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Sample records for transition region loop

  1. Chromospheric counterparts of solar transition region unresolved fine structure loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Tiago M. D.; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc; Hansteen, Viggo H.; De Pontieu, Bart

    2018-04-01

    Low-lying loops have been discovered at the solar limb in transition region temperatures by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). They do not appear to reach coronal temperatures, and it has been suggested that they are the long-predicted unresolved fine structures (UFS). These loops are dynamic and believed to be visible during both heating and cooling phases. Making use of coordinated observations between IRIS and the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope, we study how these loops impact the solar chromosphere. We show for the first time that there is indeed a chromospheric signal of these loops, seen mostly in the form of strong Doppler shifts and a conspicuous lack of chromospheric heating. In addition, we find that several instances have a inverse Y-shaped jet just above the loop, suggesting that magnetic reconnection is driving these events. Our observations add several puzzling details to the current knowledge of these newly discovered structures; this new information must be considered in theoretical models. Two movies associated to Fig. 1 are available at http://https://www.aanda.org

  2. MHD modeling of coronal loops: the transition region throat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarrasi, M.; Reale, F.; Orlando, S.; Mignone, A.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Context. The expansion of coronal loops in the transition region may considerably influence the diagnostics of the plasma emission measure. The cross-sectional area of the loops is expected to depend on the temperature and pressure, and might be sensitive to the heating rate. Aims: The approach here is to study the area response to slow changes in the coronal heating rate, and check the current interpretation in terms of steady heating models. Methods: We study the area response with a time-dependent 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) loop model, including the description of the expanding magnetic field, coronal heating and losses by thermal conduction, and radiation from optically thin plasma. We run a simulation for a loop 50 Mm long and quasi-statically heated to about 4 MK. Results: We find that the area can change substantially with the quasi-steady heating rate, e.g., by ~40% at 0.5 MK as the loop temperature varies between 1 MK and 4 MK, and, therefore, affects the interpretation of the differential emission measure vs. temperature (DEM(T)) curves. The movie associated to Fig. 4 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  3. Cool transition region loops observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z.; Xia, L.; Li, B.; Madjarska, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    An important class of loops in the solar atmosphere, cool transition region loops, have received little attention mainly due to instrumental limitations. We analyze a cluster of these loops in the on-disk active region NOAA 11934 recorded in a Si IV 1402.8 Å spectral raster and 1400Å slit-jaw (SJ) images taken by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. We divide these loops into three groups and study their dynamics, evolution and interaction.The first group comprises geometrically relatively stable loops, which are finely scaled with 382~626 km cross-sections. Siphon flows in these loops are suggested by the Doppler velocities gradually changing from -10 km/s (blue-shifts) in one end to 20 km/s (red-shifts) in the other. Nonthermal velocities from 15 to 25 km/s were determined. The obtained physical properties suggest that these loops are impulsively heated by magnetic reconnection occurring at the blue-shifted footpoints where magnetic cancellation with a rate of 1015 Mx/s is found. The released magnetic energy is redistributed by the siphon flows. The second group corresponds to two active footpoints rooted in mixed-magnetic-polarity regions. Magnetic reconnection in both footpoints is suggested by explosive-event line profiles with enhanced wings up to 200 km/s and magnetic cancellation with a rate of ~1015 Mx/s. In the third group, an interaction between two cool loop systems is observed. Mixed-magnetic polarities are seen in their conjunction area where explosive-event line profiles and magnetic cancellation with a rate of 3×1015 Mx/s are found. This is a clear indication that magnetic reconnection occurs between these two loop systems. Our observations suggest that the cool transition region loops are heated impulsively most likely by sequences of magnetic reconnection events.

  4. PROPERTIES AND MODELING OF UNRESOLVED FINE STRUCTURE LOOPS OBSERVED IN THE SOLAR TRANSITION REGION BY IRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, David H. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Reep, Jeffrey W.; Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) have discovered a new class of numerous low-lying dynamic loop structures, and it has been argued that they are the long-postulated unresolved fine structures (UFSs) that dominate the emission of the solar transition region. In this letter, we combine IRIS measurements of the properties of a sample of 108 UFSs (intensities, lengths, widths, lifetimes) with one-dimensional non-equilibrium ionization simulations, using the HYDRAD hydrodynamic model to examine whether the UFSs are now truly spatially resolved in the sense of being individual structures rather than being composed of multiple magnetic threads. We find that a simulation of an impulsively heated single strand can reproduce most of the observed properties, suggesting that the UFSs may be resolved, and the distribution of UFS widths implies that they are structured on a spatial scale of 133 km on average. Spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers appear to be typical for a range of chromospheric and coronal structures, and we conjecture that this could be an important clue for understanding the coronal heating process.

  5. Transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, C.

    1977-01-01

    The Glossary is designed to be a technical dictionary that will provide solar workers of various specialties, students, other astronomers and theoreticians with concise information on the nature and the properties of phenomena of solar and solar-terrestrial physics. Each term, or group of related terms, is given a concise phenomenological and quantitative description, including the relationship to other phenomena and an interpretation in terms of physical processes. The references are intended to lead the non-specialist reader into the literature. This section deals with: transition region; di-electronic recombination; intersystem or intercombination lines; satellite lines; grazing-incidence optics; and crystal spectrometers. (B.R.H.)

  6. Transition probability spaces in loop quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao-Kan

    2018-03-01

    We study the (generalized) transition probability spaces, in the sense of Mielnik and Cantoni, for spacetime quantum states in loop quantum gravity. First, we show that loop quantum gravity admits the structures of transition probability spaces. This is exemplified by first checking such structures in covariant quantum mechanics and then identifying the transition probability spaces in spin foam models via a simplified version of general boundary formulation. The transition probability space thus defined gives a simple way to reconstruct the discrete analog of the Hilbert space of the canonical theory and the relevant quantum logical structures. Second, we show that the transition probability space and in particular the spin foam model are 2-categories. Then we discuss how to realize in spin foam models two proposals by Crane about the mathematical structures of quantum gravity, namely, the quantum topos and causal sites. We conclude that transition probability spaces provide us with an alternative framework to understand various foundational questions of loop quantum gravity.

  7. Active region structures in the transition region and corona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, D.F.

    1981-01-01

    Observational aspects of the transition region and coronal structures of the solar active region are reviewed with an emphasis on imaging of the plasma loops which act as tracers of the magnetic flux loops. The study of the basic structure of an active region is discussed in terms of the morphological and thermal classifications of active region loops, including umbral structures, and observational knowledge of the thermal structure of loops is considered in relation to scaling laws, emission measures and the structures of individual loops. The temporal evolution of active region loop structures is reviewed with emphasis on ephemeral regions and the emergence of active regions. Planned future spaceborne observations of active region loop structures in the EUV and soft X-ray regions are also indicated

  8. Phase transitions in single macromolecules: Loop-stretch transition versus loop adsorption transition in end-grafted polymer chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuangshuang; Qi, Shuanhu; Klushin, Leonid I.; Skvortsov, Alexander M.; Yan, Dadong; Schmid, Friederike

    2018-01-01

    We use Brownian dynamics simulations and analytical theory to compare two prominent types of single molecule transitions. One is the adsorption transition of a loop (a chain with two ends bound to an attractive substrate) driven by an attraction parameter ɛ and the other is the loop-stretch transition in a chain with one end attached to a repulsive substrate, driven by an external end-force F applied to the free end. Specifically, we compare the behavior of the respective order parameters of the transitions, i.e., the mean number of surface contacts in the case of the adsorption transition and the mean position of the chain end in the case of the loop-stretch transition. Close to the transition points, both the static behavior and the dynamic behavior of chains with different length N are very well described by a scaling ansatz with the scaling parameters (ɛ - ɛ*)Nϕ (adsorption transition) and (F - F*)Nν (loop-stretch transition), respectively, where ϕ is the crossover exponent of the adsorption transition and ν is the Flory exponent. We show that both the loop-stretch and the loop adsorption transitions provide an exceptional opportunity to construct explicit analytical expressions for the crossover functions which perfectly describe all simulation results on static properties in the finite-size scaling regime. Explicit crossover functions are based on the ansatz for the analytical form of the order parameter distributions at the respective transition points. In contrast to the close similarity in equilibrium static behavior, the dynamic relaxation at the two transitions shows qualitative differences, especially in the strongly ordered regimes. This is attributed to the fact that the surface contact dynamics in a strongly adsorbed chain is governed by local processes, whereas the end height relaxation of a strongly stretched chain involves the full spectrum of Rouse modes.

  9. Wilson loop's phase transition probed by non-local observable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ling Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to give further insights into the holographic Van der Waals phase transition, it would be of great interest to investigate the behavior of Wilson loop across the holographic phase transition for a higher dimensional hairy black hole. We offer a possibility to proceed with a numerical calculation in order to discussion on the hairy black hole's phase transition, and show that Wilson loop can serve as a probe to detect a phase structure of the black hole. Furthermore, for a first order phase transition, we calculate numerically the Maxwell's equal area construction; and for a second order phase transition, we also study the critical exponent in order to characterize the Wilson loop's phase transition.

  10. Evolution of active region loop plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krall, K.R.; Antiochos, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    We investigate numerically the adjustment of coronal active-region loops to changes in their heating rate. The one-dimensional hydrodynamic equations are solved subject to boundary conditions in which heat flux-induced mass exchange between coronal and chromospheric components is allowed. The calculated evolution of physical parameters suggests that (1) mass supplied during chromospheric evaporation is much more effective in moderating coronal temperature excursions than when downward heat flux if dissipated by a static chromosphere, and (2) the method by which rhe chromosphere responds to changing coronal conditions can significantly influence coronal readjustment time scales. Observations are cited which illustrate the range of possible fluctuations in the heating rates

  11. Cooling Active Region Loops Observed With SXT and TRACE

    OpenAIRE

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Warren, Harry P.

    2005-01-01

    An Impulsive Heating Multiple Strand (IHMS) Model is able to reproduce the observational characteristics of EUV (~ 1 MK) active region loops. This model implies that some of the loops must reach temperatures where X-ray filters are sensitive (> 2.5 MK) before they cool to EUV temperatures. Hence, some bright EUV loops must be preceded by bright X-ray loops. Previous analysis of X-ray and EUV active region observations, however, have concluded that EUV loops are not preceded by X-ray loops. In...

  12. Thermal phase transition with full 2-loop effective potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, M.; Meyer, M.; Nardini, G.

    2017-07-01

    Theories with extended Higgs sectors constructed in view of cosmological ramifications (gravitational wave signal, baryogenesis, dark matter) are often faced with conflicting requirements for their couplings; in particular those influencing the strength of a phase transition may be large. Large couplings compromise perturbative studies, as well as the high-temperature expansion that is invoked in dimensionally reduced lattice investigations. With the example of the inert doublet extension of the Standard Model (IDM), we show how a resummed 2-loop effective potential can be computed without a high-T expansion, and use the result to scrutinize its accuracy. With the exception of Tc, which is sensitive to contributions from heavy modes, the high-T expansion is found to perform well. 2-loop corrections weaken the transition in IDM, but they are moderate, whereby a strong transition remains an option.

  13. Tiling arbitrarily nested loops by means of the transitive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielecki Włodzimierz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach to generation of tiled code for arbitrarily nested loops is presented. It is derived via a combination of the polyhedral and iteration space slicing frameworks. Instead of program transformations represented by a set of affine functions, one for each statement, it uses the transitive closure of a loop nest dependence graph to carry out corrections of original rectangular tiles so that all dependences of the original loop nest are preserved under the lexicographic order of target tiles. Parallel tiled code can be generated on the basis of valid serial tiled code by means of applying affine transformations or transitive closure using on input an inter-tile dependence graph whose vertices are represented by target tiles while edges connect dependent target tiles. We demonstrate how a relation describing such a graph can be formed. The main merit of the presented approach in comparison with the well-known ones is that it does not require full permutability of loops to generate both serial and parallel tiled codes; this increases the scope of loop nests to be tiled.

  14. Structure and Dynamics of Cool Flare Loops Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikuła, K.; Berlicki, A. [Astronomical Institute, University of Wrocław, Kopernika 11, 51–622 Wrocław (Poland); Heinzel, P.; Liu, W., E-mail: mikula@astro.uni.wroc.pl [Astronomical Institute, The Czech Academy of Sciences, 25165 Ondřejov (Czech Republic)

    2017-08-10

    Flare loops were well observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) during the gradual phase of two solar flares on 2014 March 29 and 2015 June 22. Cool flare loops are visible in various spectral lines formed at chromospheric and transition-region temperatures and exhibit large downflows which correspond to the standard scenario. The principal aim of this work is to analyze the structure and dynamics of cool flare loops observed in Mg ii lines. Synthetic profiles of the Mg ii h line are computed using the classical cloud model and assuming a uniform background intensity. In this paper, we study novel IRIS NUV observations of such loops in Mg ii h and k lines and also show the behavior of hotter lines detected in the FUV channel. We obtained the spatial evolution of the velocities: near the loop top, the flow velocities are small and they are increasing toward the loop legs. Moreover, from slit-jaw image (SJI) movies, we observe some plasma upflows into the loops, which are also detectable in Mg ii spectra. The brightness of the loops systematically decreases with increasing flow velocity, and we ascribe this to the effect of Doppler dimming, which works for Mg ii lines. Emission profiles of Mg ii were found to be extremely broad, and we explain this through the large unresolved non-thermal motions.

  15. Parallel tiled Nussinov RNA folding loop nest generated using both dependence graph transitive closure and loop skewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palkowski, Marek; Bielecki, Wlodzimierz

    2017-06-02

    RNA secondary structure prediction is a compute intensive task that lies at the core of several search algorithms in bioinformatics. Fortunately, the RNA folding approaches, such as the Nussinov base pair maximization, involve mathematical operations over affine control loops whose iteration space can be represented by the polyhedral model. Polyhedral compilation techniques have proven to be a powerful tool for optimization of dense array codes. However, classical affine loop nest transformations used with these techniques do not optimize effectively codes of dynamic programming of RNA structure predictions. The purpose of this paper is to present a novel approach allowing for generation of a parallel tiled Nussinov RNA loop nest exposing significantly higher performance than that of known related code. This effect is achieved due to improving code locality and calculation parallelization. In order to improve code locality, we apply our previously published technique of automatic loop nest tiling to all the three loops of the Nussinov loop nest. This approach first forms original rectangular 3D tiles and then corrects them to establish their validity by means of applying the transitive closure of a dependence graph. To produce parallel code, we apply the loop skewing technique to a tiled Nussinov loop nest. The technique is implemented as a part of the publicly available polyhedral source-to-source TRACO compiler. Generated code was run on modern Intel multi-core processors and coprocessors. We present the speed-up factor of generated Nussinov RNA parallel code and demonstrate that it is considerably faster than related codes in which only the two outer loops of the Nussinov loop nest are tiled.

  16. Transition pathways in the unfaulting of dislocation loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Alison; Wolfer, W.G.

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the dynamic mechanism of loop unfaulting, we performed large-scale classical molecular dynamics simulations involving computational cells with several millions of atoms. To induce dislocation loop unfaulting, we launched 1 ps duration traction stress pulses at a free surface of the computational box. In many cases, we observe unfaulting to involve both intuitive and complex dislocation processes with multiple Shockley partial dislocations. However, in some instances, we observe unfaulting to occur by a sudden instability of the stacking fault without clear traces of dislocation reactions

  17. WHAT IS THE SOURCE OF QUIET SUN TRANSITION REGION EMISSION?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmit, D. J.; De Pontieu, Bart [Lockheed-Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2016-11-10

    Dating back to the first observations of the on-disk corona, there has been a qualitative link between the photosphere’s magnetic network and enhanced transition-temperature plasma emission. These observations led to the development of a general model that describes emission structures through the partitioning of the atmospheric volume with different magnetic loop geometries that exhibit different energetic equilibria. Does the internetwork produce transition-temperature emission? What fraction of network flux connects to the corona? How does quiet Sun emission compare with low-activity Sun-like stars? In this work, we revisit the canonical model of the quiet Sun, with high-resolution observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) and HMI in hand, to address those questions. We use over 900 deep exposures of Si iv 1393 Å from IRIS along with nearly simultaneous HMI magnetograms to quantify the correlation between transition-temperature emission structures and magnetic field concentrations through a number of novel statistics. Our observational results are coupled with analysis of the Bifrost MHD model and a large-scale potential field model. Our results paint a complex portrait of the quiet Sun. We measure an emission signature in the distant internetwork that cannot be attributed to network contribution. We find that the dimmest regions of emission are not linked to the local vertical magnetic field. Using the MHD simulation, we categorize the emission contribution from cool mid-altitude loops and high-altitude coronal loops and discuss the potential emission contribution of spicules. Our results provide new constraints on the coupled solar atmosphere so that we can build on our understanding of how dynamic thermal and magnetic structures generate the observed phenomena in the transition region.

  18. Transitional region of phase transitions in nuclear models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotze, A A

    1988-01-01

    The phase transition in an exactly solvable nuclear model, the Lipkin model, is scrutinised, first using Hartree-Fock methods or the plain mean flield approximation, and then using projected wave functions. It turns out that the plain mean field is not reliable in the transitional region. Although the projection methods give better resutls in the transitional region, it leads to spurious singularities. While the energy of the projection before variation is slightly better than its projection after variation counterpart, the perfomance of the wave function is considerably worse in the transitional region. The model's wave function undergoes dramatic changes in the transitional region. The mechanism that brings about these changes is studied within a model Hamiltonian that can reproduce the Lipkin model mathematically. It turns out that the numerous exceptional points found in the transitional region, bring about the change of the ground state wave function. Exceptional points are associated with level crossings in the complex plane. These level crossings can be seen as level repulsions in the spectrum. Level repulsion and a sensitive dependence of the system on some external parameter are characteristics of chaotic behaviour. These two features are found in the transitional region of the Lipkin model. In order to study chaos, one has to resort to a statistical analysis. A measure of the chaotic behaviour of systems, the ..delta../sub 3/ statistic, is introduced. The results show that the Lipkin model is harmonic, even in the transitional region. For the Lipkin model the exceptional points are regularly distributed in the complex plane. In a total chaotic system the points would be randomly distributed.

  19. The transitional region of phase transitions in nuclear models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotze, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The phase transition in an exactly solvable nuclear model, the Lipkin model, is scrutinised, first using Hartree-Fock methods or the plain mean flield approximation, and then using projected wave functions. It turns out that the plain mean field is not reliable in the transitional region. Although the projection methods give better resutls in the transitional region, it leads to spurious singularities. While the energy of the projection before variation is slightly better than its projection after variation counterpart, the perfomance of the wave function is considerably worse in the transitional region. The model's wave function undergoes dramatic changes in the transitional region. The mechanism that brings about these changes is studied within a model Hamiltonian that can reproduce the Lipkin model mathematically. It turns out that the numerous exceptional points found in the transitional region, bring about the change of the ground state wave function. Exceptional points are associated with level crossings in the complex plane. These level crossings can be seen as level repulsions in the spectrum. Level repulsion and a sensitive dependence of the system on some external parameter are characteristics of chaotic behaviour. These two features are found in the transitional region of the Lipkin model. In order to study chaos, one has to resort to a statistical analysis. A measure of the chaotic behaviour of systems, the Δ 3 statistic, is introduced. The results show that the Lipkin model is harmonic, even in the transitional region. For the Lipkin model the exceptional points are regularly distributed in the complex plane. In a total chaotic system the points would be randomly distributed

  20. Morphology evolution and nanostructure of chemical looping transition metal oxide materials upon redox processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Lang; Cheng, Zhuo; Guo, Mengqing; Fan, Jonathan A.; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2017-01-01

    Transition metal are heavily used in chemical looping technologies because of their high oxygen carrying capacity and high thermal reactivity. These oxygen activities result in the oxide formation and oxygen vacancy formation that affect the nanoscale crystal phase and morphology within these materials and their subsequent bulk chemical behavior. In this study, two selected earlier transition metals manganese and cobalt as well as two selected later transition metals copper and nickel that are important to chemical looping reactions are investigated when they undergo cyclic redox reactions. We found Co microparticles exhibited increased CoO impurity presence when oxidized to Co_3O_4 upon cyclic oxidation; CuO redox cycles prefer to be limited to a reduced form of Cu_2O and an oxidized form of CuO; Mn microparticles were oxidized to a mixed phases of MnO and Mn_3O_4, which causes delamination during oxidation. For Ni microparticles, a dense surface were observed during the redox reaction. The atomistic thermodynamics methods and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are carried out to elucidate the effect of oxygen dissociation and migration on the morphological evolution of nanostructures during the redox processes. Our results indicate that the earlier transition metals (Mn and Co) tend to have stronger interaction with O_2 than the later transition metals (Ni and Cu). Also, our modified Brønsted−Evans−Polanyi (BEP) relationship for reaction energies and total reaction barriers reveals that reactions of earlier transition metals are more exergonic and have lower oxygen dissociation barriers than those of later transition metals. In addition, it was found that for these transition metal oxides the oxygen vacancy formation energies increase with the depth. The oxide in the higher oxidation state of transition metal has lower vacancy formation energy, which can facilitate forming the defective nanostructures. The fundamental understanding of these metal

  1. Geometry of Hα active region loops observed on the solar disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuan-le, C.; Loughhead, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Plasma loops are the dominant structures in the higher levels of the Sun's atmosphere above active regions. A geometrical technique has been used to reconstruct the true shapes of two large dark loops of the type ordinarily found in active regions in the absence of flares

  2. Exoplanet Transits of Stellar Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampapa, Mark S.; Andretta, Vincenzo; Covino, Elvira; Reiners, Ansgar; Esposito, Massimiliano

    2018-01-01

    We report preliminary results of a program to obtain high spectral- and temporal-resolution observations of the neutral helium triplet line at 1083.0 nm in transiting exoplanet systems. The principal objective of our program is to gain insight on the properties of active regions, analogous to solar plages, on late-type dwarfs by essentially using exoplanet transits as high spatial resolution probes of the stellar surface within the transit chord. The 1083 nm helium line is a particularly appropriate diagnostic of magnetized areas since it is weak in the quiet photosphere of solar-type stars but appears strongly in absorption in active regions. Therefore, during an exoplanet transit over the stellar surface, variations in its absorption equivalent width can arise that are functions of the intrinsic strength of the feature in the active region and the known relative size of the exoplanet. We utilized the Galileo Telescope and the GIANO-B near-IR echelle spectrograph to obtain 1083 nm spectra during transits in bright, well-known systems that include HD 189733, HD 209458, and HD 147506 (HAT-P-2). We also obtained simultaneous auxiliary data on the same telescope with the HARPS-N UV-Visible echelle spectrograph. We will present preliminary results from our analysis of the observed variability of the strength of the He I 1083 nm line during transits.Acknowledgements: Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. The NSO is operated by AURA under a cooperative agreement with the NSF.

  3. Detroit regional transit study : a study of factors that enable and inhibit effective regional transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    An interdisciplinary team of six faculty members and six students at the University of Detroit Mercy (UDM) conducted a : comprehensive study of the factors enabling or inhibiting development of effective regional transit. Focusing on Metro Detroit an...

  4. Effect of closed loop cooling water transit time on containment cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.P.; Vossahlik, J.E.; Goodwin, E.F.

    1996-01-01

    Long term containment cooling analyses in nuclear plant systems are usually conducted assuming a quasi steady-state process, that is, a steady state evaluation of the cooling system is completed for each calculational step. In reality, fluid transport in the system, and heat addition to system components may affect the heat removal rate of the system. Transient effects occurring during system startup may affect the maximum temperatures experienced in the system. It is important to ensure that such transient effects do not affect operation of the system (e.g., cause a high temperature trip). To evaluate the effect of fluid transit delays, a closed loop cooling water system model has been developed that incorporates the fluid transport times when determining the closed loop cooling system performance. This paper describes the closed loop cooling system model as implemented in the CONTEMPT-LT/028 code. The evaluation of the transient temperature response of the closed loop cooling system using the model is described. The paper also describes the effect of fluid transit time on the overall containment cooling performance

  5. Study on introduction of SN transition type FCL into looped distribution system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameda, Hideyuki; Uemura, Satoshi; Ichinose, Ataru

    2012-01-01

    A large amount of distributed generations such as PV will be introduced into the future Japanese distribution systems. Although distribution systems are presently operated under radial configuration and are terminated with loads, the connection of the distributed generations may cause some problems such as the occurrence of reverse power, the sensitivity decrease of the protection relays, and the voltage rise at the ends. It is assumed that a distribution system is looped in a large city to aim at the improvement of the service reliability under the situation mentioned above. However, a countermeasure against the increase of short-circuit current may be necessary in a looped system. We think that the installation of the SN transition type superconducting fault current limiter (FCL) is effective as a measure against the increase of short-circuit capacity, so we have proposed an effective arrangement of the FCLs into a radial distribution system and the method of setting the parameters. In this paper, a new introduction of FCLs is proposed, that is the way to clear a short-circuit fault within a looped system by the protection relay and the loop switch (LS). To achieve this purpose, the FCL needs to reduce the current through the LS below the rated current of the LS. And we propose the best arrangement to achieve the purpose, and the method of setting the parameters of a SN transition type FCL. Our proposal may bring the flexibility of composing any system configuration.

  6. The transition region and coronal explorer (TRACE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Title, Alan; Bruner, M.; Jurcevich, B.; Lemen, J.; Strong, K.; Tarbell, Ted; Wolfson, C. Jacob; Golub, L.; Bookbinder, J.; Fisher, R.

    1995-01-01

    The transition region and coronal explorer (TRACE) NASA small explorer mission and instrument are presented. The TRACE scientific investigation explores the relationships between fine-scale magnetic fields and the associated solar plasma structures. The instrument collects images of solar plasmas at temperatures from 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 7) K with one arcsec spatial resolution. The design specifications of the trace instrument are presented.

  7. Accelerating transition dynamics in city regions: A qualitative modeling perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Valkering (Pieter); Yücel, G. (Gönenç); Gebetsroither-Geringer, E. (Ernst); Markvica, K. (Karin); Meynaerts, E. (Erika); N. Frantzeskaki (Niki)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIn this article, we take stock of the findings from conceptual and empirical work on the role of transition initiatives for accelerating transitions as input for modeling acceleration dynamics. We applied the qualitative modeling approach of causal loop diagrams to capture the dynamics

  8. Volumetric contributions of loop regions of G-quadruplex DNA to the formation of the tertiary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shuntaro; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2017-12-01

    DNA guanine-quadruplexes (G-quadruplexes) are unique DNA structures formed by guanine-rich sequences. The loop regions of G-quadruplexes play key roles in stability and topology of G-quadruplexes. Here, we investigated volumetric changes induced by pressure in the folding of the G-quadruplex formed by the thrombin binding aptamer (TBA) with mutations within the loop regions. The change of partial molar volume in the transition from coil to G-quadruplex, ∆V tr , of TBA with a mutation from T to A in the 5' most loop (TBA T3A) was 75.5cm 3 mol -1 , which was larger than that of TBA (54.6cm 3 mol -1 ). TBA with a G to T mutation in the central loop (TBA G8T) had thermal stability similar to TBA T3A but a smaller ∆V tr of 41.1cm 3 mol -1 . In the presence of poly(ethylene)glycol 200 (PEG200), ∆V tr values were 14.7cm 3 mol -1 for TBA T3A and 13.2cm 3 mol -1 for TBA G8T. These results suggest that the two mutations destabilize the G-quadruplex structure differently. Thus, volumetric data obtained using pressure-based thermodynamic analyses provides information about the dynamics of the loop regions and the roles of loops in the stabilities and folding of G-quadruplex structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Plasma Parameters and Geometry of Cool and Warm Active Region Loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Haixia; Li, Bo; Huang, Zhenghua; Xia, Lidong; Fu, Hui; Mou, Chaozhou [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai, 264209 Shandong (China); Madjarska, Maria S.; Wiegelmann, Thomas [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077, Göttingen (Germany)

    2017-06-10

    How the solar corona is heated to high temperatures remains an unsolved mystery in solar physics. In the present study we analyze observations of 50 whole active region loops taken with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board the Hinode satellite. Eleven loops were classified as cool loops (<1 MK) and 39 as warm loops (1–2 MK). We study their plasma parameters, such as densities, temperatures, filling factors, nonthermal velocities, and Doppler velocities. We combine spectroscopic analysis with linear force-free magnetic field extrapolation to derive the 3D structure and positioning of the loops, their lengths and heights, and the magnetic field strength along the loops. We use density-sensitive line pairs from Fe xii, Fe xiii, Si x, and Mg vii ions to obtain electron densities by taking special care of intensity background subtraction. The emission measure loci method is used to obtain the loop temperatures. We find that the loops are nearly isothermal along the line of sight. Their filling factors are between 8% and 89%. We also compare the observed parameters with the theoretical Rosner–Tucker–Vaiana (RTV) scaling law. We find that most of the loops are in an overpressure state relative to the RTV predictions. In a follow-up study, we will report a heating model of a parallel-cascade-based mechanism and will compare the model parameters with the loop plasma and structural parameters derived here.

  10. Diagnostics of the solar wind transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotova, N.A.; Nagelis, Ya.V.; Rudnitskij, G.M.; Smirnova, T.V.; AN Latvijskoj SSR, Riga. Radioastrofizicheskaya Observatoriya; Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Fizicheskij Inst.)

    1988-01-01

    Possibilities are discussed of a more complete study of hardly observable regions of the interplanetary medium, in the zone of the solar wind formation, where transition from subsonic to supersonic flow occurs at R sun . It is shown that an investigation of fine structure of the extended transonic region of the solar wind and of the sequence of changes in the parameters of the interplanetary plasma in the region of the solar wind formation with the changing distance from the Sun can be effectuated by using jointly different modifications of the occupation method. Combination of two or more modifications of this method supposes using compact radio sources of different classes and observations in two different wavelength ranges, namely at short centimeter and at meter waves

  11. Propagating wave in active region-loops, located over the solar disk observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B.; Hou, Y. J.; Zhang, J.

    2018-03-01

    Aims: We aim to ascertain the physical parameters of a propagating wave over the solar disk detected by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Methods: Using imaging data from the IRIS and the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO), we tracked bright spots to determine the parameters of a propagating transverse wave in active region (AR) loops triggered by activation of a filament. Deriving the Doppler velocity of Si IV line from spectral observations of IRIS, we have determined the rotating directions of active region loops which are relevant to the wave. Results: On 2015 December 19, a filament was located on the polarity inversion line of the NOAA AR 12470. The filament was activated and then caused a C1.1 two-ribbon flare. Between the flare ribbons, two rotation motions of a set of bright loops were observed to appear in turn with opposite directions. Following the end of the second rotation, a propagating wave and an associated transverse oscillation were detected in these bright loops. In 1400 Å channel, there was bright material flowing along the loops in a wave-like manner, with a period of 128 s and a mean amplitude of 880 km. For the transverse oscillation, we tracked a given loop and determine the transverse positions of the tracking loop in a limited longitudinal range. In both of 1400 Å and 171 Å channels, approximately four periods are distinguished during the transverse oscillation. The mean period of the oscillation is estimated as 143 s and the displacement amplitude as between 1370 km and 690 km. We interpret these oscillations as a propagating kink wave and obtain its speed of 1400 km s-1. Conclusions: Our observations reveal that a flare associated with filament activation could trigger a kink propagating wave in active region loops over the solar disk. Movies associated to Figs. 1-4 are available at http://https://www.aanda.org

  12. DETECTION OF SUPERSONIC DOWNFLOWS AND ASSOCIATED HEATING EVENTS IN THE TRANSITION REGION ABOVE SUNSPOTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleint, L.; Martínez-Sykora, J. [Bay Area Environmental Research Institute, 625 2nd Street, Ste. 209, Petaluma, CA (United States); Antolin, P. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Tian, H.; Testa, P.; Reeves, K. K.; McKillop, S.; Saar, S.; Golub, L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Judge, P. [High Altitude Observatory/NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); De Pontieu, B.; Wuelser, J. P.; Boerner, P.; Hurlburt, N.; Lemen, J.; Tarbell, T. D.; Title, A. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover St., Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Carlsson, M.; Hansteen, V. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Jaeggli, S., E-mail: lucia.kleint@fhnw.ch [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, P.O. Box 173840, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); and others

    2014-07-10

    Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph data allow us to study the solar transition region (TR) with an unprecedented spatial resolution of 0.''33. On 2013 August 30, we observed bursts of high Doppler shifts suggesting strong supersonic downflows of up to 200 km s{sup –1} and weaker, slightly slower upflows in the spectral lines Mg II h and k, C II 1336, Si IV 1394 Å, and 1403 Å, that are correlated with brightenings in the slitjaw images (SJIs). The bursty behavior lasts throughout the 2 hr observation, with average burst durations of about 20 s. The locations of these short-lived events appear to be the umbral and penumbral footpoints of EUV loops. Fast apparent downflows are observed along these loops in the SJIs and in the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, suggesting that the loops are thermally unstable. We interpret the observations as cool material falling from coronal heights, and especially coronal rain produced along the thermally unstable loops, which leads to an increase of intensity at the loop footpoints, probably indicating an increase of density and temperature in the TR. The rain speeds are on the higher end of previously reported speeds for this phenomenon, and possibly higher than the free-fall velocity along the loops. On other observing days, similar bright dots are sometimes aligned into ribbons, resembling small flare ribbons. These observations provide a first insight into small-scale heating events in sunspots in the TR.

  13. ATLAS Transition Region Upgrade at Phase-1

    CERN Document Server

    Song, H; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the L1 Muon trigger transition region (1.0<|ƞ|<1.3) upgrade of ATLAS Detector at phase-1. The high fake trigger rate in the Endcap region 1.0<|ƞ|<2.4 would become a serious problem for the ATLAS L1 Muon trigger system at high luminosity. For the region 1.3<|ƞ|<2.4, covered by the Small Wheel, ATLAS is enhancing the present muon trigger by adding local fake rejection and track angle measurement capabilities. To reduce the rate in the remaining ƞ interval it has been proposed a similar enhancement by adding at the edge of the inner barrel a structure of 3-layers RPCs of a new generation. These RPCs will be based on a thinner gas gap and electrodes with respect to the ATLAS standards, a new high performance Front End, integrating fast TDC capabilities, and a new low profile and light mechanical structure allowing the installation in the tiny space available.This design effectively suppresses fake triggers by making the coincidence with both end-cap and interaction point...

  14. LAMPF transition-region mechanical fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, E.D. Jr.; Gallegos, J.D.F.; Harrison, R.; Hart, V.E.; Hunter, W.T.; Rislove, S.E.; Sims, J.R.; Van Dyke, W.J.

    1984-07-01

    The primary purpose of the new Transition Region (TR-II) is to optimize the phase matching of the H + and H - beams during simultaneous transport. TR-II incorporates several design improvements that include larger aperture, a straight beam track, greater beam-path length adjustments, and utility lines integrated with the support system. The close pack density of magnets and beam-line hardware required innovative solutions to magnet design and mounting, vacuum manifolding, and utility routing. Critical magnet placement was accomplished using a new three-dimensional alignment system that does real-time vector calculations on a computer with input from two digital theodolites. All assembly and a large fraction of the mechanical fabrication were done by LAMPF personnel. The TR-II has been operational since September 1983 and routinely transports production beams up to 900-μA current with no major problems

  15. Examination of Regional Transit Service Under Contracting : A Case Study in the Greater New Orleans Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Many local governments and transit agencies in the United States face financial difficulties in providing adequate public transit service in individual systems, and in providing sufficient regional coordination to accommodate transit trips involving ...

  16. Revision of loop colostomy under regional anaesthesia and sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Oriana; Thong, Sze Ying; Chia, Claramae Shulyn; Teo, Melissa Ching Ching

    2015-05-01

    Patients presenting for emergency abdominal procedures often have medical issues that cause both general anaesthesia and central neuraxial blockade to pose significant risks. Regional anaesthetic techniques are often used adjunctively for abdominal procedures under general anaesthesia, but there is limited published data on procedures done under peripheral nerve or plexus blocks. We herein report the case of a patient with recent pulmonary embolism and supraventricular tachycardia who required colostomy refashioning. Ultrasonography-guided regional anaesthesia was administered using a combination of ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric, rectus sheath and transversus abdominis plane blocks. This was supplemented with propofol and dexmedetomidine sedation as well as intermittent fentanyl and ketamine boluses to cover for visceral stimulation. We discuss the anatomical rationale for the choice of blocks and compare the anaesthetic conduct with similar cases that were previously reported.

  17. Supporting graduate nurse transition to practice through a quality assurance feedback loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Craig; Kenny, Amanda; Esterman, Adrian

    2017-11-01

    This mixed-method study focused on new graduate nurses and their transition to practice. Transition to practice can be a time of heightened stress and anxiety, leaving many new graduates disillusioned and dissatisfied with their work. The study explored how satisfaction levels with transition may improve during their first year, using a unique approach of a continuous quality assurance feedback loop. This assurance framework is utilised in hospitality, automotive and supply chain logistics and in health, primarily to monitor patient outcomes. However, an association with graduate nurse satisfaction has not been previously reported. Graduate nurses from two health services completed a short survey questionnaire every four weeks for 12 months. De-identified aggregated data was sent to health service management, giving them an opportunity to integrate the findings with the objective of potentially increasing graduate satisfaction ratings. Quantitative findings showed no statistical significance of graduate nurse satisfaction scores between health services, however, one health service consistently outperformed the other. Qualitative findings drawn from a seminar and interviews confirmed that one health service took a more proactive stance with the monthly reports, communicating the results to ward managers. Outcomes reflected a greater commitment of support and an overall increase of satisfaction scores. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Trichomonas vaginalis Ferredoxin Show a Loop-Cap Transition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weksberg, Tiffany E; Lynch, Gillian C; Krause, Kurt; Pettitt, Bernard M

    2007-05-01

    The crystal structure of the oxidized Trichomonas vaginalis ferredoxin (Tvfd) showed a unique crevice that exposed the redox center. Here we have examined the dynamics and solvation of the active site of Tvfd using molecular dynamics simulations of both the reduced and oxidized states. The oxidized simulation stays true to the crystal form with a heavy atom root mean-squared deviation of 2Å. However, within the reduced simulation of Tvfd a profound loop-cap transition into the redox center occurred within 6-ns of the start of the simulation and remained open throughout the rest of the 20-ns simulation. This large opening seen in the simulations supports the hypothesis that the exceptionally fast electron transfer rate between Tvfd and the drug metronidazole is due to the increased access of the antibiotic to the redox center of the protein and not due to the reduction potential.

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Trichomonas vaginalis Ferredoxin Show a Loop-Cap Transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weksberg, Tiffany E; Lynch, Gillian C; Krause, Kurt; Pettitt, Bernard M

    2007-05-01

    The crystal structure of the oxidized Trichomonas vaginalis ferredoxin (Tvfd) showed a unique crevice that exposed the redox center. Here we have examined the dynamics and solvation of the active site of Tvfd using molecular dynamics simulations of both the reduced and oxidized states. The oxidized simulation stays true to the crystal form with a heavy atom root mean-squared deviation of 2Å . However, within the reduced simulation of Tvfd a profound loop-cap transition into the redox center occurred within 6-ns of the start of the simulation and remained open throughout the rest of the 20-ns simulation. This large opening seen in the simulations supports the hypothesis that the exceptionally fast electron transfer rate between Tvfd and the drug metronidazole is due to the increased access of the antibiotic to the redox center of the protein and not due to the reduction potential.

  20. EDRiT - Eems Dollard Region in Transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulder, Elles

    2016-01-01

    EDRiT is a living lab focussing on transition and transitional processes in the Eems Dollard Region. Within the framework of EDRiT Dutch and German organizations, public authorities, universities and civilians work together in investigating, facilitating and innovating transitional processes

  1. Scintigraphic measurement of regional gut transit in idiopathic constipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stivland, T.; Camilleri, M.; Vassallo, M.; Proano, M.; Rath, D.; Brown, M.; Thomforde, G.; Pemberton, J.; Phillips, S.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, total gut transit and regional colonic transit in patients with idiopathic constipation were measured scintigraphically. Eight patients with severe constipation were studied, none of whom had evidence of abnormal function of the pelvic floor. 99mTc-radiolabeled Amberlite resin particles with a mixed meal were used to assess gastric emptying and small bowel transit; similar particles labeled with 111In were ingested in a coated capsule that dispersed in the ileocecal region. These were used to quantify colonic transit. Five healthy volunteers were also studied. Two patients showed delayed gastric emptying and two had slow small bowel transit. Seven of the eight patients had slow colonic transit. In five, delay affected the whole colon (pancolonic inertia); in two, transit in the ascending and transverse colon was normal, but solids moved through the left colon slowly. Mean colonic transit was also measured using radiopaque markers; this technique identified the patients with slow transit, as shown by measurements of overall colonic transit by simultaneous scintigraphy. However, estimated transit through the ascending and transverse colons was considerably shorter by the radiopaque marker technique. In conclusion, idiopathic constipation is characterized by either exaggerated reservoir functions of the ascending and transverse colons and/or impairment of propulsive function in the descending colon. Particle size may influence the result of regional colonic transit tests. Transit delays in other parts of the gut suggest that, in some patients, the condition may be a more generalized motor dysfunction

  2. Scintigraphic measurement of regional gut transit in idiopathic constipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivland, T.; Camilleri, M.; Vassallo, M.; Proano, M.; Rath, D.; Brown, M.; Thomforde, G.; Pemberton, J.; Phillips, S. (Gastroenterology Research Unit, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (USA))

    1991-07-01

    In this study, total gut transit and regional colonic transit in patients with idiopathic constipation were measured scintigraphically. Eight patients with severe constipation were studied, none of whom had evidence of abnormal function of the pelvic floor. 99mTc-radiolabeled Amberlite resin particles with a mixed meal were used to assess gastric emptying and small bowel transit; similar particles labeled with 111In were ingested in a coated capsule that dispersed in the ileocecal region. These were used to quantify colonic transit. Five healthy volunteers were also studied. Two patients showed delayed gastric emptying and two had slow small bowel transit. Seven of the eight patients had slow colonic transit. In five, delay affected the whole colon (pancolonic inertia); in two, transit in the ascending and transverse colon was normal, but solids moved through the left colon slowly. Mean colonic transit was also measured using radiopaque markers; this technique identified the patients with slow transit, as shown by measurements of overall colonic transit by simultaneous scintigraphy. However, estimated transit through the ascending and transverse colons was considerably shorter by the radiopaque marker technique. In conclusion, idiopathic constipation is characterized by either exaggerated reservoir functions of the ascending and transverse colons and/or impairment of propulsive function in the descending colon. Particle size may influence the result of regional colonic transit tests. Transit delays in other parts of the gut suggest that, in some patients, the condition may be a more generalized motor dysfunction.

  3. Detroit regional transit legal structures and governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Effective governance of transit systems is created through a qualified, representative, informed, diverse, and committed board of : directors that is ultimately accountable for the financial performance and quality of the service in the designated re...

  4. GLOBAL SAUSAGE OSCILLATION OF SOLAR FLARE LOOPS DETECTED BY THE INTERFACE REGION IMAGING SPECTROGRAPH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Hui; He, Jiansen; Young, Peter R.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Wang, Tongjiang; Antolin, Patrick; Chen, Bin

    2016-01-01

    An observation from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveals coherent oscillations in the loops of an M1.6 flare on 2015 March 12. Both the intensity and Doppler shift of Fe xxi 1354.08 Å show clear oscillations with a period of ∼25 s. Remarkably similar oscillations were also detected in the soft X-ray flux recorded by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites ( GOES ). With an estimated phase speed of ∼2420 km s −1 and a derived electron density of at least 5.4 × 10 10 cm −3 , the observed short-period oscillation is most likely the global fast sausage mode of a hot flare loop. We find a phase shift of ∼ π /2 (1/4 period) between the Doppler shift oscillation and the intensity/ GOES oscillations, which is consistent with a recent forward modeling study of the sausage mode. The observed oscillation requires a density contrast between the flare loop and coronal background of a factor ≥42. The estimated phase speed of the global mode provides a lower limit of the Alfvén speed outside the flare loop. We also find an increase of the oscillation period, which might be caused by the separation of the loop footpoints with time.

  5. Heating mechanisms for intermittent loops in active region cores from AIA/SDO EUV observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadavid, A. C.; Lawrence, J. K.; Christian, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States); Jess, D. B. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Nigro, G. [Universita della Calabria, Dipartimento di Fisica and Centro Nazionale Interuniversitario Struttura della Materia, Unita di Cosenza, I-87030 Arcavacata di Rende (Italy)

    2014-11-01

    We investigate intensity variations and energy deposition in five coronal loops in active region cores. These were selected for their strong variability in the AIA/SDO 94 Å intensity channel. We isolate the hot Fe XVIII and Fe XXI components of the 94 Å and 131 Å by modeling and subtracting the 'warm' contributions to the emission. HMI/SDO data allow us to focus on 'inter-moss' regions in the loops. The detailed evolution of the inter-moss intensity time series reveals loops that are impulsively heated in a mode compatible with a nanoflare storm, with a spike in the hot 131 Å signals leading and the other five EUV emission channels following in progressive cooling order. A sharp increase in electron temperature tends to follow closely after the hot 131 Å signal confirming the impulsive nature of the process. A cooler process of growing emission measure follows more slowly. The Fourier power spectra of the hot 131 Å signals, when averaged over the five loops, present three scaling regimes with break frequencies near 0.1 min{sup –1} and 0.7 min{sup –1}. The low frequency regime corresponds to 1/f noise; the intermediate indicates a persistent scaling process and the high frequencies show white noise. Very similar results are found for the energy dissipation in a 2D 'hybrid' shell model of loop magneto-turbulence, based on reduced magnetohydrodynamics, that is compatible with nanoflare statistics. We suggest that such turbulent dissipation is the energy source for our loops.

  6. Thermodynamics of single polyethylene and polybutylene glycols with hydrogen-bonding ends: A transition from looped to open conformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunsang; Paul, Wolfgang

    2018-02-01

    A variety of linear polymer precursors with hydrogen bonding motifs at both ends enable us to design supramolecular polymer systems with tailored macroscopic properties including self-healing. In this study, we investigate thermodynamic properties of single polyethylene and polybutylene glycols with hydrogen bonding motifs. In this context, we first build a coarse-grained model of building blocks of the supramolecular polymer system based on all-atom molecular structures. The density of states of the single precursor is obtained using the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo method. Constructing canonical partition functions from the density of states, we find the transition from looped to open conformations at transition temperatures which are non-monotonously changing with an increasing degree of polymerization due to the competition between chain stiffness and loop-forming entropy penalty. In the complete range of chain length under investigation, a coexistence of the looped and open morphologies at the transition temperature is shown regardless of whether the transition is first-order-like or continuous. Polyethylene and polybutylene glycols show similar behavior in all the thermodynamic properties but the transition temperature of the more flexible polybutylene glycol is shown to change more gradually.

  7. Observation and Modeling of Chromospheric Evaporation in a Coronal Loop Related to Active Region Transient Brightening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, G. R.; Sarkar, Aveek; Tripathi, Durgesh

    2018-04-01

    Using the observations recorded by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer and X-Ray Telescope both on board Hinode, we present evidence of chromospheric evaporation in a coronal loop after the occurrence of two active region transient brightenings (ARTBs) at the two footpoints. The chromospheric evaporation started nearly simultaneously in all of the three hot channels of AIA 131, 94, and 335 Å and was observed to be temperature dependent, being fastest in the highest temperature channel. The whole loop became fully brightened following the ARTBs after ≈25 s in 131 Å, ≈40 s in 94 Å, and ≈6.5 minutes in 335 Å. The differential emission measurements at the two footpoints (i.e., of two ARTBs) and at the loop top suggest that the plasma attained a maximum temperature of ∼10 MK at all these locations. The spectroscopic observations from IRIS revealed the presence of redshifted emission of ∼20 km s‑1 in cooler lines like C II and Si IV during the ARTBs that was cotemporal with the evaporation flow at the footpoint of the loop. During the ARTBs, the line width of C II and Si IV increased nearly by a factor of two during the peak emission. Moreover, enhancement in the line width preceded that in the Doppler shift, which again preceded enhancement in the intensity. The observed results were qualitatively reproduced by 1D hydrodynamic simulations, where energy was deposited at both of the footpoints of a monolithic coronal loop that mimicked the ARTBs identified in the observations.

  8. Transitional nuclei in the A∼100 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petry, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    This is a report on nuclear structure studies funded by the Department of Energy over a seven-year period from August 1, 1979 to August 31, 1986. In summary, the work was concerned with nuclear structure in the A∼100 region. In particular the focus of the work was on odd-A deformed nuclei in this region with N > 60

  9. The two-loop symbol of all multi-Regge regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargheer, Till; Schomerus, Volker; Papathanasiou, Georgios

    2015-12-01

    We study the symbol of the two-loop n-gluon MHV amplitude for all Mandelstam regions in multi-Regge kinematics in N= 4 super Yang-Mills theory. While the number of distinct Mandelstam regions grows exponentially with n, the increase of independent symbols turns out to be merely quadratic. We uncover how to construct the symbols for any number of external gluons from just two building blocks which are naturally associated with the six- and seven-gluon amplitude, respectively. The second building block is entirely new, and in addition to its symbol, we also construct a prototype function that correctly reproduces all terms of maximal functional transcendentality.

  10. The two-loop symbol of all multi-Regge regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargheer, Till; Papathanasiou, Georgios; Schomerus, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We study the symbol of the two-loop n-gluon MHV amplitude for all Mandelstam regions in multi-Regge kinematics in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory. While the number of distinct Mandelstam regions grows exponentially with n, the increase of independent symbols turns out to be merely quadratic. We uncover how to construct the symbols for any number of external gluons from just two building blocks which are naturally associated with the six- and seven-gluon amplitude, respectively. The second building block is entirely new, and in addition to its symbol, we also construct a prototype function that correctly reproduces all terms of maximal functional transcendentality.

  11. Regional Disparities in the Transition Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IBOLYA KURKÓ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The abolishment of the communist regime, the establishment of a democratic legal and institutional system brought important changes in the development of the regional economy of Romania. The old – from an economic point of view – differentiating factors have lost some of their importance, mainly the level of industrialization, which, in the past, was used to measure economic development. In addition, other factors came forward, that correlate more with the economic capacity, but, nowadays, their positive effect can only be increased by the combination of several other factors: foreign investments, as an indicator of regional attractiveness, regional GDP, the level of personal income, and the appreciation of human resources. Today, in the interest of enhancing the competitiveness of the regions a special role is reserved for entrepreneurial activity, the strength of the SME sector, the role of foreign working capital in the local economy, but also the territorial concentration of R&D centers. The study focuses on some aspects of disparities regarding the regional economic structure.

  12. Magnetic activity in the Galactic Centre region - fast downflows along rising magnetic loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiuchi, Kensuke; Suzuki, Takeru K.; Fukui, Yasuo; Torii, Kazufumi; Enokiya, Rei; Machida, Mami; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2018-06-01

    We studied roles of the magnetic field on the gas dynamics in the Galactic bulge by a three-dimensional global magnetohydrodynamical simulation data, particularly focusing on vertical flows that are ubiquitously excited by magnetic activity. In local regions where the magnetic field is stronger, it is frequently seen that fast downflows slide along inclined magnetic field lines that are associated with buoyantly rising magnetic loops. The vertical velocity of these downflows reaches ˜100 km s-1 near the footpoint of the loops by the gravitational acceleration towards the Galactic plane. The two footpoints of rising magnetic loops are generally located at different radial locations and the field lines are deformed by the differential rotation. The angular momentum is transported along the field lines, and the radial force balance breaks down. As a result, a fast downflow is often observed only at the one footpoint located at the inner radial position. The fast downflow compresses the gas to form a dense region near the footpoint, which will be important in star formation afterwards. Furthermore, the horizontal components of the velocity are also fast near the footpoint because the downflow is accelerated along the magnetic sliding slope. As a result, the high-velocity flow creates various characteristic features in a simulated position-velocity diagram, depending on the viewing angle.

  13. Regional unemployment and human capital in transition economies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurajda, Štěpán; Terrell, K.

    -, č. 77 (2007), s. 1-34 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : unemployment * human capital * regional labor markets Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://ipc.umich.edu/ working papers/ipc-77-jurajda,terrell,regional-unemployment-human- capital -transition-economies.pdf

  14. Regional transit stew : consensus building and transit building in metro Detroit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Over a period of 15 months during 2012 and 2013, an interdisciplinary team of six faculty members and six students at the : University of Detroit Mercy studied the factors that enable and inhibit the development of effective regional transit, focusin...

  15. The Impact of Opioid Treatment on Regional Gastrointestinal Transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Jakob L; Nilsson, Matias; Brock, Christina; Sandberg, Thomas H; Krogh, Klaus; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2016-04-30

    To employ an experimental model of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in healthy human volunteers, and evaluate the impact ofopioid treatment compared to placebo on gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and motility assessed by questionnaires and regional GItransit times using the 3-dimensional (3D)-Transit system. Twenty-five healthy males were randomly assigned to oxycodone or placebo for 5 days in a double blind, crossover design. AdverseGI effects were measured with the bowel function index, gastrointestinal symptom rating scale, patient assessment of constipationsymptom questionnaire, and Bristol stool form scale. Regional GI transit times were determined using the 3D-Transit system, and segmental transit times in the colon were determined using a custom Matlab(®) graphical user interface. GI symptom scores increased significantly across all applied GI questionnaires during opioid treatment. Oxycodone increased median total GI transit time from 22.2 to 43.9 hours (P transit times in the cecum and ascending colon from 5.7 to 9.9 hours (P = 0.012), rectosigmoid colon transit from 2.7 to 9.0 hours (P = 0.044), and colorectal transit time from 18.6 to 38.6 hours (P= 0.001). No associations between questionnaire scores and segmental transit times were detected. Self-assessed GI adverse effects and increased GI transit times in different segments were induced during oxycodone treatment. This detailed information about segmental changes in motility has great potential for future interventional head-to-head trials of different laxative regimes for prevention and treatment of constipation.

  16. TOPEM DSC study of glass transition region of polyurethane cationomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pielichowska, Kinga; Król, Piotr; Król, Bożena; Pagacz, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► TOPEM DSC method was employed to investigate the glass transition (T g ) region of fluorinated polyurethane cationomers. ► Introduction of fluorine compounds significantly changes thermal behaviour of cationomers in the T g region of hard segments. ► Introduction of fluorine compound leads to changes of the slope in activation diagram of glass transition. - Abstract: In this paper TOPEM DSC method was employed to investigate the glass transition region of fluorinated polyurethane cationomers. Fluorinated polyurethane cationomers have been synthesised in the reaction of MDI with poly(ethylene glycol) (600) and butane1,4-diol or N-methyl- or N-butyldiethanolamine and 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoro-1,4-butanediol. Better rigidity was found for generally amorphous cationomer coats. It was found that introduction of fluorine compound changes thermal behaviour of polyurethane cationomers as well as leads to changes in the slope in activation diagram profiles of glass transition in comparison to polyuretahene cationomer without fluorine compound. Application of TOPEM DSC allows to obtain more information concerning frequency dependence of glass transition region and thermodynamical stability of polyurethane structures.

  17. Regional gastrointestinal transit times in severe ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, A M; Gregersen, T; Christensen, L A; Agnholt, J; Dahlerup, J F; Schlageter, V; Krogh, K

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility may present secondary to inflammatory bowel disease. The main aim of this study was to investigate GI motility in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients during severe disease activity. Twenty patients with severe UC were studied with a novel telemetric capsule system (3D-Transit) designed for minimally invasive, ambulatory assessment of total and regional GI transit times. Ten patients were available for follow-up during remission. Data were compared to those of 20 healthy subjects (HS). Total GI transit time was significantly longer in patients with severe UC (median 44.5 h [range 9.9-102.7 h]) than in HS (median 27.6 h [range 9.6-56.4 h]) (p = 0.032). Additionally, during severe UC, transit time was prolonged through the proximal colon (p = 0.003) and there were strong trends toward longer than normal small intestinal transit time (HS: median 4.9 h [range 3.4-8.3 h] vs severe UC patients: median 5.9 h [range 3.9-11.9 h]; p = 0.053) and colorectal transit times (HS: median 18.2 h [range 1.5-43.7] vs severe UC patients: median 34.9 h [range 0.4-90.9 h]; p = 0.056). Our data further indicate that total GI and colorectal transit times may be prolonged in UC during early remission. Total GI transit times are significantly prolonged during severe UC. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. A novel network integrating a miRNA-203/SNAI1 feedback loop which regulates epithelial to mesenchymal transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michèle Moes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The majority of human cancer deaths are caused by metastasis. The metastatic dissemination is initiated by the breakdown of epithelial cell homeostasis. During this phenomenon, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT, cells change their genetic and trancriptomic program leading to phenotypic and functional alterations. The challenge of understanding this dynamic process resides in unraveling regulatory networks involving master transcription factors (e.g. SNAI1/2, ZEB1/2 and TWIST1 and microRNAs. Here we investigated microRNAs regulated by SNAI1 and their potential role in the regulatory networks underlying epithelial plasticity. RESULTS: By a large-scale analysis on epithelial plasticity, we highlighted miR-203 and its molecular link with SNAI1 and the miR-200 family, key regulators of epithelial homeostasis. During SNAI1-induced EMT in MCF7 breast cancer cells, miR-203 and miR-200 family members were repressed in a timely correlated manner. Importantly, miR-203 repressed endogenous SNAI1, forming a double negative miR203/SNAI1 feedback loop. We integrated this novel miR203/SNAI1 with the known miR200/ZEB feedback loops to construct an a priori EMT core network. Dynamic simulations revealed stable epithelial and mesenchymal states, and underscored the crucial role of the miR203/SNAI1 feedback loop in state transitions underlying epithelial plasticity. CONCLUSION: By combining computational biology and experimental approaches, we propose a novel EMT core network integrating two fundamental negative feedback loops, miR203/SNAI1 and miR200/ZEB. Altogether our analysis implies that this novel EMT core network could function as a switch controlling epithelial cell plasticity during differentiation and cancer progression.

  19. The effect of the Polyakov loop on the chiral phase transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szép Zs.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Polyakov loop is included in the S U(2L × S U(2R chiral quark-meson model by considering the propagation of the constituent quarks, coupled to the (σ, π meson multiplet, on the homogeneous background of a temporal gauge field, diagonal in color space. The model is solved at finite temperature and quark baryon chemical potential both in the chiral limit and for the physical value of the pion mass by using an expansion in the number of flavors Nf. Keeping the fermion propagator at its tree-level, a resummation on the pion propagator is constructed which resums infinitely many orders in 1/Nf, where O(1/Nf represents the order at which the fermions start to contribute in the pion propagator. The influence of the Polyakov loop on the tricritical or the critical point in the µq – T phase diagram is studied for various forms of the Polyakov loop potential.

  20. Phase control of squeezed state in double electromagnetically induced transparency system with a loop-transition structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Zhou, Yusheng; Wang, Yong; Ling, Qiang; Chen, Bing; Dou, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Weiqing; Guo, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Junxiang

    2018-03-01

    We theoretically study the squeezed probe light passing through a double electromagnetically induced transparency (DEIT) system, in which a microwave field and two coupling lights drive a loop transition. It is shown that the output squeezing can be maintained in both two transparency windows of DEIT, and it can also be manipulated by the relative phase of the three driving fields. The influence of the intensity of applied fields and the optical depth of atoms on the squeezing is also investigated. This study offers possibilities to manipulate the squeezing propagation in atomic media by the phase of electromagnetic fields.

  1. Modeling active region transient brightenings observed with X-ray telescope as multi-stranded loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobelski, Adam R.; McKenzie, David E. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 173840, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States); Donachie, Martin, E-mail: kobelski@solar.physics.montana.edu [University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G128QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-10

    Strong evidence exists that coronal loops as observed in extreme ultraviolet and soft X-rays may not be monolithic isotropic structures, but can often be more accurately modeled as bundles of independent strands. Modeling the observed active region transient brightenings (ARTBs) within this framework allows for the exploration of the energetic ramifications and characteristics of these stratified structures. Here we present a simple method of detecting and modeling ARTBs observed with the Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) as groups of zero-dimensional strands, which allows us to probe parameter space to better understand the spatial and temporal dependence of strand heating in impulsively heated loops. This partially automated method can be used to analyze a large number of observations to gain a statistical insight into the parameters of coronal structures, including the number of heating events required in a given model to fit the observations. In this article, we present the methodology and demonstrate its use in detecting and modeling ARTBs in a sample data set from Hinode/XRT. These initial results show that, in general, multiple heating events are necessary to reproduce observed ARTBs, but the spatial dependence of these heating events cannot yet be established.

  2. Modeling active region transient brightenings observed with X-ray telescope as multi-stranded loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobelski, Adam R.; McKenzie, David E.; Donachie, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Strong evidence exists that coronal loops as observed in extreme ultraviolet and soft X-rays may not be monolithic isotropic structures, but can often be more accurately modeled as bundles of independent strands. Modeling the observed active region transient brightenings (ARTBs) within this framework allows for the exploration of the energetic ramifications and characteristics of these stratified structures. Here we present a simple method of detecting and modeling ARTBs observed with the Hinode X-Ray Telescope (XRT) as groups of zero-dimensional strands, which allows us to probe parameter space to better understand the spatial and temporal dependence of strand heating in impulsively heated loops. This partially automated method can be used to analyze a large number of observations to gain a statistical insight into the parameters of coronal structures, including the number of heating events required in a given model to fit the observations. In this article, we present the methodology and demonstrate its use in detecting and modeling ARTBs in a sample data set from Hinode/XRT. These initial results show that, in general, multiple heating events are necessary to reproduce observed ARTBs, but the spatial dependence of these heating events cannot yet be established.

  3. THE COMPLEX NORTH TRANSITION REGION OF CENTAURUS A: RADIO STRUCTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, Susan G. [NASA' s Goddard Space Flight Center, Laboratory for Observational Cosmology, Mail Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Eilek, Jean A. [Physics Department, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Owen, Frazer N., E-mail: susan.g.neff@nasa.gov [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O,  Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    We present deep radio images of the inner ∼50 kpc of Centaurus A, taken with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array at 90 cm. We focus on the Transition Regions between the inner galaxy—including the active nucleus, inner radio lobes, and star-forming disk—and the outer radio lobes. We detect previously unknown extended emission around the Inner Lobes, including radio emission from the star-forming disk. We find that the radio-loud part of the North Transition Region (NTR), known as the North Middle Lobe, is significantly overpressured relative to the surrounding interstellar medium. We see no evidence for a collimated flow from the active galactic nucleus through this region. Our images show that the structure identified by Morganti et al. as a possible large-scale jet appears to be part of a narrow ridge of emission within the broader, diffuse, radio-loud region. This knotty radio ridge is coincident with other striking phenomena: compact X-ray knots, ionized gas filaments, and streams of young stars. Several short-lived phenomena in the NTR, as well as the frequent re-energization required by the Outer Lobes, suggest that energy must be flowing through both Transition Regions at the present epoch. We suggest that the energy flow is in the form of a galactic wind.

