.

  9. Monte Carlo study of efficiency roll-off of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes: Evidence for dominant role of triplet-polaron quenching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eersel, H. van, E-mail: h.v.eersel@tue.nl; Coehoorn, R. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Bobbert, P. A.; Janssen, R. A. J. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-10-06

    We present an advanced molecular-scale organic light-emitting diode (OLED) model, integrating both electronic and excitonic processes. Using this model, we can reproduce the measured efficiency roll-off for prototypical phosphorescent OLED stacks based on the green dye tris[2-phenylpyridine]iridium (Ir(ppy){sub 3}) and the red dye octaethylporphine platinum (PtOEP) and study the cause of the roll-off as function of the current density. Both the voltage versus current density characteristics and roll-off agree well with experimental data. Surprisingly, the results of the simulations lead us to conclude that, contrary to what is often assumed, not triplet-triplet annihilation but triplet-polaron quenching is the dominant mechanism causing the roll-off under realistic operating conditions. Simulations for devices with an optimized recombination profile, achieved by carefully tuning the dye trap depth, show that it will be possible to fabricate OLEDs with a drastically reduced roll-off. It is envisaged that J{sub 90}, the current density at which the efficiency is reduced to 90%, can be increased by almost one order of magnitude as compared to the experimental state-of-the-art.

  10. Monte Carlo study of efficiency roll-off of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes: Evidence for dominant role of triplet-polaron quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eersel, H. van; Coehoorn, R.; Bobbert, P. A.; Janssen, R. A. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present an advanced molecular-scale organic light-emitting diode (OLED) model, integrating both electronic and excitonic processes. Using this model, we can reproduce the measured efficiency roll-off for prototypical phosphorescent OLED stacks based on the green dye tris[2-phenylpyridine]iridium (Ir(ppy) 3 ) and the red dye octaethylporphine platinum (PtOEP) and study the cause of the roll-off as function of the current density. Both the voltage versus current density characteristics and roll-off agree well with experimental data. Surprisingly, the results of the simulations lead us to conclude that, contrary to what is often assumed, not triplet-triplet annihilation but triplet-polaron quenching is the dominant mechanism causing the roll-off under realistic operating conditions. Simulations for devices with an optimized recombination profile, achieved by carefully tuning the dye trap depth, show that it will be possible to fabricate OLEDs with a drastically reduced roll-off. It is envisaged that J 90 , the current density at which the efficiency is reduced to 90%, can be increased by almost one order of magnitude as compared to the experimental state-of-the-art.

  11. OLED microdisplay design and materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacyk, Ihor; Prache, Olivier; Ali, Tariq; Khayrullin, Ilyas; Ghosh, Amalkumar

    2010-04-01

    AMOLED microdisplays from eMagin Corporation are finding growing acceptance within the military display market as a result of their excellent power efficiency, wide operating temperature range, small size and weight, good system flexibility, and ease of use. The latest designs have also demonstrated improved optical performance including better uniformity, contrast, MTF, and color gamut. eMagin's largest format display is currently the SXGA design, which includes features such as a 30-bit wide RGB digital interface, automatic luminance regulation from -45 to +70°C, variable gamma control, and a dynamic range exceeding 50:000 to 1. This paper will highlight the benefits of eMagin's latest microdisplay designs and review the roadmap for next generation devices. The ongoing development of reduced size pixels and larger format displays (up to WUXGA) as well as new OLED device architecture (e.g. high-brightness yellow) will be discussed. Approaches being explored for improved performance in next generation designs such as lowpower serial interfaces, high frame rate operation, and new operational modes for reduction of motion artifacts will also be described. These developments should continue to enhance the appeal of AMOLED microdisplays for a broad spectrum of near-to-the-eye applications such as night vision, simulation and training, situational awareness, augmented reality, medical imaging, and mobile video entertainment and gaming.

  12. Transparent organic light-emitting diodes with different bi-directional emission colors using color-conversion capping layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jonghee, E-mail: jonghee.lee@etri.re.kr [OLED Research Center, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Koh, Tae-Wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyunsu [OLED Research Center, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Schwab, Tobias [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Lee, Jae-Hyun [Department School of Global Convergence Studies, Hanbat National University, San 16-1, Duckmyoung-dong, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of); Hofmann, Simone [Institut für Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universität Dresden, George-Bähr-Straße 1, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Lee, Jeong-Ik [OLED Research Center, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI), Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Seunghyup [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-06-15

    We report a study on transparent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with different bi-directional emission colors, enabled by color-conversion organic capping layers. Starting from a transparent blue OLED with an uncapped Ag top electrode exhibiting an average transmittance of 33.9%, a 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM)-doped tris-(8-hydroxy-quinolinato)-aluminum (Alq3) capping layer is applied to achieve color-conversion from blue to orange-red on the top side while maintaining almost unchanged device transmittance. This color-conversion capping layer does not only change the color of the top side emission, but also enhances the overall device efficiency due to the optical interaction of the capping layer with the primary blue transparent OLED. Top white emission from the transparent bi-directional OLED exhibits a correlated color temperature around 6000–7000 K, with excellent color stability as evidenced by an extremely small variation in color coordinate of Δ(x,y)=(0.002, 0.002) in the forward luminance range of 100–1000 cd m{sup −2}. At the same time, the blue emission color of bottom side is not influenced by the color conversion capping layer, which finally results in different emission colors of the two opposite sides of our transparent OLEDs. - Highlights: • We report transparent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with different bi-directional emission colors. • Transparent blue OLED with color-conversion organic capping layers (CCL) shows orange top side emission. • Top white emission exhibits a CCT around 7000 K, with excellent color stability on a driving voltage.

  13. Transparent organic light-emitting diodes with different bi-directional emission colors using color-conversion capping layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jonghee; Koh, Tae-Wook; Cho, Hyunsu; Schwab, Tobias; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Hofmann, Simone; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Yoo, Seunghyup

    2015-01-01

    We report a study on transparent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with different bi-directional emission colors, enabled by color-conversion organic capping layers. Starting from a transparent blue OLED with an uncapped Ag top electrode exhibiting an average transmittance of 33.9%, a 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM)-doped tris-(8-hydroxy-quinolinato)-aluminum (Alq3) capping layer is applied to achieve color-conversion from blue to orange-red on the top side while maintaining almost unchanged device transmittance. This color-conversion capping layer does not only change the color of the top side emission, but also enhances the overall device efficiency due to the optical interaction of the capping layer with the primary blue transparent OLED. Top white emission from the transparent bi-directional OLED exhibits a correlated color temperature around 6000–7000 K, with excellent color stability as evidenced by an extremely small variation in color coordinate of Δ(x,y)=(0.002, 0.002) in the forward luminance range of 100–1000 cd m −2 . At the same time, the blue emission color of bottom side is not influenced by the color conversion capping layer, which finally results in different emission colors of the two opposite sides of our transparent OLEDs. - Highlights: • We report transparent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with different bi-directional emission colors. • Transparent blue OLED with color-conversion organic capping layers (CCL) shows orange top side emission. • Top white emission exhibits a CCT around 7000 K, with excellent color stability on a driving voltage

  14. Effect of frost on phosphorescence for thermographic phosphor thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong; Kim, Mirae; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we analyzed phosphorescence lifetime and its accuracy by growing frost for thermographic phosphor thermometry in a low-temperature environment. Mg4FGeO6:Mn particles were coated on an aluminum plate and excited with a UV-LED to obtain phosphorescence signals. The surface temperature was maintained at  -20, -15, -10 °C, and the phosphorescence signal was acquired as the frost grew for 3700 s. The lifetime was calculated and compared with the calibration curve under no-frost conditions. The error of the measured lifetime was within 0.7% of that in the no-frost conditions. A 2D surface temperature profile of the target plate was successfully obtained with the frost formation.

  15. Optical analysis of down-conversion OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krummacher, Benjamin; Klein, Markus; von Malm, Norwin; Winnacker, Albrecht

    2008-02-01

    Phosphor down-conversion of blue organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is one approach to generate white light, which offers the possibility of easy color tuning, a simple device architecture and color stability over lifetime. In this article previous work on down-conversion devices in the field of organic solid state lighting is briefly reviewed. Further, bottom emitting down-conversion OLEDs are studied from an optical point of view. Therefore the physical processes occurring in the down-conversion layer are translated into a model which is implemented in a ray tracing simulation. By comparing its predictions to experimental results the model is confirmed. For the experiments a blue-emitting polymer OLED (PLED) panel optically coupled to a series of down-conversion layers is used. Based on results obtained from ray tracing simulation some of the implications of the model for the performance of down-conversion OLEDs are discussed. In particular it is analysed how the effective reflectance of the underlying blue OLED and the particle size distribution of the phosphor powder embedded in the matrix of the down-conversion layer influence extraction efficiency.

  16. Transparent organic light-emitting diodes with balanced white emission by minimizing waveguide and surface plasmonic loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Bo; Ou, Qing-Dong; Li, Yan-Qing; Chen, Jing-De; Zhao, Xin-Dong; Wei, Jian; Xie, Zhong-Zhi; Tang, Jian-Xin

    2017-07-10

    It is challenging in realizing high-performance transparent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with symmetrical light emission to both sides. Herein, an efficient transparent OLED with highly balanced white emission to both sides is demonstrated by integrating quasi-periodic nanostructures into the organic emitter and the metal-dielectric composite top electrode, which can simultaneously suppressing waveguide and surface plasmonic loss. The power efficiency and external quantum efficiency are raised to 83.5 lm W -1 and 38.8%, respectively, along with a bi-directional luminance ratio of 1.26. The proposed scheme provides a facile route for extending application scope of transparent OLEDs for future transparent displays and lightings.

  17. Public Transparency

    OpenAIRE

    UNCTAD; World Bank

    2018-01-01

    This note provides guidance on the type of information about agricultural investments that investors and governments can make publicly available. Transparency about certain aspects of investments can improve relations between investors and communities, enable external stakeholders to hold investors to commitments, and improve investors’ public image. Although some information should be kep...

  18. Transparency International

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulten, van M. (Michel)

    2009-01-01

    Established in 1993, Transparency International (TI) defines itself as “the global civil society organization leading the fight against corruption, that brings people together in a powerful worldwide coalition to end the devastating impact of corruption on men, women and children around the

  19. Color transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, B.K.; Miller, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    The anomously large transmission of nucleons through a nucleus following a hard collision is explored. This effect, known as color transparency, is believed to be a prediction of QCD. The necessary conditions for its occurrence and the effects that must be included a realistic calculation are discussed

  20. Color transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    Imagine shooting a beam of protons of high momentum P through an atomic nucleus. Usually the nuclear interactions prevent the particles from emerging with momentum ∼P. Further, the angular distribution of elastically scattered protons is close to the optical diffraction pattern produced by a black disk. Thus the nucleus acts as a black disk and is not transparent. However, certain high momentum transfer reactions in which a proton is knocked out of the nucleus may be completely different. Suppose that the high momentum transfer process leads to the formation of a small-size color singlet wavepacket that is ejected from the nucleus. The effects of gluons emitted by color singlet systems of closely separated quarks and gluons tend to cancel. Thus the wavepacket-nuclear interactions are suppressed, the nucleus becomes transparant and one says that color transparency CT occurs. The observation of CT also requires that the wavepacket not expand very much while it moves through the nucleus. Simple quantum mechanical formulations can assess this expansion. The creation of a small-sized wavepacket is expected in asymptotic perturbative effects. The author reviews the few experimental attempts to observe color transparency in nuclear (e,e'p) and (p,pp) reactions and interpret the data and their implications

  1. Electron-transporting layer doped with cesium azide for high-performance phosphorescent and tandem white organic light-emitting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yaoyao; Chen, Xingming; Jin, Yu; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Ye; Lin, Wenyan; Yang, Huishan

    2017-01-01

    Cesium azide was employed as an effective n-dopant in the electron-transporting layer (ETL) of organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) owing to its low deposition temperature and high ambient stability. By doping cesium azide onto 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, a green phosphorescent OLED having best efficiencies of 66.25 cd A −1 , 81.22 lm W −1 and 18.82% was realized. Moreover, the efficiency roll-off from 1000 cd m −2 to 10 000 cd m −2 is only 12.9%, which is comparable with or even lower than that of devices utilizing the co-host system. Physical mechanisms for the improvement of device performance were studied in depth by analyzing the current density–voltage ( J – V ) characteristics of the electron-only devices. In particular, by comparing the J – V characteristics of the electron-only devices instead of applying the complicated ultraviolet photoelectron spectrometer measurements, we deduced the decrease in barrier height for electron injection at the ETL/cathode contact. Finally, an efficient tandem white OLED utilizing the n-doped layer in the charge generation unit (CGU) was constructed. As far as we know, this is the first report on the application of this CGU for fabricating tandem white OLEDs. The emissions of the tandem device are all in the warm white region from 1213 cd m −2 to 10870 cd m −2 , as is beneficial to the lighting application. (paper)

  2. Efficient organic light emitting-diodes (OLEDs)

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Yi-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Following two decades of intense research globally, the organic light-emitting diode (OLED) has steadily emerged as the ultimate display technology of choice for the coming decades. Portable active matrix OLED displays have already become prevalent, and even large-sized ultra-high definition 4K TVs are being mass-produced. More exotic applications such as wearable displays have been commercialized recently. With the burgeoning success in displays, researchers are actively bringing the technology forward into the exciting solid-state lighting market. This book presents the knowledge needed for

  3. Alternative transparent electrodes for organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Yuto

    2008-07-01

    In this work, two types of alternative transparent electrodes, ZnO:Al and PEDOT, were studied for OLEDs. The ZnO:Al films were fabricated with a conventional DC magnetron sputtering. Optimised ZnO:Al with low resistivity was obtained by a high carrier concentration supplied mainly from the oxygen vacancies and Al impurity, and a high mobility by the improvement of crystallinity. The film thickness of the ZnO:Al was altered to achieve good optoelectronic characteristics. With a thickness of approximately 190nm, it reached a low sheet resistance of 22 {proportional_to} 60 {omega}/sq and an average transmittance in visible range of >90%. Moreover, important parameters for the OLED application such as very smooth surface roughness and low refractive index were simultaneously obtained. The ZnO:Al films were structured for OLEDs use with a standard photolithography process. As another candidate, PEDOT:PSS Baytron {sup registered} PH510 with 5 wt% of DMSO was investigated. The 100 nm thick PEDOT films were prepared with the spin-coating method, obtaining a high transmittance of 92.7% in the visible range. The high resistivity (200 {omega}/sq) was overcome using a highly conductive metal grid, which resulted in similar current injection to ITO. The OLEDs on the PEDOT anode showed a high rectification ratio even without a cleaning process prior to the OLED deposition. White OLEDs on the 5 x 5 cm{sup 2} PEDOT substrate achieved more than 10 lm/W of power efficiency using an optical scattering foil. Finally, 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} PEDOT substrates were prepared for OLEDs. First results showed low luminance homogeneity and low efficiencies. A new type of layout was given, which was designed in terms of luminance homogeneity and efficiency using the simulation. (orig.)

  4. Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and OLED-based chemical and biological sensors: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinar, Joseph [Ames Laboratory-USDOE and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Shinar, Ruth [Microelectronics Research Center, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2008-07-07

    The basic photophysics, transport properties, state of the art, and challenges in OLED science and technology, and the major developments in structurally integrated OLED-based luminescent chemical and biological sensors are reviewed briefly. The dramatic advances in OLED performance have resulted in devices with projected continuous operating lifetimes of {approx}2 x 10{sup 5} h ({approx}23 yr) at {approx}150 Cd m{sup -2} (the typical brightness of a computer monitor or TV). Consequently, commercial products incorporating OLEDs, e.g., cell phones, MP3 players, and, most recently, OLED TVs, are rapidly proliferating. The progress in elucidating the photophysics and transport properties, occurring in tandem with the development of OLEDs, has been no less dramatic. It has resulted in a detailed understanding of the dynamics of trapped and mobile negative and positive polarons (to which the electrons and holes, respectively, relax upon injection), and of singlet and triplet excitons. It has also yielded a detailed understanding of the spin dynamics of polarons and triplet excitons, which affects their overall dynamics significantly. Despite the aforementioned progress, there are outstanding challenges in OLED science and technology, notably in improving the efficiency of the devices and their stability at high brightness (>1000 Cd m{sup -2}). One of the most recent emerging OLED-based technologies is that of structurally integrated photoluminescence-based chemical and biological sensors. This sensor platform, pioneered by the authors, yields uniquely simple and potentially very low-cost sensor (micro)arrays. The second part of this review describes the recent developments in implementing this platform for gas phase oxygen, dissolved oxygen (DO), anthrax lethal factor, and hydrazine sensors, and for a DO, glucose, lactate, and ethanol multianalyte sensor. (topical review)

  5. Organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and OLED-based chemical and biological sensors: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinar, Joseph; Shinar, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    The basic photophysics, transport properties, state of the art, and challenges in OLED science and technology, and the major developments in structurally integrated OLED-based luminescent chemical and biological sensors are reviewed briefly. The dramatic advances in OLED performance have resulted in devices with projected continuous operating lifetimes of ∼2 x 10 5 h (∼23 yr) at ∼150 Cd m -2 (the typical brightness of a computer monitor or TV). Consequently, commercial products incorporating OLEDs, e.g., cell phones, MP3 players, and, most recently, OLED TVs, are rapidly proliferating. The progress in elucidating the photophysics and transport properties, occurring in tandem with the development of OLEDs, has been no less dramatic. It has resulted in a detailed understanding of the dynamics of trapped and mobile negative and positive polarons (to which the electrons and holes, respectively, relax upon injection), and of singlet and triplet excitons. It has also yielded a detailed understanding of the spin dynamics of polarons and triplet excitons, which affects their overall dynamics significantly. Despite the aforementioned progress, there are outstanding challenges in OLED science and technology, notably in improving the efficiency of the devices and their stability at high brightness (>1000 Cd m -2 ). One of the most recent emerging OLED-based technologies is that of structurally integrated photoluminescence-based chemical and biological sensors. This sensor platform, pioneered by the authors, yields uniquely simple and potentially very low-cost sensor (micro)arrays. The second part of this review describes the recent developments in implementing this platform for gas phase oxygen, dissolved oxygen (DO), anthrax lethal factor, and hydrazine sensors, and for a DO, glucose, lactate, and ethanol multianalyte sensor. (topical review)

  6. Maal ei ole surnud / Jaan Elken

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Elken, Jaan, 1954-

    2001-01-01

    Põhjamaade ja Baltikumi I maalibiennaal Rootsis Väsbys. Biennaali Rootsi-poolne kuraator ja kujundaja Ricardo Donoso, Eesti komplekti koostas Mare Pedanik. Eksponeeritud on Tiit Pääsukese, Ado Lille, Andres Toltsi, Kaido Ole, Jaan Elkeni tööd. Näituse ülevaade, eraldi peatutud Leedu ja Läti kunstnikel

  7. Povl Ole Fanger's impact ten years later

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d'Ambrosio Alfano, Francesca Romana; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Palella, Boris Igor

    2017-01-01

    This paper pays tribute to Povl Ole Fanger, the late professor at the Technical University of Denmark. His scientific studies, focused on the main parameters affecting indoor environmental quality, have inspired (and still inspire) professional design engineers and academic researchers on human t...

  8. "Kuhu kadunud oled ..." : [luuletused] / Aleksandr Belonogov

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Belonogov, Aleksandr

    2004-01-01

    Sisu: "Kuhu kadunud oled ..." ; "Puude juured haaravad ..." ; "Nagu hiljuti eraldi teelt ..." ; "Kui kord enam mõista ma ..." ; Käänded ; Väravale on kirjutatud ; Rahvas ütleb. Eluloolisi andmeid autori kohta lk. 361. Luuletused paralleelselt udmurdi ja eesti keeles

  9. High Efficiency, Illumination Quality OLEDs for Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Shiang; James Cella; Kelly Chichak; Anil Duggal; Kevin Janora; Chris Heller; Gautam Parthasarathy; Jeffery Youmans; Joseph Shiang

    2008-03-31

    The goal of the program was to demonstrate a 45 lumen per watt white light device based upon the use of multiple emission colors through the use of solution processing. This performance level is a dramatic extension of the team's previous 15 LPW large area illumination device. The fundamental material system was based upon commercial polymer materials. The team was largely able to achieve these goals, and was able to deliver to DOE a 90 lumen illumination source that had an average performance of 34 LPW a 1000 cd/m{sup 2} with peak performances near 40LPW. The average color temperature is 3200K and the calculated CRI 85. The device operated at a brightness of approximately 1000cd/m{sup 2}. The use of multiple emission colors particularly red and blue, provided additional degrees of design flexibility in achieving white light, but also required the use of a multilayered structure to separate the different recombination zones and prevent interconversion of blue emission to red emission. The use of commercial materials had the advantage that improvements by the chemical manufacturers in charge transport efficiency, operating life and material purity could be rapidly incorporated without the expenditure of additional effort. The program was designed to take maximum advantage of the known characteristics of these material and proceeded in seven steps. (1) Identify the most promising materials, (2) assemble them into multi-layer structures to control excitation and transport within the OLED, (3) identify materials development needs that would optimize performance within multilayer structures, (4) build a prototype that demonstrates the potential entitlement of the novel multilayer OLED architecture (5) integrate all of the developments to find the single best materials set to implement the novel multilayer architecture, (6) further optimize the best materials set, (7) make a large area high illumination quality white OLED. A photo of the final deliverable is shown

  10. Lanthanide-based laser-induced phosphorescence for spray diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voort, D. D. van der, E-mail: d.d.v.d.voort@tue.nl; Water, W. van de; Kunnen, R. P. J.; Clercx, H. J. H.; Heijst, G. J. F. van [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Maes, N. C. J.; Sweep, A. M.; Dam, N. J. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lamberts, T. [Institute of Theoretical Chemistry, University of Stuttgart, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Laser-induced phosphorescence (LIP) is a relatively recent and versatile development for studying flow dynamics. This work investigates certain lanthanide-based molecular complexes for their use in LIP for high-speed sprays. Lanthanide complexes in solutions have been shown to possess long phosphorescence lifetimes (∼1-2 ms) and to emit light in the visible wavelength range. In particular, europium and terbium complexes are investigated using fluorescence/phosphorescence spectrometry, showing that europium-thenoyltrifluoracetone-trioctylphosphineoxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) can be easily and efficiently excited using a standard frequency-tripled Nd:YAG laser. The emitted spectrum, with maximum intensity at a wavelength of 614 nm, is shown not to vary strongly with temperature (293-383 K). The decay constant of the phosphorescence, while independent of ambient pressure, decreases by approximately 12 μs/K between 323 and 373 K, with the base level of the decay constant dependent on the used solvent. The complex does not luminesce in the gas or solid state, meaning only the liquid phase is visualized, even in an evaporating spray. By using an internally excited spray containing the phosphorescent complex, the effect of vaporization is shown through the decrease in measured intensity over the length of the spray, together with droplet size measurements using interferometric particle imaging. This study shows that LIP, using the Eu-TTA-TOPO complex, can be used with different solvents, including diesel surrogates. Furthermore, it can be easily handled and used in sprays to investigate spray breakup and evaporation.

  11. Designing High Efficient Solar Powered OLED Lighting Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, Rasmus Overgaard; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff; Thorsteinsson, Sune

    2016-01-01

    for the 10 Wp version. Furthermore, we present measurements of state-of-the-art commercial available OLED with regards to the luminous flux, luminous efficacy, luminance homogeneity, temperature dependency and IV characteristic of the OLED panels. In addition, solar powered OLED product concepts are proposed.......OLEDs used in solar powered lighting applications is a market of the future. This paper reports the development of electronic Three-Port-Converters for PV OLED product integration in the low-power area respectively for 1-10 Wp and 10-50 Wp with a peak efficiency of 97% at 1.8 W of PV power...

  12. Blue and white phosphorescent organic light emitting diode performance improvement by confining electrons and holes inside double emitting layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Yu-Sheng; Hong, Lin-Ann; Juang, Fuh-Shyang; Chen, Cheng-Yin

    2014-09-15

    In this research, complex emitting layers (EML) were fabricated using TCTA doping hole-transport material in the front half of a bipolar 26DCzPPy as well as PPT doping electron-transport material in the back half of 26DCzPPy. Blue dopant FIrpic was also mixed inside the complex emitting layer to produce a highly efficient blue phosphorescent organic light emitting diode (OLED). The hole and electron injection and carrier recombination rate were effectively increased. The fabricated complex emitting layers exhibited current efficiency of 42 cd/A and power efficiency of 30 lm/W when the luminance was 1000 cd/m{sup 2}, driving voltage was 4.4 V, and current density was 2.4 mA/cm{sup 2}. A white OLED component was then manufactured by doping red dopant [Os(bpftz){sub 2}(PPh{sub 2}Me){sub 2}] (Os) in proper locations. When the Os dopant was doped in between the complex emitting layers, excitons were effectively confined within, increasing the recombination rate and therefore reducing the color shift. The resulting Commission Internationale de L’Eclairage (CIE) coordinates shifted from 4 to 10 V is (Δx=−0.04, Δy=+0.01). The component had a current efficiency of 35.7 cd/A, a power efficiency of 24 lm/W, driving voltage of 4.6 V and a CIE{sub x,y} of (0.31,0.35) at a luminance of 1000 cd/m{sup 2}, with a maximum luminance of 15,600 cd/m{sup 2} at 10 V. Attaching an outcoupling enhancement film was applied to increase the luminance efficiency to 30 lm/W. - Highlights: • Used the complex double emitting layers. • Respectively doped hole and electron transport material in the bipolar host. • Electrons and holes are effectively confined within EMLs to produce excitons.

  13. Blue and white phosphorescent organic light emitting diode performance improvement by confining electrons and holes inside double emitting layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Yu-Sheng; Hong, Lin-Ann; Juang, Fuh-Shyang; Chen, Cheng-Yin

    2014-01-01

    In this research, complex emitting layers (EML) were fabricated using TCTA doping hole-transport material in the front half of a bipolar 26DCzPPy as well as PPT doping electron-transport material in the back half of 26DCzPPy. Blue dopant FIrpic was also mixed inside the complex emitting layer to produce a highly efficient blue phosphorescent organic light emitting diode (OLED). The hole and electron injection and carrier recombination rate were effectively increased. The fabricated complex emitting layers exhibited current efficiency of 42 cd/A and power efficiency of 30 lm/W when the luminance was 1000 cd/m 2 , driving voltage was 4.4 V, and current density was 2.4 mA/cm 2 . A white OLED component was then manufactured by doping red dopant [Os(bpftz) 2 (PPh 2 Me) 2 ] (Os) in proper locations. When the Os dopant was doped in between the complex emitting layers, excitons were effectively confined within, increasing the recombination rate and therefore reducing the color shift. The resulting Commission Internationale de L’Eclairage (CIE) coordinates shifted from 4 to 10 V is (Δx=−0.04, Δy=+0.01). The component had a current efficiency of 35.7 cd/A, a power efficiency of 24 lm/W, driving voltage of 4.6 V and a CIE x,y of (0.31,0.35) at a luminance of 1000 cd/m 2 , with a maximum luminance of 15,600 cd/m 2 at 10 V. Attaching an outcoupling enhancement film was applied to increase the luminance efficiency to 30 lm/W. - Highlights: • Used the complex double emitting layers. • Respectively doped hole and electron transport material in the bipolar host. • Electrons and holes are effectively confined within EMLs to produce excitons

  14. Kinetic analysis of pulsed laser induced phosphorescence for uranium determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serdeiro, Nelida H.

    2003-01-01

    The laser induced kinetic phosphorescence allows the uranium determination in different kind of matrices, with a lower detection limit than those reached by other spectroscopic methods. It involves the uranyl ions excitation by a pulsed dye-laser source, followed by temporal resolution of the phosphorescence. This method is used for the determination of trace quantities of uranium in aqueous solution, with a suitable complexant agent, without chemical separation before the analysis. The objective of this paper is to present the results of uranium determinations in different standard samples, water, soil, filter and urine, and a comparison with other methods such as fluorimetry, alpha spectrometry and mass spectrometry. Moreover, the measurement conditions, the advantages and disadvantages, the sample preparation, the interferences and the detection limit are described. (author)

  15. High ambient contrast ratio OLED and QLED without a circular polarizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Guanjun; Zhu, Ruidong; Luo, Zhenyue; Wu, Shin-Tson; Tsai, Yi-Shou; Lee, Kuo-Chang; Lee, Yuh-Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A high ambient contrast ratio display device using a transparent organic light emitting diode (OLED) or transparent quantum-dot light-emitting diode (QLED) with embedded multilayered structure and absorber is proposed and its performance is simulated. With the help of multilayered structure, the device structure allows almost all ambient light to get through the display device and be absorbed by the absorber. Because the reflected ambient light is greatly reduced, the ambient contrast ratio of the display system is improved significantly. Meanwhile, the multilayered structure helps to lower the effective refractive index, which in turn improves the out-coupling efficiency of the display system. Potential applications for sunlight readable flexible and rollable displays are emphasized. (paper)

  16. OLED Display For Real Time Vision System

    OpenAIRE

    Sandhyalakshmi Narayanan; Sanjana Sridhar; Neha Deshpande; Ashwini Gaikwad

    2015-01-01

    This innovative glass design will carry an OLED based display controlled via nano Ardiuno board having Bluetooth connectivity with a Smartphone to exchange information along with onboard accelerometer. We are using a tilt angle sensor for detecting if the driver is feeling drowsy. An alcohol sensor has been used to promote the safe driving habit. The glasses will be getting latest updates about the current speed of the vehicle navigation directions nearby or approaching sign broads or service...

  17. Triarylborane-Based Materials for OLED Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulsen Turkoglu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Multidisciplinary research on organic fluorescent molecules has been attracting great interest owing to their potential applications in biomedical and material sciences. In recent years, electron deficient systems have been increasingly incorporated into fluorescent materials. Triarylboranes with the empty p orbital of their boron centres are electron deficient and can be used as strong electron acceptors in conjugated organic fluorescent materials. Moreover, their applications in optoelectronic devices, energy harvesting materials and anion sensing, due to their natural Lewis acidity and remarkable solid-state fluorescence properties, have also been investigated. Furthermore, fluorescent triarylborane-based materials have been commonly utilized as emitters and electron transporters in organic light emitting diode (OLED applications. In this review, triarylborane-based small molecules and polymers will be surveyed, covering their structure-property relationships, intramolecular charge transfer properties and solid-state fluorescence quantum yields as functional emissive materials in OLEDs. Also, the importance of the boron atom in triarylborane compounds is emphasized to address the key issues of both fluorescent emitters and their host materials for the construction of high-performance OLEDs.

  18. Micelle-stabilized room-temperature phosphorescence with synchronous scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Femia, R.A.; Love, L.J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The experimental requirements for synchronous wavelength scanning micelle-stabilized room temperature phosphorescence and the factors affecting peak resolution are presented and compared with those for synchronous wavelength scanning fluorescence. Identification of individual compounds in a four-component mixture is illustrated, and criteria to identify and minimize triplet state energy transfer are given. Considerable improvement in resolution of the synchronous peaks is obtained via second derivative spectra. 20 references, 7 figures, 2 tables

  19. Flexible Al-doped ZnO films grown on PET substrates using linear facing target sputtering for flexible OLEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jin-A; Shin, Hyun-Su; Choi, Kwang-Hyuk; Kim, Han-Ki

    2010-01-01

    We report the characteristics of flexible Al-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films prepared by a plasma damage-free linear facing target sputtering (LFTS) system on PET substrates for use as a flexible transparent conducting electrode in flexible organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The electrical, optical and structural properties of LFTS-grown flexible AZO electrodes were investigated as a function of dc power. We obtained a flexible AZO film with a sheet resistance of 39 Ω/□ and an average transmittance of 84.86% in the visible range although it was sputtered at room temperature without activation of the Al dopant. Due to the effective confinement of the high-density plasma between the facing AZO targets, the AZO film was deposited on the PET substrate without plasma damage and substrate heating caused by bombardment of energy particles. Moreover, the flexible OLED fabricated on the AZO/PET substrate showed performance similar to the OLED fabricated on a ITO/PET substrate in spite of a lower work function. This indicates that LFTS is a promising plasma damage-free and low-temperature sputtering technique for deposition of flexible and indium-free AZO electrodes for use in cost-efficient flexible OLEDs.

  20. Observation of the energy transfer sequence in an organic host–guest system of a luminescent polymer and a phosphorescent molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basel, Tek; Sun, Dali; Gautam, Bhoj; Valy Vardeny, Z., E-mail: val@physics.utah.edu

    2014-11-15

    We used steady state optical spectroscopies such as photoluminescence and photoinduced absorption (PA), and magnetic-field PA (MPA) for studying the energy transfer dynamics in films and organic light emitting diodes (OLED) based on host–guest blends with different guest concentrations of the fluorescent polymer poly-[2-methoxy, 5-(2′-ethyl-hexyloxy)phenylene vinylene] (MEHPPV-host), and phosphorescent molecule PtII-tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrin [Pt(tpbp); guest]. We show that the energy transfer process between the excited states of the host polymer and guest molecule takes a ‘ping-pong’ type sequence, because the lowest guest triplet exciton energy, E{sub T}(guest), lies higher than that of the host, E{sub T}(host). Upon photon excitation the photogenerated singlet excitons in the host polymer chains first undergo a Förster resonant energy transfer process to the guest singlet manifold, which subsequently reaches E{sub T}(guest) by intersystem crossing. Because E{sub T}(guest)>E{sub T}(host) there is a subsequent Dexter type energy transfer from E{sub T}(guest) to E{sub T}(host). This energy transfer sequence has profound influence on the photoluminescence and electroluminescence emission spectra in both films and OLED devices based on the MEHPPV-Pt(tpbp) system. - Highlights: • We studied electroluminescence of OLEDs based on host–guest blends. • The emission efficiency decreases with the guest concentration. • We found a dominant Dexter energy transfer from the triplet(guest) to triplet(host). • Energy transfer occurs from the host to guest and back to the host again.

  1. Observation of the energy transfer sequence in an organic host–guest system of a luminescent polymer and a phosphorescent molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basel, Tek; Sun, Dali; Gautam, Bhoj; Valy Vardeny, Z.

    2014-01-01

    We used steady state optical spectroscopies such as photoluminescence and photoinduced absorption (PA), and magnetic-field PA (MPA) for studying the energy transfer dynamics in films and organic light emitting diodes (OLED) based on host–guest blends with different guest concentrations of the fluorescent polymer poly-[2-methoxy, 5-(2′-ethyl-hexyloxy)phenylene vinylene] (MEHPPV-host), and phosphorescent molecule PtII-tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrin [Pt(tpbp); guest]. We show that the energy transfer process between the excited states of the host polymer and guest molecule takes a ‘ping-pong’ type sequence, because the lowest guest triplet exciton energy, E T (guest), lies higher than that of the host, E T (host). Upon photon excitation the photogenerated singlet excitons in the host polymer chains first undergo a Förster resonant energy transfer process to the guest singlet manifold, which subsequently reaches E T (guest) by intersystem crossing. Because E T (guest)>E T (host) there is a subsequent Dexter type energy transfer from E T (guest) to E T (host). This energy transfer sequence has profound influence on the photoluminescence and electroluminescence emission spectra in both films and OLED devices based on the MEHPPV-Pt(tpbp) system. - Highlights: • We studied electroluminescence of OLEDs based on host–guest blends. • The emission efficiency decreases with the guest concentration. • We found a dominant Dexter energy transfer from the triplet(guest) to triplet(host). • Energy transfer occurs from the host to guest and back to the host again

  2. A novel AOI system for OLED panel inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perng, D B; Chen, Y C; Lee, M K

    2005-01-01

    Organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology uses substances that emit red, green, blue or white light. An OLED panel consists of stacks of several thin layers of different materials, as such it is not easy to inspect the common OLED defects. In this paper, an autooptical inspection (AOI) system which can detect such defects effectively and robustly was proposed and developed. The proposed system can also identify, in which layer the defect occurred. Meanwhile, a moving mechanism coupled with a lighting mechanism was proposed and implemented for grabbing clear images. The proposed AOI system would provide great help in improving the OLED production process and the quality control process

  3. Aerospace Transparency Research Compendium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pinkus, Alan

    2003-01-01

    ... (ARRL), located at Wright-Patterson AFB OH, has advanced aerospace transparency technology through the investigative research of numerous optical and visual parameters inherent in aerospace transparencies...

