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Sample records for translation termination codon

  1. Position-dependent termination and widespread obligatory frameshifting in Euplotes translation

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    Lobanov, Alexei V.; Heaphy, Stephen M.; Turanov, Anton A.; Gerashchenko, Maxim V.; Pucciarelli, Sandra; Devaraj, Raghul R.; Xie, Fang; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.; Klobutcher, Lawrence A.; Atkins, John F.; Miceli, Cristina; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Baranov, Pavel V.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2016-11-21

    The ribosome can change its reading frame during translation in a process known as programmed ribosomal frameshifting. These rare events are supported by complex mRNA signals. However, we found that the ciliates Euplotes crassus and Euplotes focardii exhibit widespread frameshifting at stop codons. 47 different codons preceding stop signals resulted in either +1 or +2 frameshifts, and +1 frameshifting at AAA was the most frequent. The frameshifts showed unusual plasticity and rapid evolution, and had little influence on translation rates. The proximity of a stop codon to the 3' mRNA end, rather than its occurrence or sequence context, appeared to designate termination. Thus, a ‘stop codon’ is not a sufficient signal for translation termination, and the default function of stop codons in Euplotes is frameshifting, whereas termination is specific to certain mRNA positions and probably requires additional factors.

  2. Tail-extension following the termination codon is critical for release of the nascent chain from membrane-bound ribosomes in a reticulocyte lysate cell-free system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Michiyo; Sakaue, Haruka; Onishi, Yukiko; Yamagishi, Marifu; Kida, Yuichiro; Sakaguchi, Masao

    2013-01-11

    Nascent chain release from membrane-bound ribosomes by the termination codon was investigated using a cell-free translation system from rabbit supplemented with rough microsomal membrane vesicles. Chain release was extremely slow when mRNA ended with only the termination codon. Tail extension after the termination codon enhanced the release of the nascent chain. Release reached plateau levels with tail extension of 10 bases. This requirement was observed with all termination codons: TAA, TGA and TAG. Rapid release was also achieved by puromycin even in the absence of the extension. Efficient translation termination cannot be achieved in the presence of only a termination codon on the mRNA. Tail extension might be required for correct positioning of the termination codon in the ribosome and/or efficient recognition by release factors. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Reassigning stop codons via translation termination: How a few eukaryotes broke the dogma.

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    Alkalaeva, Elena; Mikhailova, Tatiana

    2017-03-01

    The genetic code determines how amino acids are encoded within mRNA. It is universal among the vast majority of organisms, although several exceptions are known. Variant genetic codes are found in ciliates, mitochondria, and numerous other organisms. All revealed genetic codes (standard and variant) have at least one codon encoding a translation stop signal. However, recently two new genetic codes with a reassignment of all three stop codons were revealed in studies examining the protozoa transcriptomes. Here, we discuss this finding and the recent studies of variant genetic codes in eukaryotes. We consider the possible molecular mechanisms allowing the use of certain codons as sense and stop signals simultaneously. The results obtained by studying these amazing organisms represent a new and exciting insight into the mechanism of stop codon decoding in eukaryotes. Also see the video abstract here. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The Effect of Codon Mismatch on the Protein Translation System.

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    Dinglin Zhang

    Full Text Available Incorrect protein translation, caused by codon mismatch, is an important problem of living cells. In this work, a computational model was introduced to quantify the effects of codon mismatch and the model was used to study the protein translation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. According to simulation results, the probability of codon mismatch will increase when the supply of amino acids is unbalanced, and the longer is the codon sequence, the larger is the probability for incorrect translation to occur, making the synthesis of long peptide chain difficult. By comparing to simulation results without codon mismatch effects taken into account, the fraction of mRNAs with bound ribosome decrease faster along the mRNAs, making the 5' ramp phenomenon more obvious. It was also found in our work that the premature mechanism resulted from codon mismatch can reduce the proportion of incorrect translation when the amino acid supply is extremely unbalanced, which is one possible source of high fidelity protein synthesis after peptidyl transfer.

  5. The Effect of Codon Mismatch on the Protein Translation System.

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    Zhang, Dinglin; Chen, Danfeng; Cao, Liaoran; Li, Guohui; Cheng, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Incorrect protein translation, caused by codon mismatch, is an important problem of living cells. In this work, a computational model was introduced to quantify the effects of codon mismatch and the model was used to study the protein translation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. According to simulation results, the probability of codon mismatch will increase when the supply of amino acids is unbalanced, and the longer is the codon sequence, the larger is the probability for incorrect translation to occur, making the synthesis of long peptide chain difficult. By comparing to simulation results without codon mismatch effects taken into account, the fraction of mRNAs with bound ribosome decrease faster along the mRNAs, making the 5' ramp phenomenon more obvious. It was also found in our work that the premature mechanism resulted from codon mismatch can reduce the proportion of incorrect translation when the amino acid supply is extremely unbalanced, which is one possible source of high fidelity protein synthesis after peptidyl transfer.

  6. Accessibility of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence dictates N-terminal codon bias in E. coli

    OpenAIRE

    Shakhnovich, Eugene; Zhang, Wenli; Yan, Jin; Adkar, Bharat; Jacobs, William; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Adkar, Bharat

    2018-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts, no physical mechanism has been shown to explain N-terminal codon bias in prokaryotic genomes. Using a systematic study of synonymous substitutions in two endogenous E. coli genes, we show that interactions between the coding region and the upstream Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence modulate the efficiency of translation initiation, affecting both intracellular mRNA and protein levels due to the inherent coupling of transcription and translation in E. coli. We further ...

  7. Selective forces and mutational biases drive stop codon usage in the human genome: a comparison with sense codon usage.

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    Trotta, Edoardo

    2016-05-17

    The three stop codons UAA, UAG, and UGA signal the termination of mRNA translation. As a result of a mechanism that is not adequately understood, they are normally used with unequal frequencies. In this work, we showed that selective forces and mutational biases drive stop codon usage in the human genome. We found that, in respect to sense codons, stop codon usage was affected by stronger selective forces but was less influenced by neutral mutational biases. UGA is the most frequent termination codon in human genome. However, UAA was the preferred stop codon in genes with high breadth of expression, high level of expression, AT-rich coding sequences, housekeeping functions, and in gene ontology categories with the largest deviation from expected stop codon usage. Selective forces associated with the breadth and the level of expression favoured AT-rich sequences in the mRNA region including the stop site and its proximal 3'-UTR, but acted with scarce effects on sense codons, generating two regions, upstream and downstream of the stop codon, with strongly different base composition. By favouring low levels of GC-content, selection promoted labile local secondary structures at the stop site and its proximal 3'-UTR. The compositional and structural context favoured by selection was surprisingly emphasized in the class of ribosomal proteins and was consistent with sequence elements that increase the efficiency of translational termination. Stop codons were also heterogeneously distributed among chromosomes by a mechanism that was strongly correlated with the GC-content of coding sequences. In human genome, the nucleotide composition and the thermodynamic stability of stop codon site and its proximal 3'-UTR are correlated with the GC-content of coding sequences and with the breadth and the level of gene expression. In highly expressed genes stop codon usage is compositionally and structurally consistent with highly efficient translation termination signals.

  8. Expression of the VP2 protein of murine norovirus by a translation termination-reinitiation strategy.

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    Sawsan Napthine

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Expression of the minor virion structural protein VP2 of the calicivirus murine norovirus (MNV is believed to occur by the unusual mechanism of termination codon-dependent reinitiation of translation. In this process, following translation of an upstream open reading frame (ORF and termination at the stop codon, a proportion of 40S subunits remain associated with the mRNA and reinitiate at the AUG of a downstream ORF, which is typically in close proximity. Consistent with this, the VP2 start codon (AUG of MNV overlaps the stop codon of the upstream VP1 ORF (UAA in the pentanucleotide UAAUG.Here, we confirm that MNV VP2 expression is regulated by termination-reinitiation and define the mRNA sequence requirements. Efficient reintiation is dependent upon 43 nt of RNA immediately upstream of the UAAUG site. Chemical and enzymatic probing revealed that the RNA in this region is not highly structured and includes an essential stretch of bases complementary to 18S rRNA helix 26 (Motif 1. The relative position of Motif 1 with respect to the UAAUG site impacts upon the efficiency of the process. Termination-reinitiation in MNV was also found to be relatively insensitive to the initiation inhibitor edeine.The termination-reinitiation signal of MNV most closely resembles that of influenza BM2. Similar to other viruses that use this strategy, base-pairing between mRNA and rRNA is likely to play a role in tethering the 40S subunit to the mRNA following termination at the VP1 stop codon. Our data also indicate that accurate recognition of the VP2 ORF AUG is not a pre-requisite for efficient reinitiation of translation in this system.

  9. Translation attenuation via 3′ terminal codon usage in bovine csn1s2 is responsible for the difference in αs2- and β-casein profile in milk

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    Kim, Julie J; Yu, Jaeju; Bag, Jnanankur; Bakovic, Marica; Cant, John P

    2015-01-01

    The rate of secretion of αs2-casein into bovine milk is approximately 25% of that of β-casein, yet mammary expression of their respective mRNA transcripts (csn1s2 and csn2) is not different. Our objective was to identify molecular mechanisms that explain the difference in translation efficiency between csn1s2 and csn2. Cell-free translational efficiency of csn2 was 5 times that of csn1s2. Transcripts of csn1s2 distributed into heavier polysomes than csn2 transcripts, indicating an attenuation of elongation and/or termination. Stimulatory and inhibitory effects of the 5′ and 3′ UTRs on translational efficiency were different with luciferase and casein sequences in the coding regions. Substituting the 5′ and 3′ UTRs from csn2 into csn1s2 did not improve csn1s2 translation, implicating the coding region itself in the translation difference. Deletion of a 28-codon fragment from the 3′ terminus of the csn1s2 coding region, which displays codons with low correlations to cell fitness, increased translation to a par with csn2. We conclude that the usage of the last 28 codons of csn1s2 is the main regulatory element that attenuates its expression and is responsible for the differential translational expression of csn1s2 and csn2. PMID:25826667

  10. Codon usage regulates protein structure and function by affecting translation elongation speed in Drosophila cells.

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    Zhao, Fangzhou; Yu, Chien-Hung; Liu, Yi

    2017-08-21

    Codon usage biases are found in all eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes and have been proposed to regulate different aspects of translation process. Codon optimality has been shown to regulate translation elongation speed in fungal systems, but its effect on translation elongation speed in animal systems is not clear. In this study, we used a Drosophila cell-free translation system to directly compare the velocity of mRNA translation elongation. Our results demonstrate that optimal synonymous codons speed up translation elongation while non-optimal codons slow down translation. In addition, codon usage regulates ribosome movement and stalling on mRNA during translation. Finally, we show that codon usage affects protein structure and function in vitro and in Drosophila cells. Together, these results suggest that the effect of codon usage on translation elongation speed is a conserved mechanism from fungi to animals that can affect protein folding in eukaryotic organisms. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Complete motif analysis of sequence requirements for translation initiation at non-AUG start codons.

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    Diaz de Arce, Alexander J; Noderer, William L; Wang, Clifford L

    2018-01-25

    The initiation of mRNA translation from start codons other than AUG was previously believed to be rare and of relatively low impact. More recently, evidence has suggested that as much as half of all translation initiation utilizes non-AUG start codons, codons that deviate from AUG by a single base. Furthermore, non-AUG start codons have been shown to be involved in regulation of expression and disease etiology. Yet the ability to gauge expression based on the sequence of a translation initiation site (start codon and its flanking bases) has been limited. Here we have performed a comprehensive analysis of translation initiation sites that utilize non-AUG start codons. By combining genetic-reporter, cell-sorting, and high-throughput sequencing technologies, we have analyzed the expression associated with all possible variants of the -4 to +4 positions of non-AUG translation initiation site motifs. This complete motif analysis revealed that 1) with the right sequence context, certain non-AUG start codons can generate expression comparable to that of AUG start codons, 2) sequence context affects each non-AUG start codon differently, and 3) initiation at non-AUG start codons is highly sensitive to changes in the flanking sequences. Complete motif analysis has the potential to be a key tool for experimental and diagnostic genomics. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. The distribution of synonymous codon choice in the translation initiation region of dengue virus.

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    Jian-hua Zhou

    Full Text Available Dengue is the most common arthropod-borne viral (Arboviral illness in humans. The genetic features concerning the codon usage of dengue virus (DENV were analyzed by the relative synonymous codon usage, the effective number of codons and the codon adaptation index. The evolutionary distance between DENV and the natural hosts (Homo sapiens, Pan troglodytes, Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti was estimated by a novel formula. Finally, the synonymous codon usage preference for the translation initiation region of this virus was also analyzed. The result indicates that the general trend of the 59 synonymous codon usage of the four genotypes of DENV are similar to each other, and this pattern has no link with the geographic distribution of the virus. The effect of codon usage pattern of Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti on the formation of codon usage of DENV is stronger than that of the two primates. Turning to the codon usage preference of the translation initiation region of this virus, some codons pairing to low tRNA copy numbers in the two primates have a stronger tendency to exist in the translation initiation region than those in the open reading frame of DENV. Although DENV, like other RNA viruses, has a high mutation to adapt its hosts, the regulatory features about the synonymous codon usage have been 'branded' on the translation initiation region of this virus in order to hijack the translational mechanisms of the hosts.

  13. Translational selection on codon usage in the genus Aspergillus.

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    Iriarte, Andrés; Sanguinetti, Manuel; Fernández-Calero, Tamara; Naya, Hugo; Ramón, Ana; Musto, Héctor

    2012-09-10

    Aspergillus is a genus of mold fungi that includes more than 200 described species. Many members of the group are relevant pathogens and other species are economically important. Only one species has been analyzed for codon usage, and this was performed with a small number of genes. In this paper, we report the codon usage patterns of eight completely sequenced genomes which belong to this genus. The results suggest that selection for translational efficiency and accuracy are the major factors shaping codon usage in all of the species studied so far, and therefore they were active in the last common ancestor of the group. Composition and molecular distances analyses show that highly expressed genes evolve slower at synonymous sites. We identified a conserved core of translationally optimal codons and study the tRNA gene pool in each genome. We found that the great majority of preferred triplets match the respective cognate tRNA with more copies in the respective genome. We discuss the possible scenarios that can explain the observed differences among the species analyzed. Finally we highlight the biotechnological application of this research regarding heterologous protein expression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Synonymous codon ordering: a subtle but prevalent strategy of bacteria to improve translational efficiency.

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    Zhu-Qing Shao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In yeast coding sequences, once a particular codon has been used, subsequent occurrence of the same amino acid tends to use codons sharing the same tRNA. Such a phenomenon of co-tRNA codons pairing bias (CTCPB is also found in some other eukaryotes but it is not known whether it occurs in prokaryotes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we focused on a total of 773 bacterial genomes to investigate their synonymous codon pairing preferences. After calculating the actual frequencies of synonymous codon pairs and comparing them with their expected values, we detected an obvious pairing bias towards identical codon pairs. This seems consistent with the previously reported CTCPB phenomenon, since identical codons are certainly read by the same tRNA. However, among co-tRNA but non-identical codon pairs, only 22 were often found overrepresented, suggesting that many co-tRNA codons actually do not preferentially pair together in prokaryotes. Therefore, the previously reported co-tRNA codons pairing rule needs to be more rigorously defined. The affinity differences between a tRNA anticodon and its readable codons should be taken into account. Moreover, both within-gene-shuffling tests and phylogenetic analyses support the idea that translational selection played an important role in shaping the observed synonymous codon pairing pattern in prokaryotes. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, a high level of synonymous codon pairing bias was detected in 73% investigated bacterial species, suggesting the synonymous codon ordering strategy has been prevalently adopted by prokaryotes to improve their translational efficiencies. The findings in this study also provide important clues to better understand the complex dynamics of translational process.

  15. Translation initiation factors eIF3 and HCR1 control translation termination and stop codon read-through in yeast cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beznosková, P.; Cuchalová, Lucie; Wagner, S.; Shoemaker, Ch. J.; Gunišová, S.; von der Haar, T.; Valášek, L. S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 11 (2013), e1003962_1-e1003962_17 ISSN 1553-7404 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : translation initiation * translation termination * eIF3 Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 8.167, year: 2013

  16. Translation Initiation from Conserved Non-AUG Codons Provides Additional Layers of Regulation and Coding Capacity

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    Ivaylo P. Ivanov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurospora crassa cpc-1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCN4 are homologs specifying transcription activators that drive the transcriptional response to amino acid limitation. The cpc-1 mRNA contains two upstream open reading frames (uORFs in its >700-nucleotide (nt 5′ leader, and its expression is controlled at the level of translation in response to amino acid starvation. We used N. crassa cell extracts and obtained data indicating that cpc-1 uORF1 and uORF2 are functionally analogous to GCN4 uORF1 and uORF4, respectively, in controlling translation. We also found that the 5′ region upstream of the main coding sequence of the cpc-1 mRNA extends for more than 700 nucleotides without any in-frame stop codon. For 100 cpc-1 homologs from Pezizomycotina and from selected Basidiomycota, 5′ conserved extensions of the CPC1 reading frame are also observed. Multiple non-AUG near-cognate codons (NCCs in the CPC1 reading frame upstream of uORF2, some deeply conserved, could potentially initiate translation. At least four NCCs initiated translation in vitro. In vivo data were consistent with initiation at NCCs to produce N-terminally extended N. crassa CPC1 isoforms. The pivotal role played by CPC1, combined with its translational regulation by uORFs and NCC utilization, underscores the emerging significance of noncanonical initiation events in controlling gene expression.

  17. Codon usage determines translation rate in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael Askvad; Kurland, C G; Pedersen, Steen

    1989-01-01

    We wish to determine whether differences in translation rate are correlated with differences in codon usage or with differences in mRNA secondary structure. We therefore inserted a small DNA fragment in the lacZ gene either directly or flanked by a few frame-shifting bases, leaving the reading fr...

  18. Absolute in vivo translation rates of individual codons in Escherichia coli: The two glutamic acid codons GAA and GAG are translated with a threefold difference in rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M.A.; Pedersen, Steen

    1991-01-01

    We have determined the absolute translation rates for four individual codons in Escherichia coli. We used our previously described system for direct measurements of in vivo translation rates using small, in-frame inserts in the lacZ gene. The inserts consisted of multiple synthetic 30 base-pair D...

  19. Identification of the translational start site of codon-optimized mCherry in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, Paul; Muwanguzi-Karugaba, Julian; Melief, Eduard; Files, Megan; Parish, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Background Fluorescent proteins are used widely as reporter genes in many organisms. We previously codon-optimized mCherry for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and generated expression constructs with high level expression in mycobacteria with multiple uses in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known about the expression of fluorescent proteins in mycobacteria and the translational start codon for mCherry has not been experimentally determined. Results We determined the translational start site ...

  20. Translation termination in pyrrolysine-utilizing archaea.

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    Alkalaeva, Elena; Eliseev, Boris; Ambrogelly, Alexandre; Vlasov, Peter; Kondrashov, Fyodor A; Gundllapalli, Sharath; Frolova, Lyudmila; Söll, Dieter; Kisselev, Lev

    2009-11-03

    Although some data link archaeal and eukaryotic translation, the overall mechanism of protein synthesis in archaea remains largely obscure. Both archaeal (aRF1) and eukaryotic (eRF1) single release factors recognize all three stop codons. The archaeal genus Methanosarcinaceae contains two aRF1 homologs, and also uses the UAG stop to encode the 22nd amino acid, pyrrolysine. Here we provide an analysis of the last stage of archaeal translation in pyrrolysine-utilizing species. We demonstrated that only one of two Methanosarcina barkeri aRF1 homologs possesses activity and recognizes all three stop codons. The second aRF1 homolog may have another unknown function. The mechanism of pyrrolysine incorporation in the Methanosarcinaceae is discussed.

  1. RNA sequence determinants of a coupled termination-reinitiation strategy for downstream open reading frame translation in Helminthosporium victoriae virus 190S and other victoriviruses (Family Totiviridae).

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    Li, Hua; Havens, Wendy M; Nibert, Max L; Ghabrial, Said A

    2011-07-01

    The genome-length, dicistronic mRNA of the double-stranded RNA fungal virus Helminthosporium victoriae virus 190S (genus Victorivirus, family Totiviridae) contains two long open reading frames (ORFs) that overlap in the tetranucleotide AUGA. Translation of the downstream ORF, which encodes the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), has been proposed to depend on ribosomal reinitiation following termination of the upstream ORF, which encodes the capsid protein. In the current study, we examined the RNA sequence determinants for RdRp translation in this virus and demonstrated that a coupled termination-reinitiation (stop-restart) strategy is indeed used. Signals for termination-reinitiation are found within a 32-nucleotide stretch of RNA immediately upstream of the AUGA motif, including a predicted pseudoknot structure. The close proximity in which this predicted structure is followed by the upstream ORF's stop codon appears to be especially important for promoting translation of the downstream ORF. The normal strong preferences for an AUG start codon and the canonical sequence context to favor translation initiation appear somewhat relaxed for the downstream ORF. Similar sequence motifs and predicted RNA structures in other victoriviruses suggest that they all share a related stop-restart strategy for RdRp translation. Members of the genus Victorivirus thus provide new and unique opportunities for exploring the molecular mechanisms of translational coupling, which remain only partly understood in this and other systems.

  2. Speed Controls in Translating Secretory Proteins in Eukaryotes - an Evolutionary Perspective

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    Mahlab, Shelly; Linial, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Protein translation is the most expensive operation in dividing cells from bacteria to humans. Therefore, managing the speed and allocation of resources is subject to tight control. From bacteria to humans, clusters of relatively rare tRNA codons at the N′-terminal of mRNAs have been implicated in attenuating the process of ribosome allocation, and consequently the translation rate in a broad range of organisms. The current interpretation of “slow” tRNA codons does not distinguish between protein translations mediated by free- or endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound ribosomes. We demonstrate that proteins translated by free- or ER-bound ribosomes exhibit different overall properties in terms of their translation efficiency and speed in yeast, fly, plant, worm, bovine and human. We note that only secreted or membranous proteins with a Signal peptide (SP) are specified by segments of “slow” tRNA at the N′-terminal, followed by abundant codons that are considered “fast.” Such profiles apply to 3100 proteins of the human proteome that are composed of secreted and signal peptide (SP)-assisted membranous proteins. Remarkably, the bulks of the proteins (12,000), or membranous proteins lacking SP (3400), do not have such a pattern. Alternation of “fast” and “slow” codons was found also in proteins that translocate to mitochondria through transit peptides (TP). The differential clusters of tRNA adapted codons is not restricted to the N′-terminal of transcripts. Specifically, Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins are unified by clusters of low adapted tRNAs codons at the C′-termini. Furthermore, selection of amino acids types and specific codons was shown as the driving force which establishes the translation demands for the secretory proteome. We postulate that “hard-coded” signals within the secretory proteome assist the steps of protein maturation and folding. Specifically, “speed control” signals for delaying the translation

  3. Running the Stop Sign: Readthrough of a Premature UAG Termination Signal in the Translation of a Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Taurine Biosynthetic Enzyme.

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    Larkin, Mary E M; Place, Allen R

    2017-06-03

    The UAG termination codon is generally recognized as the least efficient and least frequently used of the three universal stop codons. This is substantiated by numerous studies in an array of organisms. We present here evidence of a translational readthrough of a mutant nonsense UAG codon in the transcript from the cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase ( csad ) gene (ENSDARG00000026348) in zebrafish. The csad gene encodes the terminal enzyme in the taurine biosynthetic pathway. Taurine is a critical amino acid for all animals, playing several essential roles throughout the body, including modulation of the immune system. The sa9430 zebrafish strain (ZDB-ALT-130411-5055) has a point mutation leading to a premature stop codon (UAG) 20 amino acids 5' of the normal stop codon, UGA. Data from immunoblotting, enzyme activity assays, and mass spectrometry provide evidence that the mutant is making a CSAD protein identical to that of the wild-type (XP_009295318.1) in terms of size, activity, and amino acid sequence. UAG readthrough has been described in several species, but this is the first presentation of a case in fish. Also presented are the first data substantiating the ability of a fish CSAD to utilize cysteic acid, an alternative to the standard substrate cysteine sulfinic acid, to produce taurine.

  4. Fine-tuning translation kinetics selection as the driving force of codon usage bias in the hepatitis A virus capsid.

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    Aragonès, Lluís; Guix, Susana; Ribes, Enric; Bosch, Albert; Pintó, Rosa M

    2010-03-05

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV), the prototype of genus Hepatovirus, has several unique biological characteristics that distinguish it from other members of the Picornaviridae family. Among these, the need for an intact eIF4G factor for the initiation of translation results in an inability to shut down host protein synthesis by a mechanism similar to that of other picornaviruses. Consequently, HAV must inefficiently compete for the cellular translational machinery and this may explain its poor growth in cell culture. In this context of virus/cell competition, HAV has strategically adopted a naturally highly deoptimized codon usage with respect to that of its cellular host. With the aim to optimize its codon usage the virus was adapted to propagate in cells with impaired protein synthesis, in order to make tRNA pools more available for the virus. A significant loss of fitness was the immediate response to the adaptation process that was, however, later on recovered and more associated to a re-deoptimization rather than to an optimization of the codon usage specifically in the capsid coding region. These results exclude translation selection and instead suggest fine-tuning translation kinetics selection as the underlying mechanism of the codon usage bias in this specific genome region. Additionally, the results provide clear evidence of the Red Queen dynamics of evolution since the virus has very much evolved to re-adapt its codon usage to the environmental cellular changing conditions in order to recover the original fitness.

  5. Fine-tuning translation kinetics selection as the driving force of codon usage bias in the hepatitis A virus capsid.

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    Lluís Aragonès

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis A virus (HAV, the prototype of genus Hepatovirus, has several unique biological characteristics that distinguish it from other members of the Picornaviridae family. Among these, the need for an intact eIF4G factor for the initiation of translation results in an inability to shut down host protein synthesis by a mechanism similar to that of other picornaviruses. Consequently, HAV must inefficiently compete for the cellular translational machinery and this may explain its poor growth in cell culture. In this context of virus/cell competition, HAV has strategically adopted a naturally highly deoptimized codon usage with respect to that of its cellular host. With the aim to optimize its codon usage the virus was adapted to propagate in cells with impaired protein synthesis, in order to make tRNA pools more available for the virus. A significant loss of fitness was the immediate response to the adaptation process that was, however, later on recovered and more associated to a re-deoptimization rather than to an optimization of the codon usage specifically in the capsid coding region. These results exclude translation selection and instead suggest fine-tuning translation kinetics selection as the underlying mechanism of the codon usage bias in this specific genome region. Additionally, the results provide clear evidence of the Red Queen dynamics of evolution since the virus has very much evolved to re-adapt its codon usage to the environmental cellular changing conditions in order to recover the original fitness.

  6. Decoding options and accuracy of translation of developmentally regulated UUA codon in Streptomyces: bioinformatic analysis.

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    Rokytskyy, Ihor; Koshla, Oksana; Fedorenko, Victor; Ostash, Bohdan

    2016-01-01

    The gene bldA for leucyl [Formula: see text] is known for almost 30 years as a key regulator of morphogenesis and secondary metabolism in genus Streptomyces. Codon UUA is the rarest one in Streptomyces genomes and is present exclusively in genes with auxiliary functions. Delayed accumulation of translation-competent [Formula: see text] is believed to confine the expression of UUA-containing transcripts to stationary phase. Implicit to the regulatory function of UUA codon is the assumption about high accuracy of its translation, e.g. the latter should not occur in the absence of cognate [Formula: see text]. However, a growing body of facts points to the possibility of mistranslation of UUA-containing transcripts in the bldA-deficient mutants. It is not known what type of near-cognate tRNA(s) may decode UUA in the absence of cognate tRNA in Streptomyces, and whether UUA possesses certain inherent properties (such as increased/decreased accuracy of decoding) that would favor its use for regulatory purposes. Here we took bioinformatic approach to address these questions. We catalogued the entire complement of tRNA genes from several relevant Streptomyces and identified genes for posttranscriptional modifications of tRNA that might be involved in UUA decoding by cognate and near-cognate tRNAs. Based on tRNA gene content in Streptomyces genomes, we propose possible scenarios of UUA codon mistranslation. UUA is not associated with an increased rate of missense errors as compared to other leucyl codons, contrasting general belief that low-abundant codons are more error-prone than the high-abundant ones.

  7. Effect of the nucleotides surrounding the start codon on the translation of foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA.

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    Ma, X X; Feng, Y P; Gu, Y X; Zhou, J H; Ma, Z R

    2016-06-01

    As for the alternative AUGs in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), nucleotide bias of the context flanking the AUG(2nd) could be used as a strong signal to initiate translation. To determine the role of the specific nucleotide context, dicistronic reporter constructs were engineered to contain different versions of nucleotide context linking between internal ribosome entry site (IRES) and downstream gene. The results indicate that under FMDV IRES-dependent mechanism, the nucleotide contexts flanking start codon can influence the translation initiation efficiencies. The most optimal sequences for both start codons have proved to be UUU AUG(1st) AAC and AAG AUG(2nd) GAA.

  8. Synonymous Codon Usage Analysis of Thirty Two Mycobacteriophage Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Synonymous codon usage of protein coding genes of thirty two completely sequenced mycobacteriophage genomes was studied using multivariate statistical analysis. One of the major factors influencing codon usage is identified to be compositional bias. Codons ending with either C or G are preferred in highly expressed genes among which C ending codons are highly preferred over G ending codons. A strong negative correlation between effective number of codons (Nc and GC3s content was also observed, showing that the codon usage was effected by gene nucleotide composition. Translational selection is also identified to play a role in shaping the codon usage operative at the level of translational accuracy. High level of heterogeneity is seen among and between the genomes. Length of genes is also identified to influence the codon usage in 11 out of 32 phage genomes. Mycobacteriophage Cooper is identified to be the highly biased genome with better translation efficiency comparing well with the host specific tRNA genes.

  9. 5'-Terminal AUGs in Escherichia coli mRNAs with Shine-Dalgarno Sequences: Identification and Analysis of Their Roles in Non-Canonical Translation Initiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather J Beck

    Full Text Available Analysis of the Escherichia coli transcriptome identified a unique subset of messenger RNAs (mRNAs that contain a conventional untranslated leader and Shine-Dalgarno (SD sequence upstream of the gene's start codon while also containing an AUG triplet at the mRNA's 5'- terminus (5'-uAUG. Fusion of the coding sequence specified by the 5'-terminal putative AUG start codon to a lacZ reporter gene, as well as primer extension inhibition assays, reveal that the majority of the 5'-terminal upstream open reading frames (5'-uORFs tested support some level of lacZ translation, indicating that these mRNAs can function both as leaderless and canonical SD-leadered mRNAs. Although some of the uORFs were expressed at low levels, others were expressed at levels close to that of the respective downstream genes and as high as the naturally leaderless cI mRNA of bacteriophage λ. These 5'-terminal uORFs potentially encode peptides of varying lengths, but their functions, if any, are unknown. In an effort to determine whether expression from the 5'-terminal uORFs impact expression of the immediately downstream cistron, we examined expression from the downstream coding sequence after mutations were introduced that inhibit efficient 5'-uORF translation. These mutations were found to affect expression from the downstream cistrons to varying degrees, suggesting that some 5'-uORFs may play roles in downstream regulation. Since the 5'-uAUGs found on these conventionally leadered mRNAs can function to bind ribosomes and initiate translation, this indicates that canonical mRNAs containing 5'-uAUGs should be examined for their potential to function also as leaderless mRNAs.

  10. Translational Control of the SigR-Directed Oxidative Stress Response in Streptomyces via IF3-Mediated Repression of a Noncanonical GTC Start Codon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Morgan A; Chandra, Govind; Findlay, Kim C; Paget, Mark S B; Buttner, Mark J

    2017-06-13

    The major oxidative stress response in Streptomyces is controlled by the sigma factor SigR and its cognate antisigma factor RsrA, and SigR activity is tightly controlled through multiple mechanisms at both the transcriptional and posttranslational levels. Here we show that sigR has a highly unusual GTC start codon and that this leads to another level of SigR regulation, in which SigR translation is repressed by translation initiation factor 3 (IF3). Changing the GTC to a canonical start codon causes SigR to be overproduced relative to RsrA, resulting in unregulated and constitutive expression of the SigR regulon. Similarly, introducing IF3* mutations that impair its ability to repress SigR translation has the same effect. Thus, the noncanonical GTC sigR start codon and its repression by IF3 are critical for the correct and proper functioning of the oxidative stress regulatory system. sigR and rsrA are cotranscribed and translationally coupled, and it had therefore been assumed that SigR and RsrA are produced in stoichiometric amounts. Here we show that RsrA can be transcribed and translated independently of SigR, present evidence that RsrA is normally produced in excess of SigR, and describe the factors that determine SigR-RsrA stoichiometry. IMPORTANCE In all sigma factor-antisigma factor regulatory switches, the relative abundance of the two proteins is critical to the proper functioning of the system. Many sigma-antisigma operons are cotranscribed and translationally coupled, leading to a generic assumption that the sigma and antisigma factors are produced in a fixed 1:1 ratio. In the case of sigR - rsrA , we show instead that the antisigma factor is produced in excess over the sigma factor, providing a buffer to prevent spurious release of sigma activity. This excess arises in part because sigR has an extremely rare noncanonical GTC start codon, and as a result, SigR translation initiation is repressed by IF3. This finding highlights the potential significance

  11. Positive selection for unpreferred codon usage in eukaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galagan James E

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural selection has traditionally been understood as a force responsible for pushing genes to states of higher translational efficiency, whereas lower translational efficiency has been explained by neutral mutation and genetic drift. We looked for evidence of directional selection resulting in increased unpreferred codon usage (and presumably reduced translational efficiency in three divergent clusters of eukaryotic genomes using a simple optimal-codon-based metric (Kp/Ku. Results Here we show that for some genes natural selection is indeed responsible for causing accelerated unpreferred codon substitution, and document the scope of this selection. In Cryptococcus and to a lesser extent Drosophila, we find many genes showing a statistically significant signal of selection for unpreferred codon usage in one or more lineages. We did not find evidence for this type of selection in Saccharomyces. The signal of positive selection observed from unpreferred synonymous codon substitutions is coincident in Cryptococcus and Drosophila with the distribution of upstream open reading frames (uORFs, another genic feature known to reduce translational efficiency. Functional enrichment analysis of genes exhibiting low Kp/Ku ratios reveals that genes in regulatory roles are particularly subject to this type of selection. Conclusion Through genome-wide scans, we find recent selection for unpreferred codon usage at approximately 1% of genetic loci in a Cryptococcus and several genes in Drosophila. Unpreferred codons can impede translation efficiency, and we find that genes with translation-impeding uORFs are enriched for this selection signal. We find that regulatory genes are particularly likely to be subject to selection for unpreferred codon usage. Given that expression noise can propagate through regulatory cascades, and that low translational efficiency can reduce expression noise, this finding supports the hypothesis that translational

  12. Emergent Rules for Codon Choice Elucidated by Editing Rare Arginine Codons in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-20

    the successful 110 CGU con- versions with the 13 optimized codon substitutions to produce strain C123, in which all 123 AGR codons have been removed...culture medium consisted of LBL autoclaved with 1.5% (wt/vol) Bacto Agar (Fisher), containing the same concentrations of antibiotics as necessary. ColE1...controlling the ef- ficiency of protein translation. Cell 141(2):344–354. 15. Li GW (2015) How do bacteria tune translation efficiency? Curr Opin Microbiol

  13. Control of ribosome traffic by position-dependent choice of synonymous codons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Pedersen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) encodes a sequence of amino acids by using codons. For most amino acids, there are multiple synonymous codons that can encode the amino acid. The translation speed can vary from one codon to another, thus there is room for changing the ribosome speed while keeping the amino acid sequence and hence the resulting protein. Recently, it has been noticed that the choice of the synonymous codon, via the resulting distribution of slow- and fast-translated codons, affects not only on the average speed of one ribosome translating the mRNA but also might have an effect on nearby ribosomes by affecting the appearance of ‘traffic jams’ where multiple ribosomes collide and form queues. To test this ‘context effect’ further, we here investigate the effect of the sequence of synonymous codons on the ribosome traffic by using a ribosome traffic model with codon-dependent rates, estimated from experiments. We compare the ribosome traffic on wild-type (WT) sequences and sequences where the synonymous codons were swapped randomly. By simulating translation of 87 genes, we demonstrate that the WT sequences, especially those with a high bias in codon usage, tend to have the ability to reduce ribosome collisions, hence optimizing the cellular investment in the translation apparatus. The magnitude of such reduction of the translation time might have a significant impact on the cellular growth rate and thereby have importance for the survival of the species. (paper)

  14. [Correlation of codon biases and potential secondary structures with mRNA translation efficiency in unicellular organisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirov, N V; Likhoshvaĭ, V A; Matushkin, Iu G

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression is known to correlate with degree of codon bias in many unicellular organisms. However, such correlation is absent in some organisms. Recently we demonstrated that inverted complementary repeats within coding DNA sequence must be considered for proper estimation of translation efficiency, since they may form secondary structures that obstruct ribosome movement. We have developed a program for estimation of potential coding DNA sequence expression in defined unicellular organism using its genome sequence. The program computes elongation efficiency index. Computation is based on estimation of coding DNA sequence elongation efficiency, taking into account three key factors: codon bias, average number of inverted complementary repeats, and free energy of potential stem-loop structures formed by the repeats. The influence of these factors on translation is numerically estimated. An optimal proportion of these factors is computed for each organism individually. Quantitative translational characteristics of 384 unicellular organisms (351 bacteria, 28 archaea, 5 eukaryota) have been computed using their annotated genomes from NCBI GenBank. Five potential evolutionary strategies of translational optimization have been determined among studied organisms. A considerable difference of preferred translational strategies between Bacteria and Archaea has been revealed. Significant correlations between elongation efficiency index and gene expression levels have been shown for two organisms (S. cerevisiae and H. pylori) using available microarray data. The proposed method allows to estimate numerically the coding DNA sequence translation efficiency and to optimize nucleotide composition of heterologous genes in unicellular organisms. http://www.mgs.bionet.nsc.ru/mgs/programs/eei-calculator/.

  15. Complex Codon Usage Pattern and Compositional Features of Retroviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav RoyChoudhury

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses infect a wide range of organisms including humans. Among them, HIV-1, which causes AIDS, has now become a major threat for world health. Some of these viruses are also potential gene transfer vectors. In this study, the patterns of synonymous codon usage in retroviruses have been studied through multivariate statistical methods on ORFs sequences from the available 56 retroviruses. The principal determinant for evolution of the codon usage pattern in retroviruses seemed to be the compositional constraints, while selection for translation of the viral genes plays a secondary role. This was further supported by multivariate analysis on relative synonymous codon usage. Thus, it seems that mutational bias might have dominated role over translational selection in shaping the codon usage of retroviruses. Codon adaptation index was used to identify translationally optimal codons among genes from retroviruses. The comparative analysis of the preferred and optimal codons among different retroviral groups revealed that four codons GAA, AAA, AGA, and GGA were significantly more frequent in most of the retroviral genes inspite of some differences. Cluster analysis also revealed that phylogenetically related groups of retroviruses have probably evolved their codon usage in a concerted manner under the influence of their nucleotide composition.

  16. Codon cassette mutagenesis: a general method to insert or replace individual codons by using universal mutagenic cassettes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kegler-Ebo, D M; Docktor, C M; DiMaio, D

    1994-01-01

    We describe codon cassette mutagenesis, a simple method of mutagenesis that uses universal mutagenic cassettes to deposit single codons at specific sites in double-stranded DNA. A target molecule is first constructed that contains a blunt, double-strand break at the site targeted for mutagenesis. A double-stranded mutagenic codon cassette is then inserted at the target site. Each mutagenic codon cassette contains a three base pair direct terminal repeat and two head-to-head recognition sequen...

  17. Immunochemical determination of cellular content of translation release factor RF4 in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Manuel Palacios Moreno, Juan; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1999-01-01

    The biosynthesis of proteins in prokaryotes is terminated when a stop codon is present in the A-site of the 70S ribosomal complex. Four different translation termination factors are known to participate in the termination process. Release factor RF1 and RF2 are responsible for the recognition of ...

  18. Control of ribosome traffic by position-dependent choice of synonymous codons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Pedersen, Steen

    2013-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) encodes a sequence of amino acids by using codons. For most amino acids, there are multiple synonymous codons that can encode the amino acid. The translation speed can vary from one codon to another, thus there is room for changing the ribosome speed while keeping the amino...... acid sequence and hence the resulting protein. Recently, it has been noticed that the choice of the synonymous codon, via the resulting distribution of slow- and fast-translated codons, affects not only on the average speed of one ribosome translating the mRNA but also might have an effect on nearby...... ribosomes by affecting the appearance of 'traffic jams' where multiple ribosomes collide and form queues. To test this 'context effect' further, we here investigate the effect of the sequence of synonymous codons on the ribosome traffic by using a ribosome traffic model with codon-dependent rates, estimated...

  19. Preferred and avoided codon pairs in three domains of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenson Tanel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative synonymous codons are not used with equal frequencies. In addition, the contexts of codons – neighboring nucleotides and neighboring codons – can have certain patterns. The codon context can influence both translational accuracy and elongation rates. However, it is not known how strong or conserved the codon context preferences in different organisms are. We analyzed 138 organisms (bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes to find conserved patterns of codon pairs. Results After removing the effects of single codon usage and dipeptide biases we discovered a set of neighboring codons for which avoidances or preferences were conserved in all three domains of life. Such biased codon pairs could be divided into subtypes on the basis of the nucleotide patterns that influence the bias. The most frequently avoided type of codon pair was nnUAnn. We discovered that 95.7% of avoided nnUAnn type patterns contain out-frame UAA or UAG triplets on the sense and/or antisense strand. On average, nnUAnn codon pairs are more frequently avoided in ORFeomes than in genomes. Thus we assume that translational selection plays a major role in the avoidance of these codon pairs. Among the preferred codon pairs, nnGCnn was the major type. Conclusion Translational selection shapes codon pair usage in protein coding sequences by rules that are common to all three domains of life. The most frequently avoided codon pairs contain the patterns nnUAnn, nnGGnn, nnGnnC, nnCGCn, GUCCnn, CUCCnn, nnCnnA or UUCGnn. The most frequently preferred codon pairs contain the patterns nnGCnn, nnCAnn or nnUnCn.

  20. Distribution of ADAT-Dependent Codons in the Human Transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Àlbert Rafels-Ybern

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide modifications in the anticodons of transfer RNAs (tRNA play a central role in translation efficiency, fidelity, and regulation of translation, but, for most of these modifications, the details of their function remain unknown. The heterodimeric adenosine deaminases acting on tRNAs (ADAT2-ADAT3, or ADAT are enzymes present in eukaryotes that convert adenine (A to inosine (I in the first anticodon base (position 34 by hydrolytic deamination. To explore the influence of ADAT activity on mammalian translation, we have characterized the human transcriptome and proteome in terms of frequency and distribution of ADAT-related codons. Eight different tRNAs can be modified by ADAT and, once modified, these tRNAs will recognize NNC, NNU and NNA codons, but not NNG codons. We find that transcripts coding for proteins highly enriched in these eight amino acids (ADAT-aa are specifically enriched in NNC, NNU and NNA codons. We also show that the proteins most enriched in ADAT-aa are composed preferentially of threonine, alanine, proline, and serine (TAPS. We propose that the enrichment in ADAT-codons in these proteins is due to the similarities in the codons that correspond to TAPS.

  1. Codon and amino acid usage in two major human pathogens of genus Bartonella--optimization between replicational-transcriptional selection, translational control and cost minimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sabyasachi; Paul, Sandip; Chatterjee, Sanjib; Dutta, Chitra

    2005-01-01

    Intra-genomic variation in synonymous codon and amino acid usage in two human pathogens Bartonella henselae and B. quintana has been carried out through multivariate analysis. Asymmetric mutational bias, coupled with replicational-transcriptional selection, has been identified as the prime selection force behind synonymous codon selection--a characteristic of the genus Bartonella, not exhibited by any other alpha-proteobacterial genome. Distinct codon usage patterns and low synonymous divergence values between orthologous sequences of highly expressed genes from the two Bartonella species indicate that there exists a residual intra-strand synonymous codon bias in the highly expressed genes, possibly operating at the level of translation. In the case of amino acid usage, the mean hydropathy level and aromaticity are the major sources of variation, both having nearly equal impact, while strand-specific mutational pressure and gene expressivity strongly influence the inter-strand variations. In both species under study, the highly expressed gene products tend not to contain heavy and/or aromatic residues, following the cost-minimization hypothesis in spite of their intracellular lifestyle. The codon and amino acid usage in these two human pathogens are, therefore, consequences of a complex balance between replicational-transcriptional selection, translational control, protein hydropathy and cost minimization.

  2. Genome-wide analysis of codon usage bias in four sequenced cotton species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyuan; Xing, Huixian; Yuan, Yanchao; Wang, Xianlin; Saeed, Muhammad; Tao, Jincai; Feng, Wei; Zhang, Guihua; Song, Xianliang; Sun, Xuezhen

    2018-01-01

    Codon usage bias (CUB) is an important evolutionary feature in a genome which provides important information for studying organism evolution, gene function and exogenous gene expression. The CUB and its shaping factors in the nuclear genomes of four sequenced cotton species, G. arboreum (A2), G. raimondii (D5), G. hirsutum (AD1) and G. barbadense (AD2) were analyzed in the present study. The effective number of codons (ENC) analysis showed the CUB was weak in these four species and the four subgenomes of the two tetraploids. Codon composition analysis revealed these four species preferred to use pyrimidine-rich codons more frequently than purine-rich codons. Correlation analysis indicated that the base content at the third position of codons affect the degree of codon preference. PR2-bias plot and ENC-plot analyses revealed that the CUB patterns in these genomes and subgenomes were influenced by combined effects of translational selection, directional mutation and other factors. The translational selection (P2) analysis results, together with the non-significant correlation between GC12 and GC3, further revealed that translational selection played the dominant role over mutation pressure in the codon usage bias. Through relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis, we detected 25 high frequency codons preferred to end with T or A, and 31 low frequency codons inclined to end with C or G in these four species and four subgenomes. Finally, 19 to 26 optimal codons with 19 common ones were determined for each species and subgenomes, which preferred to end with A or T. We concluded that the codon usage bias was weak and the translation selection was the main shaping factor in nuclear genes of these four cotton genomes and four subgenomes.

  3. The Selective Advantage of Synonymous Codon Usage Bias in Salmonella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Brandis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The genetic code in mRNA is redundant, with 61 sense codons translated into 20 different amino acids. Individual amino acids are encoded by up to six different codons but within codon families some are used more frequently than others. This phenomenon is referred to as synonymous codon usage bias. The genomes of free-living unicellular organisms such as bacteria have an extreme codon usage bias and the degree of bias differs between genes within the same genome. The strong positive correlation between codon usage bias and gene expression levels in many microorganisms is attributed to selection for translational efficiency. However, this putative selective advantage has never been measured in bacteria and theoretical estimates vary widely. By systematically exchanging optimal codons for synonymous codons in the tuf genes we quantified the selective advantage of biased codon usage in highly expressed genes to be in the range 0.2-4.2 x 10-4 per codon per generation. These data quantify for the first time the potential for selection on synonymous codon choice to drive genome-wide sequence evolution in bacteria, and in particular to optimize the sequences of highly expressed genes. This quantification may have predictive applications in the design of synthetic genes and for heterologous gene expression in biotechnology.

  4. RNA editing makes mistakes in plant mitochondria: editing loses sense in transcripts of a rps19 pseudogene and in creating stop codons in coxI and rps3 mRNAs of Oenothera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, W; Brennicke, A

    1991-01-01

    An intact gene for the ribosomal protein S19 (rps19) is absent from Oenothera mitochondria. The conserved rps19 reading frame found in the mitochondrial genome is interrupted by a termination codon. This rps19 pseudogene is cotranscribed with the downstream rps3 gene and is edited on both sides of the translational stop. Editing, however, changes the amino acid sequence at positions that were well conserved before editing. Other strange editings create translational stops in open reading frames coding for functional proteins. In coxI and rps3 mRNAs CGA codons are edited to UGA stop codons only five and three codons, respectively, downstream to the initiation codon. These aberrant editings in essential open reading frames and in the rps19 pseudogene appear to have been shifted to these positions from other editing sites. These observations suggest a requirement for a continuous evolutionary constraint on the editing specificities in plant mitochondria. Images PMID:1762921

  5. The Dynamics of SecM-Induced Translational Stalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Tsai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available SecM is an E. coli secretion monitor capable of stalling translation on the prokaryotic ribosome without cofactors. Biochemical and structural studies have demonstrated that the SecM nascent chain interacts with the 50S subunit exit tunnel to inhibit peptide bond formation. However, the timescales and pathways of stalling on an mRNA remain undefined. To provide a dynamic mechanism for stalling, we directly tracked the dynamics of elongation on ribosomes translating the SecM stall sequence (FSTPVWISQAQGIRAGP using single-molecule fluorescence techniques. Within 1 min, three peptide-ribosome interactions work cooperatively over the last five codons of the SecM sequence, leading to severely impaired elongation rates beginning from the terminal proline and lasting four codons. Our results suggest that stalling is tightly linked to the dynamics of elongation and underscore the roles that the exit tunnel and nascent chain play in controlling fundamental steps in translation.

  6. Selection on start codons in prokaryotes and potential compensatory nucleotide substitutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belinky, Frida; Rogozin, Igor B; Koonin, Eugene V

    2017-09-29

    Reconstruction of the evolution of start codons in 36 groups of closely related bacterial and archaeal genomes reveals purifying selection affecting AUG codons. The AUG starts are replaced by GUG and especially UUG significantly less frequently than expected under the neutral expectation derived from the frequencies of the respective nucleotide triplet substitutions in non-coding regions and in 4-fold degenerate sites. Thus, AUG is the optimal start codon that is actively maintained by purifying selection. However, purifying selection on start codons is significantly weaker than the selection on the same codons in coding sequences, although the switches between the codons result in conservative amino acid substitutions. The only exception is the AUG to UUG switch that is strongly selected against among start codons. Selection on start codons is most pronounced in evolutionarily conserved, highly expressed genes. Mutation of the start codon to a sub-optimal form (GUG or UUG) tends to be compensated by mutations in the Shine-Dalgarno sequence towards a stronger translation initiation signal. Together, all these findings indicate that in prokaryotes, translation start signals are subject to weak but significant selection for maximization of initiation rate and, consequently, protein production.

  7. Codon Bias Patterns of E. coli's Interacting Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Dilucca

    Full Text Available Synonymous codons, i.e., DNA nucleotide triplets coding for the same amino acid, are used differently across the variety of living organisms. The biological meaning of this phenomenon, known as codon usage bias, is still controversial. In order to shed light on this point, we propose a new codon bias index, CompAI, that is based on the competition between cognate and near-cognate tRNAs during translation, without being tuned to the usage bias of highly expressed genes. We perform a genome-wide evaluation of codon bias for E.coli, comparing CompAI with other widely used indices: tAI, CAI, and Nc. We show that CompAI and tAI capture similar information by being positively correlated with gene conservation, measured by the Evolutionary Retention Index (ERI, and essentiality, whereas, CAI and Nc appear to be less sensitive to evolutionary-functional parameters. Notably, the rate of variation of tAI and CompAI with ERI allows to obtain sets of genes that consistently belong to specific clusters of orthologous genes (COGs. We also investigate the correlation of codon bias at the genomic level with the network features of protein-protein interactions in E.coli. We find that the most densely connected communities of the network share a similar level of codon bias (as measured by CompAI and tAI. Conversely, a small difference in codon bias between two genes is, statistically, a prerequisite for the corresponding proteins to interact. Importantly, among all codon bias indices, CompAI turns out to have the most coherent distribution over the communities of the interactome, pointing to the significance of competition among cognate and near-cognate tRNAs for explaining codon usage adaptation. Notably, CompAI may potentially correlate with translation speed measurements, by accounting for the specific delay induced by wobble-pairing between codons and anticodons.

  8. SHIFT: server for hidden stops analysis in frame-shifted translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arun; Singh, Tiratha Raj

    2013-02-23

    Frameshift is one of the three classes of recoding. Frame-shifts lead to waste of energy, resources and activity of the biosynthetic machinery. In addition, some peptides synthesized after frame-shifts are probably cytotoxic which serve as plausible cause for innumerable number of diseases and disorders such as muscular dystrophies, lysosomal storage disorders, and cancer. Hidden stop codons occur naturally in coding sequences among all organisms. These codons are associated with the early termination of translation for incorrect reading frame selection and help to reduce the metabolic cost related to the frameshift events. Researchers have identified several consequences of hidden stop codons and their association with myriad disorders. However the wealth of information available is speckled and not effortlessly acquiescent to data-mining. To reduce this gap, this work describes an algorithmic web based tool to study hidden stops in frameshifted translation for all the lineages through respective genetic code systems. This paper describes SHIFT, an algorithmic web application tool that provides a user-friendly interface for identifying and analyzing hidden stops in frameshifted translation of genomic sequences for all available genetic code systems. We have calculated the correlation between codon usage frequencies and the plausible contribution of codons towards hidden stops in an off-frame context. Markovian chains of various order have been used to model hidden stops in frameshifted peptides and their evolutionary association with naturally occurring hidden stops. In order to obtain reliable and persuasive estimates for the naturally occurring and predicted hidden stops statistical measures have been implemented. This paper presented SHIFT, an algorithmic tool that allows user-friendly exploration, analysis, and visualization of hidden stop codons in frameshifted translations. It is expected that this web based tool would serve as a useful complement for

  9. Efficient Reassignment of a Frequent Serine Codon in Wild-Type Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Joanne M; Reynolds, Noah M; Rivera, Keith; Connolly, Morgan; Guo, Li-Tao; Ling, Jiqiang; Pappin, Darryl J; Church, George M; Söll, Dieter

    2016-02-19

    Expansion of the genetic code through engineering the translation machinery has greatly increased the chemical repertoire of the proteome. This has been accomplished mainly by read-through of UAG or UGA stop codons by the noncanonical aminoacyl-tRNA of choice. While stop codon read-through involves competition with the translation release factors, sense codon reassignment entails competition with a large pool of endogenous tRNAs. We used an engineered pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase to incorporate 3-iodo-l-phenylalanine (3-I-Phe) at a number of different serine and leucine codons in wild-type Escherichia coli. Quantitative LC-MS/MS measurements of amino acid incorporation yields carried out in a selected reaction monitoring experiment revealed that the 3-I-Phe abundance at the Ser208AGU codon in superfolder GFP was 65 ± 17%. This method also allowed quantification of other amino acids (serine, 33 ± 17%; phenylalanine, 1 ± 1%; threonine, 1 ± 1%) that compete with 3-I-Phe at both the aminoacylation and decoding steps of translation for incorporation at the same codon position. Reassignments of different serine (AGU, AGC, UCG) and leucine (CUG) codons with the matching tRNA(Pyl) anticodon variants were met with varying success, and our findings provide a guideline for the choice of sense codons to be reassigned. Our results indicate that the 3-iodo-l-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (IFRS)/tRNA(Pyl) pair can efficiently outcompete the cellular machinery to reassign select sense codons in wild-type E. coli.

  10. Analysis of codon usage patterns in Morus notabilis based on genome and transcriptome data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yan; Zou, Ziliang; Li, Hongshun; Xiang, Zhonghuai; He, Ningjia

    2017-06-01

    Codons play important roles in regulating gene expression levels and mRNA half-lives. However, codon usage and related studies in multicellular organisms still lag far behind those in unicellular organisms. In this study, we describe for the first time genome-wide patterns of codon bias in Morus notabilis (mulberry tree), and analyze genome-wide codon usage in 12 other species within the order Rosales. The codon usage of M. notabilis was affected by nucleotide composition, mutation pressure, nature selection, and gene expression level. Translational selection optimal codons were identified and highly expressed genes of M. notabilis tended to use the optimal codons. Genes with higher expression levels have shorter coding region and lower amino acid complexity. Housekeeping genes showed stronger translational selection, which, notably, was not caused by the large differences between the expression level of housekeeping genes and other genes.

  11. Disruption of the Opal Stop Codon Attenuates Chikungunya Virus-Induced Arthritis and Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer E; Long, Kristin M; Whitmore, Alan C; Sanders, Wes; Thurlow, Lance R; Brown, Julia A; Morrison, Clayton R; Vincent, Heather; Peck, Kayla M; Browning, Christian; Moorman, Nathaniel; Lim, Jean K; Heise, Mark T

    2017-11-14

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus responsible for several significant outbreaks of debilitating acute and chronic arthritis and arthralgia over the past decade. These include a recent outbreak in the Caribbean islands and the Americas that caused more than 1 million cases of viral arthralgia. Despite the major impact of CHIKV on global health, viral determinants that promote CHIKV-induced disease are incompletely understood. Most CHIKV strains contain a conserved opal stop codon at the end of the viral nsP3 gene. However, CHIKV strains that encode an arginine codon in place of the opal stop codon have been described, and deep-sequencing analysis of a CHIKV isolate from the Caribbean identified both arginine and opal variants within this strain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the introduction of the arginine mutation in place of the opal termination codon may influence CHIKV virulence. We tested this by introducing the arginine mutation into a well-characterized infectious clone of a CHIKV strain from Sri Lanka and designated this virus Opal524R. This mutation did not impair viral replication kinetics in vitro or in vivo Despite this, the Opal524R virus induced significantly less swelling, inflammation, and damage within the feet and ankles of infected mice. Further, we observed delayed induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as reduced CD4 + T cell and NK cell recruitment compared to those in the parental strain. Therefore, the opal termination codon plays an important role in CHIKV pathogenesis, independently of effects on viral replication. IMPORTANCE Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes significant outbreaks of viral arthralgia. Studies with CHIKV and other alphaviruses demonstrated that the opal termination codon within nsP3 is highly conserved. However, some strains of CHIKV and other alphaviruses contain mutations in the opal termination codon. These mutations alter the virulence

  12. Multiple Evolutionary Selections Involved in Synonymous Codon Usages in the Streptococcus agalactiae Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan-Ping; Ke, Hao; Liang, Zhi-Ling; Liu, Zhen-Xing; Hao, Le; Ma, Jiang-Yao; Li, Yu-Gu

    2016-02-24

    Streptococcus agalactiae is an important human and animal pathogen. To better understand the genetic features and evolution of S. agalactiae, multiple factors influencing synonymous codon usage patterns in S. agalactiae were analyzed in this study. A- and U-ending rich codons were used in S. agalactiae function genes through the overall codon usage analysis, indicating that Adenine (A)/Thymine (T) compositional constraints might contribute an important role to the synonymous codon usage pattern. The GC3% against the effective number of codon (ENC) value suggested that translational selection was the important factor for codon bias in the microorganism. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that (i) mutational pressure was the most important factor in shaping codon usage of all open reading frames (ORFs) in the S. agalactiae genome; (ii) strand specific mutational bias was not capable of influencing the codon usage bias in the leading and lagging strands; and (iii) gene length was not the important factor in synonymous codon usage pattern in this organism. Additionally, the high correlation between tRNA adaptation index (tAI) value and codon adaptation index (CAI), frequency of optimal codons (Fop) value, reinforced the role of natural selection for efficient translation in S. agalactiae. Comparison of synonymous codon usage pattern between S. agalactiae and susceptible hosts (human and tilapia) showed that synonymous codon usage of S. agalactiae was independent of the synonymous codon usage of susceptible hosts. The study of codon usage in S. agalactiae may provide evidence about the molecular evolution of the bacterium and a greater understanding of evolutionary relationships between S. agalactiae and its hosts.

  13. Stringent Nucleotide Recognition by the Ribosome at the Middle Codon Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Shin, Dongwon; Ng, Martin; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y; Tor, Yitzhak; Cooperman, Barry S

    2017-08-29

    Accurate translation of the genetic code depends on mRNA:tRNA codon:anticodon base pairing. Here we exploit an emissive, isosteric adenosine surrogate that allows direct measurement of the kinetics of codon:anticodon University of California base formation during protein synthesis. Our results suggest that codon:anticodon base pairing is subject to tighter constraints at the middle position than at the 5'- and 3'-positions, and further suggest a sequential mechanism of formation of the three base pairs in the codon:anticodon helix.

  14. Stringent Nucleotide Recognition by the Ribosome at the Middle Codon Position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Accurate translation of the genetic code depends on mRNA:tRNA codon:anticodon base pairing. Here we exploit an emissive, isosteric adenosine surrogate that allows direct measurement of the kinetics of codon:anticodon University of California base formation during protein synthesis. Our results suggest that codon:anticodon base pairing is subject to tighter constraints at the middle position than at the 5′- and 3′-positions, and further suggest a sequential mechanism of formation of the three base pairs in the codon:anticodon helix.

  15. AUG is the only initiation codon in eukaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, F; McKnight, G; Stewart, J W

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicates that AUG is the sole codon capable of initiating translation of iso-1-cytochrome c. This result with yeast and the sequence results of numerous eukaryotic genes indicate that AUG is the only initiation codon in eukaryotes; in contrast, results with Escherichia colia and bacteriophages indicate that both AUG and GUG are initiation codons in prokaryotes. The difference can be explained by the lack of the t/sup 6/ A hypermodified nucleoside (N-(9-(..beta..-D-ribofuranosyl)purin-6-ylcarbamoyl)threonine) in prokaryotic initiator tRNA and its presence in eukaryotic initiator tRNA.

  16. N-terminal Proteomics Assisted Profiling of the Unexplored Translation Initiation Landscape in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Patrick; Ndah, Elvis; Jonckheere, Veronique; Stael, Simon; Sticker, Adriaan; Martens, Lennart; Van Breusegem, Frank; Gevaert, Kris; Van Damme, Petra

    2017-06-01

    Proteogenomics is an emerging research field yet lacking a uniform method of analysis. Proteogenomic studies in which N-terminal proteomics and ribosome profiling are combined, suggest that a high number of protein start sites are currently missing in genome annotations. We constructed a proteogenomic pipeline specific for the analysis of N-terminal proteomics data, with the aim of discovering novel translational start sites outside annotated protein coding regions. In summary, unidentified MS/MS spectra were matched to a specific N-terminal peptide library encompassing protein N termini encoded in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. After a stringent false discovery rate filtering, 117 protein N termini compliant with N-terminal methionine excision specificity and indicative of translation initiation were found. These include N-terminal protein extensions and translation from transposable elements and pseudogenes. Gene prediction provided supporting protein-coding models for approximately half of the protein N termini. Besides the prediction of functional domains (partially) contained within the newly predicted ORFs, further supporting evidence of translation was found in the recently released Araport11 genome re-annotation of Arabidopsis and computational translations of sequences stored in public repositories. Most interestingly, complementary evidence by ribosome profiling was found for 23 protein N termini. Finally, by analyzing protein N-terminal peptides, an in silico analysis demonstrates the applicability of our N-terminal proteogenomics strategy in revealing protein-coding potential in species with well- and poorly-annotated genomes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Codon usage bias and the evolution of influenza A viruses. Codon Usage Biases of Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Emily HM

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influenza A virus is an important infectious cause of morbidity and mortality in humans and was responsible for 3 pandemics in the 20th century. As the replication of the influenza virus is based on its host's machinery, codon usage of its viral genes might be subject to host selection pressures, especially after interspecies transmission. A better understanding of viral evolution and host adaptive responses might help control this disease. Results Relative Synonymous Codon Usage (RSCU values of the genes from segment 1 to segment 6 of avian and human influenza viruses, including pandemic H1N1, were studied via Correspondence Analysis (CA. The codon usage patterns of seasonal human influenza viruses were distinct among their subtypes and different from those of avian viruses. Newly isolated viruses could be added to the CA results, creating a tool to investigate the host origin and evolution of viral genes. It was found that the 1918 pandemic H1N1 virus contained genes with mammalian-like viral codon usage patterns, indicating that the introduction of this virus to humans was not through in toto transfer of an avian influenza virus. Many human viral genes had directional changes in codon usage over time of viral isolation, indicating the effect of host selection pressures. These changes reduced the overall GC content and the usage of G at the third codon position in the viral genome. Limited evidence of translational selection pressure was found in a few viral genes. Conclusions Codon usage patterns from CA allowed identification of host origin and evolutionary trends in influenza viruses, providing an alternative method and a tool to understand the evolution of influenza viruses. Human influenza viruses are subject to selection pressure on codon usage which might assist in understanding the characteristics of newly emerging viruses.

  18. Comparative evolutionary genomics of Corynebacterium with special reference to codon and amino acid usage diversities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Shilpee; Sarkar, Indrani; Roy, Ayan; Mohapatra, Pradeep K Das; Mondal, Keshab C; Sen, Arnab

    2018-02-01

    The present study has been aimed to the comparative analysis of high GC composition containing Corynebacterium genomes and their evolutionary study by exploring codon and amino acid usage patterns. Phylogenetic study by MLSA approach, indel analysis and BLAST matrix differentiated Corynebacterium species in pathogenic and non-pathogenic clusters. Correspondence analysis on synonymous codon usage reveals that, gene length, optimal codon frequencies and tRNA abundance affect the gene expression of Corynebacterium. Most of the optimal codons as well as translationally optimal codons are C ending i.e. RNY (R-purine, N-any nucleotide base, and Y-pyrimidine) and reveal translational selection pressure on codon bias of Corynebacterium. Amino acid usage is affected by hydrophobicity, aromaticity, protein energy cost, etc. Highly expressed genes followed the cost minimization hypothesis and are less diverged at their synonymous positions of codons. Functional analysis of core genes shows significant difference in pathogenic and non-pathogenic Corynebacterium. The study reveals close relationship between non-pathogenic and opportunistic pathogenic Corynebaterium as well as between molecular evolution and survival niches of the organism.

  19. Codon cassette mutagenesis: a general method to insert or replace individual codons by using universal mutagenic cassettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegler-Ebo, D M; Docktor, C M; DiMaio, D

    1994-05-11

    We describe codon cassette mutagenesis, a simple method of mutagenesis that uses universal mutagenic cassettes to deposit single codons at specific sites in double-stranded DNA. A target molecule is first constructed that contains a blunt, double-strand break at the site targeted for mutagenesis. A double-stranded mutagenic codon cassette is then inserted at the target site. Each mutagenic codon cassette contains a three base pair direct terminal repeat and two head-to-head recognition sequences for the restriction endonuclease Sapl, an enzyme that cleaves outside of its recognition sequence. The intermediate molecule containing the mutagenic cassette is then digested with Sapl, thereby removing most of the mutagenic cassette, leaving only a three base cohesive overhang that is ligated to generate the final insertion or substitution mutation. A general method for constructing blunt-end target molecules suitable for this approach is also described. Because the mutagenic cassette is excised during this procedure and alters the target only by introducing the desired mutation, the same cassette can be used to introduce a particular codon at all target sites. Each cassette can deposit two different codons, depending on the orientation in which it is inserted into the target molecule. Therefore, a series of eleven cassettes is sufficient to insert all possible amino acids at any constructed target site. Thus codon cassettes are 'off-the-shelf' reagents, and this methodology should be a particularly useful and inexpensive approach for subjecting multiple different positions in a protein sequence to saturation mutagenesis.