  4. Comparison of Two Coronal Magnetic Field Models to Reconstruct a Sigmoidal Solar Active Region with Coronal Loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Aiying; Zhang, Huai [Key Laboratory of Computational Geodynamics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Jiang, Chaowei [Institute of Space Science and Applied Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen, 518055 (China); Hu, Qiang; Gary, G. Allen; Wu, S. T. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Cao, Jinbin, E-mail: duanaiying@ucas.ac.cn, E-mail: hzhang@ucas.ac.cn, E-mail: chaowei@hit.edu.cn [School of Space and Environment, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2017-06-20

    Magnetic field extrapolation is an important tool to study the three-dimensional (3D) solar coronal magnetic field, which is difficult to directly measure. Various analytic models and numerical codes exist, but their results often drastically differ. Thus, a critical comparison of the modeled magnetic field lines with the observed coronal loops is strongly required to establish the credibility of the model. Here we compare two different non-potential extrapolation codes, a nonlinear force-free field code (CESE–MHD–NLFFF) and a non-force-free field (NFFF) code, in modeling a solar active region (AR) that has a sigmoidal configuration just before a major flare erupted from the region. A 2D coronal-loop tracing and fitting method is employed to study the 3D misalignment angles between the extrapolated magnetic field lines and the EUV loops as imaged by SDO /AIA. It is found that the CESE–MHD–NLFFF code with preprocessed magnetogram performs the best, outputting a field that matches the coronal loops in the AR core imaged in AIA 94 Å with a misalignment angle of ∼10°. This suggests that the CESE–MHD–NLFFF code, even without using the information of the coronal loops in constraining the magnetic field, performs as good as some coronal-loop forward-fitting models. For the loops as imaged by AIA 171 Å in the outskirts of the AR, all the codes including the potential field give comparable results of the mean misalignment angle (∼30°). Thus, further improvement of the codes is needed for a better reconstruction of the long loops enveloping the core region.

  5. Evidence for continuum absorption above the quiet sun transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmahl, E.J.; Orrall, F.Q.

    1979-01-01

    We report new evidence for continuum absorption in the solar transition zone in EUV spectra obtained from OSO 4, OSO 6, ATM, and full Sun measurements. This absorption shortward of 912 A is manifest everywhere on the Sun's disk. It is present within network cells and boundaries of the quiet Sun, in coronal holes, in active regions, above the limb, and in solar prominences. Models of the upper chromosphere and the transition zone must be modified to include an admixture of neutral hydrogen (or possibly singly ionized helium) with the hotter plasma

  6. Giant resonances in the transition regions of the periodic table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, C.W.; Lucatorto, T.B.

    1987-01-01

    In the transition regions of the periodic table of the elements, atomic d or f orbitals undergo a fairly sudden change from hydrogenic to fully collapsed form. This transition involves a large reduction in the mean orbital radius - by about 95% for the 4f orbital - and results in corresponding qualitative changes in physical processes sensitive to orbital size (e.g. excitation cross sections, bonding character). It is caused by a shift, as the nuclear charge Z increases, in the close balance between repulsive centrifugal and attractive atomic forces on the electron. The balance can also be tilted within a given element in the transition region, for instance by a change in the occupancy of its core or valence orbitals, or by the formation of a molecular bond. Transition region elements are thus characterized by an unusual sensitivity of gross orbital properties to external perturbations; and, from the standpoint of theoretical representation, to the effects of electron correlation, LS term dependence, and special relativity. This paper reports some experimental and theoretical work directed towards exploring this sensitivity. The approach of tracing physical processes along isoelectronic, isonuclear, and isoionic sequences which span particular transition regions is taken. The experimental work described here consists of soft x-ray photoabsorption studies of alkaline earth atoms and ions in the gas phase. It is based upon techniques of time-resolved sequential laser and soft x-ray excitation, which enable them to obtain the subvalence photoabsorption spectra of ground and excited states of an atom and its ions. The theoretical work is based primarily upon single- and multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculations, with particular attention to effects of orbital term dependence. 40 references, 7 figures, 3 tables

  7. Looped star polymers show conformational transition from spherical to flat toroidal shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Pascal; Fritsche, Miriam; Heermann, Dieter W

    2011-11-01

    Inspired by the topological organization of the circular Escherichia coli chromosome, which is compacted by separate domains, we study a polymer architecture consisting of a central ring to which either looped or linear side chains are grafted. A shape change from a spherical to a toroidal organization takes place as soon as the inner ring becomes large enough for the attached arms to fit within its circumference. Building up a torus, the system flattens, depending on the effective bending rigidity of the chain induced by entropic repulsion of the attached loops and, to a lesser extent, linear arms. Our results suggest that the natural formation of a toroidal structure with a decreased amount of writhe induced by a specific underlying topology could be one driving force, among others, that nature exploits to ensure proper packaging of the genetic material within a rod-shaped, bacterial envelope.

  8. The soluble loop BC region guides, but not dictates, the assembly of the transmembrane cytochrome b6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Tome-Stangl

    Full Text Available Studying folding and assembly of naturally occurring α-helical transmembrane proteins can inspire the design of membrane proteins with defined functions. Thus far, most studies have focused on the role of membrane-integrated protein regions. However, to fully understand folding pathways and stabilization of α-helical membrane proteins, it is vital to also include the role of soluble loops. We have analyzed the impact of interhelical loops on folding, assembly and stability of the heme-containing four-helix bundle transmembrane protein cytochrome b6 that is involved in charge transfer across biomembranes. Cytochrome b6 consists of two transmembrane helical hairpins that sandwich two heme molecules. Our analyses strongly suggest that the loop connecting the helical hairpins is not crucial for positioning the two protein "halves" for proper folding and assembly of the holo-protein. Furthermore, proteolytic removal of any of the remaining two loops, which connect the two transmembrane helices of a hairpin structure, appears to also not crucially effect folding and assembly. Overall, the transmembrane four-helix bundle appears to be mainly stabilized via interhelical interactions in the transmembrane regions, while the soluble loop regions guide assembly and stabilize the holo-protein. The results of this study might steer future strategies aiming at designing heme-binding four-helix bundle structures, involved in transmembrane charge transfer reactions.

  9. Transition region, coronal heating and the fast solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing

    2003-07-01

    It is assumed that magnetic flux tubes are strongly concentrated at the boundaries of supergranule convection cells. A power law spectrum of high frequency Alfvén waves with a spectral index -1 originating from the sun is assumed to supply all the energy needed to energize the plasma flowing in such magnetic flux tubes. At the high frequency end, the waves are eroded by ions due to ion cyclotron resonance. The magnetic flux concentration is essential since it allows a sufficiently strong energy flux to be carried by high frequency ion cyclotron waves and these waves can be readily released at the coronal base by cyclotron resonance. The main results are: 1. The waves are capable of creating a steep transition region, a hot corona and a fast solar wind if both the wave frequency is high enough and the magnetic flux concentration is sufficiently strong in the boundaries of the supergranule convection zone. 2. By primarily heating alpha particles only, it is possible to produce a steep transition region, a hot corona and a fast solar wind. Coulomb coupling plays a key role in transferring the thermal energy of alpha particles to protons and electrons at the corona base. The electron thermal conduction then does the remaining job to create a sharp transition region. 3. Plasma species (even ions) may already partially lose thermal equilibrium in the transition region, and minor ions may already be faster than protons at the very base of the corona. 4. The model predicts high temperature alpha particles (Talpha ~ 2 x 107 K) and low proton temperatures (Tp solar radii, suggesting that hydrogen Lyman lines observed by UVCS above coronal holes may be primarily broadened by Alfvén waves in this range.

  10. A steady-state supersonic downflow in the transition region above a sunspot umbra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, Thomas; Fleck, Bernhard; Andretta, Vincenzo

    2015-10-01

    We investigate a small-scale (~1.5 Mm along the slit), supersonic downflow of about 90 km s-1 in the transition region above the lightbridged sunspot umbra in AR 11836. The observations were obtained with the Interface Region Spectrograph (IRIS) on 2013 September 2 from 16:40 to 17:59 UT. The downflow shows up as redshifted "satellite" lines of the Si iv and O iv transition region lines and is remarkably steady over the observing period of nearly 80 min. The downflow is not visible in the chromospheric lines, which only show an intensity enhancement at the location of the downflow. The density inferred from the line ratio of the redshifted satellites of the O iv lines (Ne = 1010.6 ± 0.25 cm-3) is only a factor 2 smaller than the one inferred from the main components (Ne = 1010.95 ± 0.20 cm-3). Consequently, this implies a substantial mass flux (~5 × 10-7 g cm-2 s-1), which would evacuate the overlying corona on timescales close to 10 s. We interpret these findings as evidence of a stationary termination shock of a supersonic siphon flow in a cool loop that is rooted in the central umbra of the spot. The movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  11. A Closed-Loop Model of Operator Visual Attention, Situation Awareness, and Performance Across Automation Mode Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Aaron W; Duda, Kevin R; Sheridan, Thomas B; Oman, Charles M

    2017-03-01

    This article describes a closed-loop, integrated human-vehicle model designed to help understand the underlying cognitive processes that influenced changes in subject visual attention, mental workload, and situation awareness across control mode transitions in a simulated human-in-the-loop lunar landing experiment. Control mode transitions from autopilot to manual flight may cause total attentional demands to exceed operator capacity. Attentional resources must be reallocated and reprioritized, which can increase the average uncertainty in the operator's estimates of low-priority system states. We define this increase in uncertainty as a reduction in situation awareness. We present a model built upon the optimal control model for state estimation, the crossover model for manual control, and the SEEV (salience, effort, expectancy, value) model for visual attention. We modify the SEEV attention executive to direct visual attention based, in part, on the uncertainty in the operator's estimates of system states. The model was validated using the simulated lunar landing experimental data, demonstrating an average difference in the percentage of attention ≤3.6% for all simulator instruments. The model's predictions of mental workload and situation awareness, measured by task performance and system state uncertainty, also mimicked the experimental data. Our model supports the hypothesis that visual attention is influenced by the uncertainty in system state estimates. Conceptualizing situation awareness around the metric of system state uncertainty is a valuable way for system designers to understand and predict how reallocations in the operator's visual attention during control mode transitions can produce reallocations in situation awareness of certain states.

  12. [The mutations of the D-loop hypervariable region II and hypervariable region III of mitochondrial DNA in oral squamous cell carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao-Zhong; Jia, Mu-Yun; Yuan, Rong-Tao; Han, Guo-Dong; Bu, Ling-Xue

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the frequency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) D-loop hypervariable region II (HVR II) and hypervariable region III (HVR III) mutations in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and their correlation to provide the new targets for the prevention and treatment of OSCC. The D-loop HVR II and HVR III regions of mtDNA in seven cases with OSCC tissues, matched with paracancerous tissues and normal mucosa tissues from the same case, were amplified by polymerase chain raction (PCR), then were detected by direct sequencing to find the mutantsites after the comparison of all sequencing results with the mtDNA Cambridge sequence in the GenBank database. 82 (56 species) nucleotide changes, with 51(26 species) nucleotide polymorphism, were found after the comparison of all sequencing results with the mtDNA Cambridge sequence in the GenBank database. 31(30 species) mutations, with 21 located within the HVR II and HVR III regions, were found in 3 tumor tissue samples, their paracancerous and normal mucosa tissue were found more polymorphic changes but no mutation. The mtDNA D-loop HVR II and HVR III regions mutation rate was 42.9% (3/7) in OSCC. The mtDNA D-loop HVR II and HVR III regions were highly polymorphic and mutable regions in OSCC. It suggested that the D-loop HVR II and HVR III regions of mtDNA might play a significant role in the tumorigenesis of OSCC. It may become new targets for the gene therapy of OSCC by regulating the above indexes.

  13. Genetic distance of Malaysian mousedeer based on mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and D-loop region sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakar, Mohamad-Azam Akmal Abu; Rovie-Ryan, Jeffrine Japning; Ampeng, Ahmad; Yaakop, Salmah; Nor, Shukor Md; Md-Zain, Badrul Munir

    2018-04-01

    Mousedeer is one of the primitive mammals that can be found mainly in Southeast-Asia region. There are two species of mousedeer in Malaysia which are Tragulus kanchil and Tragulus napu. Both species can be distinguish by size, coat coloration, and throat pattern but clear diagnosis still cannot be found. The objective of the study is to show the genetic distance relationship between T. kanchil and T. napu and their population based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cytochrome oxidase I (COI) and D-loop region. There are 42 sample of mousedeer were used in this study collected by PERHILITAN from different locality. Another 29 D-loop sequence were retrieved from Genbank for comparative analysis. All sample were amplified using universal primer and species-specific primer for COI and D-loop genes via PCR process. The amplified sequences were analyzed to determine genetic distance of T. kanchil and T. napu. From the analysis, the average genetic distance between T. kanchil and T. napu based on locus COI and D-loop were 0.145 and 0.128 respectively. The genetic distance between populations of T. kanchil based on locus COI was between 0.003-0.013. For locus D-loop, genetic distance analysis showed distance in relationship between west-coast populations to east-coast population of T. kanchil. COI and D-loop mtDNA region provided a clear picture on the relationship within the mousedeer species. Last but not least, conservation effort toward protecting this species can be done by study the molecular genetics and prevent the extinction of this species.

  14. Steady flows in the solar transition region observed with SMM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebbie, K.B.; Hill, F.; Toomre, J.; November, L.J.; Simon, G.W.; Gurman, J.B.; Shine, R.A.; Woodgate, B.E.; Athay, R.G.; Bruner, E.C. Jr.; Rehse, R.A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    Steady flows in the quiet solar transition region have been observed with the Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter (UVSP) experiment on the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite. The persistent vertical motions seen at disk center have spatial rms amplitudes of 1.4 km s -1 in the C II line, 3.9 km s -1 in Si IV, and 4.2 km s -1 in C IV. The amplitudes of the more horizontal flows seen toward the limb tend to be somewhat higher. Plots of steady vertical velocity versus intensity seen at disk center in Si IV and C IV show two distinct branches

  15. Structure of the solar transition region and inner corona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariska, J.T.

    1977-01-01

    Emission gradient curves for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resonance lines of lithium-like ions were constructed from spectroheliograms of quiet limb regions and a north polar coronal hole observed with the Harvard experiment on Skylab. The observations are interpreted with simple coronal models. Comparison of the theoretical and observed emission gradients for quiet regions indicates that for these areas the temperature rises throughout the inner corona (1.03 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 1.20 R/sub mass/). In the coronal hole the temperature rises in a manner consistent with a constant conductive flux to an isothermal corona at a temperature of 1.1 x 10 6 K at 1.08/sub mass/. The geometry of the coronal hole boundary is also determined. The boundary geometry and density distribution are combined with typical solar wind parameters at the north to determine an outflow velocity of 15 km s -1 at 1.08 R/sub mass/. The energy balance implications of the models are examined. It was found that in the transition region both conduction and radiation are important in determining the energy balance in network regions in both quiet areas and coronal holes. Additional energy sources are required in the network in coronal holes. In the corona it is found that, to within the errors of the determination, the energy losses, and hence the requirements for mechanical heating, are the same in quiet regions and coronal holes

  16. One-loop transition amplitudes in the D1D5 CFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, Zaq; Hampton, Shaun; Mathur, Samir D. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University,191 West Woodruff Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2017-01-02

    We consider the issue of thermalization in the D1D5 CFT. Thermalization is expected to correspond to the formation of a black hole in the dual gravity theory. We start from the orbifold point, where the theory is essentially free, and does not thermalize. In earlier work it was noted that there was no clear thermalization effect when the theory was deformed off the orbifold point to first order in the relevant twist perturbation. In this paper we consider the deformation to second order in the twist, where we do find effects that can cause thermalization of an initial perturbation. We consider a 1-loop process where two untwisted copies of the CFT are twisted to one copy and then again untwisted to two copies. We start with a single oscillator excitation on the initial CFT, and compute the effect of the two twists on this state. We find simple approximate expressions for the Bogoliubov coefficients and the behavior of the single oscillator excitation in the continuum limit, where the mode numbers involved are taken to be much larger than unity. We also prove a number of useful relationships valid for processes with an arbitrary number of twist insertions.

  17. One-loop transition amplitudes in the D1D5 CFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Zaq; Hampton, Shaun; Mathur, Samir D.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the issue of thermalization in the D1D5 CFT. Thermalization is expected to correspond to the formation of a black hole in the dual gravity theory. We start from the orbifold point, where the theory is essentially free, and does not thermalize. In earlier work it was noted that there was no clear thermalization effect when the theory was deformed off the orbifold point to first order in the relevant twist perturbation. In this paper we consider the deformation to second order in the twist, where we do find effects that can cause thermalization of an initial perturbation. We consider a 1-loop process where two untwisted copies of the CFT are twisted to one copy and then again untwisted to two copies. We start with a single oscillator excitation on the initial CFT, and compute the effect of the two twists on this state. We find simple approximate expressions for the Bogoliubov coefficients and the behavior of the single oscillator excitation in the continuum limit, where the mode numbers involved are taken to be much larger than unity. We also prove a number of useful relationships valid for processes with an arbitrary number of twist insertions.

  18. Stresses in transition region of VVER-1000 reactor vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namgung, I. [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Nguye, T.L. [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); National Research Inst. of Mechanical Engineering, Hanoi City, Vietnam (China)

    2014-07-01

    Most of the western PWR reactor's bottom head is hemi-spherical shape, however for Russian designed VVER family of reactor it is ellipsoidal shape. The transition region from shell side to ellipsoidal head and transition top flange to cylindrical shell develop higher stress concentration than western PWR reactor vessel. This region can be modeled as conical shell with varying thickness. The theoretical derivation of stress in the thick-walled conical cylinder with varying thickness was developed and shown in detail. The results is applied to VVER-1000 reactor vessel of which shell to bottom ellipsoidal shell and shell to upper flange were investigated for stress field. The theoretical calculations were also compared with FEM solutions. An axisymmetric 3D model of VVER-1000 reactor vessel (without closure head) FEM model was created and internal hydrostatic pressure boundary condition was applied. The stress results from FEM and theoretical calculation were compared, and the discrepancies and accuracies of the theoretical results were discussed. (author)

  19. Stresses in transition region of VVER-1000 reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namgung, I.; Nguye, T.L.

    2014-01-01

    Most of the western PWR reactor's bottom head is hemi-spherical shape, however for Russian designed VVER family of reactor it is ellipsoidal shape. The transition region from shell side to ellipsoidal head and transition top flange to cylindrical shell develop higher stress concentration than western PWR reactor vessel. This region can be modeled as conical shell with varying thickness. The theoretical derivation of stress in the thick-walled conical cylinder with varying thickness was developed and shown in detail. The results is applied to VVER-1000 reactor vessel of which shell to bottom ellipsoidal shell and shell to upper flange were investigated for stress field. The theoretical calculations were also compared with FEM solutions. An axisymmetric 3D model of VVER-1000 reactor vessel (without closure head) FEM model was created and internal hydrostatic pressure boundary condition was applied. The stress results from FEM and theoretical calculation were compared, and the discrepancies and accuracies of the theoretical results were discussed. (author)

  20. CD81 Receptor Regions outside the Large Extracellular Loop Determine Hepatitis C Virus Entry into Hepatoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Banse

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters human hepatocytes using four essential entry factors, one of which is human CD81 (hCD81. The tetraspanin hCD81 contains a large extracellular loop (LEL, which interacts with the E2 glycoprotein of HCV. The role of the non-LEL regions of hCD81 (intracellular tails, four transmembrane domains, small extracellular loop and intracellular loop is poorly understood. Here, we studied the contribution of these domains to HCV susceptibility of hepatoma cells by generating chimeras of related tetraspanins with the hCD81 LEL. Our results show that non-LEL regions in addition to the LEL determine susceptibility of cells to HCV. While closely related tetraspanins (X. tropicalis CD81 and D. rerio CD81 functionally complement hCD81 non-LEL regions, distantly related tetraspanins (C. elegans TSP9 amd D. melanogaster TSP96F do not and tetraspanins with intermediate homology (hCD9 show an intermediate phenotype. Tetraspanin homology and susceptibility to HCV correlate positively. For some chimeras, infectivity correlates with surface expression. In contrast, the hCD9 chimera is fully surface expressed, binds HCV E2 glycoprotein but is impaired in HCV receptor function. We demonstrate that a cholesterol-coordinating glutamate residue in CD81, which hCD9 lacks, promotes HCV infection. This work highlights the hCD81 non-LEL regions as additional HCV susceptibility-determining factors.

  1. Formation of Cool and Warm Jets by Magnetic Flux Emerging from the Solar Chromosphere to Transition Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liping; Peter, Hardi; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Lei; Yan, Limei

    2018-01-01

    In the solar atmosphere, jets are ubiquitous at various spatial-temporal scales. They are important for understanding the energy and mass transports in the solar atmosphere. According to recent observational studies, the high-speed network jets are likely to be intermittent but continual sources of mass and energy for the solar wind. Here, we conduct a 2D magnetohydrodynamics simulation to investigate the mechanism of these network jets. A combination of magnetic flux emergence and horizontal advection is used to drive the magnetic reconnection in the transition region between a strong magnetic loop and a background open flux. The simulation results show that not only a fast warm jet, much similar to the network jets, is found, but also an adjacent slow cool jet, mostly like classical spicules, is launched. Differing from the fast warm jet driven by magnetic reconnection, the slow cool jet is mainly accelerated by gradients of both thermal pressure and magnetic pressure near the outer border of the mass-concentrated region compressed by the emerging loop. These results provide a different perspective on our understanding of the formation of both the slow cool jets from the solar chromosphere and the fast warm jets from the solar transition region.

  2. Temperature and center-limb variations of transition region velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athay, R.G.; Dere, K.P.

    1989-01-01

    HRTS data from the Spacelab 2 mission are used to derive the center-limb and temperature variations of the mean velocity and the velocity variance in the solar chromosphere and transition zone. The mean velocity is found to vary much more rapidly from center to limb and with temperature than does the velocity variance. Also, the mean velocity shows a characteristic signature at some magnetic neutral lines in accordance with the findings of Klimchuk (1987) from Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) data. The velocity variance does not show a characteristic signature at the neutral lines but shows an inverse correlation with intensity. The latter is interpreted as reduced velocity variance in strong field regions. The results are discussed in terms of downflow along lines of force in magnetic arcades. 23 refs

  3. Analytical description of brittle-to-ductile transition in bcc metals. Nucleation of dislocation loop at the crack tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voskoboinikov, R.E.

    2002-03-01

    Nucleation of dislocation loop at the crack tip in a material subjected to uniaxial loading is investigated. Analytical expression for the total energy of rectangular dislocation loop at the crack tip is found. Dependence of the nucleation energy barrier on dislocation loop shape and stress intensity factor at the crack tip is determined. It is established that the energetic barrier for nucleation of dislocation loop strongly depends on the stress intensity factor. Nucleation of dislocation loop is very sensitive to stress field modifiers (forest dislocations, precipitates, clusters of point defects, etc) in the crack tip vicinity. (orig.)

  4. Footpoints of the giant molecular loops in the Galactic center region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, D.; Amo-Baladrón, M. A.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Mauersberger, R.; Martín, S.; Burton, M.; Cunningham, M.; Jones, P. A.; Menten, K. M.; Bronfman, L.; Güsten, R.

    2018-05-01

    Aims: We aim to reveal the morphology, chemical composition, kinematics, and to establish the main processes prevalent in the gas at the footpoints of the giant molecular loops (GMLs) in the Galactic center region. Methods: Using the 22-m Mopra telescope, we mapped the M-3.8+0.9 molecular cloud, placed at the footpoints of a GML, in 3-mm range molecular lines. To derive the molecular hydrogen column density, we also observed the 13CO(2 - 1) line at 1 mm using the 12-m APEX telescope. From the 3 mm observations 12 molecular species were detected, namely HCO+, HCN, H13CN, HNC, SiO, CS, CH3OH, N2H+, SO, HNCO, OCS, and HC3N. Results: Maps revealing the morphology and kinematics of the M-3.8+0.9 molecular cloud in different molecules are presented. We identify six main molecular complexes. We derive fractional abundances in 11 selected positions of the different molecules assuming local thermodynamical equilibrium. Conclusions: Most of the fractional abundances derived for the M-3.8+0.9 molecular cloud are very similar over the whole cloud. However, the fractional abundances of some molecules show significant difference with respect to those measured in the central molecular zone (CMZ). The abundances of the shock tracer SiO are very similar between the GMLs and the CMZ. The methanol emission is the most abundant species in the GMLs. This indicates that the gas is likely affected by moderate 30 km s-1 or even high velocity (50 km s-1) shocks, consistent with the line profile observed toward one of the studied position. The origin of the shocks is likely related to the flow of the gas throughout the GMLs towards the footpoints. OPRA and APEX final data cubes (FITS) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/613/A42

  5. Genetic diversity of Guangxi chicken breeds assessed with microsatellites and the mitochondrial DNA D-loop region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yuying; Mo, Guodong; Sun, Junli; Wei, Fengying; Liao, Dezhong Joshua

    2016-05-01

    The domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) is an excellent model for genetic studies of phenotypic diversity. The Guangxi Region of China possesses several native chicken breeds displaying a broad range of phenotypes well adapted to the extreme hot-and-wet environments in the region. We thus evaluated the genetic diversity and relationships among six native chicken populations of the Guangxi region and also evaluated two commercial breeds (Arbor Acres and Roman chickens). We analyzed the sequences of the D-loop region of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and 18 microsatellite loci of 280 blood samples from six Guangxi native chicken breeds and from Arbor Acres and Roman chickens, and used the neighbor-joining method to construct the phylogenetic tree of these eight breeds. Our results showed that the genetic diversity of Guangxi native breeds was relatively rich. The phylogenetic tree using the unweighed pair-group method with arithmetic means (UPGAM) on microsatellite marks revealed two main clusters. Arbor Acres chicken and Roman chicken were in one cluster, while the Guangxi breeds were in the other cluster. Moreover, the UPGAM tree of Guangxi native breeds based on microsatellite loci was more consistent with the genesis, breeding history, differentiation and location than the mtDNA D-loop region. STRUCTURE analysis further confirmed the genetic structure of Guangxi native breeds in the Neighbor-Net dendrogram. The nomenclature of mtDNA sequence polymorphisms suggests that the Guangxi native chickens are distributed across four clades, but most of them are clustered in two main clades (B and E), with the other haplotypes within the clades A and C. The Guangxi native breeds revealed abundant genetic diversity not only on microsatellite loci but also on mtDNA D-loop region, and contained multiple maternal lineages, including one from China and another from Europe or the Middle East.

  6. TRANSITION REGION AND CHROMOSPHERIC SIGNATURES OF IMPULSIVE HEATING EVENTS. I. OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Reep, Jeffrey W. [National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow, Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Crump, Nicholas A. [Naval Center for Space Technology, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Simões, Paulo J. A. [SUPA School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-20

    We exploit the high spatial resolution and high cadence of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) to investigate the response of the transition region and chromosphere to energy deposition during a small flare. Simultaneous observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager provide constraints on the energetic electrons precipitating into the flare footpoints, while observations of the X-Ray Telescope , Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, and Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) allow us to measure the temperatures and emission measures from the resulting flare loops. We find clear evidence for heating over an extended period on the spatial scale of a single IRIS pixel. During the impulsive phase of this event, the intensities in each pixel for the Si iv 1402.770 Å, C ii 1334.535 Å, Mg ii 2796.354 Å, and O i 1355.598 Å emission lines are characterized by numerous small-scale bursts typically lasting 60 s or less. Redshifts are observed in Si iv, C ii, and Mg ii during the impulsive phase. Mg ii shows redshifts during the bursts and stationary emission at other times. The Si iv and C ii profiles, in contrast, are observed to be redshifted at all times during the impulsive phase. These persistent redshifts are a challenge for one-dimensional hydrodynamic models, which predict only short-duration downflows in response to impulsive heating. We conjecture that energy is being released on many small-scale filaments with a power-law distribution of heating rates.

  7. Phylogenetic relationships of Malaysia's pig-tailed macaque Macaca nemestrina based on D-loop region sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Latiff M. A., B.; Ampeng, A.; Yaakop, S.; Md-Zain B., M.

    2014-09-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among Malaysian pig-tailed macaques have never been established even though the data are crucial in aiding conservation plan for the species. The aims of this study is to establish the phylogenetic relationships of Macaca nemestrina in Malaysia. A total of 21 genetic samples of M. nemestrina yielding 458 bp of D-loop sequences were used in phylogenetic analyses, in addition to one sample of M. fascicularis which was used as an outgroup. Sequence character analysis revealed that D-loop locus contains 23% parsimony informative character detected among the ingroups. Further analysis indicated a clear separation between populations originating from different regions; the Malay Peninsula populations are separated from Borneo Insular population; and Perak population formed a distinctive clade within Peninsular Malaysia populations. Phylogenetic trees (NJ, MP and Bayesian) portray a consistent clustering paradigm as Borneo population was distinguished from Peninsula population (100% bootstrap value in the NJ, MP, 1.00 posterior probability in Bayesian trees). Perak's population was separated from other Peninsula populations (100% in NJ, 99% in MP and 1.00 in Bayesian). D-loop region of mtDNA is proven to be a suitable locus in studying the separation of M. nemestrina at population level. These findings are crucial in aiding the conservation management and translocation process of M. fascicularis populations in Malaysia.

  8. Gibberellin-regulated gene in the basal region of rice leaf sheath encodes basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Takasaki, Hironori

    2009-07-01

    Genes regulated by gibberellin (GA) during leaf sheath elongation in rice seedlings were identified using the transcriptome approach. mRNA from the basal regions of leaf sheaths treated with GA3 was analyzed by high-coverage gene expression profiling. 33,004 peaks were detected, and 30 transcripts showed significant changes in the presence of GA3. Among these, basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (AK073385) was significantly upregulated. Quantitative PCR analysis confirmed that expression of AK073385 was controlled by GA3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (AK073385) is therefore involved in the regulation of gene expression by GA3.

  9. Computational study of HIV gp120 as a target for polyanionic entry inhibitors: Exploiting the V3 loop region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis R Hollingsworth

    Full Text Available Multiple approaches are being utilized to develop therapeutics to treat HIV infection. One approach is designed to inhibit entry of HIV into host cells, with a target being the viral envelope glycoprotein, gp120. Polyanionic compounds have been shown to be effective in inhibiting HIV entry, with a mechanism involving electrostatic interactions with the V3 loop of gp120 being proposed. In this study, we applied computational methods to elucidate molecular interactions between the repeat unit of the precisely alternating polyanion, Poly(4,4'-stilbenedicarboxylate-alt-maleic acid (DCSti-alt-MA and the V3 loop of gp120 from strains of HIV against which these polyanions were previously tested (IIIb, BaL, 92UG037, JR-CSF as well as two strains for which gp120 crystal structures are available (YU2, 2B4C. Homology modeling was used to create models of the gp120 proteins. Using monomers of the gp120 protein, we applied extensive molecular dynamics simulations to obtain dominant morphologies that represent a variety of open-closed states of the V3 loop to examine the interaction of 112 ligands of the repeating units of DCSti-alt-MA docked to the V3 loop and surrounding residues. Using the distance between the V1/V2 and V3 loops of gp120 as a metric, we revealed through MD simulations that gp120 from the lab-adapted strains (BaL and IIIb, which are more susceptible to inhibition by DCSti-alt-MA, clearly transitioned to the closed state in one replicate of each simulation set, whereas none of the replicates from the Tier II strains (92UG037 and JR-CSF did so. Docking repeat unit microspecies to the gp120 protein before and after MD simulation enabled identification of residues that were key for binding. Notably, only a few residues were found to be important for docking both before and after MD simulation as a result of the conformational heterogeneity provided by the simulations. Consideration of the residues that were consistently involved in interactions

  10. Radiative and magnetic properties of solar active regions. II. Spatially resolved analysis of O V 62.97 nm transition region emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fludra, A.; Warren, H.

    2010-11-01

    Context. Global relationships between the photospheric magnetic flux and the extreme ultraviolet emission integrated over active region area have been studied in a previous paper by Fludra & Ireland (2008, A&A, 483, 609). Spatially integrated EUV line intensities are tightly correlated with the total unsigned magnetic flux, and yet these global power laws have been shown to be insufficient for accurately determining the coronal heating mechanism owing to the mathematical ill-conditioning of the inverse problem. Aims: Our aim is to establish a relationship between the EUV line intensities and the photospheric magnetic flux density on small spatial scales in active regions and investigate whether it provides a way of identifying the process that heats the coronal loops. Methods: We compare spatially resolved EUV transition region emission and the photospheric magnetic flux density. This analysis is based on the O V 62.97 nm line recorded by the SOHO Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) and SOHO MDI magnetograms for six solar active regions. The magnetic flux density ϕ is converted to a simulated O V intensity using a model relationship I(ϕ, L) = Cϕδ Lλ, where the loop length L is obtained from potential magnetic field extrapolations. This simulated spatial distribution of O V intensities is convolved with the CDS instrument's point spread function and compared pixel by pixel with the observed O V line intensity. Parameters δ and λ are derived to give the best fit for the observed and simulated intensities. Results: Spatially-resolved analysis of the transition region emission reveals the complex nature of the heating processes in active regions. In some active regions, particularly large, local intensity enhancements up to a factor of five are present. When areas with O V intensities above 3000 erg cm-2 s-1 sr-1 are ignored, a power law has been fitted to the relationship between the local O V line intensity and the photospheric magnetic flux density in each

  11. Beyond Solar-B: MTRAP, the Magnetic TRAnsition Region Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. M.; Moore, R. L.; Hathaway, D. H.; Science Definition CommitteeHigh-Resolution Solar Magnetography Beyond Solar-B Team

    2003-05-01

    The next generation of solar missions will reveal and measure fine-scale solar magnetic fields and their effects in the solar atmosphere at heights, small scales, sensitivities, and fields of view well beyond the reach of Solar-B. The necessity for, and potential of, such observations for understanding solar magnetic fields, their generation in and below the photosphere, and their control of the solar atmosphere and heliosphere, were the focus of a science definition workshop, "High-Resolution Solar Magnetography from Space: Beyond Solar-B," held in Huntsville Alabama in April 2001. Forty internationally prominent scientists active in solar research involving fine-scale solar magnetism participated in this Workshop and reached consensus that the key science objective to be pursued beyond Solar-B is a physical understanding of the fine-scale magnetic structure and activity in the magnetic transition region, defined as the region between the photosphere and corona where neither the plasma nor the magnetic field strongly dominates the other. The observational objective requires high cadence (x 16K pixels) with high QE at 150 nm, and extendable spacecraft structures. The Science Organizing Committee of the Beyond Solar-B Workshop recommends that: 1. Science and Technology Definition Teams should be established in FY04 to finalize the science requirements and to define technology development efforts needed to ensure the practicality of MTRAP's observational goals. 2. The necessary technology development funding should be included in Code S budgets for FY06 and beyond to prepare MTRAP for a new start no later than the nominal end of the Solar-B mission, around 2010.

  12. Geometry of the solar wind transition region during the 11-year solar cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotova, N.A.; Blums, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    Geometry of the solar wind transition region and its dynamics during the 11-year solar cycle is investigated. It is shown that the space geometry of the transition region suffers considerable changes. In the years of minimum of solar activity (1975-1977) the transition region has a form close to elliptical, shifts nearer to the Sun, while its width decreases. During the years of maximum of Solar activity (1979-1981) the form of the transition region becomes close to spherically symmetric, is located further from the Sun and its width is increased

  13. Stability region of closed-loop pilot-vehicle system for fly-by-wire aircraft with limited actuator rate

    OpenAIRE

    Ying-hui, Li; Liang, Qu; Hao-jun, Xu; Qi-meng, Cao

    2017-01-01

    The category-II PIO (Pilot Induced Oscillations) caused by actuator rate limitation of fly-by-wire airplanes will badly threaten the flight safety. The stability regions of closed-loop pilot-vehicle (CLPV) system with rate limited actuator were studied in this paper to assess stability of such CLPV system. The augmented state  variables were introduced to segregate the rate limited element from the primary  system in order to build the saturation nonlinear model of CLPV system. To get the max...

  14. Global Natural Disaster Risk Hotspots: Transition to a Regional Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner-Lam, A.; Chen, R.; Dilley, M.

    2005-12-01

    economic losses, are also limited. On one hand the data are adequate for general identification of areas of the globe that are at relatively higher single- or multiple-hazard risk than other areas. On the other hand they are inadequate for understanding the absolute levels of risk posed by any specific hazard or combination of hazards. Nevertheless it is possible to assess in general terms the exposure and potential magnitude of losses to people and their assets in these areas. Such information, although not ideal, can still be very useful for informing a range of disaster prevention and preparedness measures, including prioritization of resources, targeting of more localized and detailed risk assessments, implementation of risk-based disaster management and emergency response strategies, and development of long-term plans for poverty reduction and economic development. In addition to summarizing the results of the Hotspots Project, we discuss data collection issues and suggest methodological approaches for making the transition to more detailed regional and national studies. Preliminary results for several regional case studies will be presented.

  15. Mass transit sustainability in the Saint Louis region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    It has been often suggested that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing and expecting a different outcome. Unfortunately a : dispassionate evaluation of the current state of public transit in the United States would easily fit this defini...

  16. MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF TRANSITION REGION PENUMBRAL SUBARCSECOND BRIGHT DOTS USING IRIS AND NST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Na; Liu, Chang; Xu, Yan; Wang, Haimin [Space Weather Research Laboratory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, University Heights, Newark, NJ 07102-1982 (United States); Yurchyshyn, Vasyl [Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314-9672 (United States); Tian, Hui [School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China); Kleint, Lucia, E-mail: na.deng@njit.edu [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Bahnhofstr. 6, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland)

    2016-10-01

    Using high-resolution transition region (TR) observations taken by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) mission, Tian et al. revealed numerous short-lived subarcsecond bright dots (BDs) above sunspots (mostly located in the penumbrae), which indicate yet unexplained small-scale energy releases. Moreover, whether or not these subarcsecond TR brightenings have any signature in the lower atmosphere and how they are formed are still not fully resolved. This paper presents a multi-wavelength study of the TR penumbral BDs using a coordinated observation of a near disk center sunspot with IRIS and the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope (NST) at the Big Bear Solar Observatory. NST provides high-resolution chromospheric and photospheric observations with narrowband H α imaging spectroscopy and broadband TiO images, respectively, complementary to IRIS TR observations. A total of 2692 TR penumbral BDs are identified from a 37 minute time series of IRIS 1400 Å slit-jaw images. Their locations tend to be associated more with downflowing and darker fibrils in the chromosphere, and weakly associated with bright penumbral features in the photosphere. However, temporal evolution analyses of the BDs show that there is no consistent and convincing brightening response in the chromosphere. These results are compatible with a formation mechanism of the TR penumbral BDs by falling plasma from coronal heights along more vertical and dense magnetic loops. The BDs may also be produced by small-scale impulsive magnetic reconnection taking place sufficiently high in the atmosphere that has no energy release in the chromosphere.

  17. Effects of Zb states and bottom meson loops on ϒ (4 S )→ϒ (1 S ,2 S )π+π- transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun-Hua; Cleven, Martin; Daub, Johanna T.; Guo, Feng-Kun; Hanhart, Christoph; Kubis, Bastian; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Zou, Bing-Song

    2017-02-01

    We study the dipion transitions ϒ (4 S )→ϒ (n S )π+π- (n =1 ,2 ) . In particular, we consider the effects of the two intermediate bottomoniumlike exotic states Zb(10610 ) and Zb(10650 ) as well as bottom meson loops. The strong pion-pion final-state interactions, especially including channel coupling to K K ¯ in the S wave, are taken into account model independently by using dispersion theory. Based on a nonrelativistic effective field theory we find that the contribution from the bottom meson loops is comparable to those from the chiral contact terms and the Zb-exchange terms. For the ϒ (4 S )→ϒ (2 S )π+π- decay, the result shows that including the effects of the Zb exchange and the bottom meson loops can naturally reproduce the two-hump behavior of the π π mass spectra. Future angular distribution data are decisive for the identification of different production mechanisms. For the ϒ (4 S )→ϒ (1 S )π+π- decay, we show that there is a narrow dip around 1 GeV in the π π invariant mass distribution, caused by the final-state interactions. The distribution is clearly different from that in similar transitions from lower ϒ states, and needs to be verified by future data with high statistics. Also we predict the decay width and the dikaon mass distribution of the ϒ (4 S )→ϒ (1 S )K+K- process.

  18. Evaluation of regional real-time transit communications and data information sharing in the national capital region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This final report documents transit-related enhancements to the Regional Integration Transportation Information System (RITIS), creation of the RITIS Chat Instant Messaging tool, and final project evaluation of the effectiveness of the RITIS Chat too...

  19. Metschnikowia Species Share a Pool of Diverse rRNA Genes Differing in Regions That Determine Hairpin-Loop Structures and Evolve by Reticulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Sipiczki

    Full Text Available Modern taxonomy of yeasts is mainly based on phylogenetic analysis of conserved DNA and protein sequences. By far the most frequently used sequences are those of the repeats of the chromosomal rDNA array. It is generally accepted that the rDNA repeats of a genome have identical sequences due to the phenomenon of sequence homogenisation and can thus be used for identification and barcoding of species. Here we show that the rDNA arrays of the type strains of Metschnikowia andauensis and M. fructicola are not homogenised. Both have arrays consisting of diverse repeats that differ from each other in the D1/D2 domains by up to 18 and 25 substitutions. The variable sites are concentrated in two regions that correspond to back-folding stretches of hairpin loops in the predicted secondary structure of the RNA molecules. The substitutions do not alter significantly the overall hairpin-loop structure due to wobble base pairing at sites of C-T transitions and compensatory mutations in the complementary strand of the hairpin stem. The phylogenetic and network analyses of the cloned sequences revealed that the repeats had not evolved in a vertical tree-like way but reticulation might have shaped the rDNA arrays of both strains. The neighbour-net analysis of all cloned sequences of the type strains and the database sequences of different strains further showed that these species share a continuous pool of diverse repeats that appear to evolve by reticulate evolution.

  20. A training rule which guarantees finite-region stability for a class of closed-loop neural-network control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntanapreeda, S; Fullmer, R R

    1996-01-01

    A training method for a class of neural network controllers is presented which guarantees closed-loop system stability. The controllers are assumed to be nonlinear, feedforward, sampled-data, full-state regulators implemented as single hidden-layer neural networks. The controlled systems must be locally hermitian and observable. Stability of the closed-loop system is demonstrated by determining a Lyapunov function, which can be used to identify a finite stability region about the regulator point.

  1. Energy transitions in small-scale regions – What we can learn from a regional innovation systems perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattes, Jannika; Huber, Andreas; Koehrsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The prevalent theories in the debate on sustainability transitions have been criticised for not sufficiently addressing energy change processes at the local level. This paper aims to enhance our understanding of local energy reorganisation processes. Drawing on the Regional Innovation Systems (RIS) approach, we argue that local development dynamics result from the interaction of various subsystems: science, politics, public administration, industry, finance, intermediaries and civil society. The analysis of the involved subsystems and their interaction shows how energy transitions are shaped by different individual and organisational actors as well as institutions on the local level. Empirical evidence from case studies on the German cities of Emden and Bottrop illustrates our theoretical conceptualisation of energy transitions. We conclude by presenting characteristic interaction patterns for energy transition drawn from the two cases. - Highlights: • We highlight the importance of spatial and regional aspects for transitions. • We draw upon regional innovation systems’ subsystems to describe energy transitions. • We show how actors and institutions interact in and coordinate transition processes. • We present evidence from two small-scale regions in Germany: Emden and Bottrop

  2. Formation of Large-scale Coronal Loops Interconnecting Two Active Regions through Gradual Magnetic Reconnection and an Associated Heating Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guohui; Chen, Yao; Zhu, Chunming; Liu, Chang; Ge, Lili; Wang, Bing; Li, Chuanyang; Wang, Haimin

    2018-06-01

    Coronal loops interconnecting two active regions (ARs), called interconnecting loops (ILs), are prominent large-scale structures in the solar atmosphere. They carry a significant amount of magnetic flux and therefore are considered to be an important element of the solar dynamo process. Earlier observations showed that eruptions of ILs are an important source of CMEs. It is generally believed that ILs are formed through magnetic reconnection in the high corona (>150″–200″), and several scenarios have been proposed to explain their brightening in soft X-rays (SXRs). However, the detailed IL formation process has not been fully explored, and the associated energy release in the corona still remains unresolved. Here, we report the complete formation process of a set of ILs connecting two nearby ARs, with successive observations by STEREO-A on the far side of the Sun and by SDO and Hinode on the Earth side. We conclude that ILs are formed by gradual reconnection high in the corona, in line with earlier postulations. In addition, we show evidence that ILs brighten in SXRs and EUVs through heating at or close to the reconnection site in the corona (i.e., through the direct heating process of reconnection), a process that has been largely overlooked in earlier studies of ILs.

  3. Superhelicity Constrains a Localized and R-Loop-Dependent Formation of G-Quadruplexes at the Upstream Region of Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ke-Wei; He, Yi-de; Liu, Hong-He; Li, Xin-Min; Hao, Yu-Hua; Tan, Zheng

    2017-10-20

    Transcription induces formation of intramolecular G-quadruplex structures at the upstream region of a DNA duplex by an upward transmission of negative supercoiling through the DNA. Currently the regulation of such G-quadruplex formation remains unclear. Using plasmid as a model, we demonstrate that while it is the dynamic negative supercoiling generated by a moving RNA polymerase that triggers a formation of a G-quadruplex, the constitutional superhelicity determines the potential and range of the formation of a G-quadruplex by constraining the propagation of the negative supercoiling. G-quadruplex formation is maximal in negatively supercoiled and nearly abolished in relaxed plasmids while being moderate in nicked and linear ones. The formation of a G-quadruplex strongly correlates with the presence of an R-loop. Preventing R-loop formation virtually abolished G-quadruplex formation even in the negatively supercoiled plasmid. Enzymatic action and protein binding that manipulate supercoiling or its propagation all impact the formation of G-quadruplexes. Because chromosomes and plasmids in cells in their natural form are maintained in a supercoiled state, our findings reveal a physical basis that justifies the formation and regulation of G-quadruplexes in vivo. The structural features involved in G-quadruplex formation may all serve as potential targets in clinical and therapeutic applications.

  4. Automated Temperature and Emission Measure Analysis of Coronal Loops and Active Regions Observed with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO/AIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Boerner, Paul; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Malanushenko, Anna

    2013-03-01

    We developed numerical codes designed for automated analysis of SDO/AIA image datasets in the six coronal filters, including: i) coalignment test between different wavelengths with measurements of the altitude of the EUV-absorbing chromosphere, ii) self-calibration by empirical correction of instrumental response functions, iii) automated generation of differential emission measure [DEM] distributions with peak-temperature maps [ T p( x, y)] and emission measure maps [ EM p( x, y)] of the full Sun or active region areas, iv) composite DEM distributions [d EM( T)/d T] of active regions or subareas, v) automated detection of coronal loops, and vi) automated background subtraction and thermal analysis of coronal loops, which yields statistics of loop temperatures [ T e], temperature widths [ σ T], emission measures [ EM], electron densities [ n e], and loop widths [ w]. The combination of these numerical codes allows for automated and objective processing of numerous coronal loops. As an example, we present the results of an application to the active region NOAA 11158, observed on 15 February 2011, shortly before it produced the largest (X2.2) flare during the current solar cycle. We detect 570 loop segments at temperatures in the entire range of log( T e)=5.7 - 7.0 K and corroborate previous TRACE and AIA results on their near-isothermality and the validity of the Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana (RTV) law at soft X-ray temperatures ( T≳2 MK) and its failure at lower EUV temperatures.

  5. Loop kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdal, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    Basic operators acting in the loop space are introduced. The topology of this space and properties of the Stokes type loop functionals are discussed. The parametrically invariant loop calculus developed here is used in the loop dynamics

  6. Burgundy-Franche-Comte Region. The energy transition commitment: for a positive-energy region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This report first presents an inventory of actions and arrangement of the region for energy transition. These actions and arrangements first concern the mobilisation of territories. They also deal with buildings (social housing, public buildings, individual housing), and schools (actions on the built patrimony in terms of renovation, energy efficiency, renewable energies, and so on, implementation of a specific eco-school approach, and struggle against food waste in schools). They comprise some general means (through actions on public buildings, on vehicles), public purchases, transports (organisation and tariffs, access to stations, development of inter-modal and green transports, actions in favour of rural mobility, energy saving in touristic transport, development of car sharing, support to the development of tomorrow's vehicles). Other actions and arrangements concern the environment: waste reduction and management, development of circular economy, national scheme for biomass, education. Other themes are economy (support to sectors and enterprises), research and innovation, agriculture and forests, renewable energies, education and training, citizen mobilisation, digital environment. The presence and existence of various European programmes (FEDER, and others) in the region are mentioned

  7. Regional strategy of energy transition. The regional strategy for energy transition in Pays-de-la-Loire for 2014-2020

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auxiette, Jacques; Clergeau, Christophe; Bouchaud, Emmanuelle

    2014-04-01

    As the Pays-de-la-Loire region has been committed for three years in the preparation for energy transition, this publication first recalls the main objectives to be reached by 2050 regarding energy consumption, electric power consumption, oil consumption by the transport sector, and greenhouse gas emissions. It outlines the need for a national strategy on the long term for energy transition, and presents the adopted approach for the elaboration of such a regional strategy, based on several experiments. The main axes of this strategy are then presented: to better and less consume energy (through thermal renovation, sustainable mobility, energy efficiency, energy saving behaviours), to make energy transition the engine of territory development (through a support to sectors, the development of regional energy production, and optimisation of consumptions and productions), and to elaborate tools for cooperative action

  8. Experimental investigation of heat transfer in the transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, K.; Weber, P.; Feng, Q.

    1990-10-01

    An experimental study of forced convective boiling heat transfer for upflow of water in a circular tube has been performed using a heat transfer system with temperature-controlled indirect Joule heating. By this way, complete boiling curves from incipience of boiling to fully established film boiling could be measured including the transition boiling regime. The boiling curves were traversed in a quasi-steady mode, usually by increasing the set-point wall temperature average at a constant time rate of 3.5 K/min. The vast majority of results covers the pressure range from 0.1 to 1.0 MPa, mass flux range from 25 to 200 kg/(m 2 s) and inlet subcooling from 5 to 30 K. The experimental results of transition boiling heat transfer obtained in the centre of the test section were correlated in terms of a heat flux/surface superheat relationship that was normalized by the maximum heat flux (local CHF) and its associated wall superheat, respectively, to anchor the transition boiling curve to its low temperature limit. The upper surface temperature limit of the transition boiling regime was determined by inspection of measured axial distributions of surface heat flux and corresponding wall temperature. The critical heat flux (CHF) and its corresponding wall superheat has been measured, too. These temperature-controlled results were compared also with power-controlled experiments. The data are presented in terms of a table and accurate empirical correlations following Katto's generalized correlation scheme. Taking into account previous CHF data at L/D ≤ 100 and same range of flow conditions the length effect was found to further depend on pressure and mass flux. The data for the critical wall superheat show a distinct dependence upon pressure, mass flux and inlet quality that has not been observed before with comparable clarity

  9. Current Account Reversals and Persistency in Transition Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Aristovnik, Aleksander

    2006-01-01

    The article investigates sharp reductions seen in current account deficits in transition countries in the 1992-2003 period. By using both descriptive statistical approaches as well as panel regression-based analysis the article focuses on three important aspects of these current account reversals: a) to examine those factors that might have triggered the reversals and to provide some insights into the current account adjustment process; b) to reveal some characteristics of persistent current ...

  10. Numerical integration of massive two-loop Mellin-Barnes integrals in Minkowskian regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubovyk, Ievgen

    2016-07-01

    Mellin-Barnes (MB) techniques applied to integrals emerging in particle physics perturbative calculations are summarized. New versions of AMBRE packages which construct planar and nonplanar MB representations are shortly discussed. The numerical package MBnumerics.m is presented for the first time which is able to calculate with a high precision multidimensional MB integrals in Minkowskian regions. Examples are given for massive vertex integrals which include threshold effects and several scale parameters.

  11. Numerical integration of massive two-loop Mellin-Barnes integrals in Minkowskian regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubovyk, Ievgen [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Gluza, Janusz [Uniwersytet Slaski, Katowice (Poland). Inst. Fizyki; Riemann, Tord [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Uniwersytet Slaski, Katowice (Poland). Inst. Fizyki; Usovitsch, Johann [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    Mellin-Barnes (MB) techniques applied to integrals emerging in particle physics perturbative calculations are summarized. New versions of AMBRE packages which construct planar and nonplanar MB representations are shortly discussed. The numerical package MBnumerics.m is presented for the first time which is able to calculate with a high precision multidimensional MB integrals in Minkowskian regions. Examples are given for massive vertex integrals which include threshold effects and several scale parameters.

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the D-loop region of mitochondrial DNA is associated with the kidney survival time in chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinsheng; Guo, Zhanjun; Bai, Yaling; Zhang, Junxia; Cui, Liwen; Zhang, Huiran; Zhang, Shenglei; Ai, Xiaolu

    2015-02-01

    The mitochondrial displacement loop (D-loop) is known to accumulate mutations and SNPs at a higher frequency than other regions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We had identified chronic kidney disease (CKD) risk-associated SNPs in the D-loop of CKD patients previously. In this study, we investigated the association of SNPs in the D-loop of mtDNA with the kidney survival of CKD. The D-loop region of mtDNA was sequenced for 119 CKD patients from the inpatient of the Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to identify disease outcome-associated SNPs in the D-loop of CKD patients. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify risk factors for the kidney survival of CKD. In the present study, we identified 20 SNPs with a frequency higher than 5% and assessed the relationship of these SNPs with kidney survival time in CKD patients, a SNP of 146 was identified by log-rank test for statistically significant prediction of the kidney survival time. In an overall multivariate analysis, allele 146 was identified as an independent predictor of kidney survival time in CKD patients. The survival time of kidney in the CKD patients with 146C was significantly shorter than that of kidney in CKD patients with 146T (relative risk, 2.336; 95% CI, 1.319-3.923; p = 0.001). SNPs in the D-loop can predict the kidney survival of CKD patients. Analysis of genetic polymorphisms in the mitochondrial D-loop can help to identify CKD patient subgroup at high risk of a poor disease outcome.

  13. Microwave, EUV, and X-ray observations of active region loops and filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmahl, E.

    1980-01-01

    Until the advent of X-ray and EUV observations of coronal structures, radio observers were forced to rely on eclipse and coronagraph observations in white light and forbidden coronal lines for additional diagnostics of the high temperature microwave sources. While these data provided enough material for theoretical insight into the physics of active regions, there was no way to make direct, simultaneous comparison of coronal structures on the disk as seen at microwave and optical wavelengths. This is now possible, and therefore the author summarizes the EUV and X-ray observations indicating at each point the relevance to microwaves. (Auth.)

  14. Funding structures and competing priorities for regional transit in metro Detroit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The Detroit region provides less locally raised funding for transit than other urban areas of the U.S. and Canada, resulting in a : transit system that is less effective. : This is exacerbated by the fact that federal funds can be used for capital pr...

  15. Internal Controls over the Department of Defense Transit Subsidy Program within the National Capital Region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul J; Marsh, Patricia A; Pfeil, Lorin T; Gaich, Walter J; Lawrence, Demetria; Hart, Marcia T; Dickison, Ralph W; Varner, Pamela; Foth, Suellen

    2007-01-01

    DoD personnel with oversight responsibility and personnel working within the DoD transit subsidy program for the National Capital Region should read this report to obtain information about internal...

  16. Using coronal loops to reconstruct the magnetic field of an active region before and after a major flare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malanushenko, A. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT (United States); Schrijver, C. J.; DeRosa, M. L. [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Wheatland, M. S. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Redfern, NSW (Australia)

    2014-03-10

    The shapes of solar coronal loops are sensitive to the presence of electrical currents that are the carriers of the non-potential energy available for impulsive activity. We use this information in a new method for modeling the coronal magnetic field of active region (AR) 11158 as a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF). The observations used are coronal images around the time of major flare activity on 2011 February 15, together with the surface line-of-sight magnetic field measurements. The data are from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The model fields are constrained to approximate the coronal loop configurations as closely as possible, while also being subject to the force-free constraints. The method does not use transverse photospheric magnetic field components as input and is thereby distinct from methods for modeling NLFFFs based on photospheric vector magnetograms. We validate the method using observations of AR 11158 at a time well before major flaring and subsequently review the field evolution just prior to and following an X2.2 flare and associated eruption. The models indicate that the energy released during the instability is about 1 × 10{sup 32} erg, consistent with what is needed to power such a large eruptive flare. Immediately prior to the eruption, the model field contains a compact sigmoid bundle of twisted flux that is not present in the post-eruption models, which is consistent with the observations. The core of that model structure is twisted by ≈0.9 full turns about its axis.

  17. Regional Gastrointestinal Transit Times in Patients With Carcinoid Diarrhea: Assessment With the Novel 3D-Transit System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Tine; Haase, Anne-Mette; Schlageter, Vincent; Gronbaek, Henning; Krogh, Klaus

    2015-07-30

    The paucity of knowledge regarding gastrointestinal motility in patients with neuroendocrine tumors and carcinoid diarrhea re-stricts targeted treatment. 3D-Transit is a novel, minimally invasive, ambulatory method for description of gastrointestinal motility. The system has not yet been evaluated in any group of patients. We aimed to test the performance of 3D-Transit in patients with carcinoid diarrhea and to compare the patients' regional gastrointestinal transit times (GITT) and colonic motility patterns with those of healthy subjects. Fifteen healthy volunteers and seven patients with neuroendocrine tumor and at least 3 bowel movements per day were inves-tigated with 3D-Transit and standard radiopaque markers. Total GITT assessed with 3D-Transit and radiopaque markers were well correlated (Spearman's rho = 0.64, P = 0.002). Median total GITT was 12.5 (range: 8.5-47.2) hours in patients versus 25.1 (range: 13.1-142.3) hours in healthy (P = 0.007). There was no difference in gastric emptying (P = 0.778). Median small intestinal transit time was 3.8 (range: 1.4-5.5) hours in patients versus 4.4 (range: 1.8-7.2) hours in healthy subjects (P = 0.044). Median colorectal transit time was 5.2 (range: 2.9-40.1) hours in patients versus 18.1 (range: 5.0-134.0) hours in healthy subjects (P = 0.012). Median frequency of pansegmental co-lonic movements was 0.45 (range: 0.03-1.02) per hour in patients and 0.07 (range: 0-0.61) per hour in healthy subjects (P = 0.045). Three-dimensional Transit allows assessment of regional GITT in patients with diarrhea. Patients with carcinoid diarrhea have faster than normal gastrointestinal transit due to faster small intestinal and colorectal transit times. The latter is caused by an increased frequency of pansegmental colonic movements.

  18. A single nucleotide in stem loop II of 5'-untranslated region contributes to virulence of enterovirus 71 in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Te Yeh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterovirus 71 (EV71 has emerged as a neuroinvasive virus responsible for several large outbreaks in the Asia-Pacific region while virulence determinant remains unexplored. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report, we investigated increased virulence of unadapted EV71 clinical isolate 237 as compared with isolate 4643 in mice. A fragment 12 nucleotides in length in stem loop (SL II of 237 5'-untranslated region (UTR visibly reduced survival time and rate in mice was identified by constructing a series of infectious clones harboring chimeric 5'-UTR. In cells transfected with bicistronic plasmids, and replicon RNAs, the 12-nt fragment of isolate 237 enhanced translational activities and accelerated replication of subgenomic EV71. Finally, single nucleotide change from cytosine to uridine at base 158 in this short fragment of 5'-UTR was proven to reduce viral translation and EV71 virulence in mice. Results collectively indicated a pivotal role of novel virulence determinant C158 on virus translation in vitro and EV71 virulence in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: These results presented the first reported virulence determinant in EV71 5'-UTR and first position discovered from unadapted isolates.

  19. Regional debate on energy transition - 17 May 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, Michel

    2013-01-01

    In this conference, the author discusses the objectives of energy transition in France, and the objectives of the debate on this issue, and addresses three important questions raised by this issue: how to move towards energy efficiency and energy sobriety, which pathway to reach the targeted energy mix in 2025, which are the costs, benefits and financing of energy transition. He describes the complexity of the problem and its contradictory aspects (how to produce more energy with less oil, gas and coal). As far as the first question is concerned (energy efficiency and sobriety), he discusses the notion of energy sobriety, what is at stake (supply security, economic, social and climatic challenges), the strategic objectives, the evolution of energy consumption and production, the leading role of electricity, the CO 2 emissions by different economic sectors, the level of energy imports, the issue of electricity price. As far as the two other questions are concerned, he discusses the opportunities associated with the building and transport sectors, the issue of energy storage, and the role of EDF. In a second part, the author criticizes the Negawatt scenario, and the ADEME's position and action, and discusses opportunities related to energy efficiency, the decrease of the use of fossil energy, the promotion of electricity, and the preservation of nuclear energy as a French asset. He comments the statements of French political actors, the evolution of wind energy production in Europe, the low level of energy and electricity production by the French wind turbines. He discusses a comparison between coal and nuclear in terms of production and pollution, the issue of nuclear waste management, the perspectives for nuclear reactors, the situation in other countries (Switzerland, Germany). He notably outlines that phasing out nuclear in Germany results in the use of coal plants and gas imports

  20. Regional unemployment and human capital in transition economies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurajda, Štěpán; Terrell, K.

    -, č. 345 (2007), s. 1-34 ISSN 1211-3298 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : unemployment * human capital * regional labor markets Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://www.cerge-ei.cz/pdf/wp/Wp345.pdf

  1. Regional unemployment and human capital in transition economies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurajda, Štěpán; Terrell, K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2009), s. 241-274 ISSN 0967-0750 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC542 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : unemployment * human capital * regional labour markets Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.774, year: 2009

  2. The Impact of Opioid Treatment on Regional Gastrointestinal Transit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jakob Lykke; Nilsson, Matias; Brock, Christina

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: To employ an experimental model of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction in healthy human volunteers, and evaluate the impact ofopioid treatment compared to placebo on gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and motility assessed by questionnaires and regional GItransit times using the 3...

  3. Control Mechanism and Security Region for Intentional Islanding Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yu; Xu, Zhao; Østergaard, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    in the grid. The concept of Islanding Security Region (ISR) has been proposed as an organic composition of the developed control mechanism. The purpose of this control mechanism is to maintain the frequency stability and eventually the security of power supply to the customers, by utilizing resources from...... generation and demand sides. The control mechanism can be extended to consider the distributed generations like wind power and other innovative technologies such as the Demand as Frequency controlled Reserve (DFR) technique in the future....

