WorldWideScience

Sample records for transmission electron diffraction

  1. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiss, Ákos K.; Rauch, Edgar F.; Lábár, János L.

    2016-01-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. - Highlights: • We propose a novel technique to image the structure of polycrystalline TEM-samples. • Correlation coefficients maps highlights the evolution of the diffracting signal. • 3D views of grain boundaries are provided for nano-particles or polycrystals.

  3. Structural studies of glasses by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashchieva, E.P.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present information about the applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction (ED) for structural investigations of glasses. TEM investigations have been carried out on some binary and on a large number of ternary borate-telluride systems where glass-forming oxides, oxides of transitional elements and modified oxides of elements from I, II and III groups in the periodic table, are used as third component. The large experimental data given by TEM method allows the fine classification of the micro-heterogeneities. A special case of micro-heterogeneous structure with technological origin occurs near the boundary between the 2 immiscible liquids obtained at macro-phase separation. TEM was also used for the direct observation of the glass structure and we have studied the nano-scale structure of borate glasses obtained at slow and fast cooling of the melts. The ED possesses advantages for analysis of amorphous thin films or micro-pastilles and it is a very useful technique for study in materials containing simultaneously light and heavy elements. A comparison between the possibilities of the 3 diffraction techniques (X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and ED) is presented

  4. Automated grain mapping using wide angle convergent beam electron diffraction in transmission electron microscope for nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vineet

    2011-12-01

    The grain size statistics, commonly derived from the grain map of a material sample, are important microstructure characteristics that greatly influence its properties. The grain map for nanomaterials is usually obtained manually by visual inspection of the transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographs because automated methods do not perform satisfactorily. While the visual inspection method provides reliable results, it is a labor intensive process and is often prone to human errors. In this article, an automated grain mapping method is developed using TEM diffraction patterns. The presented method uses wide angle convergent beam diffraction in the TEM. The automated technique was applied on a platinum thin film sample to obtain the grain map and subsequently derive grain size statistics from it. The grain size statistics obtained with the automated method were found in good agreement with the visual inspection method.

  5. A measurement of electron-wall interactions using transmission diffraction from nanofabricated gratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barwick, Brett; Gronniger, Glen; Yuan, Lu; Liou, Sy-Hwang; Batelaan, Herman

    2006-01-01

    Electron diffraction from metal coated freestanding nanofabricated gratings is presented, with a quantitative path integral analysis of the electron-grating interactions. Electron diffraction out to the 20th order was observed indicating the high quality of our nanofabricated gratings. The electron beam is collimated to its diffraction limit with ion-milled material slits. Our path integral analysis is first tested against single slit electron diffraction, and then further expanded with the same theoretical approach to describe grating diffraction. Rotation of the grating with respect to the incident electron beam varies the effective distance between the electron and grating bars. This allows the measurement of the image charge potential between the electron and the grating bars. Image charge potentials that were about 15% of the value for that of a pure electron-metal wall interaction were found. We varied the electron energy from 50 to 900 eV. The interaction time is of the order of typical metal image charge response times and in principle allows the investigation of image charge formation. In addition to the image charge interaction there is a dephasing process reducing the transverse coherence length of the electron wave. The dephasing process causes broadening of the diffraction peaks and is consistent with a model that ascribes the dephasing process to microscopic contact potentials. Surface structures with length scales of about 200 nm observed with a scanning tunneling microscope, and dephasing interaction strength typical of contact potentials of 0.35 eV support this claim. Such a dephasing model motivated the investigation of different metallic coatings, in particular Ni, Ti, Al, and different thickness Au-Pd coatings. Improved quality of diffraction patterns was found for Ni. This coating made electron diffraction possible at energies as low as 50 eV. This energy was limited by our electron gun design. These results are particularly relevant for the

  6. On the optimum resolution of transmission-electron backscattered diffraction (t-EBSD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bremen, R. van; Ribas Gomes, D.; Jeer, L.T.H. de; Ocelík, V., E-mail: v.ocelik@rug.nl; De Hosson, J.Th.M.

    2016-01-15

    The work presented aims at determining the optimum physical resolution of the transmission-electron backscattered diffraction (t-EBSD) technique. The resolution depends critically on intrinsic factors such as the density, atomic number and thickness of the specimen but also on the extrinsic experimental set-up of the electron beam voltage, specimen tilt and detector position. In the present study, the so-called physical resolution of a typical t-EBSD set-up was determined with the use of Monte Carlo simulations and confronted to experimental findings. In the case of a thin Au film of 20 nm, the best resolution obtained was 9 nm whereas for a 100 nm Au film the best resolution was 66 nm. The precise dependence of resolution on thickness was found to vary differently depending on the specific elements involved. This means that the resolution of each specimen should be determined individually. Experimentally the median probe size of the t-EBSD for a 140 nm thick AuAg specimen was measured to be 87 nm. The first and third quartiles of the probe size measurements were found to be 60 nm and 118 nm. Simulation of this specimen resulted in a resolution of 94 nm which fits between these quartiles. - Highlights: • Intrinsic and extrinsic factors affecting resolution of t-EBSD are determined and characterized. • Distinction between resolutions of transmitted and detected electrons is determined. • The simulated results are confirmed experimentally on 140 nm thick AuAg foil.

  7. Multiscale phase mapping of LiFePO4-based electrodes by transmission electron microscopy and electron forward scattering diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Donatien; Douillard, Thierry; Boulineau, Adrien; Brunetti, Guillaume; Nowakowski, Pawel; Venet, Denis; Bayle-Guillemaud, Pascale; Cayron, Cyril

    2013-12-23

    LiFePO4 and FePO4 phase distributions of entire cross-sectioned electrodes with various Li content are investigated from nanoscale to mesoscale, by transmission electron microscopy and by the new electron forward scattering diffraction technique. The distributions of the fully delithiated (FePO4) or lithiated particles (LiFePO4) are mapped on large fields of view (>100 × 100 μm(2)). Heterogeneities in thin and thick electrodes are highlighted at different scales. At the nanoscale, the statistical analysis of 64 000 particles unambiguously shows that the small particles delithiate first. At the mesoscale, the phase maps reveal a core-shell mechanism at the scale of the agglomerates with a preferential pathway along the electrode porosities. At larger scale, lithiation occurs in thick electrodes "stratum by stratum" from the surface in contact with electrolyte toward the current collector.

  8. Characterizing deformed ultrafine-grained and nanocrystalline materials using transmission Kikuchi diffraction in a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimby, Patrick W.; Cao, Yang; Chen, Zibin; Han, Shuang; Hemker, Kevin J.; Lian, Jianshe; Liao, Xiaozhou; Rottmann, Paul; Samudrala, Saritha; Sun, Jingli; Wang, Jing Tao; Wheeler, John; Cairney, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Abstract: The recent development of transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) in a scanning electron microscope enables fast, automated orientation mapping of electron transparent samples using standard electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) hardware. TKD in a scanning electron microscope has significantly better spatial resolution than conventional EBSD, enabling routine characterization of nanocrystalline materials and allowing effective measurement of samples that have undergone severe plastic deformation. Combining TKD with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) provides complementary chemical information, while a standard forescatter detector system below the EBSD detector can be used to generate dark field and oriented dark field images. Here we illustrate the application of this exciting new approach to a range of deformed, ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline samples, including duplex stainless steel, nanocrystalline copper and highly deformed titanium and nickel–cobalt. The results show that TKD combined with EDS is a highly effective and widely accessible tool for measuring key microstructural parameters at resolutions that are inaccessible using conventional EBSD

  9. Diffraction contrast as a sensitive indicator of femtosecond sub-nanoscale motion in ultrafast transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Schliep, Karl B.; Flannigan, David J.

    2013-09-01

    With ultrafast transmission electron microscopy (UTEM), access can be gained to the spatiotemporal scales required to directly visualize rapid, non-equilibrium structural dynamics of materials. This is achieved by operating a transmission electron microscope (TEM) in a stroboscopic pump-probe fashion by photoelectrically generating coherent, well-timed electron packets in the gun region of the TEM. These probe photoelectrons are accelerated down the TEM column where they travel through the specimen before reaching a standard, commercially-available CCD detector. A second laser pulse is used to excite (pump) the specimen in situ. Structural changes are visualized by varying the arrival time of the pump laser pulse relative to the probe electron packet at the specimen. Here, we discuss how ultrafast nanoscale motions of crystalline materials can be visualized and precisely quantified using diffraction contrast in UTEM. Because diffraction contrast sensitively depends upon both crystal lattice orientation as well as incoming electron wavevector, minor spatial/directional variations in either will produce dynamic and often complex patterns in real-space images. This is because sections of the crystalline material that satisfy the Laue conditions may be heterogeneously distributed such that electron scattering vectors vary over nanoscale regions. Thus, minor changes in either crystal grain orientation, as occurs during specimen tilting, warping, or anisotropic expansion, or in the electron wavevector result in dramatic changes in the observed diffraction contrast. In this way, dynamic contrast patterns observed in UTEM images can be used as sensitive indicators of ultrafast specimen motion. Further, these motions can be spatiotemporally mapped such that direction and amplitude can be determined.

  10. Electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, L-C

    2006-01-01

    The properties of a carbon nanotube are dependent on its atomic structure. The atomic structure of a carbon nanotube can be defined by specifying its chiral indices (u, v), that specify its perimeter vector (chiral vector), with which the diameter and helicity are also determined. The fine electron beam available in a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM) offers a unique probe to reveal the atomic structure of individual nanotubes. This review covers two aspects related to the use of the electron probe in the TEM for the study of carbon nanotubes: (a) to understand the electron diffraction phenomena for inter-pretation of the electron diffraction patterns of carbon nanotubes and (b) to obtain the chiral indices (u, v), of the carbon nanotubes from the electron diffraction patterns. For a nanotube of a given structure, the electron scattering amplitude from the carbon nanotube is first described analytically in closed form using the helical diffraction theory. From a known structure as given by the chiral indices (u, v), its electron diffraction pattern can be calculated and understood. The reverse problem, i.e. assignment of the chiral indices from an electron diffraction pattern of a carbon nanotube, is approached from the relationship between the electron scattering intensity distribution and the chiral indices (u, v). We show that electron diffraction patterns can provide an accurate and unambiguous assignment of the chiral indices of carbon nanotubes. The chiral indices (u, v) can be read indiscriminately with a high accuracy from the intensity distribution on the principal layer lines in an electron diffraction pattern. The symmetry properties of electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes and the electron diffraction from deformed carbon nanotubes are also discussed in detail. It is shown that 2mm symmetry is always preserved for single-walled carbon nanotubes, but it can break down for multiwalled carbon nanotubes under some special circumstances

  11. Physical methods for studying minerals and solid materials: X-ray, electron and neutron diffraction; scanning and transmission electron microscopy; X-ray, electron and ion spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhart, J.-P.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: theoretical aspects of radiation-matter interactions; production and measurement of radiations (X rays, electrons, neutrons); applications of radiation interactions to the study of crystalline materials. The following techniques are presented: X-ray and neutron diffraction, electron microscopy, electron diffraction, X-ray fluorescence analysis, electron probe microanalysis, surface analysis by electron emission spectrometry (ESCA and Auger electrons), scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion emission analysis [fr

  12. Acquisition parameters optimization of a transmission electron forward scatter diffraction system in a cold-field emission scanning electron microscope for nanomaterials characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Demers, Hendrix; Trudeau, Michel; Gauvin, Raynald

    2013-01-01

    Transmission electron forward scatter diffraction (t-EFSD) is a new technique providing crystallographic information with high resolution on thin specimens by using a conventional electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) system in a scanning electron microscope. In this study, the impact of tilt angle, working distance, and detector distance on the Kikuchi pattern quality were investigated in a cold-field emission scanning electron microscope (CFE-SEM). We demonstrated that t-EFSD is applicable for tilt angles ranging from -20° to -40°. Working distance (WD) should be optimized for each material by choosing the WD for which the EBSD camera screen illumination is the highest, as the number of detected electrons on the screen is directly dependent on the scattering angle. To take advantage of the best performances of the CFE-SEM, the EBSD camera should be close to the sample and oriented towards the bottom to increase forward scattered electron collection efficiency. However, specimen chamber cluttering and beam/mechanical drift are important limitations in the CFE-SEM used in this work. Finally, the importance of t-EFSD in materials science characterization was illustrated through three examples of phase identification and orientation mapping. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  14. Puzzling Intergrowth in Cerium Nitridophosphate Unraveled by Joint Venture of Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Synchrotron Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloß, Simon D; Neudert, Lukas; Döblinger, Markus; Nentwig, Markus; Oeckler, Oliver; Schnick, Wolfgang

    2017-09-13

    Thorough investigation of nitridophosphates has rapidly accelerated through development of new synthesis strategies. Here we used the recently developed high-pressure metathesis to prepare the first rare-earth metal nitridophosphate, Ce 4 Li 3 P 18 N 35 , with a high degree of condensation >1/2. Ce 4 Li 3 P 18 N 35 consists of an unprecedented hexagonal framework of PN 4 tetrahedra and exhibits blue luminescence peaking at 455 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed two intergrown domains with slight structural and compositional variations. One domain type shows extremely weak superstructure phenomena revealed by atomic-resolution scanning TEM (STEM) and single-crystal diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The corresponding superstructure involves a modulated displacement of Ce atoms in channels of tetrahedra 6-rings. The displacement model was refined in a supercell as well as in an equivalent commensurate (3 + 2)-dimensional description in superspace group P6 3 (α, β, 0)0(-α - β, α, 0)0. In the second domain type, STEM revealed disordered vacancies of the same Ce atoms that were modulated in the first domain type, leading to sum formula Ce 4-0.5x Li 3 P 18 N 35-1.5x O 1.5x (x ≈ 0.72) of the average structure. The examination of these structural intricacies may indicate the detection limit of synchrotron diffraction and TEM. We discuss the occurrence of either Ce displacements or Ce vacancies that induce the incorporation of O as necessary stabilization of the crystal structure.

  15. Orientation and phase mapping in the transmission electron microscope using precession-assisted diffraction spot recognition: state-of-the-art results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viladot, D; Véron, M; Gemmi, M; Peiró, F; Portillo, J; Estradé, S; Mendoza, J; Llorca-Isern, N; Nicolopoulos, S

    2013-10-01

    A recently developed technique based on the transmission electron microscope, which makes use of electron beam precession together with spot diffraction pattern recognition now offers the possibility to acquire reliable orientation/phase maps with a spatial resolution down to 2 nm on a field emission gun transmission electron microscope. The technique may be described as precession-assisted crystal orientation mapping in the transmission electron microscope, precession-assisted crystal orientation mapping technique-transmission electron microscope, also known by its product name, ASTAR, and consists in scanning the precessed electron beam in nanoprobe mode over the specimen area, thus producing a collection of precession electron diffraction spot patterns, to be thereafter indexed automatically through template matching. We present a review on several application examples relative to the characterization of microstructure/microtexture of nanocrystalline metals, ceramics, nanoparticles, minerals and organics. The strengths and limitations of the technique are also discussed using several application examples. ©2013 The Authors. Journal of Microscopy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Microscopical Society.

  16. Electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the high temperature crystal structures of GexSb2Te3+x (x=1,2,3) phase change material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, B.J.; de Hosson, J.T.M.

    2002-01-01

    The crystal structures of GeSb2Te4, Ge2Sb2Te5, and Ge3Sb2Te6 were determined using electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The structure determined for the former two crystals deviates from the ones proposed in the literature. These crystal structures were

  17. Structural characterization and gas reactions of small metal particles by high resolution in-situ TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and TED (Transmission Electron Diffraction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, K.

    1987-01-01

    The detection and size analysis of small metal particles supported on amorphous substrates becomes increasingly difficult when the particle size approaches that of the phase contrast background structures of the support. An approach of digital image analysis, involving Fourier transformation of the original image, filtering, and image reconstruction was studied with respect to the likelihood of unambiguously detecting particles of less than 1 nm diameter on amorphous substrates from a single electron micrograph.

  18. Characterization by Raman scattering, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy of (AlAs)m(InAs)m short period superlattices grown by migration enhanced epitaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradshaw, J.; Song, X.J.; Shealy, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    We report growth of (InAs)1(AlAs)1 and (InAs)2(AlAs)2 strained layer superlattices by migration enhanced epitaxy. The samples were grown on InP (001) substrates and characterized by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Satellite peaks in the x-ray data...... confirm the intended periodicity and indicate the presence of some disorder in the monolayer sample. The energies of the zone folded and quantum confined optic phonons are in reasonable agreement with calculations based on one-dimensional elastic continuum and linear chain models. Journal of Applied...

  19. Structural Characterization and Gas Reactions of Small Metal Particles by High Resolution In-situ TEM and TED. [Transmission Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, K.

    1985-01-01

    A commercial electron microscope with flat-plate upper pole piece configuration of the objective lens and top entry specimen introduction was modified to obtain 5 x 10 to the minus 10th power mbar pressure at the site of the specimen while maintaining the convenience of a specimen airlock system that allows operation in the 10 to the 10th power mbar range within 15 minutes after specimen change. The specimen chamber contains three wire evaporation sources, a specimen heater, and facilities for oxygen or hydrogen plasma treatment to clean as-introduced specimens. Evacuation is achieved by dural differential pumping, with fine entrance and exit apertures for the electron beam. With the microscope operating at .000001 mbar, the first differential pumping stage features a high-speed cryopump operating in a stainless steel chamber that can be mildly baked and reaches 1 x 10 to the minus 8th power mbar. The second stage, containing the evaporation sources and a custom ionization gauge within 10 cm from the specimen, is a rigorously uncompromised all-metal uhv-system that is bakable to above 200 C throughout and is pumped with an 80-liter ion pump. Design operating pressures and image quality (resolution of metal particles smaller than 1 nm in size) was achieved.

  20. Order-disorder phase transformations in quaternary pyrochlore oxide system: Investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishnan, A.N.; Prabhakar Rao, P.; Sibi, K.S.; Deepa, M.; Koshy, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Order-disorder transformations in a quaternary pyrochlore oxide system, Ca-Y-Zr-Ta-O, were studied by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) method, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and FT-NIR Raman spectroscopic techniques. The solid solutions in different ratios, 4:1, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, 1:4, 1:6, of CaTaO 3.5 and YZrO 3.5 were prepared by the conventional high temperature ceramic route. The XRD results and Rietveld analysis revealed that the crystal structure changed from an ordered pyrochlore structure to a disordered defect fluorite structure as the ratios of the solid solutions of CaTaO 3.5 and YZrO 3.5 were changed from 4:1 to 1:4. This structural transformation in the present system is attributed to the lowering of the average cation radius ratio, r A /r B as a result of progressive and simultaneous substitution of larger cation Ca 2+ for Y 3+ at A sites and smaller cation Ta 5+ for Zr 4+ at B sites. Raman spectroscopy and TEM analysis corroborated the XRD results. - Graphical abstract: Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns showed highly ordered diffraction maxima with characteristic superlattice weak diffraction spots of the pyrochlore structure for (a) Ca 0.6 7Y 1.33 Zr 1.33 Ta 0.33 O 7 (C2YZT2) and bright diffraction maxima arranged in a ring pattern of the fluorite structure for (b) Ca 0.29 7Y 1.71 Zr 1.71 Ta 0.29 O 7 (CY6Z6T).

  1. Fine structure characterization of martensite/austenite constituent in low-carbon low-alloy steel by transmission electron forward scatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C W; Han, L Z; Luo, X M; Liu, Q D; Gu, J F

    2016-11-01

    Transmission electron forward scatter diffraction and other characterization techniques were used to investigate the fine structure and the variant relationship of the martensite/austenite (M/A) constituent of the granular bainite in low-carbon low-alloy steel. The results demonstrated that the M/A constituents were distributed in clusters throughout the bainitic ferrite. Lath martensite was the main component of the M/A constituent, where the relationship between the martensite variants was consistent with the Nishiyama-Wassermann orientation relationship and only three variants were found in the M/A constituent, suggesting that the variants had formed in the M/A constituent according to a specific mechanism. Furthermore, the Σ3 boundaries in the M/A constituent were much longer than their counterparts in the bainitic ferrite region. The results indicate that transmission electron forward scatter diffraction is an effective method of crystallographic analysis for nanolaths in M/A constituents. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. Electron microscopy and diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjoennes, J.; Olsen, A.

    1986-01-01

    This report is a description of research activities and plans at the electron microscopy laboratorium, Physics Department, University of Oslo. Since the first electron microscope was installed in 1968, the research has covered inorganic structures, physical metallurgy, as well as theory of electron scattering and the development of methods in this field. The current plans involve efforts in the development of crystallographic and spectroscopic methods

  3. Microstructural changes in CdSe-coated ZnO nanowires evaluated by in situ annealing in transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majidi, Hasti; Baxter, Jason B; Winkler, Christopher R; Taheri, Mitra L

    2012-01-01

    We report on the crystallite growth and phase change of electrodeposited CdSe coatings on ZnO nanowires during annealing. Both in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal that the nanocrystal size increases from ∼3 to ∼10 nm upon annealing at 350 °C for 1 h and then to more than 30 nm during another 1 h at 400 °C, exhibiting two distinct growth regimes. Nanocrystal growth occurs together with a structural change from zinc blende to wurtzite. The structural transition begins at 350 °C, which results in the formation of stacking faults. Increased crystallite size, comparable to the coating thickness, can improve charge separation in extremely thin absorber solar cells. We demonstrate a nearly two-fold improvement in power conversion efficiency upon annealing. (paper)

  4. Microstructural changes in CdSe-coated ZnO nanowires evaluated by in situ annealing in transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Hasti; Winkler, Christopher R.; Taheri, Mitra L.; Baxter, Jason B.

    2012-07-01

    We report on the crystallite growth and phase change of electrodeposited CdSe coatings on ZnO nanowires during annealing. Both in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal that the nanocrystal size increases from ˜3 to ˜10 nm upon annealing at 350 °C for 1 h and then to more than 30 nm during another 1 h at 400 °C, exhibiting two distinct growth regimes. Nanocrystal growth occurs together with a structural change from zinc blende to wurtzite. The structural transition begins at 350 °C, which results in the formation of stacking faults. Increased crystallite size, comparable to the coating thickness, can improve charge separation in extremely thin absorber solar cells. We demonstrate a nearly two-fold improvement in power conversion efficiency upon annealing.

  5. Mineralogical applications of electron diffraction. 1. Theory and techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Malcolm; Christ, C.L.

    1958-01-01

    The small wavelengths used in electron-diffraction experiments and the thinness of the crystals necessary for the transmission of the electron beam combine to require a somewhat different diffraction geometry for the interpretation of electron-diffraction patterns than is used in the interpretation of X-ray diffraction patterns. This geometry, based on the reciprocal lattice concept and geometrical construction of Ewald, needed for the interpretation.

  6. Diffraction of high energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, A.

    1981-10-01

    The diffraction of electrons by a crystal is examined to study its structure. As the electron-substance interaction is strong, it must be treated in a dynamic manner. Using the N waves theory and physical optics the base equations giving the wave at the outlet are deduced for a perfect crystal and their equivalence is shown. The more complex case of an imperfect crystal is then envisaged in these two approaches. In both cases, only the diffraction of high energy electrons ( > 50 KeV) are considered since in the diffraction of slow electrons back scattering cannot be ignored. Taking into account an increasingly greater number of beams, through fast calculations computer techniques, enables images to be simulated in very varied conditions. The general use of the Fast Fourier Transform has given a clear cut practical advantage to the multi-layer method [fr

  7. Characterization of CuCl quantum dots grown in NaCl single crystals via optical measurements, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Kensuke; Akatsu, Tatsuro; Itoh, Ken

    2018-05-01

    We evaluated the crystal size, shape, and alignment of the lattice planes of CuCl quantum dots (QDs) embedded in NaCl single crystals by optical measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We obtained, for the first time, an XRD pattern and TEM images for CuCl QDs in NaCl crystals. The XRD pattern showed that the lattice planes of the CuCl QDs were parallel to those of the NaCl crystals. In addition, the size of the QDs was estimated from the diffraction width. It was apparent from the TEM images that almost all CuCl QDs were polygonal, although some cubic QDs were present. The mean size and size distribution of the QDs were also obtained. The dot size obtained from optical measurements, XRD, and TEM image were almost consistent. Our new findings can help to reveal the growth mechanism of semiconductor QDs embedded in a crystallite matrix. In addition, this work will play an important role in progressing the study of optical phenomena originating from assembled semiconductor QDs.

  8. Interfacial reaction pathways and kinetics during annealing of 111-textured Al/TiN bilayers: A synchrotron x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, J.-S.; Desjardins, P.; Lavoie, C.; Petrov, I.; Cabral, C. Jr.; Greene, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    Growth of TiN layers in most diffusion-barrier applications is limited to deposition temperatures T s s =450 deg. C on SiO 2 by ultrahigh vacuum reactive magnetron sputter deposition in pure N 2 . Al overlayers, 160 nm thick with inherited 111 preferred orientation, were then deposited at T s =100 deg. C without breaking vacuum. The as-deposited TiN layer is underdense due to the low deposition temperature (T s /T m ≅0.23 in which T m is the melting point) resulting in kinetically limited adatom mobilities leading to atomic shadowing which, in turn, results in a columnar microstructure with both inter- and intracolumnar voids. The Al overlayer is fully dense. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction was used to follow interfacial reaction kinetics during postdeposition annealing of the 111-textured Al/TiN bilayers as a function of time (t a =12-1200 s) and temperature (T a =440-550 deg. C). Changes in bilayer microstructure and microchemistry were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM to obtain compositional maps of plan-view and cross-sectional specimens. Interfacial reaction during annealing is initiated at the Al/TiN interface. Al diffuses rapidly into TiN voids during anneals at temperatures ∼ 3 Ti at the interface. Al 3 Ti exhibits a relatively planar growth front extending toward the Al free surface. Analyses of time-dependent x-ray diffraction peak intensities during isothermal annealing as a function of temperature show that Al 3 Ti growth kinetics are, for the entire temperature range investigated, diffusion limited with an activation energy of 1.5±0.2 eV

  9. X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy characterization of intermetallics formed in Fe/Ti nanometer-scale multilayers during thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Z.L.; Peng, T.X.; Cao, B.S.; Lei, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Intermetallics formation in the Fe/Ti nanometer-scale multilayers magnetron-sputtering deposited on Si(100) substrate during thermal annealing at 623-873 K was investigated by using small and wide angle X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The Fe/Ti nanometer-scale multilayers were constructed with bilayer thickness of 16.2 nm and the sublayer thickness ratio of 1:1. At the annealing temperature of 623 K, intermetallics FeTi were formed by nucleation at the triple joins of α-Fe(Ti)/α-Ti interface and α-Ti grain boundary with an orientational correlation of FeTi(110)//α-Ti(100) and FeTi[001]//α-Ti[001] to adjacent α-Ti grains. The lateral growth of intermetallics FeTi which is dependent on the diffusion path of Ti led to a coalescence into an intermetallic layer. With an increase in the annealing temperature, intermetallics Fe 2 Ti were formed between the intermetallics FeTi and the excess Fe due to the limitation of Fe and Ti atomic concentrations, resulting in the coexistence of intermetallics FeTi and Fe 2 Ti. It was found that the low energy interface as well as the dominant diffusion path constrained the nucleation and growth of intermetallics during interfacial reaction in the nanometer-scale metallic multilayers.

  10. Analysis of the dislocation content in a deformed Co-based superalloy by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, D.; Klimanek, P.; Muehle, U.; Martin, U.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper compares the dislocation densities as determined in a Co-based superalloy (CoNi22Cr22W14) after creep and tensile deformation by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-ray profile analysis (XRD). After creep tests the dislocation densities obtained by both methods are in good agreement, which is the result of a nearly homogeneous dislocation distribution. The relationship between the dislocation density and the flow stress meets the Taylor equation. After tensile deformation the dislocation densities determined by TEM and XRD differ systematically from each other, but in both cases also a Taylor relationship can be obtained. The constant α of the dislocation interaction derived by TEM is much larger than in the creep tests and also than that of the XRD, which agrees well with the creep data. The difference between the TEM and the XRD results is the consequence of the dislocation cell structure much more developed in the tensile specimens, which leads to an underestimation of the dislocation density in TEM because of overweighting the cell interior. By fitting the Fourier coefficients of the X-ray diffraction line shapes with a bimodal distribution of the defect content (composite model), dislocation densities of the cell interior can be estimated that correspond well to the TEM data. (orig.)

  11. Transmission electron microscope studies of extraterrestrial materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.

    1995-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray spectrometry and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy are used to analyse carbon in interplanetary dust particles. Optical micrographs are shown depicting cross sections of the dust particles embedded in sulphur. Selected-area electron diffraction patterns are shown. Transmission Electron Microscope specimens of lunar soil were prepared using two methods: ion-milling and ultramicrotomy. A combination of high resolution TEM imaging and electron diffraction is used to characterize the opaque assemblages. The opaque assemblages analyzed in this study are dominated by ilmenite with lesser rutile and spinel exsolutions, and traces of Fe metal.

  12. Axial channeling in electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimiya, A.; Lehmpfuhl, G.

    1978-01-01

    Kossel patterns from Silicon and Niobium were obtained with a convergent electron beam. An intensity maximum in the direction of the zone axes [001] and [111] of Nb was interpreted as axial channeling. The intensity distribution in Kossel patterns was calculated by means of the Bloch wave picture of the dynamical theory of electron diffraction. Particularly zone axis patterns were calculated for different substance-energy combinations and they were compared with experimental observations. The intensity distribution in the calculated Kossel patterns was very sensitive to the model of absorption and it was found that a treatment of the absorption close to the model of Humphreys and Hirsch [Phil. Mag. 18, 115 (1968)] gave the best agreement with the experimental observations. Furthermore it is shown which Bloch waves are important for the intensity distribution in the Kossel patterns, how they are absorbed and how they change with energy. (orig.) [de

  13. Molecular beam epitaxial growth mechanism of ZnSe epilayers on (100) GaAs as determined by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruppert, P.; Hommel, D.; Behr, T.; Heinke, H.; Waag, A.; Landwehr, G. (Physikalisches Inst., Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany))

    1994-04-14

    The properties of molecular beam epitaxial growth of ZnSe epilayers deposited directly on a GaAs substrate are compared to those grown on a GaAs buffer layer. The superior quality of the latter is confirmed by RHEED, TEM and X-ray diffraction. Based on RHEED oscillation studies, a model explaining the dependence of the ZnSe growth rate on Zn and Se fluxes and the substrate temperature is developed taking into account physisorbed and chemisorbed states. For partially relaxed epilayers, the correlation between the relaxation state and the crystalline mosaicity, as found by high resolution X-ray diffraction, is discussed

  14. Transmission Electron Microscopy Physics of Image Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kohl, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy: Physics of Image Formation presents the theory of image and contrast formation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy. The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described. Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast. Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure analysis and imaging of lattices and their defects. X-ray microanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods. Specimen damage and contamination by electron irradiation limits the resolution for biological and some inorganic specimens. This fifth edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the area of aberration correction and energy filtering; moreover, the topics introduced in the fourth edition have been updated. Transmission Electron Microscopy: Physics of Image Formation is written f...

  15. Transmission Electron Microscopy and Diffractometry of Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Fultz, Brent

    2013-01-01

    This book explains concepts of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) that are important for the characterization of materials. The fourth edition adds important new techniques of TEM such as electron tomography, nanobeam diffraction, and geometric phase analysis. A new chapter on neutron scattering completes the trio of x-ray, electron and neutron diffraction. All chapters were updated and revised for clarity. The book explains the fundamentals of how waves and wavefunctions interact with atoms in solids, and the similarities and differences of using x-rays, electrons, or neutrons for diffraction measurements. Diffraction effects of crystalline order, defects, and disorder in materials are explained in detail. Both practical and theoretical issues are covered. The book can be used in an introductory-level or advanced-level course, since sections are identified by difficulty. Each chapter includes a set of problems to illustrate principles, and the extensive Appendix includes la...

  16. Future of Electron Scattering and Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Ernest [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Stemmer, Susanne [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Zheng, Haimei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Maracas, George [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2014-02-25

    spectroscopy with high spatial resolution without damaging their structure. The strong interaction of electrons with matter allows high-energy electron pulses to gather structural information before a sample is damaged. Electron ScatteringImaging, diffraction, and spectroscopy are the fundamental capabilities of electron-scattering instruments. The DOE BES-funded TEAM (Transmission Electron Aberration-corrected Microscope) project achieved unprecedented sub-atomic spatial resolution in imaging through aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. To further advance electron scattering techniques that directly enable groundbreaking science, instrumentation must advance beyond traditional two-dimensional imaging. Advances in temporal resolution, recording the full phase and energy spaces, and improved spatial resolution constitute a new frontier in electron microscopy, and will directly address the BES Grand Challenges, such as to “control the emergent properties that arise from the complex correlations of atomic and electronic constituents” and the “hidden states” “very far away from equilibrium”. Ultrafast methods, such as the pump-probe approach, enable pathways toward understanding, and ultimately controlling, the chemical dynamics of molecular systems and the evolution of complexity in mesoscale and nanoscale systems. Central to understanding how to synthesize and exploit functional materials is having the ability to apply external stimuli (such as heat, light, a reactive flux, and an electrical bias) and to observe the resulting dynamic process in situ and in operando, and under the appropriate environment (e.g., not limited to UHV conditions). To enable revolutionary advances in electron scattering and science, the participants of the workshop recommended three major new instrumental developments: A. Atomic-Resolution Multi-Dimensional Transmission Electron Microscope: This instrument would provide quantitative information over the entire real space

  17. Precise rotational alignment of x-ray transmission diffraction gratings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Gold transmission diffraction gratings used for x-ray spectroscopy must sometimes be rotationally aligned to the axis of a diagnostic instrument to within sub-milliradian accuracy. We have fabricated transmission diffraction gratings with high line-densities (grating period of 200 and 300 nm) using uv holographic and x-ray lithography. Since the submicron features of the gratings are not optically visible, precision alignment is time consuming and difficult to verify in situ. We have developed a technique to write an optically visible alignment pattern onto these gratings using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). At high magnification (15000 X) several submicron lines of the grating are observable in the SEM, making it possible to write an alignment pattern parallel to the grating lines in an electron-beam-sensitive coating that overlays the grating. We create an alignment pattern by following a 1-cm-long grating line using the SEM's joystick-controlled translation stage. By following the same grating line we are assured the traveled direction of the SEM electron beam is parallel to the grating to better than 10 μradian. The electron-beam-exposed line-width can be large (5 to 15 μm wide) depending on the SEM magnification, and is therefore optically visible. The exposed pattern is eventually made a permanent feature of the grating by ion beam etching or gold electroplating. The pattern can be used to accurately align the grating to the axis of a diagnostic instrument. More importantly, the alignment of the grating can be quickly verified in situ

  18. LEED (Low Energy Electron Diffraction)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberdam, M.

    1973-01-01

    The various types of systems studied by LEED, and for which the geometry of diffraction patterns is exploited, are reviewed, intensity profiles being another source of information. Two representative approaches of the scattering phenomenon are examined; the band structure theory and the T matrix approach [fr

  19. Strain mapping under spherical indentations using transmission Kikuchi diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cackett, A.; Hardie, C.; Wilkinson, A.; Dicks, K.

    2015-01-01

    Due to restrictions on both the specimen volumes available and the activity levels research facilities can handle, testing techniques on the micron-scale are very attractive for the study of irradiated material. However, the results of such small tests are convoluted by plasticity size-effects. Spherical nano-indentation is increasingly used to probe irradiated material, but to characterise the area of plastic deformation surrounding indentations a method capable of providing crystallographic information at extremely high spatial resolution is required. Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD) is a novel diffraction technique that can be performed in a scanning electron microscope. Using this technique, spatial resolutions below 10 nm have been achieved. Initial results, shown here, demonstrate the use of TKD in mapping the lattice rotations caused by indentation produced with a spherical diamond tip. With the addition of strain mapping software the plastic zone size was also evaluated for the first time using diffraction patterns generated via TKD. For a tip of radius 15 μm, inserted into Fe to a strain of 0.07, the plastic zone was observed to extend 1.3 μm to either side of the incident location of indentation and the deformation depth was approximately 0.5 μm. (authors)

  20. Uniting Electron Crystallography and Powder Diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Shankland, Kenneth; Meshi, Louisa; Avilov, Anatoly; David, William

    2012-01-01

    The polycrystalline and nanocrystalline states play an increasingly important role in exploiting the properties of materials, encompassing applications as diverse as pharmaceuticals, catalysts, solar cells and energy storage. A knowledge of the three-dimensional atomic and molecular structure of materials is essential for understanding and controlling their properties, yet traditional single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods lose their power when only polycrystalline and nanocrystalline samples are available. It is here that powder diffraction and single-crystal electron diffraction techniques take over, substantially extending the range of applicability of the crystallographic principles of structure determination.  This volume, a collection of teaching contributions presented at the Crystallographic Course in Erice in 2011, clearly describes the fundamentals and the state-of-the-art of powder diffraction and electron diffraction methods in materials characterisation, encompassing a diverse range of discipl...

  1. Ultrafast electron diffraction using an ultracold source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. van Mourik

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of structural dynamics of complex macromolecular crystals using electrons requires bunches of sufficient coherence and charge. We present diffraction patterns from graphite, obtained with bunches from an ultracold electron source, based on femtosecond near-threshold photoionization of a laser-cooled atomic gas. By varying the photoionization wavelength, we change the effective source temperature from 300 K to 10 K, resulting in a concomitant change in the width of the diffraction peaks, which is consistent with independently measured source parameters. This constitutes a direct measurement of the beam coherence of this ultracold source and confirms its suitability for protein crystal diffraction.

  2. In situ observation of Cu-Ni alloy nanoparticle formation by X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy: Influence of Cu/Ni ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard; Chiarello, Gian Luca

    2014-01-01

    Silica-supported, bimetallic Cu-Ni nanomaterials were prepared with different ratios of Cu to Ni by incipient wetness impregnation without a specific calcination step before reduction. Different in situ characterization techniques, in particular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray...... diffraction (XRD), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), were applied to follow the reduction and alloying process of Cu-Ni nanoparticles on silica. In situ reduction of Cu-Ni samples with structural characterization by combined synchrotron XRD and XAS reveals a strong interaction between Cu and Ni species......, which results in improved reducibility of the Ni species compared with monometallic Ni. At high Ni concentrations silica-supported Cu-Ni alloys form a homogeneous solid solution of Cu and Ni, whereas at lower Ni contents Cu and Ni are partly segregated and form metallic Cu and Cu-Ni alloy phases. Under...

  3. Deep-inelastic electron-proton diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dainton, J.B.

    1995-11-01

    Recent measurements by the H1 collaboration at HERA of the cross section for deep-inelastic electron-proton scattering in which the proton interacts with minimal energy transfer and limited 4-momentum transfer squared are presented in the form of the contribution F 2 D(3) to the proton structure function F 2 . By parametrising the cross section phenomenologically in terms of a leading effective Regge pole exchange and comparing the result with a similar parametrisation of hadronic pp physics, the proton interaction is demonstrated to be dominantly of a diffractive nature. The quantitative interpretation of the parametrisation in terms of the properties of an effective leading Regge pole exchange, the pomeron (IP), shows that there is no evidence for a 'harder' BFKL-motivated IP in such deep-inelastic proton diffraction. The total contribution of proton diffraction to deep-inelastic electron-proton scattering is measured to be ∝10% and to be rather insensitive to Bjorken-x and Q 2 . A first measurement of the partonic structure of diffractive exchange is presented. It is shown to be readily interpreted in terms of the exchange of gluons, and to suggest that the bulk of diffractive momentum transfer is carried by a leading gluon. (orig.)

  4. Electron diffraction patterns with thermal diffuse scattering maxima around Kikuchi lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakhanyan, R. K.; Karakhanyan, K. R.

    2011-01-01

    Transmission electron diffraction patterns of silicon with thermal diffuse maxima around Kikuchi lines, which are analogs of the maxima of thermal diffuse electron scattering around point reflections, have been recorded. Diffuse maxima are observed only around Kikuchi lines with indices that are forbidden for the silicon structure. The diffraction conditions for forming these maxima are discussed.

  5. Bragg's Law diffraction simulations for electron backscatter diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacher, Josh; Landon, Colin; Adams, Brent L.; Fullwood, David

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, Angus Wilkinson introduced a cross-correlation-based electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) texture analysis system capable of measuring lattice rotations and elastic strains to high resolution. A variation of the cross-correlation method is introduced using Bragg's Law-based simulated EBSD patterns as strain free reference patterns that facilitates the use of the cross-correlation method with polycrystalline materials. The lattice state is found by comparing simulated patterns to collected patterns at a number of regions on the pattern using the cross-correlation function and calculating the deformation from the measured shifts of each region. A new pattern can be simulated at the deformed state, and the process can be iterated a number of times to converge on the absolute lattice state. By analyzing an iteratively rotated single crystal silicon sample and recovering the rotation, this method is shown to have an angular resolution of ∼0.04 o and an elastic strain resolution of ∼7e-4. As an example of applications, elastic strain and curvature measurements are used to estimate the dislocation density in a single grain of a compressed polycrystalline Mg-based AZ91 alloy.

  6. Precession electron diffraction – a topical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Midgley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 20 years since precession electron diffraction (PED was introduced, it has grown from a little-known niche technique to one that is seen as a cornerstone of electron crystallography. It is now used primarily in two ways. The first is to determine crystal structures, to identify lattice parameters and symmetry, and ultimately to solve the atomic structure ab initio. The second is, through connection with the microscope scanning system, to map the local orientation of the specimen to investigate crystal texture, rotation and strain at the nanometre scale. This topical review brings the reader up to date, highlighting recent successes using PED and providing some pointers to the future in terms of method development and how the technique can meet some of the needs of the X-ray crystallography community. Complementary electron techniques are also discussed, together with how a synergy of methods may provide the best approach to electron-based structure analysis.

  7. Transmission electron microscopy of bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, Vincent; Niehof, Anneke; Tigchelaar-Gutter, Wikky; Beertsen, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes procedures to process mineralized tissues obtained from different sources for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Methods for fixation, resin embedding, staining of semi-thin sections and ultrathin sections are presented. In addition, attention will be paid to processing

  8. Two-dimensional X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy study on the effect of magnetron sputtering atmosphere on GaN/SiC interface and gallium nitride thin film crystal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Huaxiang, E-mail: shenhuaxiang@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Zhu, Guo-Zhen; Botton, Gianluigi A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Canadian Centre for Electron Microscopy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Kitai, Adrian [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2015-03-21

    The growth mechanisms of high quality GaN thin films on 6H-SiC by sputtering were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The XRD θ-2θ scans show that high quality (0002) oriented GaN was deposited on 6H-SiC by reactive magnetron sputtering. Pole figures obtained by 2D-XRD clarify that GaN thin films are dominated by (0002) oriented wurtzite GaN and (111) oriented zinc-blende GaN. A thin amorphous silicon oxide layer on SiC surfaces observed by STEM plays a critical role in terms of the orientation information transfer from the substrate to the GaN epilayer. The addition of H{sub 2} into Ar and/or N{sub 2} during sputtering can reduce the thickness of the amorphous layer. Moreover, adding 5% H{sub 2} into Ar can facilitate a phase transformation from amorphous to crystalline in the silicon oxide layer and eliminate the unwanted (33{sup ¯}02) orientation in the GaN thin film. Fiber texture GaN thin films can be grown by adding 10% H{sub 2} into N{sub 2} due to the complex reaction between H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}.

  9. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Minerals and Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Alex C.

    1991-04-01

    Of the many techniques that have been applied to the study of crystal defects, none has contributed more to our understanding of their nature and influence on the physical and chemical properties of crystalline materials than transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM is now used extensively by an increasing number of earth scientists for direct observation of defect microstructures in minerals and rocks. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Rocks and Minerals is an introduction to the principles of the technique and is the only book to date on the subject written specifically for geologists and mineralogists. The first part of the book deals with the essential physics of the transmission electron microscope and presents the basic theoretical background required for the interpretation of images and electron diffraction patterns. The final chapters are concerned with specific applications of TEM in mineralogy and deal with such topics as planar defects, intergrowths, radiation-induced defects, dislocations and deformation-induced microstructures. The examples cover a wide range of rock-forming minerals from crustal rocks to those in the lower mantle, and also take into account the role of defects in important mineralogical and geological processes.

  10. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1997-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy presents the theory of image and contrast formation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy. The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described. Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast. Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure analysis and imaging of lattices and their defects. X-ray micronanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods. Specimen damage and contamination by electron irradiation limits the resolution for biological and some inorganic specimens. This fourth edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the area of Schottky emission guns, convergent-beam electron diffraction, electron tomography, holography and the high resolution of crystal lattices.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1993-01-01

    "Transmission Electron Microscopy" presents the theory of image and contrastformation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy Theprinciples of particle and wave optics of electrons are described Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast Also analysed are the kinetical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure determination and imaging of lattices and their defects X-ray microanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods The third edition includes a brief discussionof Schottky emission guns, some clarification of minor details, and references to the recent literature

  12. Energy-weighted dynamical scattering simulations of electron diffraction modalities in the scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Elena; Singh, Saransh; Callahan, Patrick G; Hourahine, Ben; Trager-Cowan, Carol; Graef, Marc De

    2018-04-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) has been gaining momentum as a high resolution alternative to electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD), adding to the existing electron diffraction modalities in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The image simulation of any of these measurement techniques requires an energy dependent diffraction model for which, in turn, knowledge of electron energies and diffraction distances distributions is required. We identify the sample-detector geometry and the effect of inelastic events on the diffracting electron beam as the important factors to be considered when predicting these distributions. However, tractable models taking into account inelastic scattering explicitly are lacking. In this study, we expand the Monte Carlo (MC) energy-weighting dynamical simulations models used for EBSD [1] and ECP [2] to the TKD case. We show that the foil thickness in TKD can be used as a means of energy filtering and compare band sharpness in the different modalities. The current model is shown to correctly predict TKD patterns and, through the dictionary indexing approach, to produce higher quality indexed TKD maps than conventional Hough transform approach, especially close to grain boundaries. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Structure determination of modulated structures by powder X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhou, Z.Y.; Palatinus, Lukáš; Sun, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 11 (2016), s. 1351-1362 ISSN 2052-1553 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electron diffraction * incommensurate structure * powder diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.036, year: 2016

  14. Characterisation of nano-grains in MgB2 superconductors by transmission Kikuchi diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, D.C.K.; Yeoh, W.K.; Trimby, P.W.; De Silva, K.S.B.; Bao, P.; Li, W.X.; Xu, X.; Dou, S.X.; Ringer, S.P.; Zheng, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of the emerging transmission Kikuchi diffraction technique in the scanning electron microscope to investigate nano-grain structures in polycrystalline MgB 2 superconductors. Two sintering conditions were considered, and the resulting differences in superconducting properties are correlated to differences in grain structure. A brief comparison to X-ray diffraction results is presented and discussed. This work focusses more on the application of this technique to reveal grain structure, rather than on the detailed differences between the two sintering temperatures

  15. Size effect in X-ray and electron diffraction patterns from hydroxyapatite particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suvorova, E.I.; Buffat, P.-A.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron microdiffraction, and X-ray diffraction were used to study hydroxyapatite specimens with particle sizes from a few nanometers to several hundreds of nanometers. Diffuse scattering (without clear reflections in transmission diffraction patterns) or strongly broadened peaks in X-ray diffraction patterns are characteristic for agglomerated hydroxyapatite nanocrystals. However, HRTEM and microdiffraction showed that this cannot be considered as an indication of the amorphous state of the matter but rather as the demonstration of size effect and the morphological and structural features of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals

  16. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jason; Keller, Robert R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Direct observations of the MOF (UiO-66) structure by transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Liangkui; Zhang, Daliang; Xue, Ming; Li, Huan; Qiu, Shilun

    2013-01-01

    As a demonstration of ab initio structure characterizations of nano metal organic framework (MOF) crystals by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron diffraction tomography methods, a Zr-MOF (UiO-66) structure

  18. A FORTRAN program for an IBM PC compatible computer for calculating kinematical electron diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjerpe, P.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes a computer program which is useful in transmission electron microscopy. The program is written in FORTRAN and calculates kinematical electron diffraction patterns in any zone axis from a given crystal structure. Quite large unit cells, containing up to 2250 atoms, can be handled by the program. The program runs on both the Helcules graphic card and the standard IBM CGA card

  19. A transmission Kikuchi diffraction study of cementite in a quenched and tempered steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, Ahmed A., E-mail: asaleh@uow.edu.au [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Casillas, Gilberto [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Pereloma, Elena V. [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Carpenter, Kristin R. [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Plate Mill: Manufacturing, BlueScope Steel Ltd., Port Kembla, NSW 2505 (Australia); Killmore, Christopher R. [Research & Development: Sales & Marketing, BlueScope Steel Ltd., Port Kembla, NSW 2505 (Australia); Gazder, Azdiar A. [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    This is the first transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) study to report the indexing of nano-sized cementite as distinct structures and its orientation relationship with the body-centered cubic matrix in a quenched and tempered steel. Crystallographic analysis via TKD and selected area diffraction returned the well-known Bagaryatskii and Isaichev orientation relationships. However, the indexing of nano-sized cementite via TKD was sensitive to the thickness of the electron transparent region such that TEM remains the most precise method to characterise such precipitates. - Highlights: • Nano-sized cementite in a QT steel has been investigated by TKD and TEM. • Cementite has been indexed as distinct structures via TKD. • Crystallographic analysis returned the Bagaryatskii and Isaichev ORs. • Success of TKD is sensitive to the thickness of the electron transparent region. • TEM remains the most precise technique to characterise nano-sized precipitates.

  20. A transmission Kikuchi diffraction study of cementite in a quenched and tempered steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, Ahmed A.; Casillas, Gilberto; Pereloma, Elena V.; Carpenter, Kristin R.; Killmore, Christopher R.; Gazder, Azdiar A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the first transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) study to report the indexing of nano-sized cementite as distinct structures and its orientation relationship with the body-centered cubic matrix in a quenched and tempered steel. Crystallographic analysis via TKD and selected area diffraction returned the well-known Bagaryatskii and Isaichev orientation relationships. However, the indexing of nano-sized cementite via TKD was sensitive to the thickness of the electron transparent region such that TEM remains the most precise method to characterise such precipitates. - Highlights: • Nano-sized cementite in a QT steel has been investigated by TKD and TEM. • Cementite has been indexed as distinct structures via TKD. • Crystallographic analysis returned the Bagaryatskii and Isaichev ORs. • Success of TKD is sensitive to the thickness of the electron transparent region. • TEM remains the most precise technique to characterise nano-sized precipitates.

  1. NIST/Sandia/ICDD Electron Diffraction Database: A Database for Phase Identification by Electron Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M J; Chambers, W F; Melgaard, D; Himes, V L; Stalick, J K; Mighell, A D

    1989-01-01

    A new database containing crystallographic and chemical information designed especially for application to electron diffraction search/match and related problems has been developed. The new database was derived from two well-established x-ray diffraction databases, the JCPDS Powder Diffraction File and NBS CRYSTAL DATA, and incorporates 2 years of experience with an earlier version. It contains 71,142 entries, with space group and unit cell data for 59,612 of those. Unit cell and space group information were used, where available, to calculate patterns consisting of all allowed reflections with d -spacings greater than 0.8 A for ~ 59,000 of the entries. Calculated patterns are used in the database in preference to experimental x-ray data when both are available, since experimental x-ray data sometimes omits high d -spacing data which falls at low diffraction angles. Intensity data are not given when calculated spacings are used. A search scheme using chemistry and r -spacing (reciprocal d -spacing) has been developed. Other potentially searchable data in this new database include space group, Pearson symbol, unit cell edge lengths, reduced cell edge length, and reduced cell volume. Compound and/or mineral names, formulas, and journal references are included in the output, as well as pointers to corresponding entries in NBS CRYSTAL DATA and the Powder Diffraction File where more complete information may be obtained. Atom positions are not given. Rudimentary search software has been written to implement a chemistry and r -spacing bit map search. With typical data, a full search through ~ 71,000 compounds takes 10~20 seconds on a PDP 11/23-RL02 system.

  2. Monochromated scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechberger, W.; Kothleitner, G.; Hofer, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) has developed into an established technique for chemical and structural analysis of thin specimens in the (scanning) transmission electron microscope (S)TEM. The energy resolution in EELS is largely limited by the stability of the high voltage supply, by the resolution of the spectrometer and by the energy spread of the source. To overcome this limitation a Wien filter monochromator was recently introduced with commercially available STEMs, offering the advantage to better resolve EELS fine structures, which contain valuable bonding information. The method of atomic resolution Z-contrast imaging within an STEM, utilizing a high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) detector can perfectly complement the excellent energy resolution, since EELS spectra can be collected simultaneously. In combination with a monochromator microscope not only high spatial resolution images can be recorded but also high energy resolution EELS spectra are attainable. In this work we investigated the STEM performance of a 200 kV monochromated Tecnai F20 with a high resolution Gatan Imaging Filter (HR-GIF). (author)

  3. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Demonstrated with An Electron Diffraction Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, Giorgio; Ferrari, Loris; Migliori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    An experiment analogous to the classical diffraction of light from a circular aperture has been realized with electrons. The results are used to introduce undergraduate students to the wave behaviour of electrons. The diffraction fringes produced by the circular aperture are compared to those predicted by quantum mechanics and are exploited to…

  4. Correlating Atom Probe Crystallographic Measurements with Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Andrew J; Babinsky, Katharina; Day, Alec C; Eder, K; Oakman, Connor J; Trimby, Patrick W; Primig, Sophie; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2017-04-01

    Correlative microscopy approaches offer synergistic solutions to many research problems. One such combination, that has been studied in limited detail, is the use of atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) on the same tip specimen. By combining these two powerful microscopy techniques, the microstructure of important engineering alloys can be studied in greater detail. For the first time, the accuracy of crystallographic measurements made using APT will be independently verified using TKD. Experimental data from two atom probe tips, one a nanocrystalline Al-0.5Ag alloy specimen collected on a straight flight-path atom probe and the other a high purity Mo specimen collected on a reflectron-fitted instrument, will be compared. We find that the average minimum misorientation angle, calculated from calibrated atom probe reconstructions with two different pole combinations, deviate 0.7° and 1.4°, respectively, from the TKD results. The type of atom probe and experimental conditions appear to have some impact on this accuracy and the reconstruction and measurement procedures are likely to contribute further to degradation in angular resolution. The challenges and implications of this correlative approach will also be discussed.