  20. A novel nuclear genetic code alteration in yeasts and the evolution of codon reassignment in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlhausen, Stefanie; Findeisen, Peggy; Plessmann, Uwe; Urlaub, Henning; Kollmar, Martin

    2016-07-01

    The genetic code is the cellular translation table for the conversion of nucleotide sequences into amino acid sequences. Changes to the meaning of sense codons would introduce errors into almost every translated message and are expected to be highly detrimental. However, reassignment of single or multiple codons in mitochondria and nuclear genomes, although extremely rare, demonstrates that the code can evolve. Several models for the mechanism of alteration of nuclear genetic codes have been proposed (including "codon capture," "genome streamlining," and "ambiguous intermediate" theories), but with little resolution. Here, we report a novel sense codon reassignment in Pachysolen tannophilus, a yeast related to the Pichiaceae. By generating proteomics data and using tRNA sequence comparisons, we show that Pachysolen translates CUG codons as alanine and not as the more usual leucine. The Pachysolen tRNACAG is an anticodon-mutated tRNA(Ala) containing all major alanine tRNA recognition sites. The polyphyly of the CUG-decoding tRNAs in yeasts is best explained by a tRNA loss driven codon reassignment mechanism. Loss of the CUG-tRNA in the ancient yeast is followed by gradual decrease of respective codons and subsequent codon capture by tRNAs whose anticodon is not part of the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase recognition region. Our hypothesis applies to all nuclear genetic code alterations and provides several testable predictions. We anticipate more codon reassignments to be uncovered in existing and upcoming genome projects. © 2016 Mühlhausen et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. Codon Deviation Coefficient: a novel measure for estimating codon usage bias and its statistical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic mutation, selective pressure for translational efficiency and accuracy, level of gene expression, and protein function through natural selection are all believed to lead to codon usage bias (CUB. Therefore, informative measurement of CUB is of fundamental importance to making inferences regarding gene function and genome evolution. However, extant measures of CUB have not fully accounted for the quantitative effect of background nucleotide composition and have not statistically evaluated the significance of CUB in sequence analysis. Results Here we propose a novel measure--Codon Deviation Coefficient (CDC--that provides an informative measurement of CUB and its statistical significance without requiring any prior knowledge. Unlike previous measures, CDC estimates CUB by accounting for background nucleotide compositions tailored to codon positions and adopts the bootstrapping to assess the statistical significance of CUB for any given sequence. We evaluate CDC by examining its effectiveness on simulated sequences and empirical data and show that CDC outperforms extant measures by achieving a more informative estimation of CUB and its statistical significance. Conclusions As validated by both simulated and empirical data, CDC provides a highly informative quantification of CUB and its statistical significance, useful for determining comparative magnitudes and patterns of biased codon usage for genes or genomes with diverse sequence compositions.

  2. Mapping the Plasticity of the E. coli Genetic Code with Orthogonal Pair Directed Sense Codon Reassignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Margaret A; Biddle, Wil; Fisk, John Domenic

    2018-04-18

    The relative quantitative importance of the factors that determine the fidelity of translation is largely unknown, which makes predicting the extent to which the degeneracy of the genetic code can be broken challenging. Our strategy of using orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs to precisely direct the incorporation of a single amino acid in response to individual sense and nonsense codons provides a suite of related data with which to examine the plasticity of the code. Each directed sense codon reassignment measurement is an in vivo competition experiment between the introduced orthogonal translation machinery and the natural machinery in E. coli. This report discusses 20 new, related genetic codes, in which a targeted E. coli wobble codon is reassigned to tyrosine utilizing the orthogonal tyrosine tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pair from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. One at a time, reassignment of each targeted sense codon to tyrosine is quantified in cells by measuring the fluorescence of GFP variants in which the essential tyrosine residue is encoded by a non-tyrosine codon. Significantly, every wobble codon analyzed may be partially reassigned with efficiencies ranging from 0.8% to 41%. The accumulation of the suite of data enables a qualitative dissection of the relative importance of the factors affecting the fidelity of translation. While some correlation was observed between sense codon reassignment and either competing endogenous tRNA abundance or changes in aminoacylation efficiency of the altered orthogonal system, no single factor appears to predominately drive translational fidelity. Evaluation of relative cellular fitness in each of the 20 quantitatively-characterized proteome-wide tyrosine substitution systems suggests that at a systems level, E. coli is robust to missense mutations.

  3. Pioneer round of translation occurs during serum starvation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Nara; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Cho, Hana; Choe, Junho; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2007-01-01

    The pioneer round of translation plays a role in translation initiation of newly spliced and exon junction complex (EJC)-bound mRNAs. Nuclear cap-binding protein complex CBP80/20 binds to those mRNAs at the 5'-end, recruiting translation initiation complex. As a consequence of the pioneer round of translation, the bound EJCs are dissociated from mRNAs and CBP80/20 is replaced by the cytoplasmic cap-binding protein eIF4E. Steady-state translation directed by eIF4E allows for an immediate and rapid response to changes in physiological conditions. Here, we show that nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), which restricts only to the pioneer round of translation but not to steady-state translation, efficiently occurs even during serum starvation, in which steady-state translation is drastically abolished. Accordingly, CBP80 remains in the nucleus and processing bodies are unaffected in their abundance and number in serum-starved conditions. These results suggest that mRNAs enter the pioneer round of translation during serum starvation and are targeted for NMD if they contain premature termination codons

  4. Stop Codon Reassignment in the Wild

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Natalia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Schwientek, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Tripp, H. James [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Rinke, Christian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Pati, Amrita [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Huntemann, Marcel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Visel, Axel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Woyke, Tanja [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Kyrpides, Nikos [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.; Rubin, Edward [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Walnut Creek, CA (United States). Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Inst.

    2014-03-21

    Since the discovery of the genetic code and protein translation mechanisms (1), a limited number of variations of the standard assignment between unique base triplets (codons) and their encoded amino acids and translational stop signals have been found in bacteria and phages (2-3). Given the apparent ubiquity of the canonical genetic code, the design of genomically recoded organisms with non-canonical codes has been suggested as a means to prevent horizontal gene transfer between laboratory and environmental organisms (4). It is also predicted that genomically recoded organisms are immune to infection by viruses, under the assumption that phages and their hosts must share a common genetic code (5). This paradigm is supported by the observation of increased resistance of genomically recoded bacteria to phages with a canonical code (4). Despite these assumptions and accompanying lines of evidence, it remains unclear whether differential and non-canonical codon usage represents an absolute barrier to phage infection and genetic exchange between organisms. Our knowledge of the diversity of genetic codes and their use by viruses and their hosts is primarily derived from the analysis of cultivated organisms. Advances in single-cell sequencing and metagenome assembly technologies have enabled the reconstruction of genomes of uncultivated bacterial and archaeal lineages (6). These initial findings suggest that large scale systematic studies of uncultivated microorganisms and viruses may reveal the extent and modes of divergence from the canonical genetic code operating in nature. To explore alternative genetic codes, we carried out a systematic analysis of stop codon reassignments from the canonical TAG amber, TGA opal, and TAA ochre codons in assembled metagenomes from environmental and host-associated samples, single-cell genomes of uncultivated bacteria and archaea, and a collection of phage sequences

  5. Codon Deviation Coefficient: A novel measure for estimating codon usage bias and its statistical significance

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhang

    2012-03-22

    Background: Genetic mutation, selective pressure for translational efficiency and accuracy, level of gene expression, and protein function through natural selection are all believed to lead to codon usage bias (CUB). Therefore, informative measurement of CUB is of fundamental importance to making inferences regarding gene function and genome evolution. However, extant measures of CUB have not fully accounted for the quantitative effect of background nucleotide composition and have not statistically evaluated the significance of CUB in sequence analysis.Results: Here we propose a novel measure--Codon Deviation Coefficient (CDC)--that provides an informative measurement of CUB and its statistical significance without requiring any prior knowledge. Unlike previous measures, CDC estimates CUB by accounting for background nucleotide compositions tailored to codon positions and adopts the bootstrapping to assess the statistical significance of CUB for any given sequence. We evaluate CDC by examining its effectiveness on simulated sequences and empirical data and show that CDC outperforms extant measures by achieving a more informative estimation of CUB and its statistical significance.Conclusions: As validated by both simulated and empirical data, CDC provides a highly informative quantification of CUB and its statistical significance, useful for determining comparative magnitudes and patterns of biased codon usage for genes or genomes with diverse sequence compositions. 2012 Zhang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  6. Codon-triplet context unveils unique features of the Candida albicans protein coding genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira José L

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionary forces that determine the arrangement of synonymous codons within open reading frames and fine tune mRNA translation efficiency are not yet understood. In order to tackle this question we have carried out a large scale study of codon-triplet contexts in 11 fungal species to unravel associations or relationships between codons present at the ribosome A-, P- and E-sites during each decoding cycle. Results Our analysis unveiled high bias within the context of codon-triplets, in particular strong preference for triplets of identical codons. We have also identified a surprisingly large number of codon-triplet combinations that vanished from fungal ORFeomes. Candida albicans exacerbated these features, showed an unbalanced tRNA population for decoding its pool of codons and used near-cognate decoding for a large set of codons, suggesting that unique evolutionary forces shaped the evolution of its ORFeome. Conclusion We have developed bioinformatics tools for large-scale analysis of codon-triplet contexts. These algorithms identified codon-triplets context biases, allowed for large scale comparative codon-triplet analysis, and identified rules governing codon-triplet context. They could also detect alterations to the standard genetic code.

  7. Codon usage bias in phylum Actinobacteria: relevance to environmental adaptation and host pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Devi; Verma, Mansi; Behura, Susanta K; Lal, Rup

    2016-10-01

    Actinobacteria are Gram-positive bacteria commonly found in soil, freshwater and marine ecosystems. In this investigation, bias in codon usages of ninety actinobacterial genomes was analyzed by estimating different indices of codon bias such as Nc (effective number of codons), SCUO (synonymous codon usage order), RSCU (relative synonymous codon usage), as well as sequence patterns of codon contexts. The results revealed several characteristic features of codon usage in Actinobacteria, as follows: 1) C- or G-ending codons are used frequently in comparison with A- and U ending codons; 2) there is a direct relationship of GC content with use of specific amino acids such as alanine, proline and glycine; 3) there is an inverse relationship between GC content and Nc estimates, 4) there is low SCUO value (Actinobacteria, extreme GC content and codon bias are driven by mutation rather than natural selection; (2) traits like aerobicity are associated with effective natural selection and therefore low GC content and low codon bias, demonstrating the role of both mutational bias and translational selection in shaping the habitat and phenotype of actinobacterial species. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative analysis of codon usage patterns and identification of predicted highly expressed genes in five Salmonella genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondal U

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To anlyse codon usage patterns of five complete genomes of Salmonella , predict highly expressed genes, examine horizontally transferred pathogenicity-related genes to detect their presence in the strains, and scrutinize the nature of highly expressed genes to infer upon their lifestyle. Methods: Protein coding genes, ribosomal protein genes, and pathogenicity-related genes were analysed with Codon W and CAI (codon adaptation index Calculator. Results: Translational efficiency plays a role in codon usage variation in Salmonella genes. Low bias was noticed in most of the genes. GC3 (guanine cytosine at third position composition does not influence codon usage variation in the genes of these Salmonella strains. Among the cluster of orthologous groups (COGs, translation, ribosomal structure biogenesis [J], and energy production and conversion [C] contained the highest number of potentially highly expressed (PHX genes. Correspondence analysis reveals the conserved nature of the genes. Highly expressed genes were detected. Conclusions: Selection for translational efficiency is the major source of variation of codon usage in the genes of Salmonella . Evolution of pathogenicity-related genes as a unit suggests their ability to infect and exist as a pathogen. Presence of a lot of PHX genes in the information and storage-processing category of COGs indicated their lifestyle and revealed that they were not subjected to genome reduction.

  9. Codon usage bias: causative factors, quantification methods and genome-wide patterns: with emphasis on insect genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behura, Susanta K; Severson, David W

    2013-02-01

    Codon usage bias refers to the phenomenon where specific codons are used more often than other synonymous codons during translation of genes, the extent of which varies within and among species. Molecular evolutionary investigations suggest that codon bias is manifested as a result of balance between mutational and translational selection of such genes and that this phenomenon is widespread across species and may contribute to genome evolution in a significant manner. With the advent of whole-genome sequencing of numerous species, both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, genome-wide patterns of codon bias are emerging in different organisms. Various factors such as expression level, GC content, recombination rates, RNA stability, codon position, gene length and others (including environmental stress and population size) can influence codon usage bias within and among species. Moreover, there has been a continuous quest towards developing new concepts and tools to measure the extent of codon usage bias of genes. In this review, we outline the fundamental concepts of evolution of the genetic code, discuss various factors that may influence biased usage of synonymous codons and then outline different principles and methods of measurement of codon usage bias. Finally, we discuss selected studies performed using whole-genome sequences of different insect species to show how codon bias patterns vary within and among genomes. We conclude with generalized remarks on specific emerging aspects of codon bias studies and highlight the recent explosion of genome-sequencing efforts on arthropods (such as twelve Drosophila species, species of ants, honeybee, Nasonia and Anopheles mosquitoes as well as the recent launch of a genome-sequencing project involving 5000 insects and other arthropods) that may help us to understand better the evolution of codon bias and its biological significance. © 2012 The Authors. Biological Reviews © 2012 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  10. P-value based visualization of codon usage data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fricke Wolfgang

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two important and not yet solved problems in bacterial genome research are the identification of horizontally transferred genes and the prediction of gene expression levels. Both problems can be addressed by multivariate analysis of codon usage data. In particular dimensionality reduction methods for visualization of multivariate data have shown to be effective tools for codon usage analysis. We here propose a multidimensional scaling approach using a novel similarity measure for codon usage tables. Our probabilistic similarity measure is based on P-values derived from the well-known chi-square test for comparison of two distributions. Experimental results on four microbial genomes indicate that the new method is well-suited for the analysis of horizontal gene transfer and translational selection. As compared with the widely-used correspondence analysis, our method did not suffer from outlier sensitivity and showed a better clustering of putative alien genes in most cases.

  11. Analysis of amino acid and codon usage in Paramecium bursaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohra, Hideo; Fujishima, Masahiro; Suzuki, Haruo

    2015-10-07

    The ciliate Paramecium bursaria harbors the green-alga Chlorella symbionts. We reassembled the P. bursaria transcriptome to minimize falsely fused transcripts, and investigated amino acid and codon usage using the transcriptome data. Surface proteins preferentially use smaller amino acid residues like cysteine. Unusual synonymous codon and amino acid usage in highly expressed genes can reflect a balance between translational selection and other factors. A correlation of gene expression level with synonymous codon or amino acid usage is emphasized in genes down-regulated in symbiont-bearing cells compared to symbiont-free cells. Our results imply that the selection is associated with P. bursaria-Chlorella symbiosis. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ectopic expression of eIF4E-transporter triggers the movement of eIF4E into P-bodies, inhibiting steady-state translation but not the pioneer round of translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyung Chul; Cho, Hana; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2008-01-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is the best-characterized mRNA surveillance mechanism; this process removes faulty mRNAs harboring premature termination codons (PTCs). NMD targets newly synthesized mRNAs bound by nuclear cap-binding proteins 80/20 (CBP80/20) and exon junction complex (EJC), the former of which is thought to recruit the ribosome to initiate the pioneer round of translation. After completion of the pioneer round of translation, CBP80/20 is replaced by the cytoplasmic cap-binding protein eIF4E, which mediates steady-state translation in the cytoplasm. Here, we show that overexpression of eIF4E-T preferentially inhibits cap-dependent steady-state translation, but not the pioneer round of translation. We also demonstrate that overexpression of eIF4E-T or Dcp1a triggers the movement of eIF4E into the processing bodies. These results suggest that the pioneer round of translation differs from steady-state translation in terms of ribosome recruitment

  13. Identification of evolutionarily conserved non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in human coding sequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ivanov, Ivaylo P

    2011-05-01

    In eukaryotes, it is generally assumed that translation initiation occurs at the AUG codon closest to the messenger RNA 5\\' cap. However, in certain cases, initiation can occur at codons differing from AUG by a single nucleotide, especially the codons CUG, UUG, GUG, ACG, AUA and AUU. While non-AUG initiation has been experimentally verified for a handful of human genes, the full extent to which this phenomenon is utilized--both for increased coding capacity and potentially also for novel regulatory mechanisms--remains unclear. To address this issue, and hence to improve the quality of existing coding sequence annotations, we developed a methodology based on phylogenetic analysis of predicted 5\\' untranslated regions from orthologous genes. We use evolutionary signatures of protein-coding sequences as an indicator of translation initiation upstream of annotated coding sequences. Our search identified novel conserved potential non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in 42 human genes including VANGL2, FGFR1, KCNN4, TRPV6, HDGF, CITED2, EIF4G3 and NTF3, and also affirmed the conservation of known non-AUG-initiated extensions in 17 other genes. In several instances, we have been able to obtain independent experimental evidence of the expression of non-AUG-initiated products from the previously published literature and ribosome profiling data.

  14. Optimization of translation profiles enhances protein expression and solubility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Katrin Hess

    Full Text Available mRNA is translated with a non-uniform speed that actively coordinates co-translational folding of protein domains. Using structure-based homology we identified the structural domains in epoxide hydrolases (EHs and introduced slow-translating codons to delineate the translation of single domains. These changes in translation speed dramatically improved the solubility of two EHs of metagenomic origin in Escherichia coli. Conversely, the importance of transient attenuation for the folding, and consequently solubility, of EH was evidenced with a member of the EH family from Agrobacterium radiobacter, which partitions in the soluble fraction when expressed in E. coli. Synonymous substitutions of codons shaping the slow-transiting regions to fast-translating codons render this protein insoluble. Furthermore, we show that low protein yield can be enhanced by decreasing the free folding energy of the initial 5'-coding region, which can disrupt mRNA secondary structure and enhance ribosomal loading. This study provides direct experimental evidence that mRNA is not a mere messenger for translation of codons into amino acids but bears an additional layer of information for folding, solubility and expression level of the encoded protein. Furthermore, it provides a general frame on how to modulate and fine-tune gene expression of a target protein.

  15. Codon Usage Bias and Determining Forces in Taenia solium Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xing; Ma, Xusheng; Luo, Xuenong; Ling, Houjun; Zhang, Xichen; Cai, Xuepeng

    2015-12-01

    The tapeworm Taenia solium is an important human zoonotic parasite that causes great economic loss and also endangers public health. At present, an effective vaccine that will prevent infection and chemotherapy without any side effect remains to be developed. In this study, codon usage patterns in the T. solium genome were examined through 8,484 protein-coding genes. Neutrality analysis showed that T. solium had a narrow GC distribution, and a significant correlation was observed between GC12 and GC3. Examination of an NC (ENC vs GC3s)-plot showed a few genes on or close to the expected curve, but the majority of points with low-ENC (the effective number of codons) values were detected below the expected curve, suggesting that mutational bias plays a major role in shaping codon usage. The Parity Rule 2 plot (PR2) analysis showed that GC and AT were not used proportionally. We also identified 26 optimal codons in the T. solium genome, all of which ended with either a G or C residue. These optimal codons in the T. solium genome are likely consistent with tRNAs that are highly expressed in the cell, suggesting that mutational and translational selection forces are probably driving factors of codon usage bias in the T. solium genome.

  16. CodonLogo: a sequence logo-based viewer for codon patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Virag; Murphy, David P; Provan, Gregory; Baranov, Pavel V

    2012-07-15

    Conserved patterns across a multiple sequence alignment can be visualized by generating sequence logos. Sequence logos show each column in the alignment as stacks of symbol(s) where the height of a stack is proportional to its informational content, whereas the height of each symbol within the stack is proportional to its frequency in the column. Sequence logos use symbols of either nucleotide or amino acid alphabets. However, certain regulatory signals in messenger RNA (mRNA) act as combinations of codons. Yet no tool is available for visualization of conserved codon patterns. We present the first application which allows visualization of conserved regions in a multiple sequence alignment in the context of codons. CodonLogo is based on WebLogo3 and uses the same heuristics but treats codons as inseparable units of a 64-letter alphabet. CodonLogo can discriminate patterns of codon conservation from patterns of nucleotide conservation that appear indistinguishable in standard sequence logos. The CodonLogo source code and its implementation (in a local version of the Galaxy Browser) are available at http://recode.ucc.ie/CodonLogo and through the Galaxy Tool Shed at http://toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/.

  17. Translational selection is ubiquitous in prokaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fran Supek

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Codon usage bias in prokaryotic genomes is largely a consequence of background substitution patterns in DNA, but highly expressed genes may show a preference towards codons that enable more efficient and/or accurate translation. We introduce a novel approach based on supervised machine learning that detects effects of translational selection on genes, while controlling for local variation in nucleotide substitution patterns represented as sequence composition of intergenic DNA. A cornerstone of our method is a Random Forest classifier that outperformed previous distance measure-based approaches, such as the codon adaptation index, in the task of discerning the (highly expressed ribosomal protein genes by their codon frequencies. Unlike previous reports, we show evidence that translational selection in prokaryotes is practically universal: in 460 of 461 examined microbial genomes, we find that a subset of genes shows a higher codon usage similarity to the ribosomal proteins than would be expected from the local sequence composition. These genes constitute a substantial part of the genome--between 5% and 33%, depending on genome size--while also exhibiting higher experimentally measured mRNA abundances and tending toward codons that match tRNA anticodons by canonical base pairing. Certain gene functional categories are generally enriched with, or depleted of codon-optimized genes, the trends of enrichment/depletion being conserved between Archaea and Bacteria. Prominent exceptions from these trends might indicate genes with alternative physiological roles; we speculate on specific examples related to detoxication of oxygen radicals and ammonia and to possible misannotations of asparaginyl-tRNA synthetases. Since the presence of codon optimizations on genes is a valid proxy for expression levels in fully sequenced genomes, we provide an example of an "adaptome" by highlighting gene functions with expression levels elevated specifically in

  18. Evidence that translation reinitiation leads to a partially functional Menkes protein containing two copper-binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Marianne; Lund, Connie; Akram, Zarqa

    2006-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is an X-linked recessive disorder of copper metabolism. It is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene encoding a copper-translocating P-type ATPase, which contains six N-terminal copper-binding sites (CBS1-CBS6). Most patients die in early childhood. We investigated the functional...... effect of a large frameshift deletion in ATP7A (including exons 3 and 4) identified in a patient with MD with unexpectedly mild symptoms and long survival. The mutated transcript, ATP7A(Delta ex3+ex4), contains a premature termination codon after 46 codons. Although such transcripts are generally...... degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), it was established by real-time PCR quantification that the ATP7A(Delta ex3+ex4) transcript was protected from degradation. A combination of in vitro translation, recombinant expression, and immunocytochemical analysis provided evidence that the ATP7A...

  19. Evidence for a novel coding sequence overlapping the 5'-terminal ~90 codons of the Gill-associated and Yellow head okavirus envelope glycoprotein gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkins John F

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genus Okavirus (order Nidovirales includes a number of viruses that infect crustaceans, causing major losses in the shrimp industry. These viruses have a linear positive-sense ssRNA genome of ~26-27 kb, encoding a large replicase polyprotein that is expressed from the genomic RNA, and several additional proteins that are expressed from a nested set of 3'-coterminal subgenomic RNAs. In this brief report, we describe the bioinformatic discovery of a new, apparently coding, ORF that overlaps the 5' end of the envelope glycoprotein encoding sequence, ORF3, in the +2 reading frame. The new ORF has a strong coding signature and, in fact, is more conserved at the amino acid level than the overlapping region of ORF3. We propose that translation of the new ORF initiates at a conserved AUG codon separated by just 2 nt from the ORF3 AUG initiation codon, resulting in a novel 86 amino acid protein.

  20. New insights into the interplay between the translation machinery and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondeau, Etienne; Bufton, Joshua C; Schaffitzel, Christiane

    2018-06-19

    Faulty mRNAs with a premature stop codon (PTC) are recognized and degraded by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Recognition of a nonsense mRNA depends on translation and on the presence of NMD-enhancing or the absence of NMD-inhibiting factors in the 3'-untranslated region. Our review summarizes our current understanding of the molecular function of the conserved NMD factors UPF3B and UPF1, and of the anti-NMD factor Poly(A)-binding protein, and their interactions with ribosomes translating PTC-containing mRNAs. Our recent discovery that UPF3B interferes with human translation termination and enhances ribosome dissociation in vitro , whereas UPF1 is inactive in these assays, suggests a re-interpretation of previous experiments and modification of prevalent NMD models. Moreover, we discuss recent work suggesting new functions of the key NMD factor UPF1 in ribosome recycling, inhibition of translation re-initiation and nascent chain ubiquitylation. These new findings suggest that the interplay of UPF proteins with the translation machinery is more intricate than previously appreciated, and that this interplay quality-controls the efficiency of termination, ribosome recycling and translation re-initiation. © 2018 The Author(s).

  1. Chloroplast DNA codon use: evidence for selection at the psb A locus based on tRNA availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, B R

    1993-09-01

    Codon use in the three sequenced chloroplast genomes (Marchantia, Oryza, and Nicotiana) is examined. The chloroplast has a bias in that codons NNA and NNT are favored over synonymous NNC and NNG codons. This appears to be a consequence of an overall high A + T content of the genome. This pattern of codon use is not followed by the psb A gene of all three genomes and other psb A sequences examined. In this gene, the codon use favors NNC over NNT for twofold degenerate amino acids. In each case the only tRNA coded by the genome is complementary to the NNC codon. This codon use is similar to the codon use by chloroplast genes examined from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Since psb A is the major translation product of the chloroplast, this suggests that selection is acting on the codon use of this gene to adapt codons to tRNA availability, as previously suggested for unicellular organisms.

  2. Comparative studies on codon usage pattern of chloroplasts and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    different genomic organization and mutation pressures in nuclear and chloroplast genes. The results of Nc-plots and neutrality plots ... As an important organelle of plants, the chloroplast has its own genomic environment and ... leading to the suggestion that the translation mechanism and patterns of codon usage in ...

  3. The effect of tRNA levels on decoding times of mRNA codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, Alexandra; Tuller, Tamir

    2014-08-01

    The possible effect of transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) concentrations on codons decoding time is a fundamental biomedical research question; however, due to a large number of variables affecting this process and the non-direct relation between them, a conclusive answer to this question has eluded so far researchers in the field. In this study, we perform a novel analysis of the ribosome profiling data of four organisms which enables ranking the decoding times of different codons while filtering translational phenomena such as experimental biases, extreme ribosomal pauses and ribosome traffic jams. Based on this filtering, we show for the first time that there is a significant correlation between tRNA concentrations and the codons estimated decoding time both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes in natural conditions (-0.38 to -0.66, all P values decoding times are not correlated with aminoacyl-tRNA levels. The reported results support the conjecture that translation efficiency is directly influenced by the tRNA levels in the cell. Thus, they should help to understand the evolution of synonymous aspects of coding sequences via the adaptation of their codons to the tRNA pool. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. A single sequence context cannot satisfy all non-AUG initiator codons in yeast†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Tzu-Ling

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that ALA1 (encoding alanyl-tRNA synthetase and GRS1 (encoding glycyl-tRNA synthetase respectively use ACG and TTG as their alternative translation initiator codons. To explore if any other non-ATG triplets can act as initiator codons in yeast, ALA1 was used as a reporter for screening. Results We show herein that except for AAG and AGG, all triplets that differ from ATG by a single nucleotide were able to serve as initiator codons in ALA1. Among these initiator codons, TTG, CTG, ACG, and ATT had ~50% initiating activities relative to that of ATG, while GTG, ATA, and ATC had ~20% initiating activities relative to that of ATG. Unexpectedly, these non-AUG initiator codons exhibited different preferences toward various sequence contexts. In particular, GTG was one of the most efficient non-ATG initiator codons, while ATA was essentially inactive in the context of GRS1. Conclusion This finding indicates that a sequence context that is favorable for a given non-ATG initiator codon might not be as favorable for another.

  5. Determinants of translation speed are randomly distributed across transcripts resulting in a universal scaling of protein synthesis times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ajeet K.; Ahmed, Nabeel; O'Brien, Edward P.

    2018-02-01

    Ribosome profiling experiments have found greater than 100-fold variation in ribosome density along mRNA transcripts, indicating that individual codon elongation rates can vary to a similar degree. This wide range of elongation times, coupled with differences in codon usage between transcripts, suggests that the average codon translation-rate per gene can vary widely. Yet, ribosome run-off experiments have found that the average codon translation rate for different groups of transcripts in mouse stem cells is constant at 5.6 AA/s. How these seemingly contradictory results can be reconciled is the focus of this study. Here, we combine knowledge of the molecular factors shown to influence translation speed with genomic information from Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens to simulate the synthesis of cytosolic proteins in these organisms. The model recapitulates a near constant average translation rate, which we demonstrate arises because the molecular determinants of translation speed are distributed nearly randomly amongst most of the transcripts. Consequently, codon translation rates are also randomly distributed and fast-translating segments of a transcript are likely to be offset by equally probable slow-translating segments, resulting in similar average elongation rates for most transcripts. We also show that the codon usage bias does not significantly affect the near random distribution of codon translation rates because only about 10 % of the total transcripts in an organism have high codon usage bias while the rest have little to no bias. Analysis of Ribo-Seq data and an in vivo fluorescent assay supports these conclusions.

  6. Translational Control of Cell Division by Elongator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanelie Bauer

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Elongator is required for the synthesis of the mcm5s2 modification found on tRNAs recognizing AA-ending codons. In order to obtain a global picture of the role of Elongator in translation, we used reverse protein arrays to screen the fission yeast proteome for translation defects. Unexpectedly, this revealed that Elongator inactivation mainly affected three specific functional groups including proteins implicated in cell division. The absence of Elongator results in a delay in mitosis onset and cytokinesis defects. We demonstrate that the kinase Cdr2, which is a central regulator of mitosis and cytokinesis, is under translational control by Elongator due to the Lysine codon usage bias of the cdr2 coding sequence. These findings uncover a mechanism by which the codon usage, coupled to tRNA modifications, fundamentally contributes to gene expression and cellular functions.

  7. Analysis of the synonymous codon usage bias in recently emerged enterovirus D68 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karniychuk, Uladzimir U

    2016-09-02

    Understanding the codon usage pattern of a pathogen and relationship between pathogen and host's codon usage patterns has fundamental and applied interests. Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an emerging pathogen with a potentially high public health significance. In the present study, the synonymous codon usage bias of 27 recently emerged, and historical EV-D68 strains was analyzed. In contrast to previously studied enteroviruses (enterovirus 71 and poliovirus), EV-D68 and human host have a high discrepancy between favored codons. Analysis of viral synonymous codon usage bias metrics, viral nucleotide/dinucleotide compositional parameters, and viral protein properties showed that mutational pressure is more involved in shaping the synonymous codon usage bias of EV-D68 than translation selection. Computation of codon adaptation indices allowed to estimate expression potential of the EV-D68 genome in several commonly used laboratory animals. This approach requires experimental validation and may provide an auxiliary tool for the rational selection of laboratory animals to model emerging viral diseases. Enterovirus D68 genome compositional and codon usage data can be useful for further pathogenesis, animal model, and vaccine design studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Translation initiation in bacterial polysomes through ribosome loading on a standby site on a highly translated mRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Irena

    2018-01-01

    During translation, consecutive ribosomes load on an mRNA and form a polysome. The first ribosome binds to a single-stranded mRNA region and moves toward the start codon, unwinding potential mRNA structures on the way. In contrast, the following ribosomes can dock at the start codon only when the first ribosome has vacated the initiation site. Here we show that loading of the second ribosome on a natural 38-nt-long 5′ untranslated region of lpp mRNA, which codes for the outer membrane lipoprotein from Escherichia coli, takes place before the leading ribosome has moved away from the start codon. The rapid formation of this standby complex depends on the presence of ribosomal proteins S1/S2 in the leading ribosome. The early recruitment of the second ribosome to the standby site before translation by the leading ribosome and the tight coupling between translation elongation by the first ribosome and the accommodation of the second ribosome can contribute to high translational efficiency of the lpp mRNA. PMID:29632209

  9. RESEARCH ARTICLE Codon usage vis-a-vis start and stop codon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prosen

    codon usage at start and stop site showed variation in codon selection in ..... pressure is 8.3%, 0.5% and 18.5% while the influence of other factors, for example natural ..... The codon Adaptation Index--a measure of directional synonymous.

  10. Eukaryotic evolutionary transitions are associated with extreme codon bias in functionally-related proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Hudson

    Full Text Available Codon bias in the genome of an organism influences its phenome by changing the speed and efficiency of mRNA translation and hence protein abundance. We hypothesized that differences in codon bias, either between-species differences in orthologous genes, or within-species differences between genes, may play an evolutionary role. To explore this hypothesis, we compared the genome-wide codon bias in six species that occupy vital positions in the Eukaryotic Tree of Life. We acquired the entire protein coding sequences for these organisms, computed the codon bias for all genes in each organism and explored the output for relationships between codon bias and protein function, both within- and between-lineages. We discovered five notable coordinated patterns, with extreme codon bias most pronounced in traits considered highly characteristic of a given lineage. Firstly, the Homo sapiens genome had stronger codon bias for DNA-binding transcription factors than the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, whereas the opposite was true for ribosomal proteins--perhaps underscoring transcriptional regulation in the origin of complexity. Secondly, both mammalian species examined possessed extreme codon bias in genes relating to hair--a tissue unique to mammals. Thirdly, Arabidopsis thaliana showed extreme codon bias in genes implicated in cell wall formation and chloroplast function--which are unique to plants. Fourthly, Gallus gallus possessed strong codon bias in a subset of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins--perhaps reflecting the enhanced bioenergetic efficiency in birds that co-evolved with flight. And lastly, the G. gallus genome had extreme codon bias for the Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor--which may help to explain their spontaneous recovery from deafness. We propose that extreme codon bias in groups of genes that encode functionally related proteins has a pathway-level energetic explanation.

  11. Ribosomes slide on lysine-encoding homopolymeric A stretches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutmou, Kristin S; Schuller, Anthony P; Brunelle, Julie L; Radhakrishnan, Aditya; Djuranovic, Sergej; Green, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Protein output from synonymous codons is thought to be equivalent if appropriate tRNAs are sufficiently abundant. Here we show that mRNAs encoding iterated lysine codons, AAA or AAG, differentially impact protein synthesis: insertion of iterated AAA codons into an ORF diminishes protein expression more than insertion of synonymous AAG codons. Kinetic studies in E. coli reveal that differential protein production results from pausing on consecutive AAA-lysines followed by ribosome sliding on homopolymeric A sequence. Translation in a cell-free expression system demonstrates that diminished output from AAA-codon-containing reporters results from premature translation termination on out of frame stop codons following ribosome sliding. In eukaryotes, these premature termination events target the mRNAs for Nonsense-Mediated-Decay (NMD). The finding that ribosomes slide on homopolymeric A sequences explains bioinformatic analyses indicating that consecutive AAA codons are under-represented in gene-coding sequences. Ribosome ‘sliding’ represents an unexpected type of ribosome movement possible during translation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05534.001 PMID:25695637

  12. Novel mRNA-specific effects of ribosome drop-off on translation rate and polysome profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Bonnin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The well established phenomenon of ribosome drop-off plays crucial roles in translational accuracy and nutrient starvation responses during protein translation. When cells are under stress conditions, such as amino acid starvation or aminoacyl-tRNA depletion due to a high level of recombinant protein expression, ribosome drop-off can substantially affect the efficiency of protein expression. Here we introduce a mathematical model that describes the effects of ribosome drop-off on the ribosome density along the mRNA and on the concomitant protein synthesis rate. Our results show that ribosome premature termination may lead to non-intuitive ribosome density profiles, such as a ribosome density which increases from the 5' to the 3' end. Importantly, the model predicts that the effects of ribosome drop-off on the translation rate are mRNA-specific, and we quantify their resilience to drop-off, showing that the mRNAs which present ribosome queues are much less affected by ribosome drop-off than those which do not. Moreover, among those mRNAs that do not present ribosome queues, resilience to drop-off correlates positively with the elongation rate, so that sequences using fast codons are expected to be less affected by ribosome drop-off. This result is consistent with a genome-wide analysis of S. cerevisiae, which reveals that under favourable growth conditions mRNAs coding for proteins involved in the translation machinery, known to be highly codon biased and using preferentially fast codons, are highly resilient to ribosome drop-off. Moreover, in physiological conditions, the translation rate of mRNAs coding for regulatory, stress-related proteins, is less resilient to ribosome drop-off. This model therefore allows analysis of variations in the translational efficiency of individual mRNAs by accounting for the full range of known ribosome behaviours, as well as explaining mRNA-specific variations in ribosome density emerging from ribosome profiling

  13. Understanding Biases in Ribosome Profiling Experiments Reveals Signatures of Translation Dynamics in Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey A Hussmann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome profiling produces snapshots of the locations of actively translating ribosomes on messenger RNAs. These snapshots can be used to make inferences about translation dynamics. Recent ribosome profiling studies in yeast, however, have reached contradictory conclusions regarding the average translation rate of each codon. Some experiments have used cycloheximide (CHX to stabilize ribosomes before measuring their positions, and these studies all counterintuitively report a weak negative correlation between the translation rate of a codon and the abundance of its cognate tRNA. In contrast, some experiments performed without CHX report strong positive correlations. To explain this contradiction, we identify unexpected patterns in ribosome density downstream of each type of codon in experiments that use CHX. These patterns are evidence that elongation continues to occur in the presence of CHX but with dramatically altered codon-specific elongation rates. The measured positions of ribosomes in these experiments therefore do not reflect the amounts of time ribosomes spend at each position in vivo. These results suggest that conclusions from experiments in yeast using CHX may need reexamination. In particular, we show that in all such experiments, codons decoded by less abundant tRNAs were in fact being translated more slowly before the addition of CHX disrupted these dynamics.

  14. The mutational spectrum in Treacher Collins syndrome reveals a predominance of mutations that create a premature-termination codon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, S.J.; Gladwin, A.J.; Dixon, M.J. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1997-03-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. The TCS locus has been mapped to human chromosome 5q31.3-32 and the mutated gene identified. In the current investigation, 25 previously undescribed mutations, which are spread throughout the gene, are presented. This brings the total reported to date to 35, which represents a detection rate of 60%. Of the mutations that have been reported to date, all but one result in the introduction of a premature-termination codon into the predicted protein, treacle. Moreover, the mutations are largely family specific, although a common 5-bp deletion in exon 24 (seven different families) and a recurrent splicing mutation in intron 3 (two different families) have been identified. This mutational spectrum supports the hypothesis that TCS results from haploin-sufficiency. 49 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Gaining insights into the codon usage patterns of TP53 gene across eight mammalian species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarikul Huda Mazumder

    Full Text Available TP53 gene is known as the "guardian of the genome" as it plays a vital role in regulating cell cycle, cell proliferation, DNA damage repair, initiation of programmed cell death and suppressing tumor growth. Non uniform usage of synonymous codons for a specific amino acid during translation of protein known as codon usage bias (CUB is a unique property of the genome and shows species specific deviation. Analysis of codon usage bias with compositional dynamics of coding sequences has contributed to the better understanding of the molecular mechanism and the evolution of a particular gene. In this study, the complete nucleotide coding sequences of TP53 gene from eight different mammalian species were used for CUB analysis. Our results showed that the codon usage patterns in TP53 gene across different mammalian species has been influenced by GC bias particularly GC3 and a moderate bias exists in the codon usage of TP53 gene. Moreover, we observed that nature has highly favored the most over represented codon CTG for leucine amino acid but selected against the ATA codon for isoleucine in TP53 gene across all mammalian species during the course of evolution.

  16. Abortive translation caused by peptidyl-tRNA drop-off at NGG codons in the early coding region of mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I; Isaksson, Leif A

    2005-01-01

    In Escherichia coli the codons CGG, AGG, UGG or GGG (NGG codons) but not GGN or GNG (where N is non-G) are associated with low expression of a reporter gene, if located at positions +2 to +5. Induction of a lacZ reporter gene with any one of the NGG codons at position +2 to +5 does not influence......-type or the mutant strain. The inhibitory effect on the pth mutant strain by NGG codons at location +5 was suppressed by overexpression of the Pth enzyme from a plasmid. However, the overexpression of cognate tRNAs for AGG or GGG did not rescue from the growth inhibition associated with these codons early...

  17. Over Expression of a tRNALeu Isoacceptor Changes Charging Pattern of Leucine tRNAs and Reveals New Codon Reading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael Askvad; Elf, J.; Bouakaz, E.

    2005-01-01

    During mRNA translation, synonymous codons for one amino acid are often read by different isoaccepting tRNAs. The theory of selective tRNA charging predicts greatly varying percentages of aminoacylation among isoacceptors in cells starved for their common amino acid. It also predicts major changes...... in tRNA charging patterns upon concentration changes of single isoacceptors, which suggests a novel type of translational control of gene expression. We therefore tested the theory by measuring with Northern blots the charging of Leu-tRNAs in Escherichia coli under Leu limitation in response to over...... postulated a previously unknown common codon for tRNALeu GAG and tRNALeu UAG. Subsequently, we demonstrated that the tRNALeu GAG codon CUU is, in fact, read also by tRNALeu UAG, due to a uridine-5-oxyacetic acid modification....

  18. Comparative analysis of codon usage bias and codon context patterns between dipteran and hymenopteran sequenced genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta K Behura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Codon bias is a phenomenon of non-uniform usage of codons whereas codon context generally refers to sequential pair of codons in a gene. Although genome sequencing of multiple species of dipteran and hymenopteran insects have been completed only a few of these species have been analyzed for codon usage bias. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we use bioinformatics approaches to analyze codon usage bias and codon context patterns in a genome-wide manner among 15 dipteran and 7 hymenopteran insect species. Results show that GAA is the most frequent codon in the dipteran species whereas GAG is the most frequent codon in the hymenopteran species. Data reveals that codons ending with C or G are frequently used in the dipteran genomes whereas codons ending with A or T are frequently used in the hymenopteran genomes. Synonymous codon usage orders (SCUO vary within genomes in a pattern that seems to be distinct for each species. Based on comparison of 30 one-to-one orthologous genes among 17 species, the fruit fly Drosophila willistoni shows the least codon usage bias whereas the honey bee (Apis mellifera shows the highest bias. Analysis of codon context patterns of these insects shows that specific codons are frequently used as the 3'- and 5'-context of start and stop codons, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Codon bias pattern is distinct between dipteran and hymenopteran insects. While codon bias is favored by high GC content of dipteran genomes, high AT content of genes favors biased usage of synonymous codons in the hymenopteran insects. Also, codon context patterns vary among these species largely according to their phylogeny.

  19. Large scale comparative codon-pair context analysis unveils general rules that fine-tune evolution of mRNA primary structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Moura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Codon usage and codon-pair context are important gene primary structure features that influence mRNA decoding fidelity. In order to identify general rules that shape codon-pair context and minimize mRNA decoding error, we have carried out a large scale comparative codon-pair context analysis of 119 fully sequenced genomes. METHODOLOGIES/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed mathematical and software tools for large scale comparative codon-pair context analysis. These methodologies unveiled general and species specific codon-pair context rules that govern evolution of mRNAs in the 3 domains of life. We show that evolution of bacterial and archeal mRNA primary structure is mainly dependent on constraints imposed by the translational machinery, while in eukaryotes DNA methylation and tri-nucleotide repeats impose strong biases on codon-pair context. CONCLUSIONS: The data highlight fundamental differences between prokaryotic and eukaryotic mRNA decoding rules, which are partially independent of codon usage.

  20. Genome-wide comparative analysis of codon usage bias and codon context patterns among cyanobacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabha, Ratna; Singh, Dhananjaya P; Sinha, Swati; Ahmad, Khurshid; Rai, Anil

    2017-04-01

    With the increasing accumulation of genomic sequence information of prokaryotes, the study of codon usage bias has gained renewed attention. The purpose of this study was to examine codon selection pattern within and across cyanobacterial species belonging to diverse taxonomic orders and habitats. We performed detailed comparative analysis of cyanobacterial genomes with respect to codon bias. Our analysis reflects that in cyanobacterial genomes, A- and/or T-ending codons were used predominantly in the genes whereas G- and/or C-ending codons were largely avoided. Variation in the codon context usage of cyanobacterial genes corresponded to the clustering of cyanobacteria as per their GC content. Analysis of codon adaptation index (CAI) and synonymous codon usage order (SCUO) revealed that majority of genes are associated with low codon bias. Codon selection pattern in cyanobacterial genomes reflected compositional constraints as major influencing factor. It is also identified that although, mutational constraint may play some role in affecting codon usage bias in cyanobacteria, compositional constraint in terms of genomic GC composition coupled with environmental factors affected codon selection pattern in cyanobacterial genomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhanced phosphoserine insertion during Escherichia coli protein synthesis via partial UAG codon reassignment and release factor 1 deletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Ilka U.; Rovner, Alexis J.; Aerni, Hans R.; Rogulina, Svetlana; Cheng, Laura; Olds, William; Fischer, Jonathan T.; Söll, Dieter; Isaacs, Farren J.; Rinehart, Jesse

    2012-01-01

    Genetically encoded phosphoserine incorporation programmed by the UAG codon was achieved by addition of engineered elongation factor and an archaeal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase to the normal Escherichia coli translation machinery (Park (2011) Science 333, 1151). However, protein yield suffers from expression of the orthogonal phosphoserine translation system and competition with release factor 1 (RF-1). In a strain lacking RF-1, phosphoserine phosphatase, and where 7 UAG codons residing in essential genes were converted to UAA, phosphoserine incorporation into GFP and WNK4 was significantly elevated, but with an accompanying loss in cellular fitness and viability. PMID:22982858

  2. The translational regulator Cup controls NMJ presynaptic terminal morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Kaushiki P; Carrillo, Robert A; Zinn, Kai

    2015-07-01

    During oogenesis and early embryonic development in Drosophila, translation of proteins from maternally deposited mRNAs is tightly controlled. We and others have previously shown that translational regulatory proteins that function during oogenesis also have essential roles in the nervous system. Here we examine the role of Cup in neuromuscular system development. Maternal Cup controls translation of localized mRNAs encoding the Oskar and Nanos proteins and binds to the general translation initiation factor eIF4E. In this paper, we show that zygotic Cup protein is localized to presynaptic terminals at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). cup mutant NMJs have strong phenotypes characterized by the presence of small clustered boutons called satellite boutons. They also exhibit an increase in the frequency of spontaneous glutamate release events (mEPSPs). Reduction of eIF4E expression synergizes with partial loss of Cup expression to produce satellite bouton phenotypes. The presence of satellite boutons is often associated with increases in retrograde bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, and we show that synaptic BMP signaling is elevated in cup mutants. cup genetically interacts with two genes, EndoA and Dap160, that encode proteins involved in endocytosis that are also neuronal modulators of the BMP pathway. Endophilin protein, encoded by the EndoA gene, is downregulated in a cup mutant. Our results are consistent with a model in which Cup and eIF4E work together to ensure efficient localization and translation of endocytosis proteins in motor neurons and control the strength of the retrograde BMP signal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A L2HGDH initiator methionine codon mutation in a Yorkshire terrier with L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farias Fabiana HG

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria is a metabolic repair deficiency characterized by elevated levels of L-2-hydroxyglutaric acid in urine, blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Neurological signs associated with the disease in humans and dogs include seizures, ataxia and dementia. Case presentation Here we describe an 8 month old Yorkshire terrier that presented with episodes of hyperactivity and aggressive behavior. Between episodes, the dog’s behavior and neurologic examinations were normal. A T2 weighted MRI of the brain showed diffuse grey matter hyperintensity and a urine metabolite screen showed elevated 2-hydroxyglutaric acid. We sequenced all 10 exons and intron-exon borders of L2HGDH from the affected dog and identified a homozygous A to G transition in the initiator methionine codon. The first inframe methionine is at p.M183 which is past the mitochondrial targeting domain of the protein. Initiation of translation at p.M183 would encode an N-terminal truncated protein unlikely to be functional. Conclusions We have identified a mutation in the initiation codon of L2HGDH that is likely to result in a non-functional gene. The Yorkshire terrier could serve as an animal model to understand the pathogenesis of L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria and to evaluate potential therapies.

  4. Mutations in the codon for a conserved arginine-1563 in the COL4A5 collagen gene in Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, J; Gregory, M C; Hertz, Jens Michael

    1993-01-01

    for arginine to the translation stop codon TGA. In Utah kindred 2123 and in the Danish kindred A13, there was a C-->T mutation in the noncoding strand changing the same codon to CAA for glutamine. Both mutations were confirmed by allele-specific hybridization on PCR-amplified DNA from other family members....

  5. A non-catalytic N-terminal domain negatively influences the nucleotide exchange activity of translation elongation factor 1Bα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosiuk, Tetiana V; Shalak, Vyacheslav F; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Negrutskii, Boris S; El'skaya, Anna V

    2016-02-01

    Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bα (eEF1Bα) is a functional homolog of the bacterial factor EF-Ts, and is a component of the macromolecular eEF1B complex. eEF1Bα functions as a catalyst of guanine nucleotide exchange on translation elongation factor 1A (eEF1A). The C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα is necessary and sufficient for its catalytic activity, whereas the N-terminal domain interacts with eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1Bγ (eEF1Bγ) to form a tight complex. However, eEF1Bγ has been shown to enhance the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα attributed to the C-terminal domain of eEF1Bα. This suggests that the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may in some way influence the guanine nucleotide exchange process. We have shown that full-length recombinant eEF1Bα and its truncated forms are non-globular proteins with elongated shapes. Truncation of the N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα, which is dispensable for catalytic activity, resulted in acceleration of the rate of guanine nucleotide exchange on eEF1A compared to full-length eEF1Bα. A similar effect on the catalytic activity of eEF1Bα was observed after its interaction with eEF1Bγ. We suggest that the non-catalytic N-terminal domain of eEF1Bα may interfere with eEF1A binding to the C-terminal catalytic domain, resulting in a decrease in the overall rate of the guanine nucleotide exchange reaction. Formation of a tight complex between the eEF1Bγ and eEF1Bα N-terminal domains abolishes this inhibitory effect. © 2015 FEBS.

  6. Role of the ribosomal P-site elements of m²G966, m⁵C967, and the S9 C-terminal tail in maintenance of the reading frame during translational elongation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Smriti; Bhamidimarri, Satya Prathyusha; Weber, Michael H W; Varshney, Umesh

    2013-08-01

    The ribosomal P-site hosts the peptidyl-tRNAs during translation elongation. Which P-site elements support these tRNA species to maintain codon-anticodon interactions has remained unclear. We investigated the effects of P-site features of methylations of G966, C967, and the conserved C-terminal tail sequence of Ser, Lys, and Arg (SKR) of the S9 ribosomal protein in maintenance of the translational reading frame of an mRNA. We generated Escherichia coli strains deleted for the SKR sequence in S9 ribosomal protein, RsmB (which methylates C967), and RsmD (which methylates G966) and used them to translate LacZ from its +1 and -1 out-of-frame constructs. We show that the S9 SKR tail prevents both the +1 and -1 frameshifts and plays a general role in holding the P-site tRNA/peptidyl-tRNA in place. In contrast, the G966 and C967 methylations did not make a direct contribution to the maintenance of the translational frame of an mRNA. However, deletion of rsmB in the S9Δ3 background caused significantly increased -1 frameshifting at 37°C. Interestingly, the effects of the deficiency of C967 methylation were annulled when the E. coli strain was grown at 30°C, supporting its context-dependent role.

  7. Unassigned Codons, Nonsense Suppression, and Anticodon Modifications in the Evolution of the Genetic Code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.T.S. van der Gulik (Peter); W.D. Hoff (Wouter)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractThe origin of the genetic code is a central open problem regarding the early evolution of life. Here, we consider two undeveloped but important aspects of possible scenarios for the evolutionary pathway of the translation machinery: the role of unassigned codons in early stages

  8. Role of translation in the UTP-modulated attenuation at the pyrBI operon of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmesen, Kåre; Bonekamp, Fons; Karlström, Olle

    1985-01-01

    B leader peptide. In addition a gene fusion encoding a hybrid protein with -galactosidase activity was formed between the pyrB start and the rest of lacZ. This gene fusion is expressed from the lac promoter and the transcript is subject to facultative termination at the pyrBI attenuator. Different variants...... of the lacZ start were used that either contained a stop codon or directed the translation toward the attenuator in any of the alternative reading frames. The following results were obtained. No significant read-through of transcription over the pyrB attenuator was seen when the leader translation ended 49...... nucleotide residues, or more, upstream of the attenuator symmetry, but a UTP-modulated attenuation was established if the leader translation was allowed to proceed across the attenuator as for the putative leader peptide or in a frame-shifted version. The regulation, however, was not as great...

  9. Mutation-selection models of codon substitution and their use to estimate selective strengths on codon usage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Ziheng; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    Current models of codon substitution are formulated at the levels of nucleotide substitution and do not explicitly consider the separate effects of mutation and selection. They are thus incapable of inferring whether mutation or selection is responsible for evolution at silent sites. Here we impl...... codon usage in mammals. Estimates of selection coefficients nevertheless suggest that selection on codon usage is weak and most mutations are nearly neutral. The sensitivity of the analysis on the assumed mutation model is discussed.......Current models of codon substitution are formulated at the levels of nucleotide substitution and do not explicitly consider the separate effects of mutation and selection. They are thus incapable of inferring whether mutation or selection is responsible for evolution at silent sites. Here we...... implement a few population genetics models of codon substitution that explicitly consider mutation bias and natural selection at the DNA level. Selection on codon usage is modeled by introducing codon-fitness parameters, which together with mutation-bias parameters, predict optimal codon frequencies...

  10. UPF1 silenced cellular model systems for screening of read-through agents active on β039 thalassemia point mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, Francesca; Pappadà, Mariangela; Breveglieri, Giulia; D'Aversa, Elisabetta; Finotti, Alessia; Lampronti, Ilaria; Gambari, Roberto; Borgatti, Monica

    2018-05-15

    Nonsense mutations promote premature translational termination, introducing stop codons within the coding region of mRNAs and causing inherited diseases, including thalassemia. For instance, in β 0 39 thalassemia the CAG (glutamine) codon is mutated to the UAG stop codon, leading to premature translation termination and to mRNA destabilization through the well described NMD (nonsense-mediated mRNA decay). In order to develop an approach facilitating translation and, therefore, protection from NMD, ribosomal read-through molecules, such as aminoglycoside antibiotics, have been tested on mRNAs carrying premature stop codons. These findings have introduced new hopes for the development of a pharmacological approach to the β 0 39 thalassemia therapy. While several strategies, designed to enhance translational read-through, have been reported to inhibit NMD efficiency concomitantly, experimental tools for systematic analysis of mammalian NMD inhibition by translational read-through are lacking. We developed a human cellular model of the β 0 39 thalassemia mutation with UPF-1 suppressed and showing a partial NMD suppression. This novel cellular model could be used for the screening of molecules exhibiting preferential read-through activity allowing a great rescue of the mutated transcripts.

  11. ANT: Software for Generating and Evaluating Degenerate Codons for Natural and Expanded Genetic Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engqvist, Martin K M; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-08-21

    The Ambiguous Nucleotide Tool (ANT) is a desktop application that generates and evaluates degenerate codons. Degenerate codons are used to represent DNA positions that have multiple possible nucleotide alternatives. This is useful for protein engineering and directed evolution, where primers specified with degenerate codons are used as a basis for generating libraries of protein sequences. ANT is intuitive and can be used in a graphical user interface or by interacting with the code through a defined application programming interface. ANT comes with full support for nonstandard, user-defined, or expanded genetic codes (translation tables), which is important because synthetic biology is being applied to an ever widening range of natural and engineered organisms. The Python source code for ANT is freely distributed so that it may be used without restriction, modified, and incorporated in other software or custom data pipelines.

  12. PTENα, a PTEN isoform translated through alternative initiation, regulates mitochondrial function and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui; He, Shiming; Yang, Jingyi; Jia, Xinying; Wang, Pan; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Zhong; Zou, Xiajuan; McNutt, Michael A; Shen, Wen Hong; Yin, Yuxin

    2014-05-06

    PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. It is known that PTEN has a wide range of biological functions beyond tumor suppression. Here, we report that PTENα, an N-terminally extended form of PTEN, functions in mitochondrial metabolism. Translation of PTENα is initiated from a CUG codon upstream of and in-frame with the coding region of canonical PTEN. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2A (eIF2A) controls PTENα translation, which requires a CUG-centered palindromic motif. We show that PTENα induces cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP production in mitochondria. TALEN-mediated somatic deletion of PTENα impairs mitochondrial respiratory chain function. PTENα interacts with canonical PTEN to increase PINK1 protein levels and promote energy production. Our studies demonstrate the importance of eIF2A-mediated alternative translation for generation of protein diversity in eukaryotic systems and provide insights into the mechanism by which the PTEN family is involved in multiple cellular processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Made in translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, John C.

    2018-03-01

    Evolution of highly functionalized DNA could enable the discovery of artificial nucleic acid sequences with different properties to natural DNA. Now, an artificial translation system has been designed that can support the evolution of non-natural sequence-defined nucleic acid polymers carrying eight different functional groups on 32 codons.

  14. Heat shock-induced accumulation of translation elongation and termination factors precedes assembly of stress granules in S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Grousl

    Full Text Available In response to severe environmental stresses eukaryotic cells shut down translation and accumulate components of the translational machinery in stress granules (SGs. Since they contain mainly mRNA, translation initiation factors and 40S ribosomal subunits, they have been referred to as dominant accumulations of stalled translation preinitiation complexes. Here we present evidence that the robust heat shock-induced SGs of S. cerevisiae also contain translation elongation factors eEF3 (Yef3p and eEF1Bγ2 (Tef4p as well as translation termination factors eRF1 (Sup45p and eRF3 (Sup35p. Despite the presence of the yeast prion protein Sup35 in heat shock-induced SGs, we found out that its prion-like domain is not involved in the SGs assembly. Factors eEF3, eEF1Bγ2 and eRF1 were accumulated and co-localized with Dcp2 foci even upon a milder heat shock at 42°C independently of P-bodies scaffolding proteins. We also show that eEF3 accumulations at 42°C determine sites of the genuine SGs assembly at 46°C. We suggest that identification of translation elongation and termination factors in SGs might help to understand the mechanism of the eIF2α factor phosphorylation-independent repression of translation and SGs assembly.

  15. Comparative genomic analysis of translation initiation mechanisms for genes lacking the Shine–Dalgarno sequence in prokaryotes

    KAUST Repository

    Nakagawa, So

    2017-02-15

    In prokaryotes, translation initiation is believed to occur through an interaction between the 3\\' tail of a 16S rRNA and a corresponding Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence in the 5\\' untranslated region (UTR) of an mRNA. However, some genes lack SD sequences (non-SD genes), and the fraction of non-SD genes in a genome varies depending on the prokaryotic species. To elucidate non-SD translation initiation mechanisms in prokaryotes from an evolutionary perspective, we statistically examined the nucleotide frequencies around the initiation codons in non-SD genes from 260 prokaryotes (235 bacteria and 25 archaea). We identified distinct nucleotide frequency biases upstream of the initiation codon in bacteria and archaea, likely because of the presence of leaderless mRNAs lacking a 5\\' UTR. Moreover, we observed overall similarities in the nucleotide patterns between upstream and downstream regions of the initiation codon in all examined phyla. Symmetric nucleotide frequency biases might facilitate translation initiation by preventing the formation of secondary structures around the initiation codon. These features are more prominent in species\\' genomes that harbor large fractions of non-SD sequences, suggesting that a reduced stability around the initiation codon is important for efficient translation initiation in prokaryotes.

  16. Comparative genomic analysis of translation initiation mechanisms for genes lacking the Shine–Dalgarno sequence in prokaryotes

    KAUST Repository

    Nakagawa, So; Niimura, Yoshihito; Gojobori, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    In prokaryotes, translation initiation is believed to occur through an interaction between the 3' tail of a 16S rRNA and a corresponding Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of an mRNA. However, some genes lack SD sequences (non-SD genes), and the fraction of non-SD genes in a genome varies depending on the prokaryotic species. To elucidate non-SD translation initiation mechanisms in prokaryotes from an evolutionary perspective, we statistically examined the nucleotide frequencies around the initiation codons in non-SD genes from 260 prokaryotes (235 bacteria and 25 archaea). We identified distinct nucleotide frequency biases upstream of the initiation codon in bacteria and archaea, likely because of the presence of leaderless mRNAs lacking a 5' UTR. Moreover, we observed overall similarities in the nucleotide patterns between upstream and downstream regions of the initiation codon in all examined phyla. Symmetric nucleotide frequency biases might facilitate translation initiation by preventing the formation of secondary structures around the initiation codon. These features are more prominent in species' genomes that harbor large fractions of non-SD sequences, suggesting that a reduced stability around the initiation codon is important for efficient translation initiation in prokaryotes.

  17. Differential trends in the codon usage patterns in HIV-1 genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aridaman Pandit

    Full Text Available Host-pathogen interactions underlie one of the most complex evolutionary phenomena resulting in continual adaptive genetic changes, where pathogens exploit the host's molecular resources for growth and survival, while hosts try to eliminate the pathogen. Deciphering the molecular basis of host-pathogen interactions is useful in understanding the factors governing pathogen evolution and disease propagation. In host-pathogen context, a balance between mutation, selection, and genetic drift is known to maintain codon bias in both organisms. Studies revealing determinants of the bias and its dynamics are central to the understanding of host-pathogen evolution. We considered the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV type 1 and its human host to search for evolutionary signatures in the viral genome. Positive selection is known to dominate intra-host evolution of HIV-1, whereas high genetic variability underlies the belief that neutral processes drive inter-host differences. In this study, we analyze the codon usage patterns of HIV-1 genomes across all subtypes and clades sequenced over a period of 23 years. We show presence of unique temporal correlations in the codon bias of three HIV-1 genes illustrating differential adaptation of the HIV-1 genes towards the host preferred codons. Our results point towards gene-specific translational selection to be an important force driving the evolution of HIV-1 at the population level.

  18. Mutations at the cysteine codons of the recA gene of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisemann, J.M.; Weinstock, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    Each of the three cysteine residues in the Escherichia coli RecA protein was replaced with a number of other amino acids. To do this, each cysteine codon was first converted to a chain-terminating amber codon by oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. These amber mutants were then either assayed for function in different suppressor strains or reverted by a second round of mutagenesis with oligonucleotides that had random sequences at the amber codon. Thirty-three different amino acid substitutions were obtained. Mutants were tested for three functions of RecA: survival following UV irradiation, homologous recombination, and induction of the SOS response. It was found that although none of the cysteines is essential for activity, mutations at each of these positions can affect one or more of the activities of RecA, depending on the particular amino acid substitution. In addition, the cysteine at position 116 appears to be involved in the RecA-promoted cleavage of the LexA protein

  19. Human apolipoprotein B (apoB) mRNA: Identification of two distinct apoB mRNAs, an mRNA with the apoB-100 sequence and an apoB mRNA containing a premature in-frame translational stop codon, in both liver and intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, K.; Hospattankar, A.V.; Law, S.W.; Meglin, N.; Cortright, J.; Brewer, H.B. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein B (apoB) is present in plasma as two separate isoproteins, designated apoB-100 (512 kDa) and apoB-48 (250 kDa). ApoB is encoded by a single gene on chromosome 2, and a single nuclear mRNA is edited and processed into two separate apoB mRNAs. A 14.1-kilobase apoB mRNA codes for apoB-100, and the second mRNA, which codes for apoB-48, contains a premature stop codon generated by a single base substitution of cytosine to uracil at nucleotide 6,538, which converts the translated CAA codon coding for the amino acid glutamine at residue 2,153 in apoB-100 to a premature in-frame stop codon (UAA). Two 30-base synthetic oligonucleotides, designated apoB-Stop and apoB-Gln, were synthesized containing the complementary sequence to the stop codon (UAA) and glutamine codon (CAA), respectively. The combined results from these studies establish that both human intestine and liver contain the two distinct apoB mRNAs, an mRNA that codes for apoB-100 and an apoB mRNA that contains the premature stop codon, which codes for apoB-48. The premature in-frame stop codon is not tissue specific and is present in both human liver and intestine

  20. Relative codon adaptation: a generic codon bias index for prediction of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jesse M; Erill, Ivan

    2010-06-01

    The development of codon bias indices (CBIs) remains an active field of research due to their myriad applications in computational biology. Recently, the relative codon usage bias (RCBS) was introduced as a novel CBI able to estimate codon bias without using a reference set. The results of this new index when applied to Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae led the authors of the original publications to conclude that natural selection favours higher expression and enhanced codon usage optimization in short genes. Here, we show that this conclusion was flawed and based on the systematic oversight of an intrinsic bias for short sequences in the RCBS index and of biases in the small data sets used for validation in E. coli. Furthermore, we reveal that how the RCBS can be corrected to produce useful results and how its underlying principle, which we here term relative codon adaptation (RCA), can be made into a powerful reference-set-based index that directly takes into account the genomic base composition. Finally, we show that RCA outperforms the codon adaptation index (CAI) as a predictor of gene expression when operating on the CAI reference set and that this improvement is significantly larger when analysing genomes with high mutational bias.

  1. Specificity of N-terminal methionyl peptidase: analysis by site-directed mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasper, T.J.; Boissel, J.P.; Bunn, H.F.

