WorldWideScience

Sample records for transmission electron diffraction

  1. Implementing Transmission Electron Backscatter Diffraction for Atom Probe Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Katherine P; Chen, Yimeng; Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J

    2016-06-01

    There are advantages to performing transmission electron backscattering diffraction (tEBSD) in conjunction with focused ion beam-based specimen preparation for atom probe tomography (APT). Although tEBSD allows users to identify the position and character of grain boundaries, which can then be combined with APT to provide full chemical and orientation characterization of grain boundaries, tEBSD can also provide imaging information that improves the APT specimen preparation process by insuring proper placement of the targeted grain boundary within an APT specimen. In this report we discuss sample tilt angles, ion beam milling energies, and other considerations to optimize Kikuchi diffraction pattern quality for the APT specimen geometry. Coordinated specimen preparation and analysis of a grain boundary in a Ni-based Inconel 600 alloy is used to illustrate the approach revealing a 50° misorientation and trace element segregation to the grain boundary.

  2. Structural studies of glasses by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashchieva, E.P.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present information about the applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction (ED) for structural investigations of glasses. TEM investigations have been carried out on some binary and on a large number of ternary borate-telluride systems where glass-forming oxides, oxides of transitional elements and modified oxides of elements from I, II and III groups in the periodic table, are used as third component. The large experimental data given by TEM method allows the fine classification of the micro-heterogeneities. A special case of micro-heterogeneous structure with technological origin occurs near the boundary between the 2 immiscible liquids obtained at macro-phase separation. TEM was also used for the direct observation of the glass structure and we have studied the nano-scale structure of borate glasses obtained at slow and fast cooling of the melts. The ED possesses advantages for analysis of amorphous thin films or micro-pastilles and it is a very useful technique for study in materials containing simultaneously light and heavy elements. A comparison between the possibilities of the 3 diffraction techniques (X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and ED) is presented

  3. First combined electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy study of grain boundary structure of deformed quartzite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigematsu, N; Prior, D J; Wheeler, J

    2006-12-01

    The structures of boundaries in a deformed and dynamically recovered and recrystallized quartz polycrystal (mylonite) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, after the misorientation angles across the same grain boundaries had been analysed using electron backscatter diffraction in a scanning electron microscope. In this new approach, a specific sample area is mapped with electron backscatter diffraction, and the mapped area is then attached to a foil, and by the ion beam thinned for transmission electron microscopy analysis. Dislocations in grain boundaries were recognized as periodic and parallel fringes. The fringes associated with dislocations are observed in boundaries with misorientations less than 9 degrees , whereas such fringes cannot be seen in the boundaries with misorientations larger than 17 degrees . Some boundaries with misorientations between 9 degrees and 17 degrees generally have no structures associated with dislocation. One segment of a boundary with a misorientation of 13.5 degrees has structures associated with dislocations. It is likely that the transition from low-angle to high-angle boundaries occurs at misorientations ranging from approximately 9 degrees to 14 degrees . Change in the grain boundary structure presumably influences the mobility of the boundaries. In the studied deformed quartz vein, a relative dearth of boundaries between misorientation angles of theta = 2 degrees and theta = 15 degrees has previously been reported, and high-angle boundaries form cusps where they intersect low-angle boundaries, suggesting substantial mobility of high-angle boundaries.

  4. Analytics on Transmission Electron Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keum, Dong Hwa; Kim, Geung Ho; Lee, Hwak Ju and others

    1996-06-01

    This book gives descriptions of transmission electron microscopy, which deals with electron microscopy and materials science, history of electron microscopy, application of analytics on transmission electron microscopy, machine requirement of transmission electron microscopy like electron gun and TEM image and function, crystal diffraction, electron diffraction, Kikuchi's diffraction figure, analysis of diffraction figure, contrast of TEM image like absorption contrast, and phase contrast, Fresnel's diffraction and TEM contrast, thickness fringe, column approximation, analysis of diffraction contrast, image simulation, and electron energy loss spectrometry.

  5. Characterizing deformed ultrafine-grained and nanocrystalline materials using transmission Kikuchi diffraction in a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trimby, Patrick W.; Cao, Yang; Chen, Zibin; Han, Shuang; Hemker, Kevin J.; Lian, Jianshe; Liao, Xiaozhou; Rottmann, Paul; Samudrala, Saritha; Sun, Jingli; Wang, Jing Tao; Wheeler, John; Cairney, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Abstract: The recent development of transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) in a scanning electron microscope enables fast, automated orientation mapping of electron transparent samples using standard electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) hardware. TKD in a scanning electron microscope has significantly better spatial resolution than conventional EBSD, enabling routine characterization of nanocrystalline materials and allowing effective measurement of samples that have undergone severe plastic deformation. Combining TKD with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) provides complementary chemical information, while a standard forescatter detector system below the EBSD detector can be used to generate dark field and oriented dark field images. Here we illustrate the application of this exciting new approach to a range of deformed, ultrafine grained and nanocrystalline samples, including duplex stainless steel, nanocrystalline copper and highly deformed titanium and nickel–cobalt. The results show that TKD combined with EDS is a highly effective and widely accessible tool for measuring key microstructural parameters at resolutions that are inaccessible using conventional EBSD

  6. Neutron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy study of hydrogen-induced phase transformations in Zr3Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, W.J.; Faber, J. Jr.; Okamoto, P.R.; Rehn, L.E.; Kestel, B.J.; Hitterman, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogen-induced phase transformations of the equilibrium intermetallic compound Zr 3 Al have been studied by in situ elastic neutron scattering, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM observations reveal two distinct modes of amorphous phase formation in Zr 3 Al upon hydrogenation, namely, heterogeneous nucleation at preexisting grain boundaries, and homogeneous nucleation within single-crystal grains. In situ neutron diffraction reveals a phase separation between a hydrogen (deuterium) poor and a hydrogen (deuterium) rich crystalline phase. Rietveld profile refinement of the neutron diffraction data indicates predominant hydrogen (deuterium) occupation of the octahedral interstitial sites in the crystalline matrix that have only Zr nearest-neighbor atoms. The two different modes of amorphous phase nucleation are directly related to the degree of hydrogen dissolution in the host crystalline matrix

  7. Physical methods for studying minerals and solid materials: X-ray, electron and neutron diffraction; scanning and transmission electron microscopy; X-ray, electron and ion spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhart, J.-P.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: theoretical aspects of radiation-matter interactions; production and measurement of radiations (X rays, electrons, neutrons); applications of radiation interactions to the study of crystalline materials. The following techniques are presented: X-ray and neutron diffraction, electron microscopy, electron diffraction, X-ray fluorescence analysis, electron probe microanalysis, surface analysis by electron emission spectrometry (ESCA and Auger electrons), scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion emission analysis [fr

  8. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  9. Acquisition parameters optimization of a transmission electron forward scatter diffraction system in a cold-field emission scanning electron microscope for nanomaterials characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Demers, Hendrix; Trudeau, Michel; Gauvin, Raynald

    2013-01-01

    Transmission electron forward scatter diffraction (t-EFSD) is a new technique providing crystallographic information with high resolution on thin specimens by using a conventional electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) system in a scanning electron microscope. In this study, the impact of tilt angle, working distance, and detector distance on the Kikuchi pattern quality were investigated in a cold-field emission scanning electron microscope (CFE-SEM). We demonstrated that t-EFSD is applicable for tilt angles ranging from -20° to -40°. Working distance (WD) should be optimized for each material by choosing the WD for which the EBSD camera screen illumination is the highest, as the number of detected electrons on the screen is directly dependent on the scattering angle. To take advantage of the best performances of the CFE-SEM, the EBSD camera should be close to the sample and oriented towards the bottom to increase forward scattered electron collection efficiency. However, specimen chamber cluttering and beam/mechanical drift are important limitations in the CFE-SEM used in this work. Finally, the importance of t-EFSD in materials science characterization was illustrated through three examples of phase identification and orientation mapping. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Puzzling Intergrowth in Cerium Nitridophosphate Unraveled by Joint Venture of Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Synchrotron Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloß, Simon D; Neudert, Lukas; Döblinger, Markus; Nentwig, Markus; Oeckler, Oliver; Schnick, Wolfgang

    2017-09-13

    Thorough investigation of nitridophosphates has rapidly accelerated through development of new synthesis strategies. Here we used the recently developed high-pressure metathesis to prepare the first rare-earth metal nitridophosphate, Ce 4 Li 3 P 18 N 35 , with a high degree of condensation >1/2. Ce 4 Li 3 P 18 N 35 consists of an unprecedented hexagonal framework of PN 4 tetrahedra and exhibits blue luminescence peaking at 455 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed two intergrown domains with slight structural and compositional variations. One domain type shows extremely weak superstructure phenomena revealed by atomic-resolution scanning TEM (STEM) and single-crystal diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The corresponding superstructure involves a modulated displacement of Ce atoms in channels of tetrahedra 6-rings. The displacement model was refined in a supercell as well as in an equivalent commensurate (3 + 2)-dimensional description in superspace group P6 3 (α, β, 0)0(-α - β, α, 0)0. In the second domain type, STEM revealed disordered vacancies of the same Ce atoms that were modulated in the first domain type, leading to sum formula Ce 4-0.5x Li 3 P 18 N 35-1.5x O 1.5x (x ≈ 0.72) of the average structure. The examination of these structural intricacies may indicate the detection limit of synchrotron diffraction and TEM. We discuss the occurrence of either Ce displacements or Ce vacancies that induce the incorporation of O as necessary stabilization of the crystal structure.

  11. Characterization by Raman scattering, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy of (AlAs)m(InAs)m short period superlattices grown by migration enhanced epitaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradshaw, J.; Song, X.J.; Shealy, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    We report growth of (InAs)1(AlAs)1 and (InAs)2(AlAs)2 strained layer superlattices by migration enhanced epitaxy. The samples were grown on InP (001) substrates and characterized by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Satellite peaks in the x-ray data...... confirm the intended periodicity and indicate the presence of some disorder in the monolayer sample. The energies of the zone folded and quantum confined optic phonons are in reasonable agreement with calculations based on one-dimensional elastic continuum and linear chain models. Journal of Applied...

  12. Structural characterization and gas reactions of small metal particles by high resolution in-situ TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) and TED (Transmission Electron Diffraction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, K.

    1987-01-01

    The detection and size analysis of small metal particles supported on amorphous substrates becomes increasingly difficult when the particle size approaches that of the phase contrast background structures of the support. An approach of digital image analysis, involving Fourier transformation of the original image, filtering, and image reconstruction was studied with respect to the likelihood of unambiguously detecting particles of less than 1 nm diameter on amorphous substrates from a single electron micrograph.

  13. Structural Characterization and Gas Reactions of Small Metal Particles by High Resolution In-situ TEM and TED. [Transmission Electron Microscopy and Transmission Electron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, K.

    1985-01-01

    A commercial electron microscope with flat-plate upper pole piece configuration of the objective lens and top entry specimen introduction was modified to obtain 5 x 10 to the minus 10th power mbar pressure at the site of the specimen while maintaining the convenience of a specimen airlock system that allows operation in the 10 to the 10th power mbar range within 15 minutes after specimen change. The specimen chamber contains three wire evaporation sources, a specimen heater, and facilities for oxygen or hydrogen plasma treatment to clean as-introduced specimens. Evacuation is achieved by dural differential pumping, with fine entrance and exit apertures for the electron beam. With the microscope operating at .000001 mbar, the first differential pumping stage features a high-speed cryopump operating in a stainless steel chamber that can be mildly baked and reaches 1 x 10 to the minus 8th power mbar. The second stage, containing the evaporation sources and a custom ionization gauge within 10 cm from the specimen, is a rigorously uncompromised all-metal uhv-system that is bakable to above 200 C throughout and is pumped with an 80-liter ion pump. Design operating pressures and image quality (resolution of metal particles smaller than 1 nm in size) was achieved.

  14. Controlled double-slit electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, Roger; Liou, Sy-Hwang; Batelaan, Herman; Pope, Damian

    2013-01-01

    Double-slit diffraction is a corner stone of quantum mechanics. It illustrates key features of quantum mechanics: interference and the particle-wave duality of matter. In 1965, Richard Feynman presented a thought experiment to show these features. Here we demonstrate the full realization of his famous thought experiment. By placing a movable mask in front of a double-slit to control the transmission through the individual slits, probability distributions for single- and double-slit arrangements were observed. Also, by recording single electron detection events diffracting through a double-slit, a diffraction pattern was built up from individual events. (paper)

  15. Electron microscopy and diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjoennes, J.; Olsen, A.

    1986-01-01

    This report is a description of research activities and plans at the electron microscopy laboratorium, Physics Department, University of Oslo. Since the first electron microscope was installed in 1968, the research has covered inorganic structures, physical metallurgy, as well as theory of electron scattering and the development of methods in this field. The current plans involve efforts in the development of crystallographic and spectroscopic methods

  16. Diffraction of high energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, A.

    1981-10-01

    The diffraction of electrons by a crystal is examined to study its structure. As the electron-substance interaction is strong, it must be treated in a dynamic manner. Using the N waves theory and physical optics the base equations giving the wave at the outlet are deduced for a perfect crystal and their equivalence is shown. The more complex case of an imperfect crystal is then envisaged in these two approaches. In both cases, only the diffraction of high energy electrons ( > 50 KeV) are considered since in the diffraction of slow electrons back scattering cannot be ignored. Taking into account an increasingly greater number of beams, through fast calculations computer techniques, enables images to be simulated in very varied conditions. The general use of the Fast Fourier Transform has given a clear cut practical advantage to the multi-layer method [fr

  17. Scanning transmission electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a scanning transmission electron microscope comprising an electron source, an electron accelerator and deflection means for directing electrons emitted by the electron source at an object to be examined, and in addition a detector for detecting electrons coming from the

  18. Depth Resolution Dependence on Sample Thickness and Incident Energy in On-Axis Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction in Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodu, Etienne; Bouzy, Emmanuel

    2017-12-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction is an emerging technique aimed at producing orientation maps of the structure of materials with a nanometric lateral resolution. This study investigates experimentally the depth resolution of the on-axis configuration, via a twinned silicon bi-crystal sample specifically designed and fabricated. The measured depth resolution varies from 30 to 65 nm in the range 10-30 keV, with a close to linear dependence with incident energy and no dependence with the total sample thickness. The depth resolution is explained in terms of two mechanisms acting concomitantly: generation of Kikuchi diffraction all along the thickness of the sample, associated with continuous absorption on the way out. A model based on the electron mean free path is used to account for the dependence with incident energy of the depth resolution. In addition, based on the results in silicon, the use of the mean absorption coefficient is proposed to predict the depth resolution for any atomic number and incident energy.

  19. Optical and structural properties in type-II InAlAs/AlGaAs quantum dots observed by photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Daly, A.; Craciun, D.; Laura Ursu, E.; Lemaître, A.; Maaref, M. A.; Iacomi, F.; Vasile, B. S.; Craciun, V.

    2017-10-01

    We present the effects of AlGaAs alloy composition on InAlAs quantum dots (QDs) optical and structural properties. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis of samples having a variety of aluminium composition values covering type-II transitions clearly in QDs showed the presence of two transitions X-Sh and X-Ph. High-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) investigations showed that the layers grew epitaxially on the GaAs substrate, with no relaxation regardless the Al content of AlGaAs layer. From the reciprocal space map (RSM) investigation around (004) and (115) diffraction peaks, it was shown that the InAlAs layer is fully strained, the in-plane lattice parameters (a and b, a = b) being identical to those of GaAs substrate, while the c lattice parameter was dependent on the In and Al concentrations, being larger than that of the substrate. High-resolution transmission electronic microscopy (HRTEM) investigations confirmed that films grew epitaxially on the GaAs substrate with no visible dislocations or other major defects within the InAlAs/GaAlAs QDs structure.

  20. Interfacial reaction pathways and kinetics during annealing of 111-textured Al/TiN bilayers: A synchrotron x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, J.-S.; Desjardins, P.; Lavoie, C.; Petrov, I.; Cabral, C. Jr.; Greene, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    Growth of TiN layers in most diffusion-barrier applications is limited to deposition temperatures T s s =450 deg. C on SiO 2 by ultrahigh vacuum reactive magnetron sputter deposition in pure N 2 . Al overlayers, 160 nm thick with inherited 111 preferred orientation, were then deposited at T s =100 deg. C without breaking vacuum. The as-deposited TiN layer is underdense due to the low deposition temperature (T s /T m ≅0.23 in which T m is the melting point) resulting in kinetically limited adatom mobilities leading to atomic shadowing which, in turn, results in a columnar microstructure with both inter- and intracolumnar voids. The Al overlayer is fully dense. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction was used to follow interfacial reaction kinetics during postdeposition annealing of the 111-textured Al/TiN bilayers as a function of time (t a =12-1200 s) and temperature (T a =440-550 deg. C). Changes in bilayer microstructure and microchemistry were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM to obtain compositional maps of plan-view and cross-sectional specimens. Interfacial reaction during annealing is initiated at the Al/TiN interface. Al diffuses rapidly into TiN voids during anneals at temperatures ∼ 3 Ti at the interface. Al 3 Ti exhibits a relatively planar growth front extending toward the Al free surface. Analyses of time-dependent x-ray diffraction peak intensities during isothermal annealing as a function of temperature show that Al 3 Ti growth kinetics are, for the entire temperature range investigated, diffusion limited with an activation energy of 1.5±0.2 eV

  1. X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy characterization of intermetallics formed in Fe/Ti nanometer-scale multilayers during thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Z.L.; Peng, T.X.; Cao, B.S.; Lei, M.K.

    2009-01-01

    Intermetallics formation in the Fe/Ti nanometer-scale multilayers magnetron-sputtering deposited on Si(100) substrate during thermal annealing at 623-873 K was investigated by using small and wide angle X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The Fe/Ti nanometer-scale multilayers were constructed with bilayer thickness of 16.2 nm and the sublayer thickness ratio of 1:1. At the annealing temperature of 623 K, intermetallics FeTi were formed by nucleation at the triple joins of α-Fe(Ti)/α-Ti interface and α-Ti grain boundary with an orientational correlation of FeTi(110)//α-Ti(100) and FeTi[001]//α-Ti[001] to adjacent α-Ti grains. The lateral growth of intermetallics FeTi which is dependent on the diffusion path of Ti led to a coalescence into an intermetallic layer. With an increase in the annealing temperature, intermetallics Fe 2 Ti were formed between the intermetallics FeTi and the excess Fe due to the limitation of Fe and Ti atomic concentrations, resulting in the coexistence of intermetallics FeTi and Fe 2 Ti. It was found that the low energy interface as well as the dominant diffusion path constrained the nucleation and growth of intermetallics during interfacial reaction in the nanometer-scale metallic multilayers.

  2. Structure refinement of the δ1p phase in the Fe-Zn system by single-crystal X-ray diffraction combined with scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Norihiko L; Tanaka, Katsushi; Yasuhara, Akira; Inui, Haruyuki

    2014-04-01

    The structure of the δ1p phase in the iron-zinc system has been refined by single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction combined with scanning transmission electron microscopy. The large hexagonal unit cell of the δ1p phase with the space group of P63/mmc comprises more or less regular (normal) Zn12 icosahedra, disordered Zn12 icosahedra, Zn16 icosioctahedra and dangling Zn atoms that do not constitute any polyhedra. The unit cell contains 52 Fe and 504 Zn atoms so that the compound is expressed with the chemical formula of Fe13Zn126. All Fe atoms exclusively occupy the centre of normal and disordered icosahedra. Iron-centred normal icosahedra are linked to one another by face- and vertex-sharing forming two types of basal slabs, which are bridged with each other by face-sharing with icosioctahedra, whereas disordered icosahedra with positional disorder at their vertex sites are isolated from other polyhedra. The bonding features in the δ1p phase are discussed in comparison with those in the Γ and ζ phases in the iron-zinc system.

  3. Analysis of the dislocation content in a deformed Co-based superalloy by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breuer, D.; Klimanek, P.; Muehle, U.; Martin, U.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper compares the dislocation densities as determined in a Co-based superalloy (CoNi22Cr22W14) after creep and tensile deformation by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-ray profile analysis (XRD). After creep tests the dislocation densities obtained by both methods are in good agreement, which is the result of a nearly homogeneous dislocation distribution. The relationship between the dislocation density and the flow stress meets the Taylor equation. After tensile deformation the dislocation densities determined by TEM and XRD differ systematically from each other, but in both cases also a Taylor relationship can be obtained. The constant α of the dislocation interaction derived by TEM is much larger than in the creep tests and also than that of the XRD, which agrees well with the creep data. The difference between the TEM and the XRD results is the consequence of the dislocation cell structure much more developed in the tensile specimens, which leads to an underestimation of the dislocation density in TEM because of overweighting the cell interior. By fitting the Fourier coefficients of the X-ray diffraction line shapes with a bimodal distribution of the defect content (composite model), dislocation densities of the cell interior can be estimated that correspond well to the TEM data. (orig.)

  4. Study of titanate nanotubes by X-ray and electron diffraction and electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brunátová, T.; Popelková, Daniela; Wan, W.; Oleynikov, P.; Daniš, S.; Zou, X.; Kužel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 87, January (2014), s. 166-171 ISSN 1044-5803 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : computer simulations * transmission electron microscopy * electron diffraction Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.845, year: 2014

  5. High resolution powder diffraction by white source transmission measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.G.; Bowman, C.D.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction has been studied by measuring the total neutron cross section using neutron time-of-flight in transmission geometry. This method is equivalent to measurements in scattering geometry of powder diffraction at 20 = 180 0 . Measurements on iron samples were conducted using the NBS 100 MeV electron linac as a pulsed neutron source and using flight paths of 20 and 60 meters. The resolution at 60 m for 25-MeV neutrons was limited to dlambda lambda=0.2% primarily by moderator hold-up. Although the change in cross section at the Bragg edges may be quite small, counting rates are high permitting the recording of data with a 0.1% statistical precision in about one day. For the Fe samples, diffraction edges were distinguished as high as n = 196 (where n is the sum of the squares of the Miller indicies) with all edges distinguishable below n = 90

  6. Transmission Electron Microscopy Physics of Image Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kohl, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy: Physics of Image Formation presents the theory of image and contrast formation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy. The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described. Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast. Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure analysis and imaging of lattices and their defects. X-ray microanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods. Specimen damage and contamination by electron irradiation limits the resolution for biological and some inorganic specimens. This fifth edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the area of aberration correction and energy filtering; moreover, the topics introduced in the fourth edition have been updated. Transmission Electron Microscopy: Physics of Image Formation is written f...

  7. Transmission Electron Microscopy and Diffractometry of Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Fultz, Brent

    2013-01-01

    This book explains concepts of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) that are important for the characterization of materials. The fourth edition adds important new techniques of TEM such as electron tomography, nanobeam diffraction, and geometric phase analysis. A new chapter on neutron scattering completes the trio of x-ray, electron and neutron diffraction. All chapters were updated and revised for clarity. The book explains the fundamentals of how waves and wavefunctions interact with atoms in solids, and the similarities and differences of using x-rays, electrons, or neutrons for diffraction measurements. Diffraction effects of crystalline order, defects, and disorder in materials are explained in detail. Both practical and theoretical issues are covered. The book can be used in an introductory-level or advanced-level course, since sections are identified by difficulty. Each chapter includes a set of problems to illustrate principles, and the extensive Appendix includes la...

  8. Future of Electron Scattering and Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Ernest [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Stemmer, Susanne [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Zheng, Haimei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Maracas, George [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2014-02-25

    spectroscopy with high spatial resolution without damaging their structure. The strong interaction of electrons with matter allows high-energy electron pulses to gather structural information before a sample is damaged. Electron ScatteringImaging, diffraction, and spectroscopy are the fundamental capabilities of electron-scattering instruments. The DOE BES-funded TEAM (Transmission Electron Aberration-corrected Microscope) project achieved unprecedented sub-atomic spatial resolution in imaging through aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. To further advance electron scattering techniques that directly enable groundbreaking science, instrumentation must advance beyond traditional two-dimensional imaging. Advances in temporal resolution, recording the full phase and energy spaces, and improved spatial resolution constitute a new frontier in electron microscopy, and will directly address the BES Grand Challenges, such as to “control the emergent properties that arise from the complex correlations of atomic and electronic constituents” and the “hidden states” “very far away from equilibrium”. Ultrafast methods, such as the pump-probe approach, enable pathways toward understanding, and ultimately controlling, the chemical dynamics of molecular systems and the evolution of complexity in mesoscale and nanoscale systems. Central to understanding how to synthesize and exploit functional materials is having the ability to apply external stimuli (such as heat, light, a reactive flux, and an electrical bias) and to observe the resulting dynamic process in situ and in operando, and under the appropriate environment (e.g., not limited to UHV conditions). To enable revolutionary advances in electron scattering and science, the participants of the workshop recommended three major new instrumental developments: A. Atomic-Resolution Multi-Dimensional Transmission Electron Microscope: This instrument would provide quantitative information over the entire real space

  9. Low voltage transmission electron microscopy of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Zhao, Jiong; Gorantla, Sandeep Madhukar; Martinez, Ignacio Guillermo Gonzalez; Wiedermann, Jerzy; Lee, Changgu; Eckert, Juergen; Rummeli, Mark Hermann

    2015-02-04

    The initial isolation of graphene in 2004 spawned massive interest in this two-dimensional pure sp(2) carbon structure due to its incredible electrical, optical, mechanical, and thermal effects. This in turn led to the rapid development of various characterization tools for graphene. Examples include Raman spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. However, the one tool with the greatest prowess for characterizing and studying graphene is the transmission electron microscope. State-of-the-art (scanning) transmission electron microscopes enable one to image graphene with atomic resolution, and also to conduct various other characterizations simultaneously. The advent of aberration correctors was timely in that it allowed transmission electron microscopes to operate with reduced acceleration voltages, so that damage to graphene is avoided while still providing atomic resolution. In this comprehensive review, a brief introduction is provided to the technical aspects of transmission electron microscopes relevant to graphene. The reader is then introduced to different specimen preparation techniques for graphene. The different characterization approaches in both transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy are then discussed, along with the different aspects of electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The use of graphene for other electron microscopy approaches such as in-situ investigations is also presented. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Structure refinement from precession electron diffraction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Jacob, Damien; Cuvillier, Priscille; Klementová, Mariana; Sinkler, Wharton; Marks, Laurence D

    2013-03-01

    Electron diffraction is a unique tool for analysing the crystal structures of very small crystals. In particular, precession electron diffraction has been shown to be a useful method for ab initio structure solution. In this work it is demonstrated that precession electron diffraction data can also be successfully used for structure refinement, if the dynamical theory of diffraction is used for the calculation of diffracted intensities. The method is demonstrated on data from three materials - silicon, orthopyroxene (Mg,Fe)(2)Si(2)O(6) and gallium-indium tin oxide (Ga,In)(4)Sn(2)O(10). In particular, it is shown that atomic occupancies of mixed crystallographic sites can be refined to an accuracy approaching X-ray or neutron diffraction methods. In comparison with conventional electron diffraction data, the refinement against precession diffraction data yields significantly lower figures of merit, higher accuracy of refined parameters, much broader radii of convergence, especially for the thickness and orientation of the sample, and significantly reduced correlations between the structure parameters. The full dynamical refinement is compared with refinement using kinematical and two-beam approximations, and is shown to be superior to the latter two.

  11. Uniting Electron Crystallography and Powder Diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Shankland, Kenneth; Meshi, Louisa; Avilov, Anatoly; David, William

    2012-01-01

    The polycrystalline and nanocrystalline states play an increasingly important role in exploiting the properties of materials, encompassing applications as diverse as pharmaceuticals, catalysts, solar cells and energy storage. A knowledge of the three-dimensional atomic and molecular structure of materials is essential for understanding and controlling their properties, yet traditional single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods lose their power when only polycrystalline and nanocrystalline samples are available. It is here that powder diffraction and single-crystal electron diffraction techniques take over, substantially extending the range of applicability of the crystallographic principles of structure determination.  This volume, a collection of teaching contributions presented at the Crystallographic Course in Erice in 2011, clearly describes the fundamentals and the state-of-the-art of powder diffraction and electron diffraction methods in materials characterisation, encompassing a diverse range of discipl...

  12. Component analyses of urinary nanocrystallites of uric acid stone formers by combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transformation, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xia, Zhi-Yue; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to analyse the components of nanocrystallites in urines of patients with uric acid (UA) stones. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to analyse the components of these nanocrystallites. XRD and FFT showed that the main component of urinary nanocrystallites was UA, which contains a small amount of calcium oxalate monohydrate and phosphates. EDS showed the characteristic absorption peaks of C, O, Ca and P. The formation of UA stones was closely related to a large number of UA nanocrystallites in urine. A combination of HRTEM, FFT, EDS and XRD analyses could be performed accurately to analyse the components of urinary nanocrystallites.

  13. Using transmission Kikuchi diffraction for small-scale material testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cackett, A.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. In the fusion and fission industries there is an increasing need for the development of small scale testing methods that can deliver engineering relevant mechanical properties for materials research. In all concepts for dedicated neutron sources for fusion material testing there is a commonality that the sample volumes available will be extremely small. This means that in order to gather significant and usable data the analysis method must be capable of achieving high resolution results. Additionally, a reduced sample size will greatly decrease the safety hazard when dealing with irradiated material. In the case of fission, the availability of a testing technique that only requires a small sample to be extracted from a reactor offers the potential to gauge the condition of components without causing significant down-time. This would be a huge advantage in power plant life-extension projects. One such technique that has recently been developed is Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD). It is currently the only method capable of being performed in a SEM that can produce crystallographic information at a spatial resolution of 10 nm and only needs sample volumes on the order of a few mm 3 or less. TKD uses a sample in the form of a thin <200 nm foil similar to that used in TEM. It is held at a much shallower tilt (typically no more than 20 degrees) from the detector than previous diffraction techniques such as Electron Backscatter Diffraction, which is why it is able to produce such small, isotropic resolutions. The diffraction patterns resulting from forward-scattered electrons provide information on crystal lattice orientations, the relative angle of which can be translated into a measure of strain. A direct application of this method has been employed in this work, for measuring the strain within the plastically deformed zone underneath a nano-scale indentation. This has been accomplished at CCFE, resulting in a high resolution (10

  14. Advanced transmission electron microscopy on nanostructured magnetic materials

    OpenAIRE

    Campanini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This doctoral work is focused on the study of nanostructured magnetic materials by advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, with emphasis on Ni2MnGa shape memory alloy thin films and magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications. The combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction to characterize morphology and crystalline structure, with Lorentz microscopy and Electron Holography, permits to achieve a deep insight in the s...

  15. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy for Electronics

    OpenAIRE

    Arita, Masashi; Hamada, Kouichi; Takahashi, Yasuo; Sueoka, Kazuhisa; Shibayama, Tamaki

    2015-01-01

    Electronic devices are strongly influenced by their microstructures. In situ transmission electron microscopy (in situ TEM) with capability to measure electrical properties is an effective method to dynamically correlate electric properties with microstructures. We have developed tools and in situ TEM experimental procedures for measuring electronic devices, including TEM sample holders and sample preparation methods. The method was used to study metallic nanowire by electromigration, magn...

  16. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1997-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy presents the theory of image and contrast formation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy. The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described. Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast. Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure analysis and imaging of lattices and their defects. X-ray micronanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods. Specimen damage and contamination by electron irradiation limits the resolution for biological and some inorganic specimens. This fourth edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the area of Schottky emission guns, convergent-beam electron diffraction, electron tomography, holography and the high resolution of crystal lattices.

  17. Transmission electron microscopy of bone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, Vincent; Niehof, Anneke; Tigchelaar-Gutter, Wikky; Beertsen, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes procedures to process mineralized tissues obtained from different sources for transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Methods for fixation, resin embedding, staining of semi-thin sections and ultrathin sections are presented. In addition, attention will be paid to processing

  18. Energy-weighted dynamical scattering simulations of electron diffraction modalities in the scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Elena; Singh, Saransh; Callahan, Patrick G; Hourahine, Ben; Trager-Cowan, Carol; Graef, Marc De

    2018-04-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) has been gaining momentum as a high resolution alternative to electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD), adding to the existing electron diffraction modalities in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The image simulation of any of these measurement techniques requires an energy dependent diffraction model for which, in turn, knowledge of electron energies and diffraction distances distributions is required. We identify the sample-detector geometry and the effect of inelastic events on the diffracting electron beam as the important factors to be considered when predicting these distributions. However, tractable models taking into account inelastic scattering explicitly are lacking. In this study, we expand the Monte Carlo (MC) energy-weighting dynamical simulations models used for EBSD [1] and ECP [2] to the TKD case. We show that the foil thickness in TKD can be used as a means of energy filtering and compare band sharpness in the different modalities. The current model is shown to correctly predict TKD patterns and, through the dictionary indexing approach, to produce higher quality indexed TKD maps than conventional Hough transform approach, especially close to grain boundaries. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1993-01-01

    "Transmission Electron Microscopy" presents the theory of image and contrastformation, and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy Theprinciples of particle and wave optics of electrons are described Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast Also analysed are the kinetical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal-structure determination and imaging of lattices and their defects X-ray microanalysis and electron energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods The third edition includes a brief discussionof Schottky emission guns, some clarification of minor details, and references to the recent literature

  20. Structure determination of modulated structures by powder X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhou, Z.Y.; Palatinus, Lukáš; Sun, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 11 (2016), s. 1351-1362 ISSN 2052-1553 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electron diffraction * incommensurate structure * powder diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.036, year: 2016

  1. Fresnel equations and transmission line analogues for diffraction gratings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushik, S.

    1995-08-01

    A simple and intuitive formalism is presented to describe diffraction in multi-layered periodic structures. We use the well known results from scalar analysis (wave propagation in homogeneous layered media) and show that they can be generalized rather readily to vector problems such as diffraction analysis. Specifically, we derive: (1) generalized Fresnel equations appropriate for reflection and transmission from an infinitely thick grating, (2) a generalized Airy formula for thin-film to describe reflection and transmission of light through a lamellar grating and (3) a matrix propagation method akin to that used for multi-layer thin film analysis. The results developed here complement the recent work on R-matrix and S-matrix propagation algorithms that have been used in connection with modal and differential grating theories. These algorithms have proven to be numerically stable for calculating diffraction efficiencies from deep groove gratings. The formalism developed here expands upon the earlier literature by providing important details that are hitherto unavailable.

  2. Characterisation of nano-grains in MgB2 superconductors by transmission Kikuchi diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, D.C.K.; Yeoh, W.K.; Trimby, P.W.; De Silva, K.S.B.; Bao, P.; Li, W.X.; Xu, X.; Dou, S.X.; Ringer, S.P.; Zheng, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of the emerging transmission Kikuchi diffraction technique in the scanning electron microscope to investigate nano-grain structures in polycrystalline MgB 2 superconductors. Two sintering conditions were considered, and the resulting differences in superconducting properties are correlated to differences in grain structure. A brief comparison to X-ray diffraction results is presented and discussed. This work focusses more on the application of this technique to reveal grain structure, rather than on the detailed differences between the two sintering temperatures

  3. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jason; Keller, Robert R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Oxidation mechanism of nickel particles studied in an environmental transmission electron microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeangros, Q.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation of nickel particles was studied in situ in an environmental transmission electron microscope in 3.2 mbar of O2 between ambient temperature and 600°C. Several different transmission electron microscopy imaging techniques, electron diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy were...

  5. A FORTRAN program for an IBM PC compatible computer for calculating kinematical electron diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjerpe, P.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes a computer program which is useful in transmission electron microscopy. The program is written in FORTRAN and calculates kinematical electron diffraction patterns in any zone axis from a given crystal structure. Quite large unit cells, containing up to 2250 atoms, can be handled by the program. The program runs on both the Helcules graphic card and the standard IBM CGA card

  6. Structure refinement using precession electron diffraction tomography and dynamical diffraction: theory and implementation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Petříček, Václav; Correa, Cinthia Antunes

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 71, Mar (2015), 235-244 ISSN 0108-7673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-25747S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : dynamical diffraction * electron diffraction tomography * electron crystallography Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.307, year: 2014

  7. Using transmission Kikuchi diffraction to study intergranular stress corrosion cracking in type 316 stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisnar, Martina; Vilalta-Clemente, Arantxa; Gholinia, Ali; Moody, Michael; Wilkinson, Angus J; Huin, Nicolas; Lozano-Perez, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD), also known as transmission-electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) is a novel method for orientation mapping of electron transparent transmission electron microscopy specimen in the scanning electron microscope and has been utilized for stress corrosion cracking characterization of type 316 stainless steels. The main advantage of TKD is a significantly higher spatial resolution compared to the conventional EBSD due to the smaller interaction volume of the incident beam with the specimen. Two 316 stainless steel specimen, tested for stress corrosion cracking in hydrogenated and oxygenated pressurized water reactor chemistry, were characterized via TKD. The results include inverse pole figure (IPFZ) maps, image quality maps and misorientation maps, all acquired in very short time (crack with respect to the grain boundary, deformation bands, twinning and slip. Furthermore, TKD has been used to measure the grain boundary misorientation and establish a gauge for quantifying plastic deformation at the crack tip and other regions in the surrounding matrix. Both grain boundary migration and slip transfer have been detected as well. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. NIST/Sandia/ICDD Electron Diffraction Database: A Database for Phase Identification by Electron Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M J; Chambers, W F; Melgaard, D; Himes, V L; Stalick, J K; Mighell, A D

    1989-01-01

    A new database containing crystallographic and chemical information designed especially for application to electron diffraction search/match and related problems has been developed. The new database was derived from two well-established x-ray diffraction databases, the JCPDS Powder Diffraction File and NBS CRYSTAL DATA, and incorporates 2 years of experience with an earlier version. It contains 71,142 entries, with space group and unit cell data for 59,612 of those. Unit cell and space group information were used, where available, to calculate patterns consisting of all allowed reflections with d -spacings greater than 0.8 A for ~ 59,000 of the entries. Calculated patterns are used in the database in preference to experimental x-ray data when both are available, since experimental x-ray data sometimes omits high d -spacing data which falls at low diffraction angles. Intensity data are not given when calculated spacings are used. A search scheme using chemistry and r -spacing (reciprocal d -spacing) has been developed. Other potentially searchable data in this new database include space group, Pearson symbol, unit cell edge lengths, reduced cell edge length, and reduced cell volume. Compound and/or mineral names, formulas, and journal references are included in the output, as well as pointers to corresponding entries in NBS CRYSTAL DATA and the Powder Diffraction File where more complete information may be obtained. Atom positions are not given. Rudimentary search software has been written to implement a chemistry and r -spacing bit map search. With typical data, a full search through ~ 71,000 compounds takes 10~20 seconds on a PDP 11/23-RL02 system.

  9. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present the theory of image and contrast formation and the analytical modes in transmission electron microscopy The principles of particle and wave optics of electrons are described Electron-specimen interactions are discussed for evaluating the theory of scattering and phase contrast Also discussed are the kinematical and dynamical theories of electron diffraction and their applications for crystal structure determination and imaging of lattice defects X-ray microanalysis and energy-loss spectroscopy are treated as analytical methods The second edition includes discussion of recent progress, especially in the areas of energy-loss spectroscopy, crystal-lattice imaging and reflection electron microscopy

  10. The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle Demonstrated with An Electron Diffraction Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteucci, Giorgio; Ferrari, Loris; Migliori, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    An experiment analogous to the classical diffraction of light from a circular aperture has been realized with electrons. The results are used to introduce undergraduate students to the wave behaviour of electrons. The diffraction fringes produced by the circular aperture are compared to those predicted by quantum mechanics and are exploited to…

  11. Peculiarities of Forming a Multiband Transmission Function Based on Multifrequency Acousto-Optic Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proklov, V. V.; Rezvov, Yu. G.

    2018-01-01

    An analytical solution for the transmission function of noncoherent wideband radiation is obtained under acousto-optic (AO) filtering using a discrete set of monochromatic AO waves with a small spectral overlap. We studied characteristics of the AO transformation of a continuous spectrum of noncoherent radiation into a given set of discrete narrow bands of spectral transmission by excitation of a discrete set of sound frequencies. We carried out the analysis of transmission functions of individual channels taking into account a partial overlap of their spectra and possible intermodulation distortions. It is shown that a stationary value of the root-mean-square light power is found at the electronic output due to the photoelectric transformation and detecting diffracted light. Based on this, a necessary stationary, multiband, and nearly equidistant transmission function of a device can be formed by using a relevant spectrum of acoustic excitation. Peculiarities of this way of forming the multiband transmission function are revealed: the limitation of diffraction efficiency for an individual channel, the possibility of decoupling side lobes of adjacent channels, etc. A multiband acousto-optic filter (MAOF) was simulated that was based on a paratellurite monocrystal (TeO2), which was previously used for experimental optical encoding. The theoretical and experimental results are in gratifying agreement.

  12. Crystallographic tool box (CrysTBox): automated tools for transmission electron microscopists and crystallographers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klinger, Miloslav; Jäger, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 6 (2015), s. 2012-2018 ISSN 0021-8898 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP108/12/G043 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electron diffraction * automated analysis * transmission electron microscopy * high-resolution transmission electron microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.720, year: 2014

  13. A transmission Kikuchi diffraction study of cementite in a quenched and tempered steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, Ahmed A.; Casillas, Gilberto; Pereloma, Elena V.; Carpenter, Kristin R.; Killmore, Christopher R.; Gazder, Azdiar A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the first transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) study to report the indexing of nano-sized cementite as distinct structures and its orientation relationship with the body-centered cubic matrix in a quenched and tempered steel. Crystallographic analysis via TKD and selected area diffraction returned the well-known Bagaryatskii and Isaichev orientation relationships. However, the indexing of nano-sized cementite via TKD was sensitive to the thickness of the electron transparent region such that TEM remains the most precise method to characterise such precipitates. - Highlights: • Nano-sized cementite in a QT steel has been investigated by TKD and TEM. • Cementite has been indexed as distinct structures via TKD. • Crystallographic analysis returned the Bagaryatskii and Isaichev ORs. • Success of TKD is sensitive to the thickness of the electron transparent region. • TEM remains the most precise technique to characterise nano-sized precipitates.

  14. A transmission Kikuchi diffraction study of cementite in a quenched and tempered steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, Ahmed A., E-mail: asaleh@uow.edu.au [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Casillas, Gilberto [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Pereloma, Elena V. [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Carpenter, Kristin R. [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Plate Mill: Manufacturing, BlueScope Steel Ltd., Port Kembla, NSW 2505 (Australia); Killmore, Christopher R. [Research & Development: Sales & Marketing, BlueScope Steel Ltd., Port Kembla, NSW 2505 (Australia); Gazder, Azdiar A. [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    This is the first transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) study to report the indexing of nano-sized cementite as distinct structures and its orientation relationship with the body-centered cubic matrix in a quenched and tempered steel. Crystallographic analysis via TKD and selected area diffraction returned the well-known Bagaryatskii and Isaichev orientation relationships. However, the indexing of nano-sized cementite via TKD was sensitive to the thickness of the electron transparent region such that TEM remains the most precise method to characterise such precipitates. - Highlights: • Nano-sized cementite in a QT steel has been investigated by TKD and TEM. • Cementite has been indexed as distinct structures via TKD. • Crystallographic analysis returned the Bagaryatskii and Isaichev ORs. • Success of TKD is sensitive to the thickness of the electron transparent region. • TEM remains the most precise technique to characterise nano-sized precipitates.

  15. Atomic resolution three-dimensional electron diffraction microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Jianwei; Ohsuna, Tetsu; Terasaki, Osamu; Hodgson, Keith O.; O'Keefe, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    We report the development of a novel form of diffraction-based 3D microscopy to overcome resolution barriers inherent in high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography. By combining coherent electron diffraction with the oversampling phasing method, we show that the 3D structure of a nanocrystal can be determined ab initio at a resolution of 1 Angstrom from 29 simulated noisy diffraction patterns. This new form of microscopy can be used to image the 3D structures of nanocrystals and noncrystalline samples, with resolution limited only by the quality of sample diffraction

  16. Direct observations of the MOF (UiO-66) structure by transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Liangkui

    2013-01-01

    As a demonstration of ab initio structure characterizations of nano metal organic framework (MOF) crystals by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron diffraction tomography methods, a Zr-MOF (UiO-66) structure was determined and further confirmed by Rietveld refinements of powder X-ray diffraction. HRTEM gave direct imaging of the channels. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  17. Extraordinary optical transmission with tapered slits: effect of higher diffraction and slit resonance orders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, T.; Bozhevolnyi, S. I.; Beermann, J.

    2012-01-01

    Transmission through thin metal films with a periodic arrangement of tapered slits is considered. Transmission maps covering a wide range of periods, film thicknesses, and taper angles are presented. The maps show resonant transmission when fundamental and higher-order slit resonances are excited....... A study of the effect on transmission of different combinations of available transmission and reflection diffraction orders show optimum total transmission when only the fundamental reflection order and higher transmission diffraction orders are available. The optimum taper angle is shown...

  18. Characterization of calcium crystals in Abelia using x-ray diffraction and electron microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Localization, chemical composition, and morphology of calcium crystals in leaves and stems of Abelia mosanensis and A. ×grandiflora were analyzed with a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM) equipped with an X-ray diffraction system, low temperature SEM (LT-SEM) and a transmission ...

  19. Correlating Atom Probe Crystallographic Measurements with Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Andrew J; Babinsky, Katharina; Day, Alec C; Eder, K; Oakman, Connor J; Trimby, Patrick W; Primig, Sophie; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2017-04-01

    Correlative microscopy approaches offer synergistic solutions to many research problems. One such combination, that has been studied in limited detail, is the use of atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) on the same tip specimen. By combining these two powerful microscopy techniques, the microstructure of important engineering alloys can be studied in greater detail. For the first time, the accuracy of crystallographic measurements made using APT will be independently verified using TKD. Experimental data from two atom probe tips, one a nanocrystalline Al-0.5Ag alloy specimen collected on a straight flight-path atom probe and the other a high purity Mo specimen collected on a reflectron-fitted instrument, will be compared. We find that the average minimum misorientation angle, calculated from calibrated atom probe reconstructions with two different pole combinations, deviate 0.7° and 1.4°, respectively, from the TKD results. The type of atom probe and experimental conditions appear to have some impact on this accuracy and the reconstruction and measurement procedures are likely to contribute further to degradation in angular resolution. The challenges and implications of this correlative approach will also be discussed.

  20. D-stem: a parallel electron diffraction technique applied to nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, K J; Kawasaki, M; Zhou, J P; Ferreira, P J

    2010-10-01

    An electron diffraction technique called D-STEM has been developed in a transmission electron microscopy/scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM/STEM) instrument to obtain spot electron diffraction patterns from nanostructures, as small as ∼3 nm. The electron ray path achieved by configuring the pre- and postspecimen illumination lenses enables the formation of a 1-2 nm near-parallel probe, which is used to obtain bright-field/dark-field STEM images. Under these conditions, the beam can be controlled and accurately positioned on the STEM image, at the nanostructure of interest, while sharp spot diffraction patterns can be simultaneously recorded on the charge-coupled device camera. When integrated with softwares such as GatanTM STEM diffraction imaging and Automated Crystallography for TEM or DigistarTM, NanoMEGAS, the D-STEM technique is very powerful for obtaining automated orientation and phase maps based on diffraction information acquired on a pixel by pixel basis. The versatility of the D-STEM technique is demonstrated by applying this technique to nanoparticles, nanowires, and nano interconnect structures.

  1. High energy electron multibeam diffraction and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourret, Alain.

    1980-04-01

    The different theories of dynamical scattering of electrons are firstly reviewed with special reference to their basis and the validity of the different approximations. Then after a short description of the different experimental set ups, structural analysis and the investigation of the optical potential by means of high energy electrons will be surveyed

  2. Thermal expansion coefficient measurement from electron diffraction of amorphous films in a TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Misa; Cui, Kai; Malac, Marek; Egerton, Ray

    2018-05-01

    We measured the linear thermal expansion coefficients of amorphous 5-30 nm thick SiN and 17 nm thick Formvar/Carbon (F/C) films using electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope. Positive thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) was observed in SiN but negative coefficients in the F/C films. In case of amorphous carbon (aC) films, we could not measure TEC because the diffraction radii required several hours to stabilize at a fixed temperature. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. High quality transmission Kikuchi diffraction analysis of deformed alloys - Case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokarski, Tomasz; Cios, Grzegorz; Kula, Anna; Bała, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Modern scanning electron microscopes (SEM) equipped with thermally assisted field emission guns (Schottky FEG) are capable of imaging with a resolution in the range of several nanometers or better. Simultaneously, the high electron beam current can be used, which enables fast chemical and crystallographic analysis with a higher resolution than is normally offered by SEM with a tungsten cathode. The current resolution that limits the EDS and EBSD analysis is related to materials' physics, particularly to the electron-specimen interaction volume. The application of thin, electron-transparent specimens, instead of bulk samples, improves the resolution and allows for the detailed analysis of very fine microstructural features. Beside the typical imaging mode, it is possible to use a standard EBSD camera in such a configuration that only transmitted and scattered electrons are detected. This modern approach was successfully applied to various materials giving rise to significant resolution improvement, especially for the light element magnesium based alloys. This paper presents an insight into the application of the transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) technique applied to the most troublesome, heavily-deformed materials. In particular, the values of the highest possible acquisition rates for high resolution and high quality mapping were estimated within typical imaging conditions of stainless steel and magnesium-yttrium alloy. - Highlights: •Monte Carlo simulations were used to simulate EBSD camera intensity for various measuring conditions. •Transmission Kikuchi diffraction parameters were evaluated for highly deformed, light and heavy elements based alloys. •High quality maps with 20 nm spatial resolution were acquired for Mg and Fe based alloys. •High speed TKD measurements were performed at acquisition rates comparable to the reflection EBSD.

  4. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  5. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  6. Comparative study of macrotexture analysis using X-ray diffraction and electron backscattered diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serna, Marilene Morelli

    2002-01-01

    The macrotexture is one of the main characteristics in metallic materials, which the physical properties depend on the crystallographic direction. The analysis of the macrotexture to middles of the decade of 80 was just accomplished by the techniques of Xray diffraction and neutrons diffraction. The possibility of the analysis of the macrotexture using, the technique of electron backscattering diffraction in the scanning electronic microscope, that allowed to correlate the measure of the orientation with its location in the micro structure, was a very welcome tool in the area of engineering of materials. In this work it was studied the theoretical aspects of the two techniques and it was used of both techniques for the analysis of the macrotexture of aluminum sheets 1050 and 3003 with intensity, measured through the texture index 'J', from 2.00 to 5.00. The results obtained by the two techniques were shown reasonably similar, being considered that the statistics of the data obtained by the technique of electron backscatter diffraction is much inferior to the obtained by the X-ray diffraction. (author)

  7. Design of a transmission electron positron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyama, Masao; Inoue, M.; Kogure, Y.; Hayashi, Y.; Yoshii, T.; Kurihara, T.; Tsuno, K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the plans and design of positron-electron microscopes being built at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization), Tsukuba, Japan. A used electron microscope is altered. The kinetic energies of positrons produced by accelerators or by nuclear decays are not a unique value but show a spread over in a wide range. Positron beam is guided to a transmission electron microscope (JEM100SX). Positrons are moderated by a tungsten foil, are accelerated and are focused on a nickel sheet. The monochromatic focused beam is injected into an electron microscope. The focusing and aberration of positrons are the same as electrons in a magnetic system which are used in commercial electron microscopes. Imaging plates are used to record positron images for the transmission electron microscope. (author)

  8. Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy of catalysts for the methanol synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard

    Ga. Both were synthesized from Cu and Ni nitrate salts as well as Ni and Ga nitrates salts. Both systems got catalytically tested and investigated by in-situ X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy (ETEM). It was possible to follow the synthesis of the catalysts......Ni forms a substitutional alloy. During the reaction and artificial ageing a deactivation of the NiGa due to a phase change could be observed. CuNialso changes the the oxidation state during the reaction. Furthermore the influence of the electron beam on the catalytic systems during exposure to gas...... atmosphere and temperature was investigated. CuNi was exposed to the electron beam for 3 different intensities and 3 different temperatures while the oxidation state of the Cu2+ was measured by energy electron loss spectroscopy. It turns out that the electron beam does have an influence but it does not seem...

  9. Structural and electron diffraction scaling of twisted graphene bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuan; Tadmor, Ellad B.

    2018-03-01

    Multiscale simulations are used to study the structural relaxation in twisted graphene bilayers and the associated electron diffraction patterns. The initial twist forms an incommensurate moiré pattern that relaxes to a commensurate microstructure comprised of a repeating pattern of alternating low-energy AB and BA domains surrounding a high-energy AA domain. The simulations show that the relaxation mechanism involves a localized rotation and shrinking of the AA domains that scales in two regimes with the imposed twist. For small twisting angles, the localized rotation tends to a constant; for large twist, the rotation scales linearly with it. This behavior is tied to the inverse scaling of the moiré pattern size with twist angle and is explained theoretically using a linear elasticity model. The results are validated experimentally through a simulated electron diffraction analysis of the relaxed structures. A complex electron diffraction pattern involving the appearance of weak satellite peaks is predicted for the small twist regime. This new diffraction pattern is explained using an analytical model in which the relaxation kinematics are described as an exponentially-decaying (Gaussian) rotation field centered on the AA domains. Both the angle-dependent scaling and diffraction patterns are in quantitative agreement with experimental observations. A Matlab program for extracting the Gaussian model parameters accompanies this paper.