  5. Low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument based on a single-atom electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Yueh [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wei-Tse; Chen, Yi-Sheng; Hwu, En-Te; Chang, Chia-Seng; Hwang, Ing-Shouh, E-mail: ishwang@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wei-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-15

    In this work, a transmission-type, low-kilovolt coherent electron diffractive imaging instrument was constructed. It comprised a single-atom field emitter, a triple-element electrostatic lens, a sample holder, and a retractable delay line detector to record the diffraction patterns at different positions behind the sample. It was designed to image materials thinner than 3 nm. The authors analyzed the asymmetric triple-element electrostatic lens for focusing the electron beams and achieved a focused beam spot of 87 nm on the sample plane at the electron energy of 2 kV. High-angle coherent diffraction patterns of a suspended graphene sample corresponding to (0.62 Å){sup −1} were recorded. This work demonstrated the potential of coherent diffractive imaging of thin two-dimensional materials, biological molecules, and nano-objects at a voltage between 1 and 10 kV. The ultimate goal of this instrument is to achieve atomic resolution of these materials with high contrast and little radiation damage.

  6. Atomic resolution three-dimensional electron diffraction microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Jianwei; Ohsuna, Tetsu; Terasaki, Osamu; Hodgson, Keith O.; O'Keefe, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    We report the development of a novel form of diffraction-based 3D microscopy to overcome resolution barriers inherent in high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography. By combining coherent electron diffraction with the oversampling phasing method, we show that the 3D structure of a nanocrystal can be determined ab initio at a resolution of 1 Angstrom from 29 simulated noisy diffraction patterns. This new form of microscopy can be used to image the 3D structures of nanocrystals and noncrystalline samples, with resolution limited only by the quality of sample diffraction

  7. Direct observations of the MOF (UiO-66) structure by transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Liangkui

    2013-01-01

    As a demonstration of ab initio structure characterizations of nano metal organic framework (MOF) crystals by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron diffraction tomography methods, a Zr-MOF (UiO-66) structure was determined and further confirmed by Rietveld refinements of powder X-ray diffraction. HRTEM gave direct imaging of the channels. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  8. Calculation and construction of electron-diffraction photographs using computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayurov, S.S.; Notkin, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    A method of computer construction and indexing of theoretical electronograms for monophase structures with arbitrary type of crystal lattice and for polyphase ones with known orientational coorrelations between phases is presented. Electron-diffraction photograph is presented, obtained from the foil area of two-phase VT22 alloy at β phase orientation in comparison with theoretical electron-diffraction photographs, built ap by computer, with the [100] β phase zone axis and with three variants of α phase orientation relatively to β phase. It is shown that on the experimental electron-diffraction photograph simultaneously presents α-phase three orientations, which reflexes can be indexing correctly [ru

  9. Characterization of calcium crystals in Abelia using x-ray diffraction and electron microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Localization, chemical composition, and morphology of calcium crystals in leaves and stems of Abelia mosanensis and A. ×grandiflora were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM) equipped with an X-ray diffraction system, low temperature SEM (LT-SEM) and a transmission ...

  10. Relativistic electron diffraction at the UCLA Pegasus photoinjector laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musumeci, P. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)], E-mail: musumeci@physics.ucla.edu; Moody, J.T.; Scoby, C.M. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Electron diffraction holds the promise to yield real-time resolution of atomic motion in an easily accessible environment like a university laboratory at a fraction of the cost of fourth-generation X-ray sources. Currently the limit in time-resolution for conventional electron diffraction is set by how short an electron pulse can be made. A very promising solution to maintain the highest possible beam intensity without excessive pulse broadening from space charge effects is to increase the electron energy to the MeV level where relativistic effects significantly reduce the space charge forces. Rf photoinjectors can in principle deliver up to 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} electrons packed in bunches of {approx}100-fs length, allowing an unprecedented time resolution and enabling the study of irreversible phenomena by single-shot diffraction patterns. The use of rf photoinjectors as sources for ultrafast electron diffraction has been recently at the center of various theoretical and experimental studies. The UCLA Pegasus laboratory, commissioned in early 2007 as an advanced photoinjector facility, is the only operating system in the country, which has recently demonstrated electron diffraction using a relativistic beam from an rf photoinjector. Due to the use of a state-of-the-art ultrashort photoinjector driver laser system, the beam has been measured to be sub-100-fs long, at least a factor of 5 better than what measured in previous relativistic electron diffraction setups. Moreover, diffraction patterns from various metal targets (titanium and aluminum) have been obtained using the Pegasus beam. One of the main laboratory goals in the near future is to fully develop the rf photoinjector-based ultrafast electron diffraction technique with particular attention to the optimization of the working point of the photoinjector in a low-charge ultrashort pulse regime, and to the development of suitable beam diagnostics.

  11. Relativistic electron diffraction at the UCLA Pegasus photoinjector laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musumeci, P.; Moody, J.T.; Scoby, C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Electron diffraction holds the promise to yield real-time resolution of atomic motion in an easily accessible environment like a university laboratory at a fraction of the cost of fourth-generation X-ray sources. Currently the limit in time-resolution for conventional electron diffraction is set by how short an electron pulse can be made. A very promising solution to maintain the highest possible beam intensity without excessive pulse broadening from space charge effects is to increase the electron energy to the MeV level where relativistic effects significantly reduce the space charge forces. Rf photoinjectors can in principle deliver up to 10 7 -10 8 electrons packed in bunches of ∼100-fs length, allowing an unprecedented time resolution and enabling the study of irreversible phenomena by single-shot diffraction patterns. The use of rf photoinjectors as sources for ultrafast electron diffraction has been recently at the center of various theoretical and experimental studies. The UCLA Pegasus laboratory, commissioned in early 2007 as an advanced photoinjector facility, is the only operating system in the country, which has recently demonstrated electron diffraction using a relativistic beam from an rf photoinjector. Due to the use of a state-of-the-art ultrashort photoinjector driver laser system, the beam has been measured to be sub-100-fs long, at least a factor of 5 better than what measured in previous relativistic electron diffraction setups. Moreover, diffraction patterns from various metal targets (titanium and aluminum) have been obtained using the Pegasus beam. One of the main laboratory goals in the near future is to fully develop the rf photoinjector-based ultrafast electron diffraction technique with particular attention to the optimization of the working point of the photoinjector in a low-charge ultrashort pulse regime, and to the development of suitable beam diagnostics

  12. Relativistic electron diffraction at the UCLA Pegasus photoinjector laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Moody, J T; Scoby, C M

    2008-10-01

    Electron diffraction holds the promise to yield real-time resolution of atomic motion in an easily accessible environment like a university laboratory at a fraction of the cost of fourth-generation X-ray sources. Currently the limit in time-resolution for conventional electron diffraction is set by how short an electron pulse can be made. A very promising solution to maintain the highest possible beam intensity without excessive pulse broadening from space charge effects is to increase the electron energy to the MeV level where relativistic effects significantly reduce the space charge forces. Rf photoinjectors can in principle deliver up to 10(7)-10(8) electrons packed in bunches of approximately 100-fs length, allowing an unprecedented time resolution and enabling the study of irreversible phenomena by single-shot diffraction patterns. The use of rf photoinjectors as sources for ultrafast electron diffraction has been recently at the center of various theoretical and experimental studies. The UCLA Pegasus laboratory, commissioned in early 2007 as an advanced photoinjector facility, is the only operating system in the country, which has recently demonstrated electron diffraction using a relativistic beam from an rf photoinjector. Due to the use of a state-of-the-art ultrashort photoinjector driver laser system, the beam has been measured to be sub-100-fs long, at least a factor of 5 better than what measured in previous relativistic electron diffraction setups. Moreover, diffraction patterns from various metal targets (titanium and aluminum) have been obtained using the Pegasus beam. One of the main laboratory goals in the near future is to fully develop the rf photoinjector-based ultrafast electron diffraction technique with particular attention to the optimization of the working point of the photoinjector in a low-charge ultrashort pulse regime, and to the development of suitable beam diagnostics.

  13. High quality transmission Kikuchi diffraction analysis of deformed alloys - Case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarski, Tomasz; Cios, Grzegorz; Kula, Anna; Bała, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Modern scanning electron microscopes (SEM) equipped with thermally assisted field emission guns (Schottky FEG) are capable of imaging with a resolution in the range of several nanometers or better. Simultaneously, the high electron beam current can be used, which enables fast chemical and crystallographic analysis with a higher resolution than is normally offered by SEM with a tungsten cathode. The current resolution that limits the EDS and EBSD analysis is related to materials' physics, particularly to the electron-specimen interaction volume. The application of thin, electron-transparent specimens, instead of bulk samples, improves the resolution and allows for the detailed analysis of very fine microstructural features. Beside the typical imaging mode, it is possible to use a standard EBSD camera in such a configuration that only transmitted and scattered electrons are detected. This modern approach was successfully applied to various materials giving rise to significant resolution improvement, especially for the light element magnesium based alloys. This paper presents an insight into the application of the transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) technique applied to the most troublesome, heavily-deformed materials. In particular, the values of the highest possible acquisition rates for high resolution and high quality mapping were estimated within typical imaging conditions of stainless steel and magnesium-yttrium alloy. - Highlights: •Monte Carlo simulations were used to simulate EBSD camera intensity for various measuring conditions. •Transmission Kikuchi diffraction parameters were evaluated for highly deformed, light and heavy elements based alloys. •High quality maps with 20 nm spatial resolution were acquired for Mg and Fe based alloys. •High speed TKD measurements were performed at acquisition rates comparable to the reflection EBSD.

  14. rf streak camera based ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Moody, J T; Scoby, C M; Gutierrez, M S; Tran, T

    2009-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the possibility of using a rf streak camera to time resolve in a single shot structural changes at the sub-100 fs time scale via relativistic electron diffraction. We experimentally tested this novel concept at the UCLA Pegasus rf photoinjector. Time-resolved diffraction patterns from thin Al foil are recorded. Averaging over 50 shots is required in order to get statistics sufficient to uncover a variation in time of the diffraction patterns. In the absence of an external pump laser, this is explained as due to the energy chirp on the beam out of the electron gun. With further improvements to the electron source, rf streak camera based ultrafast electron diffraction has the potential to yield truly single shot measurements of ultrafast processes.

  15. High energy electron multibeam diffraction and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, Alain.

    1980-04-01

    The different theories of dynamical scattering of electrons are firstly reviewed with special reference to their basis and the validity of the different approximations. Then after a short description of the different experimental set ups, structural analysis and the investigation of the optical potential by means of high energy electrons will be surveyed

  16. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  17. Structural study of disordered SiC nanowires by three-dimensional rotation electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Duan; Guo, Peng; Wan, Wei; Zou, Ji; Shen, Zhijian; Guzi de Moraes, Elisângela; Colombo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The structure of disordered SiC nanowires was studied by using the three-dimensional rotation electron diffraction (RED) technique. The streaks shown in the RED images indicated the stacking faults of the nanowire. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging was employed to support the results from the RED data. It suggested that a 2H polytype is most possible for the nanowires. (paper)

  18. Thermal expansion coefficient measurement from electron diffraction of amorphous films in a TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Misa; Cui, Kai; Malac, Marek; Egerton, Ray

    2018-05-01

    We measured the linear thermal expansion coefficients of amorphous 5-30 nm thick SiN and 17 nm thick Formvar/Carbon (F/C) films using electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope. Positive thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) was observed in SiN but negative coefficients in the F/C films. In case of amorphous carbon (aC) films, we could not measure TEC because the diffraction radii required several hours to stabilize at a fixed temperature. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  20. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  1. Comparative study of macrotexture analysis using X-ray diffraction and electron backscattered diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serna, Marilene Morelli

    2002-01-01

    The macrotexture is one of the main characteristics in metallic materials, which the physical properties depend on the crystallographic direction. The analysis of the macrotexture to middles of the decade of 80 was just accomplished by the techniques of Xray diffraction and neutrons diffraction. The possibility of the analysis of the macrotexture using, the technique of electron backscattering diffraction in the scanning electronic microscope, that allowed to correlate the measure of the orientation with its location in the micro structure, was a very welcome tool in the area of engineering of materials. In this work it was studied the theoretical aspects of the two techniques and it was used of both techniques for the analysis of the macrotexture of aluminum sheets 1050 and 3003 with intensity, measured through the texture index 'J', from 2.00 to 5.00. The results obtained by the two techniques were shown reasonably similar, being considered that the statistics of the data obtained by the technique of electron backscatter diffraction is much inferior to the obtained by the X-ray diffraction. (author)

  2. Design of a transmission electron positron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyama, Masao; Inoue, M.; Kogure, Y.; Hayashi, Y.; Yoshii, T.; Kurihara, T.; Tsuno, K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the plans and design of positron-electron microscopes being built at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization), Tsukuba, Japan. A used electron microscope is altered. The kinetic energies of positrons produced by accelerators or by nuclear decays are not a unique value but show a spread over in a wide range. Positron beam is guided to a transmission electron microscope (JEM100SX). Positrons are moderated by a tungsten foil, are accelerated and are focused on a nickel sheet. The monochromatic focused beam is injected into an electron microscope. The focusing and aberration of positrons are the same as electrons in a magnetic system which are used in commercial electron microscopes. Imaging plates are used to record positron images for the transmission electron microscope. (author)

  3. A method of combining STEM image with parallel beam diffraction and electron-optical conditions for diffractive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Haifeng; Nelson, Chris

    2007-01-01

    We describe a method of combining STEM imaging functionalities with nanoarea parallel beam electron diffraction on a modern TEM. This facilitates the search for individual particles whose diffraction patterns are needed for diffractive imaging or structural studies of nanoparticles. This also lays out a base for 3D diffraction data collection

  4. Crystallography of refractory metal nuggets in carbonaceous chondrites: A transmission Kikuchi diffraction approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Luke; Bland, Phil A.; Dyl, Kathryn A.; Forman, Lucy V.; Saxey, David W.; Reddy, Steven M.; Fougerouse, Denis; Rickard, William D. A.; Trimby, Patrick W.; Moody, Steve; Yang, Limei; Liu, Hongwei; Ringer, Simon P.; Saunders, Martin; Piazolo, Sandra

    2017-11-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) is a relatively new technique that is currently being developed for geological sample analysis. This technique utilises the transmission capabilities of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to rapidly and accurately map the crystallographic and geochemical features of an electron transparent sample. TKD uses a similar methodology to traditional electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), but is capable of achieving a much higher spatial resolution (5-10 nm) (Trimby, 2012; Trimby et al., 2014). Here we apply TKD to refractory metal nuggets (RMNs) which are micrometre to sub-micrometre metal alloys composed of highly siderophile elements (HSEs) found in primitive carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. TKD allows us to analyse RMNs in situ, enabling the characterisation of nanometre-scale variations in chemistry and crystallography, whilst preserving their spatial and crystallographic context. This provides a complete representation of each RMN, permitting detailed interpretation of their formation history. We present TKD analysis of five transmission electron microscopy (TEM) lamellae containing RMNs coupled with EBSD and TEM analyses. These analyses revealed textures and relationships not previously observed in RMNs. These textures indicate some RMNs experienced annealing, forming twins. Some RMNs also acted as nucleation centres, and formed immiscible metal-silicate fluids. In fact, each RMN analysed in this study had different crystallographic textures. These RMNs also had heterogeneous compositions, even between RMNs contained within the same inclusion, host phase and even separated by only a few nanometres. Some RMNs are also affected by secondary processes at low temperature causing exsolution of molybdenite. However, most RMNs had crystallographic textures indicating that the RMN formed prior to their host inclusion. TKD analyses reveal most RMNs have been affected by processing in the protoplanetary disk. Despite this

  5. Transmission electron microscopy of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Sally L; Waddington, Lynne J; Goldie, Kenneth N

    2011-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy of negatively stained and cryo-prepared specimens allows amyloid fibrils to be visualised at high resolution in a dried or a hydrated state, and is an essential method for characterising the morphology of fibrils and pre-fibrillar species. We outline the key steps involved in the preparation and observation of samples using negative staining and cryo-electron preservation. We also discuss methods to measure fibril characteristics, such as fibril width, from electron micrographs.

  6. Opto-mechanical design and development of a 460mm diffractive transmissive telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Bo; Wang, Lihua; Cui, Zhangang; Bian, Jiang; Xiang, Sihua; Ma, Haotong; Fan, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Using lightweight, replicated diffractive optics, we can construct extremely large aperture telescopes in space.The transmissive primary significantly reduces the sensitivities to out of plane motion as compared to reflective systems while reducing the manufacturing time and costs. This paper focuses on the design, fabrication and ground demonstration of a 460mm diffractive transmissive telescope the primary F/# is 6, optical field of view is 0.2° imagine bandwidth is 486nm 656nm.The design method of diffractive optical system was verified, the ability to capture a high-quality image using diffractive telescope collection optics was tested.The results show that the limit resolution is 94lp/mm, the diffractive system has a good imagine performance with broad bandwidths. This technology is particularly promising as a means to achieve extremely large optical primaries from compact, lightweight packages.

  7. Optimizing disk registration algorithms for nanobeam electron diffraction strain mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pekin, Thomas C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); Gammer, Christoph [Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Jahnstrasse 12, Leoben, Austria 8700 (Austria); Ciston, Jim [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); Minor, Andrew M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States); Ophus, Colin, E-mail: cophus@gmail.com [National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA 94720 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Scanning nanobeam electron diffraction strain mapping is a technique by which the positions of diffracted disks sampled at the nanoscale over a crystalline sample can be used to reconstruct a strain map over a large area. However, it is important that the disk positions are measured accurately, as their positions relative to a reference are directly used to calculate strain. In this study, we compare several correlation methods using both simulated and experimental data in order to directly probe susceptibility to measurement error due to non-uniform diffracted disk illumination structure. We found that prefiltering the diffraction patterns with a Sobel filter before performing cross correlation or performing a square-root magnitude weighted phase correlation returned the best results when inner disk structure was present. We have tested these methods both on simulated datasets, and experimental data from unstrained silicon as well as a twin grain boundary in 304 stainless steel.

  8. Electronic diffraction tomography by Green's functions and singular values decompositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, A.

    2001-01-01

    An inverse scattering technique is developed to enable a three-dimensional sample reconstruction from the diffraction figures obtained for different sample orientations by electronic projection microscopy, thus performing a diffraction tomography. In its Green's-functions formulation, this technique takes account of all orders of diffraction by performing an iterative reconstruction of the wave function on the observation screen and in the sample. In a final step, these quantities enable a reconstruction of the potential-energy distribution, which is assumed real valued. The method relies on the use of singular values decomposition techniques, thus providing the best least-squares solutions and enabling a reduction of noise. The technique is applied to the analysis of a three-dimensional nanometric sample that is observed in Fresnel conditions with an electron energy of 40 eV. The algorithm turns out to provide results with a mean relative error around 3% and to be stable against random noise

  9. In situ electron backscattered diffraction of individual GaAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prikhodko, S.V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)], E-mail: sergey@seas.ucla.edu; Sitzman, S. [Oxford Instruments America, Concord, MA 01742 (United States); Gambin, V. [Northrop Grumman Space Technology, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); Kodambaka, S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2008-12-15

    We suggest and demonstrate that electron backscattered diffraction, a scanning electron microscope-based technique, can be used for non-destructive structural and morphological characterization of statistically significant number of nanowires in situ on their growth substrate. We obtain morphological, crystal phase, and crystal orientation information of individual GaAs nanowires in situ on the growth substrate GaAs(1 1 1) B. Our results, verified using transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction analyses of the same set of wires, indicate that most wires possess a wurtzite structure with a high density of thin structural defects aligned normal to the wire growth axis, while others grow defect-free with a zincblende structure. The demonstrated approach is general, applicable to other material systems, and is expected to provide important insights into the role of substrate structure on nanowire structure on nanowire crystallinity and growth orientation.

  10. Quantitative transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L J; D'Alfonso, A J; Forbes, B D; Findlay, S D; LeBeau, J M; Stemmer, S

    2012-01-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) it is possible to operate the microscope in bright-field mode under conditions which, by the quantum mechanical principle of reciprocity, are equivalent to those in conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). The results of such an experiment will be presented which are in excellent quantitative agreement with theory for specimens up to 25 nm thick. This is at variance with the large contrast mismatch (typically between two and five) noted in equivalent CTEM experiments. The implications of this will be discussed.

  11. Serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging: diffraction background of superfluid helium droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; He, Yunteng; Lei, Lei; Alghamdi, Maha; Oswalt, Andrew; Kong, Wei

    2017-08-01

    In an effort to solve the crystallization problem in crystallography, we have been engaged in developing a method termed "serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging" (SS-EDI). The unique features of SS-EDI are superfluid helium droplet cooling and field-induced orientation: together the two features constitute a molecular goniometer. Unfortunately, the helium atoms surrounding the sample molecule also contribute to a diffraction background. In this report, we analyze the properties of a superfluid helium droplet beam and its doping statistics, and demonstrate the feasibility of overcoming the background issue by using the velocity slip phenomenon of a pulsed droplet beam. Electron diffraction profiles and pair correlation functions of ferrocene-monomer-doped droplets and iodine-nanocluster-doped droplets are presented. The timing of the pulsed electron gun and the effective doping efficiency under different dopant pressures can both be controlled for size selection. This work clears any doubt of the effectiveness of superfluid helium droplets in SS-EDI, thereby advancing the effort in demonstrating the "proof-of-concept" one step further.

  12. Ultrafast molecular imaging by laser-induced electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, M.; Nguyen-Dang, T. T.; Cornaggia, C.; Saugout, S.; Charron, E.; Keller, A.; Atabek, O.

    2011-01-01

    We address the feasibility of imaging geometric and orbital structures of a polyatomic molecule on an attosecond time scale using the laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) technique. We present numerical results for the highest molecular orbitals of the CO 2 molecule excited by a near-infrared few-cycle laser pulse. The molecular geometry (bond lengths) is determined within 3% of accuracy from a diffraction pattern which also reflects the nodal properties of the initial molecular orbital. Robustness of the structure determination is discussed with respect to vibrational and rotational motions with a complete interpretation of the laser-induced mechanisms.

  13. Electron back scattered diffraction study of SmCo magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonamine, T.; Fukuhara, M.; Machado, R.; Missell, F.P.

    2008-01-01

    The remanence and energy product of permanent magnets is a strong function of their crystallographic texture. Electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) is a tool for texture analysis providing information about the atomic layers up to 50 nm below the surface of the material. This paper discusses experimental requirements for performing EBSD measurements on rare-earth permanent magnets and presents results on commercial SmCo magnet material. EBSD measurements proved to be very sensitive to misaligned grains and were sensitive to texture in good agreement with information provided by X-ray diffraction scans. Results for nanostructured Sm(CoFeCuZr) z magnets are also discussed

  14. Transmission Electron Microscope Measures Lattice Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, William T.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent-beam microdiffraction (CBM) in thermionic-emission transmission electron microscope (TEM) is technique for measuring lattice parameters of nanometer-sized specimens of crystalline materials. Lattice parameters determined by use of CBM accurate to within few parts in thousand. Technique developed especially for use in quantifying lattice parameters, and thus strains, in epitaxial mismatched-crystal-lattice multilayer structures in multiple-quantum-well and other advanced semiconductor electronic devices. Ability to determine strains in indivdual layers contributes to understanding of novel electronic behaviors of devices.

  15. Ponderomotive phase plate for transmission electron microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W [Livermore, CA

    2012-07-10

    A ponderomotive phase plate system and method for controllably producing highly tunable phase contrast transfer functions in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) for high resolution and biological phase contrast imaging. The system and method includes a laser source and a beam transport system to produce a focused laser crossover as a phase plate, so that a ponderomotive potential of the focused laser crossover produces a scattering-angle-dependent phase shift in the electrons of the post-sample electron beam corresponding to a desired phase contrast transfer function.

  16. Elevated temperature transmission Kikuchi diffraction in the SEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanta, Alice Bastos; Todeschini, Matteo; Burrows, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    heating associated with this system enables reliable TKD measurements at elevated temperatures without notable disturbance from infrared radiation. The dewetting of an Au thin film into Au nanoparticles upon heating is followed with orientation mapping in a temperature range between 20 °C and 900 °C....... The local thickness variation associated with the dewetting is observed qualitatively by observing the intensity of the transmitted beam, which decreases as the film thickness increases locally. The results of this study reveal that TKD is a well suited technique to study thin-film stability and solid state...... dewetting. Moreover, the outcome of this methodological study provides a baseline for further in-situ crystallographic studies of electron transparent samples in the SEM....

  17. Isotope analysis in the transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Toma; Hofer, Christoph; Argentero, Giacomo; Leuthner, Gregor T; Pennycook, Timothy J; Mangler, Clemens; Meyer, Jannik C; Kotakoski, Jani

    2016-10-10

    The Ångström-sized probe of the scanning transmission electron microscope can visualize and collect spectra from single atoms. This can unambiguously resolve the chemical structure of materials, but not their isotopic composition. Here we differentiate between two isotopes of the same element by quantifying how likely the energetic imaging electrons are to eject atoms. First, we measure the displacement probability in graphene grown from either 12 C or 13 C and describe the process using a quantum mechanical model of lattice vibrations coupled with density functional theory simulations. We then test our spatial resolution in a mixed sample by ejecting individual atoms from nanoscale areas spanning an interface region that is far from atomically sharp, mapping the isotope concentration with a precision better than 20%. Although we use a scanning instrument, our method may be applicable to any atomic resolution transmission electron microscope and to other low-dimensional materials.

  18. On the Progress of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) Imaging in a Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng; Müller, Erich; Meffert, Matthias; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2018-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with low-energy electrons has been recognized as an important addition to the family of electron microscopies as it may avoid knock-on damage and increase the contrast of weakly scattering objects. Scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) are well suited for low-energy electron microscopy with maximum electron energies of 30 keV, but they are mainly used for topography imaging of bulk samples. Implementation of a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) detector and a charge-coupled-device camera for the acquisition of on-axis transmission electron diffraction (TED) patterns, in combination with recent resolution improvements, make SEMs highly interesting for structure analysis of some electron-transparent specimens which are traditionally investigated by TEM. A new aspect is correlative SEM, STEM, and TED imaging from the same specimen region in a SEM which leads to a wealth of information. Simultaneous image acquisition gives information on surface topography, inner structure including crystal defects and qualitative material contrast. Lattice-fringe resolution is obtained in bright-field STEM imaging. The benefits of correlative SEM/STEM/TED imaging in a SEM are exemplified by structure analyses from representative sample classes such as nanoparticulates and bulk materials.

  19. Development of splitting convergent beam electron diffraction (SCBED)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houdellier, Florent, E-mail: Florent.Houdellier@cemes.fr [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Röder, Falk [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Triebenberg Lab, Institut für Strukturphysik, Technische Universität Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Snoeck, Etienne [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France)

    2015-12-15

    Using a combination of condenser electrostatic biprism with dedicated electron optic conditions for sample illumination, we were able to split a convergent beam electron probe focused on the sample in two half focused probes without introducing any tilt between them. As a consequence, a combined convergent beam electron diffraction pattern is obtained in the back focal plane of the objective lens arising from two different sample areas, which could be analyzed in a single pattern. This splitting convergent beam electron diffraction (SCBED) pattern has been tested first on a well-characterized test sample of Si/SiGe multilayers epitaxially grown on a Si substrate. The SCBED pattern contains information from the strained area, which exhibits HOLZ lines broadening induced by surface relaxation, with fine HOLZ lines observed in the unstrained reference part of the sample. These patterns have been analyzed quantitatively using both parts of the SCBED transmitted disk. The fine HOLZ line positions are used to determine the precise acceleration voltage of the microscope while the perturbed HOLZ rocking curves in the stained area are compared to dynamical simulated ones. The combination of these two information leads to a precise evaluation of the sample strain state. Finally, several SCBED setups are proposed to tackle fundamental physics questions as well as applied materials science ones and demonstrate how SCBED has the potential to greatly expand the range of applications of electron diffraction and electron holography. - Highlights: • Using a condenser biprism, we split the CBED pattern in two half-CBED disks. • We have determined the electron optical conditions used to perform various SCBED. • We propose new applications possible for this new SCBED configuration.

  20. Transmission electron microscopy study of unhydrided,dehydrided and annealed LaNi5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veirman, de A.E.M.; Staals, A.A.; Notten, P.H.L.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of hydrogen absorption on the microstructure of LaNi5 powders has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. At the surface of the unhydrided and dehydrided LaNi5 grains a reaction layer is observed. By means of selected area electron diffraction this layer is found to

  1. Analysis of intermetallic particles in Mg-12 wt.%Zn binyry alloy using transmission electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Martin; Gärtnerová, Viera; Klementová, Mariana; Jäger, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 106, Aug (2015), s. 428-436 ISSN 1044-5803 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP108/12/G043 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : biomedical alloy s * heat treatment * microstructure * transmission electron microscopy * electron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.383, year: 2015

  2. Relativistic electron planar channeling and diffraction in thin monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'ev, S.A.; Nurmagambetov, S.B.; Kaplin, V.V.; Rozum, E.I.

    1985-01-01

    The interaction of relativistic electrons with thin monocrystals was investigated in approximation of continuous potential of crystal plane system. Numerical technique for solution of one-dimensional Schroedinger equation with a periodic potential was developed. Numerical solutions conducted according to the technique were used to determine the forms of ngular distributions of electrons located in various zones of lteral motion. Calculation results were applied for analyzing experimentally obtained data on agular distribution of 5.1 MeV electrons projected at small angles onto the (110) planar system of a Si monocrystal. The conducted complex experimental and theoretical: investigations demonstrated the possibility of prevalen occupation of certain states of lateral motion and enabled to determine angular reg in directions of the electron beam projection on a crystal where either channeling effects or those of electron diffraction are important

  3. Detection of electron magnetic circular dichroism signals under zone axial diffraction geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Dongsheng [National Center for Electron Microscopy in Beijing, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE) and The State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Rusz, Jan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, S-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Cai, Jianwang [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhu, Jing, E-mail: jzhu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [National Center for Electron Microscopy in Beijing, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE) and The State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2016-10-15

    EMCD (electron magnetic circular dichroism) technique provides us a new opportunity to explore magnetic properties in the transmission electron microscope. However, specific diffraction geometry is the major limitation. Only the two-beam and three-beam case are demonstrated in the experiments until now. Here, we present the more general case of zone axial (ZA) diffraction geometry through which the EMCD signals can be detected even with the very strong sensitivity to dynamical diffraction conditions. Our detailed calculations and well-controlled diffraction conditions lead to experiments in agreement with theory. The effect of dynamical diffraction conditions on EMCD signals are discussed both in theory and experiments. Moreover, with the detailed analysis of dynamical diffraction effects, we experimentally obtain the separate EMCD signals for each crystallographic site in Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}, which is also applicable for other materials and cannot be achieved by site-specific EMCD and XMCD technique directly. Our work extends application of more general diffraction geometries and will further promote the development of EMCD technique. - Highlights: • The zone axial (ZA) diffraction geometry is presented for EMCD technique. • The detailed calculations for EMCD signals under ZA case are conducted. • The EMCD signals are obtained under the ZA case in the experiments. • The effect of dynamical effect on EMCD signals under ZA case is discussed. • Site-specific EMCD signals of Fe in Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} are obtained by specific ZA conditions.

  4. Diffraction and microscopy with attosecond electron pulse trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yuya; Baum, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Attosecond spectroscopy1-7 can resolve electronic processes directly in time, but a movie-like space-time recording is impeded by the too long wavelength ( 100 times larger than atomic distances) or the source-sample entanglement in re-collision techniques8-11. Here we advance attosecond metrology to picometre wavelength and sub-atomic resolution by using free-space electrons instead of higher-harmonic photons1-7 or re-colliding wavepackets8-11. A beam of 70-keV electrons at 4.5-pm de Broglie wavelength is modulated by the electric field of laser cycles into a sequence of electron pulses with sub-optical-cycle duration. Time-resolved diffraction from crystalline silicon reveals a propagates in space and time. This unification of attosecond science with electron microscopy and diffraction enables space-time imaging of light-driven processes in the entire range of sample morphologies that electron microscopy can access.

  5. Elemental mapping in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L J; D'Alfonso, A J; Lugg, N R; Findlay, S D; LeBeau, J M; Stemmer, S

    2010-01-01

    We discuss atomic resolution chemical mapping in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) based on core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and also on energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) imaging. Chemical mapping using EELS can yield counterintuitive results which, however, can be understood using first principles calculations. Experimental chemical maps based on EDX bear out the thesis that such maps are always likely to be directly interpretable. This can be explained in terms of the local nature of the effective optical potential for ionization under those imaging conditions. This is followed by an excursion into the complementary technique of elemental mapping using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) in a conventional transmission electron microscope. We will then consider the widely used technique of Z-contrast or high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging, which is based on phonon excitation, where it has recently been shown that intensity variations can be placed on an absolute scale by normalizing the measured intensities to the incident beam. Results, showing excellent agreement between theory and experiment to within a few percent, are shown for Z-contrast imaging from a sample of PbWO 4 .

  6. Analysis of dislocation loops by means of large-angle convergent beam electron diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Jäger, C; Morniroli, J P; Jäger, W

    2002-01-01

    Diffusion-induced dislocation loops in GaP and GaAs were analysed by means of large-angle convergent beam electron diffraction (LACBED) and conventional contrast methods of transmission electron microscopy. It is demonstrated that LACBED is perfectly suited for use in analysing dislocation loops. The method combines analyses of the dislocation-induced splitting of Bragg lines in a LACBED pattern for the determination of the Burgers vector with analyses of the loop contrast behaviour in transmission electron microscopy bright-field images during tilt experiments, from which the habit plane of the dislocation loop is determined. Perfect dislocation loops formed by condensation of interstitial atoms or vacancies were found, depending on the diffusion conditions. The loops possess left brace 110 right brace-habit planes and Burgers vectors parallel to (110). The LACBED method findings are compared with results of contrast analyses based on the so-called 'inside-outside' contrast of dislocation loops. Advantages o...

  7. Electron diffraction, elemental and image analysis of nanocrystals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šlouf, Miroslav; Pavlova, Ewa; Hromádková, Jiřina; Králová, Daniela; Tyrpekl, Václav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 16, 2a (2009), s. 33-34 ISSN 1211-5894. [Struktura - Colloquium of Czech and Slovak Crystallographic Association. Hluboká nad Vltavou, 22.06.2009-25.06.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520704; GA ČR GA203/07/0717 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : TEM * electron diffraction * nanocrystals Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  8. Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    dehope, w j; browning, n; campbell, g; cook, e; king, w; lagrange, t; reed, b; stuart, b; Shuttlesworth, R; Pyke, B

    2009-06-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM.

  9. Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeHope, W.J.; Browning, N.; Campbell, G.; Cook, E.; King, W.; Lagrange, T.; Reed, B.; Stuart, B.; Shuttlesworth, R.; Pyke, B.

    2009-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM

  10. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Itokawa Regolith Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Berger, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In a remarkable engineering achievement, the JAXA space agency successfully recovered the Hayabusa space-craft in June 2010, following a non-optimal encounter and sur-face sampling mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa. These are the first direct samples ever obtained and returned from the surface of an asteroid. The Hayabusa samples thus present a special op-portunity to directly investigate the evolution of asteroidal sur-faces, from the development of the regolith to the study of the effects of space weathering. Here we report on our preliminary TEM measurements on two Itokawa samples. Methods: We were allocated particles RA-QD02-0125 and RA-QD02-0211. Both particles were embedded in low viscosity epoxy and thin sections were prepared using ultramicrotomy. High resolution images and electron diffraction data were ob-tained using a JEOL 2500SE 200 kV field-emission scanning-transmission electron microscope. Quantitative maps and anal-yses were obtained using a Thermo thin-window energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectrometer. Results: Both particles are olivine-rich (Fo70) with µm-sized inclusions of FeS and have microstructurally complex rims. Par-ticle RA-QD02-0125 is rounded and has numerous sub-µm grains attached to its surface including FeS, albite, olivine, and rare melt droplets. Solar flare tracks have not been observed, but the particle is surrounded by a continuous 50 nm thick, stuctur-ally disordered rim that is compositionally similar to the core of the grain. One of the surface adhering grains is pyrrhotite show-ing a S-depleted rim (8-10 nm thick) with nanophase Fe metal grains (<5 nm) decorating the outermost surface. The pyrrhotite displays a complex superstructure in its core that is absent in the S-depleted rim. Particle RA-QD02-0211 contains solar flare particle tracks (2x109 cm-2) and shows a structurally disordered rim 100 nm thick. The track density corresponds to a surface exposure of 103-104 years based on the track production rate

  11. Introduction to the theory of low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingerland, A.; Tomasek, M.

    1975-01-01

    An elementary introduction to the basic principles of the theory of low-energy electron diffraction is presented. General scattering theory is used to classify the hitherto known approaches to the problem (optical potential and one-electron approximation; formal scattering theory: Born expansion and multiple scattering; translational symmetry: Ewald construction; classification of LEED theories by means of the T matrix; pseudokinematical theory for crystal with clean surface and with an adsorbed monomolecular layer; dynamical theory; inclusion of inelastic collisions; discussion of a simple example by means of the band-structure approach)

  12. Solving complex and disordered surface structures with electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hove, M.A.

    1987-10-01

    The past of surface structure determination with low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) will be briefly reviewed, setting the stage for a discussion of recent and future developments. The aim of these developments is to solve complex and disordered surface structures. Some efficient solutions to the theoretical and experimental problems will be presented. Since the theoretical problems dominate, the emphasis will be on theoretical approaches to the calculation of the multiple scattering of electrons through complex and disordered surfaces. 49 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  13. Development and characterization of electron sources for diffraction applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casandruc, Albert

    2015-12-15

    The dream to control chemical reactions that are essential to life is now closer than ever to gratify. Recent scientific progress has made it possible to investigate phenomena and processes which deploy at the angstroms scale and at rates on the order femtoseconds. Techniques such as Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) are currently able to reveal the spatial atomic configuration of systems with unit cell sizes on the order of a few nanometers with about 100 femtosecond temporal resolution. Still, major advances are needed for structural interrogation of biological systems like protein crystals, which have unit cell sizes of 10 nanometers or larger, and sample sizes of less than one micrometer. For such samples, the performance of these electron-based techniques is now limited by the quality, in particular the brightness, of the electron source. The current Ph.D. work represents a contribution towards the development and the characterization of electron sources which are essential to static and time-resolved electron diffraction techniques. The focus was on electron source fabrication and electron beam characterization measurements, using the solenoid and the aperture scan techniques, but also on the development and maintenance of the relevant experimental setups. As a result, new experimental facilities are now available in the group and, at the same time, novel concepts for generating electron beams for electron diffraction applications have been developed. In terms of existing electron sources, the capability to trigger and detect field emission from single double-gated field emitter Mo tips was successfully proven. These sharp emitter tips promise high brightness electron beams, but for investigating individual such structures, new engineering was needed. Secondly, the influence of the surface electric field on electron beam properties has been systematically performed for flat Mo photocathodes. This study is very valuable especially for state

  14. Development and characterization of electron sources for diffraction applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casandruc, Albert

    2015-12-01

    The dream to control chemical reactions that are essential to life is now closer than ever to gratify. Recent scientific progress has made it possible to investigate phenomena and processes which deploy at the angstroms scale and at rates on the order femtoseconds. Techniques such as Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) are currently able to reveal the spatial atomic configuration of systems with unit cell sizes on the order of a few nanometers with about 100 femtosecond temporal resolution. Still, major advances are needed for structural interrogation of biological systems like protein crystals, which have unit cell sizes of 10 nanometers or larger, and sample sizes of less than one micrometer. For such samples, the performance of these electron-based techniques is now limited by the quality, in particular the brightness, of the electron source. The current Ph.D. work represents a contribution towards the development and the characterization of electron sources which are essential to static and time-resolved electron diffraction techniques. The focus was on electron source fabrication and electron beam characterization measurements, using the solenoid and the aperture scan techniques, but also on the development and maintenance of the relevant experimental setups. As a result, new experimental facilities are now available in the group and, at the same time, novel concepts for generating electron beams for electron diffraction applications have been developed. In terms of existing electron sources, the capability to trigger and detect field emission from single double-gated field emitter Mo tips was successfully proven. These sharp emitter tips promise high brightness electron beams, but for investigating individual such structures, new engineering was needed. Secondly, the influence of the surface electric field on electron beam properties has been systematically performed for flat Mo photocathodes. This study is very valuable especially for state

  15. Structure refinement using precession electron diffraction tomography and dynamical diffraction: tests on experimental data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Correa, Cinthia Antunes; Steciuk, G.; Jacob, D.; Roussel, P.; Boullay, P.; Klementová, Mariana; Gemmi, M.; Kopeček, Jaromír; Domeneghetti, C.; Cámara, F.; Petříček, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 6 (2015), 740-751 ISSN 2052-5206 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR GA13-25747S; GA MŠk LO1409 Grant - others:SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132; FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568 Keywords : XRD * structure refinement * precession electron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.892, year: 2015

  16. Transmission electron microscopy in micro-nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Claverie, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Today, the availability of bright and highly coherent electron sources and sensitive detectors has radically changed the type and quality of the information which can be obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEMs are now present in large numbers not only in academia, but also in industrial research centers and fabs.This book presents in a simple and practical way the new quantitative techniques based on TEM which have recently been invented or developed to address most of the main challenging issues scientists and process engineers have to face to develop or optimize sem

  17. Oxidation mechanism of nickel particles studied in an environmental transmission electron microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeangros, Q.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation of nickel particles was studied in situ in an environmental transmission electron microscope in 3.2 mbar of O2 between ambient temperature and 600°C. Several different transmission electron microscopy imaging techniques, electron diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy were...... diffusion of Ni2+ along NiO grain boundaries, self-diffusion of Ni2+ ions and vacancies, growth of NiO grains and nucleation of voids at Ni/NiO interfaces. We also observed the formation of transverse cracks in a growing NiO film in situ in the electron microscope....

  18. Full-color, large area, transmissive holograms enabled by multi-level diffractive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Nabil; Meem, Monjurul; Wan, Xiaowen; Menon, Rajesh

    2017-07-19

    We show that multi-level diffractive microstructures can enable broadband, on-axis transmissive holograms that can project complex full-color images, which are invariant to viewing angle. Compared to alternatives like metaholograms, diffractive holograms utilize much larger minimum features (>10 µm), much smaller aspect ratios (30 mm ×30 mm). We designed, fabricated and characterized holograms that encode various full-color images. Our devices demonstrate absolute transmission efficiencies of >86% across the visible spectrum from 405 nm to 633 nm (peak value of about 92%), and excellent color fidelity. Furthermore, these devices do not exhibit polarization dependence. Finally, we emphasize that our devices exhibit negligible absorption and are phase-only holograms with high diffraction efficiency.

  19. Quantitative convergent beam electron diffraction measurements of bonding in alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.W.S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The QCBED technique of measuring accurate structure factors has been made practical by advances in energy filtering, computing and in the accurate measurement of intensity. Originally attempted in 1965 by the late Peter Goodman (CSIRO, Melbourne) while working with Gunter Lehmpfuhl (Fritz Haber Institut, Berlin), QCBED has been successfully developed and tested in the last decade on simple structures such as Si and MgO. Our work on Alumina is a step up in complexity and has shown that extinction in X-ray diffraction is not correctable to the precision required. In combination with accurate X-ray diffraction, QCBED promises to revolutionize the accuracy of bonding charge density measurements, experimental results which are of significance in the development of Density Functional Theory used in predictive chemistry. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  20. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I; Nellist, Peter D; Cosgriff, Eireann C; D'Alfonso, Adrian J; Morgan, Andrew J; Allen, Leslie J; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamical electron diffraction simulation for non-orthogonal crystal system by a revised real space method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, C L; Liu, Q B; Cai, C Y; Huang, J; Zhou, G W; Wang, Y G

    2015-01-01

    In the transmission electron microscopy, a revised real space (RRS) method has been confirmed to be a more accurate dynamical electron diffraction simulation method for low-energy electron diffraction than the conventional multislice method (CMS). However, the RRS method can be only used to calculate the dynamical electron diffraction of orthogonal crystal system. In this work, the expression of the RRS method for non-orthogonal crystal system is derived. By taking Na2 Ti3 O7 and Si as examples, the correctness of the derived RRS formula for non-orthogonal crystal system is confirmed by testing the coincidence of numerical results of both sides of Schrödinger equation; moreover, the difference between the RRS method and the CMS for non-orthogonal crystal system is compared at the accelerating voltage range from 40 to 10 kV. Our results show that the CMS method is almost the same as the RRS method for the accelerating voltage above 40 kV. However, when the accelerating voltage is further lowered to 20 kV or below, the CMS method introduces significant errors, not only for the higher-order Laue zone diffractions, but also for zero-order Laue zone. These indicate that the RRS method for non-orthogonal crystal system is necessary to be used for more accurate dynamical simulation when the accelerating voltage is low. Furthermore, the reason for the increase of differences between those diffraction patterns calculated by the RRS method and the CMS method with the decrease of the accelerating voltage is discussed. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. Desorption of hydrogen from magnesium hydride: in-situ electron diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, B.; Jones, I.P.; Walton, A.; Mann, V.; Book, D.; Harris, I.R.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of a phase change has been studied where electron beam in Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) has been used to transform MgH 2 into magnesium. A combination of in-situ Electron Diffraction (ED) and an in-situ Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) study under ED mode describes the phase transformation in terms of, respectively, change in the crystal structure and Plasmon energy shift. The orientation relation [001] MgH2 //[-2110] Mg and (-110) MgH2 //(0001) Mg , obtained from the ED study, has been used to propose a model for the movements of magnesium atoms in the structural change to describe the dynamics of the process. The in-situ EELS study has been compared with the existing H-desorption model. The study aims to describe the sorption dynamics of hydrogen in MgH 2 which is a base material for a number of promising hydrogen storage systems. (author)

  3. Application of electron back-scatter diffraction to texture research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randle, V.

    1996-01-01

    The application of electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) to materials research is reviewed. A brief history of the technique is given, followed by a description of present-day operation. The methodology of 'microtexture', i.e. spatially specific orientations, is described and recent examples of its application using EBSD are given, in particular to interstitial-free steel processing, growth of phases in a white iron and grain boundary phenomena in a superplastic alloy. The advantages and disadvantages of EBSD compared to use of X-rays for texture determination are discussed in detail

  4. Interpretation of diffuse low-energy electron diffraction intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldin, D.K.; Pendry, J.B.; Van Hove, M.A.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the diffuse low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) that occurs between sharp LEED beams can be used to determine the local bonding configuration near disordered surface atoms. Two approaches to the calculation of diffuse LEED intensities are presented for the case of lattice-gas disorder of an adsorbate on a crystalline substrate. The capabilities of this technique are most similar to those of near-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure, but avoid the restrictions due to the use of photons

  5. Hydrogen positions in single nanocrystals revealed by electron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Brázda, Petr; Boullay, P.; Pérez, O.; Klementová, Mariana; Petit, S.; Eigner, Václav; Zaarour, M.; Mintova, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 355, č. 6321 (2017), s. 166-169 ISSN 0036-8075 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-10035S; GA MŠk LO1603 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24510 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : hydrogen atoms * crystal structure * electron diffraction tomography * nanocrystalline materials Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 37.205, year: 2016

  6. Transmission electron microscopy of mercury metal

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2016-03-28

    Summary: Transmission electron microcopy (TEM) analysis of liquid metals, especially mercury (Hg), is difficult to carry out because their specimen preparation poses a daunting task due to the unique surface properties of these metals. This paper reports a cryoTEM study on Hg using a novel specimen preparation technique. Hg metal is mixed with water using sonication and quenched in liquid ethane cryogen. This technique permits research into the morphological, phase and structural properties of Hg at nanoscale dimensions. © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  7. Applications of transmission electron microscopy in the materials and mineral sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murr, L.E.

    1975-01-01

    Unique capabilities of transmission electron microscopy in characterizing the structure and properties of metals, minerals, and other crystaline materials are illustrated and compared with observations in the scanning electron and field-ion microscopes. Contrast mechanisms involving both mass-thickness and diffraction processes are illustrated, and examples presented of applications of bright and dark-field techiques. Applications of the electron microscope in the investigation of metallurgical and mineralogical problems are outlined with representative examples [pt

  8. Three-dimensional rotation electron diffraction: software RED for automated data collection and data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Wei; Sun, Junliang; Su, Jie; Hovmöller, Sven; Zou, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    Implementation of a computer program package for automated collection and processing of rotation electron diffraction (RED) data is described. The software package contains two computer programs: RED data collection and RED data processing. The RED data collection program controls the transmission electron microscope and the camera. Electron beam tilts at a fine step (0.05-0.20°) are combined with goniometer tilts at a coarse step (2.0-3.0°) around a common tilt axis, which allows a fine relative tilt to be achieved between the electron beam and the crystal in a large tilt range. An electron diffraction (ED) frame is collected at each combination of beam tilt and goniometer tilt. The RED data processing program processes three-dimensional ED data generated by the RED data collection program or by other approaches. It includes shift correction of the ED frames, peak hunting for diffraction spots in individual ED frames and identification of these diffraction spots as reflections in three dimensions. Unit-cell parameters are determined from the positions of reflections in three-dimensional reciprocal space. All reflections are indexed, and finally a list with hkl indices and intensities is output. The data processing program also includes a visualizer to view and analyse three-dimensional reciprocal lattices reconstructed from the ED frames. Details of the implementation are described. Data collection and data processing with the software RED are demonstrated using a calcined zeolite sample, silicalite-1. The structure of the calcined silicalite-1, with 72 unique atoms, could be solved from the RED data by routine direct methods.

  9. Ultrashort electron bunch length measurement with diffraction radiation deflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Dao; Huang, Wen-Hui

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method to measure electron bunch length with a diffraction radiation (DR) deflector which is composed of a DR radiator and three beam position monitors (BPMs). When an electron beam passes through a metallic aperture which is tilted by 45 degrees with respect to its trajectory, backward DR that propagates perpendicular to the beam’s trajectory is generated which adds a transverse deflection to the beam as a result of momentum conservation. The deflection is found to be largely dependent on the bunch length and could be easily observed with a downstream BPM. Detailed investigations show that this method has wide applicability, high temporal resolution, and great simplicity.

  10. Ultrashort electron bunch length measurement with diffraction radiation deflector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dao Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a novel method to measure electron bunch length with a diffraction radiation (DR deflector which is composed of a DR radiator and three beam position monitors (BPMs. When an electron beam passes through a metallic aperture which is tilted by 45 degrees with respect to its trajectory, backward DR that propagates perpendicular to the beam’s trajectory is generated which adds a transverse deflection to the beam as a result of momentum conservation. The deflection is found to be largely dependent on the bunch length and could be easily observed with a downstream BPM. Detailed investigations show that this method has wide applicability, high temporal resolution, and great simplicity.

  11. Acceleration of Electrons in a Diffraction Dominated IFEL

    CERN Document Server

    Musumeci, Pietro; Pellegrini, Claudio; Ralph, J; Rosenzweig, J B; Sung, C; Tochitsky, Sergei Ya; Travish, Gil

    2004-01-01

    We report on the observation of energy gain in excess of 20 MeV at the Inverse Free Electron Laser Accelerator experiment at the Neptune Laboratory at UCLA. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is injected ina 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered both in period and field amplitude. A CO2 10 μ m laser with power >300 GW is used as the IFEL driver. The Rayleigh range of the laser (1.8cm) is shorter than the undulator length so that the interaction is diffraction dominated. Few per cent of the injected particles are trapped in stable accelerating buckets and electrons with energies up to 35 MeV are detected on the magnetic spectrometers. Experimental results on the scaling of the accelerator characteristics versus input parameters like injection energy, laser focus position and laser power are discussed. Three dimensional simulations are in good agreement with the electron energy spectrums observed in the experiment and indicate that substantial energy exchange between laser and electron beam only occurs in the firs...

  12. Cathodoluminescence in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kociak, M., E-mail: mathieu.kociak@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Université Paris-SudParis-Sud, CNRS-UMR 8502, Orsay 91405 (France); Zagonel, L.F. [“Gleb Wataghin” Institute of Physics University of Campinas - UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a powerful tool for the investigation of optical properties of materials. In recent years, its combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has demonstrated great success in unveiling new physics in the field of plasmonics and quantum emitters. Most of these results were not imaginable even twenty years ago, due to conceptual and technical limitations. The purpose of this review is to present the recent advances that broke these limitations, and the new possibilities offered by the modern STEM-CL technique. We first introduce the different STEM-CL operating modes and the technical specificities in STEM-CL instrumentation. Two main classes of optical excitations, namely the coherent one (typically plasmons) and the incoherent one (typically light emission from quantum emitters) are investigated with STEM-CL. For these two main classes, we describe both the physics of light production under electron beam irradiation and the physical basis for interpreting STEM-CL experiments. We then compare STEM-CL with its better known sister techniques: scanning electron microscope CL, photoluminescence, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We finish by comprehensively reviewing recent STEM-CL applications. - Highlights: • Reviews the field of STEM-CL. • Introduces the technical requirements and challenges for STEM-CL. • Introduces the different types of excitations probed by STEM-CL. • Gives comprehensive overview of the last fifteenth years in the field.

  13. Quantitative biological measurement in Transmission Electron Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantell, Judith M; Verkade, Paul; Arkill, Kenton P

    2012-01-01

    It has been known for some time that biological sections shrink in the transmission electron microscope from exposure to the electron beam. This phenomenon is especially important in Electron Tomography (ET). The effect on shrinkage of parameters such as embedding medium or sample type is less well understood. In addition anisotropic area shrinkage has largely been ignored. The intention of this study is to explore the shrinkage on a number of samples ranging in thickness from 200 nm to 500 nm. A protocol was developed to determine the shrinkage in area and thickness using the gold fiducials used in electron tomography. In brief: Using low dose philosophy on the section, a focus area was used prior to a separate virgin study area for a series of known exposures on a tilted sample. The shrinkage was determined by measurements on the gold beads from both sides of the section as determined by a confirmatory tomogram. It was found that the shrinkage in area (approximately to 90-95% of the original) and the thickness (approximately 65% of the original at most) agreed with pervious authors, but that a lmost all the shrinkage was in the first minute and that although the direction of the in-plane shrinkage (in x and y) was sometimes uneven the end result was consistent. It was observed, in general, that thinner samples showed more percentage shrinkage than thicker ones. In conclusion, if direct quantitative measurements are required then the protocol described should be used for all areas studied.

  14. Quantitative biological measurement in Transmission Electron Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantell, Judith M.; Verkade, Paul; Arkill, Kenton P.

