WorldWideScience

Sample records for transition metals alloys

  1. Laser surface alloying of aluminium-transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, A.; Vilar, R.

    1998-01-01

    Laser surface alloying has been used as a tool to produce hard and corrosion resistant Al-transition metal (TM) alloys. Cr and Mo are particularly interesting alloying elements to produce stable high-strength alloys because they present low diffusion coefficients and solid solubility in Al. To produce Al-TM surface alloys a two-step laser process was developed: firstly, the material is alloyed using low scanning speed and secondly, the microstructure is modified by a refinement step. This process was used in the production of Al-Cr, Al-Mo and Al-Mo and Al-Nb surface alloys by alloying Cr, Mo or Nb powder into an Al and 7175 Al alloy substrate using a CO 2 laser . This paper presents a review of the work that has been developed at Instituto Superior Tecnico on laser alloying of Al-TM alloy, over the last years. (Author) 16 refs

  2. Phase stability of transition metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hixson, R.S.; Schiferl, D.; Wills, J.M.; Hill, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project was focused on resolving unexplained differences in calculated and measured phase transition pressures in transition metals. Part of the approach was to do new, higher accuracy calculations of transmission pressures for group 4B and group 6B metals. Theory indicates that the transition pressures for these baseline metals should change if alloyed with a d-electron donor metal, and calculations done using the Local Density Approximation (LDA) and the Virtual Crystal Approximation (VCA) indicate that this is true. Alloy systems were calculated for Ti, Zr and Hf based alloys with various solute concentrations. The second part of the program was to do new Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) measurements to experimentally verify calculational results. Alloys were prepared for these systems with grain size suitable for Diamond Anvil Cell experiments. Experiments were done on pure Ti as well as Ti-V and Ti-Ta alloys. Measuring unambiguous transition pressures for these systems proved difficult, but a new technique developed yielded good results

  3. Stable carbides in transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrkowski, R.

    1991-01-01

    In the present work different techniques were employed for the identification of stable carbides in two sets of transition metal alloys of wide technological application: a set of three high alloy M2 type steels in which W and/or Mo were total or partially replaced by Nb, and a Zr-2.5 Nb alloy. The M2 steel is a high speed steel worldwide used and the Zr-2.5 Nb alloy is the base material for the pressure tubes in the CANDU type nuclear reactors. The stability of carbide was studied in the frame of Goldschmidt's theory of interstitial alloys. The identification of stable carbides in steels was performed by determining their metallic composition with an energy analyzer attached to the scanning electron microscope (SEM). By these means typical carbides of the M2 steel, MC and M 6 C, were found. Moreover, the spatial and size distribution of carbide particles were determined after different heat treatments, and both microstructure and microhardness were correlated with the appearance of the secondary hardening phenomenon. In the Zr-Nb alloy a study of the α and β phases present after different heat treatments was performed with optical and SEM metallographic techniques, with the guide of Abriata and Bolcich phase diagram. The α-β interphase boundaries were characterized as short circuits for diffusion with radiotracer techniques and applying Fisher-Bondy-Martin model. The precipitation of carbides was promoted by heat treatments that produced first the C diffusion into the samples at high temperatures (β phase), and then the precipitation of carbide particles at lower temperature (α phase or (α+β)) two phase field. The precipitated carbides were identified as (Zr, Nb)C 1-x with SEM, electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction techniques. (Author) [es

  4. Thermophysical Property Measurements of Silicon-Transition Metal Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banish, R. Michael; Erwin, William R.; Sansoucie, Michael P.; Lee, Jonghyun; Gave, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Metals and metallic alloys often have high melting temperatures and highly reactive liquids. Processing reactive liquids in containers can result in significant contamination and limited undercooling. This is particularly true for molten silicon and it alloys. Silicon is commonly termed "the universal solvent". The viscosity, surface tension, and density of several silicon-transition metal alloys were determined using the Electrostatic Levitator system at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The temperature dependence of the viscosity followed an Arrhenius dependence, and the surface tension followed a linear temperature dependence. The density of the melts, including the undercooled region, showed a linear behavior as well. Viscosity and surface tension values were obtain for several of the alloys in the undercooled region.

  5. Special about transition metals in alloy phase formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, R E; Bennett, L H

    1979-01-01

    The d-electrons are special, though their bonding properties remain to be completely understood. It is recognized that d band broadening is the dominant term contributing to transition metal cohesion. It is also generally recognized that in compound formation between transition-metals and polyvalent metals, hybridization between d-bands and polyvalent atom p bands provides a significant contribution to the energy (for example there is such a term in Miedema's scheme). Less generally realized is that d-band hybridization leads to changes in d-electron counts at a transition metal site which are opposite in sign to the net charge transfer on or off the site. The renormalized atom picture of cohesion of the pure transition metals and consider the experimental evidence and the theoretical understanding of d charge transfer going the wrong way are reviewed. A picture of the electronegativity of transition metals based on this trend is developed. Charge transfer associated with equalizing the local chemical potentials in alloys is estimated. Friedel type model alloy calculations are reviewed. The implications of the experimental charge transfer information from Moessbauer isomer shifts to such model alloy calculations and to the strength of the Coulomb enery associated with charge transfer is considered.

  6. Magnetic properties of fcc Ni-based transition metal alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kudrnovský, Josef; Drchal, Václav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 9 (2009), s. 1193-1196 ISSN 1862-5282 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 150; GA AV ČR IAA100100616 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : transition metal alloys * Ni-based * pair exchange interactions * Curie temperatures * renormalized RPA Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.862, year: 2009

  7. Effect of alloying on elastic properties of ZrN based transition metal nitride alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Kanoun, Mohammed

    2014-09-01

    We report the effect of composition and metal sublattice substitutional element on the structural, elastic and electronic properties of ternary transition metal nitrides Zr1-xMxN with M=Al, Ti, Hf, V, Nb, W and Mo. The analysis of the elastic constants, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young\\'s modulus, and Poisson\\'s ratio provides insights regarding the mechanical behavior of Zr1-xMxN. We predict that ternary alloys are more ductile compared to their parent binary compounds. The revealed trend in the mechanical behavior might help for experimentalists on the ability of tuning the mechanical properties during the alloying process by varying the concentration of the transition metal. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Atomically Thin Ordered Alloys of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides: Stability and Band Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Mohnish; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility of modulating the electronic band edges of the transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) via alloying of different semiconductors within the same group (intra-group alloying). The stability of the ordered alloys is assessed from the calculated mixing enthalpy which is found...

  9. Surface segregation energies in transition-metal alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1999-01-01

    We present a database of 24 x 24 surface segregation energies of single transition metal impurities in transition-metal hosts obtained by a Green's-function linear-muffin-tin-orbitals method in conjunction with the coherent potential and atomic sphere approximations including a multipole correction...

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of Pd-Ni transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kart, S. O.; Kart, H. H.; Uludogan, M.; Tomak, M.; Cagin, T.

    2002-01-01

    Molecular Dynamics simulations are performed to study bulk properties of fcc metals and metal alloys by using the quantum Sutton-Chen many-body potentials within the context of the tight-binding approach. The Molecular Dynamics algorithms we used in the simulations of Pd-Ni alloys are based on an extended Hamiltonian formalism arising from the works of Andersen (1980), Parinello and Rahman (1980), Nose (1984), Hoover (1985) and Cagin (1988). In these simulations, the effect of temperature and concentration on the solid and liquid properties are studied. Elastic constants and phonon dispersion relation are the solid properties we simulated in this work. Dynamic and static properties of liquid Pd-Ni are also computed by examining the behavior of density, enthalpy, pair distribution function and structure factor. The melting temperatures of Pd-Ni alloys are investigated. The diffusion coefficients are calculated from the mean square displacement using Einstein relation and from velocity auto-correlation function using Green-Kubo relations. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experiments

  11. Production by metallothermics of pure alloys of rare earths and transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jourdan, A.

    1988-01-01

    Industrial process of production of high purity master alloys ingots by the thermite process from a rare earth compound which is reduced by a reducing agent like alkaline or alkaline earth metals. The process is characterized by introduction of the transition metal into the initial reaction mixture, at least in part, as a compound than can be reduced by the reducing agent [fr

  12. A general scheme for the estimation of oxygen binding energies on binary transition metal surface alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    A simple scheme for the estimation of oxygen binding energies on transition metal surface alloys is presented. It is shown that a d-band center model of the alloy surfaces is a convenient and appropriate basis for this scheme; variations in chemical composition, strain effects, and ligand effects...... are all incorporated into the binding energy analysis through this parameter. With few exceptions, the agreement of the results from the simple model with full DFT calculations on hundreds of binary surface alloys is remarkable. The scheme should therefore provide a fast and effective method...... for the estimation of oxygen binding energies on a wide variety of transition metal alloys. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  13. Heat of solution and site energies of hydrogen in disordered transition-metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brouwer, R.C.; Griessen, R.

    1989-01-01

    Site energies, long-range effective hydrogen-hydrogen interactions, and the enthalpy of solution in transition-metal alloys are calculated by means of an embedded-cluster model. The energy of a hydrogen atom is assumed to be predominantly determined by the first shell of neighboring metal atoms. The semiempirical local band-structure model is used to calculate the energy of the hydrogen atoms in the cluster, taking into account local deviations from the average lattice constant. The increase in the solubility limit and the weak dependence of the enthalpy of solution on hydrogen concentration in disordered alloys are discussed. Calculated site energies and enthalpies of solution in the alloys are compared with experimental data, and good agreement is found. Due to the strong interactions with the nearest-neighbor metal atoms, hydrogen atoms can be used to determine local lattice separations and the extent of short-range order in ''disordered'' alloys

  14. First Principles Calculations of Transition Metal Binary Alloys: Phase Stability and Surface Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspera, Susan Meñez; Arevalo, Ryan Lacdao; Shimizu, Koji; Kishida, Ryo; Kojima, Kazuki; Linh, Nguyen Hoang; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Kasai, Hideaki

    2017-06-01

    The phase stability and surface effects on binary transition metal nano-alloy systems were investigated using density functional theory-based first principles calculations. In this study, we evaluated the cohesive and alloying energies of six binary metal alloy bulk systems that sample each type of alloys according to miscibility, i.e., Au-Ag and Pd-Ag for the solid solution-type alloys (SS), Pd-Ir and Pd-Rh for the high-temperature solid solution-type alloys (HTSS), and Au-Ir and Ag-Rh for the phase-separation (PS)-type alloys. Our results and analysis show consistency with experimental observations on the type of materials in the bulk phase. Varying the lattice parameter was also shown to have an effect on the stability of the bulk mixed alloy system. It was observed, particularly for the PS- and HTSS-type materials, that mixing gains energy from the increasing lattice constant. We furthermore evaluated the surface effects, which is an important factor to consider for nanoparticle-sized alloys, through analysis of the (001) and (111) surface facets. We found that the stability of the surface depends on the optimization of atomic positions and segregation of atoms near/at the surface, particularly for the HTSS and the PS types of metal alloys. Furthermore, the increase in energy for mixing atoms at the interface of the atomic boundaries of PS- and HTSS-type materials is low enough to overcome by the gain in energy through entropy. These, therefore, are the main proponents for the possibility of mixing alloys near the surface.

  15. Band shift of 2D transition-metal dichalcogenide alloys: size and composition effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yipeng; Zhang, Zhe; Ouyang, Gang

    2018-04-01

    Band engineering of 2D transition-metal dichalcogenides (2D-TMDs) is a vital task for their applications in electronic and optoelectronic nanodevices. In this study, we investigate the joint effect from size and composition contributions on the band shift of 2D-TMD alloys in terms of atomic bond relaxation consideration. A theoretical model is proposed to pursue the underlying mechanism, which can connect the band offset with the atomic bonding identities in the 2D-TMD alloys. We reveal that the bandgap of 2D-TMD alloys presents a bowing shape owing to the size-dependent interaction among atoms and shows blue shift or red shift due to different intermixing of components. It is demonstrated that both size and composition can be performed as the useful methods to modulate the band shift, which suggests an effective way to realize the desirable properties of 2D-TMD alloys.

  16. Metal-insulator transition of alloyed radical cation salts, (MexEDO-TTF)2PF6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Tsuyoshi; Shao, Xiangfeng; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Uruichi, Mikio; Yakushi, Kyuya; Tanaka, Koichiro

    2010-06-01

    Ternary radical cation salts containing ethylenedioxytetrathiafulvalene, its mono-methyl substituted derivative, and hexafluorophosphate, [(EDO-TTF)1-x(MeEDO-TTF)x]2PF6 (x=mole fraction of MeEDO-TTF, x=0.01-0.13) were prepared by electrooxidation. Mole fractions of EDO-TTF and MeEDO-TTF in EDO-TTF rich alloys were consistent with the donor mixing ratios in preparation. Crystal structures of these alloys at room temperature were isostructural to that of (EDO-TTF)2PF6, where the donor molecules formed a nearly uniform stacking column to give a quasi-one-dimensional Fermi surface. The alloys exhibited a metal-insulator transition with tetramerization within the donor stack and anion-ordering. Temperature-variable structural analysis and Raman spectra revealed that the charge-ordering took place in the low temperature phase of x=0.05 alloy, however, this feature vanished in the x=0.13 alloy. The phase transition temperature decreased with increasing x value from 279 K of pristine (EDO-TTF)2PF6 to 188 K of x=0.13 alloy.

  17. Magnetic properties of fcc Ni-based transition metal alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kudrnovský, Josef; Drchal, Václav; Bruno, P.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 22 (2008), 224422/1-224422/8 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 150; GA AV ČR IAA100100616; GA ČR GA202/07/0456 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : Ni-based alloys * magnetic properties * Curie temperatures Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.322, year: 2008

  18. CPA theory of the magnetization in rare earth transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szpunar, B.; Lindgaard, P.A.

    1976-11-01

    Calculations were made of the magnetic moment per atom of the transition metal and the rare earth metal in the intermetallic compounds, Gdsub(1-x)Nisub(x), Gdsub(1-x)Fesub(x), Gdsub(1-x)Cosub(x), and Ysub(1-x)Cosub(x). A simple model of the disordered alloy consisting of spins localized on the rare earth atoms and interacting with a narrow d-band is considered. The magnetic moment of the alloy at zero temperature is calculated within the molecular field and Hartree-Fock approximations. Disorder is treated in the coherent potential approximation. Results are in good agreement with the experimental data obtained for the crystalline and amorphous intermetallic compounds. It is shown that the temperature dependence of the magnetic moments and Curie and ferrimagnetic compensation temperatures can be accounted for by a simple model assuming a RKKY interaction between the rare-earth moments and the transition metal pseudo spin. The interaction is mediated by an effective alloy medium calculated using the CPA theory and elliptic densities of states. (Auth.)

  19. Non-empirical interatomic potentials for transition metals, alloys, and semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Progress has been made on several fronts in the development and application of simplified energy and force functionals. These elucidate the basic features of bulk and defect structures, and are being coded in a form which can be used in atomistic simulations of materials properties. The main categories of materials which we have treated are transition metals, semiconductors, and aluminum alloys. We have analyzed the basic form of the angular dependence of the interatomic forces in these materials. We have then applied this understanding to the structures of polytetrahedrally packed transition metal compounds, icosahedral phase in the Ti-Mn system, and complex phases in Al-transition metal alloys. A force code for use in atomistic simulations of Si has also been developed. The Principal Investigator has completed a major review article on interatomic potentials for Solid State Physics: Advances in Research and Applications. The significance of the research accomplishment has also been recognized by several invited lectures, as well as solicitation to write an article entitled Cohesion (physics) for the upcoming new edition of the McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of Science and Technology.

  20. Controllable Synthesis of Band Gap-Tunable and Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Han eSu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The electronic and optical properties of transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD materials are directly governed by their energy gap; thus, the band gap engineering has become an important topic recently. Theoretical and some experimental results have indicated that these monolayer TMD alloys exhibit direct-gap properties and remain stable at room temperature, making them attractive for optoelectronic applications. Here we systematically compared the two approaches of forming MoS2xSe2(1-x monolayer alloys: selenization of MoS2 and sulfurization of MoSe2. The optical energy gap of as-grown CVD MoS2 can be continuously modulated from 1.86 eV (667 nm to 1.57 eV (790 nm controllable by the reaction temperature. Spectroscopic and microscopic evidences show that the Mo-S bonds can be replaced by the Mo-Se bonds in a random and homogeneous manner. By contrast, the replacement of Mo-Se by Mo-S does not randomly occur in the MoSe2 lattice, where the reaction preferentially occurs along the crystalline orientation of MoSe2 and thus the MoSe2/MoS2 biphases are easily observed in the alloys, which makes the optical band gap of these alloys distinctly different. Therefore, the selenization of metal disulfide is preferred and the proposed synthetic strategy opens up a simple route to control the atomic structure as well as optical properties of monolayer TMD alloys.

  1. Thermochemical Properties of Group IVB and VB Transition Metal Alloys with Platinum Group Metals: Acid - Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cima, Michael John

    Solid-state galvanic cell measurements and oxide equilibration experiments are used to derive thermochemical quantities for a variety of acid-base stabilized alloys such as Nb-Pd, Nb-Rh, Ti-Pd, and Ti-Rh. The experiments have effectively resulted in the titration of palladium by niobium metal. The excess partial molar Gibbs energy of niobium at infinite dilution was determined to be -62 kcal/mole at 1000^circ C and the Gibbs energy of formation of {rm NbPd}_{3.55} is -42 kcal/mole. These results and those for the other systems are used to assess the importance of crystal field effects in the context of the generalized Lewis acid-base theory.

  2. Application of machine-learning methods to solid-state chemistry: ferromagnetism in transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landrum, G.A.Gregory A.; Genin, Hugh

    2003-01-01

    Machine-learning methods are a collection of techniques for building predictive models from experimental data. The algorithms are problem-independent: the chemistry and physics of the problem being studied are contained in the descriptors used to represent the known data. The application of a variety of machine-learning methods to the prediction of ferromagnetism in ordered and disordered transition metal alloys is presented. Applying a decision tree algorithm to build a predictive model for ordered phases results in a model that is 100% accurate. The same algorithm achieves 99% accuracy when trained on a data set containing both ordered and disordered phases. Details of the descriptor sets for both applications are also presented

  3. Coercivity of domain wall motion in thin films of amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuripur, M.; Giles, R. C.; Patterson, G.

    1991-01-01

    Computer simulations of a two dimensional lattice of magnetic dipoles are performed on the Connection Machine. The lattice is a discrete model for thin films of amorphous rare-earth transition metal alloys, which have application as the storage media in erasable optical data storage systems. In these simulations, the dipoles follow the dynamic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation under the influence of an effective field arising from local anisotropy, near-neighbor exchange, classical dipole-dipole interactions, and an externally applied field. Various sources of coercivity, such as defects and/or inhomogeneities in the lattice, are introduced and the subsequent motion of domain walls in response to external fields is investigated.

  4. Upper critical fields and superconducting transition temperatures of some zirconium-base amorphous transition-metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karkut, M.G.; Hake, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    Superconducting upper critical fields H/sub c/2(T), transition temperatures T/sub c/, and normal-state electrical resistivities rho/sub n/ have been measured in the amorphous transition-metal alloy series Zr/sub 1-z/Co/sub x/, Zr/sub 1-x/Ni/sub x/, (Zr/sub 1-x/Ti/sub x/)/sub 0.78/Ni/sub 0.22/, and (Zr/sub 1-x/Nb/sub x/)/sub 0.78/Ni/sub 0.22/. Structural integrity of these melt-spun alloys is indicated by x-ray, density, bend-ductility, normal-state electrical resistivity, superconducting transition width, and mixed-state flux-pinning measurements. The specimens display T/sub c/ = 2.1--3.8 K, rho/sub n/ = 159--190 μΩ cm, and Vertical Bar(dH/sub c/2/dT)cVertical Bar = 28--36 kG/K. These imply electron mean free paths lroughly-equal2--6 A, zero-temperature Ginzburg-Landau coherence distances xi/sub G/0roughly-equal50--70 A, penetration depths lambda/sub G/0roughly-equal(7--10) x 10 3 A, and extremely high dirtiness parameters xi 0 /lroughly-equal300--1300. All alloys display H/sub c/2(T) curves with negative curvature and (with two exceptions) fair agreement with the standard dirty-limit theory of Werthamer, Helfand, Hohenberg, and Maki (WHHM) for physically reasonable values of spin-orbit-coupling induced, electron-spin-flip scattering time tau/sub so/. This is in contrast to the anomalously elevated H/sub c/2(T) behavior which is nearly linear in T that is observed by some, and the unphysically low-tau/sub so/ fits to WHHM theory obtained by others, for various amorphous alloys

  5. Crystal-Structure Contribution to the Solid Solubility in Transition Metal Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    1998-01-01

    The solution energies of 4d metals in other 4d metals as well as the bcc-hcp structural energy differences in random 4d alloys are calculated by density functional theory. It is shown that the crystal structure of the host plays a crucial role in the solid solubility. A local virtual bond...

  6. Surface and subsurface hydrogen: adsorption properties on transition metals and near-surface alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Jeff; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2005-03-03

    Periodic, self-consistent DFT-GGA calculations are used to study the thermochemical properties of both surface and subsurface atomic hydrogen on a variety of pure metals and near-surface alloys (NSAs). For surface hydrogen on pure metals, calculated site preferences, adsorption geometries, vibrational frequencies, and binding energies are reported and are found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. On NSAs, defined as alloys wherein a solute is present near the surface of a host metal in a composition different from the bulk composition, surface hydrogen generally binds more weakly than it binds to the pure-metal components composing the alloys. Some of the NSAs even possess the unusual property of binding hydrogen as weakly as the noble metals while, at the same time, dissociating H(2) much more easily. On both NSAs and pure metals, formation of surface hydrogen is generally exothermic with respect to H(2)(g). In contrast, formation of subsurface hydrogen is typically endothermic with respect to gas-phase H(2) (the only exception to this general statement is found for pure Pd). As with surface H, subsurface H typically binds more weakly to NSAs than to the corresponding pure-metal components of the alloys. The diffusion barrier for hydrogen from surface to subsurface sites, however, is usually lower on NSAs compared to the pure-metal components, suggesting that population of subsurface sites may occur more rapidly on NSAs.

  7. Proofs of cluster formation and transitions in liquid metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippov, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    Calculational and experimental proofs are presented indicating to existence of clusters in liquid metals and alloys. Systems of liquid alloys both on the base of ferrous metals and non-ferrous metals (Fe-C, Ni-C, Co-C, Fe-Ni, Ni-Mo, Co-Cr, Co-V as well as In-Sn, Bi-Sn, Si-Ge and others) are studied experimentally. It is shown that the general feature of the systems studied is sensitivity of a volume to change in structure, to replacement fcc structure on bcc or to initiation-dissociation of intermetallic compounds AxBy. It is shown that both in pure liquid metals and in their.alloys there are clusters as ordered aggregate of atoms

  8. Entropic stabilisation of topologically close-packed phases in binary transition-metal alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerschmidt, Thomas; Fries, Suzana G.; Steinbach, Ingo; Drautz, Ralf [ICAMS, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Seiser, Bernhard; Pettifor, David G. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    The formation of topologically close-packed (tcp) phases in Ni-based superalloys leads to the degradation of the mechanical properties of the alloys. The precipitation of the tcp phases is attributed to refractory elements that are added in low concentration to improve creep resistance. It is well known that the structural stability of the tcp phases A15, {sigma} and {chi} is driven by the average d-band filling. For a direct comparison to experimental phase diagrams, we carried out extensive density-functional theory (DFT) calculations of the tcp phases A15, C14, C15, C36, {mu}, {sigma}, and {chi} in tcp-forming binary transition-metal (TM) systems. We observe several systems such as W-Re with positive values of the heat of formation for all tcp phases although some of the phases are observed experimentally. By combining our DFT total energies with the CALPHAD methodology, we can demonstrate that configurational entropy can stabilise the tcp phases in these systems.

  9. Physical properties of Pd and Al transition metals and Pd-Al binary metal alloy investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coruh, A.; Uludogan, M.; Tomak, M.; Cagin, T.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, physical properties, such as Pair Distribution Function g(r), Structure Factor S(k)''1'',''4, Diffusion Coefficient D''2''.''4, Intermediate Scattering function S(k,t)''3'',''4 and Dynamical Structure Factor S(k,w)''3'',''4 of some transition metals and metal alloys are investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation method. The simulation is specified for Pd, Al transition metals and Pd-Al binary metal alloys in the liquid form for different concentrations and at various temperatures by using Quantum Sutton-Chen (Q-SC) inter atomic potential. Intermediate scattering function and dynamical structure factor are calculated for various values of wave vector k. Results are in good agreement with published data''1'',''3'',''4

  10. Multi-body forces and the energetics of transition metals, alloys, and semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    Progress over the past year is divided into 3 areas: potential-energy functions for transition-metal aluminides; electronic structure and energetics of complex structures and quasicrystals; and ceramic materials (PdO, PtO)

  11. Abrupt symmetry decrease in the ThT{sub 2}Al{sub 20} alloys (T = 3d transition metal)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uziel, A.; Bram, A.I. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, 8410501 (Israel); Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, 8410501 (Israel); Venkert, A. [Nuclear Research Center-Negev, POB 9001, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Kiv, A.E.; Fuks, D. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, 8410501 (Israel); Meshi, L., E-mail: louisa@bgu.ac.il [Department of Materials Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, 8410501 (Israel); Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, 8410501 (Israel)

    2015-11-05

    Th-T-Al system, where T-3d transition metals, was studied at ThT{sub 2}Al{sub 20} stoichiometry to establish the influence of T on the structural stability of ternary aluminide formed. Different alloys were prepared, varying T in the row from Ti to Fe. Using electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods it was found that ThT{sub 2}Al{sub 20} phase adopts CeCr{sub 2}Al{sub 20} structure type when T = Ti, V, and Cr. Starting from Mn, the symmetry of the stable Al-rich phase, which forms in the alloys with the same composition, decreases from cubic to orthorhombic. The results of Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations coincide with experiments. Concepts of the Theory of Coordination Compounds and Jahn–Teller effect were used to explain the observed abrupt change of the symmetry. These considerations were supported by DFT calculations. - Highlights: • Type of transition metal influences symmetry change in the ThT{sub 2}Al{sub 20} alloys. • It was found that cubic ThT{sub 2}Al{sub 20} phase is stable for T = Ti, V and Cr. • When T = Mn, Fe–Al + orthorhombic ThT{sub 2}Al{sub 10} are formed, lowering the symmetry. • Experimental results and DFT calculations were in full agreement. • TCC and of Jahn–Teller effect were used for explanation of the results.

  12. High-Performance Transition Metal Phosphide Alloy Catalyst for Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kewei; Zhang, Changlin; Sun, Yuandong; Zhang, Guanghui; Shen, Xiaochen; Zou, Feng; Zhang, Haichang; Wu, Zhenwei; Wegener, Evan C; Taubert, Clinton J; Miller, Jeffrey T; Peng, Zhenmeng; Zhu, Yu

    2018-01-23

    Oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is a pivotal process in many energy conversion and storage techniques, such as water splitting, regenerative fuel cells, and rechargeable metal-air batteries. The synthesis of stable, efficient, non-noble metal-based electrocatalysts for OER has been a long-standing challenge. In this work, a facile and scalable method to synthesize hollow and conductive iron-cobalt phosphide (Fe-Co-P) alloy nanostructures using an Fe-Co metal organic complex as a precursor is described. The Fe-Co-P alloy exhibits excellent OER activity with a specific current density of 10 mA/cm 2 being achieved at an overpotential as low as 252 mV. The current density at 1.5 V (vs reversible hydrogen electrode) of the Fe-Co-P catalyst is 30.7 mA/cm 2 , which is more than 3 orders of magnitude greater than that obtained with state-of-the-art Fe-Co oxide catalysts. Our mechanistic experiments and theoretical analysis suggest that the electrochemical-induced high-valent iron stabilizes the cobalt in a low-valent state, leading to the simultaneous enhancement of activity and stability of the OER catalyst.

  13. BEP-relations for N2 dissociation over stepped transition metal and alloy surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronczek-Munter, Ture Rønved; Bligaard, Thomas; Christensen, Claus H.

    2008-01-01

    , a perfectly linear Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relation between the transition-state potential energy and the dissociative chemisorption energy is obtained. The perfect BEP relation, which extends over 12 eV in chemisorption energy, suggests that the manifestation of BEP relations for surface reactions...... is a general electronic structure effect, and that geometric effects are responsible for the scatter which is normally observed around the BEP line. The BEP relation is also shown to be valid for both surface and bulk alloys. The scatter is, however, larger than for the pure elements. This can be understood...

  14. Ductile transplutonium metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, William V.

    1983-01-01

    Alloys of Ce with transplutonium metals such as Am, Cm, Bk and Cf have properties making them highly suitable as sources of the transplutonium element, e.g., for use in radiation detector technology or as radiation sources. The alloys are ductile, homogeneous, easy to prepare and have a fairly high density.

  15. Microstructure and composition of rare earth-transition metal-aluminium-magnesium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Maria Carlotti Zarpelon

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the microstructure and chemical composition of La0.7-xPr xMg0.3Al 0.3Mn0.4Co0.5 Ni3.8 (0 < x < 0.7 metal hydride alloys has been carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X ray analysis (EDX and X ray diffraction analysis (XRD. The substitution of La with Pr changed the grain structure from equiaxial to columnar. The relative atomic ratio of rare earth to (Al, Mn, Co, Ni in the matrix phase was 1:5 (LaNi5-type structure. Magnesium was detected only in two other phases present. A grey phase revealed 11 at.% Mg and the concentration ratios of other elements indicated the composition to be close to PrMgNi4. A dark phase was very heterogeneous in composition, attributed to the as-cast state of these alloys. The phases identified by XRD analysis in the La0.7Mg0.3Al0.3Mn0.4Co 0.5Ni3.8 alloy were: La(Ni,Co5, LaAl(Ni,Co4, La2(Ni,Co7 and AlMn(Ni,Co2. Praseodymium favors the formation of a phase with a PuNi3-type structure. Cobalt substituted Ni in the structures and yielded phases of the type: Pr(Ni,Co5 and Pr(Ni,Co3.

  16. Effects of configurational changes on electrical resistivity during glass-liquid transition of two bulk metal-alloy glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aji, D. P. B.; Johari, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    Consequences of increase in structural fluctuations on heating Pd40Ni10Cu30P20 and Zr46.75Ti8.25Cu7.5Ni10Be27.5 through their glass to liquid transition range were investigated by measuring the electrical resistivity, ρ, an electron scattering property. The temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR = (1/ρ) dρ/dT) of the liquid and glassy states is negative. The plots of their ρ against T in the Tg (glass to liquid transition) range show a gradual change in the slope similar to the change observed generally for the plots of the density, elastic modulus, and refractive index. As fluctuations in the melt structure involve fewer configurations on cooling, ρ increases. In the energy landscape description, the melt's structure explores fewer minima with decrease in T, vibrational frequencies increase, and electron scattering and ρ increase. Plots of (-dρ/dT) against T resemble the plot of the specific heat of other glasses and show a sub-Tg feature and a rapid rise at T near Tg. Analysis shows that the magnitude of negative TCR is dominated by change in the phonon characteristics, and configurational fluctuations make it more negative. The TCR of the liquid and glassy states seems qualitatively consistent with the variation in the structure factor in Ziman's model for pure liquid metals as extended by Nagel to metal alloys and used to explain the negative TCR of a two-component metal glass.

  17. Order-disorder phase transitions in the two-dimensional semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide alloys Mo1−xWxX2 (X = S, Se, and Te)

    KAUST Repository

    Gan, Liyong

    2014-10-21

    A combination of density functional theory, an empirical model, and Monte Carlo simulations is used to shed light on the evolution of the atomic distribution in the two-dimensional semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide alloys Mo1−xWxX2 (X = S, Se, and Te) as a function of the W concentration and temperature. Both random and ordered phases are discovered and the origin of the phase transitions is clarified. While the empirical model predicts at x = 1/3 and 2/3 ordered alloys, Monte Carlo simulations suggest that they only exist at low temperature due to a small energetic preference of Mo-X-W over Mo-X-Mo and W-X-W interactions, explaining the experimental observation of random alloy Mo1−xWxS2. Negative formation energies point to a high miscibility. Tunability of the band edges and band gaps by alteration of the W concentration gives rise to a broad range of applications.

  18. An efficient magnetic tight-binding method for transition metals and alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreteau, Cyrille; Spanjaard, Daniel; Desjonquères, Marie-Catherine

    2016-01-01

    An efficient parameterized self-consistent tight-binding model for transition metals using s, p and d valence atomic orbitals as a basis set is presented. The parameters of our tight-binding model for pure elements are determined from a fit to bulk ab-initio calculations. A very simple procedure...... that does not necessitate any further fitting is proposed to deal with systems made of several chemical elements. This model is extended to spin (and orbital) polarized materials by adding Stoner-like and spin–orbit interactions. Collinear and non-collinear magnetism as well as spin-spirals are considered...

  19. Studies of tin-transition metal-carbon alloys prepared by mechanical milling for lithium-ion battery negative electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Pierre Philippe

    Mechanical milling and co-sputtering were used to prepare various Sn-Co-C alloys as negative electrodes materials for Li-ion batteries. By varying milling conditions, it was possible to obtain nanostructured materials by mechanical methods whose x-ray diffraction patterns mimicked the diffraction patterns of co-sputtered materials. Electrochemical testing of L/Sn30 Co30C40 cells showed stable charge-discharge capacity for at least 100 cycles, and stable differential capacity versus potential profiles. Although the materials appeared to have similar nanostructures, the sputtered material showed a reversible capacity near the theoretical capacity of Sn30Co30C40, while the materials prepared by mechanical methods showed lower capacity. From small angle neutron scattering results, it was found that milled materials had grain sizes on the order of 60 A, while those of sputter deposited materials had grain sizes on the order of 10 A or were truly amorphous. These results were used to understand why mechanically alloyed Sn-Co-C alloys do not reach their expected theoretical specific capacity. In an attempt to replace cobalt with a cheaper transition metal, iron, several compositions of Sn30(Co1-xFe x)30C40 were prepared by attritor milling. XRD and Mossbauer studies showed evidence of a nanostructured phase, most prominent near x = 0, and nanocrystalline FeSn 2, most prominent near x = 1. Mossbauer studies showed an increase in the amount of Fe-carbides as the Fe content increased. Both the x = 0 and x = 0.5 samples showed excellent capacity retention with a specific capacity of 450 mAh/g for at least 100 cycles. The x = 1 sample showed the highest reversible capacity for the cells tested at approximately 500 mAh/g but its capacity retention was poor. Structural and electrochemical experiments were reported for numerous Sn30TM30C40 and Sn30Co15 TM15C40 alloys, prepared by attritor milling, with TM = 3d transition metals. Sn30TM30C40 samples with TM = Co and TM = Ni showed

  20. Theory of Temperature Dependence of the Magnetization in Rare-Earth-Transition-Metal Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szpunar, B.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that the temperature dependence of the magnetic moments and Curie and ferrimagnetic compensation temperatures for Gdl-xTx (T = Co, Ni, and Fe) and Y1-xCox can be accounted for by a simple model assuming a RKKY interaction between the rare-earth moments and the transition-metal pseudo-spin......1-xCox durch ein einfaches Model1 erklärt werden können, das eine RKKY-Wechsel-wirkung zwischen den Momenten der Seltenen Erden und des Pseudo-Spins des Übergangsmetalls annimmt. Die Wechselwirkung wird durch ein effektives Legierungsmedium übermittelt, das mit der CPA-Theorie und elliptischen...

  1. Evidence for reentrant spin glass behavior in transition metal substituted Co-Ga alloys near critical concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Sk. Mohammad; Srinivas, V.; Kasiviswanathan, S.; Vagadia, Megha; Nigam, A. K.

    2018-04-01

    In the present study magnetic and electrical transport properties of transition metal substituted Co-Ga alloys (near critical cobalt concentration) have been investigated. Analysis of temperature and field dependence of dc magnetization and ac susceptibility (ACS) data suggests an evidence of reentrant spin glass (RSG) phase in Co55.5TM3Ga41.5 (TM = Co, Cr, Fe, Cu). The magnetic transition temperatures (TC and Tf) are found to depend on the nature of TM element substitution with the exchange coupling strength Co-Fe > Co-Co > Co-Cu > Co-Cr. From magnetization dynamics precise transition temperatures for the glassy phases are estimated. It is found that characteristic relaxation times are higher than that of spin glasses with minimal spin-cluster formation. The RSG behavior has been further supported by the temperature dependence of magnetotransport studies. From the magnetic field and substitution effects it has been established that the magnetic and electrical transport properties are correlated in this system.

  2. Mechanical properties and the electronic structure of transition of metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, R. J.; Drew, H. D.

    1977-01-01

    This interdiscipline research program was undertaken in an effort to investigate the relationship between the mechanical strength of Mo based alloys with their electronic structure. Electronic properties of these alloys were examined through optical studies, and the classical solid solution strengthening mechanisms were considered, based on size and molecular differences to determine if these mechanisms could explain the hardness data.

  3. Superconducting Metallic Glass Transition-Edge-Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Charles C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A superconducting metallic glass transition-edge sensor (MGTES) and a method for fabricating the MGTES are provided. A single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is deposited on a substrate. The single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is an absorber for the MGTES and is electrically connected to a circuit configured for readout and biasing to sense electromagnetic radiation.

  4. Multiple allergies to metal alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Eng Tu

    2011-06-01

    Conclusions: Metal alloys may induce multiple metal allergies. Patients suspected of having a metal allergy should be patch tested with an extended series of metals. We recommend adding palladium and gold, at least, to the standard series.

  5. Ab initio calculations of core level shifts in random transition metal alloys: the complete screening picture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrikosov, Igor A.; Olovsson, Weine; Pourovskii, Leonid V.; Johansson, Börje

    2003-03-01

    First-principles calculations of the core-level binding energy shifts (CLS) for inner core electrons were carried out within the complete screening picture. Results show excellent agreement with experiment. In particular, we analyze the CLS on Ag and Pd in fcc Ag-Pd alloys [1]. These alloys show remarkable CLS that have the same sign for both alloy components, in contradiction to what would be expected from the simplest models for core electron energies. We show that the main contribution to the core-level shift is due to the intra-atomic charge redistribution, which is related to the hybridization between the valence electron states of the alloy components. There is also a large contribution to the CLS from the core-hole relaxation energy. [1] I. A. Abrikosov, W. Olovsson, and B. Johansson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 176403 (2001).

  6. Electrodeposition of Transition Metal-Aluminum Alloys from Chloroaluminate Molten Salts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hussey, Charles

    2004-01-01

    .... Many of these alloys, notably Al-Mo and Al-W, exhibited outstanding resistance to chloride-induced pitting corrosion, making them useful corrosion protective coatings for Air Force applications in high-salt environments.

  7. Corrosion resistance and microstructure characterization of rare-earth-transition metal-aluminum-magnesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banczek, E.P.; Zarpelon, L.M.C.; Faria, R.N.; Costa, I.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the results of investigation carried out to evaluate the corrosion resistance and microstructure of some cast alloys represented by the general formula: La 0.7-x Pr x Mg 0.3 Al 0.3 Mn 0.4 Co 0.5 Ni 3.8 (x = 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical methods, specifically, polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), have been employed in this study. The effects of Pr substitution on the composition of the various phases in the alloys and their corrosion resistance have been studied. The electrochemical results showed that the alloy without Pr and the one with total La substitution showed the highest corrosion resistance among the studied alloys. The corrosion resistance of the alloys decreased when Pr was present in the lowest concentrations (0.1 and 0.3), but for higher Pr concentrations (0.5 and 0.7), the corrosion resistance increased. Corrosion occurred preferentially in a Mg-rich phase.

  8. Interaction between extended and localized electronic states in the region of the metal to insulator transition in semiconductor alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teubert, Joerg

    2008-01-01

    The first part of this work addresses the influence of those isovalent localized states on the electronic properties of (B,Ga,In)As. Most valuable were the measurements under hydrostatic pressure that revealed a pressure induced metal-insulator transition. One of the main ideas in this context is the trapping of carriers in localized B-related cluster states that appear in the bandgap at high pressure. The key conclusion that can be drawn from the experimental results is that boron atoms seem to have the character of isovalent electron traps, rendering boron as the first known isovalent trap induced by cationic substitution. In the second part, thermoelectric properties of (B,Ga,In)As and (Ga,In)(N,As) are studied. It was found that although the electric-field driven electronic transport in n-type (Ga,In)(N,As) and (B,Ga,In)As differs considerably from that of n-type GaAs, the temperature-gradient driven electronic transport is very similar for the three semiconductors, despite distinct differences in the conduction band structure of (Ga,In)(N,As) and (B,Ga,In)As compared to GaAs. The third part addresses the influence of magnetic interactions on the transport properties near the metal-insulator transition (MIT). Here, two scenarios are considered: Firstly the focus is set on ZnMnSe:Cl, a representative of so called dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS). In this material Mn(2+) ions provide a large magnetic moment due to their half filled inner 3d-shell. It is shown that magnetic interactions in conjunction with disorder effects are responsible for the unusual magnetotransport behavior found in this and other II-Mn-VI semiconductor alloys. In the second scenario, a different magnetic compound, namely InSb:Mn, is of interest. It is a representative of the III-Mn-V DMS, where the magnetic impurity Mn serves both as the source of a large localized magnetic moment and as the source of a loosely bound hole due to its acceptor character. Up to now, little is known about

  9. Interaction between extended and localized electronic states in the region of the metal to insulator transition in semiconductor alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teubert, Joerg

    2008-07-01

    The first part of this work addresses the influence of those isovalent localized states on the electronic properties of (B,Ga,In)As. Most valuable were the measurements under hydrostatic pressure that revealed a pressure induced metal-insulator transition. One of the main ideas in this context is the trapping of carriers in localized B-related cluster states that appear in the bandgap at high pressure. The key conclusion that can be drawn from the experimental results is that boron atoms seem to have the character of isovalent electron traps, rendering boron as the first known isovalent trap induced by cationic substitution. In the second part, thermoelectric properties of (B,Ga,In)As and (Ga,In)(N,As) are studied. It was found that although the electric-field driven electronic transport in n-type (Ga,In)(N,As) and (B,Ga,In)As differs considerably from that of n-type GaAs, the temperature-gradient driven electronic transport is very similar for the three semiconductors, despite distinct differences in the conduction band structure of (Ga,In)(N,As) and (B,Ga,In)As compared to GaAs. The third part addresses the influence of magnetic interactions on the transport properties near the metal-insulator transition (MIT). Here, two scenarios are considered: Firstly the focus is set on ZnMnSe:Cl, a representative of so called dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS). In this material Mn(2+) ions provide a large magnetic moment due to their half filled inner 3d-shell. It is shown that magnetic interactions in conjunction with disorder effects are responsible for the unusual magnetotransport behavior found in this and other II-Mn-VI semiconductor alloys. In the second scenario, a different magnetic compound, namely InSb:Mn, is of interest. It is a representative of the III-Mn-V DMS, where the magnetic impurity Mn serves both as the source of a large localized magnetic moment and as the source of a loosely bound hole due to its acceptor character. Up to now, little is known about

  10. Nature of low dimensional structural modulations and relative phase stability in RexMo(W)1-xS2 transition metal dichalcogenide alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Sahu, R.