  10. Ultrafast electron diffraction: oriented molecular structures in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskin, J Spencer; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2005-11-11

    The technique of ultrafast electron diffraction allows direct measurement of changes which occur in the molecular structures of isolated molecules upon excitation by femtosecond laser pulses. The vectorial nature of the molecule-radiation interaction also ensures that the orientation of the transient populations created by the laser excitation is not isotropic. Here, we examine the influence on electron diffraction measurements--on the femtosecond and picosecond timescales--of this induced initial anisotropy and subsequent inertial (collision-free) molecular reorientation, accounting for the geometry and dynamics of a laser-induced reaction (dissociation). The orientations of both the residual ground-state population and the excited- or product-state populations evolve in time, with different characteristic rotational dephasing and recurrence times due to differing moments of inertia. This purely orientational evolution imposes a corresponding evolution on the electron scattering pattern, which we show may be similar to evolution due to intrinsic structural changes in the molecule, and thus potentially subject to misinterpretation. The contribution of each internuclear separation is shown to depend on its orientation in the molecular frame relative to the transition dipole for the photoexcitation; thus not only bond lengths, but also bond angles leave a characteristic imprint on the diffraction. Of particular note is the fact that the influence of anisotropy persists at all times, producing distinct differences between the asymptotic "static" diffraction image and the predictions of isotropic diffraction theory.

  11. Application of Electron Backscatter Diffraction to Phase Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Dasher, B S; Deal, A

    2008-07-16

    The identification of crystalline phases in solids requires knowledge of two microstructural properties: crystallographic structure and chemical composition. Traditionally, this has been accomplished using X-ray diffraction techniques where the measured crystallographic information, in combination with separate chemical composition measurements for specimens of unknown pedigrees, is used to deduce the unknown phases. With the latest microstructural analysis tools for scanning electron microscopes, both the crystallography and composition can be determined in a single analysis utilizing electron backscatter diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy, respectively. In this chapter, we discuss the approach required to perform these experiments, elucidate the benefits and limitations of this technique, and detail via case studies how composition, crystallography, and diffraction contrast can be used as phase discriminators.

  12. Exploring the nanoworld in real and reciprocal space. Part 1 x-ray and electron diffractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng Inn Khuan; Kok Kuan Ying

    2003-01-01

    The articles highlight two of the main characterization techniques that are widely used in materials characterization laboratories, namely, X-ray Diffractometry (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Part 1 of the article focuses on the diffraction while part 2 on imaging aspects of these techniques. The theoretical background for each technique is briefly covered and examples are given to illustrate the use of the techniques in solving some materials-related problem, particularly, for nanostructured systems. (Author)

  13. Convergent beam electron diffraction – A novel technique for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    This, together with the use of cooled CCD cameras, online work stations and figures, brings us to applying this technique to a wide range of problems in materials science, solid state chemistry, mineralogy and condensed matter physics. 3. Basic principles. Conventionally, until the discovery of CBED, electron diffraction from ...

  14. Crystallography of refractory metal nuggets in carbonaceous chondrites: A transmission Kikuchi diffraction approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Luke; Bland, Phil A.; Dyl, Kathryn A.; Forman, Lucy V.; Saxey, David W.; Reddy, Steven M.; Fougerouse, Denis; Rickard, William D. A.; Trimby, Patrick W.; Moody, Steve; Yang, Limei; Liu, Hongwei; Ringer, Simon P.; Saunders, Martin; Piazolo, Sandra

    2017-11-01

    Transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) is a relatively new technique that is currently being developed for geological sample analysis. This technique utilises the transmission capabilities of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to rapidly and accurately map the crystallographic and geochemical features of an electron transparent sample. TKD uses a similar methodology to traditional electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), but is capable of achieving a much higher spatial resolution (5-10 nm) (Trimby, 2012; Trimby et al., 2014). Here we apply TKD to refractory metal nuggets (RMNs) which are micrometre to sub-micrometre metal alloys composed of highly siderophile elements (HSEs) found in primitive carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. TKD allows us to analyse RMNs in situ, enabling the characterisation of nanometre-scale variations in chemistry and crystallography, whilst preserving their spatial and crystallographic context. This provides a complete representation of each RMN, permitting detailed interpretation of their formation history. We present TKD analysis of five transmission electron microscopy (TEM) lamellae containing RMNs coupled with EBSD and TEM analyses. These analyses revealed textures and relationships not previously observed in RMNs. These textures indicate some RMNs experienced annealing, forming twins. Some RMNs also acted as nucleation centres, and formed immiscible metal-silicate fluids. In fact, each RMN analysed in this study had different crystallographic textures. These RMNs also had heterogeneous compositions, even between RMNs contained within the same inclusion, host phase and even separated by only a few nanometres. Some RMNs are also affected by secondary processes at low temperature causing exsolution of molybdenite. However, most RMNs had crystallographic textures indicating that the RMN formed prior to their host inclusion. TKD analyses reveal most RMNs have been affected by processing in the protoplanetary disk. Despite this

  15. Quantitative transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L J; D'Alfonso, A J; Forbes, B D; Findlay, S D; LeBeau, J M; Stemmer, S

    2012-01-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) it is possible to operate the microscope in bright-field mode under conditions which, by the quantum mechanical principle of reciprocity, are equivalent to those in conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). The results of such an experiment will be presented which are in excellent quantitative agreement with theory for specimens up to 25 nm thick. This is at variance with the large contrast mismatch (typically between two and five) noted in equivalent CTEM experiments. The implications of this will be discussed.

  16. Microstructural investigation of plastically deformed Ti{sub 20}Zr{sub 20}Hf{sub 20}Nb{sub 20}Ta{sub 20} high entropy alloy by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirras, G., E-mail: dirras@univ-paris13.fr [Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, LSPM (UPR 3407) CNRS, 99 avenue JB Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France); Gubicza, J.; Heczel, A. [Department of Materials Physics, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 (Hungary); Lilensten, L.; Couzinié, J.-P.; Perrière, L.; Guillot, I. [Université Paris Est, ICMPE (UMR 7182), CNRS, UPEC, 94320 Thiais (France); Hocini, A. [Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, LSPM (UPR 3407) CNRS, 99 avenue JB Clément, 93430 Villetaneuse (France)

    2015-10-15

    The microstructure evolution in body-centered cubic (bcc) Ti{sub 20}Zr{sub 20}Hf{sub 20}Nb{sub 20}Ta{sub 20} high entropy alloy during quasi-static compression test was studied by X-ray line profile analysis (XLPA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The average lattice constant and other important parameters of the microstructure such as the mean crystallite size, the dislocation density and the edge/screw character of dislocations were determined by XLPA. The elastic anisotropy factor required for XLPA procedure was determined by nanoindentation. XLPA shows that the crystallite size decreased while the dislocation density increased with strain during compression, and their values reached about 39 nm and 15 × 10{sup 14} m{sup −2}, respectively, at a plastic strain of ~ 20%. It was revealed that with increasing strain the dislocation character became more screw. This can be explained by the reduced mobility of screw dislocations compared to edge dislocations in bcc structures. These observations are in line with TEM investigations. The development of dislocation density during compression was related to the yield strength evolution. - Highlights: • Ti{sub 20}Zr{sub 20}Hf{sub 20}Nb{sub 20}Ta{sub 20} high entropy alloy was processed by arc-melting. • The mechanical was evaluated by RT compression test. • The microstructure evolution was studied by XLPA and TEM. • With increasing strain the dislocation character became more screw. • The yield strength was related to the development of the dislocation density.

  17. Electron back scattered diffraction study of SmCo magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonamine, T. [Divisao de Metrologia de Materiais-INMETRO, Av. Nossa Senhora das Gracas, 50 (Xerem), 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: tyfukuhara@inmetro.gov.br; Fukuhara, M.; Machado, R. [Divisao de Metrologia de Materiais-INMETRO, Av. Nossa Senhora das Gracas, 50 (Xerem), 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Missell, F.P. [Divisao de Metrologia de Materiais-INMETRO, Av. Nossa Senhora das Gracas, 50 (Xerem), 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade de Caxias do Sul, 95070-560 Caxias do Sul, RS (Brazil)

    2008-07-15

    The remanence and energy product of permanent magnets is a strong function of their crystallographic texture. Electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) is a tool for texture analysis providing information about the atomic layers up to 50 nm below the surface of the material. This paper discusses experimental requirements for performing EBSD measurements on rare-earth permanent magnets and presents results on commercial SmCo magnet material. EBSD measurements proved to be very sensitive to misaligned grains and were sensitive to texture in good agreement with information provided by X-ray diffraction scans. Results for nanostructured Sm(CoFeCuZr){sub z} magnets are also discussed.

  18. Proximity Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy/Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Ing-Shouh

    2016-01-01

    Here a new microscopic method is proposed to image and characterize very thin samples like few-layer materials, organic molecules, and nanostructures with nanometer or sub-nanometer resolution using electron beams of energies lower than 20 eV. The microscopic technique achieves high resolution through the proximity (or near-field) effect, as in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), while it also allows detection of transmitted electrons for imaging and spectroscopy, as in scanning transmission...

  19. Opto-mechanical design and development of a 460mm diffractive transmissive telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Bo; Wang, Lihua; Cui, Zhangang; Bian, Jiang; Xiang, Sihua; Ma, Haotong; Fan, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Using lightweight, replicated diffractive optics, we can construct extremely large aperture telescopes in space.The transmissive primary significantly reduces the sensitivities to out of plane motion as compared to reflective systems while reducing the manufacturing time and costs. This paper focuses on the design, fabrication and ground demonstration of a 460mm diffractive transmissive telescope the primary F/# is 6, optical field of view is 0.2° imagine bandwidth is 486nm 656nm.The design method of diffractive optical system was verified, the ability to capture a high-quality image using diffractive telescope collection optics was tested.The results show that the limit resolution is 94lp/mm, the diffractive system has a good imagine performance with broad bandwidths. This technology is particularly promising as a means to achieve extremely large optical primaries from compact, lightweight packages.

  20. Serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging: diffraction background of superfluid helium droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; He, Yunteng; Lei, Lei; Alghamdi, Maha; Oswalt, Andrew; Kong, Wei

    2017-08-01

    In an effort to solve the crystallization problem in crystallography, we have been engaged in developing a method termed "serial single molecule electron diffraction imaging" (SS-EDI). The unique features of SS-EDI are superfluid helium droplet cooling and field-induced orientation: together the two features constitute a molecular goniometer. Unfortunately, the helium atoms surrounding the sample molecule also contribute to a diffraction background. In this report, we analyze the properties of a superfluid helium droplet beam and its doping statistics, and demonstrate the feasibility of overcoming the background issue by using the velocity slip phenomenon of a pulsed droplet beam. Electron diffraction profiles and pair correlation functions of ferrocene-monomer-doped droplets and iodine-nanocluster-doped droplets are presented. The timing of the pulsed electron gun and the effective doping efficiency under different dopant pressures can both be controlled for size selection. This work clears any doubt of the effectiveness of superfluid helium droplets in SS-EDI, thereby advancing the effort in demonstrating the "proof-of-concept" one step further.

  1. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Third volume of a 40volume series on nanoscience and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about Transmission electron microscopy characterization of nanomaterials. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume an essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry.

  2. On the Progress of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) Imaging in a Scanning Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng; Müller, Erich; Meffert, Matthias; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2018-03-28

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with low-energy electrons has been recognized as an important addition to the family of electron microscopies as it may avoid knock-on damage and increase the contrast of weakly scattering objects. Scanning electron microscopes (SEMs) are well suited for low-energy electron microscopy with maximum electron energies of 30 keV, but they are mainly used for topography imaging of bulk samples. Implementation of a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) detector and a charge-coupled-device camera for the acquisition of on-axis transmission electron diffraction (TED) patterns, in combination with recent resolution improvements, make SEMs highly interesting for structure analysis of some electron-transparent specimens which are traditionally investigated by TEM. A new aspect is correlative SEM, STEM, and TED imaging from the same specimen region in a SEM which leads to a wealth of information. Simultaneous image acquisition gives information on surface topography, inner structure including crystal defects and qualitative material contrast. Lattice-fringe resolution is obtained in bright-field STEM imaging. The benefits of correlative SEM/STEM/TED imaging in a SEM are exemplified by structure analyses from representative sample classes such as nanoparticulates and bulk materials.

  3. Transmission scanning electron microscopy: Defect observations and image simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Patrick G; Stinville, Jean-Charles; Yao, Eric R; Echlin, McLean P; Titus, Michael S; De Graef, Marc; Gianola, Daniel S; Pollock, Tresa M

    2018-03-01

    The new capabilities of a FEG scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) detector for defect characterization have been studied in parallel with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging. Stacking faults and dislocations have been characterized in strontium titanate, a polycrystalline nickel-base superalloy and a single crystal cobalt-base material. Imaging modes that are similar to conventional TEM (CTEM) bright field (BF) and dark field (DF) and STEM are explored, and some of the differences due to the different accelerating voltages highlighted. Defect images have been simulated for the transmission scanning electron microscopy (TSEM) configuration using a scattering matrix formulation, and diffraction contrast in the SEM is discussed in comparison to TEM. Interference effects associated with conventional TEM, such as thickness fringes and bending contours are significantly reduced in TSEM by using a convergent probe, similar to a STEM imaging modality, enabling individual defects to be imaged clearly even in high dislocation density regions. Beyond this, TSEM provides significant advantages for high throughput and dynamic in-situ characterization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ponderomotive phase plate for transmission electron microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W [Livermore, CA

    2012-07-10

    A ponderomotive phase plate system and method for controllably producing highly tunable phase contrast transfer functions in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) for high resolution and biological phase contrast imaging. The system and method includes a laser source and a beam transport system to produce a focused laser crossover as a phase plate, so that a ponderomotive potential of the focused laser crossover produces a scattering-angle-dependent phase shift in the electrons of the post-sample electron beam corresponding to a desired phase contrast transfer function.

  5. Analysis of intermetallic particles in Mg-12 wt.%Zn binyry alloy using transmission electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Martin; Gärtnerová, Viera; Klementová, Mariana; Jäger, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 106, Aug (2015), s. 428-436 ISSN 1044-5803 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP108/12/G043 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : biomedical alloy s * heat treatment * microstructure * transmission electron microscopy * electron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.383, year: 2015

  6. Analysis of dislocation loops by means of large-angle convergent beam electron diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Jäger, C; Morniroli, J P; Jäger, W

    2002-01-01

    Diffusion-induced dislocation loops in GaP and GaAs were analysed by means of large-angle convergent beam electron diffraction (LACBED) and conventional contrast methods of transmission electron microscopy. It is demonstrated that LACBED is perfectly suited for use in analysing dislocation loops. The method combines analyses of the dislocation-induced splitting of Bragg lines in a LACBED pattern for the determination of the Burgers vector with analyses of the loop contrast behaviour in transmission electron microscopy bright-field images during tilt experiments, from which the habit plane of the dislocation loop is determined. Perfect dislocation loops formed by condensation of interstitial atoms or vacancies were found, depending on the diffusion conditions. The loops possess left brace 110 right brace-habit planes and Burgers vectors parallel to (110). The LACBED method findings are compared with results of contrast analyses based on the so-called 'inside-outside' contrast of dislocation loops. Advantages o...

  7. Structure refinement using precession electron diffraction tomography and dynamical diffraction: tests on experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Corrêa, Cinthia Antunes; Steciuk, Gwladys; Jacob, Damien; Roussel, Pascal; Boullay, Philippe; Klementová, Mariana; Gemmi, Mauro; Kopeček, Jaromír; Domeneghetti, M Chiara; Cámara, Fernando; Petříček, Václav

    2015-12-01

    The recently published method for the structure refinement from three-dimensional precession electron diffraction data using dynamical diffraction theory [Palatinus et al. (2015). Acta Cryst. A71, 235-244] has been applied to a set of experimental data sets from five different samples - Ni2Si, PrVO3, kaolinite, orthopyroxene and mayenite. The data were measured on different instruments and with variable precession angles. For each sample a reliable reference structure was available. A large series of tests revealed that the method provides structure models with an average error in atomic positions typically between 0.01 and 0.02 Å. The obtained structure models are significantly more accurate than models obtained by refinement using kinematical approximation for the calculation of model intensities. The method also allows a reliable determination of site occupancies and determination of absolute structure. Based on the extensive tests, an optimal set of the parameters for the method is proposed.

  8. Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    dehope, w j; browning, n; campbell, g; cook, e; king, w; lagrange, t; reed, b; stuart, b; Shuttlesworth, R; Pyke, B

    2009-06-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM.

  9. Introduction to the theory of low-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingerland, A.; Tomasek, M.

    1975-01-01

    An elementary introduction to the basic principles of the theory of low-energy electron diffraction is presented. General scattering theory is used to classify the hitherto known approaches to the problem (optical potential and one-electron approximation; formal scattering theory: Born expansion and multiple scattering; translational symmetry: Ewald construction; classification of LEED theories by means of the T matrix; pseudokinematical theory for crystal with clean surface and with an adsorbed monomolecular layer; dynamical theory; inclusion of inelastic collisions; discussion of a simple example by means of the band-structure approach)

  10. Development and characterization of electron sources for diffraction applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casandruc, Albert

    2015-12-01

    The dream to control chemical reactions that are essential to life is now closer than ever to gratify. Recent scientific progress has made it possible to investigate phenomena and processes which deploy at the angstroms scale and at rates on the order femtoseconds. Techniques such as Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (UED) are currently able to reveal the spatial atomic configuration of systems with unit cell sizes on the order of a few nanometers with about 100 femtosecond temporal resolution. Still, major advances are needed for structural interrogation of biological systems like protein crystals, which have unit cell sizes of 10 nanometers or larger, and sample sizes of less than one micrometer. For such samples, the performance of these electron-based techniques is now limited by the quality, in particular the brightness, of the electron source. The current Ph.D. work represents a contribution towards the development and the characterization of electron sources which are essential to static and time-resolved electron diffraction techniques. The focus was on electron source fabrication and electron beam characterization measurements, using the solenoid and the aperture scan techniques, but also on the development and maintenance of the relevant experimental setups. As a result, new experimental facilities are now available in the group and, at the same time, novel concepts for generating electron beams for electron diffraction applications have been developed. In terms of existing electron sources, the capability to trigger and detect field emission from single double-gated field emitter Mo tips was successfully proven. These sharp emitter tips promise high brightness electron beams, but for investigating individual such structures, new engineering was needed. Secondly, the influence of the surface electric field on electron beam properties has been systematically performed for flat Mo photocathodes. This study is very valuable especially for state

  11. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Itokawa Regolith Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Berger, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In a remarkable engineering achievement, the JAXA space agency successfully recovered the Hayabusa space-craft in June 2010, following a non-optimal encounter and sur-face sampling mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa. These are the first direct samples ever obtained and returned from the surface of an asteroid. The Hayabusa samples thus present a special op-portunity to directly investigate the evolution of asteroidal sur-faces, from the development of the regolith to the study of the effects of space weathering. Here we report on our preliminary TEM measurements on two Itokawa samples. Methods: We were allocated particles RA-QD02-0125 and RA-QD02-0211. Both particles were embedded in low viscosity epoxy and thin sections were prepared using ultramicrotomy. High resolution images and electron diffraction data were ob-tained using a JEOL 2500SE 200 kV field-emission scanning-transmission electron microscope. Quantitative maps and anal-yses were obtained using a Thermo thin-window energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectrometer. Results: Both particles are olivine-rich (Fo70) with µm-sized inclusions of FeS and have microstructurally complex rims. Par-ticle RA-QD02-0125 is rounded and has numerous sub-µm grains attached to its surface including FeS, albite, olivine, and rare melt droplets. Solar flare tracks have not been observed, but the particle is surrounded by a continuous 50 nm thick, stuctur-ally disordered rim that is compositionally similar to the core of the grain. One of the surface adhering grains is pyrrhotite show-ing a S-depleted rim (8-10 nm thick) with nanophase Fe metal grains (<5 nm) decorating the outermost surface. The pyrrhotite displays a complex superstructure in its core that is absent in the S-depleted rim. Particle RA-QD02-0211 contains solar flare particle tracks (2x109 cm-2) and shows a structurally disordered rim 100 nm thick. The track density corresponds to a surface exposure of 103-104 years based on the track production rate

  12. Double-shot MeV electron diffraction and microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Musumeci

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study by numerical simulations a time-resolved MeV electron scattering mode where two consecutive electron pulses are used to capture the evolution of a material sample on 10 ps time scales. The two electron pulses are generated by illuminating a photocathode in a radiofrequency photogun by two short laser pulses with adjustable delay. A streak camera/deflecting cavity is used after the sample to project the two electron bunches on two well separated regions of the detector screen. By using sufficiently short pulses, the 2D spatial information from each snapshot can be preserved. This “double-shot” technique enables the efficient capture of irreversible dynamics in both diffraction and imaging modes. In this work, we demonstrate both modes in start-to-end simulations of the UCLA Pegasus MeV microscope column.

  13. Long distance electron transmission in marine sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    processes leads to formation of electrical fields, which modifies ion transport. The local proton producing and proton consuming half reactions induces pH extremes that accelerate dissolution of iron sul-phides and calcium carbonates in anoxic layers and promotes the formation of Mg-calcite and iron oxides...... suggest that the electron conductance is mediated by microorgan-isms. The spatial separation of electron and proton donors and acceptors has major impacts on element cycling by redox processes, pH balances, mineral dissolution/precipitations, and electromigration of ions. The sepa-ration of redox...... in the oxic zone. Oxygen seems to be the major electron acceptor in the coupled system, and more than 40% of the oxygen consumption can be driven by long distance electron transmission. The major e-donor is sulfide, which is oxidized to sulfate, and iron sulphides are the major sources for sulfide...

  14. Transmission electron microscopy in micro-nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Claverie, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Today, the availability of bright and highly coherent electron sources and sensitive detectors has radically changed the type and quality of the information which can be obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEMs are now present in large numbers not only in academia, but also in industrial research centers and fabs.This book presents in a simple and practical way the new quantitative techniques based on TEM which have recently been invented or developed to address most of the main challenging issues scientists and process engineers have to face to develop or optimize sem

  15. Structure refinement using precession electron diffraction tomography and dynamical diffraction: tests on experimental data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Correa, Cinthia Antunes; Steciuk, G.; Jacob, D.; Roussel, P.; Boullay, P.; Klementová, Mariana; Gemmi, M.; Kopeček, Jaromír; Domeneghetti, C.; Cámara, F.; Petříček, Václav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 6 (2015), 740-751 ISSN 2052-5206 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR GA13-25747S; GA MŠk LO1409 Grant - others:SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132; FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568 Keywords : XRD * structure refinement * precession electron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.892, year: 2015

  16. Design of polarization-independent transmission fused-silica grating with high diffraction efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yushui; Li, Chaoming; Chen, Xinrong; Yu, Jian; Tang, Yu; Wang, Rui; Xu, Haiyan; Hu, Zuyuan; Wu, Jianhong

    2018-01-01

    The high diffraction efficiency and high dispersion ability of diffraction grating plays a very important role in laser systems. Fused-silica transmission gratings not only have board band, high diffraction efficiency and high damage threshold, but also have the advantage of light path without shelter comparing to reflective gratings. In this paper, the study of polarization-independent transmission fused-silica grating is carried out, and the influence of rectangular and trapezoidal grating microstructures on the -1st diffraction efficiency of grating is analyzed. For trapezoidal groove structure, in the range of 80 to 90 degrees, the distributions of diffraction efficiency at different bottom angle are calculated and analyzed. The structure parameters of the grating are optimized by rigorous coupled wave theory. The designed grating groove density is 1440 lines/mm. The -1st diffraction efficiency of the grating is over 96% for both of TE and TM polarized waves at the Littrow angle (49.7 degrees) with the center wavelength of 1060nm. Within the bandwidth of 42nm (from 1039 to 1081nm), the -1st diffraction efficiency of the designed grating is theoretically greater than 90% for both of TE and TM polarized waves.

  17. Quantitative convergent beam electron diffraction measurements of bonding in alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.W.S.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The QCBED technique of measuring accurate structure factors has been made practical by advances in energy filtering, computing and in the accurate measurement of intensity. Originally attempted in 1965 by the late Peter Goodman (CSIRO, Melbourne) while working with Gunter Lehmpfuhl (Fritz Haber Institut, Berlin), QCBED has been successfully developed and tested in the last decade on simple structures such as Si and MgO. Our work on Alumina is a step up in complexity and has shown that extinction in X-ray diffraction is not correctable to the precision required. In combination with accurate X-ray diffraction, QCBED promises to revolutionize the accuracy of bonding charge density measurements, experimental results which are of significance in the development of Density Functional Theory used in predictive chemistry. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  18. Bright-field scanning confocal electron microscopy using a double aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I; Nellist, Peter D; Cosgriff, Eireann C; D'Alfonso, Adrian J; Morgan, Andrew J; Allen, Leslie J; Hashimoto, Ayako; Takeguchi, Masaki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Scanning confocal electron microscopy (SCEM) offers a mechanism for three-dimensional imaging of materials, which makes use of the reduced depth of field in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The simplest configuration of SCEM is the bright-field mode. In this paper we present experimental data and simulations showing the form of bright-field SCEM images. We show that the depth dependence of the three-dimensional image can be explained in terms of two-dimensional images formed in the detector plane. For a crystalline sample, this so-called probe image is shown to be similar to a conventional diffraction pattern. Experimental results and simulations show how the diffracted probes in this image are elongated in thicker crystals and the use of this elongation to estimate sample thickness is explored. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Electron microscopy: An introduction (with a special section on convergent-beam diffraction)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eades, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microscopy is of great importance in materials science, but the term covers a wide range of instruments and techniques, many of great complexity. The article considers the reasons for the importance of electron microscopes, some aspects of their construction and then considers in turn the scanning electron microscope and the transmission electron microscope, discussing briefly the image formation and applications of each type. A final section is dedicated to a more detailed discussion of a particular technique of rapidly growing importance: convergent-beam microscopy. Convergent-beam diffraction can supply information on lattice parameter, symmetry and crystal structure; it can be used to identify the phases present in a finely dispersed mixture. Moreover, all this can be carried out with accuracy, which is unprecedented for samples which are so small. (author)

  20. Desorption of hydrogen from magnesium hydride: in-situ electron diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, B.; Jones, I.P.; Walton, A.; Mann, V.; Book, D.; Harris, I.R.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of a phase change has been studied where electron beam in Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) has been used to transform MgH 2 into magnesium. A combination of in-situ Electron Diffraction (ED) and an in-situ Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) study under ED mode describes the phase transformation in terms of, respectively, change in the crystal structure and Plasmon energy shift. The orientation relation [001] MgH2 //[-2110] Mg and (-110) MgH2 //(0001) Mg , obtained from the ED study, has been used to propose a model for the movements of magnesium atoms in the structural change to describe the dynamics of the process. The in-situ EELS study has been compared with the existing H-desorption model. The study aims to describe the sorption dynamics of hydrogen in MgH 2 which is a base material for a number of promising hydrogen storage systems. (author)

  1. Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction Studies of Interface Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukite, Paul

    1988-12-01

    The epitaxial growth of semiconductors, such as GaAs, by the technique of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) has led to many improvements in device performance and capabilities. One important system is the epitaxial growth of GaAs on Si. This holds great promise for integrating optical and electronic devices on the same chip. The key to achieving this is to grow high quality GaAs layers on Si substrates. In this investigation, single-crystal GaAs was grown on Si and Ge substrates by MBE. The growth of the epitaxial layers was investigated in situ with reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED). Important in this heteroepitaxial system is that two possible GaAs crystal orientations can be obtained. By using a theory of kinematic electron diffraction developed in the course of this work, the mechanisms and growth conditions which choose between the two GaAs orientations have been determined for the first time. A further result is that the epitaxial growth processes are anisotropic on the two orientations. This leads to different crystalline qualities dependent on the orientation. To understand this in more detail, the crystal growth process was formulated mathematically. By incorporating the concepts of anisotropic diffusion and adsorption into a nonlinear differential equation, the time-dependent growth and RHEED behavior has been calculated and compared to experiment. The experimental observations of RHEED intensity oscillations and two-dimensional clustering are in excellent agreement with the diffraction and growth theories. It is concluded that surface steps play a vital role in the crystal growth and interface formation processes reported in this study.

  2. Femtosecond electron diffraction: heralding the era of atomically resolved dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciaini, Germán; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2011-09-01

    One of the great dream experiments in Science is to directly observe atomic motions as they occur. Femtosecond electron diffraction provided the first 'light' of sufficient intensity to achieve this goal by attaining atomic resolution to structural changes on the relevant timescales. This review covers the technical progress that made this new level of acuity possible and gives a survey of the new insights gained from an atomic level perspective of structural dynamics. Atomic level views of the simplest possible structural transition, melting, are discussed for a number of systems in which both thermal and purely electronically driven atomic displacements can be correlated with the degree of directional bonding. Optical manipulation of charge distributions and effects on interatomic forces/bonding can be directly observed through the ensuing atomic motions. New phenomena involving strongly correlated electron-lattice systems are also discussed in which optically induced changes in the potential energy landscape lead to ballistic structural changes. Concepts such as the structural order parameters are now directly observable at the atomic level of inspection to give a remarkable view of the extraordinary degree of cooperativity involved in strongly correlated electron-lattice systems. These recent examples, in combination with time-resolved real space imaging now possible with electron probes, are truly defining an emerging field that holds great promise to make a significant impact in how we understand structural dynamics. This article is dedicated to the memory of Professor David John Hugh Cockayne, a world leader in electron microscopy, who sadly passed away in December.

  3. Interpretation of diffuse low-energy electron diffraction intensities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldin, D.K.; Pendry, J.B.; Van Hove, M.A.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the diffuse low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) that occurs between sharp LEED beams can be used to determine the local bonding configuration near disordered surface atoms. Two approaches to the calculation of diffuse LEED intensities are presented for the case of lattice-gas disorder of an adsorbate on a crystalline substrate. The capabilities of this technique are most similar to those of near-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure, but avoid the restrictions due to the use of photons

  4. Application of electron back-scatter diffraction to texture research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randle, V.

    1996-01-01

    The application of electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) to materials research is reviewed. A brief history of the technique is given, followed by a description of present-day operation. The methodology of 'microtexture', i.e. spatially specific orientations, is described and recent examples of its application using EBSD are given, in particular to interstitial-free steel processing, growth of phases in a white iron and grain boundary phenomena in a superplastic alloy. The advantages and disadvantages of EBSD compared to use of X-rays for texture determination are discussed in detail

  5. Hydrogen positions in single nanocrystals revealed by electron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatinus, Lukáš; Brázda, Petr; Boullay, P.; Pérez, O.; Klementová, Mariana; Petit, S.; Eigner, Václav; Zaarour, M.; Mintova, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 355, č. 6321 (2017), s. 166-169 ISSN 0036-8075 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-10035S; GA MŠk LO1603 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24510 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : hydrogen atoms * crystal structure * electron diffraction tomography * nanocrystalline materials Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 37.205, year: 2016

  6. A systematic comparison of on-axis and off-axis transmission Kikuchi diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niessen, F.; Burrows, A.; Fanta, A. Bastos da Silva

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The capabilities of the novel on-axis transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) technique were explored in a systematic comparison with conventional off-axis TKD. The effect of experimental parameters on the appearance of on-axis and off-axis Kikuchi patterns was measured and discussed. In ...

  7. On the interpretation of the forbidden spots observed in the electron diffraction patterns of flat Au triangular nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes-Gasga, J.; Gomez-Rodriguez, A.; Gao Xiaoxia; Jose-Yacaman, M.

    2008-01-01

    In many cases nanostructures present forbidden spots in their electron diffraction patterns when they are observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To interpretate their TEM and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images properly, an understanding of the origin of these spots is necessary. In this work we comment on the origin of the forbidden spots observed in the [1 1 1] and [1 1 2] electron diffraction patterns of flat gold triangular nanoparticles. The forbidden spots were successfully indexed as corresponding to the first laue Zone (FOLZ) and the HRTEM images presented a contrast produced by the interference of the zero-order Laue zone (ZOLZ) and FOLZ spots. We discuss the use of the forbidden spots in the study of the structure of nanoparticles and show that they are related to the shape and incompleteness of layers in the very thin particles

  8. Instrumentation for EXELFS measurements using convergent beam diffraction coupling to the electron energy loss spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zou Wei; Csillag, S.; Tafreshi, M.A.

    1993-08-01

    Convergent beam diffraction coupling between a JEOL-100C scanning transmission microscope and an electron energy loss spectrometer is realised for the purpose of Extended Energy Loss Fine Structure (EXELFS) measurements. The working principle, the instrumentation for this coupling mode and some specific details, such as condenser system, shadow image, focusing conditions and measurement of convergent angles are described and discussed. The combination of a quadrupole and cylindrical lens for magnifying the image and increasing the dispersion of spectrum, together with a new type of compensation circuit for stray magnetic fields and the arrangement of the parallel recording system are also reported

  9. Crystal structure of lead uranyl carbonate mineral widenmannite: Precession electron-diffraction and synchrotron powder-diffraction study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plášil, J.; Palatinus, L.; Rohlíček, J.; Houdková, L.; Klementová, Mariana; Goliáš, V.; Škácha, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 99, 2-3 (2014), s. 276-282 ISSN 0003-004X Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Widenmannite * uranyl bicarbonate * crystal structure * precession electron diffraction * synchrotron powder diffraction Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.964, year: 2014

  10. Transmission electron microscopy of mercury metal

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2016-03-28

    Summary: Transmission electron microcopy (TEM) analysis of liquid metals, especially mercury (Hg), is difficult to carry out because their specimen preparation poses a daunting task due to the unique surface properties of these metals. This paper reports a cryoTEM study on Hg using a novel specimen preparation technique. Hg metal is mixed with water using sonication and quenched in liquid ethane cryogen. This technique permits research into the morphological, phase and structural properties of Hg at nanoscale dimensions. © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Acceleration of Electrons in a Diffraction Dominated IFEL

    CERN Document Server

    Musumeci, Pietro; Pellegrini, Claudio; Ralph, J; Rosenzweig, J B; Sung, C; Tochitsky, Sergei Ya; Travish, Gil

    2004-01-01

    We report on the observation of energy gain in excess of 20 MeV at the Inverse Free Electron Laser Accelerator experiment at the Neptune Laboratory at UCLA. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is injected ina 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered both in period and field amplitude. A CO2 10 μ m laser with power >300 GW is used as the IFEL driver. The Rayleigh range of the laser (1.8cm) is shorter than the undulator length so that the interaction is diffraction dominated. Few per cent of the injected particles are trapped in stable accelerating buckets and electrons with energies up to 35 MeV are detected on the magnetic spectrometers. Experimental results on the scaling of the accelerator characteristics versus input parameters like injection energy, laser focus position and laser power are discussed. Three dimensional simulations are in good agreement with the electron energy spectrums observed in the experiment and indicate that substantial energy exchange between laser and electron beam only occurs in the firs...

  12. Cathodoluminescence in the scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kociak, M; Zagonel, L F

    2017-05-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a powerful tool for the investigation of optical properties of materials. In recent years, its combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has demonstrated great success in unveiling new physics in the field of plasmonics and quantum emitters. Most of these results were not imaginable even twenty years ago, due to conceptual and technical limitations. The purpose of this review is to present the recent advances that broke these limitations, and the new possibilities offered by the modern STEM-CL technique. We first introduce the different STEM-CL operating modes and the technical specificities in STEM-CL instrumentation. Two main classes of optical excitations, namely the coherent one (typically plasmons) and the incoherent one (typically light emission from quantum emitters) are investigated with STEM-CL. For these two main classes, we describe both the physics of light production under electron beam irradiation and the physical basis for interpreting STEM-CL experiments. We then compare STEM-CL with its better known sister techniques: scanning electron microscope CL, photoluminescence, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We finish by comprehensively reviewing recent STEM-CL applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantitative biological measurement in Transmission Electron Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantell, Judith M; Verkade, Paul; Arkill, Kenton P

    2012-01-01

    It has been known for some time that biological sections shrink in the transmission electron microscope from exposure to the electron beam. This phenomenon is especially important in Electron Tomography (ET). The effect on shrinkage of parameters such as embedding medium or sample type is less well understood. In addition anisotropic area shrinkage has largely been ignored. The intention of this study is to explore the shrinkage on a number of samples ranging in thickness from 200 nm to 500 nm. A protocol was developed to determine the shrinkage in area and thickness using the gold fiducials used in electron tomography. In brief: Using low dose philosophy on the section, a focus area was used prior to a separate virgin study area for a series of known exposures on a tilted sample. The shrinkage was determined by measurements on the gold beads from both sides of the section as determined by a confirmatory tomogram. It was found that the shrinkage in area (approximately to 90-95% of the original) and the thickness (approximately 65% of the original at most) agreed with pervious authors, but that a lmost all the shrinkage was in the first minute and that although the direction of the in-plane shrinkage (in x and y) was sometimes uneven the end result was consistent. It was observed, in general, that thinner samples showed more percentage shrinkage than thicker ones. In conclusion, if direct quantitative measurements are required then the protocol described should be used for all areas studied.

  14. Quantitative biological measurement in Transmission Electron Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantell, Judith M.; Verkade, Paul; Arkill, Kenton P.

    2012-07-01

    It has been known for some time that biological sections shrink in the transmission electron microscope from exposure to the electron beam. This phenomenon is especially important in Electron Tomography (ET). The effect on shrinkage of parameters such as embedding medium or sample type is less well understood. In addition anisotropic area shrinkage has largely been ignored. The intention of this study is to explore the shrinkage on a number of samples ranging in thickness from 200 nm to 500 nm. A protocol was developed to determine the shrinkage in area and thickness using the gold fiducials used in electron tomography. In brief: Using low dose philosophy on the section, a focus area was used prior to a separate virgin study area for a series of known exposures on a tilted sample. The shrinkage was determined by measurements on the gold beads from both sides of the section as determined by a confirmatory tomogram. It was found that the shrinkage in area (approximately to 90-95% of the original) and the thickness (approximately 65% of the original at most) agreed with pervious authors, but that a lmost all the shrinkage was in the first minute and that although the direction of the in-plane shrinkage (in x and y) was sometimes uneven the end result was consistent. It was observed, in general, that thinner samples showed more percentage shrinkage than thicker ones. In conclusion, if direct quantitative measurements are required then the protocol described should be used for all areas studied.

  15. Cathodoluminescence in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kociak, M., E-mail: mathieu.kociak@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Université Paris-SudParis-Sud, CNRS-UMR 8502, Orsay 91405 (France); Zagonel, L.F. [“Gleb Wataghin” Institute of Physics University of Campinas - UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a powerful tool for the investigation of optical properties of materials. In recent years, its combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has demonstrated great success in unveiling new physics in the field of plasmonics and quantum emitters. Most of these results were not imaginable even twenty years ago, due to conceptual and technical limitations. The purpose of this review is to present the recent advances that broke these limitations, and the new possibilities offered by the modern STEM-CL technique. We first introduce the different STEM-CL operating modes and the technical specificities in STEM-CL instrumentation. Two main classes of optical excitations, namely the coherent one (typically plasmons) and the incoherent one (typically light emission from quantum emitters) are investigated with STEM-CL. For these two main classes, we describe both the physics of light production under electron beam irradiation and the physical basis for interpreting STEM-CL experiments. We then compare STEM-CL with its better known sister techniques: scanning electron microscope CL, photoluminescence, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We finish by comprehensively reviewing recent STEM-CL applications. - Highlights: • Reviews the field of STEM-CL. • Introduces the technical requirements and challenges for STEM-CL. • Introduces the different types of excitations probed by STEM-CL. • Gives comprehensive overview of the last fifteenth years in the field.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals from cattle bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Sangeeta, E-mail: spt658@aucklanduni.ac.nz [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand); Wei, Shanghai [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand); Han, Jie [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 205 North Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL (United States); Gao, Wei [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand)

    2015-11-15

    In this present study, hydroxyapatite which was obtained from cattle bones has been heat treated at temperature 400 °C and 600 °C. The microstructure after the treatment has been studied in detail using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction techniques. The TEM results indicate that natural bone consists of collagen and hydroxyapatite nano-crystals which are needle shaped. The heat treatment influences the crystallinity and growth of these hydroxyapatite nano-crystals known as ‘crystal maturation’ or ‘crystal ageing’. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite is obtained from cattle bones. • Material has been characterised using XRD and TEM. • Crystal growth and orientation has been studied in detail.

  17. Low temperature electron microscopy and electron diffraction of the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, S.B.

    1978-09-01

    The structure of the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium was studied by high resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction, primarily at low temperature. The handedness of the purple membrane diffraction pattern with respect to the cell membrane was determined by electron diffraction of purple membranes adsorbed to polylysine. A new method of preparing frozen specimens was used to preserve the high resolution order of the membranes in the electron microscope. High resolution imaging of glucose-embedded purple membranes at room temperature was used to relate the orientation of the diffraction pattern to the absolute orientation of the structure of the bacteriorhodopsin molecule. The purple membrane's critical dose for electron beam-induced damage was measured at room temperature and at -120 0 C, and was found to be approximately five times greater at -120 0 C. Because of this decrease in radiation sensitivity, imaging of the membrane at low temperature should result in an increased signal-to-noise ratio, and thus better statistical definition of the phases of weak reflections. Higher resolution phases may thus be extracted from images than can be determined by imaging at room temperature. To achieve this end, a high resolution, liquid nitrogen-cooled stage was built for the JEOL-100B. Once the appropriate technology for taking low dose images at very high resolution has been developed, this stage will hopefully be used to determine the high resolution structure of the purple membrane

  18. Low temperature electron microscopy and electron diffraction of the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayward, S.B.

    1978-09-01

    The structure of the purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium was studied by high resolution electron microscopy and electron diffraction, primarily at low temperature. The handedness of the purple membrane diffraction pattern with respect to the cell membrane was determined by electron diffraction of purple membranes adsorbed to polylysine. A new method of preparing frozen specimens was used to preserve the high resolution order of the membranes in the electron microscope. High resolution imaging of glucose-embedded purple membranes at room temperature was used to relate the orientation of the diffraction pattern to the absolute orientation of the structure of the bacteriorhodopsin molecule. The purple membrane's critical dose for electron beam-induced damage was measured at room temperature and at -120/sup 0/C, and was found to be approximately five times greater at -120/sup 0/C. Because of this decrease in radiation sensitivity, imaging of the membrane at low temperature should result in an increased signal-to-noise ratio, and thus better statistical definition of the phases of weak reflections. Higher resolution phases may thus be extracted from images than can be determined by imaging at room temperature. To achieve this end, a high resolution, liquid nitrogen-cooled stage was built for the JEOL-100B. Once the appropriate technology for taking low dose images at very high resolution has been developed, this stage will hopefully be used to determine the high resolution structure of the purple membrane.

  19. Characterization of nanomaterials with transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2016-08-01

    The field of nanotechnology is about research and development on materials whose at least one dimension is in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. In recent years, the research activity for developing nano-materials has grown exponentially owing to the fact that they offer better solutions to the challenges faced by various fields such as energy, food, and environment. In this paper, the importance of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) based techniques is demonstrated for investigating the properties of nano-materials. Specifically the nano-materials that are investigated in this report include gold nano-particles (Au-NPs), silver atom-clusters (Ag-ACs), tantalum single-atoms (Ta-SAs), carbon materials functionalized with iron cobalt (Fe-Co) NPs and titania (TiO2) NPs, and platinum loaded Ceria (Pt-CeO2) Nano composite. TEM techniques that are employed to investigate nano-materials include aberration corrected bright-field TEM (BF-TEM), high-angle dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and BF-TEM electron tomography (ET). With the help presented of results in this report, it is proved herein that as many TEM techniques as available in a given instrument are essential for a comprehensive nano-scale analysis of nanomaterials.

  20. Symmetry quantification and mapping using convergent beam electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyou-Hyun; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new algorithm to quantify symmetry recorded in convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns and use it for symmetry mapping in materials applications. We evaluate the effectiveness of the profile R-factor (R(p)) and the normalized cross-correlation coefficient (γ) for quantifying the amount of symmetry in a CBED pattern. The symmetry quantification procedures are automated and the algorithm is implemented as a DM (Digital Micrograph(©)) script. Experimental and simulated CBED patterns recorded from a Si single crystal are used to calibrate the proposed algorithm for the symmetry quantification. The proposed algorithm is then applied to a Si sample with defects to test the sensitivity of symmetry quantification to defects. Using the mirror symmetry as an example, we demonstrate that the normalized cross-correlation coefficient provides an effective and robust measurement of the symmetry recorded in experimental CBED patterns. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Electron backscatter diffraction: Strategies for reliable data acquisition and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randle, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    In electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) software packages there are many user choices both in data acquisition and in data processing and display. In order to extract maximum scientific value from an inquiry, it is helpful to have some guidelines for best practice in conducting an EBSD investigation. The purpose of this article therefore is to address selected topics of EBSD practice, in a tutorial manner. The topics covered are a brief summary on the principles of EBSD, specimen preparation, calibration of an EBSD system, experiment design, speed of data acquisition, data clean-up, microstructure characterisation (including grain size) and grain boundary characterisation. This list is not meant to cover exhaustively all areas where EBSD is used, but rather to provide a resource consisting of some useful strategies for novice EBSD users.

  2. Absorptive form factors for high-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, D.M.; King, Q.A.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal diffuse scattering contribution to the absorptive potential in high-energy electron diffraction is calculated in the form of an absorptive contribution to the atomic form factor. To do this, the Einstein model of lattice vibrations is used, with isotropic Debye-Waller factors. The absorptive form factors are calculated as a function of scattering vector s and temperature factor M on a grid which enables polynomial interpolation of the results to be accurate to better than 2% for much of the ranges 0≤Ms 2 ≤6 and 0≤M≤2 A 2 . The computed values, together with an interpolation routine, have been incorporated into a Fortran subroutine which calculates both the real and absorptive form factors for 54 atomic species. (orig.)

  3. Quantitative characterization of electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruskin, Rachel S; Yu, Zhiheng; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2013-12-01

    A new generation of direct electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) promises significant improvement over previous detectors in terms of their modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). However, the performance of these new detectors needs to be carefully monitored in order to optimize imaging conditions and check for degradation over time. We have developed an easy-to-use software tool, FindDQE, to measure MTF and DQE of electron detectors using images of a microscope's built-in beam stop. Using this software, we have determined the DQE curves of four direct electron detectors currently available: the Gatan K2 Summit, the FEI Falcon I and II, and the Direct Electron DE-12, under a variety of total dose and dose rate conditions. We have additionally measured the curves for the Gatan US4000 and TVIPS TemCam-F416 scintillator-based cameras. We compare the results from our new method with published curves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Simplifying Electron Beam Channeling in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ryan J; Mittal, Anudha; Odlyzko, Michael L; Mkhoyan, K Andre

    2017-08-01

    Sub-angstrom scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allows quantitative column-by-column analysis of crystalline specimens via annular dark-field images. The intensity of electrons scattered from a particular location in an atomic column depends on the intensity of the electron probe at that location. Electron beam channeling causes oscillations in the STEM probe intensity during specimen propagation, which leads to differences in the beam intensity incident at different depths. Understanding the parameters that control this complex behavior is critical for interpreting experimental STEM results. In this work, theoretical analysis of the STEM probe intensity reveals that intensity oscillations during specimen propagation are regulated by changes in the beam's angular distribution. Three distinct regimes of channeling behavior are observed: the high-atomic-number (Z) regime, in which atomic scattering leads to significant angular redistribution of the beam; the low-Z regime, in which the probe's initial angular distribution controls intensity oscillations; and the intermediate-Z regime, in which the behavior is mixed. These contrasting regimes are shown to exist for a wide range of probe parameters. These results provide a new understanding of the occurrence and consequences of channeling phenomena and conditions under which their influence is strengthened or weakened by characteristics of the electron probe and sample.

  5. Facilities for in situ ion beam studies in transmission electron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.W.; Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.

    1993-08-01

    Interfacing an ion accelerator to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) allows the analytical functions of TEM imaging and electron diffraction from very small regions to be employed during ion-irradiation effects studies. At present there are ten such installations in Japan, one in France and one in the USA. General specifications of facilities which are operational in 1993 are summarized, and additional facilities which are planned or being proposed are briefly described

  6. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Magnetite Plaquettes in Orgueil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Han, J.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite sometimes takes the form of a plaquette - barrel-shaped stack of magnetite disks - in carbonaceous chondrites (CC) that show evidence of aqueous alteration. The asymmetric nature of the plaquettes caused Pizzarello and Groy to propose magnetite plaquettes as a naturally asymmetric mineral that can indroduce symmetry-breaking in organic molecules. Our previous synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (SXRCT) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of the magnetite plaquettes in fifteen CCs indicate that magnetite plaquettes are composed of nearly parallel discs, and the crystallographic orientations of the discs change around a rotational axis normal to the discs surfaces. In order to further investigate the nanostructures of magnetite plaquettes, we made two focused ion beam (FIB) sections of nine magnetite plaquettes from a thin section of CI Orgueil for transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. The X-ray spectrum imaging shows that the magnetite discs are purely iron oxide Fe3O4 (42.9 at% Fe and 57.1 at% O), which suggest that the plaquettes are of aqueous origin as it is difficult to form pure magnetite as a nebular condensate. The selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns acquired across the plaquettes show that the magnetite discs are single crystals. SEM and EBSD analyses suggest that the planar surfaces of the magnetite discs belong to the {100} planes of the cubic inverse spinel structure, which are supported by our TEM observations. Kerridge et al. suggested that the epitaxial relationship between magnetite plaquette and carbonate determines the magnetite face. However, according to our TEM observation, the association of magnetite with porous networks of phyllosilicate indicates that the epitaxial relationship with carbonate is not essential to the formation of magnetite plaquettes. It was difficult to determine the preferred rotational orientation of the plaquettes due to the symmetry of the cubic structure

  7. Characterization of strained semiconductor structures using transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezdoel, Vasfi Burak

    2011-08-15

    Today's state-of-the-art semiconductor electronic devices utilize the charge transport within very small volumes of the active device regions. The structural, chemical and optical material properties in these small dimensions can critically affect the performance of these devices. The present thesis is focused on the nanometer scale characterization of the strain state in semiconductor structures using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Although high-resolution TEM has shown to provide the required accuracy at the nanometer scale, optimization of imaging conditions is necessary for accurate strain measurements. An alternative HRTEM method based on strain mapping on complex-valued exit face wave functions is developed to reduce the artifacts arising from objective lens aberrations. However, a much larger field of view is crucial for mapping strain in the active regions of complex structures like latest generation metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). To overcome this, a complementary approach based on electron holography is proposed. The technique relies on the reconstruction of the phase shifts in the diffracted electron beams from a focal series of dark-field images using recently developed exit-face wave function reconstruction algorithm. Combining high spatial resolution, better than 1 nm, with a field of view of about 1 {mu}m in each dimension, simultaneous strain measurements on the array of MOSFETs are possible. Owing to the much lower electron doses used in holography experiments when compared to conventional quantitative methods, the proposed approach allows to map compositional distribution in electron beam sensitive materials such as InGaN heterostructures without alteration of the original morphology and chemical composition. Moreover, dark-field holography experiments can be performed on thicker specimens than the ones required for high-resolution TEM, which in turn reduces the thin foil relaxation. (orig.)

  8. Foucault imaging and small-angle electron diffraction in controlled external magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Kotani, Atsuhiro; Harada, Ken; Ishii, Yui; Mori, Shigeo

    2016-12-01

    We report a method for acquiring Foucault images and small-angle electron diffraction patterns in external magnetic fields using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any modification. In the electron optical system that we have constructed, external magnetic fields parallel to the optical axis can be controlled using the objective lens pole piece under weak excitation conditions in the Foucault mode and the diffraction mode. We observe two ferromagnetic perovskite-type manganese oxides, La 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3 (LSMO) and Nd 0.5 Sr 0.5 MnO 3 , in order to visualize magnetic domains and their magnetic responses to external magnetic fields. In rhombohedral-structured LSMO, pinning of magnetic domain walls at crystallographic twin boundaries was found to have a strong influence on the generation of new magnetic domains in external applied magnetic fields. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Precession electron diffraction for SiC grain boundary characterization in unirradiated TRISO fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillo, T.M.; Rooyen, I.J. van; Wu, Y.Q.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • SiC grain orientation determined by TEM-based precession electron diffraction. • Orientation data improved with increasing TEM sample thickness. • Fraction of low angle grain boundaries lower from PED data than EBSD data. • Fractions of high angle and CSL-related boundaries similar to EBSD data. - Abstract: Precession electron diffraction (PED), a transmission electron microscopy-based technique, has been evaluated for the suitability for evaluating grain boundary character in the SiC layer of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. This work reports the effect of transmission electron microscope (TEM) lamella thickness on the quality of data and establishes a baseline comparison to SiC grain boundary characteristics, in an unirradiated TRISO particle, determined previously using a conventional electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) scanning electron microscope (SEM)-based technique. In general, it was determined that the lamella thickness produced using the standard focused ion beam (FIB) fabrication process (∼80 nm), is sufficient to provide reliable PED measurements, although thicker lamellae (∼120 nm) were found to produce higher quality orientation data. Also, analysis of SiC grain boundary character from the TEM-based PED data showed a much lower fraction of low-angle grain boundaries compared to SEM-based EBSD data from the SiC layer of a TRISO-coated particle made using the same fabrication parameters and a SiC layer deposited at a slightly lower temperature from a surrogate TRISO particle. However, the fractions of high-angle and coincident site lattice (CSL)-related grain boundaries determined by PED are similar to those found using SEM-based EBSD. Since the grain size of the SiC layer of TRSIO fuel can be as small as 250 nm (Kirchhofer et al., 2013), depending on the fabrication parameters, and since grain boundary fission product precipitates in irradiated TRISO fuel can be nano-sized, the TEM-based PED orientation data

  10. Object oriented database and electronic notebook for transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludtke, Steven J; Nason, Laurie; Tu, Haili; Peng, Liwei; Chiu, Wah

    2003-12-01

    As high-resolution biological transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has increased in popularity over recent years, the volume of data and number of projects underway has risen dramatically. A robust tool for effective data management is essential to efficiently process large data sets and extract maximum information from the available data. We present the Electron Microscopy Electronic Notebook (EMEN), a portable, object-oriented, web-based tool for TEM data archival and project management. EMEN has several unique features. First, the database is logically organized and annotated so multiple collaborators at different geographical locations can easily access and interpret the data without assistance. Second, the database was designed to provide flexibility to the user, so it can be used much as a lab notebook would be, while maintaining a structure suitable for data mining and direct interaction with data-processing software. Finally, as an object-oriented database, the database structure is dynamic and can be easily extended to incorporate information not defined in the original database specification.