  4. Ole Worm-Liv og videnskabTidstavle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    hæftet indeholder syv artikler om Ole Worms liv, videnskab, museum, slægtsportrætter, antikvariske arbejder og om installationen Room One......hæftet indeholder syv artikler om Ole Worms liv, videnskab, museum, slægtsportrætter, antikvariske arbejder og om installationen Room One...

  5. Kaido Ole seintel ja kaante vahel / Valner Valme

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Valme, Valner, 1970-

    2007-01-01

    Kunstnik Kaido Ole (sünd. 1963) eluloolisi andmeid, looming. Eesti Kunstiakadeemia andis välja kataloogi "Ole", toimetaja Eero Epner. Kunstinäitus "Jonas & Kaido" koos Jonas Gasiunasega Vilniuse Vartai galeriis. Näitus "Hümn" Vaal galeriis

  6. Aluminum-doped zinc oxide films as transparent conductive electrode for organic light-emitting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, X.; Wong, F.L.; Fung, M.K.; Lee, S.T.

    2003-01-01

    Highly transparent conductive, aluminum-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) films were deposited on glass substrates by midfrequency magnetron sputtering of metallic aluminum-doped zinc target. ZnO:Al films with surface work functions between 3.7 and 4.4 eV were obtained by varying the sputtering conditions. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) were fabricated on these ZnO:Al films. A current efficiency of higher than 3.7 cd/A, was achieved. For comparison, 3.9 cd/A was achieved by the reference OLEDs fabricated on commercial indium-tin-oxide substrates

  7. Enhancing light out-coupling of organic light-emitting devices using indium tin oxide-free low-index transparent electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yi-Hsiang; Lu, Chun-Yang; Tsai, Shang-Ta; Tsai, Yu-Tang; Chen, Chien-Yu; Tsai, Wei-Lung; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chang, Hong-Wei; Lee, Wei-Kai; Jiao, Min; Wu, Chung-Chih, E-mail: wucc@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, and Innovative Photonics Advanced Research Center (i-PARC), National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-05

    With its increasing and sufficient conductivity, the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) has been capable of replacing the widely used but less cost-effective indium tin oxides (ITOs) as alternative transparent electrodes for organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). Intriguingly, PEDOT:PSS also possesses an optical refractive index significantly lower than those of ITO and typical organic layers in OLEDs and well matching those of typical OLED substrates. Optical simulation reveals that by replacing ITO with such a low-index transparent electrode, the guided modes trapped within the organic/ITO layers in conventional OLEDs can be substantially suppressed, leading to more light coupled into the substrate than the conventional ITO device. By applying light out-coupling structures onto outer surfaces of substrates to effectively extract radiation into substrates, OLEDs using such low-index transparent electrodes achieve enhanced optical out-coupling and external quantum efficiencies in comparison with conventional OLEDs using ITO.

  8. Phosphorescence quenching microrespirometry of skeletal muscle in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Aleksander S.; Tevald, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an optical method for the evaluation of the oxygen consumption (V̇o2) in microscopic volumes of spinotrapezius muscle. Using phosphorescence quenching microscopy (PQM) for the measurement of interstitial Po2, together with rapid pneumatic compression of the organ, we recorded the oxygen disappearance curve (ODC) in the muscle of the anesthetized rats. A 0.6-mm diameter area in the tissue, preloaded with the phosphorescent oxygen probe, was excited once a second by a 532-nm Q-switched laser with pulse duration of 15 ns. Each of the evoked phosphorescence decays was analyzed to obtain a sequence of Po2 values that constituted the ODC. Following flow arrest and tissue compression, the interstitial Po2 decreased rapidly and the initial slope of the ODC was used to calculate the V̇o2. Special analysis of instrumental factors affecting the ODC was performed, and the resulting model was used for evaluation of V̇o2. The calculation was based on the observation of only a small amount of residual blood in the tissue after compression. The contribution of oxygen photoconsumption by PQM and oxygen inflow from external sources was evaluated in specially designed tests. The average oxygen consumption of the rat spinotrapezius muscle was V̇o2 = 123.4 ± 13.4 (SE) nl O2/cm3·s (N = 38, within 6 muscles) at a baseline interstitial Po2 of 50.8 ± 2.9 mmHg. This technique has opened the opportunity for monitoring respiration rates in microscopic volumes of functioning skeletal muscle. PMID:20971766

  9. OLED Display For Real Time Vision System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhyalakshmi Narayanan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This innovative glass design will carry an OLED based display controlled via nano Ardiuno board having Bluetooth connectivity with a Smartphone to exchange information along with onboard accelerometer. We are using a tilt angle sensor for detecting if the driver is feeling drowsy. An alcohol sensor has been used to promote the safe driving habit. The glasses will be getting latest updates about the current speed of the vehicle navigation directions nearby or approaching sign broads or services like petrol pumps. Itll also display information like incoming calls or received messages. All this information will be obtained through a Smartphone connected via Bluetooth. Also the car mileage can be monitored with help of fuel sensor as the consumption of fuel is directly related to it. Abnormalities if detected will be immediately notified in the glasses. Also the angle of the tilt angle sensor can be defined and set by the user according to his needs. Also the main idea of using OLED glasses is that it is organic thereby helps in reducing the carbon footprint and is quite slim. Therefore it can be easily mounted on the specs without making it heavy. Also they higher level of flexibility and have low power drain and energy consumption

  10. OLED-polypropylene bio-CD sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengasandra, Srikanth; Cai, Yuankun; Grewell, David; Shinar, Joseph; Shinar, Ruth

    2008-08-01

    With the goal of developing microfluidic platforms for sensing applications, flash-free micro patterns were embossed in polypropylene surfaces with ultrasonic heating for a biosensing lab-on-CD application. The embossed features were designed to act as reservoirs, valves, and reaction chambers to allow, in combination with a compact sensing platform, the monitoring of analyte levels using a standard PC-CD player. To generate the compact sensor, as an example, we chose the photoluminescence (PL)-based detection of lactate and glucose using an OLED-based sensing platform. Once embossed, the surface energy of the plastic substrate was chemically modified to make it hydrophilic. Reagents, placed in separate reservoirs, were directed through burst valves towards a reaction chamber via CD rotation. Lactate or glucose were monitored by measuring the effect of the related dissolved oxygen level on the PL decay time of an oxygen-sensitive dye, following analyte oxidation catalyzed by a suitable specific oxidase enzyme. The results demonstrate the potential of integrating OLEDs as excitation sources in PL-based sensors with microfluidic CD-based platforms, including for simultaneous multiple analyses.

  11. A precision synchrotron radiation detector using phosphorescent screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, C.K.; Lateur, M.; Nash, J.; Tinsman, J.; Butler, J.; Wormser, G.

    1990-01-01

    A precision detector to measure synchrotron radiation beam positions has been designed and installed as part of beam energy spectrometers at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The distance between pairs of synchrotron radiation beams is measured absolutely to better than 28 μm on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This contributes less than 5 MeV to the error in the measurement of SLC beam energies (approximately 50 GeV). A system of high-resolution video cameras viewing precisely aligned fiducial wire arrays overlaying phosphorescent screens has achieved this accuracy. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  12. Spin-lattice relaxation in phosphorescent triplet state molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbeek, P.J.F.

    1979-01-01

    The present thesis contains the results of a study of spin-lattice relaxation (SLR) in the photo-excited triplet state of aromatic molecules, dissolved in a molecular host crystal. It appears that SLR in phosphorescent triplet state molecules often is related to the presence of so-called (pseudo) localized phonons in the molecular mixed crystals. These local phonons can be thought to correspond with vibrations (librations) of the guest molecule in the force field of the surrounding host molecules. Since the intermolecular forces are relatively weak, the frequencies corresponding with these vibrations are relatively low and usually are of the order of 10-30 cm -1 . (Auth.)

  13. Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDS) and OLED-based structurally integrated optical sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Yuankun

    2010-01-01

    General introduction to OLED basics and OLED-based structurally integrated sensors was provided in chapter 1 and chapter 2. As discussed in chapter 3, OLEDs were developed or improved using novel engineering methods for better charge injection (increased by over 1 order of magnitude) and efficiency. As the excitation sources, these OLEDs have preferred characteristics for sensor applications, including narrowed emission, emission at desired wavelength, and enhanced output for reduced EL background, higher absorption and improved device lifetime. In addition to OLEDs with desired performance, sensor integration requires oxidase immobilization with the sensor film for O 2 -based biological and chemical sensing. Nanoparticles such as ZnO have large surface area and high isoelectric point (∼9.5), which favors enzyme immobilization via physical adsorption as well as Coulombic bonding. In chapter 4, it was demonstrated that ZnO could be used for this purpose, although future work is needed to further bond the ZnO to the sensor film. In chapter 5, single unit sensor was extended to multianalyte parallel sensing based on an OLED platform, which is compact and integrated with silicon photodiodes and electronics. Lactate and glucose were simultaneously monitored with a low limit of detection 0.02 mM, fast response time (∼ 1 minute) and dynamic range from 0-8.6 ppm of dissolved oxygen. As discovered in previous work, the dynamic range covers 0-100% gas phase O 2 or 0-40 ppm dissolved oxygen at room temperature. PL decay curve, which is used to extract the decay time, is usually not a simple exponential at high O 2 concentration, which indicates that O 2 is not equally accessible for different luminescent sites. This creates a challenge for data analysis, which however was successfully processed by stretched exponential as shown in chapter 6. This also provides an insight about the distribution of O 2 :dye collisional quenching rate due to microheterogeneity. Effect of Ti

  14. Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDS) and OLED-based structurally integrated optical sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yuankun [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    General introduction to OLED basics and OLED-based structurally integrated sensors was provided in chapter 1 and chapter 2. As discussed in chapter 3, OLEDs were developed or improved using novel engineering methods for better charge injection (increased by over 1 order of magnitude) and efficiency. As the excitation sources, these OLEDs have preferred characteristics for sensor applications, including narrowed emission, emission at desired wavelength, and enhanced output for reduced EL background, higher absorption and improved device lifetime. In addition to OLEDs with desired performance, sensor integration requires oxidase immobilization with the sensor film for O2-based biological and chemical sensing. Nanoparticles such as ZnO have large surface area and high isoelectric point (~9.5), which favors enzyme immobilization via physical adsorption as well as Coulombic bonding. In chapter 4, it was demonstrated that ZnO could be used for this purpose, although future work is needed to further bond the ZnO to the sensor film. In chapter 5, single unit sensor was extended to multianalyte parallel sensing based on an OLED platform, which is compact and integrated with silicon photodiodes and electronics. Lactate and glucose were simultaneously monitored with a low limit of detection 0.02 mM, fast response time (~1 minute) and dynamic range from 0-8.6 ppm of dissolved oxygen. As discovered in previous work, the dynamic range covers 0-100% gas phase O2 or 0-40 ppm dissolved oxygen at room temperature. PL decay curve, which is used to extract the decay time, is usually not a simple exponential at high O2 concentration, which indicates that O2 is not equally accessible for different luminescent sites. This creates a challenge for data analysis, which however was successfully processed by stretched exponential as shown in chapter 6. This also provides an insight about the distribution of O2:dye collisional quenching

  15. [1,2,4]Triazolo[1,5-a]pyridine as Building Blocks for Universal Host Materials for High-Performance Red, Green, Blue and White Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenxuan; Shi, Lijiang; Gao, Lei; Hu, Peijun; Mu, Haichuan; Xia, Zhenyuan; Huang, Jinhai; Su, Jianhua

    2018-02-14

    The electron-accepting [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridine (TP) moiety was introduced to build bipolar host materials for the first time, and two host materials based on this TP acceptor and carbazole donor, namely, 9,9'-(2-([1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridin-2-yl)-1,3-phenylene)bis(9H-carbazole) (o-CzTP) and 9,9'-(5-([1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridin-2-yl)-1,3-phenylene)bis(9H-carbazole) (m-CzTP), were designed and synthesized. These two TP-based host materials possess a high triplet energy (>2.9 eV) and appropriate highest occupied molecular orbital/lowest unoccupied molecular orbital levels as well as the bipolar transporting feature, which permits their applicability as universal host materials in multicolor phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices (PhOLEDs). Blue, green, and red PhOLEDs based on o-CzTP and m-CzTP with the same device configuration all show high efficiencies and low efficiency roll-off. The devices hosted by o-CzTP exhibit maximum external quantum efficiencies (η ext ) of 27.1, 25.0, and 15.8% for blue, green, and red light emitting, respectively, which are comparable with the best electroluminescene performance reported for FIrpic-based blue, Ir(ppy) 3 -based green, and Ir(pq) 2 (acac)-based red PhOLEDs equipped with a single-component host. The white PhOLEDs based on the o-CzTP host and three lumophors containing red, green, and blue emitting layers were fabricated with the same device structure, which exhibit a maximum current efficiency and η c of 40.4 cd/A and 17.8%, respectively, with the color rendering index value of 75.

  16. Phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence properties of fluorone dyes in bio-related films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzkofer, A.; Tyagi, A.; Slyusareva, E.; Sizykh, A.

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The spectral and temporal phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence behaviour of five fluorescein dyes in gelatine, starch, and chitosan is studied and basic parameters are determined. Research highlights: → Phosphorescence quantum yields of fluorone dyes in bio-related films are measured at room temperature. → Delayed fluorescence quantum yields of fluorone dyes in bio-related films are measured at room temperature. → Phosphorescence lifetimes of fluorone dyes in bio-related films are measured at room temperature. → Delayed fluorescence lifetimes of fluorone dyes in bio-related films are measured at room temperature. → General theory of short-pulse excited phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence is presented and relevant parameters are extracted. - Abstract: The phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence behaviour of the fluorone dyes disodium fluorescein (FL, uranine), 4,5-dibromofluorescein (DBF), eosin Y (EO), erythrosine B (ER), and rose bengal (RB) in bio-films of gelatine, starch, and chitosan at room temperature is studied. Phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes were measured. The singlet-triplet dynamics is described and applied to the fluorone dyes for parameter extraction. For uranine films at room temperature no phosphorescence could be resolved. The efficiency of singlet-triplet intersystem crossing increased in the order φ ISC (DBF) ISC (EO) ISC (ER) ISC (RB) due to the heavy atom effect on spin-orbit coupling. The phosphorescence quantum yields increased in the order φ P (DBF) P (EO) P (RB) P (ER). The phosphorescence lifetimes followed the order τ P (DBF) > τ P (EO) > τ P (ER) > τ P (RB).

  17. Efficiency optimization of green phosphorescent organic light-emitting device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Soo; Jeon, Woo Sik; Yu, Jae Hyung [Department of Information Display, Kyung Hee University, Dongdaemoon-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Pode, Ramchandra, E-mail: rbpode@khu.ac.k [Department of Physics, Kyung Hee University, Dongdaemoon-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Jang Hyuk, E-mail: jhkwon@khu.ac.k [Department of Information Display, Kyung Hee University, Dongdaemoon-gu, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-01

    Using a narrow band gap host of bis[2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-pyridine]beryllium (Bepp{sub 2}) and green phosphorescent Ir(ppy){sub 3} [fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine) iridium III] guest concentration as low as 2%, high efficiency phosphorescent organic light-emitting diode (PHOLED) is realized. Current and power efficiencies of 62.5 cd/A (max.), 51.0 lm/W (max.), and external quantum efficiency (max.) of 19.8% are reported in this green PHOLED. A low current efficiency roll-off value of 10% over the brightness of 10,000 cd/m{sup 2} is noticed in this Bepp{sub 2} single host device. Such a high efficiency is obtained by the optimization of the doping concentration with the knowledge of the hole trapping and the emission zone situations in this host-guest system. It is suggested that the reported device performance is suitable for applications in high brightness displays and lighting.

  18. Large-area OLED lightings and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J W; Shin, D C; Park, S H

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we review the key issues related to the fabrication of large-area organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) for lighting applications. We discuss the origin of a short-circuit problem, luminance non-uniformity, hot spot, efficiency reduction (power loss), and heat generation and present the way of suppressing them. We also introduce three different application areas of large-area OLED lighting panels. They can be integrated with a solar cell for power recycling or inorganic LEDs for emotional lightings. The feasibility of using OLEDs for the application of visible-light communications is also reviewed

  19. Integration of OLE into the TACL control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowling, B.; Douglas, D.; Kewisch, J.; Kloeppel, P.; Kraft, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    OLE, the On-Line Envelope program, is a first-order optics code which was designed to provide fast lattice transfer functions from actual accelerator magnet and cavity control values. This paper addresses the results of a successful integration of OLE into the CEBAF control system, TACL. This marriage provides the user with the ability for obtaining real-time Twiss parameters and transfer functions which reflect the current operational state of the machine. The resultant OLE calculation provides the analytical core for many control and diagnostic functions used at CEBAF, including focusing corrections, orbit corrections, emittance measurements, and beamline analysis

  20. Transparency and product variety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    2009-01-01

    We study long run effects of transparency on the consumer side in a differentiated market. Only some consumers know prices. Increasing transparency reduces the equilibrium price, profit and firm entry. This improves welfare and, in most cases, average consumer utility....

  1. Enhanced device performances of a new inverted top-emitting OLEDs with relatively thick Ag electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So-Ra; Suh, Min Chul

    2018-02-19

    To improve the device performances of top-emitting organic light emitting diodes (TEOLEDs), we developed a new inverted TEOLEDs structure with silver (Ag) metal as a semi-transparent top electrode. Especially, we found that the use of relatively thick Ag electrode without using any carrier injection layer is beneficial to realize highly efficient device performances. Also, we could insert very thick overlying hole transport layer (HTL) on the emitting layer (EML) which could be very helpful to suppress the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) coupling if it is applied to the common bottom-emission OLEDs (BEOLEDs). As a result, we could realize noteworthy high current efficiency of approximately ~188.1 cd/A in our new inverted TEOLEDs with 25 nm thick Ag electrode.

  2. Evaluation of kinetic phosphorescence analysis for the determination of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croatto, P.V.; Frank, I.W.; Johnson, K.D.; Mason, P.B.; Smith, M.M.

    1997-12-01

    In the past, New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) has used a fluorometric method for the determination of sub-microgram quantities of uranium. In its continuing effort to upgrade and improve measurement technology, NBL has evaluated the commercially-available KPA-11 kinetic phosphorescence analyzer (Chemchek, Richland, WA). The Chemchek KPA-11 is a bench-top instrument which performs single-measurement, quench-corrected analyses for trace uranium. It incorporates patented kinetic phosphorimetry techniques to measure and analyze sample phosphorescence as a function of time. With laser excitation and time-corrected photon counting, the KPA-11 has a lower detection limit than conventional fluorometric methods. Operated with a personal computer, the state-of-the-art KPA-11 offers extensive time resolution and phosphorescence lifetime capabilities for additional specificity. Interferences are thereby avoided while obtaining precise measurements. Routine analyses can be easily and effectively accomplished, with the accuracy and precision equivalent to the pulsed-laser fluorometric method presently performed at NBL, without the need for internal standards. Applications of kinetic phosphorimetry at NBL include the measurement of trace level uranium in retention tank, waste samples, and low-level samples. It has also been used to support other experimental activities at NBL by the measuring of nanogram amounts of uranium contamination (in blanks) in isotopic sample preparations, and the determining of elution curves of different ion exchange resins used for uranium purification. In many cases, no pretreatment of samples was necessary except to fume them with nitric acid, and then to redissolve and dilute them to an appropriate concentration with 1 M HNO 3 before measurement. Concentrations were determined on a mass basis (microg U/g of solution), but no density corrections were needed since all the samples (including the samples used for calibration) were in the same density

  3. Optimal Central Bank Transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Cruijsen, C.A.B.; Eijffinger, S.C.W.; Hoogduin, L.H.

    2008-01-01

    Should central banks increase their degree of transparency any further? We show that there is likely to be an optimal intermediate degree of central bank transparency. Up to this optimum more transparency is desirable: it improves the quality of private sector inflation forecasts. But beyond the

  4. Optimal central bank transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Cruijsen, C.A.B.; Eijffinger, S.C.W.; Hoogduin, L.

    2008-01-01

    Should central banks increase their degree of transparency any further? We show that there is likely to be an optimal intermediate degree of central bank transparency. Up to this optimum more transparency is desirable: it improves the quality of private sector inflation forecasts. But beyond the

  5. Optimal central bank transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Cruijsen, C.A.B.; Eijffinger, S.C.W.; Hoogduin, L.H.

    2010-01-01

    Should central banks increase their degree of transparency any further? We show that there is likely to be an optimal intermediate degree of central bank transparency. Up to this optimum more transparency is desirable: it improves the quality of private sector inflation forecasts. But beyond the

  6. Transparency and Product Variety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    We study the long run e¤ects of transparency in a circular town model of a differentiated market. The market is not fully transparent on the consumer side: A fraction of consumers are uninformed about prices. Increasing transparency reduces the equilibrium price, profit and entry of firms. This i...

  7. Transparency in Health Programmes

    OpenAIRE

    Vian, Taryn

    2008-01-01

    Transparency is an important tool for good governance, helping to expose abusive practices including fraud, patronage, corruption, and other abuses of power. Increasing transparency can also enhance accountability by providing performance management information and exposing policies and procedures to oversight. This U4 Brief discusses the role of transparency in preventing corruption in the health sector.

  8. Voluntarism and transparent deliberation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steglich-Petersen, Asbjørn

    2006-01-01

    voluntarism. I argue that transparency to factual questions occurs in practical deliberation in ways parallel to transparency in doxastic deliberation. I argue that this should make us reconsider the appeal to transparency in arguments against doxastic voluntarism, and the wider issue of distinguishing...... theoretical from practical rationality....

  9. Innovative transparent armour concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Broos, J.P.F.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since WWII transparent armour consists of a multi-layer of glass panels bonded by thin polymer bond-films using an autoclave process. TNO has worked on the development of innovative transparent armour concepts that are lighter and a have better multi-hit capacity. Two new transparent armour

  10. Ole Rømer som enevældens administrator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olden-Jørgensen, Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    En gennemgang af Ole Rømers liv med vægt på hans rolle som embedsmand og hans deltagelse eller mangel på samme i det politiske spil.......En gennemgang af Ole Rømers liv med vægt på hans rolle som embedsmand og hans deltagelse eller mangel på samme i det politiske spil....

  11. Seniorforsker Ole Hertel udnævnt til adjungeret professor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Christian

    2009-01-01

    Sektionsleder og seniorforsker Ole Hertel, Danmarks Miljøundersøgelser (DMU) ved Aarhus Universitet, er udnævnt til adjungeret professor ved Institut for Miljø, Samfund og Rumlig Forandring på Roskilde Universitet.......Sektionsleder og seniorforsker Ole Hertel, Danmarks Miljøundersøgelser (DMU) ved Aarhus Universitet, er udnævnt til adjungeret professor ved Institut for Miljø, Samfund og Rumlig Forandring på Roskilde Universitet....

  12. An examination of OLED display application to military equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J.; Lorimer, S.

    2010-04-01

    OLED display technology has developed sufficiently to support small format commercial applications such as cell-phone main display functions. Revenues seem sufficient to finance both performance improvements and to develop new applications. The situation signifies the possibility that OLED technology is on the threshold of credibility for military applications. This paper will examine both performance and some possible applications for the military ground mobile environment, identifying the advantages and disadvantages of this promising new technology.

  13. Highly phosphorescent hollow fibers inner-coated with tungstate nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Pui Fai; Bai, Gongxun; Si, Liping; Lee, Ka I.; Hao, Jianhua; Xin, John H.; Fei, Bin

    2017-12-01

    In order to develop luminescent microtubes from natural fibers, a facile biomimetic mineralization method was designed to introduce the CaWO4-based nanocrystals into kapok lumens. The structure, composition, and luminescence properties of resultant fibers were investigated with microscopes, x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and fluorescence spectrometry. The yield of tungstate crystals inside kapok was significantly promoted with a process at high temperature and pressure—the hydrothermal treatment. The tungstate crystals grown on the inner wall of kapok fibers showed the same crystal structure with those naked powders, but smaller in crystal size. The resultant fiber assemblies demonstrated reduced phosphorescence intensity in comparison to the naked tungstate powders. However, the fibers gave more stable luminescence than the naked powders in wet condition. This approach explored the possibility of decorating natural fibers with high load of nanocrystals, hinting potential applications in anti-counterfeit labels, security textiles, and even flexible and soft optical devices.

  14. Afterglow luminescence in sol-gel/Pechini grown oxide materials: persistence or phosphorescence process? (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontakke, Atul; Ferrier, Alban; Viana, Bruno

    2017-03-01

    Persistent luminescence and phosphorescence, both yields afterglow luminescence, but are completely different mechanisms. Persistent luminescence involves a slow thermal release of trapped electrons stored in defect states, whereas the phosphorescence is caused due to triplet to singlet transition [1,2]. Many persistent luminescence phosphors are based on oxide inorganic hosts, and exhibit long afterglow luminescence after ceasing the excitation. We observed intense and long afterglow luminescence in sol-gel/pechini grown inorganic oxides, and as a first interpretation thought to be due to persistence mechanism. However, some of these materials do not exhibit defect trap centers, and a detailed investigation suggested it is due to phosphorescence, but not the persistence. Phosphorescence is not common in inorganic solids, and that too at room temperature, and therefore usually misinterpreted as persistence luminescence [3]. Here we present a detailed methodology to distinguish phosphorescence from persistence luminescence in inorganic solids, and the process to harvest highly efficient long phosphorescence afterglow at room temperature. 1. Jian Xu, Setsuhisa Tanabe, Atul D. Sontakke, Jumpei Ueda, Appl. Phys. Lett. 107, 081903 (2015) 2. Sebastian Reineke, Marc A. Baldo, Scientific Reports, 4, 3797 (2014) 3. Pengchong Xue, Panpan Wang, Peng Chen, Boqi Yao, Peng Gong, Jiabao Sun, Zhenqi Zhang, Ran Lu, Chem. Sci. (2016) DOI: 10.1039/C5SC03739E

  15. Multispectral surface plasmon resonance approach for ultra-thin silver layer characterization: Application to top-emitting OLED cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverne, S.; Caron, B.; Gétin, S.; Lartigue, O.; Lopez, C.; Meunier-Della-Gatta, S.; Gorge, V.; Reymermier, M.; Racine, B.; Maindron, T.; Quesnel, E.

    2018-01-01

    While dielectric/metal/dielectric (DMD) multilayer thin films have raised considerable interest as transparent and conductive electrodes in various optoelectronic devices, the knowledge of optical characteristics of thin metallic layers integrated in such structures is still rather approximate. The multispectral surface plasmon resonance characterization approach described in this work precisely aims at providing a rigorous methodology able to accurately determine the optical constants of ultra-thin metallic films. As a practical example, the refractive index and extinction dispersion curves of 8 to 25 nm-thick silver layers have been investigated. As a result, their extreme dependence on the layer thickness is highlighted, in particular in a thickness range close to the critical threshold value (˜10 nm) where the silver film becomes continuous and its electrical conductance/optical transmittance ratio particularly interesting. To check the validity of the revisited Ag layers constant dispersion curves deduced from this study, they were introduced into a commercial optical model software to simulate the behavior of various optoelectronic building blocks from the simplest ones (DMD electrodes) to much more complex structures [full organic light emitting device (OLED) stacks]. As a result, a much better prediction of the emission spectrum profile as well as the angular emission pattern of top-emitting OLEDs is obtained. On this basis, it is also shown how a redesign of the top encapsulation thin film of OLEDs is necessary to better take benefit from the advanced DMD electrode. These results should particularly interest the micro-OLED display field where bright and directive single color pixel emission is required.

  16. The art of transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayim, Bilge; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Artists throughout the ages have discovered a number of techniques to depict transparency. With only a few exceptions, these techniques follow closely the properties of physical transparency. The two best known properties are X-junctions and the luminance relations described by Metelli. X-junctions are seen where the contours of a transparent material cross contours of the surface behind; Metelli's constraints on the luminance relations between the direct and filtered portions of the surface specify a range of luminance values that are consistent with transparency. These principles have been used by artists since the time of ancient Egypt. However, artists also discovered that stimuli can be seen as transparent even when these physical constraints are not met. Ancient Greek artists, for example, were able to depict transparent materials in simple black-and-white line drawings. Artists also learned how to represent transparency in cases where neither X-junctions nor Metelli's constraints could apply: for example, where no portions of the objects behind the transparent material extend beyond it. Many painters convincingly portrayed transparency in these cases by depicting the effects the transparent medium would have on material or object properties. Here, we show how artists employed these and other techniques revealing their anticipation of current formalizations of perceived transparency, and we suggest new, as-yet-untested principles.

  17. Peering into Transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Thøger; Cheney, George

    2015-01-01

    organizational effectiveness and widened democratic practice. Yet, with its most common operationalization, as information, transparency reinstalls a 'purified' notion of communication devoid of mystery, inaccuracy, and (mis)representation. We apply transparency to itself by unpacking its implicit model......The current emphasis on organizational transparency signifies a growing demand for insight, clarity, accountability, and participation. Holding the promise of improved access to valid and trustworthy knowledge about organizations, the transparency pursuit has great potential for enhanced...... of communication and critiquing its obliviousness to the representative nature of transparency-related messages and the attendant complexities of motivation. This critique interrogates the ambiguities and ambivalence of the transparency pursuit and demonstrates how the goals of organizational transparency...

  18. Highly Conductive PEDOT:PSS Films with 1,3-Dimethyl-2-Imidazolidinone as Transparent Electrodes for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Joo, Chul Woong; Lee, Jonghee; Seo, Yoon Kyung; Han, Joo Won; Oh, Ji Yoon; Kim, Jong Su; Yu, Seunggun; Lee, Jae Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Ik; Yun, Changhun; Choi, Bum Ho; Kim, Yong Hyun

    2016-09-01

    Highly conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) ( PSS) films as transparent electrodes for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are doped with a new solvent 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI) and are optimized using solvent post-treatment. The DMI doped PSS films show significantly enhanced conductivities up to 812.1 S cm(-1) . The sheet resistance of the PSS films doped with DMI is further reduced by various solvent post-treatment. The effect of solvent post-treatment on DMI doped PSS films is investigated and is shown to reduce insulating PSS in the conductive films. The solvent posttreated PSS films are successfully employed as transparent electrodes in white OLEDs. It is shown that the efficiency of OLEDs with the optimized DMI doped PSS films is higher than that of reference OLEDs doped with a conventional solvent (ethylene glycol). The results present that the optimized PSS films with the new solvent of DMI can be a promising transparent electrode for low-cost, efficient ITO-free white OLEDs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. de los hoteles españoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Claver Cortés

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Los hoteles necesitan cada vez más información para su correcta gestión y para maximizar su desempeño o éxito empresarial. De esta forma, en este estudio se analizan una serie de variables estratégicas clave que influyen directamente sobre el desempeño hotelero. Estas variables son el tamaño, el tipo de gestión y la categoría de los hoteles. En este trabajo, empleando la teoría de los grupos estratégicos, se han agrupado los hoteles españoles de entre 3 a 5 estrellas en función de cada una de estas variables estratégicas con el objetivo de determinar si influyen significativamente sobre el desempeño hotelero y en qué sentido. Entre los resultados que se han obtenido destacan el hecho de que a mayor tamaño y categoría, mayor es el desempeño que alcanzan los hoteles. Así mismo, los hoteles que pertenecen a cadenas alcanzan niveles de desempeño mayores que los independientes. Por lo tanto, de esta investigación se deducen importantes implicaciones para la dirección hotelera.

  20. Utilizing a Spiro Core with Acridine- and Phenothiazine-Based New Hole Transporting Materials for Highly Efficient Green Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanaskanda Braveenth

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Two new hole transporting materials, 2,7-bis(9,9-diphenylacridin-10(9H-yl-9,9′ spirobi[fluorene] (SP1 and 2,7-di(10H-phenothiazin-10-yl-9,9′-spirobi[fluorene] (SP2, were designed and synthesized by using the Buchwald–Hartwig coupling reaction with a high yield percentage of over 84%. Both of the materials exhibited high glass transition temperatures of over 150 °C. In order to understand the device performances, we have fabricated green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PhOLEDs with SP1 and SP2 as hole transporting materials. Both of the materials revealed improved device properties, in particular, the SP2-based device showed excellent power (34.47 lm/W and current (38.41 cd/A efficiencies when compare with the 4,4′-bis(N-phenyl-1-naphthylaminobiphenyl (NPB-based reference device (30.33 lm/W and 32.83 cd/A. The external quantum efficiency (EQE of SP2 was 13.43%, which was higher than SP1 (13.27% and the reference material (11.45% with a similar device structure. The SP2 hole transporting material provides an effective charge transporting path from anode to emission layer, which is explained by the device efficiencies.

  1. Improving Light Outcoupling Efficiency for OLEDs with Microlens Array Fabricated on Transparent Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low light outcoupling efficiency restricts the wide application of organic light-emitting diodes in solid state light market although the internal quantum efficiency of the device could reach near to 100%. In order to improve the output efficiency, different kinds of microlens array on the substrate emission surface were designed and simulated using light tracing method. Simulation results indicate that the microlens array on the substrate could efficiently improve the light output efficiency and an enhancement of 1.8 could be obtained with optimized microlens structure design. The microlens array with semicircle shape using polymer material was fabricated on glass substrate by a facile approach. Finally, the organic device with microlens array substrate was manufactured and the light output of the device with surface microlens structure could increase to 1.64 times comparing with the device without microlens.

  2. Hybrid white organic light-emitting diodes combining blue-fluorescent polymer and red phosphorescent Pt(II) complexes as active layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Germino, Jose Carlos; Faleiros, Marcelo Meira; Moraes, Emmanuel Santos; Atvars, Teresa Dib Zambon, E-mail: kakagermino@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil); Domingues, Raquel Aparecida [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil); Quites, Fernando Junior [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT), Cuiaba, MT (Brazil); Freitas, Jilian Nei de [Centro de Tecnologia da Informacao Renato Archer, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: In this work we proposed a PFO composite with two salicylidene based Pt(II) coordination compounds, the [Pt(salophen)] and [Pt(sal-3,4-ben)] (red emitters), as emissive layer (EML) for Organic Light-emitting Diodes (OLEDs), combining a blue-fluorescent polymer (PFO) with red-phosphorescent Pt(II) coordination complexes in order to obtain an efficient white electroluminescent EML for WOLEDs application. Firstly, [Pt(salophen)] and [Pt(sal-3,4-ben)] were synthesized, purified and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, yielding their respective expected molecular structures. The photoluminescence properties of the devices were evaluated by steady-state (electronic absorption and emission spectroscopies) and transient (fluorescence decays and TRES) measurements. It was observed the presence of non-radiative energy transfer processes between the PFO derivative and Pt(II) complexes. Posteriorly, the Pt(II) complexes were blended with PVK at 1% mol:mol ratio and OLEDs were made, leading to red-emitting devices with high color purity for the two coordination compounds. However, the two devices present low current efficiency values. In order to improve the electroluminescence properties of Pt(II) complexes PhOLEDs, PVK host was substituted by PFO at 0.5, 1.0 and 2.5% mol:mol ratios of complex and it was observed a great improvement of their optical-electronic properties in terms of luminance, voltage, current density and current efficiency in comparison to PVK composites or pure PFO devices. At 2.5% concentration, predominant bands of Pt(II) complexes were observed at low and high voltages. For the other concentrations, a different behavior was observed: the emission bands and device color were function of applied electrical field, exhibiting a red color at lower voltages (5 to 9V) and the PFO characteristic emission between 9 and 13V, leading to a white light emission at 13V. The best results were obtained for [Pt(sal-3,4-ben)] coordination compound

  3. Transparency in Organizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albu, Oana Brindusa

    This dissertation provides a critical analysis of transparency in the context of organizing. The empirical material is based on qualitative studies of international cooperative organizations. The dissertation seeks to contribute to transparency and organizing scholarship by adopting a communication...... centred approach to explore the implications of pursuing ideals of transparency in organizational relationships. The dissertation is comprised of four papers each contributing to extant debates in organizational studies and transparency literature. The findings indicate that transparency, in contrast...... to being a solution for efficiency and democratic organizing, is a communicatively contested process which may lead to unintended consequences. The dissertation shows that transparency is performative: it can impact authority by de/legitimating action, shape the processes of organizational identity co...