    1987-01-01

    The start site of eukaryotic translation is normally an AUG codon. The corresponding N-terminal methionine is most often removed when the nascent chain reaches about 30 residues. Data from a survey of 1764 eukaryotic protein sequences suggest that the residue adjacent to the initiator Met determines Met cleavage. In order to investigate the mechanism of this reaction, the authors have prepared oligonucleotide-directed mutants of human β-globin from gapped heteroduplexes of a T3/T7 plasmid containing a globin cDNA clone. To date, the authors have produced mutants encoding for 15 of 19 possible amino acid replacements at position 1 in the β-globin chain. These mutants have been confirmed by dideoxy sequencing, transcribed in vitro, and translated in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate in the presence of 35 S-methionine. Labeled translation products were then isolated by cation exchange HPLC, and tryptic peptides were analyzed by RP-HPLC. Thus far, this structural analysis has shown that for β-1 Val, Ala, and Ser, the initiator Met is cleaved, whereas for β-1 Lys, Met, Glu, Trp, Asn, Tyr, and Glu, initiator Met is retained. For β-1 Leu initiator Met is cleaved with a frequency of about 50%. These results are consistent with the data obtained from the previous survey. The expression of site-directed mutants in a cell-free system can also be used to investigate other N-terminal processing events, such as acetylation and myristylation

  2. Tunable translational control using site-specific unnatural amino acid incorporation in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Kato

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Translation of target gene transcripts in Escherichia coli harboring UAG amber stop codons can be switched on by the amber-codon-specific incorporation of an exogenously supplied unnatural amino acid, 3-iodo-L-tyrosine. Here, we report that this translational switch can control the translational efficiency at any intermediate magnitude by adjustment of the 3-iodo-L-tyrosine concentration in the medium, as a tunable translational controller. The translational efficiency of a target gene reached maximum levels with 10−5 M 3-iodo-L-tyrosine, and intermediate levels were observed with suboptimal concentrations (approximately spanning a 2-log10 concentration range, 10−7–10−5 M. Such intermediate-level expression was also confirmed in individual bacteria.

  3. Genetic and codon usage bias analyses of polymerase genes of equine influenza virus and its relation to evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Bidhan Ch; Virmani, Nitin; Kumar, Naveen; Anand, Taruna; Pavulraj, S; Rash, Adam; Elton, Debra; Rash, Nicola; Bhatia, Sandeep; Sood, Richa; Singh, Raj Kumar; Tripathi, Bhupendra Nath

    2017-08-23

    Equine influenza is a major health problem of equines worldwide. The polymerase genes of influenza virus have key roles in virus replication, transcription, transmission between hosts and pathogenesis. Hence, the comprehensive genetic and codon usage bias of polymerase genes of equine influenza virus (EIV) were analyzed to elucidate the genetic and evolutionary relationships in a novel perspective. The group - specific consensus amino acid substitutions were identified in all polymerase genes of EIVs that led to divergence of EIVs into various clades. The consistent amino acid changes were also detected in the Florida clade 2 EIVs circulating in Europe and Asia since 2007. To study the codon usage patterns, a total of 281,324 codons of polymerase genes of EIV H3N8 isolates from 1963 to 2015 were systemically analyzed. The polymerase genes of EIVs exhibit a weak codon usage bias. The ENc-GC3s and Neutrality plots indicated that natural selection is the major influencing factor of codon usage bias, and that the impact of mutation pressure is comparatively minor. The methods for estimating host imposed translation pressure suggested that the polymerase acidic (PA) gene seems to be under less translational pressure compared to polymerase basic 1 (PB1) and polymerase basic 2 (PB2) genes. The multivariate statistical analysis of polymerase genes divided EIVs into four evolutionary diverged clusters - Pre-divergent, Eurasian, Florida sub-lineage 1 and 2. Various lineage specific amino acid substitutions observed in all polymerase genes of EIVs and especially, clade 2 EIVs underwent major variations which led to the emergence of a phylogenetically distinct group of EIVs originating from Richmond/1/07. The codon usage bias was low in all the polymerase genes of EIVs that was influenced by the multiple factors such as the nucleotide compositions, mutation pressure, aromaticity and hydropathicity. However, natural selection was the major influencing factor in defining the

  4. CodonShuffle: a tool for generating and analyzing synonymously mutated sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge, Daniel Macedo de Melo; Mills, Ryan E.; Lauring, Adam S.

    2015-01-01

    Because synonymous mutations do not change the amino acid sequence of a protein, they are generally considered to be selectively neutral. Empiric data suggest, however, that a significant fraction of viral mutational fitness effects may be attributable to synonymous mutation. Bias in synonymous codon usage in viruses may result from selection for translational efficiency, mutational bias, base pairing requirements in RNA structures, or even selection against specific dinucleotides by innate i...

  5. Ribosomal protein methyltransferases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hadid, Qais; White, Jonelle; Clarke, Steven

    2016-02-12

    A significant percentage of the methyltransferasome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eukaryotes is devoted to methylation of the translational machinery. Methylation of the RNA components of the translational machinery has been studied extensively and is important for structure stability, ribosome biogenesis, and translational fidelity. However, the functional effects of ribosomal protein methylation by their cognate methyltransferases are still largely unknown. Previous work has shown that the ribosomal protein Rpl3 methyltransferase, histidine protein methyltransferase 1 (Hpm1), is important for ribosome biogenesis and translation elongation fidelity. In this study, yeast strains deficient in each of the ten ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae were examined for potential defects in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Like Hpm1-deficient cells, loss of four of the nine other ribosomal protein methyltransferases resulted in defects in ribosomal subunit synthesis. All of the mutant strains exhibited resistance to the ribosome inhibitors anisomycin and/or cycloheximide in plate assays, but not in liquid culture. Translational fidelity assays measuring stop codon readthrough, amino acid misincorporation, and programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting, revealed that eight of the ten enzymes are important for translation elongation fidelity and the remaining two are necessary for translation termination efficiency. Altogether, these results demonstrate that ribosomal protein methyltransferases in S. cerevisiae play important roles in ribosome biogenesis and translation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Simulation and analysis of single-ribosome translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinoco, Ignacio Jr; Wen, Jin-Der

    2009-01-01

    In the cell, proteins are synthesized by ribosomes in a multi-step process called translation. The ribosome translocates along the messenger RNA to read the codons that encode the amino acid sequence of a protein. Elongation factors, including EF-G and EF-Tu, are used to catalyze the process. Recently, we have shown that translation can be followed at the single-molecule level using optical tweezers; this technique allows us to study the kinetics of translation by measuring the lifetime the ribosome spends at each codon. Here, we analyze the data from single-molecule experiments and fit the data with simple kinetic models. We also simulate the translation kinetics based on a multi-step mechanism from ensemble kinetic measurements. The mean lifetimes from the simulation were consistent with our experimental single-molecule measurements. We found that the calculated lifetime distributions were fit in general by equations with up to five rate-determining steps. Two rate-determining steps were only obtained at low concentrations of elongation factors. These analyses can be used to design new single-molecule experiments to better understand the kinetics and mechanism of translation

  7. mRNA secondary structure at start AUG codon is a key limiting factor for human protein expression in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Weici; Xiao Weihua; Wei Haiming; Zhang Jian; Tian Zhigang

    2006-01-01

    Codon usage and thermodynamic optimization of the 5'-end of mRNA have been applied to improve the efficiency of human protein production in Escherichia coli. However, high level expression of human protein in E. coli is still a challenge that virtually depends upon each individual target genes. Using human interleukin 10 (huIL-10) and interferon α (huIFN-α) coding sequences, we systematically analyzed the influence of several major factors on expression of human protein in E. coli. The results from huIL-10 and reinforced by huIFN-α showed that exposing AUG initiator codon from base-paired structure within mRNA itself significantly improved the translation of target protein, which resulted in a 10-fold higher protein expression than the wild-type genes. It was also noted that translation process was not affected by the retained short-range stem-loop structure at Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequences. On the other hand, codon-optimized constructs of huIL-10 showed unimproved levels of protein expression, on the contrary, led to a remarkable RNA degradation. Our study demonstrates that exposure of AUG initiator codon from long-range intra-strand secondary structure at 5'-end of mRNA may be used as a general strategy for human protein production in E. coli

  8. Codon usage vis-a-vis start and stop codon context analysis of three ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prosenjit Paul

    2018-02-20

    Feb 20, 2018 ... Keywords. codon; dinucleotide; selection; mutation; genome. Introduction ..... influence of other factors, for example natural selection, is 91.7%, 99.5% ..... measure of directional synonymous codon usage bias, and its potential ...

  9. Translation of vph mRNA in Streptomyces lividans and Escherichia coli after removal of the 5' untranslated leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C J; Janssen, G R

    1996-10-01

    The Streptomyces vinaceus viomycin phosphotransferase (vph) mRNA contains an untranslated leader with a conventional Shine-Dalgarno homology. The vph leader was removed by ligation of the vph coding sequence to the transcriptional start site of a Streptomyces or an Escherichia coli promoter, such that transcription would initiate at the first position of the vph start codon. Analysis of mRNA demonstrated that transcription initiated primarily at the A of the vph AUG translational start codon in both Streptomyces lividans and E. coli; cells expressing the unleadered vph mRNA were resistant to viomycin indicating that the Shine-Dalgarno sequence, or other features contained within the leader, was not necessary for vph translation. Addition of four nucleotides (5'-AUGC-3') onto the 5' end of the unleadered vph mRNA resulted in translation initiation from the vph start codon and the AUG triplet contained within the added sequence. Translational fusions of vph sequence to a Tn5 neo reporter gene indicated that the first 16 codons of vph coding sequence were sufficient to specify the translational start site and reading frame for expression of neomycin resistance in both E. coli and S. lividans.

  10. The internal initiation of translation in bovine viral diarrhea virus RNA depends on the presence of an RNA pseudoknot upstream of the initiation codon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moes, Lorin; Wirth, Manfred

    2007-11-22

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is the prototype representative of the pestivirus genus in the Flaviviridae family. It has been shown that the initiation of translation of BVDV RNA occurs by an internal ribosome entry mechanism mediated by the 5' untranslated region of the viral RNA 1. The 5' and 3' boundaries of the IRES of the cytopathic BVDV NADL have been mapped and it has been suggested that the IRES extends into the coding of the BVDV polyprotein 2. A putative pseudoknot structure has been recognized in the BVDV 5'UTR in close proximity to the AUG start codon. A pseudoknot structure is characteristic for flavivirus IRESes and in the case of the closely related classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and the more distantly related Hepatitis C virus (HCV) pseudoknot function in translation has been demonstrated. To characterize the BVDV IRESes in detail, we studied the BVDV translational initiation by transfection of dicistronic expression plasmids into mammalian cells. A region coding for the amino terminus of the BVDV SD-1 polyprotein contributes considerably to efficient initiation of translation. The translation efficiency mediated by the IRES of BVDV strains NADL and SD-1 approximates the poliovirus type I IRES directed translation in BHK cells. Compared to the poliovirus IRES increased expression levels are mediated by the BVDV IRES of strain SD-1 in murine cell lines, while lower levels are observed in human cell lines. Site directed mutagenesis revealed that a RNA pseudoknot upstream of the initiator AUG is an important structural element for IRES function. Mutants with impaired ability to base pair in stem I or II lost their translational activity. In mutants with repaired base pairing either in stem 1 or in stem 2 full translational activity was restored. Thus, the BVDV IRES translation is dependent on the pseudoknot integrity. These features of the pestivirus IRES are reminiscent of those of the classical swine fever virus, a pestivirus, and the

  11. The internal initiation of translation in bovine viral diarrhea virus RNA depends on the presence of an RNA pseudoknot upstream of the initiation codon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moes Lorin

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV is the prototype representative of the pestivirus genus in the Flaviviridae family. It has been shown that the initiation of translation of BVDV RNA occurs by an internal ribosome entry mechanism mediated by the 5' untranslated region of the viral RNA 1. The 5' and 3' boundaries of the IRES of the cytopathic BVDV NADL have been mapped and it has been suggested that the IRES extends into the coding of the BVDV polyprotein 2. A putative pseudoknot structure has been recognized in the BVDV 5'UTR in close proximity to the AUG start codon. A pseudoknot structure is characteristic for flavivirus IRESes and in the case of the closely related classical swine fever virus (CSFV and the more distantly related Hepatitis C virus (HCV pseudoknot function in translation has been demonstrated. Results To characterize the BVDV IRESes in detail, we studied the BVDV translational initiation by transfection of dicistronic expression plasmids into mammalian cells. A region coding for the amino terminus of the BVDV SD-1 polyprotein contributes considerably to efficient initiation of translation. The translation efficiency mediated by the IRES of BVDV strains NADL and SD-1 approximates the poliovirus type I IRES directed translation in BHK cells. Compared to the poliovirus IRES increased expression levels are mediated by the BVDV IRES of strain SD-1 in murine cell lines, while lower levels are observed in human cell lines. Site directed mutagenesis revealed that a RNA pseudoknot upstream of the initiator AUG is an important structural element for IRES function. Mutants with impaired ability to base pair in stem I or II lost their translational activity. In mutants with repaired base pairing either in stem 1 or in stem 2 full translational activity was restored. Thus, the BVDV IRES translation is dependent on the pseudoknot integrity. These features of the pestivirus IRES are reminiscent of those of the classical

  12. Amino acid repeats avert mRNA folding through conservative substitutions and synonymous codons, regardless of codon bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailen Barik

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A significant number of proteins in all living species contains amino acid repeats (AARs of various lengths and compositions, many of which play important roles in protein structure and function. Here, I have surveyed select homopolymeric single [(An] and double [(ABn] AARs in the human proteome. A close examination of their codon pattern and analysis of RNA structure propensity led to the following set of empirical rules: (1 One class of amino acid repeats (Class I uses a mixture of synonymous codons, some of which approximate the codon bias ratio in the overall human proteome; (2 The second class (Class II disregards the codon bias ratio, and appears to have originated by simple repetition of the same codon (or just a few codons; and finally, (3 In all AARs (including Class I, Class II, and the in-betweens, the codons are chosen in a manner that precludes the formation of RNA secondary structure. It appears that the AAR genes have evolved by orchestrating a balance between codon usage and mRNA secondary structure. The insights gained here should provide a better understanding of AAR evolution and may assist in designing synthetic genes.

  13. Amino acid repeats avert mRNA folding through conservative substitutions and synonymous codons, regardless of codon bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Sailen

    2017-12-01

    A significant number of proteins in all living species contains amino acid repeats (AARs) of various lengths and compositions, many of which play important roles in protein structure and function. Here, I have surveyed select homopolymeric single [(A)n] and double [(AB)n] AARs in the human proteome. A close examination of their codon pattern and analysis of RNA structure propensity led to the following set of empirical rules: (1) One class of amino acid repeats (Class I) uses a mixture of synonymous codons, some of which approximate the codon bias ratio in the overall human proteome; (2) The second class (Class II) disregards the codon bias ratio, and appears to have originated by simple repetition of the same codon (or just a few codons); and finally, (3) In all AARs (including Class I, Class II, and the in-betweens), the codons are chosen in a manner that precludes the formation of RNA secondary structure. It appears that the AAR genes have evolved by orchestrating a balance between codon usage and mRNA secondary structure. The insights gained here should provide a better understanding of AAR evolution and may assist in designing synthetic genes.

  14. Non-AUG translation: a new start for protein synthesis in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearse, Michael G; Wilusz, Jeremy E

    2017-09-01

    Although it was long thought that eukaryotic translation almost always initiates at an AUG start codon, recent advancements in ribosome footprint mapping have revealed that non-AUG start codons are used at an astonishing frequency. These non-AUG initiation events are not simply errors but instead are used to generate or regulate proteins with key cellular functions; for example, during development or stress. Misregulation of non-AUG initiation events contributes to multiple human diseases, including cancer and neurodegeneration, and modulation of non-AUG usage may represent a novel therapeutic strategy. It is thus becoming increasingly clear that start codon selection is regulated by many trans -acting initiation factors as well as sequence/structural elements within messenger RNAs and that non-AUG translation has a profound impact on cellular states. © 2017 Kearse and Wilusz; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  15. Programming peptidomimetic syntheses by translating genetic codes designed de novo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Anthony C; Tan, Zhongping; Nalam, Madhavi N L; Lin, Hening; Qu, Hui; Cornish, Virginia W; Blacklow, Stephen C

    2003-05-27

    Although the universal genetic code exhibits only minor variations in nature, Francis Crick proposed in 1955 that "the adaptor hypothesis allows one to construct, in theory, codes of bewildering variety." The existing code has been expanded to enable incorporation of a variety of unnatural amino acids at one or two nonadjacent sites within a protein by using nonsense or frameshift suppressor aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs) as adaptors. However, the suppressor strategy is inherently limited by compatibility with only a small subset of codons, by the ways such codons can be combined, and by variation in the efficiency of incorporation. Here, by preventing competing reactions with aa-tRNA synthetases, aa-tRNAs, and release factors during translation and by using nonsuppressor aa-tRNA substrates, we realize a potentially generalizable approach for template-encoded polymer synthesis that unmasks the substantially broader versatility of the core translation apparatus as a catalyst. We show that several adjacent, arbitrarily chosen sense codons can be completely reassigned to various unnatural amino acids according to de novo genetic codes by translating mRNAs into specific peptide analog polymers (peptidomimetics). Unnatural aa-tRNA substrates do not uniformly function as well as natural substrates, revealing important recognition elements for the translation apparatus. Genetic programming of peptidomimetic synthesis should facilitate mechanistic studies of translation and may ultimately enable the directed evolution of small molecules with desirable catalytic or pharmacological properties.

  16. Contributions of speed and accuracy to translational selection in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqi Ran

    Full Text Available Among bacteria, we have previously shown that species that are capable of rapid growth have stronger selection on codon usage than slow growing species, and possess higher numbers of rRNA and tRNA genes. This suggests that fast-growers are adapted for fast protein synthesis. There is also considerable evidence that codon usage is influenced by accuracy of translation, and some authors have argued that accuracy is more important than speed. Here we compare the strength of the two effects by studying the codon usages in high and low expression genes and on conserved and variable sites within high expression genes. We introduce a simple statistical method that can be used to assess the significance and the strength of the two types of bias in the same sets of sequences. We compare our statistical measure of codon bias to the common used codon adaptation index, and show that the new measure is preferable for three reasons for the purposes of this analysis. Across a large sample of bacterial genomes, both effects from speed and accuracy are clearly visible, although the speed effect appears to be much stronger than the accuracy effect and is found to be significant in a larger proportion of genomes. It is also difficult to explain the correlation of codon bias in the high expression genes with growth rates and numbers of copies of tRNA and rRNA genes on the basis of selection for accuracy. Hence we conclude that selection for translational speed is a dominant effect in driving codon usage bias in fast-growing bacteria, with selection for accuracy playing a small supplementary role.

  17. Comparison of codon usage bias across Leishmania and Trypanosomatids to understand mRNA secondary structure, relative protein abundance and pathway functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Abhishek; Sarkar, Ram Rup

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the variations in gene organization and its effect on the phenotype across different Leishmania species, and to study differential clinical manifestations of parasite within the host, we performed large scale analysis of codon usage patterns between Leishmania and other known Trypanosomatid species. We present the causes and consequences of codon usage bias in Leishmania genomes with respect to mutational pressure, translational selection and amino acid composition bias. We establish GC bias at wobble position that governs codon usage bias across Leishmania species, rather than amino acid composition bias. We found that, within Leishmania, homogenous codon context coding for less frequent amino acid pairs and codons avoiding formation of folding structures in mRNA are essentially chosen. We predicted putative differences in global expression between genes belonging to specific pathways across Leishmania. This explains the role of evolution in shaping the otherwise conserved genome to demonstrate species-specific function-level differences for efficient survival. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Synonymous codon bias and functional constraint on GC3-related DNA backbone dynamics in the prokaryotic nucleoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Gregory A; Alawad, Mohammed A; Schulze, Katharina V; Hudson, André O

    2014-01-01

    While mRNA stability has been demonstrated to control rates of translation, generating both global and local synonymous codon biases in many unicellular organisms, this explanation cannot adequately explain why codon bias strongly tracks neighboring intergene GC content; suggesting that structural dynamics of DNA might also influence codon choice. Because minor groove width is highly governed by 3-base periodicity in GC, the existence of triplet-based codons might imply a functional role for the optimization of local DNA molecular dynamics via GC content at synonymous sites (≈GC3). We confirm a strong association between GC3-related intrinsic DNA flexibility and codon bias across 24 different prokaryotic multiple whole-genome alignments. We develop a novel test of natural selection targeting synonymous sites and demonstrate that GC3-related DNA backbone dynamics have been subject to moderate selective pressure, perhaps contributing to our observation that many genes possess extreme DNA backbone dynamics for their given protein space. This dual function of codons may impose universal functional constraints affecting the evolution of synonymous and non-synonymous sites. We propose that synonymous sites may have evolved as an 'accessory' during an early expansion of a primordial genetic code, allowing for multiplexed protein coding and structural dynamic information within the same molecular context. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Tuning of Recombinant Protein Expression in Escherichia coli by Manipulating Transcription, Translation Initiation Rates, and Incorporation of Noncanonical Amino Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Orr; Chemla, Yonatan; Heltberg, Mathias; Ozer, Eden; Marshall, Ryan; Noireaux, Vincent; Jensen, Mogens Høgh; Alfonta, Lital

    2017-06-16

    Protein synthesis in cells has been thoroughly investigated and characterized over the past 60 years. However, some fundamental issues remain unresolved, including the reasons for genetic code redundancy and codon bias. In this study, we changed the kinetics of the Eschrichia coli transcription and translation processes by mutating the promoter and ribosome binding domains and by using genetic code expansion. The results expose a counterintuitive phenomenon, whereby an increase in the initiation rates of transcription and translation lead to a decrease in protein expression. This effect can be rescued by introducing slow translating codons into the beginning of the gene, by shortening gene length or by reducing initiation rates. On the basis of the results, we developed a biophysical model, which suggests that the density of co-transcriptional-translation plays a role in bacterial protein synthesis. These findings indicate how cells use codon bias to tune translation speed and protein synthesis.

  20. Crystal Structure of the CTP1L Endolysin Reveals How Its Activity Is Regulated by a Secondary Translation Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Matthew; Leicht, Stefan; Krichel, Boris; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Thompson, Andrew; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Svergun, Dmitri I; Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Garde, Sonia; Uetrecht, Charlotte; Narbad, Arjan; Mayer, Melinda J; Meijers, Rob

    2016-03-04

    Bacteriophages produce endolysins, which lyse the bacterial host cell to release newly produced virions. The timing of lysis is regulated and is thought to involve the activation of a molecular switch. We present a crystal structure of the activated endolysin CTP1L that targets Clostridium tyrobutyricum, consisting of a complex between the full-length protein and an N-terminally truncated C-terminal cell wall binding domain (CBD). The truncated CBD is produced through an internal translation start site within the endolysin gene. Mutants affecting the internal translation site change the oligomeric state of the endolysin and reduce lytic activity. The activity can be modulated by reconstitution of the full-length endolysin-CBD complex with free CBD. The same oligomerization mechanism applies to the CD27L endolysin that targets Clostridium difficile and the CS74L endolysin that targets Clostridium sporogenes. When the CTP1L endolysin gene is introduced into the commensal bacterium Lactococcus lactis, the truncated CBD is also produced, showing that the alternative start codon can be used in other bacterial species. The identification of a translational switch affecting oligomerization presented here has implications for the design of effective endolysins for the treatment of bacterial infections. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Codon usage vis-a-vis start and stop codon context analysis of three ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To understand the variation in genomic composition and its effect on codon usage, we performed the comparative analysis of codon usage and nucleotide usage in the genes of three dicots, Glycine max, Arabidopsis thaliana and Medicago truncatula. The dicot genes were found to be A/T rich and have predominantly ...

  2. GUG is an efficient initiation codon to translate the human mitochondrial ATP6 gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dubot, A.; Godinot, C.; Dumur, V.; Sablonniere, B.; Stojkovic, T.; Cuisset, J. M.; Vojtíšková, Alena; Pecina, Petr; Ješina, Pavel; Houštěk, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 313, č. 3 (2004), s. 687-693 ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A079; GA MZd NE6533 Grant - others:Fondation Jerome LeJeune(XE) Grant project; GA-(FR) CNRS; GA-(FR) Rhone Alpes Region Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : GUG initiation codon * ATP6 gene * mitochondrial diseases Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.904, year: 2004

  3. Efficient use of a translation start codon in BDNF exon I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Indrek; Tuvikene, Jürgen; Lekk, Ingrid; Timmusk, Tõnis

    2015-09-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene contains a number of 5' exons alternatively spliced with a common 3' exon. BDNF protein is synthesized from alternative transcripts as a prepro-precursor encoded by the common 3' exon IX, which has a translation start site 21 bp downstream of the splicing site. BDNF mRNAs containing exon I are an exception to this arrangement as the last three nucleotides of this exon constitute an in-frame AUG. Here, we show that this AUG is efficiently used for translation initiation in PC12 cells and cultured cortical neurons. Use of exon I-specific AUG produces higher levels of BDNF protein than use of the common translation start site, resulting from a higher translation rate. No differences in protein degradation, constitutive or regulated secretion were detected between BDNF isoforms with alternative 5' termini. As the BDNF promoter preceding exon I is known to be highly regulated by neuronal activity, our results suggest that the function of this translation start site may be efficient stimulus-dependent synthesis of BDNF protein. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene contains multiple untranslated 5' exons alternatively spliced to one common protein-coding 3' exon. However, exon I contains an in-frame ATG in a favorable translation context. Here, we show that use of this ATG is associated with more efficient protein synthesis than the commonly used ATG in exon IX. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. Codon-Precise, Synthetic, Antibody Fragment Libraries Built Using Automated Hexamer Codon Additions and Validated through Next Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Frigotto

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We have previously described ProxiMAX, a technology that enables the fabrication of precise, combinatorial gene libraries via codon-by-codon saturation mutagenesis. ProxiMAX was originally performed using manual, enzymatic transfer of codons via blunt-end ligation. Here we present Colibra™: an automated, proprietary version of ProxiMAX used specifically for antibody library generation, in which double-codon hexamers are transferred during the saturation cycling process. The reduction in process complexity, resulting library quality and an unprecedented saturation of up to 24 contiguous codons are described. Utility of the method is demonstrated via fabrication of complementarity determining regions (CDR in antibody fragment libraries and next generation sequencing (NGS analysis of their quality and diversity.

  5. Confirmation of translatability and functionality certifies the dual endothelin1/VEGFsp receptor (DEspR) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Victoria L M; Steffen, Martin; Moran, Ann Marie; Tan, Glaiza A; Pasion, Khristine A; Rivera, Keith; Pappin, Darryl J; Ruiz-Opazo, Nelson

    2016-06-14

    In contrast to rat and mouse databases, the NCBI gene database lists the human dual-endothelin1/VEGFsp receptor (DEspR, formerly Dear) as a unitary transcribed pseudogene due to a stop [TGA]-codon at codon#14 in automated DNA and RNA sequences. However, re-analysis is needed given prior single gene studies detected a tryptophan [TGG]-codon#14 by manual Sanger sequencing, demonstrated DEspR translatability and functionality, and since the demonstration of actual non-translatability through expression studies, the standard-of-excellence for pseudogene designation, has not been performed. Re-analysis must meet UNIPROT criteria for demonstration of a protein's existence at the highest (protein) level, which a priori, would override DNA- or RNA-based deductions. To dissect the nucleotide sequence discrepancy, we performed Maxam-Gilbert sequencing and reviewed 727 RNA-seq entries. To comply with the highest level multiple UNIPROT criteria for determining DEspR's existence, we performed various experiments using multiple anti-DEspR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting distinct DEspR epitopes with one spanning the contested tryptophan [TGG]-codon#14, assessing: (a) DEspR protein expression, (b) predicted full-length protein size, (c) sequence-predicted protein-specific properties beyond codon#14: receptor glycosylation and internalization, (d) protein-partner interactions, and (e) DEspR functionality via DEspR-inhibition effects. Maxam-Gilbert sequencing and some RNA-seq entries demonstrate two guanines, hence a tryptophan [TGG]-codon#14 within a compression site spanning an error-prone compression sequence motif. Western blot analysis using anti-DEspR mAbs targeting distinct DEspR epitopes detect the identical glycosylated 17.5 kDa pull-down protein. Decrease in DEspR-protein size after PNGase-F digest demonstrates post-translational glycosylation, concordant with the consensus-glycosylation site beyond codon#14. Like other small single-transmembrane proteins, mass

  6. A codon window in mRNA downstream of the initiation codon where NGG codons give strongly reduced gene expression in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I; Isaksson, Leif A

    2004-01-01

    and GGG, but not GGN or GNG (where N is non-G), are unique since they are associated with a very low gene expression also if located at positions +2, +3 and +5. All codons, including NGG, give a normal gene expression if placed at positions +7. The negative effect by the NGG codons is true for both...

  7. Phylogenetic inference with weighted codon evolutionary distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscuolo, Alexis; Michel, Christian J

    2009-04-01

    We develop a new approach to estimate a matrix of pairwise evolutionary distances from a codon-based alignment based on a codon evolutionary model. The method first computes a standard distance matrix for each of the three codon positions. Then these three distance matrices are weighted according to an estimate of the global evolutionary rate of each codon position and averaged into a unique distance matrix. Using a large set of both real and simulated codon-based alignments of nucleotide sequences, we show that this approach leads to distance matrices that have a significantly better treelikeness compared to those obtained by standard nucleotide evolutionary distances. We also propose an alternative weighting to eliminate the part of the noise often associated with some codon positions, particularly the third position, which is known to induce a fast evolutionary rate. Simulation results show that fast distance-based tree reconstruction algorithms on distance matrices based on this codon position weighting can lead to phylogenetic trees that are at least as accurate as, if not better, than those inferred by maximum likelihood. Finally, a well-known multigene dataset composed of eight yeast species and 106 codon-based alignments is reanalyzed and shows that our codon evolutionary distances allow building a phylogenetic tree which is similar to those obtained by non-distance-based methods (e.g., maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood) and also significantly improved compared to standard nucleotide evolutionary distance estimates.

  8. Translational Influence on Messenger Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette

    -termination to be a global phenomena in gene regulation. The influence of codon usage in the early coding region on messenger stability was examined, in order to establish how fast or slow the ribosome has to decode the sequence for it to protect the messenger from degradation. The experiments demonstrated that very fast...

  9. A universal trend of reduced mRNA stability near the translation-initiation site in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanjun Gu

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that the thermodynamic stability of mRNA secondary structure near the start codon can regulate translation efficiency in Escherichia coli, and that translation is more efficient the less stable the secondary structure. We survey the complete genomes of 340 species for signals of reduced mRNA secondary structure near the start codon. Our analysis includes bacteria, archaea, fungi, plants, insects, fishes, birds, and mammals. We find that nearly all species show evidence for reduced mRNA stability near the start codon. The reduction in stability generally increases with increasing genomic GC content. In prokaryotes, the reduction also increases with decreasing optimal growth temperature. Within genomes, there is variation in the stability among genes, and this variation correlates with gene GC content, codon bias, and gene expression level. For birds and mammals, however, we do not find a genome-wide trend of reduced mRNA stability near the start codon. Yet the most GC rich genes in these organisms do show such a signal. We conclude that reduced stability of the mRNA secondary structure near the start codon is a universal feature of all cellular life. We suggest that the origin of this reduction is selection for efficient recognition of the start codon by initiator-tRNA.

  10. Leaderless Transcripts and Small Proteins Are Common Features of the Mycobacterial Translational Landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarlet S Shell

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA-seq technologies have provided significant insight into the transcription networks of mycobacteria. However, such studies provide no definitive information on the translational landscape. Here, we use a combination of high-throughput transcriptome and proteome-profiling approaches to more rigorously understand protein expression in two mycobacterial species. RNA-seq and ribosome profiling in Mycobacterium smegmatis, and transcription start site (TSS mapping and N-terminal peptide mass spectrometry in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, provide complementary, empirical datasets to examine the congruence of transcription and translation in the Mycobacterium genus. We find that nearly one-quarter of mycobacterial transcripts are leaderless, lacking a 5' untranslated region (UTR and Shine-Dalgarno ribosome-binding site. Our data indicate that leaderless translation is a major feature of mycobacterial genomes and is comparably robust to leadered initiation. Using translational reporters to systematically probe the cis-sequence requirements of leaderless translation initiation in mycobacteria, we find that an ATG or GTG at the mRNA 5' end is both necessary and sufficient. This criterion, together with our ribosome occupancy data, suggests that mycobacteria encode hundreds of small, unannotated proteins at the 5' ends of transcripts. The conservation of small proteins in both mycobacterial species tested suggests that some play important roles in mycobacterial physiology. Our translational-reporter system further indicates that mycobacterial leadered translation initiation requires a Shine Dalgarno site in the 5' UTR and that ATG, GTG, TTG, and ATT codons can robustly initiate translation. Our combined approaches provide the first comprehensive view of mycobacterial gene structures and their non-canonical mechanisms of protein expression.

  11. Translational control of Nrf2 within the open reading frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Leal, Oscar; Barrero, Carlos A.; Merali, Salim

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Identification of a novel Nrf2 translational repression mechanism. •The repressor is within the 3′ portion of the Nrf2 ORF. •The translation of Nrf2 or eGFP is reduced by the regulatory element. •The translational repression can be reversed with synonymous codon substitutions. •The molecular mechanism requires the mRNA sequence, but not the encoded amino acids. -- Abstract: Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that is essential for the regulation of an effective antioxidant and detoxifying response. The regulation of its activity can occur at transcription, translation and post-translational levels. Evidence suggests that under environmental stress conditions, new synthesis of Nrf2 is required – a process that is regulated by translational control and is not fully understood. Here we described the identification of a novel molecular process that under basal conditions strongly represses the translation of Nrf2 within the open reading frame (ORF). This mechanism is dependent on the mRNA sequence within the 3′ portion of the ORF of Nrf2 but not in the encoded amino acid sequence. The Nrf2 translational repression can be reversed with the use of synonymous codon substitutions. This discovery suggests an additional layer of control to explain the reason for the low Nrf2 concentration under quiescent state

  12. Genome-wide analysis of codon usage bias in Ebolavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristina, Juan; Moreno, Pilar; Moratorio, Gonzalo; Musto, Héctor

    2015-01-22

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is a member of the family Filoviridae and its genome consists of a 19-kb, single-stranded, negative sense RNA. EBOV is subdivided into five distinct species with different pathogenicities, being Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) the most lethal species. The interplay of codon usage among viruses and their hosts is expected to affect overall viral survival, fitness, evasion from host's immune system and evolution. In the present study, we performed comprehensive analyses of codon usage and composition of ZEBOV. Effective number of codons (ENC) indicates that the overall codon usage among ZEBOV strains is slightly biased. Different codon preferences in ZEBOV genes in relation to codon usage of human genes were found. Highly preferred codons are all A-ending triplets, which strongly suggests that mutational bias is a main force shaping codon usage in ZEBOV. Dinucleotide composition also plays a role in the overall pattern of ZEBOV codon usage. ZEBOV does not seem to use the most abundant tRNAs present in the human cells for most of their preferred codons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Codon optimisation to improve expression of a Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis-specific membrane-associated antigen by Lactobacillus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christopher; Douarre, Pierre E; Soulimane, Tewfik; Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge; MacSharry, John; Coffey, Aidan; Sleator, Roy D; O'Mahony, Jim

    2013-06-01

    Subunit and DNA-based vaccines against Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) attempt to overcome inherent issues associated with whole-cell formulations. However, these vaccines can be hampered by poor expression of recombinant antigens from a number of disparate hosts. The high G+C content of MAP invariably leads to a codon bias throughout gene expression. To investigate if the codon bias affects recombinant MAP antigen expression, the open reading frame of a MAP-specific antigen MptD (MAP3733c) was codon optimised for expression against a Lactobacillus salivarius host. Of the total 209 codons which constitute MAP3733c, 172 were modified resulting in a reduced G+C content from 61% for the native gene to 32.7% for the modified form. Both genes were placed under the transcriptional control of the PnisA promoter; allowing controlled heterologous expression in L. salivarius. Expression was monitored using fluorescence microscopy and microplate fluorometry via GFP tags translationally fused to the C-termini of the two MptD genes. A > 37-fold increase in expression was observed for the codon-optimised MAP3733synth variant over the native gene. Due to the low cost and improved expression achieved, codon optimisation significantly improves the potential of L. salivarius as an oral vaccine stratagem against Johne's disease. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The N-terminal region of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A signals to nuclear localization of the protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parreiras-e-Silva, Lucas T.; Gomes, Marcelo D.; Oliveira, Eduardo B.; Costa-Neto, Claudio M.

    2007-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is a ubiquitous protein of eukaryotic and archaeal organisms which undergoes hypusination, a unique post-translational modification. We have generated a polyclonal antibody against murine eIF5A, which in immunocytochemical assays in B16-F10 cells revealed that the endogenous protein is preferentially localized to the nuclear region. We therefore analyzed possible structural features present in eIF5A proteins that could be responsible for that characteristic. Multiple sequence alignment analysis of eIF5A proteins from different eukaryotic and archaeal organisms showed that the former sequences have an extended N-terminal segment. We have then performed in silico prediction analyses and constructed different truncated forms of murine eIF5A to verify any possible role that the N-terminal extension might have in determining the subcellular localization of the eIF5A in eukaryotic organisms. Our results indicate that the N-terminal extension of the eukaryotic eIF5A contributes in signaling this protein to nuclear localization, despite of bearing no structural similarity with classical nuclear localization signals

  15. Analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in the genus Rhizobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinxin; Wu, Liang; Zhou, Ping; Zhu, Shengfeng; An, Wei; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Lin

    2013-11-01

    The codon usage patterns of rhizobia have received increasing attention. However, little information is available regarding the conserved features of the codon usage patterns in a typical rhizobial genus. The codon usage patterns of six completely sequenced strains belonging to the genus Rhizobium were analysed as model rhizobia in the present study. The relative neutrality plot showed that selection pressure played a role in codon usage in the genus Rhizobium. Spearman's rank correlation analysis combined with correspondence analysis (COA) showed that the codon adaptation index and the effective number of codons (ENC) had strong correlation with the first axis of the COA, which indicated the important role of gene expression level and the ENC in the codon usage patterns in this genus. The relative synonymous codon usage of Cys codons had the strongest correlation with the second axis of the COA. Accordingly, the usage of Cys codons was another important factor that shaped the codon usage patterns in Rhizobium genomes and was a conserved feature of the genus. Moreover, the comparison of codon usage between highly and lowly expressed genes showed that 20 unique preferred codons were shared among Rhizobium genomes, revealing another conserved feature of the genus. This is the first report of the codon usage patterns in the genus Rhizobium.

  16. DNA Translator and Aligner: HyperCard utilities to aid phylogenetic analysis of molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eernisse, D J

    1992-04-01

    DNA Translator and Aligner are molecular phylogenetics HyperCard stacks for Macintosh computers. They manipulate sequence data to provide graphical gene mapping, conversions, translations and manual multiple-sequence alignment editing. DNA Translator is able to convert documented GenBank or EMBL documented sequences into linearized, rescalable gene maps whose gene sequences are extractable by clicking on the corresponding map button or by selection from a scrolling list. Provided gene maps, complete with extractable sequences, consist of nine metazoan, one yeast, and one ciliate mitochondrial DNAs and three green plant chloroplast DNAs. Single or multiple sequences can be manipulated to aid in phylogenetic analysis. Sequences can be translated between nucleic acids and proteins in either direction with flexible support of alternate genetic codes and ambiguous nucleotide symbols. Multiple aligned sequence output from diverse sources can be converted to Nexus, Hennig86 or PHYLIP format for subsequent phylogenetic analysis. Input or output alignments can be examined with Aligner, a convenient accessory stack included in the DNA Translator package. Aligner is an editor for the manual alignment of up to 100 sequences that toggles between display of matched characters and normal unmatched sequences. DNA Translator also generates graphic displays of amino acid coding and codon usage frequency relative to all other, or only synonymous, codons for approximately 70 select organism-organelle combinations. Codon usage data is compatible with spreadsheet or UWGCG formats for incorporation of additional molecules of interest. The complete package is available via anonymous ftp and is free for non-commercial uses.

  17. Insight into pattern of codon biasness and nucleotide base usage in serotonin receptor gene family from different mammalian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, J Febin Prabhu; Sudandiradoss, C

    2012-07-15

    5-HT (5-Hydroxy-tryptamine) or serotonin receptors are found both in central and peripheral nervous system as well as in non-neuronal tissues. In the animal and human nervous system, serotonin produces various functional effects through a variety of membrane bound receptors. In this study, we focus on 5-HT receptor family from different mammals and examined the factors that account for codon and nucleotide usage variation. A total of 110 homologous coding sequences from 11 different mammalian species were analyzed using relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU), correspondence analysis (COA) and hierarchical cluster analysis together with nucleotide base usage frequency of chemically similar amino acid codons. The mean effective number of codon (ENc) value of 37.06 for 5-HT(6) shows very high codon bias within the family and may be due to high selective translational efficiency. The COA and Spearman's rank correlation reveals that the nucleotide compositional mutation bias as the major factors influencing the codon usage in serotonin receptor genes. The hierarchical cluster analysis suggests that gene function is another dominant factor that affects the codon usage bias, while species is a minor factor. Nucleotide base usage was reported using Goldman, Engelman, Stietz (GES) scale reveals the presence of high uracil (>45%) content at functionally important hydrophobic regions. Our in silico approach will certainly help for further investigations on critical inference on evolution, structure, function and gene expression aspects of 5-HT receptors family which are potential antipsychotic drug targets. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Regulation, initiation, and termination of the cenA and cex transcripts of Cellulomonas fimi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, N.M.; Warren, R.A.J.; Kilburn, D.G.; Miller, R.C. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The authors characterized the in vivo transcripts of two Cellulomonas fimi genes, which encodes an extracellular endo-β-1,4-glucanase. By Northern blot analysis, cenA mRNA was detected in C. fimi RNA preparations from glycerol- and carboxymethyl cellulose-grown cells but not from glucose-grown cells. In contrast, cex mRNA was detected only in the preparations from carboxymethyl cellulose-grown cells. Therefore, the transcription of these genes is subject to regulation by the carbon source provided to C. fimi. By nuclease SI protection studies with unique 5'-labeled DNA probes and C. fimi RNA isolated in vivo, 5' termini were found 51 and 62 bases before the cenA translational initiation codon and 28 bases before the cex translational initiation codon. S1 mapping with unlabeled DNA probes and C. fimi RNA which had been isolated in vivo but which had been 5' labeled in vitro with guanylyltransferase and [α- 32 P]GTP confirmed that true transcription initiation sites for cenA and cex mRNA had been identified. Comparative analysis of the DNA sequences immediately upstream of the initiation sites of the cenA and cex mRNAs revealed a 30-base-pair region where these two sequences display at least 66% homology. S1 mapping was also used to locate the 3' termini of the cenA and cex transcripts. Three 3' termini were found for cenA messages, whereas only one 3' terminus was identified for cex mRNA. The transcripts of both genes terminate in regions where their corresponding DNA sequences contain inverted repeats

  19. Cell-specific differences in the requirements for translation quality control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, Noah M; Ling, Jiqiang; Roy, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    Protein synthesis has an overall error rate of approximately 10(-4) for each mRNA codon translated. The fidelity of translation is mainly determined by two events: synthesis of cognate amino acid:tRNA pairs by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and accurate selection of aminoacyl-tRNAs (aa-tRNAs)...... divergent requirements for quality control in different cell compartments and suggest that the limits of translational accuracy may be largely determined by cellular physiology....

  20. 2'-O-methylation in mRNA disrupts tRNA decoding during translation elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Junhong; Indrisiunaite, Gabriele; DeMirci, Hasan; Ieong, Ka-Weng; Wang, Jinfan; Petrov, Alexey; Prabhakar, Arjun; Rechavi, Gideon; Dominissini, Dan; He, Chuan; Ehrenberg, Måns; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2018-03-01

    Chemical modifications of mRNA may regulate many aspects of mRNA processing and protein synthesis. Recently, 2'-O-methylation of nucleotides was identified as a frequent modification in translated regions of human mRNA, showing enrichment in codons for certain amino acids. Here, using single-molecule, bulk kinetics and structural methods, we show that 2'-O-methylation within coding regions of mRNA disrupts key steps in codon reading during cognate tRNA selection. Our results suggest that 2'-O-methylation sterically perturbs interactions of ribosomal-monitoring bases (G530, A1492 and A1493) with cognate codon-anticodon helices, thereby inhibiting downstream GTP hydrolysis by elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and A-site tRNA accommodation, leading to excessive rejection of cognate aminoacylated tRNAs in initial selection and proofreading. Our current and prior findings highlight how chemical modifications of mRNA tune the dynamics of protein synthesis at different steps of translation elongation.

  1. Comprehensive analysis of the codon usage patterns in the envelope glycoprotein E2 gene of the classical swine fever virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Chen

    Full Text Available The classical swine fever virus (CSFV, circulating worldwide, is a highly contagious virus. Since the emergence of CSFV, it has caused great economic loss in swine industry. The envelope glycoprotein E2 gene of the CSFV is an immunoprotective antigen that induces the immune system to produce neutralizing antibodies. Therefore, it is essential to study the codon usage of the E2 gene of the CSFV. In this study, 140 coding sequences of the E2 gene were analyzed. The value of effective number of codons (ENC showed low codon usage bias in the E2 gene. Our study showed that codon usage could be described mainly by mutation pressure ENC plot analysis combined with principal component analysis (PCA and translational selection-correlation analysis between the general average hydropathicity (Gravy and aromaticity (Aroma, and nucleotides at the third position of codons (A3s, T3s, G3s, C3s and GC3s. Furthermore, the neutrality analysis, which explained the relationship between GC12s and GC3s, revealed that natural selection had a key role compared with mutational bias during the evolution of the E2 gene. These results lay a foundation for further research on the molecular evolution of CSFV.

  2. Pseudouridylation of helix 69 of 23S rRNA is necessary for an effective translation termination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejby, Morten; Sørensen, Michael A; Pedersen, Steen

    2007-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains with inactivated rluD genes were previously found to lack the conserved pseudouridines in helix 69 of 23S ribosomal RNA and to grow slowly. A suppressor mutant was isolated with a near normal growth rate that had changed the conserved Glu-172 codon to a Lys codon in prf...

  3. Translational read-through as an alternative approach for ocular gene therapy of retinal dystrophies caused by in-frame nonsense mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Möller, Fabian; Penner, Inessa; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2014-09-01

    The eye has become an excellent target for gene therapy, and gene augmentation therapy of inherited retinal disorders has made major progress in recent years. Nevertheless, a recent study indicated that gene augmentation intervention might not stop the progression of retinal degeneration in patients. In addition, for many genes, viral-mediated gene augmentation is currently not feasible due to gene size and limited packaging capacity of viral vectors as well as expression of various heterogeneous isoforms of the target gene. Thus, alternative gene-based strategies to stop or delay the retinal degeneration are necessary. This review focuses on an alternative pharmacologic treatment strategy based on the usage of translational read-through inducing drugs (TRIDs) such as PTC124, aminoglycoside antibiotics, and designer aminoglycosides for overreading in-frame nonsense mutations. This strategy has emerged as an option for up to 30-50% of all cases of recessive hereditary retinal dystrophies. In-frame nonsense mutations are single-nucleotide alterations within the gene coding sequence resulting in a premature stop codon. Consequently, translation of such mutated genes leads to the synthesis of truncated proteins, which are unable to fulfill their physiologic functions. In this context, application of TRIDs facilitates the recoding of the premature termination codon into a sense codon, thus restoring syntheses of full-length proteins. So far, clinical trials for non-ocular diseases have been initiated for diverse TRIDs. Although the clinical outcome is not analyzed in detail, an excellent safety profile, namely for PTC124, was clearly demonstrated. Moreover, recent data demonstrated sustained read-through efficacies of nonsense mutations causing retinal degeneration, as manifested in the human Usher syndrome. In addition, a strong retinal biocompatibility for PTC124 and designer aminoglycosides has been demonstrated. In conclusion, recent progress emphasizes the

  4. Codon bias and gene ontology in holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlini, David B; Makowski, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between preferred codon use (PCU), developmental mode, and gene ontology (GO) was investigated in a sample of nine insect species with sequenced genomes. These species were selected to represent two distinct modes of insect development, holometabolism and hemimetabolism, with an aim toward determining whether the differences in developmental timing concomitant with developmental mode would be mirrored by differences in PCU in their developmental genes. We hypothesized that the developmental genes of holometabolous insects should be under greater selective pressure for efficient translation, manifest as increased PCU, than those of hemimetabolous insects because holometabolism requires abundant protein expression over shorter time intervals than hemimetabolism, where proteins are required more uniformly in time. Preferred codon sets were defined for each species, from which the frequency of PCU for each gene was obtained. Although there were substantial differences in the genomic base composition of holometabolous and hemimetabolous insects, both groups exhibited a general preference for GC-ending codons, with the former group having higher PCU averaged across all genes. For each species, the biological process GO term for each gene was assigned that of its Drosophila homolog(s), and PCU was calculated for each GO term category. The top two GO term categories for PCU enrichment in the holometabolous insects were anatomical structure development and cell differentiation. The increased PCU in the developmental genes of holometabolous insects may reflect a general strategy to maximize the protein production of genes expressed in bursts over short time periods, e.g., heat shock proteins. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 324B: 686-698, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Gene composer: database software for protein construct design, codon engineering, and gene synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorimer, Don; Raymond, Amy; Walchli, John; Mixon, Mark; Barrow, Adrienne; Wallace, Ellen; Grice, Rena; Burgin, Alex; Stewart, Lance

    2009-04-21

    To improve efficiency in high throughput protein structure determination, we have developed a database software package, Gene Composer, which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their codon engineered synthetic gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bio-informatics steps used in modern structure guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. An interactive Alignment Viewer allows the researcher to simultaneously visualize sequence conservation in the context of known protein secondary structure, ligand contacts, water contacts, crystal contacts, B-factors, solvent accessible area, residue property type and several other useful property views. The Construct Design Module enables the facile design of novel protein constructs with altered N- and C-termini, internal insertions or deletions, point mutations, and desired affinity tags. The modifications can be combined and permuted into multiple protein constructs, and then virtually cloned in silico into defined expression vectors. The Gene Design Module uses a protein-to-gene algorithm that automates the back-translation of a protein amino acid sequence into a codon engineered nucleic acid gene sequence according to a selected codon usage table with minimal codon usage threshold, defined G:C% content, and desired sequence features achieved through synonymous codon selection that is optimized for the intended expression system. The gene-to-oligo algorithm of the Gene Design Module plans out all of the required overlapping oligonucleotides and mutagenic primers needed to synthesize the desired gene constructs by PCR, and for physically cloning them into selected vectors by the most popular subcloning strategies. We present a complete description of Gene Composer functionality, and an efficient PCR-based synthetic gene assembly procedure with mis-match specific endonuclease

  6. Gene Composer: database software for protein construct design, codon engineering, and gene synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mixon Mark

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To improve efficiency in high throughput protein structure determination, we have developed a database software package, Gene Composer, which facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their codon engineered synthetic gene sequences. With its modular workflow design and numerous graphical user interfaces, Gene Composer enables researchers to perform all common bio-informatics steps used in modern structure guided protein engineering and synthetic gene engineering. Results An interactive Alignment Viewer allows the researcher to simultaneously visualize sequence conservation in the context of known protein secondary structure, ligand contacts, water contacts, crystal contacts, B-factors, solvent accessible area, residue property type and several other useful property views. The Construct Design Module enables the facile design of novel protein constructs with altered N- and C-termini, internal insertions or deletions, point mutations, and desired affinity tags. The modifications can be combined and permuted into multiple protein constructs, and then virtually cloned in silico into defined expression vectors. The Gene Design Module uses a protein-to-gene algorithm that automates the back-translation of a protein amino acid sequence into a codon engineered nucleic acid gene sequence according to a selected codon usage table with minimal codon usage threshold, defined G:C% content, and desired sequence features achieved through synonymous codon selection that is optimized for the intended expression system. The gene-to-oligo algorithm of the Gene Design Module plans out all of the required overlapping oligonucleotides and mutagenic primers needed to synthesize the desired gene constructs by PCR, and for physically cloning them into selected vectors by the most popular subcloning strategies. Conclusion We present a complete description of Gene Composer functionality, and an efficient PCR-based synthetic gene

  7. The effect of gentamicin-induced readthrough on a novel premature termination codon of CD18 leukocyte adhesion deficiency patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos J Simon

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Leukocyte adhesion deficiency 1 (LAD1 is an inherited disorder of neutrophil function. Nonsense mutations in the affected CD18 (ITB2 gene have rarely been described. In other genes containing such mutations, treatments with aminoglycoside types of antibiotics (e.g., gentamicin were reported to partially correct the premature protein termination, by induction of readthrough mechanism.Genetic analysis was performed on 2 LAD1 patients. Expression, functional and immunofluorescence assays of CD18 in the patients were used to determine the in-vivo and in-vitro effects of gentamicin-induced readthrough. A theoretical modeling of the corrected CD18 protein was developed to predict the protein function.We found a novel premature termination codon, C562T (R188X, in exon 6 of the CD18 gene that caused a severe LAD1 phenotype in two unrelated Palestinian children. In-vivo studies on these patients' cells after gentamicin treatment showed abnormal adhesion and chemotactic functions, while in-vitro studies showed mislocalization of the corrected protein to the cytoplasm and not to the cell surface. A theoretical modeling of the corrected CD18 protein suggested that the replacement of the wild type arginine by gentamicin induced tryptophan at the position of the nonsense mutation, although enabled the expression of the entire CD18 protein, this was not sufficient to stabilize the CD18/11 heterodimer at the cell surface.A novel nonsense mutation in the CD18 gene causing a complete absence of CD18 protein and severe LAD1 clinical phenotype is reported. Both in vivo and in vitro treatments with gentamicin resulted in the expression of a corrected full-length dysfunctional or mislocalized CD18 protein. However, while the use of gentamicin increased the expression of CD18, it did not improve leukocyte adhesion and chemotaxis. Moreover, the integrity of the CD18/CD11 complex at the cell surface was impaired, due to abnormal CD18 protein and possibly lack of CD11a

  8. Features of Recent Codon Evolution: A Comparative Polymorphism-Fixation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongming Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Features of amino-acid and codon changes can provide us important insights on protein evolution. So far, investigators have often examined mutation patterns at either interspecies fixed substitution or intraspecies nucleotide polymorphism level, but not both. Here, we performed a unique analysis of a combined set of intra-species polymorphisms and inter-species substitutions in human codons. Strong difference in mutational pattern was found at codon positions 1, 2, and 3 between the polymorphism and fixation data. Fixation had strong bias towards increasing the rarest codons but decreasing the most frequently used codons, suggesting that codon equilibrium has not been reached yet. We detected strong CpG effect on CG-containing codons and subsequent suppression by fixation. Finally, we detected the signature of purifying selection against A∣U dinucleotides at synonymous dicodon boundaries. Overall, fixation process could effectively and quickly correct the volatile changes introduced by polymorphisms so that codon changes could be gradual and directional and that codon composition could be kept relatively stable during evolution.

  9. Kissing loops hide premature termination codons in pre-mRNAof selenoprotein genes and in genes containing programmedribosomal frameshifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Steen; Brunak, Søren

    1997-01-01

    A novel RNA secondary structure that places the selenocysteine codon UGA in one hairpin and a donor splice site in another, has been discovered in selenoprotein genes. The presence of the structure resolves the discrepancy that the selenocysteine triplet, UGA, should block splicing. Without a spe...

  10. The SmpB C-terminal tail helps tmRNA to recognize and enter stalled ribosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mickey R. Miller

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In bacteria, transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA and SmpB comprise the most common and effective system for rescuing stalled ribosomes. Ribosomes stall on mRNA transcripts lacking stop codons and are rescued as the defective mRNA is swapped for the tmRNA template in a process known as trans-translation. The tmRNA–SmpB complex is recruited to the ribosome independent of a codon–anticodon interaction. Given that the ribosome uses robust discriminatory mechanisms to select against non-cognate tRNAs during canonical decoding, it has been hard to explain how this can happen. Recent structural and biochemical studies show that SmpB licenses tmRNA entry through its interactions with the decoding center and mRNA channel. In particular, the C-terminal tail of SmpB promotes both EFTu activation and accommodation of tmRNA, the former through interactions with 16S rRNA nucleotide G530 and the latter through interactions with the mRNA channel downstream of the A site. Here we present a detailed model of the earliest steps in trans-translation, and in light of these mechanistic considerations, revisit the question of how tmRNA preferentially reacts with stalled, non-translating ribosomes.

  11. Functional Versatility of AGY Serine Codons in Immunoglobulin Variable Region Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Detanico

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In systemic autoimmunity, autoantibodies directed against nuclear antigens (Ag often arise by somatic hypermutation (SHM that converts AGT and AGC (AGY Ser codons into Arg codons. This can occur by three different single-base changes. Curiously, AGY Ser codons are far more abundant in complementarity-determining regions (CDRs of IgV-region genes than expected for random codon use or from species-specific codon frequency data. CDR AGY codons are also more abundant than TCN Ser codons. We show that these trends hold even in cartilaginous fishes. Because AGC is a preferred target for SHM by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, we asked whether the AGY abundance was solely due to a selection pressure to conserve high mutability in CDRs regardless of codon context but found that this was not the case. Instead, AGY triplets were selectively enriched in the Ser codon reading frame. Motivated by reports implicating a functional role for poly/autoreactive specificities in anti-viral antibodies, we also analyzed mutations at AGY in antibodies directed against a number of different viruses, and found that mutations producing Arg codons in anti-viral antibodies were indeed frequent. Unexpectedly, however, we also found that AGY codons mutated often to encode nearly all of the amino acids that are reported to provide the most frequent contacts with antigen (Ag. In many cases, mutations producing codons for these alternative amino acids in anti-viral antibodies were more frequent than those producing Arg codons. Mutations producing each of these key amino acids required only single-base changes in AGY. AGY is the only codon group in which 2/3rds of random mutations generate codons for these key residues. Finally, by directly analyzing x-ray structures of immune complexes from the RCSB protein database, we found that Ag-contact residues generated via somatic hypermutation occurred more often at AGY than at any other codon group. Thus, preservation of

  12. The highly conserved codon following the slippery sequence supports -1 frameshift efficiency at the HIV-1 frameshift site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneeth F Mathew

    Full Text Available HIV-1 utilises -1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting to translate structural and enzymatic domains in a defined proportion required for replication. A slippery sequence, U UUU UUA, and a stem-loop are well-defined RNA features modulating -1 frameshifting in HIV-1. The GGG glycine codon immediately following the slippery sequence (the 'intercodon' contributes structurally to the start of the stem-loop but has no defined role in current models of the frameshift mechanism, as slippage is inferred to occur before the intercodon has reached the ribosomal decoding site. This GGG codon is highly conserved in natural isolates of HIV. When the natural intercodon was replaced with a stop codon two different decoding molecules-eRF1 protein or a cognate suppressor tRNA-were able to access and decode the intercodon prior to -1 frameshifting. This implies significant slippage occurs when the intercodon is in the (perhaps distorted ribosomal A site. We accommodate the influence of the intercodon in a model of frame maintenance versus frameshifting in HIV-1.

  13. A common periodic table of codons and amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, J C; Benyó, B; Sansom, C; Szlávecz, A; Fördös, G; Micsik, T; Benyó, Z

    2003-06-27

    A periodic table of codons has been designed where the codons are in regular locations. The table has four fields (16 places in each) one with each of the four nucleotides (A, U, G, C) in the central codon position. Thus, AAA (lysine), UUU (phenylalanine), GGG (glycine), and CCC (proline) were placed into the corners of the fields as the main codons (and amino acids) of the fields. They were connected to each other by six axes. The resulting nucleic acid periodic table showed perfect axial symmetry for codons. The corresponding amino acid table also displaced periodicity regarding the biochemical properties (charge and hydropathy) of the 20 amino acids and the position of the stop signals. The table emphasizes the importance of the central nucleotide in the codons and predicts that purines control the charge while pyrimidines determine the polarity of the amino acids. This prediction was experimentally tested.

  14. eCodonOpt: a systematic computational framework for optimizing codon usage in directed evolution experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Gregory L.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2002-01-01

    We present a systematic computational framework, eCodonOpt, for designing parental DNA sequences for directed evolution experiments through codon usage optimization. Given a set of homologous parental proteins to be recombined at the DNA level, the optimal DNA sequences encoding these proteins are sought for a given diversity objective. We find that the free energy of annealing between the recombining DNA sequences is a much better descriptor of the extent of crossover formation than sequence...

  15. Codon adaptation and synonymous substitution rate in diatom plastid genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Brian R; Sorhannus, Ulf; Fox, Martin

    2002-07-01

    Diatom plastid genes are examined with respect to codon adaptation and rates of silent substitution (Ks). It is shown that diatom genes follow the same pattern of codon usage as other plastid genes studied previously. Highly expressed diatom genes display codon adaptation, or a bias toward specific major codons, and these major codons are the same as those in red algae, green algae, and land plants. It is also found that there is a strong correlation between Ks and variation in codon adaptation across diatom genes, providing the first evidence for such a relationship in the algae. It is argued that this finding supports the notion that the correlation arises from selective constraints, not from variation in mutation rate among genes. Finally, the diatom genes are examined with respect to variation in Ks among different synonymous groups. Diatom genes with strong codon adaptation do not show the same variation in synonymous substitution rate among codon groups as the flowering plant psbA gene which, previous studies have shown, has strong codon adaptation but unusually high rates of silent change in certain synonymous groups. The lack of a similar finding in diatoms supports the suggestion that the feature is unique to the flowering plant psbA due to recent relaxations in selective pressure in that lineage.

  16. Translation, modification and cellular distribution of two AC4 variants of African cassava mosaic virus in yeast and their pathogenic potential in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hipp, Katharina; Rau, Peter; Schäfer, Benjamin; Pfannstiel, Jens; Jeske, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Plant infecting geminiviruses encode a small (A)C4 protein within the open reading frame of the replication-initiator protein. In African cassava mosaic virus, two in-frame start codons may be used for the translation of a longer and a shorter AC4 variant. Both were fused to green fluorescent protein or glutathione-S-transferase genes and expressed in fission yeast. The longer variant accumulated in discrete spots in the cytoplasm, whereas the shorter variant localized to the plasma membrane. A similar expression pattern was found in plants. A myristoylation motif may promote a targeting of the shorter variant to the plasma membrane. Mass spectrometry analysis of the yeast-expressed shorter variant detected the corresponding myristoylation. The biological relevance of the second start codon was confirmed using mutated infectious clones. Whereas mutating the first start codon had no effect on the infectivity in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, the second start codon proved to be essential. -- Highlights: •The ACMV AC4 may be translated from one or the other in-frame start codon. •Both AC4 variants are translated in fission yeast. •The long AC4 protein localizes to the cytoplasm, the short to the plasma membrane. •The short variant is myristoylated in yeast and may promote membrane localization. •Only the shorter AC4 variant has an impact on viral infections in plants.

  17. Translation, modification and cellular distribution of two AC4 variants of African cassava mosaic virus in yeast and their pathogenic potential in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hipp, Katharina, E-mail: katharina.hipp@bio.uni-stuttgart.de [University of Stuttgart, Institute of Biomaterials and biomolecular Systems, Department of Molecular Biology and Plant Virology, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Rau, Peter; Schäfer, Benjamin [University of Stuttgart, Institute of Biomaterials and biomolecular Systems, Department of Molecular Biology and Plant Virology, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Pfannstiel, Jens [University of Hohenheim, Mass Spectrometry Core Facility, August-von-Hartmann-Straße 3, 70599 Stuttgart (Germany); Jeske, Holger [University of Stuttgart, Institute of Biomaterials and biomolecular Systems, Department of Molecular Biology and Plant Virology, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Plant infecting geminiviruses encode a small (A)C4 protein within the open reading frame of the replication-initiator protein. In African cassava mosaic virus, two in-frame start codons may be used for the translation of a longer and a shorter AC4 variant. Both were fused to green fluorescent protein or glutathione-S-transferase genes and expressed in fission yeast. The longer variant accumulated in discrete spots in the cytoplasm, whereas the shorter variant localized to the plasma membrane. A similar expression pattern was found in plants. A myristoylation motif may promote a targeting of the shorter variant to the plasma membrane. Mass spectrometry analysis of the yeast-expressed shorter variant detected the corresponding myristoylation. The biological relevance of the second start codon was confirmed using mutated infectious clones. Whereas mutating the first start codon had no effect on the infectivity in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, the second start codon proved to be essential. -- Highlights: •The ACMV AC4 may be translated from one or the other in-frame start codon. •Both AC4 variants are translated in fission yeast. •The long AC4 protein localizes to the cytoplasm, the short to the plasma membrane. •The short variant is myristoylated in yeast and may promote membrane localization. •Only the shorter AC4 variant has an impact on viral infections in plants.

  18. Codon based co-occurrence network motifs in human mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Shinde

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The nucleotide polymorphism in human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA tolled by codon position bias plays an indispensable role in human population dispersion and expansion. Herein, we constructed genome-wide nucleotide co-occurrence networks using a massive data consisting of five different geographical regions and around 3000 samples for each region. We developed a powerful network model to describe complex mitochondrial evolutionary patterns between codon and non-codon positions. It was interesting to report a different evolution of Asian genomes than those of the rest which is divulged by network motifs. We found evidence that mtDNA undergoes substantial amounts of adaptive evolution, a finding which was supported by a number of previous studies. The dominance of higher order motifs indicated the importance of long-range nucleotide co-occurrence in genomic diversity. Most notably, codon motifs apparently underpinned the preferences among codon positions for co-evolution which is probably highly biased during the origin of the genetic code. Our analyses manifested that codon position co-evolution is very well conserved across human sub-populations and independently maintained within human sub-populations implying the selective role of evolutionary processes on codon position co-evolution. Ergo, this study provided a framework to investigate cooperative genomic interactions which are critical in underlying complex mitochondrial evolution.

  19. Codon usage bias analysis for the coding sequences of Camellia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny t

    2016-02-24

    Feb 24, 2016 ... suggested that codon usage bias is driven by selection, particularly for .... For example, as mentioned above, highly expressed genes tend to use fewer ... directional codon bias measure effective number of codons (ENc) was ...

  20. Defect in the GTPase activating protein (GAP) function of eIF5 causes repression of GCN4 translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony A, Charles; Alone, Pankaj V

    2017-05-13

    In eukaryotes, the eIF5 protein plays an important role in translation start site selection by providing the GAP (GTPase activating protein) function. However, in yeast translation initiation fidelity defective eIF5 G31R mutant causes preferential utilization of UUG as initiation codon and is termed as Suppressor of initiation codon (Sui - ) phenotype due to its hyper GTPase activity. The eIF5 G31R mutant dominantly represses GCN4 expression and confers sensitivity to 3-Amino-1,2,4-Trizole (3AT) induced starvation. The down-regulation of the GCN4 expression (Gcn - phenotype) in the eIF5 G31R mutant was not because of leaky scanning defects; rather was due to the utilization of upUUG initiation codons at the 5' regulatory region present between uORF1 and the main GCN4 ORF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hand gesture recognition by analysis of codons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Poornima; Shrikhande, Neelima

    2007-09-01

    The problem of recognizing gestures from images using computers can be approached by closely understanding how the human brain tackles it. A full fledged gesture recognition system will substitute mouse and keyboards completely. Humans can recognize most gestures by looking at the characteristic external shape or the silhouette of the fingers. Many previous techniques to recognize gestures dealt with motion and geometric features of hands. In this thesis gestures are recognized by the Codon-list pattern extracted from the object contour. All edges of an image are described in terms of sequence of Codons. The Codons are defined in terms of the relationship between maxima, minima and zeros of curvature encountered as one traverses the boundary of the object. We have concentrated on a catalog of 24 gesture images from the American Sign Language alphabet (Letter J and Z are ignored as they are represented using motion) [2]. The query image given as an input to the system is analyzed and tested against the Codon-lists, which are shape descriptors for external parts of a hand gesture. We have used the Weighted Frequency Indexing Transform (WFIT) approach which is used in DNA sequence matching for matching the Codon-lists. The matching algorithm consists of two steps: 1) the query sequences are converted to short sequences and are assigned weights and, 2) all the sequences of query gestures are pruned into match and mismatch subsequences by the frequency indexing tree based on the weights of the subsequences. The Codon sequences with the most weight are used to determine the most precise match. Once a match is found, the identified gesture and corresponding interpretation are shown as output.