    2012-07-01

    It has been known for some time that biological sections shrink in the transmission electron microscope from exposure to the electron beam. This phenomenon is especially important in Electron Tomography (ET). The effect on shrinkage of parameters such as embedding medium or sample type is less well understood. In addition anisotropic area shrinkage has largely been ignored. The intention of this study is to explore the shrinkage on a number of samples ranging in thickness from 200 nm to 500 nm. A protocol was developed to determine the shrinkage in area and thickness using the gold fiducials used in electron tomography. In brief: Using low dose philosophy on the section, a focus area was used prior to a separate virgin study area for a series of known exposures on a tilted sample. The shrinkage was determined by measurements on the gold beads from both sides of the section as determined by a confirmatory tomogram. It was found that the shrinkage in area (approximately to 90-95% of the original) and the thickness (approximately 65% of the original at most) agreed with pervious authors, but that a lmost all the shrinkage was in the first minute and that although the direction of the in-plane shrinkage (in x and y) was sometimes uneven the end result was consistent. It was observed, in general, that thinner samples showed more percentage shrinkage than thicker ones. In conclusion, if direct quantitative measurements are required then the protocol described should be used for all areas studied.

  15. Extra spots in the electron diffraction patterns of neutron irradiated zirconium and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, P.K.

    1977-01-01

    Specimens of neutron irradiated zirconium and its alloys were examined in the transmission electron microscope. Groups of extra spots, often exhibiting four-fold symmetry, were observed in thin foil electron diffraction patterns of these specimens. The 'extra-spot' structure, like the expected black-dot/small scale dislocation loop neutron irradiated damage, is approximately 100 A in size. Its nature is uncertain. It may be related to irradiation damage or to some artefact introduced during specimen preparation. If it is the latter, then published irradiation damage defect size distributions and determined irradiation growth strains of other investigators, may require modification. The present inconclusive results indicate that extra-spot structure is likely to consist of oxide particles, but may correspond to hydride precipitation or decoration effects, or even, to electron beam effects. (author)

  16. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals from cattle bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Sangeeta; Wei, Shanghai; Han, Jie; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    In this present study, hydroxyapatite which was obtained from cattle bones has been heat treated at temperature 400 °C and 600 °C. The microstructure after the treatment has been studied in detail using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction techniques. The TEM results indicate that natural bone consists of collagen and hydroxyapatite nano-crystals which are needle shaped. The heat treatment influences the crystallinity and growth of these hydroxyapatite nano-crystals known as ‘crystal maturation’ or ‘crystal ageing’. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite is obtained from cattle bones. • Material has been characterised using XRD and TEM. • Crystal growth and orientation has been studied in detail.

  17. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals from cattle bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Sangeeta, E-mail: spt658@aucklanduni.ac.nz [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand); Wei, Shanghai [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand); Han, Jie [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 205 North Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL (United States); Gao, Wei [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand)

    2015-11-15

    In this present study, hydroxyapatite which was obtained from cattle bones has been heat treated at temperature 400 °C and 600 °C. The microstructure after the treatment has been studied in detail using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction techniques. The TEM results indicate that natural bone consists of collagen and hydroxyapatite nano-crystals which are needle shaped. The heat treatment influences the crystallinity and growth of these hydroxyapatite nano-crystals known as ‘crystal maturation’ or ‘crystal ageing’. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite is obtained from cattle bones. • Material has been characterised using XRD and TEM. • Crystal growth and orientation has been studied in detail.

  18. Characterization of nanomaterials with transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2016-08-01

    The field of nanotechnology is about research and development on materials whose at least one dimension is in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. In recent years, the research activity for developing nano-materials has grown exponentially owing to the fact that they offer better solutions to the challenges faced by various fields such as energy, food, and environment. In this paper, the importance of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) based techniques is demonstrated for investigating the properties of nano-materials. Specifically the nano-materials that are investigated in this report include gold nano-particles (Au-NPs), silver atom-clusters (Ag-ACs), tantalum single-atoms (Ta-SAs), carbon materials functionalized with iron cobalt (Fe-Co) NPs and titania (TiO2) NPs, and platinum loaded Ceria (Pt-CeO2) Nano composite. TEM techniques that are employed to investigate nano-materials include aberration corrected bright-field TEM (BF-TEM), high-angle dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and BF-TEM electron tomography (ET). With the help presented of results in this report, it is proved herein that as many TEM techniques as available in a given instrument are essential for a comprehensive nano-scale analysis of nanomaterials.

  19. Electron backscatter diffraction: Strategies for reliable data acquisition and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randle, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    In electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) software packages there are many user choices both in data acquisition and in data processing and display. In order to extract maximum scientific value from an inquiry, it is helpful to have some guidelines for best practice in conducting an EBSD investigation. The purpose of this article therefore is to address selected topics of EBSD practice, in a tutorial manner. The topics covered are a brief summary on the principles of EBSD, specimen preparation, calibration of an EBSD system, experiment design, speed of data acquisition, data clean-up, microstructure characterisation (including grain size) and grain boundary characterisation. This list is not meant to cover exhaustively all areas where EBSD is used, but rather to provide a resource consisting of some useful strategies for novice EBSD users.

  20. Absorptive form factors for high-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, D.M.; King, Q.A.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal diffuse scattering contribution to the absorptive potential in high-energy electron diffraction is calculated in the form of an absorptive contribution to the atomic form factor. To do this, the Einstein model of lattice vibrations is used, with isotropic Debye-Waller factors. The absorptive form factors are calculated as a function of scattering vector s and temperature factor M on a grid which enables polynomial interpolation of the results to be accurate to better than 2% for much of the ranges 0≤Ms 2 ≤6 and 0≤M≤2 A 2 . The computed values, together with an interpolation routine, have been incorporated into a Fortran subroutine which calculates both the real and absorptive form factors for 54 atomic species. (orig.)

  1. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Nellist, Peter D., E-mail: peter.nellist@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Cosgriff, Eireann C.; D' Alfonso, Adrian J.; Morgan, Andrew J.; Allen, Leslie J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Hashimoto, Ayako [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Takeguchi, Masaki [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Mitsuishi, Kazutaka [Advanced Nano-characterization Center, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Quantum Dot Research Center, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Shimojo, Masayuki [High Voltage Electron Microscopy Station, NIMS, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan); Advanced Science Research Laboratory, Saitama Institute of Technology, 1690 Fusaiji, Fukaya 369-0293 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. -- Research Highlights: {yields} The confocal probe image in a scanning confocal electron microscopy image reveals information about the thickness and height of the crystalline layer. {yields} The form of the contrast in a three-dimensional bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy image can be explained in terms of the confocal probe image. {yields} Despite the complicated form of the contrast in bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy, we see that depth information is transferred on a 10 nm scale.

  2. Thermal diffuse scattering in transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, B.D.; D' Alfonso, A.J. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Findlay, S.D. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Van Dyck, D. [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); LeBeau, J.M. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7907 (United States); Stemmer, S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5050 (United States); Allen, L.J., E-mail: lja@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    In conventional transmission electron microscopy, thermal scattering significantly affects the image contrast. It has been suggested that not accounting for this correctly is the main cause of the Stobbs factor, the ubiquitous, large contrast mismatch found between theory and experiment. In the case where a hard aperture is applied, we show that previous conclusions drawn from work using bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy and invoking the principle of reciprocity are reliable in the presence of thermal scattering. In the aperture-free case it has been suggested that even the most sophisticated mathematical models for thermal diffuse scattering lack in their numerical implementation, specifically that there may be issues in sampling, including that of the contrast transfer function of the objective lens. We show that these concerns can be satisfactorily overcome with modest computing resources; thermal scattering can be modelled accurately enough for the purpose of making quantitative comparison between simulation and experiment. Spatial incoherence of the source is also investigated. Neglect or inadequate handling of thermal scattering in simulation can have an appreciable effect on the predicted contrast and can be a significant contribution to the Stobbs factor problem. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We determine the numerical requirements for accurate simulation of TDS in CTEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TDS can be simulated to high precision using the Born-Oppenheimer model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Such calculations establish the contribution of TDS to the Stobbs factor problem. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Treating spatial incoherence using envelope functions increases image contrast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rigorous treatment of spatial incoherence significantly reduces image contrast.

  3. Low temperature electron microscopy and electron diffraction of the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, S.B.

    1978-09-01

    The structure of the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium was studied by high resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction, primarily at low temperature. The handedness of the purple membrane diffraction pattern with respect to the cell membrane was determined by electron diffraction of purple membranes adsorbed to polylysine. A new method of preparing frozen specimens was used to preserve the high resolution order of the membranes in the electron microscope. High resolution imaging of glucose-embedded purple membranes at room temperature was used to relate the orientation of the diffraction pattern to the absolute orientation of the structure of the bacteriorhodopsin molecule. The purple membrane's critical dose for electron beam-induced damage was measured at room temperature and at -120 0 C, and was found to be approximately five times greater at -120 0 C. Because of this decrease in radiation sensitivity, imaging of the membrane at low temperature should result in an increased signal-to-noise ratio, and thus better statistical definition of the phases of weak reflections. Higher resolution phases may thus be extracted from images than can be determined by imaging at room temperature. To achieve this end, a high resolution, liquid nitrogen-cooled stage was built for the JEOL-100B. Once the appropriate technology for taking low dose images at very high resolution has been developed, this stage will hopefully be used to determine the high resolution structure of the purple membrane

  4. Ultrafast electron diffraction with megahertz MeV electron pulses from a superconducting radio-frequency photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, L. W.; Lin, L.; Huang, S. L.; Quan, S. W.; Hao, J. K.; Zhu, F.; Wang, F.; Liu, K. X., E-mail: kxliu@pku.edu.cn [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Jiang, T.; Zhu, P. F.; Fu, F.; Wang, R.; Zhao, L.; Xiang, D., E-mail: dxiang@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-11-30

    We report ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction operating at the megahertz repetition rate where the electron beam is produced in a superconducting radio-frequency (rf) photoinjector. We show that the beam quality is sufficiently high to provide clear diffraction patterns from gold and aluminium samples. With the number of electrons, several orders of magnitude higher than that from a normal conducting photocathode rf gun, such high repetition rate ultrafast MeV electron diffraction may open up many new opportunities in ultrafast science.

  5. Bragg's Law diffraction simulations for electron backscatter diffraction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kacher, Josh, E-mail: jkacherbyu@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, 455B Crabtree Technology Building, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Landon, Colin; Adams, Brent L.; Fullwood, David [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, 455B Crabtree Technology Building, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    In 2006, Angus Wilkinson introduced a cross-correlation-based electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) texture analysis system capable of measuring lattice rotations and elastic strains to high resolution. A variation of the cross-correlation method is introduced using Bragg's Law-based simulated EBSD patterns as strain free reference patterns that facilitates the use of the cross-correlation method with polycrystalline materials. The lattice state is found by comparing simulated patterns to collected patterns at a number of regions on the pattern using the cross-correlation function and calculating the deformation from the measured shifts of each region. A new pattern can be simulated at the deformed state, and the process can be iterated a number of times to converge on the absolute lattice state. By analyzing an iteratively rotated single crystal silicon sample and recovering the rotation, this method is shown to have an angular resolution of {approx}0.04{sup o} and an elastic strain resolution of {approx}7e-4. As an example of applications, elastic strain and curvature measurements are used to estimate the dislocation density in a single grain of a compressed polycrystalline Mg-based AZ91 alloy.

  6. Facilities for in situ ion beam studies in transmission electron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.W.; Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.

    1993-08-01

    Interfacing an ion accelerator to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) allows the analytical functions of TEM imaging and electron diffraction from very small regions to be employed during ion-irradiation effects studies. At present there are ten such installations in Japan, one in France and one in the USA. General specifications of facilities which are operational in 1993 are summarized, and additional facilities which are planned or being proposed are briefly described

  7. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Magnetite Plaquettes in Orgueil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Han, J.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite sometimes takes the form of a plaquette - barrel-shaped stack of magnetite disks - in carbonaceous chondrites (CC) that show evidence of aqueous alteration. The asymmetric nature of the plaquettes caused Pizzarello and Groy to propose magnetite plaquettes as a naturally asymmetric mineral that can indroduce symmetry-breaking in organic molecules. Our previous synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (SXRCT) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of the magnetite plaquettes in fifteen CCs indicate that magnetite plaquettes are composed of nearly parallel discs, and the crystallographic orientations of the discs change around a rotational axis normal to the discs surfaces. In order to further investigate the nanostructures of magnetite plaquettes, we made two focused ion beam (FIB) sections of nine magnetite plaquettes from a thin section of CI Orgueil for transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. The X-ray spectrum imaging shows that the magnetite discs are purely iron oxide Fe3O4 (42.9 at% Fe and 57.1 at% O), which suggest that the plaquettes are of aqueous origin as it is difficult to form pure magnetite as a nebular condensate. The selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns acquired across the plaquettes show that the magnetite discs are single crystals. SEM and EBSD analyses suggest that the planar surfaces of the magnetite discs belong to the {100} planes of the cubic inverse spinel structure, which are supported by our TEM observations. Kerridge et al. suggested that the epitaxial relationship between magnetite plaquette and carbonate determines the magnetite face. However, according to our TEM observation, the association of magnetite with porous networks of phyllosilicate indicates that the epitaxial relationship with carbonate is not essential to the formation of magnetite plaquettes. It was difficult to determine the preferred rotational orientation of the plaquettes due to the symmetry of the cubic structure

  8. Analytic model of electron pulse propagation in ultrafast electron diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, A.M.; Sipe, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    We present a mean-field analytic model to study the propagation of electron pulses used in ultrafast electron diffraction experiments (UED). We assume a Gaussian form to characterize the electron pulse, and derive a system of ordinary differential equations that are solved quickly and easily to give the pulse dynamics. We compare our model to an N-body numerical simulation and are able to show excellent agreement between the two result sets. This model is a convenient alternative to time consuming and computationally intense N-body simulations in exploring the dynamics of UED electron pulses, and as a tool for refining UED experimental designs

  9. High resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction of YBa2Cu3O(7-x)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakow, W.; Shaw, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental high resolution electron micrographs and computer simulation experiments have been used to evaluate the visibility of the atomic constituents of YBa 2 Cu 3 O(7-x). In practice, the detection of oxygen has not been possible in contradiction to that predicted by modelling of perfect crystalline material. Preliminary computer experiments of the electron diffraction patterns when oxygen vacancies are introduced on the Cu-O sheets separating Ba layers show the diffuse streaks characteristic of short range ordering. 7 references

  10. Characterization of strained semiconductor structures using transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezdoel, Vasfi Burak

    2011-08-15

    Today's state-of-the-art semiconductor electronic devices utilize the charge transport within very small volumes of the active device regions. The structural, chemical and optical material properties in these small dimensions can critically affect the performance of these devices. The present thesis is focused on the nanometer scale characterization of the strain state in semiconductor structures using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Although high-resolution TEM has shown to provide the required accuracy at the nanometer scale, optimization of imaging conditions is necessary for accurate strain measurements. An alternative HRTEM method based on strain mapping on complex-valued exit face wave functions is developed to reduce the artifacts arising from objective lens aberrations. However, a much larger field of view is crucial for mapping strain in the active regions of complex structures like latest generation metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). To overcome this, a complementary approach based on electron holography is proposed. The technique relies on the reconstruction of the phase shifts in the diffracted electron beams from a focal series of dark-field images using recently developed exit-face wave function reconstruction algorithm. Combining high spatial resolution, better than 1 nm, with a field of view of about 1 {mu}m in each dimension, simultaneous strain measurements on the array of MOSFETs are possible. Owing to the much lower electron doses used in holography experiments when compared to conventional quantitative methods, the proposed approach allows to map compositional distribution in electron beam sensitive materials such as InGaN heterostructures without alteration of the original morphology and chemical composition. Moreover, dark-field holography experiments can be performed on thicker specimens than the ones required for high-resolution TEM, which in turn reduces the thin foil relaxation. (orig.)

  11. Path-separated electron interferometry in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Fehmi S.; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan J.; Pierce, Jordan S.; McMorran, Benjamin J.

    2018-05-01

    We report a path-separated electron interferometer within a scanning transmission electron microscope. In this setup, we use a nanofabricated grating as an amplitude-division beamsplitter to prepare multiple spatially separated, coherent electron probe beams. We achieve path separations of 30 nm. We pass the  +1 diffraction order probe through amorphous carbon while passing the 0th and  ‑1 orders through vacuum. The probes are then made to interfere via imaging optics, and we observe an interference pattern at the CCD detector with up to 39.7% fringe visibility. We show preliminary experimental results in which the interference pattern was recorded during a 1D scan of the diffracted probes across a test phase object. These results qualitatively agree with a modeled interference predicted by an independent measurement of the specimen thickness. This experimental design can potentially be applied to phase contrast imaging and fundamental physics experiments, such as an exploration of electron wave packet coherence length.

  12. Foucault imaging and small-angle electron diffraction in controlled external magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Kotani, Atsuhiro; Harada, Ken; Ishii, Yui; Mori, Shigeo

    2016-12-01

    We report a method for acquiring Foucault images and small-angle electron diffraction patterns in external magnetic fields using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any modification. In the electron optical system that we have constructed, external magnetic fields parallel to the optical axis can be controlled using the objective lens pole piece under weak excitation conditions in the Foucault mode and the diffraction mode. We observe two ferromagnetic perovskite-type manganese oxides, La 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 (LSMO) and Nd 0.5 Sr 0.5 MnO 3 , in order to visualize magnetic domains and their magnetic responses to external magnetic fields. In rhombohedral-structured LSMO, pinning of magnetic domain walls at crystallographic twin boundaries was found to have a strong influence on the generation of new magnetic domains in external applied magnetic fields. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Precession electron diffraction for SiC grain boundary characterization in unirradiated TRISO fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillo, T.M.; Rooyen, I.J. van; Wu, Y.Q.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • SiC grain orientation determined by TEM-based precession electron diffraction. • Orientation data improved with increasing TEM sample thickness. • Fraction of low angle grain boundaries lower from PED data than EBSD data. • Fractions of high angle and CSL-related boundaries similar to EBSD data. - Abstract: Precession electron diffraction (PED), a transmission electron microscopy-based technique, has been evaluated for the suitability for evaluating grain boundary character in the SiC layer of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. This work reports the effect of transmission electron microscope (TEM) lamella thickness on the quality of data and establishes a baseline comparison to SiC grain boundary characteristics, in an unirradiated TRISO particle, determined previously using a conventional electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) scanning electron microscope (SEM)-based technique. In general, it was determined that the lamella thickness produced using the standard focused ion beam (FIB) fabrication process (∼80 nm), is sufficient to provide reliable PED measurements, although thicker lamellae (∼120 nm) were found to produce higher quality orientation data. Also, analysis of SiC grain boundary character from the TEM-based PED data showed a much lower fraction of low-angle grain boundaries compared to SEM-based EBSD data from the SiC layer of a TRISO-coated particle made using the same fabrication parameters and a SiC layer deposited at a slightly lower temperature from a surrogate TRISO particle. However, the fractions of high-angle and coincident site lattice (CSL)-related grain boundaries determined by PED are similar to those found using SEM-based EBSD. Since the grain size of the SiC layer of TRSIO fuel can be as small as 250 nm (Kirchhofer et al., 2013), depending on the fabrication parameters, and since grain boundary fission product precipitates in irradiated TRISO fuel can be nano-sized, the TEM-based PED orientation data

  14. Interpretation of the shape of electron diffraction spots from small polyhedral crystals by means of the crystal shape amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumann, W.; Hofmeister, H.; Heydenreich, J.; Komrska, J.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of the crystal shape on the fine structure of transmission electron diffraction (TED) patterns described by the crystal shape amplitude is discussed. A general algebraic expression for the crystal shape amplitude of any crystal polyhedron is used for computing the intensity distribution of TED reflections. The computer simulation method is applied to the analysis of the fine structure of TED patterns of small gold and palladium crystals having octahedral and tetrahedral habits. (orig.)

  15. Mega-electron-volt ultrafast electron diffraction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathersby, S. P.; Brown, G.; Chase, T. F.; Coffee, R.; Corbett, J.; Eichner, J. P.; Frisch, J. C.; Fry, A. R.; Gühr, M.; Hartmann, N.; Hast, C.; Hettel, R.; Jobe, R. K.; Jongewaard, E. N.; Lewandowski, J. R.; Li, R. K., E-mail: lrk@slac.stanford.edu; Lindenberg, A. M.; Makasyuk, I.; May, J. E.; McCormick, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Ultrafast electron probes are powerful tools, complementary to x-ray free-electron lasers, used to study structural dynamics in material, chemical, and biological sciences. High brightness, relativistic electron beams with femtosecond pulse duration can resolve details of the dynamic processes on atomic time and length scales. SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory recently launched the Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) and microscopy Initiative aiming at developing the next generation ultrafast electron scattering instruments. As the first stage of the Initiative, a mega-electron-volt (MeV) UED system has been constructed and commissioned to serve ultrafast science experiments and instrumentation development. The system operates at 120-Hz repetition rate with outstanding performance. In this paper, we report on the SLAC MeV UED system and its performance, including the reciprocal space resolution, temporal resolution, and machine stability.

  16. Analysis of dislocation loops by means of large-angle convergent beam electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, Ch; Spiecker, E; Morniroli, J P; Jaeger, W

    2002-01-01

    Diffusion-induced dislocation loops in GaP and GaAs were analysed by means of large-angle convergent beam electron diffraction (LACBED) and conventional contrast methods of transmission electron microscopy. It is demonstrated that LACBED is perfectly suited for use in analysing dislocation loops. The method combines analyses of the dislocation-induced splitting of Bragg lines in a LACBED pattern for the determination of the Burgers vector with analyses of the loop contrast behaviour in transmission electron microscopy bright-field images during tilt experiments, from which the habit plane of the dislocation loop is determined. Perfect dislocation loops formed by condensation of interstitial atoms or vacancies were found, depending on the diffusion conditions. The loops possess {110}-habit planes and Burgers vectors parallel to (110). The LACBED method findings are compared with results of contrast analyses based on the so-called 'inside-outside' contrast of dislocation loops. Advantages of the LACBED method consist in the possibility of determining the complete Burgers vector of the dislocation loops and of an unambiguous and fast loop type analysis

  17. A Dictionary Approach to Electron Backscatter Diffraction Indexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu H; Park, Se Un; Wei, Dennis; Newstadt, Greg; Jackson, Michael A; Simmons, Jeff P; De Graef, Marc; Hero, Alfred O

    2015-06-01

    We propose a framework for indexing of grain and subgrain structures in electron backscatter diffraction patterns of polycrystalline materials. We discretize the domain of a dynamical forward model onto a dense grid of orientations, producing a dictionary of patterns. For each measured pattern, we identify the most similar patterns in the dictionary, and identify boundaries, detect anomalies, and index crystal orientations. The statistical distribution of these closest matches is used in an unsupervised binary decision tree (DT) classifier to identify grain boundaries and anomalous regions. The DT classifies a pattern as an anomaly if it has an abnormally low similarity to any pattern in the dictionary. It classifies a pixel as being near a grain boundary if the highly ranked patterns in the dictionary differ significantly over the pixel's neighborhood. Indexing is accomplished by computing the mean orientation of the closest matches to each pattern. The mean orientation is estimated using a maximum likelihood approach that models the orientation distribution as a mixture of Von Mises-Fisher distributions over the quaternionic three sphere. The proposed dictionary matching approach permits segmentation, anomaly detection, and indexing to be performed in a unified manner with the additional benefit of uncertainty quantification.

  18. Orientation effects on indexing of electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowell, Matthew M.; Wright, Stuart I.

    2005-01-01

    Automated Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) has become a well-accepted technique for characterizing the crystallographic orientation aspects of polycrystalline microstructures. At the advent of this technique, it was observed that patterns obtained from grains in certain crystallographic orientations were more difficult for the automated indexing algorithms to accurately identify than patterns from other orientations. The origin of this problem is often similarities between the EBSD pattern of the correct orientation and patterns from other orientations or phases. While practical solutions have been found and implemented, the identification of these problem orientations generally occurs only after running an automated scan, as problem orientations are often readily apparent in the resulting orientation maps. However, such an approach only finds those problem orientations that are present in the scan area. It would be advantageous to identify all regions of orientation space that may present problems for automated indexing prior to initiating an automated scan, and to minimize this space through the optimization of acquisition and indexing parameters. This work presents new methods for identifying regions in orientation space where the reliability of the automated indexing is suspect prior to performing a scan. This methodology is used to characterize the impact of various parameters on the indexing algorithm

  19. Molecular structure of tetramethylgermane from gas electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csákvári, Éva; Rozsondai, Béla; Hargittai, István

    1991-05-01

    The molecular structure of Ge(CH 3) 4 has been determined from gas-phase electron diffraction augmented by a normal coordinate analysis. Assuming tetrahedral symmetry for the germanium bond configuration, the following structural parameters are found: rg(GeC) = 1.958 ± 0.004 Å, rg(CH) = 1.111 ± 0.003 Å and ∠(GeCH) = 110.7 ± 0.2° ( R=4.0%). The methyl torsional barrier V 0 is estimated to be 1.3 kJ mol -1 on the basis of an effective angle of torsion 23.0 ± 1.5°, from the staggered form, yielded directly by the analysis. The GeC bond length of Ge(CH 3) 4 is the same, within experimental error, as that of Ge(C 6H 5) 4 and is in agreement with the prediction of a modified Schomaker-Stevenson relationship.

  20. Transmission electron microscopy a textbook for materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, David B

    1996-01-01

    Electron microscopy has revolutionized our understanding the extraordinary intellectual demands required of the mi­ of materials by completing the processing-structure-prop­ croscopist in order to do the job properly: crystallography, erties links down to atomistic levels. It now is even possible diffraction, image contrast, inelastic scattering events, and to tailor the microstructure (and meso structure ) of materials spectroscopy. Remember, these used to be fields in them­ to achieve specific sets of properties; the extraordinary abili­ selves. Today, one has to understand the fundamentals ties of modem transmission electron microscopy-TEM­ of all of these areas before one can hope to tackle signifi­ instruments to provide almost all of the structural, phase, cant problems in materials science. TEM is a technique of and crystallographic data allow us to accomplish this feat. characterizing materials down to the atomic limits. It must Therefore, it is obvious that any curriculum in modem mate­ be use...

  1. 'Ab initio' structure solution from electron diffraction data obtained by a combination of automated diffraction tomography and precession technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mugnaioli, E.; Gorelik, T.; Kolb, U.

    2009-01-01

    Using a combination of our recently developed automated diffraction tomography (ADT) module with precession electron technique (PED), quasi-kinematical 3D diffraction data sets of an inorganic salt (BaSO 4 ) were collected. The lattice cell parameters and their orientation within the data sets were found automatically. The extracted intensities were used for 'ab initio' structure analysis by direct methods. The data set covered almost the complete set of possible symmetrically equivalent reflections for an orthorhombic structure. The structure solution in one step delivered all heavy (Ba, S) as well as light atoms (O). Results of the structure solution using direct methods, charge flipping and maximum entropy algorithms as well as structure refinement for three different 3D electron diffraction data sets were presented.

  2. Transmission of electrons through Al2O3 nanocapillaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milosavljević, A.R.; Jureta, J.J.; Víkor, Gy.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate transmission of low-energy electrons (250 eV) through insulating AlO nanocapillaries (270 nm diameter and 15 μm length). Kinetic energy distribution of electrons transmitted through the nanocapillaries in the straightforward direction, time dependence of the transmission rate both...

  3. Lattice constant measurement from electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2017-01-01

    Kikuchi bands in election backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP) contain information about lattice constants of crystallographic samples that can be extracted via the Bragg equation. An advantage of lattice constant measurement from EBSPs over diffraction (XRD) is the ability to perform local ...

  4. Fifty years old, and still going strong: Transmission electron optical studies of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    Highlights in the history of transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy include the introduction of diffraction contrast, resolution of periodic lattices by phase contrast and incoherent imaging via the high-angle annular dark-field detector. Convergent-beam electron diffraction and analytical electron microscopy, especially the application of energy-dispersive X-ray and electron energy-loss spectrometry, have provided structural and chemical information in addition to strain contrast from lattice defects. From the outset, novel specimen stages and improvements to aid the operator enhanced the electron-optical engineering provided by the instrument makers. The spatial resolution achieved was mainly determined by the way the instrument was used, and not by the basic resolution limit set by the electron optics. However, the application of computer controlled correction of spherical (and higher order) aberration has resulted in a new generation of instruments capable of sub-Angstrom point-to-point resolution. This improved performance, combined with electron energy-loss spectrometry, promises genuine three-dimensional determination of atomic and electronic structure: an indispensable weapon in the battle to fabricate and control useful nanostructures. The uncertainty principle now fundamentally restricts some of the observations one can make, but much more technical development over the next decades must occur before one can say that the techniques of electron-optical imaging of material structure have reached their fundamental limitations. One can expect remarkable progress over the next few years

  5. Femtosecond electron diffraction. Next generation electron sources for atomically resolved dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirscht, Julian

    2015-08-01

    Three instruments for femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) experiments were erected, partially commissioned and used for first diffraction experiments. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) was completed by beamline elements including supports, a specimen chamber and dark current or electron beam collimating elements such that the commissioning process, including first diffraction experiments in this context, could be started. The temporal resolution of this machine is simulated to be 25 fs (fwhm) short, while a transverse coherence length of 30 nm (fwhm) is feasible to resolve proteins on this scale. Whether this machine is capable of meeting these predictions or whether the dynamics of the electron beam will stay limited by accelerator components, is not finally determined by the end of this work, because commissioning and improvement of accelerator components is ongoing. Simultaneously, a compact DC electron diffraction apparatus, the E-Gun 300, designed for solid and liquid specimens and a target electron energy of 300 keV, was built. Fundamental design issues of the high potential carrying and beam generating components occurred and are limiting the maximum potential and electron energy to 120 keV. Furthermore, this is limiting the range of possible applications and consequently the design and construction of a brand new instrument began. The Femtosecond Electron Diffraction CAmera for Molecular Movies (FED-CAMM) bridges the performance problems of very high electric potentials and provides optimal operational conditions for all applied electron energies up to 300 keV. The variability of gap spacings and optimized manufacturing of the high voltage electrodes lead to the best possible electron pulse durations obtainable with a compact DC setup, that does not comprise of rf-structures. This third apparatus possesses pulse durations just a few tenth femtoseconds apart from the design limit of the highly relativistic REGAE and combines the

  6. Femtosecond electron diffraction. Next generation electron sources for atomically resolved dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirscht, Julian

    2015-08-15

    Three instruments for femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) experiments were erected, partially commissioned and used for first diffraction experiments. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) was completed by beamline elements including supports, a specimen chamber and dark current or electron beam collimating elements such that the commissioning process, including first diffraction experiments in this context, could be started. The temporal resolution of this machine is simulated to be 25 fs (fwhm) short, while a transverse coherence length of 30 nm (fwhm) is feasible to resolve proteins on this scale. Whether this machine is capable of meeting these predictions or whether the dynamics of the electron beam will stay limited by accelerator components, is not finally determined by the end of this work, because commissioning and improvement of accelerator components is ongoing. Simultaneously, a compact DC electron diffraction apparatus, the E-Gun 300, designed for solid and liquid specimens and a target electron energy of 300 keV, was built. Fundamental design issues of the high potential carrying and beam generating components occurred and are limiting the maximum potential and electron energy to 120 keV. Furthermore, this is limiting the range of possible applications and consequently the design and construction of a brand new instrument began. The Femtosecond Electron Diffraction CAmera for Molecular Movies (FED-CAMM) bridges the performance problems of very high electric potentials and provides optimal operational conditions for all applied electron energies up to 300 keV. The variability of gap spacings and optimized manufacturing of the high voltage electrodes lead to the best possible electron pulse durations obtainable with a compact DC setup, that does not comprise of rf-structures. This third apparatus possesses pulse durations just a few tenth femtoseconds apart from the design limit of the highly relativistic REGAE and combines the

  7. Secondary mineralization in carious lesions of human dentin. Electron-probe, electron microscope, and electron diffraction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiwara, H [Tokyo Dental Coll. (Japan)

    1975-02-01

    Dentinal carious lesions having a remineralized surface layer were studied by means electron-probe microanalysis, electron microscopy, electron diffraction. As the results of electron-probe study, F, Mg, and Na were found to be distributed mainly in the remineralized surface layer and S in the decalcified region where decreases in Ca, P, and Mg concentration were usually observed. The decrease in Mg concentration always started earlier than that of Ca and P concentration. Electron microscope and electron diffraction studies revealed that apatic crystals in the remineralized surface layer were much larger than those in the intact dentin. Although they were less conspicuous, crystals in the decalcified region also were larger than those in the intact region. Dentinal tubules, occluded by many crystals, were frequently seen during the observations. Crystals in the tubules varied in morphology, showing granular, needle, rhomboid, and tabular shapes. By means of electron diffraction, the granular- or needle-shaped crystals were identified as apatite and the rhomboid-shaped crystals as whitlockite. Some of the tabular-shaped crystals appeared to be cotacalcium phosphate.

  8. Principle of energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Hiroki

    1997-01-01

    Energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) is widely used to make images and diffraction patterns more quantitative by removing the inelastic background, and to perform elemental and chemical mapping at high spatial resolution. The principal factors restricting the spatial resolution in elemental maps are discussed. The relativistic effect on inelastic scattering cross-section, which becomes significant for high-voltage EFTEM analysis, is also discussed in relation to the detection efficiency of core-loss signals. (author)

  9. Nanostructure characterisation of flow-formed Cr–Mo–V steel using transmission Kikuchi diffraction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birosca, S.; Ding, R.; Ooi, S.; Buckingham, R.; Coleman, C.; Dicks, K.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays flow-forming has become a desired near net shape manufacturing method as it provides excellent mechanical properties with improved surface finish and significant manufacturing cost reduction. However, the material is subjected to excessive plastic deformation during flow-forming process, generating a very fine and complex microstructure. In addition, the intense dislocation density and residual stress that is generated in the component during processing makes the microstructure characterisation using conventional micro-analytical tools challenging. Thus, the microstructure/property relationship study in such a material is rather difficult. In the present study a flow-formed Cr–Mo–V steel nanostructure and crystallographic texture were characterised by means of Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD). Here, TKD is shown to be a powerful technique in revealing very fine martensite laths within an austenite matrix. Moreover, fine precipitates in the order of 20–70 nm on the martensite lath boundaries were clearly imaged and characterised. This greatly assisted in understanding the preferable site formation of the carbides in such a complex microstructure. The results showed that the actual TKD spatial resolution was in the range of 5–10 nm using 25 kV for flow-formed Cr–Mo–V steel. - Highlights: • Optimum Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD) technique's configuration is reported. • TKD could reveal detailed nanostructural features and the microtexture of martensite laths. • Actual TKD spatial resolution was in the range of 5–10 nm using 25 kV for flow-formed Cr-Mo-V steel. • At nano scale the sub-structure morphology of martensite lath were determined using TKD

  10. Nanostructure characterisation of flow-formed Cr–Mo–V steel using transmission Kikuchi diffraction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birosca, S., E-mail: s.birosca@swansea.ac.uk [Materials Research Centre, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Ding, R. [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Ooi, S. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Buckingham, R.; Coleman, C. [Materials Research Centre, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Dicks, K. [Oxford Instruments NanoAnalysis, Halifax Road, High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire HP12 3SE (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Nowadays flow-forming has become a desired near net shape manufacturing method as it provides excellent mechanical properties with improved surface finish and significant manufacturing cost reduction. However, the material is subjected to excessive plastic deformation during flow-forming process, generating a very fine and complex microstructure. In addition, the intense dislocation density and residual stress that is generated in the component during processing makes the microstructure characterisation using conventional micro-analytical tools challenging. Thus, the microstructure/property relationship study in such a material is rather difficult. In the present study a flow-formed Cr–Mo–V steel nanostructure and crystallographic texture were characterised by means of Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD). Here, TKD is shown to be a powerful technique in revealing very fine martensite laths within an austenite matrix. Moreover, fine precipitates in the order of 20–70 nm on the martensite lath boundaries were clearly imaged and characterised. This greatly assisted in understanding the preferable site formation of the carbides in such a complex microstructure. The results showed that the actual TKD spatial resolution was in the range of 5–10 nm using 25 kV for flow-formed Cr–Mo–V steel. - Highlights: • Optimum Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD) technique's configuration is reported. • TKD could reveal detailed nanostructural features and the microtexture of martensite laths. • Actual TKD spatial resolution was in the range of 5–10 nm using 25 kV for flow-formed Cr-Mo-V steel. • At nano scale the sub-structure morphology of martensite lath were determined using TKD.

  11. Quantitative Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.

    Electronic and nanostructured materials have been investigated using advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques. The first topic is the microstructure of Ga and Sb-doped ZnO. Ga-doped ZnO is a candidate transparent conducting oxide material. The microstructure of GZO thin films grown by MBE under different growth conditions and different substrates were examined using various electron microscopy (EM) techniques. The microstructure, prevalent defects, and polarity in these films strongly depend on the growth conditions and substrate. Sb-doped ZnO nanowires have been shown to be the first route to stable p-type ZnO. Using Z-contrast STEM, I have showed that an unusual microstructure of Sb-decorated head-to-head inversion domain boundaries and internal voids contain all the Sb in the nanowires and cause the p-type conduction. InGaN thin films and InGaN / GaN quantum wells (QW) for light emitting diodes are the second topic. Low-dose Z-contrast STEM, PACBED, and EDS on InGaN QW LED structures grown by MOCVD show no evidence for nanoscale composition variations, contradicting previous reports. In addition, a new extended defect in GaN and InGaN was discovered. The defect consists of a faceted pyramid-shaped void that produces a threading dislocation along the [0001] growth direction, and is likely caused by carbon contamination during growth. Non-rigid registration (NRR) and high-precision STEM of nanoparticles is the final topic. NRR is a new image processing technique that corrects distortions arising from the serial nature of STEM acquisition that previously limited the precision of locating atomic columns and counting the number of atoms in images. NRR was used to demonstrate sub-picometer precision in STEM images of single crystal Si and GaN, the best achieved in EM. NRR was used to measure the atomic surface structure of Pt nanoacatalysts and Au nanoparticles, which revealed new bond length variation phenomenon of surface atoms. In

  12. Electron diffraction of CBr{sub 4} in superfluid helium droplets: A step towards single molecule diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei, E-mail: wei.kong@oregonstate.edu [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331-4003 (United States)

    2016-07-21

    We demonstrate the practicality of electron diffraction of single molecules inside superfluid helium droplets using CBr{sub 4} as a testing case. By reducing the background from pure undoped droplets via multiple doping, with small corrections for dimers and trimers, clearly resolved diffraction rings of CBr{sub 4} similar to those of gas phase molecules can be observed. The experimental data from CBr{sub 4} doped droplets are in agreement with both theoretical calculations and with experimental results of gaseous species. The abundance of monomers and clusters in the droplet beam also qualitatively agrees with the Poisson statistics. Possible extensions of this approach to macromolecular ions will also be discussed. This result marks the first step in building a molecular goniometer using superfluid helium droplet cooling and field induced orientation. The superior cooling effect of helium droplets is ideal for field induced orientation, but the diffraction background from helium is a concern. This work addresses this background issue and identifies a possible solution. Accumulation of diffraction images only becomes meaningful when all images are produced from molecules oriented in the same direction, and hence a molecular goniometer is a crucial technology for serial diffraction of single molecules.

  13. Complex band structure and electronic transmission eigenchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders; Strange, Mikkel; Smidstrup, Soren

    2017-01-01

    and complex band structure, in this case individual eigenchannel transmissions and different complex bands. We present calculations of decay constants for the two most conductive states as determined by complex band structure and standard DFT Landauer transport calculations for one semi-conductor and two...

  14. Determination of dislocation density by electron backscatter diffraction and X-ray line profile analysis in ferrous lath martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berecz, Tibor; Jenei, Péter; Csóré, András; Lábár, János; Gubicza, Jenő

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure and the dislocation density in as-quenched ferrous lath martensite were studied by different methods. The blocks, packets and variants formed due to martensitic transformation were identified and their sizes were determined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Concomitant transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation revealed that the laths contain subgrains with the size between 50 and 100 nm. A novel evaluation procedure of EBSD images was elaborated for the determination of the density and the space distribution of geometrically necessary dislocations from the misorientation distribution. The total dislocation density obtained by X-ray diffraction line profile analysis was in good agreement with the value determined by EBSD, indicating that the majority of dislocations formed due to martensitic transformation during quenching are geometrically necessary dislocations.

  15. Three-Dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    KAUST Repository

    De Jonge, Niels; Sougrat, Rachid; Northan, Brian M.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM

  16. Sample preparation and study by electronic diffraction of oxidations and fluorinations of some metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auguin, B.

    1963-06-01

    After having recalled that electron diffraction is particularly adapted to the study of thin films and surface layers, notably those forming during corrosions, and recalled some characteristics of this technique (wavelength, interactions with substances, parasite reactions, observation by transmission or reflection, obtained diagrams for polycrystalline and mono-crystalline substances), the author describes how samples are prepared in the case of examinations performed by transmission and by reflection. As fluorination agents are used for the separation of uranium 235 and 238, the second part discusses some works related to the fluorination of metals and alloys, some of them being used in these separation installations. Chlorine trifluoride is generally used and materials are generally oxidised. Thus, the author reports the study of the action of ClF 3 on different oxides. Oxidations of iron, nickel and Monel are addressed, as well as the behaviour of stainless steel. The study of fluorinations of metals (nickel, chromium, copper), alloys (stainless steel, Monel) and oxides is reported. The author finally addresses treatments performed after fluorinations: vacuum heating, action of humid air

  17. Ab initio structure determination of nanocrystals of organic pharmaceutical compounds by electron diffraction at room temperature using a Timepix quantum area direct electron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genderen, E. van; Clabbers, M. T. B. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics (C-CINA), Biozentrum, University of Basel, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland); Das, P. P. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Stewart, A. [Department of Physics and Energy, Materials and Surface Science Institute (MSSI), University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Nederlof, I. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Amsterdam Scientific Instruments, Postbus 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barentsen, K. C. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Portillo, Q. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Centres Científics i Tecnològics de la Universitat de Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Carrer de Lluís Solé i Sabaris, 1-3, Barcelona (Spain); Pannu, N. S. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Nicolopoulos, S. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Gruene, T., E-mail: tim.gruene@psi.ch [Biology and Chemistry, Laboratory of Biomolecular Research, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Abrahams, J. P., E-mail: tim.gruene@psi.ch [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics (C-CINA), Biozentrum, University of Basel, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland); Biology and Chemistry, Laboratory of Biomolecular Research, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-02-05

    A specialized quantum area detector for electron diffraction studies makes it possible to solve the structure of small organic compound nanocrystals in non-cryo conditions by direct methods. Until recently, structure determination by transmission electron microscopy of beam-sensitive three-dimensional nanocrystals required electron diffraction tomography data collection at liquid-nitrogen temperature, in order to reduce radiation damage. Here it is shown that the novel Timepix detector combines a high dynamic range with a very high signal-to-noise ratio and single-electron sensitivity, enabling ab initio phasing of beam-sensitive organic compounds. Low-dose electron diffraction data (∼0.013 e{sup −} Å{sup −2} s{sup −1}) were collected at room temperature with the rotation method. It was ascertained that the data were of sufficient quality for structure solution using direct methods using software developed for X-ray crystallography (XDS, SHELX) and for electron crystallography (ADT3D/PETS, SIR2014)

  18. Calculation of electron transmission through aluminium foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abroyan, M.A.; Mel'ker, A.I.; Mikhajlin, A.I.; Sirotinkin, V.V.; Tokmakov, I.L.

    1987-01-01

    Calculated by Monte Carlo method energy and angular distributions of electrons transmitted through aluminium foil with 50 μm thickness are presented. 200-500 electron energy ranges and angles of electron incidence on foil from 0 to 40 deg C are considered. That allows to use results for more universal accelerator group, for example, for accelerators with scanning beam used in industry. The received values of angular and energy characteristics allow to increase essentially estimation accuracy of accelerator extraction devices and dose distribution on irradiating item

  19. Electron magnetic chiral dichroism in CrO2 thin films using monochromatic probe illumination in a transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loukya, B.; Zhang, X.; Gupta, A.; Datta, R.

    2012-01-01

    Electron magnetic chiral dichroism (EMCD) has been studied in CrO 2 thin films (with (100) and (110) growth orientations on TiO 2 substrates) using a gun monochromator in an aberration corrected transmission electron microscope operating at 300 kV. Excellent signal-to-noise ratio is obtained at spatial resolution ∼10 nm using a monochromatic probe as compared to conventional parallel illumination, large area convergent beam electron diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy techniques of EMCD. Relatively rapid exposure using mono probe illumination enables collection of EMCD spectra in total of 8–9 min in energy filtered imaging mode for a given Cr L 2,3 energy scan (energy range ∼35 eV). We compared the EMCD signal obtained by extracting the Cr L 2,3 spectra under three beam diffraction geometry of two different reciprocal vectors (namely g=110 and 200) and found that the g=200 vector enables acquisition of excellent EMCD signal from relatively thicker specimen area due to the associated larger extinction distance. Orbital to spin moment ratio has been calculated using EMCD sum rules for 3d elements and dichroic spectral features associated with CrO 2 are compared and discussed with XMCD theoretical spectra. - Highlights: ► Electron magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD) of CrO 2 thin film with two different orientations. ► Improved EMCD signal with Gun monochromator illumination. ► Improved EMCD signal with higher g vector.

  20. Retabulation of space group extinctions for electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.; Tanaka, M.

    1989-01-01

    The space group tables previously published by one of the authors and others are here presented in a revised and compacted form designed to make for compatability with existing tables for X-ray diffraction. 136 of the 230 space groups are subject to dynamic extinctions due to glide planes and screw axes, and the observables from these space groups in specific settings are tabulated. Tabs

  1. Electron energy loss spectroscopy microanalysis and imaging in the transmission electron microscope: example of biological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diociaiuti, Marco

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports original results obtained in our laboratory over the past few years in the application of both electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopy imaging (ESI) to biological samples, performed in two transmission electron microscopes (TEM) equipped with high-resolution electron filters and spectrometers: a Gatan model 607 single magnetic sector double focusing EEL serial spectrometer attached to a Philips 430 TEM and a Zeiss EM902 Energy Filtering TEM. The primary interest was on the possibility offered by the combined application of these spectroscopic techniques with those offered by the TEM. In particular, the electron beam focusing available in a TEM allowed us to perform EELS and ESI on very small sample volumes, where high-resolution imaging and electron diffraction techniques can provide important structural information. I show that ESI was able to improve TEM performance, due to the reduced chromatic aberration and the possibility of avoiding the sample staining procedure. Finally, the analysis of the oscillating extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS) beyond the ionization edges characterizing the EELS spectra allowed me, in a manner very similar to the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the X-ray absorption spectra, to obtain short-range structural information for such light elements of biological interest as O or Fe. The Philips EM430 (250-300 keV) TEM was used to perform EELS microanalysis on Ca, P, O, Fe, Al and Si. The assessment of the detection limits of this method was obtained working with well-characterized samples containing Ca and P, and mimicking the actual cellular matrix. I applied EELS microanalysis to Ca detection in bone tissue during the mineralization process and to P detection in the cellular membrane of erythrocytes treated with an anti-tumoral drug, demonstrating that the cellular membrane is a drug target. I applied EELS microanalysis and selected area electron

  2. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  3. Investigating the mesostructure of ordered porous silica nanocomposites by transmission electron microscopy techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bullita, S.; Casula, M. F., E-mail: casulaf@unica.it [INSTM and Department of Chemical and Geological Science, University of Cagliari, Monserrato (Canada) (Italy); Piludu, M. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Cagliari, Monserrato (Canada) (Italy); Falqui, A. [INSTM and Department of Chemical and Geological Science, University of Cagliari, Monserrato (Canada) Italy and KAUST-King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Carta, D. [INSTM and Department of Chemical and Geological Science, University of Cagliari, Monserrato (Canada), Italy and Faculty of Physical Sciences and Engineering, University of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom); Corrias, A. [INSTM and Department of Chemical and Geological Science, University of Cagliari, Monserrato (Canada) Italy and School of Physical Sciences, Ingram Building, University of Kent, Canterbury (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-21

    Nanocomposites made out of FeCo alloy nanocrystals supported onto pre-formed mesoporous ordered silica which features a cubic arrangement of pores (SBA-16) were investigated. Information on the effect of the nanocrystals on the mesostructure (i.e. pore arrangement symmetry, pore size, and shape) were deduced by a multitechnique approach including N2 physisorption, low angle X-ray diffraction, and Transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques are required, however, to gain direct evidence on key compositional and textural features of the nanocomposites. In particular, electron tomography and microtomy techniques make clear that the FeCo nanocrystals are located within the pores of the SBA-16 silica, and that the ordered mesostructure of the nanocomposite is retained throughout the observed specimen.

  4. Electron diffraction analysis of an AB{sub 2}-type Laves phase for hydrogen battery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Z.; Chumbley, S.; Laabs, F.C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Ames Lab.

    2000-11-16

    A multicomponent AB{sub 2} type nickel-metal hydride (Ni-MH) battery alloy prepared by high-pressure gas atomization (HPGA) was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in both the as-atomized and heat treated condition. TEM examination showed a heavily faulted dendritic growth structure in as-atomized powder. Selected area diffraction (SAD) showed that this region consisted of both a cubic C15 structure with lattice constant a=7.03 A and an hexagonal C14 structure with lattice parameter a=4.97 A, c=8.11 A. The orientation relationship (OR) between the C14 and C15 structures was determined to be (111)[1 anti 10]{sub C15}//(0001)[11 anti 20]C{sub 14}. An interdendritic phase possessing the C14 structure was also seen. There was also a very fine grain region consisting of the C14 structure. Upon heat treatment, the faulted structure became more defined and appeared as intercalation layers within the grains. Spherical particles rich in Zr and Ni appeared scattered at the grain boundries instead of the C14 interdendritic phase. The polycrystalline region also changed to a mixture of C14 and C15 structures. The phase stability of the C15 and C14 structures based on a consideration of atomic size factor and the average electron concentration is discussed. (orig.)

  5. The Titan Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Jinschek, Jörg R.

    2009-01-01

    University of Denmark (DTU) provides a unique combination of techniques for studying materials of interest to the catalytic as well as the electronics and other communities [5]. DTU’s ETEM is based on the FEI Titan platform providing ultrahigh microscope stability pushing the imaging resolution into the sub...

  6. Exploring the environmental transmission electron microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Jakob B.; Cavalca, Filippo; Damsgaard, Christian D.

    2012-01-01

    of the opportunities that the environmental TEM (ETEM) offers when combined with other in situ techniques will be explored, directly in the microscope, by combining electron-based and photon-based techniques and phenomena. In addition, application of adjacent setups using sophisticated transfer methods...

  7. Scanning transmission low-energy electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Konvalina, Ivo; Unčovský, M.; Frank, Luděk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2011), 2:1-6 ISSN 0018-8646 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : TEM * STEM * SEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.723, year: 2011

  8. X-ray diffraction analysis device with electronic photon counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillit, R.Y.; Bruyas, H.; Patay, F.

    1985-01-01

    The means provided to control the movements around the three axes are composed of step-by-step motors related to exits control logic which is connected to the calculation and monitored by a clock. The clock monitors also the calculator so as that the calculator controls, together with the programmable clock and control logic, the coordination of the whole rotation movements, along the three rotation axes, their velocity, their duration and the acquisition of the measured intensities of the diffracted X-ray beam [fr

  9. Instrumental development of a quasi-relativistic ultrashort electron beam source for electron diffractions and spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young-Min; Figora, Michael

    2017-10-01

    A stable femtosecond electron beam system has been configured for time-resolved pump-probe experiments. The ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) system is designed with a sub-MeV photoelectron beam source pulsed by a femtosecond UV laser and nondispersive beamline components, including a bunch compressor-a pulsed S-band klystron is installed and fully commissioned with 5.5 MW peak power in a 2.5 μs pulse length. A single-cell RF photo-gun is designed to produce 1.6-16 pC electron bunches in a photoemission mode with 150 fs pulse duration at 0.5-1 MeV. The measured RF system jitters are within 1% in magnitude and 0.2° in phase, which would induce 3.4 keV and 0.25 keV of ΔE, corresponding to 80 fs and 5 fs of Δt, respectively. Our particle-in-cell simulations indicate that the designed bunch compressor reduces the time-of-arrival jitter by about an order of magnitude. The transport and focusing optics of the designed beamline with the bunch compressor enables an energy spread within 10 -4 and a bunch length (electron probe) within quasi-relativistic UED system.

  10. Long distance electron transmission in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    processes leads to formation of electrical fields, which modifies ion transport. The local proton producing and proton consuming half reactions induces pH extremes that accelerate dissolution of iron sul-phides and calcium carbonates in anoxic layers and promotes the formation of Mg-calcite and iron oxides......Geochemical observations in marine sediment have recently shown that electric currents may intimately couple spatially separated biogeochemical processes like oxygen reduction at the sediment surface and hydrogen sul-phide oxidation in anoxic layers centimeters below 1. Further experimental studies...... suggest that the electron conductance is mediated by microorgan-isms. The spatial separation of electron and proton donors and acceptors has major impacts on element cycling by redox processes, pH balances, mineral dissolution/precipitations, and electromigration of ions. The sepa-ration of redox...

  11. Strain at a semiconductor nanowire-substrate interface studied using geometric phase analysis, convergent beam electron diffraction and nanobeam diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Johan Mikael; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have been studied using electron microscopy since the early days of nanowire growth, e.g. [1]. A common approach for analysing nanowires using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) involves removing them from their substrate and subsequently transferring them onto carbon...... with CBED and NBED [4,5] have shown a high degree of consistency. Strain has previously only been measured in nanowires removed from their substrate [6], or only using GPA [7]. The sample used for the present investigation was an InP nanowire grown on a Si substrate using metal organic vapor phase...

  12. High peak power THz source for ultrafast electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengguang Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Terahertz (THz science and technology have already become the research highlight at present. In this paper, we put forward a device setup to carry out ultrafast fundamental research. A photocathode RF gun generates electron bunches with ∼MeV energy, ∼ps bunch width and about 25pC charge. The electron bunches inject the designed wiggler, the coherent radiation at THz spectrum emits from these bunches and increases rapidly until the saturation at ∼MW within a short wiggler. THz pulses can be used as pump to stimulate an ultra-short excitation in some kind of sample. Those electron bunches out of wiggler can be handled into bunches with ∼1pC change, small beam spot and energy spread to be probe. Because the pump and probe comes from the same electron source, synchronization between pump and probe is inherent. The whole facility can be compacted on a tabletop.

  13. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Malka, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Faure, J.