    2017-03-08

    We report on the various types of Peierls like two dimensional structural modulations and relative phase stability of 2H and 1T poly-types in the RexMo1-xS2 and RexW1-xS2 alloy system. Theoretical calculation predicts a polytype phase transition cross over at ∼50 at. % of Mo and W in ReS2 in both monolayer and bulk form, respectively. Experimentally, two different types of structural modulations at 50% and a modulation corresponding to trimerization at 75% alloy composition are observed for RexMo1-xS2 and only one type of modulation is observed at the 50% RexW1-xS2 alloy system. The 50% alloy system is found to be a suitable monolithic candidate for metal semiconductor transition with minute external perturbation. ReS2 is known to be in the 2D Peierls distorted 1Td structure and forms a chain like superstructure. Incorporation of Mo and W atoms into the ReS2 lattice modifies the metal-metal hybridization between the cations and influences the structural modulation and electronic properties of the system. The results offer yet another effective way to tune the electronic structure and poly-type phases of this class of materials other than intercalation, strain, and vertical stacking arrangement.

  11. The computer simulation of the structure of transition metal surface alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilic, A.; King, B.V.; O'Connor, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    In recent years interest has arisen in connection with the thin alloy films of Al and Pd. Such films are created by deposition of ≥ 0.5 ML of Al onto Pd(001) and annealing to 750-950 K. The structure has been investigated using low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) and shows a p(2x2)-p4g clock reconstruction. A structure was proposed consisting of a clock-rotated Pd top layer over a c(2x2) Al-Pd underlayer. This paper presents a simulation study of the structure and energetics of Al dissolution into the Pd(001) surface using the embedded atom method (EAM)

  12. Pressure dependence of the magnetic properties of various weakly ferromagnetic transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buis, N.

    1979-01-01

    A large number of experimental results are summarized obtained in an apparatus designed for the measurement of magnetization under high pressures (up to 5k bar gas pressure), at temperatures from 4.2K to room temperature and in magnetic fields up to 5.1 T. Two alloy systems studied were Zr (Fesub(1-x)Cosub(x)) 2 and Y(Fesub(x)Cosub(1-x)) 2 and no consistent picture could be deduced from the large pressure effects on the magnetization. Apparently, one cannot apply the model for weak itinerant ferromagnetism on Zr(Fesub(1-x)Cosub(x)) 2 or a simple giant moment model on Y(Fesub(x)Cosub(1-x)) 2 with small iron content, because the magnetic behaviour of both systems is too complicated. (C.F.)

  13. Magnetic properties of 3d-transition-metal alloy clusters: (FexCr1-x)n

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, A.; Dorantes-Davila, J.; Pastor, G.M.; Balbas, L.C.

    1991-01-01

    We present results for the magnetic properties of (Fe x Cr 1-x ) n alloy clusters obtained by using a tight-binding Hubbard Hamiltonian in the unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation. The dependence of the average magnetic moment, local magnetic moments, magnetic order, and cohesive energy on the size and composition of the cluster were determined. In agreement with surface calculations, we find that the average magnetic moment of the alloy is larger than that of the cluster of one element. For n=15 a transition from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic order is obtained for x≅0.4-0.53. We discuss the importance of the overlap interaction in the spin polarized charge distribution of the alloy (e.g., charge transfer, local magnetic moments). The characteristic properties of the mixed clusters are also discussed by comparison with available results for homogeneous clusters. (orig.)

  14. Magnetic properties of 3d-transition-metal alloy clusters: (Fe sub x Cr sub 1-x ) sub n

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, A.; Dorantes-Davila, J.; Pastor, G.M.; Balbas, L.C. (Valladolid Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica)

    1991-01-01

    We present results for the magnetic properties of (Fe{sub x}Cr{sub 1-x}){sub n} alloy clusters obtained by using a tight-binding Hubbard Hamiltonian in the unrestricted Hartree-Fock approximation. The dependence of the average magnetic moment, local magnetic moments, magnetic order, and cohesive energy on the size and composition of the cluster were determined. In agreement with surface calculations, we find that the average magnetic moment of the alloy is larger than that of the cluster of one element. For n=15 a transition from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic order is obtained for x{approx equal}0.4-0.53. We discuss the importance of the overlap interaction in the spin polarized charge distribution of the alloy (e.g., charge transfer, local magnetic moments). The characteristic properties of the mixed clusters are also discussed by comparison with available results for homogeneous clusters. (orig.).

  15. Relativistic density-functional study of the solid solubility of transition metal/γ-uranium alloys: The role of d-d orbital interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, M.; Onoe, J.; Hirata, M.; Suzuki, C.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The highlights of the present paper demonstrate that the maximum solid solubility (MSS) of transition metal (TM) atoms in solid γ-U phase, which was determined experimentally, can be explained in terms of both the TM d orbital energy (Md) and the TMd-U6d orbital overlap populations (OOP), which were obtained using first-principle calculations based on relativistic density-functional theory. Interestingly, when the correlation map between Md and the OOP is made, γ-U/TM alloys with a lower MSS appear in the lower left of the OOP-Md map, whereas those with a higher MSS appear in the upper right. Thus, the map obtained using the OOP and Md is useful for designing not only γ-U/TM alloys but also other alloy systems. - Abstract: The alloying behavior of transition metals (TMs) in solid γ-phase uranium (γ-U), which is expected to be used as fuel for next-generation nuclear reactors, was investigated using the discrete-variational Dirac-Fock-Slater molecular orbital method. Using a model cluster, U 8 /TM, as the minimum unit of γ-U/TM alloys, we evaluated the d-orbital energy of the TM (Md), the bond order between the TM and U atoms, and the orbital overlap population (OOP) between the atomic orbitals of the TM and U atoms. We subsequently examined the effect of these quantities on the maximum solid solubility (MSS) of the γ-U/TM alloys. The interaction between the U-6d and TM-d atomic orbitals was found to play a key role in determining the MSS of the γ-U/TM alloys. The magnitude of the MSS can be explained in terms of the stabilization energy, which is affected by the Md and the OOP, formed by d-d orbital interactions. We also mapped the MSS of γ-U/TM alloys using the Md and the OOP as the alloying parameters. These results will assist the quantum design of nuclear fuel materials.

  16. Magnetic measurements on transition metal compounds and dilute alloys in high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smit, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    A number of experiments are described which have in common the application of high magnetic fields to the study of magnetic ordering phenomena at low temperatures. A pulsed-field magnet is used, capable of producing field pulses during a time period of about 20 ms and maximum fields that are in the range of 40-50 Tesla. In some cases additional data have been taken in superconducting magnets with maximum fields up to 11 T. After a description of the experimental equipments a series of measurements on quasi linear chain anti-ferromagnets is given. Experiments are described on S=1 systems for which the spin-triplet is split up by the crystal field in such a way that the ground state is a nonmagnetic singlet. The upper doublet splits if a field is applied, and if the Zeeman energy is sufficiently strong one of the doublet levels will cross the singlet, yielding a magnetic ground state. The magnetization and the field and frequency dependence of the differential susceptibility of these systems have been studied. The crystal field splitting parameter D and the exchange J are determined. Magnetic measurements are presented on compounds in which the magnetic ions form dimeric or tetrameric clusters of spins, the intercluster interactions being very small. The aim of this investigation was to characterize the magnetic behaviour of these systems, and to obtain estimates of the antiferromagnetic superexchange interactions. Lastly, a study is reported on three prototype examples of metallic spin glasses. (Auth.)

  17. Magnetization of ternary alloys based on Fe0.65Ni0.35 invar with 3d transition metal additions: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoue, Masatoshi; Trimarchi, Giancarlo; Freeman, Arthur J.; Popescu, Voicu; Matsen, Marc R.

    2015-01-01

    Smart susceptors are being developed for use as tooling surfaces in molding machines that use apply electro-magnetic induction heating to mold and form plastics or metal powders into structural parts, e.g., on aerospace and automotive manufacturing lines. The optimal magnetic materials for the induction heating process should have large magnetization, high magnetic permeability, but also small thermal expansion coefficient. The Fe0.65Ni0.35 invar alloy with its negligible thermal expansion coefficient is thus a natural choice for this application. Here, we use density functional theory as implemented through the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method within the coherent-potential approximation, to design new alloys with the large magnetization desired for smart susceptor applications. We consider the Fe0.65-xNi0.35-yMx+y alloys derived from Fe0.65Ni0.35 invar adding a third element M = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, or Co with concentration (x + y) reaching up to 5 at. %. We find that the total magnetization depends linearly on the concentration of M. Specifically, the early 3d transition metals from Sc to Cr decrease the magnetization with respect to that of the invar alloy whereas Mn and Co increase it.

  18. Mechanochemical processing for metals and metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froes, Francis H.; Eranezhuth, Baburaj G.; Prisbrey, Keith

    2001-01-01

    A set of processes for preparing metal powders, including metal alloy powders, by ambient temperature reduction of a reducible metal compound by a reactive metal or metal hydride through mechanochemical processing. The reduction process includes milling reactants to induce and complete the reduction reaction. The preferred reducing agents include magnesium and calcium hydride powders. A process of pre-milling magnesium as a reducing agent to increase the activity of the magnesium has been established as one part of the invention.

  19. Magnetic properties in ultrathin 3 d transition-metal binary alloys. II. Experimental verification of quantitative theories of damping and spin pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Martin A. W.; Lucassen, Juriaan; Nembach, Hans T.; Koopmans, Bert; Silva, T. J.; Back, Christian H.; Shaw, Justin M.

    2017-04-01

    A systematic experimental study of Gilbert damping is performed via ferromagnetic resonance for the disordered crystalline binary 3 d transition-metal alloys Ni-Co, Ni-Fe, and Co-Fe over the full range of alloy compositions. After accounting for inhomogeneous linewidth broadening, the damping shows clear evidence of both interfacial damping enhancement (by spin pumping) and radiative damping. We quantify these two extrinsic contributions and thereby determine the intrinsic damping. The comparison of the intrinsic damping to multiple theoretical calculations yields good qualitative and quantitative agreement in most cases. Furthermore, the values of the damping obtained in this study are in good agreement with a wide range of published experimental and theoretical values. Additionally, we find a compositional dependence of the spin mixing conductance.

  20. Magnetic Properties and Spectroscopic Studies of Selected Rare Earth-Transition Metal Intermatellic Alloys. Final Progress Report for period January 15, 1997 - January 15, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, R.

    2002-08-31

    The hard magnetic properties of the high energy magnetic materials are of great interest on account of their vast application potential. The properties, particularly the stability at high temperatures and resistance to degradation are enhance considerably through judicious alloying and heat treatments. This project's vision was the enhancement of the properties of the already well-defined rare earth iron alloy magnet compositions by including selection transition metal atoms and carbons in the structure. The magnetic properties were correlated to the microstructures obtained after various heat treatments. The thermal stability and degradation mechanisms of the compositions were concurrently studied and defined. These were some of the aspects in the proposed study.

  1. Alloying Characteristics of the Rare Earth Elements with the Transition Elements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elliott, Rodney

    1964-01-01

    The alloying characteristics of the rare earth elements with the transition metals undergo a radical change as the atomic number of the transition series increases - - transition elements in Groups...

  2. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  3. Structural, elastic and electronic properties of transition metal carbides ZnC, NbC and their ternary alloys ZnxNb1-xC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidi, Y.; Méçabih, S.; Abbar, B.; Amari, S.

    2018-02-01

    We have investigated the structural, electronic and elastic properties of transition-metal carbides ZnxNb1-xC alloys in the range of 0 ≤ x ≤ 1 using the density functional theory (DFT). The full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within a framework of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and GGA + U (where U is the Hubbard correlation terms) approach is used to perform the calculations presented here. The lattice parameters, the bulk modulus, its pressure derivative and the elastic constants were determined. We have obtained Young's modulus, shear modulus, Poisson's ratio, anisotropy factor by the aid of the calculated elastic constants. We discuss the total and partial densities of states and charge densities.

  4. Supported metal alloy catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Joseph; Smith, David C.

    2000-01-01

    A process of preparing a Group IV, V, or VI metal carbonitride including reacting a Group IV, V, or VI metal amide complex with ammonia to obtain an intermediate product; and, heating the intermediate product to temperatures and for times sufficient to form a Group IV, V, or VI metal carbonitride is provided together with the product of the process and a process of reforming an n-alkane by use of the product.

  5. The solubility of metals in Pb-17Li liquid alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.U.; Feuerstein, H.

    1992-01-01

    The solubility data of iron in the eutectic alloy Pb-17Li which were evaluated from corrosion tests in a turbulent flow of the molten alloy are discussed in the frame of solubilities of the transition metals in liquid lead. It is shown that the solubility of iron in the alloy is close to that in lead. This is also the fact for several other alloying elements of steels. A comparison of all known data shows that they are in agreement with generally shown trends for the solubility of the transition metals in low melting metals. These trends indicate comparably high solubilities of nickel and manganese in the liquid metals, lower saturation concentration of vanadium, chromium, iron, and cobalt, and extremely low solubility of molybdenum. (orig.)

  6. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Photoabsorption coefficient of alloys at Al with transition metals V, Fe, Ni and with Cu and Pr from 30 eV to 150 eV photon energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, H.J.; Gudat, W.; Kunz, C.

    1975-10-01

    The absorption coeffecient of VAl 3 , FeAl, NiAl, NiAl 3 , CuAl 2 , PrAl 2 and of disordered V-Al (16 at. % Al, 28 %, 41%) and Fe-Al (11%) alloys has been measured in the region of the Msub(2,3)-absorption of the transition metals and the L-absorption of Al. The strong changes of the Al spectrum in the region of the 100 eV maximum upon alloying are explained as another evidence of the EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) nature of these structures. The broad, prominent absorption peaks from the 3p excitations in V and Fe and from the 4d excitations in Pr are influenced only little on alloying and thus appear to be of atomic origin. The fine structure at the onset of the Pr 4d-transitions is identical in the metal and the alloy but differs from that of Pr oxide. The only Msub(2,3)-edge which is detectably shifted is that if Ni (up to 2.1 eV), whereas the onset of the Al Lsub(2,3)-edge is shifted in all the alloys (up to 1.1 eV). The shifts are interpreted in accordance with X-ray fluorescence and nuclear resonance measurements as changes of the density of states in the valence band of the alloys. (orig.) [de

  8. Interaction Of Hydrogen With Metal Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Montano, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiments on interaction of hydrogen with number of metal alloys. Discusses relationship between metallurgical and crystallographic aspects of structures of alloys and observed distributions of hydrogen on charging. Also discusses effect of formation of hydrides on resistances of alloys to hydrogen. Describes attempt to correlate structures and compositions of alloys with their abilities to resist embrittlement by hydrogen.

  9. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  10. Self-disintegrating Raney metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, Laurance L.; Russell, James H.

    1979-01-01

    A method of preparing a Raney metal alloy which is capable of self-disintegrating when contacted with water vapor. The self-disintegrating property is imparted to the alloy by incorporating into the alloy from 0.4 to 0.8 weight percent carbon. The alloy is useful in forming powder which can be converted to a Raney metal catalyst with increased surface area and catalytic activity.

  11. The effect of scandium, transition metals and in purities on hardening of aluminium alloys upon decomposition of solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, V.V.; Rostova, T.D.

    2007-01-01

    Strengthening of aluminum alloys of the Al-Sc system in ingots due to decomposition of the solid solution of scandium in aluminum is studied as a function of the content of scandium (varied from 0.14 to 0.55%), the presence of Zr, Ti, Hf, V, and Co additives at the same content of scandium (0.2%), of the Sc/Zr proportion at the same total content of Sc + Zr, and as a function of iron and silicon admixtures. Zirconium addition produces the highest effect, increasing the hardness and stabilizing the strengthening, extending it to a wider temperature range of aging. Additions of Ti, Hf produce a similar, though a less pronounced effect. Vanadium addition decreases the hardness of Al-0.2%Sc alloy. The presence of zirconium neutralizes the negative effect of vanadium. Cobalt addition does not effect the hardness of Al-0.2%Sc. The greatest strengthening during decomposition of solid solution in the Al-Sc-Zr system alloys is achieved at equal content of Sc and Zr. In this case, the maximum saturation of the solid solution with scandium and zirconium occurs during melting of ingots and as a result of subsequent heating, judging by the alloy location in the phase diagram, the phase Al 3 (Sc 1-x , Zr x ), where scandium atoms are replaced with zirconium atoms to utmost extent, is separated [ru

  12. Liquid metal corrosion considerations in alloy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Liquid metal corrosion can be an important consideration in developing alloys for fusion and fast breeder reactors and other applications. Because of the many different forms of liquid metal corrosion (dissolution, alloying, carbon transfer, etc.), alloy optimization based on corrosion resistance depends on a number of factors such as the application temperatures, the particular liquid metal, and the level and nature of impurities in the liquid and solid metals. The present paper reviews the various forms of corrosion by lithium, lead, and sodium and indicates how such corrosion reactions can influence the alloy development process

  13. Proceedings of the sixth international workshop on rare earth-cobalt permanent magnets and their applications, August 31 - September 2, 1982, and third international symposium on magnetic anisotropy and coercivity in rare earth-transition metal alloys, September 3, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidler, J.

    1982-01-01

    The first part (workshop) is concerned specifically with applications of rare earth-cobalt permanent magnets. The session headings are 1) electro-mechanical applications 2) electronic and miscellaneous applications 3) magneto-mechanical applications plus workshop on measurement methods 4) new materials and processes 5) industrial applications of REPM and future aspects. The second part (symposium) is concerned with physical properties of specific rare earth-transition metal alloys. (G.Q.)

  14. Vibrational properties of vacancy in bcc transition metals using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    By introducing a few modifications in the Johnson and. Oh model, Guellil and Adams [5] have applied the EAM model for studying phonon dis- persion, thermal and surface properties of alkali and transition metals and their alloys. An empirical many-body interaction potential for the bcc transition metals Nb, Fe and Cr was.

  15. PDTI metal alloy as a hydrogen or hydrocarbon sensitive metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A hydrogen sensitive metal alloy contains palladium and titanium to provide a larger change in electrical resistance when exposed to the presence of hydrogen. The alloy can be used for improved hydrogen detection.

  16. An introduction to surface alloying of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Hosmani, Santosh S; Goyal, Rajendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    An Introduction to Surface Alloying of Metals aims to serve as a primer to the basic aspects of surface alloying of metals. The book serves to elucidate fundamentals of surface modification and their engineering applications. The book starts with basics of surface alloying and goes on to cover key surface alloying methods, such as carburizing, nitriding, chromizing, duplex treatment, and the characterization of surface layers. The book will prove useful to students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, as also to researchers and practitioners looking for a quick introduction to surface alloying.

  17. Vacancies in transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, G.; Lannoo, M.

    1976-01-01

    A calculation of the formation energy and volume for a vacancy in transition metals is described. A tight-binding scheme is used for the d band and a Born-Mayer type potential to account for the repulsive part of the energy at small distances. The results show that the relaxation energy is small in all cases, less than 0.1 eV. This seems to be coherent with the good agreement obtained for the theoretical and experimental values of the formation energy Esub(F)sup(V) of the vacancy, without including relaxation. The center of the transitional series is found to give a contraction (Formation volume of order -0.4 at.vol.) whereas the edges are found to produce dilations. (author)

  18. Structural and electronic properties of binary amorphous aluminum alloys with transition metals and rare earth metals; Strukturelle und elektronische Eigenschaften binaerer amorpher Aluminiumlegierungen mit Uebergangsmetallen und Metallen der Seltenen Erden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiehler, Martin

    2012-02-03

    The influence of the d-states of the transition metals on the structure formation in amorphous alloys has so far only been inadequately understood. The present work aims to elaborate additional contributions to the understanding of binary amorphous aluminum alloys with transition metals. Special emphasis was placed on alloys with a subgroup of the transition metals, the rare earth metals. Within the scope of the present work, layers of Al-Ce in the region of 15at% Ce-80at% Ce were produced by sequential flash evaporation at 4.2K in the high vacuum, and characterized electronically by electrical resistance and Hall effect measurements as well as structurally by transmission electron diffraction. In addition, studies of plasma resonance were carried out by means of electron energy loss spectroscopy. In the range of 25at% Ce-60at% Ce, homogeneous amorphous samples were obtained. Especially the structural investigations were made difficult by oxidation of the material. The influence of the Ce-4f electrons manifests itself mainly in the low-temperature and magnetoresistance, both of which are dominated by the Kondo effect. The Hall effect in Al-Ce is dominated by anomalous components over the entire temperature range (2K-320K), which are attributed to skew-scattering effects, also due to Ce-4f electrons. Down to 2K there was no macroscopic magnetic order. In the region 2K-20K, the existence of clusters of ordered magnetic moments is concluded. For T> 20K, paramagnetic behavior occurs. With regard to the structural and electronic properties, a-Al-Ce can be classified as a group with a-Al- (Sc, Y, La). In the sense of plasma resonance, a-Al-Ce is excellently arranged in a system known from other Al transition metal alloys. Furthermore, by increasing the results of binary amorphous Al transition metal alloys from the literature, it has been found that the structure formation in these systems is closely linked to a known but still unexplained structure-forming effect that

  19. Microalloying of transition metal silicides by mechanical activation and field-activated reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munir, Zuhair A [Davis, CA; Woolman, Joseph N [Davis, CA; Petrovic, John J [Los Alamos, NM

    2003-09-02

    Alloys of transition metal suicides that contain one or more alloying elements are fabricated by a two-stage process involving mechanical activation as the first stage and densification and field-activated reaction as the second stage. Mechanical activation, preferably performed by high-energy planetary milling, results in the incorporation of atoms of the alloying element(s) into the crystal lattice of the transition metal, while the densification and field-activated reaction, preferably performed by spark plasma sintering, result in the formation of the alloyed transition metal silicide. Among the many advantages of the process are its ability to accommodate materials that are incompatible in other alloying methods.

  20. Strong-Superstrong Transition in Glass Transition of Metallic Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, Wang; Hong-Yan, Peng; Xiao-Yu, Xu; Bao-Ling, Chen; Chun-Lei, Wu; Min-Hua, Sun

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic fragility of bulk metallic glass (BMG) of Zr 64 Cu 16 Ni 10 Al 10 alloy is studied by three-point beam bending methods. The fragility parameter mfor Zr 64 Cu 16 Ni 10 Al 10 BMG is calculated to be 24.5 at high temperature, which means that the liquid is a 'strong' liquid, while to be 13.4 at low temperature which means that the liquid is a 'super-strong' liquid. The dynamical behavior of Zr 64 Cu 16 Ni 10 Al 10 BMG in the supercooled region undergoes a strong to super-strong transition. To our knowledge, it is the first time that a strong-to-superstrong transition is found in the metallic glass. Using small angle x-ray scattering experiments, we find that this transition is assumed to be related to a phase separation process in supercooled liquid. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  1. Transition metals in carbohydrate chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Robert

    1997-01-01

    This review describes the application of transition metal mediated reactions in carbohydrate synthesis. The different metal mediated transformations are divided into reaction types and illustrated by various examples on monosaccharide derivatives. Carbon-carbon bond forming reactions are further ...

  2. Development of Metallic Sensory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace Terryl A.; Newman, John A.; Horne, Michael R.; Messick, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    Existing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are inherently limited by the physical response of the structural material being inspected and are therefore not generally effective at the identification of small discontinuities, making the detection of incipient damage extremely difficult. One innovative solution to this problem is to enhance or complement the NDE signature of structural materials to dramatically improve the ability of existing NDE tools to detect damage. To address this need, a multifunctional metallic material has been developed that can be used in structural applications. The material is processed to contain second phase sensory particles that significantly improve the NDE response, enhancing the ability of conventional NDE techniques to detect incipient damage both during and after flight. Ferromagnetic shape-memory alloys (FSMAs) are an ideal material for these sensory particles as they undergo a uniform and repeatable change in both magnetic properties and crystallographic structure (martensitic transformation) when subjected to strain and/or temperature changes which can be detected using conventional NDE techniques. In this study, the use of a ferromagnetic shape memory alloy (FSMA) as the sensory particles was investigated.

  3. Vibrational entropies in metallic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozolins, Vidvuds; Asta, Mark; Wolverton, Christopher

    2000-03-01

    Recently, it has been recognized that vibrational entropy can have significant effects on the phase stability of metallic alloys. Using density functional linear response calculations and molecular dynamics simulations we study three representative cases: (i) phase diagram of Al-rich Al-Sc alloys, (ii) stability of precipitate phases in CuAl_2, and (iii) phonon dynamics in bcc Zr. We find large vibrational entropy effects in all cases. In the Al-Sc system, vibrations increase the solid solubility of Sc in Al by decreasing the stability of the L12 (Al_3Sc) phase. This leads to a nearly ten-fold increase in the solid solubility of Sc in Al at T=800 K. In the Cu-Al system, our calculations predict that the tetragonal Laves phase of CuAl2 has 0.35 kB/atom higher vibrational entropy than the cubic CaF_2-type phase (the latter is predicted to be the T=0 K ground state of CuAl_2). This entropy difference causes a structural transformation in CuAl2 precipitates from the fluorite to the tetragonal Laves phase around T=500 K. Finally, we analyze the highly unusual dynamics of anharmonically stabilized bcc Zr, finding large diffuse-scattering intensity streaks between the bcc Bragg peaks.

  4. Properties of cemented carbides alloyed by metal melt treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisovsky, A.F.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results of investigations into the influence of alloying elements introduced by metal melt treatment (MMT-process) on properties of WC-Co and WC-Ni cemented carbides. Transition metals of the IV - VIll groups (Ti, Zr, Ta, Cr, Re, Ni) and silicon were used as alloying elements. It is shown that the MMT-process allows cemented carbides to be produced whose physico-mechanical properties (bending strength, fracture toughness, total deformation, total work of deformation and fatigue fracture toughness) are superior to those of cemented carbides produced following a traditional powder metallurgy (PM) process. The main mechanism and peculiarities of the influence of alloying elements added by the MMT-process on properties of cemented carbides have been first established. The effect of alloying elements on structure and substructure of phases has been analyzed. (author)

  5. Features of exoelectron emission in amorphous metallic alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Veksler, A S; Morozov, I L; Semenov, A L

    2001-01-01

    The peculiarities of the photothermostimulated exoelectron emission in amorphous metallic alloys of the Fe sub 6 sub 4 Co sub 2 sub 1 B sub 1 sub 5 composition are studied. It is established that the temperature dependences of the exoelectron emission spectrum adequately reflect the two-stage character of the amorphous alloy transition into the crystalline state. The exoelectron emission spectrum is sensitive to the variations in the modes of the studied sample thermal treatment. The thermal treatment of the amorphous metallic alloy leads to growth in the intensity of the exoelectrons yield. The highest growth in the intensify of the exoelectron emission was observed in the alloys at the initial stage of their crystallization

  6. In vitro cytotoxicity of metallic ions released from dental alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milheiro, Ana; Nozaki, Kosuke; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Muris, Joris; Miura, Hiroyuki; Feilzer, Albert J

    2016-05-01

    The cytotoxicity of a dental alloy depends on, but is not limited to, the extent of its corrosion behavior. Individual ions may have effects on cell viability that are different from metals interacting within the alloy structure. We aimed to investigate the cytotoxicity of individual metal ions in concentrations similar to those reported to be released from Pd-based dental alloys on mouse fibroblast cells. Metal salts were used to prepare seven solutions (concentration range 100 ppm-1 ppb) of the transition metals, such as Ni(II), Pd(II), Cu(II), and Ag(I), and the metals, such as Ga(III), In(III), and Sn(II). Cytotoxicity on mouse fibroblasts L929 was evaluated using the MTT assay. Ni, Cu, and Ag are cytotoxic at 10 ppm, Pd and Ga at 100 ppm. Sn and In were not able to induce cytotoxicity at the tested concentrations. Transition metals were able to induce cytotoxic effects in concentrations similar to those reported to be released from Pd-based dental alloys. Ni, Cu, and Ag were the most cytotoxic followed by Pd and Ga; Sn and In were not cytotoxic. Cytotoxic reactions might be considered in the etiopathogenesis of clinically observed local adverse reactions.

  7. Filler metal development for Hastelloy alloy XR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Katsutoshi; Nakajima, Hajime; Sahira, Kensho

    1991-11-01

    In order to develop the filler metal for Hastelloy alloy XR structure with thick wall, the weldability and high temperature strength properties of Hastelloy alloy XR weldment were investigated using the filler metals, which were alloy-designed on the basis of multiple regression analysis. The former was examined through the chemical analysis in the deposited metal, bend test, FISCO cracking test, optical microscopy and hardness measurement. The latter was investigated by means of tensile and creep test. It was found from these results that the crack susceptibility in the weldment was apparent to be lowered without degrading the high temperature strength properties. Therefore, it is concluded that these filler metals possess excellent performance as the filler metal for Hastelloy alloy XR structure with thick wall. (author)

  8. On the resistivity of metal-tellurium alloys for low concentrations of tellurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorecki, J.

    1982-04-01

    The resistivity and thermoelectric power of metal-tellurium liquid alloys have been discussed for the case of small tellurium concentration. Nearly free electron model of conduction band has been used. The rapid increase of resistivity in transition metal-tellurium alloys has been predicted. (author)

  9. Transition Metal Compounds Towards Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Dieckmann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully proposed the application of transition metal compounds in holographic recording media. Such compounds feature an ultra-fast light-induced linkage isomerization of the transition-metal–ligand bond with switching times in the sub-picosecond regime and lifetimes from microseconds up to hours at room temperature. This article highlights the photofunctionality of two of the most promising transition metal compounds and the photophysical mechanisms that are underlying the hologram recording. We present the latest progress with respect to the key measures of holographic media assembled from transition metal compounds, the molecular embedding in a dielectric matrix and their impressive potential for modern holographic applications.

  10. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Auda K.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  11. Electrical Conductivity in Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Christopher; Vickneson, Kishanda

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this "Science Note" is to describe how to test the electron-sea model to determine whether it accurately predicts relative electrical conductivity for first-row transition metals. In the electron-sea model, a metal crystal is viewed as a three-dimensional array of metal cations immersed in a sea of delocalised valence…

  12. Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xianghong; Peker, Atakan; Johnson, William L.

    1997-01-01

    At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x).sub.a Cu.sub.b (Ni.sub.1-y Co.sub.y).sub.c wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y.cndot.c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b.

  13. The interaction of hydrogen with metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.; Montano, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion coefficients were measured for several alloys, and these were determined to be about the same at 25 C for all alloys investigated. The relation of structure, both metallurgical and crystallographic, to the observed hydrogen distribution on charging was investigated, as well as the role of hydride formation in the hydrogen resistance of metal alloys. An attempt was made to correlate the structures and compositions of metal alloys as well as other parameters with the ratios of their notched tensile strengths in hydrogen to that in helium, R(H2/He), which are believed to represent a measure of their hydrogen resistance. Evidence supports the belief that hydrogen permeability and hydrogen resistance are increased by smaller grain sizes for a given alloy composition.

  14. Metal-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zylbersztejn, A.; Mott, N.F.

    1975-01-01

    The basic physical parameters which govern the metal-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide are determined through a review of the properties of this material. The major importance of the Hubbard intra-atomic correlation energy in determining the insulating phase, which was already evidence by studies of the magnetic properties of V 1 -/subx/Cr/subx/O 2 alloys, is further demonstrated from an analysis of their electrical properties. An analysis of the magnetic susceptibility of niobium-doped VO 2 yields a picture for the current carrier in the low-temperature phase in which it is accompanied by a spin cloud (owing to Hund's-rule coupling), and has therefore an enhanced mass (m approx. = 60m 0 ). Semiconducting vanadium dioxide turns out to be a borderline case for a classical band-transport description; in the alloys at high doping levels, Anderson localization with hopping transport can take place. Whereas it is shown that the insulating phase cannot be described correctly without taking into account the Hubbard correlation energy, we find that the properties of the metallic phase are mainly determined by the band structure. Metallic VO 2 is, in our view, similar to transition metals like Pt or Pd: electrons in a comparatively wide band screening out the interaction between the electrons in a narrow overlapping band. The magnetic susceptibility is described as exchange enhanced. The large density of states at the Fermi level yields a substantial contribution of the entropy of the metallic electrons to the latent heat. The crystalline distortion removes the band degeneracy so that the correlation energy becomes comparable with the band width and a metal-insulator transition takes place

  15. Noble metal alloys for metal-ceramic restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1985-10-01

    A review of the comparative characteristics and properties of noble metal alloys used for metal-ceramic restorations has been presented. Selection of an alloy for one's practice should be based on long-term clinical data, physical properties, esthetic potential, and laboratory data on metal-ceramic bond strength and thermal compatibility with commercial dental porcelains. Although gold-based alloys, such as the Au-Pt-Pd, Au-Pd-Ag, and Au-Pd classes, may appear to be costly compared with the palladium-based alloys, they have clearly established their clinical integrity and acceptability over an extended period of time. Other than the relatively low sag resistance of the high gold-low silver content alloys and the potential thermal incompatibility with some commercial porcelain products, few clinical failures have been observed. The palladium-based alloys are less costly than the gold-based alloys. Palladium-silver alloys require extra precautions to minimize porcelain discoloration. Palladium-copper and palladium-cobalt alloys may also cause porcelain discoloration, as copper and cobalt are used as colorants in glasses. The palladium-cobalt alloys are least susceptible to high-temperature creep compared with all classes of noble metals. Nevertheless, insufficient clinical data exist to advocate the general use of the palladium-copper and palladium-cobalt alloys at the present time. One should base the selection and use of these alloys in part on their ability to meet the requirements of the ADA Acceptance Program. A list of acceptable or provisionally acceptable alloys is available from the American Dental Association and is published annually in the Journal of the American Dental Association. Dentists have the legal and ethical responsibility for selection of alloys used for cast restorations. This responsibility should not be delegated to the dental laboratory technician. It is advisable to discuss the criteria for selection of an alloy with the technician and the

  16. Metastability and thermophysical properties of metallic bulk glass forming alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, R.K.; Fecht, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    The absence of crystallization over a wide time/temperature window can be used to produce bulk metallic glass by relatively slow cooling of the melt. For a number of alloys, including several multicomponent Zr-based alloys, the relevant thermodynamic and thermomechanical properties of the metastable glassy and undercooled liquid states have been measured below and above the glass transition temperature. These measurements include specific heat, viscosity, volume, and elastic properties as a function of temperature. As a result, it becomes obvious that the maximum undercooling for these alloys is given by an isentropic condition before an enthalpic or isochoric instability is reached. Alternatively, these glasses can also be produced by mechanical alloying, thus replacing the thermal disorder by static disorder and resulting in the same thermodynamic glass state. During heating through the undercooled liquid, a nanoscale phase separation occurs for most glasses as a precursor of crystallization

  17. Metal induced crystallization of silicon germanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjukic, M.

    2007-05-15

    In the framework of this thesis the applicability of the aluminium-induced layer exchange on binary silicon germanium alloys was studied. It is here for the first time shown that polycrstalline silicon-germanium layers can be fabricated over the whole composition range by the aluminium-induced layer exchange. The experimental results prove thet the resulting material exhibits a polycrystalline character with typocal grain sizes of 10-100 {mu}m. Raman measurements confirm that the structural properties of the resulting layers are because of the large crystallites more comparable with monocrystalline than with nano- or microcrystalline silicon-germanium. The alloy ratio of the polycrystalline layer correspondes to the chemical composition of the amorphous starting layer. The polycrystalline silicon-germanium layers possess in the range of the interband transitions a reflection spectrum, as it is otherwise only known from monocrystalline reference layers. The improvement of the absorption in the photovoltaically relevant spectral range aimed by the application of silicon-germanium could be also proved by absorption measurments. Strongly correlated with the structural properties of the polycrystalline layers and the electronic band structure resulting from this are beside the optical properties also the electrical properties of the material, especially the charge-carrier mobility and the doping concentration. For binary silicon-germanium layers the hole concentration of about 2 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} for pure silicon increrases to about 5 x 10{sup 20} cm{sub -3} for pure germanium. Temperature-resolved measurements were applied in order to detect doping levels respectively semiconductor-metal transitions. In the last part of the thesis the hydrogen passivation of polycrystalline thin silicon-germanium layers, which were fabricated by means of aluminium-induced layer exchange, is treated.

  18. Amorphous Metallic Alloys: Pathways for Enhanced Wear and Corrosion Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aditya, Ayyagari; Felix Wu, H.; Arora, Harpreet; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2017-11-01

    Amorphous metallic alloys are widely used in bulk form and as coatings for their desirable corrosion and wear behavior. Nevertheless, the effects of heat treatment and thermal cycling on these surface properties are not well understood. In this study, the corrosion and wear behavior of two Zr-based bulk metallic glasses were evaluated in as-cast and thermally relaxed states. Significant improvement in wear rate, friction coefficient, and corrosion penetration rate was seen for both alloys after thermal relaxation. A fully amorphous structure was retained with thermal relaxation below the glass transition. There was an increase in surface hardness and elastic modulus for both alloys after relaxation. The improvement in surface properties was explained based on annihilation of free volume.

  19. 21 CFR 872.3710 - Base metal alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Base metal alloy. 872.3710 Section 872.3710 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3710 Base metal alloy. (a) Identification. A base metal alloy is a device composed primarily of base metals, such as nickel, chromium, or cobalt, that is...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver, that... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food...

  1. Adlayer Core-Level Shifts of Random Metal Overlayers on Transition-Metal Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganduglia-Pirovano, M. V.; Kudrnovský, J.; Scheffler, M.

    1997-01-01

    and the screening effects induced by the core hole, and study the influence of the alloy composition for a number of noble metal-transition metal systems. Our analysis clearly indicates the importance of final-state screening effects for the interpretation of measured core-level shifts. Calculated deviations from...

  2. Formation of amorphous metal alloys by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullendore, Arthur W.

    1990-01-01

    Amorphous alloys are deposited by a process of thermal dissociation of mixtures or organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides, e.g., transition metal carbonyl such as nickel carbonyl, and diborane. Various sizes and shapes of deposits can be achieved, including near-net-shape free standing articles, multilayer deposits, and the like. Manipulation or absence of a magnetic field affects the nature and the structure of the deposit.

  3. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Of Metal Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Calle, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to investigate resistances of 19 alloys to corrosion under conditions similar to those of corrosive, chloride-laden seaside environment of Space Transportation System launch site. Alloys investigated: Hastelloy C-4, C-22, C-276, and B-2; Inconel(R) 600, 625, and 825; Inco(R) G-3; Monel 400; Zirconium 702; Stainless Steel 304L, 304LN, 316L, 317L, and 904L; 20Cb-3; 7Mo+N; ES2205; and Ferralium 255. Results suggest electrochemical impedance spectroscopy used to predict corrosion performances of metal alloys.

  4. Surface energy of metal alloy nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takrori, Fahed M.; Ayyad, Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    The measurement of surface energy of alloy nanoparticles experimentally is still a challenge therefore theoretical work is necessary to estimate its value. In continuation of our previous work on the calculation of the surface energy of pure metallic nanoparticles we have extended our work to calculate the surface energy of different alloy systems, namely, Co-Ni, Au-Cu, Cu-Al, Cu-Mg and Mo-Cs binary alloys. It is shown that the surface energy of metallic binary alloy decreases with decreasing particle size approaching relatively small values at small sizes. When both metals in the alloy obey the Hume-Rothery rules, the difference in the surface energy is small at the macroscopic as well as in the nano-scale. However when the alloy deviated from these rules the difference in surface energy is large in the macroscopic and in the nano scales. Interestingly when solid solution formation is not possible at the macroscopic scale according to the Hume-Rothery rules, it is shown it may form at the nano-scale. To our knowledge these findings here are presented for the first time and is challenging from fundamental as well as technological point of views.

  5. Metals and Alloys Material Stabilization Process Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RISENMAY, H.R.; BURK, R.A.

    2000-05-18

    This Plan outlines the process for brushing metal and alloys in accordance with the path forward discussed in the Integrated Project Management Plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617, and requirements set forth in the Project Management Plan for Materials Stabilization, HNF-3605. This plan provides the basis for selection of the location to process, the processes involved, equipment to be used, and the characterization of the contents of the can. The scope of the process is from retrieval of metals and alloys from storage to transfer back to storage in a repackaged configuration.

  6. Metals and Alloys Material Stabilization Process Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RISENMAY, H.R.; BURK, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    This Plan outlines the process for brushing metal and alloys in accordance with the path forward discussed in the Integrated Project Management Plan for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Stabilization and Deactivation Project, HNF-3617, and requirements set forth in the Project Management Plan for Materials Stabilization, HNF-3605. This plan provides the basis for selection of the location to process, the processes involved, equipment to be used, and the characterization of the contents of the can. The scope of the process is from retrieval of metals and alloys from storage to transfer back to storage in a repackaged configuration

  7. Theoretical studies of metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, J.S.; Wille, L.T.

    1991-07-01

    A new method to predict and understand the structure and phase stability of solid-solution alloys from a knowledge only of the atomic numbers of the constituent atoms is being developed. The coherent potential approximation will be used to obtain the electronic contribution to the energy and the Monte Carlo method of statistical mechanics will be used for the thermodynamic part of the calculation. An improved coherent potential approximation will be developed by combining the standard approach with the quadratic KKR (QKKR) band theory method. This will make it easier to predict the properties of alloys from first principles. The QKKR method will be developed further

  8. Thermal aging effects in refractory metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Joseph R.

    1987-01-01

    The alloys of niobium and tantalum are attractive from a strength and compatibility viewpoint for high operating temperatures required in materials for fuel cladding, liquid metal transfer, and heat pipe applications in space power systems that will supply from 100 kWe to multi-megawatts for advanced space systems. To meet the system requirements, operating temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1600 K have been proposed. Expected lives of these space power systems are from 7 to 10 yr. A program is conducted at NASA Lewis to determine the effects of long-term, high-temperature exposure on the microstructural stability of several commercial tantalum and niobium alloys. Variables studied in the investigation include alloy composition, pre-age annealing temperature, aging time, temperature, and environment (lithium or vacuum), welding, and hydrogen doping. Alloys are investigated by means of cryogenic bend tests and tensile tests. Results show that the combination of tungsten and hafnium or zirconium found in commercial alloys such as T-111 and Cb-752 can lead to aging embrittlement and increased susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of ternary and more complex alloys. Modification of alloy composition helps to eliminate the embrittlement problem.

  9. Alloy with metallic glass and quasi-crystalline properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Li-Qian; Hufnagel, Todd C.; Ramesh, Kaliat T.