  11. Analysis of dislocation loops by means of large-angle convergent beam electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, Ch; Spiecker, E; Morniroli, J P; Jaeger, W

    2002-01-01

    Diffusion-induced dislocation loops in GaP and GaAs were analysed by means of large-angle convergent beam electron diffraction (LACBED) and conventional contrast methods of transmission electron microscopy. It is demonstrated that LACBED is perfectly suited for use in analysing dislocation loops. The method combines analyses of the dislocation-induced splitting of Bragg lines in a LACBED pattern for the determination of the Burgers vector with analyses of the loop contrast behaviour in transmission electron microscopy bright-field images during tilt experiments, from which the habit plane of the dislocation loop is determined. Perfect dislocation loops formed by condensation of interstitial atoms or vacancies were found, depending on the diffusion conditions. The loops possess {110}-habit planes and Burgers vectors parallel to (110). The LACBED method findings are compared with results of contrast analyses based on the so-called 'inside-outside' contrast of dislocation loops. Advantages of the LACBED method consist in the possibility of determining the complete Burgers vector of the dislocation loops and of an unambiguous and fast loop type analysis

  12. Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction in Transmission Mode for Mapping Crystal Grain Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cereser, Alberto; Strobl, Markus; Hall, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    constituting the material. This article presents a new non-destructive 3D technique to study centimeter-sized bulk samples with a spatial resolution of hundred micrometers: time-of-flight three-dimensional neutron diffraction (ToF 3DND). Compared to existing analogous X-ray diffraction techniques, ToF 3DND......-of-flight neutron beamline. The technique was developed and tested with data collected at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (J-PARC) for an iron sample. We successfully reconstructed the shape of 108 grains and developed an indexing procedure....... The reconstruction algorithms have been validated by reconstructing two stacked Co-Ni-Ga single crystals, and by comparison with a grain map obtained by post-mortem electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)....

  13. Molecular structure of tetramethylgermane from gas electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csákvári, Éva; Rozsondai, Béla; Hargittai, István

    1991-05-01

    The molecular structure of Ge(CH 3) 4 has been determined from gas-phase electron diffraction augmented by a normal coordinate analysis. Assuming tetrahedral symmetry for the germanium bond configuration, the following structural parameters are found: rg(GeC) = 1.958 ± 0.004 Å, rg(CH) = 1.111 ± 0.003 Å and ∠(GeCH) = 110.7 ± 0.2° ( R=4.0%). The methyl torsional barrier V 0 is estimated to be 1.3 kJ mol -1 on the basis of an effective angle of torsion 23.0 ± 1.5°, from the staggered form, yielded directly by the analysis. The GeC bond length of Ge(CH 3) 4 is the same, within experimental error, as that of Ge(C 6H 5) 4 and is in agreement with the prediction of a modified Schomaker-Stevenson relationship.

  14. A Dictionary Approach to Electron Backscatter Diffraction Indexing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu H; Park, Se Un; Wei, Dennis; Newstadt, Greg; Jackson, Michael A; Simmons, Jeff P; De Graef, Marc; Hero, Alfred O

    2015-06-01

    We propose a framework for indexing of grain and subgrain structures in electron backscatter diffraction patterns of polycrystalline materials. We discretize the domain of a dynamical forward model onto a dense grid of orientations, producing a dictionary of patterns. For each measured pattern, we identify the most similar patterns in the dictionary, and identify boundaries, detect anomalies, and index crystal orientations. The statistical distribution of these closest matches is used in an unsupervised binary decision tree (DT) classifier to identify grain boundaries and anomalous regions. The DT classifies a pattern as an anomaly if it has an abnormally low similarity to any pattern in the dictionary. It classifies a pixel as being near a grain boundary if the highly ranked patterns in the dictionary differ significantly over the pixel's neighborhood. Indexing is accomplished by computing the mean orientation of the closest matches to each pattern. The mean orientation is estimated using a maximum likelihood approach that models the orientation distribution as a mixture of Von Mises-Fisher distributions over the quaternionic three sphere. The proposed dictionary matching approach permits segmentation, anomaly detection, and indexing to be performed in a unified manner with the additional benefit of uncertainty quantification.

  15. Orientation effects on indexing of electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowell, Matthew M.; Wright, Stuart I.

    2005-01-01

    Automated Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) has become a well-accepted technique for characterizing the crystallographic orientation aspects of polycrystalline microstructures. At the advent of this technique, it was observed that patterns obtained from grains in certain crystallographic orientations were more difficult for the automated indexing algorithms to accurately identify than patterns from other orientations. The origin of this problem is often similarities between the EBSD pattern of the correct orientation and patterns from other orientations or phases. While practical solutions have been found and implemented, the identification of these problem orientations generally occurs only after running an automated scan, as problem orientations are often readily apparent in the resulting orientation maps. However, such an approach only finds those problem orientations that are present in the scan area. It would be advantageous to identify all regions of orientation space that may present problems for automated indexing prior to initiating an automated scan, and to minimize this space through the optimization of acquisition and indexing parameters. This work presents new methods for identifying regions in orientation space where the reliability of the automated indexing is suspect prior to performing a scan. This methodology is used to characterize the impact of various parameters on the indexing algorithm

  16. Applications of orientation mapping by scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, D.

    1997-01-01

    The potentials of orientation mapping techniques (in the following referred to as OIM) for studies of thermomechanical processes are analysed. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) based OIM techniques are considered. Among the thermomechanical processes...

  17. Estimation of diffraction effect in ultrasonic attenuation by through-transmission substitution technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Guangzhen; Yang, Ping; He, Longbiao

    2013-04-01

    Measurement of ultrasonic attenuation is important in clinical and industrial applications. The overall goal of this research was to characterize the diffraction effect in ultrasonic attenuation. We have followed a systematic approach, beginning with the theoretical analysis of the calculation method using the transfer function of the signal spectrum, moving on to numerical computations and experimental confirmation. The relation of sample thickness to pulse duration is presented and the transmission coefficient of the sample for different propagation modes is discussed. Particular attention is paid to the diffraction effect which is easy to be neglected but a potential source of artifacts. Numerical computations demonstrated that lower frequencies, shorter transducer distances and larger velocity difference can result in significant diffraction effect. Due to the complexity of determining interface loss in Single Sample Substitution Method (SSM), Two Samples Substitution Method (TSM) was proposed to avoid this drawback. Comparison experiment with SSM illustrates that the proposed diffraction correction model is sound in theory and feasible in practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Transmission electron microscopy a textbook for materials science

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, David B

    1996-01-01

    Electron microscopy has revolutionized our understanding the extraordinary intellectual demands required of the mi­ of materials by completing the processing-structure-prop­ croscopist in order to do the job properly: crystallography, erties links down to atomistic levels. It now is even possible diffraction, image contrast, inelastic scattering events, and to tailor the microstructure (and meso structure ) of materials spectroscopy. Remember, these used to be fields in them­ to achieve specific sets of properties; the extraordinary abili­ selves. Today, one has to understand the fundamentals ties of modem transmission electron microscopy-TEM­ of all of these areas before one can hope to tackle signifi­ instruments to provide almost all of the structural, phase, cant problems in materials science. TEM is a technique of and crystallographic data allow us to accomplish this feat. characterizing materials down to the atomic limits. It must Therefore, it is obvious that any curriculum in modem mate­ be use...

  19. A Comparative Study of the Crystallite Size and the Dislocation Density of Bent Steel Plates using Bragg-edge Transmission Imaging, TOF Neutron Diffraction and EBSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, K.; Su, Y. H.; Tomota, Y.; Kawasaki, T.; Shinohara, T.; Kai, T.; Hiroi, K.; Zhang, S. Y.; Parker, J. D.; Sato, H.; Kiyanagi, Y.

    Line broadening analysis was performed on the time-of-flight neutron diffraction data for the plastically bent plates of a ferritic steel and a duplex stainless steel. A Rietveld analysis program, Z-Rietveld ver. 1.0 was used to fit the anisotropically broadened patterns where the increase in Lorentzian full width at half maximum (FWHM) and the Gaussian FWHM involves information of the crystallite size and the dislocation density, respectively. The derived results were compared with those obtained by using Bragg-edge transmission spectrum analysis and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) observations.

  20. Lattice constant measurement from electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2017-01-01

    Kikuchi bands in election backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP) contain information about lattice constants of crystallographic samples that can be extracted via the Bragg equation. An advantage of lattice constant measurement from EBSPs over diffraction (XRD) is the ability to perform local ...

  1. Transmission of electrons through Al2O3 nanocapillaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milosavljević, A.R.; Jureta, J.J.; Víkor, Gy.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate transmission of low-energy electrons (250 eV) through insulating AlO nanocapillaries (270 nm diameter and 15 μm length). Kinetic energy distribution of electrons transmitted through the nanocapillaries in the straightforward direction, time dependence of the transmission rate both...

  2. Femtosecond electron diffraction. Next generation electron sources for atomically resolved dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirscht, Julian

    2015-08-15

    Three instruments for femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) experiments were erected, partially commissioned and used for first diffraction experiments. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) was completed by beamline elements including supports, a specimen chamber and dark current or electron beam collimating elements such that the commissioning process, including first diffraction experiments in this context, could be started. The temporal resolution of this machine is simulated to be 25 fs (fwhm) short, while a transverse coherence length of 30 nm (fwhm) is feasible to resolve proteins on this scale. Whether this machine is capable of meeting these predictions or whether the dynamics of the electron beam will stay limited by accelerator components, is not finally determined by the end of this work, because commissioning and improvement of accelerator components is ongoing. Simultaneously, a compact DC electron diffraction apparatus, the E-Gun 300, designed for solid and liquid specimens and a target electron energy of 300 keV, was built. Fundamental design issues of the high potential carrying and beam generating components occurred and are limiting the maximum potential and electron energy to 120 keV. Furthermore, this is limiting the range of possible applications and consequently the design and construction of a brand new instrument began. The Femtosecond Electron Diffraction CAmera for Molecular Movies (FED-CAMM) bridges the performance problems of very high electric potentials and provides optimal operational conditions for all applied electron energies up to 300 keV. The variability of gap spacings and optimized manufacturing of the high voltage electrodes lead to the best possible electron pulse durations obtainable with a compact DC setup, that does not comprise of rf-structures. This third apparatus possesses pulse durations just a few tenth femtoseconds apart from the design limit of the highly relativistic REGAE and combines the

  3. Femtosecond electron diffraction. Next generation electron sources for atomically resolved dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirscht, Julian

    2015-08-01

    Three instruments for femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) experiments were erected, partially commissioned and used for first diffraction experiments. The Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) was completed by beamline elements including supports, a specimen chamber and dark current or electron beam collimating elements such that the commissioning process, including first diffraction experiments in this context, could be started. The temporal resolution of this machine is simulated to be 25 fs (fwhm) short, while a transverse coherence length of 30 nm (fwhm) is feasible to resolve proteins on this scale. Whether this machine is capable of meeting these predictions or whether the dynamics of the electron beam will stay limited by accelerator components, is not finally determined by the end of this work, because commissioning and improvement of accelerator components is ongoing. Simultaneously, a compact DC electron diffraction apparatus, the E-Gun 300, designed for solid and liquid specimens and a target electron energy of 300 keV, was built. Fundamental design issues of the high potential carrying and beam generating components occurred and are limiting the maximum potential and electron energy to 120 keV. Furthermore, this is limiting the range of possible applications and consequently the design and construction of a brand new instrument began. The Femtosecond Electron Diffraction CAmera for Molecular Movies (FED-CAMM) bridges the performance problems of very high electric potentials and provides optimal operational conditions for all applied electron energies up to 300 keV. The variability of gap spacings and optimized manufacturing of the high voltage electrodes lead to the best possible electron pulse durations obtainable with a compact DC setup, that does not comprise of rf-structures. This third apparatus possesses pulse durations just a few tenth femtoseconds apart from the design limit of the highly relativistic REGAE and combines the

  4. Complex band structure and electronic transmission eigenchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders; Strange, Mikkel; Smidstrup, Soren

    2017-01-01

    molecular junctions. The molecular junctions show that both the length dependence of the total transmission and the individual transmission eigenvalues can be, almost always, found through the complex band structure. The complex band structure of the semi-conducting material, however, does not predict...

  5. Work hardening mechanism in high nitrogen austenitic steel studied by in situ neutron diffraction and in situ electron backscattering diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojima, M.; Adachi, Y.; Tomota, Y.; Ikeda, K.; Kamiyama, T.; Katada, Y.

    2009-01-01

    With a focus on microstructural hierarchy, work hardening behaviour in high nitrogen-bearing austenitic steel (HNS) was investigated mainly by a combined technique of in situ neutron diffraction and in situ electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD). Stress partitioning due to difference in deformability among grains is enhanced in HNS. The larger stress partitioning among [h k l]-oriented family grains seems to realize high work hardening at a small strain. At a larger strain, dislocation density is higher in HNS than in low nitrogen austenitic steel (LNS), which is a possible reason for high work hardening after straining proceeds, resulting in large uniform elongation.

  6. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy study of pyrolytic silicon carbide particles for a high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uny, G.; Morlevat, J.-P.

    1977-01-01

    A study has been made by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy of the silicon carbide in the fuel particles for a high-temperature reactor. The results obtained, taken in conjunction with observations by transmission electron microscopy, allow pyrolytic SiC to be characterised as a sequence of β SiC lamellae separated by layers of microtwins. The mechanical properties of a SiC deposit are functions of the dimensions of the coherent domains of β SiC and it has been possible to define the optimum conditions of the deposit. (Auth.)

  7. Strain mapping of semiconductor specimens with nm-scale resolution in a transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David; Denneulin, Thibaud; Bernier, Nicolas; Béché, Armand; Rouvière, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The last few years have seen a great deal of progress in the development of transmission electron microscopy based techniques for strain mapping. New techniques have appeared such as dark field electron holography and nanobeam diffraction and better known ones such as geometrical phase analysis have been improved by using aberration corrected ultra-stable modern electron microscopes. In this paper we apply dark field electron holography, the geometrical phase analysis of high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images, nanobeam diffraction and precession diffraction, all performed at the state-of-the-art to five different types of semiconductor samples. These include a simple calibration structure comprising 10-nm-thick SiGe layers to benchmark the techniques. A SiGe recessed source and drain device has been examined in order to test their capabilities on 2D structures. Devices that have been strained using a nitride stressor have been examined to test the sensitivity of the different techniques when applied to systems containing low values of deformation. To test the techniques on modern semiconductors, an electrically tested device grown on a SOI wafer has been examined. Finally a GaN/AlN superlattice was tested in order to assess the different methods of measuring deformation on specimens that do not have a perfect crystalline structure. The different deformation mapping techniques have been compared to one another and the strengths and weaknesses of each are discussed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Microstructural and Defect Analysis of Metal Nanoparticles in Functional Catalysts by Diffraction and Electron Microscopy: The Cu/ZnO Catalyst for Methanol Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kandemir, T.; Kasatkin, I.; Girgsdies, F.; Zander, S.; Kühl, S.; Tovar, M.; Schlögl, R.; Behrens, M.

    2014-01-01

    The application of different methods for a microstructural analysis of functional catalysts is reported for the example of different Cu/ZnO-based methanol synthesis catalysts. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction were used as complementary techniques to extract information on the size and the defect concentration of the Cu nano-crystallites. The results, strengths and limitations of the two techniques and of different evaluation methods for line profile analysis of diffraction dat...

  9. Mapping unoccupied electronic states of freestanding graphene by angle-resolved low-energy electron transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Wicki Flavio; Longchamp Jean-Nicolas; Latychevskaia Tatiana; Escher Conrad; Fink Hans-Werner

    2016-01-01

    We report angle-resolved electron transmission measurements through freestanding graphene sheets in the energy range of 18 to 30 eV above the Fermi level. The measurements are carried out in a low-energy electron point source microscope, which allows simultaneously probing the transmission for a large angular range. The characteristics of low-energy electron transmission through graphene depend on its electronic structure above the vacuum level. The experimental technique described here allow...

  10. Neural-network-based depth-resolved multiscale structural optimization using density functional theory and electron diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Robert S.; Coll, Catalina; Estradé, Sònia; Peiró, Francesca; Koch, Christoph T.

    2018-01-01

    Iterative neural-network-based three-dimensional structural optimization of atomic positions over tens of nanometers is performed using transmission electron microscope (TEM) diffraction data simulated from density functional theory (DFT) all-electron densities, thus retrieving parameter variations along the beam direction. We first use experimental data to show that the GPAW DFT code's all-electron densities are considerably more accurate for electron diffraction calculations compared to conventional isolated-atom scattering factors, and they also compare well to Wien2K DFT simulations. This DFT-TEM combination is then integrated into an iterative neural-network-optimization-based algorithm (PRIMES, parameter retrieval and inversion from multiple electron scattering) to retrieve nanometer-scale ferroelectric polarization domains and strain in theoretical bulklike specimens from TEM data. DFT and isolated-atom methods produce substantially different diffraction patterns and retrieved polarization domain parameters, and DFT is sufficient to retrieve strain properties from a silicon specimen simulated using experimentally derived structure factors. Thus, we show that the improved accuracy, fast computation, and intuitive integration make the GPAW DFT code well suited for three-dimensional materials characterization and demonstrate this using an iterative neural-network algorithm that is verifiable on the mesoscale and, with DFT integration, self-consistent on the nanoscale.

  11. Lattice constant measurement from electron backscatter diffraction patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2017-01-01

    Kikuchi bands in election backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP) contain information about lattice constants of crystallographic samples that can be extracted via the Bragg equation. An advantage of lattice constant measurement from EBSPs over diffraction (XRD) is the ability to perform local...... is approximately 0.04 Å. Studying Kikuchi band size dependence of the measurement precision shows that the measurement error decays with increasing band size (i.e. decreasing lattice constant). However, in practice, the sharpness of wide bands tends to be low due to their low intensity, thus limiting...

  12. Transmission electron microscopy for the evaluation and optimization of crystal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Hilary P; Lin, Guowu; Barnes, Christopher O; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Krzysiak, Troy; Weiss, Simon C; Reynolds, Shelley; Wu, Ying; Nagarajan, Veeranagu; Makhov, Alexander M; Lawrence, Robert; Lamm, Emily; Clark, Lisa; Gardella, Timothy J; Hogue, Brenda G; Ogata, Craig M; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M; Conway, James F; Vilardaga, Jean Pierre; Cohen, Aina E; Calero, Guillermo

    2016-05-01

    The crystallization of protein samples remains the most significant challenge in structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Here, the effectiveness of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis to aid in the crystallization of biological macromolecules is demonstrated. It was found that the presence of well ordered lattices with higher order Bragg spots, revealed by Fourier analysis of TEM images, is a good predictor of diffraction-quality crystals. Moreover, the use of TEM allowed (i) comparison of lattice quality among crystals from different conditions in crystallization screens; (ii) the detection of crystal pathologies that could contribute to poor X-ray diffraction, including crystal lattice defects, anisotropic diffraction and crystal contamination by heavy protein aggregates and nanocrystal nuclei; (iii) the qualitative estimation of crystal solvent content to explore the effect of lattice dehydration on diffraction and (iv) the selection of high-quality crystal fragments for microseeding experiments to generate reproducibly larger sized crystals. Applications to X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) and micro-electron diffraction (microED) experiments are also discussed.

  13. Transmission electron microscopy for the evaluation and optimization of crystal growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, Hilary P.; Lin, Guowu; Barnes, Christopher O.; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Krzysiak, Troy; Weiss, Simon C.; Reynolds, Shelley; Wu, Ying; Nagarajan, Veeranagu; Makhov, Alexander M.; Lawrence, Robert; Lamm, Emily; Clark, Lisa; Gardella, Timothy J.; Hogue, Brenda G.; Ogata, Craig M.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Conway, James F.; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Cohen, Aina E.; Calero, Guillermo

    2016-04-26

    The crystallization of protein samples remains the most significant challenge in structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Here, the effectiveness of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis to aid in the crystallization of biological macromolecules is demonstrated. It was found that the presence of well ordered lattices with higher order Bragg spots, revealed by Fourier analysis of TEM images, is a good predictor of diffraction-quality crystals. Moreover, the use of TEM allowed (i) comparison of lattice quality among crystals from different conditions in crystallization screens; (ii) the detection of crystal pathologies that could contribute to poor X-ray diffraction, including crystal lattice defects, anisotropic diffraction and crystal contamination by heavy protein aggregates and nanocrystal nuclei; (iii) the qualitative estimation of crystal solvent content to explore the effect of lattice dehydration on diffraction and (iv) the selection of high-quality crystal fragments for microseeding experiments to generate reproducibly larger sized crystals. Applications to X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) and micro-electron diffraction (microED) experiments are also discussed.

  14. Ab initio structure determination of nanocrystals of organic pharmaceutical compounds by electron diffraction at room temperature using a Timepix quantum area direct electron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genderen, E. van; Clabbers, M. T. B. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics (C-CINA), Biozentrum, University of Basel, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland); Das, P. P. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Stewart, A. [Department of Physics and Energy, Materials and Surface Science Institute (MSSI), University of Limerick, Limerick (Ireland); Nederlof, I. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Amsterdam Scientific Instruments, Postbus 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barentsen, K. C. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Portillo, Q. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Centres Científics i Tecnològics de la Universitat de Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Carrer de Lluís Solé i Sabaris, 1-3, Barcelona (Spain); Pannu, N. S. [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Nicolopoulos, S. [Nanomegas SPRL, Boulevard Edmond Machtens 79, B 1080, Brussels (Belgium); Gruene, T., E-mail: tim.gruene@psi.ch [Biology and Chemistry, Laboratory of Biomolecular Research, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Abrahams, J. P., E-mail: tim.gruene@psi.ch [Biophysical Structural Chemistry, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, 2333 CC Leiden (Netherlands); Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics (C-CINA), Biozentrum, University of Basel, CH-4058 Basel (Switzerland); Biology and Chemistry, Laboratory of Biomolecular Research, Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-02-05

    A specialized quantum area detector for electron diffraction studies makes it possible to solve the structure of small organic compound nanocrystals in non-cryo conditions by direct methods. Until recently, structure determination by transmission electron microscopy of beam-sensitive three-dimensional nanocrystals required electron diffraction tomography data collection at liquid-nitrogen temperature, in order to reduce radiation damage. Here it is shown that the novel Timepix detector combines a high dynamic range with a very high signal-to-noise ratio and single-electron sensitivity, enabling ab initio phasing of beam-sensitive organic compounds. Low-dose electron diffraction data (∼0.013 e{sup −} Å{sup −2} s{sup −1}) were collected at room temperature with the rotation method. It was ascertained that the data were of sufficient quality for structure solution using direct methods using software developed for X-ray crystallography (XDS, SHELX) and for electron crystallography (ADT3D/PETS, SIR2014)

  15. Determination of dislocation density by electron backscatter diffraction and X-ray line profile analysis in ferrous lath martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berecz, Tibor; Jenei, Péter; Csóré, András; Lábár, János; Gubicza, Jenő

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure and the dislocation density in as-quenched ferrous lath martensite were studied by different methods. The blocks, packets and variants formed due to martensitic transformation were identified and their sizes were determined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Concomitant transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation revealed that the laths contain subgrains with the size between 50 and 100 nm. A novel evaluation procedure of EBSD images was elaborated for the determination of the density and the space distribution of geometrically necessary dislocations from the misorientation distribution. The total dislocation density obtained by X-ray diffraction line profile analysis was in good agreement with the value determined by EBSD, indicating that the majority of dislocations formed due to martensitic transformation during quenching are geometrically necessary dislocations.

  16. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  17. In situ and operando transmission electron microscopy of catalytic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crozier, Peter A.; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic nanomaterials play a major role in chemical conversions and energy transformations. Understanding how materials control and regulate surface reactions is a major objective for fundamental research on heterogeneous catalysts. In situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM...

  18. Sample preparation and study by electronic diffraction of oxidations and fluorinations of some metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auguin, B.

    1963-06-01

    After having recalled that electron diffraction is particularly adapted to the study of thin films and surface layers, notably those forming during corrosions, and recalled some characteristics of this technique (wavelength, interactions with substances, parasite reactions, observation by transmission or reflection, obtained diagrams for polycrystalline and mono-crystalline substances), the author describes how samples are prepared in the case of examinations performed by transmission and by reflection. As fluorination agents are used for the separation of uranium 235 and 238, the second part discusses some works related to the fluorination of metals and alloys, some of them being used in these separation installations. Chlorine trifluoride is generally used and materials are generally oxidised. Thus, the author reports the study of the action of ClF 3 on different oxides. Oxidations of iron, nickel and Monel are addressed, as well as the behaviour of stainless steel. The study of fluorinations of metals (nickel, chromium, copper), alloys (stainless steel, Monel) and oxides is reported. The author finally addresses treatments performed after fluorinations: vacuum heating, action of humid air

  19. Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction in Transmission Mode for Mapping Crystal Grain Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereser, Alberto; Strobl, Markus; Hall, Stephen A; Steuwer, Axel; Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Tremsin, Anton S; Knudsen, Erik B; Shinohara, Takenao; Willendrup, Peter K; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos; Iyengar, Srinivasan; Larsen, Peter M; Hanashima, Takayasu; Moyoshi, Taketo; Kadletz, Peter M; Krooß, Philipp; Niendorf, Thomas; Sales, Morten; Schmahl, Wolfgang W; Schmidt, Søren

    2017-08-25

    The physical properties of polycrystalline materials depend on their microstructure, which is the nano- to centimeter scale arrangement of phases and defects in their interior. Such microstructure depends on the shape, crystallographic phase and orientation, and interfacing of the grains constituting the material. This article presents a new non-destructive 3D technique to study centimeter-sized bulk samples with a spatial resolution of hundred micrometers: time-of-flight three-dimensional neutron diffraction (ToF 3DND). Compared to existing analogous X-ray diffraction techniques, ToF 3DND enables studies of samples that can be both larger in size and made of heavier elements. Moreover, ToF 3DND facilitates the use of complicated sample environments. The basic ToF 3DND setup, utilizing an imaging detector with high spatial and temporal resolution, can easily be implemented at a time-of-flight neutron beamline. The technique was developed and tested with data collected at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (J-PARC) for an iron sample. We successfully reconstructed the shape of 108 grains and developed an indexing procedure. The reconstruction algorithms have been validated by reconstructing two stacked Co-Ni-Ga single crystals, and by comparison with a grain map obtained by post-mortem electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD).

  20. Taking a closer look for a broader view: combining powder diffraction with electron crystallography for a better understanding of modulated structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatinus, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 71, Apr (2015), 125-126 ISSN 0108-7681 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : transmission electron microscopy * powder diffraction * anion-deficient perovskites * modulated structures * diffuse Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.184, year: 2014

  1. High temperature x-ray diffraction in transmission under controlled environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulies, L.; Kramer, M.J.; Williams, J.J.; Deters, E.M.; McCallum, R.W.; Goldman, A.I.; Haeffner, D.R.; Lang, J.C.; Kycia, S.

    1998-01-01

    A compact tube furnace has been developed for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies using high energy synchrotron radiation. The furnace design has a low absorption path in transmission yet allows for a high degree of control of the sample atmosphere and a minimal temperature gradient across the sample. The design allows for a maximum temperature of 1,500 C with a variety of atmospheres including inert, reducing, and oxidizing. Preliminary results obtained at the SRI-CAT 1-ID undulator line (60 keV) at the APS facility and the A2 24 pole wiggler line (45 keV) at CHESS on the Ti 5 Si 3 Z .5 (Z = C, N, O) system will be presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach

  2. Electron energy loss spectroscopy microanalysis and imaging in the transmission electron microscope: example of biological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diociaiuti, Marco

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports original results obtained in our laboratory over the past few years in the application of both electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and electron spectroscopy imaging (ESI) to biological samples, performed in two transmission electron microscopes (TEM) equipped with high-resolution electron filters and spectrometers: a Gatan model 607 single magnetic sector double focusing EEL serial spectrometer attached to a Philips 430 TEM and a Zeiss EM902 Energy Filtering TEM. The primary interest was on the possibility offered by the combined application of these spectroscopic techniques with those offered by the TEM. In particular, the electron beam focusing available in a TEM allowed us to perform EELS and ESI on very small sample volumes, where high-resolution imaging and electron diffraction techniques can provide important structural information. I show that ESI was able to improve TEM performance, due to the reduced chromatic aberration and the possibility of avoiding the sample staining procedure. Finally, the analysis of the oscillating extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS) beyond the ionization edges characterizing the EELS spectra allowed me, in a manner very similar to the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of the X-ray absorption spectra, to obtain short-range structural information for such light elements of biological interest as O or Fe. The Philips EM430 (250-300 keV) TEM was used to perform EELS microanalysis on Ca, P, O, Fe, Al and Si. The assessment of the detection limits of this method was obtained working with well-characterized samples containing Ca and P, and mimicking the actual cellular matrix. I applied EELS microanalysis to Ca detection in bone tissue during the mineralization process and to P detection in the cellular membrane of erythrocytes treated with an anti-tumoral drug, demonstrating that the cellular membrane is a drug target. I applied EELS microanalysis and selected area electron

  3. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  4. Calculation of electron transmission through aluminium foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abroyan, M.A.; Mel'ker, A.I.; Mikhajlin, A.I.; Sirotinkin, V.V.; Tokmakov, I.L.

    1987-01-01

    Calculated by Monte Carlo method energy and angular distributions of electrons transmitted through aluminium foil with 50 μm thickness are presented. 200-500 electron energy ranges and angles of electron incidence on foil from 0 to 40 deg C are considered. That allows to use results for more universal accelerator group, for example, for accelerators with scanning beam used in industry. The received values of angular and energy characteristics allow to increase essentially estimation accuracy of accelerator extraction devices and dose distribution on irradiating item

  5. Retabulation of space group extinctions for electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.; Tanaka, M.

    1989-01-01

    The space group tables previously published by one of the authors and others are here presented in a revised and compacted form designed to make for compatability with existing tables for X-ray diffraction. 136 of the 230 space groups are subject to dynamic extinctions due to glide planes and screw axes, and the observables from these space groups in specific settings are tabulated. Tabs

  6. Temporal and spatial imaging of hydrogen storage materials: watching solvent and hydrogen desorption from aluminium hydride by transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Shane D; Humphries, Terry; Weaver, Louise; McGrady, G Sean

    2008-10-07

    An in situ thermal desorption study of solvated aluminum hydride (alane) by transmission electron microscopy and selected area diffraction has permitted characterisation of the structural and morphological changes during desorption of solvent and hydrogen in real-time; this powerful technique for studying hydrogen storage materials complements several others already employed.

  7. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of aluminophosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulan, J.G.; Gronsky, R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Szostak, R. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (USA)); Sorby, K. (Oslo Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1990-04-01

    VPI-5 transforms to AlPO{sub 4}-8 under mild thermal treatment (100{degree}C, 18 hrs). HRTEM micrographs, oriented normal to the c axis, show extensive defect-free regions in VPI-5, while slip planes normal to the c axis are found in AlPO{sub 4}-8. Analysis of the HRTEM data, in conjunction with infrared and thermal analysis, adsorption studies and x-ray powder diffraction, has lead to a proposed structure for AlPO{sub 4}-8. Though the sheets containing the 18 member rings which define the pores in VPI-5 remain intact in AlPO{sub 4}-8, reduction in the porosity is attributed to blockages created by the movement of these sheets relative to each other. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Synthesis and Activation of Catalysts for Biofuel Synthesis in an Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard; Wu, Qiongxiao; Elkjær, Christian Fink

    of CuNi and NiGa catalysts for alcohol synthesis using High-Resolution TEM (HRTEM), energy electron-loss spectroscopy (EELS), Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX). Complementary observations have been done using in-situ X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). We focus on structural changes during the catalysts...... synthesis and activation in a reducing atmosphere at elevated temperature. Changes in phase and particle size distribution with respect to the temperature can be directly observed and correlated to catalytic activity and integral phase information from the in-situ XRD....... promising candidates experimentally. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used for microstructural characterization and provides feedback for both theory and synthesis. We have studied the catalysts close to their working conditions in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) equipped...

  9. Eucentric four-axis ultrahigh vacuum goniometer for reflection high-energy electron diffraction applications

    OpenAIRE

    Schmehl, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Eucentric four-axis ultrahigh vacuum goniometer for reflection high-energy electron diffraction applications / A. Schmehl, R. R. Schulz, J. Mannhart. - In: Review of scientific instruments. 76. 2005. 123901

  10. Study on surface structures with the aid of slow electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedyanin, V.K.; Mozol'kov, A.E.

    1976-01-01

    A short review is presented on experimental and theoretical data published on slow electron diffraction. The theory of slow electron diffraction on two-dimensional surface structures caused by the presence of an absorbed gas on the surface which has been earlier proposed by the authors is discussed. The model is based on a quantum-statistical model of adsorption on a homogeneous surface. Its application allows one to explain most important aspects of this problem

  11. X-ray diffraction analysis device with electronic photon counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillit, R.Y.; Bruyas, H.; Patay, F.

    1985-01-01

    The means provided to control the movements around the three axes are composed of step-by-step motors related to exits control logic which is connected to the calculation and monitored by a clock. The clock monitors also the calculator so as that the calculator controls, together with the programmable clock and control logic, the coordination of the whole rotation movements, along the three rotation axes, their velocity, their duration and the acquisition of the measured intensities of the diffracted X-ray beam [fr

  12. Ultrafast transmission electron microscopy using a laser-driven field emitter: Femtosecond resolution with a high coherence electron beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Armin; Bach, Nora; Rubiano da Silva, Nara; Danz, Thomas; Möller, Marcel; Priebe, Katharina E; Domröse, Till; Gatzmann, J Gregor; Rost, Stefan; Schauss, Jakob; Strauch, Stefanie; Bormann, Reiner; Sivis, Murat; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2017-05-01

    We present the development of the first ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UTEM) driven by localized photoemission from a field emitter cathode. We describe the implementation of the instrument, the photoemitter concept and the quantitative electron beam parameters achieved. Establishing a new source for ultrafast TEM, the Göttingen UTEM employs nano-localized linear photoemission from a Schottky emitter, which enables operation with freely tunable temporal structure, from continuous wave to femtosecond pulsed mode. Using this emission mechanism, we achieve record pulse properties in ultrafast electron microscopy of 9Å focused beam diameter, 200fs pulse duration and 0.6eV energy width. We illustrate the possibility to conduct ultrafast imaging, diffraction, holography and spectroscopy with this instrument and also discuss opportunities to harness quantum coherent interactions between intense laser fields and free-electron beams. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Exploring the environmental transmission electron microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Jakob B.; Cavalca, Filippo; Damsgaard, Christian D.

    2012-01-01

    of the opportunities that the environmental TEM (ETEM) offers when combined with other in situ techniques will be explored, directly in the microscope, by combining electron-based and photon-based techniques and phenomena. In addition, application of adjacent setups using sophisticated transfer methods...

  14. The Titan Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Jinschek, Jörg R.

    2009-01-01

    University of Denmark (DTU) provides a unique combination of techniques for studying materials of interest to the catalytic as well as the electronics and other communities [5]. DTU’s ETEM is based on the FEI Titan platform providing ultrahigh microscope stability pushing the imaging resolution into the sub...

  15. Scanning transmission low-energy electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Müllerová, Ilona; Hovorka, Miloš; Konvalina, Ivo; Unčovský, M.; Frank, Luděk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 4 (2011), 2:1-6 ISSN 0018-8646 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100650902; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : TEM * STEM * SEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.723, year: 2011

  16. Electron diffraction using ultrafast electron bunches from a laser-wakefield accelerator at kHz repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z.-H.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Beaurepaire, B.; Nees, J. A.; Hou, B.; Malka, V.; Krushelnick, K.; Faure, J.

    2013-02-01

    We show that electron bunches in the 50-100 keV range can be produced from a laser wakefield accelerator using 10 mJ, 35 fs laser pulses operating at 0.5 kHz. It is shown that using a solenoid magnetic lens, the electron bunch distribution can be shaped. The resulting transverse and longitudinal coherence is suitable for producing diffraction images from a polycrystalline 10 nm aluminum foil. The high repetition rate, the stability of the electron source, and the fact that its uncorrelated bunch duration is below 100 fs make this approach promising for the development of sub-100 fs ultrafast electron diffraction experiments.

  17. Influence of analyzed signals fiber-optic transmission system on spread function of the diffraction grating spectral device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Vasily I.; Moskaletz, Oleg D.; Paraskun, Arthur S.; Zhdanov, Arseny Yu.

    2017-08-01

    Fiber-optic transmission system of analyzed signal is considered to allow signals transmission from optical sources with either impossible or undesirable contact. Diffraction grating spectral device is chosen as investigation system. It should be noted that diffraction grating operates with transmitted light but not reflected. Influence of optical fiber consists in the distortion of wave front incident on the spectral device. Front distortion leads to a broadening of the device spread function in all diffraction orders, and as a consequence, to a deterioration in the device resolution. In this case, the complex spread function is a reaction of the device to the homogeneous plane monochromatic wave which clearly links the input-output of spectral device. Fiber-optic system influence is determined by introducing a fictitious transparency located directly in front of the diffraction grating. Research of the effect the fiber-optic system has on the spread function of the diffraction grating spectral device is made in two ways. On one hand, mathematical model is proposed to describe the influence of a single-mode optical fiber to a spread function of the diffraction grating spectral device. We performed computer simulations of the analyzed signal transmission from the end of the optical fiber to the photodetector based on the proposed model. The calculations are performed for a single-mode optical fiber with a core diameter of 8 microns. On the other hand, experimental laboratory set up of the diffraction grating spectral device with a fiber optic transmission system is created. Theoretical calculations are compared with the experimental results.

  18. High peak power THz source for ultrafast electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengguang Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Terahertz (THz science and technology have already become the research highlight at present. In this paper, we put forward a device setup to carry out ultrafast fundamental research. A photocathode RF gun generates electron bunches with ∼MeV energy, ∼ps bunch width and about 25pC charge. The electron bunches inject the designed wiggler, the coherent radiation at THz spectrum emits from these bunches and increases rapidly until the saturation at ∼MW within a short wiggler. THz pulses can be used as pump to stimulate an ultra-short excitation in some kind of sample. Those electron bunches out of wiggler can be handled into bunches with ∼1pC change, small beam spot and energy spread to be probe. Because the pump and probe comes from the same electron source, synchronization between pump and probe is inherent. The whole facility can be compacted on a tabletop.

  19. High peak power THz source for ultrafast electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shengguang

    2018-01-01

    Terahertz (THz) science and technology have already become the research highlight at present. In this paper, we put forward a device setup to carry out ultrafast fundamental research. A photocathode RF gun generates electron bunches with ˜MeV energy, ˜ps bunch width and about 25pC charge. The electron bunches inject the designed wiggler, the coherent radiation at THz spectrum emits from these bunches and increases rapidly until the saturation at ˜MW within a short wiggler. THz pulses can be used as pump to stimulate an ultra-short excitation in some kind of sample. Those electron bunches out of wiggler can be handled into bunches with ˜1pC change, small beam spot and energy spread to be probe. Because the pump and probe comes from the same electron source, synchronization between pump and probe is inherent. The whole facility can be compacted on a tabletop.

  20. Determination of the Projected Atomic Potential by Deconvolution of the Auto-Correlation Function of TEM Electron Nano-Diffraction Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liberato De Caro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel method to determine the projected atomic potential of a specimen directly from transmission electron microscopy coherent electron nano-diffraction patterns, overcoming common limitations encountered so far due to the dynamical nature of electron-matter interaction. The projected potential is obtained by deconvolution of the inverse Fourier transform of experimental diffraction patterns rescaled in intensity by using theoretical values of the kinematical atomic scattering factors. This novelty enables the compensation of dynamical effects typical of transmission electron microscopy (TEM experiments on standard specimens with thicknesses up to a few tens of nm. The projected atomic potentials so obtained are averaged on sample regions illuminated by nano-sized electron probes and are in good quantitative agreement with theoretical expectations. Contrary to lens-based microscopy, here the spatial resolution in the retrieved projected atomic potential profiles is related to the finer lattice spacing measured in the electron diffraction pattern. The method has been successfully applied to experimental nano-diffraction data of crystalline centrosymmetric and non-centrosymmetric specimens achieving a resolution of 65 pm.

  1. Transmission electron imaging in the Delft multibeam scanning electron microscope 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Y.; Kruit, P.

    2016-01-01

    Our group is developing a multibeam scanning electron microscope (SEM) with 196 beams in order to increase the throughput of SEM. Three imaging systems using, respectively, transmission electron detection, secondary electron detection, and backscatter electron detection are designed in order to

  2. Electronic structure of nanoscale Cu/Pt alloys: A combined X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xing; Chu Wangsheng; Cai Quan; Xia Dingguo; Wu Zhonghua; Wu Ziyu

    2006-01-01

    PVP-protected Cu/Pt clusters were prepared by glycol/water reduction method and characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and absorption spectra. TEM and XRD analysis show that the Cu/Pt clusters with different molar ratio have fcc structure with particle size of about 4 nm, while the lattice parameters in these clusters reduce with increasing Cu concentration. From the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at Cu-K edge and Pt-L 2,3 edge, we demonstrate that the d-electronic states of Cu and Pt are affected by the local environment as a function of Cu/Pt molar ratio. With increasing Cu concentration, Pt loses a fraction of 5d electrons and the hybridization between p- and d-states at Cu sites is enhanced

  3. Electronic structure of nanoscale Cu/Pt alloys: A combined X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xing [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100864 Beijing (China); Chu Wangsheng [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230036 (China); Cai Quan [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100864 Beijing (China); Xia Dingguo [College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, 100022 Beijing (China); Wu Zhonghua [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Wu Ziyu [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China) and National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (China)]. E-mail: wuzy@ihep.ac.cn

    2006-11-15

    PVP-protected Cu/Pt clusters were prepared by glycol/water reduction method and characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and absorption spectra. TEM and XRD analysis show that the Cu/Pt clusters with different molar ratio have fcc structure with particle size of about 4 nm, while the lattice parameters in these clusters reduce with increasing Cu concentration. From the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at Cu-K edge and Pt-L{sub 2,3} edge, we demonstrate that the d-electronic states of Cu and Pt are affected by the local environment as a function of Cu/Pt molar ratio. With increasing Cu concentration, Pt loses a fraction of 5d electrons and the hybridization between p- and d-states at Cu sites is enhanced.

  4. Absorption distances in the dynamical theory of electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Yoshihiko; Goto, Toshiaki.

    1982-01-01

    The contrast effect of the electron microscopic image at crystal defects is characterized by two parameters; extincion distance and absorption distance. Both quantities are orginally defined for the elastic scattering. Since the inelastic scattering contributes to the electron microscopic image, parameters used for the interpretation of the images are not the same as those for the elastic scattering. It is shown that the difference of absorption distance beteen the theoretical estimation and that used for interpretation is due to the contrst effect of the small angle inelastic scattering. (author)

  5. Characterization by Scanning Precession Electron Diffraction of bridgmanite and ferropericlase aggregates deformed at HP-HT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, P.; Nzogang, B. C.; Bouquerel, J.; Mussi, A.; Girard, J.; Karato, S. I.

    2017-12-01

    The rheology of the lower mantle is of primary importance for mantle convection and hence for the dynamics and thermal evolution of the Earth. The lower mantle is mainly composed of a mixture of a high-pressure silicate, bridgmanite, with ferropericlase, an oxide which is usually considered to be weaker. It is thus very important to understand how such an assemblage deforms and in particular how stress and strain partition in between these two phases. Recent developments in experimental rheology under extreme pressure allows now deformation experiments to be conducted under P,T conditions of the uppermost lower mantle. Using the rotational Drickamer apparatus (RDA), Girard et al. (2016) have deformed a mixture of bridgmanite and ferropericlase at 27 GPa, 2130 K and up to about 100% strain. In situ stress measurements show that bridgmanite is substantially stronger than ferropericlase suggesting that the latter largely accommodates the strain. Here we report a transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-based microstructural characterization of these samples. Such a study is challenging because bridgmanite is very unstable once brought at ambient pressure, especially under electron irradiation, and also because TEM is usually not well adapted to characterize deformation microstructures resulting from large strains. In this study we have acquired high-resolution orientation maps using scanning precession electron diffraction using the ASTARTM system from NanoMEGAS. Large strains are evidenced through strong intracrystalline misorientations which are analyzed and quantified to be used as a proxy of strain. We show that bridgmanite deforms along localized shear bands and that ferropericlase is indeed found to accommodate large strains (much larger than the macroscopic strain of a sample) due to profuse dislocation activity.

  6. Transmission electron microscopy and diffractometry of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Fultz, Brent

    2001-01-01

    This book teaches graduate students the concepts of trans- mission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) that are important for the characterization of materi- als. It emphasizes themes common to both techniques, such as scattering from atoms and the formation and analysis of dif- fraction patterns. It also describes unique aspects of each technique, especially imaging and spectroscopy in the TEM. The textbook thoroughly develops both introductory and ad- vanced-level material, using over 400 accompanying illustra- tions. Problems are provided at the end of each chapter to reinforce key concepts. Simple citatioins of rules are avoi- ded as much as possible, and both practical and theoretical issues are explained in detail. The book can be used as both an introductory and advanced-level graduate text since sec- tions/chapters are sorted according to difficulty and grou- ped for use in quarter and semester courses on TEM and XRD.

  7. Specimen-thickness effects on transmission Kikuchi patterns in the scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, K P; Keller, R R; Stoykovich, M P

    2014-06-01

    We report the effects of varying specimen thickness on the generation of transmission Kikuchi patterns in the scanning electron microscope. Diffraction patterns sufficient for automated indexing were observed from films spanning nearly three orders of magnitude in thickness in several materials, from 5 nm of hafnium dioxide to 3 μm of aluminum, corresponding to a mass-thickness range of ~5 to 810 μg cm(-2) . The scattering events that are most likely to be detected in transmission are shown to be very near the exit surface of the films. The energies, spatial distribution and trajectories of the electrons that are transmitted through the film and are collected by the detector are predicted using Monte Carlo simulations. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  8. Effect of triple junctions on deformation twinning in a nanostructured Cu–Zn alloy: A statistical study using transmission Kikuchi diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silu Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscopy transmission Kikuchi diffraction is able to identify twins in nanocrystalline material, regardless of their crystallographic orientation. In this study, it was employed to characterize deformation twins in Cu/10 wt % Zn processed by high-pressure torsion. It was found that in 83% of grains containing twins, at least one twin intersects with a triple junction. This suggests that triple junctions could have promoted the nucleation of deformation twins. It should be cautioned that this technique might be unable to detect extremely small nanoscale twins thinner than its step size.

  9. Irradiation-related amorphization and crystallization: In situ transmission electron microscope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.W.

    1994-01-01

    Interfacing an ion accelerator to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) allows the analytical functions of TEM imaging and diffraction to be employed during ion-irradiation effects studies. At present there are twelve such installations in Japan, one in France and one in the US. This paper treats several aspects of in situ studies involving electron and ion beam induced and enhanced phase transformations and presents results of several in situ experiments to illustrate the dynamics of this approach in the materials science of irradiation effects. The paper describes the ion- and electron-induced amorphization of CuTi; the ion-irradiation-enhanced transformation of TiCr 2 ; and the ion- and electron-irradiation-enhanced crystallization of CoSi 2

  10. Big-data reflection high energy electron diffraction analysis for understanding epitaxial film growth processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Rama K; Tselev, Alexander; Baddorf, Arthur P; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-10-28

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) has by now become a standard tool for in situ monitoring of film growth by pulsed laser deposition and molecular beam epitaxy. Yet despite the widespread adoption and wealth of information in RHEED images, most applications are limited to observing intensity oscillations of the specular spot, and much additional information on growth is discarded. With ease of data acquisition and increased computation speeds, statistical methods to rapidly mine the data set are now feasible. Here, we develop such an approach to the analysis of the fundamental growth processes through multivariate statistical analysis of a RHEED image sequence. This approach is illustrated for growth of La(x)Ca(1-x)MnO(3) films grown on etched (001) SrTiO(3) substrates, but is universal. The multivariate methods including principal component analysis and k-means clustering provide insight into the relevant behaviors, the timing and nature of a disordered to ordered growth change, and highlight statistically significant patterns. Fourier analysis yields the harmonic components of the signal and allows separation of the relevant components and baselines, isolating the asymmetric nature of the step density function and the transmission spots from the imperfect layer-by-layer (LBL) growth. These studies show the promise of big data approaches to obtaining more insight into film properties during and after epitaxial film growth. Furthermore, these studies open the pathway to use forward prediction methods to potentially allow significantly more control over growth process and hence final film quality.

  11. Image simulations of kinked vortices for transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beleggia, Marco; Pozzi, G.; Tonomura, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present an improved model of kinked vortices in high-Tc superconductors suitable for the interpretation of Fresnel or holographic observations carried out with a transmission electron microscope. A kinked vortex is composed of two displaced half-vortices, perpendicular to the film plane...... observations of high-Tc superconducting films, where the Fresnel contrast associated with some vortices showed a dumbbell like appearance. Here, we show that under suitable conditions the JV segment may reveal itself in Fresnel imaging or holographic phase mapping in a transmission electron microscope....

  12. Development of the Atomic-Resolution Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gai, Pratibha L.; Boyes, Edward D.; Yoshida, Kenta

    2016-01-01

    The development of the novel atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscope (atomic-resolution ETEM) for directly probing dynamic gas–solid reactions in situ at the atomic level under controlled reaction conditions consisting of gas environment and elevated temperatures is descr......The development of the novel atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscope (atomic-resolution ETEM) for directly probing dynamic gas–solid reactions in situ at the atomic level under controlled reaction conditions consisting of gas environment and elevated temperatures...... is used to study steels, graphene, nanowires, etc. In this chapter, the experimental setup of the microscope column and its peripherals are described....

  13. Study of the local structure of binary surfaces by electron diffraction (XPS, LEED)

    OpenAIRE

    Gereová, Katarína

    2006-01-01

    Study of local structure of binary surface with usage of ultra-thin film of cerium deposited on a Pd (111) single-crystal surface is presented. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction (XPS, XPD), angle resolved UV photoemission spectroscopy (ARUPS) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) was used for our investigations. LEED and X-ray excited photoemission intensities results represent a surface-geometrical structure. As well, mapping of ultra-violet photoelectron intensities as a...

  14. Direct fabrication of diffraction grating onto organic single crystals by electron beam lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Yoshihiro; Aoki, Kazuki; Inada, Yuhi; Yamao, Takeshi; Hotta, Shu

    2018-03-01

    We have directly fabricated a diffraction grating onto platelike single crystals made of an organic semiconducting oligomer by electron beam lithography followed by reactive-ion etching. The decrease in the grating period resulted in photoexcited spectrally narrowed emission peaks related to the first-order diffraction from the crystal edge without outstanding quenching of the crystal. This work is expected to lead to the realization of organic semiconductor lasers.

  15. Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy in an Aberration-Corrected Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas W.; Wagner, Jakob B.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing use of environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) in materials science provides exciting new possibilities for investigating chemical reactions and understanding both the interaction of fast electrons with gas molecules and the effect of the presence of gas on high......-resolution imaging. A gaseous atmosphere in the pole-piece gap of the objective lens of the microscope alters both the incoming electron wave prior to interaction with the sample and the outgoing wave below the sample. Whereas conventional TEM samples are usually thin (below 100 nm), the gas in the environmental...... cell fills the entire gap between the pole pieces and is thus not spatially localized. By using an FEI Titan environmental transmission electron microscope equipped with a monochromator and an aberration corrector on the objective lens, we have investigated the effects on imaging and spectroscopy...

  16. Neutron diffraction study of residual strains across electron beam welds in AISI 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braham, C.; Ceretti, M.; Coppola, R.; Lodini, A.; Rustichelli, F.; Tosto, S.

    1995-01-01

    The results of neutron diffraction investigation of the strains produced across an electron-beam (EB) weld in SA AISI 316L reference steel for NET are presented. The sample size was 10 x 5 x 3 cm 3 and the measurements have been carried out at different distances from the weld plane with a spatial resolution of approximately 8 mm 3 in the bulk of the material. Grain size and crystallographic texture effects were investigated, on the same sample, by means of X-ray diffraction and metallography. A method to determine the stress field from the neutron diffraction data even in the presence of strong texture is discussed. (orig.)

  17. Stacked-Bloch-wave electron diffraction simulations using GPU acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, Robert S.; Wang, Feng; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the advantages for Bloch-wave simulations performed using graphics processing units (GPUs), based on approximating the matrix exponential directly instead of performing a matrix diagonalization. Our direct matrix-exponential algorithm yields a functionally identical electron scattering matrix to that generated with matrix diagonalization. Using the matrix-exponential scaling-and-squaring method with a Padé approximation, direct GPU-based matrix-exponential double-precision calculations are up to 20× faster than CPU-based calculations and up to approximately 70× faster than matrix diagonalization. We compare precision and runtime of scaling and squaring methods with either the Padé approximation or a Taylor expansion. We also discuss the stacked-Bloch-wave method, and show that our stacked-Bloch-wave implementation yields the same electron scattering matrix as traditional Bloch-wave matrix diagonalization. - Highlights: • Bloch-wave and stacked-Bloch-wave calculations can be accelerated with GPUs. • Direct approximation of the matrix exponential can be faster than diagonalization. • GPU-based direct approximation can be ≈70× faster than CPU diagonalization. • Larger matrices benefit more from this approach than smaller ones. • Stacked-Bloch-wave scattering results are functionally identical to diagonalization

  18. Study by transmission electron microcospy of activated saponite

    OpenAIRE

    Suárez Barrios, M.; Romero, E.; Santiago, C. de; Martín Pozas, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    This work studies the modifications undergone by the Creen Clays Saponite in the Tagus Basin subjected to activation treatments, and stresses the influence of the development of the electronic microscopy technique for studying these materials. Acid treatment with HCI and pillaring treatment with All3 were performed. Characterization of the samples was carried out by DRX, chemical analysis of major elements and Transmission Electronic Microscopy. Add treament causes the delamination and fragme...