  2. Codon usage and amino acid usage influence genes expression level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Prosenjit; Malakar, Arup Kumar; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2018-02-01

    Highly expressed genes in any species differ in the usage frequency of synonymous codons. The relative recurrence of an event of the favored codon pair (amino acid pairs) varies between gene and genomes due to varying gene expression and different base composition. Here we propose a new measure for predicting the gene expression level, i.e., codon plus amino bias index (CABI). Our approach is based on the relative bias of the favored codon pair inclination among the genes, illustrated by analyzing the CABI score of the Medicago truncatula genes. CABI showed strong correlation with all other widely used measures (CAI, RCBS, SCUO) for gene expression analysis. Surprisingly, CABI outperforms all other measures by showing better correlation with the wet-lab data. This emphasizes the importance of the neighboring codons of the favored codon in a synonymous group while estimating the expression level of a gene.

  3. Pre-termination in aflR of Aspergillus sojae inhibits aflatoxin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, K; Chang, P K; Yu, J; Abe, K; Bhatnagar, D; Cleveland, T E

    2001-05-01

    The aflR gene product is the main transcriptional regulator of aflatoxin biosynthesis in Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus flavus. Although A. sojae strains do not produce aflatoxins, they do have an aflR homologue. When compared with the aflR of A. parasiticus, the A. sojae gene contains two mutations: an HAHA motif and a premature stop codon. To investigate the functionality of the A. sojae aflR gene product, we used a GAL4 one-hybrid system in yeast. The transcription-activating activity of AflR from A. sojae was 15% of that from A. parasiticus. The introduction of an additional aflR from A. sojae into an A. parasiticus strain did not affect aflatoxin productivity. A hybrid aflR comprising the amino-terminal region of A. sojae aflR and the carboxy-terminal region of A. parasiticus aflR suppressed the effect associated with pre-termination of the A. sojae AflR. We conclude that the premature stop codon of the A. sojae aflR is the key to its functionality and leads to prevention of aflatoxin biosynthesis through loss of the transcription of aflatoxin biosynthesis-related genes.

  4. The relationship between codon usage bias and cold resistant genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barozai, M.Y.; Din, M.

    2014-01-01

    This research is based on synonymous codon usage which has been well-known as a feature that affects typical expression level of protein in an organism. Different organisms prefer different codons for same amino acid and this is called Codon Usage Bias (CUB). The codon usage directly affects the level or even direction of changes in protein expression in responses to environmental stimuli. Cold stress is a major abiotic factor that limits the agricultural productivity of plants. In the recent study CUB has been studied in Arabidopsis thaliana cold resistant and housekeeping genes and their homologs in rice (Oryza sativa) to understand the cold stress and housekeeping genes relation with CUB. Six cold resistant and three housekeeping genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and their homologs in rice, were subjected to CUB analysis. The three cold resistant genes (DREB1B, RCI and MYB15) showed more than 50% (52%, 61% and 66% respectively) similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. On the other hand three cold resistant genes (MPK3, ICE1 and ZAT12) showed less than 50% (38%, 38% and 47% respectively) similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. The three housekeeping genes (Actin, Tubulin and Ubiquitin) showed 76% similar codon usage bias for Arabidopsis thaliana and rice. This study will help to manage the plant gene expression through codon optimization under the cold stress. (author)

  5. Codon-optimized antibiotic resistance gene improves efficiency of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-10-01

    Oct 1, 2013 ... transient transformation and cell growth in selective culture were significantly increased by use of fgmR ... Our result shows that similarity in codon usage pattern is an important factor ... Codon adaptation index (CAI) (Sharp.

  6. Codes in the codons: construction of a codon/amino acid periodic table and a study of the nature of specific nucleic acid-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyo, B; Biro, J C; Benyo, Z

    2004-01-01

    The theory of "codon-amino acid coevolution" was first proposed by Woese in 1967. It suggests that there is a stereochemical matching - that is, affinity - between amino acids and certain of the base triplet sequences that code for those amino acids. We have constructed a common periodic table of codons and amino acids, where the nucleic acid table showed perfect axial symmetry for codons and the corresponding amino acid table also displayed periodicity regarding the biochemical properties (charge and hydrophobicity) of the 20 amino acids and the position of the stop signals. The table indicates that the middle (2/sup nd/) amino acid in the codon has a prominent role in determining some of the structural features of the amino acids. The possibility that physical contact between codons and amino acids might exist was tested on restriction enzymes. Many recognition site-like sequences were found in the coding sequences of these enzymes and as many as 73 examples of codon-amino acid co-location were observed in the 7 known 3D structures (December 2003) of endonuclease-nucleic acid complexes. These results indicate that the smallest possible units of specific nucleic acid-protein interaction are indeed the stereochemically compatible codons and amino acids.

  7. A novel two-nucleotide deletion in the ATP7A gene associated with delayed infantile onset of Menkes disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takahito; Haddad, Marie Reine; Yi, Ling; Murakami, Tomomi; Sasaki, Akiko; Shimbo, Hiroko; Kodama, Hiroko; Osaka, Hitoshi; Kaler, Stephen G

    2014-04-01

    Determining the relationship between clinical phenotype and genotype in genetic diseases is important in clinical practice. In general, frameshift mutations are expected to produce premature termination codons, leading to production of mutant transcripts destined for degradation by nonsense-mediated decay. In X-linked recessive diseases, male patients with frameshift mutations typically have a severe or even lethal phenotype. We report a case of a 17-month-old boy with Menkes disease (NIM #309400), an X-linked recessive copper metabolism disorder caused by mutations in the ATP7A copper transporter gene. He exhibited an unexpectedly late onset and experienced milder symptoms. His genomic DNA showed a de novo two-nucleotide deletion in exon 4 of ATP7A, predicting a translational frameshift and premature stop codon, and a classic severe phenotype. Characterization of his ATP7A mRNA showed no abnormal splicing. We speculate that translation reinitiation could occur downstream to the premature termination codon and produce a partially functional ATP7A protein. Study of the child's fibroblasts found no evidence of translation reinitiation; however, the possibility remains that this phenomenon occurred in neural tissues and influenced the clinical phenotype. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Automated design of degenerate codon libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Marco A; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2005-12-01

    Degenerate codon libraries are frequently used in protein engineering and evolution studies but are often limited to targeting a small number of positions to adequately limit the search space. To mitigate this, codon degeneracy can be limited using heuristics or previous knowledge of the targeted positions. To automate design of libraries given a set of amino acid sequences, an algorithm (LibDesign) was developed that generates a set of possible degenerate codon libraries, their resulting size, and their score relative to a user-defined scoring function. A gene library of a specified size can then be constructed that is representative of the given amino acid distribution or that includes specific sequences or combinations thereof. LibDesign provides a new tool for automated design of high-quality protein libraries that more effectively harness existing sequence-structure information derived from multiple sequence alignment or computational protein design data.

  9. Abrupt onset of mutations in a developmentally regulated gene during terminal differentiation of post-mitotic photoreceptor neurons in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivette M Sandoval

    Full Text Available For sensitive detection of rare gene repair events in terminally differentiated photoreceptors, we generated a knockin mouse model by replacing one mouse rhodopsin allele with a form of the human rhodopsin gene that causes a severe, early-onset form of retinitis pigmentosa. The human gene contains a premature stop codon at position 344 (Q344X, cDNA encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP at its 3' end, and a modified 5' untranslated region to reduce translation rate so that the mutant protein does not induce retinal degeneration. Mutations that eliminate the stop codon express a human rhodopsin-EGFP fusion protein (hRho-GFP, which can be readily detected by fluorescence microscopy. Spontaneous mutations were observed at a frequency of about one per retina; in every case, they gave rise to single fluorescent rod cells, indicating that each mutation occurred during or after the last mitotic division. Additionally, the number of fluorescent rods did not increase with age, suggesting that the rhodopsin gene in mature rod cells is less sensitive to mutation than it is in developing rods. Thus, there is a brief developmental window, coinciding with the transcriptional activation of the rhodopsin locus, in which somatic mutations of the rhodopsin gene abruptly begin to appear.

  10. Universality and Shannon entropy of codon usage

    CERN Document Server

    Frappat, L; Sciarrino, A; Sorba, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The distribution functions of the codon usage probabilities, computed over all the available GenBank data, for 40 eukaryotic biological species and 5 chloroplasts, do not follow a Zipf law, but are best fitted by the sum of a constant, an exponential and a linear function in the rank of usage. For mitochondriae the analysis is not conclusive. A quantum-mechanics-inspired model is proposed to describe the observed behaviour. These functions are characterized by parameters that strongly depend on the total GC content of the coding regions of biological species. It is predicted that the codon usage is the same in all exonic genes with the same GC content. The Shannon entropy for codons, also strongly depending on the exonic GC content, is computed.

  11. Correlation matrix for quartet codon usage

    CERN Document Server

    Frappat, L; Sorba, Paul

    2005-01-01

    It has been argued that the sum of usage probabilities for codons, belonging to quartets, that have as third nucleotide C or A, is independent of the biological species for vertebrates. The comparison between the theoretical correlation matrix derived from these sum rules and the experimentally computed matrix for 26 species shows a satisfactory agreement. The Shannon entropy, weakly depending on the biological species, gives further support. Suppression of codons containing the dinucleotides CG or AU is put in evidence.

  12. Functional role of bacteriophage transfer RNAs: codon usage analysis of genomic sequences stored in the GENBANK/EMBL/DDBJ databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Kunisawa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Complete genomic sequence data are stored in the public GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ databases so that any investigator can make use of the data. This report describes a comparative analysis of codon usage that is impossible without such a public and open data system. A limited number of bacteriophages harbor their own transfer RNAs. Based on a comparison between T4 phage-encoded tRNA species and the relative cellular amounts of host Escherichia coli tRNAs, it is hypothesized that T4 tRNAs could serve to supplement host isoacceptor tRNA species that are present in minor amounts and thus enhance the translational efficiency of phage proteins. When compared to their respective host bacteria, the codon usage data of bacteriophages D3, φC31, HP1, D29 and 933W all show an increased frequency of synonymous codons or amino acids that correspond to phage tRNA species, suggesting their supplemental role in the efficient production of phage proteins. The data-analysis presents an example in which the availability of an open and fully accessible database system would allow one to obtain comprehensive insights into a fundamental problem in molecular biology.

  13. Mécanisme de formation du complexe de démarrage de la traduction chez les Archées

    OpenAIRE

    Monestier , Auriane

    2016-01-01

    A cell is subjected to different internal and external stimuli and must adapt quickly to fulfill its functions. This involves a fine regulation of gene expression. This occurs at the transcriptional level, but also at the translational level. Translation has three phases: initiation, elongation and termination. Selection of the start codon and therefore the choice of the mRNA reading frame is performed during translation initiation. From a kinetic point of view, translation initiation is the ...

  14. Gene expression, nucleotide composition and codon usage bias of genes associated with human Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Monisha Nath; Uddin, Arif; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2017-06-01

    Analysis of codon usage pattern is important to understand the genetic and evolutionary characteristics of genomes. We have used bioinformatic approaches to analyze the codon usage bias (CUB) of the genes located in human Y chromosome. Codon bias index (CBI) indicated that the overall extent of codon usage bias was low. The relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis suggested that approximately half of the codons out of 59 synonymous codons were most frequently used, and possessed a T or G at the third codon position. The codon usage pattern was different in different genes as revealed from correspondence analysis (COA). A significant correlation between effective number of codons (ENC) and various GC contents suggests that both mutation pressure and natural selection affect the codon usage pattern of genes located in human Y chromosome. In addition, Y-linked genes have significant difference in GC contents at the second and third codon positions, expression level, and codon usage pattern of some codons like the SPANX genes in X chromosome.

  15. Comparative investigation of the various determinants that influence the codon and amino acid usage patterns in the genus Bifidobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ayan; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasish; Sarkar, Indrani; Sen, Arnab

    2015-06-01

    Various strains of the genus Bifidobacterium are crucial members of the human, animal and insect gut, associated with beneficial probiotic activities. An extensive analysis on codon and amino acid usage of the GC rich genus Bifidobacterium has been executed in the present study. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed a coupled effect of GC compositional constraint and natural selection for translational efficiency to be operative in producing the observed codon usage variations. Gene expression level was inferred to be the most crucial factor governing the codon usage patterns. Amino acid usage was found to be influenced significantly by hydrophobic and aromatic character of the encoded proteins. Gene expressivity and protein energetic cost also had considerable impact on the differential mode of amino acid usage. The genus was found to strictly obey the cost-minimization hypothesis as was reflected from the amino acid usage patterns of the potential highly expressed gene products. Evolutionary analysis revealed that the highly expressed genes were candidates to extreme evolutionary selection pressure and indicated a high degree of conservation at the proteomic level. Interestingly, the complimentary strands of replication appeared to evolve under similar evolutionary constraints which might be addressed as a consequence of absence of replicational selection and lack of strand-specific asymmetry among the members of the genus. Thus, the present endeavor confers considerable know-how pertaining to the codon and amino acid usage intricacies in Bifidobacterium and might prove handy for further scientific investigations associated with the concerned domain.

  16. A detailed analysis of codon usage patterns and influencing factors in Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Niraj K; Tyagi, Anuj

    2017-07-01

    Recent outbreaks of Zika virus (ZIKV) in Africa, Latin America, Europe, and Southeast Asia have resulted in serious health concerns. To understand more about evolution and transmission of ZIKV, detailed codon usage analysis was performed for all available strains. A high effective number of codons (ENC) value indicated the presence of low codon usage bias in ZIKV. The effect of mutational pressure on codon usage bias was confirmed by significant correlations between nucleotide compositions at third codon positions and ENCs. Correlation analysis between Gravy values, Aroma values and nucleotide compositions at third codon positions also indicated some influence of natural selection. However, the low codon adaptation index (CAI) value of ZIKV with reference to human and mosquito indicated poor adaptation of ZIKV codon usage towards its hosts, signifying that natural selection has a weaker influence than mutational pressure. Additionally, relative dinucleotide frequencies, geographical distribution, and evolutionary processes also influenced the codon usage pattern to some extent.

  17. Analysis of transcriptome data reveals multifactor constraint on codon usage in Taenia multiceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xing; Xu, Jing; Chen, Lin; Wang, Yu; Gu, Xiaobin; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2017-04-20

    Codon usage bias (CUB) is an important evolutionary feature in genomes that has been widely observed in many organisms. However, the synonymous codon usage pattern in the genome of T. multiceps remains to be clarified. In this study, we analyzed the codon usage of T. multiceps based on the transcriptome data to reveal the constraint factors and to gain an improved understanding of the mechanisms that shape synonymous CUB. Analysis of a total of 8,620 annotated mRNA sequences from T. multiceps indicated only a weak codon bias, with mean GC and GC3 content values of 49.29% and 51.43%, respectively. Our analysis indicated that nucleotide composition, mutational pressure, natural selection, gene expression level, amino acids with grand average of hydropathicity (GRAVY) and aromaticity (Aromo) and the effective selection of amino-acids all contributed to the codon usage in T. multiceps. Among these factors, natural selection was implicated as the major factor affecting the codon usage variation in T. multiceps. The codon usage of ribosome genes was affected mainly by mutations, while the essential genes were affected mainly by selection. In addition, 21codons were identified as "optimal codons". Overall, the optimal codons were GC-rich (GC:AU, 41:22), and ended with G or C (except CGU). Furthermore, different degrees of variation in codon usage were found between T. multiceps and Escherichia coli, yeast, Homo sapiens. However, little difference was found between T. multiceps and Taenia pisiformis. In this study, the codon usage pattern of T. multiceps was analyzed systematically and factors affected CUB were also identified. This is the first study of codon biology in T. multiceps. Understanding the codon usage pattern in T. multiceps can be helpful for the discovery of new genes, molecular genetic engineering and evolutionary studies.

  18. RNA editing in kinetoplastid parasites: what to do with U

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloof, P.; Benne, R.

    1997-01-01

    The editing of the mitochondrial RNAs of kinetoplastid protozoa is a bizarre form of transcript maturation that involves insertion and deletion of uridylate residues. Editing leads to the formation of translational initiation and termination codons, the correction of gene-encoded reading frame

  19. Codon 219 polymorphism of PRNP in healthy caucasians and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petraroli, R.; Pocchiari, M. [Instituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy)

    1996-04-01

    A number of point and insert mutations of the PrP gene (PRNP) have been linked to familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker disease (GSS). Moreover, the methionine/valine homozygosity at the polymorphic codon 129 of PRNP may cause a predisposition to sporadic and iatrogenic CJD or may control the age at onset of familial cases carrying either the 144-bp insertion or codon 178, codon 198, and codon 210 pathogenic mutations in PRNP. In addition, the association of methionine or valine at codon 129 and the point mutation at codon 178 on the same allele seem to play an important role in determining either fatal familial insomnia or CJD. However, it is noteworthy that a relationship between codon 129 polymorphism and accelerated pathogenesis (early age at onset or shorter duration of the disease) has not been seen in familial CJD patients with codon 200 mutation or in GSS patients with codon 102 mutation, arguing that other, as yet unidentified, gene products or environmental factors, or both, may influence the clinical expression of these diseases. 17 refs.

  20. Codon Usage Patterns of Tyrosinase Genes in Clonorchis sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young-An

    2017-04-01

    Codon usage bias (CUB) is a unique property of genomes and has contributed to the better understanding of the molecular features and the evolution processes of particular gene. In this study, genetic indices associated with CUB, including relative synonymous codon usage and effective numbers of codons, as well as the nucleotide composition, were investigated in the Clonorchis sinensis tyrosinase genes and their platyhelminth orthologs, which play an important role in the eggshell formation. The relative synonymous codon usage patterns substantially differed among tyrosinase genes examined. In a neutrality analysis, the correlation between GC 12 and GC 3 was statistically significant, and the regression line had a relatively gradual slope (0.218). NC-plot, i.e., GC 3 vs effective number of codons (ENC), showed that most of the tyrosinase genes were below the expected curve. The codon adaptation index (CAI) values of the platyhelminth tyrosinases had a narrow distribution between 0.685/0.714 and 0.797/0.837, and were negatively correlated with their ENC. Taken together, these results suggested that CUB in the tyrosinase genes seemed to be basically governed by selection pressures rather than mutational bias, although the latter factor provided an additional force in shaping CUB of the C. sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini genes. It was also apparent that the equilibrium point between selection pressure and mutational bias is much more inclined to selection pressure in highly expressed C. sinensis genes, than in poorly expressed genes.

  1. The RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphatase-Like Protein FIERY2/CPL1 Interacts with eIF4AIII and Is Essential for Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng; Chen, Tao; Qin, Tao; Ding, Feng; Wang, Zhenyu; Chen, Hao; Xiong, Liming

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a posttranscriptional surveillance mechanism in eukaryotes that recognizes and degrades transcripts with premature translation-termination codons. The RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like protein FIERY2 (FRY2; also known as C-TERMINAL DOMAIN PHOSPHATASE-LIKE1 [CPL1]) plays multiple roles in RNA processing in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we found that FRY2/CPL1 interacts with two NMD factors, eIF4AIII and UPF3, and is involved in the dephosphorylation of eIF4AIII. This dephosphorylation retains eIF4AIII in the nucleus and limits its accumulation in the cytoplasm. By analyzing RNA-seq data combined with quantitative RT-PCR validation, we found that a subset of alternatively spliced transcripts and 59-extended mRNAs with NMD-eliciting features accumulated in the fry2-1 mutant, cycloheximidetreated wild type, and upf3 mutant plants, indicating that FRY2 is essential for the degradation of these NMD transcripts.

  2. The RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphatase-Like Protein FIERY2/CPL1 Interacts with eIF4AIII and Is Essential for Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2016-02-18

    © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved. Nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a posttranscriptional surveillance mechanism in eukaryotes that recognizes and degrades transcripts with premature translation-termination codons. The RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain phosphatase-like protein FIERY2 (FRY2; also known as C-TERMINAL DOMAIN PHOSPHATASE-LIKE1 [CPL1]) plays multiple roles in RNA processing in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we found that FRY2/CPL1 interacts with two NMD factors, eIF4AIII and UPF3, and is involved in the dephosphorylation of eIF4AIII. This dephosphorylation retains eIF4AIII in the nucleus and limits its accumulation in the cytoplasm. By analyzing RNA-seq data combined with quantitative RT-PCR validation, we found that a subset of alternatively spliced transcripts and 59-extended mRNAs with NMD-eliciting features accumulated in the fry2-1 mutant, cycloheximidetreated wild type, and upf3 mutant plants, indicating that FRY2 is essential for the degradation of these NMD transcripts.

  3. Dynamics of Chloroplast Translation during Chloroplast Differentiation in Maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakitchai Chotewutmontri

    2016-07-01

    does not generally discriminate between edited and unedited RNAs. However, editing of ACG to AUG at the rpl2 start codon is essential for translation initiation, demonstrating that ACG does not serve as a start codon in maize chloroplasts.

  4. Nonsense mutations in the human β-globin gene affect mRNA metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baserga, S.J.; Benz, E.J. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A number of premature translation termination mutations (nonsense mutations) have been described in the human α- and β-globin genes. Studies on mRNA isolated from patients with β 0 -thalassemia have shown that for both the β-17 and the β-39 mutations less than normal levels of β-globin mRNA accumulate in peripheral blood cells. (The codon at which the mutation occurs designates the name of the mutation; there are 146 codons in human β-globin mRNA). In vitro studies using the cloned β-39 gene have reproduced this effect in a heterologous transfection system and have suggested that the defect resides in intranuclear metabolism. The authors have asked if this phenomenon of decreased mRNA accumulation is a general property of nonsense mutations and if the effect depends on the location or the type of mutation. Toward this end, they have studied the effect of five nonsense mutations and two missense mutations on the expression of human β-globin mRNA in a heterologous transfection system. In all cases studied, the presence of a translation termination codon correlates with a decrease in the steady-state level of mRNA. The data suggest that the metabolism of a mammalian mRNA is affected by the presence of a mutation that affects translation

  5. Revelation of Influencing Factors in Overall Codon Usage Bias of Equine Influenza Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar

    Full Text Available Equine influenza viruses (EIVs of H3N8 subtype are culprits of severe acute respiratory infections in horses, and are still responsible for significant outbreaks worldwide. Adaptability of influenza viruses to a particular host is significantly influenced by their codon usage preference, due to an absolute dependence on the host cellular machinery for their replication. In the present study, we analyzed genome-wide codon usage patterns in 92 EIV strains, including both H3N8 and H7N7 subtypes by computing several codon usage indices and applying multivariate statistical methods. Relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU analysis disclosed bias of preferred synonymous codons towards A/U-ended codons. The overall codon usage bias in EIVs was slightly lower, and mainly affected by the nucleotide compositional constraints as inferred from the RSCU and effective number of codon (ENc analysis. Our data suggested that codon usage pattern in EIVs is governed by the interplay of mutation pressure, natural selection from its hosts and undefined factors. The H7N7 subtype was found less fit to its host (horse in comparison to H3N8, by possessing higher codon bias, lower mutation pressure and much less adaptation to tRNA pool of equine cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the codon usage analysis of the complete genomes of EIVs. The outcome of our study is likely to enhance our understanding of factors involved in viral adaptation, evolution, and fitness towards their hosts.

  6. Revelation of Influencing Factors in Overall Codon Usage Bias of Equine Influenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Sandeep; Sood, Richa; Selvaraj, Pavulraj

    2016-01-01

    Equine influenza viruses (EIVs) of H3N8 subtype are culprits of severe acute respiratory infections in horses, and are still responsible for significant outbreaks worldwide. Adaptability of influenza viruses to a particular host is significantly influenced by their codon usage preference, due to an absolute dependence on the host cellular machinery for their replication. In the present study, we analyzed genome-wide codon usage patterns in 92 EIV strains, including both H3N8 and H7N7 subtypes by computing several codon usage indices and applying multivariate statistical methods. Relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis disclosed bias of preferred synonymous codons towards A/U-ended codons. The overall codon usage bias in EIVs was slightly lower, and mainly affected by the nucleotide compositional constraints as inferred from the RSCU and effective number of codon (ENc) analysis. Our data suggested that codon usage pattern in EIVs is governed by the interplay of mutation pressure, natural selection from its hosts and undefined factors. The H7N7 subtype was found less fit to its host (horse) in comparison to H3N8, by possessing higher codon bias, lower mutation pressure and much less adaptation to tRNA pool of equine cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing the codon usage analysis of the complete genomes of EIVs. The outcome of our study is likely to enhance our understanding of factors involved in viral adaptation, evolution, and fitness towards their hosts. PMID:27119730

  7. Pseudo-polyprotein translated from the full-length ORF1 of capillovirus is important for pathogenicity, but a truncated ORF1 protein without variable and CP regions is sufficient for replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Hisae; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Komatsu, Ken; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Oshima, Kenro; Okano, Yukari; Takahashi, Shuichiro; Ugaki, Masashi; Namba, Shigetou

    2010-09-01

    The first open-reading frame (ORF) of the genus Capillovirus encodes an apparently chimeric polyprotein containing conserved regions for replicase (Rep) and coat protein (CP), while other viruses in the family Flexiviridae have separate ORFs encoding these proteins. To investigate the role of the full-length ORF1 polyprotein of capillovirus, we generated truncation mutants of ORF1 of apple stem grooving virus by inserting a termination codon into the variable region located between the putative Rep- and CP-coding regions. These mutants were capable of systemic infection, although their pathogenicity was attenuated. In vitro translation of ORF1 produced both the full-length polyprotein and the smaller Rep protein. The results of in vivo reporter assays suggested that the mechanism of this early termination is a ribosomal -1 frame-shift occurring downstream from the conserved Rep domains. The mechanism of capillovirus gene expression and the very close evolutionary relationship between the genera Capillovirus and Trichovirus are discussed. Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. The ribosome uses two active mechanisms to unwind messenger RNA during translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xiaohui; Wen, Jin-Der; Lancaster, Laura; Noller, Harry F; Bustamante, Carlos; Tinoco, Ignacio

    2011-07-06

    The ribosome translates the genetic information encoded in messenger RNA into protein. Folded structures in the coding region of an mRNA represent a kinetic barrier that lowers the peptide elongation rate, as the ribosome must disrupt structures it encounters in the mRNA at its entry site to allow translocation to the next codon. Such structures are exploited by the cell to create diverse strategies for translation regulation, such as programmed frameshifting, the modulation of protein expression levels, ribosome localization and co-translational protein folding. Although strand separation activity is inherent to the ribosome, requiring no exogenous helicases, its mechanism is still unknown. Here, using a single-molecule optical tweezers assay on mRNA hairpins, we find that the translation rate of identical codons at the decoding centre is greatly influenced by the GC content of folded structures at the mRNA entry site. Furthermore, force applied to the ends of the hairpin to favour its unfolding significantly speeds translation. Quantitative analysis of the force dependence of its helicase activity reveals that the ribosome, unlike previously studied helicases, uses two distinct active mechanisms to unwind mRNA structure: it destabilizes the helical junction at the mRNA entry site by biasing its thermal fluctuations towards the open state, increasing the probability of the ribosome translocating unhindered; and it mechanically pulls apart the mRNA single strands of the closed junction during the conformational changes that accompany ribosome translocation. The second of these mechanisms ensures a minimal basal rate of translation in the cell; specialized, mechanically stable structures are required to stall the ribosome temporarily. Our results establish a quantitative mechanical basis for understanding the mechanism of regulation of the elongation rate of translation by structured mRNAs. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  9. Nucleotide composition bias and codon usage trends of gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-06-10

    Jun 10, 2015 ... In a wide variety of organisms, synonymous codons are selected with different ... In addition, a series of GC skew and AT skew data was calculated for codon positions 1, ..... bias from different perspectives. Interestingly .... This study was supported by programme for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative ...

  10. Asparaginase treatment side-effects may be due to genes with homopolymeric Asn codons (Review-Hypothesis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    BANERJI, JULIAN

    2015-01-01

    The present treatment of childhood T-cell leukemias involves the systemic administration of prokary-otic L-asparaginase (ASNase), which depletes plasma Asparagine (Asn) and inhibits protein synthesis. The mechanism of therapeutic action of ASNase is poorly understood, as are the etiologies of the side-effects incurred by treatment. Protein expression from genes bearing Asn homopolymeric coding regions (N-hCR) may be particularly susceptible to Asn level fluctuation. In mammals, N-hCR are rare, short and conserved. In humans, misfunctions of genes encoding N-hCR are associated with a cluster of disorders that mimic ASNase therapy side-effects which include impaired glycemic control, dislipidemia, pancreatitis, compromised vascular integrity, and neurological dysfunction. This paper proposes that dysregulation of Asn homeostasis, potentially even by ASNase produced by the microbiome, may contribute to several clinically important syndromes by altering expression of N-hCR bearing genes. By altering amino acid abundance and modulating ribosome translocation rates at codon repeats, the microbiomic environment may contribute to genome decoding and to shaping the proteome. We suggest that impaired translation at poly Asn codons elevates diabetes risk and severity. PMID:26178806

  11. Asparaginase treatment side-effects may be due to genes with homopolymeric Asn codons (Review-Hypothesis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Julian

    2015-09-01

    The present treatment of childhood T-cell leukemias involves the systemic administration of prokaryotic L-asparaginase (ASNase), which depletes plasma Asparagine (Asn) and inhibits protein synthesis. The mechanism of therapeutic action of ASNase is poorly understood, as are the etiologies of the side-effects incurred by treatment. Protein expression from genes bearing Asn homopolymeric coding regions (N-hCR) may be particularly susceptible to Asn level fluctuation. In mammals, N-hCR are rare, short and conserved. In humans, misfunctions of genes encoding N-hCR are associated with a cluster of disorders that mimic ASNase therapy side-effects which include impaired glycemic control, dislipidemia, pancreatitis, compromised vascular integrity, and neurological dysfunction. This paper proposes that dysregulation of Asn homeostasis, potentially even by ASNase produced by the microbiome, may contribute to several clinically important syndromes by altering expression of N-hCR bearing genes. By altering amino acid abundance and modulating ribosome translocation rates at codon repeats, the microbiomic environment may contribute to genome decoding and to shaping the proteome. We suggest that impaired translation at poly Asn codons elevates diabetes risk and severity.

  12. One Gene and Two Proteins: a Leaderless mRNA Supports the Translation of a Shorter Form of the Shigella VirF Regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Letizia Di Martino

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available VirF, an AraC-like activator, is required to trigger a regulatory cascade that initiates the invasive program of Shigella spp., the etiological agents of bacillary dysentery in humans. VirF expression is activated upon entry into the host and depends on many environmental signals. Here, we show that the virF mRNA is translated into two proteins, the major form, VirF30 (30 kDa, and the shorter VirF21 (21 kDa, lacking the N-terminal segment. By site-specific mutagenesis and toeprint analysis, we identified the translation start sites of VirF30 and VirF21 and showed that the two different forms of VirF arise from differential translation. Interestingly, in vitro and in vivo translation experiments showed that VirF21 is also translated from a leaderless mRNA (llmRNA whose 5′ end is at position +309/+310, only 1 or 2 nucleotides upstream of the ATG84 start codon of VirF21. The llmRNA is transcribed from a gene-internal promoter, which we identified here. Functional analysis revealed that while VirF30 is responsible for activation of the virulence system, VirF21 negatively autoregulates virF expression itself. Since VirF21 modulates the intracellular VirF levels, this suggests that transcription of the llmRNA might occur when the onset of the virulence program is not required. We speculate that environmental cues, like stress conditions, may promote changes in virF mRNA transcription and preferential translation of llmRNA.

  13. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Synonymous Codon Usage Patterns in Riemerella anatipestifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jibin Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Riemerella anatipestifer (RA belongs to the Flavobacteriaceae family and can cause a septicemia disease in poultry. The synonymous codon usage patterns of bacteria reflect a series of evolutionary changes that enable bacteria to improve tolerance of the various environments. We detailed the codon usage patterns of RA isolates from the available 12 sequenced genomes by multiple codon and statistical analysis. Nucleotide compositions and relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU analysis revealed that A or U ending codons are predominant in RA. Neutrality analysis found no significant correlation between GC12 and GC3 (p > 0.05. Correspondence analysis and ENc-plot results showed that natural selection dominated over mutation in the codon usage bias. The tree of cluster analysis based on RSCU was concordant with dendrogram based on genomic BLAST by neighbor-joining method. By comparative analysis, about 50 highly expressed genes that were orthologs across all 12 strains were found in the top 5% of high CAI value. Based on these CAI values, we infer that RA contains a number of predicted highly expressed coding sequences, involved in transcriptional regulation and metabolism, reflecting their requirement for dealing with diverse environmental conditions. These results provide some useful information on the mechanisms that contribute to codon usage bias and evolution of RA.

  14. Dendritic cell nuclear protein-1, a novel depression-related protein, upregulates corticotropin-releasing hormone expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Tian; Wang, Shanshan; Ren, Haigang; Qi, Xin-Rui; Luchetti, Sabina; Kamphuis, Willem; Zhou, Jiang-Ning; Wang, Guanghui; Swaab, Dick F.

    2010-01-01

    The recently discovered dendritic cell nuclear protein-1 is the product of a novel candidate gene for major depression. The A allele encodes full-length dendritic cell nuclear protein-1, while the T allele encodes a premature termination of translation at codon number 117 on chromosome 5. In the

  15. Comparative Mitogenomics of Plant Bugs (Hemiptera: Miridae): Identifying the AGG Codon Reassignments between Serine and Lysine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Song, Fan; Cai, Wanzhi

    2014-01-01

    Insect mitochondrial genomes are very important to understand the molecular evolution as well as for phylogenetic and phylogeographic studies of the insects. The Miridae are the largest family of Heteroptera encompassing more than 11,000 described species and of great economic importance. For better understanding the diversity and the evolution of plant bugs, we sequence five new mitochondrial genomes and present the first comparative analysis of nine mitochondrial genomes of mirids available to date. Our result showed that gene content, gene arrangement, base composition and sequences of mitochondrial transcription termination factor were conserved in plant bugs. Intra-genus species shared more conserved genomic characteristics, such as nucleotide and amino acid composition of protein-coding genes, secondary structure and anticodon mutations of tRNAs, and non-coding sequences. Control region possessed several distinct characteristics, including: variable size, abundant tandem repetitions, and intra-genus conservation; and was useful in evolutionary and population genetic studies. The AGG codon reassignments were investigated between serine and lysine in the genera Adelphocoris and other cimicomorphans. Our analysis revealed correlated evolution between reassignments of the AGG codon and specific point mutations at the antidocons of tRNALys and tRNASer(AGN). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that mitochondrial genome sequences were useful in resolving family level relationship of Cimicomorpha. Comparative evolutionary analysis of plant bug mitochondrial genomes allowed the identification of previously neglected coding genes or non-coding regions as potential molecular markers. The finding of the AGG codon reassignments between serine and lysine indicated the parallel evolution of the genetic code in Hemiptera mitochondrial genomes. PMID:24988409

  16. Codon Distribution in Error-Detecting Circular Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Fimmel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1957, Francis Crick et al. suggested an ingenious explanation for the process of frame maintenance. The idea was based on the notion of comma-free codes. Although Crick’s hypothesis proved to be wrong, in 1996, Arquès and Michel discovered the existence of a weaker version of such codes in eukaryote and prokaryote genomes, namely the so-called circular codes. Since then, circular code theory has invariably evoked great interest and made significant progress. In this article, the codon distributions in maximal comma-free, maximal self-complementary C3 and maximal self-complementary circular codes are discussed, i.e., we investigate in how many of such codes a given codon participates. As the main (and surprising result, it is shown that the codons can be separated into very few classes (three, or five, or six with respect to their frequency. Moreover, the distribution classes can be hierarchically ordered as refinements from maximal comma-free codes via maximal self-complementary C3 codes to maximal self-complementary circular codes.

  17. Codon Distribution in Error-Detecting Circular Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimmel, Elena; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2016-03-15

    In 1957, Francis Crick et al. suggested an ingenious explanation for the process of frame maintenance. The idea was based on the notion of comma-free codes. Although Crick's hypothesis proved to be wrong, in 1996, Arquès and Michel discovered the existence of a weaker version of such codes in eukaryote and prokaryote genomes, namely the so-called circular codes. Since then, circular code theory has invariably evoked great interest and made significant progress. In this article, the codon distributions in maximal comma-free, maximal self-complementary C³ and maximal self-complementary circular codes are discussed, i.e., we investigate in how many of such codes a given codon participates. As the main (and surprising) result, it is shown that the codons can be separated into very few classes (three, or five, or six) with respect to their frequency. Moreover, the distribution classes can be hierarchically ordered as refinements from maximal comma-free codes via maximal self-complementary C(3) codes to maximal self-complementary circular codes.

  18. Insights on the evolution of metabolic networks of unicellular translationally biased organisms from transcriptomic data and sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Alessandra; Madden, Richard

    2005-10-01

    Codon bias is related to metabolic functions in translationally biased organisms, and two facts are argued about. First, genes with high codon bias describe in meaningful ways the metabolic characteristics of the organism; important metabolic pathways corresponding to crucial characteristics of the lifestyle of an organism, such as photosynthesis, nitrification, anaerobic versus aerobic respiration, sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and others, happen to involve especially biased genes. Second, gene transcriptional levels of sets of experiments representing a significant variation of biological conditions strikingly confirm, in the case of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that metabolic preferences are detectable by purely statistical analysis: the high metabolic activity of yeast during fermentation is encoded in the high bias of enzymes involved in the associated pathways, suggesting that this genome was affected by a strong evolutionary pressure that favored a predominantly fermentative metabolism of yeast in the wild. The ensemble of metabolic pathways involving enzymes with high codon bias is rather well defined and remains consistent across many species, even those that have not been considered as translationally biased, such as Helicobacter pylori, for instance, reveal some weak form of translational bias for this genome. We provide numerical evidence, supported by experimental data, of these facts and conclude that the metabolic networks of translationally biased genomes, observable today as projections of eons of evolutionary pressure, can be analyzed numerically and predictions of the role of specific pathways during evolution can be derived. The new concepts of Comparative Pathway Index, used to compare organisms with respect to their metabolic networks, and Evolutionary Pathway Index, used to detect evolutionarily meaningful bias in the genetic code from transcriptional data, are introduced.

  19. Lost in Translation: Defects in Transfer RNA Modifications and Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bednářová

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are key molecules participating in protein synthesis. To augment their functionality they undergo extensive post-transcriptional modifications and, as such, are subject to regulation at multiple levels including transcription, transcript processing, localization and ribonucleoside base modification. Post-transcriptional enzyme-catalyzed modification of tRNA occurs at a number of base and sugar positions and influences specific anticodon–codon interactions and regulates translation, its efficiency and fidelity. This phenomenon of nucleoside modification is most remarkable and results in a rich structural diversity of tRNA of which over 100 modified nucleosides have been characterized. Most often these hypermodified nucleosides are found in the wobble position of tRNAs, where they play a direct role in codon recognition as well as in maintaining translational efficiency and fidelity, etc. Several recent studies have pointed to a link between defects in tRNA modifications and human diseases including neurological disorders. Therefore, defects in tRNA modifications in humans need intensive characterization at the enzymatic and mechanistic level in order to pave the way to understand how lack of such modifications are associated with neurological disorders with the ultimate goal of gaining insights into therapeutic interventions.

  20. Dynamic Modeling of GAIT System Reveals Transcriptome Expansion and Translational Trickle Control Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Peng; Potdar, Alka A.; Arif, Abul; Ray, Partho Sarothi; Mukhopadhyay, Rupak; Willard, Belinda; Xu, Yichi; Yan, Jun; Saidel, Gerald M.; Fox, Paul L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms superimpose “fine-tuning” control upon “on-off” switches characteristic of gene transcription. We have exploited computational modeling with experimental validation to resolve an anomalous relationship between mRNA expression and protein synthesis. Differential GAIT (Gamma-interferon Activated Inhibitor of Translation) complex activation repressed VEGF-A synthesis to a low, constant rate despite high, variable VEGFA mRNA expression. Dynamic model simulations indicated the presence of an unidentified, inhibitory GAIT element-interacting factor. We discovered a truncated form of glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS), the GAIT constituent that binds the 3’-UTR GAIT element in target transcripts. The truncated protein, EPRSN1, prevents binding of functional GAIT complex. EPRSN1 mRNA is generated by a remarkable polyadenylation-directed conversion of a Tyr codon in the EPRS coding sequence to a stop codon (PAY*). By low-level protection of GAIT element-bearing transcripts, EPRSN1 imposes a robust “translational trickle” of target protein expression. Genome-wide analysis shows PAY* generates multiple truncated transcripts thereby contributing to transcriptome expansion. PMID:22386318

  1. Bacillus anthracis genome organization in light of whole transcriptome sequencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey; Zhu, Wenhan; Passalacqua, Karla D.; Bergman, Nicholas; Borodovsky, Mark

    2010-03-22

    Emerging knowledge of whole prokaryotic transcriptomes could validate a number of theoretical concepts introduced in the early days of genomics. What are the rules connecting gene expression levels with sequence determinants such as quantitative scores of promoters and terminators? Are translation efficiency measures, e.g. codon adaptation index and RBS score related to gene expression? We used the whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing of a bacterial pathogen Bacillus anthracis to assess correlation of gene expression level with promoter, terminator and RBS scores, codon adaptation index, as well as with a new measure of gene translational efficiency, average translation speed. We compared computational predictions of operon topologies with the transcript borders inferred from RNA-Seq reads. Transcriptome mapping may also improve existing gene annotation. Upon assessment of accuracy of current annotation of protein-coding genes in the B. anthracis genome we have shown that the transcriptome data indicate existence of more than a hundred genes missing in the annotation though predicted by an ab initio gene finder. Interestingly, we observed that many pseudogenes possess not only a sequence with detectable coding potential but also promoters that maintain transcriptional activity.

  2. Conformational stabilization of the membrane embedded targeting domain of the lysosomal peptide transporter TAPL for solution NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumulka, Franz [Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institute of Biochemistry, Biocenter (Germany); Roos, Christian; Loehr, Frank [Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry, Biocenter (Germany); Bock, Christoph [Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institute of Biochemistry, Biocenter (Germany); Bernhard, Frank; Doetsch, Volker [Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry, Biocenter (Germany); Abele, Rupert, E-mail: abele@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe-University Frankfurt, Institute of Biochemistry, Biocenter (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The ATP binding cassette transporter TAPL translocates cytosolic peptides into the lumen of lysosomes driven by the hydrolysis of ATP. Functionally, this transporter can be divided into coreTAPL, comprising the transport function, and an additional N-terminal transmembrane domain called TMD0, which is essential for lysosomal targeting and mediates the interaction with the lysosomal associated membrane proteins LAMP-1 and LAMP-2. To elucidate the structure of this unique domain, we developed protocols for the production of high quantities of cell-free expressed TMD0 by screening different N-terminal expression tags. Independently of the amino acid sequence, high expression was detected for AU-rich sequences in the first seven codons, decreasing the free energy of RNA secondary structure formation at translation initiation. Furthermore, avoiding NGG codons in the region of translation initiation demonstrated a positive effect on expression. For NMR studies, conditions were optimized for high solubilization efficiency, long-term stability, and high quality spectra. A most critical step was the careful exchange of the detergent used for solubilization by the detergent dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine. Several constructs of different size were tested in order to stabilize the fold of TMD0 as well as to reduce the conformation exchange. NMR spectra with sufficient resolution and homogeneity were finally obtained with a TMD0 derivative only modified by a C-terminal His{sub 10}-tag and containing a codon optimized AT-rich sequence.

  3. Global translational impacts of the loss of the tRNA modification t6A in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C. Thiaville

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The universal tRNA modification t6A is found at position 37 of nearly all tRNAs decoding ANN codons. The absence of t6A37 leads to severe growth defects in baker’s yeast, phenotypes similar to those caused by defects in mcm5s2U34 synthesis. Mutants in mcm5s2U34 can be suppressed by overexpression of tRNALysUUU, but we show t6A phenotypes could not be suppressed by expressing any individual ANN decoding tRNA, and t6A and mcm5s2U are not determinants for each other’s formation. Our results suggest that t6A deficiency, like mcm5s2U deficiency, leads to protein folding defects, and show that the absence of t6A led to stress sensitivities (heat, ethanol, salt and sensitivity to TOR pathway inhibitors. Additionally, L-homoserine suppressed the slow growth phenotype seen in t6A-deficient strains, and proteins aggregates and Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs were increased in the mutants. The global consequences on translation caused by t6A absence were examined by ribosome profiling. Interestingly, the absence of t6A did not lead to global translation defects, but did increase translation initiation at upstream non-AUG codons and increased frame-shifting in specific genes. Analysis of codon occupancy rates suggests that one of the major roles of t6A is to homogenize the process of elongation by slowing the elongation rate at codons decoded by high abundance tRNAs and I34:C3 pairs while increasing the elongation rate of rare tRNAs and G34:U3 pairs. This work reveals that the consequences of t6A absence are complex and multilayered and has set the stage to elucidate the molecular basis of the observed phenotypes.

  4. Codon usage is associated with the evolutionary age of genes in metazoan genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linial Nathan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Codon usage may vary significantly between different organisms and between genes within the same organism. Several evolutionary processes have been postulated to be the predominant determinants of codon usage: selection, mutation, and genetic drift. However, the relative contribution of each of these factors in different species remains debatable. The availability of complete genomes for tens of multicellular organisms provides an opportunity to inspect the relationship between codon usage and the evolutionary age of genes. Results We assign an evolutionary age to a gene based on the relative positions of its identified homologues in a standard phylogenetic tree. This yields a classification of all genes in a genome to several evolutionary age classes. The present study starts from the observation that each age class of genes has a unique codon usage and proceeds to provide a quantitative analysis of the codon usage in these classes. This observation is made for the genomes of Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, and Drosophila melanogaster. It is even more remarkable that the differences between codon usages in different age groups exhibit similar and consistent behavior in various organisms. While we find that GC content and gene length are also associated with the evolutionary age of genes, they can provide only a partial explanation for the observed codon usage. Conclusion While factors such as GC content, mutational bias, and selection shape the codon usage in a genome, the evolutionary history of an organism over hundreds of millions of years is an overlooked property that is strongly linked to GC content, protein length, and, even more significantly, to the codon usage of metazoan genomes.

  5. Biochemical features of genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with valine-to-isoleucine substitution at codon 180 on the prion protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoko; Sanjo, Nobuo; Hizume, Masaki; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ohgami, Tetsuya; Satoh, Katsuya; Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Yamada, Masahito; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Yokota, Takanori

    2018-02-19

    Valine-to-isoleucine substitution at codon 180 of the prion protein gene is only observed in patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and accounts for approximately half of all cases of genetic prion disease in Japan. In the present study, we investigated the biochemical characteristics of valine-to-isoleucine substitution at codon 180 in the prion protein gene, using samples obtained from the autopsied brains of seven patients with genetic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease exhibiting this mutation (diagnoses confirmed via neuropathological examination). Among these patients, we observed an absence of diglycosylated and monoglycosylated forms of PrP res at codon 181. Our findings further indicated that the abnormal prion proteins were composed of at least three components, although smaller carboxyl-terminal fragments were predominant. Western blot analyses revealed large amounts of PrP res in the cerebral neocortices, where neuropathological examination revealed marked spongiosis. Relatively smaller amounts of PrP res were detected in the hippocampus, where milder spongiosis was observed, than in the cerebral neocortex. These findings indicate that abnormal prion proteins in the neocortex are associated with severe toxicity, resulting in severe spongiosis. Our findings further indicate that the valine-to-isoleucine substitution is not a polymorphism, but rather an authentic pathogenic mutation associated with specific biochemical characteristics that differ from those observed in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Switches in Genomic GC Content Drive Shifts of Optimal Codons under Sustained Selection on Synonymous Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Tamarit, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The major codon preference model suggests that codons read by tRNAs in high concentrations are preferentially utilized in highly expressed genes. However, the identity of the optimal codons differs between species although the forces driving such changes are poorly understood. We suggest that these questions can be tackled by placing codon usage studies in a phylogenetic framework and that bacterial genomes with extreme nucleotide composition biases provide informative model systems. Switches in the background substitution biases from GC to AT have occurred in Gardnerella vaginalis (GC = 32%), and from AT to GC in Lactobacillus delbrueckii (GC = 62%) and Lactobacillus fermentum (GC = 63%). We show that despite the large effects on codon usage patterns by these switches, all three species evolve under selection on synonymous sites. In G. vaginalis, the dramatic codon frequency changes coincide with shifts of optimal codons. In contrast, the optimal codons have not shifted in the two Lactobacillus genomes despite an increased fraction of GC-ending codons. We suggest that all three species are in different phases of an on-going shift of optimal codons, and attribute the difference to a stronger background substitution bias and/or longer time since the switch in G. vaginalis. We show that comparative and correlative methods for optimal codon identification yield conflicting results for genomes in flux and discuss possible reasons for the mispredictions. We conclude that switches in the direction of the background substitution biases can drive major shifts in codon preference patterns even under sustained selection on synonymous codon sites. PMID:27540085

  7. ChloroMitoCU: Codon patterns across organelle genomes for functional genomics and evolutionary applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablok, Gaurav; Chen, Ting-Wen; Lee, Chi-Ching; Yang, Chi; Gan, Ruei-Chi; Wegrzyn, Jill L; Porta, Nicola L; Nayak, Kinshuk C; Huang, Po-Jung; Varotto, Claudio; Tang, Petrus

    2017-06-01

    Organelle genomes are widely thought to have arisen from reduction events involving cyanobacterial and archaeal genomes, in the case of chloroplasts, or α-proteobacterial genomes, in the case of mitochondria. Heterogeneity in base composition and codon preference has long been the subject of investigation of topics ranging from phylogenetic distortion to the design of overexpression cassettes for transgenic expression. From the overexpression point of view, it is critical to systematically analyze the codon usage patterns of the organelle genomes. In light of the importance of codon usage patterns in the development of hyper-expression organelle transgenics, we present ChloroMitoCU, the first-ever curated, web-based reference catalog of the codon usage patterns in organelle genomes. ChloroMitoCU contains the pre-compiled codon usage patterns of 328 chloroplast genomes (29,960 CDS) and 3,502 mitochondrial genomes (49,066 CDS), enabling genome-wide exploration and comparative analysis of codon usage patterns across species. ChloroMitoCU allows the phylogenetic comparison of codon usage patterns across organelle genomes, the prediction of codon usage patterns based on user-submitted transcripts or assembled organelle genes, and comparative analysis with the pre-compiled patterns across species of interest. ChloroMitoCU can increase our understanding of the biased patterns of codon usage in organelle genomes across multiple clades. ChloroMitoCU can be accessed at: http://chloromitocu.cgu.edu.tw/. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  8. Translation affects YoeB and MazF messenger RNA interferase activities by different mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Gerdes, Kenn

    2008-01-01

    Prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin loci encode mRNA cleaving enzymes that inhibit translation. Two types are known: those that cleave mRNA codons at the ribosomal A site and those that cleave any RNA site specifically. RelE of Escherichia coli cleaves mRNA at the ribosomal A site in vivo and in vitro bu...

  9. A Simple Combinatorial Codon Mutagenesis Method for Targeted Protein Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsare, Ketaki D; Andorfer, Mary C; Cardenas, Frida S; Chael, Julia R; Park, Hyun June; Lewis, Jared C

    2017-03-17

    Directed evolution is a powerful tool for optimizing enzymes, and mutagenesis methods that improve enzyme library quality can significantly expedite the evolution process. Here, we report a simple method for targeted combinatorial codon mutagenesis (CCM). To demonstrate the utility of this method for protein engineering, CCM libraries were constructed for cytochrome P450 BM3 , pfu prolyl oligopeptidase, and the flavin-dependent halogenase RebH; 10-26 sites were targeted for codon mutagenesis in each of these enzymes, and libraries with a tunable average of 1-7 codon mutations per gene were generated. Each of these libraries provided improved enzymes for their respective transformations, which highlights the generality, simplicity, and tunability of CCM for targeted protein engineering.

  10. Why has nature invented three stop codons of DNA and only one start codon?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křížek, Michal; Křížek, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 304, Jul 7 (2012), s. 183-187 ISSN 0022-5193 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100190803 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : DNA * RNA * stop codon * synchronization shift * drosophila genome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.351, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022519312001580

  11. Degradation of YRA1 Pre-mRNA in the cytoplasm requires translational repression, multiple modular intronic elements, Edc3p, and Mex67p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyun Dong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Intron-containing pre-mRNAs are normally retained and processed in the nucleus but are sometimes exported to the cytoplasm and degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD pathway as a consequence of their inclusion of intronic in-frame termination codons. When shunted to the cytoplasm by autoregulated nuclear export, the intron-containing yeast YRA1 pre-mRNA evades NMD and is targeted by a cytoplasmic decay pathway mediated by the decapping activator Edc3p. Here, we have elucidated this transcript-specific decay mechanism, showing that Edc3p-mediated YRA1 pre-mRNA degradation occurs independently of translation and is controlled through five structurally distinct but functionally interdependent modular elements in the YRA1 intron. Two of these elements target the pre-mRNA as an Edc3p substrate and the other three mediate transcript-specific translational repression. Translational repression of YRA1 pre-mRNA also requires the heterodimeric Mex67p/Mtr2p general mRNA export receptor, but not Edc3p, and serves to enhance Edc3p substrate specificity by inhibiting the susceptibility of this pre-mRNA to NMD. Collectively, our data indicate that YRA1 pre-mRNA degradation is a highly regulated process that proceeds through translational repression, substrate recognition by Edc3p, recruitment of the Dcp1p/Dcp2p decapping enzyme, and activation of decapping.

  12. Hon-yaku: a biology-driven Bayesian methodology for identifying translation initiation sites in prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Hoon Michiel JL

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational prediction methods are currently used to identify genes in prokaryote genomes. However, identification of the correct translation initiation sites remains a difficult task. Accurate translation initiation sites (TISs are important not only for the annotation of unknown proteins but also for the prediction of operons, promoters, and small non-coding RNA genes, as this typically makes use of the intergenic distance. A further problem is that most existing methods are optimized for Escherichia coli data sets; applying these methods to newly sequenced bacterial genomes may not result in an equivalent level of accuracy. Results Based on a biological representation of the translation process, we applied Bayesian statistics to create a score function for predicting translation initiation sites. In contrast to existing programs, our combination of methods uses supervised learning to optimally use the set of known translation initiation sites. We combined the Ribosome Binding Site (RBS sequence, the distance between the translation initiation site and the RBS sequence, the base composition of the start codon, the nucleotide composition (A-rich sequences following start codons, and the expected distribution of the protein length in a Bayesian scoring function. To further increase the prediction accuracy, we also took into account the operon orientation. The outcome of the procedure achieved a prediction accuracy of 93.2% in 858 E. coli genes from the EcoGene data set and 92.7% accuracy in a data set of 1243 Bacillus subtilis 'non-y' genes. We confirmed the performance in the GC-rich Gamma-Proteobacteria Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243. Conclusion Hon-yaku, being based on a careful choice of elements important in translation, improved the prediction accuracy in B. subtilis data sets and other bacteria except for E. coli. We believe that most remaining

  13. Codon 201Gly Polymorphic Type of the DCC Gene is Related to Disseminated Neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Tang Kong

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC gene is a potential tumor- suppressor gene on chromosome 18821.3. The relatively high frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH and loss of expression of this gene in neuroblastoma, especially in the advanced stages, imply the possibility of involvement of the DCC gene in progression of neuroblastoma. However, only few typical mutations have been identified in this gene, indicating that other possible mechanisms for the inactivation of this gene may exist. A polymorphic change (Arg to Gly at DCC codon 201 is related to advanced colorectal carcinoma and increases in the tumors with absent DCC protein expression. In order to understand whether this change is associated with the development or progression of neuroblastoma, we investigated codon 201 polymorphism of the DCC gene in 102 primary neuroblastomas by polymerase chain reaction single-strand conformation polymorphism. We found no missense or nonsense mutations, but a polymorphic change from CGA (Arg to GGA (Gly at codon 201 resulting in three types of polymorphism: codon 201Gly type, codon 201Arg/Gly type, and codon 201Arg type. The codon 201Gly type occurred more frequently in disseminated (stages IV and IVs neuroblastomas (72% than in localized (stages I, II, and III tumors (48% (P=.035, and normal controls (38% (P=.024. In addition, the codon 201Gly type was significantly more common in tumors found clinically (65% than in those found by mass screening (35% (P=.002. The results suggested that the codon 201Gly type of the DCC gene might be associated with a higher risk of disseminating neuroblastoma.

  14. Simultaneous Binding of Multiple EF-Tu Copies to Translating Ribosomes in Live Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafi, Mainak; Weisshaar, James C

    2018-01-16

    In bacteria, elongation factor Tu is a translational cofactor that forms ternary complexes with aminoacyl-tRNA (aa-tRNA) and GTP. Binding of a ternary complex to one of four flexible L7/L12 units on the ribosome tethers a charged tRNA in close proximity to the ribosomal A site. Two sequential tests for a match between the aa-tRNA anticodon and the current mRNA codon then follow. Because one elongation cycle can occur in as little as 50 ms and the vast majority of aa-tRNA copies are not cognate with the current mRNA codon, this testing must occur rapidly. We present a single-molecule localization and tracking study of fluorescently labeled EF-Tu in live Escherichia coli Imaging at 2 ms/frame distinguishes 60% slowly diffusing EF-Tu copies (assigned as transiently bound to translating ribosome) from 40% rapidly diffusing copies (assigned as a mixture of free ternary complexes and free EF-Tu). Combining these percentages with copy number estimates, we infer that the four L7/L12 sites are essentially saturated with ternary complexes in vivo. The results corroborate an earlier inference that all four sites can simultaneously tether ternary complexes near the A site, creating a high local concentration that may greatly enhance the rate of testing of aa-tRNAs. Our data and a combinatorial argument both suggest that the initial recognition test for a codon-anticodon match occurs in less than 1 to 2 ms per aa-tRNA copy. The results refute a recent study (A. Plochowietz, I. Farrell, Z. Smilansky, B. S. Cooperman, and A. N. Kapanidis, Nucleic Acids Res 45:926-937, 2016, https://doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkw787) of tRNA diffusion in E. coli that inferred that aa-tRNAs arrive at the ribosomal A site as bare monomers, not as ternary complexes. IMPORTANCE Ribosomes catalyze translation of the mRNA codon sequence into the corresponding sequence of amino acids within the nascent polypeptide chain. Polypeptide elongation can be as fast as 50 ms per added amino acid. Each amino acid

  15. Polymorphism at codon 36 of the p53 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, C A; Brown, D L; Mitsudomi, T; Ikagaki, N; Wong, A; Wasserman, R; Womer, R B; Biegel, J A

    1994-01-01

    A polymorphism at codon 36 in exon 4 of the p53 gene was identified by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and direct sequencing of genomic DNA PCR products. The polymorphic allele, present in the heterozygous state in genomic DNAs of four of 100 individuals (4%), changes the codon 36 CCG to CCA, eliminates a FinI restriction site and creates a BccI site. Including this polymorphism there are four known polymorphisms in the p53 coding sequence.

  16. A nutrient-driven tRNA modification alters translational fidelity and genome-wide protein coding across an animal genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaborske, John M; DuMont, Vanessa L Bauer; Wallace, Edward W J; Pan, Tao; Aquadro, Charles F; Drummond, D Allan

    2014-12-01

    Natural selection favors efficient expression of encoded proteins, but the causes, mechanisms, and fitness consequences of evolved coding changes remain an area of aggressive inquiry. We report a large-scale reversal in the relative translational accuracy of codons across 12 fly species in the Drosophila/Sophophora genus. Because the reversal involves pairs of codons that are read by the same genomically encoded tRNAs, we hypothesize, and show by direct measurement, that a tRNA anticodon modification from guanosine to queuosine has coevolved with these genomic changes. Queuosine modification is present in most organisms but its function remains unclear. Modification levels vary across developmental stages in D. melanogaster, and, consistent with a causal effect, genes maximally expressed at each stage display selection for codons that are most accurate given stage-specific queuosine modification levels. In a kinetic model, the known increased affinity of queuosine-modified tRNA for ribosomes increases the accuracy of cognate codons while reducing the accuracy of near-cognate codons. Levels of queuosine modification in D. melanogaster reflect bioavailability of the precursor queuine, which eukaryotes scavenge from the tRNAs of bacteria and absorb in the gut. These results reveal a strikingly direct mechanism by which recoding of entire genomes results from changes in utilization of a nutrient.

  17. A nutrient-driven tRNA modification alters translational fidelity and genome-wide protein coding across an animal genus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Zaborske

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural selection favors efficient expression of encoded proteins, but the causes, mechanisms, and fitness consequences of evolved coding changes remain an area of aggressive inquiry. We report a large-scale reversal in the relative translational accuracy of codons across 12 fly species in the Drosophila/Sophophora genus. Because the reversal involves pairs of codons that are read by the same genomically encoded tRNAs, we hypothesize, and show by direct measurement, that a tRNA anticodon modification from guanosine to queuosine has coevolved with these genomic changes. Queuosine modification is present in most organisms but its function remains unclear. Modification levels vary across developmental stages in D. melanogaster, and, consistent with a causal effect, genes maximally expressed at each stage display selection for codons that are most accurate given stage-specific queuosine modification levels. In a kinetic model, the known increased affinity of queuosine-modified tRNA for ribosomes increases the accuracy of cognate codons while reducing the accuracy of near-cognate codons. Levels of queuosine modification in D. melanogaster reflect bioavailability of the precursor queuine, which eukaryotes scavenge from the tRNAs of bacteria and absorb in the gut. These results reveal a strikingly direct mechanism by which recoding of entire genomes results from changes in utilization of a nutrient.

  18. Genomic characteristics comparisons of 12 food-related filamentous fungi in tRNA gene set, codon usage and amino acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wanping; Xie, Ting; Shao, Yanchun; Chen, Fusheng

    2012-04-10

    Filamentous fungi are widely exploited in food industry due to their abilities to secrete large amounts of enzymes and metabolites. The recent availability of fungal genome sequences has provided an opportunity to explore the genomic characteristics of these food-related filamentous fungi. In this paper, we selected 12 representative filamentous fungi in the areas of food processing and safety, which were Aspergillus clavatus, A. flavus, A. fumigatus, A. nidulans, A. niger, A. oryzae, A. terreus, Monascus ruber, Neurospora crassa, Penicillium chrysogenum, Rhizopus oryzae and Trichoderma reesei, and did the comparative studies of their genomic characteristics of tRNA gene distribution, codon usage pattern and amino acid composition. The results showed that the copy numbers greatly differed among isoaccepting tRNA genes and the distribution seemed to be related with translation process. The results also revealed that genome compositional variation probably constrained the base choice at the third codon, and affected the overall amino acid composition but seemed to have little effect on the integrated physicochemical characteristics of overall amino acids. The further analysis suggested that the wobble pairing and base modification were the important mechanisms in codon-anticodon interaction. In the scope of authors' knowledge, it is the first report about the genomic characteristics analysis of food-related filamentous fungi, which would be informative for the analysis of filamentous fungal genome evolution and their practical application in food industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of a codon optimization strategy using the efor RED reporter gene as a test case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Chee-Hoo; Yarkoni, Orr; Ajioka, James; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Nathan, Sheila

    2018-04-01

    Synthetic biology is a platform that enables high-level synthesis of useful products such as pharmaceutically related drugs, bioplastics and green fuels from synthetic DNA constructs. Large-scale expression of these products can be achieved in an industrial compliant host such as Escherichia coli. To maximise the production of recombinant proteins in a heterologous host, the genes of interest are usually codon optimized based on the codon usage of the host. However, the bioinformatics freeware available for standard codon optimization might not be ideal in determining the best sequence for the synthesis of synthetic DNA. Synthesis of incorrect sequences can prove to be a costly error and to avoid this, a codon optimization strategy was developed based on the E. coli codon usage using the efor RED reporter gene as a test case. This strategy replaces codons encoding for serine, leucine, proline and threonine with the most frequently used codons in E. coli. Furthermore, codons encoding for valine and glycine are substituted with the second highly used codons in E. coli. Both the optimized and original efor RED genes were ligated to the pJS209 plasmid backbone using Gibson Assembly and the recombinant DNAs were transformed into E. coli E. cloni 10G strain. The fluorescence intensity per cell density of the optimized sequence was improved by 20% compared to the original sequence. Hence, the developed codon optimization strategy is proposed when designing an optimal sequence for heterologous protein production in E. coli.

  20. NetAcet: prediction of N-terminal acetylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiemer, Lars; Bendtsen, Jannick Dyrløv; Blom, Nikolaj

    2005-01-01

    Summary: We present here a neural network based method for prediction of N-terminal acetylation-by far the most abundant post-translational modification in eukaryotes. The method was developed on a yeast dataset for N-acetyltransferase A (NatA) acetylation, which is the type of N-acetylation for ......Summary: We present here a neural network based method for prediction of N-terminal acetylation-by far the most abundant post-translational modification in eukaryotes. The method was developed on a yeast dataset for N-acetyltransferase A (NatA) acetylation, which is the type of N...