    2013-02-01

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  14. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Krushelnick, K. [Center for Ultrafast Optical Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106-2099 (United States); Beaurepaire, B.; Malka, V.; Faure, J. [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquee, ENSTA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7639, 91761 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-02-11

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  15. Inversion of convergent-beam electron diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, D.M.; Saunders, M.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of recovering the structure factors that contribute to a zone-axis convergent-beam diffraction pattern is discussed. It is shown that an automated matching procedure that minimizes the sum-of-squares difference between experimental and simulated patterns is effective whether one is refining accurate structure factors in a known crystal or attempting ab initio structure determination. The details of the minimization method are analysed and it is shown that a quasi-Newton method that uses analytically derived gradients is particulary effective when several structure factors are varied. The inversion method for ab initio structure determination is tested on the [110] axis of GaP, using simulated patterns as ideal 'experimental' data. (orig.)

  16. Transmission electron microscopy and diffractometry of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Fultz, Brent

    2001-01-01

    This book teaches graduate students the concepts of trans- mission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) that are important for the characterization of materi- als. It emphasizes themes common to both techniques, such as scattering from atoms and the formation and analysis of dif- fraction patterns. It also describes unique aspects of each technique, especially imaging and spectroscopy in the TEM. The textbook thoroughly develops both introductory and ad- vanced-level material, using over 400 accompanying illustra- tions. Problems are provided at the end of each chapter to reinforce key concepts. Simple citatioins of rules are avoi- ded as much as possible, and both practical and theoretical issues are explained in detail. The book can be used as both an introductory and advanced-level graduate text since sec- tions/chapters are sorted according to difficulty and grou- ped for use in quarter and semester courses on TEM and XRD.

  17. Transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with scintillation gaseous detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilatos, Gerasimos; Kollia, Mary; Dracopoulos, Vassileios

    2015-01-01

    A transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with use of a scintillation gaseous detection device has been implemented. This corresponds to a transmission scanning electron microscope but with addition of a gaseous environment acting both as environmental and detection medium. A commercial type of low vacuum machine has been employed together with appropriate modifications to the detection configuration. This involves controlled screening of various emitted signals in conjunction with a scintillation gaseous detection device already provided with the machine for regular surface imaging. Dark field and bright field imaging has been obtained along with other detection conditions. With a progressive series of modifications and tests, the theory and practice of a novel type of microscopy is briefly shown now ushering further significant improvements and developments in electron microscopy as a whole. - Highlights: • Novel scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) called TESEM. • Use of the gaseous detection device (GDD) in scintillation mode that allows high resolution bright and dark field imaging in the TESEM. • Novel approach towards a unification of both vacuum and environmental conditions in both bulk/surface and transmission mode of electron microscopy

  18. Absorption distances in the dynamical theory of electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Yoshihiko; Goto, Toshiaki.

    1982-01-01

    The contrast effect of the electron microscopic image at crystal defects is characterized by two parameters; extincion distance and absorption distance. Both quantities are orginally defined for the elastic scattering. Since the inelastic scattering contributes to the electron microscopic image, parameters used for the interpretation of the images are not the same as those for the elastic scattering. It is shown that the difference of absorption distance beteen the theoretical estimation and that used for interpretation is due to the contrst effect of the small angle inelastic scattering. (author)

  19. Simulation of loss electron in vacuum magnetically insulated transmission lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Pengfei; Li Yongdong; Liu Chunliang; Wang Hongguang; Guo Fan; Yang Hailiang; Qiu Aici; Su Zhaofeng; Sun Jianfeng; Sun Jiang; Gao Yi

    2011-01-01

    In the beginning of magnetic insulated period, loss electron in coaxial vacuum magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) strikes anode and the bremsstrahlung photons are generated in the mean time. Based on the self-limited flow model, velocity in direction of energy transport, energy spectrum and angular distribution of loss electron are simulated by PIC code, energy spectrum of bremsstrahlung photons as well calculated though Monte Carlo method. Computational results show that the velocity of loss electron is less than 2.998 x 108 m/s, the angular excursion of electron is not much in a board extent of energy spectrum. These results show an indirect diagnosis of vacuum insulted transmission line working status based on loss electron bremsstrahlung. (authors)

  20. Determination of the Projected Atomic Potential by Deconvolution of the Auto-Correlation Function of TEM Electron Nano-Diffraction Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberato De Caro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method to determine the projected atomic potential of a specimen directly from transmission electron microscopy coherent electron nano-diffraction patterns, overcoming common limitations encountered so far due to the dynamical nature of electron-matter interaction. The projected potential is obtained by deconvolution of the inverse Fourier transform of experimental diffraction patterns rescaled in intensity by using theoretical values of the kinematical atomic scattering factors. This novelty enables the compensation of dynamical effects typical of transmission electron microscopy (TEM experiments on standard specimens with thicknesses up to a few tens of nm. The projected atomic potentials so obtained are averaged on sample regions illuminated by nano-sized electron probes and are in good quantitative agreement with theoretical expectations. Contrary to lens-based microscopy, here the spatial resolution in the retrieved projected atomic potential profiles is related to the finer lattice spacing measured in the electron diffraction pattern. The method has been successfully applied to experimental nano-diffraction data of crystalline centrosymmetric and non-centrosymmetric specimens achieving a resolution of 65 pm.

  1. Analysis on electronic control unit of continuously variable transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuanggui

    Continuously variable transmission system can ensure that the engine work along the line of best fuel economy, improve fuel economy, save fuel and reduce harmful gas emissions. At the same time, continuously variable transmission allows the vehicle speed is more smooth and improves the ride comfort. Although the CVT technology has made great development, but there are many shortcomings in the CVT. The CVT system of ordinary vehicles now is still low efficiency, poor starting performance, low transmission power, and is not ideal controlling, high cost and other issues. Therefore, many scholars began to study some new type of continuously variable transmission. The transmission system with electronic systems control can achieve automatic control of power transmission, give full play to the characteristics of the engine to achieve optimal control of powertrain, so the vehicle is always traveling around the best condition. Electronic control unit is composed of the core processor, input and output circuit module and other auxiliary circuit module. Input module collects and process many signals sent by sensor and , such as throttle angle, brake signals, engine speed signal, speed signal of input and output shaft of transmission, manual shift signals, mode selection signals, gear position signal and the speed ratio signal, so as to provide its corresponding processing for the controller core.

  2. Electronic structure of nanoscale Cu/Pt alloys: A combined X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xing; Chu Wangsheng; Cai Quan; Xia Dingguo; Wu Zhonghua; Wu Ziyu

    2006-01-01

    PVP-protected Cu/Pt clusters were prepared by glycol/water reduction method and characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and absorption spectra. TEM and XRD analysis show that the Cu/Pt clusters with different molar ratio have fcc structure with particle size of about 4 nm, while the lattice parameters in these clusters reduce with increasing Cu concentration. From the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at Cu-K edge and Pt-L 2,3 edge, we demonstrate that the d-electronic states of Cu and Pt are affected by the local environment as a function of Cu/Pt molar ratio. With increasing Cu concentration, Pt loses a fraction of 5d electrons and the hybridization between p- and d-states at Cu sites is enhanced

  3. Electronic structure of nanoscale Cu/Pt alloys: A combined X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xing [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100864 Beijing (China); Chu Wangsheng [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230036 (China); Cai Quan [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100864 Beijing (China); Xia Dingguo [College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, 100022 Beijing (China); Wu Zhonghua [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Wu Ziyu [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China) and National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (China)]. E-mail: wuzy@ihep.ac.cn

    2006-11-15

    PVP-protected Cu/Pt clusters were prepared by glycol/water reduction method and characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and absorption spectra. TEM and XRD analysis show that the Cu/Pt clusters with different molar ratio have fcc structure with particle size of about 4 nm, while the lattice parameters in these clusters reduce with increasing Cu concentration. From the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at Cu-K edge and Pt-L{sub 2,3} edge, we demonstrate that the d-electronic states of Cu and Pt are affected by the local environment as a function of Cu/Pt molar ratio. With increasing Cu concentration, Pt loses a fraction of 5d electrons and the hybridization between p- and d-states at Cu sites is enhanced.

  4. Processing scarce biological samples for light and transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Taupin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Light microscopy (LM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM aim at understanding the relationship structure-function. With advances in biology, isolation and purification of scarce populations of cells or subcellular structures may not lead to enough biological material, for processing for LM and TEM. A protocol for preparation of scarce biological samples is presented. It is based on pre-embedding the biological samples, suspensions or pellets, in bovine serum albumin (BSA and bis-acrylamide (BA, cross-linked and polymerized. This preparation provides a simple and reproducible technique to process biological materials, present in limited quantities that can not be amplified, for light and transmission electron microscopy.

  5. Development of the Atomic-Resolution Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gai, Pratibha L.; Boyes, Edward D.; Yoshida, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    The development of the novel atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscope (atomic-resolution ETEM) for directly probing dynamic gas–solid reactions in situ at the atomic level under controlled reaction conditions consisting of gas environment and elevated temperatures is descr......The development of the novel atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscope (atomic-resolution ETEM) for directly probing dynamic gas–solid reactions in situ at the atomic level under controlled reaction conditions consisting of gas environment and elevated temperatures...... is used to study steels, graphene, nanowires, etc. In this chapter, the experimental setup of the microscope column and its peripherals are described....

  6. Catalysts under Controlled Atmospheres in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2014-01-01

    of resolution. Using suitably clean gases, modified pumping schemes, and short pathways through dense gas regions, these issues are now circumvented. Here we provide an account of best practice using environmental transmission electron microscopy on catalytic systems illustrated using select examples from......Over time, there has been an increasing interest in observing catalysts in their operating environment at high spatial resolution and ultimately to determine the structure of a catalytically active surface. One tool with the potential to do exactly this in direct space is the transmission electron...

  7. Phase analysis of nano-phase materials using selected area electron diffraction in the TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labar, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    In analogy to X-ray power diffraction (XRD), we are developing a method to help phase identification when examining a large number of grains simultaneously by electron diffraction. Although XRD is well established, it can not be used for small quantities of materials (volumes below 1 mm 3 ). Examining a usual TEM sample with thickness of 100 nm and using a selected area of 1 mm in diameter, the selected area electron diffraction pattern (SAED) carries information about several thousands of grains from a material with an average grain size of about 10 nm. The accuracy of XRD can not be attained by electron diffraction (ED). However, simultaneous visual observation of the nanostructure is an additional benefit of TEM (beside the small amount of needed material). The first step of the development project was the development of a computer program ('ProcessDiffraction') that processes digital versions of SAED patterns and presents them in an XRD-like form (intensity vs. scattering vector). In the present version (V2.0.3) phase identification is carried out by comparing the measured distribution to 'Markers', i.e. data of known phases. XRD data cards are used if the detailed structure of a phase is not known. Kinematic electron diffraction intensities are calculated for phases with known atomic positions (Author)

  8. Big-data reflection high energy electron diffraction analysis for understanding epitaxial film growth processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Rama K; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-10-28

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) has by now become a standard tool for in situ monitoring of film growth by pulsed laser deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. Yet despite the widespread adoption and wealth of information in RHEED images, most applications are limited to observing intensity oscillations of the specular spot, and much additional information on growth is discarded. With ease of data acquisition and increased computation speeds, statistical methods to rapidly mine the data set are now feasible. Here, we develop such an approach to the analysis of the fundamental growth processes through multivariate statistical analysis of a RHEED image sequence. This approach is illustrated for growth of La(x)Ca(1-x)MnO(3) films grown on etched (001) SrTiO(3) substrates, but is universal. The multivariate methods including principal component analysis and k-means clustering provide insight into the relevant behaviors, the timing and nature of a disordered to ordered growth change, and highlight statistically significant patterns. Fourier analysis yields the harmonic components of the signal and allows separation of the relevant components and baselines, isolating the asymmetric nature of the step density function and the transmission spots from the imperfect layer-by-layer (LBL) growth. These studies show the promise of big data approaches to obtaining more insight into film properties during and after epitaxial film growth. Furthermore, these studies open the pathway to use forward prediction methods to potentially allow significantly more control over growth process and hence final film quality.

  9. Irradiation-related amorphization and crystallization: In situ transmission electron microscope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.W.

    1994-01-01

    Interfacing an ion accelerator to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) allows the analytical functions of TEM imaging and diffraction to be employed during ion-irradiation effects studies. At present there are twelve such installations in Japan, one in France and one in the US. This paper treats several aspects of in situ studies involving electron and ion beam induced and enhanced phase transformations and presents results of several in situ experiments to illustrate the dynamics of this approach in the materials science of irradiation effects. The paper describes the ion- and electron-induced amorphization of CuTi; the ion-irradiation-enhanced transformation of TiCr 2 ; and the ion- and electron-irradiation-enhanced crystallization of CoSi 2

  10. Ultrafast electron diffraction and electron microscopy: present status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishchenko, A A; Aseyev, S A; Ryabov, E A; Bagratashvili, V N; Panchenko, V Ya

    2014-01-01

    Acting as complementary research tools, high time-resolved spectroscopy and diffractometry techniques proceeding from various physical principles open up new possibilities for studying matter with necessary integration of the 'structure–dynamics–function' triad in physics, chemistry, biology and materials science. Since the 1980s, a new field of research has started at the leading research laboratories, aimed at developing means of filming the coherent dynamics of nuclei in molecules and fast processes in biological objects ('atomic and molecular movies'). The utilization of ultrashort laser pulse sources has significantly modified traditional electron beam approaches to and provided high space–time resolution for the study of materials. Diffraction methods using frame-by-frame filming and the development of the main principles of the study of coherent dynamics of atoms have paved the way to observing wave packet dynamics, the intermediate states of reaction centers, and the dynamics of electrons in molecules, thus allowing a transition from the kinetics to the dynamics of the phase trajectories of molecules in the investigation of chemical reactions. (reviews of topical problems)

  11. Electronic diffraction study of the chlorination of nickel; Etude par diffraction electronique de la chloruration du nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigner, D [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    A study has been made of the chlorination of the (100), (110) and (111) crystal faces of nickel using high energy electron diffraction and electron microscopy. Two methods have been used: bombardment with chlorine ions having an energy of between 10 and 30 keV, and direct chlorination in a diffractor at pressures of about 10{sup -4} torr. It has thus been possible to show the very special properties of nickel chloride (CdBr{sub 2} type, space group R 3-bar m) which is always formed along the (0001) plane, whatever the orientation of the substrate. It has also been possible to attain the metal-halide interface and to show the existence of two-dimensional chemisorbed films which are ordered or disordered according to the crystal orientation. (author) [French] La chloruration des faces (100) (110) et (111) du nickel a ete etudiee par diffraction des electrons de haute energie et par microscopie electronique. Deux methodes ont ete utilisees: le bombardement avec des ions chlore ayant une energie comprise entre 10 et 30 keV, et la chloruration directe dans un diffracteur pour des pressions de l'ordre de 10{sup -4} torr. Ainsi ont ete mises en evidence les proprietes tres particulieres du chlorure de nickel (type CdBr{sub 2}, groupe spatial R 3-bar m) qui s'accole toujours suivant le plan (0001), quelle que soit l'orientation du substrat. Il a ete egalement possible d'atteindre l'interface metal-halogenure et de montrer l'existence de couches chimisorbees bidimensionnelles, ordonnees ou desordonnees suivant l'orientation cristalline etudiee. (auteur)

  12. Study of the niobium dehydrogenation process by transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulhoes, I.A.M.; Akune, K.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of the micro-structure of Nb-H, during the dehydrogenation process through thermal treatment, has been studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy. The results are used in order to interpret the variation of the line resolution of Electron Channeling Pattern (ECP) of Nb-H as a function of isochronous annealing temperature. It is concluded that the improvement of the ECP line resolution is enhanced of β hydrate in Nb. (Author) [pt

  13. High resolution electron exit wave reconstruction from a diffraction pattern using Gaussian basis decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisenko, Konstantin B; Kirkland, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    We describe an algorithm to reconstruct the electron exit wave of a weak-phase object from single diffraction pattern. The algorithm uses analytic formulations describing the diffraction intensities through a representation of the object exit wave in a Gaussian basis. The reconstruction is achieved by solving an overdetermined system of non-linear equations using an easily parallelisable global multi-start search with Levenberg-Marquard optimisation and analytic derivatives

  14. Study of the local structure of binary surfaces by electron diffraction (XPS, LEED)

    OpenAIRE

    Gereová, Katarína

    2006-01-01

    Study of local structure of binary surface with usage of ultra-thin film of cerium deposited on a Pd (111) single-crystal surface is presented. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction (XPS, XPD), angle resolved UV photoemission spectroscopy (ARUPS) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) was used for our investigations. LEED and X-ray excited photoemission intensities results represent a surface-geometrical structure. As well, mapping of ultra-violet photoelectron intensities as a...

  15. Structure Identification in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Kling, Jens; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    A connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic properties is expected for almost all material systems. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is a technique offering insight into the atomic structure, but the analysis of large image series can be time consuming. The present ...

  16. Three-Dimensional Orientation Mapping in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Haihua; Schmidt, Søren; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2011-01-01

    resolution of 200 nanometers (nm). We describe here a nondestructive technique that enables 3D orientation mapping in the transmission electron microscope of mono- and multiphase nanocrystalline materials with a spatial resolution reaching 1 nm. We demonstrate the technique by an experimental study...

  17. Ion source for thinning of specimen in transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, K.; Rothe, R.

    1983-01-01

    Thinning of specimen for transmission electron microscopy is carried out by means of sputtering. Construction, design, and operation parameters of an ion source are presented. Because the plasma is produced by means of hollow cathode glow discharges, no special focusing system is used

  18. In situ Electrical measurements in Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudneva, M.

    2013-01-01

    In the present thesis the combination of real-time electricalmeasurements on nano-sampleswith simultaneous examination by transmission electron microscope (TEM) is discussed. Application of an electrical current may lead to changes in the samples thus the possibility to correlate such changes with

  19. In situ transmission electron microscopy analyses of thermally annealed self catalyzed GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrosini, S.; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Booth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Self catalyzed GaAs nanowires grown on Si-treated GaAs substrates were studied with a transmission electron microscope before and after annealing at 600◦C. At room temperature the nanowires have a zincblende structure and are locally characterized by a high density of rotational twins and stacking...... faults. Selected area diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that nanowires undergo structural modifications upon annealing, suggesting a decrease of defect density following the thermal treatment....

  20. Electron diffraction study of {alpha}-AlMnSi crystals including non-crystallographic axes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, G.L.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-06-01

    The structure of crystalline {alpha}-AlMnSi is examined by electron diffraction. Six distinct zone axes are examined, including both normal crystallographic and non-crystallographic zones axes, allowing the space group symmetry to be studied. Electron diffraction patterns characteristic of Pm3-bar were obtained for thicker specimens. However, for very thin specimens, as used for HRTEM imaging, the electron diffraction patterns were characteristic of Im3-bar space group symmetry. The structural basis of the Pm3-bar to Im3-bar transformation may be understood in terms of an analysis of the icosahedral structural elements located at the corners and body-centers of the cubic unit cell. A method for indexing the non-crystallographic zone axis diffraction patterns is described. An electron diffraction pattern of the 5-fold axis of the quasicrystalline phase i-AlMnSi is also included; this is compared with the experimental results and calculations for the [0{tau}1] axis of Pm3-bar and Im3-bar crystalline phases. 26 refs., 4 tabs., 7 figs.

  1. Ultrafast transmission electron microscopy using a laser-driven field emitter: Femtosecond resolution with a high coherence electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feist, Armin; Bach, Nora; Rubiano da Silva, Nara; Danz, Thomas; Möller, Marcel; Priebe, Katharina E.; Domröse, Till; Gatzmann, J. Gregor; Rost, Stefan; Schauss, Jakob; Strauch, Stefanie; Bormann, Reiner; Sivis, Murat; Schäfer, Sascha, E-mail: sascha.schaefer@phys.uni-goettingen.de; Ropers, Claus, E-mail: claus.ropers@uni-goettingen.de

    2017-05-15

    We present the development of the first ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UTEM) driven by localized photoemission from a field emitter cathode. We describe the implementation of the instrument, the photoemitter concept and the quantitative electron beam parameters achieved. Establishing a new source for ultrafast TEM, the Göttingen UTEM employs nano-localized linear photoemission from a Schottky emitter, which enables operation with freely tunable temporal structure, from continuous wave to femtosecond pulsed mode. Using this emission mechanism, we achieve record pulse properties in ultrafast electron microscopy of 9 Å focused beam diameter, 200 fs pulse duration and 0.6 eV energy width. We illustrate the possibility to conduct ultrafast imaging, diffraction, holography and spectroscopy with this instrument and also discuss opportunities to harness quantum coherent interactions between intense laser fields and free-electron beams. - Highlights: • First implementation of an ultrafast TEM employing a nanoscale photocathode. • Localized single photon-photoemission from nanoscopic field emitter yields low emittance ultrashort electron pulses. • Electron pulses focused down to ~9 Å, with a duration of 200 fs and an energy width of 0.6 eV are demonstrated. • Quantitative characterization of ultrafast electron gun emittance and brightness. • A range of applications of high coherence ultrashort electron pulses is shown.

  2. Application of transmission electron microscopy for microstructural characterization of perfluoropentacene thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Benedikt; Beyer, Andreas; Witte, Wiebke; Breuer, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Volz, Kerstin

    2011-01-01

    The crystalline structure and orientation of perfluoropentacene (C 22 F 14 , PFP) fibers formed upon thin-film deposition onto SiO 2 substrates have been studied by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and x-ray diffraction. The synopsis of TEM micrographs and diffraction patterns enhances the understanding of local crystal orientation on small length scales. The relationship of the PFP fiber morphology with the crystalline arrangement of PFP molecules within single fibers was established using this technique. Radiation damage, which is a critical problem for TEM investigations of organic materials, is described and the sample morphology after TEM investigations is correlated with AFM measurements of samples previously examined by TEM.

  3. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Harada, Ken

    2012-01-01

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  4. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Harada, Ken

    2012-08-01

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  5. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi [Science and Medical Systems Business Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Matsumoto, Hiroaki [Corporate Manufacturing Strategy Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ishikawa-cho, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-1991 (Japan); Harada, Ken [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan)

    2012-08-27

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  6. Measurement of suprathermal electron confinement by cyclotron transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkwood, R.; Hutchinson, I.H.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Porkolab, M.; Squire, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    The confinement time of suprathermal electrons is determined experimentally from the distribution function determined via wave transmission measurements. Measurements of the lowest moment of the distribution perpendicular to the B field as a function of the parallel electron momentum as well as the global input power allow the suprathermal electron confinement time (τ se ) to be calculated during lower-hybrid and inductive current drive. Finite particle confinement is found to be the dominant energy loss term for the suprathermals and improves with plasma current and density

  7. Transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with scintillation gaseous detection device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilatos, Gerasimos; Kollia, Mary; Dracopoulos, Vassileios

    2015-03-01

    A transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with use of a scintillation gaseous detection device has been implemented. This corresponds to a transmission scanning electron microscope but with addition of a gaseous environment acting both as environmental and detection medium. A commercial type of low vacuum machine has been employed together with appropriate modifications to the detection configuration. This involves controlled screening of various emitted signals in conjunction with a scintillation gaseous detection device already provided with the machine for regular surface imaging. Dark field and bright field imaging has been obtained along with other detection conditions. With a progressive series of modifications and tests, the theory and practice of a novel type of microscopy is briefly shown now ushering further significant improvements and developments in electron microscopy as a whole. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrashort and coherent single-electron pulses for diffraction at ultimate resolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, Friedrich Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction is a powerful tool for studying structural dynamics with femtosecond temporal and sub-aangstroem spatial resolutions. It benefits from the high scattering cross-sections of electrons compared X-rays and allows the examination of thin samples, surfaces and gases. One of the main challenges in ultrafast electron diffraction is the generation of electron pulses with a short duration and a large transverse coherence. The former limits the temporal resolution of the experiment while the latter determines the maximum size of the scattering structures that can be studied. In this work, we strive to push the limits of electron diffraction towards higher temporal and spatial resolutions. The decisive step in our approach is to eliminate all detrimental effects caused by Coulomb repulsion between the electrons by reducing the number of electrons per pulse to one. In this situation, the electrons' longitudinal and transverse velocity distributions are determined solely by the photoemission process. By reducing the electron source size on the photocathode, we make use of the small transverse velocity spread to produce electron pulses with a transverse coherence length of 20 nm, which is about an order of magnitude larger than the reported values for comparable experiments. The energy distribution of an ensemble of single-electron pulses from a photoemission source is directly linked to the mismatch between the photon energy and the cathode's work function. This excess energy can be reduced by using a photon energy close to the material's work function. Using a tunable source of ultraviolet pulses, we demonstrate the reduction of the velocity spread of the electrons, resulting in a shorter duration of the electron pulses. The reduced electron pulse durations achieved by a tunable excitation or by other approaches require new characterization techniques for electron pulses. We developed a novel method for the characterization of electron pulses at

  9. Role of diffraction and electron analysis in the fast reactor programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, I. F. [ed.

    1975-09-15

    After first discussing irradiation damage, the whole range of new methods of probe analysis were reviewed with a special reference to the study of surfaces. Further papers discussed scanning auger microscopy and the nuclear microprobe. Current diffraction studies were then described on uranium dioxide and the neutron poisons: boron carbide and europia. Finally, new techniques were covered with special reference to the scanning electron microscope and the application of the Harwell 6000 series electronics to x-ray diffraction. Separate records were prepared for each paper covered.

  10. Nucleation of diamond by pure carbon ion bombardment--a transmission electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Y.; Liao, M.Y.; Wang, Z.G.; Lifshitz, Y.; Lee, S.

    2005-01-01

    A cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study of a film deposited by a 1 keV mass-selected carbon ion beam onto silicon held at 800 deg. C is presented. Initially, a graphitic film with its basal planes perpendicular to the substrate is evolving. The precipitation of nanodiamond crystallites in upper layers is confirmed by HRTEM, selected area electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The nucleation of diamond on graphitic edges as predicted by Lambrecht et al. [W. R. L. Lambrecht, C. H. Lee, B. Segall, J. C. Angus, Z. Li, and M. Sunkara, Nature, 364 607 (1993)] is experimentally confirmed. The results are discussed in terms of our recent subplantation-based diamond nucleation model

  11. Experimental transmission electron microscopy studies and phenomenological model of bismuth-based superconducting compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elboussiri, Khalid

    1991-01-01

    The main part of this thesis is devoted to an experimental study by transmission electron microscopy of the different phases of the superconducting bismuth cuprates Bi_2Sr_2Ca_n_-_1Cu_nO_2_n_+_4. In high resolution electron microscopy, the two types of incommensurate modulation realized in these compounds have been observed. A model of structure has been proposed from which the simulated images obtained are consistent with observations. The medium resolution images correlated with the electron diffraction data have revealed existence of a multi-soliton regime with latent lock in phases of commensurate periods between 4b and 10b. At last, a description of different phases of these compounds as a result of superstructures from a disordered perovskite type structure is proposed (author) [fr

  12. Study of the nanostructure of Gum Metal using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, T.; Murakami, Y.; Shindo, D.; Kuramoto, S.

    2009-01-01

    The nanostructure of Gum Metal, which has many anomalous mechanical properties, was investigated using transmission electron microscopy with energy filtering. A precise analysis of the weak diffuse electron scattering that was observed in the electron diffraction patterns of the Gum Metal specimen revealed that Gum Metal contains a substantial amount of the nanometer-sized ω phase. The morphology of the ω phase appeared to have a correlation with the faulting in the {2 1 1} planes, which are one of the characteristic lattice imperfections of the Gum Metal specimen. It is likely that the nanometer-sized ω phase may be a type of obstacle related to the restriction of the dislocation movement, which has been a significant problem in research on Gum Metal

  13. Electronic Biometric Transmission Specification. Version 1.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-08

    Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Electronic Biometric Transmission Specification DIN: DOD_BTF_TS_EBTS_ Nov06_01.02.00 i Revision History Revision...contains: • the ORI • a Greenwich Mean (a.k.a. Zulu or UTC) date/time stamp • a code for the software used at the point of collection/transmission...long names and would generally include the tribe name. Subfield 1 Item 1 Character Type AS Characters 1 to 50 Special Characters: Any 7-bit non

  14. New developments in transmission electron microscopy for nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.L.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is one of the most powerful tools used for characterizing nanomaterials, and it is indispensable for nanotechnology. This paper reviews some of the most recent developments in electron microscopy techniques for characterizing nanomaterials. The review covers the following areas: in-situ microscopy for studying dynamic shape transformation of nanocrystals; in-situ nanoscale property measurements on the mechanical, electrical and field emission properties of nanotubes/nanowires; environmental microscopy for direct observation of surface reactions; aberration-free angstrom-resolution imaging of light elements (such as oxygen and lithium); high-angle annular-dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM); imaging of atom clusters with atomic resolution chemical information; electron holography of magnetic materials; and high-spatial resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) for nanoscale electronic and chemical analysis. It is demonstrated that the picometer-scale science provided by HRTEM is the foundation of nanometer-scale technology. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Low-energy electron diffraction and induced damage in hydrated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlando, Thomas M.; Oh, Doogie; Chen Yanfeng; Aleksandrov, Alexandr B.

    2008-01-01

    Elastic scattering of 5-30 eV electrons within the B-DNA 5 ' -CCGGCGCCGG-3 ' and A-DNA 5 ' -CGCGAATTCGCG-3 ' DNA sequences is calculated using the separable representation of a free-space electron propagator and a curved wave multiple scattering formalism. The disorder brought about by the surrounding water and helical base stacking leads to a featureless amplitude buildup of elastically scattered electrons on the sugar and phosphate groups for all energies between 5 and 30 eV. However, some constructive interference features arising from diffraction are revealed when examining the structural waters within the major groove. These appear at 5-10, 12-18, and 22-28 eV for the B-DNA target and at 7-11, 12-18, and 18-25 eV for the A-DNA target. Although the diffraction depends on the base-pair sequence, the energy dependent elastic scattering features are primarily associated with the structural water molecules localized within 8-10 A spheres surrounding the bases and/or the sugar-phosphate backbone. The electron density buildup occurs in energy regimes associated with dissociative electron attachment resonances, direct electronic excitation, and dissociative ionization. Since diffraction intensity can be localized on structural water, compound H 2 O:DNA states may contribute to energy dependent low-energy electron induced single and double strand breaks

  16. Micro-channel plate detector for ultra-fast relativistic electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musumeci, P.; Moody, J.T.; Scoby, C.M.; Gutierrez, M.S.; Bender, H.A.; Hilko, B.; Kruschwitz, C.A.; Wilcox, N.S.

    2011-01-01

    Using relativistic ultra-short electron beams to obtain single-shot diffraction patterns holds the promise to yield real-time resolution of atomic motion in an easily accessible environment, such as a university laboratory, at a fraction of the cost of fourth-generation X-ray sources. One of the main issues in bringing this technique to full maturity is the development of efficient detector systems to record the diffraction pattern using a few MeV electron beams. Low noise, high spatial resolution, and single-electron detection capability are all characteristics of an ideal detector. In this paper, we compare the performances of a traditional fluorescent phosphor screen with a detection system based on the micro-channel plate (MCP). Since MCPs are typically used with lower energy electron beams, these tests constitute one of the few experimental data points available on the use of these devices with MeV energy beams.

  17. Micro-channel plate detector for ultra-fast relativistic electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musumeci, P., E-mail: musumeci@physics.ucla.edu [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1547 (United States); Moody, J.T.; Scoby, C.M.; Gutierrez, M.S. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, 475 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1547 (United States); Bender, H.A.; Hilko, B.; Kruschwitz, C.A.; Wilcox, N.S. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Using relativistic ultra-short electron beams to obtain single-shot diffraction patterns holds the promise to yield real-time resolution of atomic motion in an easily accessible environment, such as a university laboratory, at a fraction of the cost of fourth-generation X-ray sources. One of the main issues in bringing this technique to full maturity is the development of efficient detector systems to record the diffraction pattern using a few MeV electron beams. Low noise, high spatial resolution, and single-electron detection capability are all characteristics of an ideal detector. In this paper, we compare the performances of a traditional fluorescent phosphor screen with a detection system based on the micro-channel plate (MCP). Since MCPs are typically used with lower energy electron beams, these tests constitute one of the few experimental data points available on the use of these devices with MeV energy beams.

  18. Measuring the Shock Stage of Asteroid Regolith Grains by Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael; Martinez, James; Sitzman, Scott; Mikouchi, Takashi; Hagiya, Kenji; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Terada, Yasuko; Yagi, Naoto; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Ozawa, Hikaru; hide

    2018-01-01

    We have been analyzing Itokawa samples in order to definitively establish the degree of shock experienced by the regolith of asteroid Itokawa, and to devise a bridge between shock determinations by standard light optical petrography, crystal structures as determined by electron and X-ray diffraction. These techniques would then be available for samples returned from other asteroid regoliths.

  19. On a semiclassical analysis of high energy electron diffraction by imperfect crystals: the stacking fault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.E.; Chadderton, L.T.; Johnson, E.

    1978-01-01

    Electron diffraction amplitudes at the lower surface of a displaced sandwich crystal are obtained for the high energy limit in the real space formulation. Using semiclassical methods analytical approximations to a resulting overlap integral - central to the problem - are derived. (Auth.)

  20. A pipeline for comprehensive and automated processing of electron diffraction data in IPLT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Andreas D; Philippsen, Ansgar; Engel, Andreas; Walz, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Electron crystallography of two-dimensional crystals allows the structural study of membrane proteins in their native environment, the lipid bilayer. Determining the structure of a membrane protein at near-atomic resolution by electron crystallography remains, however, a very labor-intense and time-consuming task. To simplify and accelerate the data processing aspect of electron crystallography, we implemented a pipeline for the processing of electron diffraction data using the Image Processing Library and Toolbox (IPLT), which provides a modular, flexible, integrated, and extendable cross-platform, open-source framework for image processing. The diffraction data processing pipeline is organized as several independent modules implemented in Python. The modules can be accessed either from a graphical user interface or through a command line interface, thus meeting the needs of both novice and expert users. The low-level image processing algorithms are implemented in C++ to achieve optimal processing performance, and their interface is exported to Python using a wrapper. For enhanced performance, the Python processing modules are complemented with a central data managing facility that provides a caching infrastructure. The validity of our data processing algorithms was verified by processing a set of aquaporin-0 diffraction patterns with the IPLT pipeline and comparing the resulting merged data set with that obtained by processing the same diffraction patterns with the classical set of MRC programs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Study of thermal stability of ultrafine-grained copper by means of electron back scattering diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Man, O.; Pantělejev, L.; Kunz, Ludvík

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2010), s. 209-213 ISSN 1345-9678 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS200410502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : ultra-fine grained copper * thermal stability of microstructure * electron back scattering diffraction * grain size * texture Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.779, year: 2010

  2. Time-lapse misorientation maps for the analysis of electron backscatter diffraction data from evolving microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wheeler, J.; Cross, A.; Drury, M.; Hough, R.M.; Mariani, E.; Piazolo, S.; Prior, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    A “time-lapse misorientation map” is defined here as a map which shows the orientation change at each point in an evolving crystalline microstructure between two different times. Electron backscatter diffraction data from in situ heating experiments can be used to produce such maps, which then

  3. Electro-optic sampling for time resolving relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scoby, C. M.; Musumeci, P.; Moody, J.; Gutierrez, M.; Tran, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Pegasus laboratory at UCLA features a state-of-the-art electron photoinjector capable of producing ultrashort (<100 fs) high-brightness electron bunches at energies of 3.75 MeV. These beams recently have been used to produce static diffraction patterns from scattering off thin metal foils, and it is foreseen to take advantage of the ultrashort nature of these bunches in future pump-probe time-resolved diffraction studies. In this paper, single shot 2-d electro-optic sampling is presented as a potential technique for time of arrival stamping of electron bunches used for diffraction. Effects of relatively low bunch charge (a few 10's of pC) and modestly relativistic beams are discussed and background compensation techniques to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio are explored. From these preliminary tests, electro-optic sampling is suitable to be a reliable nondestructive time stamping method for relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction at the Pegasus lab.

  4. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and X-ray Diffraction of Boron- and Phosphorus-Doped Nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Dolmatov, V. Yu.; Lapchuk, N. M.; Shymanski, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    Powders of boron- and phosphorus-doped detonation nanodiamonds and sintered pellets of non-doped nanodiamond powders were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance and x-ray diffraction. Doping of detonation nanodiamond crystals with boron and phosphorus was demonstrated to be possible. These methods could be used to diagnose diamond nanocrystals doped during shock-wave synthesis.

  5. Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction in Transmission Mode for Mapping Crystal Grain Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cereser, Alberto; Strobl, Markus; Hall, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    constituting the material. This article presents a new non-destructive 3D technique to study centimeter-sized bulk samples with a spatial resolution of hundred micrometers: time-of-flight three-dimensional neutron diffraction (ToF 3DND). Compared to existing analogous X-ray diffraction techniques, ToF 3DND......-of-flight neutron beamline. The technique was developed and tested with data collected at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (J-PARC) for an iron sample. We successfully reconstructed the shape of 108 grains and developed an indexing procedure...

  6. Electron transmission through a periodically driven graphene magnetic barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, R., E-mail: rbiswas.pkc@gmail.com [Department of Physics, P. K. College, Contai, Purba Medinipur, West Bengal – 721401 (India); Maiti, S. [Ajodhya Hills G.S.A.T High School, Ajodhya, Purulia, West Bengal – 723152 (India); Mukhopadhyay, S. [Purulia Zilla School, Dulmi Nadiha, Purulia, West Bengal – 723102 (India); Sinha, C. [Department of Physics, P. K. College, Contai, Purba Medinipur, West Bengal – 721401 (India); Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur – 700032 (India)

    2017-05-10

    Electronic transport through graphene magnetic barriers is studied theoretically in presence of an external time harmonic scalar potential in the framework of non-perturbative Landau–Floquet Formalism. The oscillating field mostly suppresses the transmission for rectangular magnetic barrier structure and exhibits the Fano resonance for multiphoton processes due to the presence of bound state inside the barrier. While, for a pair of delta function barriers of larger separation, the oscillating potential suppresses the usual Fabry–Perot oscillations in the transmission and a new type of asymmetric Fano resonance is noted for smaller separation, occurring due to extended states between the barriers. - Highlights: • Tunnelling of the Dirac Fermions through oscillating pure magnetic barriers is reported for the first time. • The high energy transmission through a graphene magnetic barrier is suppressed by the application of time periodic modulation. • Suppression of the Fabry Perot transmission is noted due to the application of an external time harmonic potential. • Two kinds of the Fano resonances are noted in transmission through a pair of modulated δ-function magnetic barriers.

  7. Transmission of high-power electron beams through small apertures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschalär, C.; Alarcon, R.; Balascuta, S.; Benson, S.V.; Bertozzi, W.; Boyce, J.R.; Cowan, R.; Douglas, D.; Evtushenko, P.; Fisher, P.; Ihloff, E.; Kalantarians, N.; Kelleher, A.; Legg, R.; Milner, R.G.; Neil, G.R.; Ou, L.; Schmookler, B.; Tennant, C.; Williams, G.P.

    2013-01-01

    Tests were performed to pass a 100 MeV, 430 kWatt c.w. electron beam from the energy-recovery linac at the Jefferson Laboratory's FEL facility through a set of small apertures in a 127 mm long aluminum block. Beam transmission losses of 3 p.p.m. through a 2 mm diameter aperture were maintained during a 7 h continuous run

  8. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadana, D.K.

    1982-10-01

    A method to prepare cross-sectional (X) semiconductor specimens for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been described. The power and utility of XTEM has been demonstrated. It has been shown that accuracy and interpretation of indirect structural-defects profiling techniques, namely, MeV He + channeling and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) can be greatly enhanced by comparing their results with those obtained by XTEM from the same set of samples

  9. Reciprocity relations in transmission electron microscopy: A rigorous derivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Florian F; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    A concise derivation of the principle of reciprocity applied to realistic transmission electron microscopy setups is presented making use of the multislice formalism. The equivalence of images acquired in conventional and scanning mode is thereby rigorously shown. The conditions for the applicability of the found reciprocity relations is discussed. Furthermore the positions of apertures in relation to the corresponding lenses are considered, a subject which scarcely has been addressed in previous publications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Extraordinary optical transmission with tapered slits: effect of higher diffraction and slit resonance orders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, T.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Beermann, J.

    2012-01-01

    Transmission through thin metal films with a periodic arrangement of tapered slits is considered. Transmission maps covering a wide range of periods, film thicknesses, and taper angles are presented. The maps show resonant transmission when fundamental and higher-order slit resonances are excited...... to be in the range of 6 degrees-10 degrees. Both theory and experiments show split-peak spectra and shifted-peak spectra due to interference between a slit resonance and Rayleigh-Wood anomalies. (C) 2011 Optical Society of America...

  11. Multistage linear electron acceleration using pulsed transmission lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.B.; Prestwich, K.R.; Poukey, J.W.; Epstein, B.G.; Freeman, J.R.; Sharpe, A.W.; Tucker, W.K.; Shope, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    A four-stage linear electron accelerator is described which uses pulsed radial transmission lines as the basic accelerating units. An annular electron beam produced by a foilless diode is guided through the accelerator by a strong axial magnetic field. Synchronous firing of the injector and the acccelerating modules is accomplished with self-breaking oil switches. The device has accelerated beam currents of 25 kA to kinetic energies of 9 MV, with 90% current transport efficiency. The average accelerating gradient is 3 MV/m

  12. Tailoring of electron flow current in magnetically insulated transmission lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Martin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available It is desirable to optimize (minimizing both the inductance and electron flow the magnetically insulated vacuum sections of low impedance pulsed-power drivers. The goal of low inductance is understandable from basic efficiency arguments. The goal of low electron flow results from two observations: (1 flowing electrons generally do not deliver energy to (or even reach most loads, and thus constitute a loss mechanism; (2 energetic electrons deposited in a small area can cause anode damage and anode plasma formation. Low inductance and low electron flow are competing goals; an optimized system requires a balance of the two. While magnetically insulated systems are generally forgiving, there are times when optimization is crucial. For example, in large pulsed-power drivers used to energize high energy density physics loads, the electron flow as a fraction of total current is small, but that flow often reaches the anode in relatively small regions. If the anode temperature becomes high enough to desorb gas, the resulting plasma initiates a gap closure process that can impact system performance. Magnetic-pressure driven (z pinches and material equation of state loads behave like a fixed inductor for much of the drive pulse. It is clear that neither fixed gap nor constant-impedance transmission lines are optimal for driving inductive loads. This work shows a technique for developing the optimal impedance profile for the magnetically insulated section of a high-current driver. Particle-in-cell calculations are used to validate the impedance profiles developed in a radial disk magnetically insulated transmission line geometry. The input parameters are the spacing and location of the minimum gap, the effective load inductance, and the desired electron flow profile. The radial electron flow profiles from these simulations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions when driven at relatively high voltage (i.e., V≥2  MV.

  13. Ultrafast coherent diffractive imaging of nanoparticles using X-ray free-electron laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassemeyer, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers (X-FEL) promises high-resolution structure determination of single microscopic particles without the need for crystallization. The diffraction signal of small samples can be very weak, a difficulty that can not be countered by merely increasing the number of photons because the sample would be damaged by a high absorbed radiation dose. Traditional X-ray crystallography avoids this problem by bringing many sample particles into a periodic arrangement, which amplifies the individual signals while distributing the absorbed dose. Depending on the sample, however, crystallization can be very difficult or even impossible. This thesis presents algorithms for a new imaging approach using X-FEL radiation that works with single, non-crystalline sample particles. X-FELs can deliver X-rays with a peak brilliance many orders of magnitude higher than conventional X-ray sources, compensating for their weak interaction cross sections. At the same time, FELs can produce ultra-short pulses down to a few femtoseconds. In this way it is possible to perform ultra-fast imaging, essentially ''freezing'' the atomic positions in time and terminating the imaging process before the sample is destroyed by the absorbed radiation. This thesis primarily focuses on the three-dimensional reconstruction of single (and not necessarily crystalline) particles using coherent diffractive imaging at X-FELs: in order to extract three-dimensional information from scattering data, two-dimensional diffraction patterns from many different viewing angles must be combined. Therefore, the diffraction signal of many identical sample copies in random orientations is measured. The main result of this work is a globally optimal algorithm that can recover the sample orientations solely based on the diffraction signal, enabling three-dimensional imaging for arbitrary samples. The problem of finding three-dimensional orientations is

  14. Photocathode Optimization for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, P; Flom, Z; Heinselman, K; Nguyen, T; Tung, S; Haskell, R; Reed, B W; LaGrange, T

    2011-08-04

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) team at Harvey Mudd College has been sponsored by LLNL to design and build a test setup for optimizing the performance of the DTEM's electron source. Unlike a traditional TEM, the DTEM achieves much faster exposure times by using photoemission from a photocathode to produce electrons for imaging. The DTEM team's work is motivated by the need to improve the coherence and current density of the electron cloud produced by the electron gun in order to increase the image resolution and contrast achievable by DTEM. The photoemission test setup is nearly complete and the team will soon complete baseline tests of electron gun performance. The photoemission laser and high voltage power supply have been repaired; the optics path for relaying the laser to the photocathode has been finalized, assembled, and aligned; the internal setup of the vacuum chamber has been finalized and mostly implemented; and system control, synchronization, and data acquisition has been implemented in LabVIEW. Immediate future work includes determining a consistent alignment procedure to place the laser waist on the photocathode, and taking baseline performance measurements of the tantalum photocathode. Future research will examine the performance of the electron gun as a function of the photoemission laser profile, the photocathode material, and the geometry and voltages of the accelerating and focusing components in the electron gun. This report presents the team's progress and outlines the work that remains.

  15. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions and image interpretation in transmission electron mic­ roscopy. The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Munster and is a revised version of the first part of my earlier book Elek­ tronenmikroskopische Untersuchungs- und Priiparationsmethoden, omitting the part which describes specimen-preparation methods. In the introductory chapter, the different types of electron microscope are compared, the various electron-specimen interactions and their applications are summarized and the most important aspects of high-resolution, analytical and high-voltage electron microscopy are discussed. The optics of electron lenses is discussed in Chapter 2 in order to bring out electron-lens properties that are important for an understanding of the function of an electron microscope. In Chapter 3, the wave optics of elec­ trons and the phase shifts by electrostatic and magnetic fields are introduced; Fresne...

  16. Development of a secondary electron energy analyzer for a transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magara, Hideyuki; Tomita, Takeshi; Kondo, Yukihito; Sato, Takafumi; Akase, Zentaro; Shindo, Daisuke

    2018-04-01

    A secondary electron (SE) energy analyzer was developed for a transmission electron microscope. The analyzer comprises a microchannel plate (MCP) for detecting electrons, a coil for collecting SEs emitted from the specimen, a tube for reducing the number of backscattered electrons incident on the MCP, and a retarding mesh for selecting the energy of SEs incident on the MCP. The detection of the SEs associated with charging phenomena around a charged specimen was attempted by performing electron holography and SE spectroscopy using the energy analyzer. The results suggest that it is possible to obtain the energy spectra of SEs using the analyzer and the charging states of a specimen by electron holography simultaneously.

  17. Fraunhofer diffraction from a ring aperture with a spiral phase transmission function: numerical and analytical studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aubrecht, Ivo; Miler, Miroslav; Pala, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 33, 2-3 (2003), s. 225-235 ISSN 0078-5466 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/01/0428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : optica l elements * Fraunhofer diffraction Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.221, year: 2003

  18. Calculated efficiencies of three-material low stress coatings for diffractive x-ray transmission optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubec, Adam; Braun, Stefan; Gawlitza, Peter; Menzel, Maik; Leson, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray optical elements made by thin film coating techniques such as multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) and multilayer zone plates (MZP) are promising approaches to achieve resolutions in hard X-ray microscopy applications of less than 10 nm. The challenge is to make a lens with a large numerical aperture on the one hand and a decent working distance on the other hand. One of the limiting factors with the coated structures is the internal stress in the films, which can lead to significant bending of the substrate and various types of unwanted diffraction effects. Several approaches have been discussed to overcome this challenge. One of these is a three-material combination such as Mo/MoSi_2/Si, where four single layers per period are deposited. Mo and Si represent the absorber and spacer in this case while MoSi_2 forms a diffusion barrier; in addition the thicknesses of absorber and spacer are chosen to minimize residual stress of the overall coating. Here the diffraction efficiency as well as the profile of the beam in the focal plane are discussed in order to find a tradeoff between lowest residual stress and best diffraction properties.

  19. Measurements of transient electron density distributions by femtosecond X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyer, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    This thesis concerns measurements of transient charge density maps by femtosecond X-ray diffraction. Different X-ray diffraction methods will be considered, particularly with regard to their application in femtosecond X-ray diffraction. The rotation method is commonly used in stationary X-ray diffraction. In the work in hand an X-ray diffraction experiment is demonstrated, which combines the method with ultrafast X-ray pulses. This experiment is the first implementation which makes use of the rotation method to map transient intensities of a multitude of Bragg reflections. As a prototype material Bismuth is used, which previously was studied frequently by femtosecond X-ray diffraction by measuring Bragg reflections successively. The experimental results of the present work are compared with the literature data. In the second part a powder-diffraction experiment will be presented, which is used to study the dynamics of the electron-density distribution on ultrafast time scales. The experiment investigates a transition metal complex after photoexcitation of the metal to ligand charge transfer state. Besides expected results, i. e. the change of the bond length between the metal and the ligand and the transfer of electronic charge from the metal to the ligand, a strong contribution of the anion to the charge transfer was found. Furthermore, the charge transfer has predominantly a cooperative character. That is, the excitation of a single complex causes an alteration of the charge density of several neighboring units. The results show that more than 30 transition-metal complexes and 60 anions contribute to the charge transfer. This collective response is a consequence of the strong coulomb interactions of the densely packed ions.

  20. Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies of Electron-Selective Titanium Oxide Contacts in Silicon Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Haider; Yang, Xinbo; Weber, Klaus; Schoenfeld, Winston V.; Davis, Kristopher O.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the cross-section of electron-selective titanium oxide (TiO2) contacts for n-type crystalline silicon solar cells were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. It was revealed that the excellent cell efficiency of 21

  1. Quantitative microstructure characterization of self-annealed copper films with electron backscatter diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Gholinia, A.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was applied to analyze cross sections of self-annealed copper electrodeposits, for which earlier the kinetics of self-annealing had been investigated by in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). The EBSD investigations on the grain size, grain boundary character...... and crystallographic texture of copper films with different thicknesses essentially supplement results from in-situ XRD. Twin relations between neighboring grains were identified from the orientation maps and the observed twin chains confirm multiple twinning in copper electrodeposits as the mechanism...

  2. A study on displacement of crystalline diffraction peaks in electron-beam irradiated filter paper cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Ruimin; Xiang Qun; Song Jing

    1997-01-01

    It is found that the crystalline diffraction angles of the electron-beam irradiated filter paper cellulose shift regularly when the irradiation dose is increased. The experiments indicate that the molecules between crystalline area and amorphous area in the filter paper cellulose will be degraded by the irradiation and the cellulose molecules in the surface of crystal will come off, thus the microcrystalline dimension will be reduced and the diffraction angle will become smaller. The fact that intensity of the 002 peak for filter paper samples decreases gradually with the increasing storage time can be attributed to the post-irradiation effect

  3. Transmission electron microscope study of neutron irradiation-induced defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Ryuichiro; Kawano, Tetsuya; Fujimoto, Ryoji

    1994-01-01

    Commercial Czochralski-grown silicon (Cz-Si) and float-zone silicon (Fz-Si) wafers were irradiated with fission neutrons at various fluences from 10 19 to 10 22 n/cm 2 at temperatures ranging from 473 K to 1043 K. The irradiation induced defect structures were examined by transmission electron microscopy and ultra high voltage electron microscopy, which were compared with Marlowe code computer simulation results. It was concluded that the vacancy-type damage structure formed at 473 K were initiated from collapse of vacancy-rich regions of cascades, while interstitial type defect clusters formed by irradiation above 673 K were associated with interstitial oxygen atoms and free interstitials which diffused out of the cascades. Complex defect structures were identified to consist of {113} and {111} planar faults by the parallel beam illumination diffraction analysis. (author)

  4. Transmission Electron Microscopy for Wood and Fiber Analysis − A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehedi Reza

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This review describes use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM in wood and fiber analysis. Analytical techniques and sample preparation methods are used to localize substructures of the cell wall polymers and are discussed in this review. The ultrastructural features of the wood cell walls, the structures formed by microfibrils, and the distribution of cell wall polymers, as revealed by TEM, are covered. Research investigating the distribution of lignin in tension and compression woods using TEM is reviewed. Different kinds of wood biodegrading enzymes localized using TEM are mentioned. Additional features of TEM, i.e., 3D imaging, analytical TEM, and electron diffraction are discussed. Lastly, a comparison between TEM and other imaging techniques used for wood and fiber research are made. Thus, this review provides insight into the contribution of TEM in wood research since its invention and demonstrates how to use it more effectively in the future.

  5. Crystallographic orientation study of silicon steels using X-ray diffraction, electrons diffraction and the Etch Pit method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Hamilta de Oliveira

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study is the microstructural and crystallographic orientation of Fe-3%Si steel. The silicon steel shows good electrical properties and it is used in the nuclear and electrical power fields. The studied steel was supplied by Cia. Acos Especiais Itabira S/A - ACESITA. The material was received in the hot compressed condition, in one or two passes. The hot compressing temperatures used were 900, 1000 and 1100 deg C with soaking times ranging from 32 to 470 s. The material preferential crystallographic orientation was evaluated in every grain of the samples. The characterization techniques used were: scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using the etch pit method; X ray diffraction using the Laue back-reflection method; orientation imaging microscopy (OIM). Microstructural characterization in terms of grain size measurement and mean number of grains in the sample were also undertaken. The Laue method was found an easy technique to access crystallographic orientation of this work polycrystalline samples 2.5 mm average grain size. This was due to the inability to focus the X-rays on a single grain of the material. The scanning electron microscopy showed microcavities left by the etch pit method, which allowed the observation of the crystallographic orientation of each grain from the samples. No conclusive grain crystallographic orientation was possible to obtain by the OIM technique due to the non-existing rolling direction. A more extensive work with the OIM technique must be undertaken on the Fe-3%Si with oriented grains and non oriented grains. (author)

  6. Femtosecond Electron Wave Packet Propagation and Diffraction: Towards Making the ``Molecular Movie"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2003-03-01

    Time-resolved electron diffraction harbors great promise for achieving atomic resolution of the fastest chemical processes. The generation of sufficiently short electron pulses to achieve this real time view of a chemical reaction has been limited by problems in maintaining short electron pulses with realistic electron densities to the sample. The propagation dynamics of femtosecond electron packets in the drift region of a photoelectron gun are investigated with an N-body numerical simulation and mean-field model. This analyis shows that the redistribution of electrons inside the packet, arising from space-charge and dispersion contributions, changes the pulse envelope and leads to the development of a spatially linear axial velocity distribution. These results have been used in the design of femtosecond photoelectron guns with higher time resolution and novel electron-optical methods of pulse characterization that are approaching 100 fs timescales. Time-resolved diffraction studies with electron pulses of approximately 500 femtoseconds have focused on solid-liquid phase transitions under far from equilibrium conditions. This work gives a microscopic description of the melting process and illustrates the promise of atomically resolving transition state processes.