  4. Microcavity-Free Broadband Light Outcoupling Enhancement in Flexible Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Nanostructured Transparent Metal-Dielectric Composite Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu-Hai; Ou, Qing-Dong; Li, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Yi-Bo; Zhao, Xin-Dong; Xiang, Heng-Yang; Chen, Jing-De; Zhou, Lei; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Tang, Jian-Xin

    2016-01-26

    Flexible organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) hold great promise for future bendable display and curved lighting applications. One key challenge of high-performance flexible OLEDs is to develop new flexible transparent conductive electrodes with superior mechanical, electrical, and optical properties. Herein, an effective nanostructured metal/dielectric composite electrode on a plastic substrate is reported by combining a quasi-random outcoupling structure for broadband and angle-independent light outcoupling of white emission with an ultrathin metal alloy film for optimum optical transparency, electrical conduction, and mechanical flexibility. The microcavity effect and surface plasmonic loss can be remarkably reduced in white flexible OLEDs, resulting in a substantial increase in the external quantum efficiency and power efficiency to 47.2% and 112.4 lm W(-1).

  5. Transparency views by media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikawa, Y.

    2007-01-01

    In this presentation, various problems surrounding the issues of transparency, such as 'What exactly should be transparent?' 'Is all that we want amounting only to transparency?' 'Is it possible to thoroughly implement transparency', etc., are discussed with due consideration for the viewpoints of the wide range of parties concerned involving areas of politics, administration, enterprises, media, individuals, and so on. First of all, the explanation is focused on how the transparency is recognised, as well as how it is regarded as important, for the public at large and the media. Then, based on the concept that transparency is required for what cannot be justified to be secret, we will contemplate what should be transparent in the areas of politics, administration and enterprises, using the case of nuclear issues as example. Next, the discussion will proceed to the point whether the achievement of transparency itself should be the ultimate goal, in the light of taking into consideration the standpoints of individuals and the receivers of the information, in addition to that of the administration, politics, and enterprises. In closing, we will discuss what the necessary measures will be to materialize the complete transparency on the basis of the discussions made thus far. (author)

  6. Plasmonic transparent conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapis, Andreas C.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Black, Charles T.

    2016-09-01

    Many of today's technological applications, such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, displays, and touch screens, require materials that are simultaneously optically transparent and electrically conducting. Here we explore transparent conductors based on the excitation of surface plasmons in nanostructured metal films. We measure both the optical and electrical properties of films perforated with nanometer-scale features and optimize the design parameters in order to maximize optical transmission without sacrificing electrical conductivity. We demonstrate that plasmonic transparent conductors can out-perform indium tin oxide in terms of both their transparency and their conductivity.

  7. High Quantum Efficiency OLED Lighting Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiang, Joseph [General Electric (GE) Global Research, Fairfield, CT (United States)

    2011-09-30

    The overall goal of the program was to apply improvements in light outcoupling technology to a practical large area plastic luminaire, and thus enable the product vision of an extremely thin form factor high efficiency large area light source. The target substrate was plastic and the baseline device was operating at 35 LPW at the start of the program. The target LPW of the program was a >2x improvement in the LPW efficacy and the overall amount of light to be delivered was relatively high 900 lumens. Despite the extremely difficult challenges associated with scaling up a wet solution process on plastic substrates, the program was able to make substantial progress. A small molecule wet solution process was successfully implemented on plastic substrates with almost no loss in efficiency in transitioning from the laboratory scale glass to large area plastic substrates. By transitioning to a small molecule based process, the LPW entitlement increased from 35 LPW to 60 LPW. A further 10% improvement in outcoupling efficiency was demonstrated via the use of a highly reflecting cathode, which reduced absorptive loss in the OLED device. The calculated potential improvement in some cases is even larger, ~30%, and thus there is considerable room for optimism in improving the net light coupling efficacy, provided absorptive loss mechanisms are eliminated. Further improvements are possible if scattering schemes such as the silver nanowire based hard coat structure are fully developed. The wet coating processes were successfully scaled to large area plastic substrate and resulted in the construction of a 900 lumens luminaire device.

  8. Chemical and physical properties of the normal and aging lens: spectroscopic (UV, fluorescence, phosphorescence, and NMR) analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerman, S.

    1987-01-01

    In vitro [UV absorption, fluorescence, phosphorescence, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)] spectroscopic studies on the normal human lens demonstrate age-related changes which can be correlated with biochemical and photobiologic mechanisms occurring during our lifetime. Chronic cumulative UV exposure results in an age-related increase of photochemically induced chromophores and in color of the lens nucleus. This enables the lens to filter the incident UV radiation, thereby protecting the underlying aging retina from UV photodamage. We have measured the age-related increase in lens fluorescence in vivo on more than 300 normal subjects (1st to 9th decade) by UV slitlamp densitography. These data show a good correlation with the in vitro lens fluorescence studies reported previously and demonstrate that molecular photodamage can be monitored in the lens. In vitro NMR (human and animal lenses) and in vivo experiments currently in progress are rapidly elucidating the physicochemical basis for transparency and the development of light scattering areas. Surface scanning NMR can monitor organophosphate metabolism in the ocular lens in vivo as well as in vitro. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using biophysical methods (optical spectroscopy and NMR analyses) to delineate age-related parameters in the lens, in vivo as well as in vitro. 46 references

  9. Studies on phosphorescence and trapping effects of Mn-doped and undoped zinc germinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Zhiyi [Optoelectronic Institute, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004, Guangxi (China); Department of Physics, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 30460 (United States); Ma, Li [Department of Physics, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 30460 (United States); Wang, Xiaojun, E-mail: xwang@georgiasouthern.edu [Department of Physics, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 30460 (United States); School of Physics, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Photoluminescence and phosphorescence from different recombining centers in the Mn{sup 2+}-doped and undoped Zn{sub 2}GeO{sub 4} phosphors have been observed. By UV excitation the undoped sample presents a broad band of blue–white emission from the host defects while the Mn-doped samples show both the host and Mn{sup 2+} emissions with different phosphorescent durations. At the beginning of UV excitation after the phosphorescence has been exhausted, the fluorescent time dependence of Mn{sup 2+} exhibits a fast decay process to a constant intensity, different from the rising or charging process as the typical behavior for the common persistent phosphors. This unusual behavior was studied using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. A decrease of the EPR signal from Mn{sup 2+} was found for the sample under UV irradiation, suggesting the occurrence of ionization of Mn{sup 2+} to Mn{sup 3+}. A slow recovering process of the ionization has also been detected, which is consistent with the observation of phosphorescence from Mn{sup 2+} doped samples. - Highlights: • Photoluminescence and phosphorescence observed from Mn{sup 2+}-doped and undoped Zn{sub 2}GeO{sub 4}. • Unusual charging process from the common phosphors observed and analyzed. • Photo-stimulated EPR with a slow recovering process of Mn{sup 2+} ionization observed.

  10. Evaluation of OLED and edge-lit LED lighting panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Xi; Narendran, Nadarajah; Zhu, Yiting; Freyssinier, Jean Paul

    2016-09-01

    Solid-state lighting (SSL) offers a new technology platform for lighting designers and end-users to illuminate spaces with low energy demand. Two types of SSL sources include organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). OLED is an area light source, and its primary competing technology is the edge-lit LED panel. Generally, both of these technologies are considered similar in shape and appearance, but there is little understanding of how people perceive discomfort glare from large area light sources. The objective of this study was to evaluate discomfort glare for the two lighting technologies under similar operating conditions by gathering observers' reactions. The human factors study results showed no statistically significant difference in human response to discomfort glare between OLED and edge-lit LED panels when the two light sources produced the same lighting stimulus. This means both technologies appeared equally glary beyond a certain luminance.

  11. OLED Luminaire with Panel Integrated Drivers and Advanced Controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Michael [Acuity Brands Lighting, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Spindler, Jeff [OLEDWorks, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2017-01-31

    For this DOE award, Acuity Brands Lighting developed a novel OLED luminaire system featuring panel-integrated drivers at each individual OLED panel. The luminaire has a base station that receives user commands and performs AC/DC conversion. A power line communication (PLC) protocol is used to provide both power and digital control to each panel. A 66-panel CanvisTM luminaire using state-of-art OLED panels based on this system was successfully constructed. This is a first demonstration of such a luminaire architecture. It is also the first known implementation of this number of independently addressable nodes with a PLC protocol. This luminaire system architecture has added benefits in the flexibility of using multiple panel vendors for a given product, forward compatibility with future panels, and reduced luminaire wiring complexity and assembly time.

  12. White top emitting OLED with angle independent emission characteristic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomschke, Michael; Freitag, Patricia; Schwartz, Gregor; Nitsche, Robert; Walzer, Karsten; Leo, Karl [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Angewandte Photophysik, Georg-Baehr-Strasse 1, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The general device structure of a top emitting organic light emitting diode (OLED) consists of several organic layers sandwiched in between two metal contacts, with the top one being semitransparent for light outcoupling reasons. Due to the high reflectivity of the electrodes, strong microcavity effects occur which lead to a preferred emission of light of a certain wavelength with main outcoupling in forward direction. This creates rather narrow emission bands, accompanied by strong spectral shifts upon viewing angle variation. By using an organic capping layer on top of the semitransparent metal contact, this unwanted effect can be reduced. This is important especially for white light emission for the use of OLEDs in future lighting applications. Our optical simulations show that the strong angular dependence of the emission color almost vanishes. To verify the simulations we study white top emitting OLEDs based on an approach which are adapted to the top emitting case.

  13. Transparency of Banking Supervisors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liedorp, Franka; Mosch, Robert; van der Cruijsen, Carin; de Haan, Jakob

    Following Eijffinger and Geraats (2006), this paper constructs an index of transparency of banking supervisors that takes political, economic, procedural, policy, and operational transparency into account. Based on a survey, the index is constructed for 24 banking supervisors. The average score is

  14. Epilogue: degrees of transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengeveld, K.

    2011-01-01

    In this epilogue the results of the analyses of four different languages in the preceding papers are compared. It is shown that the degrees of transparency of these languages can be represented on an implicational scale, and that the features themselves can be ranked on a transparency scale as well.

  15. On color transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, B.K.; Miller, G.A.

    1989-10-01

    A quantum mechanical treatment of high momentum transfer nuclear processes is presented. Color transparency, the suppression of initial and final state interaction effects, is shown to arise from using the closure approximation. New conditions for the appearance of color transparency are derived

  16. Understanding modern transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/172436729

    2009-01-01

    Proponents and opponents fiercely debate whether computer-mediated transparency has a positive effect on trust in the public sector. This article enhances our understanding of transparency by presenting three perspectives: a premodern, modern and post-modern perspective, and analyzing the basic

  17. Introduction: The Transparency Issue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teurlings, J.; Stauff, M.

    2014-01-01

    Besides giving an overview on the individual contributions, this introduction to the special issue on transparency delineates a conceptual context for a critical analysis of the contemporary discourse on transparency and the media mechanisms related to it. It focuses on three ambivalences inherent

  18. EU Transparency Register

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mańko, R.; Thiel, M.; Bauer, E.

    2014-01-01

    Widespread lobbying in the EU institutions has led to criticism regarding the transparency and accountability of the EU's decision-making process. In response to these concerns, the Parliament set up its transparency register in 1995, followed by the Commission in 2008. The two institutions merged

  19. Advice on Admissions Transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Government Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency, 2018

    2018-01-01

    Admissions transparency means that prospective domestic undergraduate students can easily find good quality admissions information that allows them to compare courses and providers and make informed study choices. In October 2016 the Higher Education Standards Panel (HESP) made recommendations to achieve greater transparency in higher education…

  20. Privacy transparency patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siljee B.I.J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes two privacy patterns for creating privacy transparency: the Personal Data Table pattern and the Privacy Policy Icons pattern, as well as a full overview of privacy transparency patterns. It is a first step in creating a full set of privacy design patterns, which will aid

  1. Peering into Transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Thøger; Cheney, George

    and trustworthy knowledge about contemporary organizations, the transparency discourse has significant democratic potential. Yet, its most common operationalization – as information availability – reinstalls a “purified” notion of communication devoid of mystery, inaccuracy and misrepresentation. In this paper......The current emphasis on organizational and institutional transparency – driven by NGOs, inquisitive media, critical investors and other engaged stakeholders – signifies a growing demand for insight, clarity, participation and democracy. Holding the promise of improved access to valid......, we apply transparency to itself by unpacking its implicit model of communication and critiquing its ignorance towards the representative nature of current transparency practices. The critique unfolds the ambiguous nature of the transparency pursuit and demonstrates how its desire for insight, clarity...

  2. Very high efficiency phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices by using rough indium tin oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Aziz, Hany

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) is shown to significantly depend on the roughness of the indium tin oxide (ITO) anode. By using rougher ITO, light trapped in the ITO/organic wave-guided mode can be efficiently extracted, and a light outcoupling enhancement as high as 40% is achieved. Moreover, contrary to expectations, the lifetime of OLEDs is not affected by ITO roughness. Finally, an OLED employing rough ITO anode that exhibits a current efficiency of 56 cd/A at the remarkably high brightness of 10 5  cd/m 2 is obtained. This represents the highest current efficiency at such high brightness to date for an OLED utilizing an ITO anode, without any external light outcoupling techniques. The results demonstrate the significant efficiency benefits of using ITO with higher roughness in OLEDs.

  3. Very high efficiency phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices by using rough indium tin oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Aziz, Hany, E-mail: h2aziz@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2014-07-07

    The efficiency of organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) is shown to significantly depend on the roughness of the indium tin oxide (ITO) anode. By using rougher ITO, light trapped in the ITO/organic wave-guided mode can be efficiently extracted, and a light outcoupling enhancement as high as 40% is achieved. Moreover, contrary to expectations, the lifetime of OLEDs is not affected by ITO roughness. Finally, an OLED employing rough ITO anode that exhibits a current efficiency of 56 cd/A at the remarkably high brightness of 10{sup 5} cd/m{sup 2} is obtained. This represents the highest current efficiency at such high brightness to date for an OLED utilizing an ITO anode, without any external light outcoupling techniques. The results demonstrate the significant efficiency benefits of using ITO with higher roughness in OLEDs.

  4. Ole Rømer som enevældens administrator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olden-Jørgensen, Sebastian

    2004-01-01

    En biografisk skitse af Ole Rømers virke med vægt på hans rolle som embedsmand og rådgiver for Christian V. Hans virke analyseres på baggrund af en ny forståelse for den tidlige enevældes politiske kultur.......En biografisk skitse af Ole Rømers virke med vægt på hans rolle som embedsmand og rådgiver for Christian V. Hans virke analyseres på baggrund af en ny forståelse for den tidlige enevældes politiske kultur....

  5. Ole Bjørn Kraft 1893-1980

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Christian Houlberg

    2010-01-01

    Ole Bjørn Kraft (1893-1980) var en central konservativ politiker i årene før og efter anden verdenskrig. Han markerede sig som udpræget idépolitiker og opnåede ad flere omgange at blive minister.......Ole Bjørn Kraft (1893-1980) var en central konservativ politiker i årene før og efter anden verdenskrig. Han markerede sig som udpræget idépolitiker og opnåede ad flere omgange at blive minister....

  6. Active-matrix OLED (AMOLED) microdisplay for augmented-reality applications with improved color space

    OpenAIRE

    Thomschke, Michael; Fehse, Karsten; Richter, Bernd; Wartenberg, Philipp; Pfeifer, Richard; Vogel, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Our contribution describes the optimization of OLED microdisplays to increase the color gamut and to reduce the OLED complexity. We show that these improvements can be reached by a 3-color RGB-white OLED approach that features a single layer multicolor emitting zone, respectively.

  7. Host-free, yellow phosphorescent material in white organic light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Meng-Ting; Chu, Miao-Tsai; Lin, Jin-Sheng; Tseng, Mei-Rurng, E-mail: osolomio.ac89g@nctu.edu.t [Material and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI), Hsinchu, Taiwan 310 (China)

    2010-11-10

    A white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with a high power efficiency has been demonstrated by dispersing a host-free, yellow phosphorescent material in between double blue phosphorescent emitters. The device performance achieved a comparable value to that of using a complicated host-guest doping system to form the yellow emitter in WOLEDs. Based on this device concept as well as the molecular engineering of blue phosphorescent host material and light-extraction film, a WOLED with a power efficiency of 65 lm W{sup -1} at a practical brightness of 1000 cd m{sup -2} with Commission Internationale d'Echariage coordinates (CIE{sub x,y}) of (0.37, 0.47) was achieved. (fast track communication)

  8. White organic light emitting devices with hybrid emissive layers combining phosphorescence and fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei Gangtie; Chen Xiaolan; Wang Lei; Zhu Meixiang; Zhu Weiguo [Key Lab of Environmental-friendly Chemistry and Application of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China); Wang Liduo; Qiu Yong [Key Lab of Organic-Optoelectronics and Molecular Sciences of Ministry of Education, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: lgt@xtu.edu.cn

    2008-05-21

    We fabricated a white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) by hybrid emissive layers which combined phosphorescence with fluorescence. In this device, the thin layer of 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-(t-butyl)-6-(1, 1, 7, 7-tetramethyljulolidyl-9-enyl)-4H-pyran played the role of undoped red emissive layer which was inserted between two blue phosphorescence emissive layers. The blue phosphorescent dye was bis[(4, 6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N, C{sup 2}] (picolinato) Ir(III), which was doped in the host material, N, N'-dicarbazolyl-1, 4-dimethene-benzene. The WOLED showed stable Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage coordinates and a high efficency of 9.6 cd A{sup -1} when the current density was 1.8 A m{sup -2}. The maximum luminance of the device achieved was 17 400 cd m{sup -2} when the current density was 3000 A m{sup -2}.

  9. Dominant investors and strategic transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perotti, E.C.; von Thadden, E.-L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper studies product market competition under a strategic transparency decision. Dominant investors can influence information collection in the financial market, and thereby corporate transparency, by affecting market liquidity or the cost of information collection. More transparency on a

  10. Dominant investors and strategic transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perotti, E.C.; von Thadden, E.-L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper studies product market competition under a strategic transparency decision. Dominant investors can influence information collection in the financial market, and thereby corporate transparency, by affecting market liquidity or the cost of information collection. More transparency on a

  11. Transparent lithium-ion batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Y.; Jeong, S.; Hu, L.; Wu, H.; Lee, S. W.; Cui, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Transparent devices have recently attracted substantial attention. Various applications have been demonstrated, including displays, touch screens, and solar cells; however, transparent batteries, a key component in fully integrated transparent

  12. Enhanced performance of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and OLED-based photoluminescent sensing platforms by novel microstructures and device architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rui [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    After a general introduction to OLEDs and OLED-based PL sensors, the transient emission mechanism of guest-host OLEDs is described both experimentally and theoretically. A monolithic and easy-to-apply process is demonstrated for fabricating multicolor microcavity OLEDs (that improve the sensor platform). The outcoupling issues of OLEDs at the substrate/air interface are addressed by using a microstructured polymer film resulting from a PS and polyethylene glycol (PEG) mixture. Based on the understanding of OLEDs and their improvement, research was done in order to realize integrated all organic-based O2 and pH sensors with improved signal intensity and sensitivity. The sensor design modification and optimization are summarized

  13. [Kas sa Tammsaaret oled lugenud? Kirjanduslik eluloovestlus Helga Nõuga

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2015-01-01

    Tutvustus: Kas sa Tammsaaret oled lugenud? : kirjanduslik eluloovestlus Helga Nõuga : [pühendatud Helga Nõu 80. sünnipäevale] / koostaja Rutt Hinrikus. Tartu : Eesti Kirjandusmuuseumi Teaduskirjastus, 2014 ; Helga Nõu. Valetaja : mälestused, tõeotsimised. Tallinn : Eesti Ajalehed, 2011

  14. Prevention of short circuits in solution-processed OLED devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jolt Oostra, A.; Blom, P.W.M.; Michels, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Pinholes in the emitting layer of an organic light emitting diode (OLED), e.g. induced by particle contamination or processing flaws, lead to direct contact between the hole-injection layer (HIL) and the cathode. The resulting short circuits give rise to catastrophic device failure. We demonstrate

  15. Een blik in het binnenste van een witte oled

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bobbert, P.A.; Coehoorn, R.

    2013-01-01

    Witte organische iicht-emitterende diodes (oleds) voor verlichting hebben organische lagen van siechts enkele nanometers dik. Om de efficiëntie en stabiliteit te kunnen verbeteren, moeten we te weten komen waar bet licht precies wordt geëmitteerd. Reconstructie van bet emissieprofiel uit de gemeten

  16. Ole Ivar Lovaas--His Life, Merits and Legacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özerk, Kamil; Vea, Gunvor Dalby; Eikeseth, Svein; Özerk, Meral

    2016-01-01

    Ole Ivar Lovaas (1927-2010) is known worldwide for his research within the field of Applied Behavior Analysis, and is probably the most influential researcher within the field of treatment of children with autism. In the first part of this biographically oriented paper, we inform the readers about his family background, childhood, elementary and…

  17. Linnugripp ei ole biorelv / Kevin Probert-Ehaver

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Probert-Ehaver, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Vastukaja 10. juulil Eesti Ekspressis ilmunud artiklile "Linnugripp - surm katseklaasist", milles väidetakse, et linnugripp ning teised uued nakkushaigused on biorelvad. Kriisireguleerimise konsultant selgitab, et nii Eesti kui ka Ameerika spetsialistide hinnangul ei ole linnugripp kuidagi seotud biorelvade programmiga

  18. Development of a charge transport model for white OLEDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are promising candidates for future lighting applications since they can be made ultra-thin, color-tunable and exible. Improving their e??ciency is an important challenge in the ??eld of organic electronics. The availability of a device model can make the

  19. Simulations, measurements, and optimization of OLEDs with scattering layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altazin, S.; Reynaud, C.; Mayer, U.M.; Lanz, T.; Lapagna, K.; Knaack, R.; Peninck, L.; Kirsch, C.; Pernstich, K.P.; Harkema, S.; Hermes, D.; Ruhstaller, B.

    2015-01-01

    A multi-scale optical model for organic light-emitting devices containing scattering layers is presented. This model describes the radiation of embedded oscillating dipoles and scattering from spherical particles. After successful model validation with experiments on a top-emitting white OLED, we

  20. The influence of different cyclometalated ligand substituents and ancillary ligand on the phosphorescent properties of iridium(III) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qing; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Li, E-mail: chemwangl@henu.edu.cn; Zhang, Jinglai, E-mail: zhangjinglai@henu.edu.cn

    2016-07-01

    Four iridium(III) complexes, (dfpmpy){sub 2}Ir(pic), (1), (dfpmpy){sub 2}Ir(EO{sub 2}-pic) (2), (dfpmpy){sub 2}Ir(pic-N-O) (3), and (dfpmpy){sub 2}Ir(EO{sub 2}-pic-N-O) (4) (dfpmpy = 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)-4-methylpyridine, pic = picolinic acid, EO{sub 2}-pic = 4-(2-ethoxyethoxy) picolinic acid, pic-N-O = picolinic acid N-oxide, and EO{sub 2}-pic-N-O = 4-(2-ethoxyethoxy) picolinic acid N-oxide) are investigated by means of the density functional theory/time-dependent density functional theory (DFT/TD-DFT) to explore the influence of the ancillary ligand on the electronic structures, phosphorescent properties, and organic light-emitting diode (OLED) performance. Employing pic-N-O and EO{sub 2}-pic-N-O as the ancillary ligands would decrease the vertical energy and result in the red-shifted wavelength. Then, other four iridium(III) complexes (2a-2d) (See Scheme 1) are designed by introduction of the phenyl and −CHO substituents on the pyridine ring and phenyl ring of complex 2, respectively. As compared with complex 2, theoretical results show that newly designed complexes 2a-2c might be potential candidates for blue-emitting phosphors with better/comparable quantum yield and Δλ. Moreover, the performance of complexes 2a and 2c, i.e., introducing phenyl on the para-position of pyridine ring and phenyl ring in dfpmpy ligand, are better than that of 2b. - Highlights: • The structure-property relationship of Ir(III) complexes are investigated. • The effect of different substituents/positions on properties is explored. • Do the emissions follow the Kasha or non-Kasha scenario? • Newly possible blue-emitting Ir(III) complexes are theoretically designed.

  1. A Dictionary for Transparency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kouzes, Richard T.

    2001-11-15

    There are many terms that are used in association with the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Transparency Project associated with the Mayak Fissile Materials Storage Facility. This is a collection of proposed definitions of these terms.

  2. Subscribing to Transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Yinghua; Nielsson, Ulf; Guo, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The paper empirically explores how more trade transparency affects market liquidity. The analysis takes advantage of a unique setting in which the Shanghai Stock Exchange offered more trade transparency to market participants subscribing to a new software package. First, the results show...... that the additional data disclosure increased trading activity, but also increased transactions costs through wider bid-ask spreads. Thus, in contrast to popular policy belief, the paper finds that more transparency need not improve market liquidity. Second, the paper finds a particularly strong immediate liquidity...... impact accompanied by altered trading behavior, which suggests a significant impact on institutional traders subscribing relatively early. Lastly, since the effective level of market transparency is bound to depend on how many traders are subscribing to the data, the study can empirically establish...

  3. Color transparency study group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, J.A.; Pordes, S.; Botts, J.; Bunce, G.; Farrar, G.

    1990-01-01

    The group studied the relatively new notion of color transparency, discussed present experimental evidence for the effect, and explored several ideas for future experiments. This write-up summarizes these discussions. 11 refs., 1 fig

  4. Subscribing to Transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Yinghua; Nielsson, Ulf; Guo, Hong

    The paper empirically explores how more trade transparency affects market liquidity. The analysis takes advantage of a unique setting in which the Shanghai Stock Exchange offered more trade transparency to market participants subscribing to a new software package. First, the results show...... that the additional data disclosure increased trading activity, but also increased transactions costs through wider bid-ask spreads. Thus, in contrast to popular policy belief, the paper finds that more transparency need not improve market liquidity. Second, the paper finds a particularly strong immediate liquidity...... impact accompanied by altered trading behavior, which suggests a significant impact on institutional traders subscribing relatively early. Lastly, since the effective level of market transparency is bound to depend on how many traders are subscribing to the data, the study can empirically establish...

  5. Improved multilayer OLED architecture using evolutionary genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirino, W.G.; Teixeira, K.C.; Legnani, C.; Calil, V.L.; Messer, B.; Neto, O.P. Vilela; Pacheco, M.A.C.; Cremona, M.

    2009-01-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) constitute a new class of emissive devices, which present high efficiency and low voltage operation, among other advantages over current technology. Multilayer architecture (M-OLED) is generally used to optimize these devices, specially overcoming the suppression of light emission due to the exciton recombination near the metal layers. However, improvement in recombination, transport and charge injection can also be achieved by blending electron and hole transporting layers into the same one. Graded emissive region devices can provide promising results regarding quantum and power efficiency and brightness, as well. The massive number of possible model configurations, however, suggests that a search algorithm would be more suitable for this matter. In this work, multilayer OLEDs were simulated and fabricated using Genetic Algorithms (GAs) as evolutionary strategy to improve their efficiency. Genetic Algorithms are stochastic algorithms based on genetic inheritance and Darwinian strife to survival. In our simulations, it was assumed a 50 nm width graded region, divided into five equally sized layers. The relative concentrations of the materials within each layer were optimized to obtain the lower V/J 0.5 ratio, where V is the applied voltage and J the current density. The best M-OLED architecture obtained by genetic algorithm presented a V/J 0.5 ratio nearly 7% lower than the value reported in the literature. In order to check the experimental validity of the improved results obtained in the simulations, two M-OLEDs with different architectures were fabricated by thermal deposition in high vacuum environment. The results of the comparison between simulation and some experiments are presented and discussed.

  6. What color transparency measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, P.; Ralston, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Color transparency is commonly accepted to be a prediction of perturbative QCD. However it is more a phenomenon probing the interface between the perturbative and nonperturbative regimes, leading to some intricacy in its theoretical description. In this paper we study the consequences of the impulse approximation to the theory in various quantum mechanical bases. We show that the fully interacting hadronic basis, which consists of eigenstates of the exact Hamiltonian in the presence of the nucleus, provides a natural basis to study color transparency. In this basis we can relate the quark wave function at a small transverse separation distance b 2 2 directly to transparency ratios measured in experiment. With the formalism, experiment can be used to map out the quark wave function in this region. We exhibit several loopholes in existing arguments predicting a rise in transparency ratios with energy, and suggest alternatives. Among the results, we argue that the theoretical prediction of a rising transparency ratio with energy may be on better footing for heavy-quark bound states than for relativistic light-quark systems. We also point out that transparency ratios can be constant with energy and not at variance with perturbative QCD

  7. Copolymers containing phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes obtained by free and controlled radical polymerization techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulbricht, C.; Becer, C.R.; Winter, A.; Veldman, D.; Schubert, U.S.

    2008-01-01

    A methacrylate-functionalized phosphorescent Ir(III)-complex has been synthesized, characterized, and applied as a monomer in radical copolymerizations. Together with methyl methacrylate, the complex has been copolymerized under free radical polymerization conditions. Aiming for host-guest-systems,

  8. Room temperature phosphorescence study on the structural flexibility of single tryptophan containing proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska-Baron, Agnieszka; Gałęcki, Krystian; Wysocki, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have undertaken efforts to find correlation between phosphorescence lifetimes of single tryptophan containing proteins and some structural indicators of protein flexibility/rigidity, such as the degree of tryptophan burial or its exposure to solvent, protein secondary and tertiary structure of the region of localization of tryptophan as well as B factors for tryptophan residue and its immediate surroundings. Bearing in mind that, apart from effective local viscosity of the protein/solvent matrix, the other factor that concur in determining room temperature tryptophan phosphorescence (RTTP) lifetime in proteins is the extent of intramolecular quenching by His, Cys, Tyr and Trp side chains, the crystallographic structures derived from the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank were also analyzed concentrating on the presence of potentially quenching amino acid side chains in the close proximity of the indole chromophore. The obtained results indicated that, in most cases, the phosphorescence lifetimes of tryptophan containing proteins studied tend to correlate with the above mentioned structural indicators of protein rigidity/flexibility. This correlation is expected to provide guidelines for the future development of phosphorescence lifetime-based method for the prediction of structural flexibility of proteins, which is directly linked to their biological function.

  9. Phosphorescent probes for two-photon microscopy of oxygen (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Sergei A.; Esipova, Tatiana V.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to quantify oxygen in vivo in 3D with high spatial and temporal resolution is much needed in many areas of biological research. Our laboratory has been developing the phosphorescence quenching technique for biological oximetry - an optical method that possesses intrinsic microscopic capability. In the past we have developed dendritically protected oxygen probes for quantitative imaging of oxygen in tissue. More recently we expanded our design on special two-photon enhanced phosphorescent probes. These molecules brought about first demonstrations of the two-photon phosphorescence lifetime microscopy (2PLM) of oxygen in vivo, providing new information for neouroscience and stem cell biology. However, current two-photon oxygen probes suffer from a number of limitations, such as sub-optimal brightness and high cost of synthesis, which dramatically reduce imaging performance and limit usability of the method. In this paper we discuss principles of 2PLM and address the interplay between the probe chemistry, photophysics and spatial and temporal imaging resolution. We then present a new approach to brightly phosphorescent chromophores with internally enhanced two-photon absorption cross-sections, which pave a way to a new generation of 2PLM probes.

  10. Efficient white organic light-emitting diodes based on an orange iridium phosphorescent complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ping; Zhao Li; Duan Yu; Zhao Yi; Xie Wenfa; Xie Guohua; Liu Shiyong; Zhang Liying; Li Bin

    2011-01-01

    Stable and efficient white light emission is obtained by mixing blue fluorescence and orange phosphorescence. The introduction of double exciton blocking layers brings about well confinement of both charge-carriers and excitons in the emission layer. By systematically adjusting blue fluorescent and orange phosphorescent emission layers thickness, carriers in emission zone are balanced, and electrically generated excitons can be efficiently utilized. One white device with power efficiency of 14.4 lm/W at 100 cd/m 2 has excellently stable spectra. The improvement of performance is attributed to efficient utilization of the excitons and more balance of charge-carriers in emission layer. - Highlights: → Stable and efficient white light emission is obtained by mixing blue fluorescence and orange phosphorescence. → White device has power efficiency of 14.4 and 10.1 lm/W obtained at 100 and 1000 cd/m 2 , respectively. → White device has excellently stable spectra over a wide range of luminance. → Singlet and triplet excitons are sufficiently utilized by fluorescent and phosphorescent materials.

  11. Phosphorescence spectroscopy and its application to the study of colloidal dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lettinga, M.P.

    1999-01-01

    The technique of Time-resolved phosphorescence anisotropy (TPA) has been frequently used to study rotational motions of particles on the micro- to millisecond time-scale. The interpretation of the observed TPA signals is, however, not straightforward. The theoretical description of the

  12. Wireless high-speed data transmission with phosphorescent white-light LEDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grubor, J.; Lee, S.C.J.; Langer, K-D.; Koonen, A.M.J.; Walewski, J.

    2007-01-01

    Wireless transmission exceeding 100 Mbit/s is demonstrated using a phosphorescent white-light LED in a lighting-like scenario. The data rate was achieved by detecting the blue part of the optical spectrum and applying discrete multi-tone modulation.

  13. Dielectric impedance and optical performance of quantum dots doped OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobin, Marc; Pellodi, Cédric; Emmenegger, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the effect of the incorporation of CdSe quantum dots (QD) in the standard ITO/TPD/Alq3/Al organic light emitting diodes (OLED's). The OLED's structures have been prepared in a double glove box coupled to a vacuum chamber containing both low and high temperature evaporators. For the standard (undoped) OLED's, the hole transport layer (HTL) consisting of 50nm of TPD is deposited by spin coating (8000rpm during 60 sec) and the 40nm of Alq3 were deposited at 2A/sec (organic crucible Radak-I). 150nm of Al were finally evaporated at 5A/s. For the CdSe-doped OLED's, the procedure was the same expect that the QD's were mixed with TPD in toluene before spin coating. During the thermal processing if the film, the QD's are expected to segregate to the surface, and then will be located at the TPD/Alq3 interface. The various layers were imaged by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) at each phase of the structure deposition, and we could indeed visualize the segregated QD's above the TPD film. AFM was systematically used to monitor the homogeneity and the thickness of the various films. The impedance of the non-encapsulated films structures were measured in air in the 40-40MHz frequency range, with bias at 0V (non-emitting), 2V (low emission) and 8V (strong emission). The corresponding dielectric spectra were analyzed with the standard Havriliak-Negami (HV) formula, where the conductive term has been subtracted from the data in case of light emission. We have measured a relaxation ranging from 100kHZ for the unbiased structure to 1MHz for 8V (strong emission). Apart from this expected relaxation, we found a second relaxation mechanism around 10 MHz. The origin of this second peak will be discussed. To monitor the optical emission of the OLED's, we have built a specific bench which allows for the quantitative measurement of the emission spectra and the dynamics behavior of the OLED's (raising and falling time). We found that the incorporation of the QD's unfortunately

  14. Limits of transparency of transparent conducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peelaers, Hartwin

    A fundamental understanding of the factors that limit transparency in transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) is essential for further progress in materials and applications. These materials have a sufficiently large band gap, so that direct optical transitions do not lead to absorption of light within the visible spectrum. Since the presence of free carriers is essential for conductivity and thus for device applications, this introduces the possibility of additional absorption processes. In particular, indirect processes are possible, and these will constitute a fundamental limit of the material. The Drude theory is widely used to describe free-carrier absorption, but it is phenomenological in nature and tends to work poorly at shorter wavelengths, where band-structure effects are important. We will present calculations of phonon- and defect-assisted free-carrier absorption in a TCO completely from first principles. We will focus in detail on SnO2, but the methodology is general and we will also compare the results obtained for other TCO materials such as In2O3. These calculations provide not just quantitative results but also deeper insights in the mechanisms that govern absorption processes, which is essential for engineering improved materials to be used in more efficient devices. This work was performed in collaboration with E. Kioupakis and C.G. Van de Walle and was supported by ARO and NSF.