  1. Transgenic rice expressing a codon-modified synthetic CP4-EPSPS confers tolerance to broad-spectrum herbicide, glyphosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhapekar, Sushil; Raghavendrarao, Sanagala; Pavan, Gadamchetty; Ramakrishna, Chopperla; Singh, Vivek Kumar; Phanindra, Mullapudi Lakshmi Venkata; Dhandapani, Gurusamy; Sreevathsa, Rohini; Ananda Kumar, Polumetla

    2015-05-01

    Highly tolerant herbicide-resistant transgenic rice was developed by expressing codon-modified synthetic CP4--EPSPS. The transformants could tolerate up to 1% commercial glyphosate and has the potential to be used for DSR (direct-seeded rice). Weed infestation is one of the major biotic stress factors that is responsible for yield loss in direct-seeded rice (DSR). Herbicide-resistant rice has potential to improve the efficiency of weed management under DSR. Hence, the popular indica rice cultivar IR64, was genetically modified using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation with a codon-optimized CP4-EPSPS (5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase) gene, with N-terminal chloroplast targeting peptide from Petunia hybrida. Integration of the transgenes in the selected rice plants was confirmed by Southern hybridization and expression by Northern and herbicide tolerance assays. Transgenic plants showed EPSPS enzyme activity even at high concentrations of glyphosate, compared to untransformed control plants. T0, T1 and T2 lines were tested by herbicide bioassay and it was confirmed that the transgenic rice could tolerate up to 1% of commercial Roundup, which is five times more in dose used to kill weeds under field condition. All together, the transgenic rice plants developed in the present study could be used efficiently to overcome weed menace.

  2. Translational recognition of the 5'-terminal 7-methylguanosine of globin messenger RNA as a function of ionic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, L Y; Rhoads, R E

    1978-06-13

    The translation of rabbit globin mRNA in cell-free systems derived from either wheat germ or rabbit reticulocyte was studied in the presence of various analogues of the methylated 5' terminus (cap) as a function of ionic strength. Inhibition by these analogues was strongly enhanced by increasing concentrations of KCl, K(OAc), Na(OAc), or NH4(OAc). At appropriate concentrations of K(OAc), both cell-free systems were equally sensitive to inhibition by m7GTP. At 50 mM K(OAc), the reticulocyte system was not sensitive to m7GMP or m7GTP, but at higher concentrations up to 200 mM K(OAc), both nucleotides caused strong inhibition. The compound in m7G5'ppp5'Am was inhibitory at all concentrations of K(OAc) ranging from 50 to 200 mM, although more strongly so at the higher concentrations. Over the same range of nucleotide concentrations, the compounds GMP, GTP, and G5'ppp5'Am were not inhibitors. The mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis of the translation product was that of globin at all K(OAc) concentrations in the presence of m7GTP. Globin mRNA from which the terminal m7GTP group had been removed by chemical treatment (periodate-cyclohexylamine-alkaline phosphatase) or enzymatic treatment (tobacco acid pyrophosphatase-alkaline phosphatase) was translated less efficiently than untreated globin mRNA at higher K(OAc) concentrations, but retained appreciable activity at low K(OAc) concentrations.

  3. Large-Scale Genomic Analysis of Codon Usage in Dengue Virus and Evaluation of Its Phylogenetic Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Ramírez, Edgar E.; Salazar, Ma Isabel; López-López, María de Jesús; Salas-Benito, Juan Santiago; Sánchez-Varela, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of dengue virus (DENV) genome sequences available allows identifying the contributing factors to DENV evolution. In the present study, the codon usage in serotypes 1–4 (DENV1–4) has been explored for 3047 sequenced genomes using different statistics methods. The correlation analysis of total GC content (GC) with GC content at the three nucleotide positions of codons (GC1, GC2, and GC3) as well as the effective number of codons (ENC, ENCp) versus GC3 plots revealed mutational bias and purifying selection pressures as the major forces influencing the codon usage, but with distinct pressure on specific nucleotide position in the codon. The correspondence analysis (CA) and clustering analysis on relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) within each serotype showed similar clustering patterns to the phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences for DENV1–4. These clustering patterns are strongly related to the virus geographic origin. The phylogenetic dependence analysis also suggests that stabilizing selection acts on the codon usage bias. Our analysis of a large scale reveals new feature on DENV genomic evolution. PMID:25136631

  4. A Portable Piezoelectric Tactile Terminal for Braille Readers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Velázquez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel concept on reading assistive technologies for the blind: the TactoBook, a system that is able to translate entire electronic books (eBooks to Braille code and to reproduce them in portable electronic Braille terminals. The TactoBook consists of a computer-based translator that converts fast and automatically any eBook into Braille. The Braille version of the eBook is then encrypted as a file and stored in a USB memory drive which is later inserted and reproduced in a compact, lightweight, and highly-portable tactile terminal. In particular, this paper presents a piezoelectric ultrasonic actuation approach to design and implement such portable Braille terminal. Actuating mechanism, design concept, first prototype, and performance results are presented and discussed.

  5. Genomic analysis of codon usage shows influence of mutation pressure, natural selection, and host features on Marburg virus evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Izza; Butt, Azeem M; Tahir, Shifa; Idrees, Muhammad; Tong, Yigang

    2015-08-26

    The Marburg virus (MARV) has a negative-sense single-stranded RNA genome, belongs to the family Filoviridae, and is responsible for several outbreaks of highly fatal hemorrhagic fever. Codon usage patterns of viruses reflect a series of evolutionary changes that enable viruses to shape their survival rates and fitness toward the external environment and, most importantly, their hosts. To understand the evolution of MARV at the codon level, we report a comprehensive analysis of synonymous codon usage patterns in MARV genomes. Multiple codon analysis approaches and statistical methods were performed to determine overall codon usage patterns, biases in codon usage, and influence of various factors, including mutation pressure, natural selection, and its two hosts, Homo sapiens and Rousettus aegyptiacus. Nucleotide composition and relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis revealed that MARV shows mutation bias and prefers U- and A-ended codons to code amino acids. Effective number of codons analysis indicated that overall codon usage among MARV genomes is slightly biased. The Parity Rule 2 plot analysis showed that GC and AU nucleotides were not used proportionally which accounts for the presence of natural selection. Codon usage patterns of MARV were also found to be influenced by its hosts. This indicates that MARV have evolved codon usage patterns that are specific to both of its hosts. Moreover, selection pressure from R. aegyptiacus on the MARV RSCU patterns was found to be dominant compared with that from H. sapiens. Overall, mutation pressure was found to be the most important and dominant force that shapes codon usage patterns in MARV. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed codon usage analysis of MARV and extends our understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to codon usage and evolution of MARV.

  6. Codon usage and expression level of human mitochondrial 13 protein coding genes across six continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Supriyo; Uddin, Arif; Mazumder, Tarikul Huda; Choudhury, Monisha Nath; Malakar, Arup Kumar; Paul, Prosenjit; Halder, Binata; Deka, Himangshu; Mazumder, Gulshana Akthar; Barbhuiya, Riazul Ahmed; Barbhuiya, Masuk Ahmed; Devi, Warepam Jesmi

    2017-12-02

    The study of codon usage coupled with phylogenetic analysis is an important tool to understand the genetic and evolutionary relationship of a gene. The 13 protein coding genes of human mitochondria are involved in electron transport chain for the generation of energy currency (ATP). However, no work has yet been reported on the codon usage of the mitochondrial protein coding genes across six continents. To understand the patterns of codon usage in mitochondrial genes across six different continents, we used bioinformatic analyses to analyze the protein coding genes. The codon usage bias was low as revealed from high ENC value. Correlation between codon usage and GC3 suggested that all the codons ending with G/C were positively correlated with GC3 but vice versa for A/T ending codons with the exception of ND4L and ND5 genes. Neutrality plot revealed that for the genes ATP6, COI, COIII, CYB, ND4 and ND4L, natural selection might have played a major role while mutation pressure might have played a dominant role in the codon usage bias of ATP8, COII, ND1, ND2, ND3, ND5 and ND6 genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that evolutionary relationships in each of 13 protein coding genes of human mitochondria were different across six continents and further suggested that geographical distance was an important factor for the origin and evolution of 13 protein coding genes of human mitochondria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Conflict Termination: Every Conflict Must End

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garza, Mario

    1997-01-01

    .... The operational commander and his staff must understand the nature of conflict termination and the post-conflict activities so that they will be able to effectively translate the desired end state...

  8. Large-Scale Genomic Analysis of Codon Usage in Dengue Virus and Evaluation of Its Phylogenetic Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar E. Lara-Ramírez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of dengue virus (DENV genome sequences available allows identifying the contributing factors to DENV evolution. In the present study, the codon usage in serotypes 1–4 (DENV1–4 has been explored for 3047 sequenced genomes using different statistics methods. The correlation analysis of total GC content (GC with GC content at the three nucleotide positions of codons (GC1, GC2, and GC3 as well as the effective number of codons (ENC, ENCp versus GC3 plots revealed mutational bias and purifying selection pressures as the major forces influencing the codon usage, but with distinct pressure on specific nucleotide position in the codon. The correspondence analysis (CA and clustering analysis on relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU within each serotype showed similar clustering patterns to the phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences for DENV1–4. These clustering patterns are strongly related to the virus geographic origin. The phylogenetic dependence analysis also suggests that stabilizing selection acts on the codon usage bias. Our analysis of a large scale reveals new feature on DENV genomic evolution.

  9. Selection of functional 2A sequences within foot-and-mouth disease virus; requirements for the NPGP motif with a distinct codon bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjær, Jonas; Belsham, Graham J

    2018-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has a positive-sense ssRNA genome including a single, large, open reading frame. Splitting of the encoded polyprotein at the 2A/2B junction is mediated by the 2A peptide (18 residues long), which induces a nonproteolytic, cotranslational "cleavage" at its own C terminus. A conserved feature among variants of 2A is the C-terminal motif N 16 P 17 G 18 /P 19 , where P 19 is the first residue of 2B. It has been shown previously that certain amino acid substitutions can be tolerated at residues E 14 , S 15 , and N 16 within the 2A sequence of infectious FMDVs, but no variants at residues P 17 , G 18 , or P 19 have been identified. In this study, using highly degenerate primers, we analyzed if any other residues can be present at each position of the NPG/P motif within infectious FMDV. No alternative forms of this motif were found to be encoded by rescued FMDVs after two, three, or four passages. However, surprisingly, a clear codon preference for the wt nucleotide sequence encoding the NPGP motif within these viruses was observed. Indeed, the codons selected to code for P 17 and P 19 within this motif were distinct; thus the synonymous codons are not equivalent. © 2018 Kjær and Belsham; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  10. Using Student Writing and Lexical Analysis to Reveal Student Thinking about the Role of Stop Codons in the Central Dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, Luanna B; Smith, Michelle K; Knight, Jennifer K

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has shown that students have persistent difficulties in understanding how central dogma processes can be affected by a stop codon mutation. To explore these difficulties, we modified two multiple-choice questions from the Genetics Concept Assessment into three open-ended questions that asked students to write about how a stop codon mutation potentially impacts replication, transcription, and translation. We then used computer-assisted lexical analysis combined with human scoring to categorize student responses. The lexical analysis models showed high agreement with human scoring, demonstrating that this approach can be successfully used to analyze large numbers of student written responses. The results of this analysis show that students' ideas about one process in the central dogma can affect their thinking about subsequent and previous processes, leading to mixed models of conceptual understanding. © 2016 L. B. Prevost et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. HIV-1 Replication and the Cellular Eukaryotic Translation Apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Guerrero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic translation is a complex process composed of three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During infections by RNA- and DNA-viruses, the eukaryotic translation machinery is used to assure optimal viral protein synthesis. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1 uses several non-canonical pathways to translate its own proteins, such as leaky scanning, frameshifting, shunt, and cap-independent mechanisms. Moreover, HIV-1 modulates the host translation machinery by targeting key translation factors and overcomes different cellular obstacles that affect protein translation. In this review, we describe how HIV-1 proteins target several components of the eukaryotic translation machinery, which consequently improves viral translation and replication.

  12. Probable relationship between partitions of the set of codons and the origin of the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Dino G; Gallardo, Mauricio O; Osorio, Manuel I

    2014-03-01

    Here we study the distribution of randomly generated partitions of the set of amino acid-coding codons. Some results are an application from a previous work, about the Stirling numbers of the second kind and triplet codes, both to the cases of triplet codes having four stop codons, as in mammalian mitochondrial genetic code, and hypothetical doublet codes. Extending previous results, in this work it is found that the most probable number of blocks of synonymous codons, in a genetic code, is similar to the number of amino acids when there are four stop codons, as well as it could be for a primigenious doublet code. Also it is studied the integer partitions associated to patterns of synonymous codons and it is shown, for the canonical code, that the standard deviation inside an integer partition is one of the most probable. We think that, in some early epoch, the genetic code might have had a maximum of the disorder or entropy, independent of the assignment between codons and amino acids, reaching a state similar to "code freeze" proposed by Francis Crick. In later stages, maybe deterministic rules have reassigned codons to amino acids, forming the natural codes, such as the canonical code, but keeping the numerical features describing the set partitions and the integer partitions, like a "fossil numbers"; both kinds of partitions about the set of amino acid-coding codons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Animal products and K-ras codon 12 and 13 mutations in colon carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampman, E.; Voskuil, D.W.; Kraats, A.A. van; Balder, H.F.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, P. van 't

    2000-01-01

    K-ras gene mutations (codons 12 and 13) were determined by PCR-based mutant allele-specific amplification (MASA) in tumour tissue of 185 colon cancer patients: 36% harboured mutations, of which 82% were located in codon 12. High intakes of animal protein, calcium and poultry were differently

  14. Codon 129 polymorphism of prion protein gene in is not a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerusa Smid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of prion protein and amyloid-b oligomers has been demonstrated recently. Homozygosity at prion protein gene (PRNP codon 129 is associated with higher risk for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. This polymorphism has been addressed as a possible risk factor in Alzheimer disease (AD. Objective To describe the association between codon 129 polymorphisms and AD. Methods We investigated the association of codon 129 polymorphism of PRNP in 99 AD patients and 111 controls, and the association between this polymorphism and cognitive performance. Other polymorphisms of PRNP and additive effect of apolipoprotein E gene (ApoE were evaluated. Results Codon 129 genotype distribution in AD 45.5% methionine (MM, 42.2% methionine valine (MV, 12.1% valine (VV; and 39.6% MM, 50.5% MV, 9.9% VV among controls (p>0.05. There were no differences of cognitive performance concerning codon 129. Stratification according to ApoE genotype did not reveal difference between groups. Conclusion Codon 129 polymorphism is not a risk factor for AD in Brazilian patients.

  15. A Single Base Pair Mutation Encoding a Premature Stop Codon in the MIS type II receptor is Responsible for Canine Persistent Müllerian Duct Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiufeng; Wan, Shengqin; Pujar, Shashikant; Haskins, Mark E.; Schlafer, Donald H.; Lee, Mary M.; Meyers-Wallen, Vicki N.

    2008-01-01

    Müllerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS), a secreted glycoprotein in the Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-beta) family of growth factors, mediates regression of the Müllerian ducts during embryonic sex differentiation in males. In Persistent Müllerian Duct Syndrome (PMDS), rather than undergoing involution, the Müllerian ducts persist in males, giving rise to the uterus, Fallopian tubes, and upper vagina. Genetic defects in MIS or its receptor (MISRII) have been identified in patients with PMDS. The phenotype in the canine model of PMDS derived from the miniature schnauzer breed is strikingly similar to that of human patients. In this model, PMDS is inherited as a sex-limited autosomal recessive trait. Previous studies indicated that a defect in the MIS receptor or its downstream signaling pathway was likely to be causative of the canine syndrome. In this study the canine PMDS phenotype and clinical sequelae are described in detail. Affected and unaffected members of this pedigree are genotyped, identifying a single base pair substitution in MISRII that introduces a stop codon in exon 3. The homozygous mutation terminates translation at 80 amino acids, eliminating much of the extracellular domain and the entire transmembrane and intracellular signaling domains. Findings in this model may enable insights to be garnered from correlation of detailed clinical descriptions with molecular defects, which are not otherwise possible in the human syndrome. PMID:18723470

  16. Codon usage bias and phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial ND1 gene in pisces, aves, and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Arif; Choudhury, Monisha Nath; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2018-01-01

    The mitochondrially encoded NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase core subunit 1 (MT-ND1) gene is a subunit of the respiratory chain complex I and involved in the first step of the electron transport chain of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). To understand the pattern of compositional properties, codon usage and expression level of mitochondrial ND1 genes in pisces, aves, and mammals, we used bioinformatic approaches as no work was reported earlier. In this study, a perl script was used for calculating nucleotide contents and different codon usage bias parameters. The codon usage bias of MT-ND1 was low but the expression level was high as revealed from high ENC and CAI value. Correspondence analysis (COA) suggests that the pattern of codon usage for MT-ND1 gene is not same across species and that compositional constraint played an important role in codon usage pattern of this gene among pisces, aves, and mammals. From the regression equation of GC12 on GC3, it can be inferred that the natural selection might have played a dominant role while mutation pressure played a minor role in influencing the codon usage patterns. Further, ND1 gene has a discrepancy with cytochrome B (CYB) gene in preference of codons as evident from COA. The codon usage bias was low. It is influenced by nucleotide composition, natural selection, mutation pressure, length (number) of amino acids, and relative dinucleotide composition. This study helps in understanding the molecular biology, genetics, evolution of MT-ND1 gene, and also for designing a synthetic gene.

  17. Development of a Premature Stop Codon-detection method based on a bacterial two-hybrid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayorga Luis S

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of Premature Stop Codons (PSCs in human genes is very useful for the genetic diagnosis of different hereditary cancers, e.g. Familial Breast Cancer and Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC. The products of these PSCs are truncated proteins, detectable in vitro by the Protein Truncation Test and in vivo by using the living translation machinery of yeast or bacteria. These living strategies are based on the construction of recombinant plasmids where the human sequence of interest is inserted upstream of a reporter gene. Although simple, these assays have their limitations. The yeast system requires extensive work to enhance its specificity, and the bacterial systems yield many false results due to translation re-initiation events occurring post PSCs. Our aim was to design a recombinant plasmid useful for detecting PSCs in human genes and resistant to bacterial translation re-initiation interferences. Results A functional recombinant plasmid (pREAL was designed based on a bacterial two-hybrid system. In our design, the in vivo translation of fused fragments of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase triggers the production of cAMP giving rise to a selectable bacterial phenotype. When a gene of interest is inserted between the two fragments, any PSC inhibits the enzymatic activity of the product, and translation re-initiation events post-PSC yield separated inactive fragments. We demonstrated that the system can accurately detect PSCs in human genes by inserting mutated fragments of the brca1 and msh2 gene. Western Blot assays revealed translation re-initiation events in all the tested colonies, implying that a simpler plasmid would not be resistant to this source of false negative results. The application of the system to a HNPCC family with a nonsense mutation in the msh2 gene correctly diagnosed wild type homozygous and heterozygous patients. Conclusion The developed pREAL is applicable to the

  18. One Gene and Two Proteins: a Leaderless mRNA Supports the Translation of a Shorter Form of the Shigella VirF Regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Martino, Maria Letizia; Romilly, Cédric; Wagner, E Gerhart H; Colonna, Bianca; Prosseda, Gianni

    2016-11-08

    VirF, an AraC-like activator, is required to trigger a regulatory cascade that initiates the invasive program of Shigella spp., the etiological agents of bacillary dysentery in humans. VirF expression is activated upon entry into the host and depends on many environmental signals. Here, we show that the virF mRNA is translated into two proteins, the major form, VirF 30 (30 kDa), and the shorter VirF 21 (21 kDa), lacking the N-terminal segment. By site-specific mutagenesis and toeprint analysis, we identified the translation start sites of VirF 30 and VirF 21 and showed that the two different forms of VirF arise from differential translation. Interestingly, in vitro and in vivo translation experiments showed that VirF 21 is also translated from a leaderless mRNA (llmRNA) whose 5' end is at position +309/+310, only 1 or 2 nucleotides upstream of the ATG84 start codon of VirF 21 The llmRNA is transcribed from a gene-internal promoter, which we identified here. Functional analysis revealed that while VirF 30 is responsible for activation of the virulence system, VirF 21 negatively autoregulates virF expression itself. Since VirF 21 modulates the intracellular VirF levels, this suggests that transcription of the llmRNA might occur when the onset of the virulence program is not required. We speculate that environmental cues, like stress conditions, may promote changes in virF mRNA transcription and preferential translation of llmRNA. Shigella spp. are a major cause of dysentery in humans. In bacteria of this genus, the activation of the invasive program involves a multitude of signals that act on all layers of the gene regulatory hierarchy. By controlling the essential genes for host cell invasion, VirF is the key regulator of the switch from the noninvasive to the invasive phenotype. Here, we show that the Shigella virF gene encodes two proteins of different sizes, VirF 30 and VirF 21 , that are functionally distinct. The major form, VirF 30 , activates the genes

  19. Multifaceted regulation of translational readthrough by RNA replication elements in a tombusvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Cimino

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Translational readthrough of stop codons by ribosomes is a recoding event used by a variety of viruses, including plus-strand RNA tombusviruses. Translation of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp in tombusviruses is mediated using this strategy and we have investigated this process using a variety of in vitro and in vivo approaches. Our results indicate that readthrough generating the RdRp requires a novel long-range RNA-RNA interaction, spanning a distance of ∼3.5 kb, which occurs between a large RNA stem-loop located 3'-proximal to the stop codon and an RNA replication structure termed RIV at the 3'-end of the viral genome. Interestingly, this long-distance RNA-RNA interaction is modulated by mutually-exclusive RNA structures in RIV that represent a type of RNA switch. Moreover, a different long-range RNA-RNA interaction that was previously shown to be necessary for viral RNA replicase assembly was also required for efficient readthrough production of the RdRp. Accordingly, multiple replication-associated RNA elements are involved in modulating the readthrough event in tombusviruses and we propose an integrated mechanistic model to describe how this regulatory network could be advantageous by (i providing a quality control system for culling truncated viral genomes at an early stage in the replication process, (ii mediating cis-preferential replication of viral genomes, and (iii coordinating translational readthrough of the RdRp with viral genome replication. Based on comparative sequence analysis and experimental data, basic elements of this regulatory model extend to other members of Tombusviridae, as well as to viruses outside of this family.

  20. Improved secretory production of calf prochymosin by codon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-12

    Sep 12, 2011 ... results show that codon optimization and disruption of the PMR1 gene synergistically stimulate the secretion of ... With developments in recombinant DNA technology, .... regulated, it is of importance to optimize the variables.

  1. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli. Properties of the purified enzyme and primary structure of the prs gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Harlow, Kenneth W.; King, Cheryl J.

    1986-01-01

    Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (P-Rib-PP) synthetase of Escherichia coli has been purified to near homogeneity from a strain harboring the prs gene, encoding P-Rib-PP synthetase, on a multicopy plasmid. Analysis of the enzyme showed that it required inorganic phosphate for activity and for stability...... the UAA translation stop codon, within a Thy-rich region following an inverted repeat sequence, indicative of an rho-independent transcription terminator....

  2. Selective translational repression of truncated proteins from frameshift mutation-derived mRNAs in tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Tae You

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Frameshift and nonsense mutations are common in tumors with microsatellite instability, and mRNAs from these mutated genes have premature termination codons (PTCs. Abnormal mRNAs containing PTCs are normally degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD system. However, PTCs located within 50-55 nucleotides of the last exon-exon junction are not recognized by NMD (NMD-irrelevant, and some PTC-containing mRNAs can escape from the NMD system (NMD-escape. We investigated protein expression from NMD-irrelevant and NMD-escape PTC-containing mRNAs by Western blotting and transfection assays. We demonstrated that transfection of NMD-irrelevant PTC-containing genomic DNA of MARCKS generates truncated protein. In contrast, NMD-escape PTC-containing versions of hMSH3 and TGFBR2 generate normal levels of mRNA, but do not generate detectable levels of protein. Transfection of NMD-escape mutant TGFBR2 genomic DNA failed to generate expression of truncated proteins, whereas transfection of wild-type TGFBR2 genomic DNA or mutant PTC-containing TGFBR2 cDNA generated expression of wild-type protein and truncated protein, respectively. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism of gene expression regulation for PTC-containing mRNAs in which the deleterious transcripts are regulated either by NMD or translational repression.

  3. Alteration of the ATG start codon of the A* protein of bacteriophage [phi]X174 into an ATT codon yields a viable phage indicating that A* protein is not essential for [phi]X174 reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, P.D.; Liewerink, H.; Teeffelen, H.A.A.M. van; Mansfeld, A.D.M. van; Boom, J.M. van; Jansz, H.S.

    1987-01-01

    Bacteriophage X174 gene A encodes two proteins: the gene A protein and the smaller A* protein, which is synthesized from a translational start signal within the A gene in the same reading frame as the gene A protein. The gene A protein is involved in initiation, elongation and termination of rolling

  4. The same allele of translation initiation factor 4E mediates resistance against two Potyvirus spp. in Pisum sativum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Rasmussen, M.; Møller, I.S.; Tulinius, G.

    2007-01-01

    to linkage group VI together with other Potyvirus resistances. One of these, sbm1, confers resistance to strains of Pea seedborne mosaic virus and previously has been identified as a mutant allele of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E gene (eIF4E). Sequence comparison of eIF4E from BYMV...... was overcome, and virus from these plants had a codon change causing an Arg to His change at position 116 of the predicted viral genome-linked protein (VPg). Accordingly, plants carrying the wlv resistance gene were infected upon inoculation with BYMV-W derived from cDNA with a His codon at position 116...

  5. Triplet-Based Codon Organization Optimizes the Impact of Synonymous Mutation on Nucleic Acid Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Gregory A; Coppola, Erin E; Mortensen, Jamie S; Ekeren, Patrick X; Viola, Cosmo; Goldblatt, Dallan; Hudson, André O

    2018-02-01

    Since the elucidation of the genetic code almost 50 years ago, many nonrandom aspects of its codon organization remain only partly resolved. Here, we investigate the recent hypothesis of 'dual-use' codons which proposes that in addition to allowing adjustment of codon optimization to tRNA abundance, the degeneracy in the triplet-based genetic code also multiplexes information regarding DNA's helical shape and protein-binding dynamics while avoiding interference with other protein-level characteristics determined by amino acid properties. How such structural optimization of the code within eukaryotic chromatin could have arisen from an RNA world is a mystery, but would imply some preadaptation in an RNA context. We analyzed synonymous (protein-silent) and nonsynonymous (protein-altering) mutational impacts on molecular dynamics in 13823 identically degenerate alternative codon reorganizations, defined by codon transitions in 7680 GPU-accelerated molecular dynamic simulations of implicitly and explicitly solvated double-stranded aRNA and bDNA structures. When compared to all possible alternative codon assignments, the standard genetic code minimized the impact of synonymous mutations on the random atomic fluctuations and correlations of carbon backbone vector trajectories while facilitating the specific movements that contribute to DNA polymer flexibility. This trend was notably stronger in the context of RNA supporting the idea that dual-use codon optimization and informational multiplexing in DNA resulted from the preadaptation of the RNA duplex to resist changes to thermostability. The nonrandom and divergent molecular dynamics of synonymous mutations also imply that the triplet-based code may have resulted from adaptive functional expansion enabling a primordial doublet code to multiplex gene regulatory information via the shape and charge of the minor groove.

  6. Evidence of translation efficiency adaptation of the coding regions of the bacteriophage lambda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goz, Eli; Mioduser, Oriah; Diament, Alon; Tuller, Tamir

    2017-08-01

    Deciphering the way gene expression regulatory aspects are encoded in viral genomes is a challenging mission with ramifications related to all biomedical disciplines. Here, we aimed to understand how the evolution shapes the bacteriophage lambda genes by performing a high resolution analysis of ribosomal profiling data and gene expression related synonymous/silent information encoded in bacteriophage coding regions.We demonstrated evidence of selection for distinct compositions of synonymous codons in early and late viral genes related to the adaptation of translation efficiency to different bacteriophage developmental stages. Specifically, we showed that evolution of viral coding regions is driven, among others, by selection for codons with higher decoding rates; during the initial/progressive stages of infection the decoding rates in early/late genes were found to be superior to those in late/early genes, respectively. Moreover, we argued that selection for translation efficiency could be partially explained by adaptation to Escherichia coli tRNA pool and the fact that it can change during the bacteriophage life cycle.An analysis of additional aspects related to the expression of viral genes, such as mRNA folding and more complex/longer regulatory signals in the coding regions, is also reported. The reported conclusions are likely to be relevant also to additional viruses. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  7. TP53 codon 72 polymorphism in pigmentary phenotypes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-20

    Jan 20, 2012 ... pigmentation by acting as a transcription factor for other genes that are ... skin phototype I-II, burns after exposure to UVR and the development of .... morphisms of TP53 codon 72 with breast carcinoma risk: evidence from ...

  8. Establishment and comparison of three different codon optimization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-02-16

    C. elegan). It can raise the n-3/n-6 .... value) could help to judge the numbers of codon types. High level ..... function and health in mammal, especially in .... Generation of cloned transgenic pigs rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Nat.

  9. Analysis and prediction of translation rate based on sequence and functional features of the mRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Huang

    Full Text Available Protein concentrations depend not only on the mRNA level, but also on the translation rate and the degradation rate. Prediction of mRNA's translation rate would provide valuable information for in-depth understanding of the translation mechanism and dynamic proteome. In this study, we developed a new computational model to predict the translation rate, featured by (1 integrating various sequence-derived and functional features, (2 applying the maximum relevance & minimum redundancy method and incremental feature selection to select features to optimize the prediction model, and (3 being able to predict the translation rate of RNA into high or low translation rate category. The prediction accuracies under rich and starvation condition were 68.8% and 70.0%, respectively, evaluated by jackknife cross-validation. It was found that the following features were correlated with translation rate: codon usage frequency, some gene ontology enrichment scores, number of RNA binding proteins known to bind its mRNA product, coding sequence length, protein abundance and 5'UTR free energy. These findings might provide useful information for understanding the mechanisms of translation and dynamic proteome. Our translation rate prediction model might become a high throughput tool for annotating the translation rate of mRNAs in large-scale.

  10. A translationally optimized AAV-UGT1A1 vector drives safe and long-lasting correction of Crigler-Najjar syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Ronzitti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Crigler-Najjar syndrome is a severe metabolic disease of the liver due to a reduced activity of the UDP Glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1 enzyme. In an effort to translate to the clinic an adeno-associated virus vector mediated liver gene transfer approach to treat Crigler-Najjar syndrome, we developed and optimized a vector expressing the UGT1A1 transgene. For this purpose, we designed and tested in vitro and in vivo multiple codon-optimized UGT1A1 transgene cDNAs. We also optimized noncoding sequences in the transgene expression cassette. Our results indicate that transgene codon-optimization is a strategy that can improve efficacy of gene transfer but needs to be carefully tested in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, while inclusion of introns can enhance gene expression, optimization of these introns, and in particular removal of cryptic ATGs and splice sites, is an important maneuver to enhance safety and efficacy of gene transfer. Finally, using a translationally optimized adeno-associated virus vector expressing the UGT1A1 transgene, we demonstrated rescue of the phenotype of Crigler-Najjar syndrome in two animal models of the disease, Gunn rats and Ugt1a1-/- mice. We also showed long-term (>1 year correction of the disease in Gunn rats. These results support further translation of the approach to humans.

  11. A proposed vestigial translation initiation motif in VP1 of hepatitis A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong-Ah; Funkhouser, Ann W

    2002-07-01

    The internal ribosome entry site (IRES) of picornaviruses has a 3' polypyrimidine tract (PPT) 16-24 bases upstream of an AUG triplet (PPT/AUG motif). This motif is critical in determining the efficiency of cap-independent translation. HAV has a conserved PPT/AUG motif consisting of a nine base sequence (AGGUUUUUC) 23 bases upstream of the preferred AUG start codon. This HAV-specific PPT/AUG motif is repeated and conserved in VP1 of HAV, but not of other picornaviruses. We proposed that the PPT/AUG motif in the open reading frame initiated translation and/or had an impact on the life cycle of the virus. In vitro translation of mutant bicistronic mRNAs and growth in cell culture of mutant viruses provided no evidence that the VP1 PPT/AUG motif had any impact on either translation or growth. HAV differs from other picornaviruses in its inefficient growth in cell culture. Since the HAV-specific PPT/AUG motif is found in only 1 in 300,000 reported viral sequences outside the hepatovirus genus, this motif may be a vestigial translation initiation element and may have played a role in determining the unusual phenotype of HAV.

  12. Changes in Translational Efficiency is a Dominant Regulatory Mechanism in the Environmental Response of Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Ronald C.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Serres, Margrethe H.; Linggi, Bryan E.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Hill, Eric A.; Romine, Margaret F.; Lipton, Mary S.; Wiley, H. S.

    2013-09-23

    To understand how cell physiological state affects mRNA translation, we used Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 grown under steady state conditions at either aerobic or suboxic conditions. Using a combination of quantitative proteomics and RNA-Seq, we generated high-confidence data on >1000 mRNA and protein pairs. By using a steady state model, we found that differences in protein-mRNA ratios were primarily caused by differences in the translational efficiency of specific genes. When oxygen levels were lowered, 28% of the proteins showed at least a 2-fold change in expression. Altered transcription levels appeared responsible for 26% of the protein changes, altered translational efficiency appeared responsible for 46% and a combination of both were responsible for the remaining 28%. Changes in translational efficiency were significantly correlated with the codon usage pattern of the genes and measurable tRNA pools changed in response to altered O2 levels. Our results suggest that changes in the translational efficiency of proteins, in part caused by altered tRNA pools, is a major determinant of regulated protein expression in bacteria.

  13. Comparative analysis of codon usage bias in Crenarchaea and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ending codons even within the WWY (nucleotide ambiguity code) families in Crenarchaea ...... this work. Acknowledgements. Authors thank Mr Ajit Kumar Sahoo and Ms ... November J. A. 2002 Accounting for background nucleotide com-.

  14. Regulation of Translational Efficiency by Disparate 5′-UTRs of PPARγ Splice Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn McClelland

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The PPAR-γ gene encodes for at least 7 unique transcripts due to alternative splicing of five exons in the 5′-untranslated region (UTR. The translated region is encoded by exons 1–6, which are identical in all isoforms. This study investigated the role of the 5′-UTR in regulating the efficiency with which the message is translated to protein. A coupled in vitro transcription-translation assay demonstrated that PPAR-γ1, -γ2, and -γ5 are efficiently translated, whereas PPAR-γ4 and -γ7 are poorly translated. An in vivo reporter gene assay using each 5′-UTR upstream of the firefly luciferase gene showed that the 5′-UTRs for PPAR-γ1, -γ2, and -γ4 enhanced translation, whereas the 5′-UTRs for PPAR-γ5 and -γ7 inhibited translation. Models of RNA secondary structure, obtained by the mfold software, were used to explain the mechanism of regulation by each 5′-UTR. In general, it was found that the translational efficiency was inversely correlated with the stability of the mRNA secondary structure, the presence of base-pairing in the consensus Kozak sequence, the number of start codons in the 5′-UTR, and the length of the 5′-UTR. A better understanding of posttranscriptional regulation of translation will allow modulation of protein levels without altering transcription.

  15. Establishment and comparison of three different codon optimization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    C. elegan). It can raise the n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) ratio in mammalian cells. To reveal the impact of different codon optimizations of fat1 gene in influencing the catalysis efficiency of n-6 PUFAs into n-3 PUFAs in mammalian ...

  16. Mutations to Less-Preferred Synonymous Codons in a Highly Expressed Gene of Escherichia coli: Fitness and Epistatic Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Hauber

    Full Text Available Codon-tRNA coevolution to maximize protein production has been, until recently, the dominant hypothesis to explain codon-usage bias in highly expressed bacterial genes. Two predictions of this hypothesis are 1 selection is weak; and 2 similar silent replacements at different codons should have similar fitness consequence. We used an allele-replacement strategy to change five specific 3rd-codon-position (silent sites in the highly expressed Escherichia coli ribosomal protein gene rplQ from the wild type to a less-preferred alternative. We introduced the five mutations within a 10-codon region. Four of the silent sites were chosen to test the second prediction, with a CTG to CTA mutation being introduced at two closely linked leucine codons and an AAA to AAG mutation being introduced at two closely linked lysine codons. We also introduced a fifth silent mutation, a GTG to GTA mutation at a valine codon in the same genic region. We measured the fitness effect of the individual mutations by competing each single-mutant strain against the parental wild-type strain, using a disrupted form of the araA gene as a selectively neutral phenotypic marker to distinguish between strains in direct competition experiments. Three of the silent mutations had a fitness effect of |s| > 0.02, which is contradictory to the prediction that selection will be weak. The two leucine mutations had significantly different fitness effects, as did the two lysine mutations, contradictory to the prediction that similar mutations at different codons should have similar fitness effects. We also constructed a strain carrying all five silent mutations in combination. Its fitness effect was greater than that predicted from the individual fitness values, suggesting that negative synergistic epistasis acts on the combination allele.

  17. Transient erythromycin resistance phenotype associated with peptidyl-tRNA drop-off on early UGG and GGG codons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macvanin, Mirjana; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I; Ardell, David H

    2007-01-01

    -peptide-encoding sequence, we asked whether the codons UGG and GGG, which are known to promote peptidyl-tRNA drop-off at early positions in mRNA, would result in a phenotype of erythromycin resistance if located after this sequence. We find that UGG or GGG, at either position +4 or +5, without a following stop codon......, is associated with an erythromycin resistance phenotype upon gene induction. Our results suggest that, while a stop codon at +4 gives a tripeptide product (MIL) and erythromycin sensitivity, UGG or GGG codons at the same position give a tetrapeptide product (MILW or MILG) and phenotype of erythromycin...... resistance. Thus, the drop-off event on GGG or UGG codons occurs after incorporation of the corresponding amino acid into the growing peptide chain. Drop-off gives rise to a peptidyl-tRNA where the peptide moiety functionally mimics a minigene peptide product of the type previously associated...

  18. Translation Initiation Factors eIF3 and HCR1 Control Translation Termination and Stop Codon Read-Through in Yeast Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beznosková, Petra; Cuchalová, Lucie; Wagner, Susan; Shoemaker, Ch. J.; Gunišová, Stanislava; von der Haar, T.; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 11 (2013) ISSN 1553-7404 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP305/12/G034 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : RNA RECOGNITION MOTIF * MESSENGER-RNA * IN-VIVO Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.167, year: 2013

  19. Evaluating codon bias perspective in barbiturase gene using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdullah

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... along with codon usage was done to reveal dynamics of gene evolution and expression ... analysis is a potent approach for detecting mutations, selection methods and finding rationale of biased and unbiased gene changes and hence, evolutionary ... in the perception of the molecular basics plus potential.

  20. E-CAI: a novel server to estimate an expected value of Codon Adaptation Index (eCAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia-Vallvé Santiago

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Codon Adaptation Index (CAI is a measure of the synonymous codon usage bias for a DNA or RNA sequence. It quantifies the similarity between the synonymous codon usage of a gene and the synonymous codon frequency of a reference set. Extreme values in the nucleotide or in the amino acid composition have a large impact on differential preference for synonymous codons. It is thence essential to define the limits for the expected value of CAI on the basis of sequence composition in order to properly interpret the CAI and provide statistical support to CAI analyses. Though several freely available programs calculate the CAI for a given DNA sequence, none of them corrects for compositional biases or provides confidence intervals for CAI values. Results The E-CAI server, available at http://genomes.urv.es/CAIcal/E-CAI, is a web-application that calculates an expected value of CAI for a set of query sequences by generating random sequences with G+C and amino acid content similar to those of the input. An executable file, a tutorial, a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ section and several examples are also available. To exemplify the use of the E-CAI server, we have analysed the codon adaptation of human mitochondrial genes that codify a subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (excluding those genes that lack a prokaryotic orthologue and are encoded in the nuclear genome. It is assumed that these genes were transferred from the proto-mitochondrial to the nuclear genome and that its codon usage was then ameliorated. Conclusion The E-CAI server provides a direct threshold value for discerning whether the differences in CAI are statistically significant or whether they are merely artifacts that arise from internal biases in the G+C composition and/or amino acid composition of the query sequences.

  1. Genes adopt non-optimal codon usage to generate cell cycle-dependent oscillations in protein levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Danon, Tamar; Christian, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The cell cycle is a temporal program that regulates DNA synthesis and cell division. When we compared the codon usage of cell cycle-regulated genes with that of other genes, we discovered that there is a significant preference for non-optimal codons. Moreover, genes encoding proteins that cycle a...

  2. Conformational effects of a common codon 751 polymorphism on the C-terminal domain of the xeroderma pigmentosum D protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monaco Regina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The xeroderma pigmentosum D (XPD protein is a DNA helicase involved in the repair of DNA damage, including nucleotide excision repair (NER and transcription-coupled repair (TCR. The C-terminal domain of XPD has been implicated in interactions with other components of the TFIIH complex, and it is also the site of a common genetic polymorphism in XPD at amino acid residue 751 (Lys->Gln. Some evidence suggests that this polymorphism may alter DNA repair capacity and increase cancer risk. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these effects could be attributable to conformational changes in XPD induced by the polymorphism. Materials and Methods: Molecular dynamics techniques were used to predict the structure of the wild-type and polymorphic forms of the C-terminal domain of XPD and differences in structure produced by the polymorphic substitution were determined. Results: The results indicate that, although the general configuration of both proteins is similar, the substitution produces a significant conformational change immediately N-terminal to the site of the polymorphism. Conclusion: These results provide support for the hypothesis that this polymorphism in XPD could affect DNA repair capability, and hence cancer risk, by altering the structure of the C-terminal domain.

  3. The ribosome-bound chaperones RAC and Ssb1/2p are required for accurate translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakwalska, Magdalena; Rospert, Sabine

    2004-10-01

    The chaperone homologs RAC (ribosome-associated complex) and Ssb1/2p are anchored to ribosomes; Ssb1/2p directly interacts with nascent polypeptides. The absence of RAC or Ssb1/2p results in a similar set of phenotypes, including hypersensitivity against the aminoglycoside paromomycin, which binds to the small ribosomal subunit and compromises the fidelity of translation. In order to understand this phenomenon we measured the frequency of translation termination and misincorporation in vivo and in vitro with a novel reporter system. Translational fidelity was impaired in the absence of functional RAC or Ssb1/2p, and the effect was further enhanced by paromomycin. The mutant strains suffered primarily from a defect in translation termination, while misincorporation was compromised to a lesser extent. Consistently, a low level of soluble translation termination factor Sup35p enhanced growth defects in the mutant strains. Based on the combined data we conclude that RAC and Ssb1/2p are crucial in maintaining translational fidelity beyond their postulated role as chaperones for nascent polypeptides.

  4. Integrative analysis of RNA, translation, and protein levels reveals distinct regulatory variation across humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenik, Can; Cenik, Elif Sarinay; Byeon, Gun W; Grubert, Fabian; Candille, Sophie I; Spacek, Damek; Alsallakh, Bilal; Tilgner, Hagen; Araya, Carlos L; Tang, Hua; Ricci, Emiliano; Snyder, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Elucidating the consequences of genetic differences between humans is essential for understanding phenotypic diversity and personalized medicine. Although variation in RNA levels, transcription factor binding, and chromatin have been explored, little is known about global variation in translation and its genetic determinants. We used ribosome profiling, RNA sequencing, and mass spectrometry to perform an integrated analysis in lymphoblastoid cell lines from a diverse group of individuals. We find significant differences in RNA, translation, and protein levels suggesting diverse mechanisms of personalized gene expression control. Combined analysis of RNA expression and ribosome occupancy improves the identification of individual protein level differences. Finally, we identify genetic differences that specifically modulate ribosome occupancy--many of these differences lie close to start codons and upstream ORFs. Our results reveal a new level of gene expression variation among humans and indicate that genetic variants can cause changes in protein levels through effects on translation. © 2015 Cenik et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Functional Characterization of the Role of the N-terminal Domain of the c/Nip1 Subunit of Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 3 (eIF3) in AUG Recognition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karásková, Martina; Gunišová, Stanislava; Herrmannová, Anna; Wagner, Susan; Munzarová, Vanda; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 287, č. 34 (2012), s. 28420-28434 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/0335 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : START CODON SELECTION * 40S RIBOSOMAL-SUBUNIT * GCN4 TRANSLATIONAL CONTROL Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.651, year: 2012

  6. Numeral series hidden in the distribution of atomic mass of amino acids to codon domains in the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlin, Åsa

    2015-03-21

    The distribution of codons in the nearly universal genetic code is a long discussed issue. At the atomic level, the numeral series 2x(2) (x=5-0) lies behind electron shells and orbitals. Numeral series appear in formulas for spectral lines of hydrogen. The question here was if some similar scheme could be found in the genetic code. A table of 24 codons was constructed (synonyms counted as one) for 20 amino acids, four of which have two different codons. An atomic mass analysis was performed, built on common isotopes. It was found that a numeral series 5 to 0 with exponent 2/3 times 10(2) revealed detailed congruency with codon-grouped amino acid side-chains, simultaneously with the division on atom kinds, further with main 3rd base groups, backbone chains and with codon-grouped amino acids in relation to their origin from glycolysis or the citrate cycle. Hence, it is proposed that this series in a dynamic way may have guided the selection of amino acids into codon domains. Series with simpler exponents also showed noteworthy correlations with the atomic mass distribution on main codon domains; especially the 2x(2)-series times a factor 16 appeared as a conceivable underlying level, both for the atomic mass and charge distribution. Furthermore, it was found that atomic mass transformations between numeral systems, possibly interpretable as dimension degree steps, connected the atomic mass of codon bases with codon-grouped amino acids and with the exponent 2/3-series in several astonishing ways. Thus, it is suggested that they may be part of a deeper reference system. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. The CCA-end of P-tRNA Contacts Both the Human RPL36AL and the A-site Bound Translation Termination Factor eRF1 at the Peptidyl Transferase Center of the Human 80S Ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hountondji, Codjo; Bulygin, Konstantin; Créchet, Jean-Bernard; Woisard, Anne; Tuffery, Pierre; Nakayama, Jun-Ichi; Frolova, Ludmila; Nierhaus, Knud H; Karpova, Galina; Baouz, Soria

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that the E-site specific protein RPL36AL present in human ribosomes can be crosslinked with the CCA-end of a P-tRNA in situ. Here we report the following: (i) We modeled RPL36AL into the structure of the archaeal ortholog RPL44E extracted from the known X-ray structure of the 50S subunit of Haloarcula marismortui. Superimposing the obtained RPL36AL structure with that of P/E tRNA observed in eukaryotic 80S ribosomes suggested that RPL36AL might in addition to its CCA neighbourhood interact with the inner site of the tRNA elbow similar to an interaction pattern known from tRNA•synthetase pairs. (ii) Accordingly, we detected that the isolated recombinant protein RPL36AL can form a tight binary complex with deacylated tRNA, and even tRNA fragments truncated at their CCA end showed a high affinity in the nanomolar range supporting a strong interaction outside the CCA end. (iii) We constructed programmed 80S complexes containing the termination factor eRF1 (stop codon UAA at the A-site) and a 2',3'-dialdehyde tRNA (tRNAox) analog at the P-site. Surprisingly, we observed a crosslinked ternary complex containing the tRNA, eRF1 and RPL36AL crosslinked both to the aldehyde groups of tRNAox at the 2'- and 3'-positions of the ultimate A. We also demonstrated that, upon binding to the ribosomal A-site, eRF1 induces an alternative conformation of the ribosome and/or the tRNA, leading to a novel crosslink of tRNAox to another large-subunit ribosomal protein (namely L37) rather than to RPL36AL, both ribosomal proteins being labeled in a mutually exclusive fashion. Since the human 80S ribosome in complex with P-site bound tRNAox and A-site bound eRF1 corresponds to the post-termination state of the ribosome, the results represent the first biochemical evidence for the positioning of the CCA-arm of the P-tRNA in close proximity to both RPL36AL and eRF1 at the end of the translation process.

  8. Enhanced expression of codon optimized Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in Lactobacillus salivarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Johnston

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well documented that open reading frames containing high GC content show poor expression in A+T rich hosts. Specifically, G+C-rich codon usage is a limiting factor in heterologous expression of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP proteins using Lactobacillus salivarius. However, re-engineering opening reading frames through synonymous substitutions can offset codon bias and greatly enhance MAP protein production in this host. In this report, we demonstrate that codon-usage manipulation of two MAP genes (MAP2121c and MAP3733c can enhance the heterologous expression of two antigens (MMP and MptD respectively, analogous to the form to which they are produced natively by MAP bacilli. When heterologously over-expressed, antigenic determinants were preserved in synthetic MMP proteins as shown by monoclonal antibody mediated ELISA. Moreover, MMP is a membrane protein in MAP, which is also targeted to the cellular surface of recombinant L. salivarius at levels comparable to MAP. Additionally, codon optimised MptD displayed the tendency to associate with the cytoplasmic membrane boundary under confocal microscopy and the intracellularly accumulated protein selectively adhered with the MptD-specific bacteriophage fMptD. This work demonstrates there is potential for L. salivarius as a viable antigen delivery vehicle for MAP, which may provide an effective mucosal vaccine against Johne’s disease.

  9. Analysis of Low Frequency Protein Truncating Stop-Codon Variants and Fasting Concentration of Growth Hormone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Hallengren

    Full Text Available The genetic background of Growth Hormone (GH secretion is not well understood. Mutations giving rise to a stop codon have a high likelihood of affecting protein function.To analyze likely functional stop codon mutations that are associated with fasting plasma concentration of Growth Hormone.We analyzed stop codon mutations in 5451 individuals in the Malmö Diet and Cancer study by genotyping the Illumina Exome Chip. To enrich for stop codon mutations with likely functional effects on protein function, we focused on those disrupting >80% of the predicted amino acid sequence, which were carried by ≥ 10 individuals. Such mutations were related to GH concentration, measured with a high sensitivity assay (hs-GH and, if nominally significant, to GH related phenotypes, using linear regression analysis.Two stop codon mutations were associated with the fasting concentration of hs-GH. rs121909305 (NP_005370.1:p.R93* [Minor Allele Frequency (MAF = 0.8%] in the Myosin 1A gene (MYO1A was associated with a 0.36 (95%CI, 0.04 to 0.54; p=0.02 increment of the standardized value of the natural logarithm of hs-GH per 1 minor allele and rs35699176 (NP_067040.1:p.Q100* in the Zink Finger protein 77 gene (ZNF77 (MAF = 4.8% was associated with a 0.12 (95%CI, 0.02 to 0.22; p = 0.02 increase of hs-GH. The mutated high hs-GH associated allele of MYO1A was related to lower BMI (β-coefficient, -0.22; p = 0.05, waist (β-coefficient, -0.22; p = 0.04, body fat percentage (β-coefficient, -0.23; p = 0.03 and with higher HDL (β-coefficient, 0.23; p = 0.04. The ZNF77 stop codon was associated with height (β-coefficient, 0.11; p = 0.02 but not with cardiometabolic risk factors.We here suggest that a stop codon of MYO1A, disrupting 91% of the predicted amino acid sequence, is associated with higher hs-GH and GH-related traits suggesting that MYO1A is involved in GH metabolism and possibly body fat distribution. However, our results are preliminary and need replication in

  10. Codon size reduction as the origin of the triplet genetic code.

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    Pavel V Baranov

    Full Text Available The genetic code appears to be optimized in its robustness to missense errors and frameshift errors. In addition, the genetic code is near-optimal in terms of its ability to carry information in addition to the sequences of encoded proteins. As evolution has no foresight, optimality of the modern genetic code suggests that it evolved from less optimal code variants. The length of codons in the genetic code is also optimal, as three is the minimal nucleotide combination that can encode the twenty standard amino acids. The apparent impossibility of transitions between codon sizes in a discontinuous manner during evolution has resulted in an unbending view that the genetic code was always triplet. Yet, recent experimental evidence on quadruplet decoding, as well as the discovery of organisms with ambiguous and dual decoding, suggest that the possibility of the evolution of triplet decoding from living systems with non-triplet decoding merits reconsideration and further exploration. To explore this possibility we designed a mathematical model of the evolution of primitive digital coding systems which can decode nucleotide sequences into protein sequences. These coding systems can evolve their nucleotide sequences via genetic events of Darwinian evolution, such as point-mutations. The replication rates of such coding systems depend on the accuracy of the generated protein sequences. Computer simulations based on our model show that decoding systems with codons of length greater than three spontaneously evolve into predominantly triplet decoding systems. Our findings suggest a plausible scenario for the evolution of the triplet genetic code in a continuous manner. This scenario suggests an explanation of how protein synthesis could be accomplished by means of long RNA-RNA interactions prior to the emergence of the complex decoding machinery, such as the ribosome, that is required for stabilization and discrimination of otherwise weak triplet codon

  11. What makes ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation sensitive to amino acid limitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Elf

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome-mediated transcriptional attenuation mechanisms are commonly used to control amino acid biosynthetic operons in bacteria. The mRNA leader of such an operon contains an open reading frame with "regulatory" codons, cognate to the amino acid that is synthesized by the enzymes encoded by the operon. When the amino acid is in short supply, translation of the regulatory codons is slow, which allows transcription to continue into the structural genes of the operon. When amino acid supply is in excess, translation of regulatory codons is rapid, which leads to termination of transcription. We use a discrete master equation approach to formulate a probabilistic model for the positioning of the RNA polymerase and the ribosome in the attenuator leader sequence. The model describes how the current rate of amino acid supply compared to the demand in protein synthesis (signal determines the expression of the amino acid biosynthetic operon (response. The focus of our analysis is on the sensitivity of operon expression to a change in the amino acid supply. We show that attenuation of transcription can be hyper-sensitive for two main reasons. The first is that its response depends on the outcome of a race between two multi-step mechanisms with synchronized starts: transcription of the leader of the operon, and translation of its regulatory codons. The relative change in the probability that transcription is aborted (attenuated can therefore be much larger than the relative change in the time it takes for the ribosome to read a regulatory codon. The second is that the general usage frequencies of codons of the type used in attenuation control are small. A small percentage decrease in the rate of supply of the controlled amino acid can therefore lead to a much larger percentage decrease in the rate of reading a regulatory codon. We show that high sensitivity further requires a particular choice of regulatory codon among several synonymous codons for the

  12. The control of translational accuracy is a determinant of healthy ageing in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Haar, Tobias; Leadsham, Jane E; Sauvadet, Aimie; Tarrant, Daniel; Adam, Ilectra S; Saromi, Kofo; Laun, Peter; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Breitenbach-Koller, Hannelore; Breitenbach, Michael; Tuite, Mick F; Gourlay, Campbell W

    2017-01-01

    Life requires the maintenance of molecular function in the face of stochastic processes that tend to adversely affect macromolecular integrity. This is particularly relevant during ageing, as many cellular functions decline with age, including growth, mitochondrial function and energy metabolism. Protein synthesis must deliver functional proteins at all times, implying that the effects of protein synthesis errors like amino acid misincorporation and stop-codon read-through must be minimized during ageing. Here we show that loss of translational accuracy accelerates the loss of viability in stationary phase yeast. Since reduced translational accuracy also reduces the folding competence of at least some proteins, we hypothesize that negative interactions between translational errors and age-related protein damage together overwhelm the cellular chaperone network. We further show that multiple cellular signalling networks control basal error rates in yeast cells, including a ROS signal controlled by mitochondrial activity, and the Ras pathway. Together, our findings indicate that signalling pathways regulating growth, protein homeostasis and energy metabolism may jointly safeguard accurate protein synthesis during healthy ageing. © 2017 The Authors.

  13. Switch from cap- to factorless IRES-dependent 0 and +1 frame translation during cellular stress and dicistrovirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing S Wang

    Full Text Available Internal ribosome entry sites (IRES are utilized by a subset of cellular and viral mRNAs to initiate translation during cellular stress and virus infection when canonical cap-dependent translation is compromised. The intergenic region (IGR IRES of the Dicistroviridae uses a streamlined mechanism in which it can directly recruit the ribosome in the absence of initiation factors and initiates translation using a non-AUG codon. A subset of IGR IRESs including that from the honey bee viruses can also direct translation of an overlapping +1 frame gene. In this study, we systematically examined cellular conditions that lead to IGR IRES-mediated 0 and +1 frame translation in Drosophila S2 cells. Towards this, a novel bicistronic reporter that exploits the 2A "stop-go" peptide was developed to allow the detection of IRES-mediated translation in vivo. Both 0 and +1 frame translation by the IGR IRES are stimulated under a number of cellular stresses and in S2 cells infected by cricket paralysis virus, demonstrating a switch from cap-dependent to IRES-dependent translation. The regulation of the IGR IRES mechanism ensures that both 0 frame viral structural proteins and +1 frame ORFx protein are optimally expressed during virus infection.

  14. Regulation of translation during cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petz, M.

    2012-01-01

    Laminin B1 (LamB1) is a main component of the extracellular matrix and is involved in the regulation of tumor cell migration and invasion of during carcinogenesis. Metastasis of carcinoma cells is crucially linked to the process of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which allows tumor cells to acquire a more motile phenotype and to dissociate from the epithelial cell cluster of the tumor. Expression profiling of polysome-associated mRNA revealed LamB1 to be translationally upregulated upon EMT of malignant hepatocytes. The enhanced translation of LamB1 in metastatic hepatocytes proved to be regulated by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) located within the 5’-untranslated region (UTR) of the LamB1 transcript. IRES activity was detected by employing two independent reporter systems and verified by stringent assays for the presence of cryptic promoter or splice sites. The minimal cis-acting IRES sequence of 293 nucleotides that is required for cap-independent translation was localized directly upstream of the start codon. Notably, the IRES trans-acting factor (ITAF) La was identified by RNA affinity purification as regulatory factor that interacts with LamB1 5’-UTR. This interaction was verified by RNA-immunoprecipitation in vivo, which revealed enhanced binding of La to the minimal IRES motif of LamB1 after EMT. Consistently, cytoplasmic levels of La were elevated in EMT-transformed cells and correlated with increased LamB1 protein expression. Furthermore, IRES-driven translation of LamB1 was elevated in the presence of La in vitro. Importantly, the EMT-induced cytoplasmic translocation of La was found to be triggered by platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) that is downstream of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling. Together, these data demonstrate that La interacts with the LamB1 IRES in the cytoplasm, resulting in enhanced cap-independent translation of LamB1 in malignant hepatocytes that have undergone EMT. (author) [de

  15. Stop codons in the hepatitis B surface proteins are enriched during antiviral therapy and are associated with host cell apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colledge, Danielle; Soppe, Sally; Yuen, Lilly; Selleck, Lucy; Walsh, Renae; Locarnini, Stephen; Warner, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Premature stop codons in the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface protein can be associated with nucleos(t)ide analogue resistance due to overlap of the HBV surface and polymerase genes. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the replication of three common surface stop codon variants on the hepatocyte. Cell lines were transfected with infectious HBV clones encoding surface stop codons rtM204I/sW196*, rtA181T/sW172*, rtV191I/sW182*, and a panel of substitutions in the surface proteins. HBsAg was measured by Western blotting. Proliferation and apoptosis were measured using flow cytometry. All three surface stop codon variants were defective in HBsAg secretion. Cells transfected with these variants were less proliferative and had higher levels of apoptosis than those transfected with variants that did not encode surface stop codons. The most cytopathic variant was rtM204I/sW196*. Replication of HBV encoding surface stop codons was toxic to the cell and promoted apoptosis, exacerbating disease progression. - Highlights: •Under normal circumstances, HBV replication is not cytopathic. •Premature stop codons in the HBV surface protein can be selected and enriched during nucleos(t)ide analogue therapy. •Replication of these variants can be cytopathic to the cell and promote apoptosis. •Inadequate antiviral therapy may actually promote disease progression.

  16. Stop codons in the hepatitis B surface proteins are enriched during antiviral therapy and are associated with host cell apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colledge, Danielle; Soppe, Sally; Yuen, Lilly; Selleck, Lucy; Walsh, Renae; Locarnini, Stephen, E-mail: stephen.locarnini@mh.org.au; Warner, Nadia

    2017-01-15

    Premature stop codons in the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface protein can be associated with nucleos(t)ide analogue resistance due to overlap of the HBV surface and polymerase genes. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the replication of three common surface stop codon variants on the hepatocyte. Cell lines were transfected with infectious HBV clones encoding surface stop codons rtM204I/sW196*, rtA181T/sW172*, rtV191I/sW182*, and a panel of substitutions in the surface proteins. HBsAg was measured by Western blotting. Proliferation and apoptosis were measured using flow cytometry. All three surface stop codon variants were defective in HBsAg secretion. Cells transfected with these variants were less proliferative and had higher levels of apoptosis than those transfected with variants that did not encode surface stop codons. The most cytopathic variant was rtM204I/sW196*. Replication of HBV encoding surface stop codons was toxic to the cell and promoted apoptosis, exacerbating disease progression. - Highlights: •Under normal circumstances, HBV replication is not cytopathic. •Premature stop codons in the HBV surface protein can be selected and enriched during nucleos(t)ide analogue therapy. •Replication of these variants can be cytopathic to the cell and promote apoptosis. •Inadequate antiviral therapy may actually promote disease progression.

  17. Translation in cell-free systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagus, R.

    1987-01-01

    The simplest, unambiguous identification of a particular mRNA is the identification of its protein product. This can be established by translation of the mRNA of interest in a cell-free protein-synthesizing system. Messenger RNA protein product identification is important in the isolation of a particular mRNA species for cDNA cloning and in the identification of positive cDNA clones. The two high-activity translation systems in common use are those prepared from rabbit reticulocytes and from wheat germ. Both systems are easy to prepare, and both are available commercially. Each has advantages and disadvantages over the other and a choice between the two will depend on the type of mRNAs to be translated, the prejudices of experience, and availability. The main disadvantage of the reticulocyte system is that it requires removal of endogenous mRNA. However, this is a relatively simple procedure. The wheat germ system does not require removal of endogenous mRNA and may translate weakly initiating mRNAs more efficiently. However, ionic optima for translation in the wheat germ system are more sensitive to the nature and concentration of mRNA and may need to be determined for each template. The biggest problem with the use of the wheat germ system is its tendency to produce incomplete translation products due to premature termination

  18. PCR-RFLP to Detect Codon 248 Mutation in Exon 7 of "p53" Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liming; Ge, Chongtao; Wu, Haizhen; Li, Suxia; Zhang, Huizhan

    2009-01-01

    Individual genome DNA was extracted fast from oral swab and followed up with PCR specific for codon 248 of "p53" tumor suppressor gene. "Msp"I restriction mapping showed the G-C mutation in codon 248, which closely relates to cancer susceptibility. Students learn the concepts, detection techniques, and research significance of point mutations or…

  19. Euglena gracilis chloroplast DNA: analysis of a 1.6 kb intron of the psb C gene containing an open reading frame of 458 codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montandon, P E; Vasserot, A; Stutz, E

    1986-01-01

    We retrieved a 1.6 kbp intron separating two exons of the psb C gene which codes for the 44 kDa reaction center protein of photosystem II. This intron is 3 to 4 times the size of all previously sequenced Euglena gracilis chloroplast introns. It contains an open reading frame of 458 codons potentially coding for a basic protein of 54 kDa of yet unknown function. The intron boundaries follow consensus sequences established for chloroplast introns related to class II and nuclear pre-mRNA introns. Its 3'-terminal segment has structural features similar to class II mitochondrial introns with an invariant base A as possible branch point for lariat formation.

  20. Inhibition of eukaryotic translation elongation by the antitumor natural product Mycalamide B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Yongjun; Schneider-Poetsch, Tilman; Eyler, Daniel E; Jewett, John C; Bhat, Shridhar; Rawal, Viresh H; Green, Rachel; Liu, Jun O

    2011-08-01

    Mycalamide B (MycB) is a marine sponge-derived natural product with potent antitumor activity. Although it has been shown to inhibit protein synthesis, the molecular mechanism of action by MycB remains incompletely understood. We verified the inhibition of translation elongation by in vitro HCV IRES dual luciferase assays, ribosome assembly, and in vivo [(35)S]methinione labeling experiments. Similar to cycloheximide (CHX), MycB inhibits translation elongation through blockade of eEF2-mediated translocation without affecting the eEF1A-mediated loading of tRNA onto the ribosome, AUG recognition, or dipeptide synthesis. Using chemical footprinting, we identified the MycB binding site proximal to the C3993 28S rRNA residue on the large ribosomal subunit. However, there are also subtle, but significant differences in the detailed mechanisms of action of MycB and CHX. First, MycB arrests the ribosome on the mRNA one codon ahead of CHX. Second, MycB specifically blocked tRNA binding to the E-site of the large ribosomal subunit. Moreover, they display different polysome profiles in vivo. Together, these observations shed new light on the mechanism of inhibition of translation elongation by MycB.

  1. Influence of certain forces on evolution of synonymous codon usage bias in certain species of three basal orders of aquatic insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selva Kumar, C; Nair, Rahul R; Sivaramakrishnan, K G; Ganesh, D; Janarthanan, S; Arunachalam, M; Sivaruban, T

    2012-12-01

    Forces that influence the evolution of synonymous codon usage bias are analyzed in six species of three basal orders of aquatic insects. The rationale behind choosing six species of aquatic insects (three from Ephemeroptera, one from Plecoptera, and two from Odonata) for the present analysis is based on phylogenetic position at the basal clades of the Order Insecta facilitating the understanding of the evolution of codon bias and of factors shaping codon usage patterns in primitive clades of insect lineages and their subtle differences in some of their ecological and environmental requirements in terms of habitat-microhabitat requirements, altitudinal preferences, temperature tolerance ranges, and consequent responses to climate change impacts. The present analysis focuses on open reading frames of the 13 protein-coding genes in the mitochondrial genome of six carefully chosen insect species to get a comprehensive picture of the evolutionary intricacies of codon bias. In all the six species, A and T contents are observed to be significantly higher than G and C, and are used roughly equally. Since transcription hypothesis on codon usage demands A richness and T poorness, it is quite likely that mutation pressure may be the key factor associated with synonymous codon usage (SCU) variations in these species because the mutation hypothesis predicts AT richness and GC poorness in the mitochondrial DNA. Thus, AT-biased mutation pressure seems to be an important factor in framing the SCU variation in all the selected species of aquatic insects, which in turn explains the predominance of A and T ending codons in these species. This study does not find any association between microhabitats and codon usage variations in the mitochondria of selected aquatic insects. However, this study has identified major forces, such as compositional constraints and mutation pressure, which shape patterns of codon usage in mitochondrial genes in the primitive clades of insect lineages.

  2. Identification of the base-pairing requirements for repression of hctA translation by the small RNA IhtA leads to the discovery of a new mRNA target in Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A Grieshaber

    Full Text Available The non-coding small RNA, IhtA expressed by the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis modulates the translation of HctA, a key protein involved in replicative to infectious cell type differentiation. Using a combination of bioinformatics and mutagenesis we sought to identify the base pairing requirement for functional repression of HctA protein expression, with an eye to applying our findings towards the identification of additional targets. IhtA is predicted to fold into a three stem:loop structure. We found that loop 1 occludes the initiation codon of hctA, while loop 2 and 3 are not required for function. This 7 nucleotide region forms G/C rich interactions surrounding the AUG of hctA. Two additional genes in the chlamydial genome, CTL0322 and CTL0097, contained some elements of the hctA:IhtA recognition sequence. The mRNA of both CTL0322and CTL0097 interacted with IhtA in vitro as measured by biolayer interferometry. However, using a CheZ reporter expression system, IhtA only inhibited the translation of CTL0322. The proposed IhtA recognition site in the CTL0322 message contains significant G/C base pairing on either side of the initiation codon while CTL0097 only contains G/C base pairing 3' to the AUG initiation codon. These data suggest that as the functional interacting region is only 6-7nt in length that full translation repression is dependent on the degree of G/C base pairing. Additionally our results indicate that IhtA may regulate multiple mRNAs involved in the chlamydial infectious cycle.