  7. 2D Spin-Dependent Diffraction of Electrons From Periodical Chains of Nanomagnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teshome Senbeta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The scattering of the unpolarized beams of electrons by nanomagnets in the vicinity of some scattering angles leads to complete spin polarized electrons. This result is obtained with the help of the perturbation theory. The dipole-dipole interaction between the magnetic moment of the nanomagnet and the magnetic moment of electron is treated as perturbation. This interaction is not spherically symmetric. Rather it depends on the electron spin variables. It in turn results in spinor character of the scattering amplitudes. Due to the smallness of the magnetic interactions, the scattering length of this process is very small to be proved experimentally. To enhance the relevant scattering lengths, we considered the diffraction of unpolarized beams of electrons by linear chains of nanomagnets. By tuning the distance between the scatterers it is possible to obtain the diffraction maximum of the scattered electrons at scattering angles which corresponds to complete spin polarization of electrons. It is shown that the total differential scattering length is proportional to N2 (N is a number of scatterers. Even small number of nanomagnets in the chain helps to obtain experimentally visible enhancement of spin polarization of the scattered electrons.

  8. Sample Preparation and Imaging of Exosomes by Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min Kyo; Mun, Ji Young

    2018-01-04

    Exosomes are nano-sized extracellular vesicles secreted by body fluids and are known to represent the characteristics of cells that secrete them. The contents and morphology of the secreted vesicles reflect cell behavior or physiological status, for example cell growth, migration, cleavage, and death. The exosomes' role may depend highly on size, and the size of exosomes varies from 30 to 300 nm. The most widely used method for exosome imaging is negative staining, while other results are based on Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Atomic Force Microscopy. The typical exosome's morphology assessed through negative staining is a cup-shape, but further details are not yet clear. An exosome well-characterized through structural study is necessary particular in medical and pharmaceutical fields. Therefore, function-dependent morphology should be verified by electron microscopy techniques such as labeling a specific protein in the detailed structure of exosome. To observe detailed structure, ultrathin sectioned images and negative stained images of exosomes were compared. In this protocol, we suggest transmission electron microscopy for the imaging of exosomes including negative staining, whole mount immuno-staining, block preparation, thin section, and immuno-gold labelling.

  9. Diffraction and absorption of inelastically scattered electrons for K-shell ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josefsson, T.W.; Allen, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    An expression for the nonlocal inelastic scattering cross section for fast electrons in a crystalline environment, which explicitly includes diffraction as well as absorption for the inelastically scattered electrons, is used to carry out realistic calculations of K-shell electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis cross sections. The calculations demonstrate quantitatively why, in EDX spectroscopy, integration over the dynamical states of the inelastically scattered electron averages in such a way that an effective plane wave representation of the scattered electrons is a good approximation. This is only the case for large enough acceptance angles of the detector in an EELS experiment. For EELS with smaller detector apertures, explicit integration over the dynamical final states is necessary and inclusion of absorption for the scattered electrons is important, particularly for thicker crystals. 50 refs., 7 figs

  10. In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy of catalyst sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeLaRiva, Andrew T.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Challa, Sivakumar R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in the field of electron microscopy, such as aberration correctors, have now been integrated into Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEMs), making it possible to study the behavior of supported metal catalysts under operating conditions at atomic resolution. Here......, we focus on in situ electron microscopy studies of catalysts that shed light on the mechanistic aspects of catalyst sintering. Catalyst sintering is an important mechanism for activity loss, especially for catalysts that operate at elevated temperatures. Literature from the past decade is reviewed...... along with our recent in situ TEM studies on the sintering of Ni/MgAl2O4 catalysts. These results suggest that the rapid loss of catalyst activity in the earliest stages of catalyst sintering could result from Ostwald ripening rather than through particle migration and coalescence. The smallest...

  11. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivanek, O L; Dellby, N; Murfitt, M F

    2011-01-01

    The scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has been able to image individual heavy atoms in a light matrix for some time. It is now able to do much more: it can resolve individual atoms as light as boron in monolayer materials; image atomic columns as light as hydrogen, identify the chemical type of individual isolated atoms from the intensity of their annular dark field (ADF) image and by electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS); and map elemental composition at atomic resolution by EELS and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). It can even map electronic states, also by EELS, at atomic resolution. The instrumentation developments that have made this level of performance possible are reviewed, and examples of applications to semiconductors and oxides are shown.

  12. Advances in imaging and electron physics time resolved electron diffraction for chemistry, biology and material science

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Imaging & Electron Physics merges two long-running serials-Advances in Electronics & Electron Physics and Advances in Optical & Electron Microscopy. The series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. Contributions from leading authorities Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field.

  13. Mapping 180° polar domains using electron backscatter diffraction and dynamical scattering simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burch, Matthew J.; Fancher, Chris M.; Patala, Srikanth [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); De Graef, Marc [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburg, PA (United States); Dickey, Elizabeth C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2017-02-15

    A novel technique, which directly and nondestructively maps polar domains using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is described and demonstrated. Through dynamical diffraction simulations and quantitative comparison to experimental EBSD patterns, the absolute orientation of a non-centrosymmetric crystal can be determined. With this information, the polar domains of a material can be mapped. The technique is demonstrated by mapping the non-ferroelastic, or 180°, ferroelectric domains in periodically poled LiNbO{sub 3} single crystals. Further, the authors demonstrate the possibility of mapping polarity using this technique in other polar materials system. - Highlights: • A novel technique to directly polar domains utilizing EBSD is demonstrated. • The technique relies on dynamical diffraction simulations of EBSD patterns. • The technique is demonstrated by mapping 180° domains in LiNbO{sub 3} single crystals. • Further application of this technique to other materials classes is discussed.

  14. Development of an ellipse fitting method with which to analyse selected area electron diffraction patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.R.G., E-mail: dmitchel@uow.edu.au [Electron Microscopy Centre, Australian Institute for Innovative Materials, Innovation Campus, University of Wollongong, North Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Van den Berg, J.A. [Electron Microscopy Centre, Australian Institute for Innovative Materials, Innovation Campus, University of Wollongong, North Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Catalyst Fundamentals, Fischer-Tropsch and Syngas Conversion Research, Sasol Technology R & D, Sasolburg 1947 (South Africa)

    2016-01-15

    A software method has been developed which uses ellipse fitting to analyse electron diffraction patterns from polycrystalline materials. The method, which requires minimal user input, can determine the pattern centre and the diameter of diffraction rings with sub-pixel precision. This enables accurate crystallographic information to be obtained in a rapid and consistent manner. Since the method fits ellipses, it can detect, quantify and correct any elliptical distortion introduced by the imaging system. Distortion information derived from polycrystalline patterns as a function of camera length can be subsequently recalled and applied to single crystal patterns, resulting in improved precision and accuracy. The method has been implemented as a plugin for the DigitalMicrograph software by Gatan, and is a freely available via the internet. - Highlights: • A robust ellipse fitting method is developed. • Freely available software for automated diffraction pattern analysis is demonstrated. • Measurement and correction of elliptical distortion is routinely achieved.

  15. Three-dimensional nanostructure determination from a large diffraction data set recorded using scanning electron nanodiffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei Meng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A diffraction-based technique is developed for the determination of three-dimensional nanostructures. The technique employs high-resolution and low-dose scanning electron nanodiffraction (SEND to acquire three-dimensional diffraction patterns, with the help of a special sample holder for large-angle rotation. Grains are identified in three-dimensional space based on crystal orientation and on reconstructed dark-field images from the recorded diffraction patterns. Application to a nanocrystalline TiN thin film shows that the three-dimensional morphology of columnar TiN grains of tens of nanometres in diameter can be reconstructed using an algebraic iterative algorithm under specified prior conditions, together with their crystallographic orientations. The principles can be extended to multiphase nanocrystalline materials as well. Thus, the tomographic SEND technique provides an effective and adaptive way of determining three-dimensional nanostructures.

  16. Optimization of Beam Transmission of PAL-PNF Electron Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, S. G.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, E. A. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The PNF (Pohang Neutron Facility) electron Linac is providing converted neutrons and photons from electron beams to users for nuclear physics experiments and high energy gamma-ray exposures. This linac is capable of producing 100 MeV electron beams with a beam current of pulsed 100 mA. The pulse length is 2 {mu}s and the pulse repetition rate is typically 30 Hz. This linac consists of two SLAC-type S-band accelerating columns and the thermionic RF gun. They are powered by one klystron and the matching pulse modulator. The electron beams emitted from the RF gun are bunched as they pass through the alpha magnet and are injected into the accelerating column thereafter. In this paper, we discuss procedures and results of the beam transmission optimization with technical details of the accelerator system. We also briefly discuss the future upgrade plan to obtain short-pulse or electron beams for neutron TOF experiments by adopting a triode type thermionic DC electron gun

  17. Development of spin-polarized transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwahara, M; Saitoh, K; Tanaka, N; Takeda, Y; Ujihara, T; Asano, H; Nakanishi, T

    2011-01-01

    In order to study spin related phenomena in nano-size materials, spin-polarized electron source (PES) has been employed for the incident beam in transmission electron microscope (TEM). The PES has been designed and constructed with optimizing for spin-polarized TEM. The illuminating system of TEM is also designed to focus the spin-polarized electron beam emitted from a semiconductor photocathode with a negative electron affinity (NEA) surface. The beam energy is set to below 40 keV which is lower energy type as a TEM, because the spin interaction with condensed matters is very small corresponding with a Coulomb interaction. The polarized electron gun has realized in an extra high vacuum (XHV) condition and high field gradient of 4 MV/m on a surface of photocathode. Furthermore, it demonstrated that 40-keV polarized electron beam was operated with a sub-milli second pulse mode by using the backside excitation type photocathode. This high performance PES will make it possible to observe dynamically a magnetic field images with high contrast and highspeed temporal imaging in TEM.

  18. Ab-initio crystal structure analysis and refinement approaches of oligo p-benzamides based on electron diffraction data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorelik, Tatiana E; van de Streek, Jacco; Kilbinger, Andreas F M

    2012-01-01

    Ab-initio crystal structure analysis of organic materials from electron diffraction data is presented. The data were collected using the automated electron diffraction tomography (ADT) technique. The structure solution and refinement route is first validated on the basis of the known crystal stru...

  19. Three-Dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    KAUST Repository

    De Jonge, Niels

    2010-01-18

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2-3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. © 2010 Microscopy Society of America.

  20. Structural Fingerprinting of Nanocrystals in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouvimov, Sergei; Plachinda, Pavel; Moeck, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Three novel strategies for the structurally identification of nanocrystals in a transmission electron microscope are presented. Either a single high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image [1] or a single precession electron diffractogram (PED) [2] may be employed. PEDs from fine-grained crystal powders may also be utilized. Automation of the former two strategies is in progress and shall lead to statistically significant results on ensembles of nanocrystals. Open-access databases such as the Crystallography Open Database which provides more than 81,500 crystal structure data sets [3] or its mainly inorganic and educational subsets [4] may be utilized. [1] http://www.scientificjournals.org/journals 2007/j/of/dissertation.htm [2] P. Moeck and S. Rouvimov, in: {Drugs and the Pharmaceutical Sciences}, Vol. 191, 2009, 270-313 [3] http://cod.ibt.lt, http://www.crystallography.net, http://cod.ensicaen.fr, http://nanocrystallography.org, http://nanocrystallography.net, http://journals.iucr.org/j/issues/2009/04/00/kk5039/kk5039.pdf [4] http://nanocrystallography.research.pdx.edu/CIF-searchable

  1. Diffraction efficiency of plasmonic gratings fabricated by electron beam lithography using a silver halide film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudheer,, E-mail: sudheer@rrcat.gov.in, E-mail: sudheer.rrcat@gmail.com; Tiwari, P.; Srivastava, Himanshu; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.; Naik, P. A. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Indus Synchrotrons Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Porwal, S. [Solid State Lasers Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Bhartiya, S. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Laser Materials Development and Device Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Rao, B. T. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Laser Materials Processing Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Sharma, T. K. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Solid State Lasers Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India)

    2016-07-28

    The silver nanoparticle surface relief gratings of ∼10 μm period are fabricated using electron beam lithography on the silver halide film substrate. Morphological characterization of the gratings shows that the period, the shape, and the relief depth in the gratings are mainly dependent on the number of lines per frame, the spot size, and the accelerating voltage of electron beam raster in the SEM. Optical absorption of the silver nanoparticle gratings provides a broad localized surface plasmon resonance peak in the visible region, whereas the intensity of the peaks depends on the number density of silver nanoparticles in the gratings. The maximum efficiency of ∼7.2% for first order diffraction is observed for the grating fabricated at 15 keV. The efficiency is peaking at 560 nm with ∼380 nm bandwidth. The measured profiles of the diffraction efficiency for the gratings are found in close agreement with the Raman-Nath diffraction theory. This technique provides a simple and efficient method for the fabrication of plasmonic nanoparticle grating structures with high diffraction efficiency having broad wavelength tuning.

  2. Progress and applications of in situ transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rongming; Liu Jialong; Song Yuanjun

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the application of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is briefly reviewed. It is emphasized that the development of advanced in situ TEM techniques makes it possible to investigate the evolution of materials under heat, strain, magnetic field, electric field or chemical reaction environments on the atomic scale. The mechanism of the microstructure evolution under various conditions and the relationship between the atomic structures and their properties can be obtained, which is beneficial for the design of new materials with tailored properties. The clarification of the structure-property relationship will help to develop new materials and solve related basic problems in the field of condensed matter physics. (authors)

  3. Characterization of catalysts by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targos, W.M.; Bradley, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    The dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is an integral tool for characterizing catalysts because of its unique ability to image and analyze nanosized volumes. This information is valuable in optimizing catalyst formulations and determining causes for reduced catalyst performance. For many commercial catalysts direct correlations between structural features of metal crystallites and catalytic performance are not attainable. When these instances occur, determination of elemental distribution may be the only information available. In this paper the authors discuss some of the techniques employed and limitations associated with characterizing commercial catalysts

  4. Fabrication and electric measurements of nanostructures inside transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2011-06-01

    Using manipulation holders specially designed for transmission electron microscope (TEM), nanostructures can be characterized, measured, modified and even fabricated in-situ. In-situ TEM techniques not only enable real-time study of structure-property relationships of materials at atomic scale, but also provide the ability to control and manipulate materials and structures at nanoscale. This review highlights in-situ electric measurements and in-situ fabrication and structure modification using manipulation holder inside TEM. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Transmission electron microscopic study of reduced Ca2UO5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasevec, V.; Prodan, A.; Holc, J.; Kolar, D.

    1983-01-01

    Structural changes of Ca 2 UO 5 during reduction in hydrogen were studied by transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that monoclinic Ca 2 UO 5 changes into triclinic Ca 4 U 2 O 9 . They are related, respectively, to the fluorite and the bixbyite (C-M 2 O 3 ) structures, so that the product is a superstructure of the latter. Reduction occurs along the (100)/sub t/ planes originating from the (006)/sub m/ planes of the parent structure by diminishing the coordination number of the Ca cation from 7 to 6. 5 figures

  6. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of Bi-2223/Ag tapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L.G.; Bals, S.; Tendeloo, G. Van

    2001-01-01

    during the tape processing, (3) a study of the grain boundaries on an atomic scale, including intergrowth investigations. Tapes with different process parameters have been compared with respect to the microstructure. A fully processed tape has on the average 50% thicker Bi-2223 grains than a tape after......The microstructure of (Bi,Pb)(2)Sr2Ca2CuOx (Bi-2223) tapes has been investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM. The emphasis has been placed on: (1) an examination of the grain morphology and size, (2) grain and colony boundary angles, which are formed...

  7. Correction of bubble size distributions from transmission electron microscopy observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkegaard, P.; Eldrup, M.; Horsewell, A.; Skov Pedersen, J.

    1996-01-01

    Observations by transmission electron microscopy of a high density of gas bubbles in a metal matrix yield a distorted size distribution due to bubble overlap and bubble escape from the surface. A model is described that reconstructs 3-dimensional bubble size distributions from 2-dimensional projections on taking these effects into account. Mathematically, the reconstruction is an ill-posed inverse problem, which is solved by regularization technique. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations support the validity of our model. (au) 1 tab., 32 ills., 32 refs

  8. High current table-top setup for femtosecond gas electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Zandi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have constructed an experimental setup for gas phase electron diffraction with femtosecond resolution and a high average beam current. While gas electron diffraction has been successful at determining molecular structures, it has been a challenge to reach femtosecond resolution while maintaining sufficient beam current to retrieve structures with high spatial resolution. The main challenges are the Coulomb force that leads to broadening of the electron pulses and the temporal blurring that results from the velocity mismatch between the laser and electron pulses as they traverse the sample. We present here a device that uses pulse compression to overcome the Coulomb broadening and deliver femtosecond electron pulses on a gas target. The velocity mismatch can be compensated using laser pulses with a tilted intensity front to excite the sample. The temporal resolution of the setup was determined with a streak camera to be better than 400 fs for pulses with up to half a million electrons and a kinetic energy of 90 keV. The high charge per pulse, combined with a repetition rate of 5 kHz, results in an average beam current that is between one and two orders of magnitude higher than previously demonstrated.

  9. Electron backscatter diffraction characterization of laser-induced periodic surface structures on nickel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedao, Xxx, E-mail: sedao.xxx@gmail.com [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France); Maurice, Claire [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 St-Etienne (France); Garrelie, Florence; Colombier, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphanie [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France); Quey, Romain; Blanc, Gilles [Laboratoire Georges Friedel, Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines, 42023 St-Etienne (France); Pigeon, Florent [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, 42000 St-Etienne (France)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlight: •Lattice rotation and its distribution in laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and the subsurface region on a nickel substrate are revealed using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). -- Abstract: We report on the structural investigation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) generated in polycrystalline nickel target after multi-shot irradiation by femtosecond laser pulses. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is used to reveal lattice rotation caused by dislocation storage during LIPSS formation. Localized crystallographic damages in the LIPSS are detected from both surface and cross-sectional EBSD studies. A surface region (up to 200 nm) with 1–3° grain disorientation is observed in localized areas from the cross-section of the LIPSS. The distribution of the local disorientation is inhomogeneous across the LIPSS and the subsurface region.

  10. Reciprocal space mapping by spot profile analyzing low energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer zu Heringdorf, Frank-J.; Horn-von Hoegen, Michael

    2005-01-01

    We present an experimental approach for the recording of two-dimensional reciprocal space maps using spot profile analyzing low energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED). A specialized alignment procedure eliminates the shifting of LEED patterns on the screen which is commonly observed upon variation of the electron energy. After the alignment, a set of one-dimensional sections through the diffraction pattern is recorded at different energies. A freely available software tool is used to assemble the sections into a reciprocal space map. The necessary modifications of the Burr-Brown computer interface of the two Leybold and Omicron type SPA-LEED instruments are discussed and step-by-step instructions are given to adapt the SPA 4.1d software to the changed hardware. Au induced faceting of 4 deg. vicinal Si(001) is used as an example to demonstrate the technique

  11. Molecular structure determination of cyclooctane by Ab Initio and electron diffraction methods in the gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Wagner B. de

    2000-01-01

    The determination of the molecular structure of molecules is of fundamental importance in chemistry. X-rays and electron diffraction methods constitute in important tools for the elucidation of the molecular structure of systems in the solid state and gas phase, respectively. The use of quantum mechanical molecular orbital ab initio methods offer an alternative for conformational analysis studies. Comparison between theoretical results and those obtained experimentally in the gas phase can make a significant contribution for an unambiguous determination of the geometrical parameters. In this article the determination for an unambiguous determination of the geometrical parameters. In this article the determination of the molecular structure of the cyclooctane molecule by electron diffraction in the gas phase an initio calculations will be addressed, providing an example of a comparative analysis of theoretical and experimental predictions. (author)

  12. Correlated microradiography, X-ray microbeam diffraction and electron probe microanalysis of calcifications in an odontoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoba, T.; Yoshioka, C.; Yagi, T.

    1980-01-01

    Using microradiography, X-ray microbeam diffraction and electron probe microanalysis, a correlated morphologic and crystallographic study was performed on dysplastic enamel in a compound odontoma. The tumor was found in the lateral incisor-canine region of the left mandible of a 36-year-old woman. A conspicuous feature was the presence of hypomineralized areas, which were situated in the proximity of enamel surface and distinctly demarcated from the adjacent enamel. X-ray microbeam diffraction and electron microanalysis showed that these lesions have a lower crystallinity and a higher concentration of magnesium as compared with the adjacent enamel. In addition, the present study revealed the presence of two other types of calcifications: 1) calcified structures within the fissure or on the enamel surface, which include lacunae of varying size and which resemble a form of coronal cementum, and 2) spherical calcifications which may be an epithelial product. (author)

  13. Microstructural evolution in adiabatic shear bands of copper at high strain rates: Electron backscatter diffraction characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Lin; Chen Zhiyong; Zhan Congkun; Yang Xuyue; Liu Chuming; Cai Hongnian

    2012-01-01

    The microstructural evolution of adiabatic shear bands in annealed copper with different large strains at high strain rates has been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction. The results show that mechanical twinning can occur with minimal contribution to shear localization under dynamic loading. Elongated ultrafine grains with widths of 100–300 nm are observed during the evolution of the adiabatic shear bands. A rotational dynamic recrystallization mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of the elongated ultrafine grains. - Highlights: ► The microstructural evolution of ASB is studied by electron backscatter diffraction. ► Twinning can occur in ASB while the contribution to shear localization is slight. ► Elongated ultrafine grains are observed during the evolution process of ASB. ► A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the microstructure evolution of ASB.

  14. The transmission diffraction patterns of silicon implanted with high-energy α-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieteska, K.; Wierzchowski, W.

    1995-01-01

    2 mm thick silicon wafers, implanted with 4.8 MeV α-particles are studied by means of transmission section topography and additionally by Lang and double-crystal methods. It was found that all three methods produced a negligible contrast in the symmetric transmission reflection apart from some fragments of the implanted area's boundaries. The interference fringes were observed in the case of asymmetric reflections. The asymmetric section topographs revealed distinct interference fringes, which cannot be explained in terms of simple bicrystal models. In particular, the curvature of these fringes may be interpreted as being due to the change in the implanted ion dose along the beam intersecting the crystal. Some features of the fringe pattern were reproduced by numerical integration of Takagi-Taupin equations. (author)

  15. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazder, Azdiar A; Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th; Mitchell, David R G; Pereloma, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular structure determination of cyclootane by ab initio and electron diffraction methods in the gas phase

    OpenAIRE

    De Almeida, Wagner B.

    2000-01-01

    The determination of the molecular structure of molecules is of fundamental importance in chemistry. X-rays and electron diffraction methods constitute in important tools for the elucidation of the molecular structure of systems in the solid state and gas phase, respectively. The use of quantum mechanical molecular orbital ab initio methods offer an alternative for conformational analysis studies. Comparison between theoretical results and those obtained experimentally in the gas phase can ma...

  17. Calculation of diffraction patterns associated with electron irradiation induced amorphization of CuTi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devanathan, R.; Meshii, M.; Sabochik, M.J.

    1990-11-01

    A new approach that uses the multislice method in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations to study electron irradiation induced amorphisation is presented. Diffraction patterns were calculated for CuTi and found to be more sensitive than the pair correlation function to the structural changes preceding amorphisation. The results from this approach and from a study of long range order are presented. 16 refs., 8 figs

  18. Time-lapse misorientation maps for the analysis of electron backscatter diffraction data from evolving microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, J.; Cross, A.; Drury, M.; Hough, R.M.; Mariani, E.; Piazolo, S.; Prior, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    A 'time-lapse misorientation map' is defined here as a map which shows the orientation change at each point in an evolving crystalline microstructure between two different times. Electron backscatter diffraction data from in situ heating experiments can be used to produce such maps, which then highlight areas of microstructural change and also yield statistics indicative of how far different types of boundary (with different misorientations) have moved.

  19. Diffraction structures in delta electron spectra emitted in heavy-ion atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, C.; Bhalla, C.; Shingal, R.; Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Shinpaugh, J.; Wolf, W.; Wolf, H.

    1992-01-01

    We have measured doubly differential cross sections DDCS for projectiles between F and Au and find evidence for strong diffraction structure in the Binary Encounter region of the emitted electron spectra for Au(Z=79), I(Z=53) and Cu(Z=29) projectiles, however not for F projectiles in the collision energy range between 0.2 and 0.5 MeV/u. (orig.)

  20. Scanning Precession Electron Diffraction Study of 2xxx Series Aluminium Alloys Exhibiting Several Coexisting Strengthening Phases

    OpenAIRE

    Sunde, Jonas Kristoffer

    2016-01-01

    Throughout this thesis, scanning precession electron diffraction is applied to heat-treated Al-Cu-Li and Al-Mg-Cu-Ag alloys, shedding light on the distribution of phases present and the complex interplay between these microstructural features. The employed technique yielded high quality data sets, which through subsequent data processing enabled a detailed phase mapping of these multi-component Al alloys. Among the main results presented, are virtual dark field images highlighting all separat...

  1. Ab initio structure determination and quantitative disorder analysis on nanoparticles by electron diffraction tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Yaşar; Barton, Bastian; Marler, Bernd; Neder, Reinhard B; Kolb, Ute

    2018-03-01

    Nanoscaled porous materials such as zeolites have attracted substantial attention in industry due to their catalytic activity, and their performance in sorption and separation processes. In order to understand the properties of such materials, current research focuses increasingly on the determination of structural features beyond the averaged crystal structure. Small particle sizes, various types of disorder and intergrown structures render the description of structures at atomic level by standard crystallographic methods difficult. This paper reports the characterization of a strongly disordered zeolite structure, using a combination of electron exit-wave reconstruction, automated diffraction tomography (ADT), crystal disorder modelling and electron diffraction simulations. Zeolite beta was chosen for a proof-of-principle study of the techniques, because it consists of two different intergrown polymorphs that are built from identical layer types but with different stacking sequences. Imaging of the projected inner Coulomb potential of zeolite beta crystals shows the intergrowth of the polymorphs BEA and BEB. The structures of BEA as well as BEB could be extracted from one single ADT data set using direct methods. A ratio for BEA/BEB = 48:52 was determined by comparison of the reconstructed reciprocal space based on ADT data with simulated electron diffraction data for virtual nanocrystals, built with different ratios of BEA/BEB. In this way, it is demonstrated that this smart interplay of the above-mentioned techniques allows the elaboration of the real structures of functional materials in detail - even if they possess a severely disordered structure.

  2. In situ transmission electron microscopy for magnetic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Duc-The; Kuhn, Luise Theil

    2016-01-01

    Nanomagnetism is a subject of great interest because of both application and fundamental aspects in which understanding of the physical and electromagnetic structure of magnetic nanostructures is essential to explore the magnetic properties. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a powerful tool...... that allows understanding of both physical structure and micromagnetic structure of the thin samples at nanoscale. Among TEM techniques, in situ TEM is the state-of-the-art approach for imaging such structures in dynamic experiments, reconstructing a real-time nanoscale picture of the properties......-structure correlation. This paper aims at reviewing and discussing in situ TEM magnetic imaging studies, including Lorentz microscopy and electron holography in TEM, applied to the research of magnetic nanostructures....

  3. Imaging and Quantification of Extracellular Vesicles by Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Romain; Tan, Sisareuth; Gounou, Céline; Brisson, Alain R

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived vesicles that are present in blood and other body fluids. EVs raise major interest for their diverse physiopathological roles and their potential biomedical applications. However, the characterization and quantification of EVs constitute major challenges, mainly due to their small size and the lack of methods adapted for their study. Electron microscopy has made significant contributions to the EV field since their initial discovery. Here, we describe the use of two transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques for imaging and quantifying EVs. Cryo-TEM combined with receptor-specific gold labeling is applied to reveal the morphology, size, and phenotype of EVs, while their enumeration is achieved after high-speed sedimentation on EM grids.

  4. Development of a high brightness ultrafast Transmission Electron Microscope based on a laser-driven cold field emission source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdellier, F; Caruso, G M; Weber, S; Kociak, M; Arbouet, A

    2018-03-01

    We report on the development of an ultrafast Transmission Electron Microscope based on a cold field emission source which can operate in either DC or ultrafast mode. Electron emission from a tungsten nanotip is triggered by femtosecond laser pulses which are tightly focused by optical components integrated inside a cold field emission source close to the cathode. The properties of the electron probe (brightness, angular current density, stability) are quantitatively determined. The measured brightness is the largest reported so far for UTEMs. Examples of imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy using ultrashort electron pulses are given. Finally, the potential of this instrument is illustrated by performing electron holography in the off-axis configuration using ultrashort electron pulses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Ultrafast electron diffraction from non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser heated Au films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, T. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Trigo, M.; Reid, A. H.; Dürr, H. A. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Li, R.; Vecchione, T.; Shen, X.; Weathersby, S.; Coffee, R.; Hartmann, N.; Wang, X. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Reis, D. A. [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2016-01-25

    We use ultrafast electron diffraction to detect the temporal evolution of non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser-excited ultrathin single-crystalline gold films. From the time-dependence of the Debye-Waller factor, we extract a 4.7 ps time-constant for the increase in mean-square atomic displacements. The observed increase in the diffuse scattering intensity demonstrates that the energy transfer from laser-heated electrons to phonon modes near the X and K points in the Au fcc Brillouin zone proceeds with timescales of 2.3 and 2.9 ps, respectively, faster than the Debye-Waller average mean-square displacement.

  6. CL 19: Anisotropy of the electron diffraction from femtosecond Laser excited Bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, P.; Ligges, M.; Streubuehr, C.; Brazda, Th.; Payer, Th.; Meyer zu Heringdorf, F.; Horn-von Hoegen, M.; Von der Linde, D.

    2010-01-01

    We report an electron diffraction experiment in Bi in which a linearly polarized E g optical phonon mode is detected after excitation of the material by a femtosecond laser pulse. Bismuth is a semimetal with rhombohedral crystal structure with two atoms in the unit cell. There are two types of optical phonon modes: (i) The totally symmetric A 1g mode which corresponds to a displacement of the atoms along the trigonal (111) direction, and (ii) the doubly degenerate E g mode which represents a motion in the plane perpendicular to (111). The A 1g mode can be coherently excited both by displacive excitation (DE) and by impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS). Symmetry properties prevent DE of E g modes leaving ISRS as a likely excitation mechanism. We performed time resolved electron diffraction experiments on femtosecond laser excited Bi membranes of 15 nm thickness which were grown on a NaCl crystal and detached by floating in water. The experimental setup is described elsewhere. The fundamental laser beam (800 nm) was used for the excitation of the Bi films. The films had a crystalline structure with the (111) axis perpendicular to the surface. The electron beam passed perpendicular to the surface through the film. In this geometry the diffraction pattern is insensitive to atomic displacements along the (111) direction, i.e. insensitive to A 1g phonon modes. On the other hand, the excitation of E g modes corresponding to atomic displacements in the plane normal to (111) decreases the intensity of particular diffraction orders. The individual cycles of the E g vibrations (duration 475 fs) could not be resolved because our time resolution about 700 fs was not sufficient. In our experiment excitation beam with a fluence of 1 mJ/cm 2 and variable linear polarization was incident from the backside at an angle of 40 degrees (counter propagating electron and laser beam). The diffraction patterns were recorded as a function of the delay time between laser pump and

  7. Advances in imaging and electron physics the scanning transmission electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2009-01-01

    Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics merges two long-running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical and Electron Microscopy. This series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains.  This particular volume presents several timely articles on the scanning transmission electron microscope. Updated with contributions from leading international scholars and industry experts Discusses hot topic areas and presents current and future research trends Provides an invaluable reference and guide for physicists, engineers and mathematicians.

  8. Interaction of electrons with light metal hydrides in the transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongming; Wakasugi, Takenobu; Isobe, Shigehito; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2014-12-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation of light metal hydrides is complicated by the instability of these materials under electron irradiation. In this study, the electron kinetic energy dependences of the interactions of incident electrons with lithium, sodium and magnesium hydrides, as well as the constituting element effect on the interactions, were theoretically discussed, and electron irradiation damage to these hydrides was examined using in situ TEM. The results indicate that high incident electron kinetic energy helps alleviate the irradiation damage resulting from inelastic or elastic scattering of the incident electrons in the TEM. Therefore, observations and characterizations of these materials would benefit from increased, instead decreased, TEM operating voltage. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Reconstruction and visualization of nanoparticle composites by transmission electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.Y. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Canada T6H 2M9 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada T6G 2G7 (Canada); Lockwood, R. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Canada T6H 2M9 (Canada); Malac, M., E-mail: marek.malac@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Canada T6H 2M9 (Canada); Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada T6G 2G7 (Canada); Furukawa, H. [SYSTEM IN FRONTIER INC., 2-8-3, Shinsuzuharu bldg. 4F, Akebono-cho, Tachikawa-shi, Tokyo 190-0012 (Japan); Li, P.; Meldrum, A. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Canada T6H 2M9 (Canada)

    2012-02-15

    This paper examines the limits of transmission electron tomography reconstruction methods for a nanocomposite object composed of many closely packed nanoparticles. Two commonly used reconstruction methods in TEM tomography were examined and compared, and the sources of various artefacts were explored. Common visualization methods were investigated, and the resulting 'interpretation artefacts' ( i.e., deviations from 'actual' particle sizes and shapes arising from the visualization) were determined. Setting a known or estimated nanoparticle volume fraction as a criterion for thresholding does not in fact give a good visualization. Unexpected effects associated with common built-in image filtering methods were also found. Ultimately, this work set out to establish the common problems and pitfalls associated with electron beam tomographic reconstruction and visualization of samples consisting of closely spaced nanoparticles. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron tomography limits were explored by both experiment and simulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reliable quantitative volumetry using electron tomography is not presently feasible. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Volume rendering appears to be better choice for visualization of composite samples.

  10. Transmission electron and optical microscopy of the domain structure of Ni3B7O13Br ferroic boracite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos-Guzman, A.G.; Trujillo-Torrez, M.; Czank, M.

    2005-01-01

    The study investigated the domain structure of nickel bromine boracite single crystals, by means of polarised-light in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy. Single crystals of Ni 3 B 7 O 13 Br were grown by chemical transport reactions in closed quartz ampoules, in the temperature range of 1130 K and were examined by polarising optical microscopy (PLM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PLM was also used in order to study the behaviour of birefringence as a function of temperature. For TEM the single crystals were crushed and mounted on holey carbon films. Comparative electron microscope images were useful for revealing the domain structure of this fully ferroelectric/fully ferroelastic material previously observed between the crossed polars of an optical microscope. X-ray diffraction analysis of the crystal under study was performed at room temperature

  11. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-01

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  12. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  13. Nano-structured thin films : a Lorentz transmission electron microscopy and electron holography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosson, J.Th.M. de; Raedt, H.A. De; Zhong, ZY; Saka, H; Kim, TH; Holm, EA; Han, YF; Xie, XS

    2005-01-01

    This paper aims at applying advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to functional materials, such as ultra-soft magnetic films for high-frequency inductors, to reveal the structure-property relationship. The ultimate goal is to delineate a more quantitative way to obtain information of the

  14. Transmission electron microscopy of Ti-12Mo-13Nb Alloy aged after heat forging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Nathalia Rodrigues; Baldan, Renato; Gabriel, Sinara Borborema

    2014-01-01

    Metastable β-Ti alloys possess mechanical properties, in particular a elastic modulus that depends not only on its composition but also the applied thermomechanical treatments. These alloys require high mechanical strength and a low Young’s modulus to avoid stress shielding. Preliminary studies on the development of Ti- 13Nb-12Mo alloy showed than the better properties were obtained at aged at 500 ° C / 24 h after cold forging , whose microstructure consisted of bimodal α phase in the β matrix. In this work, Ti-12Mo-13Nb alloy was heat forged and aged at 500 deg C for 24h and the microstructure was analyzed by employing X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. According to the results, while the cold forging resulted in bimodal α phase in the β matrix, hot forging resulted in a fine and homogeneous α phase in the β matrix. (author)

  15. In situ transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy studies of sintering of Ag and Pt nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asoro, M.A.; Ferreira, P.J.; Kovar, D.

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy studies were conducted in situ on 2–5 nm Pt and 10–40 nm Ag nanoparticles to study mechanisms for sintering and to measure relevant sintering kinetics in nanoscale particles. Sintering between two separated particles was observed to initiate by either (1) diffusion of the particles on the sample support or (2) diffusion of atoms or small clusters of atoms to the neck region between the two particles. After particle contact, the rate of sintering was controlled by atomic surface diffusivity. The surface diffusivity was determined as a function of particle size and temperature from experimental measurements of the rate of neck growth of the particles. The surface diffusivities did not show a strong size effect for the range of particle sizes that were studied. The surface diffusivity for Pt nanoparticles exhibited the expected Arrhenius temperature dependence and did not appear to be sensitive to the presence of surface contaminants. In contrast, the surface diffusivity for Ag nanoparticles was affected by the presence of impurities such as carbon. The diffusivities for Ag nanoparticles were consistent with previous measurements of bulk surface diffusivities for Ag in the presence of C, but were significantly slower than those obtained from pristine Ag

  16. Induced magnetic anisotropy in Si-free nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials: A transmission x-ray diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, R.; Suzuki, K.; Yanai, T.; Kishimoto, H.; Kato, A.; Ohnuma, M.

    2015-01-01

    In order to better understand the origin of field-induced anisotropy (K u ) in Si-free nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloys, the lattice spacing of the bcc-Fe phase in nanocrystalline Fe 94−x Nb 6 B x (x = 10, 12, 14) alloys annealed under an applied magnetic field has been investigated by X-ray diffraction in transmission geometry (t-XRD) with the diffraction vector parallel and perpendicular to the field direction. The saturation magnetostriction (λ s ) of nanocrystalline Fe 94−x Nb 6 B x was found to increase linearly with the volume fraction of the residual amorphous phase and is well described by taking into account the volume-weighted average of two local λ s values for the bcc-Fe nanocrystallites (−5 ± 2 ppm) and the residual amorphous matrix (+8 ± 2 ppm). The lattice distortion required to produce the measured K u values (∼100 J/m 3 ) was estimated via the inverse magnetostrictive effect using the measured λ s values and was compared to the lattice spacing estimations made by t-XRD. The lattice strain required to produce K u under the magnetoelastic model was not observed by the t-XRD experiments and so the findings of this study suggest that the origin of magnetic field induced K u cannot be explained through the magnetoelastic effect

  17. Computer programs for unit-cell determination in electron diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.Z.

    2005-01-01

    A set of computer programs for unit-cell determination from an electron diffraction tilt series and pattern indexing has been developed on the basis of several well-established algorithms. In this approach, a reduced direct primitive cell is first determined from experimental data, in the means time, the measurement errors of the tilt angles are checked and minimized. The derived primitive cell is then checked for possible higher lattice symmetry and transformed into a proper conventional cell. Finally a least-squares refinement procedure is adopted to generate optimum lattice parameters on the basis of the lengths of basic reflections in each diffraction pattern and the indices of these reflections. Examples are given to show the usage of the programs

  18. A three-dimensional polarization domain retrieval method from electron diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, Robert S.; Koch, Christoph T.

    2015-01-01

    We present an algorithm for retrieving three-dimensional domains of picometer-scale shifts in atomic positions from electron diffraction data, and apply it to simulations of ferroelectric polarization in BaTiO 3 . Our algorithm successfully and correctly retrieves polarization domains in which the Ti atom positions differ by less than 3 pm (0.4% of the unit cell diagonal distance) with 5 and 10 nm depth resolution along the beam direction, and we also retrieve unit cell strain, corresponding to tetragonal-to-cubic unit cell distortions, for 10 nm domains. Experimental applicability is also discussed. - Highlights: • We show a retrieval method for ferroelectric polarization from TEM diffraction data. • Simulated strain and polarization variations along the beam direction are retrieved. • This method can be used for 3D strain and polarization mapping without specimen tilt

  19. Low-energy electron diffraction experiment, theory and surface structure determination

    CERN Document Server

    Hove, Michel A; Chan, Chi-Ming

    1986-01-01

    Surface crystallography plays the same fundamental role in surface science which bulk crystallography has played so successfully in solid-state physics and chemistry. The atomic-scale structure is one of the most important aspects in the understanding of the behavior of surfaces in such widely diverse fields as heterogeneous catalysis, microelectronics, adhesion, lubrication, cor­ rosion, coatings, and solid-solid and solid-liquid interfaces. Low-Energy Electron Diffraction or LEED has become the prime tech­ nique used to determine atomic locations at surfaces. On one hand, LEED has yielded the most numerous and complete structural results to date (almost 200 structures), while on the other, LEED has been regarded as the "technique to beat" by a variety of other surface crystallographic methods, such as photoemission, SEXAFS, ion scattering and atomic diffraction. Although these other approaches have had impressive successes, LEED has remained the most productive technique and has shown the most versatility...

  20. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data from calcite biominerals in recent gastropod shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Dauphin, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean Pierre; Cusack, Maggie

    2011-04-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a microscopy technique that reveals in situ crystallographic information. Currently, it is widely used for the characterization of geological materials and in studies of biomineralization. Here, we analyze high resolution EBSD data from biogenic calcite in two mollusk taxa, Concholepas and Haliotis, previously used in the understanding of complex biomineralization and paleoenvironmental studies. Results indicate that Concholepas has less ordered prisms than in Haliotis, and that in Concholepas the level of order is not homogenous in different areas of the shell. Overall, the usefulness of data integration obtained from diffraction intensity and crystallographic orientation maps, and corresponding pole figures, is discussed as well as its application to similar studies. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. In-situ Indentation and Correlated Precession Electron Diffraction Analysis of a Polycrystalline Cu Thin Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qianying; Thompson, Gregory B.

    2018-04-01

    In-situ TEM nanoindentation of a polycrystalline Cu film was cross-correlated with precession electron diffraction (PED) to quantify the microstructural evolution. The use of PED is shown to clearly reveal features, such as grain size, that are easily masked by diffraction contrast created by the deformation. Using PED, the accompanying grain refinement and change in texture as well as the preservation of specific grain boundary structures, including a ∑3 boundary, under the indent impression were quantified. The nucleation of dislocations, evident in low-angle grain boundary formations, was also observed under the indent. PED quantification of texture gradients created by the indentation process linked well to bend contours observed in the bright-field images. Finally, PED enabled generating a local orientation spread map that gave an approximate estimation of the spatial distribution of strain created by the indentation impression.

  2. Bunch evolution study in optimization of MeV ultrafast electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xian-Hai; Du, Ying-Chao; Huang, Wen-Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2014-12-01

    Megaelectronvolt ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a promising detection tool for ultrafast processes. The quality of diffraction image is determined by the transverse evolution of the probe bunch. In this paper, we study the contributing terms of the emittance and space charge effects to the bunch evolution in the MeV UED scheme, employing a mean-field model with an ellipsoidal distribution as well as particle tracking simulation. The small transverse dimension of the drive laser is found to be critical to improve the reciprocal resolution, exploiting both smaller emittance and larger transverse bunch size before the solenoid. The degradation of the reciprocal spatial resolution caused by the space charge effects should be carefully controlled.

  3. Bunch evolution study in optimization of MeV ultrafast electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xianhai; Du Yingchao; Huang Wenhui; Tang Chuanxiang

    2014-01-01

    transverse ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a promising detection tool for ultrafast processes. The quality of diffraction image is determined by the transverse evolution of the probe bunch. In this paper, we study the contributing terms of the emittance and space charge effects to the bunch evolution in the MeV UED scheme, employing a mean-field model with an ellipsoidal distribution as well as particle tracking simulation. The small transverse dimension of the drive laser is found to be critical to improve the reciprocal resolution, exploiting both smaller emittance and larger transverse bunch size before the solenoid. The degradation of the reciprocal spatial resolution caused by the space charge effects should be carefully controlled. (authors)

  4. Electron Source Brightness and Illumination Semi-Angle Distribution Measurement in a Transmission Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börrnert, Felix; Renner, Julian; Kaiser, Ute

    2018-05-21

    The electron source brightness is an important parameter in an electron microscope. Reliable and easy brightness measurement routes are not easily found. A determination method for the illumination semi-angle distribution in transmission electron microscopy is even less well documented. Herein, we report a simple measurement route for both entities and demonstrate it on a state-of-the-art instrument. The reduced axial brightness of the FEI X-FEG with a monochromator was determined to be larger than 108 A/(m2 sr V).

  5. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Iterative reconstruction of magnetic induction using Lorentz transmission electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phatak, C.; Gürsoy, D.

    2015-01-01

    Intense ongoing research on complex nanomagnetic structures requires a fundamental understanding of the 3D magnetization and the stray fields around the nano-objects. 3D visualization of such fields offers the best way to achieve this. Lorentz transmission electron microscopy provides a suitable combination of high resolution and ability to quantitatively visualize the magnetization vectors using phase retrieval methods. In this paper, we present a formalism to represent the magnetic phase shift of electrons as a Radon transform of the magnetic induction of the sample. Using this formalism, we then present the application of common tomographic methods particularly the iterative methods, to reconstruct the 3D components of the vector field. We present an analysis of the effect of missing wedge and the limited angular sampling as well as reconstruction of complex 3D magnetization in a nanowire using simulations. - Highlights: • We present a formalism to represent electron-optical magnetic phase shift as a Radon transform of the 3D magnetic induction of the nano-object. • We have analyzed four different tomographic reconstruction methods for vectorial data reconstruction. • Reconstruction methods were tested for varying experimental limitations such as limited tilt range and limited angular sampling. • The analysis showed that Gridrec and SIRT methods performed better with lower errors than other reconstruction methods

  7. A simple way to obtain backscattered electron images in a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Hiroki; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Tanji, Takayoshi; Morita, Chiaki

    2014-08-01

    We have fabricated a simple detector for backscattered electrons (BSEs) and incorporated the detector into a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) sample holder. Our detector was made from a 4-mm(2) Si chip. The fabrication procedure was easy, and similar to a standard transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample thinning process based on ion milling. A TEM grid containing particle objects was fixed to the detector with a silver paste. Observations were carried out using samples of Au and latex particles at 75 and 200 kV. Such a detector provides an easy way to obtain BSE images in an STEM. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Investigation of superthermal asymmetric electron distributions using electron cyclotron wave transmission in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giruzzi, G.; Fidone, I.; Marcha, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    The asymmetric electron distribution generated during lower hybrid current drive has been computed using a 3-D Fokker-Planck code. The superthermal tail and the resulting current are generally a combination of two components streaming in opposite toroidal directions. An appropriate diagnostic method for experimental investigation of the two superthermal populations is wave transmission of two equivalent rays with equal and opposite values of the refractive index. These equivalent rays can be realized by launching the waves from symmetric positions with respect ot the equatorial plane at equal and opposite angles in the toroidal direction. Using an appropriate ray tracing code, the damping of the two rays is computed and it is shown that it results from electrons with opposite parallel velocities. The differential transmission is then a measure of the overall asymmetry of the electron momentum distribution. (author). 12 refs, 8 figs

  9. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yifeng; Zou, Xiaodong; Hovmöller, Sven; Wan, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED) data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT) and rotation electron diffraction (RED), have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni-Se-O-Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal-organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three-dimensional ED methods

  10. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifeng Yun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT and rotation electron diffraction (RED, have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni–Se–O–Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal–organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three

  11. Unravelling surface and interfacial structures of a metal-organic framework by transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yihan; Ciston, Jim; Zheng, Bin; Miao, Xiaohe; Czarnik, Cory; Pan, Yichang; Sougrat, Rachid; Lai, Zhiping; Hsiung, Chia-En; Yao, Kexin; Pinnau, Ingo; Pan, Ming; Han, Yu

    2017-05-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline porous materials with designable topology, porosity and functionality, having promising applications in gas storage and separation, ion conduction and catalysis. It is challenging to observe MOFs with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) due to the extreme instability of MOFs upon electron beam irradiation. Here, we use a direct-detection electron-counting camera to acquire TEM images of the MOF ZIF-8 with an ultralow dose of 4.1 electrons per square ångström to retain the structural integrity. The obtained image involves structural information transferred up to 2.1 Å, allowing the resolution of individual atomic columns of Zn and organic linkers in the framework. Furthermore, TEM reveals important local structural features of ZIF-8 crystals that cannot be identified by diffraction techniques, including armchair-type surface terminations and coherent interfaces between assembled crystals. These observations allow us to understand how ZIF-8 crystals self-assemble and the subsequent influence of interfacial cavities on mass transport of guest molecules.

  12. Unravelling surface and interfacial structures of a metal–organic framework by transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan

    2017-02-21

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline porous materials with designable topology, porosity and functionality, having promising applications in gas storage and separation, ion conduction and catalysis1, 2, 3. It is challenging to observe MOFs with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) due to the extreme instability of MOFs upon electron beam irradiation4, 5, 6, 7. Here, we use a direct-detection electron-counting camera to acquire TEM images of the MOF ZIF-8 with an ultralow dose of 4.1 electrons per square ångström to retain the structural integrity. The obtained image involves structural information transferred up to 2.1 Å, allowing the resolution of individual atomic columns of Zn and organic linkers in the framework. Furthermore, TEM reveals important local structural features of ZIF-8 crystals that cannot be identified by diffraction techniques, including armchair-type surface terminations and coherent interfaces between assembled crystals. These observations allow us to understand how ZIF-8 crystals self-assemble and the subsequent influence of interfacial cavities on mass transport of guest molecules.

  13. A Medipix quantum area detector allows rotation electron diffraction data collection from submicrometre three-dimensional protein crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nederlof, Igor; Genderen, Eric van; Li, Yao-Wang; Abrahams, Jan Pieter, E-mail: abrahams@chem.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    An ultrasensitive Medipix2 detector allowed the collection of rotation electron-diffraction data from single three-dimensional protein nanocrystals for the first time. The data could be analysed using the standard X-ray crystallography programs MOSFLM and SCALA. When protein crystals are submicrometre-sized, X-ray radiation damage precludes conventional diffraction data collection. For crystals that are of the order of 100 nm in size, at best only single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected and rotation data collection has not been possible, irrespective of the diffraction technique used. Here, it is shown that at a very low electron dose (at most 0.1 e{sup −} Å{sup −2}), a Medipix2 quantum area detector is sufficiently sensitive to allow the collection of a 30-frame rotation series of 200 keV electron-diffraction data from a single ∼100 nm thick protein crystal. A highly parallel 200 keV electron beam (λ = 0.025 Å) allowed observation of the curvature of the Ewald sphere at low resolution, indicating a combined mosaic spread/beam divergence of at most 0.4°. This result shows that volumes of crystal with low mosaicity can be pinpointed in electron diffraction. It is also shown that strategies and data-analysis software (MOSFLM and SCALA) from X-ray protein crystallography can be used in principle for analysing electron-diffraction data from three-dimensional nanocrystals of proteins.

  14. A Medipix quantum area detector allows rotation electron diffraction data collection from submicrometre three-dimensional protein crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nederlof, Igor; Genderen, Eric van; Li, Yao-Wang; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasensitive Medipix2 detector allowed the collection of rotation electron-diffraction data from single three-dimensional protein nanocrystals for the first time. The data could be analysed using the standard X-ray crystallography programs MOSFLM and SCALA. When protein crystals are submicrometre-sized, X-ray radiation damage precludes conventional diffraction data collection. For crystals that are of the order of 100 nm in size, at best only single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected and rotation data collection has not been possible, irrespective of the diffraction technique used. Here, it is shown that at a very low electron dose (at most 0.1 e − Å −2 ), a Medipix2 quantum area detector is sufficiently sensitive to allow the collection of a 30-frame rotation series of 200 keV electron-diffraction data from a single ∼100 nm thick protein crystal. A highly parallel 200 keV electron beam (λ = 0.025 Å) allowed observation of the curvature of the Ewald sphere at low resolution, indicating a combined mosaic spread/beam divergence of at most 0.4°. This result shows that volumes of crystal with low mosaicity can be pinpointed in electron diffraction. It is also shown that strategies and data-analysis software (MOSFLM and SCALA) from X-ray protein crystallography can be used in principle for analysing electron-diffraction data from three-dimensional nanocrystals of proteins

  15. Secondary Electron Emission Materials for Transmission Dynodes in Novel Photomultipliers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Xia Tao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Secondary electron emission materials are reviewed with the aim of providing guidelines for the future development of novel transmission dynodes. Materials with reflection secondary electron yield higher than three and transmission secondary electron yield higher than one are tabulated for easy reference. Generations of transmission dynodes are listed in the order of the invention time with a special focus on the most recent atomic-layer-deposition synthesized transmission dynodes. Based on the knowledge gained from the survey of secondary election emission materials with high secondary electron yield, an outlook of possible improvements upon the state-of-the-art transmission dynodes is provided.

  16. Strain fields in crystalline solids: prediction and measurement of X- ray diffraction patterns and electron diffraction contrast images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, Teunis Cornelis

    2000-01-01

    Lattice imperfections, such as dislocations and misfitting particles, shift and/or broaden X-ray diffraction (XRD) line profiles. Most of the present analysis methods of the shift and broadening of XRD line profiles do not provide the characteristics of lattice imperfections. The main part of this

  17. Reassessment of the electron density in Cu2O using γ-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Wolfgang; Reehuis, Manfred

    2014-12-01

    The electron-density distribution in Cu2O has been critically reexamined to test controversial conclusions from earlier experimental and theoretical studies. The electron density is derived via multipole refinement of high-quality single-crystal diffraction data, collected at room temperature with 316.5 keV gamma radiation. Four γ-lines in the energy range 200-600 keV have been used to extrapolate extinction-free low-order structure factors. The remaining extinction corrections refine to a crystal mosaicity identical to the observed one. There is no support for anharmonic contributions to the thermal parameters. Important features of the derived electron density are (i) a partially filled d_{z^2} orbital, (ii) an incomplete ionization of Cu and O, and (iii) no interstitial Cu-Cu charge pileup, thereby refuting the covalent bonding hypothesis.