  19. Quantification of the Information Limit of Transmission Electron Microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthel, J.; Thust, A.

    2008-01-01

    The resolving power of high-resolution transmission electron microscopes is characterized by the information limit, which reflects the size of the smallest object detail observable with a particular instrument. We introduce a highly accurate measurement method for the information limit, which is suitable for modern aberration-corrected electron microscopes. An experimental comparison with the traditionally applied Young's fringe method yields severe discrepancies and confirms theoretical considerations according to which the Young's fringe method does not reveal the information limit

  20. Study of the niobium dehydrogenation process by transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulhoes, I.A.M.; Akune, K.

    1983-01-01

    The evolution of the micro-structure of Nb-H, during the dehydrogenation process through thermal treatment, has been studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy. The results are used in order to interpret the variation of the line resolution of Electron Channeling Pattern (ECP) of Nb-H as a function of isochronous annealing temperature. It is concluded that the improvement of the ECP line resolution is enhanced of β hydrate in Nb. (Author) [pt

  1. Electronic diffraction study of the chlorination of nickel; Etude par diffraction electronique de la chloruration du nickel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigner, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    A study has been made of the chlorination of the (100), (110) and (111) crystal faces of nickel using high energy electron diffraction and electron microscopy. Two methods have been used: bombardment with chlorine ions having an energy of between 10 and 30 keV, and direct chlorination in a diffractor at pressures of about 10{sup -4} torr. It has thus been possible to show the very special properties of nickel chloride (CdBr{sub 2} type, space group R 3-bar m) which is always formed along the (0001) plane, whatever the orientation of the substrate. It has also been possible to attain the metal-halide interface and to show the existence of two-dimensional chemisorbed films which are ordered or disordered according to the crystal orientation. (author) [French] La chloruration des faces (100) (110) et (111) du nickel a ete etudiee par diffraction des electrons de haute energie et par microscopie electronique. Deux methodes ont ete utilisees: le bombardement avec des ions chlore ayant une energie comprise entre 10 et 30 keV, et la chloruration directe dans un diffracteur pour des pressions de l'ordre de 10{sup -4} torr. Ainsi ont ete mises en evidence les proprietes tres particulieres du chlorure de nickel (type CdBr{sub 2}, groupe spatial R 3-bar m) qui s'accole toujours suivant le plan (0001), quelle que soit l'orientation du substrat. Il a ete egalement possible d'atteindre l'interface metal-halogenure et de montrer l'existence de couches chimisorbees bidimensionnelles, ordonnees ou desordonnees suivant l'orientation cristalline etudiee. (auteur)

  2. Ultrafast transmission electron microscopy using a laser-driven field emitter: Femtosecond resolution with a high coherence electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feist, Armin; Bach, Nora; Rubiano da Silva, Nara; Danz, Thomas; Möller, Marcel; Priebe, Katharina E.; Domröse, Till; Gatzmann, J. Gregor; Rost, Stefan; Schauss, Jakob; Strauch, Stefanie; Bormann, Reiner; Sivis, Murat; Schäfer, Sascha, E-mail: sascha.schaefer@phys.uni-goettingen.de; Ropers, Claus, E-mail: claus.ropers@uni-goettingen.de

    2017-05-15

    We present the development of the first ultrafast transmission electron microscope (UTEM) driven by localized photoemission from a field emitter cathode. We describe the implementation of the instrument, the photoemitter concept and the quantitative electron beam parameters achieved. Establishing a new source for ultrafast TEM, the Göttingen UTEM employs nano-localized linear photoemission from a Schottky emitter, which enables operation with freely tunable temporal structure, from continuous wave to femtosecond pulsed mode. Using this emission mechanism, we achieve record pulse properties in ultrafast electron microscopy of 9 Å focused beam diameter, 200 fs pulse duration and 0.6 eV energy width. We illustrate the possibility to conduct ultrafast imaging, diffraction, holography and spectroscopy with this instrument and also discuss opportunities to harness quantum coherent interactions between intense laser fields and free-electron beams. - Highlights: • First implementation of an ultrafast TEM employing a nanoscale photocathode. • Localized single photon-photoemission from nanoscopic field emitter yields low emittance ultrashort electron pulses. • Electron pulses focused down to ~9 Å, with a duration of 200 fs and an energy width of 0.6 eV are demonstrated. • Quantitative characterization of ultrafast electron gun emittance and brightness. • A range of applications of high coherence ultrashort electron pulses is shown.

  3. In situ transmission electron microscopy analyses of thermally annealed self catalyzed GaAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrosini, S.; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Booth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Self catalyzed GaAs nanowires grown on Si-treated GaAs substrates were studied with a transmission electron microscope before and after annealing at 600◦C. At room temperature the nanowires have a zincblende structure and are locally characterized by a high density of rotational twins and stackin...... faults. Selected area diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that nanowires undergo structural modifications upon annealing, suggesting a decrease of defect density following the thermal treatment....

  4. Microfluidic chip for high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A Microfluidic chip (100) for transmission electron microscopy has a monolithic body (101) with a front side (102) and a back side (103). The monolithic body (101) comprises an opening (104) on the back side (103) extending in a vertical direction from the back side (103) to a membrane (107...

  5. In situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minor, Andrew M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation presents the development of the novel mechanical testing technique of in situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). This technique makes it possible to simultaneously observe and quantify the mechanical behavior of nano-scale volumes of solids.

  6. Structure Identification in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Kling, Jens; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    A connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic properties is expected for almost all material systems. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is a technique offering insight into the atomic structure, but the analysis of large image series can be time consuming. The present ...

  7. Three-Dimensional Orientation Mapping in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Haihua; Schmidt, Søren; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2011-01-01

    resolution of 200 nanometers (nm). We describe here a nondestructive technique that enables 3D orientation mapping in the transmission electron microscope of mono- and multiphase nanocrystalline materials with a spatial resolution reaching 1 nm. We demonstrate the technique by an experimental study...

  8. In situ Electrical measurements in Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudneva, M.

    2013-01-01

    In the present thesis the combination of real-time electricalmeasurements on nano-sampleswith simultaneous examination by transmission electron microscope (TEM) is discussed. Application of an electrical current may lead to changes in the samples thus the possibility to correlate such changes with

  9. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of Bi-2223/Ag tapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L.G.; Bals, S.; Tendeloo, G. Van

    2001-01-01

    The microstructure of (Bi,Pb)(2)Sr2Ca2CuOx (Bi-2223) tapes has been investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM. The emphasis has been placed on: (1) an examination of the grain morphology and size, (2) grain and colony boundary angles, which are formed...

  10. The complementary use of electron backscatter diffraction and ion channelling imaging for the characterization of nanotwins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alimadadi, Hossein; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos; Pantleon, Karen

    2013-01-01

    On the example of electrodeposited nickel films, it is shown that unique information on twins with dimensions on the nanoscale can be obtained by suitable combination of ion channelling imaging and electron backscatter diffraction analysis, whereas both (routine) single techniques cannot meet...... the requirements for analysis of these films. High‐resolution electron backscatter diffraction is inadequate for full characterization of nanotwins, but image quality maps obtained from electron backscatter diffraction at least yield a qualitative estimation of the location and number of nanotwins. Complementing...... EBSD data based on ion channelling images are proposed. Thorough selection of the complementary techniques opens future perspectives for the investigation of other challenging samples with nanoscale features in the microstructure....

  11. Surface structure of Bi2Se3(111) determined by low-energy electron diffraction and surface x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Reis, Diogo Duarte; Barreto, Lucas; Bianchi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The surface structure of the prototypical topological insulator Bi2Se3 is determined by low-energy electron diffraction and surface x-ray diffraction at room temperature. Both approaches show that the crystal is terminated by an intact quintuple layer. Specifically, an alternative termination by ...

  12. Weak-beam scanning transmission electron microscopy for quantitative dislocation density measurement in steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kenta; Shimodaira, Masaki; Toyama, Takeshi; Shimizu, Yasuo; Inoue, Koji; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Milan, Konstantinovic J; Gerard, Robert; Nagai, Yasuyoshi

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate dislocations induced by neutron irradiation, we developed a weak-beam scanning transmission electron microscopy (WB-STEM) system by installing a novel beam selector, an annular detector, a high-speed CCD camera and an imaging filter in the camera chamber of a spherical aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope. The capabilities of the WB-STEM with respect to wide-view imaging, real-time diffraction monitoring and multi-contrast imaging are demonstrated using typical reactor pressure vessel steel that had been used in an European nuclear reactor for 30 years as a surveillance test piece with a fluence of 1.09 × 1020 neutrons cm-2. The quantitatively measured size distribution (average loop size = 3.6 ± 2.1 nm), number density of the dislocation loops (3.6 × 1022 m-3) and dislocation density (7.8 × 1013 m m-3) were carefully compared with the values obtained via conventional weak-beam transmission electron microscopy studies. In addition, cluster analysis using atom probe tomography (APT) further demonstrated the potential of the WB-STEM for correlative electron tomography/APT experiments. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Application of transmission electron microscopy for microstructural characterization of perfluoropentacene thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Benedikt; Beyer, Andreas; Witte, Wiebke; Breuer, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Volz, Kerstin

    2011-01-01

    The crystalline structure and orientation of perfluoropentacene (C 22 F 14 , PFP) fibers formed upon thin-film deposition onto SiO 2 substrates have been studied by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and x-ray diffraction. The synopsis of TEM micrographs and diffraction patterns enhances the understanding of local crystal orientation on small length scales. The relationship of the PFP fiber morphology with the crystalline arrangement of PFP molecules within single fibers was established using this technique. Radiation damage, which is a critical problem for TEM investigations of organic materials, is described and the sample morphology after TEM investigations is correlated with AFM measurements of samples previously examined by TEM.

  14. Transmission electron microscopy study of stacking faults and their interaction with pyramidal dislocations in deformed Mg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, B.; Yan, P.F.; Sui, M.L.; Ma, E.

    2010-01-01

    We present transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of stacking faults (SFs) and their interactions with pyramidal dislocations, in plastically deformed polycrystalline pure magnesium. We have observed well-defined fringes as well as streaking in diffraction patterns, typical of SFs. The basal SFs are decorated by a large number of dark speckles, which are created by the interaction with pyramidal dislocations that have both and components as revealed by our contrast analysis. The SFs do not appear to result from the splitting of unit dislocations, as the SFs are relatively wide and no dislocation nodes were observed. By tilting the specimen systematically inside TEM, the SFs and the associated dislocations in Mg are found to exhibit a rich variety of features in terms of their morphology and diffraction contrast.

  15. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Harada, Ken

    2012-01-01

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  16. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Harada, Ken

    2012-08-01

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  17. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi [Science and Medical Systems Business Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ichige, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Matsumoto, Hiroaki [Corporate Manufacturing Strategy Group, Hitachi High-Technologies Corp., Ishikawa-cho, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-1991 (Japan); Harada, Ken [Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., Hatoyama, Saitama 350-0395 (Japan)

    2012-08-27

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  18. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  19. In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy of catalyst sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeLaRiva, Andrew T.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Challa, Sivakumar R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in the field of electron microscopy, such as aberration correctors, have now been integrated into Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEMs), making it possible to study the behavior of supported metal catalysts under operating conditions at atomic resolution. Here......, we focus on in situ electron microscopy studies of catalysts that shed light on the mechanistic aspects of catalyst sintering. Catalyst sintering is an important mechanism for activity loss, especially for catalysts that operate at elevated temperatures. Literature from the past decade is reviewed...

  20. Measurement of suprathermal electron confinement by cyclotron transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkwood, R.; Hutchinson, I.H.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Porkolab, M.; Squire, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    The confinement time of suprathermal electrons is determined experimentally from the distribution function determined via wave transmission measurements. Measurements of the lowest moment of the distribution perpendicular to the B field as a function of the parallel electron momentum as well as the global input power allow the suprathermal electron confinement time (τ se ) to be calculated during lower-hybrid and inductive current drive. Finite particle confinement is found to be the dominant energy loss term for the suprathermals and improves with plasma current and density

  1. Transmission and Trapping of Cold Electrons in Water Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balog, Richard; Cicman, Peter; Field, David

    2011-01-01

    Experiments are reported that show currents of low energy (“cold”) electrons pass unattenuated through crystalline ice at 135 K for energies between zero and 650 meV, up to the maximum studied film thickness of 430 bilayers, showing negligible apparent trapping. By contrast, both porous amorphous...... ice and compact crystalline ice at 40 K show efficient electron trapping. Ice at intermediate temperatures reveals metastable trapping that decays within a few hundred seconds at 110 K. Our results are the first to demonstrate full transmission of cold electrons in high temperature water ice...

  2. Transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with scintillation gaseous detection device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilatos, Gerasimos; Kollia, Mary; Dracopoulos, Vassileios

    2015-03-01

    A transmission environmental scanning electron microscope with use of a scintillation gaseous detection device has been implemented. This corresponds to a transmission scanning electron microscope but with addition of a gaseous environment acting both as environmental and detection medium. A commercial type of low vacuum machine has been employed together with appropriate modifications to the detection configuration. This involves controlled screening of various emitted signals in conjunction with a scintillation gaseous detection device already provided with the machine for regular surface imaging. Dark field and bright field imaging has been obtained along with other detection conditions. With a progressive series of modifications and tests, the theory and practice of a novel type of microscopy is briefly shown now ushering further significant improvements and developments in electron microscopy as a whole. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Growth Mechanism of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Iron–Copper Catalyst and Chirality Studies by Electron Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Liu, Bilu; Chernov, Alexander I.

    2012-01-01

    Chiralities of single-walled carbon nanotubes grown on an atomic layer deposition prepared bimetallic FeCu/MgO catalyst were evaluated quantitatively using nanobeam electron diffraction. The results reveal that the growth yields nearly 90% semiconducting tubes, 45% of which are of the (6,5) type....... by impregnation, showing similar catalytic performance as the atomic layer deposition-prepared catalyst, yielding single-walled carbon nanotubes with a similar narrow chirality distribution.......Chiralities of single-walled carbon nanotubes grown on an atomic layer deposition prepared bimetallic FeCu/MgO catalyst were evaluated quantitatively using nanobeam electron diffraction. The results reveal that the growth yields nearly 90% semiconducting tubes, 45% of which are of the (6,5) type....... The growth mechanisms as well as the roles of different components in the catalyst were studied in situ using environmental transmission electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. On the basis of the understanding of carbon nanotube growth mechanisms, an MgO-supported FeCu catalyst was prepared...

  4. Probing local order in glasses from limited-volume electron and x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, A. C. Y.; Tabor, R. F.; Bourgeois, L.; de Jonge, M. D.; Mudie, S. T.; Petersen, T. C.

    2016-05-01

    It has long been recognised that spatial fluctuations in local order in disordered assemblies of particles can be probed using limited-volume diffraction measurements. These measurements have unique advantages over broad-beam diffraction experiments that isotropically average over many structural configurations and result in one-dimensional intensity curves, requiring modelling to interpret. Despite the advantages of limiting illumination to a low number of particle configurations, obtaining quantitative measurements of local order from such experiments remains a challenge. The effects on the diffraction pattern of changing the beam energy, lateral size, aberrations and coherence and the specimen thickness have only recently been clarified. We review theoretical and experimental efforts in this direction in the fields of both electron and x-ray diffraction and identify promising areas of future development.

  5. Low-energy electron diffraction and induced damage in hydrated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlando, Thomas M.; Oh, Doogie; Chen Yanfeng; Aleksandrov, Alexandr B.

    2008-01-01

    Elastic scattering of 5-30 eV electrons within the B-DNA 5 ' -CCGGCGCCGG-3 ' and A-DNA 5 ' -CGCGAATTCGCG-3 ' DNA sequences is calculated using the separable representation of a free-space electron propagator and a curved wave multiple scattering formalism. The disorder brought about by the surrounding water and helical base stacking leads to a featureless amplitude buildup of elastically scattered electrons on the sugar and phosphate groups for all energies between 5 and 30 eV. However, some constructive interference features arising from diffraction are revealed when examining the structural waters within the major groove. These appear at 5-10, 12-18, and 22-28 eV for the B-DNA target and at 7-11, 12-18, and 18-25 eV for the A-DNA target. Although the diffraction depends on the base-pair sequence, the energy dependent elastic scattering features are primarily associated with the structural water molecules localized within 8-10 A spheres surrounding the bases and/or the sugar-phosphate backbone. The electron density buildup occurs in energy regimes associated with dissociative electron attachment resonances, direct electronic excitation, and dissociative ionization. Since diffraction intensity can be localized on structural water, compound H 2 O:DNA states may contribute to energy dependent low-energy electron induced single and double strand breaks

  6. 4D nanoscale diffraction observed by convergent-beam ultrafast electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurtsever, Aycan; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2009-10-30

    Diffraction with focused electron probes is among the most powerful tools for the study of time-averaged nanoscale structures in condensed matter. Here, we report four-dimensional (4D) nanoscale diffraction, probing specific site dynamics with 10 orders of magnitude improvement in time resolution, in convergent-beam ultrafast electron microscopy (CB-UEM). As an application, we measured the change of diffraction intensities in laser-heated crystalline silicon as a function of time and fluence. The structural dynamics (change in 7.3 +/- 3.5 picoseconds), the temperatures (up to 366 kelvin), and the amplitudes of atomic vibrations (up to 0.084 angstroms) are determined for atoms strictly localized within the confined probe area (10 to 300 nanometers in diameter). We anticipate a broad range of applications for CB-UEM and its variants, especially in the studies of single particles and heterogeneous structures.

  7. New developments in transmission electron microscopy for nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.L.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is one of the most powerful tools used for characterizing nanomaterials, and it is indispensable for nanotechnology. This paper reviews some of the most recent developments in electron microscopy techniques for characterizing nanomaterials. The review covers the following areas: in-situ microscopy for studying dynamic shape transformation of nanocrystals; in-situ nanoscale property measurements on the mechanical, electrical and field emission properties of nanotubes/nanowires; environmental microscopy for direct observation of surface reactions; aberration-free angstrom-resolution imaging of light elements (such as oxygen and lithium); high-angle annular-dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM); imaging of atom clusters with atomic resolution chemical information; electron holography of magnetic materials; and high-spatial resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) for nanoscale electronic and chemical analysis. It is demonstrated that the picometer-scale science provided by HRTEM is the foundation of nanometer-scale technology. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Software electron counting for low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelberger, Andreas; Kramberger, Christian; Meyer, Jannik C

    2018-02-17

    The performance of the detector is of key importance for low-dose imaging in transmission electron microscopy, and counting every single electron can be considered as the ultimate goal. In scanning transmission electron microscopy, low-dose imaging can be realized by very fast scanning, however, this also introduces artifacts and a loss of resolution in the scan direction. We have developed a software approach to correct for artifacts introduced by fast scans, making use of a scintillator and photomultiplier response that extends over several pixels. The parameters for this correction can be directly extracted from the raw image. Finally, the images can be converted into electron counts. This approach enables low-dose imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope via high scan speeds while retaining the image quality of artifact-free slower scans. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Layer-resolved photoelectron diffraction: electron attenuation anisotropy in GaAs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartoš, Igor; Cukr, Miroslav; Jiříček, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 185, 5-7 (2012), 184-187 ISSN 0368-2048 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) Praemium Academiae Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : low-energy electron attenuation in GaAs * layer-resolved photoelectron diffraction * synchrotron radiation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.706, year: 2012

  10. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and X-ray Diffraction of Boron- and Phosphorus-Doped Nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binh, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Dolmatov, V. Yu.; Lapchuk, N. M.; Shymanski, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    Powders of boron- and phosphorus-doped detonation nanodiamonds and sintered pellets of non-doped nanodiamond powders were studied using electron paramagnetic resonance and x-ray diffraction. Doping of detonation nanodiamond crystals with boron and phosphorus was demonstrated to be possible. These methods could be used to diagnose diamond nanocrystals doped during shock-wave synthesis.

  11. Structure analysis of large argon clusters from gas-phase electron diffraction data: some recent results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Waal, B.W.

    1999-01-01

    An up-to-date overview of recent developments in the structure elucidation of large ArN-clusters (103electron diffraction data, is given. Although a satisfactory model for N3000 had been found in 1996, the size range beyond N10,000 presents new and unexpected problems.

  12. Study of thermal stability of ultrafine-grained copper by means of electron back scattering diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Man, O.; Pantělejev, L.; Kunz, Ludvík

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2010), s. 209-213 ISSN 1345-9678 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS200410502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : ultra-fine grained copper * thermal stability of microstructure * electron back scattering diffraction * grain size * texture Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.779, year: 2010

  13. Transmission electron microscopy as a tool for nanocrystal characterization pre- and post-injector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, H P; DePonte, D P; Makhov, A M; Conway, James F; Zeldin, O B; Boutet, S; Calero, G; Cohen, A E

    2014-07-17

    Recent advancements at the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) enabling successful serial femtosecond diffraction experiments using nanometre-sized crystals (NCs) have opened up the possibility of X-ray structure determination of proteins that produce only submicrometre crystals such as many membrane proteins. Careful crystal pre-characterization including compatibility testing of the sample delivery method is essential to ensure efficient use of the limited beamtime available at XFEL sources. This work demonstrates the utility of transmission electron microscopy for detecting and evaluating NCs within the carrier solutions of liquid injectors. The diffraction quality of these crystals may be assessed by examining the crystal lattice and by calculating the fast Fourier transform of the image. Injector reservoir solutions, as well as solutions collected post-injection, were evaluated for three types of protein NCs (i) the membrane protein PTHR1, (ii) the multi-protein complex Pol II-GFP and (iii) the soluble protein lysozyme. Our results indicate that the concentration and diffraction quality of NCs, particularly those with high solvent content and sensitivity to mechanical manipulation may be affected by the delivery process. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of microcrystal quality by transmission electron microscopy for efficient serial femtosecond crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Christopher O; Kovaleva, Elena G; Fu, Xiaofeng; Stevenson, Hilary P; Brewster, Aaron S; DePonte, Daniel P; Baxter, Elizabeth L; Cohen, Aina E; Calero, Guillermo

    2016-07-15

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) employing high-intensity X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources has enabled structural studies on microcrystalline protein samples at non-cryogenic temperatures. However, the identification and optimization of conditions that produce well diffracting microcrystals remains an experimental challenge. Here, we report parallel SFX and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments using fragmented microcrystals of wild type (WT) homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (HPCD) and an active site variant (H200Q). Despite identical crystallization conditions and morphology, as well as similar crystal size and density, the indexing efficiency of the diffraction data collected using the H200Q variant sample was over 7-fold higher compared to the diffraction results obtained using the WT sample. TEM analysis revealed an abundance of protein aggregates, crystal conglomerates and a smaller population of highly ordered lattices in the WT sample as compared to the H200Q variant sample. While not reported herein, the 1.75 Å resolution structure of the H200Q variant was determined from ∼16 min of beam time, demonstrating the utility of TEM analysis in evaluating sample monodispersity and lattice quality, parameters critical to the efficiency of SFX experiments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A high-speed area detector for novel imaging techniques in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caswell, T.A.; Ercius, P.; Tate, M.W.; Ercan, A.; Gruner, S.M.; Muller, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    A scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) produces a convergent beam electron diffraction pattern at each position of a raster scan with a focused electron beam, but recording this information poses major challenges for gathering and storing such large data sets in a timely manner and with sufficient dynamic range. To investigate the crystalline structure of materials, a 16x16 analog pixel array detector (PAD) is used to replace the traditional detectors and retain the diffraction information at every STEM raster position. The PAD, unlike a charge-coupled device (CCD) or photomultiplier tube (PMT), directly images 120-200 keV electrons with relatively little radiation damage, exhibits no afterglow and limits crosstalk between adjacent pixels. Traditional STEM imaging modes can still be performed by the PAD with a 1.1 kHz frame rate, which allows post-acquisition control over imaging conditions and enables novel imaging techniques based on the retained crystalline information. Techniques for rapid, semi-automatic crystal grain segmentation with sub-nanometer resolution are described using cross-correlation, sub-region integration, and other post-processing methods.

  16. Sr{sub 4}Ru{sub 6}ClO{sub 18}, a new Ru{sup 4+/5+} oxy-chloride, solved by precession electron diffraction: Electric and magnetic behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roussel, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.roussel@ensc-lille.fr [Université Lille-Nord de France, UCCS—Unité de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide, UMR CNRS 8181, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Lille, 59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Palatinus, Lukas [Institute of Physics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Department of Structure Analysis, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Belva, Frédéric; Daviero-Minaud, Sylvie; Mentre, Olivier; Huve, Marielle [Université Lille-Nord de France, UCCS—Unité de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide, UMR CNRS 8181, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Lille, 59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2014-04-01

    The crystal structure of Sr{sub 4}Ru{sub 6}ClO{sub 18}, a new Ru{sup 4+/5+} oxo-chloride, has been determined from Precession Electron Diffraction (PED) data acquired on a nanocrystal in a transmission electron microscope using the technique of electron diffraction tomography. This approach is described in details following a pedagogic route and a systematic comparison is made of this rather new method with other experimental methods of electron diffraction, and with the standard single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. Both transport and magnetic measurements, showed a transition at low temperature that may be correlated to Ru{sup 4+}/Ru{sup 5+} charge ordering. - Graphical abstract: Structure of Sr{sub 4}Ru{sub 6}ClO{sub 18}, determined using Precession Electron Diffraction data. - Highlights: • Structure of Sr{sub 4}Ru{sub 6}ClO{sub 18} was solved ab initio using precession electron diffraction. • This was done both on a nanometric sample and on a micrometric one. • Different type of experimental methods of electron diffraction are compared. • Single crystal X-ray diffraction was used to confirm the results. • Transport properties were characterized and show “exotic” behavior.

  17. A piezoelectric goniometer inside a transmission electron microscope goniometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Wei; Lockwood, Aiden; Inkson, Beverley J; Möbus, Günter

    2011-10-01

    Piezoelectric nanoactuators, which can provide extremely stable and reproducible positioning, are rapidly becoming the dominant means for position control in transmission electron microscopy. Here we present a second-generation miniature goniometric nanomanipulation system, which is fully piezo-actuated with ultrafine step size for translation and rotation, programmable, and can be fitted inside a hollowed standard specimen holder for a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The movement range of this miniaturized drive is composed of seven degrees of freedom: three fine translational movements (X, Y, and Z axes), three coarse translational movements along all three axes, and one rotational movement around the X-axis with an integrated angular sensor providing absolute rotation feedback. The new piezoelectric system independently operates as a goniometer inside the TEM goniometer. In situ experiments, such as tomographic tilt without missing wedge and differential tilt between two specimens, are demonstrated.

  18. Ultrafast coherent diffractive imaging of nanoparticles using X-ray free-electron laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassemeyer, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging with X-ray free-electron lasers (X-FEL) promises high-resolution structure determination of single microscopic particles without the need for crystallization. The diffraction signal of small samples can be very weak, a difficulty that can not be countered by merely increasing the number of photons because the sample would be damaged by a high absorbed radiation dose. Traditional X-ray crystallography avoids this problem by bringing many sample particles into a periodic arrangement, which amplifies the individual signals while distributing the absorbed dose. Depending on the sample, however, crystallization can be very difficult or even impossible. This thesis presents algorithms for a new imaging approach using X-FEL radiation that works with single, non-crystalline sample particles. X-FELs can deliver X-rays with a peak brilliance many orders of magnitude higher than conventional X-ray sources, compensating for their weak interaction cross sections. At the same time, FELs can produce ultra-short pulses down to a few femtoseconds. In this way it is possible to perform ultra-fast imaging, essentially ''freezing'' the atomic positions in time and terminating the imaging process before the sample is destroyed by the absorbed radiation. This thesis primarily focuses on the three-dimensional reconstruction of single (and not necessarily crystalline) particles using coherent diffractive imaging at X-FELs: in order to extract three-dimensional information from scattering data, two-dimensional diffraction patterns from many different viewing angles must be combined. Therefore, the diffraction signal of many identical sample copies in random orientations is measured. The main result of this work is a globally optimal algorithm that can recover the sample orientations solely based on the diffraction signal, enabling three-dimensional imaging for arbitrary samples. The problem of finding three-dimensional orientations is

  19. Practical aspects of monochromators developed for transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Koji

    2014-01-01

    A few practical aspects of monochromators recently developed for transmission electron microscopy are briefly reviewed. The basic structures and properties of four monochromators, a single Wien filter monochromator, a double Wien filter monochromator, an omega-shaped electrostatic monochromator and an alpha-shaped magnetic monochromator, are outlined. The advantages and side effects of these monochromators in spectroscopy and imaging are pointed out. A few properties of the monochromators in imaging, such as spatial or angular chromaticity, are also discussed. PMID:25125333

  20. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadana, D.K.

    1982-10-01

    A method to prepare cross-sectional (X) semiconductor specimens for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been described. The power and utility of XTEM has been demonstrated. It has been shown that accuracy and interpretation of indirect structural-defects profiling techniques, namely, MeV He + channeling and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) can be greatly enhanced by comparing their results with those obtained by XTEM from the same set of samples

  1. Transmission of high-power electron beams through small apertures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tschalär, C.; Alarcon, R.; Balascuta, S.; Benson, S.V.; Bertozzi, W.; Boyce, J.R.; Cowan, R.; Douglas, D.; Evtushenko, P.; Fisher, P.; Ihloff, E.; Kalantarians, N.; Kelleher, A.; Legg, R.; Milner, R.G.; Neil, G.R.; Ou, L.; Schmookler, B.; Tennant, C.; Williams, G.P.

    2013-01-01

    Tests were performed to pass a 100 MeV, 430 kWatt c.w. electron beam from the energy-recovery linac at the Jefferson Laboratory's FEL facility through a set of small apertures in a 127 mm long aluminum block. Beam transmission losses of 3 p.p.m. through a 2 mm diameter aperture were maintained during a 7 h continuous run

  2. Scanning transmission electron microscopy: Albert Crewe's vision and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Chisholm, Matthew F; Murfitt, Matthew F; Dellby, Niklas

    2012-12-01

    Some four decades were needed to catch up with the vision that Albert Crewe and his group had for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in the nineteen sixties and seventies: attaining 0.5Å resolution, and identifying single atoms spectroscopically. With these goals now attained, STEM developments are turning toward new directions, such as rapid atomic resolution imaging and exploring atomic bonding and electronic properties of samples at atomic resolution. The accomplishments and the future challenges are reviewed and illustrated with practical examples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Multistage linear electron acceleration using pulsed transmission lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.B.; Prestwich, K.R.; Poukey, J.W.; Epstein, B.G.; Freeman, J.R.; Sharpe, A.W.; Tucker, W.K.; Shope, S.L.

    1981-01-01

    A four-stage linear electron accelerator is described which uses pulsed radial transmission lines as the basic accelerating units. An annular electron beam produced by a foilless diode is guided through the accelerator by a strong axial magnetic field. Synchronous firing of the injector and the acccelerating modules is accomplished with self-breaking oil switches. The device has accelerated beam currents of 25 kA to kinetic energies of 9 MV, with 90% current transport efficiency. The average accelerating gradient is 3 MV/m

  4. Characterization of chiral mesoporous materials by transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsuna, Tetsu; Liu, Zheng; Che, Shunai; Terasaki, Osamu

    2005-02-01

    By using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the chirality of novel mesoporous materials has been studied. In addition, a computer simulation that uses a simple structural model was employed. The existence of chiral channels inside a tubelike material was confirmed by the observation of fringes along the length of the tubes. The chiral pitch of the channels was measured from the intermittent period, the chirality (right- or left-handed) was determined from the tilt direction of a tube compared with the direction of incident electrons and the curvature direction of the curved intermitted fringes as viewed in the TEM images.

  5. Electron transmission through a periodically driven graphene magnetic barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, R., E-mail: rbiswas.pkc@gmail.com [Department of Physics, P. K. College, Contai, Purba Medinipur, West Bengal – 721401 (India); Maiti, S. [Ajodhya Hills G.S.A.T High School, Ajodhya, Purulia, West Bengal – 723152 (India); Mukhopadhyay, S. [Purulia Zilla School, Dulmi Nadiha, Purulia, West Bengal – 723102 (India); Sinha, C. [Department of Physics, P. K. College, Contai, Purba Medinipur, West Bengal – 721401 (India); Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur – 700032 (India)

    2017-05-10

    Electronic transport through graphene magnetic barriers is studied theoretically in presence of an external time harmonic scalar potential in the framework of non-perturbative Landau–Floquet Formalism. The oscillating field mostly suppresses the transmission for rectangular magnetic barrier structure and exhibits the Fano resonance for multiphoton processes due to the presence of bound state inside the barrier. While, for a pair of delta function barriers of larger separation, the oscillating potential suppresses the usual Fabry–Perot oscillations in the transmission and a new type of asymmetric Fano resonance is noted for smaller separation, occurring due to extended states between the barriers. - Highlights: • Tunnelling of the Dirac Fermions through oscillating pure magnetic barriers is reported for the first time. • The high energy transmission through a graphene magnetic barrier is suppressed by the application of time periodic modulation. • Suppression of the Fabry Perot transmission is noted due to the application of an external time harmonic potential. • Two kinds of the Fano resonances are noted in transmission through a pair of modulated δ-function magnetic barriers.

  6. Measurements of transient electron density distributions by femtosecond X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyer, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    This thesis concerns measurements of transient charge density maps by femtosecond X-ray diffraction. Different X-ray diffraction methods will be considered, particularly with regard to their application in femtosecond X-ray diffraction. The rotation method is commonly used in stationary X-ray diffraction. In the work in hand an X-ray diffraction experiment is demonstrated, which combines the method with ultrafast X-ray pulses. This experiment is the first implementation which makes use of the rotation method to map transient intensities of a multitude of Bragg reflections. As a prototype material Bismuth is used, which previously was studied frequently by femtosecond X-ray diffraction by measuring Bragg reflections successively. The experimental results of the present work are compared with the literature data. In the second part a powder-diffraction experiment will be presented, which is used to study the dynamics of the electron-density distribution on ultrafast time scales. The experiment investigates a transition metal complex after photoexcitation of the metal to ligand charge transfer state. Besides expected results, i. e. the change of the bond length between the metal and the ligand and the transfer of electronic charge from the metal to the ligand, a strong contribution of the anion to the charge transfer was found. Furthermore, the charge transfer has predominantly a cooperative character. That is, the excitation of a single complex causes an alteration of the charge density of several neighboring units. The results show that more than 30 transition-metal complexes and 60 anions contribute to the charge transfer. This collective response is a consequence of the strong coulomb interactions of the densely packed ions.

  7. Voids and Mn-rich inclusions in a (Ga,Mn)As ferromagnetic semiconductor investigated by transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovács, András; Sadowski, J; Kasama, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    Voids adjacent to cubic (ZnS-type) and hexagonal (NiAs-type) Mn-rich nanocrystals are characterized using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy in an annealed Ga0.995Mn0.005As magnetic semiconductor specimen grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Nanobeam electron diffraction measurements...... suggest that the nanocrystals exhibit deviations in lattice parameter as compared to bulk MnAs. After annealing at 903 K, the magnetic transition temperature of the specimen is likely to be dominated by the presence of cubic ferromagnetic nanocrystals. In situ annealing inside the electron microscope...

  8. Tailoring of electron flow current in magnetically insulated transmission lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Martin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available It is desirable to optimize (minimizing both the inductance and electron flow the magnetically insulated vacuum sections of low impedance pulsed-power drivers. The goal of low inductance is understandable from basic efficiency arguments. The goal of low electron flow results from two observations: (1 flowing electrons generally do not deliver energy to (or even reach most loads, and thus constitute a loss mechanism; (2 energetic electrons deposited in a small area can cause anode damage and anode plasma formation. Low inductance and low electron flow are competing goals; an optimized system requires a balance of the two. While magnetically insulated systems are generally forgiving, there are times when optimization is crucial. For example, in large pulsed-power drivers used to energize high energy density physics loads, the electron flow as a fraction of total current is small, but that flow often reaches the anode in relatively small regions. If the anode temperature becomes high enough to desorb gas, the resulting plasma initiates a gap closure process that can impact system performance. Magnetic-pressure driven (z pinches and material equation of state loads behave like a fixed inductor for much of the drive pulse. It is clear that neither fixed gap nor constant-impedance transmission lines are optimal for driving inductive loads. This work shows a technique for developing the optimal impedance profile for the magnetically insulated section of a high-current driver. Particle-in-cell calculations are used to validate the impedance profiles developed in a radial disk magnetically insulated transmission line geometry. The input parameters are the spacing and location of the minimum gap, the effective load inductance, and the desired electron flow profile. The radial electron flow profiles from these simulations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions when driven at relatively high voltage (i.e., V≥2  MV.

  9. Transmission electron microscopy physics of image formation and microanalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, Ludwig

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this book is to outline the physics of image formation, electron­ specimen interactions and image interpretation in transmission electron mic­ roscopy. The book evolved from lectures delivered at the University of Munster and is a revised version of the first part of my earlier book Elek­ tronenmikroskopische Untersuchungs- und Priiparationsmethoden, omitting the part which describes specimen-preparation methods. In the introductory chapter, the different types of electron microscope are compared, the various electron-specimen interactions and their applications are summarized and the most important aspects of high-resolution, analytical and high-voltage electron microscopy are discussed. The optics of electron lenses is discussed in Chapter 2 in order to bring out electron-lens properties that are important for an understanding of the function of an electron microscope. In Chapter 3, the wave optics of elec­ trons and the phase shifts by electrostatic and magnetic fields are introduced; Fresne...

  10. Photocathode Optimization for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, P; Flom, Z; Heinselman, K; Nguyen, T; Tung, S; Haskell, R; Reed, B W; LaGrange, T

    2011-08-04

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) team at Harvey Mudd College has been sponsored by LLNL to design and build a test setup for optimizing the performance of the DTEM's electron source. Unlike a traditional TEM, the DTEM achieves much faster exposure times by using photoemission from a photocathode to produce electrons for imaging. The DTEM team's work is motivated by the need to improve the coherence and current density of the electron cloud produced by the electron gun in order to increase the image resolution and contrast achievable by DTEM. The photoemission test setup is nearly complete and the team will soon complete baseline tests of electron gun performance. The photoemission laser and high voltage power supply have been repaired; the optics path for relaying the laser to the photocathode has been finalized, assembled, and aligned; the internal setup of the vacuum chamber has been finalized and mostly implemented; and system control, synchronization, and data acquisition has been implemented in LabVIEW. Immediate future work includes determining a consistent alignment procedure to place the laser waist on the photocathode, and taking baseline performance measurements of the tantalum photocathode. Future research will examine the performance of the electron gun as a function of the photoemission laser profile, the photocathode material, and the geometry and voltages of the accelerating and focusing components in the electron gun. This report presents the team's progress and outlines the work that remains.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy of the preclinical phase of experimental phytophotodermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiram Larangeira de Almeida Jr

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the epidermis in induced phytophotodermatitis using transmission electron microscopy in order to detect histologic changes even before lesions are visible by light microscopy. INTRODUCTION: In the first six hours after the experimental induction of phytophotodermatitis, no changes are detectable by light microscopy. Only after 24 hours can keratinocyte necrosis and epidermal vacuolization be detected histologically, and blisters form by 48 hours. METHODS: The dorsum of four adult rats (Rattus norvegicus was manually epilated. After painting the right half of the rat with the peel juice of Tahiti lemon, they were exposed to sunlight for eight minutes under general anesthesia. The left side was used as the control and exposed to sunlight only. Biopsies were performed immediately after photoinduction and one and two hours later, and the tissue was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: No histological changes were seen on the control side. Immediately after induction, vacuolization in keratinocytes was observed. After one hour, desmosomal changes were also observed in addition to vacuolization. Keratin filaments were not attached to the desmosomal plaque. Free desmosomes and membrane ruptures were also seen. At two hours after induction, similar changes were found, and granular degeneration of keratin was also observed. DISCUSSION: The interaction of sunlight and psoralens generates a photoproduct that damages keratinocyte proteins, leading to keratinocyte necrosis and blister formation. CONCLUSIONS: Transmission electron microscopy can detect vacuolization, lesions of the membrane, and desmosomes in the first two hours after experimental induction of phytophotodermatitis.

  12. 2D Spin-Dependent Diffraction of Electrons From Periodical Chains of Nanomagnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teshome Senbeta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The scattering of the unpolarized beams of electrons by nanomagnets in the vicinity of some scattering angles leads to complete spin polarized electrons. This result is obtained with the help of the perturbation theory. The dipole-dipole interaction between the magnetic moment of the nanomagnet and the magnetic moment of electron is treated as perturbation. This interaction is not spherically symmetric. Rather it depends on the electron spin variables. It in turn results in spinor character of the scattering amplitudes. Due to the smallness of the magnetic interactions, the scattering length of this process is very small to be proved experimentally. To enhance the relevant scattering lengths, we considered the diffraction of unpolarized beams of electrons by linear chains of nanomagnets. By tuning the distance between the scatterers it is possible to obtain the diffraction maximum of the scattered electrons at scattering angles which corresponds to complete spin polarization of electrons. It is shown that the total differential scattering length is proportional to N2 (N is a number of scatterers. Even small number of nanomagnets in the chain helps to obtain experimentally visible enhancement of spin polarization of the scattered electrons.

  13. Advances in imaging and electron physics time resolved electron diffraction for chemistry, biology and material science

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Imaging & Electron Physics merges two long-running serials-Advances in Electronics & Electron Physics and Advances in Optical & Electron Microscopy. The series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains. Contributions from leading authorities Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field.

  14. Observation of dislocations in crystals using X-ray and electron transmission; Observation des dislocations dans les cristaux par transmission des rayons X et des electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morlevat, J.P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-10-01

    Two approaches of the dynamical theory of diffraction (EWALD's and AUTHIER's) are recalled briefly. In the light of these theories, one then considers what information concerning the dislocations existing in a crystal can be obtained by X-Ray as well as electron diffraction. (author) [French] Deux approches de la theorie dynamique de la diffraction, celle d'EWALD et celle d'AUTHIER, sont brievement rappelees. On examine ensuite, a la lumiere de ces theories, quelles informations relatives aux dislocations existant dans un cristal peuvent etre obtenues par diffraction des rayons X ainsi que des electrons. (auteur)

  15. Diffraction and absorption of inelastically scattered electrons for K-shell ionization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josefsson, T.W.; Allen, L.J.

    1995-09-22

    An expression for the nonlocal inelastic scattering cross section for fast electrons in a crystalline environment, which explicitly includes diffraction as well as absorption for the inelastically scattered electrons, is used to carry out realistic calculations of K-shell electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis cross sections. The calculations demonstrate quantitatively why, in EDX spectroscopy, integration over the dynamical states of the inelastically scattered electron averages in such a way that an effective plane wave representation of the scattered electrons is a good approximation. This is only the case for large enough acceptance angles of the detector in an EELS experiment. For EELS with smaller detector apertures, explicit integration over the dynamical final states is necessary and inclusion of absorption for the scattered electrons is important, particularly for thicker crystals. 50 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Crystallographic orientation study of silicon steels using X-ray diffraction, electrons diffraction and the Etch Pit method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Hamilta de Oliveira

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study is the microstructural and crystallographic orientation of Fe-3%Si steel. The silicon steel shows good electrical properties and it is used in the nuclear and electrical power fields. The studied steel was supplied by Cia. Acos Especiais Itabira S/A - ACESITA. The material was received in the hot compressed condition, in one or two passes. The hot compressing temperatures used were 900, 1000 and 1100 deg C with soaking times ranging from 32 to 470 s. The material preferential crystallographic orientation was evaluated in every grain of the samples. The characterization techniques used were: scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using the etch pit method; X ray diffraction using the Laue back-reflection method; orientation imaging microscopy (OIM). Microstructural characterization in terms of grain size measurement and mean number of grains in the sample were also undertaken. The Laue method was found an easy technique to access crystallographic orientation of this work polycrystalline samples 2.5 mm average grain size. This was due to the inability to focus the X-rays on a single grain of the material. The scanning electron microscopy showed microcavities left by the etch pit method, which allowed the observation of the crystallographic orientation of each grain from the samples. No conclusive grain crystallographic orientation was possible to obtain by the OIM technique due to the non-existing rolling direction. A more extensive work with the OIM technique must be undertaken on the Fe-3%Si with oriented grains and non oriented grains. (author)

  17. Strain at a semiconductor nanowire-substrate interface studied using geometric phase analysis, convergent beam electron diffraction and nanobeam diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Johan Mikael; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2011-01-01

    of nanowires. In particular, strain and crystallographic defects can have a major influence on the electronic structure of the material. In improved method for the characterization of such interfaces would be valuable for optimizing and understanding the transport properties of devices based on nanowires. Here......) are compared and contrasted. GPA measurements were acquired at 300kV in an FEI Titan 89-300 while the two diffraction methods were applied in the same microscope at 120kV. The GPA analysis software developed by C.T. Koch and V.B. Özdöl was used [3]. For samples other than nanowires, previous comparisons of GPA...... with CBED and NBED [4,5] have shown a high degree of consistency. Strain has previously only been measured in nanowires removed from their substrate [6], or only using GPA [7]. The sample used for the present investigation was an InP nanowire grown on a Si substrate using metal organic vapor phase...

  18. Feasibility study on temporal-resolved diffraction of high-energy electrons produced in femtosecond laser-plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Jun; Cang Yu; Chen Qing; Peng Lian Mao; Wang Huai Bin; Zhong Jia Yong

    2002-01-01

    The high-energy electrons can be produced in the interaction between intense ultra-short laser pulses and Al targets. The diffraction may take place when high-energy electrons pass through an Al single crystal. Feasibility is studied using such diffraction as a method to analyze the structures of crystals

  19. Ab-initio crystal structure analysis and refinement approaches of oligo p-benzamides based on electron diffraction data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorelik, Tatiana E; van de Streek, Jacco; Kilbinger, Andreas F M

    2012-01-01

    Ab-initio crystal structure analysis of organic materials from electron diffraction data is presented. The data were collected using the automated electron diffraction tomography (ADT) technique. The structure solution and refinement route is first validated on the basis of the known crystal stru...

  20. Effective cellulose nanocrystal imaging using transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson-Bagby, Kelly L; Roberts, Rose; Foster, E Johan

    2018-04-15

    Characterization of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) is often complex and tedious. With their increased use for biological materials, polymer reinforcing agents, and other applications, better characterization methods of CNCs are needed to ensure product quality. However, because of their small size, hydrogen bonding, and low electron density, individual CNCs are difficult to image with high resolution and magnification using electron microscopy. Methods to help counter these challenges include staining for increased contrast and techniques to increase dispersion. This work tested several stains, dispersing agents, and sample supports to find a consistent method of individualizing CNCs and providing good contrast for imaging in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The most consistent method found uses a low concentration of CNCs, bovine serum albumin as a dispersing agent, and Nanovan ® as the contrasting stain on a silicon monoxide-coated Formvar TEM grid. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Electronic properties of crystalline materials observed in X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovesey, S. W.; Balcar, E.; Knight, K. S.; Fernández Rodríguez, J.

    2005-05-01

    The few electrons in valence states of a material participate in many of its physical properties, including both structural and transport properties. In the diffraction of X-rays, or neutrons, valence electrons can lead to weak Bragg reflections that are extremely sensitive signatures of their charge and magnetic degrees of freedom. In this regard, diffraction instruments supplied with X-rays from a synchrotron source are particularly useful because the brightness, tuneability and polarization of the X-rays are all helpful in making valuable observations. The data obtained from Bragg diffraction can be analyzed on the basis of an atomic model, which has the virtue that it can be used as a common platform for the analysis of X-ray and neutron diffraction and, in addition, the analysis of observations made with X-ray absorption, NMR, EPR, muon and Mössbauer spectroscopies. We present the salient features for the calculation of structure factors based on an atomic model and applied to the analysis of Bragg diffraction by non-magnetic and magnetic materials, with an emphasis on resonant X-ray Bragg diffraction. The presentation contains a new treatment of parity-odd events found in the mixed electric dipole-electric quadrupole channel of scattering. In addition we discuss the complementary observation of dichroic signals, including natural circular and magnetochiral dichroism. The survey of available analytical tools is complemented by a series of worked examples demonstrating the application of the formalism to different materials with different crystal structures and resonant ions: dysprosium borocarbide ( DyB2C2), vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3), gadolinium tetraboride ( GdB4), chromium sesquioxide ( Cr2O3), haematite and perovskite-type manganites.

  2. Electronic properties of crystalline materials observed in X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovesey, S.W. [Diamond Light Source Ltd., ISIS Facility, RAL, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom) and RIKEN Harima Institute, SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)]. E-mail: s.w.lovesey@rl.ac.uk; Balcar, E. [Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, A1020, Vienna (Austria); Knight, K.S. [Diamond Light Source Ltd., ISIS Facility, RAL, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Mineralogy, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Fernandez Rodriguez, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, E-33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2005-05-01

    The few electrons in valence states of a material participate in many of its physical properties, including both structural and transport properties. In the diffraction of X-rays, or neutrons, valence electrons can lead to weak Bragg reflections that are extremely sensitive signatures of their charge and magnetic degrees of freedom. In this regard, diffraction instruments supplied with X-rays from a synchrotron source are particularly useful because the brightness, tuneability and polarization of the X-rays are all helpful in making valuable observations. The data obtained from Bragg diffraction can be analyzed on the basis of an atomic model, which has the virtue that it can be used as a common platform for the analysis of X-ray and neutron diffraction and, in addition, the analysis of observations made with X-ray absorption, NMR, EPR, muon and Mossbauer spectroscopies. We present the salient features for the calculation of structure factors based on an atomic model and applied to the analysis of Bragg diffraction by non-magnetic and magnetic materials, with an emphasis on resonant X-ray Bragg diffraction. The presentation contains a new treatment of parity-odd events found in the mixed electric dipole-electric quadrupole channel of scattering. In addition we discuss the complementary observation of dichroic signals, including natural circular and magnetochiral dichroism. The survey of available analytical tools is complemented by a series of worked examples demonstrating the application of the formalism to different materials with different crystal structures and resonant ions: dysprosium borocarbide (DyB{sub 2}C{sub 2}), vanadium sesquioxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 3}), gadolinium tetraboride (GdB{sub 4}), chromium sesquioxide (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}), haematite and perovskite-type manganites.

  3. Transmission diffraction-tomography system using a high-energy X-ray tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity, D J; Jenneson, P M; Crook, R; Vincent, S M

    2010-01-01

    A high-energy bench-top energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) system for 3-dimensional mapping of the crystalline structure and phase transformations in steel is described, for which preliminary data and system development are presented here. The use of precision tungsten slit screens with up to 225 keV X-rays allows for diffraction through samples of 304 L austenitic stainless steel of thickness 3-10 mm, while sample positioning is carried out with a precision goniometer and translation stage system. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Diffraction efficiency of plasmonic gratings fabricated by electron beam lithography using a silver halide film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudheer,, E-mail: sudheer@rrcat.gov.in, E-mail: sudheer.rrcat@gmail.com; Tiwari, P.; Srivastava, Himanshu; Rai, V. N.; Srivastava, A. K.; Naik, P. A. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Indus Synchrotrons Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Porwal, S. [Solid State Lasers Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Bhartiya, S. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Laser Materials Development and Device Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Rao, B. T. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Laser Materials Processing Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Sharma, T. K. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400094 (India); Solid State Lasers Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India)

    2016-07-28

    The silver nanoparticle surface relief gratings of ∼10 μm period are fabricated using electron beam lithography on the silver halide film substrate. Morphological characterization of the gratings shows that the period, the shape, and the relief depth in the gratings are mainly dependent on the number of lines per frame, the spot size, and the accelerating voltage of electron beam raster in the SEM. Optical absorption of the silver nanoparticle gratings provides a broad localized surface plasmon resonance peak in the visible region, whereas the intensity of the peaks depends on the number density of silver nanoparticles in the gratings. The maximum efficiency of ∼7.2% for first order diffraction is observed for the grating fabricated at 15 keV. The efficiency is peaking at 560 nm with ∼380 nm bandwidth. The measured profiles of the diffraction efficiency for the gratings are found in close agreement with the Raman-Nath diffraction theory. This technique provides a simple and efficient method for the fabrication of plasmonic nanoparticle grating structures with high diffraction efficiency having broad wavelength tuning.

  5. Three-Dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    KAUST Repository

    De Jonge, Niels

    2010-01-18

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2-3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset. © 2010 Microscopy Society of America.

  6. High current table-top setup for femtosecond gas electron diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Zandi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have constructed an experimental setup for gas phase electron diffraction with femtosecond resolution and a high average beam current. While gas electron diffraction has been successful at determining molecular structures, it has been a challenge to reach femtosecond resolution while maintaining sufficient beam current to retrieve structures with high spatial resolution. The main challenges are the Coulomb force that leads to broadening of the electron pulses and the temporal blurring that results from the velocity mismatch between the laser and electron pulses as they traverse the sample. We present here a device that uses pulse compression to overcome the Coulomb broadening and deliver femtosecond electron pulses on a gas target. The velocity mismatch can be compensated using laser pulses with a tilted intensity front to excite the sample. The temporal resolution of the setup was determined with a streak camera to be better than 400 fs for pulses with up to half a million electrons and a kinetic energy of 90 keV. The high charge per pulse, combined with a repetition rate of 5 kHz, results in an average beam current that is between one and two orders of magnitude higher than previously demonstrated.