  3. Structure of the gene for human butyrylcholinesterase. Evidence for a single copy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arpagaus, M.; Kott, M.; Vatsis, K.P.; Bartels, C.F.; La Du, B.N.; Lockridge, O.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have isolated five genomic clones for human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), using cDNA probes encoding the catalytic subunit of the hydrophilic tetramer. The BChE gene is at least 73 kb long and contains for exons. Exon 1 contains untranslated sequences and two potential translation initiation sites at codons -69 and -47. Exon 2 (1525 bp) contains 83% of the coding sequence for the mature protein, including the N-terminal and the active-site serine, and a third possible translation initiation site (likely functional), at codon -28. Exon 3 is 167 nucleotides long. Exon 4 (604 bp) codes for the C-terminus of the protein and the 3' untranslated region where two polyadenylation signals were identified. Intron 1 is 6.5 km long, and the minimal sizes of introns 2 and 3 are estimated to be 32 km each. Southern blot analysis of total human genomic DNA is in complete agreement with the gene structure established by restriction endonuclease mapping of the genomic clones: this strongly suggests that the BChE gene is present in a single copy

  4. Interactions ARN-protéines dans le mécanisme de biosynthèse des sélénoprotéines

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi , Akiko

    2009-01-01

    The 21st amino acid selenocysteine is encoded by a UGA codon that usually signifies translational termination. Selenoprotein synthesis therefore requires specialized factors. Among these is SBP2 that binds the SECIS, a stem-loop structure in the 3'UTR of selenoprotein mRNAs. In structural analyses of SBP2, we isolated and functionally characterized Drosophila melanogaster SBP2. By comparing it with human SBP2, we identified an additional RNA binding domain that is essential for SECIS and 60S ...

  5. Targeted amino-terminal acetylation of recombinant proteins in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Johnson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available One major limitation in the expression of eukaryotic proteins in bacteria is an inability to post-translationally modify the expressed protein. Amino-terminal acetylation is one such modification that can be essential for protein function. By co-expressing the fission yeast NatB complex with the target protein in E.coli, we report a simple and widely applicable method for the expression and purification of functional N-terminally acetylated eukaryotic proteins.

  6. Stem cell hype: media portrayal of therapy translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenova, Kalina; Caulfield, Timothy

    2015-03-11

    In this Perspective, we examine the portrayal of translational stem cell research in major daily newspapers in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom between 2010 and 2013, focusing on how timelines for stem cell therapies were represented before and after Geron terminated its pioneering stem cell program. Our content analysis reveals that press coverage has shifted from ethical, legal, and social issues to clinical translation issues, and highly optimistic timelines were provided with no substantial change in representation over time. Scientists were the dominant voice with respect to translation timelines. The findings raise questions about the degree to which the media's overly optimistic slant fosters unrealistic expectations regarding the speed of clinical translation and highlight the ethical responsibility of stem cell researchers as public communicators. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Resetting translational homeostasis restores myelination in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, Maurizio; Musner, Nicolò; Scapin, Cristina; Ungaro, Daniela; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Ron, David; Feltri, M Laura; Wrabetz, Lawrence

    2013-04-08

    P0 glycoprotein is an abundant product of terminal differentiation in myelinating Schwann cells. The mutant P0S63del causes Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1B neuropathy in humans, and a very similar demyelinating neuropathy in transgenic mice. P0S63del is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum of Schwann cells, where it promotes unfolded protein stress and elicits an unfolded protein response (UPR) associated with translational attenuation. Ablation of Chop, a UPR mediator, from S63del mice completely rescues their motor deficit and reduces active demyelination by half. Here, we show that Gadd34 is a detrimental effector of CHOP that reactivates translation too aggressively in myelinating Schwann cells. Genetic or pharmacological limitation of Gadd34 function moderates translational reactivation, improves myelination in S63del nerves, and reduces accumulation of P0S63del in the ER. Resetting translational homeostasis may provide a therapeutic strategy in tissues impaired by misfolded proteins that are synthesized during terminal differentiation.

  8. Genomic composition factors affect codon usage in porcine genome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    j.khobondo

    2015-01-28

    Jan 28, 2015 ... The mutational bias hypothesis predicted that genes in the GC-rich regions of the genome ... observed codon divided by its expected frequency at equilibrium. An RSCU value close to 1 indicates lack of bias, ..... study our results points to preferred usage of both C or G and A or T at the synonyms sites as ...

  9. Identification and functional analysis of novel phosphorylation sites in the RNA surveillance protein Upf1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasalde, Clarivel; Rivera, Andrea V; León, Alfredo J; González-Feliciano, José A; Estrella, Luis A; Rodríguez-Cruz, Eva N; Correa, María E; Cajigas, Iván J; Bracho, Dina P; Vega, Irving E; Wilkinson, Miles F; González, Carlos I

    2014-02-01

    One third of inherited genetic diseases are caused by mRNAs harboring premature termination codons as a result of nonsense mutations. These aberrant mRNAs are degraded by the Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay (NMD) pathway. A central component of the NMD pathway is Upf1, an RNA-dependent ATPase and helicase. Upf1 is a known phosphorylated protein, but only portions of this large protein have been examined for phosphorylation sites and the functional relevance of its phosphorylation has not been elucidated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using tandem mass spectrometry analyses, we report the identification of 11 putative phosphorylated sites in S. cerevisiae Upf1. Five of these phosphorylated residues are located within the ATPase and helicase domains and are conserved in higher eukaryotes, suggesting a biological significance for their phosphorylation. Indeed, functional analysis demonstrated that a small carboxy-terminal motif harboring at least three phosphorylated amino acids is important for three Upf1 functions: ATPase activity, NMD activity and the ability to promote translation termination efficiency. We provide evidence that two tyrosines within this phospho-motif (Y-738 and Y-742) act redundantly to promote ATP hydrolysis, NMD efficiency and translation termination fidelity.

  10. Primary structure of the human fgr proto-oncogene product p55/sup c-fgr/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katamine, S.; Notario, V.; Rao, C.D.; Miki, T.; Cheah, M.S.C.; Tronick, S.R.; Robbins, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    Normal human c-fgr cDNA clones were constructed by using normal peripheral blood mononuclear cell mRNA as a template. Nucleotide sequence analysis of two such clones revealed a 1,587-base-pair-long open reading frame which predicted the primary amino acid sequence of the c-fgr translational product. Homology of this protein with the v-fgr translational product stretched from codons 128 to 516, where 32 differences among 388 codons were observed. Sequence similarity with human c-src, c-yes, and fyn translations products began at amino acid position 76 of the predicted c-fgr protein and extended nearly to its C-terminus. In contrast, the stretch of 75 amino acids at the N-terminus demonstrated a greatly reduced degree of relatedness to these same proteins. To verify the deduced amino acid sequence, antibodies were prepared against peptides representing amino- and carboxy-terminal regions of the predicted c-fgr translational product. Both antibodies specifically recognized a 55-kilodalton protein expressed in COS-1 cells transfected with a c-fgr cDNA expression plasmid. Moreover, the same protein was immunoprecipitated from an Epstein-Barr virus-infected Burkitt's lymphoma cell line which expressed c-fgr mRNA but not in its uninfected fgr mRNA-negative counterpart. These findings identified the 55-kilodalton protein as the product of the human fgr proto-oncogene.

  11. Dwell-Time Distribution, Long Pausing and Arrest of Single-Ribosome Translation through the mRNA Duplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ping

    2015-10-09

    Proteins in the cell are synthesized by a ribosome translating the genetic information encoded on the single-stranded messenger RNA (mRNA). It has been shown that the ribosome can also translate through the duplex region of the mRNA by unwinding the duplex. Here, based on our proposed model of the ribosome translation through the mRNA duplex we study theoretically the distribution of dwell times of the ribosome translation through the mRNA duplex under the effect of a pulling force externally applied to the ends of the mRNA to unzip the duplex. We provide quantitative explanations of the available single molecule experimental data on the distribution of dwell times with both short and long durations, on rescuing of the long paused ribosomes by raising the pulling force to unzip the duplex, on translational arrests induced by the mRNA duplex and Shine-Dalgarno(SD)-like sequence in the mRNA. The functional consequences of the pauses or arrests caused by the mRNA duplex and the SD sequence are discussed and compared with those obtained from other types of pausing, such as those induced by "hungry" codons or interactions of specific sequences in the nascent chain with the ribosomal exit tunnel.

  12. Trans-acting translational regulatory RNA binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Robert F; Smith, Tom S; Mulroney, Thomas; Queiroz, Rayner M L; Pizzinga, Mariavittoria; Dezi, Veronica; Villenueva, Eneko; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Lilley, Kathryn S; Willis, Anne E

    2018-05-01

    The canonical molecular machinery required for global mRNA translation and its control has been well defined, with distinct sets of proteins involved in the processes of translation initiation, elongation and termination. Additionally, noncanonical, trans-acting regulatory RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are necessary to provide mRNA-specific translation, and these interact with 5' and 3' untranslated regions and coding regions of mRNA to regulate ribosome recruitment and transit. Recently it has also been demonstrated that trans-acting ribosomal proteins direct the translation of specific mRNAs. Importantly, it has been shown that subsets of RBPs often work in concert, forming distinct regulatory complexes upon different cellular perturbation, creating an RBP combinatorial code, which through the translation of specific subsets of mRNAs, dictate cell fate. With the development of new methodologies, a plethora of novel RNA binding proteins have recently been identified, although the function of many of these proteins within mRNA translation is unknown. In this review we will discuss these methodologies and their shortcomings when applied to the study of translation, which need to be addressed to enable a better understanding of trans-acting translational regulatory proteins. Moreover, we discuss the protein domains that are responsible for RNA binding as well as the RNA motifs to which they bind, and the role of trans-acting ribosomal proteins in directing the translation of specific mRNAs. This article is categorized under: RNA Interactions with Proteins and Other Molecules > RNA-Protein Complexes Translation > Translation Regulation Translation > Translation Mechanisms. © 2018 Medical Research Council and University of Cambridge. WIREs RNA published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Translation system engineering in Escherichia coli enhances non-canonical amino acid incorporation into proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Rui; Perez, Jessica G; Carlson, Erik D; Ntai, Ioanna; Isaacs, Farren J; Kelleher, Neil L; Jewett, Michael C

    2017-05-01

    The ability to site-specifically incorporate non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins has made possible the study of protein structure and function in fundamentally new ways, as well as the bio synthesis of unnatural polymers. However, the task of site-specifically incorporating multiple ncAAs into proteins with high purity and yield continues to present a challenge. At the heart of this challenge lies the lower efficiency of engineered orthogonal translation system components compared to their natural counterparts (e.g., translation elements that specifically use a ncAA and do not interact with the cell's natural translation apparatus). Here, we show that evolving and tuning expression levels of multiple components of an engineered translation system together as a whole enhances ncAA incorporation efficiency. Specifically, we increase protein yield when incorporating multiple p-azido-phenylalanine(pAzF) residues into proteins by (i) evolving the Methanocaldococcus jannaschii p-azido-phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase anti-codon binding domain, (ii) evolving the elongation factor Tu amino acid-binding pocket, and (iii) tuning the expression of evolved translation machinery components in a single vector. Use of the evolved translation machinery in a genomically recoded organism lacking release factor one enabled enhanced multi-site ncAA incorporation into proteins. We anticipate that our approach to orthogonal translation system development will accelerate and expand our ability to site-specifically incorporate multiple ncAAs into proteins and biopolymers, advancing new horizons for synthetic and chemical biotechnology. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1074-1086. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Essentiality, conservation, evolutionary pressure and codon bias in bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilucca, Maddalena; Cimini, Giulio; Giansanti, Andrea

    2018-07-15

    Essential genes constitute the core of genes which cannot be mutated too much nor lost along the evolutionary history of a species. Natural selection is expected to be stricter on essential genes and on conserved (highly shared) genes, than on genes that are either nonessential or peculiar to a single or a few species. In order to further assess this expectation, we study here how essentiality of a gene is connected with its degree of conservation among several unrelated bacterial species, each one characterised by its own codon usage bias. Confirming previous results on E. coli, we show the existence of a universal exponential relation between gene essentiality and conservation in bacteria. Moreover, we show that, within each bacterial genome, there are at least two groups of functionally distinct genes, characterised by different levels of conservation and codon bias: i) a core of essential genes, mainly related to cellular information processing; ii) a set of less conserved nonessential genes with prevalent functions related to metabolism. In particular, the genes in the first group are more retained among species, are subject to a stronger purifying conservative selection and display a more limited repertoire of synonymous codons. The core of essential genes is close to the minimal bacterial genome, which is in the focus of recent studies in synthetic biology, though we confirm that orthologs of genes that are essential in one species are not necessarily essential in other species. We also list a set of highly shared genes which, reasonably, could constitute a reservoir of targets for new anti-microbial drugs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. In vitro transcription and translation inhibition via DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde, J; Baptista, P V [Centro de Investigacao em Genetica Molecular Humana (CIGMH), Departamento de Ciencias da Vida, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); De la Fuente, J M, E-mail: pmvb@fct.unl.pt [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-12-17

    The use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been gaining momentum as vectors for gene silencing strategies, combining the AuNPs' ease of functionalization with DNA and/or siRNA, high loading capacity and fast uptake by target cells. Here, we used AuNP functionalized with thiolated oligonucleotides to specifically inhibit transcription in vitro, demonstrating the synergetic effect between AuNPs and a specific antisense sequence that blocks the T7 promoter region. Also, AuNPs efficiently protect the antisense oligonucleotide against nuclease degradation, which can thus retain its inhibitory potential. In addition, we demonstrate that AuNPs functionalized with a thiolated oligonucleotide complementary to the ribosome binding site and the start codon, effectively shut down in vitro translation. Together, these two approaches can provide for a simple yet robust experimental set up to test for efficient gene silencing of AuNP-DNA conjugates. What is more, these results show that appropriate functionalization of AuNPs can be used as a dual targeting approach to an enhanced control of gene expression-inhibition of both transcription and translation.

  16. In vitro transcription and translation inhibition via DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conde, J; Baptista, P V; De la Fuente, J M

    2010-01-01

    The use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been gaining momentum as vectors for gene silencing strategies, combining the AuNPs' ease of functionalization with DNA and/or siRNA, high loading capacity and fast uptake by target cells. Here, we used AuNP functionalized with thiolated oligonucleotides to specifically inhibit transcription in vitro, demonstrating the synergetic effect between AuNPs and a specific antisense sequence that blocks the T7 promoter region. Also, AuNPs efficiently protect the antisense oligonucleotide against nuclease degradation, which can thus retain its inhibitory potential. In addition, we demonstrate that AuNPs functionalized with a thiolated oligonucleotide complementary to the ribosome binding site and the start codon, effectively shut down in vitro translation. Together, these two approaches can provide for a simple yet robust experimental set up to test for efficient gene silencing of AuNP-DNA conjugates. What is more, these results show that appropriate functionalization of AuNPs can be used as a dual targeting approach to an enhanced control of gene expression-inhibition of both transcription and translation.

  17. Prion protein gene analysis in three kindreds with fatal familial insomnia (FFI): Codon 178 mutation and codon 129 polymorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medori, R.; Tritschler, H.J. (Universita di Bologna (Italy))

    1993-10-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a disease linked to a GAC(Asp) [yields] AAC(Asn) mutation in codon 178 of the prion protein (PrP) gene. FFI is characterized clinically by untreatable progressive insomnia, dysautonomia, and motor dysfunctions and is characterized pathologically by selective thalamic atrophy. The authors confirmed the 178[sup Asn] mutation in the PrP gene of a third FFI family of French ancestry. Three family members who are under 40 years of age and who inherited the mutation showed only reduced perfusion in the basal ganglia on single photon emission computerized tomography. Some FFI features differ from the clinical and neuropathologic findings associated with 178[sup Asn] reported elsewhere. However, additional intragenic mutations accounting for the phenotypic differences were not observed in two affected individuals. In other sporadic and familial forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Straeussler syndrome, Met or Val homozygosity at polymorphic codon 129 is associated with a more severe phenotype, younger age at onset, and faster progression. In FFI, young and old individuals at disease onset had 129[sup Met/Val]. Moreover, of five 178[sup Asn] individuals who are above age-at-onset range and who are well, two have 129[sup Met] and three have 129[sup Met/Val], suggesting that polymorphic site 129 does not modulate FFI phenotypic expression. Genetic heterogeneity and environment may play an important role in inter- and intrafamilial variability of the 178[sup Asn] mutation. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Translation of dipeptide repeat proteins from the C9ORF72 expanded repeat is associated with cellular stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonobe, Yoshifumi; Ghadge, Ghanashyam; Masaki, Katsuhisa; Sendoel, Ataman; Fuchs, Elaine; Roos, Raymond P

    2018-08-01

    Expansion of a hexanucleotide repeat (HRE), GGGGCC, in the C9ORF72 gene is recognized as the most common cause of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and ALS-FTD, as well as 5-10% of sporadic ALS. Despite the location of the HRE in the non-coding region (with respect to the main C9ORF72 gene product), dipeptide repeat proteins (DPRs) that are thought to be toxic are translated from the HRE in all three reading frames from both the sense and antisense transcript. Here, we identified a CUG that has a good Kozak consensus sequence as the translation initiation codon. Mutation of this CTG significantly suppressed polyglycine-alanine (GA) translation. GA was translated when the G 4 C 2 construct was placed as the second cistron in a bicistronic construct. CRISPR/Cas9-induced knockout of a non-canonical translation initiation factor, eIF2A, impaired GA translation. Transfection of G 4 C 2 constructs induced an integrated stress response (ISR), while triggering the ISR led to a continuation of translation of GA with a decline in conventional cap-dependent translation. These in vitro observations were confirmed in chick embryo neural cells. The findings suggest that DPRs translated from an HRE in C9ORF72 aggregate and lead to an ISR that then leads to continuing DPR production and aggregation, thereby creating a continuing pathogenic cycle. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Elevation of the Yields of Very Long Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids via Minimal Codon Optimization of Two Key Biosynthetic Enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xia

    Full Text Available Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5Δ5,8,11,14,17 and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6Δ4,7,10,13,16,19 are nutritionally beneficial to human health. Transgenic production of EPA and DHA in oilseed crops by transferring genes originating from lower eukaryotes, such as microalgae and fungi, has been attempted in recent years. However, the low yield of EPA and DHA produced in these transgenic crops is a major hurdle for the commercialization of these transgenics. Many factors can negatively affect transgene expression, leading to a low level of converted fatty acid products. Among these the codon bias between the transgene donor and the host crop is one of the major contributing factors. Therefore, we carried out codon optimization of a fatty acid delta-6 desaturase gene PinD6 from the fungus Phytophthora infestans, and a delta-9 elongase gene, IgASE1 from the microalga Isochrysis galbana for expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Arabidopsis respectively. These are the two key genes encoding enzymes for driving the first catalytic steps in the Δ6 desaturation/Δ6 elongation and the Δ9 elongation/Δ8 desaturation pathways for EPA/DHA biosynthesis. Hence expression levels of these two genes are important in determining the final yield of EPA/DHA. Via PCR-based mutagenesis we optimized the least preferred codons within the first 16 codons at their N-termini, as well as the most biased CGC codons (coding for arginine within the entire sequences of both genes. An expression study showed that transgenic Arabidopsis plants harbouring the codon-optimized IgASE1 contained 64% more elongated fatty acid products than plants expressing the native IgASE1 sequence, whilst Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing the codon optimized PinD6 yielded 20 times more desaturated products than yeast expressing wild-type (WT PinD6. Thus the codon optimization strategy we developed here offers a simple, effective and low-cost alternative to whole gene synthesis for high

  20. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of Helicobacter pylori dupA that lead to premature stop codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Sílvia B; Costa, Rafaella F A; Anacleto, Charles; Rocha, Gifone A; Rocha, Andreia M C; Queiroz, Dulciene M M

    2012-06-01

     The detection of the putative disease-specific Helicobacter pylori marker duodenal ulcer promoting gene A (dupA) is currently based on PCR detection of jhp0917 and jhp0918 that form the gene. However, mutations that lead to premature stop codons that split off the dupA leading to truncated products cannot be evaluated by PCR. We directly sequence the complete dupA of 75 dupA-positive strains of H. pylori isolated from patients with gastritis (n = 26), duodenal ulcer (n = 29), and gastric carcinoma (n = 20), to search for frame-shifting mutations that lead to stop codon. Thirty-four strains had single nucleotide mutations in dupA that lead to premature stop codon creating smaller products than the predicted 1839 bp product and, for this reason, were considered as dupA-negative. Intact dupA was more frequently observed in strains isolated from duodenal ulcer patients (65.5%) than in patients with gastritis only (46.2%) or with gastric carcinoma (50%). In logistic analysis, the presence of the intact dupA independently associated with duodenal ulcer (OR = 5.06; 95% CI = 1.22-20.96, p = .02).  We propose the primer walking methodology as a simple technique to sequence the gene. When we considered as dupA-positive only those strains that carry dupA gene without premature stop codons, the gene was associated with duodenal ulcer and, therefore, can be used as a marker for this disease in our population. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Three types of preS1 start codon deletion variants in the natural course of chronic hepatitis B infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Won Hyeok; Kim, Hong; Lee, So-Young; Choi, Yu-Min; Kwon, So Young; Moon, Hee Won; Hur, Mina; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2017-12-12

    Naturally occurring hepatitis B virus variants carrying a deletion in the preS1 start codon region may evolve during long-lasting virus-host interactions in chronic hepatitis B (CHB). The aim of this study was to determine the immune phase-specific prevalent patterns of preS1 start codon deletion variants and related factors during the natural course of CHB. A total of 399 CHB patients were enrolled. Genotypic analysis of three different preS1 start codon deletion variants (classified by deletion size: 15-base pair [bp], 18-bp, and 21-bp deletion variants) was performed. PreS1 start codon deletion variants were detected in 155 of 399 patients (38.8%). The predominant variant was a 15-bp deletion in the immune-tolerance phase (18/50, 36%) and an 18-bp deletion in the immune-clearance phase (69/183, 37.7%). A 21-bp deletion was the predominant variant in the low replicative phase (3/25, 12.0%) and reactivated hepatitis Be antigen (HBeAg)-negative phase (22/141, 15.6%). The 15-bp and 18-bp deletion variants were more frequently found in HBeAg-positive patients (P start codon deletion variants changes according to the immune phases of CHB infection, and each variant type is associated with different clinical parameters. PreS1 start codon deletion variants might interact with the host immune response differently according to their variant types. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Insulin Signaling Augments eIF4E-Dependent Nonsense-Mediated mRNA Decay in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungyun; Ahn, Seyoung; Jayabalan, Aravinth K; Ohn, Takbum; Koh, Hyun Chul; Hwang, Jungwook

    2016-07-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) modulates the level of mRNA harboring a premature termination codon (PTC) in a translation-dependent manner. Inhibition of translation is known to impair NMD; however, few studies have investigated the correlation between enhanced translation and increased NMD. Here, we demonstrate that insulin signaling events increase translation, leading to an increase in NMD of eIF4E-bound transcripts. We provide evidence that (i) insulin-mediated enhancement of translation augments NMD and rapamycin abrogates this enhancement; (ii) an increase in AKT phosphorylation due to inhibition of PTEN facilitates NMD; (iii) insulin stimulation increases the binding of up-frameshift factor 1 (UPF1), most likely to eIF4E-bound PTC-containing transcripts; and (iv) insulin stimulation induces the colocalization of UPF1 and eIF4E in processing bodies. These results illustrate how extracellular signaling promotes the removal of eIF4E-bound NMD targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Norovirus translation requires an interaction between the C Terminus of the genome-linked viral protein VPg and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Liliane; Bailey, Dalan; Leen, Eoin N; Emmott, Edward P; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Roberts, Lisa O; Curry, Stephen; Locker, Nicolas; Goodfellow, Ian G

    2014-08-01

    Viruses have evolved a variety of mechanisms to usurp the host cell translation machinery to enable translation of the viral genome in the presence of high levels of cellular mRNAs. Noroviruses, a major cause of gastroenteritis in man, have evolved a mechanism that relies on the interaction of translation initiation factors with the virus-encoded VPg protein covalently linked to the 5' end of the viral RNA. To further characterize this novel mechanism of translation initiation, we have used proteomics to identify the components of the norovirus translation initiation factor complex. This approach revealed that VPg binds directly to the eIF4F complex, with a high affinity interaction occurring between VPg and eIF4G. Mutational analyses indicated that the C-terminal region of VPg is important for the VPg-eIF4G interaction; viruses with mutations that alter or disrupt this interaction are debilitated or non-viable. Our results shed new light on the unusual mechanisms of protein-directed translation initiation. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Translation of the shallot virus X TGB3 gene depends on non-AUG initiation and leaky scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezzhov, Alexander A; Gushchin, Vladimir A; Lazareva, Ekaterina A; Vishnichenko, Valery K; Morozov, Sergey Y; Solovyev, Andrey G

    2015-10-01

    Triple gene block (TGB), a conserved gene module found in the genomes of many filamentous and rod-shaped plant viruses, encodes three proteins, TGB1, TGB2 and TGB3, required for viral cell-to-cell movement through plasmodesmata and systemic transport via the phloem. The genome of Shallot virus X, the type species of the genus Allexivirus, includes TGB1 and TGB2 genes, but contains no canonical ORF for TGB3 protein. However, a TGB3-like protein-encoding sequence lacking an AUG initiator codon has been found in the shallot virus X (ShVX) genome in a position typical for TGB3 genes. This putative TGB3 gene is conserved in all allexiviruses. Here, we carried out sequence analysis to predict possible non-AUG initiator codons in the ShVX TGB3-encoding sequence. We further used an agroinfiltration assay in Nicotiana benthamiana to confirm this prediction. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to demonstrate that the ShVX TGB3 could be translated on a bicistronic mRNA template via a leaky scanning mechanism.

  5. Immunochemical determination of cellular content of translation release factor RF4 in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Manuel Palacios Moreno, Juan; Clark, Brian F. C.

    1999-01-01

    of the stop codons, and RF3 is known to accelerate the overall termination process. Release factor RF4 is a protein involved in the release of the mRNA and tRNA from the ribosomal complex. Furthermore, RF4 is involved in the proofreading in the elongation step of protein biosynthesis. The cellular contents...... of RF1, RF2, and RF3 were determined earlier. Here we report the cellular content of RF4 in Escherichia coli to be approximately 16,500 molecules per cell. The cells were grown in a rich medium and harvested in the beginning of the exponential growth phase. The quantifications were performed by using...

  6. Rare codons effect on expression of recombinant gene cassette in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghil Esmaeili-Bandboni

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To demonstrate the sensitivity of expression of fusion genes to existence of a large number of rare codons in recombinant gene sequenced. Methods: Primers for amplification of cholera toxin B, Shiga toxin B and gfp genes were designed by Primer3 software and synthesized. All of these 3 genes were cloned. Then the genes were fused together by restriction sites and enzymatic method. Two linkers were used as a flexible bridge in connection of these genes. Results: Cloning and fusion of cholera toxin B, Shiga toxin B and gfp genes were done correctly. After that, expression of the recombinant gene construction was surveyed. Conclusions: According to what was seen, because of the accumulation of 12 rare codons of Shiga toxin B and 19 rare codons of cholera toxin B in this gene cassette, the expression of the recombinant gene cassette, in Escherichia coli BL21, failed.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of Setaria digitata (Nematoda: Filarioidea): Mitochondrial gene content, arrangement and composition compared with other nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatawara, Lalani; Wickramasinghe, Susiji; Rajapakse, R P V J; Agatsuma, Takeshi

    2010-09-01

    In the present study, we determined the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence (13,839bp) of parasitic nematode Setaria digitata and its structure and organization compared with Onchocerca volvulus, Dirofilaria immitis and Brugia malayi. The mt genome of S. digitata is slightly larger than the mt genomes of other filarial nematodes. S. digitata mt genome contains 36 genes (12 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs and 2 ribosomal RNAs) that are typically found in metazoans. This genome contains a high A+T (75.1%) content and low G+C content (24.9%). The mt gene order for S. digitata is the same as those for O. volvulus, D. immitis and B. malayi but it is distinctly different from other nematodes compared. The start codons inferred in the mt genome of S. digitata are TTT, ATT, TTG, ATG, GTT and ATA. Interestingly, the initiation codon TTT is unique to S. digitata mt genome and four protein-coding genes use this codon as a translation initiation codon. Five protein-coding genes use TAG as a stop codon whereas three genes use TAA and four genes use T as a termination codon. Out of 64 possible codons, only 57 are used for mitochondrial protein-coding genes of S. digitata. T-rich codons such as TTT (18.9%), GTT (7.9%), TTG (7.8%), TAT (7%), ATT (5.7%), TCT (4.8%) and TTA (4.1%) are used more frequently. This pattern of codon usage reflects the strong bias for T in the mt genome of S. digitata. In conclusion, the present investigation provides new molecular data for future studies of the comparative mitochondrial genomics and systematic of parasitic nematodes of socio-economic importance. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Combination of the Endogenous lhcsr1 Promoter and Codon Usage Optimization Boosts Protein Expression in the Moss Physcomitrella patens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Hiss

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The moss Physcomitrella patens is used both as an evo-devo model and biotechnological production system for metabolites and pharmaceuticals. Strong in vivo expression of genes of interest is important for production of recombinant proteins, e.g., selectable markers, fluorescent proteins, or enzymes. In this regard, the choice of the promoter sequence as well as codon usage optimization are two important inside factors to consider in order to obtain optimum protein accumulation level. To reliably quantify fluorescence, we transfected protoplasts with promoter:GFP fusion constructs and measured fluorescence intensity of living protoplasts in a plate reader system. We used the red fluorescent protein mCherry under 2x 35S promoter control as second reporter to normalize for different transfection efficiencies. We derived a novel endogenous promoter and compared deletion variants with exogenous promoters. We used different codon-adapted green fluorescent protein (GFP genes to evaluate the influence of promoter choice and codon optimization on protein accumulation in P. patens, and show that the promoter of the gene of P. patens chlorophyll a/b binding protein lhcsr1 drives expression of GFP in protoplasts significantly (more than twofold better than the commonly used 2x 35S promoter or the rice actin1 promoter. We identified a shortened 677 bp version of the lhcsr1 promoter that retains full activity in protoplasts. The codon optimized GFP yields significantly (more than twofold stronger fluorescence signals and thus demonstrates that adjusting codon usage in P. patens can increase expression strength. In combination, new promotor and codon optimized GFP conveyed sixfold increased fluorescence signal.

  9. Preferences of AAA/AAG codon recognition by modified nucleosides, τm5s2U34 and t6A37 present in tRNALys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonawane, Kailas D; Kamble, Asmita S; Fandilolu, Prayagraj M

    2017-12-27

    Deficiency of 5-taurinomethyl-2-thiouridine, τm 5 s 2 U at the 34th 'wobble' position in tRNA Lys causes MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers), a neuromuscular disease. This modified nucleoside of mt tRNA Lys , recognizes AAA/AAG codons during protein biosynthesis process. Its preference to identify cognate codons has not been studied at the atomic level. Hence, multiple MD simulations of various molecular models of anticodon stem loop (ASL) of mt tRNA Lys in presence and absence of τm 5 s 2 U 34 and N 6 -threonylcarbamoyl adenosine (t 6 A 37 ) along with AAA and AAG codons have been accomplished. Additional four MD simulations of multiple ASL mt tRNA Lys models in the context of ribosomal A-site residues have also been performed to investigate the role of A-site in recognition of AAA/AAG codons. MD simulation results show that, ASL models in presence of τm 5 s 2 U 34 and t 6 A 37 with codons AAA/AAG are more stable than the ASL lacking these modified bases. MD trajectories suggest that τm 5 s 2 U recognizes the codons initially by 'wobble' hydrogen bonding interactions, and then tRNA Lys might leave the explicit codon by a novel 'single' hydrogen bonding interaction in order to run the protein biosynthesis process smoothly. We propose this model as the 'Foot-Step Model' for codon recognition, in which the single hydrogen bond plays a crucial role. MD simulation results suggest that, tRNA Lys with τm 5 s 2 U and t 6 A recognizes AAA codon more preferably than AAG. Thus, these results reveal the consequences of τm 5 s 2 U and t 6 A in recognition of AAA/AAG codons in mitochondrial disease, MERRF.

  10. Human tRNALys3UUU Is Pre-Structured by Natural Modifications for Cognate and Wobble Codon Binding through Keto-Enol Tautomerism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendeix, Franck A.P.; Murphy, IV, Frank V.; Cantara, William A.; Leszczy,; #324; ska, Gra; #380; yna,; Gustilo, Estella M.; Sproat, Brian; Malkiewicz, Andrzej; Agris, Paul F. [Cornell; (NCSU); (Poland); (Integrated DNA); (SUNYA)

    2013-09-27

    Human tRNALys3UUU (htRNALys3UUU) decodes the lysine codons AAA and AAG during translation and also plays a crucial role as the primer for HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) reverse transcription. The posttranscriptional modifications 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm5s2U34), 2-methylthio-N6-threonylcarbamoyladenosine (ms2t6A37), and pseudouridine (Ψ39) in the tRNA's anticodon domain are critical for ribosomal binding and HIV-1 reverse transcription. To understand the importance of modified nucleoside contributions, we determined the structure and function of this tRNA's anticodon stem and loop (ASL) domain with these modifications at positions 34, 37, and 39, respectively (hASLLys3UUU-mcm5s2U34;ms2t6A3739). Ribosome binding assays in vitro revealed that the hASLLys3UUU-mcm5s2U34;ms2t6A3739 bound AAA and AAG codons, whereas binding of the unmodified ASLLys3UUU was barely detectable. The UV hyperchromicity, the circular dichroism, and the structural analyses indicated that Ψ39 enhanced the thermodynamic stability of the ASL through base stacking while ms2t6A37 restrained the anticodon to adopt an open loop conformation that is required for ribosomal binding. The NMR-restrained molecular-dynamics-derived solution structure revealed that the modifications provided an open, ordered loop for codon binding. The crystal structures of the hASLLys3UUU-mcm5s2U34;ms2t6A3739 bound to the 30S ribosomal subunit with each codon in the A site showed that the

  11. Efficient Coproduction of Mannanase and Cellulase by the Transformation of a Codon-Optimized Endomannanase Gene from Aspergillus niger into Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xianhua; Xue, Xianli; Li, Mengzhu; Gao, Fei; Hao, Zhenzhen; Huang, Huoqing; Luo, Huiying; Qin, Lina; Yao, Bin; Su, Xiaoyun

    2017-12-20

    Cellulase and mannanase are both important enzyme additives in animal feeds. Expressing the two enzymes simultaneously within one microbial host could potentially lead to cost reductions in the feeding of animals. For this purpose, we codon-optimized the Aspergillus niger Man5A gene to the codon-usage bias of Trichoderma reesei. By comparing the free energies and the local structures of the nucleotide sequences, one optimized sequence was finally selected and transformed into the T. reesei pyridine-auxotrophic strain TU-6. The codon-optimized gene was expressed to a higher level than the original one. Further expressing the codon-optimized gene in a mutated T. reesei strain through fed-batch cultivation resulted in coproduction of cellulase and mannanase up to 1376 U·mL -1 and 1204 U·mL -1 , respectively.

  12. Benzimidazole -Resistance in Haemonchus Contortus: New PCR-RFLP Method for the Detection of Point Mutation at Codon 167 of Isotype 1 Β-Tubulin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Eslami

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to the lack of a suitable and economic test for the analysis of the polymorphism at codon 167, we developed a new PCR-RFLP technique, based on a modified forward primer (UT-HC167 MF-primer, to identify simultaneously the SNPs at codons 167 and 200 of isotype 1 β-tubu­lin gene of Haemonchus contortus.Methods: There already are several safe and easy methods for identification of point mutations at codons 198 and 200. Due to the lack of a reliable and easy method for the detection of the single nucleo­tide polymorphism (SNP at codon 167, we developed an innovative PCR-RFLP technique based on a modified forward primer (UT-HC167 MF-primer, in which the nucleotide T at the posi­tion 443 was substituted through a nucleotide A creating a restriction site for restriction endonuc­lease SnaB I in the nucleotide sequences including codon 167. A total of 138 adult male H. contortus were collected from three different geo-climatic areas of Iran. The isolated genomic DNA of each single worm was amplified by PCR using primers flanking codon 167. The PCR product (527 bp was then amplified by semi-nested PCR using the UT-HC167 MF-primer and the reverse primer achiev­ing a PCR product of 451 bp in length. This PCR product was subsequently digested with the restriction endonucleases SnaB I and TaaI for analysis of the mutations at codons 167 and 200, respec­tively.Results: All worms had two alleles encoding for phenylalanine (BZss homozygote for both codons.Conclusion: Using the UT-HC167 MF-primer and a suitable reverse primer designed upstream from codon 200, it is possible to amplify a PCR product which can be used for analysis of the SNPs at all three mentioned codons using RFLP.

  13. Nascent peptide-mediated translation elongation arrest coupled with mRNA degradation in the CGS1 gene of Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onouchi, Hitoshi; Nagami, Yoko; Haraguchi, Yuhi; Nakamoto, Mari; Nishimura, Yoshiko; Sakurai, Ryoko; Nagao, Nobuhiro; Kawasaki, Daisuke; Kadokura, Yoshitomo; Naito, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Expression of the Arabidopsis CGS1 gene that codes for cystathionine γ-synthase is feedback regulated at the step of mRNA stability in response to S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet). A short stretch of amino acid sequence, called the MTO1 region, encoded by the first exon of CGS1 itself is involved in this regulation. Here, we demonstrate, using a cell-free system, that AdoMet induces temporal translation elongation arrest at the Ser-94 codon located immediately downstream of the MTO1 region, by analyzing a translation intermediate and performing primer extension inhibition (toeprint) analysis. This translation arrest precedes the formation of a degradation intermediate of CGS1 mRNA, which has its 5′ end points near the 5′ edge of the stalled ribosome. The position of ribosome stalling also suggests that the MTO1 region in nascent peptide resides in the ribosomal exit tunnel when translation elongation is temporarily arrested. In addition to the MTO1 region amino acid sequence, downstream Trp-93 is also important for the AdoMet-induced translation arrest. This is the first example of nascent peptide-mediated translation elongation arrest coupled with mRNA degradation in eukaryotes. Furthermore, our data suggest that the ribosome stalls at the step of translocation rather than at the step of peptidyl transfer. PMID:16027170

  14. Improved production of membrane proteins in Escherichia coli by selective codon substitutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholm, Morten H.H.; Toddo, Stephen; Virkki, Minttu T.I.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins are extremely challenging to produce in sufficient quantities for biochemical and structural analysis and there is a growing demand for solutions to this problem. In this study we attempted to improve expression of two difficult-to-express coding sequences (araH and narK) for me......Membrane proteins are extremely challenging to produce in sufficient quantities for biochemical and structural analysis and there is a growing demand for solutions to this problem. In this study we attempted to improve expression of two difficult-to-express coding sequences (araH and nar......K) for membrane transporters. For both coding sequences, synonymous codon substitutions in the region adjacent to the AUG start led to significant improvements in expression, whereas multi-parameter sequence optimization of codons throughout the coding sequence failed. We conclude that coding sequences can be re...

  15. A UV-induced mutation in neurospora that affects translational regulation in response to arginine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitag, M.; Dighde, N.; Sachs, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    The Neurospora crassa arg-2 gene encodes the small subunit of arginine-specific carbamoyl phosphate synthetase. The levels of arg-2 mRNA and mRNA translation are negatively regulated by arginine. An upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the transcript's 5' region has been implicated in arginine-specific control. An arg-2-hph fusion gene encoding hygromycin phosphotransferase conferred arginine-regulated resistance to hygromycin when introduced into N. crassa. We used an arg-2-hph strain to select for UV-induced mutants that grew in the presence of hygromycin and arginine, and we isolated 46 mutants that had either of two phenotypes. One phenotype indicated altered expression of both arg-2-hph and arg-2 genes; the other, altered expression of arg-2-hph but not arg-2. One of the latter mutations, which was genetically closely linked to arg-2-hph, was recovered from the 5' region of the arg-2-hph gene using PCR Sequence analyses and transformation experiments revealed a mutation at uORF codon 12 (Asp to Asn) that abrogated negative regulation. Examination of the distribution of ribosomes on arg-2-hph transcripts showed that loss of regulation had a translational component, indicating the uORF sequence was important for Arg-specific translational control. Comparisons with other uORFs suggest common elements in translational control mechanisms

  16. Maximum likelihood estimation of ancestral codon usage bias parameters in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Bauer DuMont, Vanessa L; Hubisz, Melissa J

    2007-01-01

    : the selection coefficient for optimal codon usage (S), allowing joint maximum likelihood estimation of S and the dN/dS ratio. We apply the method to previously published data from Drosophila melanogaster, Drosophila simulans, and Drosophila yakuba and show, in accordance with previous results, that the D...

  17. An environmental signature for 323 microbial genomes based on codon adaptation indices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Friis, Carsten; Juncker, Agnieszka

    2006-01-01

    , we show that codon usage preference provides an environmental signature by which it is possible to group bacteria according to their lifestyle, for instance soil bacteria and soil symbionts, spore formers, enteric bacteria, aquatic bacteria, and intercellular and extracellular pathogens. Conclusion...

  18. Thrombosis in Hb Taybe [codons 38/39 (-ACC) (α1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Maja Bech; Vestergaard, Hanne; Petersen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Hb Taybe is a highly unstable hemoglobin (Hb) variant caused by a 3 bp deletion at codons 38/39 (-ACC) on the α1-globin gene. We report for the first time, a patient with a compound heterozygosity for Hb Taybe and a 5 bp deletion at the splice donor site of IVS-I on the α2-globin gene and ischemic...

  19. Enhanced expression of codon optimized Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in Lactobacillus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Christopher D; Bannantine, John P; Govender, Rodney; Endersen, Lorraine; Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge; Coffey, Aidan; O'Mahony, Jim; Sleator, Roy D

    2014-01-01

    It is well documented that open reading frames containing high GC content show poor expression in A+T rich hosts. Specifically, G+C-rich codon usage is a limiting factor in heterologous expression of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) proteins using Lactobacillus salivarius. However, re-engineering opening reading frames through synonymous substitutions can offset codon bias and greatly enhance MAP protein production in this host. In this report, we demonstrate that codon-usage manipulation of MAP2121c can enhance the heterologous expression of the major membrane protein (MMP), analogous to the form in which it is produced natively by MAP bacilli. When heterologously over-expressed, antigenic determinants were preserved in synthetic MMP proteins as shown by monoclonal antibody mediated ELISA. Moreover, MMP is a membrane protein in MAP, which is also targeted to the cellular surface of recombinant L. salivarius at levels comparable to MAP. Additionally, we previously engineered MAP3733c (encoding MptD) and show herein that MptD displays the tendency to associate with the cytoplasmic membrane boundary under confocal microscopy and the intracellularly accumulated protein selectively adheres to the MptD-specific bacteriophage fMptD. This work demonstrates there is potential for L. salivarius as a viable antigen delivery vehicle for MAP, which may provide an effective mucosal vaccine against Johne's disease.

  20. Association between the p53 codon 72 polymorphism and primary open-angle glaucoma risk: Meta-analysis based on 11 case–control studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Gohari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The TP53 is important in functions of cell cycle control, apoptosis, and maintenance of DNA integrity. Studies on the association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG risk have yielded conflicting results. Published literature from PubMed and Web of Science databases was retrieved. All studies evaluating the association between p53 codon 72 polymorphisms and POAG were included. Pooled odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated. Eleven separate studies including 2541 cases and 1844 controls were pooled in the meta-analysis. We did not detect a significant association between POAG risk and p53 codon 72 polymorphism overall population except allele genetic model (C vs. G: OR = 0.961, 95% CI = 0.961–0.820, P = 0.622. In the stratified analysis for Asians and Caucasians, there was an association between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and POAG. In the dominant model in the overall population and by ethnicity subgroups, the highest elevated POAG risk was presented. In summary, these results indicate that p53 codon 72 polymorphism is likely an important genetic factor contributing to susceptibility of POAG. However, more case–controls studies based on larger sample size and stratified by ethnicity are suggested to further clarify the relationship between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and POAG.

  1. Characterization of Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Prions in Prion Protein-humanized Mice Carrying Distinct Codon 129 Genotypes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Atsuko; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ironside, James W.; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2013-01-01

    To date, all clinical variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) patients are homozygous for methionine at polymorphic codon 129 (129M/M) of the prion protein (PrP) gene. However, the appearance of asymptomatic secondary vCJD infection in individuals with a PRNP codon 129 genotype other than M/M and transmission studies using animal models have raised the concern that all humans might be susceptible to vCJD prions, especially via secondary infection. To reevaluate this possibility and to analyze in detail the transmission properties of vCJD prions to transgenic animals carrying distinct codon 129 genotype, we performed intracerebral inoculation of vCJD prions to humanized knock-in mice carrying all possible codon 129 genotypes (129M/M, 129M/V, or 129V/V). All humanized knock-in mouse lines were susceptible to vCJD infection, although the attack rate gradually decreased from 129M/M to 129M/V and to 129V/V. The amount of PrP deposition including florid/amyloid plaques in the brain also gradually decreased from 129M/M to 129M/V and to 129V/V. The biochemical properties of protease-resistant abnormal PrP in the brain and transmissibility of these humanized mouse-passaged vCJD prions upon subpassage into knock-in mice expressing bovine PrP were not affected by the codon 129 genotype. These results indicate that individuals with the 129V/V genotype may be more susceptible to secondary vCJD infection than expected and may lack the neuropathological characteristics observed in vCJD patients with the 129M/M genotype. Besides the molecular typing of protease-resistant PrP in the brain, transmission studies using knock-in mice carrying bovine PrP may aid the differential diagnosis of secondary vCJD infection, especially in individuals with the 129V/V genotype. PMID:23792955

  2. Characterization of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease prions in prion protein-humanized mice carrying distinct codon 129 genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Atsuko; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ironside, James W; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2013-07-26

    To date, all clinical variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) patients are homozygous for methionine at polymorphic codon 129 (129M/M) of the prion protein (PrP) gene. However, the appearance of asymptomatic secondary vCJD infection in individuals with a PRNP codon 129 genotype other than M/M and transmission studies using animal models have raised the concern that all humans might be susceptible to vCJD prions, especially via secondary infection. To reevaluate this possibility and to analyze in detail the transmission properties of vCJD prions to transgenic animals carrying distinct codon 129 genotype, we performed intracerebral inoculation of vCJD prions to humanized knock-in mice carrying all possible codon 129 genotypes (129M/M, 129M/V, or 129V/V). All humanized knock-in mouse lines were susceptible to vCJD infection, although the attack rate gradually decreased from 129M/M to 129M/V and to 129V/V. The amount of PrP deposition including florid/amyloid plaques in the brain also gradually decreased from 129M/M to 129M/V and to 129V/V. The biochemical properties of protease-resistant abnormal PrP in the brain and transmissibility of these humanized mouse-passaged vCJD prions upon subpassage into knock-in mice expressing bovine PrP were not affected by the codon 129 genotype. These results indicate that individuals with the 129V/V genotype may be more susceptible to secondary vCJD infection than expected and may lack the neuropathological characteristics observed in vCJD patients with the 129M/M genotype. Besides the molecular typing of protease-resistant PrP in the brain, transmission studies using knock-in mice carrying bovine PrP may aid the differential diagnosis of secondary vCJD infection, especially in individuals with the 129V/V genotype.

  3. Ribosome Shunting, Polycistronic Translation, and Evasion of Antiviral Defenses in Plant Pararetroviruses and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail M. Pooggin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Viruses have compact genomes and usually translate more than one protein from polycistronic RNAs using leaky scanning, frameshifting, stop codon suppression or reinitiation mechanisms. Viral (pre-genomic RNAs often contain long 5′-leader sequences with short upstream open reading frames (uORFs and secondary structure elements, which control both translation initiation and replication. In plants, viral RNA and DNA are targeted by RNA interference (RNAi generating small RNAs that silence viral gene expression, while viral proteins are recognized by innate immunity and autophagy that restrict viral infection. In this review we focus on plant pararetroviruses of the family Caulimoviridae and describe the mechanisms of uORF- and secondary structure-driven ribosome shunting, leaky scanning and reinitiation after translation of short and long uORFs. We discuss conservation of these mechanisms in different genera of Caulimoviridae, including host genome-integrated endogenous viral elements, as well as in other viral families, and highlight a multipurpose use of the highly-structured leader sequence of plant pararetroviruses in regulation of translation, splicing, packaging, and reverse transcription of pregenomic RNA (pgRNA, and in evasion of RNAi. Furthermore, we illustrate how targeting of several host factors by a pararetroviral effector protein can lead to transactivation of viral polycistronic translation and concomitant suppression of antiviral defenses. Thus, activation of the plant protein kinase target of rapamycin (TOR by the Cauliflower mosaic virus transactivator/viroplasmin (TAV promotes reinitiation of translation after long ORFs on viral pgRNA and blocks antiviral autophagy and innate immunity responses, while interaction of TAV with the plant RNAi machinery interferes with antiviral silencing.

  4. SCREENING FOR GENETIC CHANGES AND CODON 129 POLYMORPHISM IN PRNP GENE IN HEALTHY SLOVENIAN POPULATION AND SPORADIC CASES OF CREUTZFELDT-JAKOB DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sava Smerkolj

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prion protein has an important role in development of prion diseases, fatal neurodegenerative disorders. As the codon 129 genotype of the prion protein gene (PRNP is a known susceptibility factor for the diseases, we wanted to determine its distribution in healthy Slovenian population and also in cases of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD. Furthermore, we wanted to screen the whole gene in order to establish the presence of genetic changes.Methods. We screened 350 DNA samples of healthy blood donors and 12 DNA samples of patients deceased of sCJD. After the amplification and conformation analysis had been done, the gene was sequenced using an automatic sequencer.Results. Methionine homozygotes comprised 46.8% of healthy population, valine homozygotes 12.1% and heterozygotes 41.1%; out of 12 sCJD patients 10 were methionine homozygotes (83.3%, 1 was valine homozygote (8.3% and 1 was heterozygote (8.3%.Found SNPs were combination of codon 76 change (228C > T and codon 84 change (252T > C in a single sample of healthy population, combination of codon 68 change (204T > C and codon 76 change (228C > T in two samples of healthy population and codon 117 change (351A > G in a healthy population sample and in a valine homozygote patient.Conclusions. In comparison to the pooled Caucasian population is genotype M/M frequency slightly increased on account of decreased genotype M/V frequency in healthy Slovenian population, suggesting a little higher risk for acquiring a new variant of CJD (vCJD, because up to date all confirmed vCJD cases except one heterozygote were methionine homozygotes. Codon 129 genotype distribution in sCJD can be described as disease-specific. The absence of pathogenic mutations in sCJD patients confirms the non-familial, sporadic disease form.

  5. Nucleotide composition of the Zika virus RNA genome and its codon usage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hemert, Formijn; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses have genomes with a distinct nucleotide composition and codon usage. We present the global characteristics of the RNA genome of Zika virus (ZIKV), an emerging pathogen within the Flavivirus genus. ZIKV was first isolated in 1947 in Uganda, caused a widespread epidemic in South and

  6. Codon and amino-acid distribution in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.K.; Yang, S.I.; Kwon, Y.H.; Lee, E.I.

    2005-01-01

    According to the Zipf's law, the distribution of rank-ordered frequency of words in the natural language can be modelled on the power law. In this paper, we examine the frequency distribution of 64 codons over the coding and non-coding regions of 88 DNA from EMBL and GenBank database, using exponential fitting. Also, we regard 20 amino-acids as vocabulary, perform the same frequency analysis to the same database and show that amino-acids can be used as biological meaningful words for Zipf's approach. Our analysis suggests that a natural language structure may exist not only in the coding region of DNA but in the non-coding one of DNA

  7. Simulated evolution applied to study the genetic code optimality using a model of codon reassignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, José; Monteagudo, Angel

    2011-02-21

    As the canonical code is not universal, different theories about its origin and organization have appeared. The optimization or level of adaptation of the canonical genetic code was measured taking into account the harmful consequences resulting from point mutations leading to the replacement of one amino acid for another. There are two basic theories to measure the level of optimization: the statistical approach, which compares the canonical genetic code with many randomly generated alternative ones, and the engineering approach, which compares the canonical code with the best possible alternative. Here we used a genetic algorithm to search for better adapted hypothetical codes and as a method to guess the difficulty in finding such alternative codes, allowing to clearly situate the canonical code in the fitness landscape. This novel proposal of the use of evolutionary computing provides a new perspective in the open debate between the use of the statistical approach, which postulates that the genetic code conserves amino acid properties far better than expected from a random code, and the engineering approach, which tends to indicate that the canonical genetic code is still far from optimal. We used two models of hypothetical codes: one that reflects the known examples of codon reassignment and the model most used in the two approaches which reflects the current genetic code translation table. Although the standard code is far from a possible optimum considering both models, when the more realistic model of the codon reassignments was used, the evolutionary algorithm had more difficulty to overcome the efficiency of the canonical genetic code. Simulated evolution clearly reveals that the canonical genetic code is far from optimal regarding its optimization. Nevertheless, the efficiency of the canonical code increases when mistranslations are taken into account with the two models, as indicated by the fact that the best possible codes show the patterns of the

  8. Simulated evolution applied to study the genetic code optimality using a model of codon reassignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monteagudo Ángel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the canonical code is not universal, different theories about its origin and organization have appeared. The optimization or level of adaptation of the canonical genetic code was measured taking into account the harmful consequences resulting from point mutations leading to the replacement of one amino acid for another. There are two basic theories to measure the level of optimization: the statistical approach, which compares the canonical genetic code with many randomly generated alternative ones, and the engineering approach, which compares the canonical code with the best possible alternative. Results Here we used a genetic algorithm to search for better adapted hypothetical codes and as a method to guess the difficulty in finding such alternative codes, allowing to clearly situate the canonical code in the fitness landscape. This novel proposal of the use of evolutionary computing provides a new perspective in the open debate between the use of the statistical approach, which postulates that the genetic code conserves amino acid properties far better than expected from a random code, and the engineering approach, which tends to indicate that the canonical genetic code is still far from optimal. We used two models of hypothetical codes: one that reflects the known examples of codon reassignment and the model most used in the two approaches which reflects the current genetic code translation table. Although the standard code is far from a possible optimum considering both models, when the more realistic model of the codon reassignments was used, the evolutionary algorithm had more difficulty to overcome the efficiency of the canonical genetic code. Conclusions Simulated evolution clearly reveals that the canonical genetic code is far from optimal regarding its optimization. Nevertheless, the efficiency of the canonical code increases when mistranslations are taken into account with the two models, as indicated by the

  9. Identification and codon reading properties of 5-cyanomethyl uridine, a new modified nucleoside found in the anticodon wobble position of mutant haloarchaeal isoleucine tRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Debabrata; Köhrer, Caroline; Su, Dan; Babu, I Ramesh; Chan, Clement T Y; Liu, Yuchen; Söll, Dieter; Blum, Paul; Kuwahara, Masayasu; Dedon, Peter C; Rajbhandary, Uttam L

    2014-02-01

    Most archaea and bacteria use a modified C in the anticodon wobble position of isoleucine tRNA to base pair with A but not with G of the mRNA. This allows the tRNA to read the isoleucine codon AUA without also reading the methionine codon AUG. To understand why a modified C, and not U or modified U, is used to base pair with A, we mutated the C34 in the anticodon of Haloarcula marismortui isoleucine tRNA (tRNA2(Ile)) to U, expressed the mutant tRNA in Haloferax volcanii, and purified and analyzed the tRNA. Ribosome binding experiments show that although the wild-type tRNA2(Ile) binds exclusively to the isoleucine codon AUA, the mutant tRNA binds not only to AUA but also to AUU, another isoleucine codon, and to AUG, a methionine codon. The G34 to U mutant in the anticodon of another H. marismortui isoleucine tRNA species showed similar codon binding properties. Binding of the mutant tRNA to AUG could lead to misreading of the AUG codon and insertion of isoleucine in place of methionine. This result would explain why most archaea and bacteria do not normally use U or a modified U in the anticodon wobble position of isoleucine tRNA for reading the codon AUA. Biochemical and mass spectrometric analyses of the mutant tRNAs have led to the discovery of a new modified nucleoside, 5-cyanomethyl U in the anticodon wobble position of the mutant tRNAs. 5-Cyanomethyl U is present in total tRNAs from euryarchaea but not in crenarchaea, eubacteria, or eukaryotes.

  10. The mitochondrial genome sequence of the ciliate Paramecium caudatum reveals a shift in nucleotide composition and codon usage within the genus Paramecium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berendonk Thomas U

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the fact that the organization of the ciliate mitochondrial genome is exceptional, only few ciliate mitochondrial genomes have been sequenced until today. All ciliate mitochondrial genomes are linear. They are 40 kb to 47 kb long and contain some 50 tightly packed genes without introns. Earlier studies documented that the mitochondrial guanine + cytosine contents are very different between Paramecium tetraurelia and all studied Tetrahymena species. This raises the question of whether the high mitochondrial G+C content observed in P. tetraurelia is a characteristic property of Paramecium mtDNA, or whether it is an exception of the ciliate mitochondrial genomes known so far. To test this question, we determined the mitochondrial genome sequence of Paramecium caudatum and compared the gene content and sequence properties to the closely related P. tetraurelia. Results The guanine + cytosine content of the P. caudatum mitochondrial genome was significantly lower than that of P. tetraurelia (22.4% vs. 41.2%. This difference in the mitochondrial nucleotide composition was accompanied by significantly different codon usage patterns in both species, i.e. within P. caudatum clearly A/T ending codons dominated, whereas for P. tetraurelia the synonymous codons were more balanced with a higher number of G/C ending codons. Further analyses indicated that the nucleotide composition of most members of the genus Paramecium resembles that of P. caudatum and that the shift observed in P. tetraurelia is restricted to the P. aurelia species complex. Conclusions Surprisingly, the codon usage bias in the P. caudatum mitochondrial genome, exemplified by the effective number of codons, is more similar to the distantly related T. pyriformis and other single-celled eukaryotes such as Chlamydomonas, than to the closely related P. tetraurelia. These differences in base composition and codon usage bias were, however, not reflected in the amino

  11. Gemin5: A Multitasking RNA-Binding Protein Involved in Translation Control

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    David Piñeiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gemin5 is a RNA-binding protein (RBP that was first identified as a peripheral component of the survival of motor neurons (SMN complex. This predominantly cytoplasmic protein recognises the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs through its WD repeat domains, allowing assembly of the SMN complex into small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs. Additionally, the amino-terminal end of the protein has been reported to possess cap-binding capacity and to interact with the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E. Gemin5 was also shown to downregulate translation, to be a substrate of the picornavirus L protease and to interact with viral internal ribosome entry site (IRES elements via a bipartite non-canonical RNA-binding site located at its carboxy-terminal end. These features link Gemin5 with translation control events. Thus, beyond its role in snRNPs biogenesis, Gemin5 appears to be a multitasking protein cooperating in various RNA-guided processes. In this review, we will summarise current knowledge of Gemin5 functions. We will discuss the involvement of the protein on translation control and propose a model to explain how the proteolysis fragments of this RBP in picornavirus-infected cells could modulate protein synthesis.

  12. Reduce manual curation by combining gene predictions from multiple annotation engines, a case study of start codon prediction.

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    Thomas H A Ederveen

    Full Text Available Nowadays, prokaryotic genomes are sequenced faster than the capacity to manually curate gene annotations. Automated genome annotation engines provide users a straight-forward and complete solution for predicting ORF coordinates and function. For many labs, the use of AGEs is therefore essential to decrease the time necessary for annotating a given prokaryotic genome. However, it is not uncommon for AGEs to provide different and sometimes conflicting predictions. Combining multiple AGEs might allow for more accurate predictions. Here we analyzed the ab initio open reading frame (ORF calling performance of different AGEs based on curated genome annotations of eight strains from different bacterial species with GC% ranging from 35-52%. We present a case study which demonstrates a novel way of comparative genome annotation, using combinations of AGEs in a pre-defined order (or path to predict ORF start codons. The order of AGE combinations is from high to low specificity, where the specificity is based on the eight genome annotations. For each AGE combination we are able to derive a so-called projected confidence value, which is the average specificity of ORF start codon prediction based on the eight genomes. The projected confidence enables estimating likeliness of a correct prediction for a particular ORF start codon by a particular AGE combination, pinpointing ORFs notoriously difficult to predict start codons. We correctly predict start codons for 90.5±4.8% of the genes in a genome (based on the eight genomes with an accuracy of 81.1±7.6%. Our consensus-path methodology allows a marked improvement over majority voting (9.7±4.4% and with an optimal path ORF start prediction sensitivity is gained while maintaining a high specificity.

  13. Calicivirus 3C-like proteinase inhibits cellular translation by cleavage of poly(A)-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge; Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Green, Kim Y; Lloyd, Richard E

    2004-08-01

    Caliciviruses are single-stranded RNA viruses that cause a wide range of diseases in both humans and animals, but little is known about the regulation of cellular translation during infection. We used two distinct calicivirus strains, MD145-12 (genus Norovirus) and feline calicivirus (FCV) (genus Vesivirus), to investigate potential strategies used by the caliciviruses to inhibit cellular translation. Recombinant 3C-like proteinases (r3CL(pro)) from norovirus and FCV were found to cleave poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) in the absence of other viral proteins. The norovirus r3CL(pro) PABP cleavage products were indistinguishable from those generated by poliovirus (PV) 3C(pro) cleavage, while the FCV r3CL(pro) products differed due to cleavage at an alternate cleavage site 24 amino acids downstream of one of the PV 3C(pro) cleavage sites. All cleavages by calicivirus or PV proteases separated the C-terminal domain of PABP that binds translation factors eIF4B and eRF3 from the N-terminal RNA-binding domain of PABP. The effect of PABP cleavage by the norovirus r3CL(pro) was analyzed in HeLa cell translation extracts, and the presence of r3CL(pro) inhibited translation of both endogenous and exogenous mRNAs. Translation inhibition was poly(A) dependent, and replenishment of the extracts with PABP restored translation. Analysis of FCV-infected feline kidney cells showed that the levels of de novo cellular protein synthesis decreased over time as virus-specific proteins accumulated, and cleavage of PABP occurred in virus-infected cells. Our data indicate that the calicivirus 3CL(pro), like PV 3C(pro), mediates the cleavage of PABP as part of its strategy to inhibit cellular translation. PABP cleavage may be a common mechanism among certain virus families to manipulate cellular translation.

  14. Criteria for confirming sequence periodicity identified by Fourier transform analysis: application to GCR2, a candidate plant GPCR?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Christopher J R; Parkes, Kevin E; Snell, Christopher R; Mullineaux, Philip M; Reynolds, Christopher A

    2008-03-01

    Methods to determine periodicity in protein sequences are useful for inferring function. Fourier transformation is one approach but care is required to ensure the periodicity is genuine. Here we have shown that empirically-derived statistical tables can be used as a measure of significance. Genuine protein sequences data rather than randomly generated sequences were used as the statistical backdrop. The method has been applied to G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) sequences, by Fourier transformation of hydrophobicity values, codon frequencies and the extent of over-representation of codon pairs; the latter being related to translational step times. Genuine periodicity was observed in the hydrophobicity whereas the apparent periodicity (as inferred from previously reported measures) in the translation step times was not validated statistically. GCR2 has recently been proposed as the plant GPCR receptor for the hormone abscisic acid. It has homology to the Lanthionine synthetase C-like family of proteins, an observation confirmed by fold recognition. Application of the Fourier transform algorithm to the GCR2 family revealed strongly predicted seven fold periodicity in hydrophobicity, suggesting why GCR2 has been reported to be a GPCR, despite negative indications in most transmembrane prediction algorithms. The underlying multiple sequence alignment, also required for the Fourier transform analysis of periodicity, indicated that the hydrophobic regions around the 7 GXXG motifs commence near the C-terminal end of each of the 7 inner helices of the alpha-toroid and continue to the N-terminal region of the helix. The results clearly explain why GCR2 has been understandably but erroneously predicted to be a GPCR.

  15. Protein translation and cell death: the role of rare tRNAs in biofilm formation and in activating dormant phage killer genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo García-Contreras

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We discovered previously that the small Escherichia coli proteins Hha (hemolysin expression modulating protein and the adjacent, poorly-characterized YbaJ are important for biofilm formation; however, their roles have been nebulous. Biofilms are intricate communities in which cell signaling often converts single cells into primitive tissues. Here we show that Hha decreases biofilm formation dramatically by repressing the transcription of rare codon tRNAs which serves to inhibit fimbriae production and by repressing to some extent transcription of fimbrial genes fimA and ihfA. In vivo binding studies show Hha binds to the rare codon tRNAs argU, ileX, ileY, and proL and to two prophage clusters D1P12 and CP4-57. Real-time PCR corroborated that Hha represses argU and proL, and Hha type I fimbriae repression is abolished by the addition of extra copies of argU, ileY, and proL. The repression of transcription of rare codon tRNAs by Hha also leads to cell lysis and biofilm dispersal due to activation of prophage lytic genes rzpD, yfjZ, appY, and alpA and due to induction of ClpP/ClpX proteases which activate toxins by degrading antitoxins. YbaJ serves to mediate the toxicity of Hha. Hence, we have identified that a single protein (Hha can control biofilm formation by limiting fimbriae production as well as by controlling cell death. The mechanism used by Hha is the control of translation via the availability of rare codon tRNAs which reduces fimbriae production and activates prophage lytic genes. Therefore, Hha acts as a toxin in conjunction with co-transcribed YbaJ (TomB that attenuates Hha toxicity.

  16. An intermediate region in C-terminal of phosphoprotein is required ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the region of P that binds to NPNC was mapped. To determine the binding region, 18 N- and C-terminally truncated P mutants were synthesized by in vitro translation in rabbit reticulocytes and mixed with purified NP (NPNC). The mutants which did not bind to NP were considered as mutants and they contain ...