  4. Louisiana Speaks Regional Vision Transit Corridors, UTM Zone 15N NAD 83, Louisiana Recovery Authority (2007), [louisiana_speaks_vision_transit_corridors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This GIS shapefile data illustrates the primary and secondary transit corridors included in the Louisiana Speaks Regional Plan Vision. This network accommodates a...

  5. The Asia-Pacific: A Region in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    after drawn-out discussions to do with the positions of such eminences as Le Duc Tho and Truong Chinh following the death of old-guard leader Le Duan in...in regional social capital as shown in interstate and trans -state relationships. The Indo-Pakistani rivalry has been at the center of the depletion...dialogues will mean for the region’s existing ‘alphabet soup’ of trans -Pacific institutions. This means not only APEC and the ARF but also ASEAN

  6. Connecting agriculture and health care at the regional level: contributions from transition theory and institutional entrepreneurship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassink, J.; Grin, J.; Hulsink, W.

    2010-01-01

    The authors analyzed two types of regional cooperation. Regional foundations of care farms and care institutions collaborating with a group of farmers. The initiatives were analyzed with a conceptual framework based on transition sciences and institutional entrepreneurship. The presence of a

  7. Fine definition of the CXCR4-binding region on the V3 loop of feline immunodeficiency virus surface glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong-Ying Hu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is shared by primary and laboratory-adapted strains of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV for viral entry. Our previous studies implicated a contiguous nine-amino-acid region of the V3 loop of the FIV envelope surface as important in CXCR4 binding and virus entry. The binding is specific for CXCR4 since it can be inhibited by AMD3100, a selective CXCR4 inhibitor. Additional site-directed mutagenesis was used to further reveal the key residues. Binding studies indicated that basic residues R395, K397, R399 as well as N398 are critical for CXCR4 binding. The effect of other amino acid residues on receptor binding depends on the type of amino acid residue substituted. The binding study results were confirmed on human CXCR4-expressing SupT1 cells and correlated with entry efficiency using a virus entry assay. Amino acid residues critical for CXCR4 are not critical for interactions with the primary binding receptor CD134, which has an equivalent role as CD4 for HIV-1 binding. The ELISA results show that W394 and W400 are crucial for the recognition by neutralizing anti-V3 antibodies. Since certain strains of HIV-1 also use CXCR4 as the entry receptor, the findings make the feline model attractive for development of broad-based entry antagonists and for study of the molecular mechanism of receptor/virus interactions.

  8. Recombination in the 5' leader of murine leukemia virus is accurate and influenced by sequence identity with a strong bias toward the kissing-loop dimerization region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M

    1998-01-01

    during minus-strand DNA synthesis occurred within defined areas of the genome and did not lead to misincorporations at the crossover site. The nonrandom distribution of recombination sites did not reflect a bias for specific sites due to selection at the level of marker gene expression. We address...... whether template switching is affected by the length of sequence identity, by palindromic sequences, and/or by putative stem-loop structures. Sixteen of 24 sites of recombination colocalized with the kissing-loop dimerization region, and we propose that RNA-RNA interactions between palindromic sequences...

  9. Stability, structure, and evolution of cool loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cally, P.S.; Robb, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    The criteria for the existence and stability of cool loops are reexamined. It is found that the stability of the loops strongly depends on the form of the heating and radiative loss functions and that if the Ly-alpha peak which appears in most calculations of the radiative loss function is real, cool loops are almost certainly unstable. Removing the hydrogen contribution from the recent loss function Q(T) by Cook et al. (1989) does not produce the much-used result, Q proportional to T-cubed, which is so favorable to cool loop stability. Even using the probably unrealistically favorable loss function Q1 of Cook et al. with the hydrogen contribution removed, the maximum temperature attainable in stable cool loops is a factor of 2-3 too small to account for the excess emission observed in lower transition region lines. Dynamical simulations of cool loop instabilities reveal that the final state of such a model is the hot loop equilibrium. 26 refs

  10. The generation of a lower threshold multiwavelength fiber laser in the L-band region assisted by a Sagnac loop mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, Siti Narimah; Arsad, Norhana; Bakar, Ahmad Ashrif Abu; Elias, Sayidatul Nadia; Menon, P Sushita; Shaari, Sahbudin

    2015-01-01

    A low threshold multiwavelength laser generated with the assistance of a Sagnac loop mirror is proposed. Two simple ring cavity designs are studied, namely a standard design ring cavity (design A) and a ring cavity with a Sagnac loop mirror (design B). Design B, which integrates a Sagnac loop mirror together with a polarization controller, exhibits the most optimum performance, generating seven lasing modes. Using only a 40 mW pump power from the erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), design B is the preferred ring cavity design, as it successfully produces seven lasing modes simultaneously within a 0.42 nm channel spacing in the L-band region. The ring cavity is characterized by investigating the lasing threshold through the tuning output power of the EDFA, the percentages of extracted power and cavity loss. (paper)

  11. Health transition in Brazil: regional variations and divergence/convergence in mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Gabriel Mendes

    2017-08-21

    This study analyzes the main characteristics of the health transition in Brazil and its five major regions, using a framework that accounts for regional inequalities in mortality trends. The regional mortality divergence/convergence process is described and discussed by considering the specific contributions of age groups and causes of death in life expectancy variations. Results show that mortality change in Brazil has follow the epidemiologic transition theory to some extent during the period under analysis - for instance, the sharp decline in infant mortality in all regions (first from infectious and parasitic diseases and then from causes associated with the perinatal period) and the increase in the participation of chronic and degenerative diseases as the main cause of death. However, some features of Brazilian transition have not followed the linear and unidirectional pattern proposed by the epidemiologic transition theory, which helps to understand the periods of regional divergence in life expectancy, despite the long-term trends showing reducing regional inequalities. The emergence of HIV/AIDS, the persistence of relatively high levels of other infections and parasitic diseases, the regional differences in the unexpected mortality improvements from cardiovascular diseases, and the rapid and strong variations in mortality from external causes are some of the examples.

  12. Identification of sequence polymorphisms in the D-Loop region of mitochondrial DNA as a risk factor for colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhanjun; Zhao, Shengnan; Fan, Haiyan; Du, Yanming; Zhao, Yufei; Wang, Guiying

    2016-11-01

    The accumulation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the displacement loop (D-Loop) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been identified for their association with cancer risk in a number of cancers. We investigated the colon cancer risk profile of D-Loop SNPs in a case-control study. The frequent alleles of nucleotides 73G/A, 146T/C, 195T/C, 324C/G, 16261C/T, and 16304T/C as well as the minor allele of 309C/C insert were significantly associated with an increased risk for colon cancer. In conclusion, SNPs in the mtDNA D-Loop were found to be valuable markers for colon cancer risk evaluation.

  13. PHOTOSPHERIC PROPERTIES OF WARM EUV LOOPS AND HOT X-RAY LOOPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kano, R. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ueda, K. [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Tsuneta, S., E-mail: ryouhei.kano@nao.ac.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2014-02-20

    We investigate the photospheric properties (vector magnetic fields and horizontal velocity) of a well-developed active region, NOAA AR 10978, using the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope specifically to determine what gives rise to the temperature difference between ''warm loops'' (1-2 MK), which are coronal loops observed in EUV wavelengths, and ''hot loops'' (>3 MK), coronal loops observed in X-rays. We found that outside sunspots, the magnetic filling factor in the solar network varies with location and is anti-correlated with the horizontal random velocity. If we accept that the observed magnetic features consist of unresolved magnetic flux tubes, this anti-correlation can be explained by the ensemble average of flux-tube motion driven by small-scale random flows. The observed data are consistent with a flux tube width of ∼77 km and horizontal flow at ∼2.6 km s{sup –1} with a spatial scale of ∼120 km. We also found that outside sunspots, there is no significant difference between warm and hot loops either in the magnetic properties (except for the inclination) or in the horizontal random velocity at their footpoints, which are identified with the Hinode X-Ray Telescope and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer. The energy flux injected into the coronal loops by the observed photospheric motion of the magnetic fields is estimated to be 2 × 10{sup 6} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}, which is the same for both warm and hot loops. This suggests that coronal properties (e.g., loop length) play a more important role in giving rise to temperature differences of active-region coronal loops than photospheric parameters.

  14. Rocket studies of solar corona and transition region. [X-Ray spectrometer/spectrograph telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, L. W.; Bruner, E. C., Jr.; Brown, W. A.; Nobles, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    The XSST (X-Ray Spectrometer/Spectrograph Telescope) rocket payload launched by a Nike Boosted Black Brant was designed to provide high spectral resolution coronal soft X-ray line information on a spectrographic plate, as well as time resolved photo-electric records of pre-selected lines and spectral regions. This spectral data is obtained from a 1 x 10 arc second solar region defined by the paraboloidal telescope of the XSST. The transition region camera provided full disc images in selected spectral intervals originating in lower temperature zones than the emitting regions accessible to the XSST. A H-alpha camera system allowed referencing the measurements to the chromospheric temperatures and altitudes. Payload flight and recovery information is provided along with X-ray photoelectric and UV flight data, transition camera results and a summary of the anomalies encountered. Instrument mechanical stability and spectrometer pointing direction are also examined.

  15. Population genetic structure of skipjack tuna Katsuwonus pelamis from the Indian coast using sequence analysis of the mitochondrial DNA D-loop region

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.; Kumar, G.; Kunal, S.P.

    Biology (2012) 80, 2198–2212 doi:10.1111/j.1095-8649.2012.03270.x, available online at wileyonlinelibrary.com Population genetic structure of skipjack tuna Katsuwonus pelamis from the Indian coast using sequence analysis of the mitochondrial DNA D...-loop region M. R. Menezes*, G. Kumar and S. P. Kunal Biological Oceanography Division, National Institute of Oceanography (CSIR), Dona Paula, Goa 403 004, India (Received 26 May 2011, Accepted 14 February 2012) Genetic structure of skipjack tuna Katsuwonus...

  16. Three genetic stocks of frigate tuna Auxis thazard thazard (Lacepede, 1800) along the Indian coast revealed from sequence analyses of mitochondrial DNA D-loop region

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    GirishKumar; Kunal, S.P.; Menezes, M.R.; Meena, R.M.

    revealed from sequence analyses of mitochondrial DNA D-loop region Name of authors: 1. Girish Kumar* Biological Oceanography Division (BOD) National Institute of Oceanography (NIO) Dona Paula, Goa 403004, India. Email: girishkumar....nio@gmail.com Tel: +919766548060 2. Swaraj Priyaranjan Kunal Biological Oceanography Division (BOD) National Institute of Oceanography (NIO) Dona Paula, Goa 403004, India. Email: swar.mbt@gmail.com 3. Maria Rosalia Menezes Biological Oceanography...

  17. The Energy transition for green growth. Energy transition for green growth act in action: Regions - Citizens - Business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-07-01

    A great ambition underlies France's Energy Transition for Green Growth Act: to make France - following on from the Paris Climate Summit - an exemplary nation in terms of reducing its greenhouse gas emissions, diversifying its energy model and increasing the deployment of renewable energy sources. This Act provides a unique opportunity both for climate negotiations and for France. It sets goals and implements operational solutions which can be shared with different regions, companies, researchers, the public and anyone with a long-standing commitment to fighting climate change. The Energy Transition for Green Growth Act and its attendant action plans are designed to give France the means to make a more effective contribution to tackling climate change and reinforce its energy independence, while striking a better balance in its energy mix and creating jobs and business growth. The texts required for its implementation are operational and support plans are in place. These tools are available to private individuals, businesses and the regions, enabling them to take concrete action. This document summarizes the actions under way: Defining common objectives, Acting together, Renovating buildings, developing clean transport, Tackling waste and promoting the circular economy, Promoting renewable energy, optimising nuclear safety and public information, Simplifying and clarifying procedures

  18. MORPHOLOGY AND GENETIC DIVERSITY OF MITOCHONDRIAL DNA D-LOOP REGION USING PCR-RFLP ANALYSIS IN MAGELANG DUCK AND OTHER NATIVE DUCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Purwantini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the different of plumage colors on morphological diversityof Magelang duck and genetic diversity using PCR-RFLP mtDNA D-loop region analysis of Magelangduck and four others native duck population (Tegal, Mojosari, Bali and Alabio duck in Indonesia. Bloodsample was taken from 50 Magelang ducks and 20 of each native ducks. Morphological characteristicsof body measurement, production ability and egg quality of Magelang duck were analyzed usingCompletely Randomized Design with 11 plumage colors as treatments. PCR technique was administeredto amplify fragments in mtDNA D-loop region and PCR products were digested with endonucleaserestriction enzyme AluI and HaeIII. The result showed that morphology diversity of Magelang duck wasstatistically affected by different plumage colors. PCR-RFLP analysis using AluI and HaeIII restrictionenzyme resulted in six combinations of restriction fragment pattern shown in six haplotypes (A, B, C, D,E and F. Haplotype difference showed genetic diversity in the population of Magelang duck and theother native ducks. In conclusion, the different plumage colors affected morphology diversity ofMagelang duck. Genetic diversity of Indonesian native duck population could be identified by usingPCR-RFLP analysis on mtDNA D-loop region.

  19. A Loop Region in the N-Terminal Domain of Ebola Virus VP40 Is Important in Viral Assembly, Budding, and Egress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Adu-Gyamfi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV causes viral hemorrhagic fever in humans and can have clinical fatality rates of ~60%. The EBOV genome consists of negative sense RNA that encodes seven proteins including viral protein 40 (VP40. VP40 is the major Ebola virus matrix protein and regulates assembly and egress of infectious Ebola virus particles. It is well established that VP40 assembles on the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane of human cells to regulate viral budding where VP40 can produce virus like particles (VLPs without other Ebola virus proteins present. The mechanistic details, however, of VP40 lipid-interactions and protein-protein interactions that are important for viral release remain to be elucidated. Here, we mutated a loop region in the N-terminal domain of VP40 (Lys127, Thr129, and Asn130 and find that mutations (K127A, T129A, and N130A in this loop region reduce plasma membrane localization of VP40. Additionally, using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and number and brightness analysis we demonstrate these mutations greatly reduce VP40 oligomerization. Lastly, VLP assays demonstrate these mutations significantly reduce VLP release from cells. Taken together, these studies identify an important loop region in VP40 that may be essential to viral egress.

  20. Phylogenetic relationships of Scomberomorus commerson using sequence analysis of the mtDNA D-loop region in the Persian Gulf, Oman Sea and Arabian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mansourkiaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Narrow-barred Spanish mackerel, Scomberomorus commerson, is an epipelagic and migratory species of family Scombridae which have a significant role in terms of ecology and fishery. 100 samples were collected from the Persian Gulf, Oman Sea and Arabian Sea. Part of their dorsal fins was snipped and transferred to micro-tubes containing ethanol; then, DNAs were extracted and HRM-Real Time PCR was performed to designate representative specimens for sequencing. Phylogenetic relationships of S. commerson from Persian Gulf, Oman Sea and Arabian Sea were investigated using sequence data of mitochondrial DNA D-loop region. None clustered Neighbor Joining tree indicated the proximity amid S. commerson in four sites. As numbers demonstrated in sequence analyses of mitochondrial DNA D-Loop region a sublimely high degree of genetic similarity among S. commerson from the Persian Gulf and Oman Sea were perceived, thereafter, having one stock structure of S. commerson in four regions were proved, and this approximation can be merely justified by their migration process along the coasts of Oman Sea and Persian Gulf. Therefore, the assessment of distribution patterns of 20 haplotypes in the constructed phylogenetic tree using mtDNA D-Loop sequences ascertained that no significant clustering according to the sampling sites was concluded.

  1. Flow Orientation Analysis for Major Activity Regions Based on Smart Card Transit Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Singh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing public movement in transportation networks in a city is significant in understanding the life of citizen and making improved city plans for the future. This study focuses on investigating the flow orientation of major activity regions based on smart card transit data. The flow orientation based on the real movements such as transit data can provide the easiest way of understanding public movement in the complicated transportation networks. First, high inflow regions (HIRs are identified from transit data for morning and evening peak hours. The morning and evening HIRs are used to represent major activity regions for major daytime activities and residential areas, respectively. Second, the directional orientation of flow is then derived through the directional inflow vectors of the HIRs to show the bias in directional orientation and compare flow orientation among major activity regions. Finally, clustering analysis for HIRs is applied to capture the main patterns of flow orientations in the city and visualize the patterns on the map. The proposed methodology was illustrated with smart card transit data of bus and subway transportation networks in Seoul, Korea. Some remarkable patterns in the distribution of movements and orientations were found inside the city. The proposed methodology is useful since it unfolds the complexity and makes it easy to understand the main movement patterns in terms of flow orientation.

  2. Lindane Suppresses the Lipid-bilayer Permeability in Main Transition Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabra, Mads Christian; Jørgensen, Kent; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of a small molecule, the insecticide lindane, on unilamellar DMPC bilayers in the phase transition region, have been studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy. The calorimetric data show that increasing concentrations of lindane broaden the tr...

  3. A new crystal form of human tear lipocalin reveals high flexibility in the loop region and induced fit in the ligand cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breustedt, Daniel A.; Chatwell, Lorenz; Skerra, Arne

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structure of tear lipocalin determined in space group P2 1 revealed large structural deviations from the previously solved X-ray structure in space group C2, especially in the loop region and adjoining parts of the β-barrel which give rise to the ligand-binding site. These findings illustrate a novel mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition by the lipocalin protein family. Tear lipocalin (TLC) with the bound artificial ligand 1,4-butanediol has been crystallized in space group P2 1 with four protein molecules in the asymmetric unit and its X-ray structure has been solved at 2.6 Å resolution. TLC is a member of the lipocalin family that binds ligands with diverse chemical structures, such as fatty acids, phospholipids and cholesterol as well as microbial siderophores and the antibiotic rifampin. Previous X-ray structural analysis of apo TLC crystallized in space group C2 revealed a rather large bifurcated ligand pocket and a partially disordered loop region at the entrace to the cavity. Analysis of the P2 1 crystal form uncovered major conformational changes (i) in β-strands B, C and D, (ii) in loops 1, 2 and 4 at the open end of the β-barrel and (iii) in the extended C-terminal segment, which is attached to the β-barrel via a disulfide bridge. The structural comparison indicates high conformational plasticity of the loop region as well as of deeper parts of the ligand pocket, thus allowing adaptation to ligands that differ vastly in size and shape. This illustrates a mechanism for promiscuity in ligand recognition which may also be relevant for some other physiologically important members of the lipocalin protein family

  4. Savannah River Region: Transition between the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zullo, V.A.; Harris, W.B.; Price, V. [eds.

    1990-12-31

    The focus of the this conference of Coastal Plains geologists was on the Savannah River region of Georgia and South Carolina, and particularly on the geology of the US Department of Energy`s 300 square mile Savannah River Site (SRS) in western South Carolina. Current geological studies indicate that the Mesozoic-Cenozoic section in the Savannah River region is transitional between that of the Gulf Coastal Plain to the southwest and that of the Atlantic Coastal Plain to the northeast. With the transitional aspect of the region as its theme, the first session was devoted to overviews of Cretaceous and Paleogene geology in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Succeeding presentations and resulting discussions dealt with more specific problems in structural, lithostratigraphic, hydrological, biostratigraphic, and cyclostratigraphic analysis, and of correlation to standard stratigraphic frameworks. For these conference proceedings, individual papers have been processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  5. Multi-wavelength fiber laser in the S-band region using a Sagnac loop mirror as a comb generator in an SOA gain medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zulkifli, M Z; Hassan, N A; Awang, N A; Ahmad, H; Ghani, Z A; Harun, S W

    2010-01-01

    A simple design of multi-wavelength generation in the S-band region of the optical network transmission is proposed. The design consists of broad-band fiber Bragg grating (BB-FBG), which acts as a filter to enhance operation in the S-band region. A Sagnac loop mirror (SLM) is used to generate multiple wavelength oscillations in the ring cavity. The output consists of 60 lasing wavelengths oscillating simultaneously between 1464 nm and 1521 nm with a spacing of 0.92 nm and an output linewidth of 0.66 nm

  6. Small interfering RNA targeted to stem-loop II of the 5' untranslated region effectively inhibits expression of six HCV genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dash Srikanta

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The antiviral action of interferon alpha targets the 5' untranslated region (UTR used by hepatitis C virus (HCV to translate protein by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES mechanism. Although this sequence is highly conserved among different clinical strains, approximately half of chronically infected hepatitis C patients do not respond to interferon therapy. Therefore, development of small interfering RNA (siRNA targeted to the 5'UTR to inhibit IRES mediated translation may represent an alternative approach that could circumvent the problem of interferon resistance. Results Four different plasmid constructs were prepared for intracellular delivery of siRNAs targeting the stem loop II-III of HCV 5' UTR. The effect of siRNA production on IRES mediated translation was investigated using chimeric clones between the gene for green fluorescence protein (GFP and IRES sequences of six different HCV genotypes. The siRNA targeted to stem loop II effectively mediated degradation of HCV IRES mRNA and inhibited GFP expression in the case of six different HCV genotypes, where as siRNAs targeted to stem loop III did not. Furthermore, intracytoplasmic expression of siRNA into transfected Huh-7 cells efficiently degraded HCV genomic RNA and inhibited core protein expression from infectious full-length infectious clones HCV 1a and HCV 1b strains. Conclusion These in vitro studies suggest that siRNA targeted to stem-loop II is highly effective inhibiting IRES mediated translation of the major genotypes of HCV. Stem-loop II siRNA may be a good target for developing an intracellular immunization strategy based antiviral therapy to inhibit hepatitis C virus strains that are not inhibited by interferon.

  7. Non-Maxwellian Analysis of the Transition-region Line Profiles Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudík, Jaroslav; Dzifčáková, Elena [Astronomical Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Fričova 298, 251 65 Ondřejov (Czech Republic); Polito, Vanessa; Testa, Paola [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Zanna, Giulio Del, E-mail: dudik@asu.cas.cz [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, CMS, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-10

    We investigate the nature of the spectral line profiles for transition-region (TR) ions observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) . In this context, we analyzed an active-region observation performed by IRIS in its 1400 Å spectral window. The TR lines are found to exhibit significant wings in their spectral profiles, which can be well fitted with a non-Maxwellian κ distribution. The fit with a κ distribution can perform better than a double-Gaussian fit, especially for the strongest line, Si iv 1402.8 Å. Typical values of κ found are about 2, occurring in a majority of spatial pixels where the TR lines are symmetric, i.e., the fit can be performed. Furthermore, all five spectral lines studied (from Si iv, O iv, and S iv) appear to have the same full-width at half-maximum irrespective of whether the line is an allowed or an intercombination transition. A similar value of κ is obtained for the electron distribution by the fitting of the line intensities relative to Si iv 1402.8 Å, if photospheric abundances are assumed. The κ distributions, however, do not remove the presence of non-thermal broadening. Instead, they actually increase the non-thermal width. This is because, for κ distributions, TR ions are formed at lower temperatures. The large observed non-thermal width lowers the opacity of the Si iv line sufficiently enough for this line to become optically thin.

  8. Loop-to-helix transition in the structure of multidrug regulator AcrR at the entrance of the drug-binding cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjasetty, Babu A.; Halavaty, Andrei S.; Luan, Chi-Hao; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Mulligan, Rory; Kwon, Keehwan; Anderson, Wayne F.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    Multidrug transcription regulator AcrR from Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium str. LT2 belongs to the tetracycline repressor family, one of the largest groups of bacterial transcription factors. The crystal structure of dimeric AcrR was determined and refined to 1.56 Å resolution. The tertiary and quaternary structures of AcrR are similar to those of its homologs. The multidrug binding site was identified based on structural alignment with homologous proteins and has a di(hydroxyethyl)ether molecule bound. Residues from helices a4 and a7 shape the entry into this binding site. The structure of AcrR reveals that the extended helical conformation of helix a4 is stabilized by the hydrogen bond between Glu67 (helix a4) and Gln130 (helix a7). Based on the structural comparison with the closest homolog structure, the Escherichia coli AcrR, we propose that this hydrogen bond is responsible for control of the loop-to-helix transition within helix a4. This local conformational switch of helix a4 may be a key step in accessing the multidrug binding site and securing ligands at the binding site. Solution smallmolecule binding studies suggest that AcrR binds ligands with their core chemical structure resembling the tetracyclic ring of cholesterol.

  9. Loop-to-helix transition in the structure of multidrug regulator AcrR at the entrance of the drug-binding cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjasetty, Babu A; Halavaty, Andrei S; Luan, Chi-Hao; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Mulligan, Rory; Kwon, Keehwan; Anderson, Wayne F; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    Multidrug transcription regulator AcrR from Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium str. LT2 belongs to the tetracycline repressor family, one of the largest groups of bacterial transcription factors. The crystal structure of dimeric AcrR was determined and refined to 1.56Å resolution. The tertiary and quaternary structures of AcrR are similar to those of its homologs. The multidrug binding site was identified based on structural alignment with homologous proteins and has a di(hydroxyethyl)ether molecule bound. Residues from helices α4 and α7 shape the entry into this binding site. The structure of AcrR reveals that the extended helical conformation of helix α4 is stabilized by the hydrogen bond between Glu67 (helix α4) and Gln130 (helix α7). Based on the structural comparison with the closest homolog structure, the Escherichia coli AcrR, we propose that this hydrogen bond is responsible for control of the loop-to-helix transition within helix α4. This local conformational switch of helix α4 may be a key step in accessing the multidrug binding site and securing ligands at the binding site. Solution small-molecule binding studies suggest that AcrR binds ligands with their core chemical structure resembling the tetracyclic ring of cholesterol. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. EVIDENCE FOR A TRANSITION REGION RESPONSE TO PENUMBRAL MICROJETS IN SUNSPOTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vissers, G. J. M.; Rouppe van der Voort, L. H. M.; Carlsson, M.

    2015-01-01

    Penumbral microjets (PMJs) are short-lived, fine-structured, and bright jets that are generally observed in chromospheric imaging of the penumbra of sunspots. Here we investigate their potential transition region signature by combining observations with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope in the Ca ii H and Ca ii 8542 Å lines with ultraviolet imaging and spectroscopy obtained with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), which includes the C ii 1334/1335 Å, Si iv 1394/1403 Å, and Mg ii h and k 2803/2796 Å lines. We find a clear corresponding signal in the IRIS Mg ii k, C ii, and Si iv slit-jaw images, typically offset spatially from the Ca ii signature in the direction along the jets: from base to top, the PMJs are predominantly visible in Ca ii, Mg ii k, and C ii/Si iv, suggesting progressive heating to transition region temperatures along the jet extent. Hence, these results support the suggestion from earlier studies that PMJs may heat to transition region temperatures

  11. Demic and cultural diffusion propagated the Neolithic transition across different regions of Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Joaquim

    2015-05-06

    The Neolithic transition is the shift from hunting–gathering into farming. About 9000 years ago, the Neolithic transition began to spread from the Near East into Europe, until it reached Northern Europe about 5500 years ago. There are two main models of this spread. The demic model assumes that it was mainly due to the reproduction and dispersal of farmers. The cultural model assumes that European hunter-gatherers become farmers by acquiring domestic plants and animals, as well as knowledge, from neighbouring farmers. Here we use the dates of about 900 archaeological sites to compute a speed map of the spread of the Neolithic transition in Europe. We compare the speed map to the speed ranges predicted by purely demic, demic-cultural and purely cultural models. The comparison indicates that the transition was cultural in Northern Europe, the Alpine region and west of the Black Sea. But demic diffusion was at work in other regions such as the Balkans and Central Europe. Our models can be applied to many other cultural traits. We also propose that genetic data could be gathered and used to measure the demic kernels of Early Neolithic populations. This would lead to an enormous advance in Neolithic spread modelling.

  12. Determination of regional esophageal transit in children by means of krypton-8 1m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R.; Georges, B.; Delaet, M.H.; Cadranel, S.

    1984-01-01

    Radionuclide methods using Tc-99m have been developed in the last few years for the assessment of the esophageal transit. The method is physiologic, easy to perform and giving thus interesting informations concerning the severity of the disease as well as the effect of the applied treatment. In children, however, one is limited by radiation protection considerations, and the results are often of poor quality due to the low count rate. Furthermore, the risk of external contamination and the impossibility of repeating the test constitute significant disadvantages, particularly in young children. These problems are completely avoided by using Krypton-8lm diluted in a glucose solution. For each swallowing about 8 mCi of Kr-8 lm are administered. Sixty one-second frames are recorded and several parameters of regional transit can be extracted in a few minutes, using time activity curves and parametric images. The test is very sensitive in detecting minor regional transit alterations. The reproducibility of the test is good and phenomenons like intercurrent gastro-esophageal reflux or asynergic peristaltic waves can easily be detected. The test has been applied to 52 children, aged 1 week to 19 years, and provided helpful information concerning the localization and the importance of transit abnormalities in caustic and peptic esophagitis, postoperative cases (atresia or antireflux plasty) and in patients with neuromuscular disorders

  13. Fracture toughness evaluation in the transition region of reactor pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onizawa, K.; Suzuki, M.

    1995-01-01

    The fracture toughness (K jc and Jc) values at the cleavage fracture initiation in the transition region of a RPV steel were investigated using mainly precracked Charpy specimens. A conventional statistical approach and a fractographic study were applied to analyze the scatter of the fracture toughness values from precracked Charpy specimens. The material used was an ASTM A533B class 1 steel, which was designated as an IAEA correlation monitor material, JRQ. A lower bound transition curve of the fracture toughness for unirradiated condition was determined by the 5% confidence limit from the Weibull and fractographic analyses. The lower bound transition curve after irradiation was evaluated based on the statistics of unirradiated specimens. The results indicated that the shift of the fracture toughness transition curbe were somewhat larger than the Charpy 41J transition temperature. The parameters to determine the lower bound toughness such as the Weibull slope and the amount of ductile crack growth are discussed. The results are also compared with a model based on weakest link theory. (author). 12 refs, 12 figs, 5 tabs

  14. Natively unstructured loops differ from other loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avner Schlessinger

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Natively unstructured or disordered protein regions may increase the functional complexity of an organism; they are particularly abundant in eukaryotes and often evade structure determination. Many computational methods predict unstructured regions by training on outliers in otherwise well-ordered structures. Here, we introduce an approach that uses a neural network in a very different and novel way. We hypothesize that very long contiguous segments with nonregular secondary structure (NORS regions differ significantly from regular, well-structured loops, and that a method detecting such features could predict natively unstructured regions. Training our new method, NORSnet, on predicted information rather than on experimental data yielded three major advantages: it removed the overlap between testing and training, it systematically covered entire proteomes, and it explicitly focused on one particular aspect of unstructured regions with a simple structural interpretation, namely that they are loops. Our hypothesis was correct: well-structured and unstructured loops differ so substantially that NORSnet succeeded in their distinction. Benchmarks on previously used and new experimental data of unstructured regions revealed that NORSnet performed very well. Although it was not the best single prediction method, NORSnet was sufficiently accurate to flag unstructured regions in proteins that were previously not annotated. In one application, NORSnet revealed previously undetected unstructured regions in putative targets for structural genomics and may thereby contribute to increasing structural coverage of large eukaryotic families. NORSnet found unstructured regions more often in domain boundaries than expected at random. In another application, we estimated that 50%-70% of all worm proteins observed to have more than seven protein-protein interaction partners have unstructured regions. The comparative analysis between NORSnet and DISOPRED2 suggested

  15. Magnetic Field Diagnostics and Spatio-Temporal Variability of the Solar Transition Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, H.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic field diagnostics of the transition region from the chromosphere to the corona faces us with the problem that one has to apply extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectro-polarimetry. While for the coronal diagnostics techniques already exist in the form of infrared coronagraphy above the limb and radio observations on the disk, one has to investigate EUV observations for the transition region. However, so far the success of such observations has been limited, but various current projects aim to obtain spectro-polarimetric data in the extreme UV in the near future. Therefore it is timely to study the polarimetric signals we can expect from these observations through realistic forward modeling. We employ a 3D magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) forward model of the solar corona and synthesize the Stokes I and Stokes V profiles of C iv (1548 Å). A signal well above 0.001 in Stokes V can be expected even if one integrates for several minutes to reach the required signal-to-noise ratio, and despite the rapidly changing intensity in the model (just as in observations). This variability of the intensity is often used as an argument against transition region magnetic diagnostics, which requires exposure times of minutes. However, the magnetic field is evolving much slower than the intensity, and therefore the degree of (circular) polarization remains rather constant when one integrates in time. Our study shows that it is possible to measure the transition region magnetic field if a polarimetric accuracy on the order of 0.001 can be reached, which we can expect from planned instrumentation.

  16. Diagnostics of the κ-distribution using Si III lines in the solar transition region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dzifčáková, Elena; Kulinová, Alena

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 531, July (2011), A122/1-A122/10 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1705 Grant - others:SAV(SK) Vega 1/0240/11; EU(XE) ESA- PECS project No. 98030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Sun * transition region * UV-radiation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.587, year: 2011

  17. Synthetic IRIS spectra of the solar transition region: Effect of high-energy tails

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dzifčáková, Elena; Vocks, C.; Dudík, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 603, July (2017), A14/1-A14/7 E-ISSN 1432-0746 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-18495S; GA ČR(CZ) GA17-16447S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun * transition region * UV radiation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 5.014, year: 2016

  18. TIME DEPENDENT NONEQUILIBRIUM IONIZATION OF TRANSITION REGION LINES OBSERVED WITH IRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; Pontieu, Bart De; Hansteen, Viggo H. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Gudiksen, Boris, E-mail: j.m.sykora@astro.uio.no [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway)

    2016-01-20

    The properties of nonstatistical equilibrium ionization of silicon and oxygen ions are analyzed in this work. We focus on five solar targets (quiet Sun; coronal hole; plage; quiescent active region, AR; and flaring AR) as observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). IRIS is best suited for this work owing to the high cadence (up to 0.5 s), high spatial resolution (up to 0.″32), and high signal-to-noise ratios for O iv λ1401 and Si iv λ1402. We find that the observed intensity ratio between lines of three times ionized silicon and oxygen ions depends on their total intensity and that this correlation varies depending on the region observed (quiet Sun, coronal holes, plage, or active regions) and on the specific observational objects present (spicules, dynamic loops, jets, microflares, or umbra). In order to interpret the observations, we compare them with synthetic profiles taken from 2D self-consistent radiative MHD simulations of the solar atmosphere, where the statistical equilibrium or nonequilibrium treatment of silicon and oxygen is applied. These synthetic observations show vaguely similar correlations to those in the observations, i.e., between the intensity ratios and their intensities, but only in the nonequilibrium case do we find that (some of) the observations can be reproduced. We conclude that these lines are formed out of statistical equilibrium. We use our time-dependent nonequilibrium ionization simulations to describe the physical mechanisms behind these observed properties.

  19. Changing the cubic ferrimagnetic domain structure in temperature region of spin flip transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djuraev, D.R.; Niyazov, L.N.; Saidov, K.S.; Sokolov, B.Yu.

    2011-01-01

    The transformation of cubic ferrimagnetic Tb 0.2 Y 2.8 Fe 5 O 12 domain structure has been studied by magneto optic method in the temperature region of spontaneous spin flip phase transition (SPT). It has been found that SPT occurs in a finite temperature interval where the coexistence of low- and high- temperature magnetic phase domains has observed. A character of domain structure evolution in temperature region of spin flip essentially depends on the presence of mechanical stresses in crystal. Interpretation of experimental results has been carried out within the framework of SPT theory for a cubic crystal. (authors)

  20. OSO 8 observations of wave propagation in the solar chromosphere and transition region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipman, E. G.

    1978-01-01

    The University of Colorado instrument on OSO 8 has been used to observe relative phases of the 300-s intensity variation between the temperature-minimum region and several emission lines formed in the solar chromosphere and chromosphere-corona transition region. The lines used are due to Fe II, Si II, C II, Si IV, and C IV. The scattered light in the spectrograph, which originates almost entirely in the spectral region between 1700 and 1900 A, was used as a probe of the temperature-minimum region. The lines of Fe II, Si II, and C II show almost identical delays of approximately 30 s relative to the temperature minimum, while the intensity oscillations of the lines of Si IV and C IV appear to lead the temperature-minimum intensity oscillations by about 10 s.

  1. Determination of global and regional heart functions with minimum transit times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; Becker, V.; Vyska, K.; Freundlieb, C.; Bosiljanoff, P.

    1980-01-01

    The minimum transit time obviously represents the most constant flow parameter. By means of a constant, that was chosen to be 1.2 for cardiac flow, it is equal to the quotient of volume to flow and is also inversely related proportional to the fraction of ejection that is concerned. The first indicator passage through the heart is measured for the minimum cardiac transit time, whereby interesting regions were chosen for the two auricula, the two ventricula, the pulmonary artery and the aorta. The time activity characteristica obtained from the particular regions need a special smoothing by means of the gliding mean, so that the arrival times can easily be recognized. This way in one examination process the differences of arrival times respectively the minimal transit times can be obtained for each particular cardiac segment, the pulmonary circuit and the whole cardio-pulmonary circuit. The advantages of minimum cardiac transit time measurements are the simplicity and the speed of the noninvasive functional diagnostic with lower radiation load and accuracy and reproductability with low error limits, especially for the whole cardio-pulmonary MTT. The simultaneous acquisition of multiple cardiac segments is to emphasize a special way. For its particular values similar error widths were found as for the left ventricular function measurement with the triggered scintigraphy of the interior of the heart. A further advantage of the measurement is an almost problem-less application in body load. Therefore the MTT-measurement is especially useful for preventive diagnostics of coronary diseases. A combination of MTT-measurements of all segments of the small circuit with the triggered scintigraphy of the interior of the heart for analysis of regional left-ventricular ejection fractions and left-ventricular wall movements would essentially enrich the noninvasive cardiac diagnostics. (orig./APR) [de

  2. Prominence-corona interface compared with the chromosphere-corona transition region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orrall, F Q; Schmahl, E J [Harvard Coll. Observatory, Cambridge, Mass. (USA)

    1976-11-01

    The intensities of 52 EUV emission lines from each of 9 hedgerow prominences observed at the limb with the Harvard experiment on ATM-Skylab have been compared with intensities from the interior of network cells at the center of the disk, in order to compare the prominence-corona (P-C) interface with the chromosphere-corona (C-C) transition region. The intensity ratio Isub(cell)/Isub(prominence) for each line varies systematically (in all of the prominences observed), with the temperature of formation of the line as approximately Tsup(-0.6). The density sensitive C III (formed at T approximately 9x10/sup 4/ K) line ratio Isub(lambda1175)/Isub(lambda977) implies an average density 1.3x10/sup 9/ electrons cm/sup -3/ in the P-C interface and approximately 4 times this value in the C-C transition of the cells. The total optical thickness at the head of the Lyman continuum is < approximately 10 in most of the prominences studied; in two of the prominences, however, the possibility that tau/sub 0/ is large cannot be rejected. Methods of analysis of these EUV data are developed assuming both a resolved and an unresolved internal prominence structure. Although the systematic differences between the P-C interface and the C-C transition are stressed, the similarities are probably more remarkable and may be a result of fine structure in the C-C transition.

  3. TIME-RESOLVED EMISSION FROM BRIGHT HOT PIXELS OF AN ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED IN THE EUV BAND WITH SDO/AIA AND MULTI-STRANDED LOOP MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajfirouze, E.; Reale, F.; Petralia, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 (Italy); Testa, P., E-mail: aastex-help@aas.org [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of small amounts of very hot plasma has been found in active regions and might be an indication of impulsive heating released at spatial scales smaller than the cross-section of a single loop. We investigate the heating and substructure of coronal loops in the core of one such active region by analyzing the light curves in the smallest resolution elements of solar observations in two EUV channels (94 and 335 Å) from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We model the evolution of a bundle of strands heated by a storm of nanoflares by means of a hydrodynamic 0D loop model (EBTEL). The light curves obtained from a random combination of those of single strands are compared to the observed light curves either in a single pixel or in a row of pixels, simultaneously in the two channels, and using two independent methods: an artificial intelligent system (Probabilistic Neural Network) and a simple cross-correlation technique. We explore the space of the parameters to constrain the distribution of the heat pulses, their duration, their spatial size, and, as a feedback on the data, their signatures on the light curves. From both methods the best agreement is obtained for a relatively large population of events (1000) with a short duration (less than 1 minute) and a relatively shallow distribution (power law with index 1.5) in a limited energy range (1.5 decades). The feedback on the data indicates that bumps in the light curves, especially in the 94 Å channel, are signatures of a heating excess that occurred a few minutes before.

  4. Transition-Region Ultraviolet Explosive Events in IRIS Si IV: A Statistical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, Allison

    2018-01-01

    Explosive events (EEs) in the solar transition region are characterized by broad, non-Gaussian line profiles with wings at Doppler velocities exceeding the speed of sound. We present a statistical analysis of 23 IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph) sit-and-stare observations, observed between April 2014 and March 2017. Using the IRIS Si IV 1394 Å and 1403 Å spectral windows and the 1400Å Slit Jaw images we have identified 581 EEs. We found that most EEs last less than 20 min. and have a spatial scale on the slit less than 10”, agreeing with measurements in previous work. We observed most EEs in active regions, regardless of date of observation, but selection bias of IRIS observations cannot be ruled out. We also present preliminary findings of optical depth effects from our statistical study.

  5. High-spin states and coexisting states in the Pt-Au transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedinger, L.L.; Carpenter, M.P.; Courtney, L.H.; Janzen, V.P.; Schmitz, W.

    1986-01-01

    High-spin states in the N = 104 to 108 region have been studied by in-beam spectroscopy techniques in a number of Ir, Pt, and Au nuclei. These measurements have been performed at tandem Van de Graaff facilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at McMaster University. Through comparison of band crossings in a variety of odd-A and even-A nuclei, we are able to assign the first neutron and first proton alignment processes, which are nearly degenerate for 184 Pt. These measurements yield the trend of these crossing frequencies with N and Z in this region. Knowledge of this trend is important, since these crossing frequencies can give an estimate of how the shape parameters vary across this transitional region. 22 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  6. Extended interacting boson model description of Pd nuclei in the A∼100 transitional region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Böyükata M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies of even-even nuclei in the A∼100 transitional mass region within the framework of the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1 have been expanded down to 98Pd nuclei to compare the calculation with new experimental results from measurements obtained at the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Cologne. The low-lying energy levels and the E2 transition rates of 98−100Pd nuclei are investigated and their geometric structures are described in the present work. We have also focused on the new B(E2:21+ → 01+ values of 112,114Pd nuclei to compare with previously calculated values.

  7. Statistical evaluation of fracture characteristics of RPV steels in the ductile-brittle transition temperature region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sung Sik; Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa

    1998-01-01

    The statistical analysis method was applied to the evaluation of fracture toughness in the ductile-brittle transition temperature region. Because cleavage fracture in steel is of a statistical nature, fracture toughness data or values show a similar statistical trend. Using the three-parameter Weibull distribution, a fracture toughness vs. temperature curve (K-curve) was directly generated from a set of fracture toughness data at a selected temperature. Charpy V-notch impact energy was also used to obtain the K-curve by a K IC -CVN (Charpy V-notch energy) correlation. Furthermore, this method was applied to evaluate the neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel(RPV) steel. Most of the fracture toughness data were within the 95 percent confidence limits. The prediction of a transition temperature shift by statistical analysis was compared with that from the experimental data. (author)

  8. Conceptual Foundations of Transition to the Nonlinear Models of Higher Education in the Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garold Efimovich Zborovsky

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject matter of the analysis is the non-linear characteristics of the new model of higher education in relation to its resources and risk environment. The purpose of this article is to prove the need and the possibility of transition to the nonlinear model of higher education in the region on the basis of theoretical positions and the results of the study of non-linear socio-economic processes. In this connection, the socio-economic factors of such transition are characterized; the objective necessity of its implementation in the context of the economic and social uncertainty of a particular region, which is Ural Federal District, is shown. A new type of relationship between universities and their social partners is considered. The need for the change of interactions between educational communities; reliance on the use of a new wide range of economic, social and spiritual resources; the constant search for new mechanisms, educational programs, relations with the external environment, management decisions are argued. Ural Federal District is shown as one of the most advanced regions of the Russian Federation not only in the sphere of the economy, social and cultural life, but also in the sphere of higher education. This circumstance is related to the constant, intensive search for innovative approaches to the modernization of higher education in the region, including the formation of its non-linear model. The presented situation forms the basis of the hypothesis that the non-linear model of higher education can ensure its competitiveness in the global educational space, to enhance its role in the society and specific regions of the country and to turn it into a locomotive of the socio-economic and socio-cultural development. The study is based on an interdisciplinary methodology, including the potential of theoretical sociology, sociology of education, economic sociology, management theory, regional economy. The findings of the research

  9. Lower solar chromosphere-corona transition region. II - Wave pressure effects for a specific form of the heating function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, D. Tod; Holzer, Thomas E.; Macgregor, Keith B.

    1990-01-01

    Lower transition region models with a balance between mechanical heating and radiative losses are expanded to include wave pressure effects. The models are used to study the simple damping length form of the heating function. The results are compared to the results obtained by Woods et al. (1990) for solutions in the lower transition region. The results suggest that a mixture of fast-mode and slow-mode waves may provide the appropriate heating mechanism in the lower transition region, with the decline in effective vertical wave speed caused by the refraction and eventual total reflection of the fast-mode wave resulting from the decreasing atmospheric density.

  10. TRANSIT

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. TRANSIT. SYSTEM: DETERMINE 2D-POSITION GLOBALLY BUT INTERMITTENT (POST-FACTO). IMPROVED ACCURACY. PRINCIPLE: POLAR SATELLITES WITH INNOVATIONS OF: GRAVITY-GRADIENT ATTITUDE CONTROL; DRAG COMPENSATION. WORKS ...

  11. Preliminary results from the orbiting solar observatory 8: Persistent velocity fields in the chromosphere and transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lites, B.W.; Bruner, E.C. Jr.; Chipman, E.G.; Shine, R.A.; Rottman, G.J.; White, O.R.; Athay, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Velocity images, or tachograms, of the solar chromosphere and chromosphere-corona transition region were made by measuring the Si II 1816.93 A chromospheric line and the Si IV 1393.8 A transition region line with the University of Colorado spectrometer aboard OSO-8. Persistent flows are indicated in both active and quiet regions of the solar atmosphere. In quiet regions, areas of enhanced emission (the chromospheric network) are apparently systematically redshifted with respect to the areas of lower intensity. This correlation does not hold in active regions, where long-lived downflows into sunspots have been observed

  12. Etude Climat no. 36 'Regional Climate - Air - Energy Plans: a tool for guiding the energy and climate transition in French regions'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Charentenay, Jeremie; Leseur, Alexia; Bordier, Cecile

    2012-01-01

    Among the publications of CDC Climat Research, 'Climate Reports' offer in-depth analyses on a given subject. This issue addresses the following points: The Regional Climate-Air-Energy Plan (SRCAE - Schema Regional Climat-Air-Energie) was introduced by the Grenelle II legislation. The Plans are co-authored by the State through its decentralised services and the 'Conseil Regionaux' (regional councils) with the objective to guide climate and energy policy in the 26 French regions through to 2020 and 2050. Starting from an assessment of regional greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the SRCAE establishes energy transition scenarios based on the sectoral and structural guidelines that constitute the principal framework of the regional strategy. This report offers a detailed analysis of the strategies chosen by the various Regions for a successful transition to low-carbon energy sources, via the study of eleven SRCAEs that were opened to public consultation before the end of July 2012 (Alsace, Aquitaine, Auvergne, Bourgogne, Centre, Champagne-Ardenne, Ile-de-France, Midi-Pyrenees, Nord-Pas de Calais, Picardie and Rhone-Alpes regions). The wide range of methodologies used by the Regions, both to draw up their inventories of GHG emissions and for their scenarios, means that a quantitative comparison between regions or against the national objectives is not possible. Nevertheless, the report establishes a typology of regions and identifies policies that are common to all regions and those chosen in response to local characteristics. Certain guidelines could be applied by other regions of the same type, or could feed into discussions at national level. The report also indicates that the SRCAEs go beyond the competencies of the Regions, highlighting the role of local, national and European decision-making in the success of a regional energy transition. Particular attention was paid to the building and transport sectors, often identified as having the largest potential for reducing

  13. Observational Evidence of Magnetic Reconnection for Brightenings and Transition Region Arcades in IRIS Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jie; Li, Hui; Feng, Li [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China); Schmieder, Brigitte; Pariat, Etienne [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, Section de Meudon, F-92195, Meudon Principal Cedex (France); Zhu, Xiaoshuai [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Grubecka, Michalina, E-mail: nj.lihui@pmo.ac.cn [Astronomical Institute, University of Wrocław, Kopernika 11, 51-622, Wrocław (Poland)

    2017-02-10

    By using a new method of forced-field extrapolation, we study the emerging flux region AR11850 observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and Solar Dynamical Observatory . Our results suggest that the bright points (BPs) in this emerging region exhibit responses in lines formed from the upper photosphere to the transition region, which have relatively similar morphologies. They have an oscillation of several minutes according to the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data at 1600 and 1700 Å. The ratio between the BP intensities measured in 1600 and 1700 Å filtergrams reveals that these BPs are heated differently. Our analysis of the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager vector magnetic field and the corresponding topology in AR11850 indicates that the BPs are located at the polarity inversion line and most of them are related to magnetic reconnection or cancelation. The heating of the BPs might be different due to different magnetic topology. We find that the heating due to the magnetic cancelation would be stronger than the case of bald patch reconnection. The plasma density rather than the magnetic field strength could play a dominant role in this process. Based on physical conditions in the lower atmosphere, our forced-field extrapolation shows consistent results between the bright arcades visible in slit-jaw image 1400 Å and the extrapolated field lines that pass through the bald patches. It provides reliable observational evidence for testing the mechanism of magnetic reconnection for the BPs and arcades in the emerging flux region, as proposed in simulation studies.

  14. Calculating Absolute Transition Probabilities for Deformed Nuclei in the Rare-Earth Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratman, Anne; Casarella, Clark; Aprahamian, Ani

    2017-09-01

    Absolute transition probabilities are the cornerstone of understanding nuclear structure physics in comparison to nuclear models. We have developed a code to calculate absolute transition probabilities from measured lifetimes, using a Python script and a Mathematica notebook. Both of these methods take pertinent quantities such as the lifetime of a given state, the energy and intensity of the emitted gamma ray, and the multipolarities of the transitions to calculate the appropriate B(E1), B(E2), B(M1) or in general, any B(σλ) values. The program allows for the inclusion of mixing ratios of different multipolarities and the electron conversion of gamma-rays to correct for their intensities, and yields results in absolute units or results normalized to Weisskopf units. The code has been tested against available data in a wide range of nuclei from the rare earth region (28 in total), including 146-154Sm, 154-160Gd, 158-164Dy, 162-170Er, 168-176Yb, and 174-182Hf. It will be available from the Notre Dame Nuclear Science Laboratory webpage for use by the community. This work was supported by the University of Notre Dame College of Science, and by the National Science Foundation, under Contract PHY-1419765.

  15. Meson-Exchange Enhancement of First-Forbidden $\\beta$-Transitions in the Lead Region

    CERN Multimedia

    Delaure, B J P; Severijns, N

    2002-01-01

    Both on-line and off-line low temperature nuclear orientation is used to measure the $\\beta$-asymmetry parameter for the first-forbidden g.s. $\\rightarrow$~g.s. $\\beta$-transitions of $^{205}$Hg, $^{207,209}$Tl, $^{209}$Pb and $^{213}$Bi. From this, the ratio of the rank-zero and the rank-one strengths in these decays can be deduced, with the rank of a $\\beta$-transition being defined as the total angular momentum of the lepton system. Combining this result with the experimental ${ft}$-values yields for the first time a purely experimental determination of the rank-zero contribution in these $\\Delta$ J = 0 first-forbidden transitions. This provides an independent check of the large enhancement (of about 100% over the impulse approximation) of the rank-zero matrix element of $\\gamma_{5} $, caused by meson exchange currents (MEC), which was recently obtained from a comparison of calculated first-forbidden $\\beta$-decay rates with experimentally observed values for nuclei in the lead region (A = 205-212). Measur...

  16. DETERMINANTS OF EARLY RETIREMENT TRANSITIONS OF TEACHERS IN POLAND. DOES REGIONAL HETEROGENEITY PLAY A ROLE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Kopycka

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article contributes to the literature on early retirement transitions by testing a line of explanations of this phenomenon in a specific context of public sector employment. It utilizes waves 2006 and 2007 of a longitudinal data set of employment histories of Polish teachers (SIO. Standard structural explanations of early retirement transitions, i.e. labor force restructuring and devaluation of human capital of older workers do not find support in the data. Multilevel logistic regression models show instead that the considerable variance in early retirement risks found in the data can to some degree be explained by labour mobility of prime aged teachers, supporting the thesis of a labor market as generational figuration. The analyses identify two early emploment groups among Polish teachers: 49–54, and 55–59 year olds. Whereas retirement transitions in the younger group are to a greater extent attributable to individual pull factors (like work commitment, regional variation plays a greater role in the older “early retirees” group indicating higher risks of involuntary early retirement in this group.

  17. LoopIng: a template-based tool for predicting the structure of protein loops.

    KAUST Repository

    Messih, Mario Abdel

    2015-08-06

    Predicting the structure of protein loops is very challenging, mainly because they are not necessarily subject to strong evolutionary pressure. This implies that, unlike the rest of the protein, standard homology modeling techniques are not very effective in modeling their structure. However, loops are often involved in protein function, hence inferring their structure is important for predicting protein structure as well as function.We describe a method, LoopIng, based on the Random Forest automated learning technique, which, given a target loop, selects a structural template for it from a database of loop candidates. Compared to the most recently available methods, LoopIng is able to achieve similar accuracy for short loops (4-10 residues) and significant enhancements for long loops (11-20 residues). The quality of the predictions is robust to errors that unavoidably affect the stem regions when these are modeled. The method returns a confidence score for the predicted template loops and has the advantage of being very fast (on average: 1 min/loop).www.biocomputing.it/loopinganna.tramontano@uniroma1.itSupplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  18. First ultraviolet observations of the transition regions of X-ray bright solar-type stars in the Pleiades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillault, J.-P.; Vilhu, O.; Linsky, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from A UV study of the transition regions of two X-ray-bright solar-type stars from the Pleiades, in an attempt to extend the main sequence age baseline for the transition-region activity-age relation over more than two orders of magnitude. However, no emission lines were detected from either star; the upper limits to the fluxes are consistent with previously determined saturation levels, but do not help to further constrain evolutionary models.

  19. Plasma currents and anisotropy in the tail-dipole transition region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A.; Zhang, X. J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.

    2017-12-01

    Using conjugated THEMIS and Van Allen Probes observations in the nightside magnetosphere, we examine statistically plasma and magnetic field characteristics at multiple locations simultaneously across the 3-10 RE region (i.e., across the tail-dipole transition region, whose location depends on tail flux loading and the strength of global convection). We find that the spatial distributions of ion and electron anisotropies vary significantly but systematically with radial distance and geomagnetic activity. For low Kp (4), the anisotropy profiles for ions and electrons reverse: ions are isotropic closer to the Earth and field-aligned in the tail, whereas electrons are transversely anisotropic closer to Earth but isotropic in the tail. Using the measured plasma anisotropy radial profiles we estimate the currents from curvature drifts and compare them with diamagnetic currents. We also discuss the implications of the observed plasma anisotropies for the presence and spatial distribution of field-aligned electric fields.

  20. Transition from direct to inverted charge transport Marcus regions in molecular junctions via molecular orbital gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li; Wang, Lejia; Garrigues, Alvar R.; Jiang, Li; Annadata, Harshini Venkata; Anguera Antonana, Marta; Barco, Enrique; Nijhuis, Christian A.

    2018-04-01

    Solid-state molecular tunnel junctions are often assumed to operate in the Landauer regime, which describes essentially activationless coherent tunnelling processes. In solution, on the other hand, charge transfer is described by Marcus theory, which accounts for thermally activated processes. In practice, however, thermally activated transport phenomena are frequently observed also in solid-state molecular junctions but remain poorly understood. Here, we show experimentally the transition from the Marcus to the inverted Marcus region in a solid-state molecular tunnel junction by means of intra-molecular orbital gating that can be tuned via the chemical structure of the molecule and applied bias. In the inverted Marcus region, charge transport is incoherent, yet virtually independent of temperature. Our experimental results fit well to a theoretical model that combines Landauer and Marcus theories and may have implications for the interpretation of temperature-dependent charge transport measurements in molecular junctions.

  1. The investment policy and regional development of Serbia in the transition period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aničić Jugoslav

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our country can compensate the lagging in the economic development in relation to the EU countries as well as to the countries of the region only by increasing the economy's competitiveness, depending to a great extent on the possibilities of the economic entities investment in improving the attributes of the existing and development of new products and services, as well as on introducing modern technology and technological procedures. The transition program conducted by former socialist countries was highly based on foreign direct investments (FDI enabling these countries the successful inclusion into global flows of international production and overall economy. In this paper the possibilities and sources of our economy investing will be analyzed and the influence on enhancement of the overall and regional competitiveness of the companies as a necessary condition for increasing the export and the overall economic development of the country.

  2. Temperature Measurements in the Solar Transition Region Using N III Line Intensity Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doron, R.; Doschek, G. A.; Laming, J. M.; Feldman, U.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    UV emission from B-like N and O ions a rather rare opportunity for recording spectral lines in a narrow wavelength range that can potentially be used to derive temperatures relevant to the solar transition region. In these ions, the line intensity ratios of the type (2s2p(sup 2) - 2p(sup 3)) / (2s(sup 2)2p - 2s2p(sup 2)) are very sensitive to the electron temperature. Additionally, the lines involving the ratios fall within a range of only - 12 A; in N III the lines fall in the 980 - 992 A range and in O IV in the 780 - 791 A range. In this work, we explore the use of these atomic systems, primarily in N III, for temperature diagnostics of the transition region by analyzing UV spectra obtained by the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) spectrometer flown on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). The N III temperature-sensitive line ratios are measured in more than 60 observations. Most of the measured ratios correspond to temperatures in the range 5.7x10(exp 4) - 6.7x10(exp 4) K. This range is considerably lower than the calculated temperature of maximum abundance of N III, which is approx. 7.6x10(exp 4) K. Detailed analysis of the spectra further indicates that the measured ratios are probably somewhat overestimated due to resonant scattering effects in the 2s(sup 2)2p - 2s2p(sup 2) lines and small blends in the 2s2p(sup 2) - 2p3 lines. Actual lower ratios would only increase the disagreement between the ionization balance calculations and present temperature measurements based on a collisional excitation model. In the case of the O IV spectra, we determined that due to the close proximity in wavelength of the weak line (2s2p(sup 2)-2p3 transitions) to a strong Ne VIII line, sufficiently accurate ratio measurements cannot be obtained. Subject headings: atomic data --- atomic processes --- Sun: transition region --- Sun: U V radiation --- techniques: spectroscopic

  3. Spectro-polarimetric observation in UV with CLASP to probe the chromosphere and transition region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Ryouhei; Ishikawa, Ryohko; Winebarger, Amy R.; Auchère, Frédéric; Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Narukage, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Ken; Bando, Takamasa; Katsukawa, Yukio; Kubo, Masahito; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Giono, Gabriel; Hara, Hirohisa; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Sakao, Taro; Tsuneta, Saku; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Goto, Motoshi; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; De Pontieu, Bart; Casini, Roberto; Manso Sainz, Rafael; Asensio Ramos, Andres; Stepan, Jiri; Belluzzi, Luca; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-05-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a NASA sounding-rocket experiment that was performed in White Sands in the US on September 3, 2015. During its 5-minute ballistic flight, CLASP successfully made the first spectro-polarimetric observation in the Lyman-alpha line (121.57 nm) originating in the chromosphere and transition region. Since the Lyman-alpha polarization is sensitive to magnetic field of 10-100 G by the Hanle effect, we aim to infer the magnetic field information in such upper solar atmosphere with this experiment.The obtained CLASP data showed that the Lyman-alpha scattering polarization is about a few percent in the wings and the order of 0.1% in the core near the solar limb, as it had been theoretically predicted, and that both polarization signals have a conspicuous spatio-temporal variability. CLASP also observed another upper-chromospheric line, Si III (120.65 nm), whose critical field strength for the Hanle effect is 290 G, and showed a measurable scattering polarization of a few % in this line. The polarization properties of the Si III line could facilitate the interpretation of the scattering polarization observed in the Lyman-alpha line.In this presentation, we would like to show how the upper chromosphere and transition region are seen in the polarization of these UV lines and discuss the possible source of these complicated polarization signals.

  4. Observations of the longitudinal magnetic field in the transition region and photosphere of a sunspot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henze, W., Jr.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Hagyard, M. J.; West, E. A.; Woodgate, B. E.; Shine, R. A.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, M.; Hyder, C. L.; West, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter on the Solar Maximum Mission spacraft has observed for the first time the longitudinal component of the magnetic field by means of the Zeeman effect in the transition region above a sunspot. The data presented here were obtained on three days in one sunspot, have spatial resolutions of 10 arcsec and 3 arcsec, and yield maximum field strengths greater than 1000 G above the umbrae in the spot. The method of analysis, including a line-width calibration feature used during some of the observations, is described in some detail in an appendix; the line width is required for the determination of the longitudinal magnetic field from the observed circular polarization. The transition region data for one day are compared with photospheric magnetograms from the Marshall Space Flight Center. Vertical gradients of the magnetic field are compared from the two sets of data; the maximum gradients of 0.41 to 0.62 G/km occur above the umbra and agree with or are smaller than values observed previously in the photosphere and low chromosphere.

  5. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of hepatitis C virus binds to its coding region RNA stem-loop structure, 5BSL3.2, and its negative strand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Hiroshi; Yuhashi, Kazuhito; Ohnishi, Shin; Koike, Kazuhiko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko

    2010-05-01

    The hepatitis C virus NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is a key enzyme involved in viral replication. Interaction between NS5B RdRp and the viral RNA sequence is likely to be an important step in viral RNA replication. The C-terminal half of the NS5B-coding sequence, which contains the important cis-acting replication element, has been identified as an NS5B-binding sequence. In the present study, we confirm the specific binding of NS5B to one of the RNA stem-loop structures in the region, 5BSL3.2. In addition, we show that NS5B binds to the complementary strand of 5BSL3.2 (5BSL3.2N). The bulge structure of 5BSL3.2N was shown to be indispensable for tight binding to NS5B. In vitro RdRp activity was inhibited by 5BSL3.2N, indicating the importance of the RNA element in the polymerization by RdRp. These results suggest the involvement of the RNA stem-loop structure of the negative strand in the replication process.