  7. Multiobjective optimizations of a novel cryocooled dc gun based ultrafast electron diffraction beam line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliford, Colwyn; Bartnik, Adam; Bazarov, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    We present the results of multiobjective genetic algorithm optimizations of a single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction beam line utilizing a 225 kV dc gun with a novel cryocooled photocathode system and buncher cavity. Optimizations of the transverse projected emittance as a function of bunch charge are presented and discussed in terms of the scaling laws derived in the charge saturation limit. Additionally, optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of final rms bunch length at the sample location have been performed for three different sample radii: 50, 100, and 200 μ m , for two final bunch charges: 1 05 electrons (16 fC) and 1 06 electrons (160 fC). Example optimal solutions are analyzed, and the effects of disordered induced heating estimated. In particular, a relative coherence length of Lc ,x/σx=0.27 nm /μ m was obtained for a final bunch charge of 1 05 electrons and final bunch length of σt≈100 fs . For a final charge of 1 06 electrons the cryogun produces Lc ,x/σx≈0.1 nm /μ m for σt≈100 - 200 fs and σx≥50 μ m . These results demonstrate the viability of using genetic algorithms in the design and operation of ultrafast electron diffraction beam lines.

  8. Calculated efficiencies of three-material low stress coatings for diffractive x-ray transmission optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubec, Adam; Braun, Stefan; Gawlitza, Peter; Menzel, Maik; Leson, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray optical elements made by thin film coating techniques such as multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) and multilayer zone plates (MZP) are promising approaches to achieve resolutions in hard X-ray microscopy applications of less than 10 nm. The challenge is to make a lens with a large numerical aperture on the one hand and a decent working distance on the other hand. One of the limiting factors with the coated structures is the internal stress in the films, which can lead to significant bending of the substrate and various types of unwanted diffraction effects. Several approaches have been discussed to overcome this challenge. One of these is a three-material combination such as Mo/MoSi 2 /Si, where four single layers per period are deposited. Mo and Si represent the absorber and spacer in this case while MoSi 2 forms a diffusion barrier; in addition the thicknesses of absorber and spacer are chosen to minimize residual stress of the overall coating. Here the diffraction efficiency as well as the profile of the beam in the focal plane are discussed in order to find a tradeoff between lowest residual stress and best diffraction properties.

  9. Calculated efficiencies of three-material low stress coatings for diffractive x-ray transmission optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubec, Adam, E-mail: adam.kubec@iws.fraunhofer.de; Braun, Stefan; Gawlitza, Peter; Menzel, Maik; Leson, Andreas [Fraunhofer IWS Dresden, Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-27

    Diffractive X-ray optical elements made by thin film coating techniques such as multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) and multilayer zone plates (MZP) are promising approaches to achieve resolutions in hard X-ray microscopy applications of less than 10 nm. The challenge is to make a lens with a large numerical aperture on the one hand and a decent working distance on the other hand. One of the limiting factors with the coated structures is the internal stress in the films, which can lead to significant bending of the substrate and various types of unwanted diffraction effects. Several approaches have been discussed to overcome this challenge. One of these is a three-material combination such as Mo/MoSi{sub 2}/Si, where four single layers per period are deposited. Mo and Si represent the absorber and spacer in this case while MoSi{sub 2} forms a diffusion barrier; in addition the thicknesses of absorber and spacer are chosen to minimize residual stress of the overall coating. Here the diffraction efficiency as well as the profile of the beam in the focal plane are discussed in order to find a tradeoff between lowest residual stress and best diffraction properties.

  10. Crystallographic analysis of thin film surfaces using micro-probe reflexion high-energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Masakazu; Doi, Takahisa; Hayakawa, Kazunobu

    1984-01-01

    Micro-probe reflexion high-energy electron diffraction using an electron beam having a 20nm beam diameter at a beam current of 8 nA, has been developed for performing crystallographic analyses of thin film and bulk crystal surfaces. High spatial resolution and high brightness have made it possible to perform analyses of thin films on substrates having fine structures without such sample preparation as thinning. A dark field imaging method using part of the diffraction spot intensity has also been developed. Using this method, it was found that atomic steps and dislocations on bulk and material-deposited Si surfaces can be observed. This shows the usefulness of the technique for studying crystal growth of thin films with mono-layer depth resolution. (author)

  11. Correlated microradiography, X-ray microbeam diffraction and electron probe microanalysis of calcifications in an odontoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoba, T.; Yoshioka, C.; Yagi, T.

    1980-01-01

    Using microradiography, X-ray microbeam diffraction and electron probe microanalysis, a correlated morphologic and crystallographic study was performed on dysplastic enamel in a compound odontoma. The tumor was found in the lateral incisor-canine region of the left mandible of a 36-year-old woman. A conspicuous feature was the presence of hypomineralized areas, which were situated in the proximity of enamel surface and distinctly demarcated from the adjacent enamel. X-ray microbeam diffraction and electron microanalysis showed that these lesions have a lower crystallinity and a higher concentration of magnesium as compared with the adjacent enamel. In addition, the present study revealed the presence of two other types of calcifications: 1) calcified structures within the fissure or on the enamel surface, which include lacunae of varying size and which resemble a form of coronal cementum, and 2) spherical calcifications which may be an epithelial product. (author)

  12. Microstructural evolution in adiabatic shear bands of copper at high strain rates: Electron backscatter diffraction characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Lin; Chen Zhiyong; Zhan Congkun; Yang Xuyue; Liu Chuming; Cai Hongnian

    2012-01-01

    The microstructural evolution of adiabatic shear bands in annealed copper with different large strains at high strain rates has been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction. The results show that mechanical twinning can occur with minimal contribution to shear localization under dynamic loading. Elongated ultrafine grains with widths of 100–300 nm are observed during the evolution of the adiabatic shear bands. A rotational dynamic recrystallization mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of the elongated ultrafine grains. - Highlights: ► The microstructural evolution of ASB is studied by electron backscatter diffraction. ► Twinning can occur in ASB while the contribution to shear localization is slight. ► Elongated ultrafine grains are observed during the evolution process of ASB. ► A possible mechanism is proposed to explain the microstructure evolution of ASB.

  13. Structural analysis of nano structured carbon by transmission electron microscopy and image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshida, K., E-mail: oshida@nagano-nct.ac.jp [Nagano National College of Technology, Nagano 381-8550 (Japan); Murata, M.; Fujiwara, K.; Itaya, T. [Nagano National College of Technology, Nagano 381-8550 (Japan); Yanagisawa, T.; Kimura, K. [GSI Creos Corporation, Kanagawa 210-0855 (Japan); Nakazawa, T.; Kim, Y.A.; Endo, M. [Shinshu University, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan); Kim, B.-H.; Yang, K.S. [Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is one of the highest resolution analysis methods of materials. The three dimensional recognition of the materials is difficult by TEM because the observation data is projection images through the materials. In this study, space structure of carbon nanotubes loaded with metal particles was analyzed by three dimensional TEM (3D-TEM) [1,2]. The nano structured carbons are also observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) with Cs corrector. Cup-stack type carbon nanotubes (CSCNTs) loaded with Pt particles (2–3 nm in diameter) prepared by GSI Creos Corporation were analyzed by these methods. Pt particles are bound selectively to the edges of hexagonal carbon layers of inside and outer surface of CSCNTs efficiently and can be expected to work well as catalysts of electrodes of fuel cell. It is sometimes difficult that the nano sized area is analyzed by selected area electron diffraction (SAD) because the selected area aperture cannot be so small. The HRTEM and image processing technique give similar results of SAD when it works and revealed to be useful to analyze nano structured carbons.

  14. Characterization of catalysts by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targos, W.M.; Bradley, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    The dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is an integral tool for characterizing catalysts because of its unique ability to image and analyze nanosized volumes. This information is valuable in optimizing catalyst formulations and determining causes for reduced catalyst performance. For many commercial catalysts direct correlations between structural features of metal crystallites and catalytic performance are not attainable. When these instances occur, determination of elemental distribution may be the only information available. In this paper the authors discuss some of the techniques employed and limitations associated with characterizing commercial catalysts

  15. Progress and applications of in situ transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rongming; Liu Jialong; Song Yuanjun

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the application of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is briefly reviewed. It is emphasized that the development of advanced in situ TEM techniques makes it possible to investigate the evolution of materials under heat, strain, magnetic field, electric field or chemical reaction environments on the atomic scale. The mechanism of the microstructure evolution under various conditions and the relationship between the atomic structures and their properties can be obtained, which is beneficial for the design of new materials with tailored properties. The clarification of the structure-property relationship will help to develop new materials and solve related basic problems in the field of condensed matter physics. (authors)

  16. Ab initio structure determination and quantitative disorder analysis on nanoparticles by electron diffraction tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Yaşar; Barton, Bastian; Marler, Bernd; Neder, Reinhard B; Kolb, Ute

    2018-03-01

    Nanoscaled porous materials such as zeolites have attracted substantial attention in industry due to their catalytic activity, and their performance in sorption and separation processes. In order to understand the properties of such materials, current research focuses increasingly on the determination of structural features beyond the averaged crystal structure. Small particle sizes, various types of disorder and intergrown structures render the description of structures at atomic level by standard crystallographic methods difficult. This paper reports the characterization of a strongly disordered zeolite structure, using a combination of electron exit-wave reconstruction, automated diffraction tomography (ADT), crystal disorder modelling and electron diffraction simulations. Zeolite beta was chosen for a proof-of-principle study of the techniques, because it consists of two different intergrown polymorphs that are built from identical layer types but with different stacking sequences. Imaging of the projected inner Coulomb potential of zeolite beta crystals shows the intergrowth of the polymorphs BEA and BEB. The structures of BEA as well as BEB could be extracted from one single ADT data set using direct methods. A ratio for BEA/BEB = 48:52 was determined by comparison of the reconstructed reciprocal space based on ADT data with simulated electron diffraction data for virtual nanocrystals, built with different ratios of BEA/BEB. In this way, it is demonstrated that this smart interplay of the above-mentioned techniques allows the elaboration of the real structures of functional materials in detail - even if they possess a severely disordered structure.

  17. Interaction of electrons with light metal hydrides in the transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongming; Wakasugi, Takenobu; Isobe, Shigehito; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2014-12-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation of light metal hydrides is complicated by the instability of these materials under electron irradiation. In this study, the electron kinetic energy dependences of the interactions of incident electrons with lithium, sodium and magnesium hydrides, as well as the constituting element effect on the interactions, were theoretically discussed, and electron irradiation damage to these hydrides was examined using in situ TEM. The results indicate that high incident electron kinetic energy helps alleviate the irradiation damage resulting from inelastic or elastic scattering of the incident electrons in the TEM. Therefore, observations and characterizations of these materials would benefit from increased, instead decreased, TEM operating voltage. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Advances in imaging and electron physics the scanning transmission electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkes, Peter W

    2009-01-01

    Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics merges two long-running serials--Advances in Electronics and Electron Physics and Advances in Optical and Electron Microscopy. This series features extended articles on the physics of electron devices (especially semiconductor devices), particle optics at high and low energies, microlithography, image science and digital image processing, electromagnetic wave propagation, electron microscopy, and the computing methods used in all these domains.  This particular volume presents several timely articles on the scanning transmission electron microscope. Updated with contributions from leading international scholars and industry experts Discusses hot topic areas and presents current and future research trends Provides an invaluable reference and guide for physicists, engineers and mathematicians.

  19. Ultrafast electron diffraction from non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser heated Au films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chase, T.; Trigo, M.; Reid, A. H.; Dürr, H. A.; Li, R.; Vecchione, T.; Shen, X.; Weathersby, S.; Coffee, R.; Hartmann, N.; Wang, X. J.; Reis, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    We use ultrafast electron diffraction to detect the temporal evolution of non-equilibrium phonons in femtosecond laser-excited ultrathin single-crystalline gold films. From the time-dependence of the Debye-Waller factor, we extract a 4.7 ps time-constant for the increase in mean-square atomic displacements. The observed increase in the diffuse scattering intensity demonstrates that the energy transfer from laser-heated electrons to phonon modes near the X and K points in the Au fcc Brillouin zone proceeds with timescales of 2.3 and 2.9 ps, respectively, faster than the Debye-Waller average mean-square displacement

  20. Multipole electron-density modelling of synchrotron powder diffraction data: the case of diamond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, H.; Overgaard, J.; Busselez, R.

    2010-01-01

    encountered in single-crystal studies of small-unit-cell inorganic structures can be overcome with synchrotron powder diffraction. It is shown that the standard Hansen-Coppens multipole model is not flexible enough to fit the static theoretical structure factors, whereas fitting of thermally smeared structure...... parameter. This directly exposes a correlation between electron density and thermal parameters even for a light atom such as carbon, and it also underlines that in organic systems proper deconvolution of thermal motion is important for obtaining correct static electron densities....

  1. Vibrational and optical spectroscopies integrated with environmental transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picher, Matthieu; Mazzucco, Stefano; Blankenship, Steve; Sharma, Renu

    2015-03-01

    Here, we present a measurement platform for collecting multiple types of spectroscopy data during high-resolution environmental transmission electron microscopy observations of dynamic processes. Such coupled measurements are made possible by a broadband, high-efficiency, free-space optical system. The critical element of the system is a parabolic mirror, inserted using an independent hollow rod and placed below the sample holder which can focus a light on the sample and/or collect the optical response. We demonstrate the versatility of this optical setup by using it to combine in situ atomic-scale electron microscopy observations with Raman spectroscopy. The Raman data is also used to measure the local temperature of the observed sample area. Other applications include, but are not limited to: cathodo- and photoluminescence spectroscopy, and use of the laser as a local, high-rate heating source. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. High current nonlinear transmission line based electron beam driver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Hoff

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A gigawatt-class nonlinear transmission line based electron beam driver is experimentally demonstrated. Four experimental series, each with a different Marx bank charge voltage (15, 20, 25, and 30 kV, were completed. Within each experimental series, shots at peak frequencies ranging from 950 MHz to 1.45 GHz were performed. Peak amplitude modulations of the NLTL output voltage signal were found to range between 18% and 35% for the lowest frequency shots and between 5% and 20% for the highest frequency shots (higher modulation at higher Marx charge voltage. Peak amplitude modulations of the electron beam current were found to range between 10% and 20% for the lowest frequency shots and between 2% and 7% for the highest frequency shots (higher modulation at higher Marx charge voltage.

  3. Imaging and Quantification of Extracellular Vesicles by Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Romain; Tan, Sisareuth; Gounou, Céline; Brisson, Alain R

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are cell-derived vesicles that are present in blood and other body fluids. EVs raise major interest for their diverse physiopathological roles and their potential biomedical applications. However, the characterization and quantification of EVs constitute major challenges, mainly due to their small size and the lack of methods adapted for their study. Electron microscopy has made significant contributions to the EV field since their initial discovery. Here, we describe the use of two transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques for imaging and quantifying EVs. Cryo-TEM combined with receptor-specific gold labeling is applied to reveal the morphology, size, and phenotype of EVs, while their enumeration is achieved after high-speed sedimentation on EM grids.

  4. In situ transmission electron microscopy for magnetic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Duc-The; Kuhn, Luise Theil

    2016-01-01

    Nanomagnetism is a subject of great interest because of both application and fundamental aspects in which understanding of the physical and electromagnetic structure of magnetic nanostructures is essential to explore the magnetic properties. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a powerful tool...... that allows understanding of both physical structure and micromagnetic structure of the thin samples at nanoscale. Among TEM techniques, in situ TEM is the state-of-the-art approach for imaging such structures in dynamic experiments, reconstructing a real-time nanoscale picture of the properties......-structure correlation. This paper aims at reviewing and discussing in situ TEM magnetic imaging studies, including Lorentz microscopy and electron holography in TEM, applied to the research of magnetic nanostructures....

  5. High current nonlinear transmission line based electron beam driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, B. W.; French, D. M.; Simon, D. S.; Lepell, P. D.; Montoya, T.; Heidger, S. L.

    2017-10-01

    A gigawatt-class nonlinear transmission line based electron beam driver is experimentally demonstrated. Four experimental series, each with a different Marx bank charge voltage (15, 20, 25, and 30 kV), were completed. Within each experimental series, shots at peak frequencies ranging from 950 MHz to 1.45 GHz were performed. Peak amplitude modulations of the NLTL output voltage signal were found to range between 18% and 35% for the lowest frequency shots and between 5% and 20% for the highest frequency shots (higher modulation at higher Marx charge voltage). Peak amplitude modulations of the electron beam current were found to range between 10% and 20% for the lowest frequency shots and between 2% and 7% for the highest frequency shots (higher modulation at higher Marx charge voltage).

  6. In Situ Electronic Characterization of Graphene Nanoconstrictions Fabricated in a Transmission Electron Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Ye; Merchant, Christopher A.; Drndić, Marija; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2011-01-01

    We report electronic measurements on high-quality graphene nanoconstrictions (GNCs) fabricated in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), and the first measurements on GNC conductance with an accurate measurement of constriction width down to 1 nm. To create the GNCs, freely-suspended graphene ribbons were fabricated using few-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The ribbons were loaded into the TEM, and a current-annealing procedure was used to clean the material and improve ...

  7. Transmission electron and optical microscopy of the domain structure of Ni3B7O13Br ferroic boracite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos-Guzman, A.G.; Trujillo-Torrez, M.; Czank, M.

    2005-01-01

    The study investigated the domain structure of nickel bromine boracite single crystals, by means of polarised-light in conjunction with transmission electron microscopy. Single crystals of Ni 3 B 7 O 13 Br were grown by chemical transport reactions in closed quartz ampoules, in the temperature range of 1130 K and were examined by polarising optical microscopy (PLM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). PLM was also used in order to study the behaviour of birefringence as a function of temperature. For TEM the single crystals were crushed and mounted on holey carbon films. Comparative electron microscope images were useful for revealing the domain structure of this fully ferroelectric/fully ferroelastic material previously observed between the crossed polars of an optical microscope. X-ray diffraction analysis of the crystal under study was performed at room temperature

  8. Au crystal growth on natural occurring Au-Ag aggregate elucidated by means of precession electron diffraction (PED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roqué Rosell, Josep; Portillo Serra, Joaquim; Aiglsperger, Thomas; Plana-Ruiz, Sergi; Trifonov, Trifon; Proenza, Joaquín A.

    2018-02-01

    In the present work, a lamella from an Au-Ag aggregate found in Ni-laterites has been examined using Transmission Electron Microscope to produce a series of Precision Electron Diffraction (PED) patterns. The analysis of the structural data obtained, coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray microanalysis, made it possible to determine the orientation of twinned native gold growing on the Au-Ag aggregate. The native Au crystal domains are found to have grown at the outermost part of the aggregate whereas the inner core of the aggregate is an Au-Ag alloy (∼4 wt% Ag). The submicron structural study of the natural occurring Au aggregate points to the mobilization and precipitation of gold in laterites and provides insights on Au aggregates development at supergene conditions. This manuscript demonstrates the great potential of electron crystallographic analysis, and in particular, PED to study submicron structural features of micron sized mineral aggregates by using the example of a gold grain found in a Ni-laterite deposits.

  9. Phase recovery and lensless imaging by iterative methods in optical, X-ray and electron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, J C H; Weierstall, U; Howells, M

    2002-05-15

    Thomas Young's quantitative analysis of interference effects provided the confidence needed to revive the wave theory of light, and firmly established the concept of phase in optics. Phase plays a similarly fundamental role in matter-wave interferometry, for which the field-emission electron microscope provides ideal instrumentation. The wave-particle duality is vividly demonstrated by experimental 'Young's fringes' using coherent electron beams under conditions in which the flight time is less than the time between particle emission. A brief historical review is given of electron interferometry and holography, including the Aharonov-Bohm effect and the electron Sagnac interferometer. The simultaneous development of phase-contrast imaging at subnanometre spatial resolution has greatly deepened our understanding of atomic processes in biology, materials science and condensed-matter physics, while electron holography has become a routine tool for the mapping of electrostatic and magnetic fields in materials on a nanometre scale. The encoding of phase information in scattered farfield intensities is discussed, and non-interferometric, non-crystallographic methods for phase retrieval are reviewed in relationship to electron holography. Examples of phase measurement and diffraction-limited imaging using the hybrid input-output iterative algorithm are given, including simulations for soft X-ray imaging, and new experimental results for coherent electron and visible-light scattering. Image reconstruction is demonstrated from experimental electron and visible-light Fraunhofer diffraction patterns. The prospects this provides for lensless imaging using particles for which no lenses exist (such as neutrons, condensates, coherent atom beams and X-rays) are discussed. These new interactions can be expected to provide new information, perhaps, for example, in biology, with the advantage of less damage to samples.

  10. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-01

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  11. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  12. Evaluation of Medipix2 detector for recording electron diffraction data in low dose conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgieva, D; Sikharulidze, I; Jiang, L; Abrahams, J P; Jansen, J; Zandbergen, H W

    2011-01-01

    The drive for elucidation of important macromolecular structures to high resolution in their 3D native or near-native state places continuously higher demands on the quality of the experimental data. For instance, recording of diffraction patterns good enough for structural studies from cryo-preserved bio-macromolecules at low dose conditions remains challenging and highly desirable. The emergence of hybrid pixel detectors opens up new possibilities for direct electron detection and superior detector performance. Here, we report on the characteristics of the Medipix2 detector in diffraction studies, with a special focus on the reliability of the intensities acquired in very low dose conditions. Diffraction data recorded on a Medipix2 detector were assessed in refinement analysis. R-factors lower than 10% were obtained from data recorded at electron dose of 0.05 el/A 2 . The reproducibility of the data was also shown to be high, given the correlation coefficient of the intensities being higher than 0.9970. The contrast that could be achieved at very low dose conditions was at least an order of magnitude better than that of image plates, based on a direct comparison.

  13. Experimental and theoretical assessments of some approximations in the dynamical theory of electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, R.; Sheinin, S.S.

    1984-01-01

    The electron microscope is one of the most important tools used in the study of the structure of materials. In order to interpret the experimental micrographs obtained from this instrument a theoretical model which relates image contrast to specimen structure must be constructed. In order to obtain useful information experimental micrographs must normally be compared to the results of theoretical calculations based on this model. The theory involved in these calculations is normally the dynamical theory of electron diffraction. In employing this theory many approximations must be made. The study of the validity of these approximations has become increasingly important in recent years because of the growing interest in obtaining higher resolution information from experimental micrographs. These studies involve in the first instance the development of more general forms of the theory in which the approximation being studied is not made. Assessments of diffraction conditions under which conventional forms of the theory might be expected to break down can then be made and experiomental verification of these results carried out. The work presented in this paper analyses the ranges of validity of four different approximations: the symmetrical Laue diffraction conditions, the column approximation, a many-beam form of the dynamical theory for crystals containing twin boundaries and an assessment of many-beam effects in HCP perfect crystals. (author)

  14. The Precession Technique in Electron Diffraction and Its Application to Structure Determination of Nano-Size Precipitates in Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjønnes, J.; Hansen, V.; Kverneland, A.

    2004-02-01

    Crystal structure of nano-scale precipitates in age-hardening aluminum alloys is a challenge to crystallography. The utility of selected area electron diffraction intensities from embedded precipitates is limited by double scattering via matrix reflections. This effect can be signally reduced by the precession technique, which we have used to collect extensive intensity data from the semicoherent, metastable [eta][prime prime or minute]-precipitate in the Al-Zn-Mg alloy system. A structure model in the space group P-62c is proposed from high-resolution microscopy and electron diffraction intensities. The advantages of using the precession technique for quantitative electron diffraction is discussed.

  15. A simple way to obtain backscattered electron images in a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Hiroki; Tanaka, Shigeyasu; Tanji, Takayoshi; Morita, Chiaki

    2014-08-01

    We have fabricated a simple detector for backscattered electrons (BSEs) and incorporated the detector into a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) sample holder. Our detector was made from a 4-mm(2) Si chip. The fabrication procedure was easy, and similar to a standard transmission electron microscopy (TEM) sample thinning process based on ion milling. A TEM grid containing particle objects was fixed to the detector with a silver paste. Observations were carried out using samples of Au and latex particles at 75 and 200 kV. Such a detector provides an easy way to obtain BSE images in an STEM. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Bunch evolution study in optimization of MeV ultrafast electron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xian-Hai; Du, Ying-Chao; Huang, Wen-Hui; Tang, Chuan-Xiang

    2014-12-01

    Megaelectronvolt ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is a promising detection tool for ultrafast processes. The quality of diffraction image is determined by the transverse evolution of the probe bunch. In this paper, we study the contributing terms of the emittance and space charge effects to the bunch evolution in the MeV UED scheme, employing a mean-field model with an ellipsoidal distribution as well as particle tracking simulation. The small transverse dimension of the drive laser is found to be critical to improve the reciprocal resolution, exploiting both smaller emittance and larger transverse bunch size before the solenoid. The degradation of the reciprocal spatial resolution caused by the space charge effects should be carefully controlled.

  17. A three-dimensional polarization domain retrieval method from electron diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, Robert S.; Koch, Christoph T.

    2015-01-01

    We present an algorithm for retrieving three-dimensional domains of picometer-scale shifts in atomic positions from electron diffraction data, and apply it to simulations of ferroelectric polarization in BaTiO 3 . Our algorithm successfully and correctly retrieves polarization domains in which the Ti atom positions differ by less than 3 pm (0.4% of the unit cell diagonal distance) with 5 and 10 nm depth resolution along the beam direction, and we also retrieve unit cell strain, corresponding to tetragonal-to-cubic unit cell distortions, for 10 nm domains. Experimental applicability is also discussed. - Highlights: • We show a retrieval method for ferroelectric polarization from TEM diffraction data. • Simulated strain and polarization variations along the beam direction are retrieved. • This method can be used for 3D strain and polarization mapping without specimen tilt

  18. Two and three dimensional electron backscattered diffraction analysis of solid oxide cells materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath

    structure. In this case, lattice parameters analysis aid to differential the secondary phases. However lattice constant of secondary phase cannot measure by general tools such as x-ray diffraction due to its insufficiency. Point analysis in electron backscattered diffraction (EBSDX allows measuring......There are two main technique were developed in this work: a technique to calculate grain boundary energy and pressure and a technique to measure lattice constant from EBSD. The techniques were applied to Nb-doped Strontium titanate (STN) and yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) which are commonly used...... sectioning. Band contrast and band slope were used to describe the pattern quality. The FIB probe currents investigated ranged from 100 to 5000 pA and the accelerating voltage was either 30 or 5 kV. The results show that 30 kV FIB milling induced a significant reduction of the pattern quality of STN samples...

  19. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data from calcite biominerals in recent gastropod shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Huerta, Alberto; Dauphin, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean Pierre; Cusack, Maggie

    2011-04-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a microscopy technique that reveals in situ crystallographic information. Currently, it is widely used for the characterization of geological materials and in studies of biomineralization. Here, we analyze high resolution EBSD data from biogenic calcite in two mollusk taxa, Concholepas and Haliotis, previously used in the understanding of complex biomineralization and paleoenvironmental studies. Results indicate that Concholepas has less ordered prisms than in Haliotis, and that in Concholepas the level of order is not homogenous in different areas of the shell. Overall, the usefulness of data integration obtained from diffraction intensity and crystallographic orientation maps, and corresponding pole figures, is discussed as well as its application to similar studies. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Low-energy electron diffraction experiment, theory and surface structure determination

    CERN Document Server

    Hove, Michel A; Chan, Chi-Ming

    1986-01-01

    Surface crystallography plays the same fundamental role in surface science which bulk crystallography has played so successfully in solid-state physics and chemistry. The atomic-scale structure is one of the most important aspects in the understanding of the behavior of surfaces in such widely diverse fields as heterogeneous catalysis, microelectronics, adhesion, lubrication, cor­ rosion, coatings, and solid-solid and solid-liquid interfaces. Low-Energy Electron Diffraction or LEED has become the prime tech­ nique used to determine atomic locations at surfaces. On one hand, LEED has yielded the most numerous and complete structural results to date (almost 200 structures), while on the other, LEED has been regarded as the "technique to beat" by a variety of other surface crystallographic methods, such as photoemission, SEXAFS, ion scattering and atomic diffraction. Although these other approaches have had impressive successes, LEED has remained the most productive technique and has shown the most versatility...

  1. High energy gain of trapped electrons in a tapered, diffraction-dominated inverse-free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Tochitsky, S Ya; Boucher, S; Clayton, C E; Doyuran, A; England, R J; Joshi, C; Pellegrini, C; Ralph, J E; Rosenzweig, J B; Sung, C; Tolmachev, S; Travish, G; Varfolomeev, A A; Varfolomeev, A A; Yarovoi, T; Yoder, R B

    2005-04-22

    Energy gain of trapped electrons in excess of 20 MeV has been demonstrated in an inverse-free-electron-laser (IFEL) accelerator experiment. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is copropagated with a 400 GW CO2 laser beam in a 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered in period and field amplitude. The Rayleigh range of the laser, approximately 1.8 cm, is much shorter than the undulator length yielding a diffraction-dominated interaction. Experimental results on the dependence of the acceleration on injection energy, laser focus position, and laser power are discussed. Simulations, in good agreement with the experimental data, show that most of the energy gain occurs in the first half of the undulator at a gradient of 70 MeV/m and that the structure in the measured energy spectrum arises because of higher harmonic IFEL interaction in the second half of the undulator.

  2. High Energy Gain of Trapped Electrons in a Tapered, Diffraction-Dominated Inverse-Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P.; Tochitsky, S. Ya.; Boucher, S.; Clayton, C. E.; Doyuran, A.; England, R. J.; Joshi, C.; Pellegrini, C.; Ralph, J. E.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Sung, C.; Tolmachev, S.; Travish, G.; Varfolomeev, A. A.; Varfolomeev, A. A.; Yarovoi, T.; Yoder, R. B.

    2005-04-01

    Energy gain of trapped electrons in excess of 20 MeV has been demonstrated in an inverse-free-electron-laser (IFEL) accelerator experiment. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is copropagated with a 400 GW CO2 laser beam in a 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered in period and field amplitude. The Rayleigh range of the laser, ˜1.8 cm, is much shorter than the undulator length yielding a diffraction-dominated interaction. Experimental results on the dependence of the acceleration on injection energy, laser focus position, and laser power are discussed. Simulations, in good agreement with the experimental data, show that most of the energy gain occurs in the first half of the undulator at a gradient of 70 MeV/m and that the structure in the measured energy spectrum arises because of higher harmonic IFEL interaction in the second half of the undulator.

  3. Strain mapping for the semiconductor industry by dark-field electron holography and nanobeam electron diffraction with nm resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, David; Hartmann, Jean Michel; Carron, Veronique; Béché, Armand; Rouvière, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    There is a requirement of the semiconductor industry to measure strain in semiconductor devices with nm-scale resolution. Here we show that dark-field electron holography and nanobeam electron diffraction (NBED) are both complementary techniques that can be used to determine the strain in these devices. We show two-dimensional strain maps acquired by dark holography and line profiles that have been acquired by NBED of recessed SiGe sources and drains with a variety of different gate lengths and Ge concentrations. We have also used dark-field electron holography to measure the evolution in strain during the silicidation process, showing that this can reduce the applied uniaxial compressive strain in the conduction channel by up to a factor of 3

  4. Unravelling surface and interfacial structures of a metal–organic framework by transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan

    2017-02-21

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline porous materials with designable topology, porosity and functionality, having promising applications in gas storage and separation, ion conduction and catalysis1, 2, 3. It is challenging to observe MOFs with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) due to the extreme instability of MOFs upon electron beam irradiation4, 5, 6, 7. Here, we use a direct-detection electron-counting camera to acquire TEM images of the MOF ZIF-8 with an ultralow dose of 4.1 electrons per square ångström to retain the structural integrity. The obtained image involves structural information transferred up to 2.1 Å, allowing the resolution of individual atomic columns of Zn and organic linkers in the framework. Furthermore, TEM reveals important local structural features of ZIF-8 crystals that cannot be identified by diffraction techniques, including armchair-type surface terminations and coherent interfaces between assembled crystals. These observations allow us to understand how ZIF-8 crystals self-assemble and the subsequent influence of interfacial cavities on mass transport of guest molecules.

  5. Transmission electron microscopy characterisation of 0-D nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Stuart Matthew

    When materials are scaled down to the nanometre level, a change in physical behaviour is frequently observed. In so-called 0-D nanomaterials (nanoparticles), these unique nanoscale properties are most abundant and are usually linked to either a change in (electronic) structure of the material or to the dominating influence of the particle surface at the nanometre scale. In this doctoral work the nanoscale properties of several nanoparticle systems have been studied using advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Every material that was studied required for its solution a unique approach and a host of transmission electron microscopy techniques. The title of this doctoral work can be freely translated as "retrieving quantitatively the maximal and most accurate chemical, structural and morphological information from nanoparticles by advanced transmission electron microscopy, to uncover and explain their unique properties". Chapter 1 gives a brief general introduction to the world of nanomaterials and nanotechnology in general and more specifically to 0-D nanomaterials (nanoparticles). The unique properties and potential applications of these materials are described. The production of 0-D nanomaterials is not covered in this chapter, as this is an extremely broad field to cover in only a few pages. Instead, the production method for each of the materials is left to the detailed chapters that follow. In Chapter 2 the main transmission electron microscopy techniques used to characterise the materials in the further chapters are described together with the microscopes used to perform these techniques and their parameters of operation. Again, the sample-specific setups are listed in the detailed chapters that follow. Chapter 3 covers all work carried out on luminescent detonation nanodiamond powder for drug delivery and bio-medical imaging applications. Specific attention is paid to the morphology, surface chemistry and nitrogen incorporation of detonation

  6. Pulse shape and spectrum of coherent diffraction-limited transition radiation from electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Tilborg, J.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2003-12-20

    The electric field in the temporal and spectral domain of coherent diffraction-limited transition radiation is studied. An electron bunch, with arbitrary longitudinal momentum distribution, propagating at normal incidence to a sharp metal-vacuum boundary with finite transverse dimension is considered. A general expression for the spatiotemporal electric field of the transition radiation is derived, and closed-form solutions for several special cases are given. The influence of parameters such as radial boundary size, electron momentum distribution, and angle of observation on the waveform (e.g., radiation pulse length and amplitude) are discussed. For a Gaussian electron bunch, the coherent radiation waveform is shown to have a single-cycle profile. Application to a novel THz source based on a laser-driven accelerator is discussed.

  7. Reassessment of the electron density in Cu2O using γ-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Wolfgang; Reehuis, Manfred

    2014-12-01

    The electron-density distribution in Cu2O has been critically reexamined to test controversial conclusions from earlier experimental and theoretical studies. The electron density is derived via multipole refinement of high-quality single-crystal diffraction data, collected at room temperature with 316.5 keV gamma radiation. Four γ-lines in the energy range 200-600 keV have been used to extrapolate extinction-free low-order structure factors. The remaining extinction corrections refine to a crystal mosaicity identical to the observed one. There is no support for anharmonic contributions to the thermal parameters. Important features of the derived electron density are (i) a partially filled d_{z^2} orbital, (ii) an incomplete ionization of Cu and O, and (iii) no interstitial Cu-Cu charge pileup, thereby refuting the covalent bonding hypothesis.

  8. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifeng Yun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT and rotation electron diffraction (RED, have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni–Se–O–Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal–organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three

  9. Secondary Electron Emission Materials for Transmission Dynodes in Novel Photomultipliers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Xia Tao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Secondary electron emission materials are reviewed with the aim of providing guidelines for the future development of novel transmission dynodes. Materials with reflection secondary electron yield higher than three and transmission secondary electron yield higher than one are tabulated for easy reference. Generations of transmission dynodes are listed in the order of the invention time with a special focus on the most recent atomic-layer-deposition synthesized transmission dynodes. Based on the knowledge gained from the survey of secondary election emission materials with high secondary electron yield, an outlook of possible improvements upon the state-of-the-art transmission dynodes is provided.

  10. Improved Zernike-type phase contrast for transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeck, P J B

    2015-07-01

    Zernike phase contrast has been recognized as a means of recording high-resolution images with high contrast using a transmission electron microscope. This imaging mode can be used to image typical phase objects such as unstained biological molecules or cryosections of biological tissue. According to the original proposal discussed in Danev and Nagayama (2001) and references therein, the Zernike phase plate applies a phase shift of π/2 to all scattered electron beams outside a given scattering angle and an image is recorded at Gaussian focus or slight underfocus (below Scherzer defocus). Alternatively, a phase shift of -π/2 is applied to the central beam using the Boersch phase plate. The resulting image will have an almost perfect contrast transfer function (close to 1) from a given lowest spatial frequency up to a maximum resolution determined by the wave length, the amount of defocus and the spherical aberration of the microscope. In this paper, I present theory and simulations showing that this maximum spatial frequency can be increased considerably without loss of contrast by using a Zernike or Boersch phase plate that leads to a phase shift between scattered and unscattered electrons of only π /4, and recording images at Scherzer defocus. The maximum resolution can be improved even more by imaging at extended Scherzer defocus, though at the cost of contrast loss at lower spatial frequencies. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Iterative reconstruction of magnetic induction using Lorentz transmission electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phatak, C.; Gürsoy, D.

    2015-01-01

    Intense ongoing research on complex nanomagnetic structures requires a fundamental understanding of the 3D magnetization and the stray fields around the nano-objects. 3D visualization of such fields offers the best way to achieve this. Lorentz transmission electron microscopy provides a suitable combination of high resolution and ability to quantitatively visualize the magnetization vectors using phase retrieval methods. In this paper, we present a formalism to represent the magnetic phase shift of electrons as a Radon transform of the magnetic induction of the sample. Using this formalism, we then present the application of common tomographic methods particularly the iterative methods, to reconstruct the 3D components of the vector field. We present an analysis of the effect of missing wedge and the limited angular sampling as well as reconstruction of complex 3D magnetization in a nanowire using simulations. - Highlights: • We present a formalism to represent electron-optical magnetic phase shift as a Radon transform of the 3D magnetic induction of the nano-object. • We have analyzed four different tomographic reconstruction methods for vectorial data reconstruction. • Reconstruction methods were tested for varying experimental limitations such as limited tilt range and limited angular sampling. • The analysis showed that Gridrec and SIRT methods performed better with lower errors than other reconstruction methods

  12. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Multiobjective optimizations of a novel cryocooled dc gun based ultrafast electron diffraction beam line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colwyn Gulliford

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of multiobjective genetic algorithm optimizations of a single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction beam line utilizing a 225 kV dc gun with a novel cryocooled photocathode system and buncher cavity. Optimizations of the transverse projected emittance as a function of bunch charge are presented and discussed in terms of the scaling laws derived in the charge saturation limit. Additionally, optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of final rms bunch length at the sample location have been performed for three different sample radii: 50, 100, and 200  μm, for two final bunch charges: 10^{5} electrons (16 fC and 10^{6} electrons (160 fC. Example optimal solutions are analyzed, and the effects of disordered induced heating estimated. In particular, a relative coherence length of L_{c,x}/σ_{x}=0.27  nm/μm was obtained for a final bunch charge of 10^{5} electrons and final bunch length of σ_{t}≈100  fs. For a final charge of 10^{6} electrons the cryogun produces L_{c,x}/σ_{x}≈0.1  nm/μm for σ_{t}≈100–200  fs and σ_{x}≥50  μm. These results demonstrate the viability of using genetic algorithms in the design and operation of ultrafast electron diffraction beam lines.

  14. Study of electron transmission through thin metallic films by the electron moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babikova, Yu.F.; Vakar, O.M.; Gruzin, O.M.; Petrikin, Yu.V.

    1983-01-01

    Results of the experimental study of the transmission of conversion electrons through aluminium, iron, tin and gold films are presented. Absorption of resonance electrons of the Moessbauer nuclide 57 Fe, formed during target irradiation with γ-quanta of 57 Co source in chromium matrix has been studied. It is asserted that absorption of conversion electrons in films of different elements is similar; at that, like in the case of β-particles, the law of absorption of resonance electrons, emitted from the flat layer, is exponential For conversion electrons of the Moessbauer nuclide 57 Fe the absorption coefficient is (0.025+-0.002) cm 2 /μg, which in the case of iron absorbing film corresponds to (20.0+-1.0)x10 4 cm -1

  15. Low-energy positron and electron diffraction and positron-stimulated secondary electron emission from Cu(100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    The results of two series of experiments are reported. In the first, an electrostatically guided beam of low-energy (40-400 eV) positrons, delta/sub p/ was used to study low-energy positron diffraction (LEPD) from a Cu(100) surface under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. Low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) data were obtained from the same sample in the same apparatus. Comparison of LEPD and LEED intensity versus energy data with model calculations made using computer programs developed by C.B. Duke and collaborators indicated that: LEPD data is adequately modeled using potentials with no exchange-correlation term. The inelastic mean free path, lambda/sub ee/, is shorter for positrons than for electrons at low (< approx.80 eV). LEED is better than LEPD at making a determination of the first-layer spacing of Cu(100) for the particular data set reported. In the second set of experiments, the same apparatus and sample were used to compare positron- and electron-stimulated secondary-electron emission (PSSEE and ESSEE). The results were found to be consistent with existing models of secondary-electron production for metals. The energy distributions of secondary-electrons had broad low-energy (<10 eV) peaks for both positron and electron stimulation. But the PSEE distribution showed no elastic peak. Measurements of secondary-electron angular distributions, found to be cosine-like in both the PSSEE and ESSEE case, were used to obtain total secondary yield ratios, delta, at four beam energies ranging from 40-400 eV. The secondary yield ratio for primary positrons and the yield for primary electrons, delta/sub e/, were similar at these energies. For 400-eV primary particles the secondary yields were found to be delta/sub p/ = 0.94 +/- 0.12 and delta/sub e/ = 0.94 +/- 0./12, giving a ratio of unity for positron-stimulated secondary yield to electron-stimulated secondary yield

  16. Transmission in situ and operando high temperature X-ray powder diffraction in variable gaseous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, Lukas; Doran, Andrew; Schneppmüller, Peter; Gili, Albert; Czasny, Mathias; Penner, Simon; Gurlo, Aleksander

    2018-03-01

    This work describes a device for time-resolved synchrotron-based in situ and operando X-ray powder diffraction measurements at elevated temperatures under controllable gaseous environments. The respective gaseous sample environment is realized via a gas-tight capillary-in-capillary design, where the gas flow is achieved through an open-end 0.5 mm capillary located inside a 0.7 mm capillary filled with a sample powder. Thermal mass flow controllers provide appropriate gas flows and computer-controlled on-the-fly gas mixing capabilities. The capillary system is centered inside an infrared heated, proportional integral differential-controlled capillary furnace allowing access to temperatures up to 1000 °C.

  17. Applications of low-energy electron diffraction to ordering at crystal and quasicrystal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McRae, E.G.; Malic, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to measure low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) intensity profiles has been enhanced by use of low-current well-defined primary electron beams in conjunction with position-sensitive detection (PSD) of the diffracted electrons. The following are examples of applications of LEED-PSD. Compositional ordering at ordering alloy Cu 3 Au (100) and (110) surfaces - the ordering of the (100) surface is believed to conform to a conventional picture in which the already-ordered bulk acts as a template, but the profiles measured in the course of ordering of the (110) surface are of the shapes expected if the ordering occurred first at the surface. Disordering of Ge(111) surface 150 K below the bulk melting temperature - the intensities and profiles are inconsistent with surface melting or roughening, but a model based on molecular dynamics simulations is not ruled out. Order and disordering at decagonal quasicrystal Al 65 Cu 15 Co 20 surfaces - at room temperature the quasicrystalline order is well developed at both the 'ten-fold' surface (perpendicular to the ten-fold surface (perpendicular to the ten-fold periodic axis) and a 'two-fold' one (parallel to the ten-fold axis) as evidenced by narrow beam profiles. The ten-fold surface undergoes a disordering transition at 700 K, but the temperature dependence of the profiles is unlike that expected for the roughening transition anticipated theoretically. 57 refs., 15 figs

  18. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of photocatalysts for water splitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalca, Filippo; Laursen, Anders Bo; Dahl, Søren

    , it is necessary to understand the fundamentals of their reaction mechanisms, chemical behavior, structure and morphology before, during and after reaction using in situ investigations. Here, we focus on the in situ characterization of photocatalysts [1] in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM......) [2]. Such fundamental insight can be used for further material optimization with respect to performance and stability [3]. In this work, we combine conventional TEM analysis of photocatalysts with environmental TEM (ETEM) and photoactivation using light. A novel type of TEM specimen holder...... that enables in situ illumination is developed to study light-induced phenomena in photoactive materials at the nanoscale under working conditions. Our experiments are aimed at exposing a specimen to light and detecting resulting microstructural and chemical changes using in situ TEM techniques...

  19. Annular dark field transmission electron microscopy for protein structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeck, Philip J B

    2016-02-01

    Recently annular dark field (ADF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been advocated as a means of recording images of biological specimens with better signal to noise ratio (SNR) than regular bright field images. I investigate whether and how such images could be used to determine the three-dimensional structure of proteins given that an ADF aperture with a suitable pass-band can be manufactured and used in practice. I develop an approximate theory of ADF-TEM image formation for weak amplitude and phase objects and test this theory using computer simulations. I also test whether these simulated images can be used to calculate a three-dimensional model of the protein using standard software and discuss problems and possible ways to overcome these. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Transmission electron microscope sample holder with optical features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milas, Mirko [Port Jefferson, NY; Zhu, Yimei [Stony Brook, NY; Rameau, Jonathan David [Coram, NY

    2012-03-27

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  1. Fabrication and electric measurements of nanostructures inside transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Qing; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2011-01-01

    Using manipulation holders specially designed for transmission electron microscope (TEM), nanostructures can be characterized, measured, modified and even fabricated in-situ. In-situ TEM techniques not only enable real-time study of structure-property relationships of materials at atomic scale, but also provide the ability to control and manipulate materials and structures at nanoscale. This review highlights in-situ electric measurements and in-situ fabrication and structure modification using manipulation holder inside TEM. -- Research highlights: → We review in-situ works using manipulation holder in TEM. → In-situ electric measurements, fabrication and structure modification are focused. → We discuss important issues that should be considered for reliable results. → In-situ TEM is becoming a very powerful tool for many research fields.

  2. Electron diffraction determination of 11.5 Å and HySo structures: candidate water carriers to the Upper Mantle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gemmi, M.; Merlini, M.; Palatinus, Lukáš; Fumagalli, P.; Hanfland, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 12 (2016), s. 2645-2654 ISSN 0003-004X Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : subduction * MASH system * electron diffraction tomography Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 2.021, year: 2016

  3. Strain fields in crystalline solids: prediction and measurement of X- ray diffraction patterns and electron diffraction contrast images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, Teunis Cornelis

    2000-01-01

    Lattice imperfections, such as dislocations and misfitting particles, shift and/or broaden X-ray diffraction (XRD) line profiles. Most of the present analysis methods of the shift and broadening of XRD line profiles do not provide the characteristics of lattice imperfections. The main part of this

  4. Assessing strain mapping by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy using wedge-indented Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Vaudin, Mark D.; Stranick, Stephan J.; Stan, Gheorghe; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Osborn, William; Cook, Robert F., E-mail: robert.cook@nist.gov

    2016-04-15

    The accuracy of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) for small-scale strain mapping are assessed using the multi-axial strain field surrounding a wedge indentation in Si as a test vehicle. The strain field is modeled using finite element analysis (FEA) that is adapted to the near-indentation surface profile measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The assessment consists of (1) direct experimental comparisons of strain and deformation and (2) comparisons in which the modeled strain field is used as an intermediate step. Direct experimental methods (1) consist of comparisons of surface elevation and gradient measured by AFM and EBSD and of Raman shifts measured and predicted by CRM and EBSD, respectively. Comparisons that utilize the combined FEA–AFM model (2) consist of predictions of distortion, strain, and rotation for comparison with EBSD measurements and predictions of Raman shift for comparison with CRM measurements. For both EBSD and CRM, convolution of measurements in depth-varying strain fields is considered. The interconnected comparisons suggest that EBSD was able to provide an accurate assessment of the wedge indentation deformation field to within the precision of the measurements, approximately 2×10{sup −4} in strain. CRM was similarly precise, but was limited in accuracy to several times this value. - Highlights: • We map strain by electron backscatter diffraction and confocal Raman microscopy. • The test vehicle is the multi-axial strain field of wedge-indented silicon. • Strain accuracy is assessed by direct experimental intercomparison. • Accuracy is also assessed by atomic force microscopy and finite element analyses. • Electron diffraction measurements are accurate; Raman measurements need refinement.

  5. Microstructural studies of dental amalgams using analytical transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooghan, Tejpal Kaur

    Dental amalgams have been used for centuries as major restorative materials for decaying teeth. Amalgams are prepared by mixing alloy particles which contain Ag, Sn, and Cu as the major constituent elements with liquid Hg. The study of microstructure is essential in understanding the setting reactions and improving the properties of amalgams. Until the work reported in this dissertation, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) were used commonly to analyze amalgam microstructures. No previous systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study has been performed due to sample preparation difficulties and composite structure of dental amalgams. The goal of this research was to carry out detailed microstructural and compositional studies of dental amalgams. This was accomplished using the enhanced spatial resolution of the TEM and its associated microanalytical techniques, namely, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) and micro-microdiffraction (mumuD). A new method was developed for thinning amalgam samples to electron transparency using the "wedge technique." Velvalloy, a low-Cu amalgam, and Tytin, a high-Cu amalgam, were the two amalgams characterized. Velvalloy is composed of a Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) matrix surrounding unreacted Agsb3Sn (gamma) particles. In addition, hitherto uncharacterized reaction layers between Agsb3Sn(gamma)/Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb2)\\ and\\ Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) were observed and analyzed. An Ag-Hg-Sn (betasb1) phase was clearly identified for the first time. In Tytin, the matrix consists of Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1) grains. Fine precipitates of Cusb6Snsb5\\ (etasp') are embedded inside the gammasb1 and at the grain boundaries. These precipitates are responsible for the improved creep resistance of Tytin compared to Velvalloy. The additional Cu has completely eliminated the gammasb

  6. High quality ultrafast transmission electron microscopy using resonant microwave cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, W; van Rens, J F M; Kieft, E R; Mutsaers, P H A; Luiten, O J

    2018-03-10

    Ultrashort, low-emittance electron pulses can be created at a high repetition rate by using a TM 110 deflection cavity to sweep a continuous beam across an aperture. These pulses can be used for time-resolved electron microscopy with atomic spatial and temporal resolution at relatively large average currents. In order to demonstrate this, a cavity has been inserted in a transmission electron microscope, and picosecond pulses have been created. No significant increase of either emittance or energy spread has been measured for these pulses. At a peak current of 814 ± 2 pA, the root-mean-square transverse normalized emittance of the electron pulses is ɛ n,x =(2.7±0.1)·10 -12  m rad in the direction parallel to the streak of the cavity, and ɛ n,y =(2.5±0.1)·10 -12  m rad in the perpendicular direction for pulses with a pulse length of 1.1-1.3 ps. Under the same conditions, the emittance of the continuous beam is ɛ n,x =ɛ n,y =(2.5±0.1)·10 -12  m rad. Furthermore, for both the pulsed and the continuous beam a full width at half maximum energy spread of 0.95 ± 0.05 eV has been measured. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure Analyses of Fe-based Metallic Glasses by Electron Diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Hirata

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale structural information of amorphous structures has become obtainable by using nanobeam electron diffraction in combination with high resolution imaging. In addition, accurate radial distribution function analysis using energy filter has also become available to know averaged amorphous structures. In this paper, we introduce some applications of these techniques, especially to several Fe-based metallic glasses. On the basis of these results, we discuss a relationship between the glass structure and the glass stability in Fe-based metallic glasses

  8. Atom diffraction reveals the impact of atomic core electrons on atom-surface potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2010-12-03

    We measured ratios of van der Waals potential coefficients (C3) for different atoms (Li, Na, K, and Rb) interacting with the same surface by studying atom diffraction from a nanograting. These measurements are a sensitive test of atomic structure calculations because C3 ratios are strongly influenced by core electrons and only weakly influenced by the permittivity and geometry of the surface. Our measurement uncertainty of 2% in the ratio C(3)(K)/C(3)(Na) is close to the uncertainty of the best theoretical predictions, and some of these predictions are inconsistent with our measurement.

  9. Characterization of Damage in Magnesium Using Digital Image Correlation and Electron Backscattered Diffraction Patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemcko, Michael J.; Mas, Pauline; Bruhis, Moisei; Wilkinson, David S.

    The microscopic strain distribution of commercially pure magnesium has been investigated during room temperature deformation. Digital image correlation (DIC) coupled with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) patterning has been used to relate strain measurements with the microstructure. Sheet magnesium tensile samples were etched and a random pattern of points were machined onto the sample surface using a focused ion beam (FIB). The samples were pulled in tension under an optical microscope. Images were obtained in increments and the DIC method was used to calculate the strain distribution. The strain distribution was compared to the EBSD pattern and the results show that strain localization is associated with twin and grain boundaries.