  17. Genotyping of K-ras codons 12 and 13 mutations in colorectal cancer by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ling; Chang, Ya-Sian; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Wu, Shou-Mei

    2009-06-26

    Point mutations of the K-ras gene located in codons 12 and 13 cause poor responses to the anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) therapy of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Besides, mutations of K-ras gene have also been proven to play an important role in human tumor progression. We established a simple and effective capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for simultaneous point mutation detection in codons 12 and 13 of K-ras gene. We combined one universal fluorescence-based nonhuman-sequence primer and two fragment-oriented primers in one tube, and performed this two-in-one polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR fragments included wild type and seven point mutations at codons 12 and 13 of K-ras gene. The amplicons were analyzed by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP)-CE method. The CE analysis was performed by using a 1x Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) buffer containing 1.5% (w/v) hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) (MW 250,000) under reverse polarity with 15 degrees C and 30 degrees C. Ninety colorectal cancer patients were blindly genotyped using this developed method. The results showed good agreement with those of DNA sequencing method. The SSCP-CE was feasible for mutation screening of K-ras gene in populations.

  18. Same-strand overlapping genes in bacteria: compositional determinants of phase bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landan Giddy

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Same-strand overlapping genes may occur in frameshifts of one (phase 1 or two nucleotides (phase 2. In previous studies of bacterial genomes, long phase-1 overlaps were found to be more numerous than long phase-2 overlaps. This bias was explained by either genomic location or an unspecified selection advantage. Models that focused on the ability of the two genes to evolve independently did not predict this phase bias. Here, we propose that a purely compositional model explains the phase bias in a more parsimonious manner. Same-strand overlapping genes may arise through either a mutation at the termination codon of the upstream gene or a mutation at the initiation codon of the downstream gene. We hypothesized that given these two scenarios, the frequencies of initiation and termination codons in the two phases may determine the number for overlapping genes. Results We examined the frequencies of initiation- and termination-codons in the two phases, and found that termination codons do not significantly differ between the two phases, whereas initiation codons are more abundant in phase 1. We found that the primary factors explaining the phase inequality are the frequencies of amino acids whose codons may combine to form start codons in the two phases. We show that the frequencies of start codons in each of the two phases, and, hence, the potential for the creation of overlapping genes, are determined by a universal amino-acid frequency and species-specific codon usage, leading to a correlation between long phase-1 overlaps and genomic GC content. Conclusion Our model explains the phase bias in same-strand overlapping genes by compositional factors without invoking selection. Therefore, it can be used as a null model of neutral evolution to test selection hypotheses concerning the evolution of overlapping genes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Bill Martin, Itai Yanai, and Mikhail Gelfand.

  19. New OprM structure highlighting the nature of the N-terminal anchor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eMONLEZUN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Among the different mechanisms used by bacteria to resist antibiotics, active efflux plays a major role. In gram-negative bacteria, active efflux is carried out by tripartite efflux pumps that form a macromolecular assembly spanning both membranes of the cellular wall. At the outer membrane level, a well-conserved Outer Membrane Factor (OMF protein acts as an exit duct, but its sequence varies greatly among different species. The OMFs share a similar tri-dimensional structure that includes a beta-barrel pore domain that stabilizes the channel within the membrane. In addition, OMFs are often subjected to different N-terminal post-translational modifications, such as an acylation with a lipid. The role of additional N-terminal anchors is all the more intriguing since it is not always required among the OMFs family. Understanding this optional post-translational modification could open new research lines in the field of antibiotics resistance. In E. coli, it has been shown that CusC is modified with a tri-acylated lipid, whereas TolC does not show any. In the case of OprM from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the N-terminal modification remains a matter of debate, therefore, we used several approaches to investigate this issue. As definitive evidence, we present a new X ray structure at 3.8Å resolution that was solved in a new space group, making it possible to model the N-terminal residue as a palmitylated cysteine.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the W2 domain of Drosophila melanogaster eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5C domain-containing protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Hui; Wang, Hong; Liu, Huihui; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2012-01-01

    The crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the carboxy-terminal domain of D. melanogaster eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5C domain-containing protein are reported. The Drosophila melanogaster eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5C domain-containing protein (ECP) is composed of two independently folded domains which belong to the basic leucine-zipper and W2 domain-containing protein (BZW) family. Based on the sequence similarity between the C-terminal W2 domain of ECP and some eukaryotic translation initiation factors (such as eIF2B∊, eIF4γ, eIF5 etc.), ECP has been speculated to participate in the translation initiation process. Structural information on the C-terminal W2 domain of ECP would be helpful in understanding the specific cellular function of this protein. Here, the W2 domain of ECP was expressed and crystallized. Crystals grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method diffracted to 2.70 Å resolution and belonged to space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 81.05, c = 57.44 Å. The Matthews coefficient suggested that there was one molecule per asymmetric unit in the crystal

  1. Cloning, Codon Optimization, and Expression of Yersinia intermedia Phytase Gene in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Maryam; Saffar, Behnaz; Shareghi, Behzad

    2016-06-01

    Phytate is an anti-nutritional factor in plants, which catches the most phosphorus contents and some vital minerals. Therefore, Phytase is added mainly as an additive to the monogastric animals' foods to hydrolyze phytate and increase absorption of phosphorus. Y. intermedia phytase is a new phytase with special characteristics such as high specific activity, pH stability, and thermostability. Our aim was to clone, express, and characterizea codon optimized Y. intermedia phytase gene in E. coli . The Y. intermedia phytase gene was optimized according to the codon usage in E. coli . The sequence was synthesized and sub-cloned in pET-22b (+) vector and transformed into E. coli Bl21 (DE3). The protein was expressed in the presence of IPTG at a final concentration of 1 mM at 30°C. The purification of recombinant protein was performed by Ni 2+ affinity chromatography. Phytase activity and stability were determined in various pH and temperatures. The codon optimized Y. intermedia phytase gene was sub-cloned successfully.The expression was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. The recombinant enzyme (approximately 45 kDa) was purified. Specific activity of enzyme was 3849 (U.mg -1 ) with optimal pH 5 and optimal temperature of 55°C. Thermostability (80°C for 15 min) and pH stability (3-6) of the enzyme were 56 and more than 80%, respectively. The results of the expression and enzyme characterization revealed that the optimized Y. intermedia phytase gene has a good potential to be produced commercially andto be applied in animals' foodsindustry.

  2. Stabilization of the genome of the mismatch repair deficient Mycobacterium tuberculosis by context-dependent codon choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Roger M; Güthlein, Carolin; Springer, Burkhard; Böttger, Erik C; Ackermann, Martin

    2008-05-28

    The rate at which a stretch of DNA mutates is determined by the cellular systems for DNA replication and repair, and by the nucleotide sequence of the stretch itself. One sequence feature with a particularly strong influence on the mutation rate are nucleotide repeats. Some microbial pathogens use nucleotide repeats in their genome to stochastically vary phenotypic traits and thereby evade host defense. However, such unstable sequences also come at a cost, as mutations are often deleterious. Here, we analyzed how these opposing forces shaped genome stability in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis lacks a mismatch repair system, and this renders nucleotide repeats particularly unstable. We found that proteins of M. tuberculosis are encoded by using codons in a context-dependent manner that prevents the emergence of nucleotide repeats. This context-dependent codon choice leads to a strong decrease in the estimated frame-shift mutation rate and thus to an increase in genome stability. These results indicate that a context-specific codon choice can partially compensate for the lack of a mismatch repair system, and helps to maintain genome integrity in this pathogen.

  3. Stabilization of the genome of the mismatch repair deficient Mycobacterium tuberculosis by context-dependent codon choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackermann Martin

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate at which a stretch of DNA mutates is determined by the cellular systems for DNA replication and repair, and by the nucleotide sequence of the stretch itself. One sequence feature with a particularly strong influence on the mutation rate are nucleotide repeats. Some microbial pathogens use nucleotide repeats in their genome to stochastically vary phenotypic traits and thereby evade host defense. However, such unstable sequences also come at a cost, as mutations are often deleterious. Here, we analyzed how these opposing forces shaped genome stability in the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis lacks a mismatch repair system, and this renders nucleotide repeats particularly unstable. Results We found that proteins of M. tuberculosis are encoded by using codons in a context-dependent manner that prevents the emergence of nucleotide repeats. This context-dependent codon choice leads to a strong decrease in the estimated frame-shift mutation rate and thus to an increase in genome stability. Conclusion These results indicate that a context-specific codon choice can partially compensate for the lack of a mismatch repair system, and helps to maintain genome integrity in this pathogen.

  4. Experimental Analysis of Mimivirus Translation Initiation Factor 4a Reveals Its Importance in Viral Protein Translation during Infection of Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekliz, Meriem; Azza, Said; Seligmann, Hervé; Decloquement, Philippe; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2018-05-15

    The Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus is the first giant virus ever described, with a 1.2-Mb genome which encodes 979 proteins, including central components of the translation apparatus. One of these proteins, R458, was predicted to initiate translation, although its specific role remains unknown. We silenced the R458 gene using small interfering RNA (siRNA) and compared levels of viral fitness and protein expression in silenced versus wild-type mimivirus. Silencing decreased the growth rate, but viral particle production at the end of the viral cycle was unaffected. A comparative proteomic approach using two-dimensional difference-in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) revealed deregulation of the expression of 32 proteins in silenced mimivirus, which were defined as up- or downregulated. Besides revealing proteins with unknown functions, silencing R458 also revealed deregulation in proteins associated with viral particle structures, transcriptional machinery, oxidative pathways, modification of proteins/lipids, and DNA topology/repair. Most of these proteins belong to genes transcribed at the end of the viral cycle. Overall, our data suggest that the R458 protein regulates the expression of mimivirus proteins and, thus, that mimivirus translational proteins may not be strictly redundant in relation to those from the amoeba host. As is the case for eukaryotic initiation factor 4a (eIF4a), the R458 protein is the prototypical member of the ATP-dependent DEAD box RNA helicase mechanism. We suggest that the R458 protein is required to unwind the secondary structures at the 5' ends of mRNAs and to bind the mRNA to the ribosome, making it possible to scan for the start codon. These data are the first experimental evidence of mimivirus translation-related genes, predicted to initiate protein biosynthesis. IMPORTANCE The presence in the genome of a mimivirus of genes coding for many translational processes, with the exception of ribosome constituents, has been the subject of

  5. Analysis of phylogeny and codon usage bias and relationship of GC content, amino acid composition with expression of the structural nif genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sunil Kanti; Kundu, Sudip; Das, Rabindranath; Roy, Sujit

    2016-08-01

    Bacteria and archaea have evolved with the ability to fix atmospheric dinitrogen in the form of ammonia, catalyzed by the nitrogenase enzyme complex which comprises three structural genes nifK, nifD and nifH. The nifK and nifD encodes for the beta and alpha subunits, respectively, of component 1, while nifH encodes for component 2 of nitrogenase. Phylogeny based on nifDHK have indicated that Cyanobacteria is closer to Proteobacteria alpha and gamma but not supported by the tree based on 16SrRNA. The evolutionary ancestor for the different trees was also different. The GC1 and GC2% analysis showed more consistency than GC3% which appeared to below for Firmicutes, Cyanobacteria and Euarchaeota while highest in Proteobacteria beta and clearly showed the proportional effect on the codon usage with a few exceptions. Few genes from Firmicutes, Euryarchaeota, Proteobacteria alpha and delta were found under mutational pressure. These nif genes with low and high GC3% from different classes of organisms showed similar expected number of codons. Distribution of the genes and codons, based on codon usage demonstrated opposite pattern for different orientation of mirror plane when compared with each other. Overall our results provide a comprehensive analysis on the evolutionary relationship of the three structural nif genes, nifK, nifD and nifH, respectively, in the context of codon usage bias, GC content relationship and amino acid composition of the encoded proteins and exploration of crucial statistical method for the analysis of positive data with non-constant variance to identify the shape factors of codon adaptation index.

  6. The Impact of Machine Translation and Computer-aided Translation on Translators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hao

    2018-03-01

    Under the context of globalization, communications between countries and cultures are becoming increasingly frequent, which make it imperative to use some techniques to help translate. This paper is to explore the influence of computer-aided translation on translators, which is derived from the field of the computer-aided translation (CAT) and machine translation (MT). Followed by an introduction to the development of machine and computer-aided translation, it then depicts the technologies practicable to translators, which are trying to analyze the demand of designing the computer-aided translation so far in translation practice, and optimize the designation of computer-aided translation techniques, and analyze its operability in translation. The findings underline the advantages and disadvantages of MT and CAT tools, and the serviceability and future development of MT and CAT technologies. Finally, this thesis probes into the impact of these new technologies on translators in hope that more translators and translation researchers can learn to use such tools to improve their productivity.

  7. Synonymous codon usage analysis of hand, foot and mouth disease viruses: A comparative study on coxsackievirus A6, A10, A16, and enterovirus 71 from 2008 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Weiheng; Li, Xue; Chen, Meili; Dai, Wenwen; Sun, Shiyang; Wang, Shuai; Sheng, Xin; Sun, Shixiang; Gao, Chen; Hou, Ali; Zhou, Yan; Sun, Bo; Gao, Feng; Xiao, Jingfa; Zhang, Zhewen; Jiang, Chunlai

    2017-09-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) have been considered major pathogens of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) throughout the world for decades. In recent years, coxsackievirus A6 (CVA6) and coxsackievirus A10 (CVA10) have raised attention as two other serious pathogens of HFMD. The present study focused on the synonymous codon usage of four viruses isolated from 2008 to 2015, with particular attention on P1 (encoding capsid proteins) and P2-P3 regions (both encoding non-structural proteins) in the genomic RNA. Relative synonymous codon usage, effective number of codons, neutrality and correspondence were analyzed. The results indicated that these viruses prefer A/T at the third position in codons rather than G/C. The most frequent codons of 4 essential and 2 semi-essential amino acids, as well as a key amino acid of metabolic junctions (Glu) used in the four viruses are also the most frequently used in humans. Effective number of codons (ENC) values indicated weak codon usage bias in all the viruses. Relatively, the force of mutation pressure in the P1 region was found to be stronger than that in the P2-P3 region, and this force in the P1 region of CVA6 and EV71 was stronger than that of CVA10 and A16. The neutrality analysis results implied that mutation pressure plays a minor role in shaping codon bias of these viruses. Correspondence analysis indicated that the codon usage of EV71 strains varied much more than that of other viruses. In conclusion, the present study provides novel and comparative insight into the evolution of HFMD pathogens at the codon level. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of codon usage bias in Bovine Coronavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Castells, Mat?as; Victoria, Mat?as; Colina, Rodney; Musto, H?ctor; Cristina, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Background Bovine coronavirus (BCoV) belong to the genus Betacoronavirus of the family Coronaviridae. BCoV are widespread around the world and cause enteric or respiratory infections among cattle, leading to important economic losses to the beef and dairy industry worldwide. To study the relation of codon usage among viruses and their hosts is essential to understand host-pathogen interaction, evasion from host?s immune system and evolution. Methods We performed a comprehensive analysis of co...

  9. Introducing COCOS: codon consequence scanner for annotating reading frame changes induced by stop-lost and frame shift variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkiewicz, Mariusz; Haines, Jonathan L; Bush, William S

    2017-05-15

    Reading frame altering genomic variants can impact gene expression levels and the structure of protein products, thus potentially inducing disease phenotypes. Current annotation approaches report the impact of such variants in the context of altered DNA sequence only; attributes of the resulting transcript, reading frame and translated protein product are not reported. To remedy this shortcoming, we present a new genetic annotation approach termed Codon Consequence Scanner (COCOS). Implemented as an Ensembl variant effect predictor (VEP) plugin, COCOS captures amino acid sequence alterations stemming from variants that produce an altered reading frame, such as stop-lost variants and small insertions and deletions (InDels). To highlight its significance, COCOS was applied to data from the 1000 Genomes Project. Transcripts affected by stop-lost variants introduce a median of 15 amino acids, while InDels have a more extensive impact with a median of 66 amino acids being incorporated. Captured sequence alterations are written out in FASTA format and can be further analyzed for impact on the underlying protein structure. COCOS is available to all users on github: https://github.com/butkiem/COCOS. mariusz.butkiewicz@case.edu. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Please do not recycle! Translation reinitiation in microbes and higher eukaryotes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gunišová, Stanislava; Hronová, Vladislava; Mohammad, Mahabub Pasha; Hinnebusch, A.G.; Valášek, Leoš Shivaya

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 2 (2018), s. 165-192 E-ISSN 1574-6976 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-10116S EU Projects: Wellcome Trust(GB) 090812/B/09/Z Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : translation reinitiation * termination-reinitiation * uORF Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology

  11. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Tat-Activated Expression of Poliovirus Protein 2A Inhibits mRNA Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Hong; Baltimore, David

    1989-04-01

    To study the effect of poliovirus protein 2A on cellular RNA translation, the tat control system of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was used. Protein 2A was expressed from a plasmid construct (pHIV/2A) incorporating the HIV long terminal repeat. Protein synthesis was measured by using chloramphenicol acetyltransferase as a reporter gene driven by the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat. When HIV/2A was contransfected with the reporter, addition of a tat-producing plasmid caused at least a 50-fold drop in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase synthesis. A HeLa cell line carrying HIV/2A was established. In it, tat expression caused more than a 10-fold drop in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase synthesis from the reporter plasmid. Furthermore, 2A induction by tat caused cleavage of the cellular translation factor P220, a part of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F. Thus protein 2A can, by itself, carry out the inhibition of cellular protein synthesis characteristic of a poliovirus infection. Also, the HIV tat activation provides a very effective method to control gene expression in mammalian cells.

  12. Relative expression of the products of glyoxylate bypass operon: contributions of transcription and translation.

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, T; Resnik, E; Stueland, C; LaPorte, D C

    1993-01-01

    Although the genes of the aceBAK operon are expressed from the same promoter, the relative cellular levels of their products are approximately 0.3:1:0.003. Gene and operon fusions with lacZ were constructed to characterize this differential expression. The upshift in expression between aceB and aceA resulted from differences in translational efficiency. In contrast, inefficient translation and premature transcriptional termination contributed to the downshift in expression between aceA and ac...

  13. Bioinformatic analysis suggests that the Cypovirus 1 major core protein cistron harbours an overlapping gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atkins John F

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Members of the genus Cypovirus (family Reoviridae are common pathogens of insects. These viruses have linear dsRNA genomes divided into 10–11 segments, which have generally been assumed to be monocistronic. Here, bioinformatic evidence is presented for a short overlapping coding sequence (CDS in the cypovirus genome segment encoding the major core capsid protein VP1, overlapping the 5'-terminal region of the VP1 ORF in the +1 reading frame. In Cypovirus type 1 (CPV-1, a 62-codon AUG-initiated open reading frame (hereafter ORFX is present in all four available segment 1 sequences. The pattern of base variations across the sequence alignment indicates that ORFX is subject to functional constraints at the amino acid level (even when the constraints due to coding in the overlapping VP1 reading frame are taken into account; MLOGD software. In fact the translated ORFX shows greater amino acid conservation than the overlapping region of VP1. The genomic location of ORFX is consistent with translation via leaky scanning. A 62–64 codon AUG-initiated ORF is present in a corresponding location and reading frame in other available cypovirus sequences (2 CPV-14, 1 CPV-15 and an 87-codon ORFX homologue may also be present in Aedes pseudoscutellaris reovirus. The ORFX amino acid sequences are hydrophilic and basic, with between 12 and 16 Arg/Lys residues in each though, at 7.5–10.2 kDa, the putative ORFX product is too small to appear on typical published protein gels.

  14. Translation Theory 'Translated'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæraas, Arild; Nielsen, Jeppe

    2016-01-01

    Translation theory has proved to be a versatile analytical lens used by scholars working from different traditions. On the basis of a systematic literature review, this study adds to our understanding of the ‘translations’ of translation theory by identifying the distinguishing features of the most...... common theoretical approaches to translation within the organization and management discipline: actor-network theory, knowledge-based theory, and Scandinavian institutionalism. Although each of these approaches already has borne much fruit in research, the literature is diverse and somewhat fragmented......, but also overlapping. We discuss the ways in which the three versions of translation theory may be combined and enrich each other so as to inform future research, thereby offering a more complete understanding of translation in and across organizational settings....

  15. Binary translation using peephole translation rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sorav; Aiken, Alex

    2010-05-04

    An efficient binary translator uses peephole translation rules to directly translate executable code from one instruction set to another. In a preferred embodiment, the translation rules are generated using superoptimization techniques that enable the translator to automatically learn translation rules for translating code from the source to target instruction set architecture.

  16. Experimental annotation of post-translational features and translated coding regions in the pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansong, Charles; Tolic, Nikola; Purvine, Samuel O.; Porwollik, Steffen; Jones, Marcus B.; Yoon, Hyunjin; Payne, Samuel H.; Martin, Jessica L.; Burnet, Meagan C.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Venepally, Pratap; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott; Heffron, Fred; Mcclelland, Michael; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-08-25

    Complete and accurate genome annotation is crucial for comprehensive and systematic studies of biological systems. For example systems biology-oriented genome scale modeling efforts greatly benefit from accurate annotation of protein-coding genes to develop proper functioning models. However, determining protein-coding genes for most new genomes is almost completely performed by inference, using computational predictions with significant documented error rates (> 15%). Furthermore, gene prediction programs provide no information on biologically important post-translational processing events critical for protein function. With the ability to directly measure peptides arising from expressed proteins, mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches can be used to augment and verify coding regions of a genomic sequence and importantly detect post-translational processing events. In this study we utilized “shotgun” proteomics to guide accurate primary genome annotation of the bacterial pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium 14028 to facilitate a systems-level understanding of Salmonella biology. The data provides protein-level experimental confirmation for 44% of predicted protein-coding genes, suggests revisions to 48 genes assigned incorrect translational start sites, and uncovers 13 non-annotated genes missed by gene prediction programs. We also present a comprehensive analysis of post-translational processing events in Salmonella, revealing a wide range of complex chemical modifications (70 distinct modifications) and confirming more than 130 signal peptide and N-terminal methionine cleavage events in Salmonella. This study highlights several ways in which proteomics data applied during the primary stages of annotation can improve the quality of genome annotations, especially with regards to the annotation of mature protein products.

  17. Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) and Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) codon bias analysis reveals a progressive adaptation to the new niche after the host jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzo, Giovanni; Tucciarone, Claudia Maria; Cecchinato, Mattia; Drigo, Michele

    2017-09-01

    Based on virus dependence from host cell machinery, their codon usage is expected to show a strong relation with the host one. Even if this association has been stated, especially for bacteria viruses, the linkage is considered to be less consistent for more complex organisms and a codon bias adaptation after host jump has never been proven. Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) was selected as a model because it represents a well characterized case of host jump, originating from Feline panleukopenia virus (FPV). The current study demonstrates that the adaptation to specific tissue and host codon bias affected CPV-2 evolution. Remarkably, FPV and CPV-2 showed a higher closeness toward the codon bias of the tissues they display the higher tropism for. Moreover, after the host jump, a clear and significant trend was evidenced toward a reduction in the distance between CPV-2 and the dog codon bias over time. This evidence was not confirmed for FPV, suggesting that an equilibrium has been reached during the prolonged virus-host co-evolution. Additionally, the presence of an intermediate pattern displayed by some strains infecting wild species suggests that these could have facilitated the host switch also by acting on codon bias. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Production of β-globin and adult hemoglobin following G418 treatment of erythroid precursor cells from homozygous β039 thalassemia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, Francesca; Breveglieri, Giulia; Zuccato, Cristina; Finotti, Alessia; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Borgatti, Monica; Feriotto, Giordana; Destro, Federica; Canella, Alessandro; Brognara, Eleonora; Lampronti, Ilaria; Breda, Laura; Rivella, Stefano; Gambari, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    In several types of thalassemia (including β039-thalassemia), stop codon mutations lead to premature translation termination and to mRNA destabilization through nonsense-mediated decay. Drugs (for instance aminoglycosides) can be designed to suppress premature termination, inducing a ribosomal readthrough. These findings have introduced new hopes for the development of a pharmacologic approach to the cure of this disease. However, the effects of aminoglycosides on globin mRNA carrying β-thalassemia stop mutations have not yet been investigated. In this study, we have used a lentiviral construct containing the β039- thalassemia globin gene under control of the β-globin promoter and a LCR cassette. We demonstrated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis the production of β-globin by K562 cell clones expressing the β039-thalassemia globin gene and treated with G418. More importantly, after FACS and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses, erythroid precursor cells from β039-thalassemia patients were demonstrated to be able to produce β-globin and adult hemoglobin after treatment with G418. This study strongly suggests that ribosomal readthrough should be considered a strategy for developing experimental strategies for the treatment of β0-thalassemia caused by stop codon mutations. PMID:19810011

  19. Emerging genetic therapies to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Stanley F.; Crosbie, Rachelle H.; Miceli, M. Carrie; Spencer, Melissa J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive muscle degenerative disease caused by dystrophin mutations. The purpose of this review is to highlight two emerging therapies designed to repair the primary genetic defect, called `exon skipping' and `nonsense codon suppression'. Recent findings A drug, PTC124, was identified that suppresses nonsense codon translation termination. PTC124 can lead to restoration of some dystrophin expression in human Duchenne muscular dystrophy muscles with mutations resulting in premature stops. Two drugs developed for exon skipping, PRO051 and AVI-4658, result in the exclusion of exon 51 from mature mRNA. They can restore the translational reading frame to dystrophin transcripts from patients with a particular subset of dystrophin gene deletions and lead to some restoration of dystrophin expression in affected boys' muscle in vivo. Both approaches have concluded phase I trials with no serious adverse events. Summary These novel therapies that act to correct the primary genetic defect of dystrophin deficiency are among the first generation of therapies tailored to correct specific mutations in humans. Thus, they represent paradigm forming approaches to personalized medicine with the potential to lead to life changing treatment for those affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:19745732

  20. Noise analysis of genome-scale protein synthesis using a discrete computational model of translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racle, Julien; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily, E-mail: vassily.hatzimanikatis@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Computational Systems Biotechnology, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Stefaniuk, Adam Jan [Laboratory of Computational Systems Biotechnology, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-07-28

    Noise in genetic networks has been the subject of extensive experimental and computational studies. However, very few of these studies have considered noise properties using mechanistic models that account for the discrete movement of ribosomes and RNA polymerases along their corresponding templates (messenger RNA (mRNA) and DNA). The large size of these systems, which scales with the number of genes, mRNA copies, codons per mRNA, and ribosomes, is responsible for some of the challenges. Additionally, one should be able to describe the dynamics of ribosome exchange between the free ribosome pool and those bound to mRNAs, as well as how mRNA species compete for ribosomes. We developed an efficient algorithm for stochastic simulations that addresses these issues and used it to study the contribution and trade-offs of noise to translation properties (rates, time delays, and rate-limiting steps). The algorithm scales linearly with the number of mRNA copies, which allowed us to study the importance of genome-scale competition between mRNAs for the same ribosomes. We determined that noise is minimized under conditions maximizing the specific synthesis rate. Moreover, sensitivity analysis of the stochastic system revealed the importance of the elongation rate in the resultant noise, whereas the translation initiation rate constant was more closely related to the average protein synthesis rate. We observed significant differences between our results and the noise properties of the most commonly used translation models. Overall, our studies demonstrate that the use of full mechanistic models is essential for the study of noise in translation and transcription.

  1. Fidelity of HIS4 start codon selection influences 3-Amino-1,2,4 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pankaj Alone

    Fidelity of HIS4 start codon selection influences 3-Amino-1,2,4-Triazole (3AT) .... media in presence or absence of 3AT and harvested at 6000xg at room ..... The overnight cultures were serially diluted (with O.D600 of 0.5, 0.05, 0.005, 0.0005,.

  2. BARE retrotransposons are translated and replicated via distinct RNA pools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chang

    Full Text Available The replication of Long Terminal Repeat (LTR retrotransposons, which can constitute over 80% of higher plant genomes, resembles that of retroviruses. A major question for retrotransposons and retroviruses is how the two conflicting roles of their transcripts, in translation and reverse transcription, are balanced. Here, we show that the BARE retrotransposon, despite its organization into just one open reading frame, produces three distinct classes of transcripts. One is capped, polyadenylated, and translated, but cannot be copied into cDNA. The second is not capped or polyadenylated, but is destined for packaging and ultimate reverse transcription. The third class is capped, polyadenylated, and spliced to favor production of a subgenomic RNA encoding only Gag, the protein forming virus-like particles. Moreover, the BARE2 subfamily, which cannot synthesize Gag and is parasitic on BARE1, does not produce the spliced sub-genomic RNA for translation but does make the replication competent transcripts, which are packaged into BARE1 particles. To our knowledge, this is first demonstration of distinct RNA pools for translation and transcription for any retrotransposon.

  3. Correcting the bias of empirical frequency parameter estimators in codon models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Kosakovsky Pond

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Markov models of codon substitution are powerful inferential tools for studying biological processes such as natural selection and preferences in amino acid substitution. The equilibrium character distributions of these models are almost always estimated using nucleotide frequencies observed in a sequence alignment, primarily as a matter of historical convention. In this note, we demonstrate that a popular class of such estimators are biased, and that this bias has an adverse effect on goodness of fit and estimates of substitution rates. We propose a "corrected" empirical estimator that begins with observed nucleotide counts, but accounts for the nucleotide composition of stop codons. We show via simulation that the corrected estimates outperform the de facto standard estimates not just by providing better estimates of the frequencies themselves, but also by leading to improved estimation of other parameters in the evolutionary models. On a curated collection of sequence alignments, our estimators show a significant improvement in goodness of fit compared to the approach. Maximum likelihood estimation of the frequency parameters appears to be warranted in many cases, albeit at a greater computational cost. Our results demonstrate that there is little justification, either statistical or computational, for continued use of the -style estimators.

  4. Machine Translation and Other Translation Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melby, Alan

    1996-01-01

    Examines the application of linguistic theory to machine translation and translator tools, discusses the use of machine translation and translator tools in the real world of translation, and addresses the impact of translation technology on conceptions of language and other issues. Findings indicate that the human mind is flexible and linguistic…

  5. Translation of LINE-1 DNA elements in vitro and in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibold, D.M.; Swergold, G.D.; Thayer, R.E.; Singer, M.F.; Fanning, T.G.; Dombroski, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    The LINE-1(L1) family of interspread DNA sequences found throughout the human genome (L1 Homo sapiens, L1Hs) includes active transposable elements. Current models for the mechanism of transposition involve reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate and utilization of element-encoded proteins. The authors report that an antiserum against the polypeptide encoded by the L1Hs 5' open reading frame (ORF1) detects, in human cells, an endogenous ORF1 protein as well as the ORG1 product of an appropriate transfecting recombinant vector. The endogenous polypeptide is most abundant in teratocarcinoma and choriocarcinoma cells, among those cell lines tested; it appears to be a single species of ∼38 kDa. In contrast, RNAs synthesized in vitro from cDNAs representing full-length, polyadenylylated cytoplasmic L1Hs RNA yield, upon in vitro translation, ORF1 products of slightly different sizes. This is consistent with the fact that the various cDNAs are different and represent transcription of different genomic L1Hs elements. In vitro studies additionally suggest that translation of ORF1 is initiated at the first AUG codon. Finally, in no case was an ORF1-ORF2 fusion protein detected

  6. Methods for selecting fixed-effect models for heterogeneous codon evolution, with comments on their application to gene and genome data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Le; Gu, Hong; Dunn, Katherine A; Bielawski, Joseph P

    2007-02-08

    Models of codon evolution have proven useful for investigating the strength and direction of natural selection. In some cases, a priori biological knowledge has been used successfully to model heterogeneous evolutionary dynamics among codon sites. These are called fixed-effect models, and they require that all codon sites are assigned to one of several partitions which are permitted to have independent parameters for selection pressure, evolutionary rate, transition to transversion ratio or codon frequencies. For single gene analysis, partitions might be defined according to protein tertiary structure, and for multiple gene analysis partitions might be defined according to a gene's functional category. Given a set of related fixed-effect models, the task of selecting the model that best fits the data is not trivial. In this study, we implement a set of fixed-effect codon models which allow for different levels of heterogeneity among partitions in the substitution process. We describe strategies for selecting among these models by a backward elimination procedure, Akaike information criterion (AIC) or a corrected Akaike information criterion (AICc). We evaluate the performance of these model selection methods via a simulation study, and make several recommendations for real data analysis. Our simulation study indicates that the backward elimination procedure can provide a reliable method for model selection in this setting. We also demonstrate the utility of these models by application to a single-gene dataset partitioned according to tertiary structure (abalone sperm lysin), and a multi-gene dataset partitioned according to the functional category of the gene (flagellar-related proteins of Listeria). Fixed-effect models have advantages and disadvantages. Fixed-effect models are desirable when data partitions are known to exhibit significant heterogeneity or when a statistical test of such heterogeneity is desired. They have the disadvantage of requiring a priori

  7. Characterization of the mitochondrial genome of the montane grasshopper, Qinlingacris elaeodes (Orthoptera: Catantopidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ran; Jiang, Guo-Fang; Liang, Ai-Ping; Zhong, Xin-Tong; Liu, Ying

    2016-05-01

    Qinlingacris elaeodes is the dominant grasshopper at an altitude of 3000 meters and above, and is a representative species of the genus Qinlingacris endemic to China. The sequenced mitochondrial genome of this grasshopper is 14,818 bp in length, including 13 protein-coding genes (ND1-6, COI-III, ATP6, ATP8, ND4L, CTYB), 21 transfer RNAs, and 2 ribosomal RNAs (12S and 16S). The orientation and gene order of these genes are identical to those found in the putative ancestral insect mitogenome. The 13 PCGs start with a typical ATN codon as their start codons. The usual TAA and TAG termination codons are found for 12 PCGs. However, the ND5 gene has an incomplete termination codon (T).

  8. Codon-usage-based inhibition of HIV protein synthesis by human schlafen 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Manqing; Kao, Elaine; Gao, Xia; Sandig, Hilary; Limmer, Kirsten; Pavon-Eternod, Mariana; Jones, Thomas E; Landry, Sebastien; Pan, Tao; Weitzman, Matthew D; David, Michael

    2012-11-01

    In mammals, one of the most pronounced consequences of viral infection is the induction of type I interferons, cytokines with potent antiviral activity. Schlafen (Slfn) genes are a subset of interferon-stimulated early response genes (ISGs) that are also induced directly by pathogens via the interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) pathway. However, many ISGs are of unknown or incompletely understood function. Here we show that human SLFN11 potently and specifically abrogates the production of retroviruses such as human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1). Our study revealed that SLFN11 has no effect on the early steps of the retroviral infection cycle, including reverse transcription, integration and transcription. Rather, SLFN11 acts at the late stage of virus production by selectively inhibiting the expression of viral proteins in a codon-usage-dependent manner. We further find that SLFN11 binds transfer RNA, and counteracts changes in the tRNA pool elicited by the presence of HIV. Our studies identified a novel antiviral mechanism within the innate immune response, in which SLFN11 selectively inhibits viral protein synthesis in HIV-infected cells by means of codon-bias discrimination.

  9. A 3'-end structure in RNA2 of a crinivirus is essential for viral RNA synthesis and contributes to replication-associated translation activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongkolsiriwattana, Chawin; Zhou, Jaclyn S; Ng, James C K

    2016-10-03

    The terminal ends in the genome of RNA viruses contain features that regulate viral replication and/or translation. We have identified a Y-shaped structure (YSS) in the 3' terminal regions of the bipartite genome of Lettuce chlorosis virus (LCV), a member in the genus Crinivirus (family Closteroviridae). The YSS is the first in this family of viruses to be determined using Selective 2'-Hydroxyl Acylation Analyzed by Primer Extension (SHAPE). Using luciferase constructs/replicons, in vivo and in vitro assays showed that the 5' and YSS-containing 3' terminal regions of LCV RNA1 supported translation activity. In contrast, similar regions from LCV RNA2, including those upstream of the YSS, did not. LCV RNA2 mutants with nucleotide deletions or replacements that affected the YSS were replication deficient. In addition, the YSS of LCV RNA1 and RNA2 were interchangeable without affecting viral RNA synthesis. Translation and significant replication were observed for specific LCV RNA2 replicons only in the presence of LCV RNA1, but both processes were impaired when the YSS and/or its upstream region were incomplete or altered. These results are evidence that the YSS is essential to the viral replication machinery, and contributes to replication enhancement and replication-associated translation activity in the RNA2 replicons.

  10. Association of the p53 codon 72 polymorphism to gastric cancer risk in a high risk population of Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpizar-Alpizar, Warner; Sierra, Rafaela; Cuenca, Patricia; Une, Clas; Mena, Fernando; Perez-Perez, Guillermo Ignacio

    2005-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common cancer associated death cause worldwide. Several factors have been associated with higher risk to develop gastric cancer, among them genetic predisposition. The p53 gene has a polymorphism located at codon 72, which has been associated with higher risk of several types of cancer, including gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the association of p53, codon 72 polymorphism, with the risk of gastric cancer and pre-malignant lesions in a high-risk population from Costa Rica. The genotyping was carried out by PCR-RFLP in a sample of 58 gastric cancer patients, 99 control persons and 41 individuals classified as group I and II, according to the Japanese histological classification. No association was found for p53, codon 72 polymorphism with neither the risk of gastric cancer nor the risk of less severe gastric lesions in the studied sample. Based on this study and taking into account other studies carried out with p53, codon 72 polymorphism, the role of this polymorphism in the development of gastric cancer remains unclear. De novo mutations on p53 gene produced during neoplastic development of this disease might play a greater role than germinal polymorphisms of this same gene. Other polymorphic genes have been associated with higher risk to develop gastric cancer. (author) [es

  11. Readthrough of stop codons by use of aminoglycosides in cells from xeroderma pigmentosum group C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuschal, Christiane; Khan, Sikandar G; Enk, Benedikt; DiGiovanna, John J; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2015-04-01

    Readthrough of premature termination (stop) codons (PTC) is a new approach to treatment of genetic diseases. We recently reported that readthrough of PTC in cells from some xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) patients could be achieved with the aminoglycosides geneticin or gentamicin. We found that the response depended on several factors including the PTC sequence, its location within the gene and the aminoglycoside used. Here, we extended these studies to investigate the effects of other aminoglycosides that are already on the market. We reasoned that topical treatment could deliver much higher concentrations of drug to the skin, the therapeutic target, and thus increase the therapeutic effect while reducing renal or ototoxicity in comparison with systemic treatment. Our prior clinical studies indicated that only a few percent of normal XPC expression was associated with mild clinical disease. We found minimal cell toxicity in the XP-C cells with several aminoglycosides. We found increased XPC mRNA expression in PTC-containing XP-C cells with G418, paromomycin, neomycin and kanamycin and increased XPC protein expression with G418. We conclude that in selected patients with XP, topical PTC therapy can be investigated as a method of personalized medicine to alleviate their cutaneous symptoms. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  12. Codon optimization of the HIV-1 vpu and vif genes stabilizes their mRNA and allows for highly efficient Rev-independent expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Kim-Lien; Llano, Manuel; Akari, Hirofumi; Miyagi, Eri; Poeschla, Eric M.; Strebel, Klaus; Bour, Stephan

    2004-01-01

    Two HIV-1 accessory proteins, Vpu and Vif, are notoriously difficult to express autonomously in the absence of the viral Tat and Rev proteins. We examined whether the codon bias observed in the vpu and vif genes relative to highly expressed human genes contributes to the Rev dependence and low expression level outside the context of the viral genome. The entire vpu gene as well as the 5' half of the vif gene were codon optimized and the resulting open reading frames (ORFs) (vphu and hvif, respectively) were cloned in autonomous expression vectors under the transcriptional control of the CMV promoter. Codon optimization efficiently removed the expression block observed in the native genes and allowed high levels of Rev- and Tat-independent expression of Vpu and Vif. Most of the higher protein levels detected are accounted for by enhanced steady-state levels of the mRNA encoding the optimized species. Nuclear run-on experiments show for the first time that codon optimization has no effect on the rate of transcriptional initiation or elongation of the vphu mRNA. Instead, optimization of the vpu gene was found to stabilize the vphu mRNA in the nucleus and enhance its export to the cytoplasm. This was achieved by allowing the optimized mRNA to use a new CRM1-independent nuclear export pathway. This work provides a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the process of codon optimization and introduces novel tools to study the biological functions of the Vpu and Vif proteins independently of other viral proteins

  13. High yield expression in a recombinant E. coli of a codon optimized chicken anemia virus capsid protein VP1 useful for vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Bang-Jau

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chicken anemia virus (CAV, the causative agent chicken anemia, is the only member of the genus Gyrovirus of the Circoviridae family. CAV is an immune suppressive virus and causes anemia, lymph organ atrophy and immunodeficiency. The production and biochemical characterization of VP1 protein and its use in a subunit vaccine or as part of a diagnostic kit would be useful to CAV infection prevention. Results Significantly increased expression of the recombinant full-length VP1 capsid protein from chicken anemia virus was demonstrated using an E. coli expression system. The VP1 gene was cloned into various different expression vectors and then these were expressed in a number of different E. coli strains. The expression of CAV VP1 in E. coli was significantly increased when VP1 was fused with GST protein rather than a His-tag. By optimizing the various rare amino acid codons within the N-terminus of the VP1 protein, the expression level of the VP1 protein in E. coli BL21(DE3-pLysS was further increased significantly. The highest protein expression level obtained was 17.5 g/L per liter of bacterial culture after induction with 0.1 mM IPTG for 2 h. After purification by GST affinity chromatography, the purified full-length VP1 protein produced in this way was demonstrated to have good antigenicity and was able to be recognized by CAV-positive chicken serum in an ELISA assay. Conclusions Purified recombinant VP1 protein with the gene's codons optimized in the N-terminal region has potential as chimeric protein that, when expressed in E. coli, may be useful in the future for the development of subunit vaccines and diagnostic tests.

  14. [Identification of a novel GPR143 mutation in a Chinese family affected with X-linked ocular albinism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qi; Guan, Menglong; Wang, Ling; Liao, Yong; Li-Ling, Jesse; Wan, Huajing

    2017-04-10

    To detect mutation of GPR143 gene in a Chinese patient affected with ocular albinism. Peripheral blood samples were collected from the proband and his parents. The coding regions of the GPR143 gene were subjected to PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. A previously unreported mutation (c.758T>A) was found in exon 6 of the GPR143 gene in the proband and his mother. The same mutation was not found in his father. As predicted, the mutation has resulted in a stop codon, causing premature termination of protein translation. A novel mutation of the GPR143 gene related to X-linked ocular albinism has been identified.

  15. A Novel Quality Measure and Correction Procedure for the Annotation of Microbial Translation Initiation Sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overmars, L.; Siezen, R.J.; Francke, C.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of translation initiation sites (TISs) constitutes an important aspect of sequence-based genome analysis. An erroneous TIS annotation can impair the identification of regulatory elements and N-terminal signal peptides, and also may flaw the determination of descent, for any

  16. Quantitative analysis of ribosome–mRNA complexes at different translation stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokikh, Nikolay E.; Alkalaeva, Elena Z.; Vassilenko, Konstantin S.; Afonina, Zhanna A.; Alekhina, Olga M.; Kisselev, Lev L.; Spirin, Alexander S.

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of primer extension by ribosome–mRNA complexes (toeprinting) is a proven and powerful technique for studying mechanisms of mRNA translation. Here we have assayed an advanced toeprinting approach that employs fluorescently labeled DNA primers, followed by capillary electrophoresis utilizing standard instruments for sequencing and fragment analysis. We demonstrate that this improved technique is not merely fast and cost-effective, but also brings the primer extension inhibition method up to the next level. The electrophoretic pattern of the primer extension reaction can be characterized with a precision unattainable by the common toeprint analysis utilizing radioactive isotopes. This method allows us to detect and quantify stable ribosomal complexes at all stages of translation, including initiation, elongation and termination, generated during the complete translation process in both the in vitro reconstituted translation system and the cell lysate. We also point out the unique advantages of this new methodology, including the ability to assay sites of the ribosomal complex assembly on several mRNA species in the same reaction mixture. PMID:19910372

  17. Effect of Polymorphisms at Codon 146 of the Goat PRNP Gene on Susceptibility to Challenge with Classical Scrapie by Different Routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasavva-Stylianou, Penelope; Simmons, Marion Mathieson; Ortiz-Pelaez, Angel; Windl, Otto; Spiropoulos, John; Georgiadou, Soteria

    2017-11-15

    This report presents the results of experimental challenges of goats with scrapie by both the intracerebral (i.c.) and oral routes, exploring the effects of polymorphisms at codon 146 of the goat PRNP gene on resistance to disease. The results of these studies illustrate that while goats of all genotypes can be infected by i.c. challenge, the survival distribution of the animals homozygous for asparagine at codon 146 was significantly shorter than those of animals of all other genotypes (chi-square value, 10.8; P = 0.001). In contrast, only those animals homozygous for asparagine at codon 146 (NN animals) succumbed to oral challenge. The results also indicate that any cases of infection in non-NN animals can be detected by the current confirmatory test (immunohistochemistry), although successful detection with the rapid enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was more variable and dependent on the polymorphism. Together with data from previous studies of goats exposed to infection in the field, these data support the previously reported observations that polymorphisms at this codon have a profound effect on susceptibility to disease. It is concluded that only animals homozygous for asparagine at codon 146 succumb to scrapie under natural conditions. IMPORTANCE In goats, like in sheep, there are PRNP polymorphisms that are associated with susceptibility or resistance to scrapie. However, in contrast to the polymorphisms in sheep, they are more numerous in goats and may be restricted to certain breeds or geographical regions. Therefore, eradication programs must be specifically designed depending on the identification of suitable polymorphisms. An initial analysis of surveillance data suggested that such a polymorphism in Cypriot goats may lie in codon 146. In this study, we demonstrate experimentally that NN animals are highly susceptible after i.c. inoculation. The presence of a D or S residue prolonged incubation periods significantly, and prions were detected

  18. Transfer-messenger RNA controls the translation of cell-cycle and stress proteins in Streptomyces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barends, Sharief; Zehl, Martin; Bialek, Sylwia

    2010-01-01

    coelicolor, trans-translation has a specialized role in stress management. Analysis of proteins that were carboxy-terminally His(8)-tagged by a recombinant tmRNA identified only 10 targets, including the stress proteins: DnaK heat-shock protein 70, thiostrepton-induced protein A, universal stress protein A...... functionality for tmRNA, promoting the translation of the same mRNA it targets, at the expense of sacrificing the first nascent protein. In streptomycetes, tmRNA has evolved into a dedicated task force that ensures the instantaneous response to the exposure to stress....

  19. Idiosyncratic recognition of UUG/UUA codons by modified nucleoside 5-taurinomethyluridine, τm5U present at 'wobble' position in anticodon loop of tRNALeu: A molecular modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmita S Kamble

    Full Text Available Lack of naturally occurring modified nucleoside 5-taurinomethyluridine (τm5U at the 'wobble' 34th position in tRNALeu causes mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS. The τm5U34 specifically recognizes UUG and UUA codons. Structural consequences of τm5U34 to read cognate codons have not been studied so far in detail at the atomic level. Hence, 50ns multiple molecular dynamics (MD simulations of various anticodon stem loop (ASL models of tRNALeu in presence and absence of τm5U34 along with UUG and UUA codons were performed to explore the dynamic behaviour of τm5U34 during codon recognition process. The MD simulation results revealed that τm5U34 recognizes G/A ending codons by 'wobble' as well as a novel 'single' hydrogen bonding interactions. RMSD and RMSF values indicate the comparative stability of the ASL models containing τm5U34 modification over the other models, lacking τm5U34. Another MD simulation study of 55S mammalian mitochondrial rRNA with tRNALeu showed crucial interactions between the A-site residues, A918, A919, G256 and codon-anticodon bases. Thus, these results could improve our understanding about the decoding efficiency of human mt tRNALeu with τm5U34 to recognize UUG and UUA codons.

  20. Mapping Translation Technology Research in Translation Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne; Christensen, Tina Paulsen; Flanagan, Marian

    2017-01-01

    section aims to improve this situation by presenting new and innovative research papers that reflect on recent technological advances and their impact on the translation profession and translators from a diversity of perspectives and using a variety of methods. In Section 2, we present translation......Due to the growing uptake of translation technology in the language industry and its documented impact on the translation profession, translation students and scholars need in-depth and empirically founded knowledge of the nature and influences of translation technology (e.g. Christensen....../Schjoldager 2010, 2011; Christensen 2011). Unfortunately, the increasing professional use of translation technology has not been mirrored within translation studies (TS) by a similar increase in research projects on translation technology (Munday 2009: 15; O’Hagan 2013; Doherty 2016: 952). The current thematic...

  1. Systematic genomic and translational efficiency studies of uveal melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Place Johnson

    Full Text Available To further our understanding of the somatic genetic basis of uveal melanoma, we sequenced the protein-coding regions of 52 primary tumors and 3 liver metastases together with paired normal DNA. Known recurrent mutations were identified in GNAQ, GNA11, BAP1, EIF1AX, and SF3B1. The role of mutated EIF1AX was tested using loss of function approaches including viability and translational efficiency assays. Knockdown of both wild type and mutant EIF1AX was lethal to uveal melanoma cells. We probed the function of N-terminal tail EIF1AX mutations by performing RNA sequencing of polysome-associated transcripts in cells expressing endogenous wild type or mutant EIF1AX. Ribosome occupancy of the global translational apparatus was sensitive to suppression of wild type but not mutant EIF1AX. Together, these studies suggest that cells expressing mutant EIF1AX may exhibit aberrant translational regulation, which may provide clonal selective advantage in the subset of uveal melanoma that harbors this mutation.

  2. Local synteny and codon usage contribute to asymmetric sequence divergence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene duplicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergthorsson Ulfar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duplicated genes frequently experience asymmetric rates of sequence evolution. Relaxed selective constraints and positive selection have both been invoked to explain the observation that one paralog within a gene-duplicate pair exhibits an accelerated rate of sequence evolution. In the majority of studies where asymmetric divergence has been established, there is no indication as to which gene copy, ancestral or derived, is evolving more rapidly. In this study we investigated the effect of local synteny (gene-neighborhood conservation and codon usage on the sequence evolution of gene duplicates in the S. cerevisiae genome. We further distinguish the gene duplicates into those that originated from a whole-genome duplication (WGD event (ohnologs versus small-scale duplications (SSD to determine if there exist any differences in their patterns of sequence evolution. Results For SSD pairs, the derived copy evolves faster than the ancestral copy. However, there is no relationship between rate asymmetry and synteny conservation (ancestral-like versus derived-like in ohnologs. mRNA abundance and optimal codon usage as measured by the CAI is lower in the derived SSD copies relative to ancestral paralogs. Moreover, in the case of ohnologs, the faster-evolving copy has lower CAI and lowered expression. Conclusions Together, these results suggest that relaxation of selection for codon usage and gene expression contribute to rate asymmetry in the evolution of duplicated genes and that in SSD pairs, the relaxation of selection stems from the loss of ancestral regulatory information in the derived copy.

  3. N-terminal modifications of cellular proteins: The enzymes involved, their substrate specificities and biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varland, Sylvia; Osberg, Camilla; Arnesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of eukaryotic proteins are N-terminally modified by one or more processing enzymes. Enzymes acting on the very first amino acid of a polypeptide include different peptidases, transferases, and ligases. Methionine aminopeptidases excise the initiator methionine leaving the nascent polypeptide with a newly exposed amino acid that may be further modified. N-terminal acetyl-, methyl-, myristoyl-, and palmitoyltransferases may attach an acetyl, methyl, myristoyl, or palmitoyl group, respectively, to the α-amino group of the target protein N-terminus. With the action of ubiquitin ligases, one or several ubiquitin molecules are transferred, and hence, constitute the N-terminal modification. Modifications at protein N-termini represent an important contribution to proteomic diversity and complexity, and are essential for protein regulation and cellular signaling. Consequently, dysregulation of the N-terminal modifying enzymes is implicated in human diseases. We here review the different protein N-terminal modifications occurring co- or post-translationally with emphasis on the responsible enzymes and their substrate specificities. PMID:25914051

  4. Co-expression of the Thermotoga neapolitana aglB gene with an upstream 3'-coding fragment of the malG gene improves enzymatic characteristics of recombinant AglB cyclomaltodextrinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunina, Natalia A; Agafonova, Elena V; Chekanovskaya, Lyudmila A; Dvortsov, Igor A; Berezina, Oksana V; Shedova, Ekaterina N; Kostrov, Sergey V; Velikodvorskaya, Galina A

    2007-07-01

    A cluster of Thermotoga neapolitana genes participating in starch degradation includes the malG gene of sugar transport protein and the aglB gene of cyclomaltodextrinase. The start and stop codons of these genes share a common overlapping sequence, aTGAtg. Here, we compared properties of expression products of three different constructs with aglB from T. neapolitana. The first expression vector contained the aglB gene linked to an upstream 90-bp 3'-terminal region of the malG gene with the stop codon overlapping with the start codon of aglB. The second construct included the isolated coding sequence of aglB with two tandem potential start codons. The expression product of this construct in Escherichia coli had two tandem Met residues at its N terminus and was characterized by low thermostability and high tendency to aggregate. In contrast, co-expression of aglB and the 3'-terminal region of malG (the first construct) resulted in AglB with only one N-terminal Met residue and a much higher specific activity of cyclomaltodextrinase. Moreover, the enzyme expressed by such a construct was more thermostable and less prone to aggregation. The third construct was the same as the second one except that it contained only one ATG start codon. The product of its expression had kinetic and other properties similar to those of the enzyme with only one N-terminal Met residue.

  5. Protein evolution via amino acid and codon elimination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Lise; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Banerjee, Rajat

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Global residue-specific amino acid mutagenesis can provide important biological insight and generate proteins with altered properties, but at the risk of protein misfolding. Further, targeted libraries are usually restricted to a handful of amino acids because there is an exponential...... correlation between the number of residues randomized and the size of the resulting ensemble. Using GFP as the model protein, we present a strategy, termed protein evolution via amino acid and codon elimination, through which simplified, native-like polypeptides encoded by a reduced genetic code were obtained...... simultaneously), while retaining varying levels of activity. Combination of these substitutions to generate a Phe-free variant of GFP abolished fluorescence. Combinatorial re-introduction of five Phe residues, based on the activities of the respective single amino acid replacements, was sufficient to restore GFP...

  6. A System for Anesthesia Drug Administration Using Barcode Technology: The Codonics Safe Label System and Smart Anesthesia Manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelacic, Srdjan; Bowdle, Andrew; Nair, Bala G; Kusulos, Dolly; Bower, Lynnette; Togashi, Kei

    2015-08-01

    Many anesthetic drug errors result from vial or syringe swaps. Scanning the barcodes on vials before drug preparation, creating syringe labels that include barcodes, and scanning the syringe label barcodes before drug administration may help to prevent errors. In contrast, making syringe labels by hand that comply with the recommendations of regulatory agencies and standards-setting bodies is tedious and time consuming. A computerized system that uses vial barcodes and generates barcoded syringe labels could address both safety issues and labeling recommendations. We measured compliance of syringe labels in multiple operating rooms (ORs) with the recommendations of regulatory agencies and standards-setting bodies before and after the introduction of the Codonics Safe Label System (SLS). The Codonics SLS was then combined with Smart Anesthesia Manager software to create an anesthesia barcode drug administration system, which allowed us to measure the rate of scanning syringe label barcodes at the time of drug administration in 2 cardiothoracic ORs before and after introducing a coffee card incentive. Twelve attending cardiothoracic anesthesiologists and the OR satellite pharmacy participated. The use of the Codonics SLS drug labeling system resulted in >75% compliant syringe labels (95% confidence interval, 75%-98%). All syringe labels made using the Codonics SLS system were compliant. The average rate of scanning barcodes on syringe labels using Smart Anesthesia Manager was 25% (730 of 2976) over 13 weeks but increased to 58% (956 of 1645) over 8 weeks after introduction of a simple (coffee card) incentive (P < 0.001). An anesthesia barcode drug administration system resulted in a moderate rate of scanning syringe label barcodes at the time of drug administration. Further, adaptation of the system will be required to achieve a higher utilization rate.

  7. Tuning protein expression using synonymous codon libraries targeted to the 5' mRNA coding region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Lise; Borch Jensen, Martin; Bentin, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    intermediate expression levels of green fluorescent protein in Escherichia coli. At least in one case, no apparent effect on protein stability was observed, pointing to RNA level effects as the principal reason for the observed expression differences. Targeting a synonymous codon library to the 5' coding...

  8. Mutation at codon 442 in the rpoB gene of Mycobacterium leprae does not confer resistance to rifampicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavania, Mallika; Hena, Abu; Reja, Hasanoor; Nigam, Astha; Biswas, Nibir Kumar; Singh, Itu; Turankar, Ravindra P; Gupta, Ud; Kumar, Senthil; Rewaria, Latika; Patra, Pradip K R; Sengupta, Utpal; Bhattacharya, Basudeb

    2016-03-01

    Rifampicin is the major drug in the treatment of leprosy. The rifampicin resistance of Mycobacterium leprae results from a mutation in the rpoB gene, encoding the β subunit of RNA polymerase. As M. leprae is a non-cultivable organism observation of its growth using mouse food-pad (MFP) is the only Gold Standard assay used for confirmation of "in-vivo" drug resistance. Any mutation at molecular level has to be verified by MFP assay for final confirmation of drug resistance in leprosy. In the present study, M. leprae strains showing a mutation only at codon 442 Gln-His and along with mutation either at codon 424 Val-Gly or at 438 Gln-Val within the Rifampicin Resistance Determining Region (RRDR) confirmed by DNA sequencing and by high resolution melting (HRM) analysis were subjected for its growth in MFP. The M. leprae strain having the new mutation at codon 442 Gln-His was found to be sensitive to all the three drugs and strains having additional mutations at 424 Val-Gly and 438 Gln-Val were conferring resistance with Multi drug therapy (MDT) in MFP. These results indicate that MFP is the gold standard method for confirming the mutations detected by molecular techniques.

  9. The MSPDBL2 codon 591 polymorphism is associated with lumefantrine in vitro drug responses in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Kilifi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochola-Oyier, Lynette Isabella; Okombo, John; Mwai, Leah; Kiara, Steven M; Pole, Lewa; Tetteh, Kevin K A; Nzila, Alexis; Marsh, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    The mechanisms of drug resistance development in the Plasmodium falciparum parasite to lumefantrine (LUM), commonly used in combination with artemisinin, are still unclear. We assessed the polymorphisms of Pfmspdbl2 for associations with LUM activity in a Kenyan population. MSPDBL2 codon 591S was associated with reduced susceptibility to LUM (P = 0.04). The high frequency of Pfmspdbl2 codon 591S in Kenya may be driven by the widespread use of lumefantrine in artemisinin combination therapy (Coartem). Copyright © 2015, Ochola-Oyier et al.

  10. Understanding Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne Gram; Gottlieb, Henrik; Klitgård, Ida

    Understanding Translation is designed as a textbook for courses on the theory and practice of translation in general and of particular types of translation - such as interpreting, screen translation and literary translation. The aim of the book is to help you gain an in-depth understanding...... of the phenomenon of translation and to provide you with a conceptual framework for the analysis of various aspects of professional translation. Intended readers are students of translation and languages, but the book will also be relevant for others who are interested in the theory and practice of translation...... - translators, language teachers, translation users and literary, TV and film critics, for instance. Discussions focus on translation between Danish and English....

  11. Identification of Robust Terminal-Area Routes in Convective Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeil, Diana Michalek; Balakrishnan, Hamsa

    2012-01-01

    Convective weather is responsible for large delays and widespread disruptions in the U.S. National Airspace System, especially during summer. Traffic flow management algorithms require reliable forecasts of route blockage to schedule and route traffic. This paper demonstrates how raw convective weather forecasts, which provide deterministic predictions of the vertically integrated liquid (the precipitation content in a column of airspace) can be translated into probabilistic forecasts of whether or not a terminal area route will be blocked. Given a flight route through the terminal area, we apply techniques from machine learning to determine the likelihood that the route will be open in actual weather. The likelihood is then used to optimize terminalarea operations by dynamically moving arrival and departure routes to maximize the expected capacity of the terminal area. Experiments using real weather scenarios on stormy days show that our algorithms recommend that a terminal-area route be modified 30% of the time, opening up 13% more available routes that were forecast to be blocked during these scenarios. The error rate is low, with only 5% of cases corresponding to a modified route being blocked in reality, whereas the original route is in fact open. In addition, for routes predicted to be open with probability 0.95 or greater by our method, 96% of these routes (on average over time horizon) are indeed open in the weather that materializes

  12. PHS terminal 'TEGACKY' dedicated to e-mailing; Mail senyo PHS tanmatsu 'TEGACKY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    The e-mail utilization rate at mobile communication terminals is increasing at a remarkable rate, as if to grow above the rate of communication by voice. Under the circumstances, a PHS (Personal Handyphone System) terminal 'TEGACKY' (type name: PM-T101) has been developed, designed exclusively for use for e-mailing. 'TEGACKY' is characterized in that its icons may be activated with pen, that input may be made by handwriting, and that its large screen allows a 48-character message consisting of 4 lines of 12 characters to be displayed at one time despite its compact size. It can also perform communication directly with other terminals or e-mail via center, and is provided with an information service function. 'TEGACKY' having such distinguished features has created a new category of terminals which are at once e-mailing tools. (translated by NEDO)

  13. CodonTest: modeling amino acid substitution preferences in coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Delport

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Codon models of evolution have facilitated the interpretation of selective forces operating on genomes. These models, however, assume a single rate of non-synonymous substitution irrespective of the nature of amino acids being exchanged. Recent developments have shown that models which allow for amino acid pairs to have independent rates of substitution offer improved fit over single rate models. However, these approaches have been limited by the necessity for large alignments in their estimation. An alternative approach is to assume that substitution rates between amino acid pairs can be subdivided into rate classes, dependent on the information content of the alignment. However, given the combinatorially large number of such models, an efficient model search strategy is needed. Here we develop a Genetic Algorithm (GA method for the estimation of such models. A GA is used to assign amino acid substitution pairs to a series of rate classes, where is estimated from the alignment. Other parameters of the phylogenetic Markov model, including substitution rates, character frequencies and branch lengths are estimated using standard maximum likelihood optimization procedures. We apply the GA to empirical alignments and show improved model fit over existing models of codon evolution. Our results suggest that current models are poor approximations of protein evolution and thus gene and organism specific multi-rate models that incorporate amino acid substitution biases are preferred. We further anticipate that the clustering of amino acid substitution rates into classes will be biologically informative, such that genes with similar functions exhibit similar clustering, and hence this clustering will be useful for the evolutionary fingerprinting of genes.

  14. Novel insertion mutation in a non-Jewish Caucasian type 1 Gaucher disease patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choy, F.Y.M.; Humphries, M.L. [Univ. of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada); Ferreira, P. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

    1997-01-20

    Gaucher disease is the most prevalent lysosomal storage disorder. It is autosomal recessive, resulting in lysosomal glucocerebrosidase deficiency. Three clinical forms of Gaucher disease have been described: type 1 (nonneuronopathic), type 2 (acute neuronopathic), and type 3 (subacute neuronopathic). We performed PCR-thermal cycle sequence analysis of glucocerebrosidase genomic DNA and identified a novel mutation in a non-Jewish type 1 Gaucher disease patient. It is a C insertion in exon 3 at cDNA nucleotide position 122 and genomic nucleotide position 1626. This mutation causes a frameshift and, subsequently, four of the five codons immediately downstream of the insertion were changed while the sixth was converted to a stop codon, resulting in premature termination of protein translation. The 122CC insertion abolishes a Cac81 restriction endonuclease cleavage site, allowing a convenient and reliable method for detection using RFLP analysis of PCR-amplified glucocerebrosidase genomic DNA. The mutation in the other Gaucher allele was found to be an A{r_arrow}G substitution at glucocerebrosidase cDNA nucleotide position 1226 that so far has only been reported among type 1 Gaucher disease patients. Since mutation 122CC causes a frameshift and early termination of protein translation, it most likely results in a meaningless transcript and subsequently no residual glucocerebrosidase enzyme activity. We speculate that mutation 122CC may result in a worse prognosis than mutations associated with partial activity. When present in the homozygous form, it could be a lethal allele similar to what has been postulated for the other known insertion mutation, 84GG. Our patient, who is a compound heterozygote 122CC/1226G, has moderately severe type 1 Gaucher disease. Her clinical response to Ceredase{reg_sign} therapy that began 31 months ago has been favorable, though incomplete. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Immune-escape mutations and stop-codons in HBsAg develop in a large proportion of patients with chronic HBV infection exposed to anti-HBV drugs in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colagrossi, Luna; Hermans, Lucas E; Salpini, Romina

    2018-01-01

    structure of HBV genome, some immune-escape mutations or stop-codons in HBsAg can derive from drug-resistance mutations in RT. This study is aimed at gaining insight in prevalence and characteristics of immune-associated escape mutations, and stop-codons in HBsAg in chronically HBV-infected patients...

  16. Serial MRI in early Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease with a point mutation of prion protein at codon 180

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, S.; Sugino, M.; Shinoda, K.; Ohsawa, N.; Koizumi, N.; Ohta, T.; Kitamoto, T.; Tateishi, J.

    1995-01-01

    We report a 66-year-old woman with histologically diagnosed Creutzfeld-Jacob disease (CJD), followed with MRI from an early clinical stage. MRI demonstrated expansion of the high cortical signal on T2-weighted images, which differs from previous MRI reports of CJD. This patient followed an atypical clinical course: 16 months had passed before she developed akinetic mutism, and periodic sharp waves had not been detected on EEG after 2 years in spite of her akinetic mutism. Brain biopsy showed primary spongiform changes in the grey matter, and a point mutation of the prion protein gene at codon 180 was discovered using polymerase chain reaction direct sequencing and Tth 111 I cutting. This is the first case with the point mutation of the codon 180 variant with an atypical clinical course and characteristic MRI findings. (orig.)

  17. Selenium. Role of the Essential Metalloid in Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Suguru; Berry, Marla J.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient in mammals, but is also recognized as toxic in excess. It is a non-metal with properties that are intermediate between the chalcogen elements sulfur and tellurium. Selenium exerts its biological functions through selenoproteins. Selenoproteins contain selenium in the form of the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec), which is an analog of cysteine with the sulfur-containing side chain replaced by a Se-containing side chain. Sec is encoded by the codon UGA, which is one of three termination codons for mRNA translation in non-selenoprotein genes. Recognition of the UGA codon as a Sec insertion site instead of stop requires a Sec insertion sequence (SECIS) element in selenoprotein mRNAs and a unique selenocysteyl-tRNA, both of which are recognized by specialized protein factors. Unlike the 20 standard amino acids, Sec is biosynthesized from serine on its tRNA. Twenty-five selenoproteins are encoded in the human genome. Most of the selenoprotein genes were discovered by bioinformatics approaches, searching for SECIS elements downstream of in-frame UGA codons. Sec has been described as having stronger nucleophilic and electrophilic properties than cysteine, and Sec is present in the catalytic site of all selenoenzymes. Most selenoproteins, whose functions are known, are involved in redox systems and signaling pathways. However, several selenoproteins are not well characterized in terms of their function. The selenium field has grown dramatically in the last few decades, and research on selenium biology is providing extensive new information regarding its importance for human health. PMID:24470102

  18. Mapping Translation Technology Research in Translation Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne; Christensen, Tina Paulsen; Flanagan, Marian

    2017-01-01

    /Schjoldager 2010, 2011; Christensen 2011). Unfortunately, the increasing professional use of translation technology has not been mirrored within translation studies (TS) by a similar increase in research projects on translation technology (Munday 2009: 15; O’Hagan 2013; Doherty 2016: 952). The current thematic...... section aims to improve this situation by presenting new and innovative research papers that reflect on recent technological advances and their impact on the translation profession and translators from a diversity of perspectives and using a variety of methods. In Section 2, we present translation...... technology research as a subdiscipline of TS, and we define and discuss some basic concepts and models of the field that we use in the rest of the paper. Based on a small-scale study of papers published in TS journals between 2006 and 2016, Section 3 attempts to map relevant developments of translation...