  15. Supporting Transparency between Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Christian

    The paper presents the results of a case study that explores the potentials of weblogs and social bookmarking to support transparency in a university course. In the course, groups of students used weblogs and social bookmarking in their work. The objective of the case was to empower students...... by providing them with tools that would be visible to the other students in the course, thus, making students’ ideas, thoughts and questions visible to the other students in the course. The paper concludes that use of digital media for transparency can support empowerment of students and inspiration among...... students in a course, but that the challenge is to create a balance between personal tools and tools for collaborative group work that are also suitable for transparency between students....

  16. An Approach for Measuring the Dielectric Strength of OLED Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujith Sudheendran Swayamprabha

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Surface roughness of electrodes plays a key role in the dielectric breakdown of thin-film organic devices. The rate of breakdown will increase when there are stochastic sharp spikes on the surface of electrodes. Additionally, surface having spiking morphology makes the determination of dielectric strength very challenging, specifically when the layer is relatively thin. We demonstrate here a new approach to investigate the dielectric strength of organic thin films for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs. The thin films were deposited on a substrate using physical vapor deposition (PVD under high vacuum. The device architectures used were glass substrate/indium tin oxide (ITO/organic material/aluminum (Al and glass substrate/Al/organic material/Al. The dielectric strength of the OLED materials was evaluated from the measured breakdown voltage and layer thickness.

  17. Voluntarism and transparent deliberation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steglich-Petersen, Asbjørn

    2006-01-01

    It is widely assumed that doxastic deliberation is transparent to the factual question of the truth of the proposition being considered for belief, and that this sets doxastic deliberation apart from practical deliberation. This feature is frequently invoked in arguments against doxastic voluntar......It is widely assumed that doxastic deliberation is transparent to the factual question of the truth of the proposition being considered for belief, and that this sets doxastic deliberation apart from practical deliberation. This feature is frequently invoked in arguments against doxastic...

  18. La felicidad de los españoles: Factores explicativos

    OpenAIRE

    Namkee Ahn; F. Mochón

    2007-01-01

    El presente trabajo analiza los factores explicativos de la felicidad de los españoles. Los resultados son consistentes con lo establecido por la literatura disponible. Los divorciados y los viudos son notablemente más infelices que los casados, el desempleo a aparece fuertemente correlacionado con la infelicidad, la felicidad aumenta con la renta de forma decreciente, la salud tiene una notable incidencia en la felicidad y la religión se correlaciona positivamente con la felicidad. La inclus...

  19. Singlet and Triplet Excitation Management in a Bichromophoric Near-Infrared-Phosphorescent BODIPY-Benzoporphyrin Platinum Complex

    KAUST Repository

    Whited, Matthew T.; Djurovich, Peter I.; Roberts, Sean T.; Durrell, Alec C.; Schlenker, Cody W.; Bradforth, Stephen E.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    efficient near-infrared phosphorescence (λem = 772 nm, φ = 0.26). Taken together, these studies show that appropriately designed triplet-utilizing arrays may overcome fundamental limitations typically associated with core-shell chromophores by tunable

  20. Los españoles más viajeros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Callejo Gallego

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A partir de una explotación específica de los datos aportados por la encuesta que en mayor medida recoge las actividades y movimientos turísticos de los españoles, Familitur (dirigida por el Instituto de Estudios Turísticos, se analiza el comportamiento de aquellos españoles que registran una mayor frecuencia de viajes a lo largo del año. La perspectiva de tal aproximación es inicialmente descriptiva: conocer hasta qué punto configuran un perfil social diferenciado o realizan otro tipo de viajes. Es decir, hasta qué punto se diferencian de los otros españoles, más allá de la diferencia que les singulariza como más viajeros. Pero también se intenta, con los límites derivados de las características de los datos obtenidos, avanzar explicaciones sobre tal diferenciación.

  1. Transfer mechanisms between emitter molecules for OLED applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbacher, Frank [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Chiu, Chien-Shu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany); Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Krause, Ralf; Hunze, Arvid [Siemens AG, CT MM 1, Erlangen (Germany); Winnacker, Albrecht [Department of Materials Science VI, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Within the last few years white organic light emitting diodes based on small molecules have shown the potential to have a promising future in the field of lighting technology. Nevertheless there is still room for improvement of the overall efficiency and lifetime of white OLEDs. A deeper understanding of the energy transfer mechanisms between different matrix and emitter molecules used in the OLED stack concept can help to optimize the layout and reduce driving voltage thus increasing the power efficiency and color stability of the device. To simplify the complex interactions within a complete white OLED we start out with a basic model system only containing the molecules of interest. This enables us to predict the fundamental concepts causing the behavior of more intricate systems. Using photoluminescence, excitation spectra and time-resolved photoluminescence we investigated the exciton transfer between different dyes for a variety of emitter systems. Our results indicate a dependence of exciton transfer probability on the total concentrations and therefore the distance between the molecules involved.

  2. Life prediction for white OLED based on LSM under lognormal distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianping; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yu; Wu, Helen; Zhu, Wenqing; Wu, Wenli; Wu, Liang

    2012-09-01

    In order to acquire the reliability information of White Organic Light Emitting Display (OLED), three groups of OLED constant stress accelerated life tests (CSALTs) were carried out to obtain failure data of samples. Lognormal distribution function was applied to describe OLED life distribution, and the accelerated life equation was determined by Least square method (LSM). The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was performed to verify whether the white OLED life meets lognormal distribution or not. Author-developed software was employed to predict the average life and the median life. The numerical results indicate that the white OLED life submits to lognormal distribution, and that the accelerated life equation meets inverse power law completely. The estimated life information of the white OLED provides manufacturers and customers with important guidelines.

  3. The Causes of Fiscal Transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alt, James E.; Lassen, David Dreyer; Rose, Shanna

    We use unique panel data on the evolution of transparent budget procedures in the American states over the past three decades to explore the political and economic determinants of fiscal transparency. Our case studies and quantitative analysis suggest that both politics and fiscal policy outcomes...... influence the level of transparency. More equal political competition and power sharing are associated with both greater levels of fiscal transparency and increases in fiscal transparency during the sample period. Political polarization and past fiscal conditions, in particular state government debt...... and budget imbalance, also appear to affect the level of transparency...

  4. Transparency and imaginary colors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richards, W.; Koenderink, J.J.; Van Doorn, A.

    2009-01-01

    Unlike the Metelli monochrome transparencies, when overlays and their backgrounds have chromatic content, the inferred surface colors may not always be physically realizable, and are in some sense “imaginary.” In these cases, the inferred chromatic transmittance or reflectance of the overlay lies

  5. Complicating Methodological Transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges-Rhoads, Sarah; Van Cleave, Jessica; Hughes, Hilary E.

    2016-01-01

    A historical indicator of the quality, validity, and rigor of qualitative research has been the documentation and disclosure of the behind-the-scenes work of the researcher. In this paper, we use what we call "methodological data" as a tool to complicate the possibility and desirability of such transparency. Specifically, we draw on our…

  6. Transparency for international trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. R. Lakin; G. A. Fowler; W. D. Bailey; J. Cavey; P. Lehtonen

    2003-01-01

    U.S. Department of Agriculture - Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service - Plant Protection and Quarantine (USDA-APHIS-PPQ) has developed a Regulated Plant Pest List (RPPL). This provides trading partners with an official list of plant pests of concern to the U.S., along with providing greater transparency of Agency actions.

  7. The Mediated Transparent Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, Lise

    2001-01-01

    in the mediated transparent society. The paper concludes that, based on these analyses, the mediated panopticism working on the business segment is not an effective disciplinary apparatus, which can guarantee that business corporations are carrying out important ecological or ethical improvements....

  8. Remote Monitoring Transparency Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhoruchkin, V.K.; Shmelev, V.M.; Roumiantsev, A.N.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the Remote Monitoring Transparency Program is to evaluate and demonstrate the use of remote monitoring technologies to advance nonproliferation and transparency efforts that are currently being developed by Russia and the United States without compromising the national security to the participating parties. Under a lab-to-lab transparency contract between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Kurchatov Institute (KI RRC), the Kurchatov Institute will analyze technical and procedural aspects of the application of remote monitoring as a transparency measure to monitor inventories of direct- use HEU and plutonium (e.g., material recovered from dismantled nuclear weapons). A goal of this program is to assist a broad range of political and technical experts in learning more about remote monitoring technologies that could be used to implement nonproliferation, arms control, and other security and confidence building measures. Specifically, this program will: (1) begin integrating Russian technologies into remote monitoring systems; (2) develop remote monitoring procedures that will assist in the application of remote monitoring techniques to monitor inventories of HEU and Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons; and (3) conduct a workshop to review remote monitoring fundamentals, demonstrate an integrated US/Russian remote monitoring system, and discuss the impacts that remote monitoring will have on the national security of participating countries

  9. Phosphorescence quantum yield determination with time-gated fluorimeter and Tb(III)-acetylacetonate as luminescence reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Regensburg, Universitätsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► Procedure for absolute phosphorescence quantum yield measurement is described. ► Experimental setup for absolute luminescence quantum yield standard calibration. ► Tb(acac){sub 3} proposed as phosphorescence quantum yield reference standard. ► Luminescence quantum yield of Tb(acac){sub 3} in cyclohexane measured. ► Luminescence lifetime of Tb(acac){sub 3} in cyclohexane measured. - Abstract: Phosphorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent and phosphorescent samples require the use of time-gated fluorimeters in order to discriminate against the fluorescence contribution. As reference standard a non-fluorescent luminescent compound is needed for absolute phosphorescence quantum yield determination. For this purpose the luminescence behavior of the rare earth chelate terbium(III)-acetylacetonate (Tb(acac){sub 3}) was studied (determination of luminescence quantum yield and luminescence lifetime). The luminescence quantum yield of Tb(acac){sub 3} was determined by using an external light source and operating the fluorimeter in chemo/bioluminescence mode with a fluorescent dye (rhodamine 6G in methanol) as reference standard. A procedure is developed for absolute luminescence (phosphorescence) quantum yield determination of samples under investigation with a time-gated fluorimeter using a non-fluorescent luminescent compound of known luminescence quantum yield and luminescence lifetime.

  10. Compact and efficient method of RGB to RGBW data conversion for OLED microdisplays

    OpenAIRE

    Can, Chi

    2012-01-01

    Colour Electronic Information Displays (EIDs) typically consist of pixels that are made up of red, green and blue (RGB) subpixels. A recent technology, Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED), offers the potential to create a superior EID. OLED is already suitable for use in small displays and microdisplays for personal electronics products. OLED microdisplays, in particular, exhibit lower power consumption than equivalent direct-view panels thus enabling microdisplay-based persona...

  11. Recent advances in AM OLED technologies for application to aerospace and military systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Kalluri R.; Roush, Jerry; Chanley, Charles

    2012-06-01

    While initial AM OLED products have been introduced in the market about a decade ago, truly successful commercialization of OLEDs has started only a couple of years ago, by Samsung Mobile Display (SMD), with small high performance displays for smart phone applications. This success by Samsung has catalyzed significant interest in AM OLED technology advancement and commercialization by other display manufacturers. Currently, significant manufacturing capacity for AM OLED displays is being established by the industry to serve the growing demand for these displays. The current development in the AM OLED industry are now focused on the development and commercialization of medium size (~10") AM OLED panels for Tablet PC applications and large size (~55") panels for TV applications. This significant progress in commercialization of AM OLED technology is enabled by major advances in various enabling technologies that include TFT backplanes, OLED materials and device structures and manufacturing know-how. In this paper we will discuss these recent advances, particularly as they relate to supporting high performance applications such as aerospace and military systems, and then discuss the results of the OLED testing for aerospace applications.

  12. Studying the Attribution of LiF in OLED by the - Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-lin Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The organic light-emitting device (OLED with simple structures of indium tin oxide (ITO/tris(8-quinolinolato aluminum (Alq3/LiF/Al and ITO/Alq3/Al was fabricated to analyze the contribution of LiF in OLED. We used the - characteristics to investigate the contribution of LiF in OLED and found that the capacitance of the above-mentioned structures was 12.5 nF and 77.5 nF, respectively. It is shown that the LiF layer affects the property of OLED resulting in the change of the capacitance of the device.

  13. Efficient p-phenylene based OLEDs with mixed interfacial exciplex emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data, P.; Motyka, R.; Lapkowski, M.; Suwinski, J.; Jursenas, S.; Kreiza, G.; Miasojedovas, A.; Monkman, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Organic electronics, mainly due to the advancement of OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diode) technology, is a fast developing research area, and has already revolutionized the displays market. This direction presents the use of exciplex emitters and thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) in OLEDs. This is shown through electrochemical characterisation of six p-phenylene derivatives for application in optoelectronic devices and presents the possibility the compounds’ use as OLED emitters. In these OLED devices, it is established that selenophene based compounds with a “heavy-atom effect” can be used as potential emitters when exciplex phenomena are involved.

  14. File: nuclear safety and transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, J.P.; Etchegoyen, A.; Jeandron, C.

    2001-01-01

    Several experiences of nuclear safety and transparency are related in this file. Public information, access to documents, transparency in nuclear regulation are such subjects developed in this debate. (N.C.)

  15. Transparent Armor Cost Benefit Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prokurat Franks, Lisa; Holm, David; Barnak, Rick

    2006-01-01

    ...; the increase in demand for transparent gun shields in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and early versions of jerry-rigged shields used in OIF, including Pope glass and Transparent Armored Gun Shields (TAGS...

  16. Determination of DNA by solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence enhancing method based on the Morin.SiO2 luminescent nanoparticles-Pd system as a phosphorescence probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiaming; Yang Tianlong; Gao Fei; Hu Lixiang; He Hangxia; Liu Qinying; Liu Zhenbo; Huang Xiaomei; Zhu Guohui

    2006-01-01

    Sodium carbonate (Na 2 SiO 3 ) as the precursor, was mixed with Morin organic dye to synthesize silicon dioxide luminescent nanoparticles containing Morin (Morin.SiO 2 ) by sol-gel method. The particle sizes of SiO 2 .nH 2 O and Morin.SiO 2 were both 50 nm, measured with TEM (transmission electron microscope). Morin.SiO 2 modified by HS-CH 2 COOH could be dissolved by water. In the HMTA (hexamethylenetetramine)-HCl buffer solution, Pd 2+ could coordinate with Morin in Morin.SiO 2 to form complex Pd 2+ -Morin.SiO 2 , which could emit phosphorescence on polyamide membrane. And DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) could cause a sharp enhancement of the room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) intensity of complex Pd 2+ -Morin.SiO 2 . Thus a new method of solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence (SS-RTP) enhancing for the determination of DNA was established based on the Morin.SiO 2 luminescent nanoparticles-Pd system as a phosphorescence probe. The ΔIp is directly proportional to the content of DNA in the range of 4.00-1000.0 fg spot -1 (corresponding concentration: 0.010-2.50 ng ml -1 ). The regression equation of working curve was ΔIp = 21.13 + 0.2076m DNA (fg spot -1 ) (r = 0.9990) and the detection limit was 0.61 fg spot -1 (corresponding concentration: 1.5 pg ml -1 ). This method had a wide linear range, high sensitivity, convenience, rapidity and only a little sample was needed. Samples containing 0.10 and 25.0 ng ml -1 DNA were measured repeatedly for 11 times and RSDs were 3.2 and 4.1% (n = 11), respectively, which indicated that the method had a good repeatability. Disturbance of common ions, such as Mg 2+ , K + , and Ca 2+ , was small, and there was no disturbance in the presence of protein and RNA. This method has been applied to the determination of DNA in nectar successfully

  17. A specific Tween-80-Rhodamine S-MWNTs phosphorescent reagent for the detection of trace calcitonin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jiaming, E-mail: zzsyliujiaming@163.com [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Zhangzhou Normal College, Zhangzhou, 363000 (China); Huang Xiaomei; Zhang Lihong; Zheng Zhiyong [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Zhangzhou Normal College, Zhangzhou, 363000 (China); Department of Food and Biological Engineering, Zhangzhou Institute of Technology, Zhangzhou, 363000 (China); Lin Xuan; Zhang Xiaoyang; Jiao Li; Cui Malin [Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Zhangzhou Normal College, Zhangzhou, 363000 (China); Jiang Shulian [Fujian Provincial Bureau of Quality and Technical Supervision, Zhangzhou, 363000 (China); Lin Shaoqin [Department of Biochemistry, Fujian Education College, Fuzhou 350001 (China)

    2012-09-26

    Graphical abstract: A new Tween-80-Rhodamine S-water-soluble multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Tween-80-Rhod.S-MWNTs-EDC-NHS, TRMEN) phosphorescent labelling reagent was developed. High sensitive solid substrate room temperature phosphorescence immunoassay (SSRTPIA) for the determination of calcitonin (CT) in human serum and the prediction of human diseases based on the TRMEN could be used to label anti-calcitonin antibody (Ab{sub CT}) to form the TRMEN-Ab{sub CT} labelling product, which could take high specific immunoreaction with CT causing that the {Delta}I{sub p} of the system was linear to the content of CT. Moreover, the reaction mechanisms of both labelling Ab{sub CT} by TRMEN and SSRTPIA for the determination of trace CT were discussed. This research not only provides a new hormones analysis method, but also expands the application field of MWNTs and promotes the development of SSRTP and IA. --Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A Tween-80-Rhodamine S-multi-walled carbon nanotubes labelling reagent was developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphorescence immunoassay was established for the determination of calcitonin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This method has been applied to determine CT and the prediction of diseases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structure of MWNTs was characterized with SEM and IR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanisms for both determining trace CT and labelling Ab{sub CT} were discussed. - Abstract: The present study proposed a simple sensitive and specific immunoassay for the quantification of calcitonin (CT) in human serum with water-soluble multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). The -COOH group of MWNTs could react with the -NH- group of rhodamine S (Rhod.S) molecules to form Rhod.S-MWNTs, which could emit room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on acetate cellulose membrane (ACM) and react with Tween-80 to form micellar compound. Tween-80-Rhod.S-MWNTs (TRM), as a phosphorescent labelling reagent, could

  18. Triphenylsilane-substituted arenes as host materials for use in green phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jwajin; Lee, Kum Hee; Kim, Young Seok; Lee, Hyun Woo [Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Won [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Kwan, E-mail: kimyk@hongik.ac.kr [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seung Soo, E-mail: ssyoon@skku.edu [Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    We demonstrated triphenylsilane-substituted arenes (1–4) as host materials for green phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes. Particularly, a device using 9,9-dimethyl-2-(triphenylsilyl)-7-[4-(triphenylsilyl)phenyl]-9H-fluorene (compound 4) as the host material with the green phosphorescence dopant bis[2-(1,1′,2′,1′′-terphen-3-yl)pyridinato-C,N]iridium(III) (acetylacetonate) showed the efficient green emission with an external quantum efficiency of 4.64%, a power efficiency of 7.2 lm/W and luminous efficiency of 16.6 cd/A at 20 mA/cm{sup 2}, respectively, with the Commission International de L’Eclairage chromaticity coordinates of (0.33, 0.59) at 8.0 V.

  19. Efficient red phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with double emission layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Khalifa, M; Mazzeo, M; Maiorano, V; Mariano, F; Carallo, S; Melcarne, A; Cingolani, R; Gigli, G

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate efficient red phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with a bipolar emission structure (D-EML) formed by two different layers doped with a red phosphorescent dye. Due to its self-balancing character, the recombination zone is shifted far from the emission/carrier-blocking-layer interfaces. This prevents the accumulation of carriers at the interfaces and reduces the triplet-triplet annihilation, resulting in an improved efficiency of the D-EML device compared with the standard single-EML architecture. However, a current efficiency of 8.4 cd A -1 at 10 mA cm -2 is achieved in the D-EML device compared with 3.7 cd A -1 in the single-EML device

  20. Efficient red phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with double emission layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Khalifa, M; Mazzeo, M; Maiorano, V; Mariano, F; Carallo, S; Melcarne, A; Cingolani, R; Gigli, G [NNL, National Nanotechnology Laboratory of CNR-INFM, Distretto tecnologico ISUFI, Universita del Salento, Italy, Via per Arnesano, Km.5, 73100 Lecce (Italy)], E-mail: mohamed.benkhalifa@unile.it

    2008-08-07

    We demonstrate efficient red phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes with a bipolar emission structure (D-EML) formed by two different layers doped with a red phosphorescent dye. Due to its self-balancing character, the recombination zone is shifted far from the emission/carrier-blocking-layer interfaces. This prevents the accumulation of carriers at the interfaces and reduces the triplet-triplet annihilation, resulting in an improved efficiency of the D-EML device compared with the standard single-EML architecture. However, a current efficiency of 8.4 cd A{sup -1} at 10 mA cm{sup -2} is achieved in the D-EML device compared with 3.7 cd A{sup -1} in the single-EML device.

  1. Imaging of oxygenation in 3D tissue models with multi-modal phosphorescent probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papkovsky, Dmitri B.; Dmitriev, Ruslan I.; Borisov, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    Cell-penetrating phosphorescence based probes allow real-time, high-resolution imaging of O2 concentration in respiring cells and 3D tissue models. We have developed a panel of such probes, small molecule and nanoparticle structures, which have different spectral characteristics, cell penetrating and tissue staining behavior. The probes are compatible with conventional live cell imaging platforms and can be used in different detection modalities, including ratiometric intensity and PLIM (Phosphorescence Lifetime IMaging) under one- or two-photon excitation. Analytical performance of these probes and utility of the O2 imaging method have been demonstrated with different types of samples: 2D cell cultures, multi-cellular spheroids from cancer cell lines and primary neurons, excised slices from mouse brain, colon and bladder tissue, and live animals. They are particularly useful for hypoxia research, ex-vivo studies of tissue physiology, cell metabolism, cancer, inflammation, and multiplexing with many conventional fluorophors and markers of cellular function.

  2. Radiation dosimetry by optically stimulated phosphorescence of CaF2:Mn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, R.

    1974-01-01

    In addition to the light emission which occurs in TL, trapped electrons in CaF 2 :Mn can also be released by stimulation with visible and UV light. The measurement of stimulated light emission is disturbed by illumination. But there is an optically-stimulated phosphorescence, which permits to separate measurement of stimulated light emission and illumination. A theory is given. During illumination a part of the released electrons are captured by flat traps, which are emptied at room temperature. A dose dependent signal can be measured at a defined time after the stimulating pulse of visible light. Dosimeters (CaF 2 :Mn teflon disks) were illuminated by the light of a tungsten lamp. The dose response curve was found to be linear from 1 to 10 5 rads. The response curve obtained for optical stimulation was similar to the TL-response curve. Fading of the optically-stimulated signal was higher than TL-fading. Repeated readings of a single sample are possible. The number of readings is dependent on illumination conditions. Accuracy of sample to sample was about 3.5% (standard deviation). There are two background signals. (1) Post-irradiation phosphorescence occurs. Flat traps are also filled after 60 Co gamma excitation. The measurement of the signal is possible after decay of post-irradiation phosphorescence. (2) There is an optically-excited phosphorescence, which also occurs if all trapped electrons are released. The lower limit of dose measurements is given by deviations of optically-excited emission and the dark-current of the photomultiplier tube. (author)

  3. Integrated luminometer for the determination of trace metals in seawater using fluorescence, phosphorescence and chemiluminescence detection

    OpenAIRE

    Worsfold, P. J.; Achterberg, E. P.; Bowie, A. R.; Cannizzaro, V.; Charles, S.; Costa, J. M.; Dubois, F.; Pereiro, R.; San Vicente, B.; Sanz-Medel, A.; Vandeloise, R.; Donckt, E. Vander; Wollast, P.; Yunus, S.

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes an integrated luminometer able to perform fluorescence (FL), room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) and chemiluminescence (CL) measurements on seawater samples. The technical details of the instrumentation are presented together with flow injection (FI) manifolds for the determination of cadmium and zinc (by FL), lead (RTP) and cobalt (CL). The analytical figures of merit are given for each mainfold and results are presented for the determination of the four trace metals i...

  4. Certificate Transparency with Privacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eskandarian Saba

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Certificate transparency (CT is an elegant mechanism designed to detect when a certificate authority (CA has issued a certificate incorrectly. Many CAs now support CT and it is being actively deployed in browsers. However, a number of privacy-related challenges remain. In this paper we propose practical solutions to two issues. First, we develop a mechanism that enables web browsers to audit a CT log without violating user privacy. Second, we extend CT to support non-public subdomains.

  5. Transparent conducting oxide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivov, Yahya; Singh, Vivek; Ding, Yuchen; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-09-01

    Thin film or porous membranes made of hollow, transparent, conducting oxide (TCO) nanotubes, with high chemical stability, functionalized surfaces and large surface areas, can provide an excellent platform for a wide variety of nanostructured photovoltaic, photodetector, photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic devices. While large-bandgap oxide semiconductors offer transparency for incident light (below their nominal bandgap), their low carrier concentration and poor conductivity makes them unsuitable for charge conduction. Moreover, materials with high conductivity have nominally low bandgaps and hence poor light transmittance. Here, we demonstrate thin films and membranes made from TiO2 nanotubes heavily-doped with shallow Niobium (Nb) donors (up to 10%, without phase segregation), using a modified electrochemical anodization process, to fabricate transparent conducting hollow nanotubes. Temperature dependent current-voltage characteristics revealed that TiO2 TCO nanotubes, doped with 10% Nb, show metal-like behavior with resistivity decreasing from 6.5 × 10-4 Ωcm at T = 300 K (compared to 6.5 × 10-1 Ωcm for nominally undoped nanotubes) to 2.2 × 10-4 Ωcm at T = 20 K. Optical properties, studied by reflectance measurements, showed light transmittance up to 90%, within wavelength range 400 nm-1000 nm. Nb doping also improves the field emission properties of TCO nanotubes demonstrating an order of magnitude increase in field-emitter current, compared to undoped samples.

  6. Transparency -- Some observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houck, F.

    1994-01-01

    The increasingly popular term transparency has been used throughout the IAEA Safeguards Symposium to mean many things to many people. It has rather little utility as a catch-all term or buzz word. A precise definition of transparency is in order. In this paper, transparency is the provision to the IAEA of additional information for which the IAEA has an identified use and includes any associated increased IAEA access to sue the information. In 1993, the IAEA Board endorsed very specific proposals for provision to the IAEA of additional information on international nuclear transfers. It also made specific decisions on verification in the context of tis earlier confirmation of the very sweeping access rights for special inspections outlined by the director general. Additional information to the IAEA has two potential practical uses. First, it could help identify inconsistencies within the entirety of the information available to the IAEA, including information from inspections. These inconsistencies could be an indication of some violation of safeguards undertakings. Second, a declaration of the Member State could facilitate IAEA interpretation of analyses of other information or facilitate resolution of ambiguities. In these respects, additional information is not different from currently used information. When considering seeking specific additional information, the IAEA must balance the potential contribution of the information and its expected costs

  7. Spectral structure of the X-ray stimulated phosphorescence of monocrystalline ZnSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degoda, V. Ya., E-mail: degoda@univ.kiev.ua [Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University, Physics Department, 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Pavlova, N. Yu., E-mail: pavlovan7@gmail.com [The National Pedagogical Dragomanov University, Pyrogova 9, 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine); Podust, G.P., E-mail: vasylenkog379@gmail.com [Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University, Physics Department, 03680 Kyiv (Ukraine); Sofiienko, A.O., E-mail: asofienko@gmail.com [University of Bergen, Allegaten 55, PO Box 7803, 5020 Bergen (Norway)

    2015-05-15

    This work presents the extensive experimental studies of the X-ray stimulated luminescence, conductivity, phosphorescence and electric current relaxation, and the thermally stimulated luminescence and conductivity of monocrystalline ZnSe. It was found that the luminescence emission band with a maximum at 635 nm is a combination of at least three emission bands and that the appropriate recombination centres implement both electronic and hole recombination mechanisms. We propose an energy model of the traps and recombination centres in monocrystalline ZnSe and show that the majority of the generated free electrons and holes recombine in the luminescence centres with an estimated probability of 94.3% and that only a small fraction (5.7%) of generated charge carriers are accumulated in traps during the X-ray excitation of the ZnSe sample. - Highlights: • ZnSe has intensive X-ray luminescence and phosphorescence in the spectral range from 600 nm to 1000 nm. • We measured the phosphorescence of ZnSe for different wavelengths of 591 nm, 635 nm and 679 nm. • The dominant emission band of ZnSe with a maximum at 635 nm is a combination of at least three emission bands. • We propose and verify an energy model of the traps and recombination centres in monocrystalline ZnSe.

  8. Efficient white organic light-emitting devices based on blue, orange, red phosphorescent dyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ping; Duan Yu; Xie Wenfa; Zhao Yi; Hou Jingying; Liu Shiyong; Zhang Liying; Li Bin

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate efficient white organic light-emitting devices (WOLEDs) based on an orange phosphorescent iridium complex bis(2-(2-fluorphenyl)-1,3-benzothiozolato-N, C 2' )iridium(acetylacetonate) in combination with blue phosphorescent dye bis[(4, 6-difluorophenyl)-pyridinato-N,C 2 )](picolinato) Ir(III) and red phosphorescent dye bis[1-(phenyl)isoquinoline] iridium (III) acetylanetonate. By introducing a thin layer of 4, 7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline between blue and red emission layers, the diffusion of excitons is confined and white light can be obtained. WOLEDs with the interlayer all have a higher colour rendering index (>82) than the device without it (76). One device has the maximum current efficiency of 17.6 cd A -1 and a maximum luminance of 39 050 cd m -2 . The power efficiency is 8.7 lm W -1 at 100 cd m -2 . Furthermore, the device has good colour stability and the CIE coordinates just change from (0.394, 0.425) to (0.390, 0.426) with the luminance increasing from 630 to 4200 cd m -2 .

  9. 76 FR 1180 - FDA Transparency Initiative: Improving Transparency to Regulated Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ...] FDA Transparency Initiative: Improving Transparency to Regulated Industry AGENCY: Food and Drug... the Transparency Initiative, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a report entitled ``FDA Transparency Initiative: Improving Transparency to Regulated Industry.'' The...

  10. Characterization of f-actin tryptophan phosphorescence in the presence and absence of tryptophan-free myosin motor domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bódis, Emöke; Strambini, Giovanni B; Gonnelli, Margherita; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Somogyi, Béla

    2004-08-01

    The effect of binding the Trp-free motor domain mutant of Dictyostelium discoideum, rabbit skeletal muscle myosin S1, and tropomyosin on the dynamics and conformation of actin filaments was characterized by an analysis of steady-state tryptophan phosphorescence spectra and phosphorescence decay kinetics over a temperature range of 140-293 K. The binding of the Trp-free motor domain mutant of D. discoideum to actin caused red shifts in the phosphorescence spectrum of two internal Trp residues of actin and affected the intrinsic lifetime of each emitter, decreasing by roughly twofold the short phosphorescence lifetime components (tau(1) and tau(2)) and increasing by approximately 20% the longest component (tau(3)). The alteration of actin phosphorescence by the motor protein suggests that i), structural changes occur deep down in the core of actin and that ii), subtle changes in conformation appear also on the surface but in regions distant from the motor domain binding site. When actin formed complexes with skeletal S1, an extra phosphorescence lifetime component appeared (tau(4), twice as long as tau(3)) in the phosphorescence decay that is absent in the isolated proteins. The lack of this extra component in the analogous actin-Trp-free motor domain mutant of D. discoideum complex suggests that it should be assigned to Trps in S1 that in the complex attain a more compact local structure. Our data indicated that the binding of tropomyosin to actin filaments had no effect on the structure or flexibility of actin observable by this technique.

  11. Improved efficiency in OLEDs with a thin Alq3 interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian Jiarong; Yuan Yongbo; Cao Lingfang; Zhang Jie; Pang Hongqi; Zhou Yunfei; Zhou Xiang

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate an improved efficiency in OLEDs with a thin Alq 3 interlayer, which is inserted into the hole-transport layer for adjusting the hole-injection and transport, and improving the hole-electron balance. The thin Alq 3 interlayer can effectively influence the electrical performance and electroluminescence (EL) efficiency of the devices. The devices with an optimum Alq 3 interlayer exhibit a maximum EL efficiency of around 3.3 cd/A, which is improved by a factor of two over the conventional devices (1.6 cd/A) without the interlayer

  12. The fabrication and characterization of organic light-emitting diodes using transparent single-crystal Si membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Su-Hwan; Kim, Dal-Ho; Kim, Ji-Heon; Lee, Gon-Sub; Park, Jea-Gun; Takeo, Katoh

    2009-01-01

    For applications such as solar cells and displays, transparent single-crystal Si membranes were fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The SOI wafer included a buried layer of SiO 2 and Si 3 N 4 as an etch-stop layer. The etch-stop layer enabled fabrication of transparent single-crystal Si membranes with various thicknesses, and the thinning technology is described. For membranes with thicknesses of 18, 72 and 5000 nm, the respective optical transparent were 96.9%, 93.7% and 9% for R (red, λ = 660 nm), 96.9%, 91.4% and 1% for G (green, λ = 525 nm), and 97.0%, 93.2% and 0% for B (blue, λ = 470 nm). Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) were then fabricated on transparent single-crystal Si membranes with various top Si thicknesses. OLEDs fabricated on 18, 72 and 5000 nm thick membranes and operated at 6 V demonstrated a luminance of 1350, 443 and 27 cd m -2 at the current densities of 148, 131 and 1.5 mA cm -2 , respectively.

  13. Stacked white OLED having separate red, green and blue sub-elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, Stephen; Qi, Xiangfei; Slootsky, Michael

    2015-06-23

    The present invention relates to efficient organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). More specifically, the present invention relates to white-emitting OLEDs, or WOLEDs. The devices of the present invention employ three emissive sub-elements, typically emitting red, green and blue, to sufficiently cover the visible spectrum. The sub-elements are separated by charge generating layers.

  14. Los jueces españoles como jueces de la Unión Europea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayoral, Juan A.; Ordóñez Solís, David; Berberoff, Dimitry

    2013-01-01

    sentido, el presente estudio trata de esclarecer si actualmente los jueces españoles se han adaptado a las exigencias creadas por el sistema legal de la Unión para la aplicación del derecho europeo. Para comprobar si los jueces españoles han asimilado su condición de jueces europeos, operando como...

  15. GATEWAY Demonstrations: OLED Lighting in the Offices of Aurora Lighting Design, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Naomi J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-31

    At the offices of Aurora Lighting Design, Inc., in Grayslake, IL, the GATEWAY program conducted its first investigation involving OLED lighting. The project experienced several challenges, but also highlighted a number of promising attributes – which indicate that with continued improvements in efficacy, longevity, size, and flexibility, OLEDs could provide a new tool for creative and effective lighting.