  6. The fusion loops and membrane proximal region of Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein B (gB) can function in the context of herpes simplex virus 1 gB when substituted individually but not in combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Anna; Connolly, Sarah A; Spear, Patricia G; Longnecker, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Among the herpesvirus glycoprotein B (gB) fusion proteins, the hydrophobic content of fusion loops and membrane proximal regions (MPRs) are inversely correlated with each other. We examined the functional importance of the hydrophobicity of these regions by replacing them in herpes simplex virus type 1 gB with corresponding regions from Epstein-Barr virus gB. We show that fusion activity is dependent on the structural context in which the specific loops and MPR sequences exist, rather than a simple hydrophobic relationship. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. NARROW-LINE-WIDTH UV BURSTS IN THE TRANSITION REGION ABOVE SUNSPOTS OBSERVED BY IRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Zhenyong; Huang, Zhenghua; Xia, Lidong; Li, Bo; Madjarska, Maria S.; Fu, Hui; Mou, Chaozhou; Xie, Haixia, E-mail: z.huang@sdu.edu.cn, E-mail: xld@sdu.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, Institute of Space Sciences, Shandong University, Weihai, 264209 Shandong (China)

    2016-10-01

    Various small-scale structures abound in the solar atmosphere above active regions, playing an important role in the dynamics and evolution therein. We report on a new class of small-scale transition region structures in active regions, characterized by strong emissions but extremely narrow Si iv line profiles as found in observations taken with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Tentatively named as narrow-line-width UV bursts (NUBs), these structures are located above sunspots and comprise one or multiple compact bright cores at sub-arcsecond scales. We found six NUBs in two data sets (a raster and a sit-and-stare data set). Among these, four events are short-lived with a duration of ∼10 minutes, while two last for more than 36 minutes. All NUBs have Doppler shifts of 15–18 km s{sup −1}, while the NUB found in sit-and-stare data possesses an additional component at ∼50 km s{sup −1} found only in the C ii and Mg ii lines. Given that these events are found to play a role in the local dynamics, it is important to further investigate the physical mechanisms that generate these phenomena and their role in the mass transport in sunspots.

  8. Regional differences in system usage charges. Impediment to a fair energy transition?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plenz, Maik; Meister, Moritz; Doliwa, Martin; Obbelode, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The conversion of the German electricity supply system to production from renewable resources under the national energy transition policy is making it necessary to expand and restructure the distribution networks. Based on the expansion goals of the federal government, expectations are that thinly populated regions with low conflict potential will see a continued growth in distributed generation. This will increase the geographic asymmetry that exists between the production of renewable energy in rural, peripheral regions and its consumption predominantly in urban regions, thus enlarging the regional differences in system usage charges seen already today. The geographic disparity between production and consumption may grow larger still with the continuing installation of new and repowering of existing renewable energy plants. Of the possibilities discussed so far for reforming the scheme of charges, some would only have a weak impact, while others would even exacerbate the problem. The solution proposed in the present article takes account of the costs incurred through upstream supply networks in accordance with Article 14 Section 1 Sentence 1 of the Ordinance on System Usage Charges. In effect it leads to an allocation of costs according to the user-pays principle, thus protecting consumers connected to rural distribution networks against an undue cost burden and charging a fair share of the costs to consumers in urban and industrial distribution networks.

  9. Pilot study trialling a new ambulatory method for the clinical assessment of regional gastrointestinal transit using multiple electromagnetic capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, A M; Gregersen, T; Schlageter, V; Scott, M S; Demierre, M; Kucera, P; Dahlerup, J F; Krogh, K

    2014-12-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motor disorders often involve several regions of the GI tract. Therefore, easy and safe assessment of whole gut and regional motility is valuable for more precise diagnosis. 3D-Transit is a novel method for ambulatory evaluation of total and regional gastrointestinal transit times (GITT) based on the anatomical localization of ingestible electromagnetic capsules. The main purpose of this study was to test the performance of the 3D-Transit system. Twenty healthy volunteers each ingested three electromagnetic capsules over a period of two consecutive days. Standard radio-opaque markers (ROM) were also ingested to assess the agreement between total GITT obtained with both methods. Investigations were well-tolerated and three capsules could be tracked simultaneously with minimal data loss (Capsule 1: median: 0.2% of time (range 0-25.3%). Region specific contraction patterns were identified and used for computation of total and regional GITT in all subjects. Inter-observer agreement was 100% for total GITT (median variation 0%) but less for regional GITT. Day-to-day and diurnal variations were significant for total and regional GITT. Total GITT assessed by 3D-Transit capsules were moderately well-correlated to those assessed with standard ROM (Spearman's rho = 0.7). 3D-transit is a well-tolerated and minimal invasive ambulatory method for assessment of GI motility. By providing both total and regional transit times, the 3D-Transit system holds great promise for future clinical studies of GI function in health and disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. What Causes the High Apparent Speeds in Chromospheric and Transition Region Spicules on the Sun?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Pontieu, Bart; Martínez-Sykora, Juan; Chintzoglou, Georgios, E-mail: bdp@lmsal.com [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Spicules are the most ubuiquitous type of jets in the solar atmosphere. The advent of high-resolution imaging and spectroscopy from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) and ground-based observatories has revealed the presence of very high apparent motions of order 100–300 km s{sup −1} in spicules, as measured in the plane of the sky. However, line of sight measurements of such high speeds have been difficult to obtain, with values deduced from Doppler shifts in spectral lines typically of order 30–70 km s{sup −1}. In this work, we resolve this long-standing discrepancy using recent 2.5D radiative MHD simulations. This simulation has revealed a novel driving mechanism for spicules in which ambipolar diffusion resulting from ion-neutral interactions plays a key role. In our simulation, we often see that the upward propagation of magnetic waves and electrical currents from the low chromosphere into already existing spicules can lead to rapid heating when the currents are rapidly dissipated by ambipolar diffusion. The combination of rapid heating and the propagation of these currents at Alfvénic speeds in excess of 100 km s{sup −1} leads to the very rapid apparent motions, and often wholesale appearance, of spicules at chromospheric and transition region temperatures. In our simulation, the observed fast apparent motions in such jets are actually a signature of a heating front, and much higher than the mass flows, which are of order 30–70 km s{sup −1}. Our results can explain the behavior of transition region “network jets” and the very high apparent speeds reported for some chromospheric spicules.

  11. Heat transfer in the in-pile test section and penetration region of 3-pin fuel test loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Dae Young; Lee, Chung Young; Sim, Bong Shick; Park, Kook Nam; Park, Su Ki; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Young Jin

    2003-12-01

    This report studies two types of normal heat transfer. One is the heat loss from the pressure vessel of In-Pile Test Section to HANARO pool water via IPS insulation gas gap. The other is the heat transfer of the Penetration Cooling Water System including the effect of the Foamglas insulator at the penetration region. The heat transfer from IPS insulation gas gap has been performed according to the detail design results from NUKEM. The heat loss also occurs at the concrete penetration region between the HANARO pool water and the FTL pipe gallery. The Foamglas insulator has been already installed at the MCW piping of the penetration region. This insulation effect has been reviewed. The Penetration Cooling Water System has been designed to fulfill the design requirement not to exceed the allowable temperature at the penetration concrete wall. The cooling ability and heat loss of PCW system has been reviewed with the insulation effect.

  12. Quenching phenomena in natural circulation loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru; Ishida, Naoki

    1995-01-01

    Quenching phenomena has been investigated experimentally using circulation loop of liquid nitrogen. During the quenching under natural circulation, the heat transfer mode changes from film boiling to nucleate boiling, and at the same time flux changes with time depending on the vapor generation rate and related two-phase flow characteristics. Moreover, density wave oscillations occur under a certain operating condition, which is closely related to the dynamic behavior of the cooling curve. The experimental results indicates that the occurrence of the density wave oscillation induces the deterioration of effective cooling of the heat surface in the film and the transition boiling regions, which results in the decrease in the quenching velocity

  13. Quenching phenomena in natural circulation loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru [Kansai Univ., Osaka (Japan); Ishida, Naoki [Daihatsu Motor Company, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Quenching phenomena has been investigated experimentally using circulation loop of liquid nitrogen. During the quenching under natural circulation, the heat transfer mode changes from film boiling to nucleate boiling, and at the same time flux changes with time depending on the vapor generation rate and related two-phase flow characteristics. Moreover, density wave oscillations occur under a certain operating condition, which is closely related to the dynamic behavior of the cooling curve. The experimental results indicates that the occurrence of the density wave oscillation induces the deterioration of effective cooling of the heat surface in the film and the transition boiling regions, which results in the decrease in the quenching velocity.

  14. Diffusion effects on the line intensities of He I and He II in the solar transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shine, R.; Gerola, H.; Linsky, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    A heuristic treatment of diffusion in the solar chromosphere-corona transition region is developed. Diffusion becomes increasingly important with steeper temperature gradients, in active and quiet regions relative to coronal holes, and with increasing excitation potential. Numerical calculations are made for the resonance lines of He i and He ii and show that diffusion can enhance these lines. Thus the helium lines may appear relatively weak in coronal holes due to a weakening of the enhancement mechanism. Most transition region lines will be less affected by diffusion than He i or He ii

  15. The energy divide: Integrating energy transitions, regional inequalities and poverty trends in the European Union

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzarovski, Stefan; Tirado Herrero, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Energy poverty can be understood as the inability of a household to secure a socially and materially necessitated level of energy services in the home. While the condition is widespread across Europe, its spatial and social distribution is highly uneven. In this paper, the existence of a geographical energy poverty divide in the European Union (EU) provides a starting point for conceptualizing and exploring the relationship between energy transitions – commonly described as wide-ranging processes of socio-technical change – and existing patterns of regional economic inequality. We have undertaken a comprehensive analysis of spatial and temporal trends in the national-scale patterns of energy poverty, as well as gas and electricity prices. The results of our work indicate that the classic economic development distinction between the core and periphery also holds true in the case of energy poverty, as the incidence of this phenomenon is significantly higher in Southern and Eastern European EU Member States. The paper thus aims to provide the building blocks for a novel theoretical integration of questions of path-dependency, uneven development and material deprivation in existing interpretations of energy transitions. PMID:28690374

  16. Observation of second spin reorientation transition within ultrathin region in Fe films on Ag(001) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khim, T.-Y.; Shin, M.; Lee, H.; Park, B.-G.; Park, J.-H.

    2014-01-01

    We acquired direct measurements for in-plane and perpendicular-to-plane magnetic moments of Fe films using an x-ray magnetic circular dichroism technique with increase of the Fe thickness (up to 40 Å) on the Ag(001) surface. Epitaxial Fe/Ag(001) films were grown in situ with the thickness varying from 2 Å to 40 Å, and the magnetic anisotropy was carefully investigated as a function of the film thickness. We found re-entrance of the in-plane magnetic anisotropy of the Fe film in ultrathin region. The results manifest that the epitaxial Fe/Ag(001) film undergoes two distinct spin reorientation transitions from in-plane to out-of-plane at the film thickness t ≈ 9 Å and back to in-plane at t ≈ 18 Å as t increases.

  17. Probing the transition state region in catalytic CO oxidation on Ru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrom, H. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); Oberg, H. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); Xin, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); LaRue, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Beye, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Dell' Angela, M. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Gladh, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); Ng, M. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Sellberg, J. A. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kaya, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Mercurio, G. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Nordlund, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hantschmann, M. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Hieke, F. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); Kuhn, D. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Schlotter, W. F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Dakovski, G. L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Turner, J. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Minitti, M. P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Mitra, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Moeller, S. P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fohlisch, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fur Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Univ. Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany); Wolf, M. [Fritz-Haber Institute of the Max-Planck-Society, Berlin (Germany); Wurth, W. [Univ. of Hamburg and Center for Free Electron Laser Science, Hamburg (Germany); DESY Photon Science, Hamburg (Germany); Persson, M. [The Univ. of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Norskov, J. K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Abild-Pedersen, F. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Ogasawara, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Pettersson, L. G. M. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); Nilsson, A. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-12

    Femtosecond x-ray laser pulses are used to probe the CO oxidation reaction on ruthenium (Ru) initiated by an optical laser pulse. On a time scale of a few hundred femtoseconds, the optical laser pulse excites motions of CO and O on the surface, allowing the reactants to collide, and, with a transient close to a picosecond (ps), new electronic states appear in the O K-edge x-ray absorption spectrum. Density functional theory calculations indicate that these result from changes in the adsorption site and bond formation between CO and O with a distribution of OC–O bond lengths close to the transition state (TS). After 1 ps, 10% of the CO populate the TS region, which is consistent with predictions based on a quantum oscillator model.

  18. Shear viscosity of glass-forming melts in the liquid-glass transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanditov, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    A new approach to interpreting the hole-activation model of a viscous flow of glass-forming liquids is proposed. This model underlies the development of the concept on the exponential temperature dependence of the free energy of activation of a flow within the range of the liquid-glass transition in complete agreement with available experimental data. The 'formation of a fluctuation hole' in high-heat glass-forming melts is considered as a small-scale low-activation local deformation of a structural network, i.e., the quasi-lattice necessary for the switching of the valence bond, which is the main elementary event of viscous flow of glasses and their melts. In this sense, the hole formation is a conditioned process. A drastic increase in the activation free energy of viscous flow in the liquid-glass transition region is explained by a structural transformation that is reduced to a limiting local elastic deformation of the structural network, which, in turn, originates from the excitation (critical displacement) of a bridging atom like the oxygen atom in the Si-O-Si bridge. At elevated temperatures, as a rule, a necessary amount of excited bridging atoms (locally deformed regions of the structural network) always exists, and the activation free energy of viscous flow is almost independent of temperature. The hole-activation model is closely connected with a number of well-known models describing the viscous flow of glass-forming liquids (the Avramov-Milchev, Nemilov, Ojovan, and other models).

  19. Regional Gastrointestinal Transit Times in Patients With Carcinoid Diarrhea: Assessment With the Novel 3D-Transit System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Tine; Haase, Anne-Mette; Schlageter, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: The paucity of knowledge regarding gastrointestinal motility in patients with neuroendocrine tumors and carcinoid diarrhea re-stricts targeted treatment. 3D-Transit is a novel, minimally invasive, ambulatory method for description of gastrointestinal motility. The system has not ...

  20. Mass and energy supply of a cool coronal loop near its apex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Limei; Peter, Hardi; He, Jiansen; Xia, Lidong; Wang, Linghua

    2018-03-01

    Context. Different models for the heating of solar corona assume or predict different locations of the energy input: concentrated at the footpoints, at the apex, or uniformly distributed. The brightening of a loop could be due to the increase in electron density ne, the temperature T, or a mixture of both. Aim. We investigate possible reasons for the brightening of a cool loop at transition region temperatures through imaging and spectral observation. Methods: We observed a loop with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and used the slit-jaw images together with spectra taken at a fixed slit position to study the evolution of plasma properties in and below the loop. We used spectra of Si IV, which forms at around 80 000 K in equilibrium, to identify plasma motions and derive electron densities from the ratio of inter-combination lines of O IV. Additional observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) were employed to study the response at coronal temperatures (Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, AIA) and to investigate the surface magnetic field below the loop (Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, HMI). Results: The loop first appears at transition region temperatures and later also at coronal temperatures, indicating a heating of the plasma in the loop. The appearance of hot plasma in the loop coincides with a possible accelerating upflow seen in Si IV, with the Doppler velocity shifting continuously from -70 km s-1 to -265 km s-1. The 3D magnetic field lines extrapolated from the HMI magnetogram indicate possible magnetic reconnection between small-scale magnetic flux tubes below or near the loop apex. At the same time, an additional intensity enhancement near the loop apex is visible in the IRIS slit-jaw images at 1400 Å. These observations suggest that the loop is probably heated by the interaction between the loop and the upflows, which are accelerated by the magnetic reconnection between small-scale magnetic flux tubes at lower altitudes. Before

  1. Geometry of the chromosphere-corona transition region inferred from the center-to-limb variation of the radio emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, M [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Tanaka, R [Niigata Univ. (Japan)

    1975-07-01

    Based on the observations of the EUV spectroheliograms, the effective chromosphere-corona transition region is assumed to be restricted in a small volume element in the boundaries of the supergranular network. The center-to-limb variation of the quiet Sun at cm and dm wavelengths is analyzed to determine where the transition region is located in the network boundaries. Expressions are derived for the theoretical center-to-limb variation of the hypothetical brightness temperature only from the transition region, taking into account the orientation of the spicules. Comparison with the observations shows that the spicule-sheath model (Brueckner and Nicolas, 1973) and the hot plagette model (Foukal, 1974) are not compatible with the observations, because the limb brighening predicted by these models is too great. A new picture is therefore proposed that thin platelet transition regions are placed on top of the chromosphere and scattered between the network boundaries (platlet transition-region model). This model is in accord with the observed center to limb variation of the radio emission.

  2. A flare observed in coronal, transition region, and helium I 10830 Å emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Zhicheng; Cao, Wenda [Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Qiu, Jiong [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States); Judge, Philip G. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    On 2012 June 17, we observed the evolution of a C-class flare associated with the eruption of a filament near a large sunspot in the active region NOAA 11504. We obtained high spatial resolution filtergrams using the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory in broadband TiO at 706 nm (bandpass: 10 Å) and He I 10830 Å narrow band (bandpass: 0.5 Å, centered 0.25 Å to the blue). We analyze the spatio-temporal behavior of the He I 10830 Å data, which were obtained over a 90''×90'' field of view with a cadence of 10 s. We also analyze simultaneous data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment instruments on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft, and data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and GOES spacecrafts. Non-thermal effects are ignored in this analysis. Several quantitative aspects of the data, as well as models derived using the '0D' enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops model code, indicate that the triplet states of the 10830 Å multiplet are populated by photoionization of chromospheric plasma followed by radiative recombination. Surprisingly, the He II 304 Å line is reasonably well matched by standard emission measure calculations, along with the C IV emission which dominates the Atmosphere Imaging Assembly 1600 Å channel during flares. This work lends support to some of our previous work combining X-ray, EUV, and UV data of flares to build models of energy transport from corona to chromosphere.

  3. Steady flows in the chromosphere and transition-zone above active regions as observed by OSO-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lites, B. W.

    1980-01-01

    Two years of data from the University of Colorado ultraviolet spectrometer aboard OSO-8 were searched for steady line-of-sight flows in the chromosphere and transition-zone above active regions. The most conspicuous pattern that emerges from this data set is that many sunspots show persistent blueshifts of transition-zone lines indicating velocities of about 20 km/s with respect to the surrounding plage areas. The data show much smaller shifts in ultraviolet emission lines arising from the chromosphere: the shifts are frequently to the blue, but sometimes redshifts do occur. Plage areas often show a redshift of the transition-zone lines relative to the surrounding quiet areas, and a strong gradient of the vertical component of the velocity is evident in many plages. One area of persistent blueshift was observed in the transition-zone above an active region filament. The energy requirement of these steady flows over sunspots is discussed.

  4. Transition region of TEC enhancement phenomena during geomagnetically disturbed periods at mid-latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Unnikrishnan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale TEC perturbations/enhancements observed during the day sectors of major storm periods, 12-13 February 2000, 23 September 1999, 29 October 2003, and 21 November 2003, were studied using a high resolution GPS network over Japan. TEC enhancements described in the present study have large magnitudes (≥25×1016 electrons/m2 compared to the quiet-time values and long periods (≥120 min. The sequential manner of development and the propagation of these perturbations show that they are initiated at the northern region and propagate towards the southern region of Japan, with velocities >350 m/s. On 12 February 2000, remarkably high values of TEC and background content are observed at the southern region, compared to the north, because of the poleward expansion of the equatorial anomaly crest, which is characterized by strong latitudinal gradients near 35° N (26° N geomagnetically. When the TEC enhancements, initiating at the north, propagate through the region 39-34° N (30-25° N geomagnetically, they undergo transitions characterized by a severe decrease in amplitude of TEC enhancements. This may be due to their interaction with the higher background content of the expanded anomaly crest. However, at the low-latitude region, below 34° N, an increase in TEC is manifested as an enhanced ionization pattern (EIP. This could be due to the prompt penetration of the eastward electric field, which is evident from high values of the southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field component (IMF Bz and AE index. The TEC perturbations observed on the other storm days also exhibit similar transitions, characterized by a decreasing magnitude of the perturbation component, at the region around 39-34° N. In addition to this, on the other storm days, at the low-latitude region, below 34° N, an increase in TEC (EIP feature also indicates the repeatability of the above scenario. It is found that, the latitude and

  5. Transition region of TEC enhancement phenomena during geomagnetically disturbed periods at mid-latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Unnikrishnan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale TEC perturbations/enhancements observed during the day sectors of major storm periods, 12-13 February 2000, 23 September 1999, 29 October 2003, and 21 November 2003, were studied using a high resolution GPS network over Japan. TEC enhancements described in the present study have large magnitudes (≥25×1016 electrons/m2 compared to the quiet-time values and long periods (≥120 min. The sequential manner of development and the propagation of these perturbations show that they are initiated at the northern region and propagate towards the southern region of Japan, with velocities >350 m/s. On 12 February 2000, remarkably high values of TEC and background content are observed at the southern region, compared to the north, because of the poleward expansion of the equatorial anomaly crest, which is characterized by strong latitudinal gradients near 35° N (26° N geomagnetically. When the TEC enhancements, initiating at the north, propagate through the region 39-34° N (30-25° N geomagnetically, they undergo transitions characterized by a severe decrease in amplitude of TEC enhancements. This may be due to their interaction with the higher background content of the expanded anomaly crest. However, at the low-latitude region, below 34° N, an increase in TEC is manifested as an enhanced ionization pattern (EIP. This could be due to the prompt penetration of the eastward electric field, which is evident from high values of the southward Interplanetary Magnetic Field component (IMF Bz and AE index. The TEC perturbations observed on the other storm days also exhibit similar transitions, characterized by a decreasing magnitude of the perturbation component, at the region around 39-34° N. In addition to this, on the other storm days, at the low-latitude region, below 34° N, an increase in TEC (EIP feature also indicates the repeatability of the above scenario. It is found that, the latitude and time at which the decrease in magnitude

  6. LoopIng: a template-based tool for predicting the structure of protein loops.

    KAUST Repository

    Messih, Mario Abdel; Lepore, Rosalba; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    ) and significant enhancements for long loops (11-20 residues). The quality of the predictions is robust to errors that unavoidably affect the stem regions when these are modeled. The method returns a confidence score for the predicted template loops and has

  7. Temporal behavior of unresolved transition array emission in water window soft x-ray spectral region from multiply charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, Thanh-Hung, E-mail: dinh@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Yuhei; Arai, Goki; Higashiguchi, Takeshi, E-mail: higashi@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Li, Bowen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Dunne, Padraig; O' Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Fujioka, Shinsuke [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hasegawa, Noboru; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Nishikino, Masaharu [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2015-09-21

    We have characterized the spectral structure and the temporal history of the laser-produced high-Z multi-charged ion plasmas for the efficient water window soft x-ray sources. Strong unresolved transition array emission was observed due to 4d–4f and 4f–5g transitions from Au, Pb, and Bi plasmas in the 280–700 eV photon energy region. The temporal behavior of the emission was essentially similar of that of the laser pulse with a slight delay between different transitions. These results provide feedback for accurate modeling of the atomic processes with the radiative hydrodynamic simulations.

  8. THE COMPLEX NORTH TRANSITION REGION OF CENTAURUS A: A GALACTIC WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neff, Susan G. [NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Laboratory for Observational Cosmology, Mail Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Eilek, Jean A. [Physics Department, New Mexico Tech, Socorro NM 87801 (United States); Owen, Frazer N., E-mail: susan.g.neff@nasa.gov [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro NM 87801 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    We present deep GALEX images of NGC 5128, the parent galaxy of Centaurus A. We detect a striking “weather ribbon” of far-UV (FUV) and Hα emission which extends more than 35 kpc northeast of the galaxy. This ribbon is associated with a knotty ridge of radio/X-ray emission and is an extension of the previously known string of optical emission-line filaments. Many phenomena in the region are too short-lived to have survived transit out from the inner galaxy; something must be driving them locally. We also detect FUV emission from the galaxy’s central dust lane. Combining this with previous radio and far-IR measurements, we infer an active starburst in the central galaxy which is currently forming stars at ∼2 M{sub ☉} yr{sup −1}, and has been doing so for 50–100 Myr. If the wind from this starburst is enhanced by energy and mass driven out from the active galactic nucleus, the powerful augmented wind can be the driver needed for the northern weather system. We argue that both the diverse weather system, and the enhanced radio emission in the same region, result from the wind’s encounter with cool gas left by one of the recent merger/encounter events in the history of NGC 5128.

  9. Population structure and genetic diversity of Sinibrama macrops from Ou River and Ling River based on mtDNA D-loop region analysis, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liangjie; Chenoweth, Erica L; Liu, Qigen

    2018-03-01

    In order to understand the influence of human activities such as habitat fragmentation on freshwater fish population evolution, we investigated and compared the genetic diversity and phylogeography of Sinibrama macrops populations in the Oujiang River and Ling River. Mitochondrial control region sequences (D-loop region) of 131 specimens from six populations were obtained and analyzed. The diversity of main stream in the Ou River was lower than that in Ling River. Changtan population showed the lowest diversity (H = 0.646 ± 0.077; π = 0.00060 ± 0.00820). Pairwise F ST , gene flow (Nm), and genetic distance (Da) indicated that Longquan and Changtan significantly differentiate from other populations. Nested clade phylogeographical analysis (NCPA) showed some clades and total cladogram experienced isolation by distance. In conclusion, the populations from severely fragmented Ou River have the lower diversity and more intense differentiation than that from the mainstream of Ling River, Changtan population present the lowest diversity and were isolated by the dam construction.

  10. Functional Fourier transforms and the loop equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bershadskii, M.A.; Vaisburd, I.D.; Migdal, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Migdal-Makeenko momentum-space loop equation is investigated. This equation is derived from the ordinary loop equation by taking the Fourier transform of the Wilson functional. A perturbation theory is constructed for the new equation and it is proved that the action of the loop operator is determined by vertex functions which coincide with those of the previous equation. It is shown how the ghost loop arises in direct iterations of the momentum-space equation with respect to the coupling constant. A simple example is used to illustrate the mechanism of appearance of an integration in the interior loops in transition to observables

  11. EMERGENCE OF GRANULAR-SIZED MAGNETIC BUBBLES THROUGH THE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE. III. THE PATH TO THE TRANSITION REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, Ada; Hansteen, Viggo H.; Pontieu, Bart De; Carlsson, Mats; Voort, Luc Rouppe van der [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Rubio, Luis Ramón Bellot [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC), Apdo. 3040, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Rodríguez, Jaime de la Cruz, E-mail: ada@astro.uio.no [Institute for Solar Physics, Dept. of Astronomy, Stockholm University, Albanova University Center, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-07-10

    We study, for the first time, the ascent of granular-sized magnetic bubbles from the solar photosphere through the chromosphere into the transition region and above. Such events occurred in a flux emerging region in NOAA 11850 on 2013 September 25. During that time, the first co-observing campaign between the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) spacecraft was carried out. Simultaneous observations of the chromospheric H α 656.28 nm and Ca ii 854.2 nm lines, plus the photospheric Fe i 630.25 nm line, were made with the CRISP spectropolarimeter at the Spitzer Space Telescope ( SST ) reaching a spatial resolution of 0.″14. At the same time, IRIS was performing a four-step dense raster of the emerging flux region, taking slit jaw images at 133 (C ii, transition region), 140 (Si iv, transition region), 279.6 (Mg ii k, core, upper chromosphere), and 283.2 nm (Mg ii k, wing, photosphere). Spectroscopy of several lines was performed by the IRIS spectrograph in the far- and near-ultraviolet, of which we have used the Si iv 140.3 and the Mg ii k 279.6 nm lines. Coronal images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of the Solar Dynamics Observatory were used to investigate the possible coronal signatures of the flux emergence events. The photospheric and chromospheric properties of small-scale emerging magnetic bubbles have been described in detail in Ortiz et al. Here we are able to follow such structures up to the transition region. We describe the properties, including temporal delays, of the observed flux emergence in all layers. We believe this may be an important mechanism of transporting energy and magnetic flux from subsurface layers to the transition region and corona.

  12. A vulnerability and risk assessment of SEPTA's regional rail : a transit climate change adaptation assessment pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    This final report for the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) Transit Climate Change Adaptation Assessment Pilot describes the actions : taken, information gathered, analyses performed, and lessons learned throughout the pilot project. This report d...

  13. Pore system characteristics of the Permian transitional shale reservoir in the Lower Yangtze Region, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taotao Cao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Permian shale, a set of transitional shale reservoir, is considered to be an important shale gas exploration target in the Lower Yangtze region. Due to little research conducted on the pore system characteristic and its controlling factors of the shale gas reservoir, SEM, FE-SEM, low-pressure N2 adsorption, and mercury intrusion tests were carried out on the Permian shales from the outcrop and HC well in the southern Anhui. The results show that the Permian shales mainly consist of organic matter, quartz, illite, calcite, and pyrite, of which pyrite occurs as framboids coexisting with organic matter and the organic matter is distributed in shales in stripped, interstitial, thin film and shell shapes. The basic pore types are inorganic mineral pore (intercrystalline pore, intergranular edge pore, intergranular pore, and interlayer pore in clay minerals and the organic pore and microfracture, of which organic pore and microfracture are the dominating pore types. In shale, organic pores are not developed at all in some organic grains but are well developed in others, which may be related to the types of and maceral compositions of kerogen. Under tectonic stress, shale rocks could develop mylonitization phenomenon exhibiting organic grains well blend with clay minerals, and produce a mass of microfractures and nanopores between organic matter grains and clay minerals. Mercury intrusion tests show that the shale is mainly composed of micropore and transition pore with high porosity, good pore connectivity and high efficiency of mercury withdraw, while the shale that mainly dominated by mesopore and macropore has a low porosity, poor pore connectivity, and low efficiency of the mercury withdraw. The volume percentage of mesopore and marcopore is increasing with the increase of quartz, and that of micropore and transition pore has a decreased tendency along with the increase of soluble organic matter (S1. Organic matter is the main contributor to

  14. The Transition Region Explorer: Observing the Multi-Scale Dynamics of Geospace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, E.

    2015-12-01

    Meso- and global-scale IT remote sensing is accomplished via satellite imagers and ground-based instruments. On the ground, the approach is arrays providing extensive as possible coverage (the "net") and powerful observatories that drill deep to provide detailed information about small-scale processes (the "drill"). Always, there is a trade between cost, spatial resolution, coverage (extent), number of parameters, and more, such that in general the larger the network the sparser the coverage. Where are we now? There are important gaps. With THEMIS-ASI, we see processes that quickly evolve beyond the field of view of one observatory, but involve space/time scales not captured by existing meso- and large-scale arrays. Many forefront questions require observations at heretofore unexplored space and time scales, and comprehensive inter-hemispheric conjugate observations than are presently available. To address this, a new ground-based observing initiative is being developed in Canada. Called TREx, for Transition Region Explorer, this new facility will incorporate dedicated blueline, redline, and Near-Infrared All-Sky Imagers, together with an unprecedented network of ten imaging riometers, with a combined field of view spanning more than three hours of magnetic local time and from equatorward to poleward of typical auroral latitudes (spanning the ionospheric footprint of the "nightside transition region" that separates the highly stretched tail and the inner magnetosphere). The TREx field-of-view is covered by HF radars, and contains a dense network of magnetometers and VLF receivers, as well as other geospace and upper atmospheric remote sensors. Taken together, TREx and these co-located instruments represent a quantum leap forward in terms of imaging, in multiple parameters (precipitation, ionization, convection, and currents), ionospheric dynamics in the above-mentioned scale gap. This represents an exciting new opportunity for studying geospace at the system level

  15. The Role of Regional Therapies for in-Transit Melanoma in the Era of Improved Systemic Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriel, Emmanuel [Department of Surgical Oncology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States); Skitzki, Joseph, E-mail: joseph.skitzki@roswellpark.org [Department of Surgical Oncology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States); Department of Immunology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of melanoma has been increasing at a rapid rate, with 4%–11% of all melanoma recurrences presenting as in-transit disease. Treatments for in-transit melanoma of the extremity are varied and include surgical excision, lesional injection, regional techniques and systemic therapies. Excision to clear margins is preferred; however, in cases of widespread disease, this may not be practical. Historically, intralesional therapies were generally not curative and were often used for palliation or as adjuncts to other therapies, but recent advances in oncolytic viruses may change this paradigm. Radiation as a regional therapy can be quite locally toxic and is typically relegated to disease control and symptom relief in patients with limited treatment options. Regional therapies such as isolated limb perfusion and isolated limb infusion are older therapies, but offer the ability to treat bulky disease for curative intent with a high response rate. These techniques have their associated toxicities and can be technically challenging. Historically, systemic therapy with chemotherapies and biochemotherapies were relatively ineffective and highly toxic. With the advent of novel immunotherapeutic and targeted small molecule agents for the treatment of metastatic melanoma, the armamentarium against in-transit disease has expanded. Given the multitude of options, many different combinations and sequences of therapies can be offered to patients with in-transit extremity melanoma in the contemporary era. Reported response and survival rates of the varied treatments may offer valuable information regarding treatment decisions for patients with in-transit melanoma and provide rationale for these decisions.

  16. Interaction effects of region-level GDP per capita and age on labour market transition rates in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Zanin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this paper is to measure the effect of the interaction between age for the population of males and females aged 18 to 74 and region-level GDP per capita on labour market transition probabilities in Italy. We compare different occupational states in a sample of males and females who remained in their region of residence at two points in time (12 months apart. We estimate the transition probabilities using a flexible hierarchical logit model with interaction effects between worker age and region-level GDP per capita. We apply this model using longitudinal data from the Italian Labour Force Survey that cover the 2004–2013 period. We find empirical support for the assumption that people in the same age cohort have different labour market opportunities based on the level of GDP per capita in their region of residence. These differences are particularly relevant among younger workers.

  17. Energy balance in the solar transition region. I - Hydrostatic thermal models with ambipolar diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenla, J. M.; Avrett, E. H.; Loeser, R.

    1990-01-01

    The energy balance in the lower transition region is analyzed by constructing theoretical models which satisfy the energy balance constraint. The energy balance is achieved by balancing the radiative losses and the energy flowing downward from the corona. This energy flow is mainly in two forms: conductive heat flow and hydrogen ionization energy flow due to ambipolar diffusion. Hydrostatic equilibrium is assumed, and, in a first calculation, local mechanical heating and Joule heating are ignored. In a second model, some mechanical heating compatible with chromospheric energy-balance calculations is introduced. The models are computed for a partial non-LTE approach in which radiation departs strongly from LTE but particles depart from Maxwellian distributions only to first order. The results, which apply to cases where the magnetic field is either absent, or uniform and vertical, are compared with the observed Lyman lines and continuum from the average quiet sun. The approximate agreement suggests that this type of model can roughly explain the observed intensities in a physically meaningful way, assuming only a few free parameters specified as chromospheric boundary conditions.

  18. Transition Region Emission and the Energy Input to Thermal Plasma in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Holman, Gordon D.; Dennis, Brian R.; Haga, Leah; Raymond, John C.; Panasyuk, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the energetics of solar flares depends on obtaining reliable determinations of the energy input to flare plasma. X-ray observations of the thermal bremsstrahlung from hot flare plasma provide temperatures and emission measures which, along with estimates of the plasma volume, allow the energy content of this hot plasma to be computed. However, if thermal energy losses are significant or if significant energy goes directly into cooler plasma, this is only a lower limit on the total energy injected into thermal plasma during the flare. We use SOHO UVCS observations of O VI flare emission scattered by coronal O VI ions to deduce the flare emission at transition region temperatures between 100,000 K and 1 MK for the 2002 July 23 and other flares. We find that the radiated energy at these temperatures significantly increases the deduced energy input to the thermal plasma, but by an amount that is less than the uncertainty in the computed energies. Comparisons of computed thermal and nonthermal electron energies deduced from RHESSI, GOES, and UVCS are shown.

  19. Polymerase chain reaction assay for verifying the labeling of meat and commercial meat products from game birds targeting specific sequences from the mitochondrial D-loop region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, M; González, I; Pavón, M A; Pegels, N; Hernández, P E; García, T; Martín, R

    2010-05-01

    A PCR assay was developed for the identification of meats and commercial meat products from quail (Coturnix coturnix), pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), partridge (Alectoris spp.), guinea fowl (Numida meleagris), pigeon (Columba spp.), Eurasian woodcock (Scolopax rusticola), and song thrush (Turdus philomelos) based on oligonucleotide primers targeting specific sequences from the mitochondrial D-loop region. The primers designed generated specific fragments of 96, 100, 104, 106, 147, 127, and 154 bp in length for quail, pheasant, partridge, guinea fowl, pigeon, Eurasian woodcock, and song thrush tissues, respectively. The specificity of each primer pair was tested against DNA from various game and domestic species. In this work, satisfactory amplification was accomplished in the analysis of experimentally pasteurized (72 degrees C for 30 min) and sterilized (121 degrees C for 20 min) meats, as well as in commercial meat products from the target species. The technique was also applied to raw and sterilized muscular binary mixtures, with a detection limit of 0.1% (wt/wt) for each of the targeted species. The proposed PCR assay represents a rapid and straightforward method for the detection of possible mislabeling in game bird meat products.

  20. Exact solutions of sl-boson system in U(2l + 1) reversible O(2l + 2) transitional region

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Xin

    2002-01-01

    Exact eigen-energies and the corresponding wavefunctions of the interacting sl-boson system in U(2l + 1) reversible O(2l +2) transitional region are obtained by using an algebraic Bethe Ansatz with the infinite dimensional Lie algebraic technique. Numerical algorithm for solving the Bethe Ansatz equations by using mathematical package is also outlined

  1. [Process of land use transition and its impact on regional ecological quality in the Middle Reaches of Heihe River, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu Hong; Zhao, Rui Feng; Zhang, Li Hua; Li, Hong Wei

    2017-12-01

    Land use transition is one of the main drivers of regional ecosystem change in arid area, which directly affects human well-being. Based on the satellite images of 1987, 2001 and 2016, the change detection assessment model and ecological response model were used to analyze the process of land use transition and response of ecological quality during 1987-2016 in the ecologically fragile middle reaches of the Heihe River. The results showed that the land use change was significant during 1987-2016 and the total change increased significantly, as well as the continuous increase of the cultivated land and construction land. There was a strong tendency of transform from grassland to cultivated land, while the tendency of transforming unused land to other land classes was not strong under a random process of gain or loss. During 1987-2016, the ecological quality of the study area displayed a decreasing trend as a whole and the ecological land decreased by 2.8%. The land use transition with the greatest impact on the ecological environment degradation was the transition of the grassland to the cultivated land and unused land. Therefore, in order to promote the sustainable use of regional land resources and to improve the regional ecological quality, it is necessary to allocate the proportion of production land and ecological land according to the regional water resources.

  2. Lattice QED in the loop space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fort, H.

    1994-01-01

    We present a survey on the state of the art in the formulation of lattice compact QED in the space of loops. In a first part we review our most recent Hamiltonian results which signal a second order transition for (3+1) compact QED. We devote the second part to the Lagrangian loop formalism, showing the equivalence of the recently proposed loop action with the Villain form. (orig.)

  3. Capturing flood-to-drought transitions in regional climate model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Ivonne; Haslinger, Klaus; Hofstätter, Michael; Salzmann, Manuela; Resch, Gernot

    2017-04-01

    In previous studies atmospheric cyclones have been investigated in terms of related precipitation extremes in Central Europe. Mediterranean (Vb-like) cyclones are of special relevance as they are frequently related to high atmospheric moisture fluxes leading to floods and landslides in the Alpine region. Another focus in this area is on droughts, affecting soil moisture and surface and sub-surface runoff as well. Such events develop differently depending on available pre-saturation of water in the soil. In a first step we investigated two time periods which encompass a flood event and a subsequent drought on very different time scales, one long lasting transition (2002/2003) and a rather short one between May and August 2013. In a second step we extended the investigation to the long time period 1950-2016. We focused on high spatial and temporal scales and assessed the currently achievable accuracy in the simulation of the Vb-events on one hand and following drought events on the other hand. The state-of-the-art regional climate model CCLM is applied in hindcast-mode simulating the single events described above, but also the time from 1948 to 2016 to evaluate the results from the short runs to be valid for the long time period. Besides the conventional forcing of the regional climate model at its lateral boundaries, a spectral nudging technique is applied. The simulations covering the European domain have been varied systematically different model parameters. The resulting precipitation amounts have been compared to E-OBS gridded European precipitation data set and a recent high spatially resolved precipitation data set for Austria (GPARD-6). For the drought events the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI), soil moisture and runoff has been investigated. Varying the spectral nudging setup helps us to understand the 3D-processes during these events, but also to identify model deficiencies. To improve the simulation of such events in the past

  4. Sociology of the energy turnaround. Renewable energy sources and transition of rural regions; Soziologie der Energiewende. Erneuerbare Energien und die Transition des laendlichen Raums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunze, Conrad

    2012-11-01

    German politicians, industry and society are working on the 'energy turnaround'. While changes in centralized power generation and transmission are going slow, there is an increasing number of 'test laboratories' in rural regions as communities and villages abandon imported fossil fuels and generate their own power on the basis of solar, wind and geothermal resources. In his study, the author investigates the transition phase using tools of empirical sociology. He shows that local processes reflect the importance of the energy turnaround as a cultural change and as a full-scale transformation of rural regions. The development of local, decentral energy infrastructures is interpreted theoretically as an interdependence between social and technological compolexity. The further geographic diffusion of the model in German-language regions can thus be explained as a consequence of specific social structures.

  5. Threaded-Field-Line Model for the Transition Region and Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, I.; van der Holst, B.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2014-12-01

    In numerical simulations of the solar corona, both for the ambient state and especially for dynamical processes the most computational resources are spent for maintaining the numerical solution in the Low Solar Corona and in the transition region, where the temperature gradients are very sharp and the magnetic field has a complicated topology. The degraded computational efficiency is caused by the need in a highest resolution as well as the use of the fully three-dimensional implicit solver for electron heat conduction. On the other hand, the physical nature of the processes involved is rather simple (which still does not facilitate the numerical methods) as long as the heat fluxes as well as slow plasma motional velocities are aligned with the magnetic field. The Alfven wave turbulence, which is often believed to be the main driver of the solar wind and the main source of the coronal heating, is characterized by the Poynting flux of the waves, which is also aligned with the magnetic field. Therefore, the plasma state in any point of the three-dimensional grid in the Low Solar Corona can be found by solving a set of one-dimensional equations for the magnetic field line ("thread"), which passes through this point and connects it to the chromosphere and to the global Solar Corona. In the present paper we describe an innovative computational technology based upon the use of the magnetic-field-line-threads to forlmulate the boundary condition for the global solar corona model which traces the connection of each boundary point to the cromosphere along the threads.

  6. METHODOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO FORMATION OF CONDITIONS OF TRANSITION TO STEADY DEVELOPMENT OF THE CREDIT ORGANIZATIONS OF REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Pechonik

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Formation of conditions of transition to steady development of the credit organizations assumes presence of scientific toolkit which should have methodological character and represent a set of scientific receptions, methods and principles of research to which definition given clause is devoted. The executed research has shown, that the logic and the scheme of the scientific analysis of processes of maintenance with bank service of economic system of region and formation of conditions of steady development of regional bank system should: to be based on statistical methods with use of system of national accounts in addition with the SWOT-analysis of bank system; formation of conditions of transition to steady development to be spent in a complex and comprehensively; management of process of transition to steady development of bank system should be carried out at active state participation within the limits of creation socially focused according to plan-market economy. At the given approach formation of conditions of transition of regional bank system on steady development, in our opinion, becomes possible.

  7. Preparing tomorrow's grid: RTE at the service of regions to support energy transition. Regional electric assessments - Stakes and key data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-06-01

    This document gathers a first one which presents the regional electric assessments and 21 regional reports. The presentation document briefly outlines the interdependency of regions, the diversity of regional situation in terms of electricity production and consumption, needs and ways to develop energy saving in order to reduce sensitivity to temperature, the evolution, objectives and contrasted results of the development of renewable energies, the investments and projects by RTE to develop and improve the grid. Regional reports propose maps and graphs and a synthesis of the evolution of electricity consumption, of the evolution of electricity consumption by industries, of the evolution of peak consumptions, of the evolution of consumption coverage by regional production, of the origin of electricity production (renewable thermal, photovoltaic, thermal fossil, hydraulic, nuclear), of the evolution of the various productions (renewable, hydraulic, thermal fossil, nuclear), of the evolution of the share of renewable energies, of the development of photovoltaic and wind installed power. They also present projects and investments, and propose maps of France indicating the level of consumption, the evolution of consumption between 2006 and 2013, the production/consumption rate of the different French regions and the energy exchanges between regions

  8. Phylogenetic and Genetic Analysis of D-loop and Cyt-b Region of mtDNA Sequence in Iranian Sistani, Sarabi and Brown Swiss Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    reza valizadeh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cattle have an important role in primary human civilization, so molecular studies for more accurate recognition of their origin are effective to identify unknown historical aspects. Cattle can be divided in to 2 main groups including Bos Tuarus and Bos Indicus. Both types of cattle can be found in Iran; therefore study of their origin has particular importance. The aim of this study was to investigate the nucleotide sequences of Cytochrome-b (Cyt-b and HVR1&2 loci of D-loop gene region in mitochondrial DNA of Sistani, Sarabi and Brown Swiss breeds of cattle. Twenty blood samples of each breed, from non-relative individuals were obtained from blood bank of animal science department of Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. The DNA content of sample was extracted based on the guanidinium thiocianate-silicagel method. Polymerase Chain Reaction with specific designed primers was performed to amplify Cyt-b and HVR 1&2 loci with 751 and 701 bp lengths, respectively. Sequencing of amplified Cyt-b and HVR 1&2 loci were done based on Sanger method by automatic sequencer machine (ABI 3130. Nucleotide diversity in Brown Swiss, Sarabi and Sistani breeds were estimated 0.0037, 0.0024 and 0.0029, respectively. Sequences of Cyt-b and HVR 1&2 were register in National Center for Biotechnology Institute due to nucleotide differences. Results of phylogenetic test using UPGMA for both loci showed that Sarabi and Sistani breeds are belonging to first group and Brown Swiss breed to other group.

  9. Promoting effect of ethanol on dewetting transition in the confined region of melittin tetramer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Xiuping; Zhou Bo; Wang Chunlei

    2012-01-01

    To study the influence of ethanol molecules on the melittin tetramer folding, we investigated the dewetting transition of the melittin tetramer immersed in pure water and 8% aqueous ethanol solution (mass fraction) by the molecular dynamics simulations. We found that the marked dewetting transitions occurred inside a nanoscale channel of the melittin tetramer both in pure water and in aqueous ethanol solution. Also, ethanol molecules promoted this dewetting transition. We attributed this promoting effect to ethanol molecules which prefer to locate at the liquid-vapor interface and decrease the liquid-vapor surface energy. The results provide insight into the effect of ethanol on the water dewetting phenomena. (authors)

  10. Low energy E0 transitions in odd-mass nuclei of the neutron deficient 180 < A < 200 region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zganjar, E.F.; Kortelahti, M.O.; Wood, J.L.; Papanicolopulos, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    The region of neutron-deficient nuclei near Z = 82 and N = 104 provides the most extensive example of low-energy shape coexistence anywhere on the mass surface. It is shown that E0 and E0 admixed transitions may be used as a fingerprint to identify shape coexistence in odd-mass nuclei. It is also shown that all the known cases of low energy E0 and E0 admixed transitions in odd-mass nuclei occur where equally low-lying O + states occur in neighboring even-even nuclei. A discussion of these and other relevant data as well as suggestions for new studies which may help to clarify and, more importantly, quantify the connection between E0 transitions and shape coexistence are presented. 60 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Characterizing the transition region of an A508 cl3 steel using small specimens by the reference temperature and the weak-link distances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, C.A.J.

    2001-01-01

    An experimental program was developed to characterize the transition region of an A508 cl3 steel. Some fracture mechanic specimens were tested in the transition region using three geometries with thickness B c values, the reference temperature values, To, associated with each geometry and test temperature, and the measured r wl distances and the theoretical ones. (author)

  12. Driving factors for the regional implementation of renewable energy ‐ A multiple case study on the German energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, Lotte Marie; Fischer, Lisa-Britt; Newig, Jens; Lang, Daniel Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Understanding what drives the regional implementation of renewable energy is a prerequisite for energy transitions toward a post-fossil-based energy economy. This paper presents an empirical analysis of driving factors for the regional implementation and use of renewable energy. We tested literature-derived driving factors in a comparative analysis of 18 selected study regions using Rough Set Analysis and performance analysis. We paid special attention to common combinations of driving factors, which we understand as established practices concerning the use and implementation of renewable energy. Our findings confirm most of the driving factors identified in the literature, for example the existence of key actors, knowledge exchange, or the use of goals and milestones. We also observe differences in key driving factors between highly successful and less successful regions, especially regarding funding opportunities. The results may support policy makers who aim to successfully implement renewable energy at a regional level. - Highlights: • We analyzed driving factors for RE implementation in 18 best-practice regions. • Most driving factors from transition and governance literature were confirmed. • We identified common successful practices concerning RE implementation.

  13. New Insights into the Nature of Transition Disks from a Complete Disk Survey of the Lupus Star-forming Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Marel, Nienke; Williams, Jonathan P.; Ansdell, M.; Manara, Carlo F.; Miotello, Anna; Tazzari, Marco; Testi, Leonardo; Hogerheijde, Michiel; Bruderer, Simon; van Terwisga, Sierk E.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2018-02-01

    Transition disks with large dust cavities around young stars are promising targets for studying planet formation. Previous studies have revealed the presence of gas cavities inside the dust cavities, hinting at recently formed, giant planets. However, many of these studies are biased toward the brightest disks in the nearby star-forming regions, and it is not possible to derive reliable statistics that can be compared with exoplanet populations. We present the analysis of 11 transition disks with large cavities (≥20 au radius) from a complete disk survey of the Lupus star-forming region, using ALMA Band 7 observations at 0.″3 (22–30 au radius) resolution of the 345 GHz continuum, 13CO and C18O 3–2 observations, and the spectral energy distribution of each source. Gas and dust surface density profiles are derived using the physical–chemical modeling code DALI. This is the first study of transition disks of large cavities within a complete disk survey within a star-forming region. The dust cavity sizes range from 20 to 90 au radius, and in three cases, a gas cavity is resolved as well. The deep drops in gas density and large dust cavity sizes are consistent with clearing by giant planets. The fraction of transition disks with large cavities in Lupus is ≳ 11 % , which is inconsistent with exoplanet population studies of giant planets at wide orbits. Furthermore, we present a hypothesis of an evolutionary path for large massive disks evolving into transition disks with large cavities.

  14. Using High Energy Precipitation for Magnetic Mapping in the Nightside Transition Region During Dynamic Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanswick, E.

    2017-12-01

    Identifying the magnetic footprint of a satellite can be done using the in situ observations together with some ionospheric or low-altitude satellite observation to argue that the two measurements were made on the same field line. Nishimura et al. [2011], e.g., correlated a time series of chorus wave power near the magnetic equator with the time series of intensities of every pixel of a is roughly magnetically conjugate ASI. Often, the pattern of correlation shows a well-defined peak at the location of the satellite's magnetic footprint. Their results cannot be replicated during dynamic events (e.g., substorms), because the required auroral forms do not occur at such times. It would be important if we could make mappings with such confidence during active times. The Transition Region Explorer (TREx), which is presently being implemented, is a new ground-based facility that will remote sense electron precipitation across 3 hours of MLT and 12 degrees of magnetic latitude spanning the auroral zone in western Canada. TREx includes the world's first imaging riometers array with a contiguous field of view large enough to seamlessly track the spatio-temporal evolution of high energy electron precipitation at mesoscales. Two studies motivated the TREx riometers array. First, Baker et al. [1981] demonstrated riometer absorption is an excellent proxy for the electron energy flux integrated from 30 keV to 200keV keV at the magnetic equator on the flux tube corresponding to the location of that riometers. Second, Spanswick et al. [2007] showed the correlation between the riometers absorption and the integrated electron energy flux near the magnetic equator peaked when the satellite was nearest to conjugate to the riometers. Here we present observations using CANOPUS single beam riometers and CRRES MEB to illustrate how the relative closeness of the footpoint of an equatorial spacecraft can be assessed using high energy precipitation. As well, we present the capabilities of

  15. Observed Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance in the Transition Zone Between Cloud-Free and Cloudy Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Chiu, C.; Wiscombe, W.

    2010-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (ARM) new Shortwave Spectrometer (SWS) looks straight up and measures zenith radiance at 418 wavelengths between 350 and 2200 nm. Because of its 1-sec sampling resolution, the SWS provides a unique capability to study the transition zone between cloudy and clear sky areas. A surprising spectral invariant behavior is found between ratios of zenith radiance spectra during the transition from cloudy to cloud-free atmosphere. This behavior suggests that the spectral signature of the transition zone is a linear mixture between the two extremes (definitely cloudy and definitely clear). The weighting function of the linear mixture is found to be a wavelength-independent characteristic of the transition zone. It is shown that the transition zone spectrum is fully determined by this function and zenith radiance spectra of clear and cloudy regions. This new finding may help us to better understand and quantify such physical phenomena as humidification of aerosols in the relatively moist cloud environment and evaporation and activation of cloud droplets.

  16. Age and cause mortality structure in the Italian regions at the beginning of the health transition: a research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Del Panta

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at exploring Italian mortality structure (by age and cause of death at the regional level in the last decades of the 19th Century. These years, corresponding to the beginning of the health transition process, were crucial in the Italian experience. The analysis is based on a careful exploitation of the volume “Statistica delle cause delle morti 1888”, published in 1890, by the General Directorate of Statistics. This volume is the only one which offers for the Italian regions, before the second World war, death statistics classified according to both age and cause together. The principal objectives of this descriptive contribution are essentially to illustrate the territorial variation of mortality conditions in the first phase of the health transition process as well as to underline the relevance and the complexities of the causes specific mortality analysis to explain the geographical mortality differentials in terms of age and sex.

  17. Regional trade and the nutrition transition: opportunities to strengthen NCD prevention policy in the Southern African Development Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thow, Anne Marie; Sanders, David; Drury, Eliza; Puoane, Thandi; Chowdhury, Syeda N; Tsolekile, Lungiswa; Negin, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Addressing diet-related non-communicable diseases (NCDs) will require a multisectoral policy approach that includes the food supply and trade, but implementing effective policies has proved challenging. The Southern African Development Community (SADC) has experienced significant trade and economic liberalization over the past decade; at the same time, the nutrition transition has progressed rapidly in the region. This analysis considers the relationship between regional trade liberalization and changes in the food environment associated with poor diets and NCDs, with the aim of identifying feasible and proactive policy responses to support healthy diets. Changes in trade and investment policy for the SADC were documented and compared with time-series graphs of import data for soft drinks and snack foods to assess changes in imports and source country in relation to trade and investment liberalization. Our analysis focuses on regional trade flows. Diets and the burden of disease in the SADC have changed since the 1990s in parallel with trade and investment liberalization. Imports of soft drinks increased by 76% into SADC countries between 1995 and 2010, and processed snack foods by 83%. South Africa acts as a regional trade and investment hub; it is the major source of imports and investment related to these products into other SADC countries. At the same time, imports of processed foods and soft drinks from outside the region - largely from Asia and the Middle East - are increasing at a dramatic rate with soft drink imports growing by almost 1,200% and processed snack foods by 750%. There is significant intra-regional trade in products associated with the nutrition transition; however, growing extra-regional trade means that countries face new pressures in implementing strong policies to prevent the increasing burden of diet-related NCDs. Implementation of a regional nutrition policy framework could complement the SADC's ongoing commitment to regional trade policy.

  18. Regional trade and the nutrition transition: opportunities to strengthen NCD prevention policy in the Southern African Development Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thow, Anne Marie; Sanders, David; Drury, Eliza; Puoane, Thandi; Chowdhury, Syeda N.; Tsolekile, Lungiswa; Negin, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Background Addressing diet-related non-communicable diseases (NCDs) will require a multisectoral policy approach that includes the food supply and trade, but implementing effective policies has proved challenging. The Southern African Development Community (SADC) has experienced significant trade and economic liberalization over the past decade; at the same time, the nutrition transition has progressed rapidly in the region. This analysis considers the relationship between regional trade liberalization and changes in the food environment associated with poor diets and NCDs, with the aim of identifying feasible and proactive policy responses to support healthy diets. Design Changes in trade and investment policy for the SADC were documented and compared with time-series graphs of import data for soft drinks and snack foods to assess changes in imports and source country in relation to trade and investment liberalization. Our analysis focuses on regional trade flows. Results Diets and the burden of disease in the SADC have changed since the 1990s in parallel with trade and investment liberalization. Imports of soft drinks increased by 76% into SADC countries between 1995 and 2010, and processed snack foods by 83%. South Africa acts as a regional trade and investment hub; it is the major source of imports and investment related to these products into other SADC countries. At the same time, imports of processed foods and soft drinks from outside the region – largely from Asia and the Middle East – are increasing at a dramatic rate with soft drink imports growing by almost 1,200% and processed snack foods by 750%. Conclusions There is significant intra-regional trade in products associated with the nutrition transition; however, growing extra-regional trade means that countries face new pressures in implementing strong policies to prevent the increasing burden of diet-related NCDs. Implementation of a regional nutrition policy framework could complement the SADC

  19. Regional trade and the nutrition transition: opportunities to strengthen NCD prevention policy in the Southern African Development Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marie Thow

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Addressing diet-related non-communicable diseases (NCDs will require a multisectoral policy approach that includes the food supply and trade, but implementing effective policies has proved challenging. The Southern African Development Community (SADC has experienced significant trade and economic liberalization over the past decade; at the same time, the nutrition transition has progressed rapidly in the region. This analysis considers the relationship between regional trade liberalization and changes in the food environment associated with poor diets and NCDs, with the aim of identifying feasible and proactive policy responses to support healthy diets. Design: Changes in trade and investment policy for the SADC were documented and compared with time-series graphs of import data for soft drinks and snack foods to assess changes in imports and source country in relation to trade and investment liberalization. Our analysis focuses on regional trade flows. Results: Diets and the burden of disease in the SADC have changed since the 1990s in parallel with trade and investment liberalization. Imports of soft drinks increased by 76% into SADC countries between 1995 and 2010, and processed snack foods by 83%. South Africa acts as a regional trade and investment hub; it is the major source of imports and investment related to these products into other SADC countries. At the same time, imports of processed foods and soft drinks from outside the region – largely from Asia and the Middle East – are increasing at a dramatic rate with soft drink imports growing by almost 1,200% and processed snack foods by 750%. Conclusions: There is significant intra-regional trade in products associated with the nutrition transition; however, growing extra-regional trade means that countries face new pressures in implementing strong policies to prevent the increasing burden of diet-related NCDs. Implementation of a regional nutrition policy framework could

  20. The quiescent chromospheres and transition regions of active dwarf stars: what are we learning from recent observations and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linsky, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    The rapid progress in understanding active dwarf stars, which has been stimulated by recent IUE, Einstein and ground-based observations, is reviewed. Active phenomena in late-type dwarf stars are seen as somehow a direct consequence of strong magnetic fields. The nonflare phenomena in the chromosphere and transition regions of these stars are discussed, while some suggestions are given about the way in which magnetic fields control these phenomena. Especially, the review deals with a description and comparison of those activities which are similar in active and quiescent dwarf stars and summarizes the various roles which magnetic fields likely play in modifying the chromospheres and transition regions of active stars. Successively, the following subjects are discussed: the basic structure of the stars, the enhanced heating and solar-like flux tubes, the consequences of plasma flows, heating rates in different layers, heating mechanism of chromosphere and transition region, semi-empirical models. The author finishes with some suggestions for future work. (G.J.P.)

  1. Point Climat no. 26 'Regional Climate - Air - Energy Plans at the heart of the debate on the energy transition'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordier, Cecile; Leseur, Alexia

    2013-01-01

    Among the publications of CDC Climat Research, 'Climate Briefs' presents, in a few pages, hot topics in climate change policy. This issue addresses the following points: On the eve of the introduction of the environmental assessment procedure for planning documents, almost all Regional Climate - Air - Energy Plans have now been published. This Climate Brief assesses regional climate strategies, which rely on significant commitment from those involved, including citizens by changing their behaviour, companies by improving their energy efficiency and the banking sector through financial support. Identification of these challenges and areas for action will feed into the national debate on energy transition which began last autumn

  2. Magnitude of Solar Radiation Torque in the Transition Region from the Umbra to the Dark Shadow of the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabette, R E S; Kolesnikov, I; Zanardi, M C

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of solar radiation pressure force and its influence on the motion of artificial satellites has been developed by researchers. Accurate models to describe the influence of the Earth's shadow on the torque and force due to solar radiation pressure have been presented. In this work the solar radiation torque (SRT) and its influence on the attitude of an artificial satellite are taken into account by the introduction of the Earth's shadow function in the equations of motion. This function assumes a unitary value when the satellite is in the fully illuminated region of its orbit, and the value zero for the full shade region. The main objective of this study is to analyze the magnitude of SRT using the equations described by quaternions during a 35 day period and to compare the results with the satellite transition through the shadow region and the time interval in this region. The duration and transition through the shadow region were obtained using the software 'Shadow Conditions of Earth Satellites'. The formulation is applied to the Brazilian Data Collection Satellites SCD1 and SCD2, and the torque model is presented in terms of the satellite attitude quaternion, distance of the satellite to the Sun, orbital elements, right ascension and declination of the Sun. (paper)

  3. Effect of fluctuations on electron and phonon processes and thermodynamic parameters of Ag2Te and Ag2Se in the region of phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, S. A.; Aliev, F. F.

    2008-01-01

    Temperature dependences of electrical conductivity σ, thermoelectric power α, results of differential thermal analysis ΔT y , thermal conductivity χ, temperature conductivity κ, and heat capacity C p were studied in Ag 2 Te and Ag 2 Se semiconductors in the region of the phase transition. Two extrema are observed in the temperature dependence χ(T): a maximum in the region of the α' → β' transition and a minimum in the region of the β' → β transition; these extrema are caused by the similar dependence C p (T). It is shown that the α → α' and β' → β transitions are displacement transitions, while the α' → β' transition is of reconstruction type. It is established that the disorder parameter η in silver chalcogenides is highly smeared in the region of the phase transition; therefore, disordering of phases at the point of the phase transition is incomplete: 73, 62, and 48% in Ag 2 Te, Ag 2 Se, and Ag 2 S, respectively. The minimum volumes V ph for new phases are calculated; it is shown that the value of V ph in displacement transitions is larger than in the reconstruction-type transitions

  4. Magnet tracking allows assessment of regional gastrointestinal transit times in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedsund, Caroline; Joensson, Iben Moeller; Gregersen, Tine; Fynne, Lotte; Schlageter, Vincent; Krogh, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Data on small intestinal transit time in healthy children are lacking, and normal values for gastric emptying and colonic transit time are sparse. Conventional methods, including radiopaque markers, scintigraphy, and PillCam™ involve radiation or require the child to swallow a large pill. The minimally invasive, radiation-free Motility Tracking System-1 (MTS-1) has been introduced for description of gastrointestinal motility in adults. The aim of the study was to evaluate the MTS-1 for assessment of gastrointestinal transit times and motility patterns in healthy children. Twenty-one healthy children (nine girls), median age 10 (range 7-12) years were included. For evaluation with MTS-1, a small magnetic pill was ingested and tracked through the gastrointestinal tract by a matrix of 16 magnetic sensors placed behind a nonmagnetic bed. The children were investigated for 8 hours after swallowing the magnetic pill and again for 4 hours the following morning. After leaving the unit, each child came back after every bowel movement to determine if the pill had been expelled. Nineteen children could swallow the pill. Characteristic contraction patterns were identified for the stomach (three per minute), small intestine (9-11 per minute), and colon (4-5 per minute). Median total gastrointestinal transit time was 37.7 (range 9.5-95.8) hours, median gastric emptying time was 37 (range 2-142) minutes, median small intestinal transit time was 302 (range 164 to >454) minutes, and median colorectal transit time was 38.1 (range 5.6-90.0) hours. MTS-1 allows minimally invasive evaluation of gastrointestinal motility in children. Use of the method is, however, restricted by the nonambulatory setup.