  18. Pulse shape and spectrum of coherent diffraction-limited transition radiation from electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Tilborg, J.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2003-12-20

    The electric field in the temporal and spectral domain of coherent diffraction-limited transition radiation is studied. An electron bunch, with arbitrary longitudinal momentum distribution, propagating at normal incidence to a sharp metal-vacuum boundary with finite transverse dimension is considered. A general expression for the spatiotemporal electric field of the transition radiation is derived, and closed-form solutions for several special cases are given. The influence of parameters such as radial boundary size, electron momentum distribution, and angle of observation on the waveform (e.g., radiation pulse length and amplitude) are discussed. For a Gaussian electron bunch, the coherent radiation waveform is shown to have a single-cycle profile. Application to a novel THz source based on a laser-driven accelerator is discussed.

  19. Strain mapping for the semiconductor industry by dark-field electron holography and nanobeam electron diffraction with nm resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, David; Hartmann, Jean Michel; Carron, Veronique; Béché, Armand; Rouvière, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    There is a requirement of the semiconductor industry to measure strain in semiconductor devices with nm-scale resolution. Here we show that dark-field electron holography and nanobeam electron diffraction (NBED) are both complementary techniques that can be used to determine the strain in these devices. We show two-dimensional strain maps acquired by dark holography and line profiles that have been acquired by NBED of recessed SiGe sources and drains with a variety of different gate lengths and Ge concentrations. We have also used dark-field electron holography to measure the evolution in strain during the silicidation process, showing that this can reduce the applied uniaxial compressive strain in the conduction channel by up to a factor of 3

  20. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of photocatalysts for water splitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalca, Filippo; Laursen, Anders Bo; Dahl, Søren

    , it is necessary to understand the fundamentals of their reaction mechanisms, chemical behavior, structure and morphology before, during and after reaction using in situ investigations. Here, we focus on the in situ characterization of photocatalysts [1] in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM......) [2]. Such fundamental insight can be used for further material optimization with respect to performance and stability [3]. In this work, we combine conventional TEM analysis of photocatalysts with environmental TEM (ETEM) and photoactivation using light. A novel type of TEM specimen holder...... that enables in situ illumination is developed to study light-induced phenomena in photoactive materials at the nanoscale under working conditions. Our experiments are aimed at exposing a specimen to light and detecting resulting microstructural and chemical changes using in situ TEM techniques...

  1. Visualization of bacterial polysaccharides by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolanski, B S; McAleer, W J; Hilleman, M R

    1983-04-01

    Highly purified capsular polysaccharides of Neisseria meningitidis groups A, B, and C have been visualized by high resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM). Spheroidal macromolecules approximately 200 A in diameter are characteristic of the Meningococcus A and C polysaccharides whereas filaments that are 400-600 A in length are found in Meningococcus B polysaccharide preparations. Filaments are occasionally found associated with the spheroidal Meningococcus A and C polysaccharides and it is proposed that these structures are composed of a long (1-4 microns) filament or filaments that are arranged in spheroidal molecules or micelles of high molecular weight. The Meningococcus B polysaccharide, by contrast, is a short flexuous filament or strand of relatively low molecular weight. A relationship between morphology and antigenicity is proposed.

  2. Transmission electron microscope sample holder with optical features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milas, Mirko [Port Jefferson, NY; Zhu, Yimei [Stony Brook, NY; Rameau, Jonathan David [Coram, NY

    2012-03-27

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  3. Transmission electron microscope cells for use with liquid samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Waqas; Alivisatos, Paul A.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-08-09

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and devices related to transmission electron microscopy cells for use with liquids. In one aspect a device includes a substrate, a first graphene layer, and a second graphene layer. The substrate has a first surface and a second surface. The first surface defines a first channel, a second channel, and an outlet channel. The first channel and the second channel are joined to the outlet channel. The outlet channel defines a viewport region forming a though hole in the substrate. The first graphene layer overlays the first surface of the substrate, including an interior area of the first channel, the second channel, and the outlet channel. The second graphene layer overlays the first surface of the substrate, including open regions defined by the first channel, the second channel, and the outlet channel.

  4. Fabrication and electric measurements of nanostructures inside transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Qing; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2011-01-01

    Using manipulation holders specially designed for transmission electron microscope (TEM), nanostructures can be characterized, measured, modified and even fabricated in-situ. In-situ TEM techniques not only enable real-time study of structure-property relationships of materials at atomic scale, but also provide the ability to control and manipulate materials and structures at nanoscale. This review highlights in-situ electric measurements and in-situ fabrication and structure modification using manipulation holder inside TEM. -- Research highlights: → We review in-situ works using manipulation holder in TEM. → In-situ electric measurements, fabrication and structure modification are focused. → We discuss important issues that should be considered for reliable results. → In-situ TEM is becoming a very powerful tool for many research fields.

  5. Multiobjective optimizations of a novel cryocooled dc gun based ultrafast electron diffraction beam line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colwyn Gulliford

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of multiobjective genetic algorithm optimizations of a single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction beam line utilizing a 225 kV dc gun with a novel cryocooled photocathode system and buncher cavity. Optimizations of the transverse projected emittance as a function of bunch charge are presented and discussed in terms of the scaling laws derived in the charge saturation limit. Additionally, optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of final rms bunch length at the sample location have been performed for three different sample radii: 50, 100, and 200  μm, for two final bunch charges: 10^{5} electrons (16 fC and 10^{6} electrons (160 fC. Example optimal solutions are analyzed, and the effects of disordered induced heating estimated. In particular, a relative coherence length of L_{c,x}/σ_{x}=0.27  nm/μm was obtained for a final bunch charge of 10^{5} electrons and final bunch length of σ_{t}≈100  fs. For a final charge of 10^{6} electrons the cryogun produces L_{c,x}/σ_{x}≈0.1  nm/μm for σ_{t}≈100–200  fs and σ_{x}≥50  μm. These results demonstrate the viability of using genetic algorithms in the design and operation of ultrafast electron diffraction beam lines.

  6. Surface structure of Bi2Se3(111) determined by low-energy electron diffraction and surface x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Reis, Diogo Duarte; Barreto, Lucas; Bianchi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The surface structure of the prototypical topological insulator Bi2Se3 is determined by low-energy electron diffraction and surface x-ray diffraction at room temperature. Both approaches show that the crystal is terminated by an intact quintuple layer. Specifically, an alternative termination by ...... by a bismuth bilayer is ruled out. Surface relaxations obtained by both techniques are in good agreement with each other and found to be small. This includes the relaxation of the van der Waals gap between the first two quintuple layers....

  7. A comparison of texture results obtained using precession electron diffraction and neutron diffraction methods at diminishing length scales in ordered bimetallic nanolamellar composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, J.S.; Liu, X.; Darbal, A.; Nuhfer, N.T.; McCabe, R.J.; Vogel, S.C.; LeDonne, J.E.; Rollett, A.D.; Barmak, K.; Beyerlein, I.J.; Mara, N.A.

    2012-01-01

    Precession electron diffraction (PED) is used to acquire orientation information in Cu–Nb nanolamellar composites fabricated by accumulative roll bonding (ARB). The resulting maps quantify the grain size, shape, orientation distributions and interface planes in the vicinity of nanometer-thick deformation twins. The PED-based texture results compare favorably with bulk textures provided by neutron diffraction measurements, indicating uniformity in the ARB Cu–Nb texture. Additionally, {1 1 2} Cu ||{1 1 2} Nb interfaces are present, suggesting that ARB techniques can lead to stable interfaces with a special crystallography.

  8. Study of electron transmission through thin metallic films by the electron moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babikova, Yu.F.; Vakar, O.M.; Gruzin, O.M.; Petrikin, Yu.V.

    1983-01-01

    Results of the experimental study of the transmission of conversion electrons through aluminium, iron, tin and gold films are presented. Absorption of resonance electrons of the Moessbauer nuclide 57 Fe, formed during target irradiation with γ-quanta of 57 Co source in chromium matrix has been studied. It is asserted that absorption of conversion electrons in films of different elements is similar; at that, like in the case of β-particles, the law of absorption of resonance electrons, emitted from the flat layer, is exponential For conversion electrons of the Moessbauer nuclide 57 Fe the absorption coefficient is (0.025+-0.002) cm 2 /μg, which in the case of iron absorbing film corresponds to (20.0+-1.0)x10 4 cm -1

  9. Semiconductor Quantum Electron Wave Transport, Diffraction, and Interference: Analysis, Device, and Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Gregory Newell

    Semiconductor device dimensions are rapidly approaching a fundamental limit where drift-diffusion equations and the depletion approximation are no longer valid. In this regime, quantum effects can dominate device response. To increase further device density and speed, new devices must be designed that use these phenomena to positive advantage. In addition, quantum effects provide opportunities for a new class of devices which can perform functions previously unattainable with "conventional" semiconductor devices. This thesis has described research in the analysis of electron wave effects in semiconductors and the development of methods for the design, fabrication, and characterization of quantum devices based on these effects. First, an exact set of quantitative analogies are presented which allow the use of well understood optical design and analysis tools for the development of electron wave semiconductor devices. Motivated by these analogies, methods are presented for modeling electron wave grating diffraction using both an exact rigorous coupled-wave analysis and approximate analyses which are useful for grating design. Example electron wave grating switch and multiplexer designs are presented. In analogy to thin-film optics, the design and analysis of electron wave Fabry-Perot interference filters are also discussed. An innovative technique has been developed for testing these (and other) electron wave structures using Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (BEEM). This technique uses a liquid-helium temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) to perform spectroscopy of the electron transmittance as a function of electron energy. Experimental results show that BEEM can resolve even weak quantum effects, such as the reflectivity of a single interface between materials. Finally, methods are discussed for incorporating asymmetric electron wave Fabry-Perot filters into optoelectronic devices. Theoretical and experimental results show that such structures could

  10. Assessing strain mapping by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy using wedge-indented Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Vaudin, Mark D.; Stranick, Stephan J.; Stan, Gheorghe; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Osborn, William; Cook, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) for small-scale strain mapping are assessed using the multi-axial strain field surrounding a wedge indentation in Si as a test vehicle. The strain field is modeled using finite element analysis (FEA) that is adapted to the near-indentation surface profile measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The assessment consists of (1) direct experimental comparisons of strain and deformation and (2) comparisons in which the modeled strain field is used as an intermediate step. Direct experimental methods (1) consist of comparisons of surface elevation and gradient measured by AFM and EBSD and of Raman shifts measured and predicted by CRM and EBSD, respectively. Comparisons that utilize the combined FEA–AFM model (2) consist of predictions of distortion, strain, and rotation for comparison with EBSD measurements and predictions of Raman shift for comparison with CRM measurements. For both EBSD and CRM, convolution of measurements in depth-varying strain fields is considered. The interconnected comparisons suggest that EBSD was able to provide an accurate assessment of the wedge indentation deformation field to within the precision of the measurements, approximately 2×10"−"4 in strain. CRM was similarly precise, but was limited in accuracy to several times this value. - Highlights: • We map strain by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy. • The test vehicle is the multi-axial strain field of wedge-indented silicon. • Strain accuracy is assessed by direct experimental intercomparison. • Accuracy is also assessed by atomic force microscopy and finite element analyses. • Electron diffraction measurements are accurate; Raman measurements need refinement.

  11. Assessing strain mapping by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy using wedge-indented Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Vaudin, Mark D.; Stranick, Stephan J.; Stan, Gheorghe; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Osborn, William; Cook, Robert F., E-mail: robert.cook@nist.gov

    2016-04-15

    The accuracy of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) for small-scale strain mapping are assessed using the multi-axial strain field surrounding a wedge indentation in Si as a test vehicle. The strain field is modeled using finite element analysis (FEA) that is adapted to the near-indentation surface profile measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The assessment consists of (1) direct experimental comparisons of strain and deformation and (2) comparisons in which the modeled strain field is used as an intermediate step. Direct experimental methods (1) consist of comparisons of surface elevation and gradient measured by AFM and EBSD and of Raman shifts measured and predicted by CRM and EBSD, respectively. Comparisons that utilize the combined FEA–AFM model (2) consist of predictions of distortion, strain, and rotation for comparison with EBSD measurements and predictions of Raman shift for comparison with CRM measurements. For both EBSD and CRM, convolution of measurements in depth-varying strain fields is considered. The interconnected comparisons suggest that EBSD was able to provide an accurate assessment of the wedge indentation deformation field to within the precision of the measurements, approximately 2×10{sup −4} in strain. CRM was similarly precise, but was limited in accuracy to several times this value. - Highlights: • We map strain by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy. • The test vehicle is the multi-axial strain field of wedge-indented silicon. • Strain accuracy is assessed by direct experimental intercomparison. • Accuracy is also assessed by atomic force microscopy and finite element analyses. • Electron diffraction measurements are accurate; Raman measurements need refinement.

  12. Burgers Vector Analysis of Vertical Dislocations in Ge Crystals by Large-Angle Convergent Beam Electron Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groiss, Heiko; Glaser, Martin; Marzegalli, Anna; Isa, Fabio; Isella, Giovanni; Miglio, Leo; Schäffler, Friedrich

    2015-06-01

    By transmission electron microscopy with extended Burgers vector analyses, we demonstrate the edge and screw character of vertical dislocations (VDs) in novel SiGe heterostructures. The investigated pillar-shaped Ge epilayers on prepatterned Si(001) substrates are an attempt to avoid the high defect densities of lattice mismatched heteroepitaxy. The Ge pillars are almost completely strain-relaxed and essentially defect-free, except for the rather unexpected VDs. We investigated both pillar-shaped and unstructured Ge epilayers grown either by molecular beam epitaxy or by chemical vapor deposition to derive a general picture of the underlying dislocation mechanisms. For the Burgers vector analysis we used a combination of dark field imaging and large-angle convergent beam electron diffraction (LACBED). With LACBED simulations we identify ideally suited zeroth and second order Laue zone Bragg lines for an unambiguous determination of the three-dimensional Burgers vectors. By analyzing dislocation reactions we confirm the origin of the observed types of VDs, which can be efficiently distinguished by LACBED. The screw type VDs are formed by a reaction of perfect 60° dislocations, whereas the edge types are sessile dislocations that can be formed by cross-slips and climbing processes. The understanding of these origins allows us to suggest strategies to avoid VDs.

  13. Low-energy positron and electron diffraction and positron-stimulated secondary electron emission from Cu(100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    The results of two series of experiments are reported. In the first, an electrostatically guided beam of low-energy (40-400 eV) positrons, delta/sub p/ was used to study low-energy positron diffraction (LEPD) from a Cu(100) surface under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) data were obtained from the same sample in the same apparatus. Comparison of LEPD and LEED intensity versus energy data with model calculations made using computer programs developed by C.B. Duke and collaborators indicated that: LEPD data is adequately modeled using potentials with no exchange-correlation term. The inelastic mean free path, lambda/sub ee/, is shorter for positrons than for electrons at low (< approx.80 eV). LEED is better than LEPD at making a determination of the first-layer spacing of Cu(100) for the particular data set reported. In the second set of experiments, the same apparatus and sample were used to compare positron- and electron-stimulated secondary-electron emission (PSSEE and ESSEE). The results were found to be consistent with existing models of secondary-electron production for metals. The energy distributions of secondary-electrons had broad low-energy (<10 eV) peaks for both positron and electron stimulation. But the PSEE distribution showed no elastic peak. Measurements of secondary-electron angular distributions, found to be cosine-like in both the PSSEE and ESSEE case, were used to obtain total secondary yield ratios, delta, at four beam energies ranging from 40-400 eV. The secondary yield ratio for primary positrons and the yield for primary electrons, delta/sub e/, were similar at these energies. For 400-eV primary particles the secondary yields were found to be delta/sub p/ = 0.94 +/- 0.12 and delta/sub e/ = 0.94 +/- 0./12, giving a ratio of unity for positron-stimulated secondary yield to electron-stimulated secondary yield

  14. Electron diffraction determination of 11.5 Å and HySo structures: candidate water carriers to the Upper Mantle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gemmi, M.; Merlini, M.; Palatinus, Lukáš; Fumagalli, P.; Hanfland, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 12 (2016), s. 2645-2654 ISSN 0003-004X Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : subduction * MASH system * electron diffraction tomography Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 2.021, year: 2016

  15. Complex (Nonstandard) Six-Layer Polytypes of Lizardite Revealed from Oblique-Texture Electron Diffraction Patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukhlistov, A.P.; Zinchuk, N.N.; Kotel'nikov, D.D.

    2004-01-01

    Association of simple (1T and 3R) and two complex (nonstandard) orthogonal polytypes of the serpentine mineral lizardite from the Catoca kimberlite pipe (West Africa) association is revealed from oblique-texture electron diffraction patterns. A six-layer polytype with an ordered superposition of equally oriented layers (notation 3 2 3 2 3 4 3 4 3 6 3 6 or ++ - -00) belonging to the structural group A and a three-layer (336 or I,I,II) or a six-layer (336366 or I,I,II,I,II,II) polytype with alternating oppositely oriented layers and semi-disordered structure are identified using polytype analysis

  16. Accurate measurement of the orientation relationship of lath martensite and bainite by electron backscatter diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, G.; Takayama, N.; Furuhara, T.

    2009-01-01

    A new method to determine the orientation relationship between martensite and bainite with the parent austenite is developed based on electron backscatter diffraction analysis. This method can determine the orientation relationship accurately without the presence of retained austenite, and is applicable to lath martensite and bainite in low-alloyed carbon steels. The angles between close-packed directions are about 3 o for lath martensite regardless of the carbon content, while the angles between close-packed planes become smaller with increasing carbon content.

  17. Novel radio-frequency gun structures for ultrafast relativistic electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Faillace, L; Fukasawa, A; Moody, J T; O'Shea, B; Rosenzweig, J B; Scoby, C M

    2009-08-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) photoinjector-based relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a promising new technique that has the potential to probe structural changes at the atomic scale with sub-100 fs temporal resolution in a single shot. We analyze the limitations on the temporal and spatial resolution of this technique considering the operating parameters of a standard 1.6 cell RF gun (which is the RF photoinjector used for the first experimental tests of relativistic UED at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; University of California, Los Angeles; Brookhaven National Laboratory), and study the possibility of employing novel RF structures to circumvent some of these limits.

  18. Development of wave length-dispersive soft x-ray emission spectrometers for transmission electron microscopes - an introduction of valence electron spectroscopy for transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terauchi, Masami; Koike, Masato; Fukushima, Kurio; Kimura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Two types of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray spectrometers, a high-dispersion type and a conventional one, for transmission electron microscopes were constructed. Those spectrometers were used to study the electronic states of valence electrons (bonding electrons). Both spectrometers extended the acceptable energy regions to higher than 2000 eV. The best energy resolution of 0.08 eV was obtained for an Al L-emission spectrum by using the high-dispersion type spectrometer. By using the spectrometer, C K-emission of carbon allotropes, Cu L-emission of Cu 1-x Zn x alloys and Pt M-emission spectra were presented. The FWHM value of 12 eV was obtained for the Pt Mα-emission peak. The performance of the conventional one was also presented for ZnS and a section specimen of a multilayer device. W-M and Si-K emissions were clearly resolved. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has an advantage for obtaining spectra from a single crystalline specimen with a defined crystal setting. As an example of anisotropic soft X-ray emission, C K-emission spectra of single crystalline graphite with different crystal settings were presented. From the spectra, density of states of π- and σ-bondings were separately derived. These results demonstrated a method to analyse the electronic states of valence electrons of materials in the nanometre scale based on TEM. (author)

  19. Understanding deformation with high angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, T. B.; Hickey, J. L. R.

    2018-01-01

    High angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) affords an increase in angular resolution, as compared to ‘conventional’ Hough transform based EBSD, of two orders of magnitude, enabling measurements of relative misorientations of 1 x 10-4 rads (~ 0.006°) and changes in (deviatoric) lattice strain with a precision of 1 x 10-4. This is achieved through direct comparison of two or more diffraction patterns using sophisticated cross-correlation based image analysis routines. Image shifts between zone axes in the two-correlated diffraction pattern are measured with sub-pixel precision and this realises the ability to measure changes in interplanar angles and lattice orientation with a high degree of sensitivity. These shifts are linked to strains and lattice rotations through simple geometry. In this manuscript, we outline the basis of the technique and two case studies that highlight its potential to tackle real materials science challenges, such as deformation patterning in polycrystalline alloys.

  20. Towards a full retrieval of the deformation tensor F using convergent beam electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Y. [CEA, INAC-SP2M, LEMMA, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Rouviere, J.L., E-mail: jean-luc.rouviere@cea.fr [CEA, INAC-SP2M, LEMMA, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Zuo, J.M. [Department of Material Science and Engineering and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Favre-Nicolin, V. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SP2M, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SP2M, LEMMA, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2016-01-15

    A new method to retrieve the local lattice parameters and rotations in a crystal from off-axis convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns is presented and validated using Bloch wave dynamical simulations. The originality of the method is to use both the diffracted and transmitted beams and to use kinematical approximations in the fitting algorithm. The study is based on the deformation gradient tensor F which includes rotation and strain. Working on simulated images it is shown that (i) from a single direction of observation, seven parameters out of the nine parameters of F can be determined with an accuracy of 3×10{sup −4} for the normal strain parameters ε{sub xx}, ε{sub yy}, and ε{sub zz}, (ii) the unit cell volume can only be retrieved if the diffracted and transmitted beams are both included in the fitting and (iii) all the nine parameters of F can be determined by combining two directions of observation separated by about 20°. - Highlights: • New CBED strain retrieval method using both deficient and excess HOLZ lines. • From a single CBED pattern, the unit cell volume can be measured without ambiguity. • From a single pattern, seven parameters of the deformation tensor F can be determined. • From two patterns from two directions separated by 20°, the nine parameters are retrieved. • Algorithm validated using dynamical simulations.

  1. Spatially resolved determination of lattice distortions in silicon nanostructures by means of electron-backscattering diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In the submitted thesis, a novel combined approach of both focused ion beam (FIB) based target preparation and strain determination using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in semiconductor nanostructures is presented. In the first part, a powerful cross-correlation algorithm for detecting small feature shifts within EBSD patterns and, consequently, determining the strain, is presented. The corresponding strain sensitivity is demonstrated using dynamically simulated diffraction patterns. Furthermore, novel procedures for automated pattern analysis are introduced. Results of systematic studies concerning the influence of ion species, ion energy and dose density on the surface quality of silicon surfaces are presented in the second part. For that matter, the assessment of surface amorphization and rippling is based on high resolution microstructural diagnostics (TEM, AFM, Raman) and molecular dynamics simulation. The high application potential of combined FIB preparation and strain analysis using EBSD is exemplarily demonstrated for a 60 nm thick sSOI-sample. The good agreement with established techniques like Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction is also shown.

  2. Synchrotron Bragg diffraction imaging characterization of synthetic diamond crystals for optical and electronic power device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Thi, Thu Nhi; Morse, J; Caliste, D; Fernandez, B; Eon, D; Härtwig, J; Barbay, C; Mer-Calfati, C; Tranchant, N; Arnault, J C; Lafford, T A; Baruchel, J

    2017-04-01

    Bragg diffraction imaging enables the quality of synthetic single-crystal diamond substrates and their overgrown, mostly doped, diamond layers to be characterized. This is very important for improving diamond-based devices produced for X-ray optics and power electronics applications. The usual first step for this characterization is white-beam X-ray diffraction topography, which is a simple and fast method to identify the extended defects (dislocations, growth sectors, boundaries, stacking faults, overall curvature etc. ) within the crystal. This allows easy and quick comparison of the crystal quality of diamond plates available from various commercial suppliers. When needed, rocking curve imaging (RCI) is also employed, which is the quantitative counterpart of monochromatic Bragg diffraction imaging. RCI enables the local determination of both the effective misorientation, which results from lattice parameter variation and the local lattice tilt, and the local Bragg position. Maps derived from these parameters are used to measure the magnitude of the distortions associated with polishing damage and the depth of this damage within the volume of the crystal. For overgrown layers, these maps also reveal the distortion induced by the incorporation of impurities such as boron, or the lattice parameter variations associated with the presence of growth-incorporated nitrogen. These techniques are described, and their capabilities for studying the quality of diamond substrates and overgrown layers, and the surface damage caused by mechanical polishing, are illustrated by examples.

  3. Scanning transmission electron microscopy: Albert Crewe's vision and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L.; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Murfitt, Matthew F.; Dellby, Niklas

    2012-01-01

    Some four decades were needed to catch up with the vision that Albert Crewe and his group had for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in the nineteen sixties and seventies: attaining 0.5 Å resolution, and identifying single atoms spectroscopically. With these goals now attained, STEM developments are turning toward new directions, such as rapid atomic resolution imaging and exploring atomic bonding and electronic properties of samples at atomic resolution. The accomplishments and the future challenges are reviewed and illustrated with practical examples. -- Highlights: ► TV-rate STEM imaging of heavy atoms is demonstrated. ► DNA sequencing by STEM dark field imaging should be possible at a rate of 10 6 bases/s. ► Individual silicon atom impurities in graphene are imaged atom-by-atom. ► Single atoms of nitrogen and boron incorporated in graphene are imaged spectroscopically. ► Bonding of individual atoms can be probed by analyzing the fine structures of their EEL spectra.

  4. Thin dielectric film thickness determination by advanced transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, A.C.; Foran, B.; Kisielowski, C.; Muller, D.; Pennycook, S.; Principe, E.; Stemmer, S.

    2003-09-01

    High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) has been used as the ultimate method of thickness measurement for thin films. The appearance of phase contrast interference patterns in HR-TEM images has long been confused as the appearance of a crystal lattice by non-specialists. Relatively easy to interpret crystal lattice images are now directly observed with the introduction of annular dark field detectors for scanning TEM (STEM). With the recent development of reliable lattice image processing software that creates crystal structure images from phase contrast data, HR-TEM can also provide crystal lattice images. The resolution of both methods was steadily improved reaching now into the sub Angstrom region. Improvements in electron lens and image analysis software are increasing the spatial resolution of both methods. Optimum resolution for STEM requires that the probe beam be highly localized. In STEM, beam localization is enhanced by selection of the correct aperture. When STEM measurement is done using a highly localized probe beam, HR-TEM and STEM measurement of the thickness of silicon oxynitride films agree within experimental error. In this paper, the optimum conditions for HR-TEM and STEM measurement are discussed along with a method for repeatable film thickness determination. The impact of sample thickness is also discussed. The key result in this paper is the proposal of a reproducible method for film thickness determination.

  5. High-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennycook, S.J.; Jesson, D.E.

    1992-03-01

    The high-resolution imaging of crystalline materials in the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is reviewed with particular emphasis on the conditions under which an incoherent image can be obtained. It is shown that a high-angle annular detector can be used to break the coherence of the imaging process, in the transverse plane through the geometry of the detector, or in three dimensions if multiphonon diffuse scattering is detected. In the latter case, each atom can be treated as a highly independent source of high-angle scattering. The most effective fast electron states are therefore tightly bound s-type Bloch states. Furthermore, they add constructively for each incident angle in the coherent STEM probe, so that s states are responsible for practically the entire image contrast. Dynamical effects are largely removed, and almost perfect incoherent imaging is achieved. s states are relatively insensitive to neighboring strings, so that incoherent imaging is maintained for superlattice and interfaces, and supercell calculations are unnecessary. With an optimum probe profile, the incoherent image represents a direct image of the crystal projection, with compositional sensitivity built in through the strong dependence of the scattering cross sections on atomic number Z

  6. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  7. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Bombyx Mori Silk Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y.; Martin, D. C.

    1997-03-01

    The microstructure of B. Mori silk fibers before and after degumming was examined by TEM, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), WAXS and low voltage SEM. SEM micrographs of the neat cocoon revealed a network of pairs of twisting filaments. After degumming, there were only individual filaments showing a surface texture consistent with an oriented fibrillar structure in the fiber interior. WAXS patterns confirmed the oriented beta-sheet crystal structure common to silkworm and spider silks. Low dose SAED results were fully consistent with the WAXS data, and revealed that the crystallographic texture did not vary significantly across the fiber diameter. TEM observations of microtomed fiber cross sections indicated a somewhat irregular shape, and also revealed a 0.5-2 micron sericin coating which was removed by the degumming process. TEM observations of the degummed silk fiber showed banded features with a characteristic spacing of nominally 600 nm along the fiber axis. These bands were oriented in a roughly parabolic or V-shape pointing along one axis within a given fiber. We hypothesize that this orientation is induced by the extrusion during the spinning process. Equatorial DF images revealed that axial and lateral sizes of the β-sheet crystallites in silk fibroin ranged from 20 to 170 nm and from 1 to 24 nm, respectively. Crazes developed in the degummed silk fiber parallel to the fiber direction. The formation of these crazes suggests that there are significant lateral interactions between fibrils in silk fibers.

  8. Applying Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD) to Understand Nanogranular Fault Rock Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. A. F.; Demurtas, M.; Prior, D. J.; Di Toro, G.

    2017-12-01

    Nanoparticles (transparent foils with resolutions that can be below 10 nm. Therefore, the potential of TKD to understand deformation processes in nanoparticles is very high. We present results of TKD analysis performed on mixed calcite-dolomite gouges deformed in a rotary-shear apparatus at slip rates ranging from sub-seismic to co-seismic (30 µm/s to 1 m/s). Samples for TKD were prepared by argon ion slicing, a method that yields relatively large (104 µm2) electron transparent areas, as well as standard argon ion milling. Coupled TKD-EDS analysis allows quantification of elemental contents at a scale of tens of nanometers. Preliminary results show that at a slip velocity of 1 m/s, the localized slip zone that forms in the gouges during shearing is composed of recrystallized grains of calcite and Mg-calcite (the latter being a decarbonation product of dolomite) with an average grain size of c. 300 nm. Individual grains are characterized by relatively straight boundaries, and many triple and quadruple grain junctions are present. The nanogranular aggregates show a polygonised texture with absence of clear porosity and shape preferred orientation. Orientation data show a random distribution of the calcite c-axes. Further investigation will help to obtain new insights into the deformation mechanisms active during seismic faulting in carbonate-bearing faults. The integration of grain size, grain shape and crystallographic information into flow laws will help to describe and predict the rheological behaviour of carbonate faults during seismic sliding.

  9. Practical Approaches to Mitigation of Specimen Charging in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Min Kim

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Specimen charging that is associated with the electron bombardment on the sample is a practical hindrance to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM analysis because it causes a severe loss of resolution in either diffraction or image data. Conductive thin film deposition on an insulating specimen has been proposed as an effective approach to the mitigation of the specimen charging; however, this method is generally not useful in HRTEM imaging of materials because the deposited film induces another artifact in the HRTEM image contrast. In this study, we propose practical methods to mitigate the specimen charging that takes place during the HRTEM of materials. For bulk-type specimens prepared by either an ion-thinning or focused-ion beam (FIB process, a plasma cleaning treatment is significantly effective in eliminating the charging phenomenon. In the case of low-dimensional nanomaterials such as nanowires and nanoparticles, the plasma cleaning is not feasible; however, the charging effect can be effectively eliminated by adjusting the electron illumination condition. The proposed methods facilitate a decrease in the buildup of specimen charging, thereby enhancing the quality of high-resolution images significantly.

  10. Direct nanofabrication and transmission electron microscopy on a suite of easy-to-prepare ultrathin film substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, Daniel B.; Zin, Melvin T.; Ma, Hong; Sarikaya, Mehmet; Baneyx, Francois; Jen, Alex K.-Y.; Schwartz, Daniel T.

    2007-01-01

    A high-yield, easy to master method for preparing electron transparent metal, oxide, and carbon ultrathin film substrates suitable for direct nano/micro-fabrication and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is presented. To demonstrate the versatility of these substrates for fabrication processes, we use e-beam lithography, self-assembled colloidal and protein templates, and microcontact printing to create patterned masks for subsequent electrodeposition of two dimensional and three dimensional structures. The electrodeposited structures range in scale from a few nanometers to a few micrometers in characteristic dimensions. Because fabrication occurs directly on ultrathin films, TEM analysis of the resulting materials and buried interfaces is straightforward without any destructive sample preparation. We show that all the normal TEM analytical methods (imaging, diffraction, electron and X-ray spectroscopies) are compatible with the fabricated structures and the thin film substrates. These electron transparent substrates have largely rendered the need for TEM sample preparation on fabricated structures obsolete in our lab

  11. Electron backscatter diffraction as a useful method for alloys microstructure characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimek, Leszek; Pietrzyk, Bozena

    2004-11-17

    Microstructure examination of cast Co-Cr-Mo alloy is presented in this paper. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the alloy were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). An identification of alloy phases was carried out using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Two different kinds of precipitates in metallic matrix were found. They were identified as MC and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} type of carbides in Co-lattice solid solution. The advantages and limits of the EBSD method are described. It is presented that EBSD, as excellent tool for phase identification, is a valuable supplementary method for materials research.

  12. First measurements of subpicosecond electron beam structure by autocorrelation of coherent diffraction radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Lumpkin, Alex H; Rule, D W

    2001-01-01

    We report the initial measurements of subpicosecond electron beam structure using a nonintercepting technique based on the autocorrelation of coherent diffraction radiation (CDR). A far infrared (FIR) Michelson interferometer with a Golay detector was used to obtain the autocorrelation. The radiation was generated by a thermionic rf gun beam at 40 MeV as it passed through a 5-mm-tall slit/aperture in a metal screen whose surface was at 45 deg. to the beam direction. For the observed bunch lengths of about 450 fs (FWHM) with a shorter time spike on the leading edge, peak currents of about 100 A are indicated. Also a model was developed and used to calculate the CDR from the back of two metal strips separated by a 5-mm vertical gap. The demonstrated nonintercepting aspect of this method could allow on-line bunch length characterizations to be done during free-electron laser experiments.

  13. Digital acquisition and processing of electron micrographs using a scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, A.; Christen, F.; Michel, B.

    1981-01-01

    A digital acquisition system that collects multichannel information from a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and its application are described. The hardware comprises (i) single electron counting detectors, (ii) a digital scan generator, (iii) a digital multi-channel on-line processor, (iv) an interface to a minicomputer, and (v) a display system. Experimental results characterizing these components are presented, and their performance is discussed. The software includes assembler coded programs for dynamic file maintenance and fast acquisition of image data, a display driver, and FORTRAN coded application programs. The usefulness of digitized STEM is illustrated by a variety of biological applications. (orig.)

  14. Atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy of electron beam–sensitive crystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daliang; Zhu, Yihan; Liu, Lingmei; Ying, Xiangrong; Hsiung, Chia-En; Sougrat, Rachid; Li, Kun; Han, Yu

    2018-02-01

    High-resolution imaging of electron beam–sensitive materials is one of the most difficult applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The challenges are manifold, including the acquisition of images with extremely low beam doses, the time-constrained search for crystal zone axes, the precise image alignment, and the accurate determination of the defocus value. We develop a suite of methods to fulfill these requirements and acquire atomic-resolution TEM images of several metal organic frameworks that are generally recognized as highly sensitive to electron beams. The high image resolution allows us to identify individual metal atomic columns, various types of surface termination, and benzene rings in the organic linkers. We also apply our methods to other electron beam–sensitive materials, including the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbBr3.

  15. Atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy of electron beam–sensitive crystalline materials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Daliang

    2018-01-18

    High-resolution imaging of electron beam-sensitive materials is one of the most difficult applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The challenges are manifold, including the acquisition of images with extremely low beam doses, the time-constrained search for crystal zone axes, the precise image alignment, and the accurate determination of the defocus value. We develop a suite of methods to fulfill these requirements and acquire atomic-resolution TEM images of several metal organic frameworks that are generally recognized as highly sensitive to electron beams. The high image resolution allows us to identify individual metal atomic columns, various types of surface termination, and benzene rings in the organic linkers. We also apply our methods to other electron beam–sensitive materials, including the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbBr3.

  16. Surface structure of VN0.89(100) determined by low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, Y.; Joly, Y.; Rundgren, J.; Johansson, L.I.; Wincott, P.

    1990-01-01

    The structure of the (100) surface of substoichiometric vanadium nitride was studied by low-energy electron diffraction on a VN 0.89 (100) sample. A simple 1x1 (100) diffractogram was observed. To describe the electron scattering in substoichiometric VN we apply the averaged t-matrix approximation to the nitrogen atoms. We find that the best structural model is one having no nitrogen vacancies in the surface region. It turns out that the first layer is rippled with the N atoms displaced 0.17 A above the subplane of V atoms, that the spacing between this subplane and the second layer is 1.92 A, and that the spacing between the second and the third layer is 2.08 A. In relation to the (100) spacing of the bulk, 2.06 A, these spacings are 6.8% contracted and 1% expanded, respectively. The Debye temperature of VN is found to be 660 K in good agreement with a prediction from entropy data and from neutron diffraction and helium-ion channeling experiments

  17. ESCA and electron diffraction studies of InP surface heated under As molecular beam exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Shibukawa, Atsushi

    1983-01-01

    Chemical composition of InP substrate surface heattreated under As molecular beam exposure in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber was studied with ESCA, and surface reconstruction of the substrate was examined by in-situ electron diffraction. The InP substrate heated under the exposure of As molecular beam has mirror surface up to 590 0 C while the surface of InP heated above 400 0 C in vacuum is roughened. The ESCA study shows that thin InAs layer (thickness 0 C under the exposure of As. The electron diffraction study indicates that the InP is cleaned at about 500 0 C in As pressures of 10 -7 - 10 -5 Torr. The InP surface is prevented from thermally decomposing by the coverage of the InAs layer, which may be formed through the following process: 2InPO 4 + As 4 → 2InAs + P 2 O 5 + As 2 O 3 . (author)

  18. First indication of the coherent unipolar diffraction radiation generated by relativistic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, G.; Shevelev, M.

    2018-05-01

    As is generally known, the integral of the electric field strength over all time for usual (bipolar) radiation is zero. The first demonstration of the possibility of unipolar radiation generation has been considered theoretically by Bessonov in 1981 [E.G. Bessonov, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 80 (1981) 852]. According to this work, the unipolar radiation (or strange electromagnetic waves) is radiation for which the integral of the electric field strength over the entire duration of a pulse differs significantly from zero. Later, several theoretical papers devoted to this phenomenon have appeared in the literature, where authors investigated mainly synchrotron radiation. However, despite the critical interest, the experimental investigations ignored this effect. In this paper we present results of the first experimental investigation of the unipolar radiation generated by a relativistic electron beam. To detect the unipolar radiation the detector that is sensitive to the selected direction of the electric field strength has been elaborated and tested. We used a designed detector to observe the coherent backward diffraction radiation appearing when a bunched electron beam travels in the vicinity of a flat conductive target. The asymmetry of the electric field strength of the coherent backward diffraction radiation has been demonstrated.

  19. 'Diffraction-free' optical beams in inverse free electron laser accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, S.Y.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Marshall, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    'Diffraction-free' optical beams correspond to exact solutions of the wave equation in free space with the remarkable property that they propagate with negligible transverse spreading for distances much larger than the Rayleigh range. The requirement for this to occur is a large aperture. Using a 2D computer code, we find that these optical beams will also propagate with negligible diffraction even when perturbed by the electron beam in an IFEL; indeed they match well the FEL requirement for the accelerator. The numerical simulations are performed for the proposed facility at Brookhaven in which λ s =10 μm, B=1.5 T (linearly tapered l w =1.31-6.28 cm) and the optical beam power is either 8x10 11 W or 2.3x10 10 W. Approximately 70% of the electrons constituting a beam of current 5 mA or 15 A, radius 0.14 mm and initial energy of 50 MeV is accelerated at 50 MeV/m. (orig.)

  20. Induced magnetic anisotropy in Si-free nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials: A transmission x-ray diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, R., E-mail: rparsons01@gmail.com; Suzuki, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Yanai, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Kishimoto, H.; Kato, A. [Toyota Motor Corporation, Mishuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan); Ohnuma, M. [Faculty and Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    In order to better understand the origin of field-induced anisotropy (K{sub u}) in Si-free nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloys, the lattice spacing of the bcc-Fe phase in nanocrystalline Fe{sub 94−x}Nb{sub 6}B{sub x} (x = 10, 12, 14) alloys annealed under an applied magnetic field has been investigated by X-ray diffraction in transmission geometry (t-XRD) with the diffraction vector parallel and perpendicular to the field direction. The saturation magnetostriction (λ{sub s}) of nanocrystalline Fe{sub 94−x}Nb{sub 6}B{sub x} was found to increase linearly with the volume fraction of the residual amorphous phase and is well described by taking into account the volume-weighted average of two local λ{sub s} values for the bcc-Fe nanocrystallites (−5 ± 2 ppm) and the residual amorphous matrix (+8 ± 2 ppm). The lattice distortion required to produce the measured K{sub u} values (∼100 J/m{sup 3}) was estimated via the inverse magnetostrictive effect using the measured λ{sub s} values and was compared to the lattice spacing estimations made by t-XRD. The lattice strain required to produce K{sub u} under the magnetoelastic model was not observed by the t-XRD experiments and so the findings of this study suggest that the origin of magnetic field induced K{sub u} cannot be explained through the magnetoelastic effect.

  1. Direct observation of the formation of silver precipitations by means of electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, V.; Ostwald, R.; Weil, K.G.

    1976-01-01

    Thin films (20-1,000 A) of copper (I)-, silver, and lead(II)-halides were prepared by evaporation onto silver (III), gold (III), and PbTe (III)-surfaces. These films were irradiated in vacuo with 40 kV-electrons, in some cases also with the light of a Xenon-lamp. At the same time the diffraction pattern, produced by the electron beam at glancing incidence, was observed and registered photographically. Silver precipitates could be detected by their diffraction pattern, when the crystallites had grown to a size of about 50 A. From all materials investigated silveriodide showed maximum sensitivity. The precipitates formed show no orientation with respect to the host crystal. From the temperature dependence of the sensitivity an activation energy of 0.12 eV can be deduced leading to interstitial ion migration as rate determining step. Pure silverchloride can not been radiolyzed by 40 kV-electrons. After doping it with 0.3 mol% CaCl 2 or MgCl 2 it becomes very sensitive. The precipitate showes orientation with respect to the host lattice. Also pure CuJ is resistant against the electron beam. Mixed crystals (Ag, Cu)J with xsub(AgJ) > 0.5 behave similar as pure AgJ. Pb(II)-halides show no sensitivity, but the compounds AgBr x 2 PbBr 2 and 5 AgJ x PbJ 2 are readily radiolyzed, forming polycrystalline silver precipitates. The mechanism of radiolysis, its dependency on temperature and film thickness is discussed. (orig.) [de

  2. Electron beam dynamics in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope with Wehnelt electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücker, K; Picher, M; Crégut, O; LaGrange, T; Reed, B W; Park, S T; Masiel, D J; Banhart, F

    2016-12-01

    High temporal resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques have shown significant progress in recent years. Using photoelectron pulses induced by ultrashort laser pulses on the cathode, these methods can probe ultrafast materials processes and have revealed numerous dynamic phenomena at the nanoscale. Most recently, the technique has been implemented in standard thermionic electron microscopes that provide a flexible platform for studying material's dynamics over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In this study, the electron pulses in such an ultrafast transmission electron microscope are characterized in detail. The microscope is based on a thermionic gun with a Wehnelt electrode and is operated in a stroboscopic photoelectron mode. It is shown that the Wehnelt bias has a decisive influence on the temporal and energy spread of the picosecond electron pulses. Depending on the shape of the cathode and the cathode-Wehnelt distance, different emission patterns with different pulse parameters are obtained. The energy spread of the pulses is determined by space charge and Boersch effects, given by the number of electrons in a pulse. However, filtering effects due to the chromatic aberrations of the Wehnelt electrode allow the extraction of pulses with narrow energy spreads. The temporal spread is governed by electron trajectories of different length and in different electrostatic potentials. High temporal resolution is obtained by excluding shank emission from the cathode and aberration-induced halos in the emission pattern. By varying the cathode-Wehnelt gap, the Wehnelt bias, and the number of photoelectrons in a pulse, tradeoffs between energy and temporal resolution as well as beam intensity can be made as needed for experiments. Based on the characterization of the electron pulses, the optimal conditions for the operation of ultrafast TEMs with thermionic gun assembly are elaborated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Collaborative Research and Development. Delivery Order 0006: Transmission Electron Microscope Image Modeling and Semiconductor Heterointerface Characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahalingam, Krishnamurthy

    2006-01-01

    .... Transmission electron microscope (TEM) characterization studies were performed on a variety of novel III-V semiconductor heterostructures being developed for advanced optoelectronic device applications...

  4. In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the interfacial reaction between Ni and Al during rapid heating in a nanocalorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grapes, Michael D., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Material Measurement Laboratory, Materials Measurement Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Woll, Karsten [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Institute of Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); LaVan, David A., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Material Measurement Laboratory, Materials Measurement Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Weihs, Timothy P., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Al/Ni formation reaction is highly exothermic and of both scientific and technological significance. In this report, we study the evolution of intermetallic phases in this reaction at a heating rate of 830 K/s. 100-nm-thick Al/Ni bilayers were deposited onto nanocalorimeter sensors that enable the measurement of temperature and heat flow during rapid heating. Time-resolved transmission electron diffraction patterns captured simultaneously with thermal measurements allow us to identify the intermetallic phases present and reconstruct the phase transformation sequence as a function of time and temperature. The results show a mostly unaltered phase transformation sequence compared to lower heating rates.

  5. Analytical Electron Diffraction from Iii-V and II-Vi Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellward, Paul

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis describes the development and evaluation of a number of new TEM-based techniques for the measurement of composition in ternary III-V and II-VI semiconductors. New methods of polarity determination in binary and ternary compounds are also presented. The theory of high energy electron diffraction is outlined, with particular emphasis on zone axis diffraction from well-defined strings. An account of TEM microstructural studies of Cd_{rm x}Hg _{rm 1-x}Te and CdTe epitaxial layers, which provided the impetus for developing the diffraction-based analytical techniques, is given. The wide range of TEM-based compositional determination techniques is described. The use of HOLZ deficiency lines to infer composition from a lattice parameter measurement is evaluated. In the case of Cd_{ rm x}Hg_{rm 1-x}Te, it is found to be inferior to other techniques developed. Studies of dynamical aspects of HOLZ diffraction can yield information about the dispersion surface from which a measure of composition may be obtained. This technique is evaluated for Al_{rm x}Ga_{rm 1-x} As, in which it is found to be of some use, and for Cd_{rm x}Hg _{rm 1-x}Te, in which the large Debye-Waller factor associated with mercury in discovered to render the method of little value. A number of critical voltages may be measured in medium voltage TEMs. The (111) zone axis critical voltage of Cd_{rm x}Hg _{rm 1-x}Te is found to vary significantly with x and forms the basis of an accurate technique for composition measurement in that ternary compound. Other critical voltage phenomena are investigated. In Al _{rm x}Ga_ {rm 1-x}As and other light ternaries, a non-systematic critical voltage is found to vary with x, providing a good indicator of composition. Critical voltage measurements may be made by conventional CBED or by various other techniques, which may also simultaneously yield information on the spatial variation of composition. The

  6. AIMgSil Alloy Characterization Using Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masrukan; Elman, P.

    1996-01-01

    The aging alloy of AIMgSil containing Mg 2 Si of 1.29 % has been done with the following steps: e.q (a) part of the specimen was heated at 400 o C during 3 hours, and (b) the other part was done with solution treatment at 550 o C followed by quenching. After quenching a part of the specimen was aged at room temperature and other specimen was aged at 160 o C during 16 hours. After the specimen had been heated, then it was shaped into thin foil to be examined by Transmission Electron Microscope. The result showed that the heating at temperature of 400 o C during 3 hours created a second phase (i.e.Mg 2 Si) was like stick shape with the hexagonal structure at [0111] orientation and matrix [001], and the hardness was 31 HB. The aging of specimen at room temperature gave result a GP zone which was like the needles shape in the dislocation area of the face center cubic structure at [111] orientation and [111] matrix. The hardness obtained was 64 HB. In the other hand the aging process at temperature of 160 o C within 16 hours have resulted the precipitate which was greater than that of the former needle shaped as the face center cubic structure without dislocation at matrix with [111] orientation and [114] matrix. The hardness at this condition was 94 HB

  7. Visualizing aquatic bacteria by light and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thiago P; Noyma, Natália P; Duque, Thabata L A; Gamalier, Juliana P; Vidal, Luciana O; Lobão, Lúcia M; Chiarini-Garcia, Hélio; Roland, Fábio; Melo, Rossana C N

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of the functional role of aquatic bacteria in microbial food webs is largely dependent on methods applied to the direct visualization and enumeration of these organisms. While the ultrastructure of aquatic bacteria is still poorly known, routine observation of aquatic bacteria by light microscopy requires staining with fluorochromes, followed by filtration and direct counting on filter surfaces. Here, we used a new strategy to visualize and enumerate aquatic bacteria by light microscopy. By spinning water samples from varied tropical ecosystems in a cytocentrifuge, we found that bacteria firmly adhere to regular slides, can be stained by fluorochoromes with no background formation and fast enumerated. Significant correlations were found between the cytocentrifugation and filter-based methods. Moreover, preparations through cytocentrifugation were more adequate for bacterial viability evaluation than filter-based preparations. Transmission electron microscopic analyses revealed a morphological diversity of bacteria with different internal and external structures, such as large variation in the cell envelope and capsule thickness, and presence or not of thylakoid membranes. Our results demonstrate that aquatic bacteria represent an ultrastructurally diverse population and open avenues for easy handling/quantification and better visualization of bacteria by light microscopy without the need of filter membranes.

  8. Observations of silicon carbide by high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.J.; Jepps, N.W.; Page, T.F.

    1978-01-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques, principally involving direct lattice imaging, have been used as part of a study of the crystallography and phase transformation mechanics of silicon carbide polytypes. In particular, the 3C (cubic) and 6H (hexagonal) polytypes have been examined together with partially transformed structural mixtures. Although direct observation of two-dimensional atomic structures was not possible at an operating voltage of 100 kV, considerable microstructural information has been obtained by careful choice of the experimental conditions. In particular, tilted beam observations of the 0.25 nm lattice fringes have been made in the 3C polytype for two different brace 111 brace plane arrays in order to study the dimensions and coherency of finely-twinned regions together with brace 0006 brace and brace 1 0 bar1 2 brace lattice images in the 6H polytype which allow the detailed stacking operations to be resolved. Lower resolution lattice images formed with axial illumination have also been used to study the nature of the 3C → 6H transformation and results are presented showing that the transformation interface may originate with fine twinning of the 3C structure followed by growth of the resultant 6H regions. Observations have been made of the detailed stepped structure of this interface together with the stacking fault distribution in the resultant 6H material. (author)

  9. Reference nano-dimensional metrology by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Gaoliang; Fluegge, Jens; Bosse, Harald; Heidelmann, Markus; Kübel, Christian; Prang, Robby

    2013-01-01

    Traceable and accurate reference dimensional metrology of nano-structures by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is introduced in the paper. Two methods, one based on the crystal lattice constant and the other based on the pitch of a feature pair, were applied to calibrate the TEM magnification. The threshold value, which was defined as the half-intensity of boundary materials, is suggested to extract the boundary position of features from the TEM image. Experimental investigations have demonstrated the high potential of the proposed methods. For instance, the standard deviation from ten repeated measurements of a line structure with a nominal 100 nm critical dimension (CD) reaches 1σ = 0.023 nm, about 0.02%. By intentionally introduced defocus and larger sample alignment errors, the investigation shows that these influences may reach 0.20 and 1.3 nm, respectively, indicating the importance of high-quality TEM measurements. Finally, a strategy for disseminating the destructive TEM results is introduced. Using this strategy, the CD of a reference material has been accurately determined. Its agreement over five independent TEM measurements is below 1.2 nm. (paper)

  10. Transmission electron microscopy of weakly deformed alkali halide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strunk, H.

    1976-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is applied to the investigation of the dislocation arrangement of [001]-orientated alkali halide crystals (orientation four quadruple slip) deformed into stage I of the work-hardenig curve. The investigations pertain mainly to NaCl - (0.1-1) mole-% NaBr crystals, because these exhibit a relatively long stage I. The time available for observing the specimens is limited by the ionization radiation damage occuring in the microscope. An optimum reduction of the damage rate is achieved by a combination of several experimental techniques that are briefly outlined. The crystals deform essentially in single glide. According to the observations, stage I deformation of pure and weakly alloyed NaCl crystals is characterized by the glide of screw dislocations, which bow out between jogs and drag dislocation dipoles behind them. In crystals with >= 0.5 mole-% NaBr this process is not observed to occur. This is attributed to the increased importance of solid solution hardening. (orig.) [de

  11. Electron beam dynamics in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope with Wehnelt electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bücker, K.; Picher, M.; Crégut, O. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504 CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France); LaGrange, T. [Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Reed, B.W.; Park, S.T.; Masiel, D.J. [Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc., 5653 Stoneridge Drive 117, Pleasanton, CA 94588 (United States); Banhart, F., E-mail: florian.banhart@ipcms.unistra.fr [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504 CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France)

    2016-12-15

    High temporal resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques have shown significant progress in recent years. Using photoelectron pulses induced by ultrashort laser pulses on the cathode, these methods can probe ultrafast materials processes and have revealed numerous dynamic phenomena at the nanoscale. Most recently, the technique has been implemented in standard thermionic electron microscopes that provide a flexible platform for studying material's dynamics over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In this study, the electron pulses in such an ultrafast transmission electron microscope are characterized in detail. The microscope is based on a thermionic gun with a Wehnelt electrode and is operated in a stroboscopic photoelectron mode. It is shown that the Wehnelt bias has a decisive influence on the temporal and energy spread of the picosecond electron pulses. Depending on the shape of the cathode and the cathode-Wehnelt distance, different emission patterns with different pulse parameters are obtained. The energy spread of the pulses is determined by space charge and Boersch effects, given by the number of electrons in a pulse. However, filtering effects due to the chromatic aberrations of the Wehnelt electrode allow the extraction of pulses with narrow energy spreads. The temporal spread is governed by electron trajectories of different length and in different electrostatic potentials. High temporal resolution is obtained by excluding shank emission from the cathode and aberration-induced halos in the emission pattern. By varying the cathode-Wehnelt gap, the Wehnelt bias, and the number of photoelectrons in a pulse, tradeoffs between energy and temporal resolution as well as beam intensity can be made as needed for experiments. Based on the characterization of the electron pulses, the optimal conditions for the operation of ultrafast TEMs with thermionic gun assembly are elaborated. - Highlights: • A detailed characterization of electron

  12. Observation of dislocations in crystals using X-ray and electron transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morlevat, J.P.