  16. Life prediction of OLED for constant-stress accelerated degradation tests using luminance decaying model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jianping, E-mail: jpzhanglzu@163.com [College of Energy and Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Li, Wenbin [College of Energy and Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Cheng, Guoliang; Chen, Xiao [Shanghai Tianyi Electric Co., Ltd., Shanghai 201611 (China); Wu, Helen [School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Sydney 2751 (Australia); Herman Shen, M.-H. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    In order to acquire the life information of organic light emitting diode (OLED), three groups of constant stress accelerated degradation tests are performed to obtain the luminance decaying data of samples under the condition that the luminance and the current are respectively selected as the indicator of performance degradation and the test stress. Weibull function is applied to describe the relationship between luminance decaying and time, least square method (LSM) is employed to calculate the shape parameter and scale parameter, and the life prediction of OLED is achieved. The numerical results indicate that the accelerated degradation test and the luminance decaying model reveal the luminance decaying law of OLED. The luminance decaying formula fits the test data very well, and the average error of fitting value compared with the test data is small. Furthermore, the accuracy of the OLED life predicted by luminance decaying model is high, which enable rapid estimation of OLED life and provide significant guidelines to help engineers make decisions in design and manufacturing strategy from the aspect of reliability life. - Highlights: • We gain luminance decaying data by accelerated degradation tests on OLED. • The luminance decaying model objectively reveals the decaying law of OLED luminance. • The least square method (LSM) is employed to calculate Weibull parameters. • The plan designed for accelerated degradation tests proves to be feasible. • The accuracy of the OLED life and the luminance decaying fitting formula is high.

  17. Flexible barrier technology for enabling rollable AMOLED displays and upscaling flexible OLED lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, F.M.; Unnikrishnan, S.; Weijer, P. van de; Assche, F. van; Shen, J.; Ellis, T.; Manders, W.; Akkerman, H.; Bouten, P.; Mol, A.M.B. van

    2013-01-01

    The availability of a high performance thin-film barrier is the most critical challenge in upscaling and commercializing flexible OLED products. We report a flexible thin-film-barrier technology that meets lifetime specifications for OLED lighting, and demonstrate it in rollable QVGA a-IGZO AMOLED

  18. Kinetic Monte Carlo study of sensitiviy of OLED efficiency and lifetime to materials parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coehoorn, R.; Eersel, van H.; Bobbert, P.A.; Janssen, R.A.J.

    2015-01-01

    The performance of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) is determined by a complex interplay of the optoelectronic processes in the active layer stack. In order to enable simulation-assisted layer stack development, a three-dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo OLED simulation method which includes the

  19. An approach to integrated design based componet software and OLE-technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger-Petersen, Susanne C; Emborg, Jørgen; Andersen, Tom

    1996-01-01

    The paper reports on a prototype developed as to demonstrate the (dis)abilities of the OLE-standard to integrate different design-applications to a CAD-syste.......The paper reports on a prototype developed as to demonstrate the (dis)abilities of the OLE-standard to integrate different design-applications to a CAD-syste....

  20. GATEWAY Demonstrations: OLED Lighting in the Offices of DeJoy, Knauf & Blood, LLP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Naomi J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-07-24

    At the offices of the accounting firm of DeJoy, Knauf & Blood, LLP in Rochester, NY, the GATEWAY program evaluated a new lighting system that incorporates a number of different OLED luminaires. Evaluation of the OLED products included efficacy performance, field measurements of panel color, flicker measurements, and staff feedback.

  1. Life prediction of OLED for constant-stress accelerated degradation tests using luminance decaying model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jianping; Li, Wenbin; Cheng, Guoliang; Chen, Xiao; Wu, Helen; Herman Shen, M.-H.

    2014-01-01

    In order to acquire the life information of organic light emitting diode (OLED), three groups of constant stress accelerated degradation tests are performed to obtain the luminance decaying data of samples under the condition that the luminance and the current are respectively selected as the indicator of performance degradation and the test stress. Weibull function is applied to describe the relationship between luminance decaying and time, least square method (LSM) is employed to calculate the shape parameter and scale parameter, and the life prediction of OLED is achieved. The numerical results indicate that the accelerated degradation test and the luminance decaying model reveal the luminance decaying law of OLED. The luminance decaying formula fits the test data very well, and the average error of fitting value compared with the test data is small. Furthermore, the accuracy of the OLED life predicted by luminance decaying model is high, which enable rapid estimation of OLED life and provide significant guidelines to help engineers make decisions in design and manufacturing strategy from the aspect of reliability life. - Highlights: • We gain luminance decaying data by accelerated degradation tests on OLED. • The luminance decaying model objectively reveals the decaying law of OLED luminance. • The least square method (LSM) is employed to calculate Weibull parameters. • The plan designed for accelerated degradation tests proves to be feasible. • The accuracy of the OLED life and the luminance decaying fitting formula is high

  2. Stacked white OLED having separate red, green and blue sub-elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Stephen; Qi, Xiangfei; Slootsky, Michael

    2016-06-28

    The present invention relates to efficient organic light emitting devices (OLEDs). More specifically, the present invention relates to white-emitting OLEDs, or WOLEDs. The devices of the present invention employ three emissive sub-elements, typically emitting red, green and blue, to sufficiently cover the visible spectrum. The sub-elements are separated by charge generating layers.

  3. An imaging-based photometric and colorimetric measurement method for characterizing OLED panels for lighting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yiting; Narendran, Nadarajah; Tan, Jianchuan; Mou, Xi

    2014-09-01

    The organic light-emitting diode (OLED) has demonstrated its novelty in displays and certain lighting applications. Similar to white light-emitting diode (LED) technology, it also holds the promise of saving energy. Even though the luminous efficacy values of OLED products have been steadily growing, their longevity is still not well understood. Furthermore, currently there is no industry standard for photometric and colorimetric testing, short and long term, of OLEDs. Each OLED manufacturer tests its OLED panels under different electrical and thermal conditions using different measurement methods. In this study, an imaging-based photometric and colorimetric measurement method for OLED panels was investigated. Unlike an LED that can be considered as a point source, the OLED is a large form area source. Therefore, for an area source to satisfy lighting application needs, it is important that it maintains uniform light level and color properties across the emitting surface of the panel over a long period. This study intended to develop a measurement procedure that can be used to test long-term photometric and colorimetric properties of OLED panels. The objective was to better understand how test parameters such as drive current or luminance and temperature affect the degradation rate. In addition, this study investigated whether data interpolation could allow for determination of degradation and lifetime, L70, at application conditions based on the degradation rates measured at different operating conditions.

  4. Mixed-ligand Al complex—a new approach for more high efficient OLEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrova, Petia K.; Tomova, Reni L.; Stoycheva-Topalova, Rumiana T.; Kaloyanova, Stefka S.; Deligeorgiev, Todor G.

    2012-01-01

    The mixed-ligand Aluminum bis(8-hydroxyquinoline) acetylacetonate (Alq 2 Acac) complex was presented and its performance as electroluminescent and electron transporting layer for OLED was studied. The photophysical properties of the novel complex were investigated and compared with the properties of the parent Alq 3 . Highly efficient OLED based on the mixed-ligand Al complex was developed with two times higher luminescence and efficiency compared to the identical OLED based on the conventional Alq 3 The better performance of the devices make the novel Al complex a very promising material for OLEDs. - Highlights: ► A novel electroluminescent Alq 2 Acac complex is presented as material for OLED. ► Electroluminescent emission of Alq 2 Acac is very similar to that of commercial Alq 3 . ► Devices with Alq 2 Acac show better characteristics compared to those with Alq 3 .

  5. Making Image More Energy Efficient for OLED Smart Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deguang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Now, more and more mobile smart devices are emerging massively; energy consumption of these devices has become an important consideration due to the limitation of battery capacity. Displays are the dominant energy consuming component of battery-operated devices, giving rise to organic light-emitting diode (OLED as a new promising display technology, which consumes different power when displaying different content due to their emissive nature. Based on this property, we propose an approach to improve image energy efficiency on OLED displays by perceiving image content. The key idea of our approach is to eliminate undesired details while preserving the region of interest of the image by leveraging the color and spatial information. First, we use edge detection algorithm to extract region of interest (ROI of an image. Next, we gradually change luminance and saturation of region of noninterest (NON-ROI of the image. Then we perform detailed experiment and case study to validate our approach; experiment results show that our approach can save 22.5% energy on average while preserving high quality of the image.

  6. High-efficiency white OLEDs based on small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatwar, Tukaram K.; Spindler, Jeffrey P.; Ricks, M. L.; Young, Ralph H.; Hamada, Yuuhiko; Saito, N.; Mameno, Kazunobu; Nishikawa, Ryuji; Takahashi, Hisakazu; Rajeswaran, G.

    2004-02-01

    Eastman Kodak Company and SANYO Electric Co., Ltd. recently demonstrated a 15" full-color, organic light-emitting diode display (OLED) using a high-efficiency white emitter combined with a color-filter array. Although useful for display applications, white emission from organic structures is also under consideration for other applications, such as solid-state lighting, where high efficiency and good color rendition are important. By incorporating adjacent blue and orange emitting layers in a multi-layer structure, highly efficient, stable white emission has been attained. With suitable host and dopant combinations, a luminance yield of 20 cd/A and efficiency of 8 lm/W have been achieved at a drive voltage of less than 8 volts and luminance level of 1000 cd/m2. The estimated external efficiency of this device is 6.3% and a high level of operational stability is observed. To our knowledge, this is the highest performance reported so far for white organic electroluminescent devices. We will review white OLED technology and discuss the fabrication and operating characteristics of these devices.

  7. Perceptual transparency from image deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Maruya, Kazushi; Nishida, Shin'ya

    2015-08-18

    Human vision has a remarkable ability to perceive two layers at the same retinal locations, a transparent layer in front of a background surface. Critical image cues to perceptual transparency, studied extensively in the past, are changes in luminance or color that could be caused by light absorptions and reflections by the front layer, but such image changes may not be clearly visible when the front layer consists of a pure transparent material such as water. Our daily experiences with transparent materials of this kind suggest that an alternative potential cue of visual transparency is image deformations of a background pattern caused by light refraction. Although previous studies have indicated that these image deformations, at least static ones, play little role in perceptual transparency, here we show that dynamic image deformations of the background pattern, which could be produced by light refraction on a moving liquid's surface, can produce a vivid impression of a transparent liquid layer without the aid of any other visual cues as to the presence of a transparent layer. Furthermore, a transparent liquid layer perceptually emerges even from a randomly generated dynamic image deformation as long as it is similar to real liquid deformations in its spatiotemporal frequency profile. Our findings indicate that the brain can perceptually infer the presence of "invisible" transparent liquids by analyzing the spatiotemporal structure of dynamic image deformation, for which it uses a relatively simple computation that does not require high-level knowledge about the detailed physics of liquid deformation.

  8. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future.

  9. Towards energy transparent factories

    CERN Document Server

    Posselt, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    This monograph provides a methodological approach for establishing demand-oriented levels of energy transparency of factories. The author presents a systematic indication of energy drivers and cost factors, taking into account the interdependencies between facility and production domains. Particular attention is given to energy flow metering and monitoring. Readers will also be provided with an in-depth description of a planning tool which allows for systematically deriving suitable metering points in complex factory environments. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field of factory planning, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  10. Illusionary Transparency? Oil Revenues, Information Disclosure, and Transparency

    OpenAIRE

    Ofori, Jerome Jeffison; Lujala, Päivi

    2015-01-01

    xperience shows that discovery of valuable natural resources can become a curse rather than a blessing, and transparency has been identified as key to better resource governance because it can limit opportunities for corruption and mismanagement. This article shows that information disclosure, in which many governments and donor institutions engage, does not automatically translate into transparency. Ghana has embedded transparency as one of its key principles in oil management. However, fiel...

  11. Phosphorescence parameters for platinum (II) organometallic chromophores: A study at the non-collinear four-component Kohn–Sham level of theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, Patrick; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical characterization of the phosphorescence decay traces of a prototypical platinum (II) organic chromophore has been conducted. The phosphorescence wavelength and radiative lifetime are predicted to equal 544 nm and 160 μs, respectively. The third triplet state is assigned as participa...

  12. Investigation of ITO free transparent conducting polymer based electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas; Sapna, Sachdev, Kanupriya

    2016-05-01

    The last few decades have seen a significant improvement in organic semiconductor technology related to solar cell, light emitting diode and display panels. The material and structure of the transparent electrode is one of the major concerns for superior performance of devices such as OPV, OLED, touch screen and LCD display. Commonly used ITO is now restricted due to scarcity of indium, its poor mechanical properties and rigidity, and mismatch of energy levels with the active layer. Nowadays DMD (dielectric-metal-dielectric) structure is one of the prominent candidates as alternatives to ITO based electrode. We have used solution based spin coated polymer layer as the dielectric layer with silver thin film embedded in between to make a polymer-metal-polymer (PMP) structure for TCE applications. The PMP structure shows low resistivity (2.3 x 10-4Ω-cm), high carrier concentration (2.9 x 1021 cm-3) and moderate transparency. The multilayer PMP structure is characterized with XRD, AFM and Hall measurement to prove its suitability for opto-electronic device applications.

  13. Investigation of ITO free transparent conducting polymer based electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Vikas; Sapna,; Sachdev, Kanupriya

    2016-01-01

    The last few decades have seen a significant improvement in organic semiconductor technology related to solar cell, light emitting diode and display panels. The material and structure of the transparent electrode is one of the major concerns for superior performance of devices such as OPV, OLED, touch screen and LCD display. Commonly used ITO is now restricted due to scarcity of indium, its poor mechanical properties and rigidity, and mismatch of energy levels with the active layer. Nowadays DMD (dielectric-metal-dielectric) structure is one of the prominent candidates as alternatives to ITO based electrode. We have used solution based spin coated polymer layer as the dielectric layer with silver thin film embedded in between to make a polymer-metal-polymer (PMP) structure for TCE applications. The PMP structure shows low resistivity (2.3 x 10"−"4Ω-cm), high carrier concentration (2.9 x 10"2"1 cm"−"3) and moderate transparency. The multilayer PMP structure is characterized with XRD, AFM and Hall measurement to prove its suitability for opto-electronic device applications.

  14. Investigation of ITO free transparent conducting polymer based electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Vikas; Sapna,; Sachdev, Kanupriya [Department of Physics, Malaviya National Institute of Technology Jaipur, JLN Marg, Jaipur-India-302017 (India)

    2016-05-23

    The last few decades have seen a significant improvement in organic semiconductor technology related to solar cell, light emitting diode and display panels. The material and structure of the transparent electrode is one of the major concerns for superior performance of devices such as OPV, OLED, touch screen and LCD display. Commonly used ITO is now restricted due to scarcity of indium, its poor mechanical properties and rigidity, and mismatch of energy levels with the active layer. Nowadays DMD (dielectric-metal-dielectric) structure is one of the prominent candidates as alternatives to ITO based electrode. We have used solution based spin coated polymer layer as the dielectric layer with silver thin film embedded in between to make a polymer-metal-polymer (PMP) structure for TCE applications. The PMP structure shows low resistivity (2.3 x 10{sup −4}Ω-cm), high carrier concentration (2.9 x 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3}) and moderate transparency. The multilayer PMP structure is characterized with XRD, AFM and Hall measurement to prove its suitability for opto-electronic device applications.

  15. Laser Processed Silver Nanowire Network Transparent Electrodes for Novel Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spechler, Joshua Allen

    Silver nanowire network transparent conducting layers are poised to make headway into a space previously dominated by transparent conducting oxides due to the promise of a flexible, scaleable, lab-atmosphere processable alternative. However, there are many challenges standing in the way between research scale use and consumer technology scale adaptation of this technology. In this thesis we will explore many, and overcome a few of these challenges. We will address the poor conductivity at the narrow nanowire-nanowire junction points in the network by developing a laser based process to weld nanowires together on a microscopic scale. We address the need for a comparative metric for transparent conductors in general, by taking a device level rather than a component level view of these layers. We also address the mechanical, physical, and thermal limitations to the silver nanowire networks by making composites from materials including a colorless polyimide and titania sol-gel. Additionally, we verify our findings by integrating these processes into devices. Studying a hybrid organic/inorganic heterojunction photovoltaic device we show the benefits of a laser processed electrode. Green phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes fabricated on a solution phase processed silver nanowire based electrode show favorable device metrics compared to a conductive oxide electrode based control. The work in this thesis is intended to push the adoption of silver nanowire networks to further allow new device architectures, and thereby new device applications.

  16. The transparency trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Ethan

    2014-10-01

    To promote accountability, productivity, and shared learning, many organizations create open work environments and gather reams of data on how individuals spend their time. A few years ago, HBS professor Ethan Bernstein set out to find empirical evidence that such approaches improve organizational performance. What he discovered is that this kind of transparency often has an unintended consequence: It can leave employees feeling vulnerable and exposed. When that happens, they conceal any conduct that deviates from the norm so that they won't have to explain it. Unrehearsed, experimental behaviors sometimes stop altogether. But Bernstein also discovered organizations that had established zones of privacy within open environments by setting four types of boundaries: around teams, between feedback and evaluation, between decision rights and improvement rights, and around periods of experimentation. Moreover, across several studies, the companies that had done all this were the ones that consistently got the most creative, efficient, and thoughtful work from their employees. Bernstein's conclusion? By balancing transparency and privacy, organizations can capture the benefits of both, and encourage just the right amount of "positive deviance" needed to increase innovation and productivity.

  17. Corneal structure and transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Keith M.; Knupp, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The corneal stroma plays several pivotal roles within the eye. Optically, it is the main refracting lens and thus has to combine almost perfect transmission of visible light with precise shape, in order to focus incoming light. Furthermore, mechanically it has to be extremely tough to protect the inner contents of the eye. These functions are governed by its structure at all hierarchical levels. The basic principles of corneal structure and transparency have been known for some time, but in recent years X-ray scattering and other methods have revealed that the details of this structure are far more complex than previously thought and that the intricacy of the arrangement of the collagenous lamellae provides the shape and the mechanical properties of the tissue. At the molecular level, modern technologies and theoretical modelling have started to explain exactly how the collagen fibrils are arranged within the stromal lamellae and how proteoglycans maintain this ultrastructure. In this review we describe the current state of knowledge about the three-dimensional stromal architecture at the microscopic level, and about the control mechanisms at the nanoscopic level that lead to optical transparency. PMID:26145225

  18. Lattice Transparency of Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sieun; Jang, Seunghun; Choi, Won Jin; Kim, Youn Sang; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Tae Il; Lee, Jeong-O

    2017-03-08

    Here, we demonstrated the transparency of graphene to the atomic arrangement of a substrate surface, i.e., the "lattice transparency" of graphene, by using hydrothermally grown ZnO nanorods as a model system. The growth behaviors of ZnO nanocrystals on graphene-coated and uncoated substrates with various crystal structures were investigated. The atomic arrangements of the nucleating ZnO nanocrystals exhibited a close match with those of the respective substrates despite the substrates being bound to the other side of the graphene. By using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, we confirmed the energetic favorability of the nucleating phase following the atomic arrangement of the substrate even with the graphene layer present in between. In addition to transmitting information about the atomic lattice of the substrate, graphene also protected its surface. This dual role enabled the hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanorods on a Cu substrate, which otherwise dissolved in the reaction conditions when graphene was absent.

  19. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husband, P.; Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics.

  20. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husband, P; Selim, F A; Bartošová, I; Slugeň, V

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics. (paper)

  1. Organic light-emitting diodes using novel embedded al gird transparent electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cuiyun; Chen, Changbo; Guo, Kunping; Tian, Zhenghao; Zhu, Wenqing; Xu, Tao; Wei, Bin

    2017-03-01

    This work demonstrates a novel transparent electrode using embedded Al grids fabricated by a simple and cost-effective approach using photolithography and wet etching. The optical and electrical properties of Al grids versus grid geometry have been systematically investigated, it was found that Al grids exhibited a low sheet resistance of 70 Ω □-1 and a light transmission of 69% at 550 nm with advantages in terms of processing conditions and material cost as well as potential to large scale fabrication. Indium Tin Oxide-free green organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) based on Al grids transparent electrodes was demonstrated, yielding a power efficiency >15 lm W-1 and current efficiency >39 cd A-1 at a brightness of 2396 cd m-2. Furthermore, a reduced efficiency roll-off and higher brightness have been achieved compared with ITO-base device.

  2. Budget transparency in local governments

    OpenAIRE

    Giménez Perona, Paloma

    2014-01-01

    Treball Final de Grau en Finances i Comptabilitat. Codi: FC1049. Curs acadèmic 2013-2014 This work will study the socio-demographic determinants, political, budgetary and economic, that affect the transparency of local entities. To perform the study, we have chosen the transparency index data for the 110 largest municipalities of Spain, in 2012 has been chosen from the information offered by the website of the organization Transparency International Spain. The results indica...

  3. Aircraft Lighting and Transparency Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Lighting and Transparencies with Night Combat Lab performs radiometric and photometric measurements of cockpit lighting and displays. Evaluates the day,...

  4. Transparent lithium-ion batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Y.

    2011-07-25

    Transparent devices have recently attracted substantial attention. Various applications have been demonstrated, including displays, touch screens, and solar cells; however, transparent batteries, a key component in fully integrated transparent devices, have not yet been reported. As battery electrode materials are not transparent and have to be thick enough to store energy, the traditional approach of using thin films for transparent devices is not suitable. Here we demonstrate a grid-structured electrode to solve this dilemma, which is fabricated by a microfluidics-assisted method. The feature dimension in the electrode is below the resolution limit of human eyes, and, thus, the electrode appears transparent. Moreover, by aligning multiple electrodes together, the amount of energy stored increases readily without sacrificing the transparency. This results in a battery with energy density of 10 Wh/L at a transparency of 60%. The device is also flexible, further broadening their potential applications. The transparent device configuration also allows in situ Raman study of fundamental electrochemical reactions in batteries.

  5. High Temperature Transparent Furnace Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Stephen C.

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the use of novel techniques for heat containment that could be used to build a high temperature transparent furnace. The primary objective of the work was to experimentally demonstrate transparent furnace operation at 1200 C. Secondary objectives were to understand furnace operation and furnace component specification to enable the design and construction of a low power prototype furnace for delivery to NASA in a follow-up project. The basic approach of the research was to couple high temperature component design with simple concept demonstration experiments that modify a commercially available transparent furnace rated at lower temperature. A detailed energy balance of the operating transparent furnace was performed, calculating heat losses through the furnace components as a result of conduction, radiation, and convection. The transparent furnace shells and furnace components were redesigned to permit furnace operation at at least 1200 C. Techniques were developed that are expected to lead to significantly improved heat containment compared with current transparent furnaces. The design of a thermal profile in a multizone high temperature transparent furnace design was also addressed. Experiments were performed to verify the energy balance analysis, to demonstrate some of the major furnace improvement techniques developed, and to demonstrate the overall feasibility of a high temperature transparent furnace. The important objective of the research was achieved: to demonstrate the feasibility of operating a transparent furnace at 1200 C.

  6. Transparent lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuan; Jeong, Sangmoo; Hu, Liangbing; Wu, Hui; Lee, Seok Woo; Cui, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Transparent devices have recently attracted substantial attention. Various applications have been demonstrated, including displays, touch screens, and solar cells; however, transparent batteries, a key component in fully integrated transparent devices, have not yet been reported. As battery electrode materials are not transparent and have to be thick enough to store energy, the traditional approach of using thin films for transparent devices is not suitable. Here we demonstrate a grid-structured electrode to solve this dilemma, which is fabricated by a microfluidics-assisted method. The feature dimension in the electrode is below the resolution limit of human eyes, and, thus, the electrode appears transparent. Moreover, by aligning multiple electrodes together, the amount of energy stored increases readily without sacrificing the transparency. This results in a battery with energy density of 10 Wh/L at a transparency of 60%. The device is also flexible, further broadening their potential applications. The transparent device configuration also allows in situ Raman study of fundamental electrochemical reactions in batteries. PMID:21788483

  7. Canadian perspectives in evaluating transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herwig, L.

    2007-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's mission is to regulate the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect the health, safety, and security of Canadians and the environment, as well as to respect Canada's international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy. In 2001, the CNSC established a vision to be one of the best nuclear regulators in the world and established four strategic priorities of effectiveness, transparency, excellence in staff, and efficiency. While fulfilling a very comprehensive mandate, the CNSC operates with a. very clear vision of its clientele - the Canadian people. That commitment guides every employee and every action of the CNSC and ensures a firm commitment to transparency. The presentation will begin with a brief overview of the worldwide context of transparency and transparency measurement, with a look at what lessons can be learned from other organizations and initiatives. It will look broadly at the Canadian context and the government framework that establishes transparency, including the keystone legislation of the Access to Information Act. The presentation will then focus on the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. The CNSC is firmly committed to putting additional measures in place to ensure transparency, which is being done concurrently with an overall organisational performance measurement system. It is within this framework that the presentation will address the transparency efforts at the CNSC as well transparency measurement activities. And, finally, the presentation will look at future directions for transparency and its measurement at the CNSC. (author)

  8. Efficiency improvement of flexible fluorescent and phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes by inserting a spin-coating buffer layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Yu-Sheng; Wang, Shun-Hsi; Chen, Shen-Yaur; Su, Shin-Yuan; Juang, Fuh-Shyang

    2009-01-01

    We dissolved hole transport materials α-NPD and NPB in THF solvent, and spin-coated the α-NPD + THF or NPB + THF solution onto ITO anode surface to improve the luminance efficiency and lifetime of flexible fluorescent and phosphorescent organic light emitting diodes. Then the BCP and TPBi were employed as hole blocking layer (HBL) of phosphorescent device and its thickness was optimized. From the experimental results, the maximum luminance efficiency is 4.4 cd/A at 9 V of fluorescent device and 24.4 cd/A of phosphorescent device, respectively. Such an improvement in the device performance was attributed to the smoother surface and good contact between the interface of spin-coated HTL/ITO, the hole were effectively injected from the anode into the organic layer. And the deposited HTL can block excitons from diffusing into the anode to quench, thus improving the luminance efficiency and lifetime greatly.

  9. Doped zinc sulfide quantum dots based phosphorescence turn-off/on probe for detecting histidine in biological fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bian, Wei [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); School of Basic Medical Science, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Wang, Fang [School of Basic Medical Science, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Wei, Yanli; Wang, Li; Liu, Qiaoling; Dong, Wenjuan [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Shuang, Shaomin, E-mail: smshuang@sxu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Choi, Martin M.F., E-mail: mmfchoi@gmail.com [Partner State Key Laboratory of Environmental and Biological Analysis, and Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, 224 Waterloo Road, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2015-01-26

    Highlights: • A turn-on phosphorescence quantum dots probe for histidine is fabricated. • High sensitivity, good selectivity and low interference are achieved. • Histidine in urine samples can be easily detected by the phosphorescence probe. - Abstract: We report a turn-on phosphorescence probe for detection of histidine based on Co{sup 2+}-adsorbed N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) capped Mn: ZnS quantum dots (QDs) which is directly synthesized by the hydrothermal method. The phosphorescence of NAC-Mn: ZnS QDs is effectively quenched by Co{sup 2+} attributing to the adsorption of Co{sup 2+} onto the surface of QDs with a concomitant in suppressing the recombination process of hole and electron of QDs. The phosphorescence of Co{sup 2+}-adsorbed NAC-Mn: ZnS QDs can be recovered by binding of Co{sup 2+} with histidine. The quenching and regeneration of the phosphorescence of NAC-Mn: ZnS QDs have been studied in detail. The as-prepared QDs-based probe is applied to determine histidine with a linear range of 1.25–30 μM and a detection limit of 0.74 μM. The relative standard deviation for eleven repeat detections of 20 μM histidine is 0.65%. Co{sup 2+}-adsorbed NAC-Mn: ZnS QDs show high sensitivity and good selectivity to histidine over other amino acids, metal ions and co-existing substances. The proposed QDs probe has been successfully applied to determination of histidine in human urine samples with good recoveries of 98.5–103%.

  10. Kirigami-based three-dimensional OLED concepts for architectural lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taehwan; Price, Jared S.; Grede, Alex; Lee, Sora; Jackson, Thomas N.; Giebink, Noel C.

    2017-08-01

    Dramatic improvements in white organic light emitting diode (OLED) performance and lifetime over the past decade are driving commercialization of this technology for solid-state lighting applications. As white OLEDs attempt to gain a foothold in the market, however, the biggest challenge outside of lowering their manufacturing cost arguably now lies in creating an architecturally adaptable form factor that will drive public adoption and differentiate OLED lighting from established LED products. Here, we present concepts based on kirigami (the Japanese art of paper cutting and folding) that enable intricate three-dimensional (3D) OLED lighting structures from two dimensional layouts. Using an ultraflexible, encapsulated OLED device architecture on 25 60 μm thick clear polyimide film substrate with simple cut and fold patterns, we demonstrate a series of different lighting concepts ranging from a simple `pop up' structure to more complex designs such as stretchable window blind-like panel, candle flame, and multi-element globe lamp. We only find slight degradation in OLED electrical performance when these designs are shaped into 3D. Our results point to an alternate paradigm for OLED lighting that moves beyond traditional 2D panels toward 3D designs that deliver unique and creative new opportunities for lighting.

  11. Advances in OLED/OPD-based sensors and spectrometer-on-a-chip (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinar, Joseph; Kaudal, Rajiv; Manna, Eeshita; Fungura, Fadzai; Shinar, Ruth

    2016-09-01

    We describe ongoing advances toward achieving all-organic optical sensors and a spectrometer on a chip. Two-dimensional combinatorial arrays of microcavity OLEDs (μcOLEDs) with systematically varying optical cavity lengths are fabricated on a single chip by changing the thickness of different organic and/or spacer layers sandwiched between two metal electrodes (one very thin) that form the cavity. The broad spectral range is achieved by utilizing materials that result in white OLEDs (WOLEDs) when fabricated on a standard ITO substrate. The tunable and narrower emissions from the μcOLEDs serve as excitation sources in luminescent sensors and in monitoring light absorption. For each wavelength, the light from the μcOLED is partially absorbed by a sample under study and the light emitted by an electronically excited sample, or the transmitted light is detected by a photodetector (PD). To obtain a compact monitor, an organic PD (OPD) or a perovskite-based PD is integrated with the μcOLED array. We show the potential of encompassing a broader wavelength range by using WOLED materials to fabricate the μcOLEDs. The utility of the all-organic analytical devices is demonstrated by monitoring oxygen, and bioanalytes based on oxygen detection, as well as the absorption spectra of dyes.

  12. Transparency through the Internet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haginoya, Tohru [Inst. of Nuclear Materials Management, Japan Chapter, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    Many countries, especially developed countries have their 'Home Pages' and disclose their activities openly including nuclear activities. These information give, to some extent, the transparency of countries. The annual report of the IAEA can be found in its home page, reports describe its safeguards activities including facilities under its safeguards together with the status of 'subsidiary arrangements'. The Atomic Energy White Papers of the STA home pages show its nuclear activities and nuclear material. Details of safeguards related information are obtained by analyzing these home pages and find some information inconsistent each other. In connection with Strengthened Safeguards system' , non-nuclear items such as zirconium, heavy water or their manufacturing organizations which are subject to the safeguards system would be retrieved by using 'search engines' through the internet. (author)

  13. Transparency through the Internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haginoya, Tohru

    1998-01-01

    Many countries, especially developed countries have their 'Home Pages' and disclose their activities openly including nuclear activities. These information give, to some extent, the transparency of countries. The annual report of the IAEA can be found in its home page, reports describe its safeguards activities including facilities under its safeguards together with the status of 'subsidiary arrangements'. The Atomic Energy White Papers of the STA home pages show its nuclear activities and nuclear material. Details of safeguards related information are obtained by analyzing these home pages and find some information inconsistent each other. In connection with Strengthened Safeguards system' , non-nuclear items such as zirconium, heavy water or their manufacturing organizations which are subject to the safeguards system would be retrieved by using 'search engines' through the internet. (author)

  14. Macroscopic Optomechanically Induced Transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Jacob; Castelli, Alessandro; Martinez, Luis; Thompson, Johnathon; Chiao, Ray; Sharping, Jay

    Optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT) is an effect wherein the spectrum of a cavity resonance is modified through interference between coupled excitation pathways. In this work we investigate a macroscopic, 3D microwave, superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavity incorporating a niobium-coated, silicon-nitride membrane as the flexible boundary. The boundary supports acoustic vibrational resonances, which lead to coupling with the microwave resonances of the SRF cavity. The theoretical development and physical understanding of OMIT for our macroscopic SRF cavity is the same as that for other recently-reported OMIT systems despite vastly different optomechanical coupling factors and device sizes. Our mechanical oscillator has a coupling factor of g0 = 2 π . 1 ×10-5 Hz and is roughly 38 mm in diameter. The Q = 5 ×107 for the SRF cavity allows probing of optomechanical effects in the resolved sideband regime.

  15. Transparency and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    After having outlined some lessons learnt after the Chernobyl accident, notably the facts that risk assessment and management were not separated, that radioactivity measurements have suffered from a lack of means and of preparedness, and that there has been few information exchanged between the different concerned countries, this document presents the four international conventions which have been negotiated after this accident (they concern the notification, assistance, safety, safety of fuel management and of radioactive wastes). It discusses the lessons learnt in France, the credibility of information and the confidence in authorities, the evolution of transparency and information in France and in the rest of the World, the transposition of the Arhus Convention in the communautary and national law, the innovating European approaches, and the evolutions in France

  16. Recent progress in OLED and flexible displays and their potential for application to aerospace and military display systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Kalluri

    2015-05-01

    Organic light emitting diode (OLED) display technology has advanced significantly in recent years and it is increasingly being adapted in consumer electronics products with premium performance, such as high resolution smart phones, Tablet PCs and TVs. Even flexible OLED displays are beginning to be commercialized in consumer electronic devices such as smart phones and smart watches. In addition to the advances in OLED emitters, successful development and adoption of OLED displays for premium performance applications relies on the advances in several enabling technologies including TFT backplanes, pixel drive electronics, pixel patterning technologies, encapsulation technologies and system level engineering. In this paper we will discuss the impact of the recent advances in LTPS and AOS TFTs, R, G, B and White OLED with color filter pixel architectures, and encapsulation, on the success of the OLEDs in consumer electronic devices. We will then discuss potential of these advances in addressing the requirements of OLED and flexible displays for the military and avionics applications.

  17. Phosphorescence Tuning through Heavy Atom Placement in Unsymmetrical Difluoroboron β-Diketonate Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tiandong; Zhang, Guoqing; Evans, Ruffin E; Trindle, Carl O; Altun, Zikri; DeRosa, Christopher A; Wang, Fang; Zhuang, Meng; Fraser, Cassandra L

    2018-02-06

    Difluoroboron β-diketonates (BF 2 bdks) show both fluorescence (F) and room-temperature phosphorescence (RTP) when confined to a rigid matrix, such as poly(lactic acid). These materials have been utilized as optical oxygen sensors (e.g., in tumors, wounds, and cells). Spectral features include charge transfer (CT) from the major aromatic donor to the dioxaborine acceptor. A series of naphthyl-phenyl dyes (BF 2 nbm) (1-6) were prepared to test heavy-atom placement effects. The BF 2 nbm dye (1) was substituted with Br on naphthyl (2), phenyl (3), or both rings (4) to tailor the fluorescence/phosphorescence ratio and RTP lifetime-important features for designing O 2 sensing dyes by means of the heavy atom effect. Computational studies identify the naphthyl ring as the major donor. Thus, Br substitution on the naphthyl ring produced greater effects on the optical properties, such as increased RTP intensity and decreased RTP lifetime compared to phenyl substitution. However, for electron-donating piperidyl-phenyl dyes (5), the phenyl aromatic is the major donor. As a result, Br substitution on the naphthyl ring (6) did not alter the optical properties significantly. Experimental data and computational modeling show the importance of Br position. The S 1 and T 1 states are described by two singly occupied MOs (SOMOs). When both of these SOMOs have substantial amplitude on the heavy atom, passage from S 1 to T 1 and emission from T 1 to S 0 are both favored. This shortens the excited-state lifetimes and enhances phosphorescence. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Ole Ivar Lovaas - His Life, Merits and Legacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil ÖZERK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ole Ivar Lovaas (1927-2010 is known worldwide for his research within the field of Applied Behavior Analysis, and is probably the most influential researcher within the field of treatment of children with autism. In the first part of this biographically oriented paper, we inform the readers about his family background, childhood, elementary and secondary school years, and his adolescent years during World War II in his first homeland, Norway, based on archival research and interviews. In the second part, we describe his life, academic studies, research and successes in his second home country, the United States. Finally, we briefly recount the impact Lovaas has had on the field of Applied Behavior Analysis and the treatment of and services for children with autism spectrum disorders in Norway and in the North America.