  10. Diffraction of slow electrons by the periodic structure in the lattice gas model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozol'kov, A.E.; Fedyanin, V.K.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data on diffraction of small energy electrons on the systems: hydrogen-tungsten and hydrogen oxide-nickel has been analysed. It was shown that in the hemsorbed adatom system the two-dimensional phase transition of another type there occurs. The results of Onsager as well as Fischer's idea about the analogy of hemsorption on a half overlap to an antiferromagnetic in a zero magnetic field were applied. The parameter of effective interaction (epsilon) between adatoms was obtained for adsorption of H on W(100). The estimated value (epsilon) approximately + 0.145/+0.17 eV agrees well with (epsilon) from calorimetric measurements

  11. Development of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometers for transmission electron microscopes--an introduction of valence electron spectroscopy for transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Masami; Koike, Masato; Fukushima, Kurio; Kimura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Two types of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray spectrometers, a high-dispersion type and a conventional one, for transmission electron microscopes were constructed. Those spectrometers were used to study the electronic states of valence electrons (bonding electrons). Both spectrometers extended the acceptable energy regions to higher than 2000 eV. The best energy resolution of 0.08 eV was obtained for an Al L-emission spectrum by using the high-dispersion type spectrometer. By using the spectrometer, C K-emission of carbon allotropes, Cu L-emission of Cu(1-x)Zn(x) alloys and Pt M-emission spectra were presented. The FWHM value of 12 eV was obtained for the Pt Malpha-emission peak. The performance of the conventional one was also presented for ZnS and a section specimen of a multilayer device. W-M and Si-K emissions were clearly resolved. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has an advantage for obtaining spectra from a single crystalline specimen with a defined crystal setting. As an example of anisotropic soft X-ray emission, C K-emission spectra of single crystalline graphite with different crystal settings were presented. From the spectra, density of states of pi- and sigma-bondings were separately derived. These results demonstrated a method to analyse the electronic states of valence electrons of materials in the nanometre scale based on TEM.

  12. Synchrotron Bragg diffraction imaging characterization of synthetic diamond crystals for optical and electronic power device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Thi, Thu Nhi; Morse, J; Caliste, D; Fernandez, B; Eon, D; Härtwig, J; Barbay, C; Mer-Calfati, C; Tranchant, N; Arnault, J C; Lafford, T A; Baruchel, J

    2017-04-01

    Bragg diffraction imaging enables the quality of synthetic single-crystal diamond substrates and their overgrown, mostly doped, diamond layers to be characterized. This is very important for improving diamond-based devices produced for X-ray optics and power electronics applications. The usual first step for this characterization is white-beam X-ray diffraction topography, which is a simple and fast method to identify the extended defects (dislocations, growth sectors, boundaries, stacking faults, overall curvature etc. ) within the crystal. This allows easy and quick comparison of the crystal quality of diamond plates available from various commercial suppliers. When needed, rocking curve imaging (RCI) is also employed, which is the quantitative counterpart of monochromatic Bragg diffraction imaging. RCI enables the local determination of both the effective misorientation, which results from lattice parameter variation and the local lattice tilt, and the local Bragg position. Maps derived from these parameters are used to measure the magnitude of the distortions associated with polishing damage and the depth of this damage within the volume of the crystal. For overgrown layers, these maps also reveal the distortion induced by the incorporation of impurities such as boron, or the lattice parameter variations associated with the presence of growth-incorporated nitrogen. These techniques are described, and their capabilities for studying the quality of diamond substrates and overgrown layers, and the surface damage caused by mechanical polishing, are illustrated by examples.

  13. Laser technologies in micro-optics. Part 1. Fabrication of diffractive optical elements and photomasks with amplitude transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiko, V. P.; Korolkov, V. P.; Poleshchuk, A. G.; Sinev, D. A.; Shakhno, E. A.

    2017-09-01

    This paper is a review of studies carried out by the staff of the National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO University, Saint-Petersburg) and the Institute of Automation and Electrometry of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IAE SB RAS, Novosibirsk) in the field of development of laser engineering processes for the formation of the structure of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) and photomasks with amplitude binary and grayscale transmission. This paper also describes the results of the study of laser thermochemical technology for fabricating chrome DOEs and technologies for the fabrication of grayscale DOEs and photomasks based on the use of amorphous silicon and LDW glass.

  14. Thin dielectric film thickness determination by advanced transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diebold, A.C.; Foran, B.; Kisielowski, C.; Muller, D.; Pennycook, S.; Principe, E.; Stemmer, S.

    2003-09-01

    High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) has been used as the ultimate method of thickness measurement for thin films. The appearance of phase contrast interference patterns in HR-TEM images has long been confused as the appearance of a crystal lattice by non-specialists. Relatively easy to interpret crystal lattice images are now directly observed with the introduction of annular dark field detectors for scanning TEM (STEM). With the recent development of reliable lattice image processing software that creates crystal structure images from phase contrast data, HR-TEM can also provide crystal lattice images. The resolution of both methods was steadily improved reaching now into the sub Angstrom region. Improvements in electron lens and image analysis software are increasing the spatial resolution of both methods. Optimum resolution for STEM requires that the probe beam be highly localized. In STEM, beam localization is enhanced by selection of the correct aperture. When STEM measurement is done using a highly localized probe beam, HR-TEM and STEM measurement of the thickness of silicon oxynitride films agree within experimental error. In this paper, the optimum conditions for HR-TEM and STEM measurement are discussed along with a method for repeatable film thickness determination. The impact of sample thickness is also discussed. The key result in this paper is the proposal of a reproducible method for film thickness determination.

  15. High-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennycook, S.J.; Jesson, D.E.

    1992-03-01

    The high-resolution imaging of crystalline materials in the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is reviewed with particular emphasis on the conditions under which an incoherent image can be obtained. It is shown that a high-angle annular detector can be used to break the coherence of the imaging process, in the transverse plane through the geometry of the detector, or in three dimensions if multiphonon diffuse scattering is detected. In the latter case, each atom can be treated as a highly independent source of high-angle scattering. The most effective fast electron states are therefore tightly bound s-type Bloch states. Furthermore, they add constructively for each incident angle in the coherent STEM probe, so that s states are responsible for practically the entire image contrast. Dynamical effects are largely removed, and almost perfect incoherent imaging is achieved. s states are relatively insensitive to neighboring strings, so that incoherent imaging is maintained for superlattice and interfaces, and supercell calculations are unnecessary. With an optimum probe profile, the incoherent image represents a direct image of the crystal projection, with compositional sensitivity built in through the strong dependence of the scattering cross sections on atomic number Z

  16. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  17. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Bombyx Mori Silk Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y.; Martin, D. C.

    1997-03-01

    The microstructure of B. Mori silk fibers before and after degumming was examined by TEM, selected area electron diffraction (SAED), WAXS and low voltage SEM. SEM micrographs of the neat cocoon revealed a network of pairs of twisting filaments. After degumming, there were only individual filaments showing a surface texture consistent with an oriented fibrillar structure in the fiber interior. WAXS patterns confirmed the oriented beta-sheet crystal structure common to silkworm and spider silks. Low dose SAED results were fully consistent with the WAXS data, and revealed that the crystallographic texture did not vary significantly across the fiber diameter. TEM observations of microtomed fiber cross sections indicated a somewhat irregular shape, and also revealed a 0.5-2 micron sericin coating which was removed by the degumming process. TEM observations of the degummed silk fiber showed banded features with a characteristic spacing of nominally 600 nm along the fiber axis. These bands were oriented in a roughly parabolic or V-shape pointing along one axis within a given fiber. We hypothesize that this orientation is induced by the extrusion during the spinning process. Equatorial DF images revealed that axial and lateral sizes of the β-sheet crystallites in silk fibroin ranged from 20 to 170 nm and from 1 to 24 nm, respectively. Crazes developed in the degummed silk fiber parallel to the fiber direction. The formation of these crazes suggests that there are significant lateral interactions between fibrils in silk fibers.

  18. Guided Wave Propagation and Diffraction in Plates with Obstacles: Resonance Transmission and Trapping Mode Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, E. V.; Glushkova, N. V.; Eremin, A. A.; Lammering, R.

    The paper is based on the authors' report at ICU-2015 giving the idea of the semi-analytical integral equation approach to a physically clear simulation of wave phenomena in composite plate-like structures with local inhomogeneities. On this basis, a set of low-cost computer models for a reliable near- and far-field analysis had been developed and experimentally validated. Their abilities have been illustrated with examples of structural frequency response and radiation pattern diagrams for guided waves (GW) generated by piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS); the reconstruction of effective elastic moduli of fiber-reinforced composites; the PWAS frequency tuning with accounting for the radiation directivity induced by anisotropy; and the effects of wave energy resonance transmission and trapping. Some of these examples have been already discussed in journal articles. Therefore, the present paper concentrates on the recent results of resonance GW interaction with deep surface notches and buried cavities.

  19. Atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy of electron beam–sensitive crystalline materials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Daliang

    2018-01-18

    High-resolution imaging of electron beam-sensitive materials is one of the most difficult applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The challenges are manifold, including the acquisition of images with extremely low beam doses, the time-constrained search for crystal zone axes, the precise image alignment, and the accurate determination of the defocus value. We develop a suite of methods to fulfill these requirements and acquire atomic-resolution TEM images of several metal organic frameworks that are generally recognized as highly sensitive to electron beams. The high image resolution allows us to identify individual metal atomic columns, various types of surface termination, and benzene rings in the organic linkers. We also apply our methods to other electron beam–sensitive materials, including the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbBr3.

  20. Atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy of electron beam–sensitive crystalline materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daliang; Zhu, Yihan; Liu, Lingmei; Ying, Xiangrong; Hsiung, Chia-En; Sougrat, Rachid; Li, Kun; Han, Yu

    2018-02-01

    High-resolution imaging of electron beam–sensitive materials is one of the most difficult applications of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The challenges are manifold, including the acquisition of images with extremely low beam doses, the time-constrained search for crystal zone axes, the precise image alignment, and the accurate determination of the defocus value. We develop a suite of methods to fulfill these requirements and acquire atomic-resolution TEM images of several metal organic frameworks that are generally recognized as highly sensitive to electron beams. The high image resolution allows us to identify individual metal atomic columns, various types of surface termination, and benzene rings in the organic linkers. We also apply our methods to other electron beam–sensitive materials, including the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbBr3.

  1. Electron diffraction study on chemical short-range order in covalent amorphous solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Hirata, Akihiko; Naito, Muneyuki

    2012-04-01

    Studies on radiation-induced structural changes of solids are of technological importance for realizing desirable material properties and for predicting the fate of materials under radiation environments. It is known that energetic particles, such as electrons, neutrons, and ions, produce extensive damage, and may eventually lead to amorphization. Amorphization is often accompanied with significant volume changes and concomitant microcracking. To clarify the amorphization mechanism, knowledge of amorphous structures is required. Radial distribution function analysis is one of the useful ways to characterize topological and chemical disorder in amorphous networks. Here, we review the advantage of electron diffraction for analyzing short-range order of amorphous materials and show some examples of radial distribution functions obtained by our group.

  2. Electron diffraction study on chemical short-range order in covalent amorphous solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Hirata, Akihiko; Naito, Muneyuki

    2012-01-01

    Studies on radiation-induced structural changes of solids are of technological importance for realizing desirable material properties and for predicting the fate of materials under radiation environments. It is known that energetic particles, such as electrons, neutrons, and ions, produce extensive damage, and may eventually lead to amorphization. Amorphization is often accompanied with significant volume changes and concomitant microcracking. To clarify the amorphization mechanism, knowledge of amorphous structures is required. Radial distribution function analysis is one of the useful ways to characterize topological and chemical disorder in amorphous networks. Here, we review the advantage of electron diffraction for analyzing short-range order of amorphous materials and show some examples of radial distribution functions obtained by our group.

  3. First measurements of subpicosecond electron beam structure by autocorrelation of coherent diffraction radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Lumpkin, Alex H; Rule, D W

    2001-01-01

    We report the initial measurements of subpicosecond electron beam structure using a nonintercepting technique based on the autocorrelation of coherent diffraction radiation (CDR). A far infrared (FIR) Michelson interferometer with a Golay detector was used to obtain the autocorrelation. The radiation was generated by a thermionic rf gun beam at 40 MeV as it passed through a 5-mm-tall slit/aperture in a metal screen whose surface was at 45 deg. to the beam direction. For the observed bunch lengths of about 450 fs (FWHM) with a shorter time spike on the leading edge, peak currents of about 100 A are indicated. Also a model was developed and used to calculate the CDR from the back of two metal strips separated by a 5-mm vertical gap. The demonstrated nonintercepting aspect of this method could allow on-line bunch length characterizations to be done during free-electron laser experiments.

  4. Curvilinearity effects in electron diffraction. Part I. Structure analysis of linear triatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershikov, A. G.; Spiredonov, V. P.

    1981-09-01

    A classical kinetic energy expression is developed for the bending motion of a linear triatomic molecule with curvilinear departure of the terminal atoms from normal coordinate bending included. Following Hansen, Henderson and Pearson a variable parameter γ is introduced which accounts for the curvilinear motion. A simple formula is derived for the estimation of γ in terms of the masses of the constituent atoms. Based on this formula the values of γ have been calculated for a group of linear triatomic molecules. The results definitely imply that the paths of the terminal atoms appear closer to the circular loci than to the rectilinear ones specifying the normal mode coordinates. The curvilinearity contributions to the thermally-averaged distances deduced from electron diffraction data are estimated for the same group of molecules. These contributions axe found to be of comparable magnitude to that of the perpendicular amplitude and the stretch anharmonicity. Particularly large effects are shown to arise in the case of large-amplitude motion and heavy masses of the terminal atoms. It is concluded that curvilinearity distance corrections may be important in the estimation of the rα parameters from the thermally-averaged distances measured by electron diffraction and in the calculation of the Bz - Bo correction in microwave spectroscopy.

  5. Collaborative Research and Development. Delivery Order 0006: Transmission Electron Microscope Image Modeling and Semiconductor Heterointerface Characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahalingam, Krishnamurthy

    2006-01-01

    .... Transmission electron microscope (TEM) characterization studies were performed on a variety of novel III-V semiconductor heterostructures being developed for advanced optoelectronic device applications...

  6. In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the interfacial reaction between Ni and Al during rapid heating in a nanocalorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grapes, Michael D., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Material Measurement Laboratory, Materials Measurement Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Division, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Woll, Karsten [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Institute of Applied Materials, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); LaVan, David A., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Material Measurement Laboratory, Materials Measurement Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Weihs, Timothy P., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu, E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov, E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Al/Ni formation reaction is highly exothermic and of both scientific and technological significance. In this report, we study the evolution of intermetallic phases in this reaction at a heating rate of 830 K/s. 100-nm-thick Al/Ni bilayers were deposited onto nanocalorimeter sensors that enable the measurement of temperature and heat flow during rapid heating. Time-resolved transmission electron diffraction patterns captured simultaneously with thermal measurements allow us to identify the intermetallic phases present and reconstruct the phase transformation sequence as a function of time and temperature. The results show a mostly unaltered phase transformation sequence compared to lower heating rates.

  7. In situ transmission electron microscopy investigation of the interfacial reaction between Ni and Al during rapid heating in a nanocalorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grapes, Michael D.; LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H.; Woll, Karsten; LaVan, David A.; Weihs, Timothy P.

    2014-01-01

    The Al/Ni formation reaction is highly exothermic and of both scientific and technological significance. In this report, we study the evolution of intermetallic phases in this reaction at a heating rate of 830 K/s. 100-nm-thick Al/Ni bilayers were deposited onto nanocalorimeter sensors that enable the measurement of temperature and heat flow during rapid heating. Time-resolved transmission electron diffraction patterns captured simultaneously with thermal measurements allow us to identify the intermetallic phases present and reconstruct the phase transformation sequence as a function of time and temperature. The results show a mostly unaltered phase transformation sequence compared to lower heating rates

  8. Metallographic Preparation of Space Shuttle Reaction Control System Thruster Electron Beam Welds for Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, James

    2011-01-01

    A Space Shuttle Reaction Control System (RCS) thruster failed during a firing test at the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), Las Cruces, New Mexico. The firing test was being conducted to investigate a previous electrical malfunction. A number of cracks were found associated with the fuel closure plate/injector assembly (Fig 1). The firing test failure generated a flight constraint to the launch of STS-133. A team comprised of several NASA centers and other research institutes was assembled to investigate and determine the root cause of the failure. The JSC Materials Evaluation Laboratory was asked to compare and characterize the outboard circumferential electron beam (EB) weld between the fuel closure plate (Titanium 6Al-4V) and the injector (Niobium C-103 alloy) of four different RCS thrusters, including the failed RCS thruster. Several metallographic challenges in grinding/polishing, and particularly in etching were encountered because of the differences in hardness, ductility, and chemical resistance between the two alloys and the bimetallic weld. Segments from each thruster were sectioned from the outboard weld. The segments were hot-compression mounted using a conductive, carbon-filled epoxy. A grinding/polishing procedure for titanium alloys was used [1]. This procedure worked well on the titanium; but a thin, disturbed layer was visible on the niobium surface by means of polarized light. Once polished, each sample was micrographed using bright field, differential interference contrast optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using a backscatter electron (BSE) detector. No typical weld anomalies were observed in any of the cross sections. However, areas of large atomic contrast were clearly visible in the weld nugget, particularly along fusion line interfaces between the titanium and the niobium. This prompted the need to better understand the chemistry and microstructure of the weld (Fig 2). Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS

  9. Electron-beam broadening in amorphous carbon films in low-energy scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drees, H; Müller, E; Dries, M; Gerthsen, D

    2018-02-01

    Resolution in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is ultimately limited by the diameter of the electron beam. The electron beam diameter is not only determined by the properties of the condenser lens system but also by electron scattering in the specimen which leads to electron-beam broadening and degradation of the resolution with increasing specimen thickness. In this work we introduce a new method to measure electron-beam broadening which is based on STEM imaging with a multi-segmented STEM detector. We focus on STEM at low electron energies between 10 and 30 keV and use an amorphous carbon film with known thickness as test object. The experimental results are compared with calculated beam diameters using different analytical models and Monte-Carlo simulations. We find excellent agreement of the experimental data with the recently published model by Gauvin and Rudinsky [1] for small t/λ el (thickness to elastic mean free path) values which are considered in our study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Electron beam dynamics in an ultrafast transmission electron microscope with Wehnelt electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bücker, K.; Picher, M.; Crégut, O. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504 CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France); LaGrange, T. [Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Reed, B.W.; Park, S.T.; Masiel, D.J. [Integrated Dynamic Electron Solutions, Inc., 5653 Stoneridge Drive 117, Pleasanton, CA 94588 (United States); Banhart, F., E-mail: florian.banhart@ipcms.unistra.fr [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, UMR 7504 CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, 23 rue du Loess, 67034 Strasbourg (France)

    2016-12-15

    High temporal resolution transmission electron microscopy techniques have shown significant progress in recent years. Using photoelectron pulses induced by ultrashort laser pulses on the cathode, these methods can probe ultrafast materials processes and have revealed numerous dynamic phenomena at the nanoscale. Most recently, the technique has been implemented in standard thermionic electron microscopes that provide a flexible platform for studying material's dynamics over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. In this study, the electron pulses in such an ultrafast transmission electron microscope are characterized in detail. The microscope is based on a thermionic gun with a Wehnelt electrode and is operated in a stroboscopic photoelectron mode. It is shown that the Wehnelt bias has a decisive influence on the temporal and energy spread of the picosecond electron pulses. Depending on the shape of the cathode and the cathode-Wehnelt distance, different emission patterns with different pulse parameters are obtained. The energy spread of the pulses is determined by space charge and Boersch effects, given by the number of electrons in a pulse. However, filtering effects due to the chromatic aberrations of the Wehnelt electrode allow the extraction of pulses with narrow energy spreads. The temporal spread is governed by electron trajectories of different length and in different electrostatic potentials. High temporal resolution is obtained by excluding shank emission from the cathode and aberration-induced halos in the emission pattern. By varying the cathode-Wehnelt gap, the Wehnelt bias, and the number of photoelectrons in a pulse, tradeoffs between energy and temporal resolution as well as beam intensity can be made as needed for experiments. Based on the characterization of the electron pulses, the optimal conditions for the operation of ultrafast TEMs with thermionic gun assembly are elaborated. - Highlights: • A detailed characterization of electron

  11. Observation of dislocations in crystals using X-ray and electron transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morlevat, J.P.

    1965-10-01

    Two approaches of the dynamical theory of diffraction (EWALD's and AUTHIER's) are recalled briefly. In the light of these theories, one then considers what information concerning the dislocations existing in a crystal can be obtained by X-Ray as well as electron diffraction. (author) [fr

  12. Three-dimensional cathodoluminescence imaging and electron backscatter diffraction: tools for studying the genetic nature of diamond inclusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiggers de Vries, D.F.; Drury, M.R.; Winter, D.A.M.; Bulanova, G.P.; Pearson, D.G.; Davies, G.R.

    2011-01-01

    As a step towards resolving the genesis of inclusions in diamonds, a new technique is presented. This technique combines cathodoluminescence (CL) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) using a focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) instrument with the aim of determining, in

  13. Visualizing aquatic bacteria by light and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thiago P; Noyma, Natália P; Duque, Thabata L A; Gamalier, Juliana P; Vidal, Luciana O; Lobão, Lúcia M; Chiarini-Garcia, Hélio; Roland, Fábio; Melo, Rossana C N

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of the functional role of aquatic bacteria in microbial food webs is largely dependent on methods applied to the direct visualization and enumeration of these organisms. While the ultrastructure of aquatic bacteria is still poorly known, routine observation of aquatic bacteria by light microscopy requires staining with fluorochromes, followed by filtration and direct counting on filter surfaces. Here, we used a new strategy to visualize and enumerate aquatic bacteria by light microscopy. By spinning water samples from varied tropical ecosystems in a cytocentrifuge, we found that bacteria firmly adhere to regular slides, can be stained by fluorochoromes with no background formation and fast enumerated. Significant correlations were found between the cytocentrifugation and filter-based methods. Moreover, preparations through cytocentrifugation were more adequate for bacterial viability evaluation than filter-based preparations. Transmission electron microscopic analyses revealed a morphological diversity of bacteria with different internal and external structures, such as large variation in the cell envelope and capsule thickness, and presence or not of thylakoid membranes. Our results demonstrate that aquatic bacteria represent an ultrastructurally diverse population and open avenues for easy handling/quantification and better visualization of bacteria by light microscopy without the need of filter membranes.

  14. Light and transmission electronic microscopy evaluation of lyophilized corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Roberta J M; Sousa, Luciene B; Lima Filho, Acácio A S; Lourenço, Andréa C S; Tanakai, Márcia H; Freymuller, Edna

    2008-08-01

    Cornea storage for longer periods is still a challenge for corneal surgeons. The purpose of this study was to find a method to lyophilize corneas for anterior lamellar transplant and to evaluate them by light and transmission electronic microscopy. Corneal flaps were created by using a microkeratome. Corneas were lyophilized with a cryoprotectant (2.3 mol sacarousis for 40 minutes) and without a cryoprotectant in a lyophilization machine (Modulyon D). The corneas were rehydrated with distilled water, balanced saline solution (BSS), and phosphate-buffered saline, after which they were evaluated by microscopy. A cornea that did not undergo lyophilization served as a control. Lyophilization without a cryoprotectant did not preserve the corneal structure. This finding was also observed when lyophilizing and rehydrating the corneas with distilled water or phosphate-buffered saline. We found that lyophilizing corneas and rehydrating them with 11 mL of BSS for 30 minutes preserved the general corneal structure, the parallelism of the collagen fibers, the Bowman layer, and the epithelial basement membrane for 15 and 30 days and for as long as 1 year or more. Lyophilization with sacarousis and rehydration with BSS may be a good method for anterior lamellar transplantation.

  15. Low Voltage Transmission Electron Microscopy in Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendayan, Moise; Paransky, Eugene

    2015-07-01

    Low voltage transmission electron microscopy (LVTEM) was employed to examine biological tissues with accelerating voltages as low as 5kV. Tissue preparation was modified to take advantage of the low-voltage techniques. Treatments with heavy metals, such as post-fixation with osmium tetroxide, on block and counterstaining were omitted. Sections (40nm) were thinner than usual and generated highly contrasted images. General appearance of the cells remains similar to that of conventional TEM. New features were however revealed. The matrix of the pancreatic granules displays heterogeneity with partitions that may correspond to the inner-segregation of their secretory proteins. Mitochondria revealed the presence of the ATP synthase granules along their cristea. The nuclear dense chromatin displayed a honeycomb organization while distinct beads, nucleosomes, aligned along thin threads were seen in the dispersed chromatin. Nuclear pore protein complexes revealed their globular nature. The intercalated disks in cardiac muscle displayed their fine structural organization. These features correlate well with data described or predicted by cell and molecular biology. These new aspects are not revealed when thicker and conventionally osmicated tissue sections were examined by LVTEM, indicating that major masking effects are associated with standard TEM techniques. Immunogold was adapted to LVTEM further enhancing its potential in cell biology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of minerals in coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Kuang-Chien [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Minerals in eight coals from different mines were characterized in the micron-size range by using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Specimens were thinned by ion-milling wafers cut from these coals; a cold stage cooled by liquid nitrogen was used to reduce thermal degradation of the minerals by the ion-beam. Different mineral compounds were observed in different coals. The major minerals are clays, sulfides, oxides, carbonates and some minor-element-bearing phosphates. Clays (kaolinite, illite and others) have been most commonly found as either flat sheets or round globules. Iron sulfide was mostly found in the No. 5 and No. 6 coals from Illinois, distributed as massive polycrystals, as clusters of single crystals (framboids) or as isolated single crystals with size range down to some 0.25 microns. Other sulfides and some oxides were found in other coals with particle size as small as some 200 angstroms. Quartz, titanium oxides and many other carbonates and phosphate compounds were also characterized. Brief TEM work in the organic mass of coal was also introduced to study the nature of the coal macerals.

  17. Nanomaterial engineering and property studies in a transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Dmitri; Costa, Pedro M F J; Wang, Ming-Sheng; Wei, Xianlong; Tang, Dai-Ming; Xu, Zhi; Huang, Yang; Gautam, Ujjal K; Liu, Baodan; Zeng, Haibo; Kawamoto, Naoyki; Zhi, Chunyi; Mitome, Masanori; Bando, Yoshio

    2012-01-10

    Modern methods of in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) allow one to not only manipulate with a nanoscale object at the nanometer-range precision but also to get deep insights into its physical and chemical statuses. Dedicated TEM holders combining the capabilities of a conventional high-resolution TEM instrument and atomic force -, and/or scanning tunneling microscopy probes become the powerful tools in nanomaterials analysis. This progress report highlights the past, present and future of these exciting methods based on the extensive authors endeavors over the last five years. The objects of interest are diverse. They include carbon, boron nitride and other inorganic one- and two-dimensional nanoscale materials, e.g., nanotubes, nanowires and nanosheets. The key point of all experiments discussed is that the mechanical and electrical transport data are acquired on an individual nanostructure level under ultimately high spatial, temporal and energy resolution achievable in TEM, and thus can directly be linked to morphological, structural and chemical peculiarities of a given nanomaterial. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Scanning and transmission electron microscope study of pellicle morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, T

    1977-05-01

    The morphology of pellicle formation was studied using correlated transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Pellicle developed on hydroxyapatite/epoxy resin splints attached to the buccal surfaces of molars and premolars in six young individuals. Splint segments were removed at intervals of 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h. Measurements of pellicle thickness revealed that during the first 12 h considerably more material formed on the apatite surfaces than on the epoxy resin areas of the splints. This difference was equalized in 24- and 48-h specimens. Three types of pellicles could be distinguished on the basis of morphologic criteria. A globular pellicle, characterized by a consistent presence of globules of varying size and configuration, seemed to predominate in most subjects. These globules could not be mistaken for bacteria due to their dimensions, contour, and lack of cell walls. A fibrillar pellicle consisted of 3- to 7-nm-wide fibrils and frequently included some finely globular particles. A granular pellicle displayed a relatively even surface contour and did not exhibit globular or fibrillar structures. In contrast to the two other types, the granular pellicle contained distinct laminations. Apparently, the varying morphology of the early pellicle is a reflection of its complex chemical composition.

  19. Atomic structure of Mg-based metallic glass investigated with neutron diffraction, reverse Monte Carlo modeling and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babilas, Rafał; Łukowiec, Dariusz; Temleitner, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    The structure of a multicomponent metallic glass, Mg 65 Cu 20 Y 10 Ni 5 , was investigated by the combined methods of neutron diffraction (ND), reverse Monte Carlo modeling (RMC) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The RMC method, based on the results of ND measurements, was used to develop a realistic structure model of a quaternary alloy in a glassy state. The calculated model consists of a random packing structure of atoms in which some ordered regions can be indicated. The amorphous structure was also described by peak values of partial pair correlation functions and coordination numbers, which illustrated some types of cluster packing. The N = 9 clusters correspond to the tri-capped trigonal prisms, which are one of Bernal's canonical clusters, and atomic clusters with N = 6 and N = 12 are suitable for octahedral and icosahedral atomic configurations. The nanocrystalline character of the alloy after annealing was also studied by HRTEM. The selected HRTEM images of the nanocrystalline regions were also processed by inverse Fourier transform analysis. The high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) technique was used to determine phase separation in the studied glass after heat treatment. The HAADF mode allows for the observation of randomly distributed, dark contrast regions of about 4-6 nm. The interplanar spacing identified for the orthorhombic Mg 2 Cu crystalline phase is similar to the value of the first coordination shell radius from the short-range order.

  20. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of the microstructure and chemistry of Si/Cu/In/Cu/Si interconnections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommadossi, S.; Litynska, L.; Zieba, P.; Gust, W.; Mittemeijer, E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Si/Si interconnections, obtained using a Cu metallization and an In interlayer and joined by diffusion soldering are presented. The Si/Cu/In/Cu/Si bonds were accomplished due to isothermal solidification and subsequent interdiffusion of In and Cu in the samples held at 180 deg. C. Application of a transmission electron microscope (TEM) with an attachment for high-resolution chemical analysis allowed characterizing the microstructural and microchemical feature of the intermetallics formed in the joint. Appearance of two phases, namely η(Cu 2 In) and δ(Cu 7 In 3 ), was confirmed by electron diffraction patterns and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The bond quality and the high melting point of the phases (∼630 deg. C) indicate a great potential of this technique for joining of integrated circuits in electronics

  1. Preferred diffusion paths for copper electromigration by in situ transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young-Hwa; Kim, Sung-Il; Kim, Miyoung; Lee, Seung-Yong; Kim, Young-Woon

    2017-10-01

    Ionic transport in the reverse direction of an electric field is caused by momentum transfer from free electrons to metal ions, i.e., electromigration (EM), which is a critical factor leading to copper (Cu) interconnect failure in integrated circuits under extreme operating conditions. We investigated Cu self-diffusion paths under electrical bias using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). An electric current was applied to multigrain Cu lines in the TEM instrument for durations of up to the order of 10 4 s to trace EM-induced Cu movement around voids and hillocks. Combining this approach with scanning nanobeam diffraction, we observed that high-angle grain boundaries exposed to the free surface are the most favored paths for Cu EM, rather than a specific orientation within the grain. On hillocks of accumulated Cu atoms, we directly observed grain growth, accompanied by the formation of Σ7 high-mobile and Σ3 twin coincidence site lattice boundaries for effective growth. This study provides insight into the EM mechanism to improve the reliability of metal interconnect design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Nature and evolution of incommensurate charge order in manganites visualized with cryogenic scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Baggari, Ismail; Savitzky, Benjamin H; Admasu, Alemayehu S; Kim, Jaewook; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Hovden, Robert; Kourkoutis, Lena F

    2018-02-13

    Incommensurate charge order in hole-doped oxides is intertwined with exotic phenomena such as colossal magnetoresistance, high-temperature superconductivity, and electronic nematicity. Here, we map, at atomic resolution, the nature of incommensurate charge-lattice order in a manganite using scanning transmission electron microscopy at room temperature and cryogenic temperature ([Formula: see text]93 K). In diffraction, the ordering wave vector changes upon cooling, a behavior typically associated with incommensurate order. However, using real space measurements, we discover that the ordered state forms lattice-locked regions over a few wavelengths interspersed with phase defects and changing periodicity. The cations undergo picometer-scale ([Formula: see text]6 pm to 11 pm) transverse displacements, suggesting that charge-lattice coupling is strong. We further unearth phase inhomogeneity in the periodic lattice displacements at room temperature, and emergent phase coherence at 93 K. Such local phase variations govern the long-range correlations of the charge-ordered state and locally change the periodicity of the modulations, resulting in wave vector shifts in reciprocal space. These atomically resolved observations underscore the importance of lattice coupling and phase inhomogeneity, and provide a microscopic explanation for putative "incommensurate" order in hole-doped oxides. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  3. Circular Hough transform diffraction analysis: A software tool for automated measurement of selected area electron diffraction patterns within Digital MicrographTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, D.R.G.

    2008-01-01

    A software tool (script and plugin) for computing circular Hough transforms (CHT) in Digital Micrograph TM has been developed, for the purpose of automated analysis of selected area electron diffraction patterns (SADPs) of polycrystalline materials. The CHT enables the diffraction pattern centre to be determined with sub-pixel accuracy, regardless of the exposure condition of the transmitted beam or if a beam stop is present. Radii of the diffraction rings can also be accurately measured with sub-pixel precision. If the pattern is calibrated against a known camera length, then d-spacings with an accuracy of better than 1% can be obtained. These measurements require no a priori knowledge of the pattern and very limited user interaction. The accuracy of the CHT is degraded by distortion introduced by the projector lens, and this should be minimised prior to pattern acquisition. A number of optimisations in the CHT software enable rapid processing of patterns; a typical analysis of a 1kx1k image taking just a few minutes. The CHT tool appears robust and is even able to accurately measure SADPs with very incomplete diffraction rings due to texture effects. This software tool is freely downloadable via the Internet

  4. Backscattered electron imaging and electron backscattered diffraction in the study of bacterial attachment to titanium alloy structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anqi; Jones, Ian P; Landini, Gabriel; Mei, Junfa; Tse, Yau Y; Li, Yue X; Ke, Linnan; Huang, Yuanli; Liu, L I; Wang, Chunren; Sammons, Rachel L

    2018-04-01

    The application of secondary electron (SE) imaging, backscattered electron imaging (BSE) and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) was investigated in this work to study the bacterial adhesion and proliferation on a commercially pure titanium (cp Ti) and a Ti6Al4V alloy (Ti 64) with respect to substrate microstructure and chemical composition. Adherence of Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis 11047 and Streptococcus sanguinis GW2, and Gram-negative Serratia sp. NCIMB 40259 and Escherichia coli 10418 was compared on cp Ti, Ti 64, pure aluminium (Al) and vanadium (V). The substrate microstructure and the bacterial distribution on these metals were characterised using SE, BSE and EBSD imaging. It was observed that titanium alloy-phase structure, grain boundaries and grain orientation did not influence bacterial adherence or proliferation at microscale. Adherence of all four strains was similar on cp Ti and Ti 64 surfaces whilst inhibited on pure Al. This work establishes a nondestructive and straight-forward statistical method to analyse the relationship between microbial distribution and metal alloy structure. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  5. Radial distribution function analysis of ultra low-k interlayer dielectric from electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Pradeep; Schulz, Stefan; Hietschold, Michael [Chemnitz University of Technology, Institute of Physics, Chemnitz (Germany); Zimmermann, Sven [FraunhoferInstitute for Electronic Nano Systems (Fraunhofer ENAS), Dept. BEOL, Chemnitz (Germany); Schulze, Steffen [FraunhoferInstitute for Electronic Nano Systems (Fraunhofer ENAS), Dept. BEOL, Chemnitz (Germany); Chemnitz University of Technology, Center for Microtechnologies, Chemnitz, Germany (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The continuous scaling of transistor size towards deep submicron level needs an inevitable replacement of SiO{sub 2} with a low-k dielectric material. In this study we choose three different low-k dielectric materials to determine their structural arrangement by Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED). The SAED analysis for the local short-range ordering has been carried out with homemade software package BEUG having been developed in our group by S. Schulze. Using BEUG, it is possible to Fourier transform the diffracted intensity distribution ending up with the radial distribution function (RDF).The bond lengths calculated from RDF between the Si-O, O-O and Si-Si have a significant change in low-k materials as compared to the corresponding lengths in bulk amorphous SiO{sub 2}. These changes in bond lengths have a reasonable impact on the binding energy of the corresponding elements. We observed an inverse relation between bond lengths and binding energies for the elements present in the materials. Further the local densities of the materials have also been derived from the RDF curve.

  6. Investigation of electronic order using resonant soft X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlappa, J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this PhD work was the application of resonant soft X-ray diffraction technique for the investigation of electronic order in transition metal oxides at the TM L 2,3 -edge, trying to obtain a quantitative understanding of the data. The method was first systematically explored through application to a model system in order to test the feasibility of the technique and to understand of how X-ray optical effects have to be taken into account. Two more complex systems were investigated; stripe order in La 1.8 Sr 0.2 NiO 4 and charge and orbital order in Fe 3 O 4 . The main focus of the work was on the spectroscopic potential of the technique, trying to obtain a level of quantitative description of the data. For X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) from transition metal oxides, cluster configuration interaction calculation provides a powerful and realistic microscopic theory. In the frame work of this thesis cluster theory, considering explicit hybridization effects between the TM-ion and the surrounding oxygen ligands, has been applied for the first time to describe resonant diffraction data. (orig.)

  7. Investigation of electronic order using resonant soft X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlappa, J.

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this PhD work was the application of resonant soft X-ray diffraction technique for the investigation of electronic order in transition metal oxides at the TM L{sub 2,3}-edge, trying to obtain a quantitative understanding of the data. The method was first systematically explored through application to a model system in order to test the feasibility of the technique and to understand of how X-ray optical effects have to be taken into account. Two more complex systems were investigated; stripe order in La{sub 1.8}Sr{sub 0.2}NiO{sub 4} and charge and orbital order in Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The main focus of the work was on the spectroscopic potential of the technique, trying to obtain a level of quantitative description of the data. For X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) from transition metal oxides, cluster configuration interaction calculation provides a powerful and realistic microscopic theory. In the frame work of this thesis cluster theory, considering explicit hybridization effects between the TM-ion and the surrounding oxygen ligands, has been applied for the first time to describe resonant diffraction data. (orig.)

  8. Dark-field imaging based on post-processed electron backscatter diffraction patterns of bulk crystalline materials in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Demers, Hendrix; Gauvin, Raynald

    2015-01-01

    Dark-field (DF) images were acquired in the scanning electron microscope with an offline procedure based on electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns (EBSPs). These EBSD-DF images were generated by selecting a particular reflection on the electron backscatter diffraction pattern and by reporting the intensity of one or several pixels around this point at each pixel of the EBSD-DF image. Unlike previous studies, the diffraction information of the sample is the basis of the final image contrast with a pixel scale resolution at the EBSP providing DF imaging in the scanning electron microscope. The offline facility of this technique permits the selection of any diffraction condition available in the diffraction pattern and displaying the corresponding image. The high number of diffraction-based images available allows a better monitoring of deformation structures compared to electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) which is generally limited to a few images of the same area. This technique was applied to steel and iron specimens and showed its high capability in describing more rigorously the deformation structures around micro-hardness indents. Due to the offline relation between the reference EBSP and the EBSD-DF images, this new technique will undoubtedly greatly improve our knowledge of deformation mechanism and help to improve our understanding of the ECCI contrast mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Single Wall Carbon Nanotube/Polymer Nanocomposites: A First-Principles Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Francisco; Xia, Zhenhai; Lebrion-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    The physics of HRTEM image formation and electron diffraction of SWCNT in a polymer matrix were investigated theoretically on the basis of the multislice method, and the optics of a FEG Super TWIN Philips CM 200 TEM operated at 80 kV. The effect of nanocomposite thickness on both image contrast and typical electron diffraction reflections of nanofillers were explored. The implications of the results on the experimental applicability to study dispersion, chirality and diameter of nanofillers are discussed.

  10. Monochromatic coherent transition and diffraction radiation from a relativistic electron bunch train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, G.; Potylitsyn, A.; Shevelev, M.; Karataev, P.; Shipulya, M.; Bleko, V.

    2018-04-01

    Electron beams of most accelerators have a bunched structure and are synchronized with the accelerating RF field. Due to modulation of the electron beam with frequency ν RF one can expect to observe resonances with frequencies ν k=kṡ ν RF in radiation spectrum generated via any spontaneous emission mechanism (k is an integer and the resonance order). In this paper we present the results of spectral measurements of coherent transition radiation (CTR) generated by an electron bunch train from the Tomsk microtron with ν RF=2.63GHz in the spectral frequency range from 8 to 35 GHz. We also measured the spectrum of coherent diffraction radiation and demonstrated that the observed spectra in both cases consist of monochromatic lines. For spectral measurements the Martin-Puplett interferometer with spectral resolution of 800 MHz (FWMH) was employed. Using a waveguide frequency cut-off we were able to exclude several spectral lines to observe higher resonance orders of up to k =7.

  11. Phase mapping of iron-based rapidly quenched alloys using precession electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svec, P.; Janotova, I.; Hosko, J.; Matko, I.; Janickovic, D.; Svec, P. Sr.; Kepaptsoglou, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    The present contribution is focused on application of PED and phase/orientation mapping of nanocrystals of bcc-Fe formed during the first crystallization stage of amorphous Fe-Co-Si-B ribbon. Using precession electron diffraction and phase/orientation mapping the formation of primary crystalline phase, bcc-Fe, from amorphous Fe-Co-Si-B has been analyzed. Important information about mutual orientation of the phase in individual submicron grains as well as against the sample surface has been obtained. This information contributes to the understanding of micromechanisms controlling crystallization from amorphous rapidly quenched structure and of the structure of the original amorphous state. The presented technique due to its high spatial resolution, speed and information content provided complements well classical techniques, especially in nanocrystalline materials. (authors)

  12. High-voltage electron diffraction study of structure factors of Pd and Pt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, S.; Ohboshi, T.; Oki, K.; Tomokiyo, Y.

    1991-01-01

    In order to determine the atomic scattering factors of Pd and Pt for g=200 and 220 reflections as well as their temperature factors, we measured critical voltages under systematic excitation and the splitting of Kikuchi lines of high-order reflections. A simulation of the many-beam dynmaical diffraction showed that the absorption of electrons in Pd and Pt is so significant as to narrow the splitting of Kikuchi lines by 1.1% and 5.5%, respectively. The analysis of the experimental results taking into account the absorption effect, determined the atomic scattering factors for both elements and the B-factor of Pd with quite good accuracies. In contrast, the B-factor of Pt involves relatively large uncertainty, owing to diffuse Kikuchi lines. (orig.)

  13. Adaptive characterization of recrystallization kinetics in IF steel by electron backscatter diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Kyu; Park, Won-Woong; Lee, Ho Won; Kang, Seong-Hoon; Im, Yong-Taek

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a rigorous methodology for quantifying recrystallization kinetics by electron backscatter diffraction is proposed in order to reduce errors associated with the operator's skill. An adaptive criterion to determine adjustable grain orientation spread depending on the recrystallization stage is proposed to better identify the recrystallized grains in the partially recrystallized microstructure. The proposed method was applied in characterizing the microstructure evolution during annealing of interstitial-free steel cold rolled to low and high true strain levels of 0.7 and 1.6, respectively. The recrystallization kinetics determined by the proposed method was found to be consistent with the standard method of Vickers microhardness. The application of the proposed method to the overall recrystallization stages showed that it can be used for the rigorous characterization of progressive microstructure evolution, especially for the severely deformed material. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  14. Practical considerations in the calculation of orientation distribution functions from electron back-scattered diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, A.W.

    1994-01-01

    Using model data sets for the Brass orientation, the importance of scatter width, angular accuracy and grain size and volume fraction on the sensitivity of the calculated Orientation Distribution Functions have been determined in order to highlight some of the practical considerations needed in the processing of experimental data from individual grain orientation measurements determined by the Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction technique. It is suggested that the most appropriate scatter width can be calculated from the maximum function height versus scatter width curve in order to accommodate variations in texture sharpness. The sensitivity of the ODF to careful sample preparation, mounting and pattern analysis, in order to keep errors in angular accuracy to 1 or less is demonstrated, as is the imperative need to correct for the size of grains, and their volume fractions. (orig.)

  15. Advanced scanning transmission stereo electron microscopy of structural and functional engineering materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agudo Jácome, L.; Eggeler, G.; Dlouhý, A.

    2012-01-01

    Stereo transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides a 3D impression of the microstructure in a thin TEM foil. It allows to perform depth and TEM foil thickness measurements and to decide whether a microstructural feature lies inside of a thin foil or on its surface. It allows appreciating the true three-dimensional nature of dislocation configurations. In the present study we first review some basic elements of classical stereo TEM. We then show how the method can be extended by working in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) mode of a modern analytical 200 kV TEM equipped with a field emission gun (FEG TEM) and a high angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector. We combine two micrographs of a stereo pair into one anaglyph. When viewed with special colored glasses the anaglyph provides a direct and realistic 3D impression of the microstructure. Three examples are provided which demonstrate the potential of this extended stereo TEM technique: a single crystal Ni-base superalloy, a 9% Chromium tempered martensite ferritic steel and a NiTi shape memory alloy. We consider the effect of camera length, show how foil thicknesses can be measured, and discuss the depth of focus and surface effects. -- Highlights: ► The advanced STEM/HAADF diffraction contrast is extended to 3D stereo-imaging. ► The advantages of the new technique over stereo-imaging in CTEM are demonstrated. ► The new method allows foil thickness measurements in a broad range of conditions. ► We show that features associated with ion milling surface damage can be beneficial for appreciating 3D features of the microstructure.

  16. Initial microstructural study of a Ce-La alloy using electron backscattered diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Thomas B.; Younes, Charles M.; Ling, Michael; Jones, Christopher P.; Nicholson, John A.; Heard, Peter J.; Jenkins, Roderick

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → First ever successful EBSD microstructural analysis of Ce-La alloy. → Successful preparation using electro-polishing in the open laboratory. → Equiaxed grains 20-40 μm in size dominate the microstructure, with random orientations, relatively straight grain boundary contacts and no evidence for crystal twinning. → All grains matched to a fcc γ-phase. → Problematic presence of entrapped oxide particles. - Abstract: To better understand and exploit the unique electronic and structural properties of f-block metals and their alloys it is perceived that an improved knowledge of the microstructural characteristics and phase changes as a function of temperature and pressure, is necessary. For other different types of metallic systems, the use of electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) is becoming a common practice in order to obtain detailed microstructural information, but this has, as yet, been very limited in case of f-block metals. Because of their extreme affinity to oxygen and rapid surface reaction, EBSD studies of this metal-category are very sparse with only one work published on cerium metal providing an example of technical hurdles for a prerequisite oxide-free metal surface. Specifically the need to remove the oxide by ion etching was considered essential to enable a successful EBSD analysis. The current work presents the results of a first attempt to characterise the microstructure of a Ce-La alloy using EBSD. It demonstrates that high quality diffraction patterns and crystal orientation maps can be successfully obtained following a carefully controlled preparation of the alloy surface in the open laboratory by applying a simple and reproducible electro-polishing procedure without a further need for ion etching in vaccuo.

  17. AnyStitch: a tool for combining electron backscatter diffraction data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilchak, A L; Shiveley, A R; Tiley, J S; Ballard, D L

    2011-10-01

    Recent advances in electron backscatter diffraction equipment and software have permitted increased data acquisition rates on the order of hundreds of points per second with additional increases in the foreseeable future likely. This increase in speed allows users to collect data from statistically significant areas of samples by combining beam-control scans and automated stage movements. To facilitate data analysis, however, the individual tiles must be combined, or stitched, into a single data set. In this paper, we describe a matlab(®) (The Mathworks, Inc., Natick, MA, USA) program to facilitate stitching of electron backscatter diffraction data. The method offers users a wide range of controls for tile placement including independent overlaps for horizontal and vertical tiles and also includes a parameter to account for systematic stage positioning errors or improperly calibrated scan rotation. The code can stitch data collected on either square or hexagonal grids and contains a function to reduce the resolution of square grid data if the resulting file is too large (or has too many grains) to be opened by the analysis software. The software was primarily written to work with TSL(®) OIM™ data sets and includes a function to quickly read compressed *.osc files into a variable in the matlab(®) workspace as opposed to using slower, text-reading functions. The output file is in *.ang format and can be opened directly by TSL(®) OIM™ Analysis software. A set of functions to facilitate stitching of text-based *.ctf files produced by Oxford Instruments HKL systems are also included. Finally, the code can also be used to combine *.tif images to produce a montage. The source code, a graphical user interface and a compiled version of the software was made available in the online version of this paper. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Contrast of HOLZ lines in energy-filtered convergent-beam electron diffraction patterns from silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmpfuhl, G.; Krahl, D.; Uchida, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Higher-order Laue-zone (HOLZ) lines were investigated in convergent-beam electron diffraction patterns from silicon near the low-indexed zone axes [100], [110] and [111]. The visibility of these lines depends on the effective structure potentials of the reflections from the first Laue zone depending on their Debye-Waller factor. The contrast of the HOLZ lines is strongly reduced by inelastically scattered electrons. They can be excluded by an imaging Ω filter for energy losses above 2 eV. The diffraction patterns were compared with many-beam calculations. Without absorption, an excellent agreement could be achieved for the [111] and [100] zone axes, while the simulation of the [110] zone-axis pattern needed a calculation with absorption. The reason for this observation is explained in the Bloch-wave picture. Calculations with absorption, however, lead to artefacts in the intensity distribution of the [100] HOLZ pattern. In order to obtain agreement with the experiment, the Debye-Waller factor had to be modified in different ways for the different zone axes. This corresponds to a strong anisotropy of the Debye-Waller factor. To confirm this observation, the temperature dependence of the itensity distributions of the HOLZ patterns was investigated between 50 and 680 K. At room temperature, the parameter D in the Debye-Waller factor exp(-Ds 2 ) was determined as 0.13, 0.26 and 0.55 A 2 for the zone axes [100], [111] and [110], respectively. The reliability of the conclusions is discussed. (orig.)

  19. Molecular structure of caffeine as determined by gas electron diffraction aided by theoretical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Toru; Kamiya, Akemi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Konaka, Shigehiro

    2006-12-01

    The molecular structure of caffeine (3,7-dihydro-1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-dione) was determined by means of gas electron diffraction. The nozzle temperature was 185 °C. The results of MP2 and B3LYP calculations with the 6-31G ∗∗ basis set were used as supporting information. These calculations predicted that caffeine has only one conformer and some of the methyl groups perform low frequency internal rotation. The electron diffraction data were analyzed on this basis. The determined structural parameters ( rg and ∠ α) of caffeine are as follows: = 1.382(3) Å; r(C dbnd C) = 1.382(←) Å; r(C sbnd C) = 1.446(18) Å; r(C dbnd N) = 1.297(11) Å; = 1.459(13) Å; = 1.206(5) Å; = 1.085(11) Å; ∠N 1sbnd C 2sbnd N 3 = 116.5(11)°; ∠N 3sbnd C 4dbnd C 5 = 121. 5(13)°; ∠C 4dbnd C 5sbnd C 6 = 122.9(10)°; ∠C 4dbnd C 5sbnd N 7 = 104.7(14)°; ∠N 9-C 4=C 5 = 111.6(10)°; = 108.5(28)°. Angle brackets denote average values; parenthesized values are the estimated limits of error (3 σ) referring to the last significant digit; left arrow in parentheses means that this parameter is bound to the preceding one.

  20. Charging dynamics in electron transmission through Al2O3 capillaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milosavljević, A.R.; Schiessl, K.; Lemell, C.

    2012-01-01

    We have measured the transmission of low-energy (E=250eV) electrons through insulating Al O nanocapillaries. We find that transmission at the incident energy is quickly suppressed with increasing tilt angle ψ of the capillary axis relative to the incoming electron beam while inelastic transmission...... becomes more important. For small angles of incidence charging dynamics lead to a decrease of total transmission (elastic and inelastic) with time. Our results are interpreted on the basis of a microscopic model for the electron transport within the capillary including also close interactions...... with the capillary wall....

  1. Effects of lattice fluctuations on electronic transmission in metal/conjugated-oligomer/metal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Z.G.; Smith, D.L.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic transmission across metal/conjugated-oligomer/metal structures in the presence of lattice fluctuations is studied for short oligomer chains. The lattice fluctuations are approximated by static white noise disorder. Resonant transmission occurs when the energy of an incoming electron coincides with a discrete electronic level of the oligomer. The corresponding transmission peak diminishes in intensity with increasing disorder strength. Because of disorder there is an enhancement of the electronic transmission for energies that lie within the electronic gap of the oligomer. If fluctuations are sufficiently strong, a transmission peak within the gap is found at the midgap energy E=0 for degenerate conjugated oligomers (e.g., trans-polyacetylene) and E≠0 for AB-type degenerate oligomers. These results can be interpreted in terms of soliton-antisoliton states created by lattice fluctuations. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  2. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Iron Metal in Almahata Sitta Ureilite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikouchi, T.; Yubuta, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Aoyagi, Y.; Yasuhara, A.; Mihira, T.; Zolensky, M. E.; Goodrich, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Almahata Sitta (AS) is a polymict breccia mainly composed of variable ureilite lithologies with small amounts of chondritic lithologies [1]. Fe metal is a common accessory phase in ureilites, but our earlier study on Fe metals in one of AS fragments (#44) revealed a unique mineralogy never seen in other ureilites [2,3]. In this abstract we report detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on these metal grains to better understand the thermal history of ureilites. We prepared FIB sections of AS#44 by JEOL JIB-4000 from the PTS that was well characterized by SEM-EBSD in our earlier study [2]. The sections were then observed by STEM (JEOL JEM- 2100F). One of the FIB sections shows a submicron-sized symplectic intergrown texture composed of Fe metal (kamacite), Fe carbide (cohenite), Fe phosphide (schreibersite), and Fe sulfide (troilite). Each phase has an identical SAED pattern in spite of its complex texture, suggesting co-crystallization of all phases. This is probably caused by shock re-melting of pre-existing metal + graphite to form a eutectic-looking texture. The other FIB section is mostly composed of homogeneous Fe metal (93 wt% Fe, 5 wt% Ni, and 2 wt% Si), but BF-STEM images exhibited the presence of elongated lathy grains (approx. 2 microns long) embedded in the interstitial matrix. The SAED patterns from these lath grains could be indexed by alpha-Fe (bcc) while interstitial areas are gamma-Fe (fcc). The elongated alpha-Fe grains show tweed-like structures suggesting martensite transformation. Such a texture can be formed by rapid cooling from high temperature where gamma-Fe was stable. Subsequently alpha-Fe crystallized, but gamma-Fe remained in the interstitial matrix due to quenching from high temperature. This scenario is consistent with very rapid cooling history of ureilites suggested by silicate mineralogy.