    1965-10-01

    Two approaches of the dynamical theory of diffraction (EWALD's and AUTHIER's) are recalled briefly. In the light of these theories, one then considers what information concerning the dislocations existing in a crystal can be obtained by X-Ray as well as electron diffraction. (author) [fr

  13. Extensive disordering in long-range-ordered Cu3Au induced by severe plastic deformation studied by transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rentenberger, C.; Karnthaler, H.P.

    2008-01-01

    Bulk nanocrystalline materials can be made by severe plastic deformation. In L1 2 long-range-ordered alloys, this leads to extensive disordering which influences the highly improved properties of these nanocrystalline alloys. Transmission electron microscopy methods were applied to Cu 3 Au; both diffraction contrast images and diffraction patterns reveal that disordering takes place locally. It is concluded that in addition to disordering by the refinement of the grown-in antiphase boundary domains, the formation of antiphase boundary tubes is a prominent process of disordering. The latter is facilitated by the fact that, unlike dislocations, antiphase boundary tubes can be stored at a very high density without causing long-range stresses. The local disordering indicates that the nanocrystalline structure nucleates inhomogeneously in the highly strained disordered regions

  14. Atomic structure of Mg-based metallic glass investigated with neutron diffraction, reverse Monte Carlo modeling and electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Babilas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The structure of a multicomponent metallic glass, Mg65Cu20Y10Ni5, was investigated by the combined methods of neutron diffraction (ND, reverse Monte Carlo modeling (RMC and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. The RMC method, based on the results of ND measurements, was used to develop a realistic structure model of a quaternary alloy in a glassy state. The calculated model consists of a random packing structure of atoms in which some ordered regions can be indicated. The amorphous structure was also described by peak values of partial pair correlation functions and coordination numbers, which illustrated some types of cluster packing. The N = 9 clusters correspond to the tri-capped trigonal prisms, which are one of Bernal’s canonical clusters, and atomic clusters with N = 6 and N = 12 are suitable for octahedral and icosahedral atomic configurations. The nanocrystalline character of the alloy after annealing was also studied by HRTEM. The selected HRTEM images of the nanocrystalline regions were also processed by inverse Fourier transform analysis. The high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF technique was used to determine phase separation in the studied glass after heat treatment. The HAADF mode allows for the observation of randomly distributed, dark contrast regions of about 4–6 nm. The interplanar spacing identified for the orthorhombic Mg2Cu crystalline phase is similar to the value of the first coordination shell radius from the short-range order.

  15. Circular Hough transform diffraction analysis: A software tool for automated measurement of selected area electron diffraction patterns within Digital MicrographTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.R.G.

    2008-01-01

    A software tool (script and plugin) for computing circular Hough transforms (CHT) in Digital Micrograph TM has been developed, for the purpose of automated analysis of selected area electron diffraction patterns (SADPs) of polycrystalline materials. The CHT enables the diffraction pattern centre to be determined with sub-pixel accuracy, regardless of the exposure condition of the transmitted beam or if a beam stop is present. Radii of the diffraction rings can also be accurately measured with sub-pixel precision. If the pattern is calibrated against a known camera length, then d-spacings with an accuracy of better than 1% can be obtained. These measurements require no a priori knowledge of the pattern and very limited user interaction. The accuracy of the CHT is degraded by distortion introduced by the projector lens, and this should be minimised prior to pattern acquisition. A number of optimisations in the CHT software enable rapid processing of patterns; a typical analysis of a 1kx1k image taking just a few minutes. The CHT tool appears robust and is even able to accurately measure SADPs with very incomplete diffraction rings due to texture effects. This software tool is freely downloadable via the Internet

  16. Circular Hough transform diffraction analysis: A software tool for automated measurement of selected area electron diffraction patterns within Digital Micrograph{sup TM}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.R.G. [Institute of Materials and Engineering Science, ANSTO, PMB 1, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)], E-mail: drm@ansto.gov.au

    2008-03-15

    A software tool (script and plugin) for computing circular Hough transforms (CHT) in Digital Micrograph{sup TM} has been developed, for the purpose of automated analysis of selected area electron diffraction patterns (SADPs) of polycrystalline materials. The CHT enables the diffraction pattern centre to be determined with sub-pixel accuracy, regardless of the exposure condition of the transmitted beam or if a beam stop is present. Radii of the diffraction rings can also be accurately measured with sub-pixel precision. If the pattern is calibrated against a known camera length, then d-spacings with an accuracy of better than 1% can be obtained. These measurements require no a priori knowledge of the pattern and very limited user interaction. The accuracy of the CHT is degraded by distortion introduced by the projector lens, and this should be minimised prior to pattern acquisition. A number of optimisations in the CHT software enable rapid processing of patterns; a typical analysis of a 1kx1k image taking just a few minutes. The CHT tool appears robust and is even able to accurately measure SADPs with very incomplete diffraction rings due to texture effects. This software tool is freely downloadable via the Internet.

  17. Proton diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Den Besten, J.L.; Jamieson, D.N.; Allen, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Lindhard theory on ion channeling in crystals has been widely accepted throughout ion beam analysis for use in simulating such experiments. The simulations use a Monte Carlo method developed by Barret, which utilises the classical 'billiard ball' theory of ions 'bouncing' between planes or tubes of atoms in the crystal. This theory is not valid for 'thin' crystals where the planes or strings of atoms can no longer be assumed to be of infinite proportions. We propose that a theory similar to that used for high energy electron diffraction can be applied to MeV ions, especially protons, in thin crystals to simulate the intensities of transmission channeling and of RBS spectra. The diffraction theory is based on a Bloch wave solution of the Schroedinger equation for an ion passing through the periodic crystal potential. The widely used universal potential for proton-nucleus scattering is used to construct the crystal potential. Absorption due to thermal diffuse scattering is included. Experimental parameters such as convergence angle, beam tilt and scanning directions are considered in our calculations. Comparison between theory and experiment is encouraging and suggests that further work is justified. (authors)

  18. Analysis of local dislocation densities in cold-rolled alloy 690 using transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Tae-Young; Kim, Sung Woo; Hwang, Seong Sik

    2016-01-01

    Service failure of alloy 690 in NPP has not been reported. However, some research groups reported that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) occurred in severely cold-rolled alloy 690. Transgranular craking was also reported in coll-rolled alloy 690 with a banded structure. In order to understand the effect of cold rolling on the cracking of alloy 690, many research groups have focused on the local strain and the cracked carbide induced by cold-rolling, by using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been widely used to characterize structural materials because this technique has superior spatial resolution and allows for the analysis of crystallographic and chemical information. The aim of the present study is to understand the mechanism of the abnormally high crack growth rate (CGR) in cold-rolled alloy 690 with a banded structure. The local dislocation density was measured by TEM to confirm the effects of local strain on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of alloy 690 with a banded structure. The effects of intragranular carbides on the SCC were also evaluated in this study. The local dislocation densities were directly measured using TEM to understand the effect of local strain on the SCC of Ni-based alloy 690 with a banded structure. The dislocation densities in the interior of the grains sharply increased in highly cold-rolled specimens due to intragranular carbide, which acted as a dislocation source

  19. Structural investigations on nanocrystalline Ni-W alloy films by transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimenkov, M. [Institut fuer Materialforschung, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Haseeb, A.S.M.A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Bade, K., E-mail: klaus.bade@imt.fzk.d [Institut fuer Mikrostrukturtechnik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-10-30

    Electrodeposited Ni-W alloys have been investigated in the as-deposited state by transmission electron microscopy in order to investigate the microstructural features in dependence of the tungsten content. Within the tungsten content range from 7 at.% up to 12 at.%, the microstructure is nanocrystalline characterized by a bimodal grain size distribution, consisting out of 20 to 200 nm sized grains and also larger grains with several 100 nm characteristic dimension. No clear trend in microstructure formation is visible with W content or deposition conditions in the investigated W content range. Only solid solution phase characteristics were observed. The lattice constant is 0.360 nm for 12 at.% W as derived from electron diffraction for the solid solution face centered cubic structure. Larger grains show twinning and stacking faults. Voids with diameter of a few nm were detected along with some multiple twinned particles, indicating high stress level during growth. About 2 at.% difference in the alloy composition from grain to grain was measured.

  20. Electron microscopy and diffraction of ordering in Ni-W alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, N.S.

    1995-01-01

    Electron microscopy and diffraction studies of ordering in stoichiometric Ni-20%W and off-stoichiometric Ni-15%W alloys have been carried out. The specimens of Ni-20%W were first 1,398 K for 4 h and then quenched rapidly into water. Short range order (SRO) spots were observed at {1 1/2 0}* positions. Two hitherto unknown metastable phases: D 2h 25 -Ni 2 W and D0 22 -Ni 3 W were observed in the diffraction patterns. Long range order (LRO) transformations were studied at 1,103 and 1,213 K. Kinetics and mechanism of transformations have been identified. Ni-15%W specimens were solution treated at 1,523 K for 1 h followed by quenching in water. SRO spots similar to those found in Ni-20%W were observed in this alloy as well. The transition to LRO was studied at 1,093 K. Distinct Ni 4 W precipitates could be observed after 5 h of annealing at this temperature. After 100 h of annealing precipitates were found to grow into faceted shape coherent with the disordered matrix. After prolonged annealing for over 150 h the Ni 4 W precipitates began to lose coherency by the generation of misfit dislocations. The microstructural observations have been compared for the stoichiometric and off-stoichiometric alloys

  1. Investigation of electronic order using resonant soft X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlappa, J.

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this PhD work was the application of resonant soft X-ray diffraction technique for the investigation of electronic order in transition metal oxides at the TM L{sub 2,3}-edge, trying to obtain a quantitative understanding of the data. The method was first systematically explored through application to a model system in order to test the feasibility of the technique and to understand of how X-ray optical effects have to be taken into account. Two more complex systems were investigated; stripe order in La{sub 1.8}Sr{sub 0.2}NiO{sub 4} and charge and orbital order in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The main focus of the work was on the spectroscopic potential of the technique, trying to obtain a level of quantitative description of the data. For X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) from transition metal oxides, cluster configuration interaction calculation provides a powerful and realistic microscopic theory. In the frame work of this thesis cluster theory, considering explicit hybridization effects between the TM-ion and the surrounding oxygen ligands, has been applied for the first time to describe resonant diffraction data. (orig.)

  2. A deep convolutional neural network to analyze position averaged convergent beam electron diffraction patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W; LeBeau, J M

    2018-05-01

    We establish a series of deep convolutional neural networks to automatically analyze position averaged convergent beam electron diffraction patterns. The networks first calibrate the zero-order disk size, center position, and rotation without the need for pretreating the data. With the aligned data, additional networks then measure the sample thickness and tilt. The performance of the network is explored as a function of a variety of variables including thickness, tilt, and dose. A methodology to explore the response of the neural network to various pattern features is also presented. Processing patterns at a rate of  ∼ 0.1 s/pattern, the network is shown to be orders of magnitude faster than a brute force method while maintaining accuracy. The approach is thus suitable for automatically processing big, 4D STEM data. We also discuss the generality of the method to other materials/orientations as well as a hybrid approach that combines the features of the neural network with least squares fitting for even more robust analysis. The source code is available at https://github.com/subangstrom/DeepDiffraction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of electronic order using resonant soft X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlappa, J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this PhD work was the application of resonant soft X-ray diffraction technique for the investigation of electronic order in transition metal oxides at the TM L 2,3 -edge, trying to obtain a quantitative understanding of the data. The method was first systematically explored through application to a model system in order to test the feasibility of the technique and to understand of how X-ray optical effects have to be taken into account. Two more complex systems were investigated; stripe order in La 1.8 Sr 0.2 NiO 4 and charge and orbital order in Fe 3 O 4 . The main focus of the work was on the spectroscopic potential of the technique, trying to obtain a level of quantitative description of the data. For X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) from transition metal oxides, cluster configuration interaction calculation provides a powerful and realistic microscopic theory. In the frame work of this thesis cluster theory, considering explicit hybridization effects between the TM-ion and the surrounding oxygen ligands, has been applied for the first time to describe resonant diffraction data. (orig.)

  4. Tunable electronic transmission gaps in a graphene superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Weitao; Wang Shunjin; Li Wen; Wang Yonglong; Jiang Hua

    2012-01-01

    The transmission in graphene superlattices with adjustable barrier height is investigated using transfer-matrix method. It is found that one could control the angular range of transmission by changing the ratio of incidence energy and barrier height. The transmission as a function of incidence energy has more than one gaps, due to the appearance of evanescent waves in different barriers. Accordingly, more than one conductivity minimums are induced. The transmission gaps could be controlled by adjusting the incidence angle, the barrier height, and the barrier number, which gives the possibility to construct an energy-dependent wavevector filter.

  5. Advanced scanning transmission stereo electron microscopy of structural and functional engineering materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agudo Jacome, L., E-mail: leonardo.agudo@bam.de [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Eggeler, G., E-mail: gunther.eggeler@ruhr-uni-bochum.de [Institut fuer Werkstoffe, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Dlouhy, A., E-mail: dlouhy@ipm.cz [Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, 616 62 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2012-11-15

    Stereo transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides a 3D impression of the microstructure in a thin TEM foil. It allows to perform depth and TEM foil thickness measurements and to decide whether a microstructural feature lies inside of a thin foil or on its surface. It allows appreciating the true three-dimensional nature of dislocation configurations. In the present study we first review some basic elements of classical stereo TEM. We then show how the method can be extended by working in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) mode of a modern analytical 200 kV TEM equipped with a field emission gun (FEG TEM) and a high angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector. We combine two micrographs of a stereo pair into one anaglyph. When viewed with special colored glasses the anaglyph provides a direct and realistic 3D impression of the microstructure. Three examples are provided which demonstrate the potential of this extended stereo TEM technique: a single crystal Ni-base superalloy, a 9% Chromium tempered martensite ferritic steel and a NiTi shape memory alloy. We consider the effect of camera length, show how foil thicknesses can be measured, and discuss the depth of focus and surface effects. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The advanced STEM/HAADF diffraction contrast is extended to 3D stereo-imaging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The advantages of the new technique over stereo-imaging in CTEM are demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The new method allows foil thickness measurements in a broad range of conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that features associated with ion milling surface damage can be beneficial for appreciating 3D features of the microstructure.

  6. Advanced scanning transmission stereo electron microscopy of structural and functional engineering materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agudo Jácome, L.; Eggeler, G.; Dlouhý, A.

    2012-01-01

    Stereo transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides a 3D impression of the microstructure in a thin TEM foil. It allows to perform depth and TEM foil thickness measurements and to decide whether a microstructural feature lies inside of a thin foil or on its surface. It allows appreciating the true three-dimensional nature of dislocation configurations. In the present study we first review some basic elements of classical stereo TEM. We then show how the method can be extended by working in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) mode of a modern analytical 200 kV TEM equipped with a field emission gun (FEG TEM) and a high angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector. We combine two micrographs of a stereo pair into one anaglyph. When viewed with special colored glasses the anaglyph provides a direct and realistic 3D impression of the microstructure. Three examples are provided which demonstrate the potential of this extended stereo TEM technique: a single crystal Ni-base superalloy, a 9% Chromium tempered martensite ferritic steel and a NiTi shape memory alloy. We consider the effect of camera length, show how foil thicknesses can be measured, and discuss the depth of focus and surface effects. -- Highlights: ► The advanced STEM/HAADF diffraction contrast is extended to 3D stereo-imaging. ► The advantages of the new technique over stereo-imaging in CTEM are demonstrated. ► The new method allows foil thickness measurements in a broad range of conditions. ► We show that features associated with ion milling surface damage can be beneficial for appreciating 3D features of the microstructure.

  7. Some possibilities of the slow electron diffraction method when studying film systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsanova, T.S.; Tumareva, T.A.; Kiseleva, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    A film structure of an initial thickness was studied with film probing in depth by an electron beam; for this purpose energy of incident electrons changed in sufficient wide ranges. Barium oxide films of 6-10 monolayer thickness deposited on a monocrystal (110) W have been chosen for the investigation. The structure was detected in a certain temperature range (850-1250 K) and the maximum development, the largest energy range fit approximatly 1000-1100 K temperature. Optimal temperature increases slightly with increasing an initial film thickness. The investigations carried on have shown that the structure of barium oxide films is heterogeneous in the layer thickness. This is concerned espicially the films of 6-10 monolayers. Notwithstanding the thickness trifle, the ''surface'' which structure was different from a region immediately adjacent to a substrate may be separated in films of this area. The method of the investigation in layers, i. e. the method for observing the film structure when varying incident electron energy permitted to establish that an absolute by certain structure of the layer adjacent to a substrate corresponds to each structure of the surface layer. In turn the structures of the layer adjacent to a substrate for the total film thickness of 6-10 monolayers turn out to be similar to the structures of 2-5 monolayer film, anyhow these structures are described with similar diffraction pictures

  8. Notes on representing grain size distributions obtained by electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, Laszlo S.; Biswas, Somjeet; Gu, Chengfan; Beausir, Benoit

    2013-01-01

    Grain size distributions measured by electron backscatter diffraction are commonly represented by histograms using either number or area fraction definitions. It is shown here that they should be presented in forms of density distribution functions for direct quantitative comparisons between different measurements. Here we make an interpretation of the frequently seen parabolic tales of the area distributions of bimodal grain structures and a transformation formula between the two distributions are given in this paper. - Highlights: • Grain size distributions are represented by density functions. • The parabolic tales corresponds to equal number of grains in a bin of the histogram. • A simple transformation formula is given to number and area weighed distributions. • The particularities of uniform and lognormal distributions are examined

  9. Development of lamellar structures in natural waxes - an electron diffraction investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorset, Douglas L. [Electron Diffraction Department, Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute, Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1999-06-07

    When they are recrystallized from the melt, natural plant or insect waxes tend to form solid phases with a nematic-like structure (i.e. a parallel array of polymethylene chains with little or no aggregation of the molecules into distinct layers). An electron diffraction study of carnauba wax and two types of beeswax has shown that the degree of molecular organization into lamellar structures can be enhanced by annealing in the presence of benzoic acid, which also acts as an epitaxial substrate. Nevertheless, the resultant layer structure in the annealed solid is not the same as that found for paraffin wax fractions refined from petroleum. Probably because of a small but significant fraction of a very long chain ingredient, the lamellar separation is incomplete, incorporating a number of 'bridging molecules' that span the nascent lamellar interface.The same phenomenon has been described recently for a low molecular weight polyethylene. (author)

  10. Development of lamellar structures in natural waxes - an electron diffraction investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorset, Douglas L.

    1999-06-01

    When they are recrystallized from the melt, natural plant or insect waxes tend to form solid phases with a nematic-like structure (i.e. a parallel array of polymethylene chains with little or no aggregation of the molecules into distinct layers). An electron diffraction study of carnauba wax and two types of beeswax has shown that the degree of molecular organization into lamellar structures can be enhanced by annealing in the presence of benzoic acid, which also acts as an epitaxial substrate. Nevertheless, the resultant layer structure in the annealed solid is not the same as that found for paraffin wax fractions refined from petroleum. Probably because of a small but significant fraction of a very long chain ingredient, the lamellar separation is incomplete, incorporating a number of `bridging molecules' that span the nascent lamellar interface.The same phenomenon has been described recently for a low molecular weight polyethylene.

  11. Practical considerations in the calculation of orientation distribution functions from electron back-scattered diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, A.W.

    1994-01-01

    Using model data sets for the Brass orientation, the importance of scatter width, angular accuracy and grain size and volume fraction on the sensitivity of the calculated Orientation Distribution Functions have been determined in order to highlight some of the practical considerations needed in the processing of experimental data from individual grain orientation measurements determined by the Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction technique. It is suggested that the most appropriate scatter width can be calculated from the maximum function height versus scatter width curve in order to accommodate variations in texture sharpness. The sensitivity of the ODF to careful sample preparation, mounting and pattern analysis, in order to keep errors in angular accuracy to 1 or less is demonstrated, as is the imperative need to correct for the size of grains, and their volume fractions. (orig.)

  12. Phase mapping of iron-based rapidly quenched alloys using precession electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svec, P.; Janotova, I.; Hosko, J.; Matko, I.; Janickovic, D.; Svec, P. Sr.; Kepaptsoglou, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    The present contribution is focused on application of PED and phase/orientation mapping of nanocrystals of bcc-Fe formed during the first crystallization stage of amorphous Fe-Co-Si-B ribbon. Using precession electron diffraction and phase/orientation mapping the formation of primary crystalline phase, bcc-Fe, from amorphous Fe-Co-Si-B has been analyzed. Important information about mutual orientation of the phase in individual submicron grains as well as against the sample surface has been obtained. This information contributes to the understanding of micromechanisms controlling crystallization from amorphous rapidly quenched structure and of the structure of the original amorphous state. The presented technique due to its high spatial resolution, speed and information content provided complements well classical techniques, especially in nanocrystalline materials. (authors)

  13. Precipitate statistics in an Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy from scanning precession electron diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunde, J. K.; Paulsen, Ø.; Wenner, S.; Holmestad, R.

    2017-09-01

    The key microstructural feature providing strength to age-hardenable Al alloys is nanoscale precipitates. Alloy development requires a reliable statistical assessment of these precipitates, in order to link the microstructure with material properties. Here, it is demonstrated that scanning precession electron diffraction combined with computational analysis enable the semi-automated extraction of precipitate statistics in an Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy. Among the main findings is the precipitate number density, which agrees well with a conventional method based on manual counting and measurements. By virtue of its data analysis objectivity, our methodology is therefore seen as an advantageous alternative to existing routines, offering reproducibility and efficiency in alloy statistics. Additional results include improved qualitative information on phase distributions. The developed procedure is generic and applicable to any material containing nanoscale precipitates.

  14. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Nanocomposites: A First-Principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Francisco; Xia, Zhenhai; Lebrion-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The physics of HRTEM image formation and electron diffraction of SWCNT in a polymer matrix were investigated theoretically on the basis of the multislice method, and the optics of a FEG Super TWIN Philips CM 200 TEM operated at 80 kV. The effect of nanocomposite thickness on both image contrast and typical electron diffraction reflections of nanofillers were explored. The implications of the results on the experimental applicability to study dispersion, chirality and diameter of nanofillers are discussed.

  15. Study of electron-beam-evaporated MgO films using electron diffraction, optical absorption and cathodoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboelfotoh, M.O.; Ramsey, J.N.

    1982-05-21

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction, optical absorption and cathodoluminescence were used to study MgO films deposited onto fused silica, single-crystal silicon and LiF substrates at various temperatures. Results showed that some of the same optical absorption and emission bands observed in X- or UV-irradiated, additively colored or mechanically deformed MgO crystals were observed in evaporated MgO films. The peak positions and the relative peak intensities of the optical absorption and emission bands depended on the substrate temperature during film deposition as well as on the structure of the film. The effect of heating the films in air and vacuum on the optical absorption and emission bands is also discussed.

  16. Initial microstructural study of a Ce-La alloy using electron backscattered diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Thomas B.; Younes, Charles M.; Ling, Michael; Jones, Christopher P.; Nicholson, John A.; Heard, Peter J.; Jenkins, Roderick

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → First ever successful EBSD microstructural analysis of Ce-La alloy. → Successful preparation using electro-polishing in the open laboratory. → Equiaxed grains 20-40 μm in size dominate the microstructure, with random orientations, relatively straight grain boundary contacts and no evidence for crystal twinning. → All grains matched to a fcc γ-phase. → Problematic presence of entrapped oxide particles. - Abstract: To better understand and exploit the unique electronic and structural properties of f-block metals and their alloys it is perceived that an improved knowledge of the microstructural characteristics and phase changes as a function of temperature and pressure, is necessary. For other different types of metallic systems, the use of electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) is becoming a common practice in order to obtain detailed microstructural information, but this has, as yet, been very limited in case of f-block metals. Because of their extreme affinity to oxygen and rapid surface reaction, EBSD studies of this metal-category are very sparse with only one work published on cerium metal providing an example of technical hurdles for a prerequisite oxide-free metal surface. Specifically the need to remove the oxide by ion etching was considered essential to enable a successful EBSD analysis. The current work presents the results of a first attempt to characterise the microstructure of a Ce-La alloy using EBSD. It demonstrates that high quality diffraction patterns and crystal orientation maps can be successfully obtained following a carefully controlled preparation of the alloy surface in the open laboratory by applying a simple and reproducible electro-polishing procedure without a further need for ion etching in vaccuo.

  17. Contrast of HOLZ lines in energy-filtered convergent-beam electron diffraction patterns from silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmpfuhl, G.; Krahl, D.; Uchida, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Higher-order Laue-zone (HOLZ) lines were investigated in convergent-beam electron diffraction patterns from silicon near the low-indexed zone axes [100], [110] and [111]. The visibility of these lines depends on the effective structure potentials of the reflections from the first Laue zone depending on their Debye-Waller factor. The contrast of the HOLZ lines is strongly reduced by inelastically scattered electrons. They can be excluded by an imaging Ω filter for energy losses above 2 eV. The diffraction patterns were compared with many-beam calculations. Without absorption, an excellent agreement could be achieved for the [111] and [100] zone axes, while the simulation of the [110] zone-axis pattern needed a calculation with absorption. The reason for this observation is explained in the Bloch-wave picture. Calculations with absorption, however, lead to artefacts in the intensity distribution of the [100] HOLZ pattern. In order to obtain agreement with the experiment, the Debye-Waller factor had to be modified in different ways for the different zone axes. This corresponds to a strong anisotropy of the Debye-Waller factor. To confirm this observation, the temperature dependence of the itensity distributions of the HOLZ patterns was investigated between 50 and 680 K. At room temperature, the parameter D in the Debye-Waller factor exp(-Ds 2 ) was determined as 0.13, 0.26 and 0.55 A 2 for the zone axes [100], [111] and [110], respectively. The reliability of the conclusions is discussed. (orig.)

  18. Dark-field imaging based on post-processed electron backscatter diffraction patterns of bulk crystalline materials in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Demers, Hendrix; Gauvin, Raynald

    2015-01-01

    Dark-field (DF) images were acquired in the scanning electron microscope with an offline procedure based on electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns (EBSPs). These EBSD-DF images were generated by selecting a particular reflection on the electron backscatter diffraction pattern and by reporting the intensity of one or several pixels around this point at each pixel of the EBSD-DF image. Unlike previous studies, the diffraction information of the sample is the basis of the final image contrast with a pixel scale resolution at the EBSP providing DF imaging in the scanning electron microscope. The offline facility of this technique permits the selection of any diffraction condition available in the diffraction pattern and displaying the corresponding image. The high number of diffraction-based images available allows a better monitoring of deformation structures compared to electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) which is generally limited to a few images of the same area. This technique was applied to steel and iron specimens and showed its high capability in describing more rigorously the deformation structures around micro-hardness indents. Due to the offline relation between the reference EBSP and the EBSD-DF images, this new technique will undoubtedly greatly improve our knowledge of deformation mechanism and help to improve our understanding of the ECCI contrast mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Microstructural differences between two Zr(C,N) coatings revealed by analytical transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dörfel, Ilona; Rooch, Heidemarie; Österle, Werner

    2012-01-01

    The microstructures of two samples of a Zr(C,N) coating on steel, which unexpectedly differed in their tribological properties, were investigated by analytical transmission electron microscopy. The samples were produced by a cathodic arc evaporation process in two commercial coating devices under similar coating conditions with the exception of the number of Zr targets. The source of the differing tribological properties of the samples was detected by analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), energy filtering TEM (EFTEM), electron diffraction, high resolution electron microscopy, and high angel annular dark field. The TEM preparation and the results of the TEM investigations are shown in detail. The origin of the unexpected behavior was determined to be a nano-scale multilayer structure that existed only in the tribologically superior specimen. EDX and EFTEM investigations indicated enrichment in oxygen at the interface between coating and steel substrate in the tribologically inferior sample. Findings of the microstructural configuration were obtained by taking a closer look at the structure and comparing the results of the several analytical TEM techniques. This allows the allocation of the concentration fluctuations in N, C, and Zr to the two thickness fractions of the nano multilayers and a local correlation of the identified minority phase Zr 3 (C,N) 4 to the higher N content in the narrower type of the multilayer fraction of the sample with the excellent tribological properties. The minority phase Zr 3 (C,N) 4 is randomly distributed in the sample with the defective tribological properties. Coating conditions are not topic of this work, but after discussion of the TEM results, the fact that one of the coating devices worked with one Zr target and the other one with two, could be identified as cause for the formation of the nano multilayer structure in the sample with the superior tribological

  20. Effects of lattice fluctuations on electronic transmission in metal/conjugated-oligomer/metal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Z.G.; Smith, D.L.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic transmission across metal/conjugated-oligomer/metal structures in the presence of lattice fluctuations is studied for short oligomer chains. The lattice fluctuations are approximated by static white noise disorder. Resonant transmission occurs when the energy of an incoming electron coincides with a discrete electronic level of the oligomer. The corresponding transmission peak diminishes in intensity with increasing disorder strength. Because of disorder there is an enhancement of the electronic transmission for energies that lie within the electronic gap of the oligomer. If fluctuations are sufficiently strong, a transmission peak within the gap is found at the midgap energy E=0 for degenerate conjugated oligomers (e.g., trans-polyacetylene) and E≠0 for AB-type degenerate oligomers. These results can be interpreted in terms of soliton-antisoliton states created by lattice fluctuations. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  1. In situ observation of low temperature growth of Ge on Si(1 1 1) by reflection high energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, Andreas; Fissel, Andreas; Bugiel, Eberhard; Wietler, Tobias F.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Investigation of the initial stages of epitaxial growth of Ge on Si(1 1 1) in situ by RHEED. • Impact of growth temperature on strain evolution for temperatures between 200 °C and 400 °C. • Epitaxy with a high degree of structural perfection already at growth temperature of 200 °C. • Ordered interfacial dislocation networks already at 200 °C. • Tensile strain contribution of Si(1 1 1) 7 × 7-surface reconstruction to strain relaxation process for epitaxial growth of Ge. - Abstract: In this paper we investigate the initial stages of epitaxial growth of Ge on Si(1 1 1) and the impact of growth temperature on strain evolution in situ by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) for temperatures between 200 °C and 400 °C. The change in surface morphology from a flat wetting layer to subsequent islanding that is characteristic for Stranski–Krastanov growth is monitored by spot intensity analysis. The corresponding critical layer thickness is determined to 3.1 < d c < 3.4 ML. In situ monitoring of the strain relaxation process reveals a contribution of the Si(1 1 1) 7 × 7-surface reconstruction to the strain relaxation process. High resolution transmission electron microscopy confirms that the Ge islands exhibit a high degree of structural perfection and an ordered interfacial misfit dislocation network already at a growth temperature of 200 °C is established. The temperature dependency of island shape, density and height is characterized by atomic force microscopy and compared to the RHEED investigations.

  2. Multiobjective optimization design of an rf gun based electron diffraction beam line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colwyn Gulliford

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiobjective genetic algorithm optimizations of a single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction beam line comprised of a 100  MV/m 1.6-cell normal conducting rf (NCRF gun, as well as a nine-cell 2π/3 bunching cavity placed between two solenoids, have been performed. These include optimization of the normalized transverse emittance as a function of bunch charge, as well as optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of the rms bunch length of the beam at the sample location for a fixed charge of 10^{6} electrons. Analysis of the resulting solutions is discussed in terms of the relevant scaling laws, and a detailed description of one of the resulting solutions from the coherence length optimizations is given. For a charge of 10^{6} electrons and final beam sizes of σ_{x}≥25  μm and σ_{t}≈5  fs, we found a relative coherence length of L_{c,x}/σ_{x}≈0.07 using direct optimization of the coherence length. Additionally, based on optimizations of the emittance as a function of final bunch length, we estimate the relative coherence length for bunch lengths of 30 and 100 fs to be roughly 0.1 and 0.2  nm/μm, respectively. Finally, using the scaling of the optimal emittance with bunch charge, for a charge of 10^{5} electrons, we estimate relative coherence lengths of 0.3, 0.5, and 0.92  nm/μm for final bunch lengths of 5, 30 and 100 fs, respectively.

  3. High quality single shot diffraction patterns using ultrashort megaelectron volt electron beams from a radio frequency photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musumeci, P.; Moody, J. T.; Scoby, C. M.; Gutierrez, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Bender, H. A.; Wilcox, N. S. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Single shot diffraction patterns using a 250-fs-long electron beam have been obtained at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. High quality images with spatial resolution sufficient to distinguish closely spaced peaks in the Debye-Scherrer ring pattern have been recorded by scattering the 1.6 pC 3.5 MeV electron beam generated in the rf photoinjector off a 100-nm-thick Au foil. Dark current and high emittance particles are removed from the beam before sending it onto the diffraction target using a 1 mm diameter collimating hole. These results open the door to the study of irreversible phase transformations by single shot MeV electron diffraction.

  4. High quality single shot diffraction patterns using ultrashort megaelectron volt electron beams from a radio frequency photoinjector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Moody, J T; Scoby, C M; Gutierrez, M S; Bender, H A; Wilcox, N S

    2010-01-01

    Single shot diffraction patterns using a 250-fs-long electron beam have been obtained at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. High quality images with spatial resolution sufficient to distinguish closely spaced peaks in the Debye-Scherrer ring pattern have been recorded by scattering the 1.6 pC 3.5 MeV electron beam generated in the rf photoinjector off a 100-nm-thick Au foil. Dark current and high emittance particles are removed from the beam before sending it onto the diffraction target using a 1 mm diameter collimating hole. These results open the door to the study of irreversible phase transformations by single shot MeV electron diffraction.

  5. High quality single shot diffraction patterns using ultrashort megaelectron volt electron beams from a radio frequency photoinjector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musumeci, P.; Moody, J. T.; Scoby, C. M.; Gutierrez, M. S.; Bender, H. A.; Wilcox, N. S.

    2010-01-01

    Single shot diffraction patterns using a 250-fs-long electron beam have been obtained at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. High quality images with spatial resolution sufficient to distinguish closely spaced peaks in the Debye-Scherrer ring pattern have been recorded by scattering the 1.6 pC 3.5 MeV electron beam generated in the rf photoinjector off a 100-nm-thick Au foil. Dark current and high emittance particles are removed from the beam before sending it onto the diffraction target using a 1 mm diameter collimating hole. These results open the door to the study of irreversible phase transformations by single shot MeV electron diffraction.

  6. Low-energy electron transmission through high aspect ratio Al O nanocapillaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milosavljević, A.R.; Jureta, J.; Víkor, G.

    2009-01-01

    Electron transmission through insulating AlO nanocapillaries of different diameters (40 and 270 nm) and 15 μm length has been investigated for low-energy electrons (2-120 V). The total intensity of transmitted current weakly depends on the incident electron energy and tilt angle defined with resp......Electron transmission through insulating AlO nanocapillaries of different diameters (40 and 270 nm) and 15 μm length has been investigated for low-energy electrons (2-120 V). The total intensity of transmitted current weakly depends on the incident electron energy and tilt angle defined...

  7. Identification of phases in zinc alloy powders using electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Martin G. [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Kenik, Edward A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 100 Bethel Valley Rd., Bldg. 4515, MS-6064, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); O' Keefe, Matthew J. [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)]. E-mail: mjokeefe@umr.edu; Miller, F. Scott [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Johnson, Benedict [Graduate Center for Materials Research, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2006-05-25

    Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were used for the structural characterization of phases in Zn alloy powders. Commercial Zn alloy powders contained additions of <1000 ppm of Bi, In, Al or Mg. Bismuth and In have extremely low solubility in Zn and form intermetallic Bi-In compounds which segregate to the Zn grain boundaries. The Bi-In phases were <0.3 {mu}m in size, had low melting points, and were not abundant enough for EBSD analysis. Increasing the alloying additions 20-40-fold resulted in Bi-In phases >1 {mu}m that could be used for EBSD analysis for phase characterization. Deformation-free microstructures were obtained by mechanical polishing and ion milling. The Zn matrix was characterized as Zn via EBSD. A BiIn{sub 2} phase was identified in the powder microstructures via EBSD. An In phase with 8-9 wt.% Bi was identified using low voltage energy dispersive spectroscopy and closely matched the composition predicted by the Bi-In phase diagram.

  8. A preliminary electron backscattered diffraction study of sintered NdFeB-type magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, S J; Williams, A J; Davies, B E; Harris, I R

    2002-03-01

    This paper reports, for the first time, the use of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) to study orientation in sintered NdFeB type magnets. The magnetic properties of NdFeB magnets are greatly improved if a strong crystallographic texture is firstly achieved, namely, the direction of the c-axis is along the direction of magnetization. A systematic survey of sample preparation techniques showed that samples that were mechanically polished and then etched gave the most reliable EBSD data. Analyses were made using both fully automated EBSD scans and by EBSD measurements taken after manual movement of the beam. The EBSD results are presented as secondary electron SEM micrographs, orientation images and 001 pole figures. For the selection of grains investigated, the deviation of the c-axis was shown to be between 10 degrees and 30 degrees from the ideal [001]//magnetization direction. It is demonstrated that EBSD is a valuable tool for characterizing the microstructure and texture relationships and for assessing the performance of the processing routes of NdFeB magnets.

  9. Electron backscatter diffraction applied to lithium sheets prepared by broad ion beam milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Zaghib, Karim; Gauvin, Raynald

    2015-01-01

    Due to its very low hardness and atomic number, pure lithium cannot be prepared by conventional methods prior to scanning electron microscopy analysis. Here, we report on the characterization of pure lithium metallic sheets used as base electrodes in the lithium-ion battery technology using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray microanalysis using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) after the sheet surface was polished by broad argon ion milling (IM). No grinding and polishing were necessary to achieve the sufficiently damage free necessary for surface analysis. Based on EDS results the impurities could be characterized and EBSD revealed the microsctructure and microtexture of this material with accuracy. The beam damage and oxidation/hydration resulting from the intensive use of IM and the transfer of the sample into the microscope chamber was estimated to be effect on the surface temperature. However, a cryo-stage should be used if available during milling to guaranty a heating artefact free surface after the milling process. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Plastic strain characterization in austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys by electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saez-Maderuelo, A., E-mail: alberto.saez@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense, 22-28040 Madrid (Spain); Castro, L.; Diego, G. de [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense, 22-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-09-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is enhanced by cold work and causes many problems in components of the nuclear power plants. Besides, during manufacturing, installation, welding and service of the material, residual strains can be produced increasing the susceptibility to SCC. For this reason, it is important to characterize the degree of plastic strain due to dislocation accumulation in each crystal. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in conjunction with scanning electron microscope (SEM), has been a great advance in this field because it enables to estimate the plastic strain in a quick and easy way. Nevertheless, over the last few years, a lot of different mathematical expressions to estimate the plastic strain have appeared in the literature. This situation hinders the election of one of them by a novel scientist in this field. Therefore, in this paper some of the more common expressions used in the calculation of the angular misorientation have been presented and discussed in order to clarify their more important aspects. Then, using one of these expressions (average local misorientation), curves relating misorientation density with known levels of strain will be obtained for an austenitic stainless steel 304L and nickel base alloy 690, which have shown a linear behaviour that is in good agreement with results found in the literature. Finally, using curves obtained in previous steps, levels of plastic strain in a plate of nickel base alloy 600 welded with weld metal 182 were estimated between 8 and 10% for a high temperature mill annealing sample.

  11. Plastic strain characterization in austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys by electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saez-Maderuelo, A.; Castro, L.; Diego, G. de

    2011-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is enhanced by cold work and causes many problems in components of the nuclear power plants. Besides, during manufacturing, installation, welding and service of the material, residual strains can be produced increasing the susceptibility to SCC. For this reason, it is important to characterize the degree of plastic strain due to dislocation accumulation in each crystal. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), in conjunction with scanning electron microscope (SEM), has been a great advance in this field because it enables to estimate the plastic strain in a quick and easy way. Nevertheless, over the last few years, a lot of different mathematical expressions to estimate the plastic strain have appeared in the literature. This situation hinders the election of one of them by a novel scientist in this field. Therefore, in this paper some of the more common expressions used in the calculation of the angular misorientation have been presented and discussed in order to clarify their more important aspects. Then, using one of these expressions (average local misorientation), curves relating misorientation density with known levels of strain will be obtained for an austenitic stainless steel 304L and nickel base alloy 690, which have shown a linear behaviour that is in good agreement with results found in the literature. Finally, using curves obtained in previous steps, levels of plastic strain in a plate of nickel base alloy 600 welded with weld metal 182 were estimated between 8 and 10% for a high temperature mill annealing sample.

  12. In situ and ex situ electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction characterization of the evolution of a catalytic system - from synthesis to deactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardini, Diego

    Heterogeneous catalysis represents a research field of undeniable importance for a multitude of technological and industrial processes. Supported catalysts are nowadays at the base of the large-scale production of most chemicals and are used for the removal of air pollutants from automotive engines...... the understanding of the structural properties and mechanisms at the origin of catalytic activity. This thesis presents the potential and uniqueness of ex situ and in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques in the characterization of several supported material systems...... TEM (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) revealed the degradation of the supported carbide particles probably due to the formation of volatile molybdenum hydroxide species. The activity of silver nanoparticles as catalyst for soot oxidation was studied in operative conditions...

  13. The role of electron irradiation history in liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Trevor H.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Park, Chiwoo; Kelly, Ryan T.; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Evans, James E.

    2018-04-20

    In situ liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LC-TEM) allows dynamic nanoscale characterization of systems in a hydrated state. Although powerful, this technique remains impaired by issues of repeatability that limit experimental fidelity and hinder the identification and control of some variables underlying observed dynamics. We detail new LC- TEM devices that improve experimental reproducibility by expanding available imaging area and providing a platform for investigating electron flux history on the sample. Irradiation history is an important factor influencing LC-TEM results that has, to this point, been largely qualitatively and not quantitatively described. We use these devices to highlight the role of cumulative electron flux history on samples from both nanoparticle growth and biological imaging experiments and demonstrate capture of time zero, low-dose images on beam-sensitive samples. In particular, the ability to capture pristine images of biological samples, where the acquired image is the first time that the cell experiences significant electron flux, allowed us to determine that nanoparticle movement compared to the cell membrane was a function of cell damage and therefore an artifact rather than visualizing cell dynamics in action. These results highlight just a subset of the new science that is accessible with LC-TEM through the new multiwindow devices with patterned focusing aides.

  14. Local, atomic-level elastic strain measurements of metallic glass thin films by electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebner, C. [Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Sarkar, R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Rajagopalan, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, School for Engineering of Matter Transport and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe 85287 (United States); Rentenberger, C., E-mail: christian.rentenberger@univie.ac.at [Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2016-06-15

    A novel technique is used to measure the atomic-level elastic strain tensor of amorphous materials by tracking geometric changes of the first diffuse ring of selected area electron diffraction patterns (SAD). An automatic procedure, which includes locating the centre and fitting an ellipse to the diffuse ring with sub-pixel precision is developed for extracting the 2-dimensional strain tensor from the SAD patterns. Using this technique, atomic-level principal strains from micrometre-sized regions of freestanding amorphous Ti{sub 0.45}Al{sub 0.55} thin films were measured during in-situ TEM tensile deformation. The thin films were deformed using MEMS based testing stages that allow simultaneous measurement of the macroscopic stress and strain. The calculated atomic-level principal strains show a linear dependence on the applied stress, and good correspondence with the measured macroscopic strains. The calculated Poisson’s ratio of 0.23 is reasonable for brittle metallic glasses. The technique yields a strain accuracy of about 1×10{sup −4} and shows the potential to obtain localized strain profiles/maps of amorphous thin film samples. - Highlights: • A TEM method to measure elastic strain in metallic glass films is proposed. • Method is based on tracking geometric changes in TEM diffraction patterns. • An automatic procedure is developed for extracting the local strain tensor. • Atomic-level strain in amorphous TiAl film was analysed during in-situ deformation. • Capability of the method to obtain micrometer scale strain profiles/maps is shown.

  15. Double and triple crystal diffraction investigation on ion implanted and electron beam annealed silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servidori, M.; Cembali, F.; Winter, U.; Zaumseil, P.; Richter, H.

    1985-01-01

    Double (DCD) and triple crystal (TCD) diffractometry was used to investigate radiation damage produced in silicon by silicon bombardment and its evolution after electron beam annealing. The implantation processes were carried out at 60 keV energy and at doses of 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 50, 100, and 200 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 . As to the annealing treatments, an electron gun was used, operating in the ranges 7.5 to 24 W/cm 2 and 2 to 20 seconds. DCD rocking curves were analyzed by means of the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction. The formalism introduced by Taupin was used to simulate the experimental intensity profiles. From the resulting best fits, the lattice strain vs. depth profiles were obtained, indicating an increase of the damage with dose for the as-implanted samples up to 1 x 10 14 cm -2 dose, whereas amorphous layers are produced for the higher doses. After annealing, lowering of the residual strain was observed to be directly proportional to the implanted dose. In particular, a complete recovery of the damage occurred for the 0.5 and 1 x 10 13 cm -2 samples. The results obtained by the fitting procedure were substantially independent from the power densities and times used during electron beam irradiation. TCD as a very sensitive method to investigate lattice defects after implantation was used to obtain information about the crystallographic perfection of the surface layer. The absence of diffuse scattering indicates that the annealed layers do not contain microdefects within the detection limits. (author)

  16. Transmission electron microscopic study of pyrochlore to defect-fluorite transition in rare-earth pyrohafnates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthik, Chinnathambi, E-mail: Karthikchinnathambi@boisestate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Anderson, Thomas J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Gout, Delphine [Oak Ridge National Lab, Neutron Scattering Science Division, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ubic, Rick [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    A structural transition in rare earth pyrohafnates, Ln{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln=Y, La, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, Yb and Lu), has been identified. Neutron diffraction showed that the structure transforms from well-ordered pyrochloric to fully fluoritic through the lanthanide series from La to Lu with a corresponding increase in the position parameter x of the 48f (Fd3{sup Macron }m) oxygen site from 0.330 to 0.375. As evidenced by the selected area electron diffraction, La{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Pr{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} exhibited a well-ordered pyrocholoric structure with the presence of intense superlattice spots, which became weak and diffuse (in Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}) before disappearing completely as the series progressed towards the Lu end. High resolution electron microscopic studies showed the breakdown of the pyrochlore ordering in the form of antiphase domains resulting in diffused smoke-like superlattice spots in the case of Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}. - Graphical abstract: Transmission electron microscopic studies showed the ordered pyrochlore to defect fluorite transition in rare-earth pyrohafnates to occur via the formation of anti-phase domains to start with. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrochlore to fluorite structural transition in rare earth pyrohafnates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer La{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Pr{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} showed well ordered pyrochlore structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Short range ordering in Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Break down of pyrochlore ordering due to antiphase boundaries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rest of the series showed fluoritic structure.

  17. Study of deformation and fracture micro mechanisms of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V using electron microscopy and and X-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcelli, Aparecido Edilson

    2009-01-01

    This present work allowed the study of deformation and fracture micro mechanisms of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V, used commercially for the manufacture of metallic biomaterials. The techniques employed for the analysis of the material under study were: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The study of the influence and behavior of the phases present in titanium alloys is important to evaluate the behavior of cracks in titanium alloys with high mechanical strength, which have fine alpha (α), beta (β) and (α±β) microstructure, linking the presence of the phases with the strength of the material. The evaluation in situ of deformation and fracture micro mechanisms were performed by TEM and was also a study of phase transformations during cooling in titanium alloys, using the techniques of bright field, dark field and diffraction of electrons in the selected area. After heat treatment differences were observed between the amount of in relation to the original microstructure of the β and α phases material for different conditions used in heat treatment applied to the alloy. The presence of lamellar microstructure formed during cooling in the β field was observed, promoting the conversion of part of the secondary alpha structure in β phase, which was trapped between the lamellar of alpha. (author)

  18. Burgers vector analysis of large area misfit dislocation arrays from bend contour contrast in transmission electron microscope images

    CERN Document Server

    Spiecker, E

    2002-01-01

    A transmission electron microscopy method is described which allows us to determine the Burgers vectors (BVs) of a large number of interfacial misfit dislocations (MDs) in mismatched heterostructures. The method combines large-area plan-view thinning of the sample for creating a strongly bent electron transparent foil with the analysis of the splitting and displacement of bend contours at their crossings with the MDs. The BV analysis is demonstrated for 60 deg. MDs in a low-mismatched SiGe/Si(001) heterostructure. Crossings of various bend contours with the MDs are analysed with respect to their information content for the BV analysis. In future applications the method may be used for analysing such a large number of MDs that a quantitative comparison with x-ray diffraction experiments, especially with data on diffusely scattered x-rays originating from the strain fields around the dislocations, becomes possible.

  19. A study of growth and thermal dewetting behavior of ultra-thin gold films using transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The growth and solid-state dewetting behavior of Au thin films (0.7 to 8.4 nm deposited on the formvar film (substrate by sputtering technique have been studied using transmission electron microscopy. The size and number density of the Au nanoparticles (NPs change with an increase in the film thickness (0.7 to 2.8 nm. Nearly spherical Au NPs are obtained for 6 nm show capability to be used as an irreversible temperature sensor with a sensitivity of ∼0.1 CAF/°C. It is observed that annealing affects the crystallinity of the Au grains in the films. The electron diffraction measurement also shows annealing induced morphological evolution in the percolated Au thin films (≥3 nm during solid-state dewetting and recrystallization of the grains.

  20. Tackling pseudosymmetry problems in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of perovskite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Elisabetta; Kaercher, Pamela; Mecklenburgh, Julian; Wheeler, John

    2016-04-01

    Perovskite minerals form an important mineral group that has applications in Earth science and emerging alternative energy technologies, however crystallographic quantification of these minerals with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is not accurate due to pseudosymmetry problems. The silicate perovskite Bridgmanite, (Mg,Fe)SiO3, is understood to be the dominant phase in the Earth's lower mantle. Gaining insight into its physical and rheological properties is therefore vital to understand the dynamics of the Earth's deep interior. Rock deformation experiments on analogue perovskite phases, for example (Ca,Sr)TiO3, combined with quantitative microstructural analyses of the recovered samples by EBSD, yield datasets that can reveal what deformation mechanisms may dominate the flow of perovskite in the lower mantle. Additionally, perovskite structures have important technological applications as new, suitable cathodes for the operation of more efficient and environmentally-friendly solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). In recent years they have also been recognised as a potential substitute for silicon in the next generation of photovoltaic cells for the construction of economic and energy efficient solar panels. EBSD has the potential to be a valuable tool for the study of crystal orientations achieved in perovskite substrates as crystal alignment has a direct control on the properties of these materials. However, perovskite structures currently present us with challenges during the automated indexing of Kikuchi bands in electron backscatter diffraction patterns (EBSPs). Such challenges are represented by the pseudosymmetric character of perovskites, where atoms are subtly displaced (0.005 nm to 0.05 nm) from their higher symmetry positions. In orthorhombic Pbnm perovskites, for example, pseudosymmetry may be evaluated from the c/a unit cell parameter ratio, which is very close to 1. Two main types of distortions from the higher symmetry structure are recognised: a

  1. Nanoporous metal film: An energy-dependent transmission device for electron waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grech, S.; Degiovanni, A.; Lapena, L.; Morin, R.

    2011-01-01

    We measure electron transmission through free-standing ultrathin nanoporous gold films, using the coherent electron beam emitted by sharp field emission tips in a low energy electron projection microscope setup. Transmission coefficient versus electron wavelength plots show periodic oscillations between 75 and 850 eV. These oscillations result from the energy dependence of interference between paths through the gold and paths through the nanometer-sized pores of the film. We reveal that these films constitute high transmittance quantum devices acting on electron waves through a wavelength-dependent complex transmittance defined by the porosity and the thickness of the film.

  2. Observation of coherent optical phonons excited by femtosecond laser radiation in Sb films by ultrafast electron diffraction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mironov, B. N.; Kompanets, V. O.; Aseev, S. A., E-mail: isanfemto@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Spectroscopy (Russian Federation); Ischenko, A. A. [Moscow Technological University, Institute of High Chemical Technologies (Russian Federation); Kochikov, I. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Misochko, O. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics (Russian Federation); Chekalin, S. V.; Ryabov, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Spectroscopy (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The generation of coherent optical phonons in a polycrystalline antimony film sample has been investigated using femtosecond electron diffraction method. Phonon vibrations have been induced in the Sb sample by the main harmonic of a femtosecond Ti:Sa laser (λ = 800 nm) and probed by a pulsed ultrashort photoelectron beam synchronized with the pump laser. The diffraction patterns recorded at different times relative to the pump laser pulse display oscillations of electron diffraction intensity corresponding to the frequencies of vibrations of optical phonons: totally symmetric (A{sub 1g}) and twofold degenerate (E{sub g}) phonon modes. The frequencies that correspond to combinations of these phonon modes in the Sb sample have also been experimentally observed.

  3. Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope: experimental observations and possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, H; Su, D; Egerton, R F; Konno, M; Wu, L; Ciston, J; Wall, J; Zhu, Y

    2011-06-01

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondary electrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. A possible mechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Accurate virus quantitation using a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) detector in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancett, Candace D; Fetterer, David P; Koistinen, Keith A; Morazzani, Elaine M; Monninger, Mitchell K; Piper, Ashley E; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Kearney, Brian J; Norris, Sarah L; Rossi, Cynthia A; Glass, Pamela J; Sun, Mei G

    2017-10-01

    A method for accurate quantitation of virus particles has long been sought, but a perfect method still eludes the scientific community. Electron Microscopy (EM) quantitation is a valuable technique because it provides direct morphology information and counts of all viral particles, whether or not they are infectious. In the past, EM negative stain quantitation methods have been cited as inaccurate, non-reproducible, and with detection limits that were too high to be useful. To improve accuracy and reproducibility, we have developed a method termed Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy - Virus Quantitation (STEM-VQ), which simplifies sample preparation and uses a high throughput STEM detector in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) coupled with commercially available software. In this paper, we demonstrate STEM-VQ with an alphavirus stock preparation to present the method's accuracy and reproducibility, including a comparison of STEM-VQ to viral plaque assay and the ViroCyt Virus Counter. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Strong-Field Modulated Diffraction Effects in the Correlated Electron-Nuclear Motion in Dissociating H2+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Feng; Becker, Andreas; Thumm, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    We show that the electronic dynamics in a molecule driven by a strong field is complex and potentially even counterintuitive. As a prototype example, we simulate the interaction of a dissociating H 2 + molecule with an intense infrared laser pulse. Depending on the laser intensity, the direction of the electron's motion between the two nuclei is found to follow or oppose the classical laser-electric force. We explain the sensitive dependence of the correlated electronic-nuclear motion in terms of the diffracting electronic momentum distribution of the dissociating two-center system. The distribution is dynamically modulated by the nuclear motion and periodically shifted in the oscillating infrared electric field

  6. Combining nanocalorimetry and dynamic transmission electron microscopy for in situ characterization of materials processes under rapid heating and cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grapes, Michael D., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Materials Measurement Science Division, Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H. [Condensed Matter and Materials Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Friedman, Lawrence H.; LaVan, David A., E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov [Materials Measurement Science Division, Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Weihs, Timothy P., E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Nanocalorimetry is a chip-based thermal analysis technique capable of analyzing endothermic and exothermic reactions at very high heating and cooling rates. Here, we couple a nanocalorimeter with an extremely fast in situ microstructural characterization tool to identify the physical origin of rapid enthalpic signals. More specifically, we describe the development of a system to enable in situ nanocalorimetry experiments in the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM), a time-resolved TEM capable of generating images and electron diffraction patterns with exposure times of 30 ns–500 ns. The full experimental system consists of a modified nanocalorimeter sensor, a custom-built in situ nanocalorimetry holder, a data acquisition system, and the DTEM itself, and is capable of thermodynamic and microstructural characterization of reactions over a range of heating rates (10{sup 2} K/s–10{sup 5} K/s) accessible by conventional (DC) nanocalorimetry. To establish its ability to capture synchronized calorimetric and microstructural data during rapid transformations, this work describes measurements on the melting of an aluminum thin film. We were able to identify the phase transformation in both the nanocalorimetry traces and in electron diffraction patterns taken by the DTEM. Potential applications for the newly developed system are described and future system improvements are discussed.