  5. Thermal behavior in the transition region between nucleate and film boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adiutori, E.F.

    1991-01-01

    The prediction of post Critical Heat Flux (CHF) behavior is complicated by the highly nonlinear thermal behavior of boiling interfaces--ie by the nonlinear nature of the boiling curve. Nonlinearity in the boiling curve can and does cause thermal instability, resulting in temperature discontinuities. Thus the prediction of post CHF behavior requires the analysis of thermal stability. This in turn requires an accurate description of thermal behavior in transition boiling. This paper determines thermal behavior in transition boiling by analysis of literature data. It also describes design features which improve post CHF performance and are reported in the literature

  6. New Technologies and Innovation Capacity - Boosting Economic Transition Processes in the Less Favoured Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Kati-Jasmin Kosonen

    2003-01-01

    In the era of knowledge society many regions and local communities/ towns are trying to compete with larger, growing cities over the knowledge and intellectual capital resources. Regional or local knowledge environment has become more important. Building innovation capacity and the institutional capacity as one part of it could be a development tool to some lagging behind-regions, (which are called as less-favoured regions) and quite often do not have universities of their own or successful i...

  7. Alternative loop rings

    CERN Document Server

    Goodaire, EG; Polcino Milies, C

    1996-01-01

    For the past ten years, alternative loop rings have intrigued mathematicians from a wide cross-section of modern algebra. As a consequence, the theory of alternative loop rings has grown tremendously. One of the main developments is the complete characterization of loops which have an alternative but not associative, loop ring. Furthermore, there is a very close relationship between the algebraic structures of loop rings and of group rings over 2-groups. Another major topic of research is the study of the unit loop of the integral loop ring. Here the interaction between loop rings and group ri

  8. Comparison of experimental and theoretical binding and transition energies in the actinide region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, M.O.; Nestor, C.W. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The status of experimental and theoretical binding and transition energy determinations is reviewed extending the comparison between experiment and theory to encompass representative series of data for all actinides. This comprehensive comparison reveals areas where improvements may be indicated, showing whether theoretical treatments including all known contributions to the lowest order would be adequate in all instances. 45 references

  9. I. Transition regions, line tensions and contact angles in soap films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feijter, J.A. de; Vrij, A.

    An analysis is given of the thickness profile of a circular soap film and its Plateau border. It shows that in principle the thickness as a function of the radial distance, h(r), for a single film, can provide details of the interaction free energy ΔF(h) over a large range of h. The transition

  10. Neglected Voices : Untold Stories of Gender, Conflict and Transitional Justice in the Great Lakes Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, Theo

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation consists out of an introduction and one book chapter and three journal articles that are based on extensive field research in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo and northern Uganda. The three overarching themes of this dissertation are gender, armed conflict and transitional

  11. The basic helix-loop-helix region of the transcriptional repressor hairy and enhancer of split 1 is preorganized to bind DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popovic, Matija; Wienk, Hans; Coglievina, Maristella; Boelens, Rolf; Pongor, Sándor; Pintar, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Hairy and enhancer of split 1, one of the main downstream effectors in Notch signaling, is a transcriptional repressor of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family. Using nuclear magnetic resonance methods, we have determined the structure and dynamics of a recombinant protein, H1H, which includes an

  12. Magnet tracking allows assessment of regional gastrointestinal transit times in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedsund C

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Caroline Hedsund,1,2 Iben Moeller Joensson,2 Tine Gregersen,1 Lotte Fynne,1 Vincent Schlageter,3 Klaus Krogh1 1Neurogastroenterology Unit, Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, 2Department of Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 3Motilis Medica SA, Lausanne, Switzerland Background: Data on small intestinal transit time in healthy children are lacking, and normal values for gastric emptying and colonic transit time are sparse. Conventional methods, including radiopaque markers, scintigraphy, and PillCam™ involve radiation or require the child to swallow a large pill. The minimally invasive, radiation-free Motility Tracking System-1 (MTS-1 has been introduced for description of gastrointestinal motility in adults. The aim of the study was to evaluate the MTS-1 for assessment of gastrointestinal transit times and motility patterns in healthy children. Methods: Twenty-one healthy children (nine girls, median age 10 (range 7–12 years were included. For evaluation with MTS-1, a small magnetic pill was ingested and tracked through the gastrointestinal tract by a matrix of 16 magnetic sensors placed behind a nonmagnetic bed. The children were investigated for 8 hours after swallowing the magnetic pill and again for 4 hours the following morning. After leaving the unit, each child came back after every bowel movement to determine if the pill had been expelled. Results: Nineteen children could swallow the pill. Characteristic contraction patterns were identified for the stomach (three per minute, small intestine (9–11 per minute, and colon (4–5 per minute. Median total gastrointestinal transit time was 37.7 (range 9.5–95.8 hours, median gastric emptying time was 37 (range 2–142 minutes, median small intestinal transit time was 302 (range 164 to >454 minutes, and median colorectal transit time was 38.1 (range 5.6–90.0 hours. Conclusion: MTS-1 allows minimally invasive evaluation of gastrointestinal motility in

  13. Talent 2 - the new vehicle family for regional and rapid transit rail services; Talent 2 - Die neue Fahrzeugfamilie fuer den Regional- und S-Bahnverkehr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segieth, Christian [Bombardier Transportation, Hennigsdorf (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In February 2007, Deutsche Bahn AG concluded a framework contract with railway vehicle manufacturer Bombardier for the supply of 321 new-generation Talent 2 electrical multiple unit trains for regional and rapid transit rail services. In light of changing market requirements, the trains are not being delivered in predetermined numbers at predetermined dates, as used to be customary, but will be released according to need up until 2014. The contract covers the basic conditions and agreements for the overall order, which is worth some 1.2 billion of Euros. Deutsche Bahn AG has already concluded similar contracts with Bombardier for double-deck coaches. (orig.)

  14. Glass heat capacity and its abrupt change in glass transition region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    cover a large range of glass formers from metallic to non-metallic glasses. To conduct this study we convert the units of all the Cp data from J/mol K and J/g K to J/g-atom K. This study will provide insight into the correlations among chemical bonding, microstructure structure, liquid fragility, glass......Glass transition (GT) has been a fascinating, but challenging subject in the condensed matter science over decades. Despite progress in understanding GT, many crucial problems still need to be clarified. One of the problems deals with the microscopic origin of abrupt change of heat capacity (Cp......) around glass transition. Here we study this problem through two approaches. First, we analyze the Cp change with temperature on homologous series of glass formers (i.e., with regular compositional substitution). Second, we do the same on non-homologous systems (e.g. without regular compositional...

  15. Structural integrity assessment of steam generator tubes deteriorated through primary water stress corrosion cracking in transition region of tube expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, Helvecio Carlos Klinke da

    2002-01-01

    In PWR plants, steam generator tube degradation has been one of the most important economical concerns, besides causing operational safety problems. In this work, a survey of steam generator tube degradation modes is done. Degradation mechanisms and influence factors are introduced and discussed. The importance of stress corrosion cracking, especially in transition region of tube expansion zone, is underlined. The actual steam generator tube plugging criteria are conservative. Proposed alternative criteria are introduced and discussed. Distinction is done to structural integrity assessment of defective tubes. Real data of tube defect indications of axial cracks in expansion transition zone due to primary water stress corrosion cracking are used in analysis. Results allow discussing application aspects of deterministic and probabilistic criteria on structural integrity assessment of tubes with defect indications. Applied models are specifics, but the application of concept may be extended to other steam generator tube degradation modes. (author)

  16. AP-1-mediated chromatin looping regulates ZEB2 transcription: new insights into TNFα-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition in triple-negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yichun; Shiue, Chiou-Nan; Zhu, Jian; Zhuang, Ting; Jonsson, Philip; Wright, Anthony P.H.; Zhao, Chunyan; Dahlman-Wright, Karin

    2015-01-01

    The molecular determinants of malignant cell behaviour in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) are poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that regulators of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are potential therapeutic targets for TNBC. In this study, we demonstrate that the inflammatory cytokine TNFα induces EMT in TNBC cells via activation of AP-1 signaling and subsequently induces expression of the EMT regulator ZEB2. We also show that TNFα activates both the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK pathways, which act upstream of AP-1. We further investigated in detail AP-1 regulation of ZEB2 expression. We show that two ZEB2 transcripts derived from distinct promoters are both expressed in breast cancer cell lines and breast tumor samples. Using the chromosome conformation capture assay, we demonstrate that AP-1, when activated by TNFα, binds to a site in promoter 1b of the ZEB2 gene where it regulates the expression of both promoter 1b and 1a, the latter via mediating long range chromatin interactions. Overall, this work provides a plausible mechanism for inflammation-induced metastatic potential in TNBC, involving a novel regulatory mechanism governing ZEB2 isoform expression. PMID:25762639

  17. Transition state region in the A-Band photodissociation of allyl iodide—A femtosecond extreme ultraviolet transient absorption study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacherjee, Aditi, E-mail: abhattacherjee@berkeley.edu, E-mail: andrewattar@berkeley.edu; Attar, Andrew R., E-mail: abhattacherjee@berkeley.edu, E-mail: andrewattar@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Leone, Stephen R., E-mail: srl@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-03-28

    Femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption spectroscopy based on a high-harmonic generation source is used to study the 266 nm induced A-band photodissociation dynamics of allyl iodide (CH{sub 2} =CHCH{sub 2}I). The photolysis of the C—I bond at this wavelength produces iodine atoms both in the ground ({sup 2}P{sub 3/2}, I) and spin-orbit excited ({sup 2}P{sub 1/2}, I*) states, with the latter as the predominant channel. Using XUV absorption at the iodine N{sub 4/5} edge (45–60 eV), the experiments constitute a direct probe of not only the long-lived atomic iodine reaction products but also the fleeting transition state region of the repulsive n{sub I}σ{sup ∗}{sub C—I} excited states. Specifically, three distinct features are identified in the XUV transient absorption spectrum at 45.3 eV, 47.4 eV, and 48.4 eV (denoted transients A, B, and C, respectively), which arise from the repulsive valence-excited nσ{sup ∗} states and project onto the high-lying core-excited states of the dissociating molecule via excitation of 4d(I) core electrons. Transients A and B originate from 4d(I) → n(I) core-to-valence transitions, whereas transient C is best assigned to a 4d(I) →σ{sup ∗}(C—I) transition. The measured differential absorbance of these new features along with the I/I* branching ratios known from the literature is used to suggest a more definitive assignment, albeit provisional, of the transients to specific dissociative states within the A-band manifold. The transients are found to peak around 55 fs–65 fs and decay completely by 145 fs–185 fs, demonstrating the ability of XUV spectroscopy to map the evolution of reactants into products in real time. The similarity in the energies of transients A and B with analogous features observed in methyl iodide [Attar et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 6, 5072, (2015)] together with the new observation of transient C in the present work provides a more complete picture of the valence electronic

  18. Proposal of upgrade of the ATLAS muon trigger in the barrel-endcap transition region with RPCs

    CERN Document Server

    Massa, L; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This report presents a project for the upgrade of the Level-1 muon trigger in the barrel-endcap transition region (1.01) caused by charged particles originating from secondary interactions downstream of the interaction point. After the LHC upgrade forseen for 2018, the Level-1 muon trigger rate would saturate the allocated bandwidth unless new measures are adopted to improve the rejection of fake triggers. ATLAS is going to improve the trigger selectivity in the region |$\\eta$|>1.3 with the New Small Wheel detector upgrade. To obtain a similar trigger selectivity in the barrel-endcap transition region, it is proposed to add new RPC chambers at the edge of the inner layer of the barrel muon spectrometer. These chambers will be based on a three layer structure with thinner gas gaps and electrodes with respect to the ATLAS standard and a new low-profile light-weight mechanical structure that will allow the installation in the limited available space. New front-end electronics, integrating fast TDC capabilities w...

  19. Application of the RKR model for evaluating the fracture toughness of pressure vessel steel in the transition temperature region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Won Jon; Huh, Moo Young; Lee, Bong Sang; Hong, Jun Hwa

    2002-01-01

    Fracture toughness of a SA 533 B-1 steel was characterized in ductile-brittle transition temperature region by means of a RKR-type model. The original RKR model has been used to predict the plane strain fracture toughness (K IC ) behaviors in lower shelf region by assuming two material parameters, ie, the critical fracture stress and the characteristic distance. In this study, the fracture surface of every specimen was thoroughly investigated using scanning electron microscope to locate the actual cleavage initiation and to measure the cleavage initiation distance (CID) from the initial crack. The local fracture stress (σ f * ) of material was determined from the elastic-plastic stress field at the measured cleavage initiation location in the notched and precracked specimen. The local fracture stress of the precracked specimens was much higher than that of the notched specimen. The measured CIDs were strongly dependent on the test temperature and also on the fracture toughness. Based on the observations, it is found that, in the RKR-type cleavage fracture models, the characteristic distance should not be treated as a constant material parameter in the ductile-brittle transition region where the cleavage initiation controls the overall fracture process

  20. Thermodynamics in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, L.F.; Zhu, J.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is very powerful to deal with the behavior of early universe. Moreover, the effective loop quantum cosmology gives a successful description of the universe in the semiclassical region. We consider the apparent horizon of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe as a thermodynamical system and investigate the thermodynamics of LQC in the semiclassical region. The effective density and effective pressure in the modified Friedmann equation from LQC not only determine the evolution of the universe in LQC scenario but also are actually found to be the thermodynamic quantities. This result comes from the energy definition in cosmology (the Misner-Sharp gravitational energy) and is consistent with thermodynamic laws. We prove that within the framework of loop quantum cosmology, the elementary equation of equilibrium thermodynamics is still valid.

  1. 3D MHD MODELING OF TWISTED CORONAL LOOPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reale, F.; Peres, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Orlando, S. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Guarrasi, M. [CINECA—Interuniversity consortium, via Magnanelli 6/3, I-40033, Casalecchio di Reno, Bologna (Italy); Mignone, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale, Università di Torino, via Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125, Torino (Italy); Hood, A. W.; Priest, E. R., E-mail: fabio.reale@unipa.it [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-10

    We perform MHD modeling of a single bright coronal loop to include the interaction with a non-uniform magnetic field. The field is stressed by random footpoint rotation in the central region and its energy is dissipated into heating by growing currents through anomalous magnetic diffusivity that switches on in the corona above a current density threshold. We model an entire single magnetic flux tube in the solar atmosphere extending from the high- β chromosphere to the low- β corona through the steep transition region. The magnetic field expands from the chromosphere to the corona. The maximum resolution is ∼30 km. We obtain an overall evolution typical of loop models and realistic loop emission in the EUV and X-ray bands. The plasma confined in the flux tube is heated to active region temperatures (∼3 MK) after ∼2/3 hr. Upflows from the chromosphere up to ∼100 km s{sup −1} fill the core of the flux tube to densities above 10{sup 9} cm{sup −3}. More heating is released in the low corona than the high corona and is finely structured both in space and time.

  2. Transition-Region/Coronal Signatures of Penumbral Microjets: Hi-C, SDO/AIA and Hinode (SOT/FG) Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Alpert, Shane E.; Moore, Ronald L.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2014-01-01

    Penumbral microjets are bright, transient features seen in the chromosphere of sunspot penumbrae. Katsuaka et al. (2007) noted their ubiquity and characterized them using the Ca II H-line filter on Hinode's Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). The jets are 1000{4000 km in length, 300{400 km in width, and last less than one minute. It was proposed that these penumbral microjets could contribute to the transition-region and coronal heating above sunspots. We examine whether these microjets appear in the transition-region (TR) and/or corona or are related{ temporally and spatially{ to similar brightenings in the TR and/or corona. First, we identify penumbral microjets with the SOT's Ca II H-line filter. The chosen sunspot is observed on July 11, 2012 from 18:50:00 UT to 20:00:00 UT at approx. 14 inches, -30 inches. We then examine the sunspot in the same field of view and at the same time in other wavelengths. We use the High Resolution Coronal Imager Telescope (Hi-C) at 193A and the 1600A, 304A, 171A, 193A, and 94A passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We include examples of these jets and where they should appear in the other passbands, but find no signifcant association, except for a few jets with longer lifetimes and bigger sizes seen at locations in the penumbra with repeated stronger brightenings. We conclude that the normal microjets are not heated to transition-region/coronal temperatures, but the larger jets are.

  3. Enthalpy-Based Thermal Evolution of Loops: II. Improvements to the Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargill, P. J.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper further develops the zero-dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic coronal loop model "Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops" (EBTEL) originally proposed by Klimchuk et al (2008), which studies the plasma response to evolving coronal heating. It has typically been applied to impulsive heating events. The basis of EBTEL is the modelling of mass exchange between the corona and transition region and chromosphere in response to heating variations, with the key parameter being the ratio of transition region to coronal radiation. We develop new models for this parameter that now include gravitational stratification and a physically motivated approach to radiative cooling. A number of examples are presented, including nanoflares in short and long loops, and a small flare. It is found that while the evolution of the loop temperature is rather insensitive to the details of the model, accurate tracking of the density requires the inclusion of our new features. In particular, we are able to now obtain highly over-dense loops in the late cooling phase and decreases to the coronal density arising due to stratification. The 0D results are compared to a 1D hydro code (Hydrad). The agreement is acceptable, with the exception of the flare case where some versions of Hydrad can give significantly lower densities. This is attributed to the method used to model the chromosphere in a flare. EBTEL is suitable for general use as a tool for (a) quick-look results of loop evolution in response to a given heating function and (b) situations where the modelling of hundreds or thousands of elemental loops is needed. A single run takes a few seconds on a contemporary laptop.

  4. Industrial symbiosis - a means to power regional growth and the green transition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moller, Per

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available and CSR value locally and globally • Opportunity for shared marketing and investor efforts • Increased motivation, job satisfaction and pride among the employees involved BENEFITS • Increased growth and competitiveness • Decoupling... ECONOMY CIRCULAR ECONOMY TRANSITION IN DENMARK BY 2035 COULD LEAD TO... An increase in GDP by 0.8–1.4% GDP RESOURCE CO 2 EXPORT FTEs 7,000 – 13,000 additional job equivalents Reduction of the country’s carbon footprint by 3-7% Reduction...

  5. CHINA'S INTERNATIONAL TOURISM UNDER ECONOMIC TRANSITION: NATIONAL TRENDS AND REGIONAL DISPARITIES

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Chyi-Lyi (Kathleen); Guo, Rong; Wang, Qingbin

    2003-01-01

    China's Tourism industry, especially international tourism, has expanded rapidly since its market-oriented economic reform started in 1978. There has been limited information regarding the trends and regional disparities. This paper examines the national trends of China's international tourism since 1982 and analyzes the changes in regional disparities since 1995. While the trend analysis suggests that China's international tourism is likely to keep growing at a significant rate, the analysis...

  6. Identification of, and transition to, the second region of ideal MHD stability in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbagh, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    The second region of ideal MHD stability in tokamaks is studied by considering the behavior of the second region boundary for self- consistently calculated, marginally stable, second region equilibria and the characteristics of numerically computed transport sequences that achieve second stability. Equilibria with pressure profiles, p(ψ), that are marginally stable to the second region on each flux surface are generated numerically. This constraint eliminates p(ψ) as an independent variable, and reduces the predictor variables to the tokamak parameters and the q profile. The primary response functions considered are the plasma figures of merit, β and var-epsilon β p , and the normalized pressure gradient, α. Variations of the radial wavenumber in the ballooning equation negligibly affect the second region boundary for these equilibria. The second region boundary is sensitive to variations in the q profile at small aspect ratio, A, and will stabilize or destabilize depending on the balance of higher order var-epsilon = A -1 modifications of the normal field line curvature, κ n . These effects are a competition between the stabilizing geometric magnetic well of the toroidal field component of κ n and the destabilizing poloidal field component of κ n . The latter term becomes competitive in high var-epsilon β p plasmas with large Shafranov shifts. Simple analytic models are presented that reproduce the scaling of the marginally stable second region values of α and var-epsilon β p , and stability diagrams illustrating the behavior of the high-n unstable region for various parameters are shown

  7. Dominant two-loop corrections to the MSSM finite temperature effective potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    We show that two-loop corrections to the finite temperature effective potential in the MSSM can have a dramatic effect on the strength of the electroweak phase transition, making it more strongly first order. The change in the order parameter v/Tc can be as large as 75% of the one-loop daisy improved result. This effect can be decisive to widen the region in parameter space where erasure of the created baryons by sphaleron processes after the transition is suppressed and hence, where electroweak baryogenesis might be successful. We find an allowed region with tan β< or∼4.5 and a Higgs boson with standard couplings and mass below 80 GeV within the reach of LEP II. (orig.)

  8. High current density ion beam obtained by a transition to a highly focused state in extremely low-energy region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Y., E-mail: y.hirano@aist.go.jp, E-mail: hirano.yoichi@phys.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp [Innovative Plasma Processing Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); College of Science and Technologies, Nihon University, Chiyodaku, Tokyo 101-0897 (Japan); Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H. [Innovative Plasma Processing Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Fujiwara, Y.; Sakakita, H. [Innovative Plasma Processing Group, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Department of Engineering Mechanics and Energy, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    A high current density (≈3 mA/cm{sup 2}) hydrogen ion beam source operating in an extremely low-energy region (E{sub ib} ≈ 150–200 eV) has been realized by using a transition to a highly focused state, where the beam is extracted from the ion source chamber through three concave electrodes with nominal focal lengths of ≈350 mm. The transition occurs when the beam energy exceeds a threshold value between 145 and 170 eV. Low-level hysteresis is observed in the transition when E{sub ib} is being reduced. The radial profiles of the ion beam current density and the low temperature ion current density can be obtained separately using a Faraday cup with a grid in front. The measured profiles confirm that more than a half of the extracted beam ions reaches the target plate with a good focusing profile with a full width at half maximum of ≈3 cm. Estimation of the particle balances in beam ions, the slow ions, and the electrons indicates the possibility that the secondary electron emission from the target plate and electron impact ionization of hydrogen may play roles as particle sources in this extremely low-energy beam after the compensation of beam ion space charge.

  9. Loop Transfer Matrix and Loop Quantum Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savvidy, George K.

    2000-01-01

    The gonihedric model of random surfaces on a 3d Euclidean lattice has equivalent representation in terms of transfer matrix K(Q i ,Q f ), which describes the propagation of loops Q. We extend the previous construction of the loop transfer matrix to the case of nonzero self-intersection coupling constant κ. We introduce the loop generalization of Fourier transformation which allows to diagonalize transfer matrices, that depend on symmetric difference of loops only and express all eigenvalues of 3d loop transfer matrix through the correlation functions of the corresponding 2d statistical system. The loop Fourier transformation allows to carry out the analogy with quantum mechanics of point particles, to introduce conjugate loop momentum P and to define loop quantum mechanics. We also consider transfer matrix on 4d lattice which describes propagation of memebranes. This transfer matrix can also be diagonalized by using the generalized Fourier transformation, and all its eigenvalues are equal to the correlation functions of the corresponding 3d statistical system. In particular the free energy of the 4d membrane system is equal to the free energy of 3d gonihedric system of loops and is equal to the free energy of 2d Ising model. (author)

  10. Nonconformity of policy ambitions with biomass potentials in regional bioenergy transition: A Dutch example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Özcan, Evren; Arentsen, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Numerous regional authorities within the European Union are committed to meet renewable energy targets in line with the EU-20-20-20 strategy. Energy from biomass occupies a pivotal position in the renewable energy strategy of many regions. Effective bioenergy policy often depends on an assessment of the regional resource potential for energy from biomass. Using the Dutch province of Overijssel as a case study, this study presents a biomass resource potential assessment, based on existing statistics and a resource-focused methodology, to determine the region's theoretical and technical potential. Additionally, a methodological framework is provided to translate the outcome of this biomass resource potential assessment into the policy domain, to allow the region's bioenergy policy ambition to be evaluated. The results indicate that Overijssel's potential bioenergy target is a share of 8.3%, which does not match with the desired policy target of 14%. It is therefore clear that it is unlikely that the province's bioenergy ambition will be met with the current supply of biomass, in the absence of additional policy measures. The outcome of the biomass resource potential assessment has therefore been used to deduce and recommend multiple policy measures. - Highlights: • Biomass resource potential assessment performed with Dutch province as case study. • Methodology presented to translate technical biomass potential into policy domain. • Nonconformity found between the province's policy ambition and biomass potential. • Five policy measures identified to cope with this nonconformity

  11. Transit of solids through the human colon: Regional quantification in the unprepared bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proano, M.; Camilleri, M.; Phillips, S.F.; Brown, M.L.; Thomforde, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    We used a noninvasive method to label the solid phase of contents in the unprepared human colon. 111 In-labeled Amberlite pellets (0.5-1.8 mm diam) were placed in a gelatin capsule that was then coated with a pH-sensitive polymer (methacrylate). In vitro, the capsules disintegrated in simulated small bowel contents within 1-2 h; when ingested by healthy subjects, capsules released radiolabel in the distal ileum or proximal colon in 13 of 15 subjects. Transit of 111 In-pellets through the unprepared colon could then be quantitated radioscintigraphically. Segmental transit was defined in the ascending (AC), transverse (TC), descending (DC), and rectosigmoid (RS) colon. Radioactivity was also quantitated in stools. At 12 h, radioactivity was most obvious in the AC (59 +/- 11%, mean +/- SE) and the TC (21 +/- 6%); at 24 h, counts were distributed equally between AC, TC, and stools (P greater than 0.05); by 48 h, 56 +/- 11% counts had been excreted, although 30 +/- 10% remained in the TC. At 24 and 48 h, the amount in DC or RS was lower (P less than 0.05) than in the TC or in stools. Emptying of the AC was characterized by an initial lag period, when no counts emptied into the TC, followed by a period of emptying that was approximately linear. Thus this simple approach is able to label contents in the healthy human colon. The ascending and transverse colon appear to be sites of storage of solid residue, whereas the left colon and rectosigmoid function mainly as conduits

  12. Determination of the fracture thoughness curve within the ductile brittle transition region in ferritic steel AISI4140

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, R.; Orozco, E.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this work is to show the validity in the employment of small test tubes (1/2 T) in order to determine the fracture thoughness in ferritic steels that experience the beginning of cracking by cleavage, to elastic instability, and/or elasto-plastic. It was calculated the change of fracture thoughness in the ductile brittle transition region like function of the temperature employing statistic methods for steel to the annealed carbon of the type AISI4140. The testings were carried out within an interval of temperatures, where the cracking by cleavage and/or pop-in occurs. The thoughness curve of the cracking in the transition region was determined, in small test tubes 1/2 T, and in standard test tubes, 1T. It was calculated the beginning of instability of the integral J, J IC , and was converted to its equivalent in K JC units based in the ASTM Standard rev. 6-12-95 (ref. 6). (Author)

  13. Tree Changes or Wholesale Changes: The Role of Adult Education in Transitions in Regional Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Robert; Delves, Melinda

    2009-01-01

    Regional adult education and training providers have been required in recent decades to adapt to funding structures rather than engage with their local communities. This has meant providing education programs that are funded based on national or State and Territory based policy frameworks, often linked to human capital development. Adult education…

  14. Effect of vegetation cover and transitions on regional wind erosion in drylands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Youssef, I.F.

    2012-01-01

    Wind erosion is a critical environmental problem that threatens mainly the arid and semi-arid regions of our planet. Usually this problem is associated with desertification, poverty and other environmental and socioeconomic problems. Wind erosion causes the loss of fertile topsoil, and has a

  15. Ecological and economic problems of the Aral Sea region during transition to market economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, Yu.M.; Rice, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    The anthropogenic pressure upon the Aral Sea has exceeded reasonably permissible bounds too long. As a result of extensive water and land resources use, the regional ecology has been disrupted. The region is presently subject to potentially irreversible environment degradation. Under existing condition stabilization of the situation may be only achieved by applying modern land use management methods. Wise water resources distribution among water users in the different countries impossible under improved development condition and acceptance of appropriate legal mechanisms. Abundance of solar energy (238 MJ/m 2 per year) and windy days in the region imply that solar and wind energy development projects in the former sea bottom would be successful. Such project should be implemented when feasible. The use of natural resources incurs environmental and financial costs. Wise land must consider the ecological and socioeconomic division within region. Disturbed areas with unprofitable or unsuitable agricultural production must be evaluated and perhaps taken out of production. All infertile lands should be excluded from agricultural production and should be converted to permanent pastures or wildlife habitant. Optimal rotational grazing system should be used in the deltas. A scientific soil fertility improvement program should be implemented. Rice and cotton cultivation on fields adjacent to human population centers should be discontinued. Finally, all productive irrigated lands should be privatised by the local farmers

  16. An improved anisotropy-resolving subgrid-scale model for flows in laminar–turbulent transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Masahide; Abe, Ken-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An anisotropy-resolving subgrid-scale model, covering a wide range of grid resolutions, is improved. • The new model enhances its applicability to flows in the laminar-turbulent transition region. • A mixed-timescale subgrid-scale model is used as the eddy viscosity model. • The proposed model successfully predicts the channel flows at transitional Reynolds numbers. • The influence of the definition of the grid-filter width is also investigated. - Abstract: Some types of mixed subgrid-scale (SGS) models combining an isotropic eddy-viscosity model and a scale-similarity model can be used to effectively improve the accuracy of large eddy simulation (LES) in predicting wall turbulence. Abe (2013) has recently proposed a stabilized mixed model that maintains its computational stability through a unique procedure that prevents the energy transfer between the grid-scale (GS) and SGS components induced by the scale-similarity term. At the same time, since this model can successfully predict the anisotropy of the SGS stress, the predictive performance, particularly at coarse grid resolutions, is remarkably improved in comparison with other mixed models. However, since the stabilized anisotropy-resolving SGS model includes a transport equation of the SGS turbulence energy, k SGS , containing a production term proportional to the square root of k SGS , its applicability to flows with both laminar and turbulent regions is not so high. This is because such a production term causes k SGS to self-reproduce. Consequently, the laminar–turbulent transition region predicted by this model depends on the inflow or initial condition of k SGS . To resolve these issues, in the present study, the mixed-timescale (MTS) SGS model proposed by Inagaki et al. (2005) is introduced into the stabilized mixed model as the isotropic eddy-viscosity part and the production term in the k SGS transport equation. In the MTS model, the SGS turbulence energy, k es , estimated by

  17. Eigenvalue distributions of Wilson loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohmayer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we focus on the distribution of the eigenvalues of the unitary Wilson loop matrix in the two-dimensional case at arbitrary finite N. To characterize the distribution of the eigenvalues, we introduce three density functions (the ''symmetric'', the ''antisymmetric'', and the ''true'' eigenvalue density) which differ at finite N but possess the same infinite-N limit, exhibiting the Durhuus-Olesen phase transition. Using expansions of determinants and inverse determinants in characters of totally symmetric or totally antisymmetric representations of SU(N), the densities at finite N can be expressed in terms of simple sums involving only dimensions and quadratic Casimir invariants of certain irreducible representations of SU(N), allowing for a numerical computation of the densities at arbitrary N to any desired accuracy. We find that the true eigenvalue density, adding N oscillations to the monotonic symmetric density, is in some sense intermediate between the symmetric and the antisymmetric density, which in turn is given by a sum of N delta peaks located at the zeros of the average of the characteristic polynomial. Furthermore, we show that the dependence on N can be made explicit by deriving integral representations for the resolvents associated to the three eigenvalue densities. Using saddle-point approximations, we confirm that all three densities reduce to the Durhuus-Olesen result in the infinite-N limit. In the second part, we study an exponential form of the multiplicative random complex matrix model introduced by Gudowska-Nowak et al. Varying a parameter which can be identified with the area of the Wilson loop in the unitary case, the region of non-vanishing eigenvalue density of the N-dimensional complex product matrix undergoes a topological change at a transition point in the infinite-N limit. We study the transition by a detailed analysis of the average of the modulus square of the characteristic polynomial. Furthermore

  18. Eigenvalue distributions of Wilson loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmayer, Robert

    2010-07-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we focus on the distribution of the eigenvalues of the unitary Wilson loop matrix in the two-dimensional case at arbitrary finite N. To characterize the distribution of the eigenvalues, we introduce three density functions (the ''symmetric'', the ''antisymmetric'', and the ''true'' eigenvalue density) which differ at finite N but possess the same infinite-N limit, exhibiting the Durhuus-Olesen phase transition. Using expansions of determinants and inverse determinants in characters of totally symmetric or totally antisymmetric representations of SU(N), the densities at finite N can be expressed in terms of simple sums involving only dimensions and quadratic Casimir invariants of certain irreducible representations of SU(N), allowing for a numerical computation of the densities at arbitrary N to any desired accuracy. We find that the true eigenvalue density, adding N oscillations to the monotonic symmetric density, is in some sense intermediate between the symmetric and the antisymmetric density, which in turn is given by a sum of N delta peaks located at the zeros of the average of the characteristic polynomial. Furthermore, we show that the dependence on N can be made explicit by deriving integral representations for the resolvents associated to the three eigenvalue densities. Using saddle-point approximations, we confirm that all three densities reduce to the Durhuus-Olesen result in the infinite-N limit. In the second part, we study an exponential form of the multiplicative random complex matrix model introduced by Gudowska-Nowak et al. Varying a parameter which can be identified with the area of the Wilson loop in the unitary case, the region of non-vanishing eigenvalue density of the N-dimensional complex product matrix undergoes a topological change at a transition point in the infinite-N limit. We study the transition by a detailed analysis of the average of the

  19. Stormtime and Interplanetary Magnetic Field Drivers of Wave and Particle Acceleration Processes in the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Transition Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Spencer Mark

    The magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) transition region is the several thousand-kilometer stretch between the cold, dense and variably resistive region of ionized atmospheric gases beginning tens of kilometers above the terrestrial surface, and the hot, tenuous, and conductive plasmas that interface with the solar wind at higher altitudes. The M-I transition region is therefore the site through which magnetospheric conditions, which are strongly susceptible to solar wind dynamics, are communicated to ionospheric plasmas, and vice versa. We systematically study the influence of geomagnetic storms on energy input, electron precipitation, and ion outflow in the M-I transition region, emphasizing the role of inertial Alfven waves both as a preferred mechanism for dynamic (instead of static) energy transfer and particle acceleration, and as a low-altitude manifestation of high-altitude interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere, as observed by the FAST satellite. Via superposed epoch analysis and high-latitude distributions derived as a function of storm phase, we show that storm main and recovery phase correspond to strong modulations of measures of Alfvenic activity in the vicinity of the cusp as well as premidnight. We demonstrate that storm main and recovery phases occur during 30% of the four-year period studied, but together account for more than 65% of global Alfvenic energy deposition and electron precipitation, and more than 70% of the coincident ion outflow. We compare observed interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) control of inertial Alfven wave activity with Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD simulations predicting that southward IMF conditions lead to generation of Alfvenic power in the magnetotail, and that duskward IMF conditions lead to enhanced prenoon Alfvenic power in the Northern Hemisphere. Observed and predicted prenoon Alfvenic power enhancements contrast with direct-entry precipitation, which is instead enhanced postnoon. This situation

  20. Comparison of experimental and theoretical binding and transition energies in the actinide region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, M. O.; NESTOR, JR., C. W. [OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LAB., TENN. (USA)

    1977-11-15

    The present status of experimental and theoretical binding and transition energy determinations is reviewed. Experimental data and the most recent theoretical predictions are compared for the energies of K..cap alpha../sub 1/ X-rays, M series X-rays, K-LL Auger electrons, K, L/sub 3/, M and N levels, and the 4f spin-orbit splitting. In addition, the K..cap alpha../sub 1/ and L/sub 3/ data are fitted by Moseley-type diagrams, and data on the shallow levels and the valence bands of actinide oxides are discussed. Comparison shows that the single-particle Dirac-Fock theory and the inclusion of quantum-electrodynamic contributions predicts energies of the innermost levels generally within the accuracy of data, that is in the order of magnitude of 1 eV. However, in the N, O... shells large deviations do occur presumably due to strong many-electron interactions. The inclusion of many-electron effects in the relativistic theory remains a challenge, as do experimental investigations affording an accuracy of better than 1 eV for the various electronic levels.

  1. The Steens Mountain ( Oregon) geomagnetic polarity transition ( USA). 3. Its regional significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankinen, E.A.; Larson, E.E.; Gromme, C.S.; Prevot, M.; Coe, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    Study of the variations of direction and intensity of the geomagnetic field as recorded by the Miocene lava flows on Steens Mountain, SE Oregon, has resulted in a detailed description of total field behavior during a reversal in polarity. In addition to information about the polarity reversal itself, the detailed paleomagnetic record includes several thousand years of geomagnetic history preceding and following the polarity transition at 15.5 Ma. To test the feasibility of using this record as a means of correlation in this part of the western US, comparisons are made of reconnaissance and previously published paleomagnetic records obtained from what has been thought to be the Steens Basalt or rocks of equivalent age. Despite the fact that many of these earlier studies were not detailed and were not intended for correlation purposes, convincing similarities among some of the records are evident. The Steens Basalt paleomagnetic record does, indeed, have potential as a correlation tool during this time of widespread basaltic volcanism. Concludes that findings indicate no post-20 Ma differential rotation between S-E Washington and S-central Oregon, in contrast to previous interpretations. -from Authors

  2. Gating transitions in the selectivity filter region of a sodium channel are coupled to the domain IV voltage sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capes, Deborah L; Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel; Jarecki, Brian W; French, Robert J; Chanda, Baron

    2012-02-14

    Voltage-dependent ion channels are crucial for generation and propagation of electrical activity in biological systems. The primary mechanism for voltage transduction in these proteins involves the movement of a voltage-sensing domain (D), which opens a gate located on the cytoplasmic side. A distinct conformational change in the selectivity filter near the extracellular side has been implicated in slow inactivation gating, which is important for spike frequency adaptation in neural circuits. However, it remains an open question whether gating transitions in the selectivity filter region are also actuated by voltage sensors. Here, we examine conformational coupling between each of the four voltage sensors and the outer pore of a eukaryotic voltage-dependent sodium channel. The voltage sensors of these sodium channels are not structurally symmetric and exhibit functional specialization. To track the conformational rearrangements of individual voltage-sensing domains, we recorded domain-specific gating pore currents. Our data show that, of the four voltage sensors, only the domain IV voltage sensor is coupled to the conformation of the selectivity filter region of the sodium channel. Trapping the outer pore in a particular conformation with a high-affinity toxin or disulphide crossbridge impedes the return of this voltage sensor to its resting conformation. Our findings directly establish that, in addition to the canonical electromechanical coupling between voltage sensor and inner pore gates of a sodium channel, gating transitions in the selectivity filter region are also coupled to the movement of a voltage sensor. Furthermore, our results also imply that the voltage sensor of domain IV is unique in this linkage and in the ability to initiate slow inactivation in sodium channels.

  3. Transition towards improved regional wood flows by integrating material flux analysis and agent analysis. The case of Appenzell Ausserrhoden, Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, Claudia R.; Hofer, Christoph; Wiek, Arnim; Scholz, Roland W.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the integration of material flux analysis and agent analysis as the basis for a transition towards improved regional wood management in Appenzell Ausserrhoden (AR), a small Swiss canton located in the Pre-Alps of Switzerland. We present a wood flow analysis for forests, wood processing industries and consumption in AR, accounting for different wood products. We find that the forest is currently significantly underutilized although there are sizeable imports of wood and fuel to this small region. The underutilization of the forest contributes to a skewed age distribution, jeopardizing long-term sustainable development of the forest, as the fulfillment of its protective and production function are likely to be at risk. The wood resources, however, are capable of satisfying current wood demand among the population of AR and wood could even be exported. Underutilization has two main causes: first, wood prices are so low that harvesting trees is a money-losing proposition; second, consumer wood demand and the current supply from forest owners are not aligned. Furthermore, cultural values, lifestyle trends and traditions make an alignment of supply and demand difficult. Consensus and strategy building with the relevant stakeholders on the basis of the results obtained from the wood flow analysis and agent analysis is a reasonable next step to take. We conclude that wood flow analysis combined with agent analysis provide a useful and straightforward tool to be used as the basis of a transition process towards improved regional wood flows, which in turn should contribute to sustainable forest management

  4. Mass and energy flows between the Solar chromosphere, transition region, and corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansteen, V. H.

    2017-12-01

    A number of increasingly sophisticated numerical simulations spanning the convection zone to corona have shed considerable insight into the role of the magnetic field in the structure and energetics of the Sun's outer atmosphere. This development is strengthened by the wealth of observational data now coming on-line from both ground based and space borne observatories. We discuss what numerical models can tell us about the mass and energy flows in the region of the upper chromosphere and lower corona, using a variety of tools, including the direct comparison with data and the use of passive tracer particles (so-called 'corks') inserted into the simulated flows.

  5. [Perception of the transition to motherhood: a phenomenological study in the Barcelona region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlanga Fernández, Sofía; Vizcaya-Moreno, María Flores; Pérez-Cañaveras, Rosa María

    2013-10-01

    To describe needs and experiences of mothers with children under one year old, to identify the factors that hinder the transition to motherhood, and to design the content of a health promotion program to develop motherhood support group sessions. A qualitative study with a phenomenological approach. Eight Primary Care Centres in the province of Barcelona, between July 2011 and July 2012. A total of 21 mothers participating in group dynamics maternity support: All of them participated in interviews and 8 in focus group. Semi-structured interviews were used in a purposive sample. The transcriptions were analysed by structure (latent content analysis) and content (manifest content analysis), with different categories being obtained. The participants in the study defined the construct of motherhood around three categories: Changes in lifestyle, feelings and perceptions. They identified as the most stressful times; «the new role», «changes in the partner relationship», «feelings», «experiences of pregnancy and childbirth», «idealisation», «lack of support», «crying», «colic», «read the signs of the child», «bath», «rest», «contradictory opinions», «learning», and «acquisition of new skills». They highlighted, as key topics for group dynamics, feeding, development, affective relationship, maternal confidence, fathers participation, family role, emotional, rest, massage, bath, accident prevention, colic, first aid, childcare, resources, and vaccines. Dynamic groups should be contextualised according to the perceived needs of the mothers, and other family members should be allowed to participate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Biomechanics of Ergometric Stress Test: regional and local effects on elastic, transitional and muscular human arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls, G.; Torrado, J.; Farro, I.; Bia, D.; Zócalo, Y.; Lluberas, S.; Craiem, D.; Armentano, Rl

    2011-09-01

    Ergometric exercise stress tests (EST) give important information about the cardiovascular (CV) response to increased demands. The expected EST-related changes in variables like blood pressure and heart rate are known, but those in the arterial biomechanics are controversial and incompletely characterized. In this context, this work aims were to characterize the regional and local arterial biomechanical behaviour in response to EST; to evaluate its temporal profile in the post-EST recovery phase; and to compare the biomechanical response of different to EST. Methods: In 16 non-trained healthy young subjects the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and the carotid, femoral and brachial arterial distensibility were non-invasively evaluated before (Rest) and after EST. Main results: The EST resulted in an early increase in the arterial stiffness, evidenced by both, regional and local parameters (pulse wave velocity increase and distensibility reduction). When analyzing conjunctly the different post-EST recovery stages there were quali-quantitative differences among the arterial local stiffness response to EST. The biomechanical changes could not be explained only by blood pressure variations.

  7. Biomechanics of Ergometric Stress Test: regional and local effects on elastic, transitional and muscular human arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valls, G; Torrado, J; Farro, I; Bia, D; Zocalo, Y; Lluberas, S; Armentano, RL; Craiem, D

    2011-01-01

    Ergometric exercise stress tests (EST) give important information about the cardiovascular (CV) response to increased demands. The expected EST-related changes in variables like blood pressure and heart rate are known, but those in the arterial biomechanics are controversial and incompletely characterized. In this context, this work aims were to characterize the regional and local arterial biomechanical behaviour in response to EST; to evaluate its temporal profile in the post-EST recovery phase; and to compare the biomechanical response of different to EST. Methods: In 16 non-trained healthy young subjects the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and the carotid, femoral and brachial arterial distensibility were non-invasively evaluated before (Rest) and after EST. Main results: The EST resulted in an early increase in the arterial stiffness, evidenced by both, regional and local parameters (pulse wave velocity increase and distensibility reduction). When analyzing conjunctly the different post-EST recovery stages there were quali-quantitative differences among the arterial local stiffness response to EST. The biomechanical changes could not be explained only by blood pressure variations.

  8. Validation of transit-time flowmetry for chronic measurements of regional blood flow in resting and exercising rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Amaral

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to validate the transit-time technique for long-term measurements of iliac and renal blood flow in rats. Flow measured with ultrasonic probes was confirmed ex vivo using excised arteries perfused at varying flow rates. An implanted 1-mm probe reproduced with accuracy different patterns of flow relative to pressure in freely moving rats and accurately quantitated the resting iliac flow value (on average 10.43 ± 0.99 ml/min or 2.78 ± 0.3 ml min-1 100 g body weight-1. The measurements were stable over an experimental period of one week but were affected by probe size (resting flows were underestimated by 57% with a 2-mm probe when compared with a 1-mm probe and by anesthesia (in the same rats, iliac flow was reduced by 50-60% when compared to the conscious state. Instantaneous changes of iliac and renal flow during exercise and recovery were accurately measured by the transit-time technique. Iliac flow increased instantaneously at the beginning of mild exercise (from 12.03 ± 1.06 to 25.55 ± 3.89 ml/min at 15 s and showed a smaller increase when exercise intensity increased further, reaching a plateau of 38.43 ± 1.92 ml/min at the 4th min of moderate exercise intensity. In contrast, exercise-induced reduction of renal flow was smaller and slower, with 18% and 25% decreases at mild and moderate exercise intensities. Our data indicate that transit-time flowmetry is a reliable method for long-term and continuous measurements of regional blood flow at rest and can be used to quantitate the dynamic flow changes that characterize exercise and recovery

  9. The Brownian loop soup

    OpenAIRE

    Lawler, Gregory F.; Werner, Wendelin

    2003-01-01

    We define a natural conformally invariant measure on unrooted Brownian loops in the plane and study some of its properties. We relate this measure to a measure on loops rooted at a boundary point of a domain and show how this relation gives a way to ``chronologically add Brownian loops'' to simple curves in the plane.

  10. Population aging from 1950 to 2010 in seventeen transitional countries in the wider region of South Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihajlo Jakovljevic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Population aging has profoundly reshaped demographic landscapes in all South Eastern European (SEE countries. The aim of this study was to provide a thorough comparative inter-country assessment on the speed of population aging in the entire SEE region for the period 1950-2010. Methods: Descriptive observational analysis of long-term trends on core primary and composite indicators of population aging across seventeen countries of the wider SEE region, with panel data sets at a national level. Results: During the past six decades, the entire SEE region has experienced a rapid increase in the median age (from 25.2 years in 1950 to 37.9 years in 2010, with a simultaneous fall of fertility rates for two children per woman (from 3.55 children per each childbearing woman in 1950 to 1.49 in 2010, coupled with significant rise in the population of elderly citizens. The speed of population aging has vastly accelerated (with a 2.5 fold increase over the past three decades. The percentage of individuals over 65 years has doubled from 7% in 1950 to 14% in 2010. Conclusion: Complex national strategies are needed to cope with the shrinking labour force coupled with the growing proportion of the older population. With all likelihood, population aging will further accelerate in the near future. This profound long-term demographic transition will threaten financial sustainability of current health systems in all SEE countries.

  11. North and south: Regional footprints on the transition pathway towards a low carbon, global economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranston, G.R.; Hammond, G.P.

    2010-01-01

    Environmental or 'ecological' footprints are indicators of resource consumption and waste absorption transformed on the basis of biologically productive land area required per capita with prevailing technology. They represent a partial measure of the extent to which the planet, its regions, or nations are moving along a sustainable development pathway. Such footprints vary between countries at different stages of economic development and varying geographic characteristics. A correlation equation for national environmental footprints is used, alongside international projections of population growth and gross regional income, to estimate the relative contributions of the peoples of the industrialised North and populous South that would be needed in order to secure climate-stabilising carbon reductions out to about 2100. The four so-called 'marker scenarios' produced by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are used to estimate the degree of energy efficiency improvement and carbon mitigation that is feasible. The present footprint projections suggest that a reduction in the consumption of biophysical assets across both the developing and industrialised world is indeed possible. However, the developing world's footprint is shown to overshoot that of the industrialised countries by around 2010-2015. It then levels out and starts to fall, on the most optimistic scenario, by about 2050. In order to achieve global sustainability in the 21st Century a serious commitment to environmental protection is required in both the industrialised North and the 'majority South'. That implies balancing population growth, economic well-being, and environmental impacts in the interests of all the people and wildlife on 'Spaceship Earth'.

  12. Sequence-structure relationships in RNA loops: establishing the basis for loop homology modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schudoma, Christian; May, Patrick; Nikiforova, Viktoria; Walther, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    The specific function of RNA molecules frequently resides in their seemingly unstructured loop regions. We performed a systematic analysis of RNA loops extracted from experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of RNA molecules. A comprehensive loop-structure data set was created and organized into distinct clusters based on structural and sequence similarity. We detected clear evidence of the hallmark of homology present in the sequence-structure relationships in loops. Loops differing by structures. Thus, our results support the application of homology modeling for RNA loop model building. We established a threshold that may guide the sequence divergence-based selection of template structures for RNA loop homology modeling. Of all possible sequences that are, under the assumption of isosteric relationships, theoretically compatible with actual sequences observed in RNA structures, only a small fraction is contained in the Rfam database of RNA sequences and classes implying that the actual RNA loop space may consist of a limited number of unique loop structures and conserved sequences. The loop-structure data sets are made available via an online database, RLooM. RLooM also offers functionalities for the modeling of RNA loop structures in support of RNA engineering and design efforts.

  13. The quiescent chromospheres and transition regions of active dwarf stars - What are we learning from recent observations and models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsky, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in understanding active dwarf stars based on recent IUE, Einstein, and ground-based observations is reviewed. The extent of magnetic field control over nonflare phenomena in active dwarf stars is considered, and the spatial homogeneity and time variability of active dwarf atmospheres is discussed. The possibility that solar like flux tubes can explain enhanced heating in active dwarf stars in examined, and the roles of systematic flows in active dwarf star atmospheres are considered. The relation between heating rates in different layers of active dwarf stars is summarized, and the mechanism of chromosphere and transition region heating in these stars are discussed. The results of one-component and two-component models of active dwarf stars are addressed.

  14. Fluctuations and the Phase Transition in a Chiral Model with Polyakov Loops%引入Polyakov环路的手征模型中的涨落与相变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We explore the NJL model with Polyakov loops for a system of three colors and two flavors within the mean-field approximation, where both chiral symmetry and confinement are taken into account. We focus on the phase structure of the model and study the chiral and Polyakov loop susceptibilities.

  15. The impact of transition training on adapting to Technically Advanced Aircraft at regional airlines: Perceptions of pilots and instructor pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Renzo, John Carl, Jr.

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was to test a hypothesis about pilot and instructor pilot perceptions of how effectively pilots learn and use new technology, found in Technically Advanced Aircraft (TAA), given initial type of instrumentation training. New aviation technologies such as Glass Cockpits in technically advanced aircraft are complex and can be difficult to learn and use. The research questions focused on the type of initial instrumentation training to determine the differences among pilots trained using various types of instrumentation ranging from aircraft equipped with traditional analog instrumentation to aircraft equipped with glass cockpits. A convenience sample of Pilots in Training (PT) and Instructor Pilots (IP) was selected from a regional airline. The research design used a mixed methodology. Pilots in training completed a thirty-two question quantitative questionnaire and instructor pilots completed a five question qualitative questionnaire. Findings and conclusions. This investigation failed to disprove the null hypothesis. The type of instrumentation training has no significant effect on newly trained regional airline pilot perceived ability to adapt to advanced technology cockpits. Therefore, no evidence exists from this investigation to support the early introduction and training of TAA. While the results of this investigation were surprising, they are nonetheless, instructive. Even though it would seem that there would be a relationship between exposure to and use of technically advanced instrumentation, apparently there was no perceived relationship for this group of airline transport pilots. However, a point of interest is that these pilots were almost evenly divided in their opinion of whether or not their previous training had prepared them for transition to TAA. The majority also believed that the type of initial instrumentation training received does make a difference when transitioning to TAA. Pilots believed

  16. A study of hydrogen density in emerging flux loops from a coordinated Transition Region and Coronal Explorer and Canary Islands observation campaign

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mein, N.; Schmieder, B.; DeLuca, E. E.; Heinzel, Petr; Mein, P.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 556, č. 1 (2001), s. 438-451 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : solar activity * magnetic fields * UV radiation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.921, year: 2001

  17. Photon W value for krypton in the M-shell transition region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, N; Suzuki, I H

    2001-09-01

    Absolute W values for krypton have been measured for incident X rays with energies in the range of 85 to 1000 eV, using monochromatic synchrotron radiation and a multiple-electrode ion chamber technique that yields the absolute intensity of the X-ray beam and the photoabsorption cross section. To improve the purity of the incident X rays, the electron storage ring was operated at an energy lower than the normal mode, and thin filters were used. The W values are derived from the measured photon intensity and photoabsorption cross section, using the mean charges of the residual ions obtained in previous work. A considerable oscillation of the W values with the photon energy was found in the region near the krypton 3d electron ionization edge. The results are discussed and compared with data in the literature for low-energy electrons and with the calculations from a model that includes multiple photoionization effects related to inner-shell ionization.

  18. Robust optimization of the billet for isothermal local loading transitional region of a Ti-alloy rib-web component based on dual-response surface method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ke; Fan, Xiaoguang; Zhan, Mei; Meng, Miao

    2018-03-01

    Billet optimization can greatly improve the forming quality of the transitional region in the isothermal local loading forming (ILLF) of large-scale Ti-alloy ribweb components. However, the final quality of the transitional region may be deteriorated by uncontrollable factors, such as the manufacturing tolerance of the preforming billet, fluctuation of the stroke length, and friction factor. Thus, a dual-response surface method (RSM)-based robust optimization of the billet was proposed to address the uncontrollable factors in transitional region of the ILLF. Given that the die underfilling and folding defect are two key factors that influence the forming quality of the transitional region, minimizing the mean and standard deviation of the die underfilling rate and avoiding folding defect were defined as the objective function and constraint condition in robust optimization. Then, the cross array design was constructed, a dual-RSM model was established for the mean and standard deviation of the die underfilling rate by considering the size parameters of the billet and uncontrollable factors. Subsequently, an optimum solution was derived to achieve the robust optimization of the billet. A case study on robust optimization was conducted. Good results were attained for improving the die filling and avoiding folding defect, suggesting that the robust optimization of the billet in the transitional region of the ILLF was efficient and reliable.

  19. THE ELECTRON DENSITY IN EXPLOSIVE TRANSITION REGION EVENTS OBSERVED BY IRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doschek, G. A.; Warren, H. P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Young, P. R. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    We discuss the intensity ratio of the O iv line at 1401.16 Å to the Si iv line at 1402.77 Å in Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) spectra. This intensity ratio is important if it can be used to measure high electron densities that cannot be measured using line intensity ratios of two different O iv lines from the multiplet within the IRIS wavelength range. Our discussion is in terms of considerably earlier observations made from the Skylab manned space station and other spectrometers on orbiting spacecraft. The earlier data on the O iv and Si iv ratio and other intersystem line ratios not available to IRIS are complementary to IRIS data. In this paper, we adopt a simple interpretation based on electron density. We adopt a set of assumptions and calculate the electron density as a function of velocity in the Si iv line profiles of two explosive events. At zero velocity the densities are about 2–3 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}, and near 200 km s{sup -1} outflow speed the densities are about 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}. The densities increase with outflow speed up to about 150 km s{sup -1} after which they level off. Because of the difference in the temperature of formation of the two lines and other possible effects such as non-ionization equilibrium, these density measurements do not have the precision that would be available if there were some additional lines near the formation temperature of O iv.

  20. Estuarine demersal fish assemblage from a transition region between the tropics and the subtropics of the South Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Hostim-Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2013v26n3p153 Estuarine demersal fish assemblage from a transition region between the tropics and the subtropics of the South Atlantic. The coastal state of Espírito Santo is in the central region of Brazil, where biological productivity is considered low. The objective of this work is to present a current list of demersal, estuarine fish from northern Espírito Santo. This work is based on the compilation of data collected monthly using trawl nets. The ichthyofauna comprises 57 species, within 10 orders and 32 families. The family Sciaenidae has the largest number of species (8, followed by Carangidae (4 and Gerreidae (4. This coincides with what has been found for the Brazilian coast and for the coast of the South Atlantic. It is important to note that the total species richness in the estuaries of northern Espírito Santo is lower than other estuaries of the South West Atlantic coast. Most of the species are widely distributed in the Western Atlantic. Only a small part (14% of the fauna of northern Espírito Santo was evaluated in regards to risk of extinction, but conservation should be prioritized in the area due to overexploitation of species.

  1. Dynamics of Subarcsecond Bright Dots in the Transition Region above Sunspots and Their Relation to Penumbral Micro-jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samanta, Tanmoy; Banerjee, Dipankar [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India); Tian, Hui [School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University (China); Schanche, Nicole, E-mail: tsamanta@iiap.res.in, E-mail: huitian@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: dipu@iiap.res.in, E-mail: ns81@st-andrews.ac.uk [University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-01

    Recent high-resolution observations have revealed that subarcsecond bright dots (BDs) with sub-minute lifetimes appear ubiquitously in the transition region (TR) above sunspot penumbra. The presence of penumbral micro-jets (PMJs) in the chromosphere was previously reported. It was proposed that both the PMJs and BDs are formed due to a magnetic reconnection process and may play an important role in heating of the penumbra. Using simultaneous observations of the chromosphere from the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on board Hinode and observations of the TR from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph , we study the dynamics of BDs and their relation to PMJs. We find two types of BDs, one that is related to PMJs, and another that does not show any visible dynamics in the SOT Ca ii H images. From a statistical analysis we show that these two types have different properties. The BDs that are related to PMJs always appear at the top of the PMJs, the vast majority of which show inward motion and originate before the generation of the PMJs. These results may indicate that the reconnection occurs at the lower coronal/TR height and initiates PMJs at the chromosphere. This formation mechanism is in contrast with the formation of PMJs by reconnection in the (upper) photosphere between differently inclined fields.

  2. Renormalization of loop functions for all loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, R.A.; Neri, F.; Sato, M.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that the vacuum expectation values W(C 1 ,xxx, C/sub n/) of products of the traces of the path-ordered phase factors P exp[igcontour-integral/sub C/iA/sub μ/(x)dx/sup μ/] are multiplicatively renormalizable in all orders of perturbation theory. Here A/sub μ/(x) are the vector gauge field matrices in the non-Abelian gauge theory with gauge group U(N) or SU(N), and C/sub i/ are loops (closed paths). When the loops are smooth (i.e., differentiable) and simple (i.e., non-self-intersecting), it has been shown that the generally divergent loop functions W become finite functions W when expressed in terms of the renormalized coupling constant and multiplied by the factors e/sup -K/L(C/sub i/), where K is linearly divergent and L(C/sub i/) is the length of C/sub i/. It is proved here that the loop functions remain multiplicatively renormalizable even if the curves have any finite number of cusps (points of nondifferentiability) or cross points (points of self-intersection). If C/sub γ/ is a loop which is smooth and simple except for a single cusp of angle γ, then W/sub R/(C/sub γ/) = Z(γ)W(C/sub γ/) is finite for a suitable renormalization factor Z(γ) which depends on γ but on no other characteristic of C/sub γ/. This statement is made precise by introducing a regularization, or via a loop-integrand subtraction scheme specified by a normalization condition W/sub R/(C-bar/sub γ/) = 1 for an arbitrary but fixed loop C-bar/sub γ/. Next, if C/sub β/ is a loop which is smooth and simple except for a cross point of angles β, then W(C/sub β/) must be renormalized together with the loop functions of associated sets S/sup i//sub β/ = ]C/sup i/ 1 ,xxx, C/sup i//sub p/i] (i = 2,xxx,I) of loops C/sup i//sub q/ which coincide with certain parts of C/sub β/equivalentC 1 1 . Then W/sub R/(S/sup i//sub β/) = Z/sup i/j(β)W(S/sup j//sub β/) is finite for a suitable matrix Z/sup i/j

  3. Spontaneous fluxoid formation in superconducting loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monaco, R.; Mygind, Jesper; Rivers, R.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the experimental verification of the Zurek-Kibble scenario in an isolated superconducting ring over a wide parameter range. The probability of creating a single flux quantum spontaneously during the fast normal-superconducting phase transition of a wide Nb loop clearly follows...