  19. Agricultural activities in the Oleśnica commune

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Borkowska

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyse and assess the agricultural activity in the Oleśnica commune. The representative rural property owner was a secondary-educated 43-year old man. Over 70% of respondents demonstrated their willingness to expand by purchasing or renting land and also to develop infrastructure. Agricultural activities within this area were focused mainly on plant-growing, which was preferable due to sustained tide of the market. Arable land was the dominating land type and the main products were: grains, potatoes and rape. Introduced in farms innovations were focused on increasing ef-fectiveness of plant-growing and improving the quality of work in rural properties. These innovations were expected to increase income and, in longer term, make the rural production more competitive on the European market.

  20. Comparison of Cherenkov excited fluorescence and phosphorescence molecular sensing from tissue with external beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huiyun; Zhang, Rongxiao; Gunn, Jason R; Esipova, Tatiana V; Vinogradov, Sergei; Gladstone, David J; Jarvis, Lesley A; Pogue, Brian W

    2016-05-21

    Ionizing radiation delivered by a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) generates Cherenkov emission within the treated tissue. A fraction of this light, in the 600-900 nm wavelength region, propagates through centimeters of tissue and can be used to excite optical probes in vivo, enabling molecular sensing of tissue analytes. The success of isolating the emission signal from this Cherenkov excitation background is dependent on key factors such as: (i) the Stokes shift of the probe spectra; (ii) the excited state lifetime; (iii) the probe concentration; (iv) the depth below the tissue surface; and (v) the radiation dose used. Previous studies have exclusively focused on imaging phosphorescent dyes, rather than fluorescent dyes. However there are only a few biologically important phosphorescent dyes and yet in comparison there are thousands of biologically relevant fluorescent dyes. So in this study the focus was a study of efficacy of Cherenkov-excited luminescence using fluorescent commercial near-infrared probes, IRDye 680RD, IRDye 700DX, and IRDye 800CW, and comparing them to the well characterized phosphorescent probe Oxyphor PtG4, an oxygen sensitive dye. Each probe was excited by Cherenkov light from a 6 MV external radiation beam, and measured in continuous wave or time-gated modes. The detection was performed by spectrally resolving the luminescence signals, and measuring them with spectrometer-based separation on an ICCD detector. The results demonstrate that IRDye 700DX and PtG4 allowed for the maximal signal to noise ratio. In the case of the phosphorescent probe, PtG4, with emission decays on the microsecond (μs) time scale, time-gated acquisition was possible, and it allowed for higher efficacy in terms of the probe concentration and detection depth. Phantoms containing the probe at 5 mm depth could be detected at concentrations down to the nanoMolar range, and at depths into the tissue simulating phantom near 3 cm. In vivo studies showed that 5

  1. Transparency issues still plague business in Latvia

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2010-01-01

    Läti Kaubanduskoja teatel ei ole investorid rahul korruptsiooni ja läbipaistvusega Läti ärikeskkonnas. Läti valitsuselt oodatakse tõhusamaid samme majandus- ja investeerimistingimuste parandamiseks

  2. Nanocellulose reinforcement of Transparent Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua Steele; Hong Dong; James F. Snyder; Josh A. Orlicki; Richard S. Reiner; Alan W. Rudie

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the impact of nanocellulose reinforcement on transparent composite properties. Due to the small diameter, high modulus, and high strength of cellulose nanocrystals, transparent composites that utilize these materials should show improvement in bulk mechanical performances without a corresponding reduction in optical properties. In this study...

  3. Student Perceptions of Teaching Transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Alecia D.; Hunt, Andrea N.; Powell, Rachel E.; Dollar, Cindy Brooks

    2013-01-01

    The authors discuss the relationship between teaching transparency and active learning through the perspectives of their students. Active learning directly engages students in the learning process while transparency involves the instructor's divulgence of logic regarding course organization and activity choices. After utilizing these teaching…

  4. Transparency as an ethical safeguard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spagnolli, Anna; Frank, Lily E.; Haselager, Pim; Kirsh, David; Ham, Jaap; Spagnolli, Anna; Blankertz, Benjamin; Gamberini, Luciano; Jacucci, Giulio

    2018-01-01

    Transparency seems to represent a solution to many ethic issues generated by systems that collect implicit data from users to model the user themselves based on programmed criteria. However, making such systems transparent -- besides being a major technical challenge - risks raising more issues than

  5. Robot transparency, trust and utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortham, Robert H.; Theodorou, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    As robot reasoning becomes more complex, debugging becomes increasingly hard based solely on observable behaviour, even for robot designers and technical specialists. Similarly, non-specialist users have difficulty creating useful mental models of robot reasoning from observations of robot behaviour. The EPSRC Principles of Robotics mandate that our artefacts should be transparent, but what does this mean in practice, and how does transparency affect both trust and utility? We investigate this relationship in the literature and find it to be complex, particularly in nonindustrial environments where, depending on the application and purpose of the robot, transparency may have a wider range of effects on trust and utility. We outline our programme of research to support our assertion that it is nevertheless possible to create transparent agents that are emotionally engaging despite having a transparent machine nature.

  6. Phenomenal transparency in achromatic checkerboards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masin, S C

    1999-04-01

    The study explored the luminance relations that determine the occurrence of achromatic transparency in phenomenal surfaces on complex backgrounds. Let the luminances of the left and right parts of a transparent surface on a bipartite background and those of the left and right parts of the bipartite background be p and q and m and n, respectively. Metelli proposed that this surface looks transparent when the rule p q if m > n) is satisfied, and Masin and Fukuda that it looks transparent when the inclusion rule is satisfied, that is, when p epsilon (m, q) or q epsilon (p, n). These rules also apply to achromatic checkerboards formed by one checkerboard enclosed in another checkerboard. This study shows that only the inclusion rule correctly predicted the occurrence of transparency in these checkerboards.

  7. Kuu plaat : Lauri Saatpalu ja Katrin Mandel "Sa oled hea". Plaadid kauplusest Lasering

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: Lauri Saatpalu ja Katrin Mandel "Sa oled hea", Goldfrapp "Supernature", Ultima Thule "Ingel ja suli", Sigur Ros "Takk...", Franz Ferdinand "You Could Have It So Much Better", Ans.Andur "Tuled peale"

  8. Development of functional nano-particle layer for highly efficient OLED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Min-Hoi; Choi, Haechul; Choi, Yoonseuk

    2015-12-01

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are now widely commercialized in market due to many advantages such as possibility of making thin or flexible devices. Nevertheless there are still several things to obtain the high quality flexible OLEDs, one of the most important issues is the light extraction of the device. It is known that OLEDs have the typical light loss such as the waveguide loss, plasmon absorption loss and internal total reflection. In this paper, we demonstrate the one-step processed light scattering films with aluminum oxide nano-particles and polystyrene matrix composite to achieve highly efficient OLEDs. Optical characteristics and surface roughness of light scattering film was optimized by changing the mixing concentration of Al2O3 nano-particles and investigated with the atomic force microscopy and hazemeter, respectively.

  9. Jumal tänatud, et sa siin oled! / Inge Pitsner

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Pitsner, Inge

    2007-01-01

    Kanal 2 sketshishõude sarja "Jumal tänatud, et sa siin oled!" esimesest saatest : saatejuht Andrus Vaarik : osalejad Peeter Oja, Anu Saagim, Juhan Ulfsak, Mihkel Raud : kohtunik Eino Baskin : tootjafirma Ruut

  10. Voltage-controlled colour-tunable microcavity OLEDs with enhanced colour purity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choy, Wallace C H; Niu, J H; Li, W L; Chui, P C

    2008-01-01

    The emission spectrum of single-unit voltage-controlled colour-tunable organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) has been theoretically and experimentally studied. Our results show that by introducing the microcavity structure, the colour purity of not only the destination colour but also the colour-tunable route can be enhanced, while colour purity is still an issue in typical single-unit voltage-controlled colour-tunable OLEDs. With the consideration of the periodical cycling of resonant wavelength and absorption loss of the metal electrodes, the appropriate change in the thickness of the microcavity structure has been utilized to achieve voltage-controlled red-to-green and red-to-blue colour-tunable OLEDs without adding dyes or other organic materials to the OLEDs

  11. Mechanism of phosphorescence quenching in photomagnetic molecules determined by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, A.; Naidu, S. V. N.

    1994-01-01

    Platinum Octaethyl Porphyrin (Pt.OEP) is an efficient phosphor under ultraviolet excitation. The phosphorescent triplet state (T(sub 1)) is readily quenched by the oxygen (O2) molecules. This phenomenon is being utilized as the basis for global air pressure measurements in aerodynamic facilities at various laboratories. The exact mechanism by which O2 molecules quench the (T(sub 1) - S(sub 0)) transitions is still unknown. The diamagnetic S(sub n) singlet states, which feed T(sub 1) states via intersystem crossings, would presumably not be affected by O2. It must be the magnetic T(sub 1) states, which can interact with the paramagnetic O2 molecules, that are affected. However, our positron lifetime and Doppler broadening studies suggest the formation of (S(sub n) central dot O2) complexes which can also eventually reduce the population of the T(sub 1) states (i.e. quench phosphorescence). This is possible since higher triplet states in (Pt.OEP) are admixed with the S(sub n) states via spin orbit interactions. The experimental procedures and the results of various measurements are discussed in this paper.

  12. Investigation of Oxygen-Induced Quenching of Phosphorescence in Photoexcited Aromatic Molecules by Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jag J.; Eftekhari, Abe

    1996-01-01

    Platinum OctaEthyl Porphyrin (Pt.OEP) is an efficient phosphor under ultraviolet excitation. The phosphorescent triplet state P(T(Sup 1)) is readily quenched by the oxygen O2 molecules. This phenomenon is being utilized as the basis for global air pressure measurements in aerodynamic facilities at various laboratories. The exact mechanism by which O2 molecules quench the P(T(Sup 1) approaches P(S(Sub O)) transitions is still unknown. The diamagnetic singlet states P(S(Sub n)), which feed P(T(Sub 1)) states via intersystem crossings, would presumably not be affected by O2. It must be only the magnetic P(T(Sub 1)) states, which can interact with the paramagnetic O2 molecules, that are affected. However, our positron lifetime and Doppler broadening studies suggest the formation of O2P(S(Sub n)), complexes which can also eventually reduce the population of the P(T(Sub 1)) states (i.e., quench phosphorescence). This reduction is possible because higher triplet states in (Pt.OEP) are admixed with the P(S(Sub 1)), states via spin orbit interactions. The experimental procedures and the results of various measurements are presented in this paper.

  13. Room temperature phosphorescence in the liquid state as a tool in analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijt, Jacobus; Ariese, Freek; Brinkman, Udo A.Th.; Gooijer, Cees

    2003-01-01

    A wide-ranging overview of room temperature phosphorescence in the liquid state (RTPL ) is presented, with a focus on recent developments. RTPL techniques like micelle-stabilized (MS)-RTP, cyclodextrin-induced (CD)-RTP, and heavy atom-induced (HAI)-RTP are discussed. These techniques are mainly applied in the stand-alone format, but coupling with some separation techniques appears to be feasible. Applications of direct, sensitized and quenched phosphorescence are also discussed. As regards sensitized and quenched RTP, emphasis is on the coupling with liquid chromatography (LC) and capillary electrophoresis (CE), but stand-alone applications are also reported. Further, the application of RTPL in immunoassays and in RTP optosensing - the optical sensing of analytes based on RTP - is reviewed. Next to the application of RTPL in quantitative analysis, its use for the structural probing of protein conformations and for time-resolved microscopy of labelled biomolecules is discussed. Finally, an overview is presented of the various analytical techniques which are based on the closely related phenomenon of long-lived lanthanide luminescence. The paper closes with a short evaluation of the state-of-the-art in RTP and a discussion on future perspectives

  14. Microchambers with Solid-State Phosphorescent Sensor for Measuring Single Mitochondrial Respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ted D; Wallace, Douglas C; Burke, Peter J

    2016-07-09

    It is now well established that, even within a single cell, multiple copies of the mitochondrial genome may be present (genetic heteroplasmy). It would be interesting to develop techniques to determine if and to what extent this genetic variation results in functional variation from one mitochondrion to the next (functional heteroplasmy). Measuring mitochondrial respiration can reveal the organelles' functional capacity for Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and determine mitochondrial damage that may arise from genetic or age related defects. However, available technologies require significant quantities of mitochondria. Here, we develop a technology to assay the respiration of a single mitochondrion. Our "micro-respirometer" consists of micron sized chambers etched out of borofloat glass substrates and coated with an oxygen sensitive phosphorescent dye Pt(II) meso-tetra(pentafluorophenyl)porphine (PtTFPP) mixed with polystyrene. The chambers are sealed with a polydimethylsiloxane layer coated with oxygen impermeable Viton rubber to prevent diffusion of oxygen from the environment. As the mitochondria consume oxygen in the chamber, the phosphorescence signal increases, allowing direct determination of the respiration rate. Experiments with coupled vs. uncoupled mitochondria showed a substantial difference in respiration, confirming the validity of the microchambers as single mitochondrial respirometers. This demonstration could enable future high-throughput assays of mitochondrial respiration and benefit the study of mitochondrial functional heterogeneity, and its role in health and disease.

  15. Tracking the Oxygen Status in the Cell Nucleus with a Hoechst-Tagged Phosphorescent Ruthenium Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Daiki; Umehara, Yui; Son, Aoi; Asahi, Wataru; Misu, Sotaro; Kurihara, Ryohsuke; Kondo, Teruyuki; Tanabe, Kazuhito

    2018-05-04

    Molecular oxygen in living cells is distributed and consumed inhomogeneously, depending on the activity of each organelle. Therefore, tractable methods that can be used to monitor the oxygen status in each organelle are needed to understand cellular function. Here we report the design of a new oxygen-sensing probe for use in the cell nucleus. We prepared "Ru-Hoechsts", each consisting of a phosphorescent ruthenium complex linked to a Hoechst 33258 moiety, and characterized their properties as oxygen sensors. The Hoechst unit shows strong DNA-binding properties in the nucleus, and the ruthenium complex shows oxygen-dependent phosphorescence. Thus, Ru-Hoechsts accumulated in the cell nucleus and showed oxygen-dependent signals that could be monitored. Of the Ru-Hoechsts prepared in this study, Ru-Hoechst b, in which the ruthenium complex and the Hoechst unit were linked through a hexyl chain, showed the most suitable properties for monitoring the oxygen status. Ru-Hoechsts are probes with high potential for visualizing oxygen fluctuations in the nucleus. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Dopant effects on charge transport to enhance performance of phosphorescent white organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Liping; Chen, Jiangshan; Ma, Dongge, E-mail: mdg1014@ciac.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Polymer Physics and Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2015-11-07

    We compared the performance of phosphorescent white organic light emitting diodes (WOLEDs) with red-blue-green and green-blue-red sequent emissive layers. It was found that the influence of red and green dopants on electron and hole transport in emissive layers leads to the large difference in the efficiency of fabricated WOLEDs. This improvement mechanism is well investigated by the current density-voltage characteristics of single-carrier devices based on dopant doped emissive layers and the comparison of electroluminescent and photoluminescence spectra, and attributed to the different change of charge carrier transport by the dopants. The optimized device achieves a maximum power efficiency, current efficiency, and external quantum efficiency of 37.0 lm/W, 38.7 cd/A, and 17.7%, respectively, which are only reduced to 32.8 lm/W, 38.5 cd/A, and 17.3% at 1000 cd/m{sup 2} luminance. The critical current density is as high as 210 mA/cm{sup 2}. It can be seen that the efficiency roll-off in phosphorescent WOLEDs can be well improved by effectively designing the structure of emissive layers.

  17. Direct Detection of Potential Pyrethroids in Yangtze River via an Imprinted Multilayer Phosphorescence Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Lv, Xiaodong; Dai, Jiangdong; Sun, Lin; Huo, Pengwei; Li, Chunxiang; Yan, Yongsheng

    2018-01-01

    A novel tailored multilayer probe for monitoring potential pyrethroids in the Yangtze River was proposed. The room-temperature phosphorescence method was applied to realize a detection strategy that is superior to the fluorescence method. Efficient Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots with uniform size of 4.6 nm were firstly coated with a mesoporous silica to obtain a suitable intermediate transition layer, then an imprinted layer containing bifenthrin specific recognition sites was anchored. Characterizations verified the multilayer structure convincingly and the detection process relied on the electron transfer-induced fluorescence quenching mechanism. Optional detection time and standard detection curve were obtained within a concentration range from 5.0 to 50 μmol L -1 . The stability was verified to be good after 12 replicates. Feasibility of the probe was proved by monitoring water samples from the Zhenjiang reach of the Yangtze River. The probe offers promise for direct bifenthrin detection in unknown environmental water with an accurate and stable phosphorescence analysis strategy.

  18. Steady-state fluorescence and phosphorescence spectroscopic studies of bacterial luciferase tryptophan mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Meighen, E A

    1994-09-01

    Bacterial luciferase, which catalyzes the bioluminescence reaction in luminous bacteria, consists of two nonidentical polypeptides, α and β. Eight mutants of luciferase with each of the tryptophans replaced by tyrosine were generated by site-directed mutagenesis and purified to homogeneity. The steady-state tryptophan fluorescence and low-temperature phosphorescence spectroscopic properties of these mutants were characterized. In some instances, mutation of only a single tryptophan residue resulted in large spectral changes. The tryptophan residues conserved in both the α and the β subunits exhibited distinct fluorescence emission properties, suggesting that these tryptophans have different local enviroments. The low-temperature phosphorescence data suggest that the tryptophans conserved in bot the α and the β subunits are not located at the subunit interface and/or involved in subunit interactions. The differences in the spectral properties of the mutants have provided useful information on the local environment of the individual tryptophan residues as well as on the quaternary structure of the protein.

  19. Energy-donor phosphorescence quenching study of triplet–triplet energy transfer between UV absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Azusa; Nakabai, Yuya; Oguchi-Fujiyama, Nozomi; Miyazawa, Kazuyuki; Yagi, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    The intermolecular triplet–triplet energy transfer from a photounstable UV-A absorber, 4-tert-butyl-4′-methoxydibenzoylmethane (BMDBM), to UV-B absorbers, 2-ethylhexyl 4-methoxycinnamate (octyl methoxycinnamate, OMC), octocrylene (OCR) and dioctyl 4-methoxybenzylidenemalonate (DOMBM) has been observed using a 355 nm laser excitation in rigid solutions at 77 K. The decay curves of the energy-donor phosphorescence in the presence of the UV-B absorbers deviate from the exponential decay at the initial stage of the decay. The Stern–Volmer formulation is not valid in rigid solutions because molecular diffusion is impossible. The experimental results indicate that the rate constant of triplet–triplet energy transfer from BMDBM to the UV-B absorbers, k T–T , decreases in the following order: k T–T (BMDBM–DOMBM)>k T–T (BMDBM–OMC)≥k T–T (BMDBM–OCR). The presence of DOMBM enhances the photostability of the widely used combination of UV-A and UV-B absorbers, BMDBM and OCR. The effects of the triplet–triplet energy transfer on the photostability of BMDBM are discussed. - Highlights: • The intermolecular triplet–triplet energy transfer between UV absorbers was observed. • The phosphorescence decay deviates from exponential at the initial stage of decay. • The effects of triplet–triplet energy transfer on the photostability are discussed

  20. Effect of Doping Phosphorescent Material and Annealing Treatment on the Performance of Polymer Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zixuan Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of polymer solar cells (PSCs with P3HT:PCBM or P3HT:PCBM:Ir(btpy3 blend films as the active layer were fabricated under the same conditions. Effects of phosphorescent material Ir(btpy3 doping concentration and annealing temperature on the performance of PSCs were investigated. The short-circuit current density (Jsc and open-circuit voltage (Voc are increased by adopting P3HT:PCBM:Ir(btpy3 blend films as the active layer when the cells do not undergo annealing treatment. The increased Jsc should be attributed to the increase of photon harvesting induced by doping phosphorescent material Ir(btpy3 and the effective energy transfer from Ir(btpy3 to P3HT. The effective energy transfer from Ir(btpy3 to P3HT was demonstrated by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL spectra. The increased Voc is due to the photovoltaic effect between Ir(btpy3 and PCBM. The power conversion efficiency (PCE of PSCs with P3HT:PCBM as the active layer is increased from 0.19% to 1.49% by annealing treatment at 140°C for 10 minutes. The PCE of PSCs with P3HT:PCBM:Ir(btpy3 as the active layer is increased from 0.49% to 0.95% by annealing treatment at lower temperature at 100°C for 10 minutes.

  1. Size-tunable phosphorescence in colloidal metastable gamma-Ga2O3 nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Farvid, Shokouh S; Abulikemu, Mutalifu; Radovanovic, Pavle V

    2010-07-14

    We report a colloidal synthesis of gallium oxide (Ga(2)O(3)) nanocrystals having metastable cubic crystal structure (gamma phase) and uniform size distribution. Using the synthesized nanocrystal size series we demonstrate for the first time a size-tunable photoluminescence in Ga(2)O(3) from ultraviolet to blue, with the emission shifting to lower energies with increasing nanocrystal size. The observed photoluminescence is dominated by defect-based donor-acceptor pair recombination and has a lifetime of several milliseconds. Importantly, the decay of this phosphorescence is also size dependent. The phosphorescence energy and the decay rate increase with decreasing nanocrystal size, owing to a reduced donor-acceptor separation. These results allow for a rational and predictable tuning of the optical properties of this technologically important material and demonstrate the possibility of manipulating the localized defect interactions via nanocrystal size. Furthermore, the same defect states, particularly donors, are also implicated in electrical conductivity rendering monodispersed Ga(2)O(3) nanocrystals a promising material for multifunctional optoelectronic structures and devices.

  2. Intracellular O2 sensing probe based on cell-penetrating phosphorescent nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fercher, Andreas; Borisov, Sergey M; Zhdanov, Alexander V; Klimant, Ingo; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2011-07-26

    A new intracellular O(2) (icO(2)) sensing probe is presented, which comprises a nanoparticle (NP) formulation of a cationic polymer Eudragit RL-100 and a hydrophobic phosphorescent dye Pt(II)-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin (PtPFPP). Using the time-resolved fluorescence (TR-F) plate reader set-up, cell loading was investigated in detail, particularly the effects of probe concentration, loading time, serum content in the medium, cell type, density, etc. The use of a fluorescent analogue of the probe in conjunction with confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, revealed that cellular uptake of the NPs is driven by nonspecific energy-dependent endocytosis and that the probe localizes inside the cell close to the nucleus. Probe calibration in biological environment was performed, which allowed conversion of measured phosphorescence lifetime signals into icO(2) concentration (μM). Its analytical performance in icO(2) sensing experiments was demonstrated by monitoring metabolic responses of mouse embryonic fibroblast cells under ambient and hypoxic macroenvironment. The NP probe was seen to generate stable and reproducible signals in different types of mammalian cells and robust responses to their metabolic stimulation, thus allowing accurate quantitative analysis. High brightness and photostability allow its use in screening experiments with cell populations on a commercial TR-F reader, and for single cell analysis on a fluorescent microscope.

  3. Selectively reflective transparent sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waché, Rémi; Florescu, Marian; Sweeney, Stephen J.; Clowes, Steven K.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the possibility to selectively reflect certain wavelengths while maintaining the optical properties on other spectral ranges. This is of particular interest for transparent materials, which for specific applications may require high reflectivity at pre-determined frequencies. Although there exist currently techniques such as coatings to produce selective reflection, this work focuses on new approaches for mass production of polyethylene sheets which incorporate either additives or surface patterning for selective reflection between 8 to 13 μ m. Typical additives used to produce a greenhouse effect in plastics include particles such as clays, silica or hydroxide materials. However, the absorption of thermal radiation is less efficient than the decrease of emissivity as it can be compared with the inclusion of Lambertian materials. Photonic band gap engineering by the periodic structuring of metamaterials is known in nature for producing the vivid bright colors in certain organisms via strong wavelength-selective reflection. Research to artificially engineer such structures has mainly focused on wavelengths in the visible and near infrared. However few studies to date have been carried out to investigate the properties of metastructures in the mid infrared range even though the patterning of microstructure is easier to achieve. We present preliminary results on the diffuse reflectivity using FDTD simulations and analyze the technical feasibility of these approaches.

  4. Characteristics of indium zinc oxide films deposited using the facing targets sputtering method for OLEDs applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rim, Y.S.; Kim, H.J.; Kim, K.H.

    2010-01-01

    The amorphous indium zinc oxide (IZO) thin films were deposited on polyethersulfone (PES) and glass substrates using the facing targets sputtering (FTS) system. The electrical, optical and structural properties of the IZO thin films deposited as functions of sputtering parameters on the glass and PES substrates. An optimal IZO deposition condition is fabricated for organic light-emitting device (OLED) based on glass and PES. The amorphous IZO anode-based OLEDs show superior current density and luminance characteristics.

  5. Photovoltaic OLED Driver for Low-Power Stand-Alone Light-to-Light Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, Rasmus Overgaard; Knott, Arnold

    2016-01-01

    of a three-port-converter for this purpose optimized for the specifications for driving an Organic Light Emitting Diode (OLED) panel intended for lighting purposes. By using a three-port-converter, featuring shared components for each conversion mode, the converter reaches 97 % efficiency at 1.8 W during...... conversion from photovoltaic panel to the battery, and 97 % in the area 1.4 W to 2 W for power delivery to the OLED....

  6. Multi-Periodic Photonic Crystal Out-Coupling Layers for Flexible OLEDs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kluge, Christian; Pradana, Arfat; Adam, Jost

    2014-01-01

    Waveguide mode extraction with multi-periodic photonic crystals is studied in experiment and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. Flexible nanostructured organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are fabricated by UV nanoimprint lithography.......Waveguide mode extraction with multi-periodic photonic crystals is studied in experiment and finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. Flexible nanostructured organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are fabricated by UV nanoimprint lithography....

  7. GATEWAY Report Brief: OLED Lighting in the Offices of Aurora Lighting Design, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-05-31

    Summary of a GATEWAY report evaluation at the offices of Aurora Lighting Design, Inc., in Grayslake, IL, where the GATEWAY program conducted its first investigation involving OLED lighting. The project experienced several challenges, but also highlighted a number of promising attributes – which indicate that with continued improvements in efficacy, longevity, size, and flexibility, OLEDs could provide a new tool for creative and effective lighting.

  8. Oxygenation measurement by multi-wavelength oxygen-dependent phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence: catchment depth and application in intact heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balestra, Gianmarco M.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Specht, Patricia A. C.; Ince, Can; Mik, Egbert G.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen delivery and metabolism represent key factors for organ function in health and disease. We describe the optical key characteristics of a technique to comprehensively measure oxygen tension (PO(2)) in myocardium, using oxygen-dependent quenching of phosphorescence and delayed fluorescence of

  9. Stereoselective Binding of Flurbiprofen Enantiomers and their Methyl Esters to Human Serum Albumin Studied by Time-Resolved Phosphorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    mr. Lammers, I.; Lhiaubet-Vallet, V.; Jimenez, M.C.; Ariese, F.; Miranda, M.A.; Gooijer, C.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen (FBP) with human serum albumin (HSA) hardly influences the fluorescence of the protein's single tryptophan (Trp). Therefore, in addition to fluorescence, heavy atom-induced room-temperature phosphorescence is used to study the

  10. Determination of macromolecular exchange and PO2 in the microcirculation: a simple system for in vivo fluorescence and phosphorescence videomicroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres L.N.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a system with two epi-illumination sources, a DC-regulated lamp for transillumination and mechanical switches for rapid shift of illumination and detection of defined areas (250-750 µm² by fluorescence and phosphorescence videomicroscopy. The system permits investigation of standard microvascular parameters, vascular permeability as well as intra- and extravascular PO2 by phosphorescence quenching of Pd-meso-tetra (4-carboxyphenyl porphine (PORPH. A Pechan prism was used to position a defined region over the photomultiplier and TV camera. In order to validate the system for in vivo use, in vitro tests were performed with probes at concentrations that can be found in microvascular studies. Extensive in vitro evaluations were performed by filling glass capillaries with solutions of various concentrations of FITC-dextran (diluted in blood and in saline mixed with different amounts of PORPH. Fluorescence intensity and phosphorescence decay were determined for each mixture. FITC-dextran solutions without PORPH and PORPH solutions without FITC-dextran were used as references. Phosphorescence decay curves were relatively unaffected by the presence of FITC-dextran at all concentrations tested (0.1 µg/ml to 5 mg/ml. Likewise, fluorescence determinations were performed in the presence of PORPH (0.05 to 0.5 mg/ml. The system was successfully used to study macromolecular extravasation and PO2 in the rat mesentery circulation under controlled conditions and during ischemia-reperfusion.

  11. Quantitative determination of localized tissue oxygen concentration in vivo by two-photon excitation phosphorescence lifetime measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mik, Egbert G.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Raat, Nicolaas J.; Ince, Can

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the use of two-photon excitation phosphorescence lifetime measurements for quantitative oxygen determination in vivo. Doubling the excitation wavelength of Pd-porphyrin from visible light to the infrared allows for deeper tissue penetration and a more precise and confined

  12. A computational protocol for the study of circularly polarized phosphorescence and circular dichroism in spin-forbidden absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaminski, Maciej; Cukras, Janusz; Pecul, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    We present a computational methodology to calculate the intensity of circular dichroism (CD) in spinforbidden absorption and of circularly polarized phosphorescence (CPP) signals, a manifestation of the optical activity of the triplet–singlet transitions in chiral compounds. The protocol is based...

  13. Nuclear deterrence: which environmental transparency?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherief, Hamza

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the field of nuclear geopolitics. The author discusses the tensions between the principle of transparency regarding environmental issues on the one hand, and the protection of nuclear deterrence as instrument of power on the other hand. According to the French law, the preservation of nuclear power instruments means the acknowledgement of a legal regime which is specific to national defence requirements in terms of secret and right to information. Thus, the author discusses the constitutional limitations of the environmental transparency obligation for the protection of Nation's fundamental interests. Then, by commenting the Rainbow Warrior affair, the author highlights the exceptional limitations of the transparency requirement regarding nuclear issues

  14. Transparency masters for mathematics revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Elizabeth

    1980-01-01

    Transparency Masters for Mathematics Revealed focuses on master diagrams that can be used for transparencies for an overhead projector or duplicator masters for worksheets. The book offers information on a compilation of master diagrams prepared by John R. Stafford, Jr., audiovisual supervisor at the University of Missouri at Kansas City. Some of the transparencies are designed to be shown horizontally. The initial three masters are number lines and grids that can be used in a mathematics course, while the others are adaptations of text figures which are slightly altered in some instances. The

  15. New cyclometalated iridium(III) complex as a phosphorescent dopant in organic light emitting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, P.; Tomova, R.; Petrova, P.; Stanimirov, S.; Petkov, I.

    2014-05-01

    A new cyclometalated iridium (III) bis[2-(4-chlorophenyl)benzothiazolato-N,C2]-acetylacetonate, (Cl-bt)2Ir(acac), was synthesized and identified by 1H NMR and elemental analysis. The application was studied of the new compound as a dopant in the hole transporting layer (HTL) of the following organic light emitting diode (OLED) structure: HTL/EL/ETL, where HTL was 4,4'-bis(9H-carbazol-9-yl)biphenyl (CBP) or N,N'-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N'-diphenylbenzidine (TPD), incorporated in a poly(N-vinylcarbazole) (PVK) matrix; EL was an electroluminescent layer of bis(8-hydroxy-2-methylquinoline)-(4-phenylpheno-xy) aluminum (BAlq); and ETL was an electron-transporting layer of bis[2-(2-benzothiazoly) phenolato]zinc(II) (Zn(btz)2). We established that the electroluminescence spectra of the OLEDs at different dopant concentrations were basically the sum of the greenish-blue emission of BAlq and the yellowish-green emission of the Ir complex. It was also found that increasing the dopant concentration resulted in an increase in the relative electroluminescent intensity of the Ir complex emission, while that of BAlq decreased, thus a fine tuning of the OLED color was observed.

  16. Strengthening Transparency in Regulatory Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Where available and appropriate, EPA will use peer-reviewed information, standardized test methods, consistent data evaluation procedures, and good laboratory practices to ensure transparent, understandable, and reproducible scientific assessments.

  17. Transparency in Cooperative Online Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Christian; Paulsen, Morten Flate

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the following question: What is the potential of social networking within cooperative online education? Social networking does not necessarily involve communication, dialogue, or collaboration. Instead, the authors argue that transparency is a unique...... feature of social networking services. Transparency gives students insight into each other’s actions. Cooperative learning seeks to develop virtual learning environments that allow students to have optimal individual freedom within online learning communities. This article demonstrates how cooperative...... learning can be supported by transparency. To illustrate this with current examples, the article presents NKI Distance Education’s surveys and experiences with cooperative learning. The article discusses by which means social networking and transparency may be utilized within cooperative online education...

  18. Transparent Memory For Harsh Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Ho, C. H.; Duran Retamal, Jose Ramon; Yang, P. K.; Lee, C. P.; Tsai, M. L.; Kang, C. F.; He, Jr-Hau

    2017-01-01

    As a new class of non-volatile memory, resistive random access memory (RRAM) offers not only superior electronic characteristics, but also advanced functionalities, such as transparency and radiation hardness. However, the environmental tolerance

  19. Transparent Ferroelectric Capacitors on Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Sette

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We deposited transparent ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate thin films on fused silica and contacted them via Al-doped zinc oxide (AZO transparent electrodes with an interdigitated electrode (IDE design. These layers, together with a TiO2 buffer layer on the fused silica substrate, are highly transparent (>60% in the visible optical range. Fully crystallized Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PZT films are dielectrically functional and exhibit a typical ferroelectric polarization loop with a remanent polarization of 15 μC/cm2. The permittivity value of 650, obtained with IDE AZO electrodes is equivalent to the one measured with Pt electrodes patterned with the same design, which proves the high quality of the developed transparent structures.