  3. In situ conversion of nanostructures from solid to hollow in transmission electron microscopes using electron beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Bittencourt, Carla

    2016-06-07

    With the current development of electron beam sources, the use of transmission electron microscopes is no more limited to imaging or chemical analysis but has rather been extended to nanoengineering. This includes the e-beam induced growth, etching and structural transformation of nanomaterials. In this review we summarize recent progress on the e-beam induced morphological transformation of nanostructures from solid to hollow. We provide a detailed account of the processes reported so far in the literature with a special emphasis on the mechanistic understanding of the e-beam induced hollowing of nanomaterials. Through an important number of examples, we discuss how one can achieve a precise control of such hollowing processes by understanding the fundamental mechanisms occurring at the atomic scale during the irradiation of solid nanostructures. Finally, we conclude with remarks and our own view on the prospective future directions of this research field.

  4. Multiobjective optimization design of an rf gun based electron diffraction beam line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliford, Colwyn; Bartnik, Adam; Bazarov, Ivan; Maxson, Jared

    2017-03-01

    Multiobjective genetic algorithm optimizations of a single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction beam line comprised of a 100 MV /m 1.6-cell normal conducting rf (NCRF) gun, as well as a nine-cell 2 π /3 bunching cavity placed between two solenoids, have been performed. These include optimization of the normalized transverse emittance as a function of bunch charge, as well as optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of the rms bunch length of the beam at the sample location for a fixed charge of 1 06 electrons. Analysis of the resulting solutions is discussed in terms of the relevant scaling laws, and a detailed description of one of the resulting solutions from the coherence length optimizations is given. For a charge of 1 06 electrons and final beam sizes of σx≥25 μ m and σt≈5 fs , we found a relative coherence length of Lc ,x/σx≈0.07 using direct optimization of the coherence length. Additionally, based on optimizations of the emittance as a function of final bunch length, we estimate the relative coherence length for bunch lengths of 30 and 100 fs to be roughly 0.1 and 0.2 nm /μ m , respectively. Finally, using the scaling of the optimal emittance with bunch charge, for a charge of 1 05 electrons, we estimate relative coherence lengths of 0.3, 0.5, and 0.92 nm /μ m for final bunch lengths of 5, 30 and 100 fs, respectively.

  5. Multiobjective optimization design of an rf gun based electron diffraction beam line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colwyn Gulliford

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiobjective genetic algorithm optimizations of a single-shot ultrafast electron diffraction beam line comprised of a 100  MV/m 1.6-cell normal conducting rf (NCRF gun, as well as a nine-cell 2π/3 bunching cavity placed between two solenoids, have been performed. These include optimization of the normalized transverse emittance as a function of bunch charge, as well as optimization of the transverse coherence length as a function of the rms bunch length of the beam at the sample location for a fixed charge of 10^{6} electrons. Analysis of the resulting solutions is discussed in terms of the relevant scaling laws, and a detailed description of one of the resulting solutions from the coherence length optimizations is given. For a charge of 10^{6} electrons and final beam sizes of σ_{x}≥25  μm and σ_{t}≈5  fs, we found a relative coherence length of L_{c,x}/σ_{x}≈0.07 using direct optimization of the coherence length. Additionally, based on optimizations of the emittance as a function of final bunch length, we estimate the relative coherence length for bunch lengths of 30 and 100 fs to be roughly 0.1 and 0.2  nm/μm, respectively. Finally, using the scaling of the optimal emittance with bunch charge, for a charge of 10^{5} electrons, we estimate relative coherence lengths of 0.3, 0.5, and 0.92  nm/μm for final bunch lengths of 5, 30 and 100 fs, respectively.

  6. Low-energy electron transmission through high aspect ratio Al O nanocapillaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milosavljević, A.R.; Jureta, J.; Víkor, G.

    2009-01-01

    Electron transmission through insulating AlO nanocapillaries of different diameters (40 and 270 nm) and 15 μm length has been investigated for low-energy electrons (2-120 V). The total intensity of transmitted current weakly depends on the incident electron energy and tilt angle defined with resp......Electron transmission through insulating AlO nanocapillaries of different diameters (40 and 270 nm) and 15 μm length has been investigated for low-energy electrons (2-120 V). The total intensity of transmitted current weakly depends on the incident electron energy and tilt angle defined...

  7. A preliminary electron backscattered diffraction study of sintered NdFeB-type magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, S J; Williams, A J; Davies, B E; Harris, I R

    2002-03-01

    This paper reports, for the first time, the use of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) to study orientation in sintered NdFeB type magnets. The magnetic properties of NdFeB magnets are greatly improved if a strong crystallographic texture is firstly achieved, namely, the direction of the c-axis is along the direction of magnetization. A systematic survey of sample preparation techniques showed that samples that were mechanically polished and then etched gave the most reliable EBSD data. Analyses were made using both fully automated EBSD scans and by EBSD measurements taken after manual movement of the beam. The EBSD results are presented as secondary electron SEM micrographs, orientation images and 001 pole figures. For the selection of grains investigated, the deviation of the c-axis was shown to be between 10 degrees and 30 degrees from the ideal [001]//magnetization direction. It is demonstrated that EBSD is a valuable tool for characterizing the microstructure and texture relationships and for assessing the performance of the processing routes of NdFeB magnets.

  8. An automated method of quantifying ferrite microstructures using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrestha, Sachin L.; Breen, Andrew J.; Trimby, Patrick; Proust, Gwénaëlle; Ringer, Simon P.; Cairney, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    The identification and quantification of the different ferrite microconstituents in steels has long been a major challenge for metallurgists. Manual point counting from images obtained by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is commonly used for this purpose. While classification systems exist, the complexity of steel microstructures means that identifying and quantifying these phases is still a great challenge. Moreover, point counting is extremely tedious, time consuming, and subject to operator bias. This paper presents a new automated identification and quantification technique for the characterisation of complex ferrite microstructures by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). This technique takes advantage of the fact that different classes of ferrite exhibit preferential grain boundary misorientations, aspect ratios and mean misorientation, all of which can be detected using current EBSD software. These characteristics are set as criteria for identification and linked to grain size to determine the area fractions. The results of this method were evaluated by comparing the new automated technique with point counting results. The technique could easily be applied to a range of other steel microstructures. - Highlights: • New automated method to identify and quantify ferrite microconstituents in HSLA steels is presented. • Unique characteristics of the ferrite microconstituents are investigated using EBSD. • Characteristics of ferrite microconstituents are exploited to identify the type of ferrite grains within the steel's microstructures. • The identified ferrite grains are linked to their associated grain's size for area fraction calculations

  9. Femtosecond electron diffraction and spectroscopic studies of a solid state organic chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Ruel, Hubert

    Photochromic diarylethene molecules are excellent model systems for studying electrocyclic reactions, in addition to having important technological applications in optoelectronics. The photoinduced ring-closing reaction in a crystalline photochromic diarylethene derivative was fully resolved using the complementary techniques of transient absorption spectroscopy and femtosecond electron crystallography. These studies are detailed in this thesis, together with the associated technical developments which enabled them. Importantly, the time-resolved crystallographic investigation reported here represents a highly significant proof-of-principle experiment. It constitutes the first study directly probing the molecular structural changes associated with an organic chemical reaction with sub-picosecond temporal and atomic spatial resolution---to follow the primary motions directing chemistry. In terms of technological development, the most important advance reported is the implementation of a radio frequency rebunching system capable of producing femtosecond electron pulses of exceptional brightness. The temporal resolution of this newly developed electron source was fully characterized using laser ponderomotive scattering, confirming a 435 +/- 75 fs instrument response time with 0.20 pC bunches. The ultrafast spectroscopic and crystallographic measurements were both achieved by exploiting the photoreversibility of diarylethene. The transient absorption study was first performed, after developing a novel robust acquisition scheme for thermally irreversible reactions in the solid state. It revealed the formation of an open-ring excited state intermediate, following photoexcitation of the open-ring isomer with an ultraviolet laser pulse, with a time constant of approximately 200 fs. The actual ring closing was found to occur from this intermediate with a time constant of 5.3 +/- 0.3 ps. The femtosecond diffraction measurements were then performed using multiple crystal

  10. Ab-initio crystal structure analysis and refinement approaches of oligo p-benzamides based on electron diffraction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, Tatiana E; van de Streek, Jacco; Kilbinger, Andreas F M; Brunklaus, Gunther; Kolb, Ute

    2012-04-01

    Ab-initio crystal structure analysis of organic materials from electron diffraction data is presented. The data were collected using the automated electron diffraction tomography (ADT) technique. The structure solution and refinement route is first validated on the basis of the known crystal structure of tri-p-benzamide. The same procedure is then applied to solve the previously unknown crystal structure of tetra-p-benzamide. In the crystal structure of tetra-p-benzamide, an unusual hydrogen-bonding scheme is realised; the hydrogen-bonding scheme is, however, in perfect agreement with solid-state NMR data.

  11. In Situ Electronic Characterization of Graphene Nanoconstrictions Fabricated in a Transmission Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ye; Merchant, Christopher; Drndic, Marija; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    2012-02-01

    We report electronic measurements on high quality graphene nanoconstrictions (GNCs) fabricated in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), and the first measurements on GNC conductance with an accurate measurement of constriction width down to 1 nm. To create the GNCs, freely suspended graphene ribbons were fabricated using few-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. The ribbons were loaded into the TEM, and a current-annealing procedure was used to clean the material and improve its electronic characteristics. The TEM beam was then used to sculpt GNCs to a series of desired widths in the range 1-700 nm; after each sculpting step, the sample was imaged by TEM and its electronic properties were measured in situ. GNC conductance was found to be remarkably high, comparable to that of exfoliated graphene samples of similar size. The GNC conductance varied with width approximately as G(w) = (e^2/h)w^0.75, where w is the constriction width in nanometers. GNCs support current densities greater than 120 μA/nm^2, 2 orders of magnitude higher than that which has been previously reported for graphene nanoribbons and 2000 times higher than that reported for copper.

  12. Charging of carbon thin films in scanning and phase-plate transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hettler, Simon; Kano, Emi; Dries, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    A systematic study on charging of carbon thin films under intense electron-beam irradiation was performed in a transmission electron microscope to identify the underlying physics for the functionality of hole-free phase plates. Thin amorphous carbon films fabricated by different deposition...... as simulations of the electrostatic potential distribution. The described ESD-based model explains previous experimental findings and is of general interest to any phase-related technique in a transmission electron microscope....

  13. Study of deformation and fracture micro mechanisms of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V using electron microscopy and and X-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morcelli, Aparecido Edilson

    2009-01-01

    This present work allowed the study of deformation and fracture micro mechanisms of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V, used commercially for the manufacture of metallic biomaterials. The techniques employed for the analysis of the material under study were: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The study of the influence and behavior of the phases present in titanium alloys is important to evaluate the behavior of cracks in titanium alloys with high mechanical strength, which have fine alpha (α), beta (β) and (α±β) microstructure, linking the presence of the phases with the strength of the material. The evaluation in situ of deformation and fracture micro mechanisms were performed by TEM and was also a study of phase transformations during cooling in titanium alloys, using the techniques of bright field, dark field and diffraction of electrons in the selected area. After heat treatment differences were observed between the amount of in relation to the original microstructure of the β and α phases material for different conditions used in heat treatment applied to the alloy. The presence of lamellar microstructure formed during cooling in the β field was observed, promoting the conversion of part of the secondary alpha structure in β phase, which was trapped between the lamellar of alpha. (author)

  14. Diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period critical-angle transmission gratings in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet wavelength bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Ahn, Minseung; Bruccoleri, Alex; Chang, Chih-Hao; Gullikson, Eric M.; Mukherjee, Pran; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2011-01-01

    We report on measurements of the diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period freestanding blazed transmission gratings for wavelengths in the 0.96 to 19.4 nm range. These critical-angle transmission (CAT) gratings achieve highly efficient blazing over a broad band via total external reflection off the sidewalls of smooth, tens of nanometer thin ultrahigh aspect-ratio silicon grating bars and thus combine the advantages of blazed x-ray reflection gratings with those of more conventional x-ray transmission gratings. Prototype gratings with maximum depths of 3.2 and 6 μm were investigated at two different blaze angles. In these initial CAT gratings the grating bars are monolithically connected to a cross support mesh that only leaves less than half of the grating area unobstructed. Because of our initial fabrication approach, the support mesh bars feature a strongly trapezoidal cross section that leads to varying CAT grating depths and partial absorption of diffracted orders. While theory predicts broadband absolute diffraction efficiencies as high as 60% for ideal CAT gratings without a support mesh, experimental results show efficiencies in the range of ∼50-100% of theoretical predictions when taking the effects of the support mesh into account. Future minimization of the support mesh therefore promises broadband CAT grating absolute diffraction efficiencies of 50% or higher.

  15. A study of growth and thermal dewetting behavior of ultra-thin gold films using transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The growth and solid-state dewetting behavior of Au thin films (0.7 to 8.4 nm deposited on the formvar film (substrate by sputtering technique have been studied using transmission electron microscopy. The size and number density of the Au nanoparticles (NPs change with an increase in the film thickness (0.7 to 2.8 nm. Nearly spherical Au NPs are obtained for 6 nm show capability to be used as an irreversible temperature sensor with a sensitivity of ∼0.1 CAF/°C. It is observed that annealing affects the crystallinity of the Au grains in the films. The electron diffraction measurement also shows annealing induced morphological evolution in the percolated Au thin films (≥3 nm during solid-state dewetting and recrystallization of the grains.

  16. Burgers vector analysis of large area misfit dislocation arrays from bend contour contrast in transmission electron microscope images

    CERN Document Server

    Spiecker, E

    2002-01-01

    A transmission electron microscopy method is described which allows us to determine the Burgers vectors (BVs) of a large number of interfacial misfit dislocations (MDs) in mismatched heterostructures. The method combines large-area plan-view thinning of the sample for creating a strongly bent electron transparent foil with the analysis of the splitting and displacement of bend contours at their crossings with the MDs. The BV analysis is demonstrated for 60 deg. MDs in a low-mismatched SiGe/Si(001) heterostructure. Crossings of various bend contours with the MDs are analysed with respect to their information content for the BV analysis. In future applications the method may be used for analysing such a large number of MDs that a quantitative comparison with x-ray diffraction experiments, especially with data on diffusely scattered x-rays originating from the strain fields around the dislocations, becomes possible.

  17. Stress-induced phase transformations studied by in-situ transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    No, M L; Ibarra, A [Dpto de Fisica Aplicada II, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UPV/EHU. Apdo 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Caillard, D [CEMES/CNRS, BP 4347, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex (France); San Juan, J, E-mail: maria.no@ehu.e [Dpto de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UPV/EHU. Apdo 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    In this work, we carry out a detailed study, by in-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (in-situ TEM), focused on two single-crystals of Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys with different transformation temperatures. The first single crystal is in beta phase at Room Temperature (RT) and has been cycled under stress, by super-elastic effect, inside the TEM. Two different mechanisms for the nucleation of {beta}'{sub 3} and {gamma}'{sub 3} martensite phases were observed: a) Martensite can nucleate on dislocations during super-elastic tests and when withdrawing the stress, the reverse transformation takes place by the disappearance of the martensite plate on the dislocation. b) During mechanical cycling martensite plates nucleate in other plates. The second single crystal is in martensite phase at RT, and when the stress is applied different mechanisms are observed: a) Reorientation and interface motion of the plates under the external applied stress, b) nucleation of mobile dislocations inside the martensite. A quantitative analysis of the experimental results, having into account the images and the diffraction patterns, has been realized and different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the experimental results.

  18. Volta potential phase plate for in-focus phase contrast transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danev, Radostin; Buijsse, Bart; Khoshouei, Maryam; Plitzko, Jürgen M; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2014-11-04

    We describe a phase plate for transmission electron microscopy taking advantage of a hitherto-unknown phenomenon, namely a beam-induced Volta potential on the surface of a continuous thin film. The Volta potential is negative, indicating that it is not caused by beam-induced electrostatic charging. The film must be heated to ∼ 200 °C to prevent contamination and enable the Volta potential effect. The phase shift is created "on the fly" by the central diffraction beam eliminating the need for precise phase plate alignment. Images acquired with the Volta phase plate (VPP) show higher contrast and unlike Zernike phase plate images no fringing artifacts. Following installation into the microscope, the VPP has an initial settling time of about a week after which the phase shift behavior becomes stable. The VPP has a long service life and has been used for more than 6 mo without noticeable degradation in performance. The mechanism underlying the VPP is the same as the one responsible for the degradation over time of the performance of thin-film Zernike phase plates, but in the VPP it is used in a constructive way. The exact physics and/or chemistry behind the process causing the Volta potential are not fully understood, but experimental evidence suggests that radiation-induced surface modification combined with a chemical equilibrium between the surface and residual gases in the vacuum play an important role.

  19. Nicotiana Occidentalis Chloroplast Ultrastructure imaged with Transmission Electron Microscopes Working at Different Accelerating Voltages

    OpenAIRE

    SVIDENSKÁ, Silvie

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis is to study and compare electron microscopy images of Nicotiana Occidentalis chloroplasts, obtained from two types of transmission electron microscopes,which work with different accelerating voltage of 80kV and 5kV. The two instruments, TEM JEOL 1010 and low voltage electron microscope LVEM5 are employed for experiments. In the first theoretical part, principle of electron microscopy and chloroplast morphology is described. In experimental part, electron microscop...

  20. Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope: experimental observations and possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, H; Su, D; Egerton, R F; Konno, M; Wu, L; Ciston, J; Wall, J; Zhu, Y

    2011-06-01

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondary electrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. A possible mechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Accurate virus quantitation using a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) detector in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancett, Candace D; Fetterer, David P; Koistinen, Keith A; Morazzani, Elaine M; Monninger, Mitchell K; Piper, Ashley E; Kuehl, Kathleen A; Kearney, Brian J; Norris, Sarah L; Rossi, Cynthia A; Glass, Pamela J; Sun, Mei G

    2017-10-01

    A method for accurate quantitation of virus particles has long been sought, but a perfect method still eludes the scientific community. Electron Microscopy (EM) quantitation is a valuable technique because it provides direct morphology information and counts of all viral particles, whether or not they are infectious. In the past, EM negative stain quantitation methods have been cited as inaccurate, non-reproducible, and with detection limits that were too high to be useful. To improve accuracy and reproducibility, we have developed a method termed Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy - Virus Quantitation (STEM-VQ), which simplifies sample preparation and uses a high throughput STEM detector in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) coupled with commercially available software. In this paper, we demonstrate STEM-VQ with an alphavirus stock preparation to present the method's accuracy and reproducibility, including a comparison of STEM-VQ to viral plaque assay and the ViroCyt Virus Counter. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Practical spatial resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, A B; Ramasse, Q M; Wen, J G; Bhattacharya, A; Zuo, J M

    2011-08-01

    The resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is limited by delocalization of inelastic electron scattering rather than probe size in an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). In this study, we present an experimental quantification of EELS spatial resolution using chemically modulated 2×(LaMnO(3))/2×(SrTiO(3)) and 2×(SrVO(3))/2×(SrTiO(3)) superlattices by measuring the full width at half maxima (FWHM) of integrated Ti M(2,3), Ti L(2,3), V L(2,3), Mn L(2,3), La N(4,5), La N(2,3) La M(4,5) and Sr L(3) edges over the superlattices. The EELS signals recorded using large collection angles are peaked at atomic columns. The FWHM of the EELS profile, obtained by curve-fitting, reveals a systematic trend with the energy loss for the Ti, V, and Mn edges. However, the experimental FWHM of the Sr and La edges deviates significantly from the observed experimental tendency. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Electron density study of urea using TDS-corrected X-ray diffraction data: quantitative comparison of experimental theoretical results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zavodnik, Valery; Stash, Adam; Tsirelson, Vladimir; Feil, D.; de Vries, R.Y.; Feil, Dirk

    1999-01-01

    The electron-density distribution in urea, CO(NH2)2, was studied by high-precision single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis at 148 (1) K. An experimental correction for TDS was applied to the X-ray intensities. Rmerge(F2) = 0.015. The displacement parameters agree quite well with results from

  4. Effects of focused ion beam milling on electron backscatter diffraction patterns in strontium titanate and stabilized zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saowadee, Nath; Agersted, Karsten; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of focused ion beam (FIB) current and accelerating voltage on electron backscatter diffraction pattern quality of yttria‐stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Nb‐doped strontium titanate (STN) to optimize data quality and acquisition time for 3D‐EBSD experiments by FIB...

  5. An Incommensurately Modulated Structure of eta '-Phase of Cu3+xSi Determined by Quantitative Electron Diffraction Tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palatinus, L.; Klementová, Mariana; Dřínek, V.; Jarošová, M.; Petříček, V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 8 (2011), s. 3743-3751 ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1088 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : copper silicide * incommensurate structure * electron diffraction tomography * ab inition structure solution * superspace Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.601, year: 2011

  6. Combining nanocalorimetry and dynamic transmission electron microscopy for in situ characterization of materials processes under rapid heating and cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grapes, Michael D., E-mail: mgrapes1@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Materials Measurement Science Division, Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); LaGrange, Thomas; Reed, Bryan W.; Campbell, Geoffrey H. [Condensed Matter and Materials Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Friedman, Lawrence H.; LaVan, David A., E-mail: david.lavan@nist.gov [Materials Measurement Science Division, Material Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Weihs, Timothy P., E-mail: weihs@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Nanocalorimetry is a chip-based thermal analysis technique capable of analyzing endothermic and exothermic reactions at very high heating and cooling rates. Here, we couple a nanocalorimeter with an extremely fast in situ microstructural characterization tool to identify the physical origin of rapid enthalpic signals. More specifically, we describe the development of a system to enable in situ nanocalorimetry experiments in the dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM), a time-resolved TEM capable of generating images and electron diffraction patterns with exposure times of 30 ns–500 ns. The full experimental system consists of a modified nanocalorimeter sensor, a custom-built in situ nanocalorimetry holder, a data acquisition system, and the DTEM itself, and is capable of thermodynamic and microstructural characterization of reactions over a range of heating rates (10{sup 2} K/s–10{sup 5} K/s) accessible by conventional (DC) nanocalorimetry. To establish its ability to capture synchronized calorimetric and microstructural data during rapid transformations, this work describes measurements on the melting of an aluminum thin film. We were able to identify the phase transformation in both the nanocalorimetry traces and in electron diffraction patterns taken by the DTEM. Potential applications for the newly developed system are described and future system improvements are discussed.

  7. Combining structural and chemical information at the nanometer scale by correlative transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbig, M; Choi, P; Raabe, D

    2015-06-01

    In many cases, the three-dimensional reconstructions from atom probe tomography (APT) are not sufficiently accurate to resolve crystallographic features such as lattice planes, shear bands, stacking faults, dislocations or grain boundaries. Hence, correlative crystallographic characterization is required in addition to APT at the exact same location of the specimen. Also, for the site-specific preparation of APT tips containing regions of interest (e.g. grain boundaries) correlative electron microscopy is often inevitable. Here we present a versatile experimental setup that enables performing correlative focused ion beam milling, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and APT under optimized characterization conditions. The setup was designed for high throughput, robustness and practicability. We demonstrate that atom probe tips can be characterized by TEM in the same way as a standard TEM sample. In particular, the use of scanning nanobeam diffraction provides valuable complementary crystallographic information when being performed on atom probe tips. This technique enables the measurement of orientation and phase maps as known from electron backscattering diffraction with a spatial resolution down to one nanometer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of the decameric structure of peroxiredoxin-II by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, J. Robin; Schröder, Ewald; Isupov, Michail N.

    2001-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin; Transmission electron microscopy; X-ray structure; Negative staining; angular reconstitution; Molecular fitting......Peroxiredoxin; Transmission electron microscopy; X-ray structure; Negative staining; angular reconstitution; Molecular fitting...

  9. Microfluidic sorting of protein nanocrystals by size for X-ray free-electron laser diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahige G. Abdallah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The advent and application of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL has uncovered the structures of proteins that could not previously be solved using traditional crystallography. While this new technology is powerful, optimization of the process is still needed to improve data quality and analysis efficiency. One area is sample heterogeneity, where variations in crystal size (among other factors lead to the requirement of large data sets (and thus 10–100 mg of protein for determining accurate structure factors. To decrease sample dispersity, we developed a high-throughput microfluidic sorter operating on the principle of dielectrophoresis, whereby polydisperse particles can be transported into various fluid streams for size fractionation. Using this microsorter, we isolated several milliliters of photosystem I nanocrystal fractions ranging from 200 to 600 nm in size as characterized by dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking, and electron microscopy. Sorted nanocrystals were delivered in a liquid jet via the gas dynamic virtual nozzle into the path of the XFEL at the Linac Coherent Light Source. We obtained diffraction to ∼4 Å resolution, indicating that the small crystals were not damaged by the sorting process. We also observed the shape transforms of photosystem I nanocrystals, demonstrating that our device can optimize data collection for the shape transform-based phasing method. Using simulations, we show that narrow crystal size distributions can significantly improve merged data quality in serial crystallography. From this proof-of-concept work, we expect that the automated size-sorting of protein crystals will become an important step for sample production by reducing the amount of protein needed for a high quality final structure and the development of novel phasing methods that exploit inter-Bragg reflection intensities or use variations in beam intensity for radiation damage-induced phasing. This method will also

  10. The effect of pattern overlap on the accuracy of high resolution electron backscatter diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Vivian, E-mail: v.tong13@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Jiang, Jun [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Britton, T. Ben [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    High resolution, cross-correlation-based, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measures the variation of elastic strains and lattice rotations from a reference state. Regions near grain boundaries are often of interest but overlap of patterns from the two grains could reduce accuracy of the cross-correlation analysis. To explore this concern, patterns from the interior of two grains have been mixed to simulate the interaction volume crossing a grain boundary so that the effect on the accuracy of the cross correlation results can be tested. It was found that the accuracy of HR-EBSD strain measurements performed in a FEG-SEM on zirconium remains good until the incident beam is less than 18 nm from a grain boundary. A simulated microstructure was used to measure how often pattern overlap occurs at any given EBSD step size, and a simple relation was found linking the probability of overlap with step size. - Highlights: • Pattern overlap occurs at grain boundaries and reduces HR-EBSD accuracy. • A test is devised to measure the accuracy of HR-EBSD in the presence of overlap. • High pass filters can sometimes, but not generally, improve HR-EBSD measurements. • Accuracy of HR-EBSD remains high until the reference pattern intensity is <72%. • 9% of points near a grain boundary will have significant error for 200nm step size in Zircaloy-4.

  11. Analysis of soft magnetic materials by electron backscatter diffraction as a powerful tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, David; Hohs, Dominic; Loeffler, Ralf; Bernthaler, Timo; Goll, Dagmar; Schneider, Gerhard

    2018-04-01

    The current work demonstrates that electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a powerful and versatile characterization technique for investigating soft magnetic materials. The properties of soft magnets, e.g., magnetic losses strongly depend on the materials chemical composition and microstructure, including grain size and shape, texture, degree of plastic deformation and elastic strain. In electrical sheet stacks for e-motor applications, the quality of the machined edges/surfaces of each individual sheet is of special interest. Using EBSD, the influence of the punching process on the microstructure at the cutting edge is quantitatively assessed by evaluating the crystallographic misorientation distribution of the deformed grains. Using an industrial punching process, the maximum affected deformation depth is determined to be 200 - 300 μm. In the case of laser cutting, the affected deformation depth is determined to be approximately zero. Reliability and detection limits of the developed EBSD approach are evaluated on non-affected sample regions and model samples containing different indentation test bodies. A second application case is the investigation of the recrystallization process during the annealing step of soft magnetic composites (SMC) toroids produced by powder metallurgy as a function of compaction pressure, annealing parameters and powder particle size. With increasing pressure and temperature, the recrystallized area fraction (e.g., grains with crystallographic misorientations size distributions. Here, large particles with coarse internal grain structures show a favorable recrystallization behavior which results in large bulk permeability of up to 600 - 700 and lower amount of residual misorientations (>3°).

  12. Reconstruction of Laser-Induced Surface Topography from Electron Backscatter Diffraction Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Patrick G; Echlin, McLean P; Pollock, Tresa M; De Graef, Marc

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate that the surface topography of a sample can be reconstructed from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns collected with a commercial EBSD system. This technique combines the location of the maximum background intensity with a correction from Monte Carlo simulations to determine the local surface normals at each point in an EBSD scan. A surface height map is then reconstructed from the local surface normals. In this study, a Ni sample was machined with a femtosecond laser, which causes the formation of a laser-induced periodic surface structure (LIPSS). The topography of the LIPSS was analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reconstructions from EBSD patterns collected at 5 and 20 kV. The LIPSS consisted of a combination of low frequency waviness due to curtaining and high frequency ridges. The morphology of the reconstructed low frequency waviness and high frequency ridges matched the AFM data. The reconstruction technique does not require any modification to existing EBSD systems and so can be particularly useful for measuring topography and its evolution during in situ experiments.

  13. Application of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to fracture studies of ferritic steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P A; Novovic, M; Randle, V; Bowen, P

    2002-03-01

    The application of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to fracture studies has provided a new method for investigating the crystallography of fracture surfaces. The crystallographic indices of cleavage planes can be measured both directly from the fracture surface and indirectly from metallographic sections perpendicular to the plane of the adjoining fracture surfaces. The results of direct individual cleavage facet plane orientation measurements are presented for carbon-manganese (C-Mn) and low-alloy Mn-Mo-Ni (similar to ASTM A553 type-B). Pressure vessel steel weld metals, obtained from fracture surfaces of Charpy impact test specimens fractured at various test temperatures and for an ultra-low carbon steel (Fe-0.002C- 0.058P) fractured at -196 degrees C by impact. In addition to the direct measurement from the fracture surface, cleavage facet orientation measurements for the ultra-low carbon steel were complemented by the results obtained from the metallographic sections. Fractographic observations revealed that cleavage fracture is accommodated by a microvoid coalescence fracture micromechanism, which was induced by decohesion of second phase particles (inclusions). The correlation between the direct and indirect methodologies shows that the cleavage facet planes are dominated by the [001] plane orientations, and indicated that even when information concerning the full five degrees of freedom is inaccessible, the cleavage facet plane could still be determined. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of direct orientation measurements from the fracture surface and indirectly by a destructive sectioning technique are discussed.

  14. In situ electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) during the compression of micropillars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niederberger, C.; Mook, W.M.; Maeder, X.; Michler, J.

    2010-01-01

    For the first time, in situ electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements during compression experiments by a modified nanoindenter on micron-sized single crystal pillars are demonstrated here. The experimental setup and the requirements concerning the compression sample are described in detail. EBSD mappings have been acquired before loading, under load and after unloading for consecutive compression cycles on a focused ion beam (FIB) milled GaAs micropillar. In situ EBSD allows for the determination of crystallographic orientation with sub-100 nm spatial resolution. Thereby, it provides highly localized information pertaining to the deformation phenomena such as elastic bending of the micropillar or the formation of deformation twins and plastic orientation gradients due to geometrically necessary dislocations. The most striking features revealed by in situ EBSD are the non-negligible amount of reversible (elastic) bending of the micropillar and the fact that deformation twinning and dislocation glide initiate where the bending is strongest. Due to this high spatial and orientation resolution, in situ EBSD measurements during micromechanical testing are demonstrated to be a promising technique for the investigation of deformation phenomena at the nano- to micro-scale.

  15. Electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction evidence for two Z-band structural states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perz-Edwards, Robert J; Reedy, Michael K

    2011-08-03

    In vertebrate muscles, Z-bands connect adjacent sarcomeres, incorporate several cell signaling proteins, and may act as strain sensors. Previous electron microscopy (EM) showed Z-bands reversibly switch between a relaxed, "small-square" structure, and an active, "basketweave" structure, but the mechanism of this transition is unknown. Here, we found the ratio of small-square to basketweave in relaxed rabbit psoas muscle varied with temperature, osmotic pressure, or ionic strength, independent of activation. By EM, the A-band and both Z-band lattice spacings varied with temperature and pressure, not ionic strength; however, the basketweave spacing was consistently 10% larger than small-square. We next sought evidence for the two Z-band structures in unfixed muscles using x-ray diffraction, which indicated two Z-reflections whose intensity ratios and spacings correspond closely to the EM measurements for small-square and basketweave if the EM spacings are adjusted for 20% shrinkage due to EM processing. We conclude that the two Z-reflections arise from the small-square and basketweave forms of the Z-band as seen by EM. Regarding the mechanism of transition during activation, the effects of Ca(2+) in the presence of force inhibitors suggested that the interconversion of Z-band forms was correlated with tropomyosin movement on actin. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Trapping the M sub 1 and M sub 2 substrates of bacteriorhodopsin for electron diffraction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, G.A.

    1992-05-01

    Visible and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopies are used to observe protein conformational changes occuring during the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle. Spectroscopic measurements which define the conditions under which bacteriorhodopsin can be isolated and trapped in two distinct substates of the m intermediate of the photocycle, M{sub 1}, and M{sub 2}, are described. A protocol that can be used for high-resolution electron diffraction studies is presented that will trap glucose-embedded purple membrane in the M{sub 1}and M{sub 2} substates at greater than 90% concentration. It was discovered that glucose alone does not provide a fully hydrated environment for bacteriorhodopsin. Equilibration of glucose-embedded samples at high humidity can result in a physical state that is demonstrably closer to the native, fully hydrated state. An extension of the C-T Model of bacteriorhodopsin functionality (Fodor et al., 1988; Mathies et al., 1991) is proposed based on FTIR results and guided by published spectra from resonance Raman and FTIR work. 105 refs.

  17. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Studies on the Formation of Superlattice Metal Hydride Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuli Yan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Microstructures of a series of La-Mg-Ni-based superlattice metal hydride alloys produced by a novel method of interaction of a LaNi5 alloy and Mg vapor were studied using a combination of X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. The conversion rate of LaNi5 increased from 86.8% into 98.2%, and the A2B7 phase abundance increased from 42.5 to 45.8 wt % and reduced to 39.2 wt % with the increase in process time from four to 32 h. During the first stage of reaction, Mg formed discrete grains with the same orientation, which was closely related to the orientation of the host LaNi5 alloy. Mg then diffused through the ab-phase of LaNi5 and formed the AB2, AB3, and A2B7 phases. Diffusion of Mg stalled at the grain boundary of the host LaNi5 alloy. Good alignments in the c-axis between the newly formed superlattice phases and LaNi5 were observed. The density of high-angle grain boundary decreased with the increase in process time and was an indication of lattice cracking.

  18. Experimental evidence concerning the significant information depth of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisniewski, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.w@uni-jena.de [Otto-Schott-Institut, Jena University, Fraunhoferstr. 6, 07743 Jena (Germany); Saager, Stefan [Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP, Winterbergstraße 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Böbenroth, Andrea [Fraunhofer Institute for the Microstructure of Materials and Systems IMWS, Walter-Huelse-Straße 1, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Rüssel, Christian [Otto-Schott-Institut, Jena University, Fraunhoferstr. 6, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Experiments concerning the information depth of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) are performed on samples featuring an amorphous wedge on a crystalline substrate and a crystalline wedge on an amorphous substrate. The effects of the acceleration voltage and exemplary software settings on the ability to measure through an amorphous layer are presented. Changes in the EBSD-signal could be detected through a ≈142 nm thick layer of amorphous Si while orientation measurements could be performed through a ≈116 nm thick layer when using a voltage of 30 kV. The complexity of the information depth significant to a given EBSD-pattern and the multiple parameters influencing it are discussed. It is suggested that a “core information depth” is significant to high quality patterns while a larger “maximum information depth” becomes relevant when the pattern quality decreases or the sample is inhomogeneous within the information volume, i.e. in the form of partially crystalline materials or crystal layers in the nm scale. - Highlights: • Experimental evidence of the significant information depth of EBSD is presented. • Effects of the voltage and exemplary software settings are discussed. • Dependence of the significant information depth on the pattern quality is proposed. • The information depth may reach up to 142 nm in Si when using a voltage of 30 kV. • The information depth depends on the available technology.

  19. Nonintercepting Electron Beam Diagnostics Based on Optical Diffraction Radiation for X-Ray FELs

    CERN Document Server

    Lumpkin, Alex H; Sereno, N S; Yang, B X; Yao, C

    2005-01-01

    The challenge of providing nonintercepting beam diagnostics that address transverse parameters such as beam size and divergence in a linear transport line has been met. We have successfully used near-field imaging of optical diffraction radiation (ODR) from a 7-GeV electron beam passing near a single edge of a conducting screen to obtain beam size for the first time [1]. In this case appreciable visible wavelength ODR is emitted for impact parameters of 1 to 2 mm, values that are close to gamma times the reduced observation wavelength. We have now upgraded our imaging system to include an intensified camera; selectable bandpass filters, neutral density filters, and polarizers; a steering mirror; and an optical lens setup that provides either near-field or far-field imaging. The ODR has been obtained in both the single-edge mode and aperture mode with a single pulse of 3.3 nC. Beam-size resolution in the 20-50 micron regime is projected while beam position resolution to 10 microns with a smaller beam and highe...

  20. Dynamic molecular structure retrieval from low-energy laser-induced electron diffraction spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Dinh-Duy T.; Phan, Ngoc-Loan T.; Hoang, Van-Hung; Le, Van-Hoang

    2017-12-01

    A recently developed quantitative rescattering theory showed that a laser-free elastic cross section can be separated from laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED) spectra. Based upon this idea, Blaga et al investigated the possibility of reconstructing molecular structure from LIED spectra (2012 Nature 483 7388). In the above study, an independent atoms model (IAM) was used to interpret high-energy electron–molecule collisions induced by a mid-infrared laser. Our research aims to extend the application range of this structural retrieval method to low-energy spectra induced by more common near-infrared laser sources. The IAM is insufficient in this case, so we switch to a more comprehensive model—the multiple scattering (MS) theory. From the original version concerning only neutral targets, we upgrade the model so that it is compatible with electron–ion collisions at low energy. With available LIED experiment data of CO2 and O2, the upgraded MS is shown to be greatly effective as a tool for molecular imaging from spectra induced by a near-infrared laser. The captured image is at about 2 fs after the ionization, shorter than the period 4–6 fs by using the mid-infrared laser in Blaga’s experiment.

  1. Microstructural analysis of quartz crystals in an andalusite-cordierite schist using electron backscatter diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimi-Chakdel, A.; Boyle, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the shape preferred orientation and crystal preferred orientation of quartz crystals using electron backscatter diffraction in andalusite-cordierite schist from the Ythan Valley, Aberdeenshire, in the Scottish Dalradian block. Quartz crystals in the matrix and andalusite pophyroblasts have inequant to slightly equant shapes. Quartz crystals show weak shape preferred orientation in the matrix and andalusite pophyroblasts, which are sub-parallel to each other. The weak shape preferred orientation in quartz crystals of the studied sample can be related to (1) Grain boundary migration of quartz crystals and (2) non-quartz crystals (e.g. mica) at junction of quartz crystals. Also, quartz crystals show random crystal preferred orientation in the matrix and inclusion. The lack of crystal preferred orientation of quartz crystals in the matrix can be explained by (i) absence, or low amounts of strain in the rock that is experienced only low temperature and pressure and (ii) diffusion creep. The random crystallographic orientation of quartz inclusions may confirm non-selective orientations of the matrix quartz crystals by andalusite pophyroblast during growth.

  2. Enhanced thermal stability of a polymer solar cell blend induced by electron beam irradiation in the transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bäcke, Olof, E-mail: obacke@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Lindqvist, Camilla; Diaz de Zerio Mendaza, Amaia [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Gustafsson, Stefan [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Wang, Ergang; Andersson, Mats R.; Müller, Christian [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden); Kristiansen, Per Magnus [Institute of Polymer Nanotechnology (INKA), FHNW University of Applied Science and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Olsson, Eva, E-mail: eva.olsson@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2017-05-15

    We show by in situ microscopy that the effects of electron beam irradiation during transmission electron microscopy can be used to lock microstructural features and enhance the structural thermal stability of a nanostructured polymer:fullerene blend. Polymer:fullerene bulk-heterojunction thin films show great promise for use as active layers in organic solar cells but their low thermal stability is a hindrance. Lack of thermal stability complicates manufacturing and influences the lifetime of devices. To investigate how electron irradiation affects the thermal stability of polymer:fullerene films, a model bulk-heterojunction film based on a thiophene-quinoxaline copolymer and a fullerene derivative was heat-treated in-situ in a transmission electron microscope. In areas of the film that exposed to the electron beam the nanostructure of the film remained stable, while the nanostructure in areas not exposed to the electron beam underwent large phase separation and nucleation of fullerene crystals. UV–vis spectroscopy shows that the polymer:fullerene films are stable for electron doses up to 2000 kGy. - Highlights: • Thermal stability of a polymer: fullerne blend is increased using electron irradiation. • Using in-situ transmission electron microscopy the nanostructure is studied. • Electron irradiation stops phase separation between the polymer and fullerene. • Electron irradiation quenches the formation and nucleation of fullerene crystals.

  3. Development of a high repetition rate laser-plasma accelerator for ultra-fast electron diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaurepaire, B.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic microscopy and electron diffraction allowed the understanding of the organization of atoms in matter. Using a temporally short source, one can measure atomic displacements or modifications of the electronic distribution in matter. To date, the best temporal resolution for time resolved diffraction experiments is of the order of a hundred femto-seconds (fs). Laser accelerators are good candidates to reach the femtosecond temporal resolution in electron diffraction experiments. Such accelerators used to work at a low repetition rate, so that it was necessary to develop a new one operating at a high repetition rate in order to accumulate a large amount of data. In this thesis, a laser-plasma accelerator operating at the kHz repetition rate was developed and built. This source generates electron bunches at 100 keV from 3 mJ and 25 fs laser pulses. The physics of the acceleration has been studied, and the effect of the laser wavefront on the electron transverse distribution has been demonstrated. (author)

  4. Transmission of electrons through insulating PET foils: Dependence on charge deposition, tilt angle and incident energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keerthisinghe, D., E-mail: darshika.keerthisinghe@wmich.edu [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Dassanayake, B.S. [Department of Physics, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Wickramarachchi, S.J. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Stolterfoht, N. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Tanis, J.A. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Transmission of electrons through insulating polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nanocapillaries was observed as a function of charge deposition, angular and energy dependence. Two samples with capillary diameters 100 and 200 nm and pore densities 5 × 10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2} and 5 × 10{sup 7}/cm{sup 2}, respectively, were studied for incident electron energies of 300, 500 and 800 eV. Transmission and steady state of the electrons were attained after a time delay during which only a few electron counts were observed. The transmission through the capillaries depended on the tilt angle with both elastic and inelastic electrons going through. The guiding ability of electrons was found to increase with the incident energy in contrast to previous measurements in our laboratory for a similar PET foil.

  5. Transmission electron microscopy study of aerosol particles from the brown hazes in northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weijun; Shao, Longyi

    2009-05-01

    Airborne aerosol collections were performed in urban areas of Beijing that were affected by regional brown haze episodes over northern China from 31 May to 12 June 2007. Morphologies, elemental compositions, and mixing states of 810 individual aerosol particles of different sizes were obtained by transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The phases of some particles were verified using selected-area electron diffraction. Aerosol particle types less than 10 μm in diameter include mineral, complex secondary (Ca-S, K-, and S-rich), organic, soot, fly ash, and metal (Fe-rich and Zn-bearing). Most soot, fly ash, and organic particles are less than 2 μm in diameter. Approximately 84% of the analyzed mineral particles have diameters between 2 and 10 μm, while 81% of the analyzed complex secondary and metal particles are much smaller, from 0.1 to 2 μm. Trajectory analysis with fire maps show that southerly air masses arriving at Beijing have been transported through many agricultural biomass burning sites and heavy industrial areas. Spherical fly ash and Fe-rich particles were from industrial emissions, and abundant K-rich and organic particles likely originated from field burning of crop residues. Abundant Zn-bearing particles are associated with industrial activities and local waste incinerators. On the basis of the detailed analysis of 443 analyzed aerosol particles, about 70% of these particles are internally mixed with two or more aerosol components from different sources. Most mineral particles are covered with visible coatings that contain N, O, Ca (or Mg), minor S, and Cl. K- and S-rich particles tend to be coagulated with fly ash, soot, metal, and fine-grained mineral particles. Organic materials internally mixed with K- and S-rich particles can be their inclusions and coatings.

  6. Measurements of transient electron density distributions by femtosecond X-ray diffraction; Messungen transienter Elektronendichteverteilungen durch Femtosekunden-Roentgenbeugung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freyer, Benjamin

    2013-05-02

    This thesis concerns measurements of transient charge density maps by femtosecond X-ray diffraction. Different X-ray diffraction methods will be considered, particularly with regard to their application in femtosecond X-ray diffraction. The rotation method is commonly used in stationary X-ray diffraction. In the work in hand an X-ray diffraction experiment is demonstrated, which combines the method with ultrafast X-ray pulses. This experiment is the first implementation which makes use of the rotation method to map transient intensities of a multitude of Bragg reflections. As a prototype material Bismuth is used, which previously was studied frequently by femtosecond X-ray diffraction by measuring Bragg reflections successively. The experimental results of the present work are compared with the literature data. In the second part a powder-diffraction experiment will be presented, which is used to study the dynamics of the electron-density distribution on ultrafast time scales. The experiment investigates a transition metal complex after photoexcitation of the metal to ligand charge transfer state. Besides expected results, i. e. the change of the bond length between the metal and the ligand and the transfer of electronic charge from the metal to the ligand, a strong contribution of the anion to the charge transfer was found. Furthermore, the charge transfer has predominantly a cooperative character. That is, the excitation of a single complex causes an alteration of the charge density of several neighboring units. The results show that more than 30 transition-metal complexes and 60 anions contribute to the charge transfer. This collective response is a consequence of the strong coulomb interactions of the densely packed ions.

  7. In situ transmission electron microscopy of light-induced photocatalytic reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalca, Filippo; Laursen, Anders Bo; Kardynal, Beata

    2012-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) makes it possible to obtain insight into the structure, composition and reactivity of photocatalysts, which are of fundamental interest for sustainable energy research. Such insight can be used for further material optimization. Here, we combine conventional...

  8. In vivo degradation of processed dermal sheep collagen evaluated with transmission electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wachem, P.B.; van Luyn, M.J.A.; Nieuwenhuis, P.; Koerten, H.K.; Olde damink, L.H.H.; Olde-Damink, L.; ten Hoopen, Hermina W.M.; Feijen, Jan

    1991-01-01

    The in vivo degradation of hexamethylenediisocyanate-tanned dermal sheep collagen was studied with transmission electron microscopy. Discs of hexamethylenediisocyanate-tanned dermal sheep collagen were subcutaneously implanted in rats. Both an intra- and an extracellular route of degradation could

  9. INVIVO DEGRADATION OF PROCESSED DERMAL SHEEP COLLAGEN EVALUATED WITH TRANSMISSION ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANWACHEM, PB; VANLUYN, MJA; NIEUWENHUIS, P; KOERTEN, HK; DAMINK, LO; TENHOOPEN, H; FEIJEN, J

    The in vivo degradation of hexamethylenediisocyanate-tanned dermal sheep collagen was studied with transmission electron microscopy. Discs of hexamethylenediisocyanate-tanned dermal sheep collagen were subcutaneously implanted in rats. Both an intra- and an extracellular route of degradation could

  10. Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Individual Carbon Nanotube Breakdown Caused by Joule Heating in Air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Gudnason, S.B.; Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier

    2006-01-01

    We present repeated structural and electrical measurements on individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes, alternating between electrical measurements under ambient conditions and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The multiwalled carbon nanotubes made by chemical vapor deposition were manipulated...

  11. Automated magnification calibration in transmission electron microscopy using Fourier analysis of replica images.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laak, J.A.W.M. van der; Dijkman, H.B.P.M.; Pahlplatz, M.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    The magnification factor in transmission electron microscopy is not very precise, hampering for instance quantitative analysis of specimens. Calibration of the magnification is usually performed interactively using replica specimens, containing line or grating patterns with known spacing. In the

  12. TISSUE INTERACTIONS WITH DERMAL SHEEP COLLAGEN IMPLANTS - A TRANSMISSION ELECTRON-MICROSCOPIC EVALUATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANWACHEM, PB; VANLUYN, MJA; DAMINK, LO; FEIJEN, J; NIEUWENHUIS, P

    1991-01-01

    Tissue interactions with discs of dermal sheep collagen (DSC), subcutaneously implanted in rats, were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. DSC cross-linked with hexamethylenediisocyanate (HDSC) had already been tested previously. In the present study, we compared tissue interactions of

  13. Aberration corrected and monochromated environmental transmission electron microscopy: challenges and prospects for materials science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2010-01-01

    The latest generation of environmental transmission electron microscopes incorporates aberration correctors and monochromators, allowing studies of chemical reactions and growth processes with improved spatial resolution and spectral sensitivity. Here, we describe the performance of such an instr...

  14. Artificial construction of the layered Ruddlesden-Popper manganite La2Sr2Mn3O10 by reflection high energy electron diffraction monitored pulsed laser deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palgrave, Robert G; Borisov, Pavel; Dyer, Matthew S; McMitchell, Sean R C; Darling, George R; Claridge, John B; Batuk, Maria; Tan, Haiyan; Tian, He; Verbeeck, Jo; Hadermann, Joke; Rosseinsky, Matthew J

    2012-05-09

    Pulsed laser deposition has been used to artificially construct the n = 3 Ruddlesden-Popper structure La(2)Sr(2)Mn(3)O(10) in epitaxial thin film form by sequentially layering La(1-x)Sr(x)MnO(3) and SrO unit cells aided by in situ reflection high energy electron diffraction monitoring. The interval deposition technique was used to promote two-dimensional SrO growth. X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy indicated that the trilayer structure had been formed. A site ordering was found to differ from that expected thermodynamically, with the smaller Sr(2+) predominantly on the R site due to kinetic trapping of the deposited cation sequence. A dependence of the out-of-plane lattice parameter on growth pressure was interpreted as changing the oxygen content of the films. Magnetic and transport measurements on fully oxygenated films indicated a frustrated magnetic ground state characterized as a spin glass-like magnetic phase with the glass temperature T(g) ≈ 34 K. The magnetic frustration has a clear in-plane (ab) magnetic anisotropy, which is maintained up to temperatures of 150 K. Density functional theory calculations suggest competing antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic long-range orders, which are proposed as the origin of the low-temperature glassy state.

  15. Synthesis, structural analysis and in situ transmission electron microscopy mechanical tests on individual aluminum matrix/boron nitride nanotube nanohybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Maho; Tang, Dai-Ming; Zhi Chunyi; Bando, Yoshio; Shtansky, Dmitry; Golberg, Dmitri

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotube (BNNT)/aluminum matrix composite nanohybrids were fabricated through magnetron sputtering of Al onto dispersed multiwalled BNNTs with average external diameters of 40–50 nm. Aluminum phase coating tightly wrapped the BNNTs after the deposition. The coating thickness in the range of 5–200 nm was controlled by changing sputtering time. Using imaging techniques and electron diffraction analysis in a transmission electron microscope, the Al phase was found to create nanocrystalline shields around individual BNNTs. The chemical states of the hybrid nanomaterials during the initial stages of sputtering were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Direct in situ bending and tensile tests on individual BNNT–Al nanocomposites were carried out by using a dedicated transmission electron microscope-atomic force microscope holder. In parallel, high-resolution TEM images and video recordings were taken for the analysis of deformation kinetics and fracture mechanisms. The nanohybrids with a suitably thick aluminum coating (∼40 nm) withstood at least nine times higher stresses compared to a pure non-armed Al metal. This pioneering work opens up a prospective pathway for making ultralight and superstrong “dream” structural materials for future automotive and aerospace applications.

  16. Applications of anomalous diffraction systems, generation of attosecond electron and photon pulses and Raman amplification by stimulated emission of radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartak, Sameer Dinkar

    1998-10-01

    Anomalous diffraction is scattering process due to phase distortion introduced on incident phase front by scattering object. Phase mask or hologram, Christiansen filter, PDLC are examples of an anomalously diffracting systems. Phase hologram modulates an input wavefront to produce a wavefront which when Fourier transformed using a converging lens gives desired image on to a screen. We made a nonlinear optical element using phase mask made up of nonlinear material. It forms a lens because of nonlinear index of refraction when a high intensity beam is incident. This lens Fourier transforms the phase mask and images the phase mask. This nonlinear optical element can be used for various applications like image gating and 3-D memory writing and read out. Christiansen filter (CF) is a two component scattering system whose dispersion curves intersect at certain wavelength. Thus light corresponding to this wavelength traverses the filter without any scattering and light at other wavelengths gets scattered. This results in narrow wavelength dependent transmission curve centered at the index matching wavelength. When materials with an intensity dependent refractive index are used to make a CF, the index matching condition of CF becomes function of the input intensity resulting in intensity dependent beam size and transmittance through the filter. This property of nonlinear CF can be used to switch beam optically in both self and cross-modulation modes. Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystal (PDLC) is dispersion of liquid crystal droplets in polymer whose index of refraction is same as ordinary refractive index of liquid crystal. PDLC shows voltage dependent scattering and are used in flat panel displays. We used this element as voltage controlled intracavity loss element in a laser cavity to make a lasing pixel projection display. Output of this pixel shows all desired properties for a projection display like narrow linewidth, high brightness, TTL switching compatibility and

  17. Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies of Electron-Selective Titanium Oxide Contacts in Silicon Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Haider

    2017-08-15

    In this study, the cross-section of electron-selective titanium oxide (TiO2) contacts for n-type crystalline silicon solar cells were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. It was revealed that the excellent cell efficiency of 21.6% obtained on n-type cells, featuring SiO2/TiO2/Al rear contacts and after forming gas annealing (FGA) at 350°C, is due to strong surface passivation of SiO2/TiO2 stack as well as low contact resistivity at the Si/SiO2/TiO2 heterojunction. This can be attributed to the transformation of amorphous TiO2 to a conducting TiO2-x phase. Conversely, the low efficiency (9.8%) obtained on cells featuring an a-Si:H/TiO2/Al rear contact is due to severe degradation of passivation of the a-Si:H upon FGA.