  4. Flow regime transition and heat transfer model at low mass flux condition in a post-dryout region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hae Yong

    1996-02-01

    The post-dryout flow regime transition criterion from inverted annular flow (IAF) to agitated inverted annular flow (AIAF) is suggested based on the hyperbolicity breaking concept. The hyperbolicity breaking represents a bifurcation point where a sudden flow transition occurs. The hyperbolicity breaking concept is applied to describe the flow regime transition from IAF to AIAF by the growth of disturbance on liquid core surface. The resultant correlation has the similar form to Takenaka's empirical one. To validate the proposed model, it is applied to predict Takenake's experimental results using R-113 refrigerant with four different tube diameters of 3, 5, 7 and 10 mm. The proposed model gives accurate predictions for the tube diameters of 7 and 10 mm. As the tube diameter decreases, the differences between the predictions and the experimental results slightly increase. The flow regime transition from AIAF to dispersed flow (DF) is described by the drift flux model. It is shown that the transition criterion can be well predicted if the droplet sizes in dispersed flow are evaluated appropriately. Existing mechanistic post-dryout models result in fairly good predictions when the mass flux is high or when the film dryout occurs. However, the predictions by these models become poor at low mass flux at which the flow regime before dryout is believed to be churn-turbulent. This is because the constitutive relations and/or the imposed assumptions used in the models become erroneous at low mass flux. The droplet size predicted by the correlation used in the model becomes unrealistically large. In addition, the single phase vapor heat transfer correlation becomes invalid at low mass flux condition. To develop a mechanistic post-dryout model which is available at low mass flux condition, the entrainment mechanisms and the entrained droplet sizes with relation to the flow regimes are investigated. Through the analysis of many experimental post-dryout data, it is shown that

  5. Loop Quantum Gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2008-01-01

    The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime , is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i) The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii) A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler's "spacetime foam" intuition. (iii) Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv) A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black-hole entropy. (v) Low-energy calculations, yielding n -point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  6. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of describing the quantum behavior of gravity, and thus understanding quantum spacetime, is still open. Loop quantum gravity is a well-developed approach to this problem. It is a mathematically well-defined background-independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Today research in loop quantum gravity forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained so far are: (i The computation of the spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yield tentative quantitative predictions for Planck-scale physics. (ii A physical picture of the microstructure of quantum spacetime, characterized by Planck-scale discreteness. Discreteness emerges as a standard quantum effect from the discrete spectra, and provides a mathematical realization of Wheeler’s “spacetime foam” intuition. (iii Control of spacetime singularities, such as those in the interior of black holes and the cosmological one. This, in particular, has opened up the possibility of a theoretical investigation into the very early universe and the spacetime regions beyond the Big Bang. (iv A derivation of the Bekenstein–Hawking black-hole entropy. (v Low-energy calculations, yielding n-point functions well defined in a background-independent context. The theory is at the roots of, or strictly related to, a number of formalisms that have been developed for describing background-independent quantum field theory, such as spin foams, group field theory, causal spin networks, and others. I give here a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  7. The phase transition of the first order in the critical region of the gas-liquid system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.R. Yukhnovskii

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This is a summarising investigation of the events of the phase transition of the first order that occur in the critical region below the liquid-gas critical point. The grand partition function has been completely integrated in the phase-space of the collective variables. The basic density measure is the quartic one. It has the form of the exponent function with the first, second, third and fourth degree of the collective variables. The problem has been reduced to the Ising model in an external field, the role of which is played by the generalised chemical potential μ*. The line μ*(η =0, where η is the density, is the line of the phase transition. We consider the isothermal compression of the gas till the point where the phase transition on the line μ*(η =0 is reached. When the path of the pressing reaches the line μ* =0 in the gas medium, a droplet of liquid springs up. The work for its formation is obtained, the surface-tension energy is calculated. On the line μ* =0 we have a two-phase system: the gas and the liquid (the droplet one. The equality of the gas and of the liquid chemical potentials is proved. The process of pressing is going on. But the pressure inside the system has stopped, two fixed densities have arisen: one for the gas-phase ηG=ηc(1-d/2 and the other for the liquid-phase ηL=ηc(1+d/2 (symmetrically to the rectlinear diameter, where ηc=0.13044 is the critical density. Starting from that moment the external pressure works as a latent work of pressure. Its value is obtained. As a result, the gas-phase disappears and the whole system turns into liquid. The jump of the density is equal to ηc d, where d=(D/2G1/2 ~ τν/2. D and G are coefficients of the Hamiltonian in the last cell connected with the renormalisation-group symmetry. The equation of state is written.

  8. Regional gastrointestinal transit and pH studied in 215 healthy volunteers using the wireless motility capsule: influence of age, gender, study country and testing protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y T; Mohammed, S D; Farmer, A D; Wang, D; Zarate, N; Hobson, A R; Hellström, P M; Semler, J R; Kuo, B; Rao, S S; Hasler, W L; Camilleri, M; Scott, S M

    2015-09-01

    The wireless motility capsule (WMC) offers the ability to investigate luminal gastrointestinal (GI) physiology in a minimally invasive manner. To investigate the effect of testing protocol, gender, age and study country on regional GI transit times and associated pH values using the WMC. Regional GI transit times and pH values were determined in 215 healthy volunteers from USA and Sweden studied using the WMC over a 6.5-year period. The effects of test protocol, gender, age and study country were examined. For GI transit times, testing protocol was associated with differences in gastric emptying time (GET; shorter with protocol 2 (motility capsule ingested immediately after meal) vs. protocol 1 (motility capsule immediately before): median difference: 52 min, P = 0.0063) and colonic transit time (CTT; longer with protocol 2: median 140 min, P = 0.0189), but had no overall effect on whole gut transit time. Females had longer GET (by median 17 min, P = 0.0307), and also longer CTT by (104 min, P = 0.0285) and whole gut transit time by (263 min, P = 0.0077). Increasing age was associated with shorter small bowel transit time (P = 0.002), and study country also influenced small bowel and CTTs. Whole gut and CTTs showed clustering of data at values separated by 24 h, suggesting that describing these measures as continuous variables is invalid. Testing protocol, gender and study country also significantly influenced pH values. Regional GI transit times and pH values, delineated using the wireless motility capsule (WMC), vary based on testing protocol, gender, age and country. Standardisation of testing is crucial for cross-referencing in clinical practice and future research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. DETERMINING HEATING RATES IN RECONNECTION FORMED FLARE LOOPS OF THE M8.0 FLARE ON 2005 MAY 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Wenjuan; Qiu Jiong; Longcope, Dana W. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States); Caspi, Amir [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2013-06-20

    We analyze and model an M8.0 flare on 2005 May 13 observed by the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to determine the energy release rate from magnetic reconnection that forms and heats numerous flare loops. The flare exhibits two ribbons in UV 1600 A emission. Analysis shows that the UV light curve at each flaring pixel rises impulsively within a few minutes, and decays slowly with a timescale longer than 10 minutes. Since the lower atmosphere (the transition region and chromosphere) responds to energy deposit nearly instantaneously, the rapid UV brightening is thought to reflect the energy release process in the newly formed flare loop rooted at the footpoint. In this paper, we utilize the spatially resolved (down to 1'') UV light curves and the thick-target hard X-ray emission to construct heating functions of a few thousand flare loops anchored at the UV footpoints, and compute plasma evolution in these loops using the enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops model. The modeled coronal temperatures and densities of these flare loops are then used to calculate coronal radiation. The computed soft X-ray spectra and light curves compare favorably with those observed by RHESSI and by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite X-ray Sensor. The time-dependent transition region differential emission measure for each loop during its decay phase is also computed with a simplified model and used to calculate the optically thin C IV line emission, which dominates the UV 1600 A bandpass during the flare. The computed C IV line emission decays at the same rate as observed. This study presents a method to constrain heating of reconnection-formed flare loops using all available observables independently, and provides insight into the physics of energy release and plasma heating during the flare. With this method, the lower limit of the total energy used to heat the flare loops in

  10. PONDEROMOTIVE ACCELERATION IN CORONAL LOOPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Obenschain, K. [LCP and FD, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Laming, J. M. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Taylor, B. D. [AFRL Eglin AFB, Pensacola, FL 32542 (United States)

    2016-11-10

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, the well-known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3–4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a “by-product” of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 to 0.02 T and lengths from 25,000 to 75,000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets, which act to heat the loop. As a consequence of coronal magnetic reconnection, small-scale, high-speed jets form. The familiar vortex quadrupoles form at reconnection sites. Between the magnetic footpoints and the corona the reconnection flow merges with the boundary flow. It is in this region that the ponderomotive acceleration occurs. Mirroring the character of the coronal reconnection, the ponderomotive acceleration is also found to be intermittent.

  11. PONDEROMOTIVE ACCELERATION IN CORONAL LOOPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlburg, R. B.; Obenschain, K.; Laming, J. M.; Taylor, B. D.

    2016-01-01

    Ponderomotive acceleration has been asserted to be a cause of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, the well-known enhancement in abundance by a factor of 3–4 over photospheric values of elements in the solar corona with FIP less than about 10 eV. It is shown here by means of numerical simulations that ponderomotive acceleration occurs in solar coronal loops, with the appropriate magnitude and direction, as a “by-product” of coronal heating. The numerical simulations are performed with the HYPERION code, which solves the fully compressible three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic equations including nonlinear thermal conduction and optically thin radiation. Numerical simulations of coronal loops with an axial magnetic field from 0.005 to 0.02 T and lengths from 25,000 to 75,000 km are presented. In the simulations the footpoints of the axial loop magnetic field are convected by random, large-scale motions. There is a continuous formation and dissipation of field-aligned current sheets, which act to heat the loop. As a consequence of coronal magnetic reconnection, small-scale, high-speed jets form. The familiar vortex quadrupoles form at reconnection sites. Between the magnetic footpoints and the corona the reconnection flow merges with the boundary flow. It is in this region that the ponderomotive acceleration occurs. Mirroring the character of the coronal reconnection, the ponderomotive acceleration is also found to be intermittent.

  12. Functional characteristics of a double positive feedback loop coupled with autorepression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Subhasis; Bose, Indrani

    2008-01-01

    We study the functional characteristics of a two-gene motif consisting of a double positive feedback loop and an autoregulatory negative feedback loop. The motif appears in the gene regulatory network controlling the functional activity of pancreatic β-cells. The model exhibits bistability and hysteresis in appropriate parameter regions. The two stable steady states correspond to low (OFF state) and high (ON state) protein levels, respectively. Using a deterministic approach, we show that the region of bistability increases in extent when the copy number of one of the genes is reduced from 2 to 1. The negative feedback loop has the effect of reducing the size of the bistable region. Loss of a gene copy, brought about by mutations, hampers the normal functioning of the β-cells giving rise to the genetic disorder, maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). The diabetic phenotype makes its appearance when a sizable fraction of the β-cells is in the OFF state. Using stochastic simulation techniques we show that, on reduction of the gene copy number, there is a transition from the monostable ON to the ON state in the bistable region of the parameter space. Fluctuations in the protein levels, arising due to the stochastic nature of gene expression, can give rise to transitions between the ON and OFF states. We show that as the strength of autorepression increases, the ON → OFF state transitions become less probable whereas the reverse transitions are more probable. The implications of the results in the context of the occurrence of MODY are pointed out

  13. Functional characteristics of a double positive feedback loop coupled with autorepression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Subhasis; Bose, Indrani

    2008-12-01

    We study the functional characteristics of a two-gene motif consisting of a double positive feedback loop and an autoregulatory negative feedback loop. The motif appears in the gene regulatory network controlling the functional activity of pancreatic β-cells. The model exhibits bistability and hysteresis in appropriate parameter regions. The two stable steady states correspond to low (OFF state) and high (ON state) protein levels, respectively. Using a deterministic approach, we show that the region of bistability increases in extent when the copy number of one of the genes is reduced from 2 to 1. The negative feedback loop has the effect of reducing the size of the bistable region. Loss of a gene copy, brought about by mutations, hampers the normal functioning of the β-cells giving rise to the genetic disorder, maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). The diabetic phenotype makes its appearance when a sizable fraction of the β-cells is in the OFF state. Using stochastic simulation techniques we show that, on reduction of the gene copy number, there is a transition from the monostable ON to the ON state in the bistable region of the parameter space. Fluctuations in the protein levels, arising due to the stochastic nature of gene expression, can give rise to transitions between the ON and OFF states. We show that as the strength of autorepression increases, the ON → OFF state transitions become less probable whereas the reverse transitions are more probable. The implications of the results in the context of the occurrence of MODY are pointed out.

  14. Random walk loop soup

    OpenAIRE

    Lawler, Gregory F.; Ferreras, José A. Trujillo

    2004-01-01

    The Brownian loop soup introduced in Lawler and Werner (2004) is a Poissonian realization from a sigma-finite measure on unrooted loops. This measure satisfies both conformal invariance and a restriction property. In this paper, we define a random walk loop soup and show that it converges to the Brownian loop soup. In fact, we give a strong approximation result making use of the strong approximation result of Koml\\'os, Major, and Tusn\\'ady. To make the paper self-contained, we include a proof...

  15. Regional transit coordination guidebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Constant growth in rural areas and extensive suburban development have contributed to increasingly more people needing seamless and adequate public transportation into and from nearby cities. Coordinating existing services or determining the need for...

  16. SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATION OF SOLAR OSCILLATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH CORONAL LOOPS FROM THE PHOTOSPHERE TO THE CORONA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, J. T.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y. Z.; Zhao, H.; Xu, H. Q.; Xie, W. B. [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Liu, Y. [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2013-01-01

    The solar oscillations along one coronal loop in AR 11504 are observed simultaneously in white light emission and Doppler velocity by SDO/HMI, and in UV and EUV emissions by SDO/AIA. The technique of the time-distance diagram is used to detect the propagating oscillations of the emission intensities along the loop. We find that although all the oscillation signals were intercorrelated, the low chromospheric oscillation correlated more closely to the oscillations of the transition region and corona than to those of the photosphere. Situated above the sunspot, the oscillation periods were {approx}3 minutes in the UV/EUV emissions; however, moving away from the sunspot and into the quiet Sun, the periods became longer, e.g., up to {approx}5 minutes or more. In addition, along another loop we observe both the high-speed outflows and oscillations, which roughly had a one-to-one corresponding relationship. This indicates that the solar periodic oscillations may modulate the magnetic reconnections between the loops of the high and low altitudes that drive the high-speed outflows along the loop.

  17. On loop extensions and cohomology of loops

    OpenAIRE

    Benítez, Rolando Jiménez; Meléndez, Quitzeh Morales

    2015-01-01

    In this paper are defined cohomology-like groups that classify loop extensions satisfying a given identity in three variables for association identities, and in two variables for the case of commutativity. It is considered a large amount of identities. This groups generalize those defined in works of Nishigori [2] and of Jhonson and Leedham-Green [4]. It is computed the number of metacyclic extensions for trivial action of the quotient on the kernel in one particular case for left Bol loops a...

  18. Neutron transport in irradiation loops (IRENE loop)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarsam, Maher.

    1980-09-01

    This thesis is composed of two parts with different aspects. Part one is a technical description of the loop and its main ancillary facilities as well as of the safety and operational regulations. The measurement methods on the model of the ISIS reactor and on the loop in the OSIRIS reactor are described. Part two deals with the possibility of calculating the powers dissipated by each rod of the fuel cluster, using appropriate computer codes, not only in the reflector but also in the core and to suggest a method of calculation [fr

  19. Fractographic observations of cleavage initiation in the ductile-brittle transition region of a reactor-pressure-vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfield, A.R.; Shetty, D.K.; Skidmore, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    This note reports the results of a fractographic study conducted on a group of 1T compact fracture toughness specimens of a heavy-section A508 steel denoted TSE6 tested in the ductile-brittle transition region (22 and 82 0 C). The fatigue-precracked specimens were loaded at a rapid rate (760 or 550 mm per second) to promote cleavage-crack growth and lower-bound toughness behavior. All specimens experienced unstable cleavage fracture prior to reaching a maximum in the load displacement curve. Some ductile crack growth occurred in half of the specimens. The objective of fractographic examinations was to understand the observed statistical variations in cleavage initiation by (a) locating the origins of unstable cleavage fracture in the vicinity of the fatigue-precrack or ductilerupture crack fronts, (b) identifying microstructural features associated with the triggering of cleavage, and (c) documenting characteristic fracture surface dimensions such as the extent of stable-crack growth prior to unstable cleavage (Δα) and the distance of the cleavage origin from the ductilerupture front, /chi/ (or fatigue-crack front when Δα = 0)

  20. The effects of the local fracture stress and carbides on the cleavage fracture characteristics of Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steels in the transition region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Won Jon; Huh, Moo Young; Roh, Sung Joo; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Yong Jun; Hong, Jun Hwa

    2000-01-01

    In the ductile-brittle transition temperature region of SA508 C1.3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steels, the relationship of the local fracture stress and carbides influencing the cleavage fracture behavior was investigated. Based on the ASTM E1921-97 standard method, the reference transition temperatures were determined by three point bending fracture toughness tests. A local fracture stress σ f * , was determined from a theoretical stress distribution in front of crack tip using the cleavage initiation distance measured in each fractured specimen surface. The local fracture stress values showed a strong relationship with toughness characteristics of the materials and those were larger in the materials of smaller carbide size. Quantitative analysis of carbides showed that carbides larger than a certain size are mainly responsible for the cleavage fracture in the ductile-brittle transition temperature region. (author)

  1. Two-step transition towards the reversibility region in Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8-δ single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastoriza, H.; de La Cruz, F.; Mitzi, D. B.; Kapitulnik, A.

    1992-10-01

    We have performed magnetization measurements on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8-δ single crystals in the c^ crystallographic direction for fields from 2 Oe up to 700 Oe. The results strongly suggest that the reversible thermodynamic region is achieved after the vortex flux structure shows an abrupt transition at a temperature lower than that determined by the irreversibility line.

  2. Ngoelmun Yawar, Our Journey: The Transition and The Challenges for Female Students Leaving Torres Strait Island Communities for Boarding Schools in Regional Queensland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobongie, Francis

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the transitional experiences and challenges faced by girls from the Torres Strait Islands when they leave individual communities to attend boarding school in regional Queensland. The paper presents original ethnographic research using a narrative enquiry approach, capturing stories as narrated by a broad cohort of girls from…

  3. Isotopic transit in the cerebrospinal fluid value of In111 and results of its use in the study of malformations of the occipito-cervical region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretti, J.L.; Comoy, J.; Robert, G.; Mathieu, E.; Galle, P.; Caron, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    In-111 DTPA has been used in more than 200 studies of isotopic transit in the cerebrospinal fluid since the beginning of 1973. The results obtained with this isotope in 15 cases of malformation of the occipito-cervical region, scanned after lumbar and intra-ventricular injection, represent an example of its usefulness [fr

  4. Water loop for training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, S.V.

    1983-02-01

    The procedures used to operate the water loop of the Institute of Nuclear Enginering (IEN) in Brazil are presented. The aim is to help future operators of the training water loop in the operation technique and in a better comprehension of the phenomena occured during the execution of an experience. (E.G.) [pt

  5. Loop connectors in dentogenic diastema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjna Nayar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with a missing tooth along with diastema have limited treatment options to restore the edentulous space. The use of a conventional fixed partial denture (FPD to replace the missing tooth may result in too wide anterior teeth leading to poor esthetics. Loss of anterior teeth with existing diastema may result in excess space available for pontic. This condition presents great esthetic challenge for prosthodontist. If implant supported prosthesis is not possible because of inadequate bone support, FPD along with loop connector may be a treatment option to maintain the diastema and provide optimal esthetic restoration. Here, we report a clinical case where FPD along with loop connector was used to achieve esthetic rehabilitation in maxillary anterior region in which midline diastema has been maintained.

  6. Electroweak phase transition in an extension of the standard model with scalar color octet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, S. W.; Shim, Seong-A; Oh, S. K.

    2010-01-01

    In an extension of the standard model with a scalar color octet, the possibility of the strongly first-order electroweak phase transition is studied by examining the finite-temperature effective Higgs potential at the one-loop level. It is found that there are wide regions in the parameter space that allow the strongly first-order electroweak phase transition, where the Higgs boson mass is larger than the experimental lower bound of 115 GeV, and the masses of the scalar color octet is around 200 GeV. The parameter regions may be explored at the LHC with respect to the electroweak phase transition.

  7. Solar Lyman-Alpha Polarization Observation of the Chromosphere and Transition Region by the Sounding Rocket Experiment CLASP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Kano, Ryohei; Bando, Takamasa; Ishikawa, Ryoko; Kubo, Masahito; Katsukawa, Yukio; Ishikawa, Shinnosuke; Hara, Hiroshi; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Giono, Gabriel; hide

    2015-01-01

    We are planning an international rocket experiment Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is (2015 planned) that Lyman a line (Ly(alpha) line) polarization spectroscopic observations from the sun. The purpose of this experiment, detected with high accuracy of the linear polarization of the Ly(alpha) lines to 0.1% by using a Hanle effect is to measure the magnetic field of the chromosphere-transition layer directly. For polarization photometric accuracy achieved that approx. 0.1% required for CLASP, it is necessary to realize the monitoring device with a high throughput. On the other hand, Ly(alpha) line (vacuum ultraviolet rays) have a sensitive characteristics that is absorbed by the material. We therefore set the optical system of the reflection system (transmission only the wavelength plate), each of the mirrors, subjected to high efficiency of the multilayer coating in accordance with the role. Primary mirror diameter of CLASP is about 30 cm, the amount of heat about 30,000 J is about 5 minutes of observation time is coming mainly in the visible light to the telescope. In addition, total flux of the sun visible light overwhelmingly large and about 200 000 times the Ly(alpha) line wavelength region. Therefore, in terms of thermal management and 0.1% of the photometric measurement accuracy achieved telescope, elimination of the visible light is essential. We therefore, has a high reflectivity (> 50%) in Lya line, visible light is a multilayer coating be kept to a low reflectance (Science was achieved a high throughput as a device for a vacuum ultraviolet ray of the entire system less than 5% (CCD of QE is not included).

  8. Single Mutations in the VP2 300 Loop Region of the Three-Fold Spike of the Carnivore Parvovirus Capsid Can Determine Host Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organtini, Lindsey J.; Zhang, Sheng; Hafenstein, Susan L.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sylvatic carnivores, such as raccoons, have recently been recognized as important hosts in the evolution of canine parvovirus (CPV), a pandemic pathogen of domestic dogs. Although viruses from raccoons do not efficiently bind the dog transferrin receptor (TfR) or infect dog cells, a single mutation changing an aspartic acid to a glycine at capsid (VP2) position 300 in the prototype raccoon CPV allows dog cell infection. Because VP2 position 300 exhibits extensive amino acid variation among the carnivore parvoviruses, we further investigated its role in determining host range by analyzing its diversity and evolution in nature and by creating a comprehensive set of VP2 position 300 mutants in infectious clones. Notably, some position 300 residues rendered CPV noninfectious for dog, but not cat or fox, cells. Changes of adjacent residues (residues 299 and 301) were also observed often after cell culture passage in different hosts, and some of the mutations mimicked changes seen in viruses recovered from natural infections of alternative hosts, suggesting that compensatory mutations were selected to accommodate the new residue at position 300. Analysis of the TfRs of carnivore hosts used in the experimental evolution studies demonstrated that their glycosylation patterns varied, including a glycan present only on the domestic dog TfR that dictates susceptibility to parvoviruses. Overall, there were significant differences in the abilities of viruses with alternative position 300 residues to bind TfRs and infect different carnivore hosts, demonstrating that the process of infection is highly host dependent and that VP2 position 300 is a key determinant of host range. IMPORTANCE Although the emergence and pandemic spread of canine parvovirus (CPV) are well documented, the carnivore hosts and evolutionary pathways involved in its emergence remain enigmatic. We recently demonstrated that a region in the capsid structure of CPV, centered around VP2 position 300

  9. Large lithium loop experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolowith, R.; Owen, T.J.; Berg, J.D.; Atwood, J.M.

    1981-10-01

    An engineering design and operating experience of a large, isothermal, lithium-coolant test loop are presented. This liquid metal coolant loop is called the Experimental Lithium System (ELS) and has operated safely and reliably for over 6500 hours through September 1981. The loop is used for full-scale testing of components for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility. Main system parameters include coolant temperatures to 430 0 C and flow to 0.038 m 3 /s (600 gal/min). Performance of the main pump, vacuum system, and control system is discussed. Unique test capabilities of the ELS are also discussed

  10. Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. This course will discuss operating principles and performance characteristics of a loop heat pipe. Topics include: 1) pressure profiles in the loop; 2) loop operating temperature; 3) operating temperature control; 4) loop startup; 4) loop shutdown; 5) loop transient behaviors; 6) sizing of loop components and determination of fluid inventory; 7) analytical modeling; 8) examples of flight applications; and 9) recent LHP developments.

  11. Diffusion of Wilson loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzoska, A.M.; Lenz, F.; Thies, M.; Negele, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    A phenomenological analysis of the distribution of Wilson loops in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory is presented in which Wilson loop distributions are described as the result of a diffusion process on the group manifold. It is shown that, in the absence of forces, diffusion implies Casimir scaling and, conversely, exact Casimir scaling implies free diffusion. Screening processes occur if diffusion takes place in a potential. The crucial distinction between screening of fundamental and adjoint loops is formulated as a symmetry property related to the center symmetry of the underlying gauge theory. The results are expressed in terms of an effective Wilson loop action and compared with various limits of SU(2) Yang-Mills theory

  12. Blind loop syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001146.htm Blind loop syndrome To use the sharing features on ... Clinical Professor of Medicine, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC. Also reviewed by David ...

  13. Mashup the OODA Loop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heier, Jeffrey E

    2008-01-01

    ...) processes via the Observe, Orient, Decide, and Act (OODA) Loop concept. As defined by Wikipedia, a mashup is a Website or application that combines the content from more than one source into an integrated presentation...

  14. Reactor loops at Chalk River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sochaski, R.O.

    1962-07-01

    This report describes broadly the nine in-reactor loops, and their components, located in and around the NRX and NRU reactors at Chalk River. First an introduction and general description is given of the loops and their function, supplemented with a table outlining some loop specifications and nine simplified flow sheets, one for each individual loop. The report then proceeds to classify each loop into two categories, the 'main loop circuit' and the 'auxiliary circuit', and descriptions are given of each circuit's components in turn. These components, in part, are comprised of the main loop pumps, the test section, loop heaters, loop coolers, delayed-neutron monitors, surge tank, Dowtherm coolers, loop piping. Here again photographs, drawings and tables are included to provide a clearer understanding of the descriptive literature and to include, in tables, some specifications of the more important components in each loop. (author)

  15. Dechanneling by dislocation loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalant, Gerard.

    1976-09-01

    Ion implantation always induces the creation of dislocation loops. When the damage profile is determined by a backscattering technique, the dechanneling by these loops is implicitely at the origin of these measurements. The dechanneling of alpha particles by dislocation loops produced by the coalescence of quenched-in vacancies in aluminium is studied. The dechanneling and the concentration of loops were determined simultaneously. The dechanneling width around dislocation was found equal to lambda=6A, both for perfect and imperfect loops having a mean diameter d=250A. In the latter case, a dechanneling probability chi=0.34 was determined for the stacking fault, in good agreement with previous determination in gold. A general formula is proposed which takes into account the variation of lambda with the curvature (or the diameter d) of the loops. Finally, by a series of isothermal anneals, the self-diffusion energy ΔH of aluminium was measured. The value obtained ΔH=1.32+-0.10eV is in good agreement with the values obtained by other methods [fr

  16. Non-equilibrium ionization by a periodic electron beam. II. Synthetic Si IV and O IV transition region spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzifčáková, Elena; Dudík, Jaroslav

    2018-03-01

    Context. Transition region (TR) spectra typically show the Si IV 1402.8 Å line to be enhanced by a factor of 5 or more compared to the neighboring O IV 1401.2 Å, contrary to predictions of ionization equilibrium models and the Maxwellian distribution of particle energies. Non-equilibrium effects in TR spectra are therefore expected. Aims: To investigate the combination of non-equilibrium ionization and high-energy particles, we apply the model of the periodic electron beam, represented by a κ-distribution that recurs at periods of several seconds, to plasma at chromospheric temperatures of 104 K. This simple model can approximate a burst of energy release involving accelerated particles. Methods: Instantaneous time-dependent charge states of silicon and oxygen were calculated and used to synthesize the instantaneous and period-averaged spectra of Si IV and O IV. Results: The electron beam drives the plasma out of equilibrium. At electron densities of Ne = 1010 cm-3, the plasma is out of ionization equilibrium at all times in all cases we considered, while for a higher density of Ne = 1011 cm-3, ionization equilibrium can be reached toward the end of each period, depending on the conditions. In turn, the character of the period-averaged synthetic spectra also depends on the properties of the beam. While the case of κ = 2 results in spectra with strong or even dominant O IV, higher values of κ can approximate a range of observed TR spectra. Spectra similar to typically observed spectra, with the Si IV 1402.8 Å line about a factor 5 higher than O IV 1401.2 Å, are obtained for κ = 3. An even higher value of κ = 5 results in spectra that are exclusively dominated by Si IV, with negligible O IV emission. This is a possible interpretation of the TR spectra of UV (Ellerman) bursts, although an interpretation that requires a density that is 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than for equilibrium estimates. Movies associated to Fig. A.1 are available at http://https://www.aanda.org

  17. THE CORONAL LOOP INVENTORY PROJECT: EXPANDED ANALYSIS AND RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmelz, J. T. [USRA, 7178 Columbia Gateway Drive, Columbia, MD 21046 (United States); Christian, G. M.; Chastain, R. A., E-mail: jschmelz@usra.edu [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

    2016-11-10

    We have expanded upon earlier work that investigates the relative importance of coronal loops with isothermal versus multithermal cross-field temperature distributions. These results are important for determining if loops have substructure in the form of unresolved magnetic strands. We have increased the number of loops targeted for temperature analysis from 19 to 207 with the addition of 188 new loops from multiple regions. We selected all loop segments visible in the 171 Å images of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) that had a clean background. Eighty-six of the new loops were rejected because they could not be reliably separated from the background in other AIA filters. Sixty-one loops required multithermal models to reproduce the observations. Twenty-eight loops were effectively isothermal, that is, the plasma emission to which AIA is sensitive could not be distinguished from isothermal emission, within uncertainties. Ten loops were isothermal. Also, part of our inventory was one small flaring loop, one very cool loop whose temperature distribution could not be constrained by the AIA data, and one loop with inconclusive results. Our survey can confirm an unexpected result from the pilot study: we found no isothermal loop segments where we could properly use the 171-to-193 ratio method, which would be similar to the analysis done for many loops observed with TRACE and EIT. We recommend caution to observers who assume the loop plasma is isothermal, and hope that these results will influence the direction of coronal heating models and the effort modelers spend on various heating scenarios.

  18. The Procedures for Transit of Ships Carrying Radioactive Materials in Regional Waters and Sea Ports of Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, F.A.; Riad, N.

    2005-01-01

    According to the Egyptian Legislation related to the safe transport of radioactive materials, a license is required for transit of ships carrying radioactive materials in the Egyptian territorial water and sea harbors of Egypt including Suez Canal. The License is granted, upon a written application to NCNSRC-AEA. All the procedures and conditions for granting the license have been developed according to the International and Egyptian Legislation. The procedures for transit of ships carrying radioactive material in Suez Canal are also constructed. The NCNSRC-AEA experts are entitled to accept or refuse the transit of ships carrying radioactive material in the Egyptian territorial water and its sea harbors including Suez Canal according to the national and international regulations

  19. Influence of the transition region between p- and n-type polycrystalline silicon passivating contacts on the performance of interdigitated back contact silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, Christian; Müller, Ralph; Feldmann, Frank; Richter, Armin; Hermle, Martin; Glunz, Stefan W.

    2017-11-01

    Passivating contacts based on thin tunneling oxides (SiOx) and n- and p-type semi-crystalline or polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) enable high passivation quality and low contact resistivity, but the integration of these p+/n emitter and n+/n back surface field junctions into interdigitated back contact silicon solar cells poses a challenge due to high recombination at the transition region from p-type to n-type poly-Si. Here, the transition region was created in different configurations—(a) p+ and n+ poly-Si regions are in direct contact with each other ("pn-junction"), using a local overcompensation (counterdoping) as a self-aligning process, (b) undoped (intrinsic) poly-Si remains between the p+ and n+ poly-Si regions ("pin-junction"), and (c) etched trenches separate the p+ and n+ poly-Si regions ("trench")—in order to investigate the recombination characteristics and the reverse breakdown behavior of these solar cells. Illumination- and injection-dependent quasi-steady state photoluminescence (suns-PL) and open-circuit voltage (suns-Voc) measurements revealed that non-ideal recombination in the space charge regions with high local ideality factors as well as recombination in shunted regions strongly limited the performance of solar cells without a trench. In contrast, solar cells with a trench allowed for open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 720 mV, fill factor of 79.6%, short-circuit current (Jsc) of 41.3 mA/cm2, and a conversion efficiencies (η) of 23.7%, showing that a lowly conducting and highly passivating intermediate layer between the p+ and n+ poly-Si regions is mandatory. Independent of the configuration, no hysteresis was observed upon multiple stresses in reverse direction, indicating a controlled and homogeneously distributed breakdown, but with different breakdown characteristics.

  20. Unequal-thickness billet optimization in transitional region during isothermal local loading forming of Ti-alloy rib-web component using response surface method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke WEI

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Avoiding the folding defect and improving the die filling capability in the transitional region are desired in isothermal local loading forming of a large-scale Ti-alloy rib-web component (LTRC. To achieve a high-precision LTRC, the folding evolution and die filling process in the transitional region were investigated by 3D finite element simulation and experiment using an equal-thickness billet (ETB. It is found that the initial volume distribution in the second-loading region can greatly affect the amount of material transferred into the first-loading region during the second-loading step, and thus lead to the folding defect. Besides, an improper initial volume distribution results in non-concurrent die filling in the cavities of ribs after the second-loading step, and then causes die underfilling. To this end, an unequal-thickness billet (UTB was employed with the initial volume distribution optimized by the response surface method (RSM. For a certain eigenstructure, the critical value of the percentage of transferred material determined by the ETB was taken as a constraint condition for avoiding the folding defect in the UTB optimization process, and the die underfilling rate was considered as the optimization objective. Then, based on the RSM models of the percentage of transferred material and the die underfilling rate, non-folding parameter combinations and optimum die filling were achieved. Lastly, an optimized UTB was obtained and verified by the simulation and experiment. Keywords: Die filling, Folding defect, Isothermal local loading forming, Transitional region, Unequal-thickness billet optimization

  1. Investigation on transition behavior and electrical properties of (K0.5Na0.51-xLixNb0.84Ta0.1Sb0.06O3 around polymorphic phase transition region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available (K0.5Na0.51-xLixNb0.84Ta0.1Sb0.06O3 (KNLNTS lead free ceramics with different Li concentration were fabricated by conventional solid-state reaction method. By increasing Li ions in KNLNTS, the grains grow up and the crystal structure changes from orthorhombic to tetragonal. When 0.03 ≤ x ≤ 0.05, the ceramics structure lays in PPT region. Polarization versus electric field (P-E hysteresis loops at room temperature show good ferroelectric properties and the remnant polarization decreases by increasing Li content while coercive electric keeps almost unchanged. In PPT region, taking x = 0.04 as an example, the sample shows excellent dielectric properties: the dielectric constant is 1159 and loss tangent is 0.04, while the piezoelectric constant d33 is 245 pC/N and kp is 0.44 at room temperature, it is promising for (K0.5Na0.51-xLixNb0.84Ta0.1Sb0.06O3 with 4 at. % Li to substitute PZT.

  2. Impacts of Transit-Oriented Compact-Growth on Air Pollutant Concentrations and Exposures in the Tampa Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-31

    Amy L. Stuart (ORCID # 0000-0003-1229-493) The objective of this study was to model the potential impacts of alternative transit-oriented urban design scenarios on community exposures to roadway air pollution. We used a modeling framework developed p...

  3. Orbitally-paced variations of water availability in the SE Asian Monsoon region following the Miocene Climate Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Emma O.; Ji, Shunchuan; Nie, Junsheng; Breecker, Daniel O.

    2017-09-01

    Middle Miocene Earth had several boundary conditions similar to those predicted for future Earth including similar atmospheric pCO2 and substantial Antarctic ice cover but no northern hemisphere ice sheets. We describe a 12 m outcrop of the terrestrial Yanwan Section in the Tianshui Basin, Gansu, China, following the Miocene Climate Transition (13.9-13.7 Ma). It consists of ∼25 cm thick CaCO3-cemented horizons that overprint siltstones every ∼1 m. We suggest that stacked soils developed in siltstones under a seasonal climate with a fluctuating water table, evidenced by roots, clay films, mottling, presence of CaCO3 nodules, and stacked carbonate nodule δ13 C and δ18 O profiles that mimic modern soils. We suggest that the CaCO3-cemented horizons are capillary-fringe carbonates that formed in an arid climate with a steady water table and high potential evapotranspiration rates (PET), evidenced by sharp upper and basal contacts, micrite, sparite, and root-pore cements. The CaCO3 of the cemented horizons and the carbonate nodules have similar mean δ18 O and δ13 C values but the cements have significantly smaller variance in δ13 C and δ18 O values and a different δ18 O versus δ13 C slope, supporting the conclusion that these carbonates are from different populations. The magneto-stratigraphic age model indicates obliquity pacing of the arid conditions required to form the CaCO3-cemented horizons suggesting an orbital control on water availability. We suggest two possible drivers for the obliquity pacing of arid conditions: 1) variability in the cross-equatorial pressure gradient that controls summer monsoon (ASM) strength and is influenced by obliquity-paced variations of Antarctic ice volume and 2) variability in Western Pacific Ocean-East Asian continent pressure gradient controlled by the 25-45°N meridional insolation gradient. We also suggest that variations in aridity were influenced by variations in PET and sensible heating of the regional land

  4. Conformal boundary loop models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, Jesper Lykke; Saleur, Hubert

    2008-01-01

    We study a model of densely packed self-avoiding loops on the annulus, related to the Temperley-Lieb algebra with an extra idempotent boundary generator. Four different weights are given to the loops, depending on their homotopy class and whether they touch the outer rim of the annulus. When the weight of a contractible bulk loop x≡q+q -1 element of (-2,2], this model is conformally invariant for any real weight of the remaining three parameters. We classify the conformal boundary conditions and give exact expressions for the corresponding boundary scaling dimensions. The amplitudes with which the sectors with any prescribed number and types of non-contractible loops appear in the full partition function Z are computed rigorously. Based on this, we write a number of identities involving Z which hold true for any finite size. When the weight of a contractible boundary loop y takes certain discrete values, y r ≡([r+1] q )/([r] q ) with r integer, other identities involving the standard characters K r,s of the Virasoro algebra are established. The connection with Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions in the O(n) model is discussed in detail, and new scaling dimensions are derived. When q is a root of unity and y=y r , exact connections with the A m type RSOS model are made. These involve precise relations between the spectra of the loop and RSOS model transfer matrices, valid in finite size. Finally, the results where y=y r are related to the theory of Temperley-Lieb cabling

  5. Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 crystal with a region of periodic blind antidots - transition between bulk and interface vortex pinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutman, I.; Goldberg, S.; Segev, Y.; Tamegai, T.

    2010-01-01

    This work focuses on differential magneto-optical two-dimensional imaging of the current distribution in a high-T c superconducting Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8 crystal having a region of 170 x 170 μm 2 patterned with periodic blind antidots. By measuring the self-induced field of an applied current, we can map the current flow distribution within and at the edges of the patterned region. We detected three separate types of current flow within the patterned region, which correspond to three different arrangements of pancake vortices within and at the edges of the patterned region. At high temperatures the vortices delocalize from the antidots, presumably due to thermal fluctuations. However, at lower temperatures vortex pinning mechanisms become prominent, lowering the vortex mobility in the patterned region. There are two contributing mechanisms: bulk pinning by the patterned antidots and interface pinning due to an entry barrier into the patterned region. Each mechanism is dominant at different temperatures. From our experiments we see that the T-H transition line from the bulk to the interface pinning and the vortex melting line in the pristine region coincide.

  6. Impact of Germany's energy transition on the Nordic power market – A market-based multi-region energy system model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakeri, Behnam; Virasjoki, Vilma; Syri, Sanna; Connolly, David; Mathiesen, Brian V.; Welsch, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The EU energy policy aims at creating a single European electricity market through market couplings and grid expansions. To analyse the implications of such power market couplings, we propose a market-based multi-region energy system model. The model simulates a multi-region power market (by applying market optimization and network theory), with detailed representation of each region as an energy system (by simulation of both heat and power sectors). We examine the impact of further integration of variable renewable energy (VRE) in Germany on the Nordic power market. The results indicate that the average electricity price slightly grows in the Nordic power market after Germany's Energy Transition (Energiewende). Hence, the economic surplus of Nordic consumers diminishes while Nordic producers improve their gain under new market conditions. Considering the gird congestion income, the overall system-level benefits (social welfare) will improve in the Nordic region after Germany's Energiewende. However, this gain is not equally distributed among different Nordic countries and across different stakeholders. Furthermore, the Energiewende slightly increases carbon emissions from power and district heating (DH) sectors, and reduces the flexibility in integration of VRE in some Nordic countries like Denmark. The direct interconnection of Norway and Germany through NordLink will contribute to the flexibility in wind integration in other Nordic countries, such as Denmark and Finland. - Highlights: • By an integrated hourly analysis, we model the energy systems of several networked countries and their common electricity market. • The proposed model can inform energy policy on implications of renewable energy integration in an international power market. • Among Nordic countries, Norway gains the highest economic benefits from Germany's energy transition. • Germany's energy transition constrains the flexibility of the Nordic countries in wind integration. • Nord

  7. An Investigation of Loop Seal Clearings in ATLAS SBLOCA Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeonsik; Cho, Seok; Kang, Kyoungho; Park, Hyunsik; Min, Kyeongho; Choi, Namhyeon; Park, Jonggook; Kim, Bokdeuk; Choi, Kiyong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In most of the SBLOCA cases, the pressure of the upper-head region will increase mainly owing to the accumulated steam and water inventory in the upper-plenum. This build-up pressure acts as a suppression force to the core water level, and resultantly the core water level will decrease possibly up to and/or below the top of the active core region. Simultaneously, the downcomer water level will increase owing to the evacuated water inventory from the lower part of the core region. This unbalanced hydro-static pressure between the core and downcomer region acts as a potential pushing force to the reactor coolant pump (RCP) side intermediate leg. The potential pushing force will be increased with time to overcome the hydro-static head in the upflow intermediate leg. The unbalanced hydro-static pressure can finally be dissolved with the occurrence of the loop seal clearing. A minimum core collapsed water level, located below the elevation of the loop seal bottom leg in the ATLAS tests, is taken at this time. Since the loop seal bottom leg is located below the core top for typical PWR plants such as an APR1400, the water level depression may uncover the core upper regions until the core water level recovers with the progress of the clearing of the loop seal upflow leg. At this moment, the core temperature may increase to a peak cladding temperature (PCT) owing to an excessive core uncovery by the minimum core collapsed water level. Therefore, the loop seal clearing phenomenon is very important with respect to the PCT occurrence, which is one of the most important parameters to insure the safety of the reactor system. The loop seal clearing behavior seems to be closely related to the break location and break size. Usually, a loop seal in the break loop is cleared first, and the number of loop seal clearings is dependent on the break size. The larger the break size, the more the loop seals that are cleared. An investigation of LSC in the SBLOCA for DVI line and CL breaks

  8. Loop quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pullin, J.

    2015-01-01

    Loop quantum gravity is one of the approaches that are being studied to apply the rules of quantum mechanics to the gravitational field described by the theory of General Relativity . We present an introductory summary of the main ideas and recent results. (Author)

  9. Blind Loop Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or scleroderma involving the small intestine History of radiation therapy to the abdomen Diabetes Diverticulosis of the small intestine Complications A blind loop can cause escalating problems, including: Poor absorption of fats. Bacteria in your small intestine break down the bile ...

  10. Improving Loop Dependence Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Nicklas Bo; Karlsson, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Programmers can no longer depend on new processors to have significantly improved single-thread performance. Instead, gains have to come from other sources such as the compiler and its optimization passes. Advanced passes make use of information on the dependencies related to loops. We improve th...

  11. Cytokine loops driving senescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartek, Jiří; Hodný, Zdeněk; Lukáš, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 8 (2008), s. 887-889 ISSN 1465-7392 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : cellular senescence * cytokines * autocrine feedback loop Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 17.774, year: 2008

  12. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of finding the quantum theory of the gravitational field, and thus understanding what is quantum spacetime, is still open. One of the most active of the current approaches is loop quantum gravity. Loop quantum gravity is a mathematically well-defined, non-perturbative and background independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Research in loop quantum gravity today forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained are: (i The computation of the physical spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yields quantitative predictions on Planck-scale physics. (ii A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black hole entropy formula. (iii An intriguing physical picture of the microstructure of quantum physical space, characterized by a polymer-like Planck scale discreteness. This discreteness emerges naturally from the quantum theory and provides a mathematically well-defined realization of Wheeler's intuition of a spacetime ``foam''. Long standing open problems within the approach (lack of a scalar product, over-completeness of the loop basis, implementation of reality conditions have been fully solved. The weak part of the approach is the treatment of the dynamics: at present there exist several proposals, which are intensely debated. Here, I provide a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  13. HIV1 V3 loop hypermutability is enhanced by the guanine usage bias in the part of env gene coding for it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrustalev, Vladislav Victorovich

    2009-01-01

    Guanine is the most mutable nucleotide in HIV genes because of frequently occurring G to A transitions, which are caused by cytosine deamination in viral DNA minus strands catalyzed by APOBEC enzymes. Distribution of guanine between three codon positions should influence the probability for G to A mutation to be nonsynonymous (to occur in first or second codon position). We discovered that nucleotide sequences of env genes coding for third variable regions (V3 loops) of gp120 from HIV1 and HIV2 have different kinds of guanine usage biases. In the HIV1 reference strain and 100 additionally analyzed HIV1 strains the guanine usage bias in V3 loop coding regions (2G>1G>3G) should lead to elevated nonsynonymous G to A transitions occurrence rates. In the HIV2 reference strain and 100 other HIV2 strains guanine usage bias in V3 loop coding regions (3G>2G>1G) should protect V3 loops from hypermutability. According to the HIV1 and HIV2 V3 alignment, insertion of the sequence enriched with 2G (21 codons in length) occurred during the evolution of HIV1 predecessor, while insertion of the different sequence enriched with 3G (19 codons in length) occurred during the evolution of HIV2 predecessor. The higher is the level of 3G in the V3 coding region, the lower should be the immune escaping mutation occurrence rates. This hypothesis was tested in this study by comparing the guanine usage in V3 loop coding regions from HIV1 fast and slow progressors. All calculations have been performed by our algorithms "VVK In length", "VVK Dinucleotides" and "VVK Consensus" (www.barkovsky.hotmail.ru).

  14. Upgrade of the Level-1 muon trigger of the ATLAS detector in the barrel-endcap transition region with RPC chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Massa, L; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This report presents a project for the upgrade of the Level-1 muon trigger in the barrel-endcap transition region (1.01) caused by charged particles originating from secondary interactions downstream of the interaction point. After the LHC phase-1 upgrade, forseen for 2018, the Level-1 muon trigger rate would saturate the allocated bandwidth unless new measures are adopted to improve the rejection of fake triggers. ATLAS is going to improve the trigger selectivity in the region |$\\eta$|>1.3 with the addition of the New Small Wheel detector as an inner trigger plane. To obtain a similar trigger selectivity in the barrel-endcap transition region 1.0<|$\\eta$|<1.3, it is proposed to add new RPC chambers at the edge of the inner layer of the barrel muon spectrometer. These chambers will be based on a three layer structure with thinner gas gaps and electrodes with respect to the ATLAS standard and a new low-profile light-weight mechanical structure that will allow the installation in the limited available spa...

  15. Explosive Chromospheric Evaporation Driven by Nonthermal Electrons around One Footpoint of a Solar Flare Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.; Ning, Z. J.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, Q. M., E-mail: lidong@pmo.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2017-05-20

    We explore the temporal relationship between microwave/hard X-ray (HXR) emission and Doppler velocity during the impulsive phase of a solar flare on 2014 October 27 (SOL2014-10-27) that displays a pulse on the light curves in the microwave (34 GHz) and HXR (25–50 keV) bands before the flare maximum. Imaging observation shows that this pulse mainly comes from one footpoint of a solar flare loop. The slit of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) stays at this footpoint during this solar flare. The Doppler velocities of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å and Si iv 1402.77 Å are extracted from the Gaussian fitting method. We find that the hot line of Fe xxi 1354.09 Å (log T ∼ 7.05) in the corona exhibits blueshift, while the cool line of Si iv 1402.77 Å (log T ∼ 4.8) in the transition region exhibits redshift, indicating explosive chromospheric evaporation. Evaporative upflows along the flare loop are also observed in the AIA 131 Å image. To our knowledge, this is the first report of chromospheric evaporation evidence from both spectral and imaging observations in the same flare. Both microwave and HXR pulses are well correlated with the Doppler velocities, suggesting that the chromospheric evaporation is driven by nonthermal electrons around this footpoint of a solar flare loop.

  16. Random walk loop soups and conformal loop ensembles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Brug, T.; Camia, F.; Lis, M.

    2016-01-01

    The random walk loop soup is a Poissonian ensemble of lattice loops; it has been extensively studied because of its connections to the discrete Gaussian free field, but was originally introduced by Lawler and Trujillo Ferreras as a discrete version of the Brownian loop soup of Lawler and Werner, a

  17. Loop quantum cosmology and spin foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Campiglia, Miguel; Henderson, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is used to provide concrete evidence in support of the general paradigm underlying spin foam models (SFMs). Specifically, it is shown that: (i) the physical inner product in the timeless framework equals the transition amplitude in the deparameterized theory; (ii) this quantity admits a vertex expansion a la SFMs in which the M-th term refers just to M volume transitions, without any reference to the time at which the transition takes place; (iii) the exact physical inner product is obtained by summing over just the discrete geometries; no 'continuum limit' is involved; and, (iv) the vertex expansion can be interpreted as a perturbative expansion in the spirit of group field theory. This sum over histories reformulation of LQC also addresses certain other issues which are briefly summarized.

  18. Line formation in the solar chromosphere. II - An optically thick region of the chromosphere-corona transition region observed with OSO 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lites, B. W.; Hansen, E. R.; Shine, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The University of Colorado ultraviolet spectrometer aboard the Orbiting Solar Observatory 8(OSO 8) has measured self-reversed profiles of the resonance line of C IV lamda 1548.2 at the limb passage of an active region. The degree of the self-reversal together with the absolute intensity of the line profile determine the electron density in the active region at 10 to the 10th/cu cm at temperatures where the C IV line is formed. The nonthermal component of the broadening velocity is no more than 14km/s, and the physical thickness of an equivalent plane-parallel slab in hydrostatic equilibrium that would give rise to the observed line profiles is about 430 km.

  19. Agroecology to Promote Just Sustainability Transitions: Analysis of a Civil Society Network in the Rwenzori Region, Western Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellinor Isgren

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Agroecology is gaining ground within the debate on how to address systemic social and environmental problems in agriculture. However, it remains marginalized in agricultural research and development plans around the world. This paper analyzes agroecology as a socio-technical niche in Uganda, where its emergence in part can be seen as an unintended consequence of neoliberalist development. The case studied is a civil society network that links farmer groups and non-governmental organizations across different levels. Through the analytical lens of regime dimensions, we find that agroecology is practiced as a smallholder-centric approach that champions collective action, locally appropriate technologies, participatory methods in research and extension, and calls for more active state guidance of agricultural change along specific principles. However, two major concerns are raised; the niche converges with the dominant discourse around commercialization, and policy advocacy is hampered by the apolitical history of NGOs and an increasingly tense political climate. These two areas are critical for agroecology to contribute to just sustainability transitions, and civil society organizations with strong links to smallholder farmers need to be included in the growing scholarly debate both to inform it and to receive guidance from it. Transition frameworks can help facilitate the development of viable institutional designs and explicitly transformative strategies, but we also point towards the need for engagement with theories on civil society collective action and political mobilization.

  20. Transitioning Lessons Learned and Assets of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative to Global and Regional Measles and Rubella Elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretsinger, Katrina; Strebel, Peter; Kezaala, Robert; Goodson, James L

    2017-07-01

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative has built an extensive infrastructure with capabilities and resources that should be transitioned to measles and rubella elimination efforts. Measles continues to be a major cause of child mortality globally, and rubella continues to be the leading infectious cause of birth defects. Measles and rubella eradication is feasible and cost saving. The obvious similarities in strategies between polio elimination and measles and rubella elimination include the use of an extensive surveillance and laboratory network, outbreak preparedness and response, extensive communications and social mobilization networks, and the need for periodic supplementary immunization activities. Polio staff and resources are already connected with those of measles and rubella, and transitioning existing capabilities to measles and rubella elimination efforts allows for optimized use of resources and the best opportunity to incorporate important lessons learned from polio eradication, and polio resources are concentrated in the countries with the highest burden of measles and rubella. Measles and rubella elimination strategies rely heavily on achieving and maintaining high vaccination coverage through the routine immunization activity infrastructure, thus creating synergies with immunization systems approaches, in what is termed a "diagonal approach." © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  1. Transitions of microstructure and photoluminescence properties of the Ge/ZnO multilayer films in certain annealing temperature region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Tianhang; Li Ziquan; Chen Jiankang; Shen Kai; Sun Kefei

    2006-01-01

    The Ge/ZnO multilayer films have been prepared by rf magnetron sputtering. The effects of annealing on the microstructure and photoluminescence properties of the multilayers have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry and photoluminescence (PL) spectrometry. The investigation of structural properties indicates that Zn 2 GeO 4 has been formed with (220) texture and Zn deficiency from Ge/ZnO multilayer films in the process of annealing. However, lower Zn/Ge ratio can be improved by annealing. The annealed multilayers show three main emission bands at 532, 700, and 761nm, which originate from the transition between oxygen vacancy (V o * ) and Zn vacancies (V Zn ), the radiative recombination of quantum-confined excitons (QCE) in Ge nanocrystals, and the optical transition in the GeO color centers, respectively. Finally, the fabrication of thin film Zn 2 GeO 4 from Ge/ZnO multilayer films by annealing at low temperature provides another approach to prepare the green-emitting oxide phosphor film:Zn 2 GeO 4 :Mn

  2. Interaction between extended and localized electronic states in the region of the metal to insulator transition in semiconductor alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teubert, Joerg

    2008-07-01

    The first part of this work addresses the influence of those isovalent localized states on the electronic properties of (B,Ga,In)As. Most valuable were the measurements under hydrostatic pressure that revealed a pressure induced metal-insulator transition. One of the main ideas in this context is the trapping of carriers in localized B-related cluster states that appear in the bandgap at high pressure. The key conclusion that can be drawn from the experimental results is that boron atoms seem to have the character of isovalent electron traps, rendering boron as the first known isovalent trap induced by cationic substitution. In the second part, thermoelectric properties of (B,Ga,In)As and (Ga,In)(N,As) are studied. It was found that although the electric-field driven electronic transport in n-type (Ga,In)(N,As) and (B,Ga,In)As differs considerably from that of n-type GaAs, the temperature-gradient driven electronic transport is very similar for the three semiconductors, despite distinct differences in the conduction band structure of (Ga,In)(N,As) and (B,Ga,In)As compared to GaAs. The third part addresses the influence of magnetic interactions on the transport properties near the metal-insulator transition (MIT). Here, two scenarios are considered: Firstly the focus is set on ZnMnSe:Cl, a representative of so called dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS). In this material Mn(2+) ions provide a large magnetic moment due to their half filled inner 3d-shell. It is shown that magnetic interactions in conjunction with disorder effects are responsible for the unusual magnetotransport behavior found in this and other II-Mn-VI semiconductor alloys. In the second scenario, a different magnetic compound, namely InSb:Mn, is of interest. It is a representative of the III-Mn-V DMS, where the magnetic impurity Mn serves both as the source of a large localized magnetic moment and as the source of a loosely bound hole due to its acceptor character. Up to now, little is known about

  3. Interaction between extended and localized electronic states in the region of the metal to insulator transition in semiconductor alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teubert, Joerg

    2008-01-01

    The first part of this work addresses the influence of those isovalent localized states on the electronic properties of (B,Ga,In)As. Most valuable were the measurements under hydrostatic pressure that revealed a pressure induced metal-insulator transition. One of the main ideas in this context is the trapping of carriers in localized B-related cluster states that appear in the bandgap at high pressure. The key conclusion that can be drawn from the experimental results is that boron atoms seem to have the character of isovalent electron traps, rendering boron as the first known isovalent trap induced by cationic substitution. In the second part, thermoelectric properties of (B,Ga,In)As and (Ga,In)(N,As) are studied. It was found that although the electric-field driven electronic transport in n-type (Ga,In)(N,As) and (B,Ga,In)As differs considerably from that of n-type GaAs, the temperature-gradient driven electronic transport is very similar for the three semiconductors, despite distinct differences in the conduction band structure of (Ga,In)(N,As) and (B,Ga,In)As compared to GaAs. The third part addresses the influence of magnetic interactions on the transport properties near the metal-insulator transition (MIT). Here, two scenarios are considered: Firstly the focus is set on ZnMnSe:Cl, a representative of so called dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS). In this material Mn(2+) ions provide a large magnetic moment due to their half filled inner 3d-shell. It is shown that magnetic interactions in conjunction with disorder effects are responsible for the unusual magnetotransport behavior found in this and other II-Mn-VI semiconductor alloys. In the second scenario, a different magnetic compound, namely InSb:Mn, is of interest. It is a representative of the III-Mn-V DMS, where the magnetic impurity Mn serves both as the source of a large localized magnetic moment and as the source of a loosely bound hole due to its acceptor character. Up to now, little is known about

  4. Diagnostics of Coronal Heating in Solar Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fludra, Andrzej; Hornsey, Christopher; Nakariakov, Valery

    2015-04-01

    We aim to develop a diagnostic method for the coronal heating mechanism in active region loops. Observational constraints on coronal heating models have been sought using measurements in the X-ray and EUV wavelengths. Statistical analysis, using EUV emission from many active regions, was done by Fludra and Ireland (2008) who studied power-law relationships between active region integrated magnetic flux and emission line intensities. A subsequent study by Fludra and Warren (2010) for the first time compared fully resolved images in an EUV spectral line of OV 63.0 nm with the photospheric magnetic field, leading to the identification of a dominant, ubiquitous variable component of the transition region EUV emission and a discovery of a steady basal heating, and deriving the dependence of the basal heating rate on the photospheric magnetic flux density. In this study, we compare models of single coronal loops with EUV observations. We assess to what degree observations of individual coronal loops made in the EUV range are capable of providing constraints on the heating mechanism. We model the coronal magnetic field in an active region using an NLFF extrapolation code applied to a photospheric vector magnetogram from SDO/HMI and select several loops that match an SDO/AIA 171 image of the same active region. We then model the plasma in these loops using a 1D hydrostatic code capable of applying an arbitrary heating rate as a function of magnetic field strength along the loop. From the plasma parameters derived from this model, we calculate the EUV emission along the loop in AIA 171 and 335 bands, and in pure spectral lines of Fe IX 17.1 nm and Fe XVI 33.5 nm. We use different spatial distributions of the heating function: concentrated near the loop top, uniform and concentrated near the footpoints, and investigate their effect on the modelled EUV intensities. We find a diagnostics based on the dependence of the total loop intensity on the shape of the heating function

  5. Tradeoffs in Chemical and Thermal Variations in the Post-perovskite Phase Transition: Mixed Phase Regions in the Deep Lower Mantle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, G. F.; Spera, F. J.; Yuen, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    The recent discovery of a phase-transition in Mg-rich perovskite (Pv) to a post-perovskite (pPv) phase at lower mantle depths and its relationship to D", lower mantle heterogeneity and iron content prompted an investigation of the relative importance of lower mantle (LM) compositional and temperature fluctuations in creating topographic undulations on mixed phase regions. Above the transition, Mg-rich Pv makes up ~70 percent by mass of the LM. Using results from experimental phase equilibria, first-principles computations and thermodynamic relations for Fe2+-Mg mixing in silicates, a preliminary thermodynamic model for the perovskite to post-perovskite phase transition in the divariant system MgSiO3-FeSiO3 is developed. Complexities associated with components Fe2O3 and Al2O3 and other phases (Ca-Pv, magnesiowustite) are neglected. The model predicts phase transition pressures are sensitive to the FeSiO3 content of perovskite (~-1.5 GPa per one mole percent FeSiO3). This leads to considerable topography along the top boundary of the mixed phase region. The Clapeyron slope for the Pv to pPv transition at XFeSiO3=0.1 is +11 MPa/K about 20% higher than for pure Mg-Pv. Increasing bulk concentration of iron elevates the mixed (two-phase) layer above the core-mantle boundary (CMB); increasing temperature acts to push the mixed layer deeper into the LM into the D" thermal boundary layer resting upon the (CMB). For various LM geotherms and CMB temperatures, a single mixed layer of thickness ~300 km lies within the bottom 40% of the lower mantle. For low iron contents (XFeSiO3 ~5 mole percent or less), two perched layers are found. This is the divariant analog to the univariant double-crosser. The hotter the mantle, the deeper the mixed phase layer; the more iron-rich the LM, the higher the mixed phase layer. In a hotter Hadean Earth with interior temperatures everywhere 200-500 K warmer pPv is not stable unless the LM bulk composition is Fe-enriched compared to the present

  6. Closing the loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassau, E; Atlas, E; Phillip, M

    2010-02-01

    The dream of closing the loop is actually the dream of creating an artificial pancreas and freeing the patients from being involved with the care of their own diabetes. Insulin-dependent diabetes (type 1) is a chronic incurable disease which requires constant therapy without the possibility of any 'holidays' or insulin-free days. It means that patients have to inject insulin every day of their life, several times per day, and in order to do it safely they also have to measure their blood glucose levels several times per day. Patients need to plan their meals, their physical activities and their insulin regime - there is only very small room for spontaneous activities. This is why the desire for an artificial pancreas is so strong despite the fact that it will not cure the diabetic patients. Attempts to develop a closed-loop system started in the 1960s but never got to a clinical practical stage of development. In recent years the availability of continuous glucose sensors revived those efforts and stimulated the clinician and researchers to believe that closing the loop might be possible nowadays. Many papers have been published over the years describing several different ideas on how to close the loop. Most of the suggested systems have a sensing arm that measures the blood glucose repeatedly or continuously, an insulin delivery arm that injects insulin upon command and a computer that makes the decisions of when and how much insulin to deliver. The differences between the various published systems in the literature are mainly in their control algorithms. However, there are also differences related to the method and site of glucose measurement and insulin delivery. SC glucose measurements and insulin delivery are the most studied option but other combinations of insulin measurements and glucose delivery including intravascular and intraperitoneal (IP) are explored. We tried to select recent publications that we believe had influenced and inspired people interested

  7. Loop Quantum Cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojowald, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations in which classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical spacetime inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding spacetime is then modified. One particular theory is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. The main effects are introduced into effective classical equations, which allow one to avoid the interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early-universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function, which allows an extension of quantum spacetime beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of spacetime arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds light on more general issues, such as the nature of time. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrr-2008-4.

  8. Loop Quantum Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojowald Martin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations in which classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical spacetime inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding spacetime is then modified. One particular theory is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. The main effects are introduced into effective classical equations, which allow one to avoid the interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early-universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function, which allows an extension of quantum spacetime beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of spacetime arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds light on more general issues, such as the nature of time.

  9. Loop Quantum Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojowald Martin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations where classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical space-time inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding space-time is then modified. One particular realization is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. Main effects are introduced into effective classical equations which allow to avoid interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function which allows to extend space-time beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of space-time arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds new light on more general issues such as time.