  7. Effects of focused ion beam milling on electron backscatter diffraction patterns in strontium titanate and stabilized zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of focused ion beam (FIB) current and accelerating voltage on electron backscatter diffraction pattern quality of yttria‐stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Nb‐doped strontium titanate (STN) to optimize data quality and acquisition time for 3D‐EBSD experiments by FIB...

  8. Quantum-chemical calculations and electron diffraction study of the equilibrium molecular structure of vitamin K3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaikin, L. S.; Tikhonov, D. S.; Grikina, O. E.; Rykov, A. N.; Stepanov, N. F.

    2014-05-01

    The equilibrium molecular structure of 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (vitamin K3) having C s symmetry is experimentally characterized for the first time by means of gas-phase electron diffraction using quantum-chemical calculations and data on the vibrational spectra of related compounds.

  9. In situ electron backscatter diffraction investigation of recrystallization in a copper wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisset, François; Helbert, Anne-Laure; Baudin, Thierry

    2013-08-01

    The microstructural evolution of a cold drawn copper wire (reduction area of 38%) during primary recrystallization and grain growth was observed in situ by electron backscatter diffraction. Two thermal treatments were performed, and successive scans were acquired on samples undergoing heating from ambient temperature to a steady state of 200°C or 215°C. During a third in situ annealing, the temperature was continuously increased up to 600°C. Nuclei were observed to grow at the expense of the deformed microstructure. This growth was enhanced by the high stored energy difference between the nuclei and their neighbors (driving energy in recrystallization) and by the presence of high-angle grain boundaries of high mobility. In the early stages of growth, the nuclei twin and the newly created orientations continue to grow to the detriment of the strained copper. At high temperatures, the disappearance of some twins was evidenced by the migration of the incoherent twin boundaries. Thermal grooving of grain boundaries is observed at these high temperatures and affects the high mobile boundaries but tends to preserve the twin boundaries of lower energy. Thus, grooving may contribute to the twin vanishing.

  10. The effect of pattern overlap on the accuracy of high resolution electron backscatter diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Vivian, E-mail: v.tong13@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Jiang, Jun [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Britton, T. Ben [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    High resolution, cross-correlation-based, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measures the variation of elastic strains and lattice rotations from a reference state. Regions near grain boundaries are often of interest but overlap of patterns from the two grains could reduce accuracy of the cross-correlation analysis. To explore this concern, patterns from the interior of two grains have been mixed to simulate the interaction volume crossing a grain boundary so that the effect on the accuracy of the cross correlation results can be tested. It was found that the accuracy of HR-EBSD strain measurements performed in a FEG-SEM on zirconium remains good until the incident beam is less than 18 nm from a grain boundary. A simulated microstructure was used to measure how often pattern overlap occurs at any given EBSD step size, and a simple relation was found linking the probability of overlap with step size. - Highlights: • Pattern overlap occurs at grain boundaries and reduces HR-EBSD accuracy. • A test is devised to measure the accuracy of HR-EBSD in the presence of overlap. • High pass filters can sometimes, but not generally, improve HR-EBSD measurements. • Accuracy of HR-EBSD remains high until the reference pattern intensity is <72%. • 9% of points near a grain boundary will have significant error for 200nm step size in Zircaloy-4.

  11. Reconstruction of Laser-Induced Surface Topography from Electron Backscatter Diffraction Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Patrick G; Echlin, McLean P; Pollock, Tresa M; De Graef, Marc

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate that the surface topography of a sample can be reconstructed from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns collected with a commercial EBSD system. This technique combines the location of the maximum background intensity with a correction from Monte Carlo simulations to determine the local surface normals at each point in an EBSD scan. A surface height map is then reconstructed from the local surface normals. In this study, a Ni sample was machined with a femtosecond laser, which causes the formation of a laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS). The topography of the LIPSS was analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reconstructions from EBSD patterns collected at 5 and 20 kV. The LIPSS consisted of a combination of low frequency waviness due to curtaining and high frequency ridges. The morphology of the reconstructed low frequency waviness and high frequency ridges matched the AFM data. The reconstruction technique does not require any modification to existing EBSD systems and so can be particularly useful for measuring topography and its evolution during in situ experiments.

  12. Structure of ultrathin Pd films determined by low-energy electron microscopy and diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, B; De la Figuera, J [Centro de Microanalisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Puerta, J M; Cerda, J I [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, CSIC, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Herranz, T [Instituto de Quimica-Fisica ' Rocasolano' , CSIC, Madrid 28006 (Spain); McCarty, K F [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)], E-mail: benitosantos001@gmail.com

    2010-02-15

    Palladium (Pd) films have been grown and characterized in situ by low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and microscopy in two different regimes: ultrathin films 2-6 monolayers (ML) thick on Ru(0001), and {approx}20 ML thick films on both Ru(0001) and W(110). The thinner films are grown at elevated temperature (750 K) and are lattice matched to the Ru(0001) substrate. The thicker films, deposited at room temperature and annealed to 880 K, have a relaxed in-plane lattice spacing. All the films present an fcc stacking sequence as determined by LEED intensity versus energy analysis. In all the films, there is hardly any expansion in the surface-layer interlayer spacing. Two types of twin-related stacking sequences of the Pd layers are found on each substrate. On W(110) the two fcc twin types can occur on a single substrate terrace. On Ru(0001) each substrate terrace has a single twin type and the twin boundaries replicate the substrate steps.

  13. In situ electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) during the compression of micropillars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederberger, C.; Mook, W.M.; Maeder, X.; Michler, J.

    2010-01-01

    For the first time, in situ electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements during compression experiments by a modified nanoindenter on micron-sized single crystal pillars are demonstrated here. The experimental setup and the requirements concerning the compression sample are described in detail. EBSD mappings have been acquired before loading, under load and after unloading for consecutive compression cycles on a focused ion beam (FIB) milled GaAs micropillar. In situ EBSD allows for the determination of crystallographic orientation with sub-100 nm spatial resolution. Thereby, it provides highly localized information pertaining to the deformation phenomena such as elastic bending of the micropillar or the formation of deformation twins and plastic orientation gradients due to geometrically necessary dislocations. The most striking features revealed by in situ EBSD are the non-negligible amount of reversible (elastic) bending of the micropillar and the fact that deformation twinning and dislocation glide initiate where the bending is strongest. Due to this high spatial and orientation resolution, in situ EBSD measurements during micromechanical testing are demonstrated to be a promising technique for the investigation of deformation phenomena at the nano- to micro-scale.

  14. Electron backscatter diffraction studies of focused ion beam induced phase transformation in cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, H.G., E-mail: helen.jones@npl.co.uk [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Day, A.P. [Aunt Daisy Scientific Ltd, Claremont House, High St, Lydney GL15 5DX (United Kingdom); Cox, D.C. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Advanced Technology Institute, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    A focused ion beam microscope was used to induce cubic to hexagonal phase transformation in a cobalt alloy, of similar composition to that of the binder phase in a hardmetal, in a controlled manner at 0°, 45° and 80° ion incident angles. The cobalt had an average grain size of ~ 20 μm, allowing multiple orientations to be studied, exposed to a range of doses between 6 × 10{sup 7} and 2 × 10{sup 10} ions/μm{sup 2}. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to determine the original and induced phase orientations, and area fractions, before and after the ion beam exposure. On average, less phase transformation was observed at higher incident angles and after lower ion doses. However there was an orientation effect where grains with an orientation close to (111) planes were most susceptible to phase transformation, and (101) the least, where grains partially and fully transformed at varying ion doses. - Highlights: •Ion-induced phase change in FCC cobalt was observed at multiple incidence angles. •EBSD was used to study the relationship between grain orientation and transformation. •Custom software analysed ion dose and phase change with respect to grain orientation. •A predictive capability of ion-induced phase change in cobalt was enabled.

  15. Thiobenzamide: Structure of a free molecule as studied by gas electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, Inna N.; Putkov, Andrei E.; Rykov, Anatolii N.; Shishkov, Igor F.

    2018-06-01

    The equilibrium (re) molecular structure of thiobenzamide along with rh1 structure has been determined in gas phase using gas electron-diffraction (GED) at about 127 °C and quantum-chemical calculations (QC). Rovibrational distance corrections to the thermal averaged GED structure have been computed with anharmonic force constants obtained at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory. According to the results of GED and QC thiobenzamide exists as mixture of two non-planar enantiomers of C1 symmetry. The selected equilibrium geometrical parameters of thiobenzamide (re, Å and ∠e, deg) are the following: (Cdbnd S) = 1.641(4), (Csbnd N) = 1.352(2), (Csbnd C) = 1.478(9), (Cdbnd C)av = 1.395(2), CCN = 114.7(5), CCS = 123.4(5), C2C1C7S = 31(4), C6C1C7N = 29(4). The structure of thiobenzamide in the gas phase is markedly different to that in the literature for the single crystal. The differences between the gas and the solid structures are ascribed to the presence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the solid phase.

  16. Analysis of soft magnetic materials by electron backscatter diffraction as a powerful tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Schuller

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The current work demonstrates that electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD is a powerful and versatile characterization technique for investigating soft magnetic materials. The properties of soft magnets, e.g., magnetic losses strongly depend on the materials chemical composition and microstructure, including grain size and shape, texture, degree of plastic deformation and elastic strain. In electrical sheet stacks for e-motor applications, the quality of the machined edges/surfaces of each individual sheet is of special interest. Using EBSD, the influence of the punching process on the microstructure at the cutting edge is quantitatively assessed by evaluating the crystallographic misorientation distribution of the deformed grains. Using an industrial punching process, the maximum affected deformation depth is determined to be 200 - 300 μm. In the case of laser cutting, the affected deformation depth is determined to be approximately zero. Reliability and detection limits of the developed EBSD approach are evaluated on non-affected sample regions and model samples containing different indentation test bodies. A second application case is the investigation of the recrystallization process during the annealing step of soft magnetic composites (SMC toroids produced by powder metallurgy as a function of compaction pressure, annealing parameters and powder particle size. With increasing pressure and temperature, the recrystallized area fraction (e.g., grains with crystallographic misorientations 3°.

  17. Crystallography of waxes - an electron diffraction study of refined and natural products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorset, Douglas L.

    1997-02-01

    The crystal structure of four waxes has been investigated by electron crystallography. Two of these waxes, including a refined petroleum product (Gulfwax) and a material from lignite (montan wax), form well ordered crystals and their structure could be solved quantitatively from the observed 0022-3727/30/3/018/img1 diffraction patterns. As also found previously for simpler binary n-paraffin solid solutions, the average structure resembles that of a pure paraffin (e.g. n-0022-3727/30/3/018/img2) but with a Gaussian distribution of atomic occupancies near the chain ends to account for the statistical distribution of chain lengths within a lamella. Two other waxes from living organisms, South African bee honeycomb and the leaves of the Brazilian carnauba palm, are much less ordered, even though they share the same methylene subcell packing of the most crystalline parts of the previous materials. It appears that these waxes cannot fully separate into distinct lamellae, perhaps due to the presence of very long `tie' molecules, and are therefore `frustrated' crystal structures.

  18. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Studies on the Formation of Superlattice Metal Hydride Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuli Yan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Microstructures of a series of La-Mg-Ni-based superlattice metal hydride alloys produced by a novel method of interaction of a LaNi5 alloy and Mg vapor were studied using a combination of X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The conversion rate of LaNi5 increased from 86.8% into 98.2%, and the A2B7 phase abundance increased from 42.5 to 45.8 wt % and reduced to 39.2 wt % with the increase in process time from four to 32 h. During the first stage of reaction, Mg formed discrete grains with the same orientation, which was closely related to the orientation of the host LaNi5 alloy. Mg then diffused through the ab-phase of LaNi5 and formed the AB2, AB3, and A2B7 phases. Diffusion of Mg stalled at the grain boundary of the host LaNi5 alloy. Good alignments in the c-axis between the newly formed superlattice phases and LaNi5 were observed. The density of high-angle grain boundary decreased with the increase in process time and was an indication of lattice cracking.

  19. Experimental evidence concerning the significant information depth of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisniewski, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.w@uni-jena.de [Otto-Schott-Institut, Jena University, Fraunhoferstr. 6, 07743 Jena (Germany); Saager, Stefan [Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP, Winterbergstraße 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Böbenroth, Andrea [Fraunhofer Institute for the Microstructure of Materials and Systems IMWS, Walter-Huelse-Straße 1, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Rüssel, Christian [Otto-Schott-Institut, Jena University, Fraunhoferstr. 6, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Experiments concerning the information depth of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) are performed on samples featuring an amorphous wedge on a crystalline substrate and a crystalline wedge on an amorphous substrate. The effects of the acceleration voltage and exemplary software settings on the ability to measure through an amorphous layer are presented. Changes in the EBSD-signal could be detected through a ≈142 nm thick layer of amorphous Si while orientation measurements could be performed through a ≈116 nm thick layer when using a voltage of 30 kV. The complexity of the information depth significant to a given EBSD-pattern and the multiple parameters influencing it are discussed. It is suggested that a “core information depth” is significant to high quality patterns while a larger “maximum information depth” becomes relevant when the pattern quality decreases or the sample is inhomogeneous within the information volume, i.e. in the form of partially crystalline materials or crystal layers in the nm scale. - Highlights: • Experimental evidence of the significant information depth of EBSD is presented. • Effects of the voltage and exemplary software settings are discussed. • Dependence of the significant information depth on the pattern quality is proposed. • The information depth may reach up to 142 nm in Si when using a voltage of 30 kV. • The information depth depends on the available technology.

  20. Production of muscovite-feldspathic glass composite: scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, F.P.F.; Ogasawara, T.; Santos, S.F.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to find the sintering conditions for the feldspathic glass + muscovite mixture to produce a dense composite block for manufacturing dental prosthesis by using CAD-CAM. Each 20g of the glass-frit had : 15.55g of Armil-feldspar; 0.53g of Al 2 O 3 ; 1.56g of Na 2 CO 3 ; 0.5g of borax; 1.74g of K 2 CO 3 ; 0.13g of CeO 2 . Frit's powder finer than 350 Tyler mesh was mixed with 0 wt%, 10 wt%, 20 wt% and 100 wt% of muscovite pressed cylinders (5600 pounds force) 16mm in diameter and sintered under vacuum Vacumat (VITA) furnace at 850 deg C, 900 deg C, 950 deg C, 1000 deg C, 1050 deg C, 1100 deg C and 1150 deg C. X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy were carried out. The necessary temperature for high densification depended on the composition of the mixture: 850 deg C (for pure frit); 1050 deg C (for 10 wt% mica) and 1150 deg C (for 20 wt% mica); pure mica degraded during sintering. (author)

  1. Oxygen adsorption on Cu-9 at. %Al(111) studied by low energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Michiko; Bera, Santanu; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Song, Weijie

    2003-07-01

    Cu-based alloys have been used for electric cables for long time. In the field of microelectronics, Al had been used for electrical wiring. However, it became clear that electromigration occurs in Al that causes breaking of wires in minute wirings. Due to this problem, Cu wiring is used in most advanced microprocessors. Cu metal is more corrosive than Al and Cu-based alloys with a small amount of Al is expected to solve problems both on electromigration and corrosion. The initial stage of corrosion is oxygen adsorption. We studied surface segregation of Al on Cu-9% Al(111) and oxygen adsorption on the surface with/without Al segregation in ultrahigh vacuum by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy. It was found that Al segregates on the surface to form (√3×√3)R30° structure and the structure vanishes above 595 K to give (1×1) structure while Al still segregates. The specimen was exposed to oxygen at different temperatures. The amount of oxygen uptake was not structure dependent but temperature dependent. Below 595 K, only a small amount of oxygen adsorbed. Between 595 and 870 K, oxygen adsorbed surface showed amorphous LEED pattern. The specimen was annealed at 1070 K after oxygen exposure. When the specimen was exposed oxygen below 870 K, the oxygen Auger intensity decreased significantly by annealing and the annealed surface showed (√3×√3)R30° structure at room temperature. When the specimen was exposed to oxygen at 870 K, diffused spots developed newly in LEED pattern but the pattern disappeared after 1070 K annealing while oxygen Auger intensity remained almost constant. Exposing the specimen to oxygen at 995 K resulted in clear spots in the LEED pattern, which were attributed to the (7/√3×7√3)R30° structure.

  2. Development of a high repetition rate laser-plasma accelerator for ultra-fast electron diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaurepaire, B.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic microscopy and electron diffraction allowed the understanding of the organization of atoms in matter. Using a temporally short source, one can measure atomic displacements or modifications of the electronic distribution in matter. To date, the best temporal resolution for time resolved diffraction experiments is of the order of a hundred femto-seconds (fs). Laser accelerators are good candidates to reach the femtosecond temporal resolution in electron diffraction experiments. Such accelerators used to work at a low repetition rate, so that it was necessary to develop a new one operating at a high repetition rate in order to accumulate a large amount of data. In this thesis, a laser-plasma accelerator operating at the kHz repetition rate was developed and built. This source generates electron bunches at 100 keV from 3 mJ and 25 fs laser pulses. The physics of the acceleration has been studied, and the effect of the laser wavefront on the electron transverse distribution has been demonstrated. (author)

  3. Design of electron wave filters in monolayer graphene by tunable transmission gap

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xi; Tao, Jia-Wei

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the transmission in monolayer graphene barrier at nonzero angle of incidence. Taking the influence of parallel wave vector into account, the transmission as the function of incidence energy has a gap due to the evanescent waves in two cases of Klein tunneling and classical motion. The modulation of the transmission gap by the incidence angle, the height, and width of potential barrier may lead to potential applications in graphene-based electronic devices.

  4. A Low-Temperature Electron Microscopy and Electron Diffraction Study of La1.84Sr0.16CuO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Takashi; Omori, Mamoru; Hirabayashi, Makoto; Syono, Yasuhiko

    1987-10-01

    A high-Tc superconducting compound, La1.84Sr0.16CuO4, has been investigated by electron microscopy and electron diffraction in the range from 10 K to ambient temperature. The tetragonal K2NiF4-type structure undergoes an orthorhombic distortion below about 130 K. In the low-temperature phase, extra diffraction spots and twin lamellae are observed reversibly on cooling and heating in situ. Based on the observed results, a plausible structure model with orthorhombic distortion is proposed.

  5. A low-temperature electron microscopy and electron diffraction study of La1.84Sr0.16CuO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, Takashi; Omori, Mamoru; Hirabayashi, Makoto; Syono, Yasuhiko

    1987-01-01

    A high-T c superconducting compound, La 1.84 Sr 0.16 CuO 4 , has been investigated by electron microscopy and electron diffraction in the range from 10 K to ambient temperature. The tetragonal K 2 NiF 4 -type structure undergoes an orthorhombic distortion below about 130 K. In the low-temperature phase, extra diffraction spots and twin lamellae are observed reversibly on cooling and heating in situ. Based on the observed results, a plausible structure model with orthorhombic distortion is proposed. (author)

  6. Low-temperature electron microscopy and electron diffraction study of La/sub 1. 84/Sr/sub 0. 16/CuO/sub 4/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, Takashi; Omori, Mamoru; Hirabayashi, Makoto; Syono, Yasuhiko

    1987-10-01

    A high-T/sub c/ superconducting compound, La/sub 1.84/Sr/sub 0.16/CuO/sub 4/, has been investigated by electron microscopy and electron diffraction in the range from 10 K to ambient temperature. The tetragonal K/sub 2/NiF/sub 4/-type structure undergoes an orthorhombic distortion below about 130 K. In the low-temperature phase, extra diffraction spots and twin lamellae are observed reversibly on cooling and heating in situ. Based on the observed results, a plausible structure model with orthorhombic distortion is proposed

  7. Enhanced thermal stability of a polymer solar cell blend induced by electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bäcke, Olof, E-mail: obacke@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Lindqvist, Camilla; Diaz de Zerio Mendaza, Amaia [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Gustafsson, Stefan [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Wang, Ergang; Andersson, Mats R.; Müller, Christian [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Kristiansen, Per Magnus [Institute of Polymer Nanotechnology (INKA), FHNW University of Applied Science and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Olsson, Eva, E-mail: eva.olsson@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-05-15

    We show by in situ microscopy that the effects of electron beam irradiation during transmission electron microscopy can be used to lock microstructural features and enhance the structural thermal stability of a nanostructured polymer:fullerene blend. Polymer:fullerene bulk-heterojunction thin films show great promise for use as active layers in organic solar cells but their low thermal stability is a hindrance. Lack of thermal stability complicates manufacturing and influences the lifetime of devices. To investigate how electron irradiation affects the thermal stability of polymer:fullerene films, a model bulk-heterojunction film based on a thiophene-quinoxaline copolymer and a fullerene derivative was heat-treated in-situ in a transmission electron microscope. In areas of the film that exposed to the electron beam the nanostructure of the film remained stable, while the nanostructure in areas not exposed to the electron beam underwent large phase separation and nucleation of fullerene crystals. UV–vis spectroscopy shows that the polymer:fullerene films are stable for electron doses up to 2000 kGy. - Highlights: • Thermal stability of a polymer: fullerne blend is increased using electron irradiation. • Using in-situ transmission electron microscopy the nanostructure is studied. • Electron irradiation stops phase separation between the polymer and fullerene. • Electron irradiation quenches the formation and nucleation of fullerene crystals.

  8. Geometrically necessary dislocation densities in olivine obtained using high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallis, David, E-mail: davidwa@earth.ox.ac.uk [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3AN (United Kingdom); Hansen, Lars N. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3AN (United Kingdom); Ben Britton, T. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Royal School of Mines, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, Oxfordshire, OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Dislocations in geological minerals are fundamental to the creep processes that control large-scale geodynamic phenomena. However, techniques to quantify their densities, distributions, and types over critical subgrain to polycrystal length scales are limited. The recent advent of high-angular resolution electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD), based on diffraction pattern cross-correlation, offers a powerful new approach that has been utilised to analyse dislocation densities in the materials sciences. In particular, HR-EBSD yields significantly better angular resolution (<0.01°) than conventional EBSD (~0.5°), allowing very low dislocation densities to be analysed. We develop the application of HR-EBSD to olivine, the dominant mineral in Earth's upper mantle by testing (1) different inversion methods for estimating geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) densities, (2) the sensitivity of the method under a range of data acquisition settings, and (3) the ability of the technique to resolve a variety of olivine dislocation structures. The relatively low crystal symmetry (orthorhombic) and few slip systems in olivine result in well constrained GND density estimates. The GND density noise floor is inversely proportional to map step size, such that datasets can be optimised for analysing either short wavelength, high density structures (e.g. subgrain boundaries) or long wavelength, low amplitude orientation gradients. Comparison to conventional images of decorated dislocations demonstrates that HR-EBSD can characterise the dislocation distribution and reveal additional structure not captured by the decoration technique. HR-EBSD therefore provides a highly effective method for analysing dislocations in olivine and determining their role in accommodating macroscopic deformation. - Highlights: • Lattice orientation gradients in olivine were measured using HR-EBSD. • The limited number of olivine slip systems enable simple least squares inversion for GND

  9. Aberration corrected and monochromated environmental transmission electron microscopy: challenges and prospects for materials science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2010-01-01

    The latest generation of environmental transmission electron microscopes incorporates aberration correctors and monochromators, allowing studies of chemical reactions and growth processes with improved spatial resolution and spectral sensitivity. Here, we describe the performance of such an instr...

  10. Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Individual Carbon Nanotube Breakdown Caused by Joule Heating in Air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Gudnason, S.B.; Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier

    2006-01-01

    We present repeated structural and electrical measurements on individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes, alternating between electrical measurements under ambient conditions and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The multiwalled carbon nanotubes made by chemical vapor deposition were manipulated...

  11. INVIVO DEGRADATION OF PROCESSED DERMAL SHEEP COLLAGEN EVALUATED WITH TRANSMISSION ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANWACHEM, PB; VANLUYN, MJA; NIEUWENHUIS, P; KOERTEN, HK; DAMINK, LO; TENHOOPEN, H; FEIJEN, J

    The in vivo degradation of hexamethylenediisocyanate-tanned dermal sheep collagen was studied with transmission electron microscopy. Discs of hexamethylenediisocyanate-tanned dermal sheep collagen were subcutaneously implanted in rats. Both an intra- and an extracellular route of degradation could

  12. In vivo degradation of processed dermal sheep collagen evaluated with transmission electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wachem, P.B.; van Luyn, M.J.A.; Nieuwenhuis, P.; Koerten, H.K.; Olde damink, L.H.H.; Olde-Damink, L.; ten Hoopen, Hermina W.M.; Feijen, Jan

    1991-01-01

    The in vivo degradation of hexamethylenediisocyanate-tanned dermal sheep collagen was studied with transmission electron microscopy. Discs of hexamethylenediisocyanate-tanned dermal sheep collagen were subcutaneously implanted in rats. Both an intra- and an extracellular route of degradation could

  13. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy of Ag nanoparticles grown on an ionic liquid substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.; Stiger, Rebecca M.; Finley, James J.; Conway, James F.

    2010-01-01

    We report a novel method of growing silver nanostructures by cathodic sputtering onto an ionic liquid (IL) and our visualization by transmission cryo-electron microscopy to avoid beam-induced motion of the nanoparticles. By freezing the IL

  14. Measurements of transient electron density distributions by femtosecond X-ray diffraction; Messungen transienter Elektronendichteverteilungen durch Femtosekunden-Roentgenbeugung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freyer, Benjamin

    2013-05-02

    This thesis concerns measurements of transient charge density maps by femtosecond X-ray diffraction. Different X-ray diffraction methods will be considered, particularly with regard to their application in femtosecond X-ray diffraction. The rotation method is commonly used in stationary X-ray diffraction. In the work in hand an X-ray diffraction experiment is demonstrated, which combines the method with ultrafast X-ray pulses. This experiment is the first implementation which makes use of the rotation method to map transient intensities of a multitude of Bragg reflections. As a prototype material Bismuth is used, which previously was studied frequently by femtosecond X-ray diffraction by measuring Bragg reflections successively. The experimental results of the present work are compared with the literature data. In the second part a powder-diffraction experiment will be presented, which is used to study the dynamics of the electron-density distribution on ultrafast time scales. The experiment investigates a transition metal complex after photoexcitation of the metal to ligand charge transfer state. Besides expected results, i. e. the change of the bond length between the metal and the ligand and the transfer of electronic charge from the metal to the ligand, a strong contribution of the anion to the charge transfer was found. Furthermore, the charge transfer has predominantly a cooperative character. That is, the excitation of a single complex causes an alteration of the charge density of several neighboring units. The results show that more than 30 transition-metal complexes and 60 anions contribute to the charge transfer. This collective response is a consequence of the strong coulomb interactions of the densely packed ions.

  15. Origin of spin-dependent asymmetries in electron transmission through ultrathin ferromagnetic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokhale, M.P.; Mills, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    We present theoretical calculations of exchange asymmetries in the transmission of electrons through ultrathin films of ferromagnetic Fe. The results account nicely for the magnitude of the asymmetries observed by Pappas et al. in photoemission studies of Cu covered by an ultrathin film of Fe. We argue that exchange asymmetry in the transmissivity of the Fe film, rather than the spin dependence of the electron mean free path, is responsible for the effects reported by these authors

  16. Applications of anomalous diffraction systems, generation of attosecond electron and photon pulses and Raman amplification by stimulated emission of radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartak, Sameer Dinkar

    1998-10-01

    Anomalous diffraction is scattering process due to phase distortion introduced on incident phase front by scattering object. Phase mask or hologram, Christiansen filter, PDLC are examples of an anomalously diffracting systems. Phase hologram modulates an input wavefront to produce a wavefront which when Fourier transformed using a converging lens gives desired image on to a screen. We made a nonlinear optical element using phase mask made up of nonlinear material. It forms a lens because of nonlinear index of refraction when a high intensity beam is incident. This lens Fourier transforms the phase mask and images the phase mask. This nonlinear optical element can be used for various applications like image gating and 3-D memory writing and read out. Christiansen filter (CF) is a two component scattering system whose dispersion curves intersect at certain wavelength. Thus light corresponding to this wavelength traverses the filter without any scattering and light at other wavelengths gets scattered. This results in narrow wavelength dependent transmission curve centered at the index matching wavelength. When materials with an intensity dependent refractive index are used to make a CF, the index matching condition of CF becomes function of the input intensity resulting in intensity dependent beam size and transmittance through the filter. This property of nonlinear CF can be used to switch beam optically in both self and cross-modulation modes. Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystal (PDLC) is dispersion of liquid crystal droplets in polymer whose index of refraction is same as ordinary refractive index of liquid crystal. PDLC shows voltage dependent scattering and are used in flat panel displays. We used this element as voltage controlled intracavity loss element in a laser cavity to make a lasing pixel projection display. Output of this pixel shows all desired properties for a projection display like narrow linewidth, high brightness, TTL switching compatibility and

  17. Elucidating structural order and disorder phenomena in mullite-type Al4B2O9 by automated electron diffraction tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Haishuang; Krysiak, Yaşar; Hoffmann, Kristin; Barton, Bastian; Molina-Luna, Leopoldo; Neder, Reinhard B.; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Gesing, Thorsten M.; Schneider, Hartmut; Fischer, Reinhard X.

    2017-01-01

    The crystal structure and disorder phenomena of Al 4 B 2 O 9 , an aluminum borate from the mullite-type family, were studied using automated diffraction tomography (ADT), a recently established method for collection and analysis of electron diffraction data. Al 4 B 2 O 9 , prepared by sol-gel approach, crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/m. The ab initio structure determination based on three-dimensional electron diffraction data from single ordered crystals reveals that edge-connected AlO 6 octahedra expanding along the b axis constitute the backbone. The ordered structure (A) was confirmed by TEM and HAADF-STEM images. Furthermore, disordered crystals with diffuse scattering along the b axis are observed. Analysis of the modulation pattern implies a mean superstructure (AAB) with a threefold b axis, where B corresponds to an A layer shifted by ½a and ½c. Diffraction patterns simulated for the AAB sequence including additional stacking disorder are in good agreement with experimental electron diffraction patterns. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure and disorder phenomena of B-rich Al 4 B 2 O 9 studied by automated electron diffraction tomography (ADT) and described by diffraction simulation using DISCUS. - Highlights: • Ab-initio structure solution by electron diffraction from single nanocrystals. • Detected modulation corresponding mainly to three-fold superstructure. • Diffuse diffraction streaks caused by stacking faults in disordered crystals. • Observed streaks explained by simulated electron diffraction patterns.

  18. Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies of Electron-Selective Titanium Oxide Contacts in Silicon Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Haider

    2017-08-15

    In this study, the cross-section of electron-selective titanium oxide (TiO2) contacts for n-type crystalline silicon solar cells were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. It was revealed that the excellent cell efficiency of 21.6% obtained on n-type cells, featuring SiO2/TiO2/Al rear contacts and after forming gas annealing (FGA) at 350°C, is due to strong surface passivation of SiO2/TiO2 stack as well as low contact resistivity at the Si/SiO2/TiO2 heterojunction. This can be attributed to the transformation of amorphous TiO2 to a conducting TiO2-x phase. Conversely, the low efficiency (9.8%) obtained on cells featuring an a-Si:H/TiO2/Al rear contact is due to severe degradation of passivation of the a-Si:H upon FGA.

  19. Indium hydroxide to oxide decomposition observed in one nanocrystal during in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miehe, Gerhard; Lauterbach, Stefan; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Gurlo, Aleksander

    2013-02-01

    The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) is used to study, in situ, spatially resolved decomposition in individual nanocrystals of metal hydroxides and oxyhydroxides. This case study reports on the decomposition of indium hydroxide (c-In(OH)3) to bixbyite-type indium oxide (c-In2O3). The electron beam is focused onto a single cube-shaped In(OH)3 crystal of {100} morphology with ca. 35 nm edge length and a sequence of HR-TEM images was recorded during electron beam irradiation. The frame-by-frame analysis of video sequences allows for the in situ, time-resolved observation of the shape and orientation of the transformed crystals, which in turn enables the evaluation of the kinetics of c-In2O3 crystallization. Supplementary material (video of the transformation) related to this article can be found online at 10.1016/j.jssc.2012.09.022. After irradiation the shape of the parent cube-shaped crystal is preserved, however, its linear dimension (edge) is reduced by the factor 1.20. The corresponding spotted selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern representing zone [001] of c-In(OH)3 is transformed to a diffuse strongly textured ring-like pattern of c-In2O3 that indicates the transformed cube is no longer a single crystal but is disintegrated into individual c-In2O3 domains with the size of about 5-10 nm. The induction time of approximately 15 s is estimated from the time-resolved Fourier transforms. The volume fraction of the transformed phase (c-In2O3), calculated from the shrinkage of the parent c-In(OH)3 crystal in the recorded HR-TEM images, is used as a measure of the kinetics of c-In2O3 crystallization within the framework of Avrami-Erofeev formalism. The Avrami exponent of ˜3 is characteristic for a reaction mechanism with fast nucleation at the beginning of the reaction and subsequent three-dimensional growth of nuclei with a constant growth rate. The structural transformation path in reconstructive decomposition of c-In(OH)3 to c

  20. The effect of different electrodes on the electronic transmission of benzene junctions: Analytical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohebbi, Razie; Seyed-Yazdi, Jamileh, E-mail: j.seyedyazdi@vru.ac.ir

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we have investigated the electronic transmission of systems electrode–benzene–electrode using the Landauer approach. The effect of different electrodes made of metal (Au) and semiconductors (Si, TiO{sub 2}) is investigated. These three electrodes are compared between them and the results show that the electronic transmission of benzene junctions, when using semiconductor electrodes, is associated to a gap in transmission which is due to the electrodes band gap. As a consequence, a threshold voltage is necessary to obtain conducting channels.

  1. Interfacial orientation and misorientation relationships in nanolamellar Cu/Nb composites using transmission-electron-microscope-based orientation and phase mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, X.; Nuhfer, N.T.; Rollett, A.D.; Sinha, S.; Lee, S.-B.; Carpenter, J.S.; LeDonne, J.E.; Darbal, A.; Barmak, K.

    2014-01-01

    A transmission-electron-microscope-based orientation mapping technique that makes use of beam precession to achieve near-kinematical conditions was used to map the phase and crystal orientations in nanolamellar Cu/Nb composites with average layer thicknesses of 86, 30 and 18 nm. Maps of high quality and reliability were obtained by comparing the recorded diffraction patterns with pre-calculated templates. Particular care was taken in optimizing the dewarping parameters and in calibrating the frames of reference. Layers with thicknesses as low as 4 nm were successfully mapped. Heterophase interface plane and character distributions (HIPD and HICD, respectively) of Cu and Nb phases from the samples were determined from the orientation maps. In addition, local orientation relation stereograms of the Cu/Nb interfaces were calculated, and these revealed the detailed layer-to-layer texture information. The results are in agreement with previously reported neutron-diffraction-based and precession-electron-diffraction-based measurements on an accumulated roll bonding (ARB)-fabricated Cu/Nb sample with an average layer thickness of 30 nm as well as scanning-electron-microscope-based electron backscattered diffraction HIPD/HICD plots of ARB-fabricated Cu/Nb samples with layer thicknesses between 200 and 600 nm

  2. Microstructural characterization by electron backscatter diffraction of a hot worked Al-Cu-Mg alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cepeda-Jimenez, C.M., E-mail: cm.cepeda@cenim.csic.es [Department of Physical Metallurgy, CENIM, CSIC, Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Hidalgo, P.; Carsi, M.; Ruano, O.A.; Carreno, F. [Department of Physical Metallurgy, CENIM, CSIC, Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} The most favourable conditions for hot workability have been determined. {yields} EBSD was employed to characterize the obtained microtexture and microstructure. {yields} The Al 2024 alloy torsion tested at 408 deg. C and 2.1 s{sup -1} showed maximum ductility. {yields} Solid solution and fine precipitates favour a fine microstructure at 408 deg. C. {yields} The increase in test temperature to 467 deg. C produces a sharp decrease in ductility. - Abstract: Hot torsion tests to fracture to simulate thermomechanical processing were carried out on a solution-treated Al-Cu-Mg alloy (Al 2024-T351) at constant temperature. Torsion tests were conducted in the range 278-467 deg. C, and at two strain rates, 2.1 and 4.5 s{sup -1}. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was employed to characterize the microtexture and microstructure before and after testing. The microstructural evolution during torsion deformation at different temperatures and strain rate conditions determines the mechanical properties at room temperature of the Al 2024 alloy since grain refining, dynamic precipitation and precipitate coalescence occur during the torsion test. These mechanical properties were measured by Vickers microhardness tests. At 408 deg. C and 2.1 s{sup -1} the optimum combination of solid solution and incipient precipitation gives rise to maximum ductility and large fraction of fine and misoriented grains (f{sub HAB} = 54%). In contrast, the increase in test temperature to 467 deg. C produces a sharp decrease in ductility, attributed to the high proportion of alloying elements in solid solution. Both the stress-strain flow curves obtained by torsion tests and the final microstructures are a consequence of recovery phenomena and the dynamic nature of the precipitation process taking place during deformation.

  3. Determination of grain boundary mobility during recrystallization by statistical evaluation of electron backscatter diffraction measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, I.; Chen, M.; Loeck, M.; Al-Samman, T.; Molodov, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    One of the key aspects influencing microstructural design pathways in metallic systems is grain boundary motion. The present work introduces a method by means of which direct measurement of grain boundary mobility vs. misorientation dependence is made possible. The technique utilizes datasets acquired by means of serial electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements. The experimental EBSD measurements are collectively analyzed, whereby datasets were used to obtain grain boundary mobility and grain aspect ratio with respect to grain boundary misorientation. The proposed method is further validated using cellular automata (CA) simulations. Single crystal aluminium was cold rolled and scratched in order to nucleate random orientations. Subsequent annealing at 300 °C resulted in grains growing, in the direction normal to the scratch, into a single deformed orientation. Growth selection was observed, wherein the boundaries with misorientations close to Σ7 CSL orientation relationship (38° 〈111〉) migrated considerably faster. The obtained boundary mobility distribution exhibited a non-monotonic behavior with a maximum corresponding to misorientation of 38° ± 2° about 〈111〉 axes ± 4°, which was 10–100 times higher than the mobility values of random high angle boundaries. Correlation with the grain aspect ratio values indicated a strong growth anisotropy displayed by the fast growing grains. The observations have been discussed in terms of the influence of grain boundary character on grain boundary motion during recrystallization. - Highlights: • Statistical microstructure method to measure grain boundary mobility during recrystallization • Method implementation independent of material or crystal structure • Mobility of the Σ7 boundaries in 5N Al was calculated as 4.7 × 10"–"8 m"4/J ⋅ s. • Pronounced growth selection in the recrystallizing nuclei in Al • Boundary mobility values during recrystallization 2–3 orders of magnitude

  4. Analysis of soft magnetic materials by electron backscatter diffraction as a powerful tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, David; Hohs, Dominic; Loeffler, Ralf; Bernthaler, Timo; Goll, Dagmar; Schneider, Gerhard

    2018-04-01

    The current work demonstrates that electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a powerful and versatile characterization technique for investigating soft magnetic materials. The properties of soft magnets, e.g., magnetic losses strongly depend on the materials chemical composition and microstructure, including grain size and shape, texture, degree of plastic deformation and elastic strain. In electrical sheet stacks for e-motor applications, the quality of the machined edges/surfaces of each individual sheet is of special interest. Using EBSD, the influence of the punching process on the microstructure at the cutting edge is quantitatively assessed by evaluating the crystallographic misorientation distribution of the deformed grains. Using an industrial punching process, the maximum affected deformation depth is determined to be 200 - 300 μm. In the case of laser cutting, the affected deformation depth is determined to be approximately zero. Reliability and detection limits of the developed EBSD approach are evaluated on non-affected sample regions and model samples containing different indentation test bodies. A second application case is the investigation of the recrystallization process during the annealing step of soft magnetic composites (SMC) toroids produced by powder metallurgy as a function of compaction pressure, annealing parameters and powder particle size. With increasing pressure and temperature, the recrystallized area fraction (e.g., grains with crystallographic misorientations particle boundaries or areas with existing plastic deformation. The progress of recrystallization is visualized as a function of time and of different particle to grain size distributions. Here, large particles with coarse internal grain structures show a favorable recrystallization behavior which results in large bulk permeability of up to 600 - 700 and lower amount of residual misorientations (>3°).

  5. Microstructural characterization by electron backscatter diffraction of a hot worked Al-Cu-Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepeda-Jimenez, C.M.; Hidalgo, P.; Carsi, M.; Ruano, O.A.; Carreno, F.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The most favourable conditions for hot workability have been determined. → EBSD was employed to characterize the obtained microtexture and microstructure. → The Al 2024 alloy torsion tested at 408 deg. C and 2.1 s -1 showed maximum ductility. → Solid solution and fine precipitates favour a fine microstructure at 408 deg. C. → The increase in test temperature to 467 deg. C produces a sharp decrease in ductility. - Abstract: Hot torsion tests to fracture to simulate thermomechanical processing were carried out on a solution-treated Al-Cu-Mg alloy (Al 2024-T351) at constant temperature. Torsion tests were conducted in the range 278-467 deg. C, and at two strain rates, 2.1 and 4.5 s -1 . Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was employed to characterize the microtexture and microstructure before and after testing. The microstructural evolution during torsion deformation at different temperatures and strain rate conditions determines the mechanical properties at room temperature of the Al 2024 alloy since grain refining, dynamic precipitation and precipitate coalescence occur during the torsion test. These mechanical properties were measured by Vickers microhardness tests. At 408 deg. C and 2.1 s -1 the optimum combination of solid solution and incipient precipitation gives rise to maximum ductility and large fraction of fine and misoriented grains (f HAB = 54%). In contrast, the increase in test temperature to 467 deg. C produces a sharp decrease in ductility, attributed to the high proportion of alloying elements in solid solution. Both the stress-strain flow curves obtained by torsion tests and the final microstructures are a consequence of recovery phenomena and the dynamic nature of the precipitation process taking place during deformation.

  6. Data processing software suite SITENNO for coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using the X-ray free-electron laser SACLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    The software suite SITENNO is developed for processing diffraction data collected in coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiments of non-crystalline particles using an X-ray free-electron laser. Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging is a promising technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of micrometers to sub-micrometers. Recently, X-ray free-electron laser sources have enabled efficient experiments in the ‘diffraction before destruction’ scheme. Diffraction experiments have been conducted at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) using the custom-made diffraction apparatus KOTOBUKI-1 and two multiport CCD detectors. In the experiments, ten thousands of single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected within several hours. Then, diffraction patterns with significant levels of intensity suitable for structural analysis must be found, direct-beam positions in diffraction patterns determined, diffraction patterns from the two CCD detectors merged, and phase-retrieval calculations for structural analyses performed. A software suite named SITENNO has been developed to semi-automatically apply the four-step processing to a huge number of diffraction data. Here, details of the algorithm used in the suite are described and the performance for approximately 9000 diffraction patterns collected from cuboid-shaped copper oxide particles reported. Using the SITENNO suite, it is possible to conduct experiments with data processing immediately after the data collection, and to characterize the size distribution and internal structures of the non-crystalline particles

  7. Intergrown new zeolite beta polymorphs with interconnected 12-ring channels solved by combining electron crystallography and single-crystal X-ray diffraction

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Zhengbao

    2012-10-09

    Two new polymorphs of zeolite beta, denoted as SU-78A and SU-78B, were synthesized by employing dicyclohexylammonium hydroxides as organic structure-directing agents. The structure was solved by combining transmission electron microscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. SU-78 is an intergrowth of SU-78A and SU-78B and contains interconnected 12-ring channels in three directions. The two polymorphs are built from the same building layer, similar to that for the zeolite beta family. The layer stacking in SU-78, however, is different from those in zeolite beta polymorph A, B, and C, showing new zeolite framework topologies. SU-78 is thermally stable up to 600 °C. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  8. In SITU Transmission Electron Microscopy on Operating Electrochemical CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gualandris, Fabrizio; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2016-01-01

    Solid oxide cells (SOC) have the potential of playing a significant role in the future efficient energy system scenario. In order to become widely commercially available, an improved performance and durability of the cells has to be achieved [1]. Conventional scanning and transmission SEM and TEM...... have been often used for ex-situ post mortem characterization of SOFCs and SOECs [2,3]. However, in order to get fundamental insight of the microstructural development of SOFC/SOEC during operation conditions in situ studies are necessary [4]....

  9. LACDIF, a new electron diffraction technique obtained with the LACBED configuration and a C{sub s} corrector: Comparison with electron precession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morniroli, J.P. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique et Genie des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 8517, USTL and ENSCL, Cite Scientifique, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)], E-mail: jean-paul.morniroli@univ-lille1.fr; Houdellier, F.; Roucau, C. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, BP 94347, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Puiggali, J.; Gesti, S. [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Redjaimia, A. [Laboratoire de Science et Genie des Surfaces, UMR CNRS 7570, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt 54042 Nancy (France)

    2008-01-15

    By combining the large-angle convergent-beam electron diffraction (LACBED) configuration together with a microscope equipped with a C{sub s} corrector it is possible to obtain good quality spot patterns in image mode and not in diffraction mode as it is usually the case. These patterns have two main advantages with respect to the conventional selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) or microdiffraction patterns. They display a much larger number of reflections and the diffracted intensity is the integrated intensity. These patterns have strong similarities with the electron precession patterns and they can be used for various applications like the identification of the possible space groups of a crystal from observations of the Laue zones or the ab-initio structure identifications. Since this is a defocused method, another important application concerns the analysis of electron beam-sensitive materials. Successful applications to polymers are given in the present paper to prove the validity of this method with regards to these materials.

  10. Structure and microstructure of hexagonal Ba3Ti2RuO9 by electron diffraction and microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maunders, C.; Etheridge, J.; Whitfield, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have used electron microscopy and diffraction to refine the structure and investigate the microstructure of Ba 3 Ti 2 RuO 9 . The parent compound is hexagonal BaTiO 3 with the space group P6 3 /mmc. Using convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) combined with electron-sensitive image plates we have found that the space group of Ba 3 Ti 2 RuO 9 is the non-centrosymmetric group P6 3 mc. at room temperature and at ∝ 110 K. This is consistent with the Ru and Ti atoms occupying alternate face-sharing octahedral sites in the h0001i direction. This maintains the c-glide, but breaks the mirror normal to the c axis and consequently removes the centre of symmetry. Using powder X-ray diffraction, we have measured the lattice parameters from polycrystalline samples to be a = 5.7056 ± 0.0005, c = 14.0093 ± 0.0015 Aa at room temperature. Using high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) we observed highly coherent, low-strain {10 anti 10} grain boundaries intersecting at 60 and 120 . From CBED we deduce that adjacent grains are identical but for the relative phase of the Ti and Ru atom ordering along the c axis. HREM also revealed occasional stacking faults, normal to the c-axis

  11. Multipole electron-density modelling of synchrotron powder diffraction data: the case of diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, H.; Overgaard, J.; Busselez, R.

    2010-01-01

    between experiment and theory, and the study therefore demonstrates that synchrotron powder diffraction can indeed provide accurate structure-factor values based on data measured in minutes with limited sample preparation. Thus, potential systematic errors such as extinction and twinning commonly......Accurate structure factors are extracted from synchrotron powder diffraction data measured on crystalline diamond based on a novel multipole model division of overlapping reflection intensities. The approach limits the spherical-atom bias in structure factors extracted from overlapping powder data...

  12. Indium hydroxide to oxide decomposition observed in one nanocrystal during in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miehe, Gerhard; Lauterbach, Stefan; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Gurlo, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) is used to study, in situ, spatially resolved decomposition in individual nanocrystals of metal hydroxides and oxyhydroxides. This case study reports on the decomposition of indium hydroxide (c-In(OH) 3 ) to bixbyite-type indium oxide (c-In 2 O 3 ). The electron beam is focused onto a single cube-shaped In(OH) 3 crystal of {100} morphology with ca. 35 nm edge length and a sequence of HR-TEM images was recorded during electron beam irradiation. The frame-by-frame analysis of video sequences allows for the in situ, time-resolved observation of the shape and orientation of the transformed crystals, which in turn enables the evaluation of the kinetics of c-In 2 O 3 crystallization. Supplementary material (video of the transformation) related to this article can be found online at (10.1016/j.jssc.2012.09.022). After irradiation the shape of the parent cube-shaped crystal is preserved, however, its linear dimension (edge) is reduced by the factor 1.20. The corresponding spotted selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern representing zone [001] of c-In(OH) 3 is transformed to a diffuse strongly textured ring-like pattern of c-In 2 O 3 that indicates the transformed cube is no longer a single crystal but is disintegrated into individual c-In 2 O 3 domains with the size of about 5–10 nm. The induction time of approximately 15 s is estimated from the time-resolved Fourier transforms. The volume fraction of the transformed phase (c-In 2 O 3 ), calculated from the shrinkage of the parent c-In(OH) 3 crystal in the recorded HR-TEM images, is used as a measure of the kinetics of c-In 2 O 3 crystallization within the framework of Avrami–Erofeev formalism. The Avrami exponent of ∼3 is characteristic for a reaction mechanism with fast nucleation at the beginning of the reaction and subsequent three-dimensional growth of nuclei with a constant growth rate. The structural transformation path in reconstructive

  13. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  14. Removal of Vesicle Structures from Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff; Sigworth, Fred; Brandt, Sami Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of imaging membrane proteins for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the isolated protein structure. More precisely, we propose a method for learning and removing the interfering vesicle signals from the micrograph, prior to reconstruct...

  15. Small round structured viruses (SRSVs) and transmission electron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    immune-electron microscopy (IEM) from patients' feces. They reported this virus particle as the causative agent of winter vomiting outbreaks in Norwalk (Kapikian et al.,. 1972). This is the remarkable landmark study of non- bacterial gastroenteritis viruses, especially for small round structured viruses (SRSVs). After that, many.

  16. Anisotropic Shape Changes of Silica Nanoparticles Induced in Liquid with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecevic, J.; Hermannsdorfer, Justus; Schuh, Tobias; de Jong, Krijn P.; de Jonge, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used for in-situ imaging of nanoscale processes taking place in liquid, such as the evolution of nanoparticles during synthesis or structural changes of nanomaterials in liquid environment. Here, it is shown that the focused electron beam of

  17. Charging of carbon thin films in scanning and phase-plate transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hettler, Simon; Kano, Emi; Dries, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    A systematic study on charging of carbon thin films under intense electron-beam irradiation was performed in a transmission electron microscope to identify the underlying physics for the functionality of hole-free phase plates. Thin amorphous carbon films fabricated by different deposition techni...

  18. The Design and Construction of a Simple Transmission Electron Microscope for Educational Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearsey, Paul K.

    This document presents a model for a simple transmission electron microscope for educational purposes. This microscope could demonstrate thermonic emission, particle acceleration, electron deflection, and flourescence. It is designed to be used in high school science courses, particularly physics, taking into account the size, weight, complexity…

  19. Incipient crystallization of transition-metal tungstates under microwaves probed by Raman scattering and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, Kisla P. F.; Dias, Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Microwave synthesis was used to produce nanosized transition-metal tungstates in environmentally friendly conditions not yet reported by the literature: 110 and 150 °C, for times of 10 and 20 min. X-ray diffraction evidenced incipient crystallized materials, while transmission electron microscopy indicates nanostructured regions of about 2–5 nm inside an amorphous matrix. Raman spectroscopy was used to probe short-range ordering in the achieved samples and also to obtain a reliable set of spectra containing all the Raman-active bands predicted by group-theory calculations. The vibrational spectra showed no extra feature, indicating that the microwave processing was able to produce short-range ordered materials without tetrahedral distortions. These distortions are frequently reported when commercially modified kitchen microwave units are employed. In this work, the syntheses were conducted in a commercial apparatus especially designed for fully controlled temperature–time–pressure conditions.

  20. Chemical Reactions of Molecules Promoted and Simultaneously Imaged by the Electron Beam in Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Stephen T; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Besley, Elena; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2017-08-15

    The main objective of this Account is to assess the challenges of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of molecules, based on over 15 years of our work in this field, and to outline the opportunities in studying chemical reactions under the electron beam (e-beam). During TEM imaging of an individual molecule adsorbed on an atomically thin substrate, such as graphene or a carbon nanotube, the e-beam transfers kinetic energy to atoms of the molecule, displacing them from equilibrium positions. Impact of the e-beam triggers bond dissociation and various chemical reactions which can be imaged concurrently with their activation by the e-beam and can be presented as stop-frame movies. This experimental approach, which we term ChemTEM, harnesses energy transferred from the e-beam to the molecule via direct interactions with the atomic nuclei, enabling accurate predictions of bond dissociation events and control of the type and rate of chemical reactions. Elemental composition and structure of the reactant molecules as well as the operating conditions of TEM (particularly the energy of the e-beam) determine the product formed in ChemTEM processes, while the e-beam dose rate controls the reaction rate. Because the e-beam of TEM acts simultaneously as a source of energy for the reaction and as an imaging tool monitoring the same reaction, ChemTEM reveals atomic-level chemical information, such as pathways of reactions imaged for individual molecules, step-by-step and in real time; structures of illusive reaction intermediates; and direct comparison of catalytic activity of different transition metals filmed with atomic resolution. Chemical transformations in ChemTEM often lead to previously unforeseen products, demonstrating the potential of this method to become not only an analytical tool for studying reactions, but also a powerful instrument for discovery of materials that can be synthesized on preparative scale.