  18. Catalysts under Controlled Atmospheres in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2014-01-01

    microscope, and since its invention by Ernst Ruska, the idea of imaging samples under gaseous atmospheres was envisioned. However, microscopes have traditionally been operated in high vacuum due to sensitive electron sources, sample contamination, and electron scattering off gas molecules resulting in loss...

  19. Electron tomography of HEK293T cells using scanning electron microscope-based scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yun-Wen; Chang, Hsun-Yun; Liao, Hua-Yang; Kao, Wei-Lun; Yen, Guo-Ji; Chang, Chi-Jen; Tsai, Meng-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2012-10-01

    Based on a scanning electron microscope operated at 30 kV with a homemade specimen holder and a multiangle solid-state detector behind the sample, low-kV scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is presented with subsequent electron tomography for three-dimensional (3D) volume structure. Because of the low acceleration voltage, the stronger electron-atom scattering leads to a stronger contrast in the resulting image than standard TEM, especially for light elements. Furthermore, the low-kV STEM yields less radiation damage to the specimen, hence the structure can be preserved. In this work, two-dimensional STEM images of a 1-μm-thick cell section with projection angles between ±50° were collected, and the 3D volume structure was reconstructed using the simultaneous iterative reconstructive technique algorithm with the TomoJ plugin for ImageJ, which are both public domain software. Furthermore, the cross-sectional structure was obtained with the Volume Viewer plugin in ImageJ. Although the tilting angle is constrained and limits the resulting structural resolution, slicing the reconstructed volume generated the depth profile of the thick specimen with sufficient resolution to examine cellular uptake of Au nanoparticles, and the final position of these nanoparticles inside the cell was imaged.

  20. Neutron diffraction and electron microscopical studies of decomposition and radiation-induced ageing in Cr-Ni-Ti steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alyab'ev, V.M.; Vologin, V.G.; Dubinin, S.F.; Lapin, S.S.; Parkhomenko, V.D.; Sagaradze, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    Kinetic and structure peculiarities of intermetallic ageing in Cr-Ni-Ti austenitic steels within time wide interval are investigated using neutron diffraction and electron microscopy techniques. Sizes and bulk share of γ'-particles at initial (0.25 h) and succeessive (up to 1000 h) stages of ageing are determined. γ'-phase in Kh16N15M3T1 stainless steel irradiated by fast neutrons and characterized by high resistance to radiation swelling is identified by means of neutron diffraction through superstructure reflexes

  1. Neutron diffraction and electron microscopic investigation of decomposition and radiation-induced ageing of Cr-Ni-Ti austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alyab'yev, V.M.; Vologin, V.G.; Dubinin, S.F.; Lapin, S.S.; Parkhomenko, V.D.; Sagaradze, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    The kinetic and structural features of intermetallic ageing of Cr-Ni-Ti austenitic steels are investigated over a wide time interval with neutron diffraction and electron microscopic methods. The size and volume fraction of γ'-particles at the initial (0.25 hr) and later (up to 1000 hr) stages of ageing are determined. From superlattice reflections in neutron diffraction a γ'-phase is identified after irradiation by fast neutrons of stainless steel Kh16N15M3T1, which possesses a high resistance to radiation swelling. (author)

  2. Data processing software suite SITENNO for coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using the X-ray free-electron laser SACLA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi, E-mail: nakasako@phys.keio.ac.jp [Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kohto, Sayo, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    The software suite SITENNO is developed for processing diffraction data collected in coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiments of non-crystalline particles using an X-ray free-electron laser. Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging is a promising technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of micrometers to sub-micrometers. Recently, X-ray free-electron laser sources have enabled efficient experiments in the ‘diffraction before destruction’ scheme. Diffraction experiments have been conducted at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) using the custom-made diffraction apparatus KOTOBUKI-1 and two multiport CCD detectors. In the experiments, ten thousands of single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected within several hours. Then, diffraction patterns with significant levels of intensity suitable for structural analysis must be found, direct-beam positions in diffraction patterns determined, diffraction patterns from the two CCD detectors merged, and phase-retrieval calculations for structural analyses performed. A software suite named SITENNO has been developed to semi-automatically apply the four-step processing to a huge number of diffraction data. Here, details of the algorithm used in the suite are described and the performance for approximately 9000 diffraction patterns collected from cuboid-shaped copper oxide particles reported. Using the SITENNO suite, it is possible to conduct experiments with data processing immediately after the data collection, and to characterize the size distribution and internal structures of the non-crystalline particles.

  3. Data processing software suite SITENNO for coherent X-ray diffraction imaging using the X-ray free-electron laser SACLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Takayama, Yuki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2014-01-01

    The software suite SITENNO is developed for processing diffraction data collected in coherent X-ray diffraction imaging experiments of non-crystalline particles using an X-ray free-electron laser. Coherent X-ray diffraction imaging is a promising technique for visualizing the structures of non-crystalline particles with dimensions of micrometers to sub-micrometers. Recently, X-ray free-electron laser sources have enabled efficient experiments in the ‘diffraction before destruction’ scheme. Diffraction experiments have been conducted at SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser (SACLA) using the custom-made diffraction apparatus KOTOBUKI-1 and two multiport CCD detectors. In the experiments, ten thousands of single-shot diffraction patterns can be collected within several hours. Then, diffraction patterns with significant levels of intensity suitable for structural analysis must be found, direct-beam positions in diffraction patterns determined, diffraction patterns from the two CCD detectors merged, and phase-retrieval calculations for structural analyses performed. A software suite named SITENNO has been developed to semi-automatically apply the four-step processing to a huge number of diffraction data. Here, details of the algorithm used in the suite are described and the performance for approximately 9000 diffraction patterns collected from cuboid-shaped copper oxide particles reported. Using the SITENNO suite, it is possible to conduct experiments with data processing immediately after the data collection, and to characterize the size distribution and internal structures of the non-crystalline particles

  4. LACDIF, a new electron diffraction technique obtained with the LACBED configuration and a C{sub s} corrector: Comparison with electron precession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morniroli, J.P. [Laboratoire de Metallurgie Physique et Genie des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 8517, USTL and ENSCL, Cite Scientifique, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)], E-mail: jean-paul.morniroli@univ-lille1.fr; Houdellier, F.; Roucau, C. [CEMES-CNRS, 29 Rue Jeanne Marvig, BP 94347, 31055 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Puiggali, J.; Gesti, S. [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Redjaimia, A. [Laboratoire de Science et Genie des Surfaces, UMR CNRS 7570, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt 54042 Nancy (France)

    2008-01-15

    By combining the large-angle convergent-beam electron diffraction (LACBED) configuration together with a microscope equipped with a C{sub s} corrector it is possible to obtain good quality spot patterns in image mode and not in diffraction mode as it is usually the case. These patterns have two main advantages with respect to the conventional selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) or microdiffraction patterns. They display a much larger number of reflections and the diffracted intensity is the integrated intensity. These patterns have strong similarities with the electron precession patterns and they can be used for various applications like the identification of the possible space groups of a crystal from observations of the Laue zones or the ab-initio structure identifications. Since this is a defocused method, another important application concerns the analysis of electron beam-sensitive materials. Successful applications to polymers are given in the present paper to prove the validity of this method with regards to these materials.

  5. Intergrown new zeolite beta polymorphs with interconnected 12-ring channels solved by combining electron crystallography and single-crystal X-ray diffraction

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Zhengbao

    2012-10-09

    Two new polymorphs of zeolite beta, denoted as SU-78A and SU-78B, were synthesized by employing dicyclohexylammonium hydroxides as organic structure-directing agents. The structure was solved by combining transmission electron microscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. SU-78 is an intergrowth of SU-78A and SU-78B and contains interconnected 12-ring channels in three directions. The two polymorphs are built from the same building layer, similar to that for the zeolite beta family. The layer stacking in SU-78, however, is different from those in zeolite beta polymorph A, B, and C, showing new zeolite framework topologies. SU-78 is thermally stable up to 600 °C. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  6. Carbon contamination in scanning transmission electron microscopy and its impact on phase-plate applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettler, Simon; Dries, Manuel; Hermann, Peter; Obermair, Martin; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Malac, Marek

    2017-05-01

    We analyze electron-beam induced carbon contamination in a transmission electron microscope. The study is performed on thin films potentially suitable as phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy and phase-plate imaging is utilized to analyze the contamination. The deposited contamination layer is identified as a graphitic carbon layer which is not prone to electrostatic charging whereas a non-conductive underlying substrate charges. Several methods that inhibit contamination are evaluated and the impact of carbon contamination on phase-plate imaging is discussed. The findings are in general interesting for scanning transmission electron microscopy applications. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. X-ray diffraction from single molecules at the worlds first X-ray free-electron laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Stephan; Kuepper, Jochen; Chapman, Henry; Rolles, Daniel [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL), DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The advent of the first X-ray Free-Electron Laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), opens up a new approach for diffractive imaging of even single molecules that cannot be crystallized into macromolecular crystals of sufficient size necessary for conventional X-ray crystallography. Here, we present the concept, the experimental parametric space that has to be addressed together with first experimental results of X-ray diffractive imaging of single molecules in the gas phase at LCLS. We use a supersonically cooled molecular beam to provide an ensemble of test-molecules, laser-align them, and subsequently probe them with the LCLS in order to get diffraction patterns of single molecules.

  8. Structure and microstructure of hexagonal Ba3Ti2RuO9 by electron diffraction and microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maunders, C.; Etheridge, J.; Whitfield, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have used electron microscopy and diffraction to refine the structure and investigate the microstructure of Ba 3 Ti 2 RuO 9 . The parent compound is hexagonal BaTiO 3 with the space group P6 3 /mmc. Using convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) combined with electron-sensitive image plates we have found that the space group of Ba 3 Ti 2 RuO 9 is the non-centrosymmetric group P6 3 mc. at room temperature and at ∝ 110 K. This is consistent with the Ru and Ti atoms occupying alternate face-sharing octahedral sites in the h0001i direction. This maintains the c-glide, but breaks the mirror normal to the c axis and consequently removes the centre of symmetry. Using powder X-ray diffraction, we have measured the lattice parameters from polycrystalline samples to be a = 5.7056 ± 0.0005, c = 14.0093 ± 0.0015 Aa at room temperature. Using high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) we observed highly coherent, low-strain {10 anti 10} grain boundaries intersecting at 60 and 120 . From CBED we deduce that adjacent grains are identical but for the relative phase of the Ti and Ru atom ordering along the c axis. HREM also revealed occasional stacking faults, normal to the c-axis

  9. Molecular structure and benzene ring deformation of three cyanobenzenes from gas-phase electron diffraction and quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, Anna Rita; Domenicano, Aldo; Ramondo, Fabio; Hargittai, István

    2008-10-30

    The molecular structures of cyanobenzene, p-dicyanobenzene, and 1,2,4,5-tetracyanobenzene have been accurately determined by gas-phase electron diffraction and ab initio/DFT MO calculations. The equilibrium structures of these molecules are planar, but their average geometries in the gaseous phase are nonplanar because of large-amplitude vibrational motions of the substituents out of the plane of the benzene ring. The use of nonplanar models in electron diffraction analysis is necessary to yield ring angles consistent with the results of MO calculations. The angular deformation of the benzene ring in the three molecules is found to be much smaller than obtained from previous electron diffraction studies, as well as from microwave spectroscopy studies of cyanobenzene. While the deformation of the ring CC bonds and CCC angles in p-dicyanobenzene is well interpreted as arising from the superposition of independent effects from each substituent, considerable deviation from additivity occurs in 1,2,4,5-tetracyanobenzene. The changes in the ring geometry and C ipso-C cyano bond lengths in this molecule indicate an enhanced ability of the cyano group to withdraw pi-electrons from the benzene ring, compared with cyanobenzene and p-dicyanobenzene. In particular, gas-phase electron diffraction and MP2 or B3LYP calculations show a small but consistent increase in the mean length of the ring CC bonds for each cyano group and a further increase in 1,2,4,5-tetracyanobenzene. Comparison with accurate results from X-ray and neutron crystallography indicates that in p-dicyanobenzene the internal ring angle at the place of substitution opens slightly as the molecule is frozen in the crystal. The small geometrical change, about 0.6 degrees , is shown to be real and to originate from intermolecular C identical withN...HC interactions in the solid state.

  10. In SITU Transmission Electron Microscopy on Operating Electrochemical CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gualandris, Fabrizio; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2016-01-01

    Solid oxide cells (SOC) have the potential of playing a significant role in the future efficient energy system scenario. In order to become widely commercially available, an improved performance and durability of the cells has to be achieved [1]. Conventional scanning and transmission SEM and TEM...... have been often used for ex-situ post mortem characterization of SOFCs and SOECs [2,3]. However, in order to get fundamental insight of the microstructural development of SOFC/SOEC during operation conditions in situ studies are necessary [4]....

  11. Single atom image observation by means of scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komoda, Tsutomu; Todokoro, Hideo; Nomura, Setsuo

    1977-01-01

    In a scanning transmission electron microscope, electrons emitted from the ion source are finely focused to a spot on a specimen, and scanned with the deflection coil. The electrons transmitted through the specimen are detected by the scintillate, and converted to image signals with the photomultiplier, and the image is obtained on the cathode ray tube. The Hitachi scanning transmission electron microscope employs a field emission type electron gun, thus it can focus the electron beam to 0.3 nm diameter. In the microscope, elastically scattered electrons are captured by a doughnut shaped detector, while the electrons transmitted through the specimen without colliding with atoms and the non-elastically scattered electrons which has lost a part of their energy due to the ionization or excitation of atoms are detected by the energy analyzer installed at the bottom of the microscope. Though single atom image observation requires the fixation of the atoms to be marked on a support, the problem is how to discriminate the aimed atoms from the atoms of the support. The most sensitive method is the dark-field method which uses the difference of elastically scattered electron intensity as the signal. Thorium and iodine atom images have been successfully observed as the trials to prove the feasibility of observation of heavy atoms with the scanning transmission electron microscope. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  12. Exorcising Ghost Transmission from Electron Transport Calculations: Refighting Old Battles in New Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Matthew; Harrison, Robert

    2014-03-01

    First-principles calculations of electron transport aim to understand the dynamics of electrons as they traverse quantum mechanical systems. For instance, how does electric current travel through a molecule? Despite their successes over the years, these calculations are known to be haunted by several numerical artifacts. Ghost transmission is among the most serious of these unphysical results, causing transmission coefficients to show an extreme dependence on the basis set and to be many orders of magnitude too large. In this talk, we discuss electron transport formalisms, uncover the cause of ghost transmission, develop exorcism strategies, and present several numerical examples. In the end, ghost transmission is a ramification of poorly chosen spatial partitions. Instead of choosing partitions with the basis set (in a manner reminiscent of Mulliken or Löwdin population analyses), the relevant projection operators must be selected without referencing the basis set.

  13. Indium hydroxide to oxide decomposition observed in one nanocrystal during in situ transmission electron microscopy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miehe, Gerhard; Lauterbach, Stefan; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Gurlo, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    The high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) is used to study, in situ, spatially resolved decomposition in individual nanocrystals of metal hydroxides and oxyhydroxides. This case study reports on the decomposition of indium hydroxide (c-In(OH) 3 ) to bixbyite-type indium oxide (c-In 2 O 3 ). The electron beam is focused onto a single cube-shaped In(OH) 3 crystal of {100} morphology with ca. 35 nm edge length and a sequence of HR-TEM images was recorded during electron beam irradiation. The frame-by-frame analysis of video sequences allows for the in situ, time-resolved observation of the shape and orientation of the transformed crystals, which in turn enables the evaluation of the kinetics of c-In 2 O 3 crystallization. Supplementary material (video of the transformation) related to this article can be found online at (10.1016/j.jssc.2012.09.022). After irradiation the shape of the parent cube-shaped crystal is preserved, however, its linear dimension (edge) is reduced by the factor 1.20. The corresponding spotted selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern representing zone [001] of c-In(OH) 3 is transformed to a diffuse strongly textured ring-like pattern of c-In 2 O 3 that indicates the transformed cube is no longer a single crystal but is disintegrated into individual c-In 2 O 3 domains with the size of about 5–10 nm. The induction time of approximately 15 s is estimated from the time-resolved Fourier transforms. The volume fraction of the transformed phase (c-In 2 O 3 ), calculated from the shrinkage of the parent c-In(OH) 3 crystal in the recorded HR-TEM images, is used as a measure of the kinetics of c-In 2 O 3 crystallization within the framework of Avrami–Erofeev formalism. The Avrami exponent of ∼3 is characteristic for a reaction mechanism with fast nucleation at the beginning of the reaction and subsequent three-dimensional growth of nuclei with a constant growth rate. The structural transformation path in reconstructive

  14. Selective growth and characterization of nanostructures with transmission electron microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojo, M.; Bysakh, S.; Mitsuishi, K.; Tanaka, M.; Song, M.; Furuya, K.

    2005-02-01

    A new type of electron beam-induced reactions is reported. Focused electron beams, the probe size of which is about 0.8 nm, were irradiated on carbon and Si substrates with an introduction of an aluminum trichloride or a gold trichloride gas in the chamber. Nanometer-sized carbon and Si rods were formed using carbon and Si substrates, respectively, by moving the beam position at a certain speed. As no aluminum, gold or chlorine was found in the rods, it is considered that chloride gases behaved as a sort of catalysis.

  15. Selective growth and characterization of nanostructures with transmission electron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimojo, M.; Bysakh, S.; Mitsuishi, K.; Tanaka, M.; Song, M.; Furuya, K.

    2005-01-01

    A new type of electron beam-induced reactions is reported. Focused electron beams, the probe size of which is about 0.8 nm, were irradiated on carbon and Si substrates with an introduction of an aluminum trichloride or a gold trichloride gas in the chamber. Nanometer-sized carbon and Si rods were formed using carbon and Si substrates, respectively, by moving the beam position at a certain speed. As no aluminum, gold or chlorine was found in the rods, it is considered that chloride gases behaved as a sort of catalysis

  16. Chemical Reactions of Molecules Promoted and Simultaneously Imaged by the Electron Beam in Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Stephen T; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Besley, Elena; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2017-08-15

    The main objective of this Account is to assess the challenges of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of molecules, based on over 15 years of our work in this field, and to outline the opportunities in studying chemical reactions under the electron beam (e-beam). During TEM imaging of an individual molecule adsorbed on an atomically thin substrate, such as graphene or a carbon nanotube, the e-beam transfers kinetic energy to atoms of the molecule, displacing them from equilibrium positions. Impact of the e-beam triggers bond dissociation and various chemical reactions which can be imaged concurrently with their activation by the e-beam and can be presented as stop-frame movies. This experimental approach, which we term ChemTEM, harnesses energy transferred from the e-beam to the molecule via direct interactions with the atomic nuclei, enabling accurate predictions of bond dissociation events and control of the type and rate of chemical reactions. Elemental composition and structure of the reactant molecules as well as the operating conditions of TEM (particularly the energy of the e-beam) determine the product formed in ChemTEM processes, while the e-beam dose rate controls the reaction rate. Because the e-beam of TEM acts simultaneously as a source of energy for the reaction and as an imaging tool monitoring the same reaction, ChemTEM reveals atomic-level chemical information, such as pathways of reactions imaged for individual molecules, step-by-step and in real time; structures of illusive reaction intermediates; and direct comparison of catalytic activity of different transition metals filmed with atomic resolution. Chemical transformations in ChemTEM often lead to previously unforeseen products, demonstrating the potential of this method to become not only an analytical tool for studying reactions, but also a powerful instrument for discovery of materials that can be synthesized on preparative scale.

  17. Incipient crystallization of transition-metal tungstates under microwaves probed by Raman scattering and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, Kisla P. F.; Dias, Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Microwave synthesis was used to produce nanosized transition-metal tungstates in environmentally friendly conditions not yet reported by the literature: 110 and 150 °C, for times of 10 and 20 min. X-ray diffraction evidenced incipient crystallized materials, while transmission electron microscopy indicates nanostructured regions of about 2–5 nm inside an amorphous matrix. Raman spectroscopy was used to probe short-range ordering in the achieved samples and also to obtain a reliable set of spectra containing all the Raman-active bands predicted by group-theory calculations. The vibrational spectra showed no extra feature, indicating that the microwave processing was able to produce short-range ordered materials without tetrahedral distortions. These distortions are frequently reported when commercially modified kitchen microwave units are employed. In this work, the syntheses were conducted in a commercial apparatus especially designed for fully controlled temperature–time–pressure conditions.

  18. Morphology and ultrastructure of Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii) spermatozoa using scanning and transmission electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pšenička, M.; Hadi Alavi, S.M.; Rodina, M.; Gela, D.; Nebesářová, Jana; Linhart, O.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 2 (2007), s. 103-115 ISSN 0248-4900 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/06/0817 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : acrosome * flagellum * scanning electron microscopy * Siberian sturgeon * Acipenser baerii * spermatozoon , * transmission electron microscopy Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.752, year: 2007

  19. A toolkit for the characterization of CCD cameras for transmission electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vulovic, M.; Rieger, B.; Van Vliet, L.J.; Koster, A.J.; Ravelli, R.B.G.

    2009-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD) are nowadays commonly utilized in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for applications in life sciences. Direct access to digitized images has revolutionized the use of electron microscopy, sparking developments such as automated collection of tomographic data, focal

  20. Anisotropic Shape Changes of Silica Nanoparticles Induced in Liquid with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecevic, J.; Hermannsdorfer, Justus; Schuh, Tobias; de Jong, Krijn P.; de Jonge, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used for in-situ imaging of nanoscale processes taking place in liquid, such as the evolution of nanoparticles during synthesis or structural changes of nanomaterials in liquid environment. Here, it is shown that the focused electron beam of

  1. Small round structured viruses (SRSVs) and transmission electron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    immune-electron microscopy (IEM) from patients' feces. They reported this virus particle as the causative agent of winter vomiting outbreaks in Norwalk (Kapikian et al.,. 1972). This is the remarkable landmark study of non- bacterial gastroenteritis viruses, especially for small round structured viruses (SRSVs). After that, many.

  2. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  3. Removal of vesicle structures from transmission electron microscope images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff; Sigworth, Fred J.; Brandt, Sami Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of imaging membrane proteins for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the isolated protein structure. More precisely, we propose a method for learning and removing the interfering vesicle signals from the micrograph, prior to reconstruct...

  4. Elucidation of crystal and electronic structures within highly strained BiFeO3by transmission electron microscopy and first-principles simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, In-Tae; Kovács, András; Zhao, Hong Jian; Íñiguez, Jorge; Yasui, Shintaro; Ichinose, Tomohiro; Naganuma, Hiroshi

    2017-04-19

    Crystal and electronic structures of ~380 nm BiFeO 3 film grown on LaAlO 3 substrate are comprehensively studied using advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique combined with first-principles theory. Cross-sectional TEM images reveal the BiFeO 3 film consists of two zones with different crystal structures. While zone II turns out to have rhombohedral BiFeO 3 , the crystal structure of zone I matches none of BiFeO 3 phases reported experimentally or predicted theoretically. Detailed electron diffraction analysis combined with first-principles calculation allows us to determine that zone I displays an orthorhombic-like monoclinic structure with space group of Cm (=8). The growth mechanism and electronic structure in zone I are further discussed in comparison with those of zone II. This study is the first to provide an experimentally validated complete crystallographic detail of a highly strained BiFeO 3 that includes the lattice parameter as well as the basis atom locations in the unit cell.

  5. Minerals and aligned collagen fibrils in tilapia fish scales: structural analysis using dark-field and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Mitsuhiro; Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tagaya, Motohiro; Chen, Song; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ikoma, Toshiyuki

    2011-10-01

    The mineralized structure of aligned collagen fibrils in a tilapia fish scale was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques after a thin sample was prepared using aqueous techniques. Electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy data indicated that a mineralized internal layer consisting of aligned collagen fibrils contains hydroxyapatite crystals. Bright-field imaging, dark-field imaging, and energy-filtered TEM showed that the hydroxyapatite was mainly distributed in the hole zones of the aligned collagen fibrils structure, while needle-like materials composed of calcium compounds including hydroxyapatite existed in the mineralized internal layer. Dark-field imaging and three-dimensional observation using electron tomography revealed that hydroxyapatite and needle-like materials were mainly found in the matrix between the collagen fibrils. It was observed that hydroxyapatite and needle-like materials were preferentially distributed on the surface of the hole zones in the aligned collagen fibrils structure and in the matrix between the collagen fibrils in the mineralized internal layer of the scale.

  6. Transmission electron microscopy of carbon-coated and iron-doped titania nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2016-08-02

    We present a study on the properties of iron (Fe)-doped and carbon (C)-coated titania (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) which has been compiled by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). These TiO2 NPs were prepared by using the flame synthesis method. This method allows the simultaneous C coating and Fe doping of TiO2 NPs. XRD investigations revealed that the phase of the prepared NPs was anatase TiO2. Conventional TEM analysis showed that the average size of the TiO2 NPs was about 65 nm and that the NPs were uniformly coated with the element C. Furthermore, from the x-ray energy dispersive spectrometry analysis, it was found that about 8 at.% Fe was present in the synthesized samples. High-resolution TEM (HRTEM) revealed the graphitized carbon structure of the layer surrounding the prepared TiO2 NPs. HRTEM analysis further revealed that the NPs possessed the crystalline structure of anatase titania. Energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) analysis showed the C coating and Fe doping of the NPs. The ratio of L3 and L2 peaks for the Ti-L23 and Fe-L23 edges present in the core loss electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) revealed a +4 oxidation state for the Ti and a +3 oxidation state for the Fe. These EELS results were further confirmed with XPS analysis. The electronic properties of the samples were investigated by applying Kramers-Kronig analysis to the low-loss EELS spectra acquired from the prepared NPs. The presented results showed that the band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs decreased from an original value of 3.2 eV to about 2.2 eV, which is quite close to the ideal band gap energy of 1.65 eV for photocatalysis semiconductors. The observed decrease in band gap energy of the TiO2 NPs was attributed to the presence of Fe atoms at the lattice sites of the anatase TiO2 lattice. In short, C-coated and Fe-doped TiO2 NPs were synthesized with a rather cost-effective and comparatively easily scalable method. The

  7. Ultra high vacuum compatible versatile design of a sample holder for photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhaka, R.S.; Shukla, A.K.; Barman, S.R.

    2008-01-01

    A versatile new sample holder design is presented, which overcome most frequent problems associated with single crystal transfer mechanism for photoelectron spectrometer. This sample holder was mounted and tested under ultrahigh vacuum condition during photoemission studies of different single crystal samples. It permits the cooling by liquid nitrogen and resistive heating up to 1000 K of the sample as well as in situ tilt motion to make it perfectly vertical, particularly for low energy electron diffraction study. (author)

  8. Structure determination of a new phase Ni.sub.8./sub.Ti.sub.5./sub. by electron diffraction tomography

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klementová, Mariana; Karlík, M.; Novák, P.; Palatinus, Lukáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 85, Jun (2017), s. 110-116 ISSN 0966-9795 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1603 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24510 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : shape-memory alloys * crystal chemistry * nanocrystalline structure * powder metallurgy * electron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.140, year: 2016

  9. Investigations in space-related molecular biology. [cryo-electron microscopic and diffraction studies on terrestrial and extraterrestrial specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Moran, H.; Pritzker, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    Improved instrumentation and preparation techniques for high resolution, high voltage cryo-electron microscopic and diffraction studies on terrestrial and extraterrestrial specimens are reported. Computer correlated ultrastructural and biochemical work on hydrated and dried cell membranes and related biological systems provided information on membrane organization, ice crystal formation and ordered water, RNA virus linked to cancer, lunar rock samples, and organometallic superconducting compounds. Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 specimens were analyzed

  10. The Structures of Self-Assembled Monolayer Films of Organosulfur Compounds Adsorbed on Gold Single Crystals: Electron Diffraction Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    AD-M193 125 THE STRUCTURES OF SELF-RSSENSLED MOMOLAYER FILMS OF 1/1 ORGANOSULFUR COMPOUND..(U) HRlYARD UNJY CAMBRIDGE MASS DEPT OF CHEMISTRY L STRONG...VV L- ___ THE STRUCTURES OF SELF-ASSEMBLED MONOLAYER FILMS OF ORGANOSULFUR COMPOUNDS ADSORBED ON GOLD SINGLE CRYSTALS: ELECTRON DIFFRACTION STUDIES...true sulfide phase. V V ’A. LA8700876 REVISED The Structures of Self-Assembled Monolayer Films of Organosulfur Compounds Adsorbed on Gold Single

  11. Quantitative low-energy electron diffraction analysis of the GaN(000-1) (1×1) reconstruction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Romanyuk, Olexandr; Jiříček, Petr; Paskova, T.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 606, 7-8 (2012), s. 740-743 ISSN 0039-6028 R&D Projects: GA ČR GPP204/10/P028 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : gallium nitride * semiconductor surfaces * quantitative low-energy electron diffraction * LEED Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.838, year: 2012

  12. Incident energy and charge deposition dependences of electron transmission through a microsized tapered glass capillary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickramarachchi, S.J. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Ikeda, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Dassanayake, B.S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Peradeniya (Sri Lanka); Keerthisinghe, D.; Tanis, J.A. [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    An experimental study of electron transmission and guiding through a tapered glass capillary has been performed. Electrons were transmitted for tilt angles up to ∼6.5° and ∼9.5° (laboratory angles) for incident energies of 500 and 1000 eV, respectively. It is found that elastic and inelastic contributions give rise to distinguishable peaks in the transmitted profile. For 500 eV elastic transmission dominates the profile, while for 1000 eV both elastic and inelastic contributions are present. The transmission for both energies was studied as a function of the charge (time) deposition and found to be strongly dependent. Results suggest fundamental differences between 500 and 1000 eV incident electrons. For 500 eV the transmission slowly increases suggesting charge up of the capillary wall, reaching relative stability with infrequent breakdowns for all angles investigated. For 1000 eV for tilt angles near zero degrees the time dependent profile shows oscillations in the transmission, which never reached a stable condition, while for the larger angle investigated the transmission reached near equilibrium. Inelastic processes dominated the transmission for 1000 eV even at very small tilt angles, but was generally elastic (due to Coulomb deflection) for 500 eV even for the largest tilt angle measured.

  13. In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of Interfaces in Li-ion Batteries: Challenges and Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chong M.; Xu, Wu; Liu, Jun; Choi, Daiwon; Arey, Bruce W.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Zhang, Jiguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Salmon, Norman

    2010-01-01

    The critical challenge facing the lithium ion battery development is the basic understanding of the structural evolution during the cyclic operation of the battery and the consequence of the structural evolution on the properties of the battery. Although transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and spectroscopy have been evolved to a stage such that it can be routinely used to probe into both the structural and chemical composition of the materials with a spatial resolution of a single atomic column, a direct in-situ TEM observation of structural evolution of the materials in lithium ion battery during the dynamic operation of the battery has never been reported. This is related to three factors: high vacuum operation of a TEM; electron transparency requirement of the region to be observed, and the difficulties dealing with the liquid electrolyte of lithium ion battery. In this paper, we report the results of exploring the in-situ TEM techniques for observation of the interface in lithium ion battery during the operation of the battery. A miniature battery was fabricated using a nanowire and an ionic liquid electrolyte. The structure and chemical composition of the interface across the anode and the electrolyte was studied using TEM imaging, electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. In addition, we also explored the possibilities of carrying out in-situ TEM studies of lithium ion batteries with a solid state electrolyte.

  14. Distinguishing Biologically Controlled Calcareous Biomineralization in Fossil Organisms Using Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Päßler, Jan-Filip; Jarochowska, Emilia; Bestmann, Michel; Munnecke, Axel

    2018-02-01

    Although carbonate-precipitating cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems today, the criteria used to identify them in the geological record are subjective and rarely testable. Differences in the mode of biomineralization between cyanobacteria and eukaryotes, i.e. biologically induced calcification (BIM) vs. biologically controlled calcification (BCM), result in different crystallographic structures which might be used as a criterion to test cyanobacterial affinities. Cyanobacteria are often used as a ‘wastebasket taxon’, to which various microfossils are assigned. The lack of a testable criterion for the identification of cyanobacteria may bias their fossil record severely. We employed electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to investigate the structure of calcareous skeletons in two microproblematica widespread in Palaeozoic marine ecosystems: Rothpletzella, hypothesized to be a cyanobacterium, and an incertae sedis microorganism Allonema. We used a calcareous trilobite shell as a BCM reference. The mineralized structure of Allonema has a simple single-layered structure of acicular crystals perpendicular to the surface of the organism. The c-axes of these crystals are parallel to the elongation and thereby normal to the surface of the organism. EBSD pole figures and misorientation axes distribution reveal a fibre texture around the c-axis with a small degree of variation (up to 30°), indicating a highly ordered structure. A comparable pattern was found in the trilobite shell. This structure allows excluding biologically induced mineralization as the mechanism of shell formation in Allonema. In Rothpletzella, the c-axes of the microcrystalline sheath show a broader clustering compared to Allonema, but still reveal crystals tending to be perpendicular to the surface of the organism. The misorientation axes of adjacent crystals show an approximately random distribution. Rothpletzella also shares morphological similarities with extant cyanobacteria. We

  15. Distinguishing Biologically Controlled Calcareous Biomineralization in Fossil Organisms Using Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Filip Päßler

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Although carbonate-precipitating cyanobacteria are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems today, the criteria used to identify them in the geological record are subjective and rarely testable. Differences in the mode of biomineralization between cyanobacteria and eukaryotes, i.e., biologically induced calcification (BIM vs. biologically controlled calcification (BCM, result in different crystallographic structures which might be used as a criterion to test cyanobacterial affinities. Cyanobacteria are often used as a “wastebasket taxon,” to which various microfossils are assigned. The lack of a testable criterion for the identification of cyanobacteria may bias their fossil record severely. We employed electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD to investigate the structure of calcareous skeletons in two microproblematica widespread in Palaeozoic marine ecosystems: Rothpletzella, hypothesized to be a cyanobacterium, and an incertae sedis microorganism Allonema. We used a calcareous trilobite shell as a BCM reference. The mineralized structure of Allonema has a simple single-layered structure of acicular crystals perpendicular to the surface of the organism. The c-axes of these crystals are parallel to the elongation and thereby normal to the surface of the organism. EBSD pole figures and misorientation axes distribution reveal a fiber texture around the c-axis with a small degree of variation (up to 30°, indicating a highly ordered structure. A comparable pattern was found in the trilobite shell. This structure allows excluding biologically induced mineralization as the mechanism of shell formation in Allonema. In Rothpletzella, the c-axes of the microcrystalline sheath show a broader clustering compared to Allonema, but still reveal crystals tending to be perpendicular to the surface of the organism. The misorientation axes of adjacent crystals show an approximately random distribution. Rothpletzella also shares morphological similarities with extant

  16. Implementation of a virtual correlative light and transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Tilman; Zuber, Benoît; Gawatz, Gerlinde; Herrmann, Gudrun

    2013-07-01

    In the long run, the widespread use of slide scanners by pathologists requires an adaptation of teaching methods in histology and cytology in order to target these new possibilities of image processing and presentation via the internet. Accordingly, we were looking for a tool with the possibility to teach microscopic anatomy, histology, and cytology of tissue samples which would be able to combine image data from light and electron microscopes independently of microscope suppliers. With the example of a section through the villus of jejunum, we describe here how to process image data from light and electron microscopes in order to get one image-stack which allows a correlation of structures from the microscopic anatomic to the cytological level. With commercially available image-presentation software that we adapted to our needs, we present here a platform which allows for the presentation of this new but also of older material independently of microscope suppliers. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    OpenAIRE

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called ?big-data? methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient ima...

  18. First transmission of electrons and ions through the KATRIN beamline

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arenz, M.; Dragoun, Otokar; Kovalík, Alojz; Lebeda, Ondřej; Ryšavý, Miloš; Sentkerestiová, Jana; Suchopár, Martin; Vénos, Drahoslav

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2018), č. článku P04020. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015056; GA MŠk LTT18021 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : ion sources * electron beam * detector control systems * beam-line instrumentation * spectrometers Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  19. Robotized semiautomatic motorcycle transmission development. Electronic and software design

    OpenAIRE

    Neghină Mihai; Petruse Radu Emanuil; Olteanu Sebastian; Bondrea Ioan; Lobonț Lucian; Stanciu Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an electrical design (implemented on a PCB board) and an accompanying software design for controlling the automatic gear change. The designs complement the mechanical solutions developed in Part 1. The paper also analyses the issues encountered during the intermediate steps of the development of the electronic module, which is expected to be small and adaptable enough to be installed on a motorcycle without changing its ergonomics. The control software runs on the Ar...

  20. Robust image alignment for cryogenic transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Robert A; Kowal, Julia; Ringler, Philippe; Stahlberg, Henning

    2017-03-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy recently experienced great improvements in structure resolution due to direct electron detectors with improved contrast and fast read-out leading to single electron counting. High frames rates enabled dose fractionation, where a long exposure is broken into a movie, permitting specimen drift to be registered and corrected. The typical approach for image registration, with high shot noise and low contrast, is multi-reference (MR) cross-correlation. Here we present the software package Zorro, which provides robust drift correction for dose fractionation by use of an intensity-normalized cross-correlation and logistic noise model to weight each cross-correlation in the MR model and filter each cross-correlation optimally. Frames are reliably registered by Zorro with low dose and defocus. Methods to evaluate performance are presented, by use of independently-evaluated even- and odd-frame stacks by trajectory comparison and Fourier ring correlation. Alignment of tiled sub-frames is also introduced, and demonstrated on an example dataset. Zorro source code is available at github.com/CINA/zorro. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Atomic Metrology in Ordered/Disordered Systems Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oni, Adedapo Adesoji

    Electron microscopy has become a powerful tool for the characterization of material structure from the micron-scale to the Angstrom-scale. Notably, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with sub-Angstrom imaging capability provides access to atomic structure information. The latest STEMs equipped with small electron sources (Schottky or cold field emission gun), aberration-correctors, and improved electronic and mechanical stability enables spatial resolution better than 1 A. Herein, electron microscopy is utlized for structural and chemical atomic-scale characterization of ordered/disordered material systems. Structural quantification is commonly performed using spatially averaging approaches, such as X-ray or neutron diffraction. These techniques preclude real space analysis with local spatial sensitivity, e.g. across interfaces or at defects. In contrast, atomic resolution STEM enables direct imaging of the crystal structures, but until now, drift distortion has prevented accurate crystallographic measurements. Rather, the development of revolving STEM (RevSTEM) has enabled direct lattice parameter measurements to be performed across ordered/disordered systems using a probe{corrected scanning tranmission electron microscope with high accuracy and precision. Furthermore, the high spatial resolution of the probe-corrected STEM and advancement in the high sensitivity detector system owing to the state-of-the-art Super-X energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) detector enables simultaneous EDS elemental mapping at atomic resolution. Consequently, the site preference of solute atoms can be directly determined in the structure sublattice of the ordered intermetallic phase. Also, chemical segregation behavior of the constitutent elements within the microstructure are investigated using a combination of EDS and atom probe tomography (APT) analysis. In this dissertation, strain analysis was conducted across electron microscopy sample using multiple atomic

  2. Fine structure of the endolymphatic duct in the rat. A scanning and transmission electron microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, K; Rostgaard, Jørgen; Bretlau, P

    1995-01-01

    and thiocarbohydrazide followed by a continuous dehydration procedure. Three types of cells were identified with the scanning electron microscope: A polygonal and oblong epithelial cell was observed in the largest number throughout the duct, whereas in the juxta-saccular half of the duct two additional types...... of epithelial cells were observed. The scanning electron microscopical observations are compared and discussed with reference to transmission electron microscopical observations of the endolymphatic duct....

  3. Transmission electron microscope studies of crystalline LiNbO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareja, R.; Gonzalez, R.; Chen, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Transmission electron microscope investigations in both as-grown and hydrogen-reduced LiNbO 3 reveal that niobium oxide precipitates can be produced by in situ irradiations in the electron microscope. The precipitation process is produced by a combined effect of ionizing electrons and the thermal heating of the specimens during irradiation. It is proposed that the composition of the precipitates is primarily Nb 2 O 5

  4. Imaging many-body Coulomb interactions and ultrafast photoionization and diffraction with cold atom electron and ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Robert; Speirs, Rory; Murphy, Dene; Torrance, Joshua; Thompson, Daniel; Sparkes, Benjamin; McCulloch, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The CAEIS cold-atom electron/ion source, based on photoionisation of laser cooled atoms, provides a powerful tool for investigating fundamental physical processes. The very low temperature of the ions has allowed us to image intra-beam Coulomb effects with unprecedented detail. With ultrafast laser excitation and streak detection we can probe competing ionization processes, particularly via Rydberg states, including sequential excitation, multiphoton excitation, resonance-enhanced multiphoton excitation and two-color multiphoton excitation. Knowledge from these studies has enabled ultrafast single-shot diffractive electron imaging with atomic resolution using a CAEIS.

  5. Surface structure determinations of crystalline ionic thin films grown on transition metal single crystal surfaces by low energy electron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Joel Glenn [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The surface structures of NaCl(100), LiF(100) and alpha-MgCl2(0001) adsorbed on various metal single crystals have been determined by low energy electron diffraction (LEED). Thin films of these salts were grown on metal substrates by exposing the heated metal surface to a molecular flux of salt emitted from a Knudsen cell. This method of investigating thin films of insulators (ionic salts) on a conducting substrate (metal) circumvents surface charging problems that plagued bulk studies, thereby allowing the use of electron-based techniques to characterize the surface.

  6. Electronic control of a 4-speed automatic transmission with lock-up clutch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwab, M.

    1984-01-01

    The paper describes the electronic control of an automatic 4-speed transmission with lock-up clutch. As compared to purely hydraulically controlled transmissions, this control offers a clearly improved quality of shifting and the possibility of achieving improvements in fuel consumption thanks to a special economy program. The electronic control unit is a Bosch MOTRONIC which has been expanded to include the functions of transmission control. A special feature is the engine torque control which is implemented by way of retarding the ignition when shifting. This opens up an additional degree of freedom for optimizing a transmission in terms of shift comfort, life of the friction elements and the power which can be transmitted.

  7. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, S; Chi, M; Belianinov, A; Beekman, C; Kalinin, S V; Borisevich, A Y; Lupini, A R

    2016-05-23

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called "big-data" methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  8. Transmission electron microscopy and the molecular structure of icosahedral viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Martín, Carmen

    2015-09-01

    The field of structural virology developed in parallel with methodological advances in X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. At the end of the 1970s, crystallography yielded the first high resolution structure of an icosahedral virus, the T=3 tomato bushy stunt virus at 2.9Å. It took longer to reach near-atomic resolution in three-dimensional virus maps derived from electron microscopy data, but this was finally achieved, with the solution of complex icosahedral capsids such as the T=25 human adenovirus at ∼3.5Å. Both techniques now work hand-in-hand to determine those aspects of virus assembly and biology that remain unclear. This review examines the trajectory followed by EM imaging techniques in showing the molecular structure of icosahedral viruses, from the first two-dimensional negative staining images of capsids to the latest sophisticated techniques that provide high resolution three-dimensional data, or snapshots of the conformational changes necessary to complete the infectious cycle. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of quartz crystallographic preferred orientations identified with optical fabric analysis, electron backscatter and neutron diffraction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, N J R; Wilson, C J L; Luzin, V

    2017-02-01

    Three techniques are used to measure crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) in a naturally deformed quartz mylonite: transmitted light cross-polarized microscopy using an automated fabric analyser, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and neutron diffraction. Pole figure densities attributable to crystal-plastic deformation are variably recognizable across the techniques, particularly between fabric analyser and diffraction instruments. Although fabric analyser techniques offer rapid acquisition with minimal sample preparation, difficulties may exist when gathering orientation data parallel with the incident beam. Overall, we have found that EBSD and fabric analyser techniques are best suited for studying CPO distributions at the grain scale, where individual orientations can be linked to their source grain or nearest neighbours. Neutron diffraction serves as the best qualitative and quantitative means of estimating the bulk CPO, due to its three-dimensional data acquisition, greater sample area coverage, and larger sample size. However, a number of sampling methods can be applied to FA and EBSD data to make similar approximations. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  10. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of cubic Si3N4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; He, Hongliang; Xu, F. F.; Sekine, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Bando, Y.

    2000-09-01

    A cubic Si3N4 phase/nanostructure has been characterized by means of high-resolution analytical electron microscopy. The specimen prepared from β-Si3N4 powders at a high pressure and temperature by shock wave compression contained nanometer-sized Si3N4 crystallites. The results of nano-beam electron diffraction analysis and high-resolution lattice images as well as computer simulations revealed that the Si3N4 crystallites had a cubic symmetry with spinel structure. The electron energy loss spectrum suggested that the chemical compositions of these nanostructures were close to Si3N4.

  11. Electronic transport on the nanoscale: ballistic transmission and Ohm's law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homoth, J; Wenderoth, M; Druga, T; Winking, L; Ulbrich, R G; Bobisch, C A; Weyers, B; Bannani, A; Zubkov, E; Bernhart, A M; Kaspers, M R; Möller, R

    2009-04-01

    If a current of electrons flows through a normal conductor (in contrast to a superconductor), it is impeded by local scattering at defects as well as phonon scattering. Both effects contribute to the voltage drop observed for a macroscopic complex system as described by Ohm's law. Although this concept is well established, it has not yet been measured around individual defects on the atomic scale. We have measured the voltage drop at a monatomic step in real space by restricting the current to a surface layer. For the Si(111)-( [see text]3 x [see text]3)-Ag surface a monotonous transition with a width below 1 nm was found. A numerical analysis of the data maps the current flow through the complex network and the interplay between defect-free terraces and monatomic steps.

  12. Robotized semiautomatic motorcycle transmission development. Electronic and software design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neghină Mihai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an electrical design (implemented on a PCB board and an accompanying software design for controlling the automatic gear change. The designs complement the mechanical solutions developed in Part 1. The paper also analyses the issues encountered during the intermediate steps of the development of the electronic module, which is expected to be small and adaptable enough to be installed on a motorcycle without changing its ergonomics. The control software runs on the Arduino Nano board and is built as a state machine with one idle state, five active states that cover different stages of the gear change and one error state for preventing malfunctions in case of an unexpected event. The sketch uses 5,760 bytes (or 18% of program storage space and 706 bytes (or 34% of the dynamic memory.

  13. Toward atomic resolution diffractive imaging of isolated molecules with x-ray free-electron lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, Stephan; Holmegaard, Lotte; Filsinger, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We give a detailed account of the theoretical analysis and the experimental results of an x-ray-diffraction experiment on quantum-state selected and strongly laser-aligned gas-phase ensembles of the prototypical large asymmetric rotor molecule 2,5-diiodobenzonitrile, performed at the Linac Cohere...

  14. Integral staggered point-matching method for millimeter-wave reflective diffraction gratings on electron cyclotron heating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Donghui; Huang, Mei; Wang, Zhijiang; Zhang, Feng; Zhuang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The integral staggered point-matching method for design of polarizers on the ECH systems is presented. • The availability of the integral staggered point-matching method is checked by numerical calculations. • Two polarizers are designed with the integral staggered point-matching method and the experimental results are given. - Abstract: The reflective diffraction gratings are widely used in the high power electron cyclotron heating systems for polarization strategy. This paper presents a method which we call “the integral staggered point-matching method” for design of reflective diffraction gratings. This method is based on the integral point-matching method. However, it effectively removes the convergence problems and tedious calculations of the integral point-matching method, making it easier to be used for a beginner. A code is developed based on this method. The calculation results of the integral staggered point-matching method are compared with the integral point-matching method, the coordinate transformation method and the low power measurement results. It indicates that the integral staggered point-matching method can be used as an optional method for the design of reflective diffraction gratings in electron cyclotron heating systems.

  15. Integral staggered point-matching method for millimeter-wave reflective diffraction gratings on electron cyclotron heating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Donghui [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Huang, Mei [Southwestern Institute of Physics, 610041 Chengdu (China); Wang, Zhijiang, E-mail: wangzj@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China); Zhang, Feng [Southwestern Institute of Physics, 610041 Chengdu (China); Zhuang, Ge [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 430074 Wuhan (China)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The integral staggered point-matching method for design of polarizers on the ECH systems is presented. • The availability of the integral staggered point-matching method is checked by numerical calculations. • Two polarizers are designed with the integral staggered point-matching method and the experimental results are given. - Abstract: The reflective diffraction gratings are widely used in the high power electron cyclotron heating systems for polarization strategy. This paper presents a method which we call “the integral staggered point-matching method” for design of reflective diffraction gratings. This method is based on the integral point-matching method. However, it effectively removes the convergence problems and tedious calculations of the integral point-matching method, making it easier to be used for a beginner. A code is developed based on this method. The calculation results of the integral staggered point-matching method are compared with the integral point-matching method, the coordinate transformation method and the low power measurement results. It indicates that the integral staggered point-matching method can be used as an optional method for the design of reflective diffraction gratings in electron cyclotron heating systems.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy studying of structural features of NiTi B2 phase formed under pulsed electron-beam impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisner, Ludmila L.; Semin, Viktor O.; Gudimova, Ekaterina Y. [Institute of Strength Physicists and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Neiman, Alexey A., E-mail: nasa@ispms.tsc.ru; Lotkov, Alexander I.; Ostapenko, Marina G. [Institute of Strength Physicists and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Koval, Nikolai N.; Teresov, Anton D. [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    By transmission electron microscopy method the evolution of structural-phase states on a depth of close to equiatomic NiTi modified layer has been studied. Modification performed by pulse impact on its surface low-energy high-current electron beam (beam energy density 10 J/sm{sup 2}, 10 pulses, pulse duration 50mks). It is established that during the treatment in the layer thickness of 8–10 μm, the melting of primary B2 phase and contained therein as Ti2Ni phase particles occurs. The result is change in the concentration ratio of titanium and nickel in the direction of increasing titanium content, which was confirmed by X-ray analysis in the form of increased unit cell parameter B2 phase. Analysis of the electron diffraction pattern showed that the modified layer is characterized as a highly distorted structure on the basis of bcc lattice. Lattice distortions are maximal near the surface and extends to a depth of melt. In subjacent layer there is gradual decline lattice distortions is observed.

  17. Holography and coherent diffraction with low-energy electrons: A route towards structural biology at the single molecule level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner, E-mail: hwfink@physik.uzh.ch

    2015-12-15

    The current state of the art in structural biology is led by NMR, X-ray crystallography and TEM investigations. These powerful tools however all rely on averaging over a large ensemble of molecules. Here, we present an alternative concept aiming at structural analysis at the single molecule level. We show that by combining electron holography and coherent diffraction imaging estimations concerning the phase of the scattered wave become needless as the phase information is extracted from the data directly and unambiguously. Performed with low-energy electrons the resolution of this lens-less microscope is just limited by the De Broglie wavelength of the electron wave and the numerical aperture, given by detector geometry. In imaging freestanding graphene, a resolution of 2 Å has been achieved revealing the 660.000 unit cells of the graphene sheet from a single data set. Once applied to individual biomolecules the method shall ultimately allow for non-destructive imaging and imports the potential to distinguish between different conformations of proteins with atomic resolution. - Highlights: • Structural biology of single proteins. • Radiation damage-free imaging of individual biomolecules. • Holography. • Low-energy electrons. • Coherent diffraction and phase retrieval.

  18. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy study of hot-deformed gamma-TiAl-based alloy microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrapoński, J; Rodak, K

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the changes in the microstructure of hot-deformed specimens made of alloys containing 46-50 at.% Al, 2 at.% Cr and 2 at.% Nb (and alloying additions such as carbon and boron) with the aid of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. After homogenization and heat treatment performed in order to make diverse lamellae thickness, the specimens were compressed at 1000 degrees C. Transmission electron microscopy examinations of specimens after the compression test revealed the presence of heavily deformed areas with a high density of dislocation. Deformation twins were also observed. Dynamically recrystallized grains were revealed. For alloys no. 2 and no. 3, the recovery and recrystallization processes were more extensive than for alloy no. 1.

  19. Structure studies by electron microscopy and electron diffraction at Physics Department, University of Oslo, 1976-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjoennes, J.K.; Olsen, A.

    1985-08-01

    The paper describes the reasearch activities and plans at the electron microscopy laboratorium, Physics Departmen, University of Oslo. Since the first electron microscope was installed in 1968, the research has covered inorganic structures, physical metallurgy, as well as theory of electron scattering and the development of methods in this field. The current plans involve efforts in the development of crystallographic and spectroscopic methods

  20. Dysprosium disilicide nanostructures on silicon(001) studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Gangfeng; Nogami, Jun; Crimp, Martin A.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure of self-assembled dysprosium silicide nanostructures on silicon(001) has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The studies focused on nanostructures that involve multiple atomic layers of the silicide. Cross-sectional high resolution transmission electron microscopy images and fast Fourier transform analysis showed that both hexagonal and orthorhombic/tetragonal silicide phases were present. Both the magnitude and the anisotropy of lattice mismatch between the silicide and the substrate play roles in the morphology and epitaxial growth of the nanostructures formed