  10. SEMI-EMPIRICAL MODELING OF THE PHOTOSPHERE, CHROMOPSHERE, TRANSITION REGION, AND CORONA OF THE M-DWARF HOST STAR GJ 832

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontenla, J. M. [NorthWest Research Associates, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey L. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States); Witbrod, Jesse [University of Colorado Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); France, Kevin [LASP, University of Colorado Boulder, CO 80309-0600 (United States); Buccino, A.; Mauas, Pablo; Vieytes, Mariela [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (CONICET-UBA), C.C. 67, Sucursal 28, C1428EHA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Walkowicz, Lucianne M., E-mail: johnf@digidyna.com, E-mail: jlinsky@jila.colorado.edu, E-mail: jesse.witbrod@colorado.edu, E-mail: kevin.france@lasp.colorado.edu, E-mail: abuccino@iafe.uba.ar, E-mail: pablo@iafe.uba.ar, E-mail: mariela@iafe.uba.ar, E-mail: LWalkowicz@adlerplanetarium.org [The Adler Planetarium, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States)

    2016-10-20

    Stellar radiation from X-rays to the visible provides the energy that controls the photochemistry and mass loss from exoplanet atmospheres. The important extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region (10–91.2 nm) is inaccessible and should be computed from a reliable stellar model. It is essential to understand the formation regions and physical processes responsible for the various stellar emission features to predict how the spectral energy distribution varies with age and activity levels. We compute a state-of-the-art semi-empirical atmospheric model and the emergent high-resolution synthetic spectrum of the moderately active M2 V star GJ 832 as the first of a series of models for stars with different activity levels. We construct a one-dimensional simple model for the physical structure of the star’s chromosphere, chromosphere-corona transition region, and corona using non-LTE radiative transfer techniques and many molecular lines. The synthesized spectrum for this model fits the continuum and lines across the UV-to-optical spectrum. Particular emphasis is given to the emission lines at wavelengths that are shorter than 300 nm observed with the Hubble Space Telescope , which have important effects on the photochemistry of the exoplanet atmospheres. The FUV line ratios indicate that the transition region of GJ 832 is more biased to hotter material than that of the quiet Sun. The excellent agreement of our computed EUV luminosity with that obtained by two other techniques indicates that our model predicts reliable EUV emission from GJ 832. We find that the unobserved EUV flux of GJ 832, which heats the outer atmospheres of exoplanets and drives their mass loss, is comparable to the active Sun.

  11. Skill of ship-following large-eddy simulations in reproducing MAGIC observations across the northeast Pacific stratocumulus to cumulus transition region

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGibbon, J.; Bretherton, C. S.

    2017-06-01

    During the Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) in October 2011 to September 2012, a container ship making periodic cruises between Los Angeles, CA, and Honolulu, HI, was instrumented with surface meteorological, aerosol and radiation instruments, a cloud radar and ceilometer, and radiosondes. Here large-eddy simulation (LES) is performed in a ship-following frame of reference for 13 four day transects from the MAGIC field campaign. The goal is to assess if LES can skillfully simulate the broad range of observed cloud characteristics and boundary layer structure across the subtropical stratocumulus to cumulus transition region sampled during different seasons and meteorological conditions. Results from Leg 15A, which sampled a particularly well-defined stratocumulus to cumulus transition, demonstrate the approach. The LES reproduces the observed timing of decoupling and transition from stratocumulus to cumulus and matches the observed evolution of boundary layer structure, cloud fraction, liquid water path, and precipitation statistics remarkably well. Considering the simulations of all 13 cruises, the LES skillfully simulates the mean diurnal variation of key measured quantities, including liquid water path (LWP), cloud fraction, measures of decoupling, and cloud radar-derived precipitation. The daily mean quantities are well represented, and daily mean LWP and cloud fraction show the expected correlation with estimated inversion strength. There is a -0.6 K low bias in LES near-surface air temperature that results in a high bias of 5.6 W m-2 in sensible heat flux (SHF). Overall, these results build confidence in the ability of LES to represent the northeast Pacific stratocumulus to trade cumulus transition region.Plain Language SummaryDuring the Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) field campaign in October 2011 to September 2012, a cargo container ship making regular cruises between Los Angeles, CA, and Honolulu, HI, was fitted with tools to

  12. Herschel HIFI GOT C+ Survey: CII, HI, and CO Emissions in a Sample of Transition Clouds and Star-Forming regions in the Inner Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Jorge; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Langer, William D.; Goldsmith, Paul; Li, Di; Yorke, Harold

    The GOT C+ a HIFI Herschel Key Project, studies the diffuse ISM throughout the Galactic Plane, using C+ as cloud tracer. The C+ line at 1.9 THz traces a so-far poorly studied stage in ISM cloud evolution -the transitional clouds going from atomic HI to molecular H2. This transition cloud phase, which is difficult to observe in HI and CO alone, may be best characterized via CII emission or absorption. The C+ line is also an excellent tracer of the warm diffuse gas and the warm, dense gas in the Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs). We can, therefore, use the CII emission as a probe to understand the effects of star formation on their interstellar environment. We present our first results on the transition between dense and hot gas (traced by CII) and dense and cold gas (traced by 12CO and 13CO) along a few representative lines of sight in the inner Galaxy from longitude 325 degrees to 25 degrees, taken during the HIFI Priority Science Phase. Comparisons of the high spectral resolution ( 1 km/s) HIFI data on C+ with HI, 12CO, and 13CO spectra allow us to separate out the different ISM components along each line of sight. Our results provide detailed information about the transition of diffuse atomic to molecular gas clouds needed to understand star formation and the lifecycle of the interstellar gas. These observations are being carried out with the Herschel Space Observatory, which is an ESA cornerstone mission, with contributions from NASA. This research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. JLP was supported under the NASA Postdoctoral Program at JPL, Caltech, administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through a contract with NASA, and is currently supported as a Caltech-JPL Postdoctoral associate.

  13. The meson and the baryon in the one-loop dual model of the pomeron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennington, M.R.; Gula, A.

    1975-01-01

    In the lowest order dual loop perturbation theory the crossing and factorisation properties of the pomeron are considered. It is shown that the baryon loop is the necessary complement of the single crossed meson loop in building the low-energy pomeron. Recent experimental indications that in this energy region the pomeron is different in MM, MB and BB processes are naturally explained. (Auth.)

  14. Analysis of severe accidents on fast reactor test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cenerini, R.; Verzelletti, G.; Curioni, S.

    1975-01-01

    The Pec reactor is a sodium cooled fast reactor which is being designed for the primary purpose of accomodating closed sodium cooled test loops for the developmental and proof testing of fast reactor fuel assemblies. The test loops are located in the central test region of reactor. The basic function for which the loop is designed is burn-up to failure testing of fuel under advanced performance conditions. It is therefore necessary to design the loop for failure conditions. Basically two types of accidents can occur within the loops: rupture of gas plenum in the fuel pins and coolant starvation. Explosive tests on Pec loop, whose first set is described in this report, are devoted to investigate the effects of an accidental energy release on loop containment. The loop model reproduces in the test section the prototype dimensions in radial scale 1:1. Using a wire explosive charge of 300mm, the height of test section is sufficient for determining the containment capability of the loop that has a nearly constant deformation in a length of. 3-4 time the diameter. The inertial effects of the coolant column are reproduced by two tubes at the extremities of test section, closed with top plugs. Some tests has been performed by wrapping around the test section four layers of steel wire in order to evaluate the influence on the containment of tungsten wire that is foreseen in prototype loop. The influence of the coolant around the loop was evaluated by inserting the model in water. Dummy sub-assemblies was used and explosive substitutes the central rods. Piezoelectric pressure transducers were mounted on the three plugs and radial deformation was measured directly at different height. From experiments performed it resulted the importance of harmonic wires and inertial reaction of external water on loop containment; maximum containable energy is about 50 Cal with E.1 explosive

  15. Wilson loops in minimal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukker, Nadav; Gross, David J.; Ooguri, Hirosi

    1999-01-01

    The AdS/CFT correspondence suggests that the Wilson loop of the large N gauge theory with N = 4 supersymmetry in 4 dimensions is described by a minimal surface in AdS 5 x S 5 . The authors examine various aspects of this proposal, comparing gauge theory expectations with computations of minimal surfaces. There is a distinguished class of loops, which the authors call BPS loops, whose expectation values are free from ultra-violet divergence. They formulate the loop equation for such loops. To the extent that they have checked, the minimal surface in AdS 5 x S 5 gives a solution of the equation. The authors also discuss the zig-zag symmetry of the loop operator. In the N = 4 gauge theory, they expect the zig-zag symmetry to hold when the loop does not couple the scalar fields in the supermultiplet. They will show how this is realized for the minimal surface

  16. Wilson loops and minimal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukker, Nadav; Gross, David J.; Ooguri, Hirosi

    1999-01-01

    The AdS-CFT correspondence suggests that the Wilson loop of the large N gauge theory with N=4 supersymmetry in four dimensions is described by a minimal surface in AdS 5 xS 5 . We examine various aspects of this proposal, comparing gauge theory expectations with computations of minimal surfaces. There is a distinguished class of loops, which we call BPS loops, whose expectation values are free from ultraviolet divergence. We formulate the loop equation for such loops. To the extent that we have checked, the minimal surface in AdS 5 xS 5 gives a solution of the equation. We also discuss the zigzag symmetry of the loop operator. In the N=4 gauge theory, we expect the zigzag symmetry to hold when the loop does not couple the scalar fields in the supermultiplet. We will show how this is realized for the minimal surface. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  17. Regional differences in system usage charges. Impediment to a fair energy transition?; Regionale Unterschiede der Netznutzungsentgelte. Hindernis fuer eine faire Energiewende?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plenz, Maik; Meister, Moritz; Doliwa, Martin; Obbelode, Felix [Leuphana Univ. Lueneburg (Germany). Forschungsprojekt EnERgioN

    2014-12-15

    The conversion of the German electricity supply system to production from renewable resources under the national energy transition policy is making it necessary to expand and restructure the distribution networks. Based on the expansion goals of the federal government, expectations are that thinly populated regions with low conflict potential will see a continued growth in distributed generation. This will increase the geographic asymmetry that exists between the production of renewable energy in rural, peripheral regions and its consumption predominantly in urban regions, thus enlarging the regional differences in system usage charges seen already today. The geographic disparity between production and consumption may grow larger still with the continuing installation of new and repowering of existing renewable energy plants. Of the possibilities discussed so far for reforming the scheme of charges, some would only have a weak impact, while others would even exacerbate the problem. The solution proposed in the present article takes account of the costs incurred through upstream supply networks in accordance with Article 14 Section 1 Sentence 1 of the Ordinance on System Usage Charges. In effect it leads to an allocation of costs according to the user-pays principle, thus protecting consumers connected to rural distribution networks against an undue cost burden and charging a fair share of the costs to consumers in urban and industrial distribution networks.

  18. SECURITY RISKS, MYTHS IN A TRANSITIONING SUB-NATIONAL REGIONAL ECONOMY (CROSS RIVER STATE AND IMAGINATIVE GEOGRAPHIES OF NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. UKWAYI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of an “international community” through accumulation of perceived risks that contrasts with those risks (of considerably lower levels of seriousness compared to those perceived constitutes one of the interesting (or intriguing subjects of risks and disaster studies surrounding the 9/11 era. The constructions of “imaginative geographies”, have frequently been biased in the practices that underlie the mapping of the foreign places tend to put-down the affected regions in their “paintings” for the global community. The latter are subsequently “demonized” in their ratings of competence for participating in world trade, tourism, travel, among other social/cultural, and economic and political activities. The objective of this article is to highlight how the exaggeration of risks (contrasted to actually existing/lived risks, practices that are frequently associated with such adverse “imaginative geographies” poses sub-national regional development dilemma in Nigeria’s Niger Delta. We trace the roots of adverse “imaginative geographies” of Nigeria to the Abacha dictatorship (1993-1997. Then we highlight the mixed characteristics of the Niger Delta conditions during the “return of positive image recapture” by Nigeria’s federal government (re-democratisation of the Fourth Republic, 1999-present, re-branding campaigns; as well as adverse conditions present. Most significantly, we show that despite these adversities, a combination of favorable geographical size, differentiation, sub-national regional security programme formulation and management taking aims at diversification have created “large oases” of peace and security in Cross River State, a part of the Niger Delta that has been completely unscathed by insurgencies of the nearby sub-national region and further away national origin. Apart from identifying sub-national regions qualifying for delisting from “adverse imaginative geographies” due to

  19. Regional cerebral blood flow (RCBF) measurements by SPECT analysis of Xenon-133 transit: Validation of technique and clinical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezai, K.; Kirchner, P.; Armstrong, C.; Ehrhardt, J.; Damasio, H.; Adams, H.; Damasio, A.

    1984-01-01

    The SPECT system (Tomomatic-64) developed by a previous study for rCBF measurements with Xe-133 was validated with phantom simulations and clinical studies. A bi-compartmental flow phantom was developed consisting of a Xenon-133 pump connected in series to head and lung compartments. Flow rates between 0.2 and 1.4 brain volumes/min (20-140 cc/100ml/min) were tested against Tomomatic measurements by linear regression. Correlation was excellent (r=1.0) in the range of 0.2-1.2 (20-120 cc/100ml/min), representing flow rates which are most likely to be encountered in clinical studies. Flow rates above 1.2 (120 cc/100 ml/min) were significantly underestimated. 32 studies on 20 volunteers gave a mean normal flow of 72 (SD=12) cc/ 100g/min. Mean regional flow ranged from 62 in frontal lobes to 75 in central gray matter. Right-to-left variation was less than 5%. The lowest regional flow in a normal subject was 45 cc/100g/min. 68 studies were performed on 30 stroke patients. In 27 rCBF was less than 45 in affected brain areas for a sensitivity of 90% which improved to 97% when comparisons with contralateral brain were included. Initial CT scans were normal or non-diagnostic in 10, but showed CVA's in regions of reduced rCBF in 17 patients. rCBF abnormalities involved greater portions of brain than CT changes, often (8/17) including distant regions, unpredicted by CT or clinical studies but known to be strongly interconnected to the area of structural damage. SPECT estimates of rCBF appear to be a sensitive research and diagnostic tool and complement the structural information provided by CT

  20. Strange mesonic transition form factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goity, J.L.; Musolf, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    The strange-quark vector current ρ-to-π meson transition form factor is computed at one-loop order using strange meson intermediate states. A comparison is made with a φ-meson dominance model estimate. We find that one-loop contributions are comparable in magnitude to those predicted by φ-meson dominance. It is possible that the one-loop contribution can make the matrix element as large as those of the electromagnetic current mediating vector meson radiative decays. However, due to the quadratic dependence of the one-loop results on the hadronic form factor cutoff mass, a large uncertainty in the estimate of the loops is unavoidable. These results indicate that non-nucleonic strange quarks could contribute appreciable in moderate-parallel Q 2 parallel parity-violating electron-nucleus scattering measurements aimed at probing the strange-quark content of the nucleon. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. Post-CHF low-void heat transfer of water: measurements in the complete transition boiling region at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, K.; Meinen, W.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation of low-void heat transfer of water has been performed in the range of CHF and the minimum stable film boiling temperature. The heat transfer system used consists of a vertically mounted copper tube of 1 cm I.D. and 5 cm length with surface-temperature controlled, indirect Joule heating. Results are presented for upflowing water at inverted annular flow conditions in the inlet subcooling range of 2.5 - 40 0 C and mass flux range of 137-600 kg/m 2 s in terms of boiling curves and heat transfer coefficients versus wall temperature. Heat transfer in the stationary rewetting front, which occurs within the test section during operation in the transition boiling mode, is also dealt with. At high mass flux, occurrence of an inverse rewetting front has been observed. It is also noted that, at fixed location, minimum heat flux observed is usually not associated with the minimum stable film boiling temperature

  2. Transition From a Magmatic to a Tectonic Rift System : Seismotectonics of the Eyasi- Manyara Region, Northern Tanzania, East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaric, J.; Perrot, J.; Deschamps, A.; Deverchere, J.; Wambura, R. F.; Tiberi, C.; Petit, C.; Le Gall, B.; Sue, C.

    2008-12-01

    How a rift system propagates and breaks throughout a cold and thick continental crust remains poorly known. Only few places allow to address the question. In the East African Rift System (EARS), the eastern magma- rich branch abruptly splits into two amagmatic arms (the Eyasi and Manyara faulted systems), south of a E-W volcanic chain (the Ngorongoro-Kilimanjaro transverse volcanic belt), as crossing the Archaean Tanzanian craton margin. We present the first detailed seismotectonic picture of the Eyasi-Manyara rifts where a network of ~25 seismometers was settled from June to November 2007 (SEISMO-TANZ'07 seismological experiment). From the seismicity recorded by the network, we identify active faults and discuss the stress field framework obtained from the inversion of focal mechanisms. We use the determined depth of earthquakes (1) to discuss the crustal structure of the transition zone from a magma-rich to a magma-starved section of the EARS and (2) to further emphasize the rheological control on depth distributions in the EARS (Albaric et al., Tectonophysics, 2008). The stress and strain directions deduced from our work are also used to question recently published kinematics and conceptual models of the EARS (Calais et al., Geol. Soc. London, 2006 ; Le Gall et al., Tectonophysics, 2008).

  3. Stress relief to prevent stress corrosion in the transition region of expanded Alloy 600 steam-generator tubing. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, J.; van Rooyen, D.

    1983-05-01

    The feasibility of preventing primary side roll transition cracking has been investigated, using induction heating to attain stress relief of expanded Ni-Cr-Fe Alloy 600 steam generator tubing. Work on rolled tubing and U-bends has shown that temperatures with which stress relief can be obtained range from 700 to 850 0 C, with lower temperatures in this range requiring longer times at temperature to provide the requisite reduction in residual stresses. No work has yet been done outside this range. Preliminary tests, using induction heating, have been carried out on a mock tube sheet assembly, designed to the dimensions of a typical steam generator, and have identified the type of heating/cooling cycle that would occur in the tube sheet during a stress relief operation. Preliminary results show that the times to reach the higher temperatures in the range observed to give stress relief, of the order of 850 0 C, can be as short as 8 seconds, and less with optimum coil design and power control

  4. Investigating the Response of Loop Plasma to Nanoflare Heating Using RADYN Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, V.; Testa, P.; Allred, J.; De Pontieu, B.; Carlsson, M.; Pereira, T. M. D.; Gošić, Milan; Reale, Fabio

    2018-04-01

    We present the results of 1D hydrodynamic simulations of coronal loops that are subject to nanoflares, caused by either in situ thermal heating or nonthermal electron (NTE) beams. The synthesized intensity and Doppler shifts can be directly compared with Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations of rapid variability in the transition region (TR) of coronal loops, associated with transient coronal heating. We find that NTEs with high enough low-energy cutoff ({E}{{C}}) deposit energy in the lower TR and chromosphere, causing blueshifts (up to ∼20 km s‑1) in the IRIS Si IV lines, which thermal conduction cannot reproduce. The {E}{{C}} threshold value for the blueshifts depends on the total energy of the events (≈5 keV for 1024 erg, up to 15 keV for 1025 erg). The observed footpoint emission intensity and flows, combined with the simulations, can provide constraints on both the energy of the heating event and {E}{{C}}. The response of the loop plasma to nanoflares depends crucially on the electron density: significant Si IV intensity enhancements and flows are observed only for initially low-density loops (<109 cm‑3). This provides a possible explanation of the relative scarcity of observations of significant moss variability. While the TR response to single heating episodes can be clearly observed, the predicted coronal emission (AIA 94 Å) for single strands is below current detectability and can only be observed when several strands are heated closely in time. Finally, we show that the analysis of the IRIS Mg II chromospheric lines can help further constrain the properties of the heating mechanisms.

  5. On some properties of conjugacy closed loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adeniran, John Olusola

    2002-07-01

    It is shown that central loops are not conjugacy closed loops but instead are loops of units in their loop algebras that are conjugacy closed. It is also shown that certain inner mappings of a conjugacy closed loop are nuclear. Some invariants of left conjugacy closed loops are obtained. (author)

  6. Loop equations and bootstrap methods in the lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D. Anderson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pure gauge theories can be formulated in terms of Wilson Loops by means of the loop equation. In the large-N limit this equation closes in the expectation value of single loops. In particular, using the lattice as a regulator, it becomes a well defined equation for a discrete set of loops. In this paper we study different numerical approaches to solving this equation. Previous ideas gave good results in the strong coupling region. Here we propose an alternative method based on the observation that certain matrices ρˆ of Wilson loop expectation values are positive definite. They also have unit trace (ρˆ⪰0,Trρˆ=1, in fact they can be defined as reduced density matrices in the space of open loops after tracing over color indices and can be used to define an entropy associated with the loss of information due to such trace SWL=−Tr[ρˆln⁡ρˆ]. The condition that such matrices are positive definite allows us to study the weak coupling region which is relevant for the continuum limit. In the exactly solvable case of two dimensions this approach gives very good results by considering just a few loops. In four dimensions it gives good results in the weak coupling region and therefore is complementary to the strong coupling expansion. We compare the results with standard Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. On the temperature dependence of the Adam-Gibbs equation around the crossover region in the glass transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Michel; Andraca, Adriana; Goldstein, Patricia; del Castillo, Luis Felipe

    2018-04-01

    The Adam-Gibbs equation has been used for more than five decades, and still a question remains unanswered on the temperature dependence of the chemical potential it includes. Nowadays, it is a well-known fact that in fragile glass formers, actually the behavior of the system depends on the temperature region it is being studied. Transport coefficients change due to the appearance of heterogeneity in the liquid as it is supercooled. Using the different forms for the logarithmic shift factor and the form of the configurational entropy, we evaluate this temperature dependence and present a discussion on our results.

  8. MODELING OF REFLECTIVE PROPAGATING SLOW-MODE WAVE IN A FLARING LOOP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, X.; Yuan, D.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Keppens, R.; Xia, C. [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-11-01

    Quasi-periodic propagating intensity disturbances have been observed in large coronal loops in extreme ultraviolet images over a decade, and are widely accepted to be slow magnetosonic waves. However, spectroscopic observations from Hinode/EIS revealed their association with persistent coronal upflows, making this interpretation debatable. We perform a 2.5D magnetohydrodynamic simulation to imitate the chromospheric evaporation and the following reflected patterns in a flare loop. Our model encompasses the corona, transition region, and chromosphere. We demonstrate that the quasi periodic propagating intensity variations captured by the synthesized Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 131, 94 Å emission images match the previous observations well. With particle tracers in the simulation, we confirm that these quasi periodic propagating intensity variations consist of reflected slow mode waves and mass flows with an average speed of 310 km s{sup −1} in an 80 Mm length loop with an average temperature of 9 MK. With the synthesized Doppler shift velocity and intensity maps of the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation Fe xix line emission, we confirm that these reflected slow mode waves are propagating waves.

  9. Loop Growth and Point-Defect Profiles during HVEM Irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leffers, Torben; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1979-01-01

    The point-defect profile in a thin foil is included in the model for the growth of dislocation loops during HVEM irradiation suggested by Kiritani, Yoshida, Takata, and Maehara, and the possible effect of divacancies is discussed. It is found that there is a fairly wide transition range between...

  10. Two-loop polygon Wilson loops in N = 4 SYM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastasiou, C.; Brandhuber, A.; Heslop, P.; Spence, B.; Travaglini, G.; Khoze, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    We compute for the first time the two-loop corrections to arbitrary n-gon lightlike Wilson loops in N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, using efficient numerical methods. The calculation is motivated by the remarkable agreement between the finite part of planar six-point MHV amplitudes and hexagon Wilson loops which has been observed at two loops. At n = 6 we confirm that the ABDK/BDS ansatz must be corrected by adding a remainder function, which depends only on conformally invariant ratios of kinematic variables. We numerically compute remainder functions for n = 7,8 and verify dual conformal invariance. Furthermore, we study simple and multiple collinear limits of the Wilson loop remainder functions and demonstrate that they have precisely the form required by the collinear factorisation of the corresponding two-loop n-point amplitudes. The number of distinct diagram topologies contributing to the n-gon Wilson loops does not increase with n, and there is a fixed number of 'master integrals', which we have computed. Thus we have essentially computed general polygon Wilson loops, and if the correspondence with amplitudes continues to hold, all planar n-point two-loop MHV amplitudes in the N = 4 theory.

  11. Loop quantum gravity in asymptotically flat spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnsdorf, M.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis describes applications and extensions of the loop variable approach to non-perturbative quantum gravity. The common theme of the work presented, is the need to generalise loop quantum gravity to be applicable in cases where space is asymptotically flat, and no longer compact as is usually assumed. This is important for the study of isolated gravitational systems. It also presents a natural context in which to search for the semi-classical limit, one of the main outstanding problems in loop quantum gravity. In the first part of the thesis we study how isolated gravitational systems can be attributed particle-like properties. In particular, we show how spinorial states can arise in pure loop quantum gravity if spatial topology is non-trivial, thus confirming an old conjecture of Friedman and Sorkin. Heuristically, this corresponds to the idea that we can rotate isolated regions of spatial topology relative to the environment at infinity, and that only a 4π-rotation will take us back to the original configuration. To do this we extend the standard loop quantum gravity formalism by introducing a compactification of our non-compact spatial manifold, and study the knotting of embedded graphs. The second part of the thesis takes a more systematic approach to the study of loop quantum gravity on non-compact spaces. We look for new representations of the loop algebra, which give rise to quantum theories that are inequivalent to the standard one. These theories naturally describe excitations of a fiducial background state, which is specified via the choice of its vacuum expectation values. In particular, we can choose background states that describe the geometries of non-compact manifolds. We also discuss how suitable background states can be constructed that can approximate classical phase space data, in our case holonomies along embedded paths and geometrical quantities related to areas and volumes. These states extend the notion of the weave and provide a

  12. Computational Model of a Positive BDNF Feedback Loop in Hippocampal Neurons Following Inhibitory Avoidance Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yili; Smolen, Paul; Alberini, Cristina M.; Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory avoidance (IA) training in rodents initiates a molecular cascade within hippocampal neurons. This cascade contributes to the transition of short- to long-term memory (i.e., consolidation). Here, a differential equation-based model was developed to describe a positive feedback loop within this molecular cascade. The feedback loop begins…

  13. High temperature storage loop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  14. Accelerating the loop expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingermanson, R.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis introduces a new non-perturbative technique into quantum field theory. To illustrate the method, I analyze the much-studied phi 4 theory in two dimensions. As a prelude, I first show that the Hartree approximation is easy to obtain from the calculation of the one-loop effective potential by a simple modification of the propagator that does not affect the perturbative renormalization procedure. A further modification then susggests itself, which has the same nice property, and which automatically yields a convex effective potential. I then show that both of these modifications extend naturally to higher orders in the derivative expansion of the effective action and to higher orders in the loop-expansion. The net effect is to re-sum the perturbation series for the effective action as a systematic ''accelerated'' non-perturbative expansion. Each term in the accelerated expansion corresponds to an infinite number of terms in the original series. Each term can be computed explicitly, albeit numerically. Many numerical graphs of the various approximations to the first two terms in the derivative expansion are given. I discuss the reliability of the results and the problem of spontaneous symmetry-breaking, as well as some potential applications to more interesting field theories. 40 refs

  15. WHY IS NON-THERMAL LINE BROADENING OF SPECTRAL LINES IN THE LOWER TRANSITION REGION OF THE SUN INDEPENDENT OF SPATIAL RESOLUTION?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Pontieu, B.; Martinez-Sykora, J.; McIntosh, S.; Peter, H.; Pereira, T. M. D.

    2015-01-01

    Spectral observations of the solar transition region (TR) and corona show broadening of spectral lines beyond what is expected from thermal and instrumental broadening. The remaining non-thermal broadening is significant (5–30 km s −1 ) and correlated with intensity. Here we study spectra of the TR Si iv 1403 Å line obtained at high resolution with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). We find that the large improvement in spatial resolution (0.″33) of IRIS compared to previous spectrographs (2″) does not resolve the non-thermal line broadening which, in most regions, remains at pre-IRIS levels of about 20 km s −1 . This invariance to spatial resolution indicates that the processes behind the broadening occur along the line-of-sight (LOS) and/or on spatial scales (perpendicular to the LOS) smaller than 250 km. Both effects appear to play a role. Comparison with IRIS chromospheric observations shows that, in regions where the LOS is more parallel to the field, magneto-acoustic shocks driven from below impact the TR and can lead to significant non-thermal line broadening. This scenario is supported by MHD simulations. While these do not show enough non-thermal line broadening, they do reproduce the long-known puzzling correlation between non-thermal line broadening and intensity. This correlation is caused by the shocks, but only if non-equilibrium ionization is taken into account. In regions where the LOS is more perpendicular to the field, the prevalence of small-scale twist is likely to play a significant role in explaining the invariance and correlation with intensity. (letters)

  16. Shortening a loop can increase protein native state entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Yulian; Dagan, Shlomi; Levy, Yaakov

    2015-12-01

    Protein loops are essential structural elements that influence not only function but also protein stability and folding rates. It was recently reported that shortening a loop in the AcP protein may increase its native state conformational entropy. This effect on the entropy of the folded state can be much larger than the lower entropic penalty of ordering a shorter loop upon folding, and can therefore result in a more pronounced stabilization than predicted by polymer model for loop closure entropy. In this study, which aims at generalizing the effect of loop length shortening on native state dynamics, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study how gradual shortening a very long or solvent-exposed loop region in four different proteins can affect their stability. For two proteins, AcP and Ubc7, we show an increase in native state entropy in addition to the known effect of the loop length on the unfolded state entropy. However, for two permutants of SH3 domain, shortening a loop results only with the expected change in the entropy of the unfolded state, which nicely reproduces the observed experimental stabilization. Here, we show that an increase in the native state entropy following loop shortening is not unique to the AcP protein, yet nor is it a general rule that applies to all proteins following the truncation of any loop. This modification of the loop length on the folded state and on the unfolded state may result with a greater effect on protein stability. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Acute poisoning with psychoactive substances in the 1990-2000 period of socioeconomic transition and crisis in Plovdiv region, Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illiev, Y; Akabaliev, V

    2002-06-01

    The "opening" of the post-totalitarian societies of Eastern Europe increased the illegal spread of psychoactive substances (PAS) in the past decade. We studied psychoactive substance acute poisoning (PAS AP)--types of toxic agents involved, incidence rates, and their changes--as indirect indicators of the characteristics, magnitude and development of the problem in Bulgaria during the 1990-2000 period of socioeconomic transition and crisis after collapse of communism. The study analyzed retrospectively the caseload of all 571 PAS acute poisonings that occurred in the territory: 417 men (73%) and 154 women (27%); mean age 24.07y (range 10-75). The number of all AP and PAS AP showed a marked increase during the last 3years of the studied period, especially in 2000. The average PAS AP incidence rate for 1998-2000 (13.50/100,000) compared to the mean value for the preceding period 1990-1997 (5.76/100,000) showed a 2.34 fold increase. Acute alcohol intoxication was 62.7%, of all PASAP; the opioid 15.2% (heroin 11.0%, other opioids 4.2%); prescribed and over the counter drugs 12.6%; inhalants 1.1%; cannabis 1.1%; and cocaine 0.7%. Amphetamine (or amphetamine-like), hallucinogens and phencyclidine (or phencyclidine-like) AP were not encountered. The average percentage of alcohol AP for 1998-2000 compared to the preceding 1990-1997 dropped from 78.12% to 44.72% (1.75 fold), while that of opioids rose from 6.59% to 26.47% (4.02 fold), and that of the other drugs group from 12.22% to 21.78% (1.78 fold increase). The new non-alcoholic PAS AP (heroin, cocaine, inhalants and cannabis AP, as indirect indicators of narcotic exposure) showed a rapid increase. The data showed they are expanding and catching up with alcohol as a new cause of substance-related problems, thus becoming one of the important health and social problems of post-totalitarian society.

  18. Deuteron electromagnetic form factors in the transitional region between nucleon-meson and quark-gluon pictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobushkin, A.P.; Syamtomov, A.I.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental observables of the elastic ed-scattering in the region of intermediate energies are discussed. We offer the numerical analysis of the available experimental data, which reproduces the results of the calculations with popular NN-potentials at low energies (Q 2 2 ), but, at the same time, provides the right asymptotic behavior of the deuteron e.m. form factors, following from the quark counting rules, at high energies (Q 2 >>1(GeV/c) 2 ). The numerical analysis developed allows to make certain estimations of the characteristic energy scale, at what the consideration of quark-gluon degrees of freedom in the deuteron becomes essential. (author). 18 refs., 2 tab., 10 figs

  19. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of the F + H–F Transition-State Region by Photodetachment of [F–H–F] -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Gao-Lei [Physical; Wang, Xue-Bin [Physical; McCoy, Anne B. [Department; Borden, Weston Thatcher [Department

    2017-10-05

    The transition-state (TS) region of the simplest heavy-light-heavy type of reaction, F• + H-F F-H + F•, is investigated in this work by a joint experimental and theoretical approach. Photodetaching the bifluride anion, [F…H…F]–, generates a negative ion photoelectron (NIPE) spectrum with three partially resolved bands in the electron binding energy (eBE) range of 5.4 – 7.0 eV. These bands correspond to the transition from the ground state of the anion to the electronic ground state of [F-H-F]• neutral, with associated vibrational excitations. The significant increase of eBE of the bifluride anion, relative to that of F-, reflects a hydrogen bond energy between F- and HF of 46 kcal/mol. Theoretical modeling reveals that the antisymmetric motion of H between the two F atoms, near the TS on the neutral [F-H-F]• surface, dominates the observed three bands, while the F-H-F bending, F—F symmetric stretching modes, and the couplings between them is calculated to account for the breadth of the observed spectrum. From the NIPE spectrum, a lower limit on the activation enthalpy for F• + H-F F-H + F can be estimated to be H‡ = 12 ± 2 kcal/mol, a value below that of H‡ = 14.9 kcal/mol, given by our G4 calculations.

  20. Mirror symmetry and loop operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assel, Benjamin [Department of Mathematics, King’s College London,The Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Gomis, Jaume [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

    2015-11-09

    Wilson loops in gauge theories pose a fundamental challenge for dualities. Wilson loops are labeled by a representation of the gauge group and should map under duality to loop operators labeled by the same data, yet generically, dual theories have completely different gauge groups. In this paper we resolve this conundrum for three dimensional mirror symmetry. We show that Wilson loops are exchanged under mirror symmetry with Vortex loop operators, whose microscopic definition in terms of a supersymmetric quantum mechanics coupled to the theory encode in a non-trivial way a representation of the original gauge group, despite that the gauge groups of mirror theories can be radically different. Our predictions for the mirror map, which we derive guided by branes in string theory, are confirmed by the computation of the exact expectation value of Wilson and Vortex loop operators on the three-sphere.

  1. Reactor recirculation pump test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taka, Shusei; Kato, Hiroyuki

    1979-01-01

    A test loop for a reactor primary loop recirculation pumps (PLR pumps) has been constructed at Ebara's Haneda Plant in preparation for production of PLR pumps under license from Byron Jackson Pump Division of Borg-Warner Corporation. This loop can simulate operating conditions for test PLR pumps with 130 per cent of the capacity of pumps for a 1100 MWe BWR plant. A main loop, primary cooling system, water demineralizer, secondary cooling system, instrumentation and control equipment and an electric power supply system make up the test loop. This article describes the test loop itself and test results of two PLR pumps for Fukushima No. 2 N.P.S. Unit 1 and one main circulation pump for HAZ Demonstration Test Facility. (author)

  2. Studies of Corrosion of Cladding Materials in Simulated BWR-environment Using Impedance Measurements. Part I: Measurements in the Pre-transition Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, Stefan; Ahlberg, Elisabet; Andersson, Ulf

    2004-09-01

    The corrosion of three Zircaloy 2 cladding materials, LK2, LK2+ and LK3, have been studied in-situ in an autoclave using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Measurements were performed in simulated BWR water at temperatures up to 288 deg C. The impedance spectra were successfully modelled using equivalent circuits. When the oxide grew thicker during the experiments, a change-over from one to two time constants was seen, showing that a layered structure was formed. Oxide thickness, oxide conductivity and effective donor density were evaluated from the impedance data. The calculated oxide thickness at the end of the experiments was consistent with the value obtained from SEM. It was shown that the difference in oxide growth rate between the investigated materials is small in the pre-transition region. The effective donor density, which is a measure of electronic conductivity, was found to be lower for the LK3 material compared to the other two materials

  3. Applying micromechanic failure models for description of failure modes in the ductile-brittle transition region; Einsatz mikromechanischer Schaedigungsmodelle im sproed-duktilen Uebergangsbereich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernauer, G.

    1997-07-01

    The work reported was to examine whether the modified Gurson model and the Beremin model can be applied to the brittle-ductile transition region of a ferritic steel, and whether the material`s behaviour can be characterized with a failure model integrating the two models mentioned above into one. Any possible improvements of this approach were to be found. The report at first gives a brief list of terminology and formulas used. Chapter 3 explains the microscopic processes typically observed in the transition region in connection with the failure modes of ductile fracture and cleavage fracture, and shows possible approaches for modelling. Chapter 4 defines the specimens and materials, and chapter 5 explains the experiments as well as the microscopic analyses of the fracture surfaces. Chapter 6 presents subsequent calculations representing the processes observed. Based on the stress distributions thus derived, the Beremin model is re-examined for further development. Chapter 7 summarizes the results obtained. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Ziel der Arbeit ist, zu untersuchen, ob das modifizierte Gurson-Modell und das Beremin-Modell im sproed-duktilen Uebergangsbereich eines ferritischen Stahls einsetzbar sind und ob das Werkstoffverhalten mit einem aus beiden Modellen kombinierten Schaedigungsmodell berechnet werden kann. Gegebenenfalls sind Verbesserungen herbeizufuehren. Die vorliegende Arbeit beginnt mit einer kurzen Einfuehrung der verwendeten Begriffe und Formalismen. In Kap. 3 werden die mikroskopischen Vorgaenge bei den im Uebergangsbereich typischerweise auftretenden Versagensarten duktiler Bruch und Spaltbruch vorgestellt und verschiedene Moeglichkeiten ihrer Modellierung aufgezeigt. Nach der Vorstellung des Probenwerkstoffs werden in Kap. 4 die Experimente beschrieben und die mikroskopischen Untersuchungen der Bruchflaechen in Kap. 5 dargestellt. Die Nachrechnungen der Experimente werden in Kap. 6 vorgestellt. Auf der Grundlage der dadurch bereitgestellten

  4. Assessing the hydrological response from an ensemble of CMIP5 climate projections in the transition zone of the Atlantic region (Bay of Biscay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meaurio, Maite; Zabaleta, Ane; Boithias, Laurie; Epelde, Ane Miren; Sauvage, Sabine; Sánchez-Pérez, Jose-Miguel; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Antiguedad, Iñaki

    2017-05-01

    The climate changes projected for the 21st century will have consequences on the hydrological response of catchments. These changes, and their consequences, are most uncertain in the transition zones. The study area, in the Bay of Biscay, is located in the transition zone of the European Atlantic region, where hydrological impact of climate change was scarcely studied. In order to address this scarcity, the hydrological impacts of climate change on river discharge were assessed. To do so, a hydrological modelling was carried out considering 16 climate scenarios that include 5 General Circulation Models (GCM) from the 5th report of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5), 2 statistical downscaling methods and 2 Representative Concentration Pathways. Projections for future discharge (2011-2100) were divided into three 30-year horizons (2030s, 2060s and 2090s) and a comparison was made between these time horizons and the baseline (1961-2000). The results show that the downscaling method used resulted in a higher source of uncertainty than GCM itself. In addition, the uncertainties inherent to the methods used at all the levels do not affect the results equally along the year. In spite of those uncertainties, general trends for the 2090s predict seasonal discharge decreases by around -17% in autumn, -16% in spring, -11% in winter and -7% in summer. These results are in line with those predicted for the Atlantic region (France and the Iberian Peninsula). Trends for extreme flows were also analysed: the most significant show an increase in the duration (days) of low flows. From an environmental point of view, and considering the need to meet the objectives established by the Water Framework Directive (WFD), this will be a major challenge for the future planning on water management.

  5. Impacts of extensive driftnet fishery and late 1990s climate regime shift on dominant epipelagic nekton in the Transition Region and Subtropical Frontal Zone: Implications for fishery management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichii, T.; Nishikawa, H.; Igarashi, H.; Okamura, H.; Mahapatra, K.; Sakai, M.; Wakabayashi, T.; Inagake, D.; Okada, Y.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the impacts of extensive anthropogenic (high seas driftnet squid fishery) and natural (late 1990s major climate regime shift) events on dominant epipelagic fish, squid, and shark in the central North Pacific Transition Region based on a driftnet survey covering the years 1979-2006. Fishing was conducted by Japan, Korea and Taiwan to target neon flying squid in the period 1979-1992, resulting in a decline in stocks of the target species and non-target species (Pacific pomfret and juvenile blue shark), which were by-catch of this fishery. The catch was found to be at the maximum sustainable yield (MSY) level for neon flying squid, the underfished level for juvenile blue shark, but the overfished level for Pacific pomfret. The MSY of Pacific pomfret indicated that this species is more susceptible to exploitation than previously considered. In response to the late 1990s regime shift, neon flying squid and Pacific saury showed low stock levels in 1999-2002 and 1998-2002, respectively, as a result of reduced productivity in their nursery grounds (the Subtropical Frontal Zone and Kuroshio Extension Bifurcation Region, respectively). On the other hand, Pacific pomfret showed no decreasing trend in stock during the low- and intermediate-productivity regimes because of the high productivity of their main spawning/nursery ground (Transition Zone Chlorophyll Front), which was independent of the regime shifts. Thus, squid and saury appear to be more susceptible to the regime shift than pomfret. We discuss the implications for stock management of the species-specific responses to the fishery and the regime shift.

  6. Loop Heat Pipe Startup Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung

    2016-01-01

    A loop heat pipe must start successfully before it can commence its service. The startup transient represents one of the most complex phenomena in the loop heat pipe operation. This paper discusses various aspects of loop heat pipe startup behaviors. Topics include the four startup scenarios, the initial fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir that determines the startup scenario, factors that affect the fluid distribution between the evaporator and reservoir, difficulties encountered during the low power startup, and methods to enhance the startup success. Also addressed are the pressure spike and pressure surge during the startup transient, and repeated cycles of loop startup and shutdown under certain conditions.

  7. Modeling of compact loop antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baity, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    A general compact loop antenna model which treats all elements of the antenna as lossy transmission lines has been developed. In addition to capacitively-tuned resonant double loop (RDL) antennas the model treats stub-tuned resonant double loop antennas. Calculations using the model have been compared with measurements on full-scale mockups of resonant double loop antennas for ATF and TFTR in order to refine the transmission line parameters. Results from the model are presented for RDL antenna designs for ATF, TFTR, Tore Supra, and for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

  8. Vascular Steal Explains Early Paradoxical Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Cerebrovascular Response in Brain Regions with Delayed Arterial Transit Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Poublanc

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD magnetic resonance imaging (MRI during manipulation of inhaled carbon dioxide (CO2 can be used to measure cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR and map regions of exhausted cerebrovascular reserve. These regions exhibit a reduced or negative BOLD response to inhaled CO2. In this study, we sought to clarify the mechanism behind the negative BOLD response by investigating its time delay (TD. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC MRI with the injection of a contrast agent was used as the gold standard in order to provide measurement of the blood arrival time to which CVR TD could be compared. We hypothesize that if negative BOLD responses are the result of a steal phenomenon, they should be synchronized with positive BOLD responses from healthy brain tissue, even though the blood arrival time would be delayed. Methods: On a 3-tesla MRI system, BOLD CVR and DSC images were collected in a group of 19 patients with steno-occlusive cerebrovascular disease. For each patient, we generated a CVR magnitude map by regressing the BOLD signal with the end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (PETCO2, and a CVR TD map by extracting the time of maximum cross-correlation between the BOLD signal and PETCO2. In addition, a blood arrival time map was generated by fitting the DSC signal with a gamma variate function. ROI masks corresponding to varying degrees of reactivity were constructed. Within these masks, the mean CVR magnitude, CVR TD and DSC blood arrival time were extracted and averaged over the 19 patients. CVR magnitude and CVR TD were then plotted against DSC blood arrival time. Results: The results show that CVR magnitude is highly correlated to DSC blood arrival time. As expected, the most compromised tissues with the longest blood arrival time have the lowest (most negative CVR magnitude. However, CVR TD shows a noncontinuous relationship with DSC blood arrival time. CVR TD is well correlated to DSC blood arrival time

  9. Impacts of climate change on vegetation, hydrological and socio-economic droughts in a transitional wet-to-dry Mediterranean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, João Pedro; Pulquério, Mário; Grosso, Nuno; Duarte Santos, Filipe; João Cruz, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The Tagus river basin is located in a transitional region between humid and semi-arid climate. The lower part of the basin is a strategic source of water for Portugal, providing water for agricultural irrigation, hydropower generation, and domestic water supplies for over 4 million people. Climate change in this region is expected to lead to higher temperatures and lower rainfall, therefore increasing climatic aridity. In this transitional region, this could lead to an increased frequency of severe droughts, threatening climatic support for current agricultural and forestry practices, as well as the sustainability of domestic water supplies. This work evaluated the impacts of climate change on drought frequency and severity for the Portuguese part of the Tagus river basin. Climate change scenarios for 2010-2100 (A2 greenhouse emission scenarios) were statistically downscaled for the study area. They were evaluated with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) eco-hydrological model, which simulated vegetation water demand and drought stress, soil water availability, irrigation abstraction, streamflow, reservoir storage and groundwater recharge. Water inflows from Spain were estimated using an empirical climate-based model. Drought occurrence and severity was analyzed in terms of: * meteorological drought, based on (i) the Standardized Precipitation Index and (ii) the Aridity Index; * vegetation/agricultural drought, based on plant water stress; * hydrological drought, based on (i) streamflow rates and (ii) reservoir storage; * socio-economic drought, based on (i) the capacity of the main reservoir in the system (Castelo de Bode) to sustain hydropower and domestic supplies, and (ii) the rate of groundwater extraction vs. irrigation demands for the cultures located in the intensive cultivation regions of the Lezírias near the Tagus estuary. The results indicate a trend of increasing frequency and severity of most drought types during the XXIst century, with a

  10. Modeling Metropolitan Detroit transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    "The seven-county Southeast Michigan region, that encompasses the Detroit Metropolitan Area, : ranks fifth in population among top 25 regions in the nation. It also ranks among bottom five in : the transit service provided, measured in miles or hours...

  11. Estuarine demersal fish assemblage from a transition region between the tropics and the subtropics of the South Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Hostim-Silva

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The coastal state of Espírito Santo is in the central region of Brazil, where biological productivity is considered low. The objective of this work is to present a current list of demersal, estuarine fish from northern Espírito Santo. This work is based on the compilation of data collected monthly using trawl nets. The ichthyofauna comprises 57 species, within 10 orders and 32 families. The family Sciaenidae has the largest number of species (8, followed by Carangidae (4 and Gerreidae (4. This coincides with what has been found for the Brazilian coast and for the coast of the South Atlantic. It is important to note that the total species richness in the estuaries of northern Espírito Santo is lower than other estuaries of the South West Atlantic coast. Most of the species are widely distributed in the Western Atlantic. Only a small part (14% of the fauna of northern Espírito Santo was evaluated in regards to risk of extinction, but conservation should be prioritized in the area due to overexploitation of species.

  12. New even parity energy levels of Pr I found by excitation of transitions in the region 560 - 695 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Tanweer Iqbal; Khan, Shamim; Imran, Siddiqui; Zaheer, Uddin; Windholz, Laurentius [Inst. f. Experimentalphysik, Techn. Univ. Graz, Petersgasse 16, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2011-07-01

    The knowledge of electronic levels is essentially needed for a description of the interactions between the electrons of an atom and for the classification of an atomic spectrum. We have studied the hyperfine structure of Praseodymium spectral lines in the region from 560 to 695 nm. The hyperfine structure of a large number of unclassified Pr I-lines have been investigated by using the method of laser induced fluorescence in a hollow cathode discharge. During this investigation, we have discovered twelve energy levels with even parity, which were previously unknown. The excitation source was a ring dye laser operated with R6G, Kiton red, or DCM. J-quantum numbers and magnetic dipole interaction constants A for upper and lower levels have been determined from the recorded hyperfine structures. The energies of new levels have been determined by using these constants, excitation and fluorescence wavelengths. Promising excitation wavelengths have been taken from Fourier transform spectra. The new levels were confirmed by at least one second laser excitation.

  13. New site selection for the immigrant transit of the post-disaster reconstruction of Wenchuan earthquake region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wunian; Hu, Guochao; Liu, Hanhu; Peng, Li

    2009-06-01

    The strong earthquake struck on 12 May 2008 destroyed numerous houses in Wenchuan, Sichuan, China. This earthquake escalated the scale of existing geological disasters, undermined the stability of earthquake-prone zones, and triggered landslides and many other hidden disasters. In addition, many aftershocks and heavy rainfalls have prompted secondary disasters and consequently, the actual damages have been doubled in terms of scale and magnitude. Since some regions there are no longer appropriate for people to live, temporary housing and post-disaster reconstruction are badly needed. Recent advances in remote sensing and geospatial technologies have promoted their successful applications in siting engineering. Because of different research backgrounds, geological disasters and vegetation density were rarely incorporated as primary parameters for siting assessment. Based on the principles of avoiding active faults and encouraging synthetic prevention of geological disasters, we performed a locating analysis using part of the Wenchuan County as a case. Six major parameters were used to build a siting model, including geological disasters, vegetation index, stream systems, faults, terrain slope, and elevation. The results show that the proposed method can provide useful information for decision-making in the selection of temporary housing and post-disaster reconstruction.

  14. First cytoplasmic loop of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor can function at the third cytoplasmic loop position of rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Tose, Koji; Shichida, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are classified into several families based on their amino acid sequences. In family 1, GPCRs such as rhodopsin and adrenergic receptor, the structure-function relationship has been extensively investigated to demonstrate that exposure of the third cytoplasmic loop is essential for selective G protein activation. In contrast, much less is known about other families. Here we prepared chimeric mutants between Gt-coupled rhodopsin and Gi/Go- and Gs-coupled glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor of family 2 and tried to identify the loop region that functions at the third cytoplasmic loop position of rhodopsin. We succeeded in expressing a mutant having the first cytoplasmic loop of GLP-1 receptor and found that this mutant activated Gi and Go efficiently but did not activate Gt. Moreover, the rhodopsin mutant having the first loop of Gs-coupled secretin receptor of family 2 decreased the Gi and Go activation efficiencies. Therefore, the first loop of GLP-1 receptor would share a similar role to the third loop of rhodopsin in G protein activation. This result strongly suggested that different families of GPCRs have maintained molecular architectures of their ancestral types to generate a common mechanism, namely exposure of the cytoplasmic loop, to activate peripheral G protein.

  15. Vortex loops and Majoranas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesi, Stefano; Jaffe, Arthur; Loss, Daniel; Pedrocchi, Fabio L.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the role that vortex loops play in characterizing eigenstates of interacting Majoranas. We give some general results and then focus on ladder Hamiltonian examples as a test of further ideas. Two methods yield exact results: (i) A mapping of certain spin Hamiltonians to quartic interactions of Majoranas shows that the spectra of these two examples coincide. (ii) In cases with reflection-symmetric Hamiltonians, we use reflection positivity for Majoranas to characterize vortices in the ground states. Two additional methods suggest wider applicability of these results: (iii) Numerical evidence suggests similar behavior for certain systems without reflection symmetry. (iv) A perturbative analysis also suggests similar behavior without the assumption of reflection symmetry

  16. Inductance loop and partial

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Clayton R

    2010-01-01

    "Inductance is an unprecedented text, thoroughly discussing "loop" inductance as well as the increasingly important "partial" inductance. These concepts and their proper calculation are crucial in designing modern high-speed digital systems. World-renowned leader in electromagnetics Clayton Paul provides the knowledge and tools necessary to understand and calculate inductance." "With the present and increasing emphasis on high-speed digital systems and high-frequency analog systems, it is imperative that system designers develop an intimate understanding of the concepts and methods in this book. Inductance is a much-needed textbook designed for senior and graduate-level engineering students, as well as a hands-on guide for working engineers and professionals engaged in the design of high-speed digital and high-frequency analog systems."--Jacket.

  17. Dynamic PID loop control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, L.; Klebaner, A.; Theilacker, J.; Soyars, W.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R.; DeGraff, B.; Darve, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Horizontal Test Stand (HTS) SRF Cavity and Cryomodule 1 (CM1) of eight 9-cell, 1.3GHz SRF cavities are operating at Fermilab. For the cryogenic control system, how to hold liquid level constant in the cryostat by regulation of its Joule-Thompson JT-valve is very important after cryostat cool down to 2.0 K. The 72-cell cryostat liquid level response generally takes a long time delay after regulating its JT-valve; therefore, typical PID control loop should result in some cryostat parameter oscillations. This paper presents a type of PID parameter self-optimal and Time-Delay control method used to reduce cryogenic system parameters oscillation.

  18. Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of the work discussed in this report were to: (1) develop a flow loop that would simulate the purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP); (2) develop a test plan that would simulate normal operation and disturbances that could be anticipated in an NUCP; (3) use the flow loop to test commercially available flowmeters for use as safeguards monitors; and (4) recommend a flowmeter for production-scale testing at an NUCP. There has been interest in safeguarding conversion plants because the intermediate products [uranium dioxide (UO 2 ), uranium tetrafluoride (UF 4 ), and uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 )] are all suitable uranium feedstocks for producing special nuclear materials. Furthermore, if safeguards are not applied virtually any nuclear weapons program can obtain these feedstocks without detection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Historically, IAEA had not implemented safeguards until the purified UF 6 product was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. H. A. Elayat et al. provide a basic definition of a safeguards system: 'The function of a safeguards system on a chemical conversion plant is in general terms to verify that no useful nuclear material is being diverted to use in a nuclear weapons program'. The IAEA now considers all highly purified uranium compounds as candidates for safeguarding. DOE is currently interested in 'developing instruments, tools, strategies, and methods that could be of use to the IAEA in the application of safeguards' for materials found in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle-prior to the production of the uranium hexafluoride or oxides that have been the traditional starting point for IAEA safeguards. Several national laboratories, including Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Brookhaven, have been involved in developing tools or techniques for safeguarding conversion plants. This study was sponsored by

  19. Double-negative feedback loop between long non-coding RNA TUG1 and miR-145 promotes epithelial to mesenchymal transition and radioresistance in human bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jiemei; Qiu, Kaifeng; Li, Mingyi; Liang, Ying

    2015-10-07

    LncRNAs have a critical role in the regulation of cellular processes such as cancer progression and metastasis. In the present study, we confirmed that TUG1 was overexpressed in bladder cancer tissues and established cell lines. Knockdown of TUG1 inhibited bladder cancer cell metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we found that TUG1 promoted cancer cell invasion and radioresistance through inducing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Interestingly, TUG1 decreased the expression of miR-145 and there was a reciprocal repression between TUG1 and miR-145 in an Argonaute2-dependent manner. ZEB2 was identified as a down-stream target of miR-145 and TUG1 exerted its function through the miR-145/ZEB2 axis. In summary, our data indicated that blocking TUG1 function may be an effective anti-cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Computational study of heat transfer from the inner surface of a circular tube to force high temperature liquid metal flow in laminar and transition regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, K.; Fukuda, K.; Masuzaki, S.

    2018-03-01

    Heat transfer through forced convection from the inner surface of a circular tube to force the flow of liquid sodium in the laminar and transition regions were numerically analysed for two types of tube geometries (concentric annular and circular tubes) and two types of equivalent diameters (hydraulic and thermal equivalent diameters). The unsteady laminar three-dimensional basic equations for forced convection heat transfer caused by a step heat flux were numerically solved until a steady state is attained. The code of the parabolic hyperbolic or elliptic numerical integration code series (PHOENICS) was used for calculations by considering relevant temperature dependent thermo-physical properties. The concentric annular tube has a test tube with inner and outer diameters of 7.6 and 14.3 mm, respectively, has a heated length of 52 mm, and an L/d of 6.84. The two circular tubes have inner diameters of 6.7 and 19.3 mm with L/d of 7.76 and 2.69, respectively, and a heated length of 52 mm. The inlet liquid temperature, inlet liquid velocity, and surface heat flux were equally set for each test tube as T in ≅573 to 585 K, u in = 0.0852 to 1 m/s, and q = 2×105 to 2.5×106 W/m2, respectively. The increase in temperature from the leading edge of the heated section to the outlet of the circular tubes (with a hydraulic diameter of d H = 6.7 mm and a thermal equivalent diameter d te = 19.3 mm) was approximately 2.70 and 1.21 times as large as the corresponding values of the concentric annular tube with an inner diameter of 7.6 mm and an outer diameter of 14.3 mm, respectively. A quantity in the laminar and transition regions was suggested as the dominant variable involved in the forced convection heat transfer in the circular tube. The values of the local and average Nusselt numbers, Nu z and Nu av , respectively, for a concentric annular tube with d H = 6.7 mm and for a circular tube with d H = 6.7 mm were calculated to examine the effects of q, T in , and Pe on heat

  1. A totally diverting loop colostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrett, N. D.; Gartell, P. C.

    1993-01-01

    A technique is described where the distal limb of a loop colostomy is tied with nylon or polydioxanone. This ensures total faecal diversion and dispenses with the supporting rod, enabling early application of stoma appliances. The technique does not interfere with the traditional transverse closure of a loop colostomy. PMID:8379632

  2. Higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is the symmetric sector of loop quantum gravity. In this paper, we generalize the structure of loop quantum cosmology to the theories with arbitrary spacetime dimensions. The isotropic and homogeneous cosmological model in n + 1 dimensions is quantized by the loop quantization method. Interestingly, we find that the underlying quantum theories are divided into two qualitatively different sectors according to spacetime dimensions. The effective Hamiltonian and modified dynamical equations of n + 1 dimensional LQC are obtained. Moreover, our results indicate that the classical big bang singularity is resolved in arbitrary spacetime dimensions by a quantum bounce. We also briefly discuss the similarities and differences between the n + 1 dimensional model and the 3 + 1 dimensional one. Our model serves as a first example of higher dimensional loop quantum cosmology and offers the possibility to investigate quantum gravity effects in higher dimensional cosmology. (orig.)

  3. Quantifying high resolution transitional breaks in plant and mammal distributions at regional extent and their association with climate, topography and geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Virgilio, Giovanni; Laffan, Shawn W; Ebach, Malte C

    2013-01-01

    We quantify spatial turnover in communities of 1939 plant and 59 mammal species at 2.5 km resolution across a topographically heterogeneous region in south-eastern Australia to identify distributional breaks and low turnover zones where multiple species distributions overlap. Environmental turnover is measured to determine how climate, topography and geology influence biotic turnover differently across a variety of biogeographic breaks and overlaps. We identify the genera driving turnover and confirm the versatility of this approach across spatial scales and locations. Directional moving window analyses, rotated through 360°, were used to measure spatial turnover variation in different directions between gridded cells containing georeferenced plant and mammal occurrences and environmental variables. Generalised linear models were used to compare taxic turnover results with equivalent analyses for geology, regolith weathering, elevation, slope, solar radiation, annual precipitation and annual mean temperature, both uniformly across the entire study area and by stratifying it into zones of high and low turnover. Identified breaks and transitions were compared to a conservation bioregionalisation framework widely used in Australia. Detailed delineations of plant and mammal turnover zones with gradational boundaries denoted subtle variation in species assemblages. Turnover patterns often diverged from bioregion boundaries, though plant turnover adhered most closely. A prominent break zone contained either comparable or greater numbers of unique genera than adjacent overlaps, but these were concentrated in a small subsection relatively under-protected by conservation reserves. The environmental correlates of biotic turnover varied for different turnover zones in different subsections of the study area. Topography and temperature showed much stronger relationships with plant turnover in a topographically complex overlap, relative to a lowland overlap where weathering

  4. Mining protein loops using a structural alphabet and statistical exceptionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Juliette

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein loops encompass 50% of protein residues in available three-dimensional structures. These regions are often involved in protein functions, e.g. binding site, catalytic pocket... However, the description of protein loops with conventional tools is an uneasy task. Regular secondary structures, helices and strands, have been widely studied whereas loops, because they are highly variable in terms of sequence and structure, are difficult to analyze. Due to data sparsity, long loops have rarely been systematically studied. Results We developed a simple and accurate method that allows the description and analysis of the structures of short and long loops using structural motifs without restriction on loop length. This method is based on the structural alphabet HMM-SA. HMM-SA allows the simplification of a three-dimensional protein structure into a one-dimensional string of states, where each state is a four-residue prototype fragment, called structural letter. The difficult task of the structural grouping of huge data sets is thus easily accomplished by handling structural letter strings as in conventional protein sequence analysis. We systematically extracted all seven-residue fragments in a bank of 93000 protein loops and grouped them according to the structural-letter sequence, named structural word. This approach permits a systematic analysis of loops of all sizes since we consider the structural motifs of seven residues rather than complete loops. We focused the analysis on highly recurrent words of loops (observed more than 30 times. Our study reveals that 73% of loop-lengths are covered by only 3310 highly recurrent structural words out of 28274 observed words. These structural words have low structural variability (mean RMSd of 0.85 Å. As expected, half of these motifs display a flanking-region preference but interestingly, two thirds are shared by short (less than 12 residues and long loops. Moreover, half of

  5. Mining protein loops using a structural alphabet and statistical exceptionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regad, Leslie; Martin, Juliette; Nuel, Gregory; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2010-02-04

    Protein loops encompass 50% of protein residues in available three-dimensional structures. These regions are often involved in protein functions, e.g. binding site, catalytic pocket... However, the description of protein loops with conventional tools is an uneasy task. Regular secondary structures, helices and strands, have been widely studied whereas loops, because they are highly variable in terms of sequence and structure, are difficult to analyze. Due to data sparsity, long loops have rarely been systematically studied. We developed a simple and accurate method that allows the description and analysis of the structures of short and long loops using structural motifs without restriction on loop length. This method is based on the structural alphabet HMM-SA. HMM-SA allows the simplification of a three-dimensional protein structure into a one-dimensional string of states, where each state is a four-residue prototype fragment, called structural letter. The difficult task of the structural grouping of huge data sets is thus easily accomplished by handling structural letter strings as in conventional protein sequence analysis. We systematically extracted all seven-residue fragments in a bank of 93000 protein loops and grouped them according to the structural-letter sequence, named structural word. This approach permits a systematic analysis of loops of all sizes since we consider the structural motifs of seven residues rather than complete loops. We focused the analysis on highly recurrent words of loops (observed more than 30 times). Our study reveals that 73% of loop-lengths are covered by only 3310 highly recurrent structural words out of 28274 observed words). These structural words have low structural variability (mean RMSd of 0.85 A). As expected, half of these motifs display a flanking-region preference but interestingly, two thirds are shared by short (less than 12 residues) and long loops. Moreover, half of recurrent motifs exhibit a significant level of

  6. Pairing transition, coherence transition, and the irreversibility line in granular GdBa2Cu3O7-δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roa-Rojas, J.; Menegotto Costa, R.; Pureur, P.; Prieto, P.