  19. Developmentally Regulated Post-translational Modification of Nucleoplasmin Controls Histone Sequestration and Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Onikubo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nucleoplasmin (Npm is an abundant histone chaperone in vertebrate oocytes and embryos. During embryogenesis, regulation of Npm histone binding is critical for its function in storing and releasing maternal histones to establish and maintain the zygotic epigenome. Here, we demonstrate that Xenopus laevis Npm post-translational modifications (PTMs specific to the oocyte and egg promote either histone deposition or sequestration, respectively. Mass spectrometry and Npm phosphomimetic mutations used in chromatin assembly assays identified hyperphosphorylation on the N-terminal tail as a critical regulator for sequestration. C-terminal tail phosphorylation and PRMT5-catalyzed arginine methylation enhance nucleosome assembly by promoting histone interaction with the second acidic tract of Npm. Electron microscopy reconstructions of Npm and TTLL4 activity toward the C-terminal tail demonstrate that oocyte- and egg-specific PTMs cause Npm conformational changes. Our results reveal that PTMs regulate Npm chaperoning activity by modulating Npm conformation and Npm-histone interaction, leading to histone sequestration in the egg.

  20. Detecting consistent patterns of directional adaptation using differential selection codon models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parto, Sahar; Lartillot, Nicolas

    2017-06-23

    Phylogenetic codon models are often used to characterize the selective regimes acting on protein-coding sequences. Recent methodological developments have led to models explicitly accounting for the interplay between mutation and selection, by modeling the amino acid fitness landscape along the sequence. However, thus far, most of these models have assumed that the fitness landscape is constant over time. Fluctuations of the fitness landscape may often be random or depend on complex and unknown factors. However, some organisms may be subject to systematic changes in selective pressure, resulting in reproducible molecular adaptations across independent lineages subject to similar conditions. Here, we introduce a codon-based differential selection model, which aims to detect and quantify the fine-grained consistent patterns of adaptation at the protein-coding level, as a function of external conditions experienced by the organism under investigation. The model parameterizes the global mutational pressure, as well as the site- and condition-specific amino acid selective preferences. This phylogenetic model is implemented in a Bayesian MCMC framework. After validation with simulations, we applied our method to a dataset of HIV sequences from patients with known HLA genetic background. Our differential selection model detects and characterizes differentially selected coding positions specifically associated with two different HLA alleles. Our differential selection model is able to identify consistent molecular adaptations as a function of repeated changes in the environment of the organism. These models can be applied to many other problems, ranging from viral adaptation to evolution of life-history strategies in plants or animals.

  1. Two cloned β thalassemia genes are associated with amber mutations at codon 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolizzi, Robert; Spritz, Richard A.; Spence, Sally; Goossens, Michel; Kan, Yuet Wai; Bank, Arthur

    1981-01-01

    Two β globin genes from patients with the β+ thalassemia phenotype have been cloned and sequenced. A single nucleotide change from CAG to TAG (an amber mutation) at codon 39 is the only difference from normal in both genes analyzed. The results are consistent with the assumption that both patients are doubly heterozygous for β+ and β° thalassemia, and that we have isolated and analyzed the β° thalassemia gene. Images PMID:6278453

  2. Characterization of a translation inhibitory protein from Luffa aegyptiaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, S; Enghlid, J J; Bryant, H L; Xu, F J

    1989-04-28

    A protein with a molecular weight of about 30,000 was purified from the seeds of Luffa aegyptiaca. This protein inhibited cell free translation at pM concentrations. In spite of functional similarity to other ribosomal inhibitory proteins, the NH2-terminal analysis did not show any significant homology. Competitive inhibition studies indicate no immunological crossreactivity between the inhibitory protein from Luffa aegyptiaca, pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) and recombinant ricin A chain. Chemical linkage of the protein to a monoclonal antibody reactive to transferrin receptor resulted in a highly cytotoxic conjugate.

  3. DG TO FT - AUTOMATIC TRANSLATION OF DIGRAPH TO FAULT TREE MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    Fault tree and digraph models are frequently used for system failure analysis. Both types of models represent a failure space view of the system using AND and OR nodes in a directed graph structure. Each model has its advantages. While digraphs can be derived in a fairly straightforward manner from system schematics and knowledge about component failure modes and system design, fault tree structure allows for fast processing using efficient techniques developed for tree data structures. The similarities between digraphs and fault trees permits the information encoded in the digraph to be translated into a logically equivalent fault tree. The DG TO FT translation tool will automatically translate digraph models, including those with loops or cycles, into fault tree models that have the same minimum cut set solutions as the input digraph. This tool could be useful, for example, if some parts of a system have been modeled using digraphs and others using fault trees. The digraphs could be translated and incorporated into the fault trees, allowing them to be analyzed using a number of powerful fault tree processing codes, such as cut set and quantitative solution codes. A cut set for a given node is a group of failure events that will cause the failure of the node. A minimum cut set for a node is any cut set that, if any of the failures in the set were to be removed, the occurrence of the other failures in the set will not cause the failure of the event represented by the node. Cut sets calculations can be used to find dependencies, weak links, and vital system components whose failures would cause serious systems failure. The DG TO FT translation system reads in a digraph with each node listed as a separate object in the input file. The user specifies a terminal node for the digraph that will be used as the top node of the resulting fault tree. A fault tree basic event node representing the failure of that digraph node is created and becomes a child of the terminal

  4. tmRNA-mediated trans-translation as the major ribosome rescue system in a bacterial cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyouta eHimeno

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available tmRNA (transfer messenger RNA; also known as 10Sa RNA or SsrA RNA is a small RNA molecule that is conserved among bacteria. It has structural and functional similarities to tRNA: it has an upper half of the tRNA-like structure, its 5’ end is processed by RNase P, it has typical tRNA-specific base modifications, it is aminoacylated with alanine, it binds to EF-Tu after aminoacylation and it enters the ribosome with EF-Tu and GTP. However, tmRNA lacks an anticodon, and instead it has a coding sequence for a short peptide called tag-peptide. An elaborate interplay of actions of tmRNA as both tRNA and mRNA with the help of a tmRNA-binding protein, SmpB, facilitates trans-translation, which produces a single polypeptide from two mRNA molecules. Initially alanyl-tmRNA in complex with EF-Tu and SmpB enters the vacant A-site of the stalled ribosome like aminoacyl-tRNA but without a codon-anticodon interaction, and subsequently truncated mRNA is replaced with the tag-encoding region of tmRNA. During these processes, not only tmRNA but also SmpB structurally and functionally mimics both tRNA and mRNA. Thus trans-translation rescues the stalled ribosome, thereby allowing recycling of the ribosome. Since the tag-peptide serves as a target of AAA+ proteases, the trans-translation products are preferentially degraded so that they do not accumulate in the cell. Although alternative rescue systems have recently been revealed, trans-translation is the only system that universally exists in bacteria. Furthermore, it is unique in that it employs a small RNA and that it prevents accumulation of nonfunctional proteins from truncated mRNA in the cell. It might play the major role in rescuing the stalled translation in the bacterial cell.

  5. Translational Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    A long-established approach to legal translation focuses on terminological equivalence making translators strictly follow the words of source texts. Recent research suggests that there is room for some creativity allowing translators to deviate from the source texts. However, little attention...... is given to genre conventions in source texts and the ways in which they can best be translated. I propose that translators of statutes with an informative function in expert-to-expert communication may be allowed limited translational creativity when translating specific types of genre convention....... This creativity is a result of translators adopting either a source-language or a target-language oriented strategy and is limited by the pragmatic principle of co-operation. Examples of translation options are provided illustrating the different results in target texts. The use of a target-language oriented...

  6. Prevalence of codon 72 P53 polymorphism in Brazilian women with cervix cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Michelina Fernandes Brenna

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The p53 codon 72 polymorphism seems to be associated with HPV-carcinogenesis, although controversial data have been reported. A series of Brazilian women with cervix carcinomas were analyzed. Ninety-nine (67% of 148 women were found to be homozygous (arg/arg for the arginine polymorphism, and 49 (33% were heterozygous (arg/pro. This polymorphism may be an important determinant of the risk for cervix cancer, but does not seem to be sufficient for carcinogenesis.

  7. Topical Review: Translating Translational Research in Behavioral Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommel, Kevin A; Modi, Avani C; Piazza-Waggoner, Carrie; Myers, James D

    2015-01-01

    To present a model of translational research for behavioral science that communicates the role of behavioral research at each phase of translation. A task force identified gaps in knowledge regarding behavioral translational research processes and made recommendations regarding advancement of knowledge. A comprehensive model of translational behavioral research was developed. This model represents T1, T2, and T3 research activities, as well as Phase 1, 2, 3, and 4 clinical trials. Clinical illustrations of translational processes are also offered as support for the model. Behavioral science has struggled with defining a translational research model that effectively articulates each stage of translation and complements biomedical research. Our model defines key activities at each phase of translation from basic discovery to dissemination/implementation. This should be a starting point for communicating the role of behavioral science in translational research and a catalyst for better integration of biomedical and behavioral research. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Finite translation surfaces with maximal number of translations

    OpenAIRE

    Schlage-Puchta, Jan-Christoph; Weitze-Schmithuesen, Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    The natural automorphism group of a translation surface is its group of translations. For finite translation surfaces of genus g > 1 the order of this group is naturally bounded in terms of g due to a Riemann-Hurwitz formula argument. In analogy with classical Hurwitz surfaces, we call surfaces which achieve the maximal bound Hurwitz translation surfaces. We study for which g there exist Hurwitz translation surfaces of genus g.

  9. Machine Translation Tools - Tools of The Translator's Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastberg, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In this article three of the more common types of translation tools are presented, discussed and critically evaluated. The types of translation tools dealt with in this article are: Fully Automated Machine Translation (or FAMT), Human Aided Machine Translation (or HAMT) and Machine Aided Human...... Translation (or MAHT). The strengths and weaknesses of the different types of tools are discussed and evaluated by means of a number of examples. The article aims at two things: at presenting a sort of state of the art of what is commonly referred to as “machine translation” as well as at providing the reader...... with a sound basis for considering what translation tool (if any) is the most appropriate in order to meet his or her specific translation needs....

  10. Touch-input compatible portable terminal for receiving and issuing orders; Touch nyuryoku kanona keitai hacchu tanmatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    A portable terminal with an 800-times-600-dot color display has been developed, useful in receiving and issuing orders in the distribution industry or the like. The terminal runs on Microsoft Windows(reg sign) CE 2.11 embedded as the operating system (OS), and exhibits a high affinity with the system. It uses Toshiba's CPU TX3922 and dedicated ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit), and achieves an energy efficient uninterrupted 7-hour operation without degrading augmentability involving various peripheral interfaces such as the PC card, infrared communication, USB (Universal Serial Bus), PS/2 (Personal System/2), and the like. Since the terminal is to be touch-operated, the operator can issue orders while checking the inventories and utilize presentation on the display at negotiations on business. (translated by NEDO)

  11. Cap-proximal nucleotides via differential eIF4E binding and alternative promoter usage mediate translational response to energy stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarkin-Ben-Harush, Ana; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Debart, Françoise; Ulitsky, Igor; Dikstein, Rivka

    2017-02-08

    Transcription start-site (TSS) selection and alternative promoter (AP) usage contribute to gene expression complexity but little is known about their impact on translation. Here we performed TSS mapping of the translatome following energy stress. Assessing the contribution of cap-proximal TSS nucleotides, we found dramatic effect on translation only upon stress. As eIF4E levels were reduced, we determined its binding to capped-RNAs with different initiating nucleotides and found the lowest affinity to 5'cytidine in correlation with the translational stress-response. In addition, the number of differentially translated APs was elevated following stress. These include novel glucose starvation-induced downstream transcripts for the translation regulators eIF4A and Pabp, which are also translationally-induced despite general translational inhibition. The resultant eIF4A protein is N-terminally truncated and acts as eIF4A inhibitor. The induced Pabp isoform has shorter 5'UTR removing an auto-inhibitory element. Our findings uncovered several levels of coordination of transcription and translation responses to energy stress.

  12. Translation Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Marcia Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss three translation techniques: literal, cultural, and artistic. Literal translation is a well-known technique, which means that it is quite easy to find sources on the topic. Cultural and artistic translation may be new terms. Whilst cultural translation focuses on matching contexts, artistic translation focuses on matching reactions. Because literal translation matches only words, it is not hard to find situations in which we should not use this technique.  Because a...

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Li-Shang; Zhu, Bao-Jian; Qian, Cen; Zhang, Cong-Fen; Li, Jun; Wang, Lei; Wei, Guo-Qing; Liu, Chao-Liang

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) was determined (GenBank accession No. KM023645). The length of this mitogenome is 16,014 bp with 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and an A + T-rich region. It presents the typical gene organization and order for completely sequenced lepidopteran mitogenomes. The nucleotide composition of the genome is highly A + T biased, accounting for 81.48%, with a slightly positive AT skewness (0.005). All PCGs are initiated by typical ATN codons, except for the gene cox1, which uses CGA as its start codon. Some PCGs harbor TA (nad5) or incomplete termination codon T (cox1, cox2, nad2 and nad4), while others use TAA as their termination codons. The A + T-rich region is located between rrnS and trnM with a length of 888 bp.

  14. Theoretical analysis of the distribution of isolated particles in totally asymmetric exclusion processes: Application to mRNA translation rate estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao Duc, Khanh; Saleem, Zain H.; Song, Yun S.

    2018-01-01

    The Totally Asymmetric Exclusion Process (TASEP) is a classical stochastic model for describing the transport of interacting particles, such as ribosomes moving along the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) during translation. Although this model has been widely studied in the past, the extent of collision between particles and the average distance between a particle to its nearest neighbor have not been quantified explicitly. We provide here a theoretical analysis of such quantities via the distribution of isolated particles. In the classical form of the model in which each particle occupies only a single site, we obtain an exact analytic solution using the matrix ansatz. We then employ a refined mean-field approach to extend the analysis to a generalized TASEP with particles of an arbitrary size. Our theoretical study has direct applications in mRNA translation and the interpretation of experimental ribosome profiling data. In particular, our analysis of data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests a potential bias against the detection of nearby ribosomes with a gap distance of less than approximately three codons, which leads to some ambiguity in estimating the initiation rate and protein production flux for a substantial fraction of genes. Despite such ambiguity, however, we demonstrate theoretically that the interference rate associated with collisions can be robustly estimated and show that approximately 1% of the translating ribosomes get obstructed.

  15. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... a native gentamicin resistance gene, suggesting that codon optimization improved translation efficiency of the marker gene and increased antibiotic resistance. Our result shows that similarity in codon usage pattern is an important factor to be taken into account when exogenous transgenes are expressed in Frankia cells.

  16. Supplementary data: Comparative studies on sequence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Page 1. Supplementary data: Comparative studies on sequence characteristics around translation initiation codon in four eukaryotes. Qingpo Liu and Qingzhong Xue. J. Genet. 84, 317–322. Table 1. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients of 39 base positions around the AUG codon in the four eukaryotic species studied.

  17. Translation Ambiguity but Not Word Class Predicts Translation Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Anat; Kroll, Judith F.; Macwhinney, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the influence of word class and translation ambiguity on cross-linguistic representation and processing. Bilingual speakers of English and Spanish performed translation production and translation recognition tasks on nouns and verbs in both languages. Words either had a single translation or more than one translation. Translation…

  18. Examining English-German Translation Ambiguity Using Primed Translation Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddington, Chelsea M.; Tokowicz, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Many words have more than one translation across languages. Such "translation-ambiguous" words are translated more slowly and less accurately than their unambiguous counterparts. We examine the extent to which word context and translation dominance influence the processing of translation-ambiguous words. We further examine how these factors…

  19. A GRAMMATICAL ADJUSTMENT ANALYSIS OF STATISTICAL MACHINE TRANSLATION METHOD USED BY GOOGLE TRANSLATE COMPARED TO HUMAN TRANSLATION IN TRANSLATING ENGLISH TEXT TO INDONESIAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Pujianto

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Google translate is a program which provides fast, free and effortless translating service. This service uses a unique method to translate. The system is called ―Statistical Machine Translation‖, the newest method in automatic translation. Machine translation (MT is an area of many kinds of different subjects of study and technique from linguistics, computers science, artificial intelligent (AI, translation theory, and statistics. SMT works by using statistical methods and mathematics to process the training data. The training data is corpus-based. It is a compilation of sentences and words of the languages (SL and TL from translation done by human. By using this method, Google let their machine discovers the rules for themselves. They do this by analyzing millions of documents that have already been translated by human translators and then generate the result based on the corpus/training data. However, questions arise when the results of the automatic translation prove to be unreliable in some extent. This paper questions the dependability of Google translate in comparison with grammatical adjustment that naturally characterizes human translators' specific advantage. The attempt is manifested through the analysis of the TL of some texts translated by the SMT. It is expected that by using the sample of TL produced by SMT we can learn the potential flaws of the translation. If such exists, the partial of more substantial undependability of SMT may open more windows to the debates of whether this service may suffice the users‘ need.

  20. An operon encoding three glycolytic enzymes in Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate kinase and triosephosphate isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branny, P; de la Torre, F; Garel, J R

    1998-04-01

    The structural genes gap, pgk and tpi encoding three glycolytic enzymes, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), respectively, have been cloned and sequenced from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus). The genes were isolated after screening genomic sublibraries with specific gap and pgk probes obtained by PCR amplification of chromosomal DNA with degenerate primers corresponding to amino acid sequences highly conserved in GAPDHs and PGKs. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that the three genes were organized in the order gap-pgk-tpi. The translation start codons of the three genes were identified by alignment of the N-terminal sequences. These genes predicted polypeptide chains of 338, 403 and 252 amino acids for GAPDH, PGK and TPI, respectively, and they were separated by 96 bp between gap and pgk, and by only 18 bp between pgk and tpi. The codon usage in gap, pgk, tpi and three other glycolytic genes from L. bulgaricus differed, noticeably from that in other chromosomal genes. The site of transcriptional initiation was located by primer extension, and a probable promoter was identified for the gap-pgk-tpi operon. Northern hybridization of total RNA with specific probes showed two transcripts, an mRNA of 1.4 kb corresponding to the gap gene, and a less abundant mRNA of 3.4 kb corresponding to the gap-pgk-tpi cluster. The absence of a visible terminator in the 3'-end of the shorter transcript and the location of this 3'-end inside the pgk gene indicated that this shorter transcript was produced by degradation of the longer one, rather than by an early termination of transcription after the gap gene.

  1. Translation-coupling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleger, Brian; Mendez-Perez, Daniel

    2013-11-05

    Disclosed are systems and methods for coupling translation of a target gene to a detectable response gene. A version of the invention includes a translation-coupling cassette. The translation-coupling cassette includes a target gene, a response gene, a response-gene translation control element, and a secondary structure-forming sequence that reversibly forms a secondary structure masking the response-gene translation control element. Masking of the response-gene translation control element inhibits translation of the response gene. Full translation of the target gene results in unfolding of the secondary structure and consequent translation of the response gene. Translation of the target gene is determined by detecting presence of the response-gene protein product. The invention further includes RNA transcripts of the translation-coupling cassettes, vectors comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, hosts comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, methods of using the translation-coupling cassettes, and gene products produced with the translation-coupling cassettes.

  2. The Role of Semantics in Translation Recognition: Effects of Number of Translations, Dominance of Translations and Semantic Relatedness of Multiple Translations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxen, Jannika; Lavaur, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to examine the influence of multiple translations of a word on bilingual processing in three translation recognition experiments during which French-English bilinguals had to decide whether two words were translations of each other or not. In the first experiment, words with only one translation were recognized as translations…

  3. Inspiring hope-A physician's responsibility, translating the science into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Walley J

    2018-03-01

    Giving hope to patients is our responsibility. It is the essence of a meaningful practice in medicine. Science now allows us to understand this complex and multidimensional human dynamic, and translate it into clinical practice. Quantitative research has shown hope is strong even in terminal illness. Through qualitative methodology hope fostering strategies and hope hindering behaviors have been identified. This exciting new knowledge facilitates the challenging task of disclosure of bad news while enabling hope. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Identification of potential hot spots in the carboxy-terminal part of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BNLF-1 gene in both malignant and benign EBV-associated diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvej, K; Peh, S C; Andresen, B S

    1994-01-01

    mononucleosis (IM). Our study showed that some of the 7 single-base mutations and the 30-bp deletion previously detected between codons of amino acid 322 and 366 in the BNLF-1 gene of the nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line CAO were present in all Malaysian PTLs and in 60% of the Danish PTLs. In HD and the IM......In this study, we have sequenced the C-terminal part of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-BNLF-1 gene encoding for the latent membrane protein-1 from tissues of EBV-positive Danish Hodgkin's disease (HD) and of Danish and Malaysian peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTLs) and from tonsils of Danish infectious...

  5. Engineering and Validation of a Vector for Concomitant Expression of Rare Transfer RNA (tRNA and HIV-1 nef Genes in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Aisyah Mualif

    Full Text Available Relative ease in handling and manipulation of Escherichia coli strains make them primary candidate to express proteins heterologously. Overexpression of heterologous genes that contain codons infrequently used by E. coli is related with difficulties such as mRNA instability, early termination of transcription and/or translation, deletions and/or misincorporation, and cell growth inhibition. These codon bias -associated problems are addressed by co-expressing ColE1-compatible, rare tRNA expressing helper plasmids. However, this approach has inadequacies, which we have addressed by engineering an expression vector that concomitantly expresses the heterologous protein of interest, and rare tRNA genes in E. coli. The expression vector contains three (argU, ileY, leuW rare tRNA genes and a useful multiple cloning site for easy in-frame cloning. To maintain the overall size of the parental plasmid vector, the rare tRNA genes replaced the non-essential DNA segments in the vector. The cloned gene is expressed under the control of T7 promoter and resulting recombinant protein has a C-terminal 6His tag for IMAC-mediated purification. We have evaluated the usefulness of this expression vector by expressing three HIV-1 genes namely HIV-1 p27 (nef, HIV-1 p24 (ca, and HIV-1 vif in NiCo21(DE3 E.coli and demonstrated the advantages of using expression vector that concomitantly expresses rare tRNA and heterologous genes.

  6. [Association between HRE-2 gene polymorphism at codon 655 and genetic susceptibility of colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xia; Zhang, Yong-jing; Liu, Bing; Ni, Qin; Jin, Ming-juan; Ma, Xin-yuan; Yao, Kai-yan; Li, Qi-long; Chen, Kun

    2009-06-01

    To explore the distribution of HER-2 genetic polymorphism at codon 655 and its association with susceptibility of colorectal cancer in Chinese. A population-based case-control study was carried out. 292 patients with colorectal cancer and 842 healthy controls were interviewed. Meanwhile, the genetic polymorphism of HRE-2 was detected using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The frequencies of Ile/Val+Val/Val genotypes and Val allele were both higher in cases (25.34% and 13.36%) than those in controls (18.41% and 9.74%) (P<0.05). Compared with Ile/Ile genotype, Ile/Val+Val/Val genotypes were significantly associated with colorectal cancer [ORadjusted=1.54, 95% CI: 1.11-2.14]. The adjusted odds ratio of interactions between this polymorphism and smoking, alcohol drinking were 1.43 (95%CI: 0.88-2.30) and 1.29 (95%CI: 0.73-2.29), respectively. The present findings suggest that HER-2 genetic polymorphism at codon 655 may be associated with the risk of colorectal cancer in Chinese. In addition, there are no interactions between this polymorphism and smoking, alcohol drinking, respectively.

  7. TP53 codon 72 polymorphism and cervical cancer : a pooled analysis of individual data from 49 studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klug, Stefanie J.; Ressing, Meike; Koenig, Jochem; Abba, Martin C.; Agorastos, Theodoros; Brenna, Sylvia M. F.; Ciotti, Marco; Das, B. R.; Del Mistro, Annarosa; Dybikowska, Aleksandra; Giuliano, Anna R.; Gudleviciene, Zivile; Gyllensten, Ulf; Haws, Andrea L. F.; Helland, Aslaug; Herrington, C. Simon; Hildesheim, Alan; Humbey, Olivier; Jee, Sun H.; Kim, Jae Weon; Madeleine, Margaret M.; Menczer, Joseph; Ngan, Hextan Y. S.; Nishikawa, Akira; Niwa, Yoshimitsu; Pegoraro, Rosemary; Pillai, M. R.; Ranzani, Gulielmina; Rezza, Giovanni; Rosenthal, Adam N.; Roychoudhury, Susanta; Saranath, Dhananjaya; Schmitt, Virginia M.; Sengupta, Sharmila; Settheetham-Ishida, Wannapa; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Stoler, Mark H.; Suarez-Rincon, Angel E.; Szarka, Krisztina; Tachezy, Ruth; Ueda, Masatsugu; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Doeberitz, Magnus von Knebel; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Yamashita, Tsuyoshi; Zehbe, Ingeborg; Blettner, Maria

    Background Cervical cancer is caused primarily by human papillomaviruses (HPV). The polymorphism rs1042522 at codon 72 of the TP53 tumour-suppressor gene has been investigated as a genetic cofactor. More than 80 studies were done between 1998 and 2006, after it was initially reported that women who

  8. PERSONALITY TYPE AND TRANSLATION PERFORMANCE OF PERSIAN TRANSLATOR TRAINEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shaki

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the relationship between the personality typology of a sample of Iranian translation students and their translation quality in terms of expressive, appellative, and informative text types. The study also attempted to identify the personality types that can perform better in English to Persian translation of the three text types. For that purpose, the personality type and the translation quality of the participants was assessed using Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI personality test and translation quality assessment (TQA, respectively. The analysis of the data revealed that the personality type of the participants seemed relevant to the translation quality of all the text types. The translation quality of the participants with intuitive and thinking types was significantly better than the sensing type counterparts in translating expressive texts. The participants with intuitive and feeling types also performed better than their counterparts with sensing type in translation of the informative text. Moreover, the participants with intuitive, feeling, and thinking personality types performed more successfully than the participants with sensing type in translation of the appellative text. The findings of the study are discussed in light of the existing research literature.

  9. The Jigsaw Puzzle of mRNA Translation Initiation in Eukaryotes: A Decade of Structures Unraveling the Mechanics of the Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Yaser; Frank, Joachim

    2018-03-01

    Translation initiation in eukaryotes is a highly regulated and rate-limiting process. It results in the assembly and disassembly of numerous transient and intermediate complexes involving over a dozen eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs). This process culminates in the accommodation of a start codon marking the beginning of an open reading frame at the appropriate ribosomal site. Although this process has been extensively studied by hundreds of groups for nearly half a century, it has been only recently, especially during the last decade, that we have gained deeper insight into the mechanics of the eukaryotic translation initiation process. This advance in knowledge is due in part to the contributions of structural biology, which have shed light on the molecular mechanics underlying the different functions of various eukaryotic initiation factors. In this review, we focus exclusively on the contribution of structural biology to the understanding of the eukaryotic initiation process, a long-standing jigsaw puzzle that is just starting to yield the bigger picture. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biophysics Volume 47 is May 20, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  10. Severe congenital neutropenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Blood, Tidwell et al1 demonstrate that mutations in the start codon (protein synthesis is initiated at the codon ATG) of neutrophil elastase (ELANE) result in the production of N-terminally truncated elastase, which mislocates to the nucleus and results in severe congenital neutr...... neutropenia (SCN)....

  11. Beta 2 adrenergic receptor polymorphisms, at codons 16 and 27, and bronchodilator responses in adult Venezuelan asthmatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocca, Nancy; Moreno, Dolores; Garmendia, Jenny Valentina; Velasquez, Olga; Martin-Rojo, Joana; Talamo, Carlos; Garcia, Alexis; De Sanctis, Juan Bautista

    2013-12-01

    One of the gene polymorphisms often studied in asthmatic patients is the β2 adrenergic receptor (ADRβ2). Even though in the Venezuelan Mestizo population there is a high incidence of asthma, there are no direct reports of ADRβ2 gene polymorphism, and treatment response. The aim of this study was to assess, in this population, the gene frequency of ADRβ2 polymorphisms at codons 16 Arg/Gly and 27 Gln/Glu, allergen sensitization, and its relationship to bronchodilator response. Purified genomic DNA was obtained form 105 Mestizo asthmatic and 100 Mestizo healthy individuals from Venezuela. The two polymorphisms were assessed by PCR-RFLP. Patient sensitization to aeroallergens and their response to bronchodilatation were correlated. Significant differences between patients and controls were recorded in: 1) the prevalence of Arg/Arg at codon 16 (28.6% in patients vs. 47% in controls, P<0.01), 2) the frequency of heterozygotes Arg/Gly (55% in patients vs. 35% in controls, P<0.01). Conversely, no differences in polymorphism frequencies were found at codon 27. The haplotypes Arg/Gly-Gln/Gln were more common in patients than controls (P <0.01), whereas the Arg/Arg-Gln/Glu combination prevailed in the control group (P<0.01). The Arg/Gly and Gln/Glu genotypes were associated with better responses after salbutamol. The asthmatic homozygotes Arg/Arg have higher sensitivity to aeroallergens. The difference in Arg/Arg frequency between groups suggests that this could be a protective genotype although the asthmatic group had a higher sensitivity to aeroallergens. The asthmatic heterozygotes had better bronchodilator responses than the homozygotes.

  12. Molecular mimicry of human tRNALys anti-codon domain by HIV-1 RNA genome facilitates tRNA primer annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher P; Saadatmand, Jenan; Kleiman, Lawrence; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2013-02-01

    The primer for initiating reverse transcription in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is tRNA(Lys3). Host cell tRNA(Lys) is selectively packaged into HIV-1 through a specific interaction between the major tRNA(Lys)-binding protein, human lysyl-tRNA synthetase (hLysRS), and the viral proteins Gag and GagPol. Annealing of the tRNA primer onto the complementary primer-binding site (PBS) in viral RNA is mediated by the nucleocapsid domain of Gag. The mechanism by which tRNA(Lys3) is targeted to the PBS and released from hLysRS prior to annealing is unknown. Here, we show that hLysRS specifically binds to a tRNA anti-codon-like element (TLE) in the HIV-1 genome, which mimics the anti-codon loop of tRNA(Lys) and is located proximal to the PBS. Mutation of the U-rich sequence within the TLE attenuates binding of hLysRS in vitro and reduces the amount of annealed tRNA(Lys3) in virions. Thus, LysRS binds specifically to the TLE, which is part of a larger LysRS binding domain in the viral RNA that includes elements of the Psi packaging signal. Our results suggest that HIV-1 uses molecular mimicry of the anti-codon of tRNA(Lys) to increase the efficiency of tRNA(Lys3) annealing to viral RNA.

  13. Prophylactic thyroidectomy for asymptomatic 3-year-old boy with positive multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A mutation (codon 634).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesić, Maja D; Tancić-Gajić, Milina; Jesić, Milos M; Zivaljević, Vladan; Sajić, Silvija; Vujović, Svetlana; Damjanović, Svetozar

    2014-01-01

    The multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A) syndrome, comprising medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), pheochromocytoma and primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is most frequently caused by codon 634 activating mutations of the RET (rearranged during transfection) proto-oncogene on chromosome 10. For this codon-mutation carriers, earlier thyroidectomy (before the age of 5 years) would be advantageous in limiting the potential for the development of MTC as well as parathyroid adenomas. This is a case report of 3-year-old boy from the MEN 2A family (the boy's father and grandmother and paternal aunt) in which cysteine substitutes for phenylalanine at codon 634 in exon 11 of the RET proto-oncogene, who underwent thyroidectomy solely on the basis of genetic information. A boy had no thyromegaly, thyroidal irregularities or lymphadenopathy and no abnormality on the neck ultrasound examination. The pathology finding of thyroid gland was negative for MTC. Two years after total thyroidectomy, 5-year-old boy is healthy with permanent thyroxine replacement. His serum calcitonin level is < 2 pg/ml (normal < 13 pg/ml), has normal serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels and negative urinary catecholamines. Long-term follow-up of this patient is required to determine whether very early thyroidectomy improves the long-term outcome of PHPT. Children with familial antecedents of MEN 2A should be genetically studied for the purpose of determining the risk of MTC and assessing the possibilities of making prophylactic thyroidectomy before the age of 5 years.

  14. Pauses by Student and Professional Translators in Translation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusdi Noor Rosa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Translation as a process of meaning making activity requires a cognitive process one of which is realized in a pause, a temporary stop or a break indicating doing other than typing activities in a certain period of translation process. Scholars agree that pauses are an indicator of cognitive process without which there will never be any translation practices. Despite such agreement, pauses are debatable as well, either in terms of their length or in terms of the activities managed by a translator while taking pauses. This study, in particular, aims at finding out how student translators and professional translators managed the pauses in a translation process. This was a descriptive research taking two student translators and two professional translators as the participants who were asked to translate a text from English into bahasa Indonesia. The source text (ST was a historical recount text entitled ‘Early History of Yellowstone National Park’ downloaded from http://www.nezperce.com/yelpark9.html composed of 230-word long from English into bahasa Indonesia. The data were collected using Translog protocols, think aloud protocols (TAPs and screen recording. Based on the data analysis, it was found that student translators took the longest pauses in the drafting phase spent to solve the problems related to finding out the right equivalent for the ST words or terms and to solve the difficulties encountered in encoding their ST understanding in the TL; meanwhile, professional translators took the longest pauses in the pos-drafting phase spent to ensure whether their TT had been natural and whether their TT had corresponded to the prevailing grammatical rules of the TL.

  15. A genome-scale integration and analysis of Lactococcus lactis translation data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Racle

    Full Text Available Protein synthesis is a template polymerization process composed by three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During translation, ribosomes are engaged into polysomes whose size is used for the quantitative characterization of translatome. However, simultaneous transcription and translation in the bacterial cytosol complicates the analysis of translatome data. We established a procedure for robust estimation of the ribosomal density in hundreds of genes from Lactococcus lactis polysome size measurements. We used a mechanistic model of translation to integrate the information about the ribosomal density and for the first time we estimated the protein synthesis rate for each gene and identified the rate limiting steps. Contrary to conventional considerations, we find significant number of genes to be elongation limited. This number increases during stress conditions compared to optimal growth and proteins synthesized at maximum rate are predominantly elongation limited. Consistent with bacterial physiology, we found proteins with similar rate and control characteristics belonging to the same functional categories. Under stress conditions, we found that synthesis rate of regulatory proteins is becoming comparable to proteins favored under optimal growth. These findings suggest that the coupling of metabolic states and protein synthesis is more important than previously thought.

  16. Machine translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, M

    1982-04-01

    Each language has its own structure. In translating one language into another one, language attributes and grammatical interpretation must be defined in an unambiguous form. In order to parse a sentence, it is necessary to recognize its structure. A so-called context-free grammar can help in this respect for machine translation and machine-aided translation. Problems to be solved in studying machine translation are taken up in the paper, which discusses subjects for semantics and for syntactic analysis and translation software. 14 references.

  17. First Case of a Compound Heterozygosity for Two Nondeletional α-Thalassemia mutations, Hb Constant Spring and Hb Quong Sze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-Ying; Yan, Jin-Mei; Li, Jian; Li, Dong-Zhi

    2016-06-01

    Nondeletional α-thalassemia (α-thal) is the result of point mutations in critical regions of the α-globin genes, affecting mRNA processing, mRNA translation, or α-globin stability. Hb Constant Spring (Hb CS, HBA2: c.427T > C) is the most common nondeletional α-thal that results from a nucleotide substitution at the termination codon of the α2-globin gene. Hb Quong Sze (Hb QS, HBA2: c.377T > C) is another nondeletional α-thal in South China with the missense mutation at codon 125 of the α2-globin gene making this hemoglobin (Hb) variant highly unstable. Although homozygosity for Hb CS (α(CS)α/α(CS)α) or Hb QS (α(QS)α/α(QS)α) has been reported, clinical pictures vary from severe hemolysis that developed early in life to only mild anemia, no clinical phenotypic data of compound heterozygosity for Hb CS/Hb QS (α(CS)α/α(QS)α) has been described. In this report we describe an adult case with such a compound heterozygosity who presented with a mild α-thal.

  18. A novel post-translational modification in nerve terminals: O-linked N-acetylglucosamine phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, Mark E; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Bache, Nicolai

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation and glycosylation are the most common post-translational modifications observed in biology, frequently on the same protein. Assembly protein AP180 is a synapse-specific phosphoprotein and O-linked beta-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modified glycoprotein. AP180 is involved......NAc-P to a Thr residue was confirmed by electron transfer dissociation MS. A second AP180 tryptic peptide was also glycosyl phosphorylated, but the site of modification was not assigned. Sequence similarities suggest there may be a common motif within AP180 involving glycosyl phosphorylation and dual flanking...... phosphorylation sites within 4 amino acid residues. This novel type of protein glycosyl phosphorylation adds a new signaling mechanism to the regulation of neurotransmission and more complexity to the study of O-GlcNAc modification....

  19. The tRNA-like structure of Turnip yellow mosaic virus RNA is a 3'-translational enhancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Daiki; Dreher, Theo W.

    2004-01-01

    Many positive stand RNA viral genomes lack the poly(A) tail that is characteristic of cellular mRNAs and that promotes translation in cis. The 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) of such genomes are expected to provide similar translation-enhancing properties as a poly(A) tail, yet the great variety of 3' sequences suggests that this is accomplished in a range of ways. We have identified a translational enhancer present in the 3' UTR of Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) RNA using luciferase reporter RNAs with generic 5' sequences transfected into plant cells. The 3' terminal 109 nucleotides comprising the tRNA-like structure (TLS) and an upstream pseudoknot (UPSK) act in synergy with a 5'-cap to enhance translation, with a minor contribution in stabilizing the RNA. Maximum enhancement requires that the RNA be capable of aminoacylation, but either the native valine or engineered methionine is acceptable. Mutations that decrease the affinity for translation elongation factor eEF1A (but also diminish aminoacylation efficiency) strongly decrease translational enhancement, suggesting that eEF1A is mechanistically involved. The UPSK seems to act as an important, though nonspecific, spacer element ensuring proper presentation of a functional TLS. Our studies have uncovered a novel type of translational enhancer and a new role for a plant viral TLS

  20. Expression of the amino-terminal half-molecule of human serum transferrin in cultured cells and characterization of the recombinant protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funk, W.D.; MacGillivray, R.T.A.; Mason, A.B.; Brown, S.A.; Woodworth, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    A human liver cDNA library was screened with a synthetic oligonucleotide, complementary to the 5' region of human transferrin mRNA, as a hybridization probe. The full-length human cDNA clone isolated from this screen contained part of the 5' untranslated region, the complete coding region for the signal peptide and the two lobes of transferrin, the 3' untranslated region, and a poly(A) tail. By use of oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis in vitro, two translational stop codons and a HindIII site were introduced after the codon for Asp-337. This fragment was inserted into two different expression vectors that were then introduced into Escherichia coli. As judged by NaDodSO 4 -polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis, however, recombinant hTF/2N was undetectable in bacteria transformed by these plasmids. Concurrently, the authors developed a plasmid vector for the expression of recombinant hTF/2N in eukaryotic cells. The recombinant hTF/2N appeared to behave identically with the proteolytically derived half-molecule, but to show a higher degree of monodispersity than the latter protein. Addition of m-fluorotyrosine to the culture medium resulted in random incorporation of this amino acid into cellular protein in lieu of tyrosine. Purified recombinant 19 F-Tyr hTF/2N gave four well-resolved 19 F NMR resonances of 20-40 Hz line width, two with suggestions of shoulders

  1. Combined protein construct and synthetic gene engineering for heterologous protein expression and crystallization using Gene Composer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walchli John

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the goal of improving yield and success rates of heterologous protein production for structural studies we have developed the database and algorithm software package Gene Composer. This freely available electronic tool facilitates the information-rich design of protein constructs and their engineered synthetic gene sequences, as detailed in the accompanying manuscript. Results In this report, we compare heterologous protein expression levels from native sequences to that of codon engineered synthetic gene constructs designed by Gene Composer. A test set of proteins including a human kinase (P38α, viral polymerase (HCV NS5B, and bacterial structural protein (FtsZ were expressed in both E. coli and a cell-free wheat germ translation system. We also compare the protein expression levels in E. coli for a set of 11 different proteins with greatly varied G:C content and codon bias. Conclusion The results consistently demonstrate that protein yields from codon engineered Gene Composer designs are as good as or better than those achieved from the synonymous native genes. Moreover, structure guided N- and C-terminal deletion constructs designed with the aid of Gene Composer can lead to greater success in gene to structure work as exemplified by the X-ray crystallographic structure determination of FtsZ from Bacillus subtilis. These results validate the Gene Composer algorithms, and suggest that using a combination of synthetic gene and protein construct engineering tools can improve the economics of gene to structure research.

  2. The 18-kilodalton Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) contains a potential N-terminal dimerization site and a C-terminal nucleic acid-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, LB; Birkelund, Svend; Holm, A

    1996-01-01

    The Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) is a DNA-binding protein specific for the metabolically inactive chlamydial developmental form, the elementary body. Hc1 induces DNA condensation in Escherichia coli and is a strong inhibitor of transcription and translation. These effects may......-hydroxysuccinimide ester), purified recombinant Hc1 was found to form dimers. The dimerization site was located in the N-terminal part of Hc1 (Hc1(2-57)). Moreover, circular dichroism measurements indicated an overall alpha-helical structure of this region. By using limited proteolysis, Southwestern blotting, and gel...

  3. Codon Optimization Significantly Improves the Expression Level of α-Amylase Gene from Bacillus licheniformis in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Rong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available α-Amylase as an important industrial enzyme has been widely used in starch processing, detergent, and paper industries. To improve expression efficiency of recombinant α-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis, the α-amylase gene from B. licheniformis was optimized according to the codon usage of Pichia pastoris (P. pastoris and expressed in P. pastoris. Totally, the codons encoding 305 amino acids were optimized in which a total of 328 nucleotides were changed and the G+C content was increased from 47.6 to 49.2%. The recombinants were cultured in 96-deep-well microplates and screened by a new plate assay method. Compared with the wild-type gene, the optimized gene is expressed at a significantly higher level in P. pastoris after methanol induction for 168 h in 5- and 50-L bioreactor with the maximum activity of 8100 and 11000 U/mL, which was 2.31- and 2.62-fold higher than that by wild-type gene. The improved expression level makes the enzyme a good candidate for α-amylase production in industrial use.

  4. Translating Inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallov, Mia Arp; Birk, Rasmus

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how practices of translation shape particular paths of inclusion for people living in marginalized residential areas in Denmark. Inclusion, we argue, is not an end-state, but rather something which must be constantly performed. Active citizenship, today......, is not merely a question of participation, but of learning to become active in all spheres of life. The paper draws on empirical examples from a multi-sited field work in 6 different sites of local community work in Denmark, to demonstrate how different dimensions of translation are involved in shaping active...... citizenship. We propose the following different dimensions of translation: translating authority, translating language, translating social problems. The paper takes its theoretical point of departure from assemblage urbanism, arguing that cities are heterogeneous assemblages of socio-material interactions...

  5. Codon 972 polymorphism in the insulin receptor substrate-1 gene, obesity, and risk of noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigal, R.J.; Doria, A.; Warram, J.H.; Krolewski, A.S. [Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Because of the role of insulin receptor substrate-1 in insulin action, the insulin receptor substrate-1 gene is a candidate gene for noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Modest associations between NIDDM and a GGG-AGG single base substitution (corresponding to a glycine-arginine amino acid substitution) in codon 972 of the gene have been found, but none reached statistical significance. To examine further how large a proportion of NIDDM cases could be caused by the mutation, we performed a stratified analysis combining the results from the 6 earlier studies and those from our panel of 192 unrelated NIDDM subjects and 104 healthy controls. In addition, we looked for a possibility that the codon 972 mutation plays a role only in the presence of certain conditions. Genomic DNA samples obtained from NIDDM cases and healthy controls were genotyped using a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism protocol modified for genomic DNA. The GGG{r_arrow}AGG substitution was found in 5.7% of the diabetic subjects (11 of 192) and 6.9% of the controls (7 of 104). The difference between groups was not statistically significant, and it was not different from the results of other studies. The Mantel-Haenszel summary odds ratio across all studies was 1.49 (P < 0.05; 95% confidence intervals, 1.01-2.2). This summary odds ratio is consistent with a small proportion of NIDDM cases ({approximately}3%) being caused by the mutation. Exploratory subgroup analyses on our panel suggested a clustering of NIDDM, the codon 972 mutation, and overweight, raising the hypothesis that the mutation may predispose to NIDDM only in the presence of excess body weight. 9 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. AKT phosphorylates H3-threonine 45 to facilitate termination of gene transcription in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Hyuk; Kang, Byung-Hee; Jang, Hyonchol; Kim, Tae Wan; Choi, Jinmi; Kwak, Sojung; Han, Jungwon; Cho, Eun-Jung; Youn, Hong-Duk

    2015-05-19

    Post-translational modifications of core histones affect various cellular processes, primarily through transcription. However, their relationship with the termination of transcription has remained largely unknown. In this study, we show that DNA damage-activated AKT phosphorylates threonine 45 of core histone H3 (H3-T45). By genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis, H3-T45 phosphorylation was distributed throughout DNA damage-responsive gene loci, particularly immediately after the transcription termination site. H3-T45 phosphorylation pattern showed close-resemblance to that of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain (CTD) serine 2 phosphorylation, which establishes the transcription termination signal. AKT1 was more effective than AKT2 in phosphorylating H3-T45. Blocking H3-T45 phosphorylation by inhibiting AKT or through amino acid substitution limited RNA decay downstream of mRNA cleavage sites and decreased RNA polymerase II release from chromatin. Our findings suggest that AKT-mediated phosphorylation of H3-T45 regulates the processing of the 3' end of DNA damage-activated genes to facilitate transcriptional termination. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Prophylactic thyroidectomy for asymptomatic 3-year-old boy with positive multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A mutation (codon 634

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    Ješić Maja D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A syndrome, comprising medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC, pheochromocytoma and primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT is most frequently caused by codon 634 activating mutations of the RET (rearranged during transfection proto-oncogene on chromosome 10. For this codon-mutation carriers, earlier thyroidectomy (before the age of 5 years would be advantageous in limiting the potential for the development of MTC as well as parathyroid adenomas. Case Outline. This is a case report of 3-year-old boy from the MEN 2A family (the boy’s father and grandmother and paternal aunt in which cysteine substitutes for phenylalanine at codon 634 in exon 11 of the RET proto-oncogene, who underwent thyroidectomy solely on the basis of genetic information. A boy had no thyromegaly, thyroidal irregularities or lymphadenopathy and no abnormality on the neck ultrasound examination. The pathology finding of thyroid gland was negative for MTC. Two years after total thyroidectomy, 5-year-old boy is healthy with permanent thyroxine replacement. His serum calcitonin level is <2 pg/ml (normal <13 pg/ml, has normal serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels and negative urinary catecholamines. Long-term follow-up of this patient is required to determine whether very early thyroidectomy improves the long-term outcome of PHPT. Conclusion. Children with familial antecedents of MEN 2A should be genetically studied for the purpose of determining the risk of MTC and assessing the possibilities of making prophylactic thyroidectomy before the age of 5 years.

  8. Translation and Culture:Translation as a Cross-cultural Mediation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶谋锦

    2013-01-01

    Translation is a complex activity which involves language competence as well as proficiency in multiculturalism. From the perspective of multiculturalism, translation resembles recreation of source text by grasping essential meanings to produce a sub-tle target text which can be clearly perceived by target readers. Ignoring cultural issues can present serious mistranslations in the field of advertising translation. This paper aims to explore the significance of connotation confined by the framework of culture and point out that verbal translation is a dangerous inclination by illustrating three business examples. This paper argues that cross-cultural mediation plays an important role in translation.

  9. A La autoantigen homologue is required for the internal ribosome entry site mediated translation of giardiavirus.

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    Srinivas Garlapati

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Translation of Giardiavirus (GLV mRNA is initiated at an internal ribosome entry site (IRES in the viral transcript. The IRES localizes to a downstream portion of 5' untranslated region (UTR and a part of the early downstream coding region of the transcript. Recent studies indicated that the IRES does not require a pre-initiation complex to initiate translation but may directly recruit the small ribosome subunit with the help of a number of trans-activating protein factors. A La autoantigen homologue in the viral host Giardia lamblia, GlLa, was proposed as one of the potential trans-activating factors based on its specific binding to GLV-IRES in vitro. In this study, we further elucidated the functional role of GlLa in GLV-IRES mediated translation in Giardia by knocking down GlLa with antisense morpholino oligo, which resulted in a reduction of GLV-IRES activity by 40%. An over-expression of GlLa in Giardia moderately stimulated GLV-IRES activity by 20%. A yeast inhibitory RNA (IRNA, known to bind mammalian and yeast La autoantigen and inhibit Poliovirus and Hepatitis C virus IRES activities in vitro and in vivo, was also found to bind to GlLa protein in vitro and inhibited GLV-IRES function in vivo. The C-terminal domain of La autoantigen interferes with the dimerization of La and inhibits its function. An over-expression of the C-terminal domain (200-348aa of GlLa in Giardia showed a dominant-negative effect on GLV-IRES activity, suggesting a potential inhibition of GlLa dimerization. HA tagged GlLa protein was detected mainly in the cytoplasm of Giardia, thus supporting a primary role of GlLa in translation initiation in Giardiavirus.

  10. The NS1 Protein from Influenza Virus Stimulates Translation Initiation by Enhancing Ribosome Recruitment to mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthu, Baptiste; Terrier, Olivier; Carron, Coralie; Traversier, Aurélien; Corbin, Antoine; Balvay, Laurent; Lina, Bruno; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2017-10-27

    The non-structural protein NS1 of influenza A viruses exerts pleiotropic functions during infection. Among these functions, NS1 was shown to be involved in the control of both viral and cellular translation; however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be determined. Thus, we have revisited the role of NS1 in translation by using a combination of influenza infection, mRNA reporter transfection, and in vitro functional and biochemical assays. Our data show that the NS1 protein is able to enhance the translation of virtually all tested mRNAs with the exception of constructs bearing the Dicistroviruses Internal ribosome entry segment (IRESes) (DCV and CrPV), suggesting a role at the level of translation initiation. The domain of NS1 required for translation stimulation was mapped to the RNA binding amino-terminal motif of the protein with residues R38 and K41 being critical for activity. Although we show that NS1 can bind directly to mRNAs, it does not correlate with its ability to stimulate translation. This activity rather relies on the property of NS1 to associate with ribosomes and to recruit them to target mRNAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Effect of Translators' Emotional Intelligence on Their Translation Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varzande, Mohsen; Jadidi, Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    Translators differ from each other in many ways in terms of their knowledge, professional and psychological conditions that may directly influence their translation. The present study aimed at investigating the impact of translators' Emotional Intelligence on their translation quality. Following a "causal-comparative study," a sample of…

  12. The 18-kilodalton Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) contains a potential N-terminal dimerization site and a C-terminal nucleic acid-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Birkelund, S; Holm, A

    1996-01-01

    The Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) is a DNA-binding protein specific for the metabolically inactive chlamydial developmental form, the elementary body. Hc1 induces DNA condensation in Escherichia coli and is a strong inhibitor of transcription and translation. These effects may......-hydroxysuccinimide ester), purified recombinant Hc1 was found to form dimers. The dimerization site was located in the N-terminal part of Hc1 (Hc1(2-57)). Moreover, circular dichroism measurements indicated an overall alpha-helical structure of this region. By using limited proteolysis, Southwestern blotting, and gel...... retardation assays, Hc1(53-125) was shown to contain a domain capable of binding both DNA and RNA. Under the same conditions, Hc1(2-57) had no nucleic acid-binding activity. Electron microscopy of Hc1-DNA and Hc1(53-125)-DNA complexes revealed differences suggesting that the N-terminal part of Hc1 may affect...

  13. Translating India

    CERN Document Server

    Kothari, Rita

    2014-01-01

    The cultural universe of urban, English-speaking middle class in India shows signs of growing inclusiveness as far as English is concerned. This phenomenon manifests itself in increasing forms of bilingualism (combination of English and one Indian language) in everyday forms of speech - advertisement jingles, bilingual movies, signboards, and of course conversations. It is also evident in the startling prominence of Indian Writing in English and somewhat less visibly, but steadily rising, activity of English translation from Indian languages. Since the eighties this has led to a frenetic activity around English translation in India's academic and literary circles. Kothari makes this very current phenomenon her chief concern in Translating India.   The study covers aspects such as the production, reception and marketability of English translation. Through an unusually multi-disciplinary approach, this study situates English translation in India amidst local and global debates on translation, representation an...

  14. The Impact of Translators' Academic Experience on Their Translation Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varzande, Mohsen; Jadidi, Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    Translators differ from each other in many ways in terms of their knowledge and professional conditions that may directly influence their translation. The present study aimed at investigating the impact of translators' academic experience on their translation quality. Following a "causal-comparative study", a sample of 100 male and…

  15. Evolution of type 2 vaccine derived poliovirus lineages. Evidence for codon-specific positive selection at three distinct locations on capsid wall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapani Hovi

    Full Text Available Partial sequences of 110 type 2 poliovirus strains isolated from sewage in Slovakia in 2003-2005, and most probably originating from a single dose of oral poliovirus vaccine, were subjected to a detailed genetic analysis. Evolutionary patterns of these vaccine derived poliovirus strains (SVK-aVDPV2 were compared to those of type 1 and type 3 wild poliovirus (WPV lineages considered to have a single seed strain origin, respectively. The 102 unique SVK-aVDPV VP1 sequences were monophyletic differing from that of the most likely parental poliovirus type 2/Sabin (PV2 Sabin by 12.5-15.6%. Judging from this difference and from the rate of accumulation of synonymous transversions during the 22 month observation period, the relevant oral poliovirus vaccine dose had been administered to an unknown recipient more than 12 years earlier. The patterns of nucleotide substitution during the observation period differed from those found in the studied lineages of WPV1 or 3, including a lower transition/transversion (Ts/Tv bias and strikingly lower Ts/Tv rate ratios at the 2(nd codon position for both purines and pyrimidines. A relatively low preference of transitions at the 2(nd codon position was also found in the large set of VP1 sequences of Nigerian circulating (cVDPV2, as well as in the smaller sets from the Hispaniola cVDPV1 and Egypt cVDPV2 outbreaks, and among aVDPV1and aVDPV2 strains recently isolated from sewage in Finland. Codon-wise analysis of synonymous versus non-synonymous substitution rates in the VP1 sequences suggested that in five codons, those coding for amino acids at sites 24, 144, 147, 221 and 222, there may have been positive selection during the observation period. We conclude that pattern of poliovirus VP1 evolution in prolonged infection may differ from that found in WPV epidemics. Further studies on sufficiently large independent datasets are needed to confirm this suggestion and to reveal its potential significance.

  16. Translating Legal Collocations in Contract Agreements by Iraqi EFL Students-Translators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntaha A. Abdulwahid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Legal translation of contract agreements is a challenge to translators as it involves combining the literary translation with the technical terminological precision. In translating legal contract agreements, a legal translator must utilize the lexical or syntactic precision and, more importantly, the pragmatic awareness of the context. This will guarantee an overall communicative process and avoid inconsistency in legal translation. However, the inability of the translator to meet these two functions in translating the contract item not only affects the contractors’ comprehension of the contract item but also affects the parties’ contractual obligations. In light of this, the purpose of this study was to find out how legal collocations used in contract agreements are translated from Arabic into English by student-translators in terms of (1 purely technical, (2 semi-technical, and (3 everyday vocabulary collocations. For the data collection, a multiple-choice collocation test was used to be answered by 35 EFL Iraqi undergraduate translator-students to decide on the aspects of weaknesses and strengths of their translation, thus decide on the aspects of correction. The findings showed that these students had serious problems in translating legal collocations as they lack the linguistic knowledge and pragmatic awareness needed to achieve the legal meaning and effect. They were also unable to make a difference among the three categories of legal collocations, purely technical, semi-technical, and everyday vocabulary collocations. These students should be exposed to more legal translation practices to obtain the required experience needed for their future career.

  17. Frozen Accident Pushing 50: Stereochemistry, Expansion, and Chance in the Evolution of the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2017-05-23

    Nearly 50 years ago, Francis Crick propounded the frozen accident scenario for the evolution of the genetic code along with the hypothesis that the early translation system consisted primarily of RNA. Under the frozen accident perspective, the code is universal among modern life forms because any change in codon assignment would be highly deleterious. The frozen accident can be considered the default theory of code evolution because it does not imply any specific interactions between amino acids and the cognate codons or anticodons, or any particular properties of the code. The subsequent 49 years of code studies have elucidated notable features of the standard code, such as high robustness to errors, but failed to develop a compelling explanation for codon assignments. In particular, stereochemical affinity between amino acids and the cognate codons or anticodons does not seem to account for the origin and evolution of the code. Here, I expand Crick's hypothesis on RNA-only translation system by presenting evidence that this early translation already attained high fidelity that allowed protein evolution. I outline an experimentally testable scenario for the evolution of the code that combines a distinct version of the stereochemical hypothesis, in which amino acids are recognized via unique sites in the tertiary structure of proto-tRNAs, rather than by anticodons, expansion of the code via proto-tRNA duplication, and the frozen accident.

  18. Translation Analysis on Civil Engineering Text Produced by Machine Translator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutopo Anam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Translation is extremely needed in communication since people have serious problem in the language used. Translation activity is done by the person in charge for translating the material. Translation activity is also able to be done by machine. It is called machine translation, reflected in the programs developed by programmer. One of them is Transtool. Many people used Transtool for helping them in solving the problem related with translation activities. This paper wants to deliver how important is the Transtool program, how effective is Transtool program and how is the function of Transtool for human business. This study applies qualitative research. The sources of data were document and informant. This study used documentation and in dept-interviewing as the techniques for collecting data. The collected data were analyzed by using interactive analysis. The results of the study show that, first; Transtool program is helpful for people in translating the civil engineering text and it functions as the aid or helper, second; the working of Transtool software program is effective enough and third; the result of translation produced by Transtool is good for short and simple sentences and not readable, not understandable and not accurate for long sentences (compound, complex and compound complex thought the result is informative. The translated material must be edited by the professional translator.

  19. Translation Analysis on Civil Engineering Text Produced by Machine Translator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutopo, Anam

    2018-02-01

    Translation is extremely needed in communication since people have serious problem in the language used. Translation activity is done by the person in charge for translating the material. Translation activity is also able to be done by machine. It is called machine translation, reflected in the programs developed by programmer. One of them is Transtool. Many people used Transtool for helping them in solving the problem related with translation activities. This paper wants to deliver how important is the Transtool program, how effective is Transtool program and how is the function of Transtool for human business. This study applies qualitative research. The sources of data were document and informant. This study used documentation and in dept-interviewing as the techniques for collecting data. The collected data were analyzed by using interactive analysis. The results of the study show that, first; Transtool program is helpful for people in translating the civil engineering text and it functions as the aid or helper, second; the working of Transtool software program is effective enough and third; the result of translation produced by Transtool is good for short and simple sentences and not readable, not understandable and not accurate for long sentences (compound, complex and compound complex) thought the result is informative. The translated material must be edited by the professional translator.

  20. tRNA-like structure regulates translation of Brome mosaic virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barends, Sharief; Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle; Florentz, Catherine; Giegé, Richard; Pleij, Cornelis W A; Kraal, Barend

    2004-04-01

    For various groups of plant viruses, the genomic RNAs end with a tRNA-like structure (TLS) instead of the 3' poly(A) tail of common mRNAs. The actual function of these TLSs has long been enigmatic. Recently, however, it became clear that for turnip yellow mosaic virus, a tymovirus, the valylated TLS(TYMV) of the single genomic RNA functions as a bait for host ribosomes and directs them to the internal initiation site of translation (with N-terminal valine) of the second open reading frame for the polyprotein. This discovery prompted us to investigate whether the much larger TLSs of a different genus of viruses have a comparable function in translation. Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a bromovirus, has a tripartite RNA genome with a subgenomic RNA4 for coat protein expression. All four RNAs carry a highly conserved and bulky 3' TLS(BMV) (about 200 nucleotides) with determinants for tyrosylation. We discovered TLS(BMV)-catalyzed self-tyrosylation of the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase but could not clearly detect tyrosine incorporation into any virus-encoded protein. We established that BMV proteins do not need TLS(BMV) tyrosylation for their initiation. However, disruption of the TLSs strongly reduced the translation of genomic RNA1, RNA2, and less strongly, RNA3, whereas coat protein expression from RNA4 remained unaffected. This aberrant translation could be partially restored by providing the TLS(BMV) in trans. Intriguingly, a subdomain of the TLS(BMV) could even almost fully restore translation to the original pattern. We discuss here a model with a central and dominant role for the TLS(BMV) during the BMV infection cycle.

  1. HCV IRES domain IIb affects the configuration of coding RNA in the 40S subunit's decoding groove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filbin, Megan E; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2011-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) uses a structured internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNA to recruit the translation machinery to the viral RNA and begin protein synthesis without the ribosomal scanning process required for canonical translation initiation. Different IRES structural domains are used in this process, which begins with direct binding of the 40S ribosomal subunit to the IRES RNA and involves specific manipulation of the translational machinery. We have found that upon initial 40S subunit binding, the stem-loop domain of the IRES that contains the start codon unwinds and adopts a stable configuration within the subunit's decoding groove. This configuration depends on the sequence and structure of a different stem-loop domain (domain IIb) located far from the start codon in sequence, but spatially proximal in the IRES•40S complex. Mutation of domain IIb results in misconfiguration of the HCV RNA in the decoding groove that includes changes in the placement of the AUG start codon, and a substantial decrease in the ability of the IRES to initiate translation. Our results show that two distal regions of the IRES are structurally communicating at the initial step of 40S subunit binding and suggest that this is an important step in driving protein synthesis.

  2. DsrA regulatory RNA represses both hns and rbsD mRNAs through distinct mechanisms in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalaouna, David; Morissette, Audrey; Carrier, Marie-Claude; Massé, Eric

    2015-10-01

    The 87 nucleotide long DsrA sRNA has been mostly studied for its translational activation of the transcriptional regulator RpoS. However, it also represses hns mRNA, which encodes H-NS, a major regulator that affects expression of nearly 5% of Escherichia coli genes. A speculative model previously suggested that DsrA would block hns mRNA translation by binding simultaneously to start and stop codon regions of hns mRNA (coaxial model). Here, we show that DsrA efficiently blocked translation of hns mRNA by base-pairing immediately downstream of the start codon. In addition, DsrA induced hns mRNA degradation by actively recruiting the RNA degradosome complex. Data presented here led to a model of DsrA action on hns mRNA, which supports a canonical mechanism of sRNA-induced mRNA degradation by binding to the translation initiation region. Furthermore, using MS2-affinity purification coupled with RNA sequencing technology (MAPS), we also demonstrated that DsrA targets rbsD mRNA, involved in ribose utilization. Surprisingly, DsrA base pairs far downstream of rbsD start codon and induces rapid degradation of the transcript. Thus, our study enables us to draw an extended DsrA targetome. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Characterization, cell-surface expression and ligand-binding properties of different truncated N-terminal extracellular domains of the ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit GluR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlhinney, R A; Molnár, E

    1996-04-01

    To identify the location of the first transmembrane segment of the GluR1 glutamate receptor subunit artificial stop codons have been introduced into the N-terminal domain at amino acid positions 442, 510, and 563, namely just before and spanning the proposed first two transmembrane regions. The resultant truncated N-terminal fragments of GluR1, termed NT1, NT2, and NT3 respectively were expressed in Cos-7 cells and their cellular distribution and cell-surface expression analysed using an N-terminal antibody to GluR1. All of the fragments were fully glycosylated and were found to be associated with cell membranes but none was secreted. Differential extraction of the cell membranes indicated that both NT1 and NT2 behave as peripheral membrane proteins. In contrast NT3, like the full subunit, has integral membrane protein properties. Furthermore only NT3 is expressed at the cell surface as determined by immunofluorescence and cell-surface biotinylation. Protease protection assays indicated that only NT3 had a cytoplasmic tail. Binding studies using the selective ligand [(3)H]alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate ([(3)H]AMPA) demonstrated that NT3 does not bind ligand. Together these results indicate that the first transmembrane domain of the GluR1 subunit lies between residues 509 and 562, that the N-terminal domain alone cannot form a functional ligand-binding site and that this domain can be targeted to the cell surface provided that it has a transmembrane-spanning region.

  4. Translation: between what can be translated and what must be translated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Jeanrenaud

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Starting from a disconcerting interpretation of Jacques Derrida, our analysis aims at investigating and also tries to explain the blockage which appears in the English, French and Romanian translations (signed by Maurice de Gandillac, Antoine Berman, Laurent Lamy, Alexis Nouss, Harry Zohn, Steven Rendall, Martine Broda, Catrinel Pleșu etc. of a well-known text of Walter Benjamin, Die Aufgabe des Übersetzers, when translators transpose in their target languages the two quotations given by Benjamin: one of Mallarmé, left untranslated in the source text, and another, signed by Pannwitz. The fact is that both quotations have something in common: a discoursive form which results from an unusual syntax, as if they were already, in a certain sense, „translations”. As if the translators feared—a feature of the translator’s psychology?—not to render their text sufficiently accessible, even when the source text is not intended to be accessible. Hence the painful dilemma of the intentional fallacy (not only of the text to be translated.

  5. Determinants of Genomic RNA Encapsidation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposons Ty1 and Ty3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Pachulska-Wieczorek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Long-terminal repeat (LTR retrotransposons are transposable genetic elements that replicate intracellularly, and can be considered progenitors of retroviruses. Ty1 and Ty3 are the most extensively characterized LTR retrotransposons whose RNA genomes provide the template for both protein translation and genomic RNA that is packaged into virus-like particles (VLPs and reverse transcrib