  20. Lines that induce phenomenal transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieco, Alba; Roncato, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    Three neighbouring opaque surfaces may appear split into two layers, one transparent and one opaque beneath, if an outline contour is drawn that encompasses two of them. The phenomenon was originally observed by Kanizsa [1955 Rivista di Psicologia 69 3-19; 1979 Organization in Vision: Essays on Gestalt Psychology (New York: Praeger)], for the case where an outline contour is drawn to encompass one of the two parts of a bicoloured figure and a portion of a background of lightest (or darkest) luminance. Preliminary observations revealed that the outline contour yields different effects: in addition to the stratification into layers described by Kanizsa, a second split, opposite in depth order, may occur when the outline contour is close in luminance to one of the three surfaces. An initial experiment was designed to investigate what conditions give rise to the two phenomenal transparencies: this led to the conclusion that an outline contour superimposed on an opaque surface causes this surface to emerge as a transparent layer when the luminances of the contour and the surface differ, in absolute value, by no more than 13.2 cd m(-2). We have named this phenomenon 'transparency of the intercepted surface', to distinguish it from the phenomenal transparency arising when the contour and surface are very different in luminance. When such a difference exists, the contour acts as a factor of surface definition and grouping: the portion of the homogeneous surface it bounds emerges as a fourth surface and groups with a nearby surface if there is one close in luminance. The transparency phenomena ('transparency of the contoured surface') perceived in this context conform to the constraints of Metelli's model, as demonstrated by a second experiment, designed to gather 'opacity' ratings of stimuli. The observer judgments conformed to the values predicted by Metelli's formula for perceived degree of transparency, alpha. The role of the outline contour in conveying figural and

  1. Double-layered liquid crystal light shutter for control of absorption and scattering of the light incident to a transparent display device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jae-Won; Yu, Byeong-Hun; Shin, Dong-Myung; Yoon, Tae-Hoon

    2015-03-01

    Recently, a transparent display has got much attention as one of the next generation display devices. Especially, active studies on a transparent display using organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are in progress. However, since it is not possible to obtain black color using a transparent OLED, it suffers from poor visibility. This inevitable problem can be solved by using a light shutter. Light shutter technology can be divided into two types; light absorption and scattering. However, a light shutter based on light absorption cannot block the background image perfectly and a light shutter based on light scattering cannot provide black color. In this work we demonstrate a light shutter using two liquid crystal (LC) layers, a light absorption layer and a light scattering layer. To realize a light absorption layer and a light scattering layer, we use the planar state of a dye-doped chiral nematic LC (CNLC) cell and the focal-conic state of a long-pitch CNLC cell, respectively. The proposed light shutter device can block the background image perfectly and show black color. We expect that the proposed light shutter can increase the visibility of a transparent display.

  2. A Concise Dictionary of Transparency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Misun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses an essay collection by Marek Bieńczyk, Przeźroczystość [Transparency]. The concept, placed in various context, shows various aspects and is seen in various shades. The author does not put forward a statement, but rather proposes a work to be done: to determine the modality of transparency. The concept initially seems to be mainly epistemological: the cognizant subject would like to make the world transparent, to discover all possible mysteries. Before that, however, the subject must know itself, and here the dream of trans­parency also plays the key role. Lack of epistemological transparency is the main cause of melancholy and its reverse — hysteria. The concept turns out to be important in the domain of love — the loer thinks that (she knows the desired person more better anybody else, that (she has entirely penetrated the subjectivity of the Other. Ultimately, however, the dream of transparency goes down to a slow demise of the subject: as self-discovery progresses, there is less and less of the discoverer. In conclusion of this work, the border of modality of the concept turns out to be horrifyingly obvious. The desire for transparency consequently searches not for knowledge, but for an escape whose name is death.

  3. Semi-transparent solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, J; Jasieniak, J J

    2017-01-01

    Semi-transparent solar cells are a type of technology that combines the benefits of visible light transparency and light-to-electricity conversion. One of the biggest opportunities for such technologies is in their integration as windows and skylights within energy-sustainable buildings. Currently, such building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) are dominated by crystalline silicon based modules; however, the opaque nature of silicon creates a unique opportunity for the adoption of emerging photovoltaic candidates that can be made truly semi-transparent. These include: amorphous silicon-, kesterite-, chalcopyrite-, CdTe-, dye-sensitized-, organic- and perovskite- based systems. For the most part, amorphous silicon has been the workhorse in the semi-transparent solar cell field owing to its established, low-temperature fabrication processes. Excitement around alternative classes, particularly perovskites and the inorganic candidates, has recently arisen because of the major efficiency gains exhibited by these technologies. Importantly, each of these presents unique opportunities and challenges within the context of BIPV. This topic review provides an overview into the broader benefits of semi-transparent solar cells as building-integrated features, as well as providing the current development status into all of the major types of semi-transparent solar cells technologies. (topical review)

  4. Lignin-Retaining Transparent Wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Fu, Qiliang; Rojas, Ramiro; Yan, Min; Lawoko, Martin; Berglund, Lars

    2017-09-11

    Optically transparent wood, combining optical and mechanical performance, is an emerging new material for light-transmitting structures in buildings with the aim of reducing energy consumption. One of the main obstacles for transparent wood fabrication is delignification, where around 30 wt % of wood tissue is removed to reduce light absorption and refractive index mismatch. This step is time consuming and not environmentally benign. Moreover, lignin removal weakens the wood structure, limiting the fabrication of large structures. A green and industrially feasible method has now been developed to prepare transparent wood. Up to 80 wt % of lignin is preserved, leading to a stronger wood template compared to the delignified alternative. After polymer infiltration, a high-lignin-content transparent wood with transmittance of 83 %, haze of 75 %, thermal conductivity of 0.23 W mK -1 , and work-tofracture of 1.2 MJ m -3 (a magnitude higher than glass) was obtained. This transparent wood preparation method is efficient and applicable to various wood species. The transparent wood obtained shows potential for application in energy-saving buildings. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  5. Semi-transparent solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J.; Jasieniak, J. J.

    2017-03-01

    Semi-transparent solar cells are a type of technology that combines the benefits of visible light transparency and light-to-electricity conversion. One of the biggest opportunities for such technologies is in their integration as windows and skylights within energy-sustainable buildings. Currently, such building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) are dominated by crystalline silicon based modules; however, the opaque nature of silicon creates a unique opportunity for the adoption of emerging photovoltaic candidates that can be made truly semi-transparent. These include: amorphous silicon-, kesterite-, chalcopyrite-, CdTe-, dye-sensitized-, organic- and perovskite- based systems. For the most part, amorphous silicon has been the workhorse in the semi-transparent solar cell field owing to its established, low-temperature fabrication processes. Excitement around alternative classes, particularly perovskites and the inorganic candidates, has recently arisen because of the major efficiency gains exhibited by these technologies. Importantly, each of these presents unique opportunities and challenges within the context of BIPV. This topic review provides an overview into the broader benefits of semi-transparent solar cells as building-integrated features, as well as providing the current development status into all of the major types of semi-transparent solar cells technologies.

  6. Photochemically induced emission tuning of conductive polumers used in OLEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilopoulou, M [NCSR ' Demokritos' , Institute of Microelectronics, POB 60228, 153 10 Agia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Pistolis, G [Institute of Physical Chemistry, NCSR ' Demokritos' Athens 153 10 (Greece); Argitis, P [NCSR ' Demokritos' , Institute of Microelectronics, POB 60228, 153 10 Agia Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece)

    2005-01-01

    The present work focuses on the use of novel patterning technology schemes for the fabrication of OLED-based displays and in particular on the definition of two colour emitting pixels in one polymeric conducting layer. The approach adopted to this end is based on photochemically induced emition tuning. On the basis of this approach a novel photolithographic patterning technique was developed, aiming at the considerable simplification of the display fabrication process and on the performance improvement. We prepared electroluminescent devices that are emitting blue colour ({lambda}{sub max} 413 nm) with a turnon voltage about 12-15 V. In other devices we introduce a dispersed dye (1-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]-6-phenylhexatriene) and a series of photoacid generators (onium salts) in the polymeric layer and, by using an appropriate photochemical transformation through a photomask in a single layer, we were able to change the colour to desirable direction, since the parent compound and its photochemical product have distinguishable luminescence spectra (green and blue colour respectively). We were able to produce two of the three primary colours in a single layer of a conductive polymer by using a photochemical transformation based on photoacid induced emission change. A series of photoacid generators were evaluated.

  7. New concept for in-line OLED manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, U.; Landgraf, H.; Campo, M.; Keller, S.; Koening, M.

    2011-03-01

    A new concept of a vertical In-Line deposition machine for large area white OLED production has been developed. The concept targets manufacturing on large substrates (>= Gen 4, 750 x 920 mm2) using linear deposition source achieving a total material utilization of >= 50 % and tact time down to 80 seconds. The continuously improved linear evaporation sources for the organic material achieve thickness uniformity on Gen 4 substrate of better than +/- 3 % and stable deposition rates down to less than 0.1 nm m/min and up to more than 100 nm m/min. For Lithium-Fluoride but also for other high evaporation temperature materials like Magnesium or Silver a linear source with uniformity better than +/- 3 % has been developed. For Aluminum we integrated a vertical oriented point source using wire feed to achieve high (> 150 nm m/min) and stable deposition rates. The machine concept includes a new vertical vacuum handling and alignment system for Gen 4 shadow masks. A complete alignment cycle for the mask can be done in less than one minute achieving alignment accuracy in the range of several 10 μm.

  8. White OLED in Hybrid Structure for Enhancing Color Purity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Eun; Kang, Min-Jae; Park, Gwang-Ryeol; Lee, Burm-Jong; Kwon, Young-Soo; Shin, Hoon-Kyu

    2016-06-01

    We synthesized the red emission material, bis(1,4-bis(5-phenyloxazol-2-yl)phenyl) iridium(picolate) [Ir-complexes] and the blue emission material, bis (2-(2-hydroxyphenyl) benzoxazolate)zinc [Zn(HPB)2]. White Organic Light Emitting Diodes were fabricated by using Zn(HPB)2 for a blue emitting layer, Ir-complexes for a red emitting layer and a tris (8-hydroxy quinoline)aluminum [Alq3] for a green emitting layer. The important experimental results obtained, white OLED was fabricated by using double emitting layers of Zn(HPB)2 and Alq3:Ir-complexes, and hole blocking layer of 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline[BCP]. We also varied the thickness of BCP. When the thickness of BCP layer was 5 nm, white emission was achieved. We obtained a maximum luminance of 5400 cd/m2 at a current density of 650 mA/cm2. The CIE coordinates was (0.339, 0.323) at voltage of 10 V.

  9. Transient behaviour of the mechanoluminescence induced by impulsive deformation of fluorescent and phosphorescent crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, B.P.; Mahobia, S.K.; Jha, P.; Kuraria, R.K.; Kuraria, S.R.; Baghel, R.N.; Thaker, S.

    2008-01-01

    When a crystal is fractured impulsively by the impact of a moving piston, then initially the mechanoluminescence (ML) intensity increases quadratically with time, attains a peak value and later on it decreases with time. Considering that the solid state ML and gas discharge ML are excited due to the charging and subsequent production of electric field near the tip of moving cracks, expressions are derived for the transient ML intensity I, time t m and intensity I m corresponding to the peak of ML intensity versus time curve, respectively, the total ML intensity I T , and for fast and slow decays of the ML intensity. It is shown that the decay time for the fast decrease of the ML intensity after t m , is related to the decay time of the strain rate of crystals, and the decay time of slow decay of ML, only observed in phosphorescent crystals, is equal to the decay time of phosphorescence. The value of t m decreases with the increasing impact velocity, I m increases with the increasing impact velocity, and I T initially increases and then it tends to attain a saturation value for higher values of the impact velocity. The values of t m , I m and I T increase linearly with the thickness, area of cross-section and volume of the crystals, respectively. So far as the rise, attainment of ML peak, and fast decay of ML are concerned, there is no any significant difference in the time-evolution of solid state ML, gas discharge ML, and the ML emission consisting of both the solid state ML and gas discharge ML. From the time-dependence of ML, the values of the time-constant for decrease of the surface area created by the movement of a single crack, the time-constant for the decrease of strain rate of crystals, and the decay time of phosphorescence of crystals can be determined. A good agreement is found between the theoretical and experimental results. The importance of fracto ML induced by impulsive deformation of crystals is discussed

  10. Direct screening of tetracyclines in water and bovine milk using room temperature phosphorescence detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traviesa-Alvarez, J.M.; Costa-Fernandez, J.M.; Pereiro, R.; Sanz-Medel, A.

    2007-01-01

    A fast and simple flow-through optosensor was designed and characterized for the direct screening of four tetracycline (TCC) antibiotics (tetracycline, oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline and doxycycline) in water and bovine milk samples. The proposed optosensor provides rapid binary yes/no overall responses, being appropriate for the screening of this family of antibiotics above or below a pre-set concentration threshold. The experimental set-up is based on a flow-injection manifold coupled on-line to a phosphorescence detector. Aliquots of the samples are pretreated with Eu(III) to form room temperature phosphorescent metal chelates and injected in the flow manifold. Those chelates are then on-line retained on a conventional flow-cell (packed with polymeric Amberlite XAD-4 particles) which is placed inside the cell holder of the phosphorimeter. After the emission is registered, the antibiotic-metal complexes are eluted from the packed resin with 1 M HCl (for milk samples a second regeneration step, using methanol, should be performed). A sample throughput of about 20 samples per hour was obtained. Optimum experimental conditions include a pH 9, a Eu(III) concentration of 2 x 10 -4 M and 8 mM sodium sulphite as chemical deoxygenant. The phosphorescence emitted by the europium-TCC complexes was measured at 394 and 617 nm for excitation and emission wavelengths, respectively. The unreliability region, given by the probability of false positives and false negatives, respectively (set at 5% in both cases) was in the range between 0.2 and 11.6 nM for detection of tetracyclines in water samples (at a cut-off level of 4 nM) and in the range between 165 and 238 nM for detection of tetracyclines in milk (cut-off level fixed at the normative EU level of 200 nM). Finally, the applicability of the proposed screening optosensor was tested for the reliable control of tetracyclines in contaminated and uncontaminated water and milk samples

  11. Direct screening of tetracyclines in water and bovine milk using room temperature phosphorescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traviesa-Alvarez, J M [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Oviedo, c/Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Costa-Fernandez, J M [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Oviedo, c/Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Pereiro, R [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Oviedo, c/Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Sanz-Medel, A [Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Oviedo, c/Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)

    2007-04-18

    A fast and simple flow-through optosensor was designed and characterized for the direct screening of four tetracycline (TCC) antibiotics (tetracycline, oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline and doxycycline) in water and bovine milk samples. The proposed optosensor provides rapid binary yes/no overall responses, being appropriate for the screening of this family of antibiotics above or below a pre-set concentration threshold. The experimental set-up is based on a flow-injection manifold coupled on-line to a phosphorescence detector. Aliquots of the samples are pretreated with Eu(III) to form room temperature phosphorescent metal chelates and injected in the flow manifold. Those chelates are then on-line retained on a conventional flow-cell (packed with polymeric Amberlite XAD-4 particles) which is placed inside the cell holder of the phosphorimeter. After the emission is registered, the antibiotic-metal complexes are eluted from the packed resin with 1 M HCl (for milk samples a second regeneration step, using methanol, should be performed). A sample throughput of about 20 samples per hour was obtained. Optimum experimental conditions include a pH 9, a Eu(III) concentration of 2 x 10{sup -4} M and 8 mM sodium sulphite as chemical deoxygenant. The phosphorescence emitted by the europium-TCC complexes was measured at 394 and 617 nm for excitation and emission wavelengths, respectively. The unreliability region, given by the probability of false positives and false negatives, respectively (set at 5% in both cases) was in the range between 0.2 and 11.6 nM for detection of tetracyclines in water samples (at a cut-off level of 4 nM) and in the range between 165 and 238 nM for detection of tetracyclines in milk (cut-off level fixed at the normative EU level of 200 nM). Finally, the applicability of the proposed screening optosensor was tested for the reliable control of tetracyclines in contaminated and uncontaminated water and milk samples.

  12. Approach to Low-Cost High-Efficiency OLED Lighting. Building Technologies Solid State Lighting (SSL) Program Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Qibing [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2017-10-06

    This project developed an integrated substrate which organic light emitting diode (OLED) panel developers could employ the integrated substrate to fabricate OLED devices with performance and projected cost meeting the MYPP targets of the Solid State Lighting Program of the Department of Energy. The project optimized the composition and processing conditions of the integrated substrate for OLED light extraction efficiency and overall performance. The process was further developed for scale up to a low-cost process and fabrication of prototype samples. The encapsulation of flexible OLEDs based on this integrated substrate was also investigated using commercial flexible barrier films.

  13. High efficient OLED displays prepared with the air-gapped bridges on quantum dot patterns for optical recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Hyo-Jun Kim; Min-Ho Shin; Joo-Suc Kim; Se-Eun Kim; Young-Joo Kim

    2017-01-01

    An optically efficient structure was proposed and fabricated to realize high brightness organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays based on a white OLED prepared with the air-gapped bridges on the quantum dot (QD) patterns. Compared with a conventional white OLED display, in our experiments, the optical intensity of the proposed OLED display shows the enhancement of 58.2% in the red color and 16.8% in the green color after applying the air-gapped bridge structure on QD patterns of 20?wt% co...

  14. Interaction between social influence and payoff transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinyue; Xie, Wenwen; Ye, Maolin

    2014-02-01

    Social influence and payoff transparency interact with each other to influence decision making. Social influence masks payoff transparency, and lacking transparency drives people to seek social influence. Moreover, our survey supports our claim by showing that social influence and payoff transparency correlate with each other (r(53) = -.71). Bentley et al.'s model can be revised to accommodate the covariance.

  15. Optically transparent semiconducting polymer nanonetwork for flexible and transparent electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kilho; Park, Byoungwook; Kim, Geunjin; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Park, Sungjun; Kim, Jehan; Jung, Suhyun; Jeong, Soyeong; Kwon, Sooncheol; Kang, Hongkyu; Kim, Junghwan; Yoon, Myung-Han; Lee, Kwanghee

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneously achieving high optical transparency and excellent charge mobility in semiconducting polymers has presented a challenge for the application of these materials in future “flexible” and “transparent” electronics (FTEs). Here, by blending only a small amount (∼15 wt %) of a diketopyrrolopyrrole-based semiconducting polymer (DPP2T) into an inert polystyrene (PS) matrix, we introduce a polymer blend system that demonstrates both high field-effect transistor (FET) mobility and excellent optical transparency that approaches 100%. We discover that in a PS matrix, DPP2T forms a web-like, continuously connected nanonetwork that spreads throughout the thin film and provides highly efficient 2D charge pathways through extended intrachain conjugation. The remarkable physical properties achieved using our approach enable us to develop prototype high-performance FTE devices, including colorless all-polymer FET arrays and fully transparent FET-integrated polymer light-emitting diodes. PMID:27911774

  16. Measurement of cell respiration and oxygenation in standard multichannel biochips using phosphorescent O2-sensitive probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrashina, Alina V; Papkovsky, Dmitri B; Dmitriev, Ruslan I

    2013-09-07

    Measurement of cell oxygenation and oxygen consumption is useful for studies of cell bioenergetics, metabolism, mitochondrial function, drug toxicity and common pathophysiological conditions. Here we present a new platform for such applications which uses commercial multichannel biochips (μ-slides, Ibidi) and phosphorescent O2 sensitive probes. This platform was evaluated with both extracellular and intracellular O2 probes, several different cell types and treatments including mitochondrial uncoupling and inhibition, depletion of extracellular Ca(2+) and inhibition of V-ATPase and histone deacetylases. The results show that compared to the standard microwell plates currently used, the μ-slide platform provides facile O2 measurements with both suspension and adherent cells, higher sensitivity and reproducibility, and faster measurement time. It also allows re-perfusion and multiple treatments of cells and multi-parametric analyses in conjunction with other probes. Optical measurements are conducted on standard fluorescence readers and microscopes.

  17. Precise Design of Phosphorescent Molecular Butterflies with Tunable Photoinduced Structural Change and Dual Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chenkun; Tian, Yu; Yuan, Zhao; Han, Mingu; Wang, Jamie; Zhu, Lei; Tameh, Maliheh Shaban; Huang, Chen; Ma, Biwu

    2015-08-10

    Photoinduced structural change (PSC) is a fundamental excited-state dynamic process in chemical and biological systems. However, precise control of PSC processes is very challenging, owing to the lack of guidelines for designing excited-state potential energy surfaces (PESs). A series of rationally designed butterfly-like phosphorescent binuclear platinum complexes that undergo controlled PSC by Pt-Pt distance shortening and exhibit tunable dual (greenish-blue and red) emission are herein reported. Based on the Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle, it is demonstrated how the energy barrier of the PSC, which can be described as a chemical-reaction-like process between the two energy minima on the first triplet excited-state PES, can be controlled by synthetic means. These results reveal a simple method to engineer the dual emission of molecular systems by manipulating PES to control PSC. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. A Multifunctional Biomaterial with NIR Long Persistent Phosphorescence, Photothermal Response and Magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiling; Li, Yang; Qin, Xixi; Qiu, Jianrong

    2016-09-20

    There are many reports on long persistent phosphors (LPPs) applied in bioimaging. However, there are few reports on LPPs applied in photothermal therapy (PTT), and an integrated system with multiple functions of diagnosis and therapy. In this work, we fabricate effective multifunctional phosphors Zn3 Ga2 SnO8 : Cr(3+) , Nd(3+) , Gd(3+) with NIR persistent phosphorescence, photothermal response and magnetism. Such featured materials can act as NIR optical biolabels and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents for tracking the early cancer cells, but also as photothermal therapeutic agent for killing the cancer cells. This new multifunctional biomaterial is expected to open a new possibility of setting up an advanced imaging-guided therapy system featuring a high resolution for bioimaging and low side effects for the photothermal ablation of tumors. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Matrix perdeuteration effects on the 3ππ→S0 phosphorescence of p-chlorobenzaldehyde at 4.2degreeK. I. Phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, O.S.; Goodman, L.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of matrix perdeuteration and variation of cooling rate on the phosphorescence vibrational structure of p-chlorobenzaldehyde (PCB) are studied in methylcyclohexane (MCH) and p-xylene. PCB shows very different phosphorescence spectra in slowly cooled MCH-h 14 and MCH-d 14 , generally broad spectra in fast cooled samples, and a mixture of the two phosphorescences (observed in the slow cooled sample) in intermediate cooled MCH-d 14 . In p-xylene, no change in the phosphorescence vibrational structure is observed on matrix perdeuteration. These observations are interpreted by postulating two crystalline modifications for methylcyclohexane, one of them stable in slowly cooled MCH-h 14 , the other stable in slowly cooled MCH-d 14 . The spectra of PCB is different in the two modifications. The anomalous response of the PCB phosphorescence vibrational structure to the crystalline modifications of MCH is indicative of a large degree of distortability in its 3 ππ* state. The distortability is interpreted as originating from vibrational--electronic interactions between the closely spaced 3 ππ*-- 3 nπ* states. Support for this view is found in the phosphorescence spectra of various deuterated derivatives of PCB in perprotonated and perdeuterated MCH. The apparent distortability of the emitting state varies with the extent of deuteration

  20. Strong ligand field effects of blue phosphorescent Ir(III) complexes with phenylpyrazole and phosphines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se Won; Ham, Ho Wan; Kim, Young Sik

    2012-04-01

    In the paper, we describe new Ir complexes for achieving efficient blue phosphorescence. New blue-emitting mixed-ligand Ir complexes comprising one cyclometalating, two phosphines trans to each other such as Ir(dppz)(PPh3)2(H)(L) (Ll= Cl, NCMe+, CN), [dppz = 3,5-Diphenylpyrazole] were synthesized and studied to tune the phosphorescence wavelength to the deep blue region and to enhance the luminescence efficiencies. To gain insight into the factors responsible for the emission color change and the variation of luminescence efficiency, we investigate the electron-withdrawing capabilities of ancillary ligands using DFT and TD-DFT calculations on the ground and excited states of the complexes. To achieve deep blue emission and increase the emission efficiency, (1) we substitute the phenyl group on the 3-position of the pyrazole ring that lowers the triplet energy enough that the quenching channel is not thermally accessible and (2) change the ancillary ligands coordinated to iridium atom to phosphine and cyano groups known as very strong field ligands. Their inclusion in the coordination sphere can increase the HOMO-LUMO gap to achieve the hypsochromic shift in emission color and lower the HOMO and LUMO energy level, which causes a large d-orbital energy splitting and avoids the quenching effect to improve the luminescence efficiency. The maximum emission spectra of Ir(dppz)(PPh3)2(H)(CI) and Ir(dppz)(PPh3)2(H)(CN) were in the ranges of 439, 432 nm, respectively.

  1. Highly efficient blue organic light emitting device using indium-free transparent anode Ga:ZnO with scalability for large area coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liang; Matson, Dean W.; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Swensen, James S.; Bonham, Charles C.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.; Berry, Joseph J.; Ginley, David S.

    2010-01-01

    Organic light emitting devices have been achieved with an indium-free transparent anode, Ga doped ZnO (GZO). A large area coating technique was used (RF magnetron sputtering) to deposit the GZO films onto glass. The respective organic light emitting devices exhibited an operational voltage of 3.7 V, an external quantum efficiency of 17%, and a power efficiency of 39 lm/W at a current density of 1 mA/cm 2 . These parameters are well within acceptable standards for blue OLEDs to generate a white light with high enough brightness for general lighting applications. It is expected that high-efficiency, long-lifetime, large area, and cost-effective white OLEDs can be made with these indium-free anode materials.

  2. Narrow Bandwidth Top-Emitting OLEDs Designed for Rhodamine 6G Excitation in Biological Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Jahnel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Organic light emitting diodes (OLED are promising candidates offering in optical sensor applications to detect different gas compositions and excitable optical marker groups in chemical and biological processes. They enable attractive solutions for monitoring the gas phase composition of e.g., dissolved molecular oxygen (O2 species in bio reactors or excitation of fluorescent markers. In this work, we investigate different OLED devices for biomedical applications to excite the fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G (R6G. The OLED devices are built in top emission geometry comprising a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR acting as optical mirror. The OLED is optimized to provide a very narrow emission characteristic to excite the R6G at 530 nm wavelength and enabling the possibility to minimize the optical crosstalk between the OLED electroluminescence and the fluorescence of R6G. The DBR includes a thin film encapsulation and enables the narrowing of the spectral emission band depending on the number of DBR pairs. The comparison between optical simulation data and experimental results exhibits good agreement and proves process stability.

  3. FDTD analysis of the light extraction efficiency of OLEDs with a random scattering layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jun-Whee; Jang, Ji-Hyang; Oh, Min-Cheol; Shin, Jin-Wook; Cho, Doo-Hee; Moon, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Ik

    2014-01-13

    The light extraction efficiency of OLEDs with a nano-sized random scattering layer (RSL-OLEDs) was analyzed using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. In contrast to periodic diffraction patterns, the presence of an RSL suppresses the spectral shift with respect to the viewing angle. For FDTD simulation of RSL-OLEDs, a planar light source with a certain spatial and temporal coherence was incorporated, and the light extraction efficiency with respect to the fill factor of the RSL and the absorption coefficient of the material was investigated. The design results were compared to the experimental results of the RSL-OLEDs in order to confirm the usefulness of FDTD in predicting experimental results. According to our FDTD simulations, the light confined within the ITO-organic waveguide was quickly absorbed, and the absorption coefficients of ITO and RSL materials should be reduced in order to obtain significant improvement in the external quantum efficiency (EQE). When the extinction coefficient of ITO was 0.01, the EQE in the RSL-OLED was simulated to be enhanced by a factor of 1.8.

  4. Mixed-ligand Al complex-a new approach for more high efficient OLEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrova, Petia K., E-mail: petia@clf.bas.bg [Institute of Optical Materials and Technologies ' Acad. J. Malinowski' , Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G Bonchev st., bl. 109, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Tomova, Reni L.; Stoycheva-Topalova, Rumiana T. [Institute of Optical Materials and Technologies ' Acad. J. Malinowski' , Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G Bonchev st., bl. 109, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Kaloyanova, Stefka S.; Deligeorgiev, Todor G. [Applied Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Sofia, Sofia 1164 (Bulgaria)

    2012-02-15

    The mixed-ligand Aluminum bis(8-hydroxyquinoline) acetylacetonate (Alq{sub 2}Acac) complex was presented and its performance as electroluminescent and electron transporting layer for OLED was studied. The photophysical properties of the novel complex were investigated and compared with the properties of the parent Alq{sub 3}. Highly efficient OLED based on the mixed-ligand Al complex was developed with two times higher luminescence and efficiency compared to the identical OLED based on the conventional Alq{sub 3} The better performance of the devices make the novel Al complex a very promising material for OLEDs. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel electroluminescent Alq{sub 2}Acac complex is presented as material for OLED. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electroluminescent emission of Alq{sub 2}Acac is very similar to that of commercial Alq{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Devices with Alq{sub 2}Acac show better characteristics compared to those with Alq{sub 3}.

  5. A spectral measurement method for determining white OLED average junction temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yiting; Narendran, Nadarajah

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate an indirect method of measuring the average junction temperature of a white organic light-emitting diode (OLED) based on temperature sensitivity differences in the radiant power emitted by individual emitter materials (i.e., "blue," "green," and "red"). The measured spectral power distributions (SPDs) of the white OLED as a function of temperature showed amplitude decrease as a function of temperature in the different spectral bands, red, green, and blue. Analyzed data showed a good linear correlation between the integrated radiance for each spectral band and the OLED panel temperature, measured at a reference point on the back surface of the panel. The integrated radiance ratio of the spectral band green compared to red, (G/R), correlates linearly with panel temperature. Assuming that the panel reference point temperature is proportional to the average junction temperature of the OLED panel, the G/R ratio can be used for estimating the average junction temperature of an OLED panel.

  6. Purely organic thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs)

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Michael Y.; Zysman-Colman, Eli

    2017-01-01

    We thank the University of St Andrews for support. EZ-C thanks the Leverhulme Trust for financial support (RPG-2016-047). and the EPSRC (EP/P010482/1) for financial support. The design of thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials both as emitters and as hosts is an exploding area of research. The replacement of phosphorescent metal complexes with inexpensive organic compounds in electroluminescent (EL) devices that demonstrate comparable performance metrics is paradigm shif...

  7. Transparent Memory For Harsh Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Ho, C. H.

    2017-03-14

    As a new class of non-volatile memory, resistive random access memory (RRAM) offers not only superior electronic characteristics, but also advanced functionalities, such as transparency and radiation hardness. However, the environmental tolerance of RRAM is material-dependent, and therefore the materials used must be chosen carefully in order to avoid instabilities and performance degradation caused by the detrimental effects arising from environmental gases and ionizing radiation. In this work, we demonstrate that AlN-based RRAM displays excellent performance and environmental stability, with no significant degradation to the resistance ratio over a 100-cycle endurance test. Moreover, transparent RRAM (TRRAM) based on AlN also performs reliably under four different harsh environmental conditions and 2 MeV proton irradiation fluences, ranging from 1011 to 1015 cm-2. These findings not only provide a guideline for TRRAM design, but also demonstrate the promising applicability of AlN TRRAM for future transparent harsh electronics.

  8. Issues in Canadian board transparency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Bart

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Transparency is considered one of the principles of good corporate governance. But what does it mean – in practice – especially when it comes to Board transparency – i.e. the ability of shareholders to gain knowledge about an organization’s corporate governance practices in order to make an informed assessment of Directors’ individual and collective roles and performance. In a preliminary investigation of Board transparency practices in Canadian listed firms (using data from 2003-2004, it was found that there were wide variations in the nature and quantity of corporate governance practices disclosed. The reasons for these variations are discussed and a number of recommendations for improved disclosure are presented.

  9. Transparency of nuclear regulatory activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    One of the main missions of nuclear regulators is to protect the public, and this cannot be completely achieved without public confidence. The more a regulatory process is transparent, the more such confidence will grow. Despite important cultural differences across countries, a number of common features characterise media and public expectations regarding any activity with an associated risk. A common understanding of transparency and main stakeholders' expectations in the field of nuclear safety were identified during this workshop, together with a number of conditions and practices aimed at improving the transparency of nuclear regulatory activities. These conditions and practices are described herein, and will be of particular interest to all those working in the nuclear regulatory field. Their implementation may, however, differ from one country to another depending on national context. (authors)

  10. Transparent solar cell window module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chau, Joseph Lik Hang; Chen, Ruei-Tang; Hwang, Gan-Lin; Tsai, Ping-Yuan [Nanopowder and Thin Film Technology Center, ITRI South, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Tainan County 709 (China); Lin, Chien-Chu [I-Lai Acrylic Corporation, Tainan City (China)

    2010-03-15

    A transparent solar cell window module based on the integration of traditional silicon solar cells and organic-inorganic nanocomposite material was designed and fabricated. The transparent solar cell window module was composed of a nanocomposite light-guide plate and traditional silicon solar cells. The preparation of the nanocomposite light-guide plate is easy without modification of the traditional casting process, the nanoparticles sol can be added directly to the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) monomer syrup during the process. The solar energy collected by this window can be used to power up small household electrical appliances. (author)

  11. Does doxastic transparency support evidentialism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steglich-Petersen, Asbjørn

    2008-01-01

    Nishi Shah has recently argued that transparency in doxastic deliberation supports a strict version of evidentialism about epistemic reasons. I argue that Shah’s argument relies on a principle that is incompatible the strict version of evidentialism Shah wishes to advocate.......Nishi Shah has recently argued that transparency in doxastic deliberation supports a strict version of evidentialism about epistemic reasons. I argue that Shah’s argument relies on a principle that is incompatible the strict version of evidentialism Shah wishes to advocate....

  12. Color transparency: Enchantment and effort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    A quantum mechanical approach is used to study high momentum transfer reactions in which a nucleon is knocked out of the nucleus. We show that the nuclear interactions of the wave packet produced in such a process tend to cancel, so that the nuclear medium becomes transparent. The wave packet (ejectile)-nucleon interactions, including the production of nucleon resonances are also discussed. Color transparency effects in the (e,e'p) reaction may be significant at relatively low momentum transfer Q 2 = 3 - 6 (GeV 2 /c) 2 . 17 refs., 3 figs

  13. A FRAMEWORK FOR TRANSPARENCY IN INTERNATIONAL TRADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernal Turnes, Paloma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to cover the gap in literature about transparency in the context of international trade facilitation. It focuses on the importance of transparency in achieving growth in international trade and the differences between non-transparent practices and corruption in global trade. Managing the disclosure of information about rules, regulations and laws is not the only trade policy instrument where transparency becomes important. To build a framework on levels of transparency we developed a matrix classifying the transparency of each country based on ease of doing business and levels of bribery. Four different strategies are explained based on the different scenarios of transparency in international trade. The main conclusions reflect that disclosure of information is not enough to guarantee transparency and monitoring of transparency must be improved.

  14. Formation of ultralong copper nanowires by hydrothermal growth for transparent conducting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balela, Mary Donnabelle L.; Tan, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Transparent conducting electrodes are key components of optoelectronic devices, such as touch screens, organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and solar cells. Recent market surveys have shown that the demands for these devices are rapidly growing at a tremendous rate. Semiconducting oxides, in particular indium tin oxide (ITO) are the material of choice for transparent conducting electrodes. However, these conventional oxides are typically brittle, which limits their applicability in flexible electronics. Metal nanowires, e.g. copper (Cu) nanowires, are considered as the best candidate as substitute for ITO due to their excellent mechanical and electrical properties. In this paper, ultralong copper (Cu) nanowires with were successfully prepared by hydrothermal growth at 50-80°C for 1 h. Ethylenediamine was employed as the structure-directing agents, while hydrazine was used as the reductant. In situ mixed potential measurement was also carried out to monitor Cu deposition. Higher temperature shifted the mixed potential negatively, leading to thicker Cu nanowires. Transparent conducting electrode, with a sheet resistance of 197 Ω sq-1 at an optical transmittance of around 61 %, was fabricated with the Cu nanowire ink.