    2000-05-01

    We report on electrical magnetoconductivity experiments near the superconducting transition of a granular sample of GdBa2Cu3O7-δ. The measurements were performed in magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 500 Oe applied parallel to the current orientation. The results show that the transition proceeds in two steps. When the temperature is decreased we first observe the pairing transition, which stabilizes superconductivity within the grains at a temperature practically coincident with the bulk critical temperature Tc. Analysis of the fluctuation contributions to the conductivity shows that the universality class for this transition is that of the three dimensional (3D)-XY model in the ordered case, with dynamic critical exponent z=3/2. Close to the zero-resistance state, the measurements reveal the occurrence of a coherence transition, where the phases of the order parameter in individual grains become long-range ordered. The critical temperature Tco for this transition is close to the point where the resistivity vanishes. A strong enlargement of the fluctuation interval preceding the coherence transition is caused by the applied magnetic field. In this region, a 3D-Gaussian regime and an asymptotic critical regime were clearly identified. The critical conductivity behavior for the coherence transition is interpreted within a 3D-XY model where disorder and frustration are relevant. The irreversibility line is determined from magnetoconductivity measurements performed according to the zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled data collected on cooling (FCC) recipes. The locus of this line coincides with the upper temperature limit for the fluctuation region above the coherence transition. The irreversibility line is interpreted as an effect of the formation of small clusters with closed loops of Josephson-coupled grains.

  7. Field-Lines-Threaded Model for: (1) the Low Solar Corona; (2) Electrons in the Transition Region; and (3) Solar Energetic Particle Acceleration and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, I.; van der Holst, B.; Jin, M.; Gombosi, T. I.; Taktakishvili, A.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2013-12-01

    In numerical simulations of the solar corona, both for the ambient state and especially for dynamical processes the most computational resources are spent for maintaining the numerical solution in the Low Solar Corona and in the transition region, where the temperature gradients are very sharp and the magnetic field has a complicated topology. The degraded computational efficiency is caused by the need in a highest resolution as well as the use of the fully three-dimensional implicit solver for electron heat conduction. On the other hand, the physical nature of the processes involved is rather simple (which still does not facilitate the numerical methods) as long as the heat fluxes as well as slow plasma motional velocities are aligned with the magnetic field. The Alfven wave turbulence, which is often believed to be the main driver of the solar wind and the main source of the coronal heating, is characterized by the Poynting flux of the waves, which is also aligned with the magnetic field. Therefore, the plasma state in any point of the three-dimensional grid in the Low Solar Corona can be found by solving a set of one-dimensional equations for the magnetic field line ('thread'), which passes through this point and connects it to the chromosphere and to the global Solar Corona. In the present paper we describe an innovative computational technology based upon the use of the magnetic-field-line-threads to find the local solution. We present the development of the AWSoM code of the University of Michigan with the field-lines-threaded Low Solar Corona. In the transition region, where the essentially kinetic description of the electron energy fluxes is required, we solve the Fokker-Plank equation on the system of threads, to achieve the physically consistent description of chromosphere evaporation. The third application for the field-lines-treaded model is the Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) acceleration and transport. Being the natural extension of the Field

  8. Rogowski Loop design for NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormack, B.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; Hatcher, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Rogowski Loop is one of the most basic diagnostics for tokamak operations. On the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), the plasma current Rogowski Loop had the constraints of the very limited space available on the center stack, 5,000 volt isolation, flexibility requirements as it remained a part of the Center Stack assembly after the first phase of operation, and a +120 C temperature requirement. For the second phase of operation, four Halo Current Rogowski Loops under the Center Stack tiles will be installed having +600 C and limited space requirements. Also as part of the second operational phase, up to ten Rogowski Loops will installed to measure eddy currents in the Passive Plate support structures with +350 C, restricted space, and flexibility requirements. This presentation will provide the details of the material selection, fabrication techniques, testing, and installation results of the Rogowski Loops that were fabricated for the high temperature operational and bakeout requirements, high voltage isolation requirements, and the space and flexibility requirements imposed upon the Rogowski Loops. In the future operational phases of NSTX, additional Rogowski Loops could be anticipated that will measure toroidal plasma currents in the vacuum vessel and in the Passive Plate assemblies

  9. Two-loop hard-thermal-loop thermodynamics with quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Jens O.; Petitgirard, Emmanuel; Strickland, Michael

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the quark contribution to the free energy of a hot quark-gluon plasma to two-loop order using hard-thermal-loop (HTL) perturbation theory. All ultraviolet divergences can be absorbed into renormalizations of the vacuum energy and the HTL quark and gluon mass parameters. The quark and gluon HTL mass parameters are determined self-consistently by a variational prescription. Combining the quark contribution with the two-loop HTL perturbation theory free energy for pure glue we obtain the total two-loop QCD free energy. Comparisons are made with lattice estimates of the free energy for N f =2 and with exact numerical results obtained in the large-N f limit

  10. String breaking with Wilson loops?

    CERN Document Server

    Kratochvila, S; Kratochvila, Slavo; Forcrand, Philippe de

    2003-01-01

    A convincing, uncontroversial observation of string breaking, when the static potential is extracted from Wilson loops only, is still missing. This failure can be understood if the overlap of the Wilson loop with the broken string is exponentially small. In that case, the broken string ground state will only be seen if the Wilson loop is long enough. Our preliminary results show string breaking in the context of the 3d SU(2) adjoint static potential, using the L\\"uscher-Weisz exponential variance reduction approach. As a by-product, we measure the fundamental SU(2) static potential with improved accuracy and see clear deviations from Casimir scaling.

  11. BMN correlators by loop equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eynard, Bertrand; Kristjansen, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    In the BMN approach to N=4 SYM a large class of correlators of interest are expressible in terms of expectation values of traces of words in a zero-dimensional gaussian complex matrix model. We develop a loop-equation based, analytic strategy for evaluating such expectation values to any order in the genus expansion. We reproduce the expectation values which were needed for the calculation of the one-loop, genus one correction to the anomalous dimension of BMN-operators and which were earlier obtained by combinatorial means. Furthermore, we present the expectation values needed for the calculation of the one-loop, genus two correction. (author)

  12. Coupling between feedback loops in autoregulatory networks affects bistability range, open-loop gain and switching times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Abhinav; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2012-01-01

    Biochemical regulatory networks governing diverse cellular processes such as stress-response, differentiation and cell cycle often contain coupled feedback loops. We aim at understanding how features of feedback architecture, such as the number of loops, the sign of the loops and the type of their coupling, affect network dynamical performance. Specifically, we investigate how bistability range, maximum open-loop gain and switching times of a network with transcriptional positive feedback are affected by additive or multiplicative coupling with another positive- or negative-feedback loop. We show that a network's bistability range is positively correlated with its maximum open-loop gain and that both quantities depend on the sign of the feedback loops and the type of feedback coupling. Moreover, we find that the addition of positive feedback could decrease the bistability range if we control the basal level in the signal-response curves of the two systems. Furthermore, the addition of negative feedback has the capacity to increase the bistability range if its dissociation constant is much lower than that of the positive feedback. We also find that the addition of a positive feedback to a bistable network increases the robustness of its bistability range, whereas the addition of a negative feedback decreases it. Finally, we show that the switching time for a transition from a high to a low steady state increases with the effective fold change in gene regulation. In summary, we show that the effect of coupled feedback loops on the bistability range and switching times depends on the underlying mechanistic details. (paper)

  13. Ring diagrams and phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, K.

    1986-01-01

    Ring diagrams at finite temperatures carry most infrared-singular parts among Feynman diagrams. Their effect to effective potentials are in general so significant that one must incorporate them as well as 1-loop diagrams. The author expresses these circumstances in some examples of supercooled phase transitions

  14. Phase transitions in field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, C.A.A. de; Bollini, C.G.; Giambiagi, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    By means of an example for which the effective potential is explicitly calculable (up to the one loop approximation), it is discussed how a phase transition takes place as the temperature is increased and pass from spontaneously broken symmetry to a phase in which the symmetry is restored. (Author) [pt

  15. TRANSITION-REGION/CORONAL SIGNATURES AND MAGNETIC SETTING OF SUNSPOT PENUMBRAL JETS: HINODE (SOT/FG), Hi-C, AND SDO/AIA OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Moore, Ronald L.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Alpert, Shane E.

    2016-01-01

    Penumbral microjets (PJs) are transient narrow bright features in the chromosphere of sunspot penumbrae, first characterized by Katsukawa et al. using the Ca ii H-line filter on Hinode's Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). It was proposed that the PJs form as a result of reconnection between two magnetic components of penumbrae (spines and interspines), and that they could contribute to the transition region (TR) and coronal heating above sunspot penumbrae. We propose a modified picture of formation of PJs based on recent results on the internal structure of sunspot penumbral filaments. Using data of a sunspot from Hinode/SOT, High Resolution Coronal Imager, and different passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we examine whether PJs have signatures in the TR and corona. We find hardly any discernible signature of normal PJs in any AIA passbands, except for a few of them showing up in the 1600 Å images. However, we discovered exceptionally stronger jets with similar lifetimes but bigger sizes (up to 600 km wide) occurring repeatedly in a few locations in the penumbra, where evidence of patches of opposite-polarity fields in the tails of some penumbral filaments is seen in Stokes-V images. These tail PJs do display signatures in the TR. Whether they have any coronal-temperature plasma is unclear. We infer that none of the PJs, including the tail PJs, directly heat the corona in active regions significantly, but any penumbral jet might drive some coronal heating indirectly via the generation of Alfvén waves and/or braiding of the coronal field

  16. Conformal anomaly of generalized form factors and finite loop integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Chicherin, Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    We reveal a new mechanism of conformal symmetry breaking at Born level. It occurs in generalized form factors with several local operators and an on-shell state of massless particles. The effect is due to hidden singularities on collinear configurations of the momenta. This conformal anomaly is different from the holomorphic anomaly of amplitudes. We present a number of examples in four and six dimensions. We find an application of the new conformal anomaly to finite loop momentum integrals with one or more massless legs. The collinear region around a massless leg creates a contact anomaly, made visible by the loop integration. The anomalous conformal Ward identity for an $\\ell-$loop integral is a 2nd-order differential equation whose right-hand side is an $(\\ell-1)-$loop integral. We show several examples, in particular the four-dimensional scalar double box.

  17. Optical loop framing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalibjian, R.; Chong, Y.P.; Prono, D.S.; Cavagnolo, H.R.

    1984-06-01

    The ATA provides an electron beam pulse of 70-ns duration at a 1-Hz rate. Our present optical diagnostics technique involve the imaging of the visible light generated by the beam incident onto the plant of a thin sheet of material. It has already been demonstrated that the light generated has a sufficiently fast temporal reponse in performing beam diagnostics. Notwithstanding possible beam emittance degradation due to scattering in the thin sheet, the observation of beam spatial profiles with relatively high efficiencies has provided data complementary to that obtained from beam wall current monitors and from various x-ray probes and other electrical probes. The optical image sensor consists of a gated, intensified television system. The gate pulse of the image intensifier can be appropriately delayed to give frames that are time-positioned from the head to the tail of the beam with a minimum gate time of 5-ns. The spatial correlation of the time frames from pulse to pulse is very good for a stable electron beam; however, when instabilities do occur, it is difficult to properly assess the spatial composition of the head and the tail of the beam on a pulse-to-pulse basis. Multiple gating within a pulse duration becomes desirable but cannot be performed because the recycle time (20-ms) of the TV system is much longer than the beam pulse. For this reason we have developed an optical-loop framing technique that will allow the recording of two frames within one pulse duration with our present gated/intensified TV system

  18. 3-D numerical simulations of coronal loops oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Selwa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We present numerical results of 3-D MHD model of a dipole active region field containing a loop with a higher density than its surroundings. We study different ways of excitation of vertical kink oscillations by velocity perturbation: as an initial condition, and as an impulsive excitation with a pulse of a given position, duration, and amplitude. These properties are varied in the parametric studies. We find that the amplitude of vertical kink oscillations is significantly amplified in comparison to horizontal kink oscillations for exciters located centrally (symmetrically below the loop, but not if the exciter is located a significant distance to the side of the loop. This explains why the pure vertical kink mode is so rarely observed in comparison to the horizontally polarized one. We discuss the role of curved magnetic field lines and the pulse overlapping at one of the loop's footpoints in 3-D active regions (AR's on the excitation and the damping of slow standing waves. We find that footpoint excitation becomes more efficient in 3-D curved loops than in 2-D curved arcades and that slow waves can be excited within an interval of time that is comparable to the observed one wave-period due to the combined effect of the pulse inside and outside the loop. Additionally, we study the effect of AR topology on the excitation and trapping of loop oscillations. We find that a perturbation acting directly on a single loop excites oscillations, but results in an increased leakage compared to excitation of oscillations in an AR field by an external source.

  19. 3-D numerical simulations of coronal loops oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Selwa

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We present numerical results of 3-D MHD model of a dipole active region field containing a loop with a higher density than its surroundings. We study different ways of excitation of vertical kink oscillations by velocity perturbation: as an initial condition, and as an impulsive excitation with a pulse of a given position, duration, and amplitude. These properties are varied in the parametric studies. We find that the amplitude of vertical kink oscillations is significantly amplified in comparison to horizontal kink oscillations for exciters located centrally (symmetrically below the loop, but not if the exciter is located a significant distance to the side of the loop. This explains why the pure vertical kink mode is so rarely observed in comparison to the horizontally polarized one. We discuss the role of curved magnetic field lines and the pulse overlapping at one of the loop's footpoints in 3-D active regions (AR's on the excitation and the damping of slow standing waves. We find that footpoint excitation becomes more efficient in 3-D curved loops than in 2-D curved arcades and that slow waves can be excited within an interval of time that is comparable to the observed one wave-period due to the combined effect of the pulse inside and outside the loop. Additionally, we study the effect of AR topology on the excitation and trapping of loop oscillations. We find that a perturbation acting directly on a single loop excites oscillations, but results in an increased leakage compared to excitation of oscillations in an AR field by an external source.

  20. Multi-wavelength Observations of Solar Active Region NOAA 7154

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, M. E.; Nitta, N. V.; Frank. Z. A.; Dame, L.; Suematsu, Y.

    2000-01-01

    We report on observations of a solar active region in May 1992 by the Solar Plasma Diagnostic Experiment (SPDE) in coordination with the Yohkoh satellite (producing soft X-ray images) and ground-based observatories (producing photospheric magnetograms and various filtergrams including those at the CN 3883 A line). The main focus is a study of the physical conditions of hot (T is approximately greater than 3 MK) coronal loops at their foot-points. The coronal part of the loops is fuzzy but what appear to be their footpoints in the transition region down to the photosphere are compact. Despite the morphological similarities, the footpoint emission at 10(exp 5) K is not quantitatively correlated with that at approximately 300 km above the tau (sub 5000) = 1 level, suggesting that the heat transport and therefore magnetic field topology in the intermediate layer is complicated. High resolution imaging observations with continuous temperature coverage are crucially needed.

  1. Characterization of dynamics in complex lyophilized formulations: I. Comparison of relaxation times measured by isothermal calorimetry with data estimated from the width of the glass transition temperature region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieng, Norman; Mizuno, Masayasu; Pikal, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The purposes of this study are to characterize the relaxation dynamics in complex freeze dried formulations and to investigate the quantitative relationship between the structural relaxation time as measured by thermal activity monitor (TAM) and that estimated from the width of the glass transition temperature (ΔT(g)). The latter method has advantages over TAM because it is simple and quick. As part of this objective, we evaluate the accuracy in estimating relaxation time data at higher temperatures (50 °C and 60 °C) from TAM data at lower temperature (40 °C) and glass transition region width (ΔT(g)) data obtained by differential scanning calorimetry. Formulations studied here were hydroxyethyl starch (HES)-disaccharide, HES-polyol, and HES-disaccharide-polyol at various ratios. We also re-examine, using TAM derived relaxation times, the correlation between protein stability (human growth hormone, hGH) and relaxation times explored in a previous report, which employed relaxation time data obtained from ΔT(g). Results show that most of the freeze dried formulations exist in single amorphous phase, and structural relaxation times were successfully measured for these systems. We find a reasonably good correlation between TAM measured relaxation times and corresponding data obtained from estimates based on ΔT(g), but the agreement is only qualitative. The comparison plot showed that TAM data are directly proportional to the 1/3 power of ΔT(g) data, after correcting for an offset. Nevertheless, the correlation between hGH stability and relaxation time remained qualitatively the same as found with using ΔT(g) derived relaxation data, and it was found that the modest extrapolation of TAM data to higher temperatures using ΔT(g) method and TAM data at 40 °C resulted in quantitative agreement with TAM measurements made at 50 °C and 60 °C, provided the TAM experiment temperature, is well below the Tg of the sample. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  2. Mercury Thermal Hydraulic Loop (MTHL) Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felde, David K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Crye, Jason Michael [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wendel, Mark W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yoder, Jr, Graydon L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Farquharson, George [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jallouk, Philip A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McFee, Marshall T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pointer, William David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ruggles, Art E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Carbajo, Juan J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high-power linear accelerator built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) which incorporates the use of a flowing liquid mercury target. The Mercury Thermal Hydraulic Loop (MTHL) was constructed to investigate and verify the heat transfer characteristics of liquid mercury in a rectangular channel. This report provides a compilation of previously reported results from the water-cooled and electrically heated straight and curved test sections that simulate the geometry of the window cooling channel in the target nose region.

  3. Conceptual design of helium experimental loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xingfu; Feng Kaiming

    2007-01-01

    In a future demonstration fusion power station (DEMO), helium is envisaged as coolant for plasma facing components, such as blanket and dive,or. All these components have a very complex geometry, with many parallel cooling channels, involving a complex helium flow distribution. Test blanket modules (TBM) of this concept will under go various tests in the experimental reactor ITER. For the qualification of TBM, it is indispensable to test mock-ups in a helium loop under realistic pressure and temperature profiles, in order to validate design codes, especially regarding mass flow and heat transition processes in narrow cooling channels. Similar testing must be performed for DEMO blanket, currently under development. A Helium Experimental Loop (HELOOP) is planed to be built for TBM tests. The design parameter of temperature, pressure, flow rate is 550 degree C, 10 MPa, l kg/s respectively. In particular, HELOOP is able to: perform full-scale tests of TBM under realistic conditions; test other components of the He-cooling system in ITER; qualify the purification circuit; obtain information for the design of the ITER cooling system. The main requirements and characteristics of the HELOOP facility and a preliminary conceptual design are described in the paper. (authors)

  4. On the Occurrence of Thermal Nonequilibrium in Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froment, C.; Auchère, F.; Mikić, Z.; Aulanier, G.; Bocchialini, K.; Buchlin, E.; Solomon, J.; Soubrié, E.

    2018-03-01

    Long-period EUV pulsations, recently discovered to be common in active regions, are understood to be the coronal manifestation of thermal nonequilibrium (TNE). The active regions previously studied with EIT/Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and AIA/SDO indicated that long-period intensity pulsations are localized in only one or two loop bundles. The basic idea of this study is to understand why. For this purpose, we tested the response of different loop systems, using different magnetic configurations, to different stratifications and strengths of the heating. We present an extensive parameter-space study using 1D hydrodynamic simulations (1020 in total) and conclude that the occurrence of TNE requires specific combinations of parameters. Our study shows that the TNE cycles are confined to specific ranges in parameter space. This naturally explains why only some loops undergo constant periodic pulsations over several days: since the loop geometry and the heating properties generally vary from one loop to another in an active region, only the ones in which these parameters are compatible exhibit TNE cycles. Furthermore, these parameters (heating and geometry) are likely to vary significantly over the duration of a cycle, which potentially limits the possibilities of periodic behavior. This study also confirms that long-period intensity pulsations and coronal rain are two aspects of the same phenomenon: both phenomena can occur for similar heating conditions and can appear simultaneously in the simulations.

  5. The visual corticostriatal loop through the tail of the caudate: Circuitry and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol A Seger

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Although high level visual cortex projects to a specific region of the striatum, the tail of the caudate, and participates in corticostriatal loops, the function of this visual corticostriatal system is not well understood. This article first reviews what is known about the anatomy of the visual corticostriatal loop across mammals, including rodents, cats, monkeys, and humans. Like other corticostriatal systems, the visual corticostriatal system includes both closed loop components (recurrent projections that return to the originating cortical location and open loop components (projections that terminate in other neural regions. The article then reviews what previous empircal research has shown about the function of the tail of the caudate. The article finally addresses the possible functions of the closed and open loop connections of the visual loop in the context of theories and computational models of corticostriatal function.

  6. Calculation of photonuclear process in the region of several tens MeV. Formulation of exact transition rate for high energy γ-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Hiroaki; Harada, Hideo

    1999-01-01

    The electromagnetic field approximated by using long wave-length limit is not valid for heavy nuclear mass or high energy γ-ray transition. To examine the contribution of the electric multipole field that is neglected in long wave-length limit, we formulize the El transition rate for the strict electric multipole field and compare quantitatively this result with Weisskopf estimate. (author)

  7. Resistivity features in intercalated graphite compounds with bromine and iodine chloride in the region of structural phase transitions in the layer of intercalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovsyijenko, Yi.V.; Lazarenko, O.A.; Matsuj, L.Yu.; Prokopov, O.Yi.

    2013-01-01

    In the paper anomalous changes of resistivity in graphite intercalated compounds with iodine chloride and bromine are investigated in the phase transition temperature interval. It is shown that these anomalies are caused by the change of carriers mobility in the phase transitional interval as well as by the origin of ''mobile ions liquids''

  8. Loop equations in the theory of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makeenko, Yu.M.; Voronov, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    Loop-space variables (matrices of parallel transport) for the theory of gravitation are described. Loop equations, which are equivalent to the Einstein equations, are derived in the classical case. Loop equations are derived for gravity with cosmological constant as well. An analogy with the loop-space approach in Yang-Mills theory is discussed [ru

  9. Kalman Orbit Optimized Loop Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lawrence E.; Meehan, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Under certain conditions of low signal power and/or high noise, there is insufficient signal to noise ratio (SNR) to close tracking loops with individual signals on orbiting Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. In addition, the processing power available from flight computers is not great enough to implement a conventional ultra-tight coupling tracking loop. This work provides a method to track GNSS signals at very low SNR without the penalty of requiring very high processor throughput to calculate the loop parameters. The Kalman Orbit-Optimized Loop (KOOL) tracking approach constitutes a filter with a dynamic model and using the aggregate of information from all tracked GNSS signals to close the tracking loop for each signal. For applications where there is not a good dynamic model, such as very low orbits where atmospheric drag models may not be adequate to achieve the required accuracy, aiding from an IMU (inertial measurement unit) or other sensor will be added. The KOOL approach is based on research JPL has done to allow signal recovery from weak and scintillating signals observed during the use of GPS signals for limb sounding of the Earth s atmosphere. That approach uses the onboard PVT (position, velocity, time) solution to generate predictions for the range, range rate, and acceleration of the low-SNR signal. The low- SNR signal data are captured by a directed open loop. KOOL builds on the previous open loop tracking by including feedback and observable generation from the weak-signal channels so that the MSR receiver will continue to track and provide PVT, range, and Doppler data, even when all channels have low SNR.

  10. Phase Transition Couplings in the Higgsed Monopole Model

    CERN Document Server

    Laperashvili, L V

    1999-01-01

    Using a one-loop approximation for the effective potential in the Higgs model of electrodynamics for a charged scalar field, we argue for the existence of a triple point for the renormalized (running) values of the selfinteraction beta-function as a typical quantity we estimate that the one-loop approximation is valid with accuracy of deviations not more than 30% in the region of the parameters: $0.2 \\stackrel{<}{\\sim}{\\large \\alpha, \\tilde{\\alpha}} corresponds to the above-mentioned region of $\\alpha, \\tilde \\alpha$. Under the point of view that the Higgs particle is a monopole with a magnetic charge g, the obtained electric fine structure constant turns out to be to the $\\alpha_{crit}^{lat}\\approx{0.20}$ which in a U(1) lattice gauge theory corresponds to the phase transition between the "Coulomb" and confinement phases. Such a result is very encouraging for the idea of an approximate "universality" (regularization independence) of gauge couplings at the phase transition point. This idea was suggested by...

  11. Hemodynamic evaluation before and after the STA-MCA anastomosis; With special reference to measurement of regional transit time with intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touho, Hajime; Karasawa, Jun; Shishido, Hisashi; Yamada, Keisuke; Shibamoto, Keiji [Osaka Neurological Inst. Toyonaka (Japan)

    1990-09-01

    Twenty-seven patients with minor completed and major stroke in the chronic stage underwent superficial temporal artery-middle cerebral artery (STA-MCA) anastomosis. The regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), using inhalation of stable xenon and computed tomographic scanning (Xe{sup s} CT-CBF study), and the mode of transit time (MTT) in the MCA territory using intra-arterial digital aortography were measured. Activated rCBF and MTT was measured 20 minutes after the administration of acetazolamide (10 mg/kg) in 14 patients. Nineteen of the 23 patients with minor stroke (Group 1) showed immediate improvement in their neurological state within a few days of the operation, while four patients with minor stroke (Group 2) and four patients with major stroke (Group 3) showed no improvement. Based on the rCBF obtained with the Xe{sup s} CT-CBF study, affected side rCBF/unaffected side rCBF and %f ((peak DSA number/affected side MTT)/(peak DSA number/unaffected side MTT)) were compared. There was a significant positive correlation. Affected side MTT in Group 1 was 6.41{plus minus}1.16 sec, preoperatively, and significantly decreased to 5.13{plus minus}0.91 sec after the operation. On the other hand, preoperative MTT in Group 2 was 4.40{plus minus}0.81 sec and 4.76{plus minus}0.89 sec, postoperatively. Preoperative %f in Group 1 was 0.514{plus minus}0.143 and significantly increased to 0.739{plus minus}0.154, postoperatively. Group 2 showed no change. Vasodilatory capacity with acetazolamide showed a marked improvement in Group 1, postoperativery. Our study indicated that if MTT is moderately lengthened, %f is moderately decreased, and vasodilatory capacity is impaired, in patients with minor ischemic stroke will benefit from STA-MCA anastomosis. (author).

  12. A type of loop algebra and the associated loop algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam Honwah; Zhang Yufeng

    2008-01-01

    A higher-dimensional twisted loop algebra is constructed. As its application, a new Lax pair is presented, whose compatibility gives rise to a Liouville integrable hierarchy of evolution equations by making use of Tu scheme. One of the reduction cases of the hierarchy is an analogous of the well-known AKNS system. Next, the twisted loop algebra, furthermore, is extended to another higher dimensional loop algebra, from which a hierarchy of evolution equations with 11-potential component functions is obtained, whose reduction is just standard AKNS system. Especially, we prove that an arbitrary linear combination of the four Hamiltonian operators directly obtained from the recurrence relations is still a Hamiltonian operator. Therefore, the hierarchy with 11-potential functions possesses 4-Hamiltonian structures. Finally, an integrable coupling of the hierarchy is worked out

  13. Distributed and multi-core computation of 2-loop integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Doncker, E; Yuasa, F

    2014-01-01

    For an automatic computation of Feynman loop integrals in the physical region we rely on an extrapolation technique where the integrals of the sequence are obtained with iterated/repeated adaptive methods from the QUADPACK 1D quadrature package. The integration rule evaluations in the outer level, corresponding to independent inner integral approximations, are assigned to threads dynamically via the OpenMP runtime in the parallel implementation. Furthermore, multi-level (nested) parallelism enables an efficient utilization of hyperthreading or larger numbers of cores. For a class of loop integrals in the unphysical region, which do not suffer from singularities in the interior of the integration domain, we find that the distributed adaptive integration methods in the multivariate PARINT package are highly efficient and accurate. We apply these techniques without resorting to integral transformations and report on the capabilities of the algorithms and the parallel performance for a test set including various types of two-loop integrals

  14. Tritium Management Loop Design Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rader, Jordan D. [ORNL; Felde, David K. [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Greenwood, Michael Scott [ORNL; Qualls, A L. [ORNL; Calderoni, Pattrick [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2017-12-01

    This report summarizes physical, chemical, and engineering analyses that have been done to support the development of a test loop to study tritium migration in 2LiF-BeF2 salts. The loop will operate under turbulent flow and a schematic of the apparatus has been used to develop a model in Mathcad to suggest flow parameters that should be targeted in loop operation. The introduction of tritium into the loop has been discussed as well as various means to capture or divert the tritium from egress through a test assembly. Permeation was calculated starting with a Modelica model for a transport through a nickel window into a vacuum, and modifying it for a FLiBe system with an argon sweep gas on the downstream side of the permeation interface. Results suggest that tritium removal with a simple tubular permeation device will occur readily. Although this system is idealized, it suggests that rapid measurement capability in the loop may be necessary to study and understand tritium removal from the system.

  15. Criteria for saturated magnetization loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harres, A.; Mikhov, M.; Skumryev, V.; Andrade, A.M.H. de; Schmidt, J.E.; Geshev, J.

    2016-01-01

    Proper estimation of magnetization curve parameters is vital in studying magnetic systems. In the present article, criteria for discrimination non-saturated (minor) from saturated (major) hysteresis loops are proposed. These employ the analysis of (i) derivatives of both ascending and descending branches of the loop, (ii) remanent magnetization curves, and (iii) thermomagnetic curves. Computational simulations are used in order to demonstrate their validity. Examples illustrating the applicability of these criteria to well-known real systems, namely Fe_3O_4 and Ni fine particles, are provided. We demonstrate that the anisotropy-field value estimated from a visual examination of an only apparently major hysteresis loop could be more than two times lower than the real one. - Highlights: • Proper estimation of hysteresis-loop parameters is vital in magnetic studies. • We propose criteria for discrimination minor from major hysteresis loops. • The criteria analyze magnetization, remanence and ZFC/FC curves and/or their derivatives. • Examples of their application on real nanoparticles systems are given. • Using the criteria could avoid twofold or bigger saturation-field underestimation errors.

  16. Criteria for saturated magnetization loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harres, A. [Departamento de Física, UFSM, Santa Maria, 97105-900 Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Mikhov, M. [Faculty of Physics, University of Sofia, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Skumryev, V. [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Andrade, A.M.H. de; Schmidt, J.E. [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, 91501-970 Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Geshev, J., E-mail: julian@if.ufrgs.br [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, 91501-970 Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Proper estimation of magnetization curve parameters is vital in studying magnetic systems. In the present article, criteria for discrimination non-saturated (minor) from saturated (major) hysteresis loops are proposed. These employ the analysis of (i) derivatives of both ascending and descending branches of the loop, (ii) remanent magnetization curves, and (iii) thermomagnetic curves. Computational simulations are used in order to demonstrate their validity. Examples illustrating the applicability of these criteria to well-known real systems, namely Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Ni fine particles, are provided. We demonstrate that the anisotropy-field value estimated from a visual examination of an only apparently major hysteresis loop could be more than two times lower than the real one. - Highlights: • Proper estimation of hysteresis-loop parameters is vital in magnetic studies. • We propose criteria for discrimination minor from major hysteresis loops. • The criteria analyze magnetization, remanence and ZFC/FC curves and/or their derivatives. • Examples of their application on real nanoparticles systems are given. • Using the criteria could avoid twofold or bigger saturation-field underestimation errors.

  17. Efficiently computing exact geodesic loops within finite steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Shi-Qing; He, Ying; Fu, Chi-Wing

    2012-06-01

    Closed geodesics, or geodesic loops, are crucial to the study of differential topology and differential geometry. Although the existence and properties of closed geodesics on smooth surfaces have been widely studied in mathematics community, relatively little progress has been made on how to compute them on polygonal surfaces. Most existing algorithms simply consider the mesh as a graph and so the resultant loops are restricted only on mesh edges, which are far from the actual geodesics. This paper is the first to prove the existence and uniqueness of geodesic loop restricted on a closed face sequence; it contributes also with an efficient algorithm to iteratively evolve an initial closed path on a given mesh into an exact geodesic loop within finite steps. Our proposed algorithm takes only an O(k) space complexity and an O(mk) time complexity (experimentally), where m is the number of vertices in the region bounded by the initial loop and the resultant geodesic loop, and k is the average number of edges in the edge sequences that the evolving loop passes through. In contrast to the existing geodesic curvature flow methods which compute an approximate geodesic loop within a predefined threshold, our method is exact and can apply directly to triangular meshes without needing to solve any differential equation with a numerical solver; it can run at interactive speed, e.g., in the order of milliseconds, for a mesh with around 50K vertices, and hence, significantly outperforms existing algorithms. Actually, our algorithm could run at interactive speed even for larger meshes. Besides the complexity of the input mesh, the geometric shape could also affect the number of evolving steps, i.e., the performance. We motivate our algorithm with an interactive shape segmentation example shown later in the paper.

  18. CFD simulation of a four-loop PWR at asymmetric operation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jian-Ping; Yan, Li-Ming; Li, Feng-Chen, E-mail: lifch@hit.edu.cn

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • A CFD numerical simulation procedure was established for simulating RPV of VVER-1000. • The established CFD approach was validated by comparing with available data. • Thermal hydraulic characteristics under asymmetric operation condition were investigated. • Apparent influences of the shutdown loop on its neighboring loops were obtained. - Abstract: The pressurized water reactor (PWR) with multiple loops may have abnormal working conditions with coolant pumps out of running in some loops. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical study of the four-loop VVER-1000 PWR pressure vessel model was presented. Numerical simulations of the thermohydrodynamic characteristics in the pressure vessel were carried out at different inlet conditions with four and three loops running, respectively. At normal stead-state condition (four-loop running), different parameters were obtained for the full fluid domain, including pressure losses across different parts, pressure, velocity and temperature distributions in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and mass flow distribution of the coolant at the inlet of reactor core. The obtained results for pressure losses matched with the experimental reference values of the VVER-1000 PWR at Tianwan nuclear power plant (NPP). For most fuel assemblies (FAs), the inlet flow rates presented a symmetrical distribution about the center under full-loop operation conditions, which accorded with the practical distribution. These results indicate that it is now possible to study the dynamic transition process between different asymmetric operation conditions in a multi-loop PWR using the established CFD method.

  19. FAST CONTRACTION OF CORONAL LOOPS AT THE FLARE PEAK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Rui; Wang Haimin

    2010-01-01

    On 2005 September 8, a coronal loop overlying the active region NOAA 10808 was observed in TRACE 171 A to contract at ∼100 km s -1 at the peak of an X5.4-2B flare at 21:05 UT. Prior to the fast contraction, the loop underwent a much slower contraction at ∼6 km s -1 for about 8 minutes, initiating during the flare preheating phase. The sudden switch to fast contraction is presumably corresponding to the onset of the impulsive phase. The contraction resulted in the oscillation of a group of loops located below, with the period of about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, the contracting loop exhibited a similar oscillatory pattern superimposed on the dominant downward motion. We suggest that the fast contraction reflects a suddenly reduced magnetic pressure underneath due either to (1) the eruption of magnetic structures located at lower altitudes or to (2) the rapid conversion of magnetic free energy in the flare core region. Electrons accelerated in the shrinking trap formed by the contracting loop can theoretically contribute to a late-phase hard X-ray burst, which is associated with Type IV radio emission. To complement the X5.4 flare which was probably confined, a similar event observed in SOHO/EIT 195 A on 2004 July 20 in an eruptive, M8.6 flare is briefly described, in which the contraction was followed by the expansion of the same loop leading up to a halo coronal mass ejection. These observations further substantiate the conjecture of coronal implosion and suggest coronal implosion as a new exciter mechanism for coronal loop oscillations.

  20. Intraspecific variations in Cyt b and D-loop sequences of Testudine species, Lissemys punctata from south Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lalitha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The freshwater Testudine species have gained importance in recent years, as most of their population is threatened due to exploitation for delicacy and pet trade. In this regard, Lissemys punctata, a freshwater terrapin, predominantly distributed in Asian countries has gained its significance for the study. A pilot study report on mitochondrial markers (Cyt b and D-loop conducted on L. punctata species from southern Karnataka, India was presented in this investigation. A complete region spanning 1.14 kb and ∼1 kb was amplified by HotStart PCR and sequenced by Sanger sequencing. The Cyt b sequence revealed 85 substitution sites, no indels and 17 parsimony informative sites, whereas D-loop showed 189 variable sites, 51 parsimony informative sites with 5′ functional domains TAS, CSB-F, CSBs (1, 2, 3 preceding tandem repeat at 3′ end. Current data highlights the intraspecific variations in these target regions and variations validated using suitable evolutionary models points out that the overall point mutations observed in the region are transitions leading to no structural and functional alterations. The mitochondrial data generated uncover the genetic diversity within species and conservationist can utilize the data to estimate the effective population size or for forensic identification of animal or its seizures during unlawful trade activities.

  1. Wilson loop OPE, analytic continuation and multi-Regge limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatsuda, Yasuyuki

    2014-05-01

    We explore a direct connection between the collinear limit and the multi-Regge limit for scattering amplitudes in the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory. Starting with the collinear expansion for the six-gluon amplitude in the Euclidean kinematic region, we perform an analytic continuation term by term to the so-called Mandelstam region. We find that the result coincides with the collinear expansion of the analytically continued amplitude. We then take the multi-Regge limit, and conjecture that the final result precisely reproduces the one from the BFKL approach. Combining this procedure with the OPE for null polygonal Wilson loops, we explicitly compute the leading contribution in the ''collinear-Regge'' limit up to five loops. Our results agree with all the known results up to four loops. At five-loop, our results up to the next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic approximation (NNLLA) also reproduce the known results, and for the N 3 LLA and the N 4 LLA give non-trivial predictions. We further present an all-loop prediction for the imaginary part of the next-to-double-leading logarithmic approximation. Our procedure has a possibility of an interpolation from weak to strong coupling in the multi-Regge limit with the help of the OPE.

  2. High pressure experimental water loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenon, M.

    1958-01-01

    A high pressure experimental water loop has been made for studying the detection and evolution of cladding failure in a pressurized reactor. The loop has been designed for a maximum temperature of 360 deg. C, a maximum of 160 kg/cm 2 and flow rates up to 5 m 3 /h. The entire loop consists of several parts: a main circuit with a canned rotor circulation pump, steam pressurizer, heating tubes, two hydro-cyclones (one de-gasser and one decanter) and one tubular heat exchanger; a continuous purification loop, connected in parallel, comprising pressure reducing valves and resin pots which also allow studies of the stability of resins under pressure, temperature and radiation; following the gas separator is a gas loop for studying the recombination of the radiolytic gases in the steam phase. The preceding circuits, as well as others, return to a low pressure storage circuit. The cold water of the low pressure storage flask is continuously reintroduced into the high pressure main circuit by means of a return pump at a maximum head of 160 kg /cm 2 , and adjusted to the pressurizer level. This loop is also a testing bench for the tight high pressure apparatus. The circulating pump and the connecting flanges (Oak Ridge type) are water-tight. The feed pump and the pressure reducing valves are not; the un-tight ones have a system of leak recovery. To permanently check the tightness the circuit has been fitted with a leak detection system (similar to the HRT one). (author) [fr

  3. Mass upflows in 'post'-flare loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forbes, T.G.; Priest, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    A self-consistent numerical model of a reconnecting magnetic field configuration similar to that occurring during the main-phase of two-ribbon flares is used to estimate the upflow caused by the fast-mode expansion of the magnetic field moving into the reconnection region. Such an expansion creates a field-aligned pressure gradient which accelerates plasma upward from the chromospheric base of magnetic field lines in the region external to the loops. The numerical results imply that the amount of mass sucked up in this way is even smaller than was previously estimated by Kopp and Pneuman who used a kinematic model. Therefore, some indirect mechanism (such as evaporation), which would probably derive its motive power from the thermal energy generated by the reconnection, is required to explain the large mass upflows inferred from observations. (orig.)

  4. Integrable systems and loop coproducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musso, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    We present a generalization of a framework for the construction of classical integrable systems that we call loop coproduct formulation (Musso 2010 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43 434026). In this paper, the loop coproduct formulation includes systems of Gelfand-Tsetlin type, the linear r-matrix formulation, the Sklyanin algebras, the reflection algebras, the coalgebra symmetry approach and some of its generalizations as particular cases, showing that all these apparently different approaches have a common algebraic origin. On the other hand, all these subcases do not exhaust the domain of applicability of this new technique, so that new possible directions of investigation do naturally emerge in this framework.

  5. Perturbations in loop quantum cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W; Agullo, I; Ashtekar, A

    2014-01-01

    The era of precision cosmology has allowed us to accurately determine many important cosmological parameters, in particular via the CMB. Confronting Loop Quantum Cosmology with these observations provides us with a powerful test of the theory. For this to be possible, we need a detailed understanding of the generation and evolution of inhomogeneous perturbations during the early, quantum gravity phase of the universe. Here, we have described how Loop Quantum Cosmology provides a completion of the inflationary paradigm, that is consistent with the observed power spectra of the CMB

  6. LISA Pathfinder: OPD loop characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Michael; LPF Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    The optical metrology system (OMS) of the LISA Pathfinder mission is measuring the distance between two free-floating test masses with unprecedented precision. One of the four OMS heterodyne interferometers reads out the phase difference between the reference and the measurement laser beam. This phase from the reference interferometer is common to all other longitudinal interferometer read outs and therefore subtracted. In addition, the phase is fed back via the digital optical pathlength difference (OPD) control loop to keep it close to zero. Here, we analyse the loop parameters and compare them to on-ground measurement results.

  7. LOOP: engineering marvel, economic calamity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brossard, E B

    1985-01-01

    The Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP) is the first superport built in the Lower 48. The United States was the only major oil-importing country that did not have a superport, and therefore, could not offload very large crude carriers (VLCCs). Unfortunately, a number of factors changed after it was decided to build LOOP, and these, plus the onerous provisions of the Deepwater Ports Act of 1974, which authorized superports, prevented LOOP from operating economically. LOOP's facilities consist of an offshore platform complex with three single-point-mooring (SPM) system buoys, 19 miles offshore in 110 feet of water, as well as a 32-million-barrel storage terminal 31 miles inland at Clovelly Salt Dome, and connecting pipelines offshore and onshore. By the time LOOP was started-up in May 1981, demand for oil had declined, because of rises in the price of oil, and the source of US oil imports had shifted back to the western hemisphere, away from the eastern hemisphere, closer to the US. The refinery mix in the US also changed, because of up-grading of a number of big refineries, which further reduced demand and made heavier crudes from countries like Mexico and Venezuela more economical. Because of reduced oil imports and shorter hauls, oil shippers started using or continued to use smaller tankers. Smaller tankers are not economical for LOOP, nor do they need LOOP. The start-up of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) in mid-1977 backed out 1.5 million bd/sup -1/ of foreign imports. TAPS' capacity coincides with LOOP's offloading capacity of 1.4 million bd/sup -1/. US decontrol of domestic crude in 1981 and increased drilling, plus general energy conservation further reduced US oil imports. US consumption declined to 15.1 million bd/sup -1/ in 1983, from 18.8 million bd/sup -1/ in 1978. This award-winning superport needed federal decontrol and increased oil imports along with more VLCCs, in order to operate economically.

  8. Two-Loop Splitting Amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bern, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Splitting amplitudes govern the behavior of scattering amplitudes at the momenta of external legs become collinear. In this talk we outline the calculation of two-loop splitting amplitudes via the unitarity sewing method. This method retains the simple factorization properties of light-cone gauge, but avoids the need for prescriptions such as the principal value or Mandelstam-Leibbrandt ones. The encountered loop momentum integrals are then evaluated using integration-by-parts and Lorentz invariance identities. We outline a variety of applications for these splitting amplitudes

  9. Two-loop splitting amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bern, Z.; Dixon, L.J.; Kosower, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Splitting amplitudes govern the behavior of scattering amplitudes at the momenta of external legs become collinear. In this talk we outline the calculation of two-loop splitting amplitudes via the unitarity sewing method. This method retains the simple factorization properties of light-cone gauge, but avoids the need for prescriptions such as the principal value or Mandelstam-Leibbrandt ones. The encountered loop momentum integrals are then evaluated using integration-by-parts and Lorentz invariance identities. We outline a variety of applications for these splitting amplitudes

  10. Fermions and loops on graphs: I. Loop calculus for determinants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernyak, Vladimir Y; Chertkov, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series devoted to evaluation of the partition function in statistical models on graphs with loops in terms of the Berezin/fermion integrals. The paper focuses on a representation of the determinant of a square matrix in terms of a finite series, where each term corresponds to a loop on the graph. The representation is based on a fermion version of the loop calculus, previously introduced by the authors for graphical models with finite alphabets. Our construction contains two levels. First, we represent the determinant in terms of an integral over anti-commuting Grassmann variables, with some reparametrization/gauge freedom hidden in the formulation. Second, we show that a special choice of the gauge, called the BP (Bethe–Peierls or belief propagation) gauge, yields the desired loop representation. The set of gauge fixing BP conditions is equivalent to the Gaussian BP equations, discussed in the past as efficient (linear scaling) heuristics for estimating the covariance of a sparse positive matrix

  11. Robust fault detection in open loop vs. closed loop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Stoustrup, J.

    1997-01-01

    The robustness aspects of fault detection and isolation (FDI) for uncertain systems are considered. The FDI problem is considered in a standard problem formulation. The FDI design problem is analyzed both in the case where the control input signal is considered as a known external input signal (o...... (open loop) and when the input signal is generated by a feedback controller...

  12. A virtual closed loop method for closed loop identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agüero, J.C.; Goodwin, G.C.; Hof, Van den P.M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Indirect methods for the identification of linear plant models on the basis of closed loop data are based on the use of (reconstructed) input signals that are uncorrelated with the noise. This generally requires exact (linear) controller knowledge. On the other hand, direct identification requires

  13. The effectiveness of Light Rail transit in achieving regional CO2 emissions targets is linked to building energy use: insights from system dynamics modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cities worldwide face the challenges of accommodating a growing population, while reducing emissions to meet climate mitigation targets. Public transit investments are often proposed as a way to curb emissions while maintaining healthy urban economies. However, cities face a syst...

  14. Feedback loops and reciprocal regulation: recurring motifs in the systems biology of the cell cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrell, James E.

    2013-01-01

    The study of eukaryotic cell cycle regulation over the last several decades has led to a remarkably detailed understanding of the complex regulatory system that drives this fundamental process. This allows us to now look for recurring motifs in the regulatory system. Among these are negative feedback loops, which underpin checkpoints and generate cell cycle oscillations; positive feedback loops, which promote oscillations and make cell cycle transitions switch-like and unidirectional; and rec...

  15. Simulation of misfit dislocation loops at the Ag/Cu(111) interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, Torben

    2000-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations combined with the nudged elastic band method for finding transition states and corresponding activation energies are used to study mechanisms of nucleation, growth, and motion of misfit dislocation loops at the Ag/Cu(111) interface. A variety of mechanisms involving concerted motion of several atoms are identified. Nucleation has the highest activation energy, ∼1eV. Growth and motion of the loops have activation energies in the range 0.3--0.7eV

  16. Free loop spaces and cyclohedra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Markl, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 71, - (2003), s. 151-157 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1019203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905; CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : cyclohedron * free loop space * recognition Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  17. Feedback - closing the loop digitally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagel, J.; Chase, B.

    1992-01-01

    Many feedback and feedforward systems are now using microprocessors within the loop. We describe the wide range of possibilities and problems that arise. We also propose some ideas for analysis and testing, including examples of motion control in the Flying Wire systems in Main Ring and Tevatron and Low Level RF control now being built for the Fermilab Linac upgrade. (author)

  18. Morbidity of temporary loop ileostomies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakx, R.; Busch, O. R. C.; Bemelman, W. A.; Veldink, G. J.; Slors, J. F. M.; van Lanschot, J. J. B.

    2004-01-01

    Background/Aims: A temporary loop ileostomy is constructed to protect a distal colonic anastomosis. Closure is usually performed not earlier than 8 - 12 weeks after the primary operation. During this period, stoma-related complications can occur and enhance the adverse effect on quality of life. The

  19. Wilson loops in Kerr gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollini, C.G.; Giambiagi, J.J.; Tiomno, J.

    1981-01-01

    The ordered integrals for several paths in Kerr gravitation is computed in a compact form. When the path is closed its relation with the angular parallel displacement is discussed and the corresponding Wilson loop is calculated. The validity of Mandelstam relations for gauge fields is also explicitly verified. (Author) [pt

  20. Loop quantum cosmology: Recent progress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aspects of the full theory of loop quantum gravity can be studied in a simpler .... group) 1-forms and vector fields and Λ is an SO(3)-matrix indicating the internal ... are p and c which are related to the more familiar scale factor by the relations.

  1. Loop quantum cosmology and singularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyve, Ward

    2017-08-15

    Loop quantum gravity is believed to eliminate singularities such as the big bang and big crunch singularity. This belief is based on studies of so-called loop quantum cosmology which concerns symmetry-reduced models of quantum gravity. In this paper, the problem of singularities is analysed in the context of the Bohmian formulation of loop quantum cosmology. In this formulation there is an actual metric in addition to the wave function, which evolves stochastically (rather than deterministically as the case of the particle evolution in non-relativistic Bohmian mechanics). Thus a singularity occurs whenever this actual metric is singular. It is shown that in the loop quantum cosmology for a homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker space-time with arbitrary constant spatial curvature and cosmological constant, coupled to a massless homogeneous scalar field, a big bang or big crunch singularity is never obtained. This should be contrasted with the fact that in the Bohmian formulation of the Wheeler-DeWitt theory singularities may exist.

  2. Independent SU(2)-loop variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loll, R.

    1991-04-01

    We give a reduction procedure for SU(2)-trace variables and introduce a complete set of indepentent, gauge-invariant and almost local loop variables for the configuration space of SU(2)-lattice gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions. (orig.)

  3. X-ray characteristics of the Lupus Loop and SN1006 supernova remnants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toor, A [California Univ., Livermore (USA). Lawrence Livermore Lab.

    1980-01-01

    The spatial extent of the Lupus Loop and spectra for the Lupus Loop and SN1006 supernova remnants have been determined with a rocket-borne payload. The Lupus Loop is an extended source of soft X-rays (approx. 300' diam) that shows a correlation between its brightest X-ray and radio-emission regions. Its spectrum is characterized by a temperature of 350 eV. Thus, the Lupus Loop appears similar to Vela X and Cygnus Loop, although much weaker. Emission from SN1006 is spatially unresolved and exhibits a harder spectrum than that of the Lupus Loop. All spectral data (0.2 100 keV) from our observation and previous observations are satisfactorily fit with a power law (index = 2.15). This spectral dependence suggests the possibility that a rotating neutron star is the underlying source of the radiated energy although such an interpretation appears inconsistent with the remnant's morphology.

  4. X-ray characteristics of the Lupus Loop and SN1006 supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toor, A.

    1980-01-01

    The spatial extent of the Lupus Loop and spectra for the Lupus Loop and SN1006 supernova remnants have been determined with a rocket-borne payload. The Lupus Loop is an extended source of soft X-rays (approx. 300' diam) that shows a correlation between its brightest X-ray and radio-emission regions. Its spectrum is characterized by a temperature of 350 eV. Thus, the Lupus Loop appears similar to Vela X and Cygnus Loop, although much weaker. Emission from SN1006 is spatially unresolved and exhibits a harder spectrum than that of the Lupus Loop. All spectral data (0.2 100 keV) from our observation and previous observations are satisfactorily fit with a power law (index = 2.15). This spectral dependence suggests the possibility that a rotating neutron star is the underlying source of the radiated energy although such an interpretation appears inconsistent with the remnant's morphology. (orig.)

  5. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-01-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3

  6. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  7. Calculation and modular properties of multi-loop superstring amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilov, G S

    2012-01-01

    Multi-loop superstring amplitude is calculated in the conventional gauge where Grassmann moduli are carried by the 2D gravitino field. Generally, instead of the modular symmetry, the amplitudes hold the symmetry under modular transformations added by relevant transformations of the 2D local supersymmetry. If a number of loops are larger than 3, the integration measures are not modular forms. In this case the expression for the amplitude contains an integral over the bound of the fundamental region of the modular group. (paper)

  8. Corrosion and material transfer in a sodium loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, A.M.; Espigares, M.M.; Arroyo, J.; Borgstedt, H.U.; Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H.

    1984-01-01

    The corrosion and material transfer behaviour of the martensitic steel X18 CrMoVNb 12 1 as a function of the temperature and the position is studied in the ML-1 sodium loop. Up to 600 C the material has the same good compatibility with liquid sodium as austenitic stainless steels, as well in the corrosion region of the loop as in the deposition zone in the cooled leg. The steel is not sensitive to carburization or decarburization under the conditions in the sodium rig. (author)

  9. An experimental study of dislocation loop nucleation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounaud, J.Y.; Leteurtre, J.

    1975-01-01

    The nucleation of dislocation loops is experimentally studied by observing the demixion of the Burgers vectors of dislocation loops nucleated in copper whiskers irradiated in flexion by fission fragments at room temperature. The demixion of Burgers vectors is observed by the dimensional effects of dislocation loops: after irradiation, the applied stress is removed; the whisker shows a residual strain that is due to loops because, after an annealing treatment to evaporate dislocation loops, each whisker recovers its initial straight shape. Everywhere along the whisker, the radius of curvature is measured and plotted vs the max. applied stress. Estimations of the interstitial and vacancy dislocation loop nuclei are derived [fr

  10. [Altitude-belt zonality of wood vegetation within mountainous regions of the Sayan Mountains: a model of ecological second-order phase transitions ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhovol'skiĭ, V G; Ovchinnikova, T M; Baboĭ, S D

    2014-01-01

    As a description of altitude-belt zonality of wood vegetation, a model of ecological second-order transitions is proposed. Objects of the study have been chosen to be forest cenoses of the northern slope of Kulumyss Ridge (the Sayan Mauntains), while the results are comprised by the altitude profiles of wood vegetation. An ecological phase transition can be considered as the transition of cenoses at different altitudes from the state of presence of certain tree species within the studied territory to the state of their absence. By analogy with the physical model of second-order, phase transitions the order parameter is introduced (i.e., the area portion occupied by a single tree species at the certain altitude) as well as the control variable (i.e., the altitude of the wood vegetation belt). As the formal relation between them, an analog of the Landau's equation for phase transitions in physical systems is obtained. It is shown that the model is in a good accordance with the empirical data. Thus, the model can be used for estimation of upper and lower boundaries of altitude belts for individual tree species (like birch, aspen, Siberian fir, Siberian pine) as well as the breadth of their ecological niches with regard to altitude. The model includes also the parameters that describe numerically the interactions between different species of wood vegetation. The approach versatility allows to simplify description and modeling of wood vegetation altitude zonality, and enables assessment of vegetation cenoses response to climatic changes.

  11. Transitional Justice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gissel, Line Engbo

    This presentation builds on an earlier published article, 'Contemporary Transitional Justice: Normalising a Politics of Exception'. It argues that the field of transitional justice has undergone a shift in conceptualisation and hence practice. Transitional justice is presently understood to be th...... to be the provision of ordinary criminal justice in contexts of exceptional political transition.......This presentation builds on an earlier published article, 'Contemporary Transitional Justice: Normalising a Politics of Exception'. It argues that the field of transitional justice has undergone a shift in conceptualisation and hence practice. Transitional justice is presently understood...

  12. Magnetic fields with photon beams: Use of circular current loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jette, David

    2001-01-01

    Strong transverse magnetic fields can produce very large dose enhancements and reductions in localized regions of a patient under irradiation by a photon beam. Through EGS4 Monte Carlo simulations, we have examined the effects of applying a magnetic field produced by a pair of circular current loops to a photon beam penetrating a water phantom of finite thickness. We have indeed found very substantial localized dose enhancements, albeit with no corresponding dose reduction just distal to the region of dose enhancement. (However, dose reduction does occur near the distal end of the phantom.) We have also observed two phenomena to be concerned with, for this configuration: significant broadening of the penumbra close to the current loop, and narrowness of the enhanced dose region in a plane parallel to the planes of the loops. We have also examined the use of a single current loop to produce the magnetic field, and have found great asymmetry in the dose distribution; this asymmetry appears to make it impossible to treat with a single circular magnet a tumor of large dimension extending below the application surface

  13. On the duality-transformed Wilson loop operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizrachi, L.

    1981-08-01

    Duality transformation of the vacuum expectation value of the Wilson loop operator is performed in the radial gauge (xsub(μ)Asub(μ)sup(a)(x) = 0). It is found to be equal, up to a multiplicative constant, to , where O(c) is a line integral along the loop c (defining the Wilson loop operator) of a function of the dual field variables. In the weak coupling region self duality is recovered in the sense that the Lagrangian is local gauge invariant defined in terms of the dual gauge potentials but with g (the coupling constant) replaced by 1/g, and O(c) is simply the line integral of the dual gauge potentials. For large g, a strong coupling expansion is suggested (but the theory is not local gauge invariant). (author)

  14. Motion of matter in flare loops of the solar disc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Ao-ao

    1987-01-01

    By using the optical observation data of a Class 3B double-ribbon flare obtained on July 14, 1980 at the Yunan Observatory, and the x-ray result from the SMM satellite for the same flare, the law of motion of matter in the flare loops of the solar disc is discussed. First, the solar disc positions from the Hα and x-ray images for the flare were compared, and the altitude of the flare loop was determined according to projection effects. Second, the line-of-sight velocity distribution in the region of flare activity due to the falling of matter in the flare loop was estimated theoretically. The result agreed with the observed data

  15. Fast loop modeling for protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiong; Nguyen, Son; Shang, Yi; Xu, Dong; Kosztin, Ioan

    2015-03-01

    X-ray crystallography is the main method for determining 3D protein structures. In many cases, however, flexible loop regions of proteins cannot be resolved by this approach. This leads to incomplete structures in the protein data bank, preventing further computational study and analysis of these proteins. For instance, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of structure-function relationship require complete protein structures. To address this shortcoming, we have developed and implemented an efficient computational method for building missing protein loops. The method is database driven and uses deep learning and multi-dimensional scaling algorithms. We have implemented the method as a simple stand-alone program, which can also be used as a plugin in existing molecular modeling software, e.g., VMD. The quality and stability of the generated structures are assessed and tested via energy scoring functions and by equilibrium MD simulations. The proposed method can also be used in template-based protein structure prediction. Work supported by the National Institutes of Health [R01 GM100701]. Computer time was provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  16. Two- and three-loop amplitudes in covariant loop calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roland, K.

    1988-04-01

    We study 2- and 3-loop vacuum-amplitudes for the closed bosonic string. We compare two sets of expressions for the corresponding density on moduli space: One, based on the covariant Reggeon loop calculus (where modular invariance is not manifest). The other, based on analytic geometry. We want to prove identity between the two sets of expressions. Quite apart from demonstrating modular invariance of the Reggeon results, this would in itself be a remarkable mathematical feature. Identity is established to 'high' order in some moduli and exactly in others. The expansions reveal an essentially number-theoretical structure. Agreement is found only by exploiting the connection between the 4 Jacobi θ-functions and number theory. (orig.)

  17. Two- and three-loop amplitudes in covariant loop calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roland, K.

    1989-01-01

    We study two- and three-loop vacuum amplitudes for the closed bosonic string. We compare two sets of expressions for the corresponding density on moduli space. One is based on the covariant reggeon loop calculus (where modular invariance is not manifest). The other is based on analytic geometry. We want to prove identity between the two sets of expressions. Quite apart from demonstrating modular invariance of the reggeon results, this would in itself be a remarkable mathematical feature. Identity is established to ''high'' order in some moduli and exactly in others. The expansions reveal an essentially number-theoretic structure. Agreement is found only by exploiting the connection between the four Jacobi θ-functions and number theory. (orig.)

  18. Advancements in Development of Chemical-Looping Combustion: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Fang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical-looping combustion (CLC is a novel combustion technology with inherent separation of greenhouse CO2. Extensive research has been performed on CLC in the last decade with respect to oxygen carrier development, reaction kinetics, reactor design, system efficiencies, and prototype testing. Transition metal oxides, such as Ni, Fe, Cu, and Mn oxides, were reported as reactive species in the oxygen carrier particles. Ni-based oxygen carriers exhibited the best reactivity and stability during multiredox cycles. The performance of the oxygen carriers can be improved by changing preparation method or by making mixedoxides. The CLC has been demonstrated successfully in continuously operated prototype reactors based on interconnected fluidized-bed system in the size range of 0.3–50 kW. High fuel conversion rates and almost 100%  CO2 capture efficiencies were obtained. The CLC system with two interconnected fluidized-bed reactors was considered the most suitable reactor design. Development of oxygen carriers with excellent reactivity and stability is still one of the challenges for CLC in the near future. Experiences of building and operating the large-scale CLC systems are needed before this technology is used commercially. Chemical-looping reforming (CLR and chemical-looping hydrogen (CLH are novel chemical-looping techniques to produce synthesis gas and hydrogen deserving more attention and research.

  19. Transition-Systems, Event Structures, and Unfoldings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Rozenberg, Grzegorz; Thiagarajan, P.S.

    1995-01-01

    systems. Here we show that by smoothly strengthening the regional axioms for elementary transition systems, one obtains a subclass called occurrence transition system. We then prove that occurrence transition systems are the transition system model of yet another basic model of concurrency, namely, prime......A subclass of transition systems called elementary transition systems can be identified with the help of axioms based on a structural notion called regions. Elementary transition systems have been shown to be the transition system model of a basic system model of net theory called elementary net...

  20. Exploring the Dynamics of Propeller Loops in Human Telomeric DNA Quadruplexes Using Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We have carried out a series of extended unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (up to 10 μs long, ∼162 μs in total) complemented by replica-exchange with the collective variable tempering (RECT) approach for several human telomeric DNA G-quadruplex (GQ) topologies with TTA propeller loops. We used different AMBER DNA force-field variants and also processed simulations by Markov State Model (MSM) analysis. The slow conformational transitions in the propeller loops took place on a scale of a few μs, emphasizing the need for long simulations in studies of GQ dynamics. The propeller loops sampled similar ensembles for all GQ topologies and for all force-field dihedral-potential variants. The outcomes of standard and RECT simulations were consistent and captured similar spectrum of loop conformations. However, the most common crystallographic loop conformation was very unstable with all force-field versions. Although the loss of canonical γ-trans state of the first propeller loop nucleotide could be related to the indispensable bsc0 α/γ dihedral potential, even supporting this particular dihedral by a bias was insufficient to populate the experimentally dominant loop conformation. In conclusion, while our simulations were capable of providing a reasonable albeit not converged sampling of the TTA propeller loop conformational space, the force-field description still remained far from satisfactory. PMID:28475322