    2004-02-17

    An alloy is described that is capable of forming a metallic glass at moderate cooling rates and exhibits large plastic flow at ambient temperature. Preferably, the alloy has a composition of (Zr, Hf).sub.a Ta.sub.b Ti.sub.c Cu.sub.d Ni.sub.e Al.sub.f, where the composition ranges (in atomic percent) are 45.ltoreq.a.ltoreq.70, 3.ltoreq.b.ltoreq.7.5, 0.ltoreq.c.ltoreq.4, 3.ltoreq.b+c.ltoreq.10, 10.ltoreq.d.ltoreq.30, 0.ltoreq.e.ltoreq.20, 10.ltoreq.d+e.ltoreq.35, and 5.ltoreq.f.ltoreq.15. The alloy may be cast into a bulk solid with disordered atomic-scale structure, i.e., a metallic glass, by a variety of techniques including copper mold die casting and planar flow casting. The as-cast amorphous solid has good ductility while retaining all of the characteristic features of known metallic glasses, including a distinct glass transition, a supercooled liquid region, and an absence of long-range atomic order. The alloy may be used to form a composite structure including quasi-crystals embedded in an amorphous matrix. Such a composite quasi-crystalline structure has much higher mechanical strength than a crystalline structure.

  10. Fatigue Characteristics of Selected Light Metal Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cieśla M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses results of fatigue testing of light metal alloys used in the automotive as well as aerospace and aviation industries, among others. The material subject to testing comprised hot-worked rods made of the AZ31 alloy, the Ti-6Al-4V two-phase titanium alloy and the 2017A (T451 aluminium alloy. Both low- and high-cycle fatigue tests were conducted at room temperature on the cycle asymmetry ratio of R=-1. The low-cycle fatigue tests were performed using the MTS-810 machine on two levels of total strain, i.e.Δεc= 1.0% and 1.2%. The high-cycle fatigue tests, on the other hand, were performed using a machine from VEB Werkstoffprufmaschinen-Leipzig under conditions of rotary bending. Based on the results thus obtained, one could develop fatigue life characteristics of the materials examined (expressed as the number of cycles until failure of sample Nf as well as characteristics of cyclic material strain σa=f(N under the conditions of low-cycle fatigue testing. The Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy was found to be characterised by the highest value of fatigue life Nf, both in lowand high-cycle tests. The lowest fatigue life, on the other hand, was established for the aluminium alloys examined. Under the high-cycle fatigue tests, the life of the 2017A aluminium and the AZ31 magnesium alloy studied was determined by the value of stress amplitude σa. With the stress exceeding 150 MPa, it was the aluminium alloy which displayed higher fatigue life, whereas the magnesium alloy proved better on lower stress.

  11. Transition Metal Complexes and Catalysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 9. Transition Metal Complexes and Catalysis. Balaji R Jagirdar. General Article Volume 4 Issue 9 ... Author Affiliations. Balaji R Jagirdar1. Department of Inorganic & Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  12. Thermal expansion: Metallic elements and alloys. [Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touloukian, Y. S.; Kirby, R. K.; Taylor, R. E.; Desai, P. D.

    1975-01-01

    The introductory sections of the work are devoted to the theory of thermal expansion of solids and to methods for the measurement of the linear thermal expansion of solids (X-ray methods, high speed methods, interferometry, push-rod dilatometry, etc.). The bulk of the work is devoted to numerical data on the thermal linear expansion of all the metallic elements, a large number of intermetallics, and a large number of binary alloy systems and multiple alloy systems. A comprehensive bibliography is provided along with an index to the materials examined.

  13. Modification of surface properties of copper-refractory metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.

    1993-10-12

    The surface properties of copper-refractory metal (CU-RF) alloy bodies are modified by heat treatments which cause the refractory metal to form a coating on the exterior surfaces of the alloy body. The alloys have a copper matrix with particles or dendrites of the refractory metal dispersed therein, which may be niobium, vanadium, tantalum, chromium, molybdenum, or tungsten. The surface properties of the bodies are changed from those of copper to that of the refractory metal.

  14. Homogeneous catalysis by transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masters, K.

    1983-01-01

    Fundamentals of homogeneous catalysis by metal complex aAe presented in the monograph along with the mechanisms of practically all types of catalytic reactions proceeding in the presence of transition metal complexes. In particular, considered are: catalytic cycles for olefin hydrogenation in the presence of Ru(2) complex; for alkene epoxidation catalyzed by Mo(6); for alkene metathesis reaction catalyzed by Ta and W compounds. Catalytic systems on the basis of Zr, Mo, W, Ru complexes being in the stage of development of the processes of nitrogen fixation reductive oligomerization alkene activation are described. Bibliography contains more than 400 references

  15. PROCESS FOR THE PREPARATION OF ALLOY NANOPARTICLES COMPRISING A NOBLE AND A NON-NOBLE METAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention concerns a chemical process for preparing nanoparticles of an alloy comprising both a noble metal, such as platinum, and a non-noble transition or lanthanide metal, such as yttrium, gadolinium or terbium. The process is carried out by reduction with hydrogen and removal...

  16. Layered Structures in Deformed Metals and Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2014-01-01

    Layered structures characterize metals and alloys deformed to high strain. The morphology is typical lamellar or fibrous and the interlamellar spacing can span several length scales down to the nanometer dimension. The layered structures can be observed in bulk or in surface regions, which is shown...... by the way of examples of different processing routes: friction, wire drawing, shot peening, high pressure torsion and rolling. The interlamellar spacing reaches from 5-10 nanometers to about one micrometer and the analysis will cover structural evolution, strengthening parameters and strength-structure...... relationships. Finally, the results will be discussed based on universal principles for the evolution of microstructure and properties during plastic deformation of metals and alloys from low to high strain....

  17. Metal-to-nonmetal transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Hensel, Friedrich; Holst, Bastian

    2010-01-01

    This book is devoted to nonmetal-to-metal transitions. The original ideas of Mott for such a transition in solids have been adapted to describe a broad variety of phenomena in condensed matter physics (solids, liquids, and fluids), in plasma and cluster physics, as well as in nuclear physics (nuclear matter and quark-gluon systems). The book gives a comprehensive overview of theoretical methods and experimental results of the current research on the Mott effect for this wide spectrum of topics. The fundamental problem is the transition from localized to delocalized states which describes the nonmetal-to-metal transition in these diverse systems. Based on the ideas of Mott, Hubbard, Anderson as well as Landau and Zeldovich, internationally respected scientists present the scientific challenges and highlight the enormous progress which has been achieved over the last years. The level of description is aimed to specialists in these fields as well as to young scientists who will get an overview for their own work...

  18. Full Electroresistance Modulation in a Mixed-Phase Metallic Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Li, L.; Gai, Z.; Clarkson, J. D.; Hsu, S. L.; Wong, A. T.; Fan, L. S.; Lin, M.-W.; Rouleau, C. M.; Ward, T. Z.; Lee, H. N.; Sefat, A. S.; Christen, H. M.; Ramesh, R.

    2016-03-01

    We report a giant, ˜22 %, electroresistance modulation for a metallic alloy above room temperature. It is achieved by a small electric field of 2 kV /cm via piezoelectric strain-mediated magnetoelectric coupling and the resulting magnetic phase transition in epitaxial FeRh /BaTiO3 heterostructures. This work presents detailed experimental evidence for an isothermal magnetic phase transition driven by tetragonality modulation in FeRh thin films, which is in contrast to the large volume expansion in the conventional temperature-driven magnetic phase transition in FeRh. Moreover, all the experimental results in this work illustrate FeRh as a mixed-phase model system well similar to phase-separated colossal magnetoresistance systems with phase instability therein.

  19. Cast bulk metallic glass alloys: prospects as wear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Shiflet, Gary J. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA)

    2005-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are single phase materials with unusual physical and mechanical properties. One intriguing area of possible use is as a wear material. Usually, pure metals and single phase dilute alloys do not perform well in tribological conditions. When the metal or alloy is lightweight, it is usually soft leading to galling in sliding situations. For the harder metals and alloys, their density is usually high, so there is an energy penalty when using these materials in wear situations. However, bulk metallic glasses at the same density are usually harder than corresponding metals and dilute single phase alloys, and so could offer better wear resistance. This work will discuss preliminary wear results for metallic glasses with densities in the range of 4.5 to 7.9 g/cc. The wear behavior of these materials will be compared to similar metals and alloys.

  20. Laser processing of metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, G.L.; Kumar, Dilip; Roy, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    Laser, due to its high degree of coherence can produce powder density in the range of 10 3 -10 11 W/mm 2 . This high power density of the laser beam enables it to be utilized for many industrial applications, e.g. welding, cutting, drilling, surface treatment, etc. Laser processing of materials has many advantages, e.g. good quality product at high processing speed, least heat affected zone, minimum distortion, etc. In addition, the same laser system can be utilized for different applications, a very cost effective factor for any industry. Therefore laser has been adopted for processing of different materials for a wide range of applications and is now replacing conventional materials processing techniques on commercial merits with several economic and metallurgical advantages. Applications of laser to process materials of different thicknesses varying from 0.1 mm to 100 mm have demonstrat ed its capability as an important manufacturing tool for engineering industries. While lasers have most widely been utilized in welding, cutting and drilling they have also found applications in surface treatment of metals and alloys, e.g. transfor mation hardening and annealing. More recently, there has been significant amount of research being undertaken in laser glazing, laser surface alloying and laser cladding for obtaining improved surface properties. This report reviews the stat us of laser processing of metals and alloys emphasising its metallurgical aspects a nd deals with the different laser processes like welding, cutting, drilling and surface treatment highlighting the types and choice of laser and its interaction with metals and alloys and the applications of these processes. (author). 93 refs., 32 figs., 7 tables

  1. Deriving the Metal and Alloy Networks of Modern Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hajime; Nuss, Philip; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Graedel, Thomas E

    2016-04-05

    Metals have strongly contributed to the development of the human society. Today, large amounts of and various metals are utilized in a wide variety of products. Metals are rarely used individually but mostly together with other metals in the form of alloys and/or other combinational uses. This study reveals the intersectoral flows of metals by means of input-output (IO) based material flow analysis (MFA). Using the 2007 United States IO table, we calculate the flows of eight metals (i.e., manganese, chromium, nickel, molybdenum, niobium, vanadium, tungsten, and cobalt) and simultaneously visualize them as a network. We quantify the interrelationship of metals by means of flow path sharing. Furthermore, by looking at the flows of alloys into metal networks, the networks of the major metals iron, aluminum, and copper together with those of the eight alloying metals can be categorized into alloyed-, nonalloyed-(i.e., individual), and both mixed. The result shows that most metals are used primarily in alloy form and that functional recycling thereby requires identification, separation, and alloy-specific reprocessing if the physical properties of the alloys are to be retained for subsequent use. The quantified interrelation of metals helps us consider better metal uses and develop a sustainable cycle of metals.

  2. Influence of alkali metal hydroxides on corrosion of Zr-base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yong Hwan

    1996-01-01

    The influence of group-1 alkali hydroxides on different Zr-based alloys have been carried out in static autoclaves at 350 deg C in pressurized water, conditioned in low(0.32 mmol), medium(4.3 mmol) and high(31.5 mmol) equimolar concentration of Li-, Na-, K-, Rb- and Cs-hydroxide. Two types of alloys have been investigated: Zr-Sn-(TRM, Transition metal) and Zr-Sn-Nb-(TRM, Transition metal). From the experiments the cation could be identified as the responsible species for corrosion of Zr alloy in alkalized water. The radius of the cation governs the accelerated corrosion in the pre-transition region of Zr alloy. Incorporation of alkali cation into the zirconium oxide lattice is probably the mechanism which allows the corrosion enhancement for Li and Na and the significant lower effect for the other bases. Nb containing alloys showed lower corrosion resistance than Zr-Sn-TRM alloys in all alkali solutions. Both types of alloys were corroded significantly more in LiOH and NaOH than in the other alkali environments. Lowest corrosive aggressiveness has been found for CsOH followed by KOH. Concluding from the corrosion behavior in the different alkali environments and taking into account the tendency to accelerate the corrosion of Zr alloys, CsOH and KOH are possible alternate alkali for PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) application. (author)

  3. Enantioselective, transition metal catalyzed cycloisomerizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinetti, Angela; Jullien, Hélène; Voituriez, Arnaud

    2012-07-21

    This review illustrates enantioselective transition-metal promoted skeletal rearrangements of polyunsaturated substrates possessing olefin, alkyne or allene functions. These processes are classified according to the number of carbon atoms involved in the cyclization, from (1C+1C) to (2C+2C+2C) or (2C+5C) cyclizations. Thus, for instance, (1C+1C) processes are typified notably by Alder-ene type reactions taking place mainly under palladium and rhodium catalysis, in the presence of chiral phosphorus ligands. Also, rhodium, platinum, and gold promoted insertions of unsaturated carbon-carbon bonds into C-H bonds belong to this class. For each class of reactions or substrate type the best ligand-metal pairs are highlighted. Unfortunately, unlike other transition metal promoted reactions, the mechanisms of chiral induction and stereochemical pathways have not been established so far in any of these reactions. In only a few instances, qualitative heuristic models have been tentatively proposed. Although the available stereochemical information is systematically given here, the paper focuses mainly on synthetic aspects of enantioselective cycloisomerizations.

  4. Metal-ceramic alloys in dentistry: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Howard W; Berzins, David W; Moore, B Keith; Charlton, David G

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to review basic information about the alloys used for fabricating metal-ceramic restorations in dentistry. Their compositions, properties, advantages, and disadvantages are presented and compared. In addition to reviewing traditional noble-metal and base-metal metal-ceramic alloys, titanium and gold composite alloys are also discussed. A broad search of the published literature was performed using Medline to identify pertinent current articles on metal-ceramic alloys as well as articles providing a historical background about the development of these alloys. Textbooks, the internet, and manufacturers' literature were also used to supplement this information. The review discusses traditional as well as more recently-developed alloys and technologies used in dentistry for fabricating metal-ceramic restorations. Clear advantages and disadvantages for these alloy types are provided and discussed as well as the role that compositional variations have on the alloys' performance. This information should enable clinicians and technicians to easily identify the important physical properties of each type and their primary clinical indications. A number of alloys and metals are available for metal-ceramic use in dentistry. Each has its advantages and disadvantages, primarily based on its specific composition. Continuing research and development are resulting in the production of new technologies and products, giving clinicians even more choices in designing and fabricating metal-ceramic restorations.

  5. Mass transport in non crystalline metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limoge, Y.

    1986-08-01

    In order to improve our understanding of mass transport in non crystalline metallic alloys we have developed indirect studies of diffusion based on electron irradiation and hydrostatic pressure effects upon crystallization. In a first part we present the models of crystallization which are used, then we give the experimental results. The main point is the first experimental measurement of the activation volume for diffusion in a metallic glass: the value of which is roughly one atomic volume. We show also recent quantitative results concerning radiation enhanced diffusion in metallic glasses (FeNi) 8 (PB) 2 and Ni 6 Nb 4 . In a last part we discuss the atomic model needed to explain our results

  6. Heterostructures of transition metal dichalcogenides

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Bin

    2015-08-24

    The structural, electronic, optical, and photocatalytic properties of out-of-plane and in-plane heterostructures of transition metal dichalcogenides are investigated by (hybrid) first principles calculations. The out-of-plane heterostructures are found to be indirect band gap semiconductors with type-II band alignment. Direct band gaps can be achieved by moderate tensile strain in specific cases. The excitonic peaks show blueshifts as compared to the parent monolayer systems, whereas redshifts occur when the chalcogen atoms are exchanged along the series S-Se-Te. Strong absorption from infrared to visible light as well as excellent photocatalytic properties can be achieved.

  7. Metal dusting of low alloy steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabke, H.J. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)); Bracho-Troconis, C.B. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)); Mueller-Lorenz, E.M. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany))

    1994-04-01

    The metal dusting of two low alloy steels was investigated at 475 C in flowing CO-H[sub 2]-H[sub 2]O mixtures at atmospheric pressure with a[sub C] > 1. The reaction sequence comprises: (1) oversaturation with C, formation of cementite and its decomposition to metal particles and carbon, and (2) additional carbon deposition on the metal particles from the atmosphere. The metal wastage rate r[sub 1] was determined by analysis of the corrosion product after exposures, this rate is constant with time and virtually independent of the environment. The carbon deposition from the atmosphere was determined by thermogravimetry, its rate r[sub 2] increases linearly with time, which can be explained by the catalytic action of the metal particles - periodic changes are superposed. The rate of carbon deposition r[sub 2] is proportional to the carbon activity in the atmosphere. The metal dusting could not be suppressed by increasing the oxygen activity or preoxidation, even if magnetite should be stable. Addition of H[sub 2]S, however, effectively suppresses the attack. (orig.)

  8. 2D transition metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzeli, Sajedeh; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry; Pasquier, Diego; Yazyev, Oleg V.; Kis, Andras

    2017-08-01

    Graphene is very popular because of its many fascinating properties, but its lack of an electronic bandgap has stimulated the search for 2D materials with semiconducting character. Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs), which are semiconductors of the type MX2, where M is a transition metal atom (such as Mo or W) and X is a chalcogen atom (such as S, Se or Te), provide a promising alternative. Because of its robustness, MoS2 is the most studied material in this family. TMDCs exhibit a unique combination of atomic-scale thickness, direct bandgap, strong spin-orbit coupling and favourable electronic and mechanical properties, which make them interesting for fundamental studies and for applications in high-end electronics, spintronics, optoelectronics, energy harvesting, flexible electronics, DNA sequencing and personalized medicine. In this Review, the methods used to synthesize TMDCs are examined and their properties are discussed, with particular attention to their charge density wave, superconductive and topological phases. The use of TMCDs in nanoelectronic devices is also explored, along with strategies to improve charge carrier mobility, high frequency operation and the use of strain engineering to tailor their properties.

  9. Radiation blistering in metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation blistering in solids has been identified as a process leading to damage and erosion of irradiated surfaces. Some of the major parameters governing the blistering process in metals and some metallic alloys are the type of projectile and its energy, total dose, dose rate, target temperature, channeling condition of the projectile, orientation of the irradiated surface plane, and target material and its microstructure. Experimental results and models proposed for blister formation and rupture are reviewed. The blistering phenomenon is important as an erosion process in applications such as fusion reactor technology (plasma-wall interactions) and accelerator technology (erosion of components and targets). A description of methods for the reduction of surface erosion caused by blistering is included

  10. In vitro cytotoxicity of metallic ions released from dental alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milheiro, A.; Nozaki, K.; Kleverlaan, C.J.; Muris, J.; Miura, H.; Feilzer, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of a dental alloy depends on, but is not limited to, the extent of its corrosion behavior. Individual ions may have effects on cell viability that are different from metals interacting within the alloy structure. We aimed to investigate the cytotoxicity of individual metal ions in

  11. Accelerated decarburization of Fe-C metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Uday B.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    1997-01-01

    A process for improving the rate of metal production and FeO utilization in a steelmaking process or a process combining iron-making and steelmaking in a single reactor that uses or generates Fe-C metal alloy droplets submerged in an FeO-containing slag. The process involves discharging a charge build-up (electron accumulation) in the slag at the slag-metal alloy interface by means of an electron conductor connected between the metal alloy droplets and a gas at a gas-slag interface, said gas having an oxygen partial pressure of at least about 0.01 atmosphere.

  12. Base metal alloys used for dental restorations and implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Michael

    2007-07-01

    One of the primary reasons for the development of base metal alloys for dental applications has been the escalating cost of gold throughout the 20th century. In addition to providing lower cost alternatives, these nonprecious alloys were also found to provide better mechanical properties and aesthetics for some oral applications. Additionally, certain base metal alloy systems are preferred because of their superior mechanical properties, lower density, and in some cases, their capability to osseo-integrate. The base metal alloy systems most commonly used in dentistry today include stainless steels, nickel-chromium, cobalt-chromium, titanium, and nickel-titanium alloys. Combined, these alloy systems provide a wide range of available properties to choose the correct material for both temporary and long-term restoration and implant applications.

  13. [Systemic reactions to orally applied metal alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feilzer, A J; Kleverlaan, C J; Prahl, C; Muris, J

    2013-06-01

    Orally applied metal alloys can cause undesirable physical effects. A distinction needs to be made in this respect between local and systemic reactions and toxic and immunological reactions. A case is presented which illustrates this problem. In this case, the application of orthodontic appliances was probably the trigger for an exacerbation of nickel allergy. The oral exposure to nickel resulted in hand eczema. The patient was also exposed to nickel by single-unit fixed dental prostheses, a removable dental prosthesis, and food, as a result of which removal of the orthodontic appliances did not result in complete healing. Therefore, the single-unit fixed dental prostheses also had to be removed and food had to be prepared henceforward in nickel free pans.

  14. Investigation of americium-241 metal alloys for target applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, W.V.; Rockwell International Corp., Golden, CO

    1982-01-01

    Several 241 Am metal alloys have been investigated for possible use in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Radiochemical Diagnostic Tracer Program. Several properties were desired for an alloy to be useful for tracer program applications. A suitable alloy would have a fairly high density, be ductile, homogeneous and easy to prepare. Alloys investigated have included uranium-americium, aluminium-americium, and cerium-americium. Uranium-americium alloys with the desired properties proved to be difficult to prepare, and work with this alloy was discontinued. Aluminium-americium alloys were much easier to prepare, but the alloy consisted of an aluminium-americium intermetallic compound (AmAl 4 ) in an aluminum matrix. This alloy could be cast and formed into shapes, but the low density of aluminum, and other problems, made the alloy unsuitable for the intended application. Americium metal was found to have a high solid solubility in cerium and alloys prepared from these two elements exhibited all of the properties desired for the tracer program application. Cerium-americium alloys containing up to 34 wt% americium have been prepared using both co-melting and co-reduction techniques. The latter technique involves co-reduction of cerium tetrafluoride and americium tetrafluoride with calcium metal in a sealed reduction vessel. Casting techniques have been developed for preparing up to eight 2.2 cm (0.87 in) diameter disks in a single casting, and cerium-americium metal alloy disks containing from 10 to 25 wt% 241 Am have been prepared using these techniques. (orig.)

  15. Structure and properties of transition metal-metalloid glasses based on refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.L.; Williams, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    The structure and properties of several new transition metal-metalloid (TM/sub 1-x/M/sub x/) metallic glasses based on refractory transition metals (e.g. Mo, W, Ru etc.) have been systemically investigated as a function of composition. The structure of the alloys has been investigated by x-ray diffraction methods and measurements of superconducting properties, electrical resistivity, density, hardness, and mechanical behavior were made. These data are used in developing a novel description of the structure of TM/sub 1-x/M/sub x/ glasses. The experimental evidence suggests that an ideal amorphous phase forms at a specific composition x/sub c/ and that this phase has a well defined atomic short range order. For metallic glasses having x x/sub c/. This novel picture can explain the variation of many properties of these glasses with metalloid concentration

  16. Modeling of thermodiffusion in liquid metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamian, Morteza; Sabzi, Fatemeh; Saghir, M Ziad

    2010-11-07

    In this paper following the linear non-equilibrium thermodynamics approach, an expression is derived for the calculation of the thermodiffusion factor in binary liquid metal alloys. The expression is comprised of two terms; the first term accounts for the thermally driven interactions between metal ions, a phenomenon similar to that of the non-ionic binary mixtures, such as hydrocarbons; the second term is called the electronic contribution and is the mass diffusion due to an internal electric field that is induced as a result of the imposed thermal gradient. Both terms are formulated as functions of the net heats of transport. The ion-ion net heat of transport is simulated by the activation energy of viscous flow and the electronic net heat of transport is correlated with the force acting on the ions by the rearrangement of the conduction electrons and ions. A methodology is presented and used to estimate the liquid metal properties, such as the partial molar internal energies, enthalpies, volumes and the activity coefficients used for model validation. The prediction power of the proposed expression along with some other existing thermodiffusion models for liquid mixtures, such as the Haase, Kempers, Drickamer and Firoozabadi formulas are examined against available experimental data obtained on ground or in microgravity environment. The proposed model satisfactorily predicts the thermodiffusion data of mixtures that are composed of elements with comparable melting points. It is also potentially and qualitatively able to predict a sign change in thermodiffusion factor of Na-K liquid mixture. With some speculation, the sign change is attributed to an anomalous change in thermoelectric power of Na-K mixture with composition.

  17. Influence of alkali metal hydroxides on corrosion of Zr-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Y.H.; Ruhmann, H.; Garzarolli, F.

    1997-01-01

    In this study the influence of group-1 alkali hydroxides on different zirconium based alloys has been evaluated. The experiments have been carried out in small stainless steel autoclaves at 350 deg. C in pressurized 17 MPa water, with in low (0.32 mmol), medium (4.3 mmol) and high (31.5 mmol) equimolar concentrations of Li-, Na-, K-, Rb- and Cs-Hydroxides. Two types of alloys have been investigated: Zr-Sn-(Transition metal) and Zr-Sn-Nb-(Transition metal). The corrosion behaviour was evaluated from weight gain measurements. From the experiments the cation could be identified as the responsible species for zirconium alloy corrosion in alkalized water. The radius of the cation governs the corrosion behaviour in the pre accelerated region of zircaloy corrosion. Incorporating of alkali cations into the zirconium oxide lattice is probably the mechanism which allows the corrosion enhancement for Li and Na and the significantly lower effect for the other bases. Nb containing alloys show lower corrosion resistance than alloys from the Zr-Sn-TRM system in all alkali solutions. Both types of alloys corrode significantly more in LiOH and NaOH than in the other alkali environments. Lowest corrosive aggressiveness has been found for CsOH followed by KOH. Concluding from the corrosion behaviour in the different alkali environments and taking into account the tendency to promote accelerate corrosion, CsOH and KOH are possible alternate alkalis for PWR application. (author). 17 refs, 15 figs, 5 tabs

  18. Electronic doping of transition metal oxide perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammarata, Antonio, E-mail: cammaant@fel.cvut.cz [Department of Control Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 2, 16627 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Rondinelli, James M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2016-05-23

    CaFeO{sub 3} is a prototypical negative charge transfer oxide that undergoes electronic metal-insulator transition concomitant with a dilation and contraction of nearly rigid octahedra. Altering the charge neutrality of the bulk system destroys the electronic transition, while the structure is significantly modified at high charge content. Using density functional theory simulations, we predict an alternative avenue to modulate the structure and the electronic transition in CaFeO{sub 3}. Charge distribution can be modulated using strain-rotation coupling and thin film engineering strategies, proposing themselves as a promising avenue for fine tuning electronic features in transition metal-oxide perovskites.

  19. Generic trend of work functions in transition-metal carbides and nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshitake, Michiko, E-mail: yoshitake.michiko@nims.go.jp [MANA Nanoelectronics Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0003 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    Transition-metal carbides and nitrides (TMCs and TMNs) are promising electrode materials for various electronic devices such as metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors and metal-insulator-metal capacitors. In this paper, the work functions of TMCs and TMNs are discussed systematically. Based upon the origin of the work function, the effect upon transition metal species by different periodic table groups is explained, carbides are compared with nitrides for the same transition metal, and the effect of carbon or nitrogen vacancies is discussed. In addition, a method to estimate the generic trend of the work function is proposed for TMC{sub x}, TMN{sub x}, TMC{sub 1−y}N{sub y} (transition metal carbonitrides), and TM{sub 1−z}TM′{sub z}C (alloy carbides)

  20. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of nanowires of different metals and two-metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, M C; Schmicker, Wolfgang

    2011-02-14

    Nanowires of different metals and two-metal alloys have been studied by means of canonical Monte Carlo simulations and the embedded atom method for the interatomic potentials. For nanowires of gold, a relatively stable three-atom-wide chain was observed. The presence of one-atom-wide linear atomic chains is not stable in any case. For two-metal alloy nanowires, the metal with a higher surface energy tends to locate in the inner region of the nanowire.

  2. The Role of the Interface in Refractory Metal Alloy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobstein, Toni; Yun, Hee M.

    1991-01-01

    Creep-rupture and tensile tests have been used to evaluate thoriated W-wire reinforced Nb-1 percent Zr alloy matrix composites fabricated via arc-spray monotape technique. A significant creep strength enhancement was observed over the unreinforced matrix alloy while matrix integrity was maintained; the fiber/matrix interface phase is noted to be a strong and ductile W/Nb alloy, which is formed due to the mutual solubility of the constituent metals. High strength, toughness, and thermal stability are demonstrated by this material system, which is also resistant to liquid alkali metal corrosion.

  3. Determination of hydrogen in metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayi, Y.S.; Ramanjaneyulu, P.S.; Ramakumar, K.L.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen will be invariably present in all materials. Its presence in excess is harmful and sometimes calamitous. Hydrogen embrittlement can occur quite readily in most high strength materials, irrespective of their composition or structure. It is therefore essential to maintain low levels of hydrogen. To know the amount of hydrogen present in the materials, it is essential to determine it with high degree of precision and accuracy. It is required to give the uncertainty associated with the measurement to increase the confidence on measurements. Several methodologies are available for the determination of hydrogen. It its isotope, deuterium, also co-exists it becomes all the more difficult to determine these individually. Hot vacuum extraction cum quadrupole mass spectrometry (HVE-QMS) developed in our laboratory to determine hydrogen and deuterium is routinely employed for the determination of hydrogen and deuterium in metals and alloys. The present paper deals in detail about our experiences with HVE-QMS and estimation of uncertainty associated in this methodology. (author)

  4. Polyoxometalate coordinated transition metal complexes as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Heptamolybdate type polyoxometalate cluster anion; transition metal coordination complexes; ... industrial chemistry. This oxidation can be divided into three categories: (i) the cleavage of the C=C bond by using the surface of the metal oxide, e.g., osmium or .... supported cobalt complexes (catalysts 1 and 2) pro-.

  5. Transition metal catalysis in confined spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, S.H.A.M.; Gramage-Doria, R.; de Bruin, B.; Reek, J.N.H.

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal catalysis plays an important role in both industry and in academia where selectivity, activity and stability are crucial parameters to control. Next to changing the structure of the ligand, introducing a confined space as a second coordination sphere around a metal catalyst has

  6. Plasmons in metallic monolayer and bilayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kirsten; Thygesen, Kristian S.

    2013-01-01

    We study the collective electronic excitations in metallic single-layer and bilayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) using time dependent density functional theory in the random phase approximation. For very small momentum transfers (below q≈0.02 Å−1), the plasmon dispersion follows the √q...

  7. Strain glass transition in a multifunctional β-type Ti alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Gao, Jinghui; Wu, Haijun; Yang, Sen; Ding, Xiangdong; Wang, Dong; Ren, Xiaobing; Wang, Yunzhi; Song, Xiaoping; Gao, Jianrong

    2014-02-01

    Recently, a class of multifunctional Ti alloys called GUM metals attracts tremendous attentions for their superior mechanical behaviors (high strength, high ductility and superelasticity) and novel physical properties (Invar effect, Elinvar effect and low modulus). The Invar and Elinvar effects are known to originate from structural or magnetic transitions, but none of these transitions were found in the GUM metals. This challenges our fundamental understanding of their physical properties. In this study, we show that the typical GUM metal Ti-23Nb-0.7Ta-2Zr-1.2O (at%) alloy undergoes a strain glass transition, where martensitic nano-domains are frozen gradually over a broad temperature range by random point defects. These nano-domains develop strong texture after cold rolling, which causes the lattice elongation in the rolling direction associated with the transition upon cooling and leads to its Invar effect. Moreover, its Elinvar effect and low modulus can also be explained by the nano-domain structure of strain glass.

  8. Effect of the combination of dithiooctanoate monomers and acidic adhesive monomers on adhesion to precious metals, precious metal alloys and non-precious metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemura, Kunio; Kojima, Katsunori; Endo, Takeshi; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the combination of a dithiooctanoate monomer and an acidic adhesive monomer on adhesion to precious metals, precious and non-precious metal alloys. From a selection of four dithiooctanoate monomers and six acidic adhesive monomers, 14 experimental primers containing a combination of 5.0 wt% of a dithiooctanoate monomer and 1.0 wt% of an acidic adhesive monomer in acetone were prepared. Tensile bond strengths (TBSs) of MMA-PMMA/TBBO resin to nine kinds of precious metals, precious metal alloys, and non-precious metal alloys after 2,000 thermal cycles were measured. Results showed that there were no significant differences in TBS among the primers to all the precious and non-precious metal adherends tested (p>0.05). Highest TBS values (46.5-55.8 MPa) for bonding to Au alloy, Au-Ag-Pd alloy, Co-Cr alloy, and Ni-Cr alloy were achieved with the primer which contained 5.0 wt% 10-methacryloyloxydecyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (10-MDDT) and 1.0 wt% 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl phosphonoacetate (6-MHPA). Therefore, 5.0 wt% 10-MDDT and 1.0 wt% 6-MHPA was determined as the optimal combination for bonding to precious metals, precious and non-precious metal alloys.

  9. Transition metal catalysis in confined spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenders, Stefan H A M; Gramage-Doria, Rafael; de Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost N H

    2015-01-21

    Transition metal catalysis plays an important role in both industry and in academia where selectivity, activity and stability are crucial parameters to control. Next to changing the structure of the ligand, introducing a confined space as a second coordination sphere around a metal catalyst has recently been shown to be a viable method to induce new selectivity and activity in transition metal catalysis. In this review we focus on supramolecular strategies to encapsulate transition metal complexes with the aim of controlling the selectivity via the second coordination sphere. As we will discuss, catalyst confinement can result in selective processes that are impossible or difficult to achieve by traditional methods. We will describe the template-ligand approach as well as the host-guest approach to arrive at such supramolecular systems and discuss how the performance of the catalyst is enhanced by confining it in a molecular container.

  10. Alloying behaviour of binary transition metal systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paidar, Václav; Duparc, O. H.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 3 (2009), 308-310 ISSN 1862-5282 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : atomic interactions * ordering * phase separation * interfaces Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.862, year: 2009

  11. Transition metal contacts to graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Politou, Maria, E-mail: Maria.Politou@imec.be; De Gendt, Stefan; Heyns, Marc [KU Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Asselberghs, Inge; Radu, Iuliana; Conard, Thierry; Richard, Olivier; Martens, Koen; Huyghebaert, Cedric; Tokei, Zsolt [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lee, Chang Seung [SAIT, Samsung Electronics Co., Suwon 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Sayan, Safak [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Intel Corporation, 2200 Mission College Blvd, Santa Clara, California 95054 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    Achieving low resistance contacts to graphene is a common concern for graphene device performance and hybrid graphene/metal interconnects. In this work, we have used the circular Transfer Length Method (cTLM) to electrically characterize Ag, Au, Ni, Ti, and Pd as contact metals to graphene. The consistency of the obtained results was verified with the characterization of up to 72 cTLM structures per metal. Within our study, the noble metals Au, Ag and Pd, which form a weaker bond with graphene, are shown to result in lower contact resistance (Rc) values compared to the more reactive Ni and Ti. X-ray Photo Electron Spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization for the latter have shown the formation of Ti and Ni carbides. Graphene/Pd contacts show a distinct intermediate behavior. The weak carbide formation signature and the low Rc values measured agree with theoretical predictions of an intermediate state of weak chemisorption of Pd on graphene.

  12. Analytic functions for calculating binary alloys of FCC metals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The problem studied in this paper is that of obtaining appropriate electron density function and a pair potential function for an FCC metal within the EAM format. The approach adopted is to use the experimental dilute limit heats of solution of the binary alloys of FCC metals as input parameters into Johnson analytical model, ...

  13. Local Chemical Reactivity of a Metal Alloy Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Bjørk; Scheffler, Matthias

    1995-01-01

    The chemical reactivity of a metal alloy surface is studied by density functional theory investigating the interaction of H2 with NiAl(110). The energy barrier for H2 dissociation is largely different over the Al and Ni sites without, however, reflecting the barriers over the single component metal...

  14. Mechanisms of diffusional phase transformations in metals and alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Aaronson, Hubert I; Lee, Jong K

    2010-01-01

    Developed by the late metallurgy professor and master experimentalist Hubert I. Aaronson, this collection of lecture notes details the fundamental principles of phase transformations in metals and alloys upon which steel and other metals industries are based. Mechanisms of Diffusional Phase Transformations in Metals and Alloys is devoted to solid-solid phase transformations in which elementary atomic processes are diffusional jumps, and these processes occur in a series of so-called nucleation and growth through interface migration. Instead of relying strictly on a pedagogical approach, it doc

  15. Development and fabrication of high strength alloy fibers for use in metal-metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, G. W.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Metal fiber reinforced superalloys are being considered for construction of critical components in turbine engines that operate at high temperature. The problems involved in fabricating refractory metal alloys into wire form in such a manner as to maximize their strength properties without developing excessive structural defects are described. The fundamental principles underlying the development of such alloy fibers are also briefly discussed. The progress made to date in developing tungsten, tantalum and columbium base alloys for fiber reinforcement is reported and future prospects for alloy fiber development considered.

  16. Bioaccessibility of metals in alloys: evaluation of three surrogate biofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillwalker, Wendy E; Anderson, Kim A

    2014-02-01

    Bioaccessibility in vitro tests measure the solubility of materials in surrogate biofluids. However, the lack of uniform methods and the effects of variable test parameters on material solubility limit interpretation. One aim of this study was to measure and compare bioaccessibility of selected economically important alloys and metals in surrogate physiologically based biofluids representing oral, inhalation and dermal exposures. A second aim was to experimentally test different biofluid formulations and residence times in vitro. A third aim was evaluation of dissolution behavior of alloys with in vitro lung and dermal biofluid surrogates. This study evaluated the bioaccessibility of sixteen elements in six alloys and 3 elemental/metal powders. We found that the alloys/metals, the chemical properties of the surrogate fluid, and residence time all had major impacts on metal solubility. The large variability of bioaccessibility indicates the relevancy of assessing alloys as toxicologically distinct relative to individual metals. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. The influence of the pure metal components of four different casting alloys on the electrochemical properties of the alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Süleyman H; Pekmez, Nuran Ozçiçek; Keyf, Filiz; Canli, Fulya

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the pure metal components of the four different casting alloys on the corrosion behaviors of these alloys tested. Potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out on four different types of casting alloys and their pure metals at 37 degrees C in an artificial saliva solution. The ions released from the alloys into the solutions during the polarization test were also determined quantitatively using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Ni-Cr (M1) and Co-Cr (M2) alloys had a more homogenous structure than palladium based (M3) and gold based (M4) alloys in terms of the pitting potentials of the casting alloys and those of the pure metals composing the alloys. The total ion concentration released from M3 and M4 was less than from M1 and M2. This may be because M3 and M4 alloys contained noble metals. It was also found that the noble metals in the M3 and M4 samples decreased the current density in the anodic branch of the potentiodynamic polarization curves. In other words, noble metals contributed positively to dental materials. Corrosion resistance of the casting alloys can be affected by the pure metals they are composed of. Au and Pd based noble alloys dissolved less than Ni-Cr and Co-Cr based alloys.

  18. Cleavage crystallography of liquid metal embrittled aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, A. P.; Stoner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    The crystallography of liquid metal-induced transgranular cleavage in six aluminum alloys having a variety of microstructures has been determined via Laue X-ray back reflection. The cleavage crystallography was independent of alloy microstructure, and the cleavage plane was 100-plane oriented in all cases. It was further determined that the cleavage crystallography was not influenced by alloy texture. Examination of the fracture surface indicated that there was not a unique direction of crack propagation. In addition, the existence of 100-plane cleavage on alloy 2024 fracture surfaces was inferred by comparison of secondary cleavage crack intersection geometry on the 2024 surfaces with the geometry of secondary cleavage crack intersections on the test alloys.

  19. Directional and short-range ordering kinetics in metallic alloys, crystalline and amorphous

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillairet, J.

    1985-01-01

    This presentation describes the methods (resistometric and anelastic) based on analysis of stress-induced directional ordering and short-range ordering and their application to the study of metallic alloys, crystalline and amorphous. It focuses on the determination of the atomic mobility and point defect properties. It discusses also the structural information which can be gained by Zener relaxation studies about the order-disorder transition and self-induced directional ordering phenomena

  20. Graded coatings for metallic implant alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Fujino, Shigeru; Gomez-Vega, Jose M.

    2002-08-01

    Graded glass and glass-hydroxyapatite coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been prepared using a simple enameling technique. The composition of the glasses has been tailored to match the thermal expansion of the alloys. By controlling the firing time, and temperature, it has been possible to control the reactivity between the glass and the alloy and to fabricate coatings (25 to 150 mu m thick) with excellent adhesion to the substrate, resistant to corrosion and able to precipitate hydroxyapatite during in vitro tests in simulated body fluid.

  1. Room temperature creep in metals and alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deibler, Lisa Anne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Characterization and Performance

    2014-09-01

    Time dependent deformation in the form of creep and stress relaxation is not often considered a factor when designing structural alloy parts for use at room temperature. However, creep and stress relaxation do occur at room temperature (0.09-0.21 Tm for alloys in this report) in structural alloys. This report will summarize the available literature on room temperature creep, present creep data collected on various structural alloys, and finally compare the acquired data to equations used in the literature to model creep behavior. Based on evidence from the literature and fitting of various equations, the mechanism which causes room temperature creep is found to include dislocation generation as well as exhaustion.

  2. Multiple parameter cytotoxicity index on dental alloys and pure metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornez, J C; Lefèvre, A; Joly, D; Hildebrand, H F

    2002-08-01

    Palladium (Pd) is a metal frequently used for dental alloys. In order to elucidate controversial options about Pd concerning its biological performances, our study consists in the evaluation of commercial and experimental PFM and C&B precious and semi-precious dental alloys. This investigation was also designated to the establishment of a cytotoxicity index (CI) such as it was described for hemocompatibility testing. The following materials were tested: 36 commercial alloys (Au-, Pd- and Ag-base), 14 experimental alloys (Pd-base established by an experience plan) and pure metals (Ag, Au, Cu, Ni, Cr, In, Sn, Pt, Ti, Zn). The cells culture experiments were carried out with epithelial L132 cells and NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. In vitro cell viability tests show that Pt, Sn, In, Ti, Au and Pd have no cytotoxic effect; Cr, Cu and Ag are toxic, Ni, Zn, and Co are highly toxic. An identical ranking was found with the inflammatory and proliferation tests. Toxic and highly toxic metals induced slight or strong prosthetic dental restoration morphological alterations after 3-days cultures and mostly cell death after 6-days cultures. These effects are dependent on the leakage of the element into the culture medium as revealed by ICP. The addition of Au gives benefit to Pd-Ag alloys, but does not produce any major effect on Pd-Cu alloys. This qualitative ranking can quantitatively be confirmed by cytocompatibility testing after application of a CI.

  3. The action of small gamma-fluxes on structural and phase stability of metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krulikovskaya, M.P.; Chirko, L.I.

    1994-01-01

    It is review of 1971-1991 y.researches of metals and alloys properties into gamma-flux with intensity approx approx 10 12 quants/sm 2 s. It was established that the increase of atomic mobility at first moments of radiation leads to the acceleration of processes controlled by the atoms migration on short distances and to the changes of activation energy. It was established the criterions of influence of γ-radiation on equilibrium temperatures decrease of metals crystallization and alloys disordering. It was shown that γ-radiation leads to change of mechanism of the new phases created during polymorphic transition ξ-β, crystallization of metals and the decomposition of supersaturated solid solution in austenitic steel. (author). 90 refs., 1 tab., 14 figs

  4. Solubility of hydrogen in transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.M.

    1976-01-01

    Correlations exist between the heat of solution of hydrogen and the difference in energy between the lowest lying energy levels of the trivalent d/sup n-1/s electronic configuration and the divalent d/sup n-2/s 2 (or the tetravalent d/sup n/) configuration of the neutral gaseous atoms. The trends observed in the transition metal series are discussed in relation to the number of valence electrons per atom in the transition elements in their metallic and neutral states

  5. Fundamentals of radiation materials science metals and alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Was, Gary S

    2017-01-01

    The revised second edition of this established text offers readers a significantly expanded introduction to the effects of radiation on metals and alloys. It describes the various processes that occur when energetic particles strike a solid, inducing changes to the physical and mechanical properties of the material. Specifically it covers particle interaction with the metals and alloys used in nuclear reactor cores and hence subject to intense radiation fields. It describes the basics of particle-atom interaction for a range of particle types, the amount and spatial extent of the resulting radiation damage, the physical effects of irradiation and the changes in mechanical behavior of irradiated metals and alloys. Updated throughout, some major enhancements for the new edition include improved treatment of low- and intermediate-energy elastic collisions and stopping power, expanded sections on molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methodologies describing collision cascade evolution, new treatment of t...

  6. Method for low temperature preparation of a noble metal alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Jr., William R.

    2002-01-01

    A method for producing fine, essentially contamination free, noble metal alloys is disclosed. The alloys comprise particles in a size range of 5 to 500 nm. The method comprises 1. A method for preparing a noble metal alloy at low temperature, the method comprising the steps of forming solution of organometallic compounds by dissolving the compounds into a quantity of a compatible solvent medium capable of solvating the organometallic, mixing a portion of each solution to provide a desired molarity ratio of ions in the mixed solution, adding a support material, rapidly quenching droplets of the mixed solution to initiate a solute-solvent phase separation as the solvent freezes, removing said liquid cryogen, collecting and freezing drying the frozen droplets to produce a dry powder, and finally reducing the powder to a metal by flowing dry hydrogen over the powder while warming the powder to a temperature of about 150.degree. C.

  7. Development of new metallic alloys for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Hieda, Junko

    2012-11-01

    New low modulus β-type titanium alloys for biomedical applications are still currently being developed. Strong and enduring β-type titanium alloy with a low Young's modulus are being investigated. A low modulus has been proved to be effective in inhibiting bone atrophy, leading to good bone remodeling in a bone fracture model in the rabbit tibia. Very recently β-type titanium alloys with a self-tunable modulus have been proposed for the construction of removable implants. Nickel-free low modulus β-type titanium alloys showing shape memory and super elastic behavior are also currently being developed. Nickel-free stainless steel and cobalt-chromium alloys for biomedical applications are receiving attention as well. Newly developed zirconium-based alloys for biomedical applications are proving very interesting. Magnesium-based or iron-based biodegradable biomaterials are under development. Further, tantalum, and niobium and its alloys are being investigated for biomedical applications. The development of new metallic alloys for biomedical applications is described in this paper. Copyright © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hydrogen as a New Alloying Element in Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapovalov, Vladimir

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen was regarded as a harmful impurity in many alloys and particularly in steels where it gives rise to a specific type of embrittlement and forms various discontinuities like flakes and blowholes. For this reason, the researcher efforts were mainly focused on eliminating hydrogen's negative impacts and explaining its uncommonly high diffusivity in condensed phases. Meanwhile, positive characteristics of hydrogen as an alloying element remained unknown for quite a long time. Initial reports in this field did not appear before the early 1970s. Data on new phase diagrams are given for metal-hydrogen systems where the metal may or may not form hydrides. Various kinds of hydrogen impact on structure formation in solidification, melting and solid-solid transformations are covered. Special attention is given to the most popular alloys based on iron, aluminum, copper, nickel, magnesium and titanium. Detailed is what is called gas-eutectic reaction resulting in a special type of gas-solid structure named gasarite. Properties and applications of gasars - gasaritic porous materials - are dealt with. Various versions of solid-state alloying with hydrogen are discussed that change physical properties and fabrication characteristics of metals. Details are given on a unique phenomenon of anomalous spontaneous deformation due to combination of hydrogen environment and polymorphic transformation. All currently known versions of alloying with hydrogen are categorized for both hydride-forming and non-hydrid forming metals

  9. Spin-exchange interaction between transition metals and metalloids in soft-ferromagnetic metallic glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Santanu; Choudhary, Kamal; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Choi Yim, Haein; Bandyopadhyay, Asis K.; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2016-06-01

    High-performance magnetic materials have immense industrial and scientific importance in wide-ranging electronic, electromechanical, and medical device technologies. Metallic glasses with a fully amorphous structure are particularly suited for advanced soft-magnetic applications. However, fundamental scientific understanding is lacking for the spin-exchange interaction between metal and metalloid atoms, which typically constitute a metallic glass. Using an integrated experimental and molecular dynamics approach, we demonstrate the mechanism of electron interaction between transition metals and metalloids. Spin-exchange interactions were investigated for a Fe-Co metallic glass system of composition [(Co1-x Fe x )0.75B0.2Si0.05]96Cr4. The saturation magnetization increased with higher Fe concentration, but the trend significantly deviated from simple rule of mixtures. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation was used to identify the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interaction between the transition metals and metalloids. The overlapping band-structure and density of states represent ‘Stoner type’ magnetization for the amorphous alloys in contrast to ‘Heisenberg type’ in crystalline iron. The enhancement of magnetization by increasing iron was attributed to the interaction between Fe 3d and B 2p bands, which was further validated by valence-band study.

  10. Metallic ion release from biocompatible cobalt-based alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimić Ivana D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallic biomaterials, which are mainly used for the damaged hard tissue replacements, are materials with high strength, excellent toughness and good wear resistance. The disadvantages of metals as implant materials are their susceptibility to corrosion, the elastic modulus mismatch between metals and human hard tissues, relatively high density and metallic ion release which can cause serious health problems. The aim of this study was to examine metallic ion release from Co-Cr-Mo alloy in artificial saliva. In that purpose, alloy samples were immersed into artificial saliva with different pH values (4.0, 5.5 and 7.5. After a certain immersion period (1, 3 and 6 weeks the concentrations of released ions were determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma - Mass Spectrophotometer (ICP-MS. The research findings were used in order to define the dependence between the concentration of released metallic ions, artificial saliva pH values and immersion time. The determined released metallic ions concentrations were compared with literature data in order to describe and better understand the phenomenon of metallic ion release from the biocompatible cobalt-based alloy. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 46010 i br. ON 174004

  11. Convective effects on directional solidification of a simulated metal alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccay, T. D.; Mccay, M. H.; Lowry, S. A.; Smith, L. M.

    1988-01-01

    The first significant results of a ground-based experimental program which supports a low gravity space processing Spacelab experiment are reported. The phenomena which precipitate pluming and thus freckling in a metal alloy analog (ammonium chloride and water) are studied in detail and the sequential events leading to massive channeling and convection are optically documented. The pluming is shown to be other than a random burst of unstable fluid from a preferred channel but rather a natural occurrence resulting from a fundamental (Rayleigh-Benard) fluid dynamic instability at the density inversion interface. This extrapolates to critical size parameters appropriate to processing of actual metal alloys.

  12. Elementary characterization of Ti metal alloys used in implant dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Catarina A. M. P.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Rocha, Anna S. S.; Corrêa, Janine Nicolosi [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Deniak, Valeriy [Instituto de Pesquisa Pelé Pequeno Príncipe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Camargo, Liliane [Universidade Paranaense, Umuarama, PR (Brazil); Assis, J.T, E-mail: cata-montenegro@bol.com.br, E-mail: spaschuk@gmail.com, E-mail: denyak@gmail.com, E-mail: lili_camargo2@hotmail.com, E-mail: joaquim@iprj.uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The main goal of present work is analytical characterization of standard dental implants broadly used by Brazilian dentists. An ideal biological alloy for dental implants must have very high biocompatibility, which means that such material should not provoke any serious adverse tissue response. Dental implants are generally marketed as commercially pure titanium (TiCP) due to their excellent mechanical and physical properties. However, sometimes other alloys are employed and consequently it is essential to study the chemical elements present in those alloys that could bring prejudice for the health. Present work investigated TiCP metal alloys used for dental implant manufacturing and evaluated the presence of elements. For alloy characterization and identification of elements it was used EDXRF technique. This method allows to perform the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the materials using the spectra of the characteristic X-rays emitted by the elements present in the metal samples. The experimental setup was based on two X- ray tubes, Mini X model with Ag and Au targets and X-123SDD detector (AMPTEK) and a 0.5 mm Cu collimator, developed due to specific sample geometrical and topography characteristics. Obtained results showed that implant alloys are not exactly TiCP but were manufactured using Ti-Al-V alloy, which contained Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn. The presence of such metals as Al and V in all studied samples shows very clear that studied implants were not manufactured from TiCP alloy. Moreover, according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), these elements should not be present in TiCP. (author)

  13. Elementary characterization of Ti metal alloys used in implant dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Catarina A. M. P.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Rocha, Anna S. S.; Corrêa, Janine Nicolosi; Deniak, Valeriy; Camargo, Liliane; Assis, J.T

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of present work is analytical characterization of standard dental implants broadly used by Brazilian dentists. An ideal biological alloy for dental implants must have very high biocompatibility, which means that such material should not provoke any serious adverse tissue response. Dental implants are generally marketed as commercially pure titanium (TiCP) due to their excellent mechanical and physical properties. However, sometimes other alloys are employed and consequently it is essential to study the chemical elements present in those alloys that could bring prejudice for the health. Present work investigated TiCP metal alloys used for dental implant manufacturing and evaluated the presence of elements. For alloy characterization and identification of elements it was used EDXRF technique. This method allows to perform the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the materials using the spectra of the characteristic X-rays emitted by the elements present in the metal samples. The experimental setup was based on two X- ray tubes, Mini X model with Ag and Au targets and X-123SDD detector (AMPTEK) and a 0.5 mm Cu collimator, developed due to specific sample geometrical and topography characteristics. Obtained results showed that implant alloys are not exactly TiCP but were manufactured using Ti-Al-V alloy, which contained Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn. The presence of such metals as Al and V in all studied samples shows very clear that studied implants were not manufactured from TiCP alloy. Moreover, according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), these elements should not be present in TiCP. (author)

  14. Defect-Tolerant Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, Mohnish; Rasmussen, Filip Anselm; Kuhar, Korina

    2016-01-01

    -principles investigation of defect tolerance in 29 monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) of interest for nanoscale optoelectronics. We find that the TMDs based on group VI and X metals form deep gap states upon creation of a chalcogen (S, Se, Te) vacancy, while the TMDs based on group IV metals form only...... shallow defect levels and are thus predicted to be defect-tolerant. Interestingly, all the defect sensitive TMDs have valence and conduction bands with a very similar orbital composition. This indicates a bonding/antibonding nature of the gap, which in turn suggests that dangling bonds will fall inside...

  15. Electromagnetic Characterization Of Metallic Sensory Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Simpson, John; Wallace, Terryl A.; Newman, John A.; Leser, Paul; Lahue, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Ferromagnetic shape-memory alloy (FSMA) particles undergo changes in both electromagnetic properties and crystallographic structure when strained. When embedded in a structural material, these attributes can provide sensory output of the strain state of the structure. In this work, a detailed characterization of the electromagnetic properties of a FSMA under development for sensory applications is performed. In addition, a new eddy current probe is used to interrogate the electromagnetic properties of individual FSMA particles embedded in the sensory alloy during controlled fatigue tests on the multifunctional material.

  16. Ancient Metal Mirror Alloy Revisited: Quasicrystalline Nanoparticles Observed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, J. A.; Mantri, A. S.; Yamjala, S.; Saha, Sabyasachi; Balamuralikrishnan, R.; Rao, P. Rama

    2015-12-01

    This article presents, for the first time, evidence of nanocrystalline structure, through direct transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, in a Cu-32 wt.% Sn alloy that has been made by an age-old, uniquely crafted casting process. This alloy has been used as a metal mirror for centuries. The TEM images also reveal five-sided projections of nano-particles. The convergent beam nano-diffraction patterns obtained from the nano-particles point to the nano-phase being quasicrystalline, a feature that has never before been reported for a copper alloy, although there have been reports of the presence of icosahedral `clusters' within large unit cell intermetallic phases. This observation has been substantiated by x-ray diffraction, wherein the observed peaks could be indexed to an icosahedral quasi-crystalline phase. The mirror alloy casting has been valued for its high hardness and high reflectance properties, both of which result from its unique internal microstructure that include nano-grains as well as quasi-crystallinity. We further postulate that this microstructure is a consequence of the raw materials used and the manufacturing process, including the choice of mold material. While the alloy consists primarily of copper and tin, impurity elements such as zinc, iron, sulfur, aluminum and nickel are also present, in individual amounts not exceeding one wt.%. It is believed that these trace impurities could have influenced the microstructure and, consequently, the properties of the metal mirror alloy.

  17. Processing of Refractory Metal Alloys for JOYO Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RF Luther; ME Petrichek

    2006-01-01

    This is a summary of the refractory metal processing experienced by candidate Prometheus materiats as they were fabricated into specimens destined for testing within the JOYO test reactor, ex-reactor testing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), or testing within the NRPCT. The processing is described for each alloy from the point of inception to the point where processing was terminated due to the cancellation of Naval Reactor's involvement in the Prometheus Project. The alloys included three tantalum-base alloys (T-111, Ta-10W, and ASTAR-811C), a niobium-base alloy, (FS-85), and two molybdenum-rhenium alloys, one containing 44.5 w/o rhenium, and the other 47.5 w/o rhenium. Each of these alloys was either a primary candidate or back-up candidate for cladding and structural applications within the space reactor. Their production was intended to serve as a forerunner for large scale production ingots that were to be procured from commercial refractory metal vendors such as Wah Chang

  18. Processing of Refractory Metal Alloys for JOYO Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RF Luther; ME Petrichek

    2006-02-21

    This is a summary of the refractory metal processing experienced by candidate Prometheus materiats as they were fabricated into specimens destined for testing within the JOYO test reactor, ex-reactor testing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), or testing within the NRPCT. The processing is described for each alloy from the point of inception to the point where processing was terminated due to the cancellation of Naval Reactor's involvement in the Prometheus Project. The alloys included three tantalum-base alloys (T-111, Ta-10W, and ASTAR-811C), a niobium-base alloy, (FS-85), and two molybdenum-rhenium alloys, one containing 44.5 w/o rhenium, and the other 47.5 w/o rhenium. Each of these alloys was either a primary candidate or back-up candidate for cladding and structural applications within the space reactor. Their production was intended to serve as a forerunner for large scale production ingots that were to be procured from commercial refractory metal vendors such as Wah Chang.

  19. Overlapping double etch technique for evaluation of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Stewart, James C.

    1981-01-01

    A double overlapping etch zone technique for evaluation of the resistance of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking. The technique involves evaluating the metallic alloy along the line of demarcation between an overlapping double etch zone and single etch zone formed on the metallic alloy surface.

  20. 49 CFR 173.187 - Pyrophoric solids, metals or alloys, n.o.s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pyrophoric solids, metals or alloys, n.o.s. 173... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.187 Pyrophoric solids, metals or alloys, n.o.s. Packagings for pyrophoric solids, metals, or alloys, n.o.s. must conform to the requirements of part 178 of this subchapter at the...

  1. Mesoporous Transition Metal Oxides for Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, transition metal oxides, such as ruthenium oxide (RuO2, manganese dioxide (MnO2, nickel oxides (NiO and cobalt oxide (Co3O4, have been widely investigated as electrode materials for pseudo-capacitors. In particular, these metal oxides with mesoporous structures have become very hot nanomaterials in the field of supercapacitors owing to their large specific surface areas and suitable pore size distributions. The high specific capacities of these mesoporous metal oxides are resulted from the effective contacts between electrode materials and electrolytes as well as fast transportation of ions and electrons in the bulk of electrode and at the interface of electrode and electrolyte. During the past decade, many achievements on mesoporous transition metal oxides have been made. In this mini-review, we select several typical nanomaterials, such as RuO2, MnO2, NiO, Co3O4 and nickel cobaltite (NiCo2O4, and briefly summarize the recent research progress of these mesoporous transition metal oxides-based electrodes in the field of supercapacitors.

  2. A Novel 3D Printer to Support Additive Manufacturing of Gradient Metal Alloy Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gradient metal alloy structures possess multi-functional properties that conventional monolithic metal counterparts do not have. Such structures can potentially...

  3. A Novel 3D Printer to Support Additive Manufacturing of Gradient Metal Alloy Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gradient metal alloy structures possess multi-functional properties that conventional monolithic metal counterparts do not have. Such structures can potentially...

  4. Prospects for use of radiation for metal and alloy treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovskij, E.A.; Krasnoshchekov, M.M.; Pereverzev, D.D.

    1978-01-01

    Analyzed were the prospects for electron and neutron irradiation application for metal and alloy heat treatment. Advantages of such treatment are as follows: possibility of local treatments; possibility of production of surface hardened layers with differentiated characteristics; decrease in heat treatment time; improvement of characteristics of diffusion and electrolytic coatings; possibility of metal treatment in gaseous or liquid medium; improvement of strength and antifrictional characteristics of metals etc. These advantages show application prospects for the treatment method with irradiation for the increase of durability of carburized and sulphidized surfaces of pieces, of various electrolytic coatings and non-hardening metal friction surfaces

  5. High temperature strain of metals and alloys. Physical fundamentals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitin, V. [National Technical Univ., Zaporozhye (Ukraine)

    2006-07-01

    The author shows how new in-situ X-ray investigations and transmission electron microscope studies lead to novel explanations of high-temperature deformation and creep in pure metals, solid solutions and super alloys. This approach is the first to find unequivocal and quantitative expressions for the macroscopic deformation rate by means of three groups of parameters: substructural characteristics, physical material constants and external conditions. Creep strength of the studied uptodate single crystal super alloys is greatly increased over conventional polycrystalline super alloys. The contents of this book include: macroscopic characteristics of strain at high temperatures; experimental equipment and technique of in situ X-ray investigations; experimental data and structural parameters in deformed metals; sub-boundaries as dislocation sources and obstacles; the physical mechanism of creep and the quantitative structural model; simulation of the parameters evolution; system of differential equations; high-temperature deformation of industrial super alloys; single crystals of super alloys; effect of composition, orientation and temperature on properties; and creep of some refractory metals.

  6. Molybdenum-A Key Component of Metal Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropschot, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    Molybdenum, whose chemical symbol is Mo, was first recognized as an element in 1778. Until that time, the mineral molybdenite-the most important source of molybdenum-was believed to be a lead mineral because of its metallic gray color, greasy feel, and softness. In the late 19th century, French metallurgists discovered that molybdenum, when alloyed (mixed) with steel in small quantities, creates a substance that is remarkably tougher than steel alone and is highly resistant to heat. The alloy was found to be ideal for making tools and armor plate. Today, the most common use of molybdenum is as an alloying agent in stainless steel, alloy steels, and superalloys to enhance hardness, strength, and resistance to corrosion.

  7. High temperature seal for joining ceramics and metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiya, P. Subraya; Picciolo, John J.; Emerson, James E.; Dusek, Joseph T.; Balachandran, Uthamalingam

    1998-01-01

    For a combination of a membrane of SrFeCo.sub.0.5 O.sub.x and an Inconel alloy, a high-temperature seal is formed between the membrane and the alloy. The seal is interposed between the alloy and the membrane, and is a fritted compound of Sr oxide and boric oxide and a fritted compound of Sr, Fe and Co oxides. The fritted compound of SrFeCo.sub.0.50 O.sub.x is present in the range of from about 30 to 70 percent by weight of the total sealant material and the fritted compound of Sr oxide and boric oxide has a mole ratio of 2 moles of the Sr oxide for each mole of boric oxide. A method of sealing a ceramic to an Inconel metal alloy is also disclosed.

  8. Diffusion and surface alloying of gradient nanostructured metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenbo Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gradient nanostructures (GNSs have been optimized in recent years for desired performance. The diffusion behavior in GNS metals is crucial for understanding the diffusion mechanism and relative characteristics of different interfaces that provide fundamental understanding for advancing the traditional surface alloying processes. In this paper, atomic diffusion, reactive diffusion, and surface alloying processes are reviewed for various metals with a preformed GNS surface layer. We emphasize the promoted atomic diffusion and reactive diffusion in the GNS surface layer that are related to a higher interfacial energy state with respect to those in relaxed coarse-grained samples. Accordingly, different surface alloying processes, such as nitriding and chromizing, have been modified significantly, and some diffusion-related properties have been enhanced. Finally, the perspectives on current research in this field are discussed.

  9. Hydrogen formation in metals and alloys during fusion reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimin, S.; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Mori, Seiji

    1994-08-01

    The results of neutron transport calculations of the hydrogen formation based on the JENDL gas-production cross section file are discussed for some metals and alloys, namely 51 V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Mo, austenitic stainless steel (Ti modified 316SS:PCA), ferritic steel (Fe-8Cr-2W:F82H) and the vanadium-base alloy (V-5Cr-5Ti). Impact of the steel fraction in steel/water homogeneous blanket/shield compositions on the hydrogen formation rate in above-mentioned metals and alloys is discussed both for the hydrogen formation in the first wall and the blanket/shield components. The results obtained for the first wall are compared with those for the helium formation obtained at JAERI by the same calculational conditions. Hydrogen formation rates at the first wall having 51 V, Cr, Fe, Ni and Mo are larger than those of helium by 3-8 times. (author)

  10. Density functional theory based screening of ternary alkali-transition metal borohydrides: A computational material design project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Jens Strabo; Landis, David; Voss, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    We present a computational screening study of ternary metal borohydrides for reversible hydrogen storage based on density functional theory. We investigate the stability and decomposition of alloys containing 1 alkali metal atom, Li, Na, or K (M1); and 1 alkali, alkaline earth or 3d/4d transition...

  11. Separation of matrix alloy and reinforcement from aluminum metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Separation of matrix alloy and reinforcements from pure Al–SiCp composite scrap by salt flux addi- tion has been theoretically predicted .... zero and the salt fluxes have only little solubility in the matrix metal, separation of the matrix ... aluminum melt with SiC at this temperature did not exceed. 30 min. In order to change the ...

  12. Fatigue damage assessment of recycled metals and alloys | Ayensu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cyclic fatigue tests were conducted on recycled polycrystalline metals and alloys at room and elevated tempera-ures to determine the fatigue strength, endurance limit and endurance ratio. Annealed and polished stainless steel (Fe-18Cr-8Ni), mild steel (Fe-0.25Cr), aluminium (Al), alpha-brass (Cu-30 % Zn) and copper ...

  13. A comparison in activity between transition-metal oxides and transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Bligaard, Thomas; Nørskov, Jens

    2012-02-01

    Transition-metal oxides are widely used materials in catalysis as substrates and promoters, but also as the active catalyst materials themselves. We compare the reactivity of transition-metal oxides with the one of transition metals. The comparison is exemplified for the ammonia synthesis reaction. First we show that there exist characteristic Brønsted-Evans Polanyi (BEP) relations (linear relations between transition state and dissociation energies) for dissociation of molecules on transition-metal oxides in the rutile and perovskite structure. It is well-known that the (211) metal surface is several orders of magnitude more reactive than the (111) metal surface due to the lower BEP line for the 211 facet. We find that both rutiles and perovskites follow BEP relations that are lower than the one of the 211 facet. Second we utilize the established BEP relations together with calculated adsorption energetics in a micro-kinetic model to obtain a volcano plot for the catalytic activity. We find that oxides have a higher turn over frequency as compared with metals. Hence, oxides intrinsically have a great advantage in terms of catalytic activity which opens up for catalyst design.

  14. First-row transition metal hydrogenation and hydrosilylation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovitch, Ryan J.; Mukhopadhyay, Tufan K.; Pal, Raja; Levin, Hagit Ben-Daat; Porter, Tyler M.; Ghosh, Chandrani

    2017-07-18

    Transition metal compounds, and specifically transition metal compounds having a tetradentate and/or pentadentate supporting ligand are described, together with methods for the preparation thereof and the use of such compounds as hydrogenation and/or hydrosilylation catalysts.

  15. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Jr., Howard W.; Horton, James A.; Elliott, Guy R. B.

    1995-01-01

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO.sub.3), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO.sub.2). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl.sub.4), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation.

  16. Process for continuous production of metallic uranium and uranium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, H.W. Jr.; Horton, J.A.; Elliott, G.R.B.

    1995-06-06

    A method is described for forming metallic uranium, or a uranium alloy, from uranium oxide in a manner which substantially eliminates the formation of uranium-containing wastes. A source of uranium dioxide is first provided, for example, by reducing uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}), or any other substantially stable uranium oxide, to form the uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This uranium dioxide is then chlorinated to form uranium tetrachloride (UCl{sub 4}), and the uranium tetrachloride is then reduced to metallic uranium by reacting the uranium chloride with a metal which will form the chloride of the metal. This last step may be carried out in the presence of another metal capable of forming one or more alloys with metallic uranium to thereby lower the melting point of the reduced uranium product. The metal chloride formed during the uranium tetrachloride reduction step may then be reduced in an electrolysis cell to recover and recycle the metal back to the uranium tetrachloride reduction operation and the chlorine gas back to the uranium dioxide chlorination operation. 4 figs.

  17. COST 507: Thermophysical properties of light metal alloys. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaroma-Weiland, G.; Brandt, R.; Neuer, G.

    1994-02-15

    The thermophysical properties of Al-, Mg- and Ti-based light metal alloys have been studied by reviewing the literature published so far, evaluating the empirical results and by empirical investigations. The properties to the covered in the literature research are: thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, thermal expansion and electrical resistivity. The data have been stored in the factual data base THERSYST together with the results of experimental measurements supplied from participants of the COST 507-action (Group D). Altogether 1325 data-sets referring to 146 alloys have been stored. They have been uniformly represented and critically analyzed by means of the THERSYST program moduli. These numerical data cover a number of systems with variing chemical composition and thermal treatment. Partly large discrepancies especially of the thermal conductivity have been found for similar alloys. The problem of experimental uncertainities has been studied in detail by investigation of AA-8090 alloy (Al-2.5Li-1.1Cu). The thermophysical properties of monolithic alloy KS1275 (AlSi12CuNi) and metal matrix composite (KS1275 reinforced with Al2O3 short fibre) have been determined experimentally. (orig.)

  18. (Electronic structure and reactivities of transition metal clusters)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The following are reported: theoretical calculations (configuration interaction, relativistic effective core potentials, polyatomics, CASSCF); proposed theoretical studies (clusters of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, Ru; transition metal cluster ions; transition metal carbide clusters; bimetallic mixed transition metal clusters); reactivity studies on transition metal clusters (reactivity with H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, hydrocarbons; NO and CO chemisorption on surfaces). Computer facilities and codes to be used, are described. 192 refs, 13 figs.

  19. Computational dynamics of laser alloyed metallic materials for improved corrosion performance: computational dynamics of laser alloyed metallic materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fatoba, OS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser alloying is a material processing method which utilizes the high power density available from defocused laser beam to melt both metal coatings and a part of the underlying substrate. Since melting occur solitary at the surface, large...

  20. On the ductile-to-brittle transition behavior of martensitic alloys neutron irradiated to 26 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Charpy impact tests were conducted on specimens made of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo in various heat treatment conditions which were irradiated in EBR-II to 26 dpa at 390 to 500 0 C. The results are compared with previous results on specimens irradiated to 13 dpa. HT-9 base metal irradiated at low temperatures showed a small additional increase in ductile brittle transition temperature and a decrease in upper shelf energy from 13 to 26 dpa. No fluence effect was observed in 9Cr-1Mo base metal. The 9Cr-1Mo weldment showed degraded DBTT but improved USE response compared to base metal, contrary to previous findings on HT-9. Significant differences were observed in HT-9 base metal between mill annealed material and normalized and tempered material. The highest DBTT for HT-9 alloys was 50 0 C higher than for the worst case in 9Cr-1Mo alloys. Fractography and hardness measurements were also obtained. Significant differences in fracture appearance were observed in different product forms, although no dependence on fluence was observed. Failure was controlled by the preirradiation microstructure

  1. Bulk metallic glasses and high entropy alloys for reprocessing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.; Jayaraj, J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in materials engineering have generated complex alloys that retain a glassy state in bulk form (bulk metallic glasses or BMGs) via ingot casting. High corrosion resistance is expected for BMGs (amorphous) as they are free from defects associated with the crystalline state such as grain boundaries, dislocations and stacking faults. Compared with conventional alloys containing one or two principal elements, the recently developed HEAs are usually composed of five or more elements with equimolar or near equimolar elemental fractions, which forms single solid solution phase. These HEAs exhibit excellent microstructural stability with better mechanical, wear and corrosion resistance properties as they are essentially single phase. Reprocessing of spent fuel from the fast breeder reactor involves the use of high concentration of (11.5 M) nitric acid under boiling conditions for the dissolution of the fuel. Conventional AISI type 304LSS and nitric acid grade 304L stainless steel would undergo inter-granular corrosion under these conditions and cannot be used for the fabrication of dissolver vessel. Currently titanium is used and zirconium alloys are proposed for future dissolver applications. Thus searching for newer materials with higher corrosion resistance suggests metallic glasses and HEAs for critical components of the dissolver application. Several Zr-based glassy alloys with different microstructural states and Ni-Nb based glassy alloys and TiZrHfNbTa HEA were cast and characterized for microstructure and corrosion resistance in nitric acid medium. From these studies, factors such as the corrosive environment (nitric acid, chloride and fluoride), and the presence of passivating elements in the alloy were emphasized for better corrosion resistance of BMGs and HEA. Attempts were also made to prepare coatings of Zr-and Ni-based glassy alloys on 304LSS by laser based deposition technique and their corrosion properties were evaluated. (author)

  2. New applications and novel processing of refractory metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briant, C.L.

    2001-01-01

    Refractory metals have often been limited in their application because of their propensity to oxidize and to undergo a loos of yield strength at elevated temperatures. However, recent developments in both processing and alloy composition have opened the possibility that these materials might be used in structural applications that were not considered possible in the past. At the same time, the use of refractory metals in the electronics industry is growing, particularly with the use of tantalum as a diffusion barrier for copper metallization. Finally, the application of grain boundary engineering to the problem of intergranular fracture in these materials may allow processes to be developed that will produce alloys with a greater resistance to fracture. (author)

  3. Spin-Orbitronics at Transition Metal Interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-11-09

    The presence of large spin–orbit interaction at transition metal interfaces enables the emergence of a variety of fascinating phenomena that have been at the forefront of spintronics research in the past 10 years. The objective of the present chapter is to offer a review of these various effects from a theoretical perspective, with a particular focus on spin transport, chiral magnetism, and their interplay. After a brief description of the orbital hybridization scheme at transition metal interfaces, we address the impact of spin–orbit coupling on the interfacial magnetic configuration, through the celebrated Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction. We then discuss the physics of spin transport and subsequent torques occurring at these interfaces. We particularly address the spin Hall, spin swapping, and inverse spin-galvanic effects. Finally, the interplay between flowing charges and chiral magnetic textures and their induced dynamics are presented. We conclude this chapter by proposing some perspectives on promising research directions.

  4. The phosphorus and the transition metals chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathey, F.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report, concerning the Polytechnic School unit (France), which studies the phosphorus and the transition metals chemistry, is presented. The laboratory activities are related to the following topics: the phosporus heterocyclic chemistry, the phosphorus-carbon double bonds chemistry, the new transition metals phosphorus compounds, the phosphonates and their uses. Some practical applications of homogeneous catalysis and new materials synthesis are investigated. The main results obtained are: the discovery of the tetra-phosphafulvalenes, the utilization of a new synthesis method of the phosphorus-carbon double bonds and the stabilization of the α-phosphonyled carbanions by the lithium diisopropylamidourea. The papers, the congress communications and the thesis are also shown [fr

  5. Lattice Location of Transition Metals in Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %IS366 %title\\\\ \\\\Transition metals (TMs) in semiconductors have been the subject of considerable research for nearly 40 years. This is due both to their role as important model impurities for deep centers in semiconductors, and to their technological impact as widespread contaminants in Si processing, where the miniaturization of devices requires to keep their sheet concentration below 10$^{10}$ cm$^{-2}$. As a consequence of the low TM solubility, conventional ion beam methods for direct lattice location have failed completely in identifying the lattice sites of isolated transition metals. Although electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has yielded valuable information on a variety of TM centers, it has been unable to detect certain defects considered by theory, e.g., isolated interstitial or substitutional Cu in Si. The proposed identity of other EPR centers such as substitutional Fe in Si, still needs confirmation by additional experimental methods. As a consequence, the knowledge on the structural propert...

  6. Chemical-disorder effects in half-metallic Heusler alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomski, Ralph; Jin, Yunlong; Waybright, Jace; Kharel, Parashu; Pathak, Rohit; Choudhary, Renu; Kashyap, Arti; Sellmyer, D. J.

    The electronic structure, magnetism, and conductivity of disordered Heusler alloys are investigated theoretically and experimentally. Emphasis is on Heuslers that are predicted to be half-metallic or spin-gapless semiconducting in their fully ordered states, such as CoFeCrAl. Experimental alloys often exhibit resistivities of the order of 200 μΩ cm, which is consistent with both dirty-metal and spin-gapless semiconducting behaviors, but a distinction can be made by comparing the residual resistivities of samples having different degrees of order. The corresponding analysis shows that careful processing is necessary to keep the alloys in the spin-gapless semiconducting regime. Several types of disorder occur in Y-type Heusler alloys, with different negative effects on half-metallicity and spin-gapless semiconductivity. A2 (or bcc) disorder is most harmful but can be limited experimentally in CoFeCrAl thin films. B2 (or CsCl) disorder is less harmful, whereas L21 (normal Heusler) disorder, corresponding to Fe-Co solid solubility is least harmful. The residual resistivity of the partially diorderd alluys is discussed as a carrier-localization effect. This work is supported by DOE BES (DE-FG02-04ER46152, R.S.) and NSF DMREF (SusChEM 1436385, D.J.S.).

  7. Structure and properties of transition metal-metalloid glasses based on refractory metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, W.L.; Williams, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    The structure and properties of several new transition metal-metalloid (TM/sub 1-x/M/sub x/) metallic glasses based on refractory transition metals (e.g. Mo, W, Ru etc.) have been systemically investigated as a function of composition. The structure of the alloys has been investigated by x-ray diffraction methods and measurements of superconducting properties, electrical resistivity, density, hardness, and mechanical behavior were made. These data are used in developing a novel description of the structure of TM/sub 1-x/M/sub x/ glasses. The experimental evidence suggests that an ideal amorphous phase forms at a specific composition x/sub c/ and that this phase has a well defined atomic short range order. For metallic glasses having x < x/sub c/ (metalloid poor glasses) vacancy-like defects form, which are characterized by the excess volume which they contribute to the glass. Another, as yet unspecified defect appears to form in glasses with x > x/sub c/. This novel picture can explain the variation of many properties of these glasses with metalloid concentration.

  8. Biocompatibility evaluation of nickel-titanium shape memory metal alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Ryhänen, J. (Jorma)

    1999-01-01

    Abstract The shape memory effect, superelasticity, and good damping properties, uncommon in other implant alloys, make the nickel-titanium shape memory metal alloy (Nitinol or NiTi) a fascinating material for surgical applications. It provides a possibility to make self-locking, self-expanding and self-compressing implants. The purpose of this work was to determine if NiTi is a safe material for surgical implant applications. The primary cytotoxicity and the corrosion rate of NiTi were...

  9. Transformation paths in transition-metal disilicides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Káňa, Tomáš; Šob, Mojmír; Vitek, V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 465, - (2011), s. 61-64 ISSN 1662-9795. [MSMF /6./ Materials Structure and Micromechanics of Fracture. Brno, 28.06.2010-30.06.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100920; GA MŠk(CZ) OC10008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : transition-metal disilicides * transformation path * structural stability * electronic structure Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  10. Single-layer transition metal sulfide catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Steven G [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-05-31

    Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for upgrading heavy petroleum feedstocks and removing sulfur, nitrogen and other pollutants from fuels. We have developed an improved synthesis technique to produce SLTMS catalysts, such as molybdenum disulfide, with potentially greater activity and specificity than those currently available. Applications for this technology include heavy feed upgrading, in-situ catalysis, bio-fuel conversion and coal liquefaction.

  11. Magnetic Interactions in Transition-Metal Oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Solovyev, I. V.

    2003-01-01

    This a review article, which presents a general framework for the analysis of interatomic magnetic interactions in the spin-density-functional theory, which is based on the magnetic force theorem, make a link with the models for transition-metal oxides, and gives several examples of how this strategy can be used for the analysis of magnetic properties of colossal-magnetoresistive perovskite manganites, double perovskite and pyrochlore compounds.

  12. Electronic structure of hcp transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, O.; Andersen, O. Krogh; Mackintosh, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    Using the linear muffin-tin-orbital method described in the previous paper, we have calculated the electronic structures of the hcp transition metals, Zr, Hf, Ru, and Os. We show how the band structures of these metals may be synthesized from the sp and d bands, and illustrate the effects...... of hybridization, relativistic band shifts, and spin-orbit coupling by the example of Os. By making use of parameters derived from the muffin-tin potential, we discuss trends in the positions and widths of the energy bands, especially the d bands, as a function of the location in the periodic table. The densities...... of states of the four metals are presented, and the calculated heat capacities compared with experiment. The Fermi surfaces of both Ru and Os are found to be in excellent quantitative agreement with de Haas-van Alphen measurements, indicating that the calculated d-band position is misplaced by less than 10...

  13. Metal and Metal Alloy Hydride Nuclear Acoustic Resonance and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Rebecca Scholz

    Effects of interstitial hydrogen on the quadrupole coupled nuclear acoustic resonance (NAR) and the (skin depth) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) line shapes and magnetic field positions of ('51)V and ('93)Nb were studied at 300K and 1 tesla in annealed single crystals of the transition metal alloys Nb(,.96)V(,.04)H(,x) (x (LESSTHEQ) .07), V(,.96)Nb(,.04)H(,x) (x (LESSTHEQ) .04), Ta(,.96)Nb(,.07)H(,x) (x (LESSTHEQ) .20) and Ta(,.68)Nb.04H(,x) (x (LESSTHEQ) .23), with the hydrogen in the gaseous (alpha) phase. This work was undertaken to further the understanding of the role of hydrogen in alloys. Static quadrupole effects dominate the line widths, with the ('51)V NMR in the NbV alloys exhibiting first order broadening, the ('93)Nb NMR line width broadened in second order in Nb(,.96)V(,.04),Ta(,.68)Nb(,.32) and Ta(,.93)Nb(,.07), and the ('93)Nb NAR in Nb(,.96)V(,.04) broadened more than an order of magnitude over the pure niobium NAR. No ('181)Ta NAR was observed, due to severe quadrupole effects coupled with its large quadrupole moment. As hydrogen is absorbed by Nb(,.96)V(,.04), the ('93)Nb NMR and NAR line widths narrow and the ('51)V Knight shift increases, in accord with a previous study which proposes the vanadium atoms trap hydrogen in their nearest neighboring tetrahedral sites. This is compatible with the increase seen in the ('51)V line width, thought to arise from the sharing of trapped hydrogen by neighboring vanadium atoms. The absorption of hydrogen by V(,.96)Nb(,.04) initially relieves the quadrupole broadening of ('51)V NMR but finally broadens the line width, while causing the ('51)V Knight shift to increase. This is consistent with a model in which hydrogen avoids sites near the Nb atoms. The absorption of hydrogen narrows the ('93)Nb line width in Ta(,93)Nb(,.07) but appears to have no effect on it in Ta(,.68)Nb(,.32), while the ('93)Nb Knight shift is increased slightly in both alloys. Also, the first measurement of the dipole coupled NAR of ('25

  14. [Should metal alloy discs be used for patch testing in suspected metal implant intolerance reaction?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P; Geier, J; Dickel, H; Diepgen, T; Hillen, U; Kreft, B; Schnuch, A; Szliska, C; Mahler, V

    2015-11-01

    Intolerance reactions to metal implants may be caused by metal allergy. However, prior to implantation, patch testing should not be done in a prophylactic-prophetic approach. Pre-implant patch testing should only be performed to verify or exclude metal allergy in patients with a reported respective history. In the case of implant-in particular arthroplasty-related complications like, for example, pain, effusion, skin changes, reduced range of motion, or loosening, orthopedic-surgical differential diagnostics should be performed first. Allergological workup of suspected metal implant allergy should be done with the DKG baseline series which contains nickel-, cobalt- and chromium-preparations. Various studies assessing the usefulness of metal alloy discs for patch testing proved that this approach does not give reliable information about metal allergy. Positive patch test reactions to the discs cannot be assigned to a specific metal within the disc alloy components. Furthermore, availability of such metal discs might be an invitation to uncritical testing. Accordingly, due to lack of benefit in comparison to patch testing with standardized metal salt preparations, we do not recommend patch testing with metal alloy discs.

  15. PASSIVATION LAYER STABILITY OF A METALLIC ALLOY WASTE FORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, M.; Mickalonis, J.; Fisher, D.; Sindelar, R.

    2010-01-01

    Alloy waste form development under the Waste Forms Campaign of the DOE-NE Fuel Cycle Research and Development program includes the process development and characterization of an alloy system to incorporate metal species from the waste streams generated during nuclear fuel recycling. This report describes the tests and results from the FY10 activities to further investigate an Fe-based waste form that uses 300-series stainless steel as the base alloy in an induction furnace melt process to incorporate the waste species from a closed nuclear fuel recycle separations scheme. This report is focused on the initial activities to investigate the formation of oxyhydroxide layer(s) that would be expected to develop on the Fe-based waste form as it corrodes under aqueous repository conditions. Corrosion tests were used to evaluate the stability of the layer(s) that can act as a passivation layer against further corrosion and would affect waste form durability in a disposal environment.

  16. The dissimilar brazing of Kovar alloy to SiCp/Al composites using silver-based filler metal foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Xu, Dongxia; Zhai, Yahong; Niu, Jitai

    2017-09-01

    Aluminum metal matrix composites with high SiC content (60 vol.% SiCp/Al MMCs) were surface metallized with a Ni-P alloy coating, and vacuum brazing between the composites and Kovar alloy were performed using rapidly cooled Ag-22.0Cu-15.9In-10.86Sn-1.84Ti (wt%) foil. The effects of Ni-P alloy coating and brazing parameters on the joint microstructures and properties were researched by SEM, EDS, and single lap shear test, respectively. Results show that Ag-Al intermetallic strips were formed in the 6063Al matrix and filler metal layer because of diffusion, and they were arranged regularly and accumulated gradually as the brazing temperature was increased ( T/°C = 550-600) or the soaking time was prolonged ( t/min = 10-50). However, excessive strips would destroy the uniformity of seams and lead to a reduced bonding strength (at most 70 MPa). Using a Ni-P alloy coating, void free joints without those strips were obtained at 560 °C after 20 min soaking time, and a higher shear strength of 90 MPa was achieved. The appropriate interface reaction ( 2 μm transition layer) that occurred along the Ni-P alloy coating/filler metal/Kovar alloy interfaces resulted in better metallurgical bonding. In this research, the developed Ag-based filler metal was suitable for brazing the dissimilar materials of Ni-P alloy-coated SiCp/Al MMCs and Kovar alloy, and capable welding parameters were also broadened.

  17. Synthesis of arsenic transition metal sulfides and metal arsenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singhal, G.H.; Brown, L.D.; Ryan, D.F. [Exxon Research & Development Labs, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    One of the chief problems in upgrading shale oil is the presence of inherent arsenic which is known to poison downstream catalysts. Highly dispersed transition metal sulfides formed in situ from the decomposition of dithiocarbamate (DTC) complexes of transition metals show excellent potential as dearsenation agents. The authors have studied the reaction of these sulfides with various arsenic compositions and characterized the metal arsenides and arsenic metal sulfides formed as well as the ease of their formation. Thus, the reaction of bis(butyldithiocarbamato)Ni, (NiBuDTC) with model compounds was very facile and gave NiAs, NiAsS, and NiAs2=xSx. In general the effectiveness of the sulfides for dearsenation followed the sequence Ni>Mo{much_gt}Co, while iron sulfides were totally ineffective. Based upon these results, tests were run in autoclaves (as well as a fixed-bed flow-through unit) with NiBuDTC and shale oil having 73 ppm inherent As. Under optimum conditions, dearsenation down to les than 1 ppm was obtained.

  18. Estimation of stacking fault and twin energies in transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papon, Anne-Marie

    1979-01-01

    As twins and stacking faults play an important role in the plastic deformation of metals, the objective of this research thesis is, by using an as correct as possible description of band d state density, to assess the internal energy of twins and stacking faults in metals with a CFC, HC or CC crystal structure. If, in transition metals, cohesion mainly results from d electron attraction, other terms intervening in crystal equilibrium must also be taken into account. Thus, the author proposes a decomposition of cohesion energy. The geometry of twins and stacking faults in compact phases is defined, and energy calculations are presented and discussed. Alloying effects are then addressed, as well as a general comparison with available experimental results. After a geometric description of twins and stacking faults in CC structures, their energies are calculated for a Gaussian distribution of state density. For higher order moments, defect energy due to d orbital anisotropy is assessed, and then applied to energy and stability calculations in twins and stacking faults for various relaxed atomic configurations

  19. Spin glass transition in canonical AuFe alloys: A numerical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Kai-Cheng; Li, Yong-Feng; Liu, Gui-Bin; Zhu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Although spin glass transitions have long been observed in diluted magnetic alloys, e.g. AuFe and CuMn alloys, previous numerical studies are not completely consistent with the experiment results. The abnormal critical exponents of the alloys remain still puzzling. By employing parallel tempering algorithm with finite-size scaling analysis, we investigated the phase transitions in canonical AuFe alloys. Our results strongly support that spin glass transitions occur at finite temperatures in the alloys. The calculated critical exponents agree well with those obtained from experiments. -- Highlights: ► By simulation we investigated the abnormal critical exponents observed in canonical SG alloys. ► The critical exponents obtained from our simulations agree well with those measured from experiments. ► Our results strongly support that RKKY interactions lead to SG transitions at finite temperatures.

  20. Mechanical Alloying of Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Tamas; Horike, Satoshi; Hagi, Keisuke; Ogiwara, Naoki; Kadota, Kentaro; Itakura, Tomoya; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2017-02-20

    The solvent-free mechanical milling process for two distinct metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals induced the formation of a solid solution, which is not feasible by conventional solution-based syntheses. X-ray and STEM-EDX studies revealed that performing mechanical milling under an Ar atmosphere promotes the high diffusivity of each metal ion in an amorphous solid matrix; the amorphous state turns into the porous crystalline structure by vapor exposure treatment to form a new phase of a MOF solid solution. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Nature of hardness evolution in nanocrystalline NiTi shape memory alloys during solid-state phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Abbas; Cheng, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Due to a distinct nature of thermomechanical smart materials' reaction to applied loads, a revolutionary approach is needed to measure the hardness and to understand its size effect for pseudoelastic NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) during the solid-state phase transition. Spherical hardness is increased with depths during the phase transition in NiTi SMAs. This behaviour is contrary to the decrease in the hardness of NiTi SMAs with depths using sharp tips and the depth-insensitive hardness of traditional metallic alloys using spherical tips. In contrast with the common dislocation theory for the hardness measurement, the nature of NiTi SMAs' hardness is explained by the balance between the interface and the bulk energy of phase transformed SMAs. Contrary to the energy balance in the indentation zone using sharp tips, the interface energy was numerically shown to be less dominant than the bulk energy of the phase transition zone using spherical tips.

  2. Nature of hardness evolution in nanocrystalline NiTi shape memory alloys during solid-state phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Abbas; Cheng, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Due to a distinct nature of thermomechanical smart materials' reaction to applied loads, a revolutionary approach is needed to measure the hardness and to understand its size effect for pseudoelastic NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) during the solid-state phase transition. Spherical hardness is increased with depths during the phase transition in NiTi SMAs. This behaviour is contrary to the decrease in the hardness of NiTi SMAs with depths using sharp tips and the depth-insensitive hardness of traditional metallic alloys using spherical tips. In contrast with the common dislocation theory for the hardness measurement, the nature of NiTi SMAs' hardness is explained by the balance between the interface and the bulk energy of phase transformed SMAs. Contrary to the energy balance in the indentation zone using sharp tips, the interface energy was numerically shown to be less dominant than the bulk energy of the phase transition zone using spherical tips. PMID:23963305

  3. Determining eutectic composition in metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, R. L.; Kim, Y. G.

    1977-01-01

    Tube crucible and furnace are used to separate eutectic mixture from trial-melt ingot. As ingot is a slowly heated to melting point, initial surface meeting will be eutectic mixture. Molten metal is collected at bottom of crucible, where it is solidified.

  4. On the unit rupture work of metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkhoturov, A.D.; Kovalenko, V.S.; Dyatel, V.P.

    1980-01-01

    Studied is the effect of the nature of the treated material treatment regimes on their unit rupture work at laser treatment in the regime of quasistationary evaporation. It is shown that the unit rupture work changes its values depending on the treatment regimes, coincidences between experimental and calculation values of unit rupture work are not being observed, especially for refractory metals of the 6th group and for solid alloys. Established are optimum regimes for determination of stable values of unit rupture work

  5. Gas porosity in metals and alloys irradiated by helium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, B.A.; Korshunov, S.N.; Chernov, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental studies of the development of gas porosity in metals and alloys during irradiation with helium ions up to high doses and during post-irradiation annealings, are reviewed. The main theoretical problems of the mechanisms of bubble formation and growth, the regularities and peculiarities of bubble development in a thin near-the surface layer during the introduction of helium with the energy of tens of kiloelectron volt, are considered

  6. Semiquantitative activation analysis in metallic alloys submitted to irregular irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veissid, N.; Lucki, G.

    1979-01-01

    An analytic semiquantitative method using neutron activation was developed to determine the impurities and verify the composition of metallic alloys. By the radioactive transformation law, the number of atoms of each element present in the sample is determined measuring the activity in a multichannel. Two samples were analysed: a) Sample of nominal compositions FeNiCr (49,95-49,95 - 0,1% at). b) Sample of nominal composition NiCr (80,20% at). (Author) [pt

  7. The temperature variation of hydrogen diffusion coefficients in metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogen diffusion coefficients were measured as a function of temperature for a few metal alloys using an electrochemical evolution technique. Results from these measurements are compared to those obtained by the time-lag method. In all cases, diffusion coefficients obtained by the electrochemical method are larger than those by the time-lag method by an order of magnitude or more. These differences are attributed mainly to hydrogen trapping.

  8. Formation of bulk metallic glasses in the Fe-M-Y-B (M = transition metal) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, X.M. [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM) and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chang, C.T. [Institute for Material Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Chang, Z.Y.; Wang, X.D.; Cao, Q.P. [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM) and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Shen, B.L.; Inoue, A. [Institute for Material Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Jiang, J.Z. [International Center for New-Structured Materials (ICNSM) and Laboratory of New-Structured Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: jiangjz@zju.edu.cn

    2008-07-28

    In this work, quaternary Fe{sub 72-x}M{sub x}Y{sub 6}B{sub 22} (M = Ni, Co and Mo) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have been developed. It is found that a fully amorphous Fe{sub 68}Mo{sub 4}Y{sub 6}B{sub 22} cylindrical rod with 6.5 mm in diameter can be prepared by copper mold injection. These alloys have a high glass transition temperature of about 900 K with high fracture strengths up to about 3 GPa although they are still brittle. Magnetic measurements reveal that they are ferromagnetic at ambient temperature with low coercive force of about 2 A/m, saturation magnetization of about 0.7 T and effective permeability of about 7000 at 100 kHz. The newly developed Fe-based quaternary alloys exhibit excellent combination properties: superior glass forming ability (GFA), high glass transition temperature, and soft magnetic properties, which could have potential applications in electronic industries. Furthermore, the effect of Mo addition on GFA in the Fe-Y-B BMG system has been discussed compared with those of Ni and Co additions.

  9. X-ray diffraction broadening effects in metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmel, G.; Dayan, D.

    1996-01-01

    Although an extensive work had been done in the last decade in the field of line broadening analysis of XRPD there is still little agreement whether this method can be accepted as a characterization tool. The purpose of the present work is to demonstrate that a valuable information can be retrieved from line broadening effects in XRPD. In this work it was focused on the line broadening effects accompanied with typical processes in metallic systems. The following systems were studied:, pure iron, steels, and alloying effects in uranium alloys. The broadening analysis was linked to different variables like hardness, Izod notch toughness, amount of cold work, surface treatment, concentration of additional elements in solid solutions. The Williamson-Hall method was adopted providing fast and global view of resolved 'strain'-'size' effects, considering the entire diffraction spectrum. The size effect was occasionally approved by direct observations of STM or SEM for example. The results of the broadening analysis were well correlated with other measured parameters like toughness and hardness. It was found that alloying in metallic system is sometimes expressed by pure strain effect but cold work results in a mix of strain and size broadening. The complete view of our results lead us to believe that broadening effect can be quantified. Hence, it is recommended to establish a quantitative XRD line broadening analysis method as a novel tool for characterization of metallic materials. (author)

  10. Refractory metal alloys and composites for space nuclear power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titran, Robert H.; Stephens, Joseph R.; Petrasek, Donald W.

    1988-01-01

    Space power requirements for future NASA and other U.S. missions will range from a few kilowatts to megawatts of electricity. Maximum efficiency is a key goal of any power system in order to minimize weight and size so that the Space Shuttle may be used a minimum number of times to put the power supply into orbit. Nuclear power has been identified as the primary power source to meet these high levels of electrical demand. One method to achieve maximum efficiency is to operate the power supply, energy conservation system, and related components at relatively high temperatures. For systems now in the planning stages, design temperatures range from 1300 K for the immediate future to as high as 1700 K for the advanced systems. NASA Lewis Research Center has undertaken a research program on advanced technology of refractory metal alloys and composites that will provide baseline information for space power systems in the 1900's and the 21st century. Special emphasis is focused on the refractory metal alloys of niobium and on the refractory metal composites which utilize tungsten alloy wires for reinforcement. Basic research on the creep and creep-rupture properties of wires, matrices, and composites are discussed.

  11. Plating on some difficult-to-plate metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1980-02-01

    Electrodeposition of coatings on metals such as beryllium, beryllium-copper, Kovar, lead, magnesium, thorium, titanium, tungsten, uranium, zirconium, and their alloys can be problematic. This is due in most cases to a natural oxide surface film that readily reforms after being removed. The procedures we recommend for plating on these metals rely on replacing the oxide film with a displacement coating, or etching to allow mechanical keying between the substrate and plated deposit. The effectiveness of the procedures is demonstrated by interface bond strengths found in ring-shear and conical-head tensile tests

  12. Magnetic excitations in transition-metal ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, Y.J.

    1984-01-01

    A review is given on current neutron scattering experiments at Brookhaven National Laboratory on transition-metal ferromagnets Ni, Fe, Pd 2 MnSn and MnSi. The scattering intensity in constant-energy scans, observed above T/sub c/ in all of these materials, exhibited a clear peak at finite momentum transfers. Using a simple scattering function with double-Lorentzian shape, we demonstrate that this peak is a manifestation of simple diffusive spin fluctuations. Experimental results of several parameters are compared in the context of localized-moment and itinerant-electron pictures. The ratio of spin wave stiffness constant D and transition temperature kT/sub c/ is shown to be a good yardstick for the degree of itinerancy of d-electrons

  13. Versatile two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Affannoukoué, Kévin; Döbeli, Max

    Two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (2D-TMDCs), such as MoS2, have emerged as a new class of semiconducting materials with distinct optical and electrical properties. The availability of 2D-TMDCs with distinct band gaps allows for unlimited combinations of TMDC monolayers (MLs...... vacancies. We have found that the absorption spectra of the MoS2 films exhibit distinct excitonic peaks at ~1.8 and ~2 eV when grown in the presence of a sulfur evaporation beam as compared to those deposited in vacuum. The structure of the PLD-grown MoS2 films will be further discussed based Raman...

  14. Magnetic correlations in doped transition metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors review recent reactor- and spallation-source-based neutron scattering experiments on the magnetic fluctuations and order in a variety of doped transition metal oxides. In particular, data are shown for the NiO chain compound, Y 2-x Ca x BaNiO 5 , the two-dimensional cuprate superconductors La 2-x Sr x CuO 4 and YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+x , and the classical three-dimensional ''Mott-Hubbard'' system V 2-y O 3

  15. Magnetic Ground State Properties of Transition Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O. K.; Madsen, J.; Poulsen, U. K.

    1977-01-01

    We review a simple one-electron theory of the magnetic and cohesive properties of ferro- and nearly ferromagnetic transition metals at 0 K. The theory is based on the density functional formalism, it makes use of the local spin density and atomic sphere approximations and it may, with further...... approximations, be reduced to the Stoner model. Results for the volume dependence of the ferromagnetic moment and the electronic pressure of bcc, fcc and hcp Fe are presented, together with theoretical values for the equilibrium atomic volume, the bulk modulus, the ferromagnetic moment, the spin susceptibility...

  16. ANIONS FUNCTIONS IN TRANSITION METALS COORDINATION COMPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Koksharova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of anions on the structure and properties of coordination compounds of transition metals has been discussed. The examples of changes in the composition of the formed complexes by replacement of the anion are given: metal ratio to a neutral ligand, the composition of the inner sphere, the direction of template synthesis. Anions can determine the presence of isomers in complexes with different ligands. Examples of conformational, ionization isomerism, inner sphere bond isomerization are given. The nature of the coordination polyhedron is highly sensitive to the replacement of the anion too. Examples of coordination compounds where the anion change causes a change in coordination capacity of neutral ligands and the strength of their bonds with the metal, coordination number and geometry of the inner sphere, the organization of molecular structures (the structure of the hydrogen bond networks and the degree of polymerization, crystal packing. The anions significantly affect the binding of the solvent molecules, complexes magnetic and luminescent properties, they can change the compound color, the mechanisms of thermolysis. Anions make a very noticeable influence on possible redox processes following the complexation in some cases. Anions in the coordination sphere can change catalytic and biochemical processes as well as the ways of interaction of metal ions with drugs.

  17. Alkali metal and alkali metal hydroxide intercalates of the layered transition metal disulfides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanzaki, Y.; Konuma, M.; Matsumoto, O.

    1981-01-01

    The intercalation reaction of some layered transition metal disulfides with alkali metals, alkali metal hydroxides, and tetraalkylammonium hydroxides were investigated. The alkali metal intercalates were prepared in the respective metal-hexamethylphosphoric triamide solutions in vaccuo, and the hydroxide intercalates in aqueous hydroxide solutions. According to the intercalation reaction, the c-lattice parameter was increased, and the increase indicated the expansion of the interlayer distance. In the case of alkali metal intercalates, the expansion of the interlayer distance increased continuously, corresponding to the atomic radius of the alkali metal. On the other hand, the hydroxide intercalates showed discrete expansion corresponding to the effective ionic radius of the intercalated cation. All intercalates of TaS 2 amd NbS 2 were superconductors. The expansion of the interlayer distance tended to increase the superconducting transition temperature in the intercalates of TaS 2 and vice versa in those of NbS 2 . (orig.)

  18. High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard T. Scalettar; Warren E. Pickett

    2005-01-01

    This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (1) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (2) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (3) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals

  19. High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scalettar, Richard T.; Pickett, Warren E.

    2004-07-01

    This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (1) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (2) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (3) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals.

  20. High-Pressure Thermodynamic Properties of f-electron Metals, Transition Metal Oxides, and Half-Metallic Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard T. Scalettar; Warren E. Pickett

    2005-08-02

    This project involves research into the thermodynamic properties of f-electron metals, transition metal oxides, and half-metallic magnets at high pressure. These materials are ones in which the changing importance of electron-electron interactions as the distance between atoms is varied can tune the system through phase transitions from localized to delocalized electrons, from screened to unscreened magnetic moments, and from normal metal to one in which only a single spin specie can conduct. Three main thrusts are being pursued: (i) Mott transitions in transition metal oxides, (ii) magnetism in half-metallic compounds, and (iii) large volume-collapse transitions in f-band metals.

  1. Local Oxidation Nanolithography on Metallic Transition Metal Dichalcogenides Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pinilla-Cienfuegos

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The integration of atomically-thin layers of two dimensional (2D materials in nanodevices demands for precise techniques at the nanoscale permitting their local modification, structuration or resettlement. Here, we present the use of Local Oxidation Nanolithography (LON performed with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM for the patterning of nanometric motifs on different metallic Transition Metal Dichalcogenides (TMDCs. We show the results of a systematic study of the parameters that affect the LON process as well as the use of two different modes of lithographic operation: dynamic and static. The application of this kind of lithography in different types of TMDCs demonstrates the versatility of the LON for the creation of accurate and reproducible nanopatterns in exfoliated 2D-crystals and reveals the influence of the chemical composition and crystalline structure of the systems on the morphology of the resultant oxide motifs.

  2. Metal non-metal transitions in doped semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezini, A.

    1989-12-01

    A disordered Hubbard model with diagonal disorder is used to examine the electron localization effects associated with both disorder and electron-electron interaction. Extensive results are reported on the ground state properties and compared with other theories. In particular two regimes are observed; when the electron-electron interaction U is greater than the disorder parameter and when is smaller. Furthermore the effect of including conduction-band minima into the calculation of metal-insulator transitions in doped Si and Ge is investigated with use of Berggren approach. Good agreement with experiments are found when both disorder and interactions are included. (author). 37 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  3. Computation of the Structure Factor of Some Transition Liquid Metals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Applying the solution of the Percus-Yevic equation to a one component hard sphere system and using the recently developed potential for liquid transition liquid metals, the structure factor of transition liquid metals were computed. The peak height and peak position of the structure factor of the liquid metals were studied.

  4. Method for inhibiting alkali metal corrosion of nickel-containing alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVan, Jackson H.; Selle, James E.

    1983-01-01

    Structural components of nickel-containing alloys within molten alkali metal systems are protected against corrosion during the course of service by dissolving therein sufficient aluminum, silicon, or manganese to cause the formation and maintenance of a corrosion-resistant intermetallic reaction layer created by the interaction of the molten metal, selected metal, and alloy.

  5. Metal Insulator transition in Vanadium Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovaini, Azita; Fujita, Shigeji; Suzuki, Akira; Godoy, Salvador

    2012-02-01

    MAR12-2011-000262 Abstract Submitted for the MAR12 Meeting of The American Physical Society Sorting Category: 03.9 (T) On the metal-insulator-transition in vanadium dioxide AZITA JOVAINI, SHIGEJI FUJITA, University at Buffalo, SALVADOR GODOY, UNAM, AKIRA SUZUKI, Tokyo University of Science --- Vanadium dioxide (VO2) undergoes a metal-insulator transition (MIT) at 340 K with the structural change from tetragonal to monoclinic crystal. The conductivity _/ drops at MIT by four orders of magnitude. The low temperature monoclinic phase is known to have a lower ground-state energy. The existence of the k-vector k is prerequisite for the conduction since the k appears in the semiclassical equation of motion for the conduction electron (wave packet). The tetragonal (VO2)3 unit is periodic along the crystal's x-, y-, and z-axes, and hence there is a three-dimensional k-vector. There is a one-dimensional k for a monoclinic crystal. We believe this difference in the dimensionality of the k-vector is the cause of the conductivity drop. Prefer Oral Session X Prefer .

  6. Janus monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Ang-Yu

    2017-05-15

    Structural symmetry-breaking plays a crucial role in determining the electronic band structures of two-dimensional materials. Tremendous efforts have been devoted to breaking the in-plane symmetry of graphene with electric fields on AB-stacked bilayers or stacked van der Waals heterostructures. In contrast, transition metal dichalcogenide monolayers are semiconductors with intrinsic in-plane asymmetry, leading to direct electronic bandgaps, distinctive optical properties and great potential in optoelectronics. Apart from their in-plane inversion asymmetry, an additional degree of freedom allowing spin manipulation can be induced by breaking the out-of-plane mirror symmetry with external electric fields or, as theoretically proposed, with an asymmetric out-of-plane structural configuration. Here, we report a synthetic strategy to grow Janus monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides breaking the out-of-plane structural symmetry. In particular, based on a MoS2 monolayer, we fully replace the top-layer S with Se atoms. We confirm the Janus structure of MoSSe directly by means of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy-dependent X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and prove the existence of vertical dipoles by second harmonic generation and piezoresponse force microscopy measurements.

  7. Alloys for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowcliffe, Arthur F.; Bleiberg, Melvin L.; Diamond, Sidney; Bajaj, Ram

    1979-01-01

    An essentially gamma-prime precipitation-hardened iron-chromium-nickel alloy has been designed with emphasis on minimum nickel and chromium contents to reduce the swelling tendencies of these alloys when used in liquid metal fast breeder reactors. The precipitation-hardening components have been designed for phase stability and such residual elements as silicon and boron, also have been selected to minimize swelling. Using the properties of these alloys in one design would result in an increased breeding ratio over 20% cold worked stainless steel, a reference material, of 1.239 to 1.310 and a reduced doubling time from 15.8 to 11.4 years. The gross stoichiometry of the alloying composition comprises from about 0.04% to about 0.06% carbon, from about 0.05% to about 1.0% silicon, up to about 0.1% zirconium, up to about 0.5% vanadium, from about 24% to about 31% nickel, from 8% to about 11% chromium, from about 1.7% to about 3.5% titanium, from about 1.0% to about 1.8% aluminum, from about 0.9% to about 3.7% molybdenum, from about 0.04% to about 0.8% boron, and the balance iron with incidental impurities.

  8. Automated image analysis of microstructure changes in metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Mohammed E.; Ford, Ralph M.; Roth, John T.

    2005-02-01

    The ability to identify and quantify changes in the microstructure of metal alloys is valuable in metal cutting and shaping applications. For example, certain metals, after being cryogenically and electrically treated, have shown large increases in their tool life when used in manufacturing cutting and shaping processes. However, the mechanisms of microstructure changes in alloys under various treatments, which cause them to behave differently, are not yet fully understood. The changes are currently evaluated in a semi-quantitative manner by visual inspection of images of the microstructure. This research applies pattern recognition technology to quantitatively measure the changes in microstructure and to validate the initial assertion of increased tool life under certain treatments. Heterogeneous images of aluminum and tungsten carbide of various categories were analyzed using a process including background correction, adaptive thresholding, edge detection and other algorithms for automated analysis of microstructures. The algorithms are robust across a variety of operating conditions. This research not only facilitates better understanding of the effects of electric and cryogenic treatment of these materials, but also their impact on tooling and metal-cutting processes.

  9. Metal Compression Forming of aluminum alloys and metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, S.; Ren, W.; Porter, W.D.; Brinkman, C.R.; Sabau, A.S.; Purgert, R.M.

    2000-02-01

    Metal Compression Forming (MCF) is a variant of the squeeze casting process, in which molten metal is allowed to solidify under pressure in order to close porosity and form a sound part. However, the MCF process applies pressure on the entire mold face, thereby directing pressure on all regions of the casting and producing a uniformly sound part. The process is capable of producing parts with properties close to those of forgings, while retaining the near net shape, complexity in geometry, and relatively low cost of the casting process.

  10. Corrosion fatigue of biomedical metallic alloys: mechanisms and mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Renato Altobelli; de Oliveira, Mara Cristina Lopes

    2012-03-01

    Cyclic stresses are often related to the premature mechanical failure of metallic biomaterials. The complex interaction between fatigue and corrosion in the physiological environment has been subject of many investigations. In this context, microstructure, heat treatments, plastic deformation, surface finishing and coatings have decisive influence on the mechanisms of fatigue crack nucleation and growth. Furthermore, wear is frequently present and contributes to the process. However, despite all the effort at elucidating the mechanisms that govern corrosion fatigue of biomedical alloys, failures continue to occur. This work reviews the literature on corrosion-fatigue-related phenomena of Ti alloys, surgical stainless steels, Co-Cr-Mo and Mg alloys. The aim was to discuss the correlation between structural and surface aspects of these materials and the onset of fatigue in the highly saline environment of the human body. By understanding such correlation, mitigation of corrosion fatigue failure may be achieved in a reliable scientific-based manner. Different mitigation methods are also reviewed and discussed throughout the text. It is intended that the information condensed in this article should be a valuable tool in the development of increasingly successful designs against the corrosion fatigue of metallic implants. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Refractory metal alloys and composites for space power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, R.; Petrasek, D. W.; Titran, R. H.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on recent studies of refractory-metal-alloy and refractory-metal-composite technologies for space power systems, with emphasis on work performed at the Lewis Research Center in support of the Ground Engineering System (GES) for the SP-100 reactor. Special attention is given to the mechanical properties of alloys with compositions Nb-1Zr and Nb-0.1Zr-0.1C (the PWC-11 alloy) and to advanced fiber-reinforced composites. The results to date indicate that, for the GES at a power level of about 100 kWe, the PWC-11 has attractive creep properties that will extend the capabilities of the SP-100 reactor compared to a similar system fabricated from Nb-1Zr. On the other hand, tungsten-reinforced Nb-1Zr composites were found to provide a ten-fold and four-fold creep strength over Nb-1Zr and PWC-11, respectively, at 1400 to 1500 K.

  12. The corrosion behaviour of nanograined metals and alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrasti, P.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available There has been considerable interest in the properties of nanocrystalline materials over the last decade. Such materials include metals and alloys with a crystal size within the order of 1 to 100 nm. The interest arises due to the substantial differences in electrical, optical and magnetic properties and also due to their high adsorption capability and chemical reactivity compared to their larger grained counterparts. In this paper, the corrosion of nanocrystalline metals and alloys is investigated and compared to the corrosion of microcrystalline materials having a similar composition. The focus is on the corrosion of nickel, copper, cobalt and iron alloys. Key aspects of different corrosion behaviour such grain boundaries and size are identified.

    En la última década ha habido un gran interes en las propiedades de materiales nanocristalinos. Estos materiales incluyen metales y aleaciones con un tamaño de cristal del orden de 1 a 100 nm. El interes por estos materiales es debido a las grandes diferencias en cuanto a sus propiedades electricas, opticas y magneticas, asi como a su alta capacidad de adsorción y reactividad química en relación a los mismos materiales con tamaños de grano mayores. En este trabajo se ha investigado y comparado la corrosión de materiales nano y microcristalinos de similar composición química. Principalmente se ha centrado en la corrosión de metales tales como niquel, cobre, cobalto y aleaciones de hierro. Se ha comprobado que los diferentes comportamientos frente al proceso de corrosión están intimamente ligados con los bordes de grano y el tamaño de dichos granos.

  13. Study of concentrated metal-ammonia solutions: magnetic properties and non metal-metal transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelieur, Jean-Pierre

    1972-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of alkali metal-liquid ammonia solutions has been measured in the concentration range where the solutions show a progressive passage toward the metallic state. The Knight shift of the metal nuclei and the nitrogen nucleus have been determined as a function of concentration and temperature, in Na-NH 3 and Cs-NH 3 solutions. A phenomenological analysis of the transport properties of metal-ammonia solutions is also presented. This analysis permits the presentation of a model for the mechanism of the transition to the metallic state. (author) [fr

  14. Extreme conditions synthesis, processing and characterization of metal-nitrides and alloys of mechanical and optoelectronic importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serghiou, G; McGaff, A J; Russell, N; Morniroli, J P; Frost, D J; Odling, N; Boehler, R; Troadec, D; Lathe, C

    2010-01-01

    High density nitrides and group IV alloys are of growing importance for both ceramic and optoelectronic applications. We present here new data and processes in our ongoing preparation of alkaline earth and transition metal nitrides as well as group IV alloys, here, up to 25 GPa and 2300 K. We employ large volume and laser-heated diamond anvil cell techniques for synthesis, processing tools including focused ion beam, and synchrotron X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy for characterization.

  15. Direct Solid-State Conversion of Recyclable Metals and Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Z; Manchiraju, K [Southwire Co.

    2012-02-22

    This project is to develop and demonstrate the concept feasibility of a highly energy-efficient solid-state material synthesis process, friction stir extrusion (FSE) technology. Specifically, the project seeks to explore and demonstrate the feasibility to recycle metals, produce nano-particle dispersion strengthened bulk materials and/or nano-composite materials from powders, chips or other recyclable feedstock metals or scraps through mechanical alloying and thermo-mechanical processing in a single-step. In this study, we focused on metal recycling, producing nano-engineered wires and evaluating their potential use in future generation long-distance electric power delivery infrastructure. More comprehensive R&D on the technology fundamentals and system scale-up toward early-stage applications in two targeted “showcase” fields of use: nano engineered bulk materials and Al recycling will be considered and planned as part of Project Continuation Plan.

  16. Transport mechanisms in the laser alloying of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Ryszard; Tomczyk, Mariusz; Walczak, Maria

    2003-10-01

    This article presents some investigations of a laser alloyed surface layer of nickel doped with gold and of copper doped with aluminum. The velocity of the convectino flow in the laser pool predicted by computation implies that there may exist good miscibility for the range of components different from those obtained by the conventional method. This indicates a predominant role of the Marangoni convection for mixing elements. Some metallurgical cross-sections of Ni-Au; Mo-Au; Cu-Al; Cu-Au layers, alloyed by an Nd-YAG laser, for different contents of doping elements are presented. They may be interesting information about miscibility of these metals during laser pulse τ1=4ms.

  17. Non-stoichiometric AB5 alloys for metal hydride electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, James J.; Adzic, Gordana D.; Johnson, John R.; Vogt, Thomas; McBreen, James

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a non-stoichiometric alloy comprising a composition having the formula AB.sub.5+X an atomic ratio wherein A is selected from the group consisting of the rare earth metals, yttrium, mischmetal, or a combination thereof; B is nickel and tin, or nickel and tin and at least a third element selected from the group consisting of the elements in group IVA of the periodic table, aluminum, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper, antimony or a combination thereof; X is greater than 0 and less than or equal to about 2.0; and wherein at least one substituted A site is occupied by at least one of the B elements. An electrode incorporating said alloy and an electrochemical cell incorporating said electrode are also described.

  18. The effect of recasting on bond strength between porcelain and base-metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Azam S; Rokni, Shahin Rezaii; Mohammadi, Abolghasem; Bahrami, Mehran

    2011-04-01

    Long-term success of metal ceramic restorations depends on metal ceramic bond strength. The purpose of this study was to determine whether recasting of base-metal alloys has any effect on metal ceramic bond strength. Super Cast and Verabond base-metal alloys were used to cast 260 wax patterns. The alloy specimens were equally divided into five groups and cast as: group A 0.0%, B 25%, C 50%, D 75%, and E 100% once-cast alloy. Each group was divided into two subgroups: the first group was cast with Super Cast and the second with Verabond. In each subgroup half of the cast alloys were veneered with Vita VMK 68 and the others with Ceramco 3. Recasting decreased bond strength (p alloy. Group E with 100% new Super Cast alloy veneered with Vita VMK 68 porcelain had the highest bond strength (30.75 ± 9.58 MPa), and group B including 25% new and 75% recast Super Cast alloy veneered with the same porcelain had the lowest bond strength (21.72 ± 5.19 MPa). By adding over 50% once-cast alloy in base-metal alloys, metal-ceramic bond strength decreases significantly. © 2011 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  19. Fluorescence signalling of the transition metal ions: Design strategy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    on fluorescence signalling systems for the transition metal ions. It is shown that even simple fluorophore-spacer-receptor systems can display excellent off-on fluorescence signalling towards the quenching metal ions when the fluorophore ...

  20. Behaviour of metals and alloys in molten fluoride media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabre, St.

    2009-01-01

    Fluoride salts are contemplated for Generation IV nuclear systems which structural materials need to resist corrosion at high temperatures. Corrosion of metals in molten fluorides has been investigated in support of the Molten Salt Reactor's development and led to an optimized alloy, Hastelloy-N, but it lacked fundamentals data for the comprehension of materials' degradation mechanisms. The main objective of this work is then to help with the understanding of the corrosion behaviour of nickel and its alloys in fluoride salts. An experimental method was built up using electrochemical techniques and enabled to investigate the thermochemical conditions of the media and the influence of different parameters (media, temperature and quantity of impurities) on the behaviour of the materials. Most tests were performed in LiF-NaF mixtures between 800 and 1000 C. Pure metals can be classified as follows: Cr ≤ Fe ≤ Ni ≤ Mo ≤ W in increasing stability order and two specific behaviours were evidenced: Cr and Fe corrode in the melt, whereas Ni, Mo and W are stable, underlining the significance level of the redox couple controlling the reactions in the mixture. Moreover, corrosion current densities increase with temperature, fluoro-acidity and the quantity of dissolved oxide in the melt. Binary Ni-Cr alloys were also tested; selective attack of Cr is first observed before both elements are oxidized. Combining thermochemical calculations and experimental results enables to propose an approach to establish an optimized composition for a stable alloy. Immersion tests were finally achieved in addition to the electrochemical tests: interpretations of both methods were compared and completed. (author)

  1. Electrically induced phase transition in GeSbTe alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruns, Gunnar; Schlockermann, Carl; Woda, Michael; Wuttig, Matthias [I. Physikalisches Institut Ia, RWTH Aachen, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    While phase change materials have already successfully been applied in rewriteable optical data storage, they are now also promising to form the basis for novel non-volatile electrical data storage devices. To understand the physical concepts of these so-called Phase Change Random Access Memory (PCRAM) it is mandatory to gain a deeper insight into the switching process between the highly resistive amorphous and the lowly resistive crystalline phase. The fast phase transitions between the amorphous and crystalline state of GeSbTe-based alloys has so far often been studied using pulsed laser irradiation. In this work an alternative approach is employed to investigate this transition. Electrical pulses are used to rapidly and reversibly switch between the two states. For these experiments a setup was built with a specially designed contacting circuit board to meet the requirements of electrical measurements on a nanosecond timescale. The influence of the pulse parameters on the change of device resistance was determined for different initial states. Furthermore the high time resolution of 0.4 ns allows investigation of transient electrical effects like the so-called threshold switching first described by Ovshinsky in the late 1960s.

  2. Neutron irradiation damage in transition metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Hisayuki; Nesaki, Kouji; Kiritani, Michio

    1991-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on the physical properties of light transition metal carbides, TiC x , VC x and NbC x , were examined, emphasizing the characterization of irradiation induced defects in the nonstoichiometric composition. TiC x irradiated with 14 MeV (fusion) neutrons showed higher damage rates with increasing C/Ti (x) ratio. A brief discussion is made on 'cascade damage' in TiC x irradiated with fusion neutrons. Two other carbides (VC x and NbC x ) were irradiated with fission reactor neutrons. The irradiation effects on VC x were not so simple, because of the complex irradiation behavior of 'ordered' phases. For instance, complete disordering was revealed in an ordered phase, 'V 8 C 7 ', after an irradiation dose of 10 25 n/m 2 . (orig.)

  3. Dark excitations in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deilmann, Thorsten; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2017-01-01

    Monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) possess unique optoelectronic properties, including strongly bound excitons and trions. To date, most studies have focused on optically active excitations, but recent experiments have highlighted the existence of dark states, which are equally...... important in many respects. Here, we use ab initio many-body calculations to unravel the nature of the dark excitations in monolayer MoSe2, MoS2, WSe2, andWS(2). Our results show that all these monolayer TMDCs host dark states as their lowest neutral and charged excitations. We further show that dark...... excitons possess larger binding energies than their bright counterparts while the opposite holds for trions....

  4. Direct Solid-State Conversion of Recyclable Metals and Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran Manchiraju

    2012-03-27

    Friction Stir Extrusion (FSE) is a novel energy-efficient solid-state material synthesis and recycling technology capable of producing large quantity of bulk nano-engineered materials with tailored, mechanical, and physical properties. The novelty of FSE is that it utilizes the frictional heating and extensive plastic deformation inherent to the process to stir, consolidate, mechanically alloy, and convert the powders, chips, and other recyclable feedstock materials directly into useable product forms of highly engineered materials in a single step (see Figure 1). Fundamentally, FSE shares the same deformation and metallurgical bonding principles as in the revolutionary friction stir welding process. Being a solid-state process, FSE eliminates the energy intensive melting and solidification steps, which are necessary in the conventional metal synthesis processes. Therefore, FSE is highly energy-efficient, practically zero emissions, and economically competitive. It represents a potentially transformational and pervasive sustainable manufacturing technology for metal recycling and synthesis. The goal of this project was to develop the technological basis and demonstrate the commercial viability of FSE technology to produce the next generation highly functional electric cables for electricity delivery infrastructure (a multi-billion dollar market). Specific focus of this project was to (1) establish the process and material parameters to synthesize novel alloys such as nano-engineered materials with enhanced mechanical, physical, and/or functional properties through the unique mechanical alloying capability of FSE, (2) verifying the expected major energy, environmental, and economic benefits of FSE technology for both the early stage 'showcase' electric cable market and the anticipated pervasive future multi-market applications across several industry sectors and material systems for metal recycling and sustainable manufacturing.

  5. Mechanical properties of metal-ceramic systems from nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Metal-ceramic bond strength and alloys' elastic modulus clearly determine the potential of alloy application, because the ceramic integrity during mastication depends on these two characteristics. The aim of this study was to evaluate metal-ceramic bond strength and elastic modulus of cobalt-chromium alloys in making porcelainfused- to-metal restorations, regarding the application of the most frequent nickel-chromium alloy. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Six metalceramic samples were made from nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron 99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C, according to the manufactures manuals and instructions from ISO 9693: 1996. Three-point bending test was performed up to the ceramic fracture. The fracture load was measured on an universal testing machine (Zwick, type 1464, with cross-head speed of 0,05mm/min. Results. The results of this study confirmed the significant differences between the metal-ceramic bond strength (p < 0.01 and elastic modulus (p < 0.001 of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys, where cobalt-chromium alloys showed higher values for both tested parameters. Conclusion. Cobalt-chromium metal-ceramic alloys can successfully replace nickel-chromium alloys, especially for fabrication of long-span metal-ceramic bridges due to the great flexural strength.

  6. Scalable shape- and size-controlled synthesis of metal nano-alloys

    KAUST Repository

    Bakr, Osman M.

    2016-01-21

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a continuous-flow reactor, methods of making metal nano-alloys, and metal nano-alloys. An embodiment of the continuous-flow reactor includes a first tubular component having a tubular inlet and a tubular outlet, and a heated tube-in-tube gas reactor fluidly connected to the first tubular component, wherein the heated tube-in-tube gas reactor comprises an inner tube having a gas permeable surface and an outer tube. An embodiment of the method of producing metal nano-alloys, includes contacting a reducible metal precursor and a reducing fluid in a continuous-flow reactor to form a mixed solution; and flowing the mixed solution through the continuous-flow reactor for a residence time to form the metal nano-alloys. An embodiment of the composition includes a plurality of metal nano-alloys having a monodisperse size distribution and a uniform shape distribution.

  7. Ultrafast magnetization dynamics of lanthanide metals and alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sultan, Muhammad

    2012-05-14

    In this study, the laser-induced magnetization dynamics of the lanthanide ferromagnets Gadolinium (Gd), Terbium (Tb) and their alloys is investigated using femtosecond (fs) time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) and magnetic second harmonic generation (MSHG). The magnetization dynamics is analyzed from the time scale of a few fs up to several hundred picoseconds (ps). The contributions of electrons, phonons, spin fluctuations, as well as the temporal regimes corresponding to the spin-orbit and exchange interactions are disentangled. In addition to possible applications in magnetic storage devices, understanding magnetization dynamics in lanthanides is also important because of their different magnetic structure compared to well-studied itinerant ferromagnets. Lanthanides are model Heisenberg-ferromagnets with localized 4f magnetic moments and long range magnetic ordering through indirect exchange interaction. By optical excitation of the conduction electrons, which mediate the exchange interaction, and studying the induced dynamics of the localized 4f and delocalized 5d6s magnetic moments, one can obtain insight into the angular momentum transfer at ultrafast time scales. Moreover, lanthanides offer the possibility to tune spin-lattice coupling via the 4f shell occupation and the concomitant changes in the 4f spin and orbital moments due to Hund's rules. Utilizing this fact, the importance of spin-lattice coupling in laser-induced demagnetization is also analyzed by comparing the magnetization dynamics in Gd and Tb. By investigating the magnetization dynamics of localized 4f moments of Gd and Tb using time-resolved XMCD, it is found that the demagnetization proceeds in both metals in two time scales, following fs laser excitation, which are classified as: (i) non-equilibrium (t > 1 ps), with respect to equilibration of electron and phonon temperatures. The

  8. Dark excitons in transition metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malic, Ermin; Selig, Malte; Feierabend, Maja; Brem, Samuel; Christiansen, Dominik; Wendler, Florian; Knorr, Andreas; Berghäuser, Gunnar

    2018-01-01

    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) exhibit a remarkably strong Coulomb interaction that manifests in tightly bound excitons. Due to the complex electronic band structure exhibiting several spin-split valleys in the conduction and valence band, dark excitonic states can be formed. They are inaccessibly by light due to the required spin-flip and/or momentum transfer. The relative position of these dark states with respect to the optically accessible bright excitons has a crucial impact on the emission efficiency of these materials and thus on their technological potential. Based on the solution of the Wannier equation, we present the excitonic landscape of the most studied TMD materials including the spectral position of momentum- and spin-forbidden excitonic states. We show that the knowledge of the electronic dispersion does not allow to conclude about the nature of the material's band gap since excitonic effects can give rise to significant changes. Furthermore, we reveal that an exponentially reduced photoluminescence yield does not necessarily reflect a transition from a direct to a nondirect gap material, but can be ascribed in most cases to a change of the relative spectral distance between bright and dark excitonic states.

  9. Effect of metal primers and tarnish treatment on bonding between dental alloys and veneer resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Seung-Sik; Huh, Yoon-Hyuk; Cho, Lee-Ra; Park, Chan-Jin

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of metal primers on the bonding of dental alloys and veneer resin. Polyvinylpyrrolidone solution's tarnish effect on bonding strength was also investigated. Disk-shape metal specimens (diameter 8 mm, thickness 1.5 mm) were made from 3 kinds of alloy (Co-Cr, Ti and Au-Ag-Pd alloy) and divided into 4 groups per each alloy. Half specimens (n=12 per group) in tarnished group were immersed into polyvinylpyrrolidone solution for 24 hours. In Co-Cr and Ti-alloy, Alloy Primer (MDP + VBATDT) and MAC-Bond II (MAC-10) were applied, while Alloy Primer and V-Primer (VBATDT) were applied to Au-Ag-Pd alloys. After surface treatment, veneering composite resin were applied and shear bond strength test were conducted. Alloy Primer showed higher shear bond strength than MAC-Bond II in Co-Cr alloys and Au-Ag-Pd alloy (PAg-Pd alloy surfaces presented significantly decreased shear bond strength. Combined use of MDP and VBATDT were effective in bonding of the resin to Co-Cr and Au-Ag-Pd alloy. Tarnish using polyvinylpyrrolidone solution negatively affected on the bonding of veneer resin to Co-Cr and Au-Ag-Pd alloys.

  10. Enhancement of surface integrity of titanium alloy with copper by means of laser metal deposition process

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erinosho, MF

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The laser metal deposition process possesses the combination of metallic powder and laser beam respectively. However, these combinations create an adhesive bonding that permanently solidifies the laser-enhanced-deposited powders. Titanium alloys (Ti...

  11. Allergic reactions associated with metal alloys in porcelain-fused-to-metal fixed prosthodontic devices-A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Lauren; Barak, Shlomo; Katz, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    To systematically review the allergic reactions associated with metal alloys in porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) fixed prosthetic devices. After reviewing the titles and abstracts of the articles as well as removing duplicates, 22 articles were considered relevant. PubMed, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar from 1970 to 2012 were evaluated, and randomized studies, review articles, case reports, cross-sectional surveys, and abstracts were included. Conference papers and posters were excluded. Although reported, allergic reactions to metallic alloys in the context of PFM devices are not well documented. Allergic reactions to high noble and noble metal alloy cores of palladium and gold and to base metal alloys nickel and cobalt in the context of PFM fixed partial dentures (FPDs) are reported. Each type of metal is associated with a different rate of allergic reactions, which may be attributed to the extent of corrosion of the alloy, population exposure, and the biologic environment. Because few studies document allergic reactions to metals that comprise PFM crowns and partial dentures, further research in this field is necessary to determine the frequency and type of reactions elicited. Though allergic reactions to metal alloys used in dentistry are well documented, only few articles focus on the correlation between FPDs and metal allergies. Thus, this paper surveys case reports of hypersensitivity reactions linked to FPDs and reviews the current literature on allergic reactions to the metallic elements comprising those devices.

  12. Metal Injection Molding (MIM of Magnesium and Its Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wolff

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Current research has highlighted that magnesium and its alloys as biodegradable material are highly suitable for biomedical applications. The new material fully degrades into nontoxic elements and offers material properties matching those of human bone tissue. As biomedical implants are rather small and complex in shape, the metal injection molding (MIM technique seems to be well suited for the near net shape mass production of such parts. Furthermore, MIM of Mg-alloys is of high interest in further technical fields. This study focusses on the performance of MIM-processing of magnesium alloy powders. It includes Mg-specific development of powder blending, feedstock preparation, injection molding, solvent and thermal debinding and final sintering. Even though Mg is a highly oxygen-affine material forming a stable oxide layer on each particle surface, the material can be sintered to nearly dense parts, providing mechanical properties matching those of as cast material. An ultimate tensile strength of 142 MPa, yield strength of 67 MPa, elastic modulus of 40 GPa and 8% elongation at fracture could be achieved using novel organic polymer binders for the feedstock preparation. Thus, first implant demonstrator parts could be successfully produced by the MIM technique.

  13. Microstructure and mechanical property change of dissimilar metal welds Alloy 600 - Alloy 182 - A508 Gr. 3 according to thermal aging effect at 400 .deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ham, Jun Hyuk; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2015-01-01

    To prevent such critical matters above mentioned, investigation about degradation mechanism of materials by thermal aging should be conducted. However, there are no sufficient studies on this field. Therefore, the final goal of this study is to investigate microstructure along the DMW undergone thermal aging process. Firstly, in order to get a reference data for further comparison analysis which is expected to show degradation mechanism of the weld joint, un-heated weld joint was investigated with several instruments, Vickers hardness tester, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). Detail instrumental analysis in Alloy 600 - Alloy 182 - A508 Gr. 3 DMW joint were performed in order to investigate microstructure and mechanical properties of material. Following conclusions can be drawn from this study. Alloy 182 has austenitic dendrite structure which is formed by heat flow during welding process. Type-II boundaries were observed at the interface between Alloy 182 and A508 Gr. 3. Chemical composition shows rapid transition at the interface which makes 3000 µm of chromium dilution zone. Microstructure of A508 Gr. 3 was investigated from the interface between Alloy 182 to base metal

  14. Metallic Thin-Film Bonding and Alloy Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Jack Merrill (Inventor); Campbell, Geoff (Inventor); Peotter, Brian S. (Inventor); Droppers, Lloyd (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion bonding a stack of aluminum thin films is particularly challenging due to a stable aluminum oxide coating that rapidly forms on the aluminum thin films when they are exposed to atmosphere and the relatively low meting temperature of aluminum. By plating the individual aluminum thin films with a metal that does not rapidly form a stable oxide coating, the individual aluminum thin films may be readily diffusion bonded together using heat and pressure. The resulting diffusion bonded structure can be an alloy of choice through the use of a carefully selected base and plating metals. The aluminum thin films may also be etched with distinct patterns that form a microfluidic fluid flow path through the stack of aluminum thin films when diffusion bonded together.

  15. Mesoporous diphosphine-transition metal complex catalyst for hydroformylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reek, J.N.H.; Coppens, M.O.

    2012-01-01

    The invention pertains to a diphosphine-transition metal complex comprising a diphosphine-transition metal ligand that is covalently bonded to an insoluble mesoporous support having an average pore diameter of from 4.5 nm to 50 nm, characterized in that the ligand as attached to the support has the

  16. Nanostructured transition metal oxides useful for water oxidation catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Heinz M; Jiao, Feng

    2013-12-24

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a nanostructured transition metal oxide capable of oxidizing two H.sub.2O molecules to obtain four protons. In some embodiments of the invention, the composition further comprises a porous matrix wherein the nanocluster of the transition metal oxide is embedded on and/or in the porous matrix.

  17. Fluorescence signalling of the transition metal ions: Design strategy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Transition metal ions are notorious for their fluorescence quenching abilities. In this paper, we discuss the design strategies for the development of efficient off-on fluorescence signalling systems for the transition metal ions. It is shown that even simple fluorophore-spacer-receptor systems can display excellent.

  18. Investigation of irradiation strengthening of bcc metals and their alloys. Progress report, January 1977--October 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported in the areas of (a) the effect of neutron damage on the dislocation kinetics in bcc metals and their alloys, and (b) the effect of 3 He on the deformation characteristics of body centered cubic metals and their alloys. Results obtained from these projects are discussed

  19. Evaluation of different finish line designs in base metal alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghandeh R

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was performed according to the widespread application of base metal alloys"nand few articles published about the marginal integrity of restorations fabricated by these metals."nThree standard dies of a maxillary first premolar were prepared with a flat shoulder finish line in buccal"naspect and chamfer in palatal. One of them left with no change. On the buccal aspect of the second and"nthird dies 135?and 1607 bevel were added respectively"nUsing dual wax technique, nine wax patterns were formed on each die and casting procedure of selected"nnon precious alloy was performed by centrifugal method. Marginal gaps of each copping seated on dies"nwere measured by scanning electron microscope (SEM with X500 magnification. Measurements were"ndone on three areas of marked dies on buccal aspect. Measurement son palatal aspect was done on"nmarked midpalatal point as control."nResults and statistical analysis showed no significant difference among marginal gaps in lingual aspect."nBut on the buccal aspect there were statistically significant differences among the groups (P<0.001. Flat"nshoulder had the best marginal integrity (mean 4 micron. Shoulder with 160' bevel had the most marginal"ngap (mean 26.5 micron and shoulder with 1357 bevel was between two other groups (mean 15.7 micron.

  20. Thermodynamic studies on molybdenum-noble metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamawaki, M.; Kanno, M.

    1979-01-01

    Electromotive force cells have been used to determine the activities of molybdenum for Mo-Pd, Mo-Rh and Mo-Ru-Pd alloys over the temperature range 1200-1300K, and thermodynamic functions were derived from the results. Solid ZrO 2 -11 mol-% CaO was used as the electrolyte. In ternary Mo-Rud-Pd alloy the ratio Ru:Pd was fixed to 72,5:27.5 in atomic % in order to simulate the white metallic inclusions in irradiated (U, Pu)O 2 fuel. Activities of molybdenum showed negative deviations from Raoult's law in the composition range where the atomic fraction of molybdenum Nsub(Mo) being less than about 0.3, and then positive deviations in the intermediate Nsub(Mo) range. It was shown that the estimation of activities of molybdenum in the white metallic inclusions based on the regular solution approximation were generally fairly good, but might lead to error in the intermediate and higher Nsub(Mo) ranges. Standard Gibbs energy of formation of Mo-Rh intermetallic epsilon phase was shown to be negatively larger than those of some other Mo intermetallic phases, showing higher thermodynamic stability of this phase. (orig.) [de

  1. Ultrashort pulse laser machining of metals and alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Michael D.; Stuart, Brent C.

    2003-09-16

    The invention consists of a method for high precision machining (cutting, drilling, sculpting) of metals and alloys. By using pulses of a duration in the range of 10 femtoseconds to 100 picoseconds, extremely precise machining can be achieved with essentially no heat or shock affected zone. Because the pulses are so short, there is negligible thermal conduction beyond the region removed resulting in negligible thermal stress or shock to the material beyond approximately 0.1-1 micron (dependent upon the particular material) from the laser machined surface. Due to the short duration, the high intensity (>10.sup.12 W/cm.sup.2) associated with the interaction converts the material directly from the solid-state into an ionized plasma. Hydrodynamic expansion of the plasma eliminates the need for any ancillary techniques to remove material and produces extremely high quality machined surfaces with negligible redeposition either within the kerf or on the surface. Since there is negligible heating beyond the depth of material removed, the composition of the remaining material is unaffected by the laser machining process. This enables high precision machining of alloys and even pure metals with no change in grain structure.

  2. Near-infrared two-color pyrometer for determining ignition temperatures of metals and metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, K.; Branch, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    A two-color pyrometer has been designed, constructed, and used to measure the ignition temperatures of metals and metal alloys. Cylindrical metal and metal alloy specimens were ignited by a focused cw CO2 laser beam in a cool, static, pure oxygen environment. The pyrometer operates in the near-infrared at two narrow spectral regions, with a nominal bandwidth of 10 nm centered at 0.9051 and 1.06 micron, and has a temperature range from 1000 to 4000 K. In the present design the temperature of a spot, about 0.5 mm in diameter, can be recorded with a maximum time resolution of 25 microseconds and with an accuracy of a few percent. Results of CO2 laser ignition of cylindrical specimens of 6061 aluminum alloy and 302 SS in a pure oxygen environment were obtained from the two-color pyrometer and were compared with those obtained from a thermocouple placed inside the specimen near the laser-irradiated surface.

  3. Directed light fabrication of refractory metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca, J.C.; Lewis, G.K.; Dickerson, P.G.; Nemec, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    This report covers deposition of refractory pure metals and alloys using the Directed Light Fabrication (DLF) process and represents progress in depositing these materials through September 1998. In extending the DLF process technology to refractory metals for producing fully dense, structurally sound deposits, several problems have become evident. (1) Control of porosity in DLF-deposited refractory metal is difficult because of gases, apparently present in commercially purchased refractory metal powder starting materials. (2) The radiant heat from the molten pool during deposition melts the DLF powder feed nozzle. (3) The high reflectivity of molten refractory metals, at the Nd-YAG laser wavelength (1.06microm), produces damaging back reflections to the optical train and fiber optic delivery system that can terminate DLF processing. (4) The current limits on the maximum available laser power to prevent back reflection damage limit the parameter range available for densification of refractory metals. The work to date concentrated on niobium, W-25Re, and spherodized tungsten. Niobium samples, made from hydride-dehydride powder, had minimal gas porosity and the deposition parameters were optimized; however, test plates were not made at this time. W-25Re samples, containing sodium and potassium from a precipitation process, were made and porosity was a problem for all samples although minimized with some process parameters. Deposits made from potassium reduced tungsten that was plasma spherodized were made with minimized porosity. Results of this work indicate that further gas analysis of starting powders and de-gassing of starting powders and/or gas removal during deposition of refractory metals is required

  4. Influence of S. mutans on base-metal dental casting alloy toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, E L; Dowling, A H; Moran, G P; Fleming, G J P

    2013-01-01

    We have highlighted that exposure of base-metal dental casting alloys to the acidogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans significantly increases cellular toxicity following exposure to immortalized human TR146 oral keratinocytes. With Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), S. mutans-treated nickel-based (Ni-based) and cobalt-chromium-based (Co-Cr-based) dental casting alloys were shown to leach elevated levels of metal ions compared with untreated dental casting alloys. We targeted several biological parameters: cell morphology, viable cell counts, cell metabolic activity, cell toxicity, and inflammatory cytokine expression. S. mutans-treated dental casting alloys disrupted cell morphology, elicited significantly decreased viable cell counts (p dental casting alloys induced elevated levels of cellular toxicity compared with S. mutans-treated Co-Cr-based dental casting alloys. While our findings indicated that the exacerbated release of metal ions from S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys was the likely result of the pH reduction during S. mutans growth, the exact nature of mechanisms leading to accelerated dissolution of alloy-discs is not yet fully understood. Given the predominance of S. mutans oral carriage and the exacerbated cytotoxicity observed in TR146 cells following exposure to S. mutans-treated base-metal dental casting alloys, the implications for the long-term stability of base-metal dental restorations in the oral cavity are a cause for concern.

  5. The evaluation of the use of metal alloy fuels in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lancaster, D.

    1992-01-01

    The use of metal alloy fuels in a PWR was investigated. It was found that it would be feasible and competitive to design PWRs with metal alloy fuels but that there seemed to be no significant benefits. The new technology would carry with it added economic uncertainty and since no large benefits were found it was determined that metal alloy fuels are not recommended. Initially, a benefit was found for metal alloy fuels but when the oxide core was equally optimized the benefit faded. On review of the optimization of the current generation of ''advanced reactors,'' it became clear that reactor design optimization has been under emphasized. Current ''advanced reactors'' are severely constrained. The AP-600 required the use of a fuel design from the 1970's. In order to find the best metal alloy fuel design, core optimization became a central effort. This work is ongoing

  6. The evaluation of the use of metal alloy fuels in pressurized water reactors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancaster, D.

    1992-10-26

    The use of metal alloy fuels in a PWR was investigated. It was found that it would be feasible and competitive to design PWRs with metal alloy fuels but that there seemed to be no significant benefits. The new technology would carry with it added economic uncertainty and since no large benefits were found it was determined that metal alloy fuels are not recommended. Initially, a benefit was found for metal alloy fuels but when the oxide core was equally optimized the benefit faded. On review of the optimization of the current generation of ``advanced reactors,`` it became clear that reactor design optimization has been under emphasized. Current ``advanced reactors`` are severely constrained. The AP-600 required the use of a fuel design from the 1970`s. In order to find the best metal alloy fuel design, core optimization became a central effort. This work is ongoing.

  7. Half-metallicity in new Heusler alloys NaTO2 (T=Sc, Ti, V, Cr, and Mn): A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Kh; Ahmadian, F.

    2018-03-01

    On the basis of the full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FPLAPW) method within density functional theory (DFT), electronic structure and magnetic properties of Heusler alloys NaTO2 (T = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, and Mn) were investigated. The negative values of formation energy showed that these compounds can be experimentally synthesized. Results showed that in all compounds, AlCu2Mn-type structure was the most favorable one. The NaTO2 (T = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, and Mn) alloys were HM ferromagnets except NaScO2 (in both structures which were nonmagnetic semiconductors) and NaVO2 (in AlCu2Mn-type structure which was a magnetic semiconductor). The origin of half-metallicity was also verified in HM alloys. NaCrO2 and NaVO2 alloys had higher half-metallic band gaps in comparison with Heusler alloys including and excluding transition metals. The total magnetic moments of HM NaTO2 (T = Ti, V, Cr, and Mn) alloys obeyed Slater-Pauling rule (Mtot = Ztot-12). Among NaTO2 (T = Sc, Ti, V, Cr, and Mn) alloys, NaCrO2 had the highest robustness of half-metallicity with variation of lattice constant in both structures.

  8. Reentrant Metal-Insulator Transitions in Silicon -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, John William M.

    This thesis describes a study of reentrant metal -insulator transitions observed in the inversion layer of extremely high mobility Si-MOSFETs. Magneto-transport measurements were carried out in the temperature range 20mK-4.2 K in a ^3He/^4 He dilution refrigerator which was surrounded by a 15 Tesla superconducting magnet. Below a melting temperature (T_{M}~500 mK) and a critical electron density (n_{s }~9times10^{10} cm^{-2}), the Shubnikov -de Haas oscillations in the diagonal resistivity enormous maximum values at the half filled Landau levels while maintaining deep minima corresponding to the quantum Hall effect at filled Landau levels. At even lower electron densities the insulating regions began to spread and eventually a metal-insulator transition could be induced at zero magnetic field. The measurement of extremely large resistances in the milliKelvin temperature range required the use of very low currents (typically in the 10^ {-12} A range) and in certain measurements minimizing the noise was also a consideration. The improvements achieved in these areas through the use of shielding, optical decouplers and battery operated instruments are described. The transport signatures of the insulating state are considered in terms of two basic mechanisms: single particle localization with transport by variable range hopping and the formation of a collective state such as a pinned Wigner crystal or electron solid with transport through the motion of bound dislocation pairs. The experimental data is best described by the latter model. Thus the two dimensional electron system in these high mobility Si-MOSFETs provides the first and only experimental demonstration to date of the formation of an electron solid at zero and low magnetic fields in the quantum limit where the Coulomb interaction energy dominates over the zero point oscillation energy. The role of disorder in favouring either single particle localization or the formation of a Wigner crystal is explored by

  9. Theoretical study of the localization-delocalization transition in amorphous molybdenum-germanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, K.; Andersen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Electronic structure calculations were performed for amorphous germanium and amorphous alloys of molybdenum and germanium. The calculations used Harrison's universal linear-combination-of-atomic-orbitals parameters to generate one-electron Hamiltonians for structural configurations obtained from molecular-dynamics simulations. The density of states calculated for a model of a-Ge showed a distinct pseudogap, although with an appreciable density of states at the minimum. The states in the pseudogap are localized. As the concentration of Mo atoms increases, the pseudogap of the density of states is gradually filled up. The density of states at the Fermi energy calculated for our model of the alloys agrees quite well with that experimentally determined by Yoshizumi, Geballe, and co-workers. The localization index for the states at the Fermi energy is a decreasing function of Mo concentration in the range of 2--14 at. % Mo and the localization length is an increasing function of molybdenum concentration. These results are consistent with the experimental observation of an insulator-metal transition at about 10 at. % Mo

  10. Metallacyclopentadienes: structural features and coordination in transition metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgushin, Fedor M; Yanovsky, Aleksandr I; Antipin, Mikhail Yu

    2004-01-01

    Results of structural studies of polynuclear transition metal complexes containing the metallacyclopentadiene fragment are overviewed. The structural features of the complexes in relation to the nature of the substituents in the organic moiety of the metallacycles, the nature of the transition metals and their ligand environment are analysed. The main structural characteristics corresponding to different modes of coordination of metallacyclopentadienes to one or two additional metal centres are revealed.

  11. Pressure dependence on the remanent magnetization of Fe-Ni alloys and Ni metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingguo; Gilder, Stuart Alan; Maier, Bernd

    2014-10-01

    We measured the acquisition of magnetic remanence of iron-nickel alloys (Fe64Ni36, Fe58Ni42, and Fe50Ni50) and pure Ni under pressures up to 23 GPa at room temperature. Magnetization decreases markedly for Fe64Ni36 between 5 and 7 GPa yet remains ferromagnetic until at least 16 GPa. Magnetization rises by a factor of 2-3 for the other compositions during compression to the highest applied pressures. Immediately upon decompression, magnetic remanence increases for all Fe-Ni alloys while magnetic coercivity remains fairly constant at relatively low values (5-20 mT). The amount of magnetization gained upon complete decompression correlates with the maximum pressure experienced by the sample. Martensitic effects best explain the increase in remanence rather than grain-size reduction, as the creation of single domain sized grains would raise the coercivity. The magnetic remanence of low Ni Invar alloys increases faster with pressure than for other body-centered-cubic compositions due to the higher magnetostriction of the low Ni Invar metals. Thermal demagnetization spectra of Fe64Ni36 measured after pressure release broaden as a function of peak pressure, with a systematic decrease in Curie temperature. Irreversible strain accumulation from the martensitic transition likely explains the broadening of the Curie temperature spectra, consistent with our x-ray diffraction analyses.

  12. Computational study of 5d transition metal mononitrides and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 33; Issue 3. Computational study of 5 transition metal mononitrides and monoborides using ... affinity and ionization potential is wider for mononitrides than that for monoborides. The properties of 5-metal mononitrides and 3-metal mononitrides are also compared.

  13. The strong reactions of Lewis-base noble-metals with vanadium and other acidic transition metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbinghaus, Bartley B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-05-01

    The noble metals often thought of as unreactive solids,react strongly with nearly 40% of the elements in the periodictable: group IIIB-VB transition metals, lanthanides, theactinides, and group IIIA-IVA non-transition metals. These strong reactions arise from increased bonding/electron transfer fromnonbonding electrons d electron pairs on the noble metal tovacant orbitals on V, etc. This effect is a generalized Lewis acid-base interaction. The partial Gibbs energy of V in the noblemetals has been measured as a function of concentration at a temperature near 1000C. Thermodynamics of the intermetallics are determined by ternary oxide equilibria, ternary carbide equilibria, and the high-temperature galvanic cell technique. These experimental methods use equilibrated solid composite mixtures in which grains of V oxides or of V carbides are interspersed with grains of V-NM(noble-metal) alloys. In equilibrium the activity of V in the oxide or the carbide equals the activity in the alloy. Consequently, the thermodynamics available in the literature for the V oxides and V carbides are reviewed. Test runs on the galvanic cell were attempted. The V oxide electrode reacts with CaF2, ThO2, YDT(0.85ThO2-0.15YO1.5), and LDT(0.85ThO2- 0.15LaO1.5) to interfere with the measured data observed toward the beginning of a galvanic cell experiment are the most accurate. The interaction of vanadium at infinite dilution in the noble-metals was determined.

  14. The strong reactions of Lewis-base noble-metals with vanadium and other acidic transition metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.

    1991-05-01

    The noble metals often thought of as unreactive solids,react strongly with nearly 40% of the elements in the periodictable: group IIIB-VB transition metals, lanthanides, theactinides, and group IIIA-IVA non-transition metals. These strong reactions arise from increased bonding/electron transfer fromnonbonding electrons d electron pairs on the noble metal tovacant orbitals on V, etc. This effect is a generalized Lewis acid-base interaction. The partial Gibbs energy of V in the noblemetals has been measured as a function of concentration at a temperature near 1000C. Thermodynamics of the intermetallics are determined by ternary oxide equilibria, ternary carbide equilibria, and the high-temperature galvanic cell technique. These experimental methods use equilibrated solid composite mixtures in which grains of V oxides or of V carbides are interspersed with grains of V-NM(noble-metal) alloys. In equilibrium the activity of V in the oxide or the carbide equals the activity in the alloy. Consequently, the thermodynamics available in the literature for the V oxides and V carbides are reviewed. Test runs on the galvanic cell were attempted. The V oxide electrode reacts with CaF[sub 2], ThO[sub 2], YDT(0.85ThO[sub 2]-0.15YO[sub 1.5]), and LDT(0.85ThO[sub 2]- 0.15LaO[sub 1.5]) to interfere with the measured data observed toward the beginning of a galvanic cell experiment are the most accurate. The interaction of vanadium at infinite dilution in the noble-metals was determined.

  15. Nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Liuting; Li, Juan; Liu, Qiaoling; Qiu, Liping; Tan, Weihong

    2017-03-15

    In clinical diagnostics, as well as food and environmental safety practices, biosensors are powerful tools for monitoring biological or biochemical processes. Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal nanomaterials, including transition metal chalcogenides (TMCs) and transition metal oxides (TMOs), are receiving growing interest for their use in biosensing applications based on such unique properties as high surface area and fluorescence quenching abilities. Meanwhile, nucleic acid probes based on Watson-Crick base-pairing rules are also being widely applied in biosensing based on their excellent recognition capability. In particular, the emergence of functional nucleic acids in the 1980s, especially aptamers, has substantially extended the recognition capability of nucleic acids to various targets, ranging from small organic molecules and metal ions to proteins and cells. Based on π-π stacking interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids, biosensing systems can be easily assembled. Therefore, the combination of 2D transition metal nanomaterials and nucleic acids brings intriguing opportunities in bioanalysis and biomedicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheets in biosensing applications. The structure and properties of 2D transition metal nanomaterials are first discussed, emphasizing the interaction between transition metal nanosheets and nucleic acids. Then, the applications of nucleic acid-functionalized transition metal nanosheet-based biosensors are discussed in the context of different signal transducing mechanisms, including optical and electrochemical approaches. Finally, we provide our perspectives on the current challenges and opportunities in this promising field. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Electronic specific heat of transition metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conte, R.

    1964-07-01

    The experimental results that make it possible to define the band structure of transition metal carbides having an NaCI structure are still very few. We have measured the electronic specific heat of some of these carbides of varying electronic concentration (TiC, either stoichiometric or non-stoichiometric, TaC and mixed (Ti, Ta) - C). We give the main characteristics (metallography, resistivity, X-rays) of our samples and we describe the low temperature specific heat apparatus which has been built. In one of these we use helium as the exchange gas. The other is set up with a mechanical contact. The two use a germanium probe for thermometer. The measurement of the temperature using this probe is described, as well as the various measurement devices. The results are presented in the form of a rigid band model and show that the density of the states at the Fermi level has a minimum in the neighbourhood of the group IV carbides. (author) [fr

  17. Photocatalysis of Modified Transition Metal Oxide Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batzill, Matthias

    2018-02-28

    The goal of this project has been to establish a cause-effect relationship for photocatalytic activity variations of different structures of the same material; and furthermore gain fundamental understanding on modification of photocatalysts by compositional or surface modifications. The reasoning is that gaining atomic scale understanding of how surface and bulk modifications alter the photo reactivity will lead to design principles for next generation photocatalysts. As a prototypical photocatalyst the research focused on TiO2 synthesized in well-defined single crystalline form to enable fundamental characterizations.We have obtained results in the following areas: (a) Preparation of epitaxial anataseTiO2 samples by pulsed laser deposition. (b) Comparison of hydrogen diffusion on different crystallographic surface. (c) Determining the stability of the TiO2(011)-2x1 reconstruction upon interactions with adsorbates. (d) Characterization of adsorption and (thermal and photo) reaction of molecules with nitro-endgroups, (e) Exploring the possibility of modifying planar model photocatalyst surfaces with graphene to enable fundamental studies on reported enhanced photocatalytic activities of graphene modified transition metal oxides, (f) gained fundamental understanding on the role of crystallographic polymorphs of the same material for their photocatalytic activities.

  18. Enhancement of Platinum Cathode Catalysis by Addition of Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Hung Tuan

    2009-01-01

    The sluggish kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) contributes significantly to the loss of cathode overpotential in fuel cells, thus requiring high loadings of platinum (Pt), which is an expensive metal with limited supply. However, Pt and Pt-based alloys are still the best available electrocatalysts for ORR thus far. The research presented…

  19. Addressing aquatic hazard classification for metals, metal compounds and alloys in marine systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsman-Mapila, P; Skeaff, J M; Pawlak, M; Beaudoin, R

    2016-08-15

    New International Maritime Organization regulations require shippers to classify all solid bulk cargo to indicate whether they are Harmful to the Marine Environment (HME). The objective of this work was to adapt the freshwater Transformation/Dissolution Protocol (T/DP) to marine water to provide a method to determine, when compared with marine Ecotoxicity Reference Values (ERVs), whether a metal-bearing substance is HME. The substances examined were: Cu2O powder; Ni metal powder; Co3O4 powder; and a Ni-Co-Fe alloy, as wire cuttings, which were the same substances examined in the freshwater T/D validation study and afforded comparisons of the reactivity, or measure of the rate and extent of metal release from the metal-bearing substances in freshwater versus marine conditions. The marine T/D method is suitable for conducting examinations of metal-bearing substances with a wide range of reactivities, from the relatively reactive Cu2O powder and the alloy to the Co3O4 powder, which was the least reactive. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Preparation and characterization of several transition metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wold, A.; Dwight, K.

    1989-01-01

    The structure-property relationships of several conducting transition metal oxides, as well as their preparative methods, are presented in this paper. The importance of preparing homogeneous phases with precisely known stoichiometry is emphasized. A comparison is also made of the various techniques used to prepare both polycrystalline and single crystal samples. For transition metal oxides, the metallic properties are discussed either in terms of metal-metal distances which are short enough to result in metallic behavior, or in terms of the formation of a π* conduction band resulting from covalent metal-oxygen interactions. Metallic behavior is observed when the conduction bands are populated with either electrons or holes. The concentration of these carriers can be affected by either cation or anion substitutions. The discussion in this presentation will be limited to the elements Re, Ti, V, Cr, Mo, and Cu

  1. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide on post-transition metal and metal oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James L.

    The electroreduction of carbon dioxide to liquid products is an important component in the utilization of CO2 and in the high-density storage of intermittent renewable energy in the form of chemical bonds. Materials based on indium and tin, which yield predominantly formic acid, have been investigated in order to gain a greater understanding of the electrochemically active species and the mechanism of CO2 reduction on these heavy post-transition metals, since prior studies on the bulk metals did not provide thermodynamically sensible reaction pathways. Nanoparticles of the oxides and hydroxides of tin and indium have been prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and various electrochemical methods in order to obtain structural information and analyze the role of various surface species on the CO2 reduction pathway. On both indium and tin, metastable surface-bound hydroxides bound CO2 and formed metal carbonates, which can then be reduced electrochemically. The relevant oxidation state of tin was suggested to be SnII rather than SnIV, necessitating a pre reduction to generate the CO2-binding species. Metallic indium nanoparticles partially oxidized in air and became highly efficient CO2 reduction electrocatalysts. Unit Faradaic efficiencies for formate, much higher than on bulk indium, were achieved with only 300 mV of overpotential on these particles, which possessed an oxyhydroxide shell surrounding a conductive metallic core. Alloys and mixed-metal oxide and hydroxide particles of tin and indium have also been studied for their carbon dioxide electrocatalytic capabilities, especially in comparison to the pure metal species. Additionally, a solar-driven indium-based CO2 electrolyzer was developed to investigate the overall efficiency for intermittent energy storage. The three flow cells were powered by a commercial photovoltaic array and had a maximum conversion efficiency of incident

  2. Applications for Gradient Metal Alloys Fabricated Using Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Borgonia, John Paul C.; Dillon, Robert P.; Suh, Eric J.; Mulder, jerry L.; Gardner, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    assortment of "post-processing" methods to locally alter properties (such as coating, heat treating, work hardening, shot peening, etching, anodizing, among others). Building the final part in an additive process allows for the development of an entirely new class of metals, so-called "functionally graded metals" or "gradient alloys." By carefully blending feedstock materials with different properties in an AM process, hardware can be developed with properties that cannot be obtained using other techniques but with the added benefit of the net-shaped fabrication that AM allows.

  3. Testing metals and alloys for use in oxygen systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    1986-01-01

    When oxygen is present in high concentrations or large quantities, as in oxygen-based life-support systems, the likelihood of combustion and the probable intensity of a conflagration increase, together with the severity of the damage caused. Even stainless steel will burn vigorously when ignited in a 1000-psi oxygen environment. The hazards involved in the use of oxygen increase with system operation at the elevated temperatures typical of propulsion systems. Fires in oxygen systems are generally catastrophic, causing a threat to life in manned vehicles. When mechanical components of a mechanism generate friction heat in the presence of oxygen, many commonly used metal alloys ignite and burn. Attention is presently given to frictional heating, particle impact, and flame propagation tests conducted in oxygen environments.

  4. Standard test method for macroetching metals and alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 These test procedures describe the methods of macro- etching metals and alloys to reveal their macrostructure. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as the standard. The SI equivalents of inch-pound units may be approximate. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific warning statements, see 6.2, 7.1, 8.1.3, 8.2.1, 8.8.3, 8.10.1.1, and 8.13.2.

  5. Tethered Transition Metals Promoted Photocatalytic System for Efficient Hydrogen Evolutions

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-03-05

    The present invention is directed, at least in part, to a process for improving the efficiency of a photocatalyst (a semiconductor photocatalyst) by tethering (depositing) a metal (e.g., metal ions of a late transition metal, such as nickel) to the semiconductor (photocatalyst) surface through the use of an organic ligand. More specifically, 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT) functions as an excellent molecular linker (organic ligand) to attach a transition metal complex (e.g., nickel (Ni.sup.2+ ions)) to the semiconductor surface, which can be in the form of a cadmium sulfide surface. The photocatalyst has particular utility in generating hydrogen from H.sub.2S.

  6. Electronic structure of disordered transition metals within scattering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakyibchuk, P.M.; Volkov, O.V.; Vakarchuk, S.O.

    2005-01-01

    Here we present a new approach to the calculation of density of states of disordered transition metals based on the T-matrix framework presented by Lloyd within generalized Ziman's theory of transport properties and energy structure of disordered metals. This approach makes it possible to avoid such difficulties of familiar calculations as renormalized perturbation theory. We have achieved double hill energy resonance for transition metals at Fe and Co groups caused by hybridization potential. So the results are in good correlation with model presentation of energy structure of these metals conduction band for explaining magnetic and transport properties

  7. Wear Behavior of Mechanically Alloyed Ti-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Containing Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Sheng Lin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports the preparation and wear behavior of mechanically alloyed Ti-based bulk metallic glass composites containing carbon nanotube (CNT particles. The differential scanning calorimeter results show that the thermal stability of the amorphous matrix is affected by the presence of CNT particles. Changes in glass transition temperature (Tg and crystallization temperature (Tx suggest that deviations in the chemical composition of the amorphous matrix occurred because of a partial dissolution of the CNT species into the amorphous phase. Although the hardness of CNT/Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass composites is increased with the addition of CNT particles, the wear resistance of such composites is not directly proportional to their hardness, and does not follow the standard wear law. A worn surface under a high applied load shows that the 12 vol. % CNT/Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass composite suffers severe wear compared with monolithic Ti50Cu28Ni15Sn7 bulk metallic glass.

  8. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF TRANSITION METAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    The metal complexes separated out were filtered through the sintered glass crucible ... All the metal complexes (Table 2) are colored, stable to air at room temperature ... Table 2. Physical characteristics and conductivity data of metal complexes and ligands. Ligand/complex. Color. Melting/decomposition temperature, 0C.

  9. Impact of Interfacial Defects on the Properties of Monolayer Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Lateral Heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Cao, Zhen

    2017-03-25

    We explored the impact of interfacial defects on the stability and optoelectronic properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide lateral heterojunctions using a density functional theory approach. As a prototype, we focused on the MoS2-WSe2 system and found that even a random alloy-like interface with a width of less than 1 nm has only a minimal impact on the band gap and alignment compared to the defect-less interface. The largest impact is on the evolution of the electrostatic potential across the monolayer. Similar to defect-less interfaces, a small number of defects results in an electrostatic potential profile with a sharp change at the interface, which facilitates exciton dissociation. Differently, a large number of defects results in an electrostatic potential profile switching smoothly across the interface, which is expected to reduce the capability of the heterojunction to promote exciton dissociation. These results are generalizable to other transition metal dichalcogenide lateral heterojunctions.

  10. Corrosion behaviour of cobalt-chromium dental alloys doped with precious metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reclaru, Lucien; Lüthy, Heinz; Eschler, Pierre-Yves; Blatter, Andreas; Susz, Christian

    2005-07-01

    Precious metal based dental alloys generally exhibit a superior corrosion resistance, in particular enhanced resistance to pitting and crevice corrosion, compared to non-precious metal based alloys such as CoCr alloys. A new generation of Co-Cr alloys enriched with precious metals (Au, Pt, Ru) have now appeared on the market. The goal of this study was to clarify the effect of the precious metals additions on the corrosion behaviour of such alloys. Various commercial alloys with different doping levels were tested by electrochemical techniques in two different milieus based on the Fusayama artificial saliva and an electrolyte containing NaCl. Open circuit potentials, corrosion currents, polarization resistances, and crevices potentials were determined for the various alloys and completed by a coulometric analysis of the potentiodynamic curves. In addition, the microstructures were characterised by metallography and phase compositions analysed by EDX. The results show that the presence of precious metals can deteriorate the corrosion behaviour of Co-Cr alloys in a significant way. Gold doping, in particular, produces heterogeneous microstructures that are vulnerable to corrosive attack.

  11. The metallicities of stars with and without transiting planets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Lars A.; Latham, David W.

    2015-01-01

    terrestrial-sized planets. Here, we report metallicities for a sample of 518 stars in the Kepler field that have no detected transiting planets and compare their metallicity distribution to a sample of stars that hosts small planets (). Importantly, both samples have been analyzed in a homogeneous manner...... using the same set of tools (Stellar Parameters Classification tool). We find the average metallicity of the sample of stars without detected transiting planets to be and the sample of stars hosting small planets to be . The average metallicities of the two samples are indistinguishable within......Host star metallicities have been used to infer observational constraints on planet formation throughout the history of the exoplanet field. The giant planet metallicity correlation has now been widely accepted, but questions remain as to whether the metallicity correlation extends to the small...

  12. Dissolution of metallic uranium and its alloys. Part 1. Review of analytical and process-scale metallic uranium dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, C.A.; Gates-Anderson, D.; Fitch, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    This review focuses on dissolution/reaction systems capable of treating uranium metal waste to remove its pyrophoric properties. The primary emphasis is the review of literature describing analytical and production-scale dissolution methods applied to either uranium metal or uranium alloys. A brief summary of uranium's corrosion behavior is included since the corrosion resistance of metals and alloys affects their dissolution behavior. Based on this review, dissolution systems were recommended for subsequent screening studies designed to identify the best system to treat depleted uranium metal wastes at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). (author)

  13. Solid state reactions in mechanically alloyed Al-Y alloy with addition of metal oxides; Al-Y gokin to kinzoku sankabutsu tono mechanical alloying to koso hanno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, M. [Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan); Kaneko, J.; Sugamata, M. [Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan). College of Industrial Technology

    1999-12-15

    With a purpose of attesting preferential oxidation of an alloying element which has low solid solubility in aluminum, an Al-5at%Y alloy was mechanically alloyed with or without addition of metal oxides. Y was chosen as an alloying element since it has higher oxidation tendency than Al and a low maximum solid solubility of 0.17mass% in Al. Mechanically alloyed powders were consolidated by hot-extrusion to the P/M materials of which constituent phases, microstructures and mechanical properties were examined. The added oxygen, either from the process control agent or from oxide powders, acted as oxygen sources for internal oxidation, and Y in Al was shown to be preferentially oxidized to Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 5}Y{sub 3}O{sub 12}. The P/M materials with addition of oxide powders showed high tensile strength of about 600MPa at room temperature. (author)

  14. A generic process of growing aligned carbon nanotube arrays on metals and metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parthangal, Prahalad M; Cavicchi, Richard E; Zachariah, Michael R

    2007-01-01

    Aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays are integral towards the development of several applications such as field emission, interconnects in silicon technology, and chemical and biological sensing. Even though the synthesis of CNTs has been described extensively in the literature, there has not been significant success in growing uniform, well-aligned CNT arrays on pure metal surfaces other than metals that catalyse CNT growth themselves. In this paper, we describe a method of growing aligned CNT arrays on a variety of pure metals, metal alloys, and conductive ceramics using a bimetallic iron/alumina composite catalyst at low temperatures (550 to 700 deg. C). We believe that the addition of alumina to the iron catalyst significantly reduces catalyst-metal underlayer interactions that have traditionally proven to be a barrier for the growth of CNTs on metals. The alumina also minimizes surface diffusion of iron and allows the formation of a high density of uniformly dispersed catalyst nanoparticles to act as nucleation sites for well-aligned CNT arrays. Despite the presence of non-conducting alumina from the catalyst, the contact resistance between the CNTs and the metal underlayer was observed to be quite low, emphasizing the usefulness of this approach to practical applications. Our process was successful in growing aligned CNTs even on commercial steel plates and may be applicable for substrates of any shape or size

  15. Solidification mechanism of highly undercooled metal alloys. [tin-lead and nickel-tin alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiohara, Y.; Chu, M. G.; Macisaac, D. G.; Flemings, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on metal droplet undercooling, using Sn-25wt%Pb and Ni-34wt%Sn alloys. To achieve the high degree of undercooling, emulsification treatments were employed. Results show the fraction of supersaturated primary phase is a function of the amount of undercooling, as is the fineness of the structures. The solidification behavior of the tin-lead droplets during recalescence was analyzed using three different hypotheses; (1) solid forming throughout recalescence is of the maximum thermodynamically stable composition; (2) partitionless solidification below the T sub o temperature, and solid forming thereafter is of the maximum thermodynamically stable composition; and (3) partitionless solidification below the T sub o temperature with solid forming thereafter that is of the maximum thermodynamically metastable composition that is possible. The T sub o temperature is calculated from the equal molar free energies of the liquid solid using the regular solution approximation.

  16. Fatigue and creep crack growth behaviour at high temperatures for weld metals of Alloy 800 and Alloy 617

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedig, M.; Choudhary, B.K.

    1993-01-01

    High temperature fatigue crack growth (FCG) and creep crack growth (CCG) experiments have been conducted in air on weld metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal of the austenitic Alloy 800 and the nickel base Alloy 617. Tests were performed on specimens machined from pipes, in the temperature range 550-900 deg. C. The crack propagation mode was examined. At all temperatures and for both materials, FCG of base metal was found to be the highest, whereas the weld metal exhibited the lowest FCG rate. The FCG rate in the HAZ was found to lie in between of those observed for base and weld metal. The crack propagation mode remained transgranular in base metal and transdendritic in weld metal at all temperatures. CCG behaviour could be described using the energy rate integral C*. Base metal and weld metal exhibited similar CCG rate at same C*. The crack propagation mode under CCG condition was found to be intergranular in base metal and HAZ and interdendritic in the weld metal. (author)

  17. On metal-insulator transition in cubic fullerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahara, Naoya; Chibotaru, Liviu

    The interplay between degenerate orbital and electron correlation is a key to characterize the electronic phases in, for example, transition metal compounds and alkali-doped fullerides. Besides, the degenerate orbital couples to spin and lattice degrees of freedom ,giving rise to exotic phenomena. Here, we develop the self-consistent Gutzwiller approach for the simultaneous treatment of the Jahn-Teller effect and electron correlation, and apply the methodology to reveal the nature of the ground electronic state of fullerides. For small Coulomb repulsion on site U, the fulleride is quasi degenerate correlated metal. With increase of U, we found the quantum phase transition from the metallic phase to JT split phase. In the latter, the Mott transition (MT) mainly develops in the half-filled subband, whereas the empty and the completely filled subbands are almost uninvolved. Therefore, we can qualify the metal-insulator transition in fullerides as an orbital selective MT induced by JT effect.

  18. Spectrum of ferromagnetic transition metal magnetic excitations and neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzemskij, A.L.

    1979-01-01

    Quantum statistical models of ferromagnetic transition metals as well as methods of their solutions are reviewed. The correspondence of results on solving these models and the data on scattering thermal neutrons in ferromagnetic is discussed

  19. New approaches in organometallic and transition metal assemblies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stannoxanes and phosphonates: New approaches in organometallic and transition metal assemblies. VADAPALLI CHANDRASEKHAR*, KANDASAMY GOPAL,. LOGANATHAN NAGARAJAN, PALANI SASIKUMAR and PAKKIRISAMY THILAGAR. Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016.

  20. Liquid -to-glass transition in bulk glass-forming Cu55-xZr45Agx alloys using molecular dynamic simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celtek M.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We report results from molecular dynamics (MD studies concerning the microscopic structure of the ternary, bulk metallic glass-forming Cu55-x Zr45Agx (x=0,10,20 alloys using tight-binding potentials. Understanding of the nature of Glass Forming Ability (GFA of studied alloys, GFA parameters, glass transition temperature (T-g, melting temperature (T-m, reduced glass transition temperature (T-g/T-m, the supercooled liquid region and other parameters were simulated and compared with experiments. The computed pair distribution functions reproduce well experimental x-ray data of Inoue and co-workers. Structure analysis of the Cu-Zr-Ag alloy based on MD simulation will be also presented

  1. Structural phase transition in some disordered binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Haniph; Sharma, K.S.

    1998-01-01

    The pseudopotential formalism of binary alloys has been used to obtain binding energy of some disordered binary alloys by using the linear potential due to Sharma and Kachhava along with RPA form of screening function. The alloy potential is treated as the linear combination of the potential of the average lattice and the difference potential. The binding energy of Li-Mg, Li-Al, Al-Mg and In-Mg systems has been computed at different atomic concentrations in three possible phases viz. bcc, fcc and hcp. Minimum energy values and phases corresponding to these alloys are obtained. The results obtained show a good agreement with the experimental data as well as with the other theoretical results. (author)

  2. Trends in catalytic NO decomposition over transition metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falsig, Hanne; Bligaard, Thomas; Rass-Hansen, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

    The formation of NOx from combustion of fossil and renewable fuels continues to be a dominant environmental issue. We take one step towards rationalizing trends in catalytic activity of transition metal catalysts for NO decomposition by combining microkinetic modelling with density functional...... theory calculations. We show specifically why the key problem in using transition metal surfaces to catalyze direct NO decomposition is their significant relative overbinding of atomic oxygen compared to atomic nitrogen....

  3. Transition in Deformation Mechanism of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy during High-Temperature Tensile Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Noda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys can be used for reducing the weight of various structural products, because of their high specific strength. They have attracted considerable attention as materials with a reduced environmental load, since they help to save both resources and energy. In order to use Mg alloys for manufacturing vehicles, it is important to investigate the deformation mechanism and transition point for optimizing the material and vehicle design. In this study, we investigated the transition of the deformation mechanism during the high-temperature uniaxial tensile deformation of the AZ31 Mg alloy. At a test temperature of 523 K and an initial strain rate of 3×10−3 s-1, the AZ31 Mg alloy (mean grain size: ~5 μm exhibited stable deformation behavior and the deformation mechanism changed to one dominated by grain boundary sliding.

  4. Size dependent reactivity of metal nanoparticles and alloys supported on HOPG, probed by the H-D exchange and the NH3 decomposition reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiordaliso, Elisabetta Maria

    This thesis presents the results obtained from experiments performed in an Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) apparatus, named Parallel Screening, consisting of a preparation chamber combined to a High Pressure Cell (HPC) for testing catalytic activity at 1 bar. Two catalytic reactions have been carried out...... on different transition metals and metal alloys supported on sputtered Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG). The first is the H-D exchange reaction, used as probe reaction for H2 dissociation, which is relevant for Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Experiments have been performed on Pt, Ru, and Rh...... for Ru and Rh is due to the formation of compressed hydrogen adlayers on the terraces of the larger particles. In the case of the Pt/Ru alloys, it is found that the activity exceeds the values measured on the individual metals and have a maximum on alloys with surface composition ratio of Pt:Ru equal...

  5. The origins of strengthening in nanostructured metals and alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris, D. G.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured metals and alloys have a variety of chemical and physical properties that are greatly modified by the nano-scale of their microstructure. At the same time, these materials generally show very high strength, although ductility or toughness may not be good. Strength increases as the microstructure scale reduces from the macro-micro level and even finer, but sometimes the strength appears to fall as the structure scale approaches the nano level. These strength variations are examined here, and the mechanisms responsible for both strengthening and weakening are discussed. The fall in ductility and toughness as materials become nanostructured is a complex topic that requires extensive analysis, but this will not be treated in the present overview.

    Los metales y aleaciones nanoestructuradas muestran una serie de propiedades químicas y físicas fuertemente modificadas cuando su microestructura entra en la escala nano. A la vez, estos materiales muestran generalmente alta resistencia pero mediocre ductilidad o tenacidad. La resistencia aumenta cuando baja la escala de la microestructura desde el nivel micro hacia el nivel nano, pero a veces la resistencia parece reducir por las microestructuras mas finas. Se examinan aquí todas estas variaciones y se discuten los mecanismos responsables del endurecimiento y ablandamiento. Los cambios de ductilidad o tenacidad cuando la microestructura entra en la escala nano necesitan un análisis detallado que no se trata en este articulo.

  6. Physical chemistry of the chlorination reactions of metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Micco, Georgina

    2007-01-01

    This thesis has contributed towards the knowledge of complex systems.The chlorination reactions are non-catalytic solid-gas heterogeneous reactions which, in addition to the difficulties associated with the reactions occurring in an interface, have the particular features of chlorides compounds and their interactions.The questions arising from this type of study can not be solved by the application of an individual analysis technique.From the experimental point of view it is complicated, and many instrumental techniques need to be applied in order to obtain significant results as well as meaningful interpretations.The system under study is the chlorination of ternary and binary alloys containing Al, Cu and Zn and the pure metals, as these elements belong to the spent nuclear fuel cladding.The aim of the research has been to develop a process that eliminates most of the aluminium, which is the more abundant specie. In this way, the amount of material to be conditioned (vitrified) is reduced.The objectives proposed for each system have been achieved, and the results obtained can also be applied to similar systems for metal recycling [es

  7. Thermodynamic analysis of transition pressure of δ-stabilized binary plutonium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qinghui

    1992-01-01

    The transformation of δ-stabilized binary plutonium alloys to α-Pu was studies by thermodynamic analysis. A transition pressure-composition equation which can characterize the high pressure transformation from δ to α was derived. Values calculated by the equation and values measured by experiments of published references have the same tendency. the following facts can be explained properly by this equation. (1)The transformation pressure increases linearly with the amount of an alloying element. (2) The slope of the plot of transformation pressure versus composition of δ-Pu alloys is inversely proportional to the minimum amount of solute required to retain δ-phase at room temperature and pressure. (3) Curves showing the relationship between transformation pressure and composition of various δ-stabilized binary alloys interact at the same point of zero solute (transformation pressure axis). In addition, some transformation pressures from δ to α of δ-stabilized alloys are predicted by using the modified theoretical equation

  8. Early Transition Metal Alkyl and Tetrahydroborate Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, James Allen

    1988-06-01

    An investigation of early transition metal alkyl and tetrahydroborate complexes as catalytic models and ceramic precursors has been initiated. The compounds MX _2 (dmpe)_2, dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane, for M = Ti, V, Cr, and X = Br, I, BH_4, have been prepared. These complexes are paramagnetic and have been shown by X-ray crystallography to have trans-octahedral structures. The BH_4^{-} groups in Ti(BH_4)_2(dmpe) _2 bond to the metal in a bidentate manner. This structure is in marked contrast to the structure of the vanadium analogue, V(BH_4)_2 (dmpe)_2, which displays two unidentate BH_4^{-} groups. Alkylation of Ti(BH_4)_2 (dmpe)_2 with LiMe results in the complex TiMe_2(dmpe) _2 which is diamagnetic in both solution and solid state. Single crystal X-ray and neutron diffraction studies show that there may be strong Ti-C pi -bonding. A tetragonal compression along the C -Ti-C bond vector accounts for the observed diamegnetism. A series of complexes of the formula Ti(BH _4)_3(PR_3)_2 has been prepared where PR_3 = PMe_3, PEt_3, PMe_3Ph, and P(OMe)_3 . The X-ray crystal structure of Ti(BH _4)_3(PMe_3)_2 reveals a pseudo trigonal bipyramidal geometry in which two BH_4^{-} groups display an unusual "side-on" bonding mode. The "side-on" ligation mode has been attributed to a Jahn-Teller distortion of the orbitally degenerate d^1 ground state. In contrast, the non-Jahn-Teller susceptible vanadium analogue, V(BH_4)_3 (PMe_3)_2, possesses a nearly ideal D_{rm 3h} >=ometry with three bidentate tetrahydroborate groups. Addition of excess PMe_3 to V(BH_4)_3(PMe _3)_2water forms the vanadium(III) oxo dimer (V(BH_4)_2 (PMe_3)_2]_2 [mu-O) which has been structurally characterized. The compound Ti(CH_2CMe _3)_4 can be prepared by addition of Ti(OEt)_4 to LiCH_2 CMe_3. Sublimation of Ti(CH _2CMe_3)_4 over a substrate heated to 250^ circC results in the chemical vapor deposition of amorphous TiC thin films. This CVD approach has been extended to the Group 4 borides: Ti

  9. Transition metal mediated transformations of small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Ayusman [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-03-08

    Catalysis at metal centers is of great scientific, as well as practical, importance because of the high efficiency, high specificity, and low energy demands often associated with such systems. The two major themes of our research are (a) the design of metal-based systems for the synthesis of novel classes of polymers and (b) the identification of new metal-catalyzed systems for the conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals, and related “green” chemical processes.

  10. Interface magnetism of 3d transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niklasson, A. M. N.; Johansson, B.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1999-01-01

    The layered resolved magnetic spin moments of the magnetic 3d bilayer interfaces Fe/V bcc, Fe/Co bcc, Fe/Cu bcc, Co/V bcc, Co/Ni fee, Co/Cu fee, Ni/V fee, Ni/Cr fcc, Ni/Cu fee and the magnetic surfaces Fe bcc, Co bcc, Co fee, and Ni fee are calculated for the (001), (011), and (111) orientations...... by means of a first-principles Green's function method. It is shown how the magnetic profiles around the bilayer interfaces and surfaces directly can be used to predict the magnetization of more complex systems such as magnetic multilayers and clusters. Furthermore, it is shown how the magnetic interface...... moments can be estimated from data of the corresponding binary bulk alloys. The behavior of interface magnetism can thus be traced back to the understanding of magnetism in bulk alloys. [:S0163-1829(99)04005-9]....

  11. Effects of different production technologies on mechanical and metallurgical properties of precious metal denture alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Paolo; Battaglia, Eleonora; Capuzzi, Stefano; Berto, Filippo

    2017-12-01

    Precious metal alloys can be supplied in traditional plate form or innovative drop form with high degree of purity. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the influence of precious metal alloy form on metallurgical and mechanical properties of the final dental products with particular reference to metal-ceramic bond strength and casting defects. A widely used alloy for denture was selected; its nominal composition was close to 55 wt% Pd - 34 wt% Ag - 6 wt% In - 3 wt% Sn. Specimens were produced starting from the alloy in both plate and drop forms. A specific test method was developed to obtain results that could be representative of the real conditions of use. In order to achieve further information about the adhesion behaviour and resistance, the fracture surfaces of the samples were observed using `Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM)'. Moreover, material defects caused by the moulding process were studied. The form of the alloy before casting does not significantly influence the shear bond strength between the metal and the ceramic material (p-value=0,976); however, according to SEM images, products from drop form alloy show less solidification defects compared to products obtained with plate form alloy. This was attributed to the absence of polluting additives used in the production of drop form alloy. This study shows that the use of precious metal denture alloys supplied in drop form does not affect the metal-ceramic bond strength compared to alloys supplied in the traditional plate form. However, compared to the plate form, the drop form is found free of solidification defects, less expensive to produce and characterized by minor environmental impacts.

  12. Effects of thermomechanical processing on strength and toughness of iron - 12-percent-nickel - reactive metal alloys at -196 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1978-01-01

    Thermomechanical processing (TMP) was evaluated as a method of strengthening normally tough iron-12-nickel-reactive metal alloys at cryogenic temperatures. Five iron-12 nickel alloys with reactive metal additions of aluminum, niobium, titanium, vanadium, and aluminum plus niobium were investigated. Primary evaluation was based on the yield strength and fracture toughness of the thermomechanically processed alloys at -196 C.

  13. Comparison of heat treatment response of semisolid metal processed alloys A356 and F357

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moller, H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The heat treatment response of semisolid metal high pressure die cast Al-7Si-Mg alloys A356 and F357 was studied and compared. It was found that the heat treatment behaviour of alloy F357 is influenced markedly by the stability of the Mg containing...

  14. Study by positron annihilation of defects in metals, crystalline or amorphous alloys and in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moumene, M.

    1984-07-01

    In this work lifetime of positron is used to study vacancies in different systems irradiated by electrons: pure metals (Fe, Zn), diluted (FeCo, FeAu) and concentrated (Cu 3 Au) alloys, semiconductors (CdTe, ZnTe) and amorphous alloys. Results on vacancy migration temperature and of the formation of two or three-dimensional vacancy clusters are given [fr

  15. Local lattice relaxations in random metallic alloys: Effective tetrahedron model and supercell approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei; Simak, S.I.; Shallcross, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present a simple effective tetrahedron model for local lattice relaxation effects in random metallic alloys on simple primitive lattices. A comparison with direct ab initio calculations for supercells representing random Ni0.50Pt0.50 and Cu0.25Au0.75 alloys as well as the dilute limit of Au...

  16. Analysis of sulphur, phosphorus and silica in metals, alloys, inorganic compounds and solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhya, J.C.; Naik, S.S.; Khedikar, W.K.; Sudersanan, M.; Mathur, P.K

    1999-10-01

    Procedures for the analysis of sulphur, phosphorus and silica in various metals and alloys like mild steel, carbon steel and stainless steel as well as nickel base alloys are described. Procedures were also developed for the analysis of sulphur in thoria pellets and in other materials like crack check fluids, coal etc. Typical results obtained are summarised. (author)

  17. Method and Apparatus for the Detection of Hydrogen Using a Metal Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A hydrogen sensitive metal alloy contains palladium and titanium to provide a larger change in electrical resistance when exposed to the presence of hydrogen. The alloy is deposited on a substrate and a thin film and connected across electrical circuitry to provide a sensor device that can be used for improved sensitivity and accuracy of hydrogen detection.

  18. High-pressure phase transition of alkali metal-transition metal deuteride Li2PdD2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yansun; Stavrou, Elissaios; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Majumdar, Arnab; Wang, Hui; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Epshteyn, Albert; Purdy, Andrew P.

    2017-06-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of lithium palladium deuteride (Li2PdD2) subjected to pressures up to 50 GPa reveals one structural phase transition near 10 GPa, detected by synchrotron powder x-ray diffraction, and metadynamics simulations. The ambient-pressure tetragonal phase of Li2PdD2 transforms into a monoclinic C2/m phase that is distinct from all known structures of alkali metal-transition metal hydrides/deuterides. The structure of the high-pressure phase was characterized using ab initio computational techniques and from refinement of the powder x-ray diffraction data. In the high-pressure phase, the PdD2 complexes lose molecular integrity and are fused to extended [PdD2]∞ chains. The discovered phase transition and new structure are relevant to the possible hydrogen storage application of Li2PdD2 and alkali metal-transition metal hydrides in general.

  19. Protective coatings for metal alloys and methods incorporating the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Ibanez, Sergio; Swartz, Scott L.

    2015-06-09

    An electrochemical device having one or more solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), each of the SOFCs including a cathode, an anode, and an electrolyte layer positioned between the cathode and anode; and at least one additional component comprising a metallic substrate having an electronically conductive, chromium-free perovskite coating deposited directly thereon. The perovskite coating has the formula ABO.sub.3, wherein A is a lanthanide element or Y, and B is a mixture of two or more transition elements, with the A site undoped by any alkaline earth element, and the perovskite coating exhibits limited or no ionic transport of oxygen.

  20. [Non-empirical interatomic potentials for transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The report is divided into the following sections: potential-energy functions for d-band metals, potential-energy functions for aluminides and quasicrystals, electronic structure of complex structures and quasicrystals, potential-energy functions in transition-metal oxides, applications to defect structure and mechanical properties, and basic theory of interatomic potentials

  1. Catalytic olefin polymerization with early transition metal compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eshuis, Johan Jan Willem

    1991-01-01

    The catalysis of organic reactions by soluble metal complexes has become a major tool in synthesis, both in the laboratory and in the chemical industry. Processes catalyzed by transition metal complexes include carbonylation, olefin polymerization, olefin addition, olefin oxidation and alkane and

  2. Nonmetal-metal transition in metal–molten-salt solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silvestrelli, P.-L.; Alavi, A.; Parrinello, M.; Frenkel, D.

    1996-01-01

    The method of ab initio molecular dynamics, based on finite-temperature density-functional theory, is used to study the nonmetal-metal transition in two different metal–molten-salt solutions, Kx(KCl)1-x and Nax(NaBr)1-x. As the excess metal concentration is increased the electronic density becomes

  3. Ductile and brittle transition behavior of titanium alloys in ultra-precision machining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, W S; To, S

    2018-03-02

    Titanium alloys are extensively applied in biomedical industries due to their excellent material properties. However, they are recognized as difficult to cut materials due to their low thermal conductivity, which induces a complexity to their deformation mechanisms and restricts precise productions. This paper presents a new observation about the removal regime of titanium alloys. The experimental results, including the chip formation, thrust force signal and surface profile, showed that there was a critical cutting distance to achieve better surface integrity of machined surface. The machined areas with better surface roughness were located before the clear transition point, defining as the ductile to brittle transition. The machined area at the brittle region displayed the fracture deformation which showed cracks on the surface edge. The relationship between depth of cut and the ductile to brittle transaction behavior of titanium alloys in ultra-precision machining(UPM) was also revealed in this study, it showed that the ductile to brittle transaction behavior of titanium alloys occurred mainly at relatively small depth of cut. The study firstly defines the ductile to brittle transition behavior of titanium alloys in UPM, contributing the information of ductile machining as an optimal machining condition for precise productions of titanium alloys.

  4. Formation of Fe-Nb-X (X=Zr, Ti) amorphous alloys from pure metal elements by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Zhiyu [National Engineering Research Center of Near-net-shape Forming for Metallic Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Tang Cuiyong, E-mail: hnrtcy@163.com [National Engineering Research Center of Near-net-shape Forming for Metallic Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ngai, Tungwai Leo; Yang Chao; Li Yuanyuan [National Engineering Research Center of Near-net-shape Forming for Metallic Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Fe-based amorphous powders of Fe{sub 56}Nb{sub 6}Zr{sub 38} and Fe{sub 60}Nb{sub 6}Ti{sub 34} based on binary eutectic were prepared by mechanical alloying starting from mixtures of pure metal powders. The amorphization behavior and thermal stability were examined by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Results show that Fe{sub 56}Nb{sub 6}Zr{sub 38} alloy has a better glass forming ability and a relatively lower thermal stability comparing with Fe{sub 60}Nb{sub 6}Ti{sub 34} alloy. The prepared amorphous powders have homogeneous element distribution and no obvious contaminants coming from mechanical alloying. The synthesized amorphous powders offer the potential for consolidation to full density with desirable mechanical properties through the powder metallurgy methods.

  5. The efficacy of noble metal alloy urinary catheters in reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanood Ahmed Aljohi

    2016-01-01

    Results: A 90% relative risk reduction in the rate of CAUTI was observed with the noble metal alloy catheter compared to the standard catheter (10 vs. 1 cases, P = 0.006. When considering both catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria and CAUTI, the relative risk reduction was 83% (12 vs. 2 cases, P = 0.005. In addition to CAUTI, the risk of acquiring secondary bacteremia was lower (100% for the patients using noble metal alloy catheters (3 cases in the standard group vs. 0 case in the noble metal alloy catheter group, P = 0.24. No adverse events related to any of the used catheters were recorded. Conclusion: Results from this study revealed that noble metal alloy catheters are safe to use and significantly reduce CAUTI rate in ICU patients after 3 days of use.

  6. Polarographic methods for the analysis of beryllium metal and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, J.M.

    1975-10-01

    This report describes polarographic methods for the analysis of beryllium metal and its alloys. The elements covered by these methods are aluminium, bismuth, cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, lead, molybdenum, nickel, thallium, tungsten, uranium, vanadium and zinc. (author)

  7. Pumped lithium loop test to evaluate advanced refractory metal alloys and simulated nuclear fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburf, G. P.; Hoffman, E. E.; Smith, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The performance was determined of refractory metal alloys and uranium nitride fuel element specimens in flowing 1900F (1083C) lithium. The results demonstrate the suitability of the selected materials to perform satisfactorily from a chemical compatibility standpoint.

  8. Effect of Repeated Firings of Porcelain on Bond Strength of Two Base Metal Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerami Panah F

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The formation of oxides on the surface of the metal are proven to contribute to the formation of strong bonding. However, The base metal alloys are expected to exhibit more oxidation than high gold alloys, increase in oxide layer thickness due to repeated firing in them can reduce the bond strength. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of repeated porcelain firing on the bond strength of two base metal alloys (Minalux and Verabond II. Sixteen metal plates (20x5x0.5 from each alloy were cast and prepared according to the manufacturers' instruction. Porcelain with uniform thickness (Imm was applied on the middle one third of metal plates. After this stage, each alloy group divided to three subgroups. Group I was fired for the second time to form the final glaze, group II and III were fired two and four more times respectively. Specimens were subjected to 3-point flexural test in a digital tritest machine. Results showed no significant differences between bond strength of two alloys. Also results showed repeated firing had no significant effect on bond strength. Due to these findings, this study support similarity of two alloys (Minalux and Verabond II in their bond strength with porcelain.

  9. A FeNiMnC alloy with strain glass transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ma

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental and theoretical investigations suggested that doping sufficient point defects into a normal ferroelastic/martensitic alloy systems could lead to a frozen disordered state of local lattice strains (nanomartensite domains, thereby suppressing the long-range strain-ordering martensitic transition. In this study, we attempt to explore the possibility of developing novel ferrous Elinvar alloys by replacing nickel with carbon and manganese as dopant species. A nominal Fe89Ni5Mn4.6C1.4 alloy was prepared by argon arc melting, and XRD, DSC, DMA and TEM techniques were employed to characterize the strain glass transition signatures, such as invariance in average structure, frequency dispersion in dynamic mechanical properties (storage modulus and internal friction and the formation of nanosized strain domains. It is indicated that doping of Ni, Mn and C suppresses γ→α long-range strain-ordering martensitic transformation in Fe89Ni5Mn4.6C1.4 alloy, generating randomly distributed nanosized domains by strain glass transition. Keywords: Strain glass transition, Elinvar alloys, Point defects, Nanosized domains

  10. Intermartensitic transitions in Ni-Mn-Fe-Cu-Ga Heusler alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Mahmud; Gautam, Bhoj; Pathak, Arjun; Dubenko, Igor; Stadler, Shane; Ali, Naushad

    2008-01-01

    A series of Fe doped Ni 2 Mn 0.75-x Fe x Cu 0.25 Ga Heusler alloys have been investigated by means of x-ray diffraction, magnetizations, thermal expansion, and electrical resistivity measurements. In Ni 2 Mn 0.75 Cu 0.25 Ga, martensitic and ferromagnetic transitions occur at the same temperature. Partial substitution of Mn by Fe results in a decrease of the martensitic transition temperature, T M , and an increase of the ferromagnetic transition temperature, T C , resulting in separation of the two transitions. In addition to the martensitic transition, complete thermoelastic intermartensitic transformations have been observed in the Fe doped Ni 2 Mn 0.75-x Fe x Cu 0.25 Ga samples with x>0.04. An unusual transition is observed in the alloy with x = 0.04. The magnetization curve as a function of increasing temperature shows only one first-order transition in the temperature range 5-400 K, which is identified as a typical coupled magnetostructural martensitic transformation. The magnetization curve as a function of decreasing temperature shows three different transitions, which are characterized as the ferromagnetic transition, the martensitic transition and the intermartensitic transition.

  11. Reactivity of monoolefin ligand in transition metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rybinskaya, M.I.

    1978-01-01

    The main tendencies in the coordinated olefin ligand property changes are discussed in the transition metal complexes in comparison with free olefins. The review includes the papers published from 1951 up to 1976. It has been shown that in complexes with transition metal cations olefin π-base acquires the ability to react with nucleophylic reagents. Olefin π-acids in complexes with zero valent metals are easily subjected to electrophylic reagent action. At coordination with transition metal cations the olefin properties are generally preserved, while in the zero-valent metal complexes the nonsaturated ligand acquires the properties of a saturated compounds. The ability of transition metal cations in complexes to intensify reactions of nucleophylic bimolecular substitution of vinyl halogen is clearly detected in contrast to the zero valent metal complexes. It has been shown that investigations of the coordinated olefin ligand reactivity give large possibilities in the further development of the organic synthesis. Some reactions are taken as the basis of important industrial processes

  12. Processing of Zn-3Mg alloy by equal channel angular pressing for biodegradable metal implants

    OpenAIRE

    Murtala Sule Dambatta; Sudin Izman; Denni Kurniawan; Hendra Hermawan

    2017-01-01

    Zn-based alloys have been studied as new biodegradable metals owing to its slower corrosion rate compared to Mg-based alloys and its high potential for mechanical properties improvement. The present work attempts to improve mainly the mechanical properties of a eutectic Zn-3Mg alloy via equal channels angular pressing (ECAP). Cast Zn-3Mg alloy was homogenized at 370 °C for 15 h and quenched in water before subjected to 2 steps ECAP process. Results showed that the process decreases the alloy’...

  13. Understanding the resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power of disordered metals and alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Jean-Georges

    2008-03-19

    We recall definitions of the electronic transport properties, direct coefficients like electrical and thermal transport conductivities and crossed thermoelectric coefficients like the Seebeck, Peltier and Thomson coefficients. We discuss the links between the different electronic transport coefficients and the experimental problems in measuring these properties in liquid metals. The electronic transport properties are interpreted in terms of the scattering of electrons by 'pseudo-atoms'. The absolute thermoelectric power (ATP), thermopower or Seebeck coefficient is known as the derivative of the electrical resistivity versus energy. The key is to understand the concept of resistivity versus energy. We show that the resistivity follows approximately a 1/E curve. The structure factor modulates this curve and, for a Fermi energy corresponding to noble and divalent metals, induces a positive thermopower when the free electron theory predicts a negative one. A second modulation is introduced by the pseudopotential squared form factor or equivalently by the squared t matrix of the scattering potential. This term sometimes introduces an anti-resonance (divalent metals) which lowers the resistivity, and sometimes a resonance having an important effect on the transition metals. Following the position of the Fermi energy, the thermopower can be positive or negative. For heavy semi-metals, the density of states splits into an s and a p band, themselves different from a free electron E(0.5) curve. The electrons available to be scattered enter the Ziman formula. Thus if the density of states is not a free electron one, a third modulation of the [Formula: see text] curve is needed, which also can change the sign of the thermopower. For alloys, different contributions weighted by the concentrations are needed to explain the concentration dependent resistivity or thermopower. The formalism is the same for amorphous metals. It is possible that this mechanism can be extended to high

  14. Understanding the resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power of disordered metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasser, Jean-Georges

    2008-01-01

    We recall definitions of the electronic transport properties, direct coefficients like electrical and thermal transport conductivities and crossed thermoelectric coefficients like the Seebeck, Peltier and Thomson coefficients. We discuss the links between the different electronic transport coefficients and the experimental problems in measuring these properties in liquid metals. The electronic transport properties are interpreted in terms of the scattering of electrons by 'pseudo-atoms'. The absolute thermoelectric power (ATP), thermopower or Seebeck coefficient is known as the derivative of the electrical resistivity versus energy. The key is to understand the concept of resistivity versus energy. We show that the resistivity follows approximately a 1/E curve. The structure factor modulates this curve and, for a Fermi energy corresponding to noble and divalent metals, induces a positive thermopower when the free electron theory predicts a negative one. A second modulation is introduced by the pseudopotential squared form factor or equivalently by the squared t matrix of the scattering potential. This term sometimes introduces an anti-resonance (divalent metals) which lowers the resistivity, and sometimes a resonance having an important effect on the transition metals. Following the position of the Fermi energy, the thermopower can be positive or negative. For heavy semi-metals, the density of states splits into an s and a p band, themselves different from a free electron E 0.5 curve. The electrons available to be scattered enter the Ziman formula. Thus if the density of states is not a free electron one, a third modulation of the ρ ≅ 1/E curve is needed, which also can change the sign of the thermopower. For alloys, different contributions weighted by the concentrations are needed to explain the concentration dependent resistivity or thermopower. The formalism is the same for amorphous metals. It is possible that this mechanism can be extended to high

  15. Review of alkali metal and refractory alloy compatibility for Rankine cycle applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiStefano, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The principal corrosion mechanisms in refractory metal-alkali systems are dissolution, mass transfer, and impurity reactions. In general, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten have low solubilities in the alkali metals, even to very high temperatures, and static corrosion studies have verified that the systems are basically compatible. Loop studies with niobium and tantalum based alloys do not indicate any serious problems due to temperature gradient mass transfer. Above 1000 K, dissimilar metal mass transfer is noted between the refractory metals and iron or nickel based alloys. The most serious corrosion problems encountered are related to impurity reactions associated with oxygen

  16. Effects of metal primers on the bonding of an adhesive resin cement to noble metal ceramic alloys after thermal cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hiroyuki; Murahara, Sadaaki; Suzuki, Shiro; Tanaka, Takuo

    2011-12-01

    Although the effectiveness of primers for resin bonding to noble alloys has been demonstrated, no effective clinical technique for bonding to noble metal ceramic alloys has been established. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of metal primers on the shear bond strength of an adhesive resin to noble metal ceramic alloys after thermal cycling. Sixty-three disk-shaped specimens (10 × 2.5 mm) were cast from high-gold-content alloys (Super Metal W-85: W85 or IFK88 GR: IFK88), a high-palladium-content alloy (Super Metal N-40: N40), and an Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy (Castwell M.C.12: MC12). Smaller-sized disk-shaped specimens (8 × 2.5 mm) were fabricated with MC12. Bonding surfaces were finished with 600-grit SiC-paper and airborne-particle abraded with 50-μm alumina. Pairs of disks were primed (V-Primer: VP; ML Primer: ML; or Metaltite: MT) and bonded with an adhesive resin (Super-Bond C&B). The bond strengths were determined before and after 20,000 and 50,000 thermal cycles (n=7). Data were analyzed by using a 3-way ANOVA and the Bonferroni test (α=.05). Failure modes were determined by optical microscope and SEM observation. Bond strengths to high-gold-content alloys with VP and MT significantly decreased after the thermal cycling (Palloys were not degraded up to 50,000 thermal cycles when primed with ML. None of the primers evaluated was effective for high-palladium-content alloy. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Phase transition of Ni43Mn41Co5Sn11 Heusler alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwindari, N.; Kurniawan, C.; Manaf, A.

    2017-07-01

    In the recent years, Heusler alloy has been extensively studied. Among various the Heusler alloys, Ni-Mn-Sn has gained considerable interest due to their multifunctional properties like magnetoresistance, shape memory effect and magnetocaloric effect associated with a first order phase transition martensite to austenite. In this paper, we report the magneto-structural phase transitions under varying temperature of Ni43Mn41Co5Sn11 synthesized through vacuum arc-melting process. The magnetization of the sample was obtained after annealing process at 1173 K for 12 hours. It was evaluated by magnetic measurement using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM250) up to a field of 21 kOe. The magnetic isotherm (M-H curves) shows the vicinity of the structural phase transition point. Magnetic saturation (Ms) of the NMCS alloy decreased and ferromagnetic transition shift towards higher temperature from 297-372 K. It might occur due to the alignment of the atomic magnetic moments depends on temperature. We discussed also the context of structural disorder and the ferromagnetic correlations in this study. The structural disorder of these alloys will explain the magnetic transition and the entropy change related magnetic properties.

  18. Comparative study of ceramometal tensile bonding strength in two base metal alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comparative study of ceramometal tensile bonding strength in two base metal alloys

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: One of the greatest problems in metal –ceramic restorations is debonding of porcelain from dental alloys. Production of dental alloys by Iranian companies necessitates the evaluation of physical and handling properties of these products. Purpose: In this study the bond strength between porcelain and two types of base metal alloys, Supercast (with beryllium and Minalux (without beryllium was investigated. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study 10 cylindric bars from each base metal alloy were prepared. The bars were degassed and porcelain was applied around them in a disc form (8 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness. The bond strength of porcelain to metal bars was tested with the shear strength test by Instron. Data were analyzed with student t-test and P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Results: The mean failure load was 71.58±6.4 KgF for Supercast and 67.34±5.48 for Minalux alloy. The bond strength of Supercast and Minalux were 55.85±4.99 MPa and 52.54±4.27 MPa respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P0.001. Conclusions: This study showed that nickel-chromium-beryllium alloy (Supercast produced significantly better ceramometal bonding than nickel chromium alloy without beryllium (Minalux.

  19. Flexible metallic seal for transition duct in turbine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, James Scott; LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; McMahan, Kevin Weston; Dillard, Daniel Jackson; Pentecost, Ronnie Ray

    2014-04-22

    A turbine system is disclosed. In one embodiment, the turbine system includes a transition duct. The transition duct includes an inlet, an outlet, and a passage extending between the inlet and the outlet and defining a longitudinal axis, a radial axis, and a tangential axis. The outlet of the transition duct is offset from the inlet along the longitudinal axis and the tangential axis. The transition duct further includes an interface member for interfacing with a turbine section. The turbine system further includes a flexible metallic seal contacting the interface member to provide a seal between the interface member and the turbine section.

  20. Ultrasonic characterization of microstructure in powder metal alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittmann, B. R.; Ahlberg, L. A.; Fertig, K.

    1986-01-01

    The ultrasonic wave propagation characteristics were measured for IN-100, a powder metallurgy alloy used for aircraft engine components. This material was as a model system for testing the feasibility of characterizing the microstructure of a variety of inhomogeneous media including powder metals, ceramics, castings and components. The data were obtained for a frequency range from about 2 to 20 MHz and were statistically averaged over numerous volume elements of the samples. Micrographical examination provided size and number distributions for grain and pore structure. The results showed that the predominant source for the ultrasonic attenuation and backscatter was a dense (approx. 100/cubic mm) distribution of small micropores (approx. 10 micron radius). Two samples with different micropore densities were studied in detail to test the feasibility of calculating from observed microstructural parameters the frequency dependence of the microstructural backscatter in the regime for which the wavelength is much larger than the size of the individual scattering centers. Excellent agreement was found between predicted and observed values so as to demonstrate the feasibility of solving the forward problem. The results suggest a way towards the nondestructive detection and characterization of anomalous distributions of micropores when conventional ultrasonic imaging is difficult. The findings are potentially significant toward the application of the early detection of porosity during the materials fabrication process and after manufacturing of potential sites for stress induced void coalescence leading to crack initiation and subsequent failure.

  1. Corrosion resistance of metals and alloys in molten alkalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarubitskij, O.G.; Dmitruk, B.F.; Minets, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    Literature data on the corrosion of non-ferrous and noble metals, iron and steels in the molten alkalis and mixtures of their base are presented. It is shown that zirconium, niobium and tantalum are characterized by high corrosion stability in the molten NaOH. Additions of NaOH and KOH to the alkali chloride melts result in a 1000 time decrease of zirconium corrosion rate at 850 deg. The data testify to the characteristic passivating properties of OH - ions; Mo and W do not possess an ability to selfpassivation in hydroxide melts. Corrosion resistance of carbon and chromium-nickel steels in hydroxide melts depends considerably on the temperature, electrolyte composition and atmosphere over them. At the temperatures up to 600 deg C chromium-nickel steel is corrosion resistant in the molten alkali only in the inert atmosphere. Corrosion rate of chromium-nickel alloy is the lower the less chromium and the more nickel it contains. For the small installations the 4Kh18N25S2 and Kh23N28M3D3T steels can be recommended

  2. Computing elastic anisotropy to discover gum-metal-like structural alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, I. S.; de Jong, M.; Asta, M.; Chrzan, D. C.

    2017-08-01

    The computer aided discovery of structural alloys is a burgeoning but still challenging area of research. A primary challenge in the field is to identify computable screening parameters that embody key structural alloy properties. Here, an elastic anisotropy parameter that captures a material's susceptibility to solute solution strengthening is identified. The parameter has many applications in the discovery and optimization of structural materials. As a first example, the parameter is used to identify alloys that might display the super elasticity, super strength, and high ductility of the class of TiNb alloys known as gum metals. In addition, it is noted that the parameter can be used to screen candidate alloys for shape memory response, and potentially aid in the optimization of the mechanical properties of high-entropy alloys.

  3. Advanced Testing Techniques to Measure the PWSCC Resistance of Alloy 690 and its Weld Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.Andreson

    2004-10-01

    Wrought Alloy 600 and its weld metals (Alloy 182 and Alloy 82) were originally used in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) due to the material's inherent resistance to general corrosion in a number of aggressive environments and because of a coefficient of thermal expansion that is very close to that of low alloy and carbon steel. Over the last thirty years, stress corrosion cracking in PWR primary water (PWSCC) has been observed in numerous Alloy 600 component items and associated welds, sometimes after relatively long incubation times. The occurrence of PWSCC has been responsible for significant downtime and replacement power costs. As part of an ongoing, comprehensive program involving utilities, reactor vendors and engineering/research organizations, this report will help to ensure that corrosion degradation of nickel-base alloys does not limit service life and that full benefit can be obtained from improved designs for both replacement components and new reactors.

  4. Development of high-capacity nickel-metal hydride batteries using superlattice hydrogen-absorbing alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuoka, Shigekazu; Magari, Yoshifumi; Murata, Tetsuyuki; Tanaka, Tadayoshi; Ishida, Jun; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Nohma, Toshiyuki; Kihara, Masaru; Baba, Yoshitaka; Teraoka, Hirohito

    2006-01-01

    New R-Mg-Ni (R: rare earths) superlattice alloys with higher-capacity and higher-durability than the conventional Mm-Ni alloys with CaCu 5 structure have been developed. The oxidation resistibility of the superlattice alloys has been improved by optimizing the alloy composition by such as substituting aluminum for nickel and optimizing the magnesium content in order to prolong the battery life. High-capacity nickel-metal hydride batteries for the retail market, the Ni-MH2500/900 series (AA size type 2500mAh, AAA size type 900mAh), have been developed and commercialized by using an improved superlattice alloy for negative electrode material. alized by using an improved superlattice alloy for negative electrode material. (author)

  5. Development of high-capacity nickel-metal hydride batteries using superlattice hydrogen-absorbing alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuoka, Shigekazu; Magari, Yoshifumi; Murata, Tetsuyuki; Tanaka, Tadayoshi; Ishida, Jun; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Nohma, Toshiyuki [Mobile Energy Company, Sanyo Electric Co. Ltd., 7-3-2, Ibukidai-higashimachi Nishi-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 651-2242 (Japan); Kihara, Masaru; Baba, Yoshitaka; Teraoka, Hirohito [Sanyo Energy Twicell Co. Ltd., 307-2 Koyagimachi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-0071 (Japan)

    2006-06-01

    New R-Mg-Ni (R: rare earths) superlattice alloys with higher-capacity and higher-durability than the conventional Mm-Ni alloys with CaCu{sub 5} structure have been developed. The oxidation resistibility of the superlattice alloys has been improved by optimizing the alloy composition by such as substituting aluminum for nickel and optimizing the magnesium content in order to prolong the battery life. High-capacity nickel-metal hydride batteries for the retail market, the Ni-MH2500/900 series (AA size type 2500mAh, AAA size type 900mAh), have been developed and commercialized by using an improved superlattice alloy for negative electrode material. alized by using an improved superlattice alloy for negative electrode material. (author)

  6. [Transition metal mediated transformations of small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, A.

    1992-01-01

    Work on organotransition metal chemistry, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis is summarized. Several cationic palladium(II) complexes with bulky phosphine or pyridine ligands were discovered that are highly selective catalysts for linear dimerization of vinyl monomers and linear polymerization of p-divinylbenzene, the reactions proceeding through a carbocationic mechanism. Our studies were continued on alternating olefin-carbon monoxide copolymers. The copolymerization reaction and reactivity of copolymers were examined. New catalytic systems for alternating copolymerization of [alpha]-olefins with CO were discovered. In the case of styrene derivatives, tactic copolymers were obtained. Poly(ethylenepyrrolediyl) derivatives were synthesized from alternating ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymer and become electronic conductors when doped with iodine. A catalytic system for direct synthesis of polyureas and polyoxamides from and diamines was also discovered. Pt metal catalyzed the oxidation of ethers, esters, and amines to carboxylic acids and the oxidation of olefins to 1,2-diols. Anaerobic and aerobic decomposition of molybdenum(VI)-oxoalkyl compounds were studied for heterogeneous oxidation of alkanes and olefins on Mo(VI)-oxide surfaces. Synthesis of polymer-trapped metal, metal oxide, and metal sulfide nanoclusters (size <1--10 nm) was studied.

  7. Transition-metal-free chemo- and regioselective vinylation of azaallyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minyan; Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Berritt, Simon; Pascual-Escudero, Ana; Yeşilçimen, Ahmet; Yang, Xiaodong; Adrio, Javier; Huang, Georgia; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Kozlowski, Marisa C.; Walsh, Patrick J.

    2017-10-01

    Direct C(sp3)-C(sp2) bond formation under transition-metal-free conditions offers an atom-economical, inexpensive and environmentally benign alternative to traditional transition-metal-catalysed cross-coupling reactions. A new chemo- and regioselective coupling protocol between 3-aryl-substituted-1,1-diphenyl-2-azaallyl derivatives and vinyl bromides has been developed. This is the first transition-metal-free cross-coupling of azaallyls with vinyl bromide electrophiles and delivers allylic amines in excellent yields (up to 99%). This relatively simple and mild protocol offers a direct and practical strategy for the synthesis of high-value allylic amine building blocks that does not require the use of transition metals, special initiators or photoredox catalysts. Radical clock experiments, electron paramagnetic resonance studies and density functional theory calculations point to an unprecedented substrate-dependent coupling mechanism. Furthermore, an electron paramagnetic resonance signal was observed when the N-benzyl benzophenone ketimine was subjected to silylamide base, supporting the formation of radical species upon deprotonation. The unique mechanisms outlined herein could pave the way for new approaches to transition-metal-free C-C bond formations.

  8. Harnessing the metal-insulator transition for tunable metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charipar, Nicholas A.; Charipar, Kristin M.; Kim, Heungsoo; Bingham, Nicholas S.; Suess, Ryan J.; Mathews, Scott A.; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Piqué, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    The control of light-matter interaction through the use of subwavelength structures known as metamaterials has facilitated the ability to control electromagnetic radiation in ways not previously achievable. A plethora of passive metamaterials as well as examples of active or tunable metamaterials have been realized in recent years. However, the development of tunable metamaterials is still met with challenges due to lack of materials choices. To this end, materials that exhibit a metal-insulator transition are being explored as the active element for future metamaterials because of their characteristic abrupt change in electrical conductivity across their phase transition. The fast switching times (▵t properties associated with thin film metal-insulator transition materials are strongly dependent on the growth conditions. For this work, we have studied how growth conditions (such as gas partial pressure) influence the metalinsulator transition in VO2 thin films made by pulsed laser deposition. In addition, strain engineering during the growth process has been investigated as a method to tune the metal-insulator transition temperature. Examples of both the optical and electrical transient dynamics facilitating the metal-insulator transition will be presented together with specific examples of thin film metamaterial devices.

  9. Noble metal alloy clusters in the gas phase derived from protein templates: unusual recognition of palladium by gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksi, Ananya; Pradeep, T.

    2013-11-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of a mixture of gold and palladium adducts of the protein lysozyme (Lyz) produces naked alloy clusters of the type Au24Pd+ in the gas phase. While a lysozyme-Au adduct forms Au18+, Au25+, Au38+ and Au102+ ions in the gas phase, lysozyme-Pd alone does not form any analogous cluster. Addition of various transition metal ions (Ag+, Pt2+, Pd2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Ni2+ and Cr3+) in the adducts contributes to drastic changes in the mass spectrum, but only palladium forms alloys in the gas phase. Besides alloy formation, palladium enhances the formation of specific single component clusters such as Au38+. While other metal ions like Cu2+ help forming Au25+ selectively, Fe2+ catalyzes the formation of Au25+ over all other clusters. Gas phase cluster formation occurs from protein adducts where Au is in the 1+ state while Pd is in the 2+ state. The creation of alloys in the gas phase is not affected whether a physical mixture of Au and Pd adducts or a Au and Pd co-adduct is used as the precursor. The formation of Au cores and AuPd alloy cores of the kind comparable to monolayer protected clusters implies that naked clusters themselves may be nucleated in solution.Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization of a mixture of gold and palladium adducts of the protein lysozyme (Lyz) produces naked alloy clusters of the type Au24Pd+ in the gas phase. While a lysozyme-Au adduct forms Au18+, Au25+, Au38+ and Au102+ ions in the gas phase, lysozyme-Pd alone does not form any analogous cluster. Addition of various transition metal ions (Ag+, Pt2+, Pd2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Ni2+ and Cr3+) in the adducts contributes to drastic changes in the mass spectrum, but only palladium forms alloys in the gas phase. Besides alloy formation, palladium enhances the formation of specific single component clusters such as Au38+. While other metal ions like Cu2+ help forming Au25+ selectively, Fe2+ catalyzes the formation of Au25+ over all other clusters. Gas phase cluster

  10. Stable isotopes of transition and post-transition metals as tracers in environmental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, Tomas D.; Baskaran, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The transition and post-transition metals, which include the elements in Groups 3–12 of the Periodic Table, have a broad range of geological and biological roles as well as industrial applications and thus are widespread in the environment. Interdisciplinary research over the past decade has resulted in a broad understanding of the isotope systematics of this important group of elements and revealed largely unexpected variability in isotope composition for natural materials. Significant kinetic and equilibrium isotope fractionation has been observed for redox sensitive metals such as iron, chromium, copper, molybdenum and mercury, and for metals that are not redox sensitive in nature such as cadmium and zinc. In the environmental sciences, the isotopes are increasingly being used to understand important issues such as tracing of metal contaminant sources and fates, unraveling metal redox cycles, deciphering metal nutrient pathways and cycles, and developing isotope biosignatures that can indicate the role of biological activity in ancient and modern planetary systems.

  11. Phase transitions and thermal expansion in Ni51- x Mn36 + x Sn13 alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaletina, Yu. V.; Gerasimov, E. G.; Kazantsev, V. A.; Kaletin, A. Yu.

    2017-10-01

    Thermal expansion and structural and magnetic phase transitions in alloys of the Ni-Mn-Sn system have been investigated. The spontaneous martensitic transformation in Ni51-xMn36 + xSn13 (0 ≤ x ≤ 3) alloys is found to be accompanied by high jumps in the temperature dependences of the linear thermal expansion. The relative change in the linear sizes of these alloys at the martensitic transformation is 1.5 × 10-3. There are no anomalies in the magnetic-ordering temperature range in the temperature dependences of the coefficient of linear thermal expansion. The differences in the behavior of linear thermal expansion at the martensitic transformation in Ni51-xMn36 + xSn13 (0 ≤ x ≤ 3) and Ni47Mn40Sn13( x = 4) alloys have been established.

  12. NF ISO 10270. Corrosion of metals and alloys. Aqueous corrosion tests of zirconium alloys used in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    This international standard prescribes the determination of the mass gain and the superficial control of zirconium and zirconium alloy products after a corrosion test performed in water at 360 deg. C and in steam at 400 deg. C or more. A pressure of 10.3 MPa (1500 psi) is applied during the tests performed in vapor. This standard applies to welded and molded products, to powder metallurgy products and to filler metals for welding application. The method has been widely used in the development of new alloys and new techniques of thermal treatment and in the evaluation of welding techniques. (J.S.)

  13. DKG statement on the use of metal alloy discs for patch testing in suspected intolerance to metal implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Peter; Geier, Johannes; Dickel, Heinrich; Diepgen, Thomas; Hillen, Uwe; Kreft, Burkhard; Schnuch, Axel; Szliska, Christiane; Mahler, Vera

    2015-10-01

    Intolerance reactions to metal implants may be caused by metal allergy. However, prior to implantation, 'prophetic'/prophylactic patch testing should not be performed. Pre-implant patch testing should only be done to verify or exclude metal allergy in patients with a corresponding history. In case of implant-related complications - in particular following replacement arthroplasty - such as pain, effusion, skin lesions, reduced range of motion or implant loosening, orthopedic causes should be ruled out first. Workup of suspected metal implant allergy should then be done using the DKG standard series, which includes nickel, cobalt, and chromium preparations. Various studies assessing the usefulness of metal alloy discs for patch testing have shown this particular approach to be ineffective with respect to providing reliable information on metal allergy. Any positive reaction in such tests cannot be assigned to a specific metal contained within the alloy. Furthermore, there is a risk of broad and indiscriminate use of these readily available discs. Accordingly, given the lack of additional benefit compared to patch testing with standardized metal salt preparations, we do not recommend patch testing with metal alloy discs. © 2015 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Outstanding resistance and passivation behaviour of new Fe-Co metal-metal glassy alloys in alkaline media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijah M Emran

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behavior of the oxide layers on two metal-metal glassy alloys, Fe78Co9Cr10Mo2Al1 (VX9and Fe49Co49V2 (VX50 (at.%, were studied using electrochemical techniques including electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and cyclic polarization (CP measurements. The morphology and composition of the alloy surfaces were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The corrosion rate and surface roughness of both alloys increased as the concentration of NaOH in aqueous solution was raised. The presence of some protective elements in the composition of the alloys led to the formation of a spontaneous passive layer on the alloy surface. The higher resistance values of both alloys were associated with the magnitude of the dielectric properties of the passive films formed on their surfaces. Both alloys are classified as having outstanding resistance to corrosion, which results from the formation of a passive film that acts as an efficient barrier to corrosion in alkaline solution.

  15. Outstanding resistance and passivation behaviour of new Fe-Co metal-metal glassy alloys in alkaline media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emran, Khadijah M; Al-Harbi, Albandaree K

    2018-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of the oxide layers on two metal-metal glassy alloys, Fe78Co9Cr10Mo2Al1 (VX9)and Fe49Co49V2 (VX50) (at.%), were studied using electrochemical techniques including electrochemical frequency modulation (EFM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic polarization (CP) measurements. The morphology and composition of the alloy surfaces were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The corrosion rate and surface roughness of both alloys increased as the concentration of NaOH in aqueous solution was raised. The presence of some protective elements in the composition of the alloys led to the formation of a spontaneous passive layer on the alloy surface. The higher resistance values of both alloys were associated with the magnitude of the dielectric properties of the passive films formed on their surfaces. Both alloys are classified as having outstanding resistance to corrosion, which results from the formation of a passive film that acts as an efficient barrier to corrosion in alkaline solution.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Microstructure and Phase Transitions in Ag-Cu-Zn Brazing Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijević, Stevan P.; Manasijević, Dragan; Kamberović, Željko; Dimitrijević, Silvana B.; Mitrić, Miodrag; Gorgievski, Milan; Mladenović, Srba

    2018-03-01

    Microstructure and phase transitions of selected brazing alloys from the Ag-Cu-Zn ternary system were investigated. Four ternary alloys with silver content in the compositional range from 25 to 60 wt.% were studied using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with the energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). Phase transitions of the investigated alloys were measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Experimentally obtained results were compared with the results of a thermodynamic calculation of the phase equilibria according to the CALPHAD method. The experiments confirmed the optimized thermodynamic parameters for the calculations from the thermodynamic assessment in literature. Phase compositions, liquidus and solidus temperatures were confirmed by the EDS and DTA methods. Additionally, the calculated solidification paths and predicted phase transformations were in agreement with the SEM images.

  17. Nanodisperse transition metal electrodes (NTME) for electrochemical cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; Wen, Shi-Jie

    1998-12-01

    Disclosed are transition metal electrodes for electrochemical cells using gel-state and solid-state polymers. The electrodes are suitable for use in primary and secondary cells. The electrodes (either negative electrode or positive electrode) are characterized by uniform dispersion of the transition metal at the nanoscale in the polymer. The transition metal moiety is structurally amorphous, so no capacity fade should occur due to lattice expansion/contraction mechanisms. The small grain size, amorphous structure and homogeneous distribution provide improved charge/discharge cycling performance, and a higher initial discharge rate capability. The cells can be cycled at high current densities, limited only by the electrolyte conductivity. A method of making the electrodes (positive and negative), and their usage in electrochemical cells are disclosed.

  18. Unusual metal-insulator transition in disordered ferromagnetic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muttalib, K.A.; Wölfle, P.; Misra, R.; Hebard, A.F.

    2012-01-01

    We present a theoretical interpretation of recent data on the conductance near and farther away from the metal-insulator transition in thin ferromagnetic Gd films of thickness b≈2-10 nm. For increasing sheet resistances a dimensional crossover takes place from d=2 to d=3 dimensions, since the large phase relaxation rate caused by scattering of quasiparticles off spin wave excitations renders the dephasing length L φ ≲b at strong disorder. The conductivity data in the various regimes obey fractional power-law or logarithmic temperature dependence. One observes weak localization and interaction induced corrections at weaker disorder. At strong disorder, near the metal-insulator transition, the data show scaling and collapse onto two scaling curves for the metallic and insulating regimes. We interpret this unusual behavior as proof of two distinctly different correlation length exponents on both sides of the transition.

  19. Covalency, Excitons, Double Counting and the Metal-Insulator Transition in Transition Metal Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin

    2012-02-01

    We present single-site dynamical mean-field studies of realistic models of transition metal oxides, including the cuprate superconductors and rare earth nickelates (in bulk and superlattice form). We include orbital multiplet effects and hybridization to ligands. We explicitly calculate the d-d exciton spectra for cuprates, finding sharp exciton lines in both metallic and insulating phases, which should be visible in experiments. We also find that the additional d3z^2-r^2 orbital does not contribute to an additional Fermi surface at any reasonable doping, in contradiction to previous slave-boson studies. The hybridization to ligands is shown to have crucial effects, for example suppressing the ferro-orbital order previously found in Hubbard model studies of nickelates. Hybridization to ligands is shown to be most naturally parametrized by the d-orbital occupancy. For cuprates and nickelates, insulating behavior is found to be present only for a very narrow range of d-occupancy, irrespective of the Coulomb repulsion. The d-occupancy predicted by standard band calculations is found to be very far from the values required to obtain an insulating phase, calling into question the interpretation of these materials as charge transfer insulators. [4pt] This work is done in collaboration with A.J. Millis, M.J. Han, C.A. Marianetti, L. de' Medici, and H.T. Dang, and is supported by NSF-DMR-1006282, the Army Office of Scientific Research, and the Condensed Matter Theory Center and CNAM at University of Maryland. [4pt] [1] X. Wang, H. T. Dang, and A. J. Millis, Phys. Rev. B 84, 014530 (2011).[0pt] [2] X. Wang, M. J. Han, L. de' Medici, C. A. Marianetti, and A. J. Millis, arXiv:1110.2782.[0pt] [3] M. J. Han, X. Wang, C. A. Marianetti, and A. J. Millis, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 206804 (2011).

  20. Metal-Insulator Transition Driven by Vacancy Ordering in GeSbTe Phase Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragaglia, Valeria; Arciprete, Fabrizio; Zhang, Wei; Mio, Antonio Massimiliano; Zallo, Eugenio; Perumal, Karthick; Giussani, Alessandro; Cecchi, Stefano; Boschker, Jos Emiel; Riechert, Henning; Privitera, Stefania; Rimini, Emanuele; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Calarco, Raffaella

    2016-04-01

    Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are unique compounds employed in non-volatile random access memory thanks to the rapid and reversible transformation between the amorphous and crystalline state that display large differences in electrical and optical properties. In addition to the amorphous-to-crystalline transition, experimental results on polycrystalline GeSbTe alloys (GST) films evidenced a Metal-Insulator Transition (MIT) attributed to disorder in the crystalline phase. Here we report on a fundamental advance in the fabrication of GST with out-of-plane stacking of ordered vacancy layers by means of three distinct methods: Molecular Beam Epitaxy, thermal annealing and application of femtosecond laser pulses. We assess the degree of vacancy ordering and explicitly correlate it with the MIT. We further tune the ordering in a controlled fashion attaining a large range of resistivity. Employing ordered GST might allow the realization of cells with larger programming windows.

  1. Metal - Insulator Transition Driven by Vacancy Ordering in GeSbTe Phase Change Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragaglia, Valeria; Arciprete, Fabrizio; Zhang, Wei; Mio, Antonio Massimiliano; Zallo, Eugenio; Perumal, Karthick; Giussani, Alessandro; Cecchi, Stefano; Boschker, Jos Emiel; Riechert, Henning; Privitera, Stefania; Rimini, Emanuele; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Calarco, Raffaella

    2016-04-01

    Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are unique compounds employed in non-volatile random access memory thanks to the rapid and reversible transformation between the amorphous and crystalline state that display large differences in electrical and optical properties. In addition to the amorphous-to-crystalline transition, experimental results on polycrystalline GeSbTe alloys (GST) films evidenced a Metal-Insulator Transition (MIT) attributed to disorder in the crystalline phase. Here we report on a fundamental advance in the fabrication of GST with out-of-plane stacking of ordered vacancy layers by means of three distinct methods: Molecular Beam Epitaxy, thermal annealing and application of femtosecond laser pulses. We assess the degree of vacancy ordering and explicitly correlate it with the MIT. We further tune the ordering in a controlled fashion attaining a large range of resistivity. Employing ordered GST might allow the realization of cells with larger programming windows.

  2. The nonmetal-metal transition in solutions of metals in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, M.P.

    1997-04-01

    Solutions of metals in molten salts present a rich phenomenology: localization of electrons in disordered ionic media, activated electron transport increasing with metal concentration towards a nonmetal-metal (NM-M) transition, and liquid-liquid phase separation. A brief review of progress in the study of these systems is given in this article, with main focus on the NM-M transition. After recalling the known NM-M behaviour of the component elements in the case of expanded fluid alkali metals and mercury and of solid halogens under pressure, the article focuses on liquid metal - molten salt solutions and traces the different NM-M behaviours of the alkalis in their halides and of metals added to polyvalent metal halides. (author). 51 refs, 2 figs

  3. Development of dissimilar metal transition joint by hot bond rolling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurokawa, Hiroyuki; Nakasuji, Kazuyuki; Kajimura, Haruhiko; Nagai, Takayuki; Takeda, Seiichiro.

    1997-01-01

    Metallurgically bonded transition joints which enable to connect reprocessing equipments made of superior corrosion resistant valve metals (Ti-5Ta, Zr or Ti) to stainless steel piping are required for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The authors have developed dissimilar transition joints made of stainless steel and Ti-5Ta, Zr or Ti with an insert metal of Ta by the hot bond rolling process of clad bars and clad pipes, using a newly developed mill called 'rotary reduction mill'. This report presents the manufacturing process of dissimilar transition joints produced from the clad pipe with three layers by the hot bond rolling. First, the method of hot bond rolling of clad pipe is proposed. Then, the mechanical and corrosion properties of the dissimilar transition joints are evaluated in detail by carrying out various tests. Finally, the rolling properties in the clad pipe method are discussed. (author)

  4. Utilization of Electrolyte Solution in Nanotube Formation on Ti-6Al-4V Metal Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlena

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Formation of nanotube morphology on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V metal did not occur homogeneously, so when it was coated with hydroxyapatite, it did not merge well. One of the factor that affected the inhomogeneously formed nanotube was the utilization of electrolyte solution. The research has been done to observe the effect of electrolyte solution in the formation of nanotube morphology on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V metal alloy. Electrolyte solution that was used was ethylene glycol, HF, and NH4F with time variation of an hour, 2 hour, and 3 hour. Formation of nanotube morphology on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V metal alloy was done using anodization process. The result showed that in HF electrolyte solution which was anodized for an hour ɑ and β phase that composed Ti-6Al-4V metal alloy was formed, meanwhile when using electrolyte solution of ethylene glycol + NH4F for 2 hours showed that there were pores that opened on Ti-6Al-4V metal alloy surface. Nanotube morphology on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V metal alloy was formed using electrolyte solution of ethylene glycol + NH4F which was anodized for 3 hours.

  5. Biologically activated noble metal alloys at the nanoscale: for lithium ion battery anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, Youjin; Oh, Dahyun; Chen, Tiffany; Ceder, Gerbrand; Belcher, Angela M

    2010-07-14

    We report the synthesis and electrochemical activity of gold and silver noble metals and their alloy nanowires using multiple virus clones as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. Using two clones, one for specificity (p8#9 virus) and one versatility (E4 virus), noble metal nanowires of high-aspect ratio with diameters below 50 nm were successfully synthesized with control over particle sizes, morphologies, and compositions. The biologically derived noble metal alloy nanowires showed electrochemical activities toward lithium even when the electrodes were prepared from bulk powder forms. The improvement in capacity retention was accomplished by alloy formation and surface stabilization. Although the cost of noble metals renders them a less ideal choice for lithium ion batteries, these noble metal/alloy nanowires serve as great model systems to study electrochemically induced transformation at the nanoscale. Given the demonstration of the electrochemical activity of noble metal alloy nanowires with various compositions, the M13 biological toolkit extended its utility for the study on the basic electrochemical property of materials.

  6. Direct NO decomposition over stepped transition-metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falsig, Hanne; Bligaard, Thomas; Christensen, Claus H.

    2007-01-01

    We establish the full potential energy diagram for the direct NO decomposition reaction over stepped transition-metal surfaces by combining a database of adsorption energies on stepped metal surfaces with known Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations for the activation barriers of dissociation...... of diatomic molecules over stepped transition- and noble-metal surfaces. The potential energy diagram directly points to why Pd and Pt are the best direct NO decomposition catalysts among the 3d, 4d, and 5d metals. We analyze the NO decomposition reaction in terms of a Sabatier-Gibbs-type analysis, and we...... demonstrate that this type of analysis yields results that to within a surprisingly small margin of error are directly proportional to the measured direct NO decomposition over Ru, Rh, Pt, Pd, Ag, and An. We suggest that Pd, which is a better catalyst than Pt under the employed reaction conditions...

  7. An Investigation on Metallic Ion Release from Four Dental Casting Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nejatidanesh

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Element release from dental casting alloys into the oral environment is of clinical concern and is considered to be a potential health problem to all patients.Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the metallic ion release of four base metal alloys.Materials and Methods: Two Ni-Cr (Minalux and Supercast and two Co-Cr alloys (Minalia and Wironit were examined. Nine specimens of each type were prepared in 13×11×1.4 mm dimensions and each of the four alloys (3 specimens per group were conditioned in artificial saliva at 37 c for one, three and seven days.The conditioning media were analyzed for element-release using Inductive CoupledPlasma Atomic Emission Spectrophotometer (ICPAES. Collected data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Duncan multiple range test (P< 0.05.Results: The greatest amount of element release was seen after seven days (134.9 ppb Supercast, 159.2 ppb Minalux, 197.2 ppb Minalia, and 230.2 ppb Wironit. There was a significant difference between the released elements from the alloys after the three conditioning times (p<0.001.Conclusion: Element release from the studied alloys is proportional to the conditioning time. The Ni-Cr alloys tested in this investigation were more resistant to corrosion as compared to the Co-Cr alloys in artificial saliva. Supercast had the highest corrosion resistance.

  8. The Importance of Rare-Earth Additions in Zr-Based AB2 Metal Hydride Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwo-Hsiung Young

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Effects of substitutions of rare earth (RE elements (Y, La, Ce, and Nd to the Zr-based AB2 multi-phase metal hydride (MH alloys on the structure, gaseous phase hydrogen storage (H-storage, and electrochemical properties were studied and compared. Solubilities of the RE atoms in the main Laves phases (C14 and C15 are very low, and therefore the main contributions of the RE additives are through the formation of the RENi phase and change in TiNi phase abundance. Both the RENi and TiNi phases are found to facilitate the bulk diffusion of hydrogen but impede the surface reaction. The former is very effective in improving the activation behaviors. −40 °C performances of the Ce-doped alloys are slightly better than the Nd-doped alloys but not as good as those of the La-doped alloys, which gained the improvement through a different mechanism. While the improvement in ultra-low-temperature performance of the Ce-containing alloys can be associated with a larger amount of metallic Ni-clusters embedded in the surface oxide, the improvement in the La-containing alloys originates from the clean alloy/oxide interface as shown in an earlier transmission electron microscopy study. Overall, the substitution of 1 at% Ce to partially replace Zr gives the best electrochemical performances (capacity, rate, and activation and is recommended for all the AB2 MH alloys for electrochemical applications.

  9. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to base metal alloys having different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Shafiei

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Based on the results, sandblasting improves the shear bond strength of self-etch and self-adhesive resin cement to base metal alloys. The best results can be achieved with a combination of sandblasting and metal primers. The performance of resin cement depends on to their chemical composition, not to the type of system.

  10. The thermodynamics of latent fingerprint corrosion of metal elements and alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, John W

    2008-11-01

    Redox reactions taking place between the surface of a metal and fingerprint residue have been expressed thermodynamically in terms of both the Nernst equation for reduction potential and the complexation constant for the formation of complex metal halide ions in aqueous solution. These expressions are used to explain experimental results for the corrosion of 10 different metal elements by fingerprint residue in air at room temperature. Corrosion of noble metals, such as silver and gold, supports the proposition that the degree of metal corrosion is enhanced by the presence of chloride ions in eccrine sweat. Extending the experiments to include 10 metal alloys enabled the construction of a fingerprint corrosion series for 20 different metals. Fingerprint corrosion on metals alloyed with > approximately 40% copper was found to display third level fingerprint detail. A comparison of both conventional ink on paper and digital (Livescan) fingerprinting techniques with fingerprints deposited on 9 Karat gold alloy has shown that gold alloy depositions are least susceptible to third level detail obliteration by poor fingerprint capturing techniques.

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF TRANSITION METALS ON THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experimental results show that the addition of Zr, Mn, Co, and Cu promoters improved the activity of Pt Rh Pd/γ-Al2O3 catalyst remarkably for CO, CH and NOx conversion, respectively. The effective order of the promoters is CuO > ZrO2 > Co3O4 > MnO2. The addition of CuO improved the dispersion of the noble metal on ...

  12. Search for positron localization near transition-metal solutes of negative effective charge in Ni and Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, D.M.; Grynszpan, R.I.; Arrott, A.S.

    1993-01-01

    Results of an early (1973) angular correlation (ACAR) study of dilute (0.5 at.%) Cu based alloys by a Japanese group were interpreted in terms of an attraction of e + by transition metal solutes of effective negative charge. Doppler Broadening (DB) measurements reveal no such an effect for Cu(Mn) and Cu(Ni) solid solutions as well as for Ni alloys with 3d, 4d and 5d transition metal solutes (0.1 to 1.5 at.%) i.e. no evidence of e + localization near these impurities is seen. Our results strongly suggest that the ACAR results are due to the metallurgical state of the samples. In contrast, significant DB lineshape parameter variations, observed for our Ni(Zr) alloys, are attributed to positron trapping in and near Ni 5 Zr precipitates. Our DB results for a series of Ni(Au) alloys are understood in terms of a combination of the effect of an overall lattice expansion and a positron preference for clusters of Au atoms. The above comparison between DB and ACAR results is supported by our 'spin polarized' DB results for a (001) Ni single crystal which resemble those obtained by other groups using a 'spin polarized' 2D-ACAR technique. (orig.)

  13. Bias-induced insulator-metal transition in organic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, J. H.; Xie, S. J.; Mei, L. M.; Yan, YiJing

    2007-07-01

    The authors investigate the bias-induced insulator-metal transition in organic electronics devices on the basis of the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model [W. P. Su et al., Phys. Rev. B 22, 2099 (1980)] combined with the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism. The insulator-metal transition is explained with the energy level crossover that eliminates the Peierls phase [R. Peierls, Quantum Theory of Solids (Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1955)] and delocalizes the electron states near the threshold voltage. This may account for the experimental observations on the devices that exhibit intrinsic bistable conductance switching with large on-off ratio.

  14. Determination of the transition to the high entropy regime for alloys of refractory elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosso, Mariela F. del [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San Martin (Argentina); CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Grupo de Caracterizacion y Modelizacion de Materiales, UTN, FRGP, H. Yrigoyen 288, (B1617FRG) Gral. Pacheco (Argentina); Bozzolo, Guillermo, E-mail: guille_bozzolo@yahoo.com [Loyola University Maryland, 4501 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21210 (United States); Mosca, Hugo O. [Gerencia de Investigacion y Aplicaciones, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499 (B1650KNA), San Martin (Argentina); Grupo de Caracterizacion y Modelizacion de Materiales, UTN, FRGP, H. Yrigoyen 288, (B1617FRG) Gral. Pacheco (Argentina)

    2012-09-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Atomistic modeling using a quantum approximate method for the energetics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modeling of the phase structure of high entropy alloys of refractory elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of modeled structure with experimental results for five-element alloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of bulk properties of transitional chains from 4 to 5 element alloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Introduction of an algorithm to aid in the design of high entropy alloys. - Abstract: The development of high entropy alloys is currently limited to experimental work aimed at the determination of specific compositions that exhibit particular properties. The main feature of these alloys is their particular phase structure, which tends to be a continuous solid solution in spite of the large number of constituents which would otherwise form a large number of intermetallic phases. While it is known that equimolar concentrations and large number of elements are two necessary conditions for achieving high entropy behavior, not much is known regarding the transition to this regime in the presence of specific elements. Such knowledge would be useful when determining alloy compositions, as it would set boundaries for the necessary concentrations of each element in experimental situations. In this work, results of a computational modeling effort are presented, where a recently developed 5-element high entropy alloy of refractory elements is used as the foundation needed to examine such transition and determine the necessary lower bounds for the concentration of each element. Details of the phase structure of the quaternary combinations of W, Nb, Mo, Ta and V as they evolve upon the addition of a fifth element are discussed. The results are compared to the experimental case for the case of V added to W-Nb-Mo-Ta. Using these examples as a reference, the concept of critical concentrations for each element

  15. Asymmetric partitioning of metals among cluster anions and cations generated via laser ablation of mixed aluminum/Group 6 transition metal targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Sarah E; Mann, Jennifer E; Jarrold, Caroline Chick

    2013-02-28

    While high-power laser ablation of metal alloys indiscriminately produces gas-phase atomic ions in proportion to the abundance of the various metals in the alloy, gas-phase ions produced by moderate-power laser ablation sources coupled with molecular beams are formed by more complicated mechanisms. A mass spectrometric study that directly compares the mass distributions of cluster anions and cations generated from laser ablation of pure aluminum, an aluminum/molybdenum mixed target, and an aluminum/tungsten mixed target is detailed. Mass spectra of anionic species generated from the mixed targets showed that both tungsten and molybdenum were in higher abundance in the negatively charged species than in the target material. Mass spectra of the cationic species showed primarily Al(+) and aluminum oxide and hydroxide cluster cations. No molybdenum- or tungsten-containing cluster cations were definitively assigned. The asymmetric distribution of aluminum and Group 6 transition metals in cation and anion cluster composition is attributed to the low ionization energy of atomic aluminum and aluminum suboxide clusters. In addition, the propensity of both molybdenum and tungsten to form metal oxide cluster anions under the same conditions that favor metallic aluminum cluster anions is attributed to differences in the optical properties of the surface oxide that is present in the metal powders used to prepare the ablation targets. Mechanisms of mixed metal oxide clusters are considered.

  16. Integrating Transition Metals into Nanomaterials: Strategies and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Fhayli, Karim

    2016-04-14

    Transition metals complexes have been involved in various catalytic, biomedical and industrial applications, but only lately they have been associated with nanomaterials to produce innovative and well-defined new hybrid systems. The introduction of transition metals into nanomaterials is important to bear the advantages of metals to nanoscale and also to raise the stability of nanomaterials. In this dissertation, we study two approaches of associating transition metals into nanomaterials. The first approach is via spontaneous self-organization based assembly of small molecule amphiphiles and bulky hydrophilic polymers to produce organic-inorganic hybrid materials that have nanoscale features and can be precisely controlled depending on the experimental conditions used. These hybrid materials can successfully act as templates to design new porous material with interesting architecture. The second approach studied is via electroless reduction of transition metals on the surface of nanocarbons (nanotubes and nanodiamonds) without using any reducing agents or catalysts. The synthesis of these systems is highly efficient and facile resulting in stable and mechanically robust new materials with promising applications in catalysis.

  17. Effect of rhenium on the structure and properties of the weld metal of a molybdenum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachenko, V. V.; Morozov, B. P.; Tylkina, M. A.; Savitskiy, Y. M.; Nikishanov, V. V.

    1984-01-01

    The structure and properties of welds made in molybdenum alloy VM-1 as a function of rhenium concentrations in the weld metal were studied. Rhenium was introduced into the weld using rhenium wire and tape or wires of Mo-47Re and Mo-52Re alloys. The properties of the weld metal were studied by means of metallographic techniques, electron microscopy, X-ray analysis, and autoradiography. The plasticity of the weld metal sharply was found to increase with increasing concentration of rhenium up to 50%. During welding, a decarburization process was observed which was more pronounced at higher concentrations of rhenium.

  18. Micro- and nano-spheres of low melting point metals and alloys, formed by ultrasonic cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, H; Reich, S; Popovitz-Biro, R; von Huth, P; Halevy, I; Koltypin, Y; Gedanken, A; Porat, Z

    2013-01-01

    Metals and alloys of low melting points (metals into microspheres that solidify rapidly upon cooling. This method has been applied to seven pure metals (Ga, In, Sn, Bi, Pb, Zn, Hg) and two eutectic alloys of gold (Au-Ge and Au-Si). The morphology and composition of the resulting microspheres were examined by SEM and EDS. Eutectic Au-Si formed also crystalline Au nanoparticles, which were separated and studied by HRTEM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Density functional theory studies of transition metal nanoparticles in catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Rankin, Rees; Zeng, Zhenhua

    2013-01-01

    Periodic Density Functional Theory calculations are capable of providing powerful insights into the structural, energetics, and electronic phenomena that underlie heterogeneous catalysis on transition metal nanoparticles. Such calculations are now routinely applied to single crystal metal surfaces...... and electrocatalysis, in which single crystal models are combined with Wulff construction-based ideas to produce descriptions of average nanocatalyst behavior. Then, I will proceed to describe explicitly DFT-based descriptions of catalysis on truly nanosized particles (

  20. Corrosion protection of aluminum alloys in contact with other metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, C. A.

    1969-01-01

    Study establishes the quality of chemical and galvanized protection afforded by anodized and aldozided coatings applied to test panels of various aluminum alloys. The test panels, placed in firm contact with panels of titanium alloys, were subjected to salt spray tests and visually examined for corrosion effect.

  1. Manipulating Light with Transition Metal Clusters, Organic Dyes, and Metal Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogut, Serdar [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-09-11

    The primary goals of our research program is to develop and apply state-of-the-art first-principles methods to predict electronic and optical properties of three systems of significant scientific and technological interest: transition metal clusters, organic dyes, and metal-organic frameworks. These systems offer great opportunities to manipulate light for a wide ranging list of energy-related scientific problems and applications. During this grant period, we focused our investigations on the development, implementation, and benchmarking of many-body Green’s function methods (GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation) to examine excited-state properties of transition metal/transition-metal-oxide clusters and organic molecules that comprise the building blocks of dyes and metal-organic frameworks.

  2. Interfacial shear bond strength between different base metal alloys and five low fusing feldspathic ceramic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipahi, Cumhur; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength between metal alloys and 5 ceramic systems. Ceramic systems (Vita VMK68, Ivoclar IPSd. SIGN, Ceramco II, Matchmaker and Finesse) were fired onto either Ni-Cr or Co-Cr base metal alloy. Metal-ceramic interfaces were subjected to shear loading until failure. The ceramic type significantly affected the bond strength results (palloy, the results ranged between 15.4-25.3 MPa and for Co-Cr alloy between 13.3-19.0 MPa. The highest mean bond strength value was obtained with the combination of Ni-Cr alloy-Ceramco II (25.3 MPa), the lowest bond strength was received from the combination of Co-Cr alloy-Ivoclar IPS d.SIGN ceramic (13.3 MPa). Adhesive failures between metal and ceramic were significantly more frequent with Ni-Cr alloy (31 out of 50) than with Co-Cr (20 out of 50) (p<0.05). Ceramco II presented the highest bond strength with both Ni-Cr and Co-Cr being significantly different from one another.

  3. Color change during the surface preparation stages of metal ceramic alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozçelik, Tuncer Burak; Yilmaz, Burak; Ozcan, Isil; Wee, Alvin G

    2011-07-01

    Even though metal ceramic restorations (MCRs) are widely used by clinicians, the influence of the metal on the color of overlaying porcelain is unknown. The purpose of this study was to analyze the color alterations of different types of metal ceramic alloys during several stages of metal surface preparation and to determine the effect of those changes on the resulting color of opaque porcelain (OP). Seven different types of alloys (3 base metal, 3 noble, and 1 high noble) were used to prepare disk-shaped specimens (1 mm × 10 mm, n=3), followed by OP application (0.1 mm). L*a*b* values of specimens were recorded after different stages of metal surface preparation (ingot, after casting, after oxidation, and after the OP application) in addition to the shade tab of OP B1 (target shade). L*a*b* values of alloys were measured from the ingot structure to the OP application stage and statistically analyzed (Repeated measures ANOVA, and Bonferroni corrected paired t test, α=.05). L*a*b* values of OP applied groups and the OP shade tab (target shade) were analyzed (1-way ANOVA with Dunnett's multiple comparison test, α=.05). The color differences of the target shade both before and after OP application were calculated and statistically analyzed (1-way ANOVA, Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch Multiple Range Test, α=.05). The L* values of all alloys changed significantly after each stage except for 2 alloys (V-Deltaloy SF (N-VDSF)) and (Gnathos Plus (HN-GP)) after casting and airborne-particle abrasion (Palloys increased after casting. Changes in the a* coordinate were significant except for one of the base metal alloys (Palloys showed variation in direction after oxidation and OP application (Palloys showed variation in direction after each stage (Palloys were significantly different from that of the OP shade tab (Palloy-target shade)) of 2 OP-applied alloys (Cerapall 2 (N-CP2) and Ceradelta (N-CD)) were significantly different (Palloys. The achromatic color behavior of

  4. Ternary scandium and transition metals germanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotur, B.Ya.

    1992-01-01

    Brief review of data on phase diagram of ternary Sc-Me-Ge systems (Me-d - , f-transition element) is given. Isothermal sections at 870 and 1070 K of 17 ternary systems are plotted. Compositions and their structural characteristics are presented. Variability of crystal structure is typical for ternary scandium germanides: 70 compounds with the studied structure belong to 23 structural types. Ternary germanides isostructural to types of Sm 4 Ge 4 , ZrCrSi 2 , ZrNiAl, ScCeSi, TiNiSi U 4 Re 7 Si 6 145 compounds from 70 under investigation are mostly formed in studied systems

  5. Effects of Er:YAG laser treatments on surface roughness of base metal alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunt, Göknil Ergün; Güler, Ahmet Umut; Ceylan, Gözlem; Duran, Ibrahim; Ozkan, Pelin; Kirtiloğlu, Tuğrul

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of different Er:YAG laser treatments on the surface roughness of base metal alloys. A total of 36 specimens were prepared of two base metal alloys (Wiron 99, Bellabond plus). The surfaces of the specimens were standardized by gradual wet grinding with 320-, 600-, 800- and 1,000-grit silicon carbide paper for 10 s each on a grinding machine at 300 rpm. Specimens of each alloy were randomly divided into six groups (n = 6) comprising a control group (group C), a group sandblasted with Al(2)O(3) powder at 60 psi for 10 s through a nozzle at a distance of 10 mm (group S), and four Er:YAG laser (Fotona AT) treatment groups. The laser treatment groups were as follows: 500 mJ, 10 Hz, 100 μs (group 500MSP); 500 mJ, 10 Hz, 300 μs (group 500SP); 400 mJ, 10 Hz, 100 μs (group 400MSP); and 400 mJ, 10 Hz, 300 μs (group 400SP). Surface roughness measurements (Ra) were performed using a profilometer. The data were analysed by two-way ANOVA, and mean values were compared using Tukey's HSD test (α = 0.05). According to the two-way ANOVA results, the base metal alloys and interaction between base metal alloy and surface treatment were not statistically significant different (p > 0.05), the surface treatments were significantly different (p metal alloy groups, no significant differences were observed among the control, 400MSP, and 400SP groups (p = 0.912), and these groups demonstrated the lowest Ra values. The highest Ra value was observed in group S (p laser treatment at 400 and 500 mJ/10 Hz is not an alternative method for surface roughening of base metal alloys.

  6. A new phase transition phenomenon in gallium-lanthanide binary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimmel, G.; Kaplan, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    The existence of an enthalpy gap during heating or cooling indicates a first order phase transition. The difference in entropy can be directly found from the enthalpy change and the transition temperature. The increase in entropy in heating is linked to the type of phase transformation; for melting (solid-liquid transformations) it is roughly an order of magnitude greater than in solid-solid first order transformations. The observation of unusually large enthalpy gaps received as endothermic peaks in differential thermal analyses (DTA) of Lanthanides-Gallium without any known first order phase transition called our attention to this phenomenon. The regime of the phenomenon is limited to gallium alloyed by light Lanthanides (La-Gd) in atomic concentration from 66 to 80 atomic percent Ga. a common feature of these alloys is the unique Pair Wise Substitution (PWS) effect, where Lanthanide atoms are replaced by Ga-Ga pairs. This is due to the tendency of gallium to bond in pairs. Hence, a single formula R 1-x Ga 2+2x (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.333) is used to define the alloys or compounds in these systems. In this paper, the authors deduce from their experiments that this transition is related solely to the sub-unit cell configuration of Ga-Ga pairs, and is a new phase transition phenomenon

  7. Electronic and thermodynamic properties of transition metal elements and compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeglund, J.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the use of band-structure calculations for studying thermodynamic properties of solids. We discuss 3d-, 4d- and 5d-transition metal carbides and nitrides. Through a detailed comparison between theoretical and experimental results, we draw conclusions on the character of the atomic bonds in these materials. We show how electronic structure calculations can be used to give accurate predictions for bonding energies. Part of the thesis is devoted to the application of the generalized gradient approximation in electronic structure calculations on transition metals. For structures with vibrational disorder, we present a method for calculating averaged phonon frequencies without using empirical information. For magnetic excitations, we show how a combined use of theoretical results and experimental data can yield information on magnetic fluctuations at high temperatures. The main results in the thesis are: Apart for an almost constant shift, theoretically calculated bonding energies for transition metal carbides and nitrides agree with experimental data or with values from analysis of thermochemical information. The electronic spectrum of transition metal carbides and nitrides can be separated into bonding, antibonding and nonbonding electronic states. The lowest enthalpy of formation for substoichiometric vanadium carbide VC 1-X at zero temperature and pressure occurs for a structure containing vacancies (x not equal to 0). The generalized gradient approximation improves theoretical calculated cohesive energies for 3d-transition metals. Magnetic phase transitions are sensitive to the description of exchange-correlation effects in electronic structure calculations. Trends in Debye temperatures can be successfully analysed in electronic structure calculations on disordered lattices. For the elements, there is a clear dependence on the crystal structure (e.g., bcc, fcc or hcp). Chromium has fluctuating local magnetic moments at temperatures well above

  8. Metal-insulator transition in epitaxial vanadium sesquioxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allimi, Bamidele S.

    Of all the transition metal oxides which exhibit metal-insulator transitions (MIT), one of the most extensively studied in recent years is the vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3), both from experimental and theoretical point of view. At a transition temperature of about 160 K at an ambient pressure of 1 atm, pure V2O3 transforms from a rhombohedral paramagnetic metallic (PM) to a monoclinic antiferromagnetic insulating (AFI) phase upon cooling, with a jump in the resistivity of about seven orders of magnitude. Experimental studies have focused more on bulk V2O3 and recently there have been significant interest in thin film fabrication of this material due to potential applications as thermal sensors, current limiters, Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC) thermistors, and optical switches. This study addresses the deposition, characterization, and properties of high-quality epitaxial V2O3 thin films grown on a-, c-Al2O3 and c-LiTaO 3 substrates by a straightforward method of pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Various characterization techniques including X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy were used to examine the structural, crystallographic, and surface properties, while four point probe resistivity measurements were used to examine the electrical properties of the films. V2O3 thin films of different thicknesses ranging from 10-450 nm were deposited on c-Al 2O3 and c-LiTaO3 substrates by PLD to understand also the role of epitaxial strains. Resistivity measurements showed that depending on the thicknesses of films, different electrical transitions were exhibited by the samples. While some of the samples displayed the expected metal-insulator transition typical of bulk V2O3, some showed insulating behavior only and others exhibited metallic characteristics only over the whole temperature range. For example, for films on c-LiTaO3 with increasing film thickness, first an insulator-insulator, then a

  9. The effect of hydrogen peroxide concentration on metal ion release from dental casting alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Salehi, S K; Hatton, P V; Johnson, A; Cox, A G; McLeod, C

    2008-04-01

    There are concerns that tooth bleaching agents may adversely affect dental materials. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that increasing concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP) are more effective than water at increasing metal ion release from two typical dental casting alloys during bleaching. Discs