  15. Next generation smart window display using transparent organic display and light blocking screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gyeong Woo; Lampande, Raju; Choe, Dong Cheol; Ko, Ik Jang; Park, Jin Hwan; Pode, Ramchandra; Kwon, Jang Hyuk

    2018-04-02

    Transparent organic light emitting diodes (TOLED) have widespread applications in the next-generation display devices particularly in the large size transparent window and interactive displays. Herein, we report high performance and stable attractive smart window displays using facile process. Advanced smart window display is realized by integrating the high performance light blocking screen and highly transparent white OLED panel. The full smart window display reveals a maximum transmittance as high as 64.2% at the wavelength of 600 nm and extremely good along with tunable ambient contrast ratio (171.94:1) compared to that of normal TOLED (4.54:1). Furthermore, the performance decisive light blocking screen has demonstrated an excellent optical and electrical characteristics such as i) high transmittance (85.56% at 562nm) at light-penetrating state, ii) superior absorbance (2.30 at 562nm) in light interrupting mode, iii) high optical contrast (85.50 at 562 nm), iv) high optical stability for more than 25,000 cycle of driving, v) fast switching time of 1.9 sec, and vi) low driving voltage of 1.7 V. The experimental results of smart window display are also validated using optical simulation. The proposed smart window display technology allows us to adjust the intensity of daylight entering the system quickly and conveniently.

  16. Measurement of Local Partial Pressure of Oxygen in the Brain Tissue under Normoxia and Epilepsy with Phosphorescence Lifetime Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cong; Bélanger, Samuel; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    In this work a method for measuring brain oxygen partial pressure with confocal phosphorescence lifetime microscopy system is reported. When used in conjunction with a dendritic phosphorescent probe, Oxyphor G4, this system enabled minimally invasive measurements of oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in cerebral tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution during 4-AP induced epileptic seizures. Investigating epileptic events, we characterized the spatio-temporal distribution of the "initial dip" in pO2 near the probe injection site and along nearby arterioles. Our results reveal a correlation between the percent change in the pO2 signal during the "initial dip" and the duration of seizure-like activity, which can help localize the epileptic focus and predict the length of seizure. PMID:26305777

  17. Measurement of Local Partial Pressure of Oxygen in the Brain Tissue under Normoxia and Epilepsy with Phosphorescence Lifetime Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cong; Bélanger, Samuel; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    In this work a method for measuring brain oxygen partial pressure with confocal phosphorescence lifetime microscopy system is reported. When used in conjunction with a dendritic phosphorescent probe, Oxyphor G4, this system enabled minimally invasive measurements of oxygen partial pressure (pO2) in cerebral tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution during 4-AP induced epileptic seizures. Investigating epileptic events, we characterized the spatio-temporal distribution of the "initial dip" in pO2 near the probe injection site and along nearby arterioles. Our results reveal a correlation between the percent change in the pO2 signal during the "initial dip" and the duration of seizure-like activity, which can help localize the epileptic focus and predict the length of seizure.

  18. The use of room temperature phosphorescence for the determination of uranium in tin-tailings mineral samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meor Yusof bin Meor Sulaiman

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of using phosphorescence technique in determining uranium in mineral samples and its comparison with that of fluorescence using high carbonate flux is presented. Samples used are tin-tailings mineral such as monazite, xenotime, ilmenite and zircon. The calibration graph obtained shows a linear relationship between the concentration range of 0-55 ppm U. From here, analysis of the standard showed that the result obtained and that of the certified value are consistent. HN0 3 :H 2 SO 4 (1:3) and phosphoric acid leaching methods are tried and the results show that phosphoric acid is the better method for phosphate mineral. Comparison of the results obtained from this technique and that of the direct and extraction methods of fluorimetry are also made. Phosphorescence is found to be a better method in determining uranium in this type of samples. (author)

  19. Optical detection of magnetic resonance of the F-centre in CaO in its phosphorescent state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krap, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The F-centre in CaO consists of two electrons trapped in an oxygen vacancy. The centre possesses bound excited states, of which the phosphorescent 3 Tsub(1u) state is a Jahn-Teller state. Jahn-Teller systems have been of interest in many investigations. However, detailed experimental studies about the relaxation paths for the Jahn-Teller states are relatively few. The author studies by means of optical detection of magnetic resonance (ODMR) and phosphorescence microwave double resonance (PMDR) techniques the relaxation between the components of the 3 Tsub(1u) state, the magnetic properties of the individual spin-vibronic Jahn-Teller states and the inhomogeneous line broadening in the ODMR and PMDR spectra. (Auth.)

  20. Development of robust flexible OLED encapsulations using simulated estimations and experimental validations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang-Chun; Shih, Yan-Shin; Wu, Chih-Sheng; Tsai, Chia-Hao; Yeh, Shu-Tang; Peng, Yi-Hao; Chen, Kuang-Jung

    2012-01-01

    This work analyses the overall stress/strain characteristic of flexible encapsulations with organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices. A robust methodology composed of a mechanical model of multi-thin film under bending loads and related stress simulations based on nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) is proposed, and validated to be more reliable compared with related experimental data. With various geometrical combinations of cover plate, stacked thin films and plastic substrate, the position of the neutral axis (NA) plate, which is regarded as a key design parameter to minimize stress impact for the concerned OLED devices, is acquired using the present methodology. The results point out that both the thickness and mechanical properties of the cover plate help in determining the NA location. In addition, several concave and convex radii are applied to examine the reliable mechanical tolerance and to provide an insight into the estimated reliability of foldable OLED encapsulations. (paper)

  1. Optimization of the host–guest system within an OLED using different models of mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adames Prada, Rosana, E-mail: rdadamesp@unal.edu.co; Ardila Vargas, Angel Miguel, E-mail: amardilav@unal.edu.co

    2014-12-15

    To optimize the host–guest system of organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), it were performed simulations by doping a small molecule organic semiconductor (acting as host) with the transition organometallic complex known as Ir(ppy){sub 2}(acac) (acting as a guest). The simulation was carried out using simOLED with different mobility models: the Pool–Frenkel Model (PFM), the Extended Gaussian Disorder Model (EGDM) and Extended Correlated Disorder Model (ECDM), with the aim to determine the magnitude of some parameters like temperature, applied electric field, film thickness and charge carrier density that improve the electrical and optical properties of OLEDs with a more simplified structure like ITO/CBP/CBP:Ir(ppy){sub 2}(acac)/TPBi/LiF/Al.

  2. Considerable improvement in the stability of solution processed small molecule OLED by annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao Guilin [Key Laboratory of Photonics Technology for Information, Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China); Wu Zhaoxin, E-mail: zhaoxinwu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Photonics Technology for Information, Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China); He Qiang [Key Laboratory of Photonics Technology for Information, Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China); Department of UAV, Wuhan Ordnance Noncommissioned Officers Academy, Wuhan, 430075 (China); Jiao Bo; Xu Guojin; Hou Xun [Key Laboratory of Photonics Technology for Information, Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, 710049 (China); Chen Zhijian; Gong Qihuang [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics and Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China)

    2011-06-15

    We investigated the annealing effect on solution processed small organic molecule organic films, which were annealed with various conditions. It was found that the densities of the spin-coated (SC) films increased and the surface roughness decreased as the annealing temperature rose. We fabricated corresponding organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) by spin coating on the same annealing conditions. The solution processed OLEDs show the considerable efficiency and stability, which were prior or equivalent to the vacuum-deposited (VD) counterparts. Our research shows that annealing process plays a key role in prolonging the lifetime of solution processed small molecule OLEDs, and the mechanism for the improvement of the device performance upon annealing was also discussed.

  3. "Kus sa oled mu võluratsu..." : [luuletused] / Mõkola Vingranovski ; tlk. Harald Rajamets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vingranovski, Mõkola

    2004-01-01

    Sisu: "Kus sa oled mu võluratsu..." ; Ja rahvas on... ; "Oled rada, mu armsam..." ; "Sa oled siin! Mu armastus, mu lumm..." ; "Me ahvatluste aastad, albid aastad..." ; "Mul juba siis, kui oli kevad veel..." ; "Nüüd tõuse, kalur! Kustumas on tähed..." ; Meresügisel ; "Kauss hirsiputru, õilmelend..." ; "Õde võõpab aias õunapuid..." ; Esimene hälilaul ; "Noor tüdruk, alles laps. Ei kõnni kikivarvul..." ; "Ülal künka peal seisis päike..." ; "Jäid suve lõpul tuhmiks puud..." ; "Nüüd hakkab lumesadu, nüüd..." ; "Lumehämarus, hall nagu hall..." ; "Tüüpõllu aur on jäärakute kohal..." ; "Parv linde kriiskab salu kohal..." ; "Põld kuivi maisivarsi täis..." ; Haiavata

  4. Origin of colour stability in blue/orange/blue stacked phosphorescent white organic light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Jang, Jyongsik; Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2009-01-01

    The origin of colour stability in phosphorescent white organic light-emitting diodes (PHWOLEDs) with a blue/orange/blue stacked emitting structure was studied by monitoring the change in a recombination zone. A balanced recombination zone shift between the blue and the orange light-emitting layers was found to be responsible for the colour stability in the blue/orange/blue stacked PHWOLEDs.

  5. A new analytical application of nylon-induced room-temperature phosphorescence: Determination of thiabendazole in water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, R.A. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Suipacha 531 (2000) Rosario (Argentina); Escandar, G.M. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Suipacha 531 (2000) Rosario (Argentina)]. E-mail: gescanda@fbioyf.unr.edu.ar

    2006-06-30

    This paper discusses the first analytical determination of the widely used fungicide thiabendazole by nylon-induced phosphorimetry. Nylon was investigated as a novel solid-matrix for inducing room-temperature phosphorescence of thiabendazole, which was enhanced under the effect of external heavy-atom salts. Among the investigated salts, lead(II) acetate was the most effective in yielding a high phosphorescence signal. An additional enhancement of the phosphorescence emission was attained when the measurements were carried out under a nitrogen atmosphere. There was only a moderate increase in the presence of cyclodextrins. The room-temperature phosphorescence lifetimes of the adsorbed thiabendazole were measured under different working conditions and, in all cases, two decaying components were detected. On the basis of the obtained results, a very simple and sensitive phosphorimetric method for the determination of thiabendazole was established. The analytical figures of merit obtained under the best experimental conditions were: linear calibration range from 0.031 to 0.26 {mu}g ml{sup -1} (the lowest value corresponds to the quantitation limit), relative standard deviation, 2.4% (n = 5) at a level of 0.096 {mu}g ml{sup -1}, and limit of detection calculated according to 1995 IUPAC Recommendations equal to 0.010 {mu}g ml{sup -1} (0.03 ng/spot). The potential interference from common agrochemicals was also studied. The feasibility of determining thiabendazole in real samples was successfully evaluated through the analysis of spiked river, tap and mineral water samples.

  6. Lipophilic phosphorescent gold(I) clusters as selective probes for visualization of lipid droplets by two-photon microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koshel, E. I.; Cheluskin, P. S.; Melnikov, A. S.; Serdobintsev, P. Y.; Stolbovaia, A. Y.; Saifitdinova, A. F.; Scheslavskiy, V. I.; Chernyavskiy, Oleksandr; Gaginskaya, E. R.; Koshevoy, I. O.; Tunik, S. P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 332, Jan 1 (2017), s. 122-130 ISSN 1010-6030 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : polynuclear gold-alkynyl cluster * lipophilic probe * phosphorescence * adipocyte * two-photon microscopy * PLIM Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Medical laboratory technology (including laboratory samples analysis Impact factor: 2.625, year: 2016

  7. GATEWAY Report Brief: Evaluating OLED Lighting in the Accounting Office of DeJoy, Knauf & Blood LLP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-08-21

    Summary of GATEWAY report evaluating a new lighting system, at the offices of the accounting firm of DeJoy, Knauf & Blood, LLP in Rochester, NY, that incorporates a number of different OLED luminaires. Evaluation of the OLED products included efficacy performance, field measurements of panel color, flicker measurements, and staff feedback.

  8. Mechanistic study on black and grey spot growth in OLEDs performed on laser-ablated pinholes in the cathode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijer, P. van de; Bouten, P.C.P.; Fledderus, H.; Janssen, R.R.; Winter, S.H.P.M. de; Akkerman, H.B.

    2017-01-01

    Local laser ablation of the cathode of OLEDs has been applied to create a population of pinholes of the same size. This enables the direct comparison at different conditions of black spots and grey spots in the emission of OLEDs as a result of water ingress into the device. We confirmed earlier

  9. Phosphorescent light-emitting iridium complexes serve as a hypoxia-sensing probe for tumor imaging in living animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Toshiyuki; Zhang, Shaojuan; Negishi, Kazuya; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Hosaka, Masahiro; Tobita, Seiji

    2010-02-01

    Iridium complex, a promising organic light-emitting diode material for next generation television and computer displays, emits phosphorescence. Phosphorescence is quenched by oxygen. We used this oxygen-quenching feature for imaging tumor hypoxia. Red light-emitting iridium complex Ir(btp)2(acac) (BTP) presented hypoxia-dependent light emission in culture cell lines, whose intensity was in parallel with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 expression. BTP was further applied to imaging five nude mouse-transplanted tumors. All tumors presented a bright BTP-emitting image as early as 5 min after the injection. The BTP-dependent tumor image peaked at 1 to 2 h after the injection, and was then removed from tumors within 24 h. The minimal BTP image recognition size was at least 2 mm in diameter. By morphological examination and phosphorescence lifetime measurement, BTP is presumed to localize to the tumor cells, not to stay in the tumor microvessels by binding to albumin. The primary problem on suse of luminescent probe for tumor imaging is its weak penetrance to deep tissues from the skin surface. Since BTP is easily modifiable, we made BTP analogues with a longer excitation/emission wavelength to improve the tissue penetrance. One of them, BTPHSA, displayed 560/720 wavelength, and depicted its clear imaging from tumors transplanted over 6-7 mm deep from the skin surface. We suggest that BTP analogues have a vast potential for imaging hypoxic lesions such as tumor tissues.

  10. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) and Optically-Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR) studies on organic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Min [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors have evolved rapidly over the last decades and currently are considered as the next-generation technology for many applications, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in flat-panel displays (FPDs) and solid state lighting (SSL), and organic solar cells (OSCs) in clean renewable energy. This dissertation focuses mainly on OLEDs. Although the commercialization of the OLED technology in FPDs is growing and appears to be just around the corner for SSL, there are still several key issues that need to be addressed: (1) the cost of OLEDs is very high, largely due to the costly current manufacturing process; (2) the efficiency of OLEDs needs to be improved. This is vital to the success of OLEDs in the FPD and SSL industries; (3) the lifetime of OLEDs, especially blue OLEDs, is the biggest technical challenge. All these issues raise the demand for new organic materials, new device structures, and continued lower-cost fabrication methods. In an attempt to address these issues, we used solution-processing methods to fabricate highly efficient small molecule OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is costeffective in comparison to the more common thermal vacuum evaporation. We also successfully made efficient indium tin oxide (ITO)-free SMOLEDs to further improve the efficiency of the OLEDs. We employed the spin-dependent optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) technique to study the luminescence quenching processes in OLEDs and organic materials in order to understand the intrinsic degradation mechanisms. We also fabricated polymer LEDs (PLEDs) based on a new electron-accepting blue-emitting polymer and studied the effect of molecular weight on the efficiency of PLEDs. All these studies helped us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OLEDs’ performance, and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiency of OLEDs. With strongly improved device performance (in addition to

  11. Why is Transparency Greenland Necessary?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Boris Brorman

    2012-01-01

    Greenland is facing significant changes in the composition of its economy, and is moving rapidly in the direction of becoming a commodities economy. Studies conducted by Transparency International in other parts of the world suggest that oil exploration and mining are among the areas of economic...

  12. Transparency in Cooperative Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalsgaard, Christian; Paulsen, Morten Flate

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the following question: What is the potential of social networking within cooperative online education? Social networking does not necessarily involve communication, dialogue, or collaboration. Instead, the authors argue that "transparency" is a unique feature of social networking services.…

  13. Transparent ceramic lamp envelope materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, G C [OSRAM SYLVANIA, 71 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2005-09-07

    Transparent ceramic materials with optical qualities comparable to single crystals of similar compositions have been developed in recent years, as a result of the improved understanding of powder-processing-fabrication- sintering-property inter-relationships. These high-temperature materials with a range of thermal and mechanical properties are candidate envelopes for focused-beam, short-arc lamps containing various fills operating at temperatures higher than quartz. This paper reviews the composition, structure and properties of transparent ceramic lamp envelope materials including sapphire, small-grained polycrystalline alumina, aluminium oxynitride, yttrium aluminate garnet, magnesium aluminate spinel and yttria-lanthana. A satisfactory thermal shock resistance is required for the ceramic tube to withstand the rapid heating and cooling cycles encountered in lamps. Thermophysical properties, along with the geometry, size and thickness of a transparent ceramic tube, are important parameters in the assessment of its resistance to fracture arising from thermal stresses in lamps during service. The corrosive nature of lamp-fill liquid and vapour at high temperatures requires that all lamp components be carefully chosen to meet the target life. The wide range of new transparent ceramics represents flexibility in pushing the limit of envelope materials for improved beamer lamps.

  14. Camuflagem e transparência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima de A. Silveira

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available O ensaio estabelece, a partir da compreensão de ELIADE, analogias entre alguns símbolos universais e os rituais de morte desenvolvidos pela Enfermagem, desnudando a camuflagem ali existente e apontando sua transparência como forma de enriquecer a prática profissional, beneficiando cuidadora(es e sujeitos do cuidado.

  15. Camuflagem e transparência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima de A. Silveira

    Full Text Available O ensaio estabelece, a partir da compreensão de ELIADE, analogias entre alguns símbolos universais e os rituais de morte desenvolvidos pela Enfermagem, desnudando a camuflagem ali existente e apontando sua transparência como forma de enriquecer a prática profissional, beneficiando cuidadora(es e sujeitos do cuidado.

  16. Enhanced color purity of blue OLEDs based on well-design structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qianqian; Wang, Wenjun; Li, Shuhong; Wang, Qingru; Xia, Shuzhen; Zhang, Bingyuan; Wang, Minghong; Fan, Quli

    2016-09-01

    We have fabricated blue organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) with higher color purity and stability by optimizing the structure of the Glass/ITO/NPB(50 nm)/ BCzVBi (30 nm)/ TPBi (x nm)/Alq3(20 nm)/LiF/Al. The results show that the introducing of hole blocking layer(HBL) TPBi greatly can improve not only the color purity but the color stability, which owe to its higher the Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO) energy levels of 6.2 eV. We expect our work will be useful to optimizing the blue OLEDs structure to enhancing the color property.

  17. Voltage color tunable OLED with (Sm,Eu)-β-diketonate complex blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, R.; Cremona, M.; Teotonio, E. E. S.; Brito, H. F.; Malta, O. L.

    2004-09-01

    Light emission from organic electroluminescent diodes (OLEDs) in which mixed samarium and europium β-diketonate complexes, [Sm 0.7Eu 0.3(TTA) 3(TPPO) 2], was used as the emitting layer is described. The electroluminescence spectra exhibit narrow peaks arising from 4f-intraconfigurational transitions of the Sm 3+ and Eu 3+ ions and a broad emission band attributed to the electrophosphorescence of the TTA ligand. The intensity ratio of the peaks determined by the bias voltage applied to the OLED, together with the ligand electrophosphorescence, allows to obtain a voltage-tunable color light source.

  18. La generación de ingresos comerciales en los aeropuertos españoles

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Rendeiro Martín-Cejas; Francisco López del Pino

    2004-01-01

    Este trabajo pretende analizar la importancia del tráfico internacional y el nivel de servicio establecido en la generación de ingresos comerciales en los aeropuertos españoles. En primer lugar, mediante un modelo ad hoc de ingresos, se valora la influencia de las diferentes clases de tráfico en la generación de ingresos de la red de aeropuertos españoles. Se estima, asimismo, la importancia de disponer de tiendas libres de impuestos en la capacidad de generar ingresos comerciales. Seguidamen...

  19. Legal framework to ensure transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treier, A.

    2007-01-01

    There is a national and an international trend towards administrative transparency. This trend has not stopped at. the Swiss border. Some cantons of Switzerland have already introduced the transparency principle at the cantonal level. At the federal level, the Swiss Confederation introduced on 1 July 2006 the new Federal 'Freedom of Information Act'. Also the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (I-ISK) falls under this rule. Before introduction of this law on transparency. most of the documents of Swiss federal Administration were treated as confidential. Access rights to official documents were granted only on certain conditions and in special cases. But there is a general interest, that the public should have the possibility to ask to look at the files of the administration. Since years, the administration had no longer been able to hide behind secretiveness. For instance, the introduction of Internet brought a lot of transparency. The administration had to explain what sort of job it is actually doing and how it is doing. Also, the media were and are increasing their research for information. In this context, the new law on transparency ('Freedom of Information Act') is rather an evolution than a revolution. The Freedom of Information Act guarantees the public access to official documents. Most of the documents of the Federal Administration are public. This access can be limited, differentiated or refused in certain cases. That means that the principle of proportionality between private interests and public transparency has to be applied. The real challenge for the authority is the trade off between the public's right to access information and the industrial legitimate efforts to protect industrial and trade secrets. In the nuclear field, the international principle of transparency has also become an important national principle for Switzerland and FISK. The Swiss Nuclear Energy Act says that 'The relevant authorities shall regularly inform the general

  20. España y los españoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caba, Rubén

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The author here argues in favour of the historical reality that we call Spain. To recognize the Cadiz Constitution of 1812 as the origin of present Spain, he maintains, does not imply that our country had no national identity before the 19th century. And to this effect he expounds the famous controversy between Americo Castro and Claudio Sánchez-Albornoz. Before the Arab invasion there were no “españoles”, since this word of provençal origin dates back to the 11th century, as Castro points out. However, it is also true that during the Roman as well the Gothic domination, the peninsular inhabitants were known as “hispani”, as Sánchez-Albornoz sarcastically alleges. In addition, this article includes a number of quotations from Latin, Gothic and Spanish writers of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, references which bear witness to a feeling of belonging to an old country called “Hispania” or “España”.

    El autor aporta argumentos en favor de la realidad histórica que llamamos España. Sostiene que reconocer a la Constitución de Cádiz de 1812 como origen de la España política actual no implica que nuestro país careciera de identidad nacional antes del siglo XIX. Y expone la controversia de Américo Castro y de Claudio Sánchez-Albornoz sobre la génesis histórica de España para concluir que, si bien antes de la invasión árabe no había “españoles”, vocablo provenzal del siglo XI como advierte Castro, también es cierto que durante la dominación romana y goda los peninsulares eran “hispani”, como alega con sorna Sánchez-Albornoz. Además, se recogen citas de autores latinos, godos y españoles tanto medievales como renacentistas que testimonian su sentimiento de pertenecer a un viejo país llamado Hispania o España.

  1. TH-C-17A-05: Cherenkov Excited Phosphorescence Oxygen (CEPhOx) Imaging During Multi-Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R; Pogue, B [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Holt, R [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH - New Hampshire (United States); Esipova, T; Vinogradov, S [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gladstone, D [Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Hanover, City of Lebanon (Lebanon)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Cherenkov radiation is created during external beam radiation therapy that can excite phosphorescence in tissue from oxygen-sensitive, bio-compatible probes. Utilizing the known spatial information of the treatment plan with directed multiple beam angles, Cherenkov Excited Phosphorescence Oxygen (CEPhOx) imaging was realized from the reconstructions of Cherenkov excited phosphorescence lifetime. Methods: Platinum(II)-G4 (PtG4) was used as the oxygen-sensitive phosphorescent probe and added to a oxygenated cylindrical liquid phantom with a oxygenated/deoxygenated cylindrical anomaly. Cherenkov excited phosphorescence was imaged using a time-gated ICCD camera temporallysynchronized to the LINAC pulse output. Lifetime reconstruction was carried out in NIRFAST software. Multiple angles of the incident radiation beam was combined with the location of the prescribed treatment volume (PTV) to improve the tomographic recovery as a function of location. The tissue partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in the background and PTV was calculated based on the recovered lifetime distribution and Stern-Volmer equation. Additionally a simulation study was performed to examine the accuracy of this technique in the setting of a human brain tumor. Results: Region-based pO2 values in the oxygenated background and oxygenated/deoxygenated PTV were correctly recovered, with the deoxygenated anomaly (15.4 mmHg) easily distinguished from the oxygenated background (143 mmHg). The data acquisition time could be achieved within the normal irradiation time for a human fractionated plan. The simulations indicated that CEPhOx would be a sufficient to sample tumor pO2 sensing from tumors which are larger than 2cm in diameter or within 23mm depth from the surface. Conclusion: CEPhOx could be a novel imaging tool for pO2 assessment during external radiation beam therapy. It is minimally invasive and should work within the established treatment plan of radiation therapy with multiple beams in

  2. Broadband plasmon induced transparency in terahertz metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Zhihua; Yang, Xu; Gu, Jianqiang; Jiang, Jun; Yue, Weisheng; Tian, Zhen; Tonouchi, Masayoshi; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2013-01-01

    Plasmon induced transparency (PIT) could be realized in metamaterials via interference between different resonance modes. Within the sharp transparency window, the high dispersion of the medium may lead to remarkable slow light phenomena

  3. Outside finance, dominant investors and strategic transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perotti, E.C.; von Thadden, E.-L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper studies optimal financial contracts and product market competition under a strategic transparency decision. When firms seeking outside finance resort to actively monitored debt in order to commit against opportunistic behaviour, the dominant lender can influence corporate transparency.

  4. Categories and Dimensions of Organizational Transparency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albu, Oana Brindusa; Flyverbom, Mikkel

    Transparency is a distinctive area of research across disciplines and presents significant importance for organization studies. However, transparency is rarely subject to structured and critical scrutiny and as a result its relevance for organizational analysis is underestimated. In an attempt...... to foreground the value of transparency studies, we offer an overview of the existing research and indicate two paradigmatic positions underpinning the transparency literature, namely what we term non-performative and performative approaches. The main contribution of the paper lies in this ground......, an approach which remains underexplored. Finally, we discuss some avenues for future studies of the organizing properties of transparency: the secrecy-transparency interplay, the power-transparency nexus and the transparency ‘family tree’ (i.e., intersections between multiple forms of disclosure)....

  5. Highly efficient white organic light-emitting devices consisting of undoped ultrathin yellow phosphorescent layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shengqiang [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu 610054 (China); Yu, Junsheng, E-mail: jsyu@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu 610054 (China); Ma, Zhu; Zhao, Juan [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2013-02-15

    High-efficiency white organic light-emitting devices (WOLEDs) based on an undoped ultrathin yellow light-emitting layer and a doped blue light-emitting layer were demonstrated. While the thickness of blue light-emitting layer, formed by doping a charge-trapping phosphor, iridium(III) bis(4 Prime ,6 Prime -difluorophenylpyridinato)tetrakis(1-pyrazolyl)borate (FIr6) in a wide bandgap host, was kept constant, the thickness of neat yellow emissive layer of novel phosphorescent material, bis[2-(4-tertbutylphenyl)benzothiazolato-N,C{sup 2 Prime }]iridium (acetylacetonate) [(t-bt){sub 2}Ir(acac)] was varied to optimize the device performance. The optimized device exhibited maximum luminance, current efficiency and power efficiency of 24,000 cd/m{sup 2} (at 15.2 V), 79.0 cd/A (at 1550 cd/m{sup 2}) and 40.5 lm/W (at 1000 cd/m{sup 2}), respectively. Besides, the white-light emission covered a wide range of visible spectrum, and the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates were (0.32, 0.38) with a color temperature of 5800 K at 8 V. Moreover, high external quantum efficiency was also obtained in the high-efficiency WOLEDs. The performance enhancement was attributed to the proper thickness of (t-bt){sub 2}Ir(acac) layer that enabled adequate current density and enough phosphorescent dye to trap electrons. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly efficient WOLEDs based on two complementary layers were fabricated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The yellow emissive layer was formed by utilizing undoping system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The blue emissive layer was made by host-guest doping system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thickness of the yellow emissive layer was varied to make device optimization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimized device achieved high power efficiency of 40.5 lm/W.

  6. Second-order nonlinearity induced transparency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y H; Zhang, S S; Shen, H Z; Yi, X X

    2017-04-01

    In analogy to electromagnetically induced transparency, optomechanically induced transparency was proposed recently in [Science330, 1520 (2010)SCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1195596]. In this Letter, we demonstrate another form of induced transparency enabled by second-order nonlinearity. A practical application of the second-order nonlinearity induced transparency is to measure the second-order nonlinear coefficient. Our scheme might find applications in quantum optics and quantum information processing.

  7. Playing the numbers game: Dealing with transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pachidi, S.; Huysman, M.H.; Berends, Hans; van de Weerd, G.C.

    2015-01-01

    Our research focus is on unpacking the performativity of transparency in order to explain how digital technologies, formerly perceived as enablers of surveillance and control, afford opaqueness as much as transparency. We develop a sociomaterial perspective on transparency and investigate how

  8. Organizational Transparency as Myth and Metaphor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Thøger; Cornelissen, Joep

    2015-01-01

    Transparency has achieved a mythical status in society. Myths are not false accounts or understandings, but deep-seated and definitive descriptions of the world that ontologically ground the ways in which we frame and see the world around us. We explore the mythical nature of transparency from...... of the transparency myth....

  9. Transparency and Oversight in Local Wellness Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chriqui, Jamie F.; Chaloupka, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Advocates have called for increased wellness policy transparency and oversight through the use of health advisory councils. This study examines (1) wellness policy transparency, (2) advisory council requirements, (3) factors associated with each, and (4) whether transparency or advisory council requirements are indicative of a stronger…

  10. Transparency in port-Hamiltonian based telemanipulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Secchi, C; Stramigioli, Stefano; Fantuzzi, C.

    2005-01-01

    After stability, transparency is the major issue in the design of a telemanipulation system. In this paper we exploit a behavioral approach in order to provide an index for the evaluation of transparency in port-Hamiltonian based teleoperators. Furthermore we provide a transparency analysis of

  11. Transparency in Port-Hamiltonian-Based Telemanipulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Secchi, Cristian; Stramigioli, Stefano; Fantuzzi, Cesare

    After stability, transparency is the major issue in the design of a telemanipulation system. In this paper, we exploit the behavioral approach in order to provide an index for the evaluation of transparency in port-Hamiltonian-based teleoperators. Furthermore, we provide a transparency analysis of

  12. Pixel masks for screen-door transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D. Mulder (Jurriaan); F.C.A. Groen; J.J. van Wijk (Jack)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractRendering objects transparently gives additional insight in complex and overlapping structures. However, traditional techniques for the rendering of transparent objects such as alpha blending are not very well suited for the rendering of multiple transparent objects in dynamic scenes.

  13. Does transparent government agencies strengthen trust?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimmelikhuijsen, S.G.

    2009-01-01

    Trust in government has been shown to be volatile in recent years and Internet transparency is seen as a solution to strengthen trust. However, critics argue that transparency will only lead to less trust, and sceptics say that it has no effect at all. This debate on transparency is lacking

  14. Fullerol-fluorescein isothiocyanate-concanavalin agglutinin phosphorescent sensor for the detection of alpha-fetoprotein and forecast of human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-ming; Lin, Li-ping; Jiang, Shu-Lian; Cui, Ma Lin; Jiao, Li; Zhang, Xiao Yang; Zhang, Li-hong; Zheng, Zhi Yong; Lin, Xuan; Lin, Shao-qin

    2013-11-01

    Based on the reaction of the active -OH group in fullerol (F) with the dissociated -COOH group in fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to form an F-FITC and the enhanced effect of N, N-dimethylaniline (DMA) on phosphorescence signal of F-FITC, a new phosphorescent labeling reagent (DMA-F-FITC) was developed. What's more, a phosphorescent sensor for the determination of alpha-fetoprotein variant (AFP-V) has been designed via the coupling technique of the high sensitivity for affinity adsorption-solid substrate-room temperature phosphorimetry (AA-SS-RTP) with the strong specificity reaction between DMA-F-FITC-Con A and AFP-V. The DMA-F-FITC increased the number of luminescent molecules in the biological target which improved the sensitivity of phosphorescent sensor. The proposed sensor was responsive, simple, selective and sensitive, and it has been applied to the determination of trace AFP-V in human serum and the forecast of human diseases using phosphorescence emission wavelength of F or FITC, with the results agreed well with those obtained by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). Meanwhile, the mechanisms for the labeling reaction and the sensing detection of AFP-V were discussed.

  15. Efficient, deep-blue TADF-emitters for OLED display applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, Daniel; Baumann, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Currently, the mobile display market is strongly shifting towards AMOLED technology, in order to enable curved and flexible displays. This leads to a growing demand for highly efficient OLED emitters to reduce the power consumption and increase display resolution at the same time. While highly efficient green and red OLEDs already found their place in commercial OLED-displays, the lack of efficient blue emitters is still an issue. Consequently, the active area for blue is considerably larger than for green and red pixels, to make up for the lower efficiency. We intend to close this efficiency-gap with novel emitters based on thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) technology. Compared to state-of-the-art fluorescent dopants, the efficiency of TADF-emitters is up to four times higher. At the same time, it is possible to design them in a way to maintain deep blue emission, i.e. CIE y < 0.2. These aspects are relevant to produce efficient high resolution AMOLED displays. Apart from these direct customer benefits, our TADF technology does not contain any rare elements, which allows for the fabrication of sustainable OLED technology. In this work, we highlight one of our recently developed blue TADF materials. Basic material properties as well as first device results are discussed. In a bottom-emitting device, a CIEx/CIEy coordinate of (0.16/0.17) was achieved with efficiency values close to 20% EQE.

  16. Efficiency and stability of different tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq3) derivatives in OLED applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwong, C.Y.; Djurisic, A.B.; Choy, W.C.H.; Li, D.; Xie, M.H.; Chan, W.K.; Cheah, K.W.; Lai, P.T.; Chui, P.C.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we have investigated the material stability and organic light emitting diode (OLED) performance for tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminium (Alq 3 ) and for three of the Alq 3 derivatives. For each material, electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements were performed and the degradation of photoluminescence (PL) with atmosphere exposure was studied. Performance of OLEDs based on these materials was also studied. The device structure was ITO/N,N'-di(naphthalene-1-yl)-N,N'-diphenyl-benzidine (NPB) (50 nm)/Alq 3 or Alq 3 derivatives (60 nm)/LiF (0.3 nm)/Al (60 nm). It was found that the rate of PL decay of the films correlates strongly with the existence of ESR signal. However, stability of OLEDs fabricated from these materials showed no direct relationship with PL decay in the films. This indicates that the dominant degradation mechanism in OLEDs is related to the passage of electric current through the device. Detailed discussion of the performances of four light emitting materials in terms of efficiency and stability is given

  17. Modeling of charge-transport processes for predictive simulation of OLEDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cottaar, J.

    2012-01-01

    Intensive research is taking place into alternative light sources to replace incandescent and fluorescent lamps. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) show great promise, with their main potential advantages being high energy efficiency, cheap roll-to-roll production, excellent color rendering and a

  18. The electro-thermal-mechanical performance of an OLED : a multi-physics model study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, A.W.J.; Barink, M.; Brand, J. van de; Mol, A.M.B. van

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the electrical-thermo-mechanical interaction in OLEDs, finite element based simulation models were developed. Two dimensional models were used to study detailed design effects, such as the location of the bus bars, while a three dimensional model was used to study the effect of

  19. OLED Encapsulation by Room Temperature Plasma-Assisted ALD Al2O3 Films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuning, W.; Creatore, M.; Langereis, E.; Lifka, H.; Weijer, van de P.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs, both small molecule and polymer LEDs) require excellent gas and moisture permeation barrier layers to increase their lifetime. The quality of the barrier layer is ultimately controlled by the presence of defects in the layer. Although a barrier layer may be

  20. Piezoelectric Lead Zirconium Titanate Composite Touch Sensors for Integration with Flexible OLED Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deutz, D.B.; Tempelman, E.; Zwaag, S. van der; Groen, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    To enable the design of more intuitive product user interfaces, the prospects of matching piezoelectric touch sensors with flexible organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology are investigated. Low stiffness piezoelectric composite sensors, combining piezoelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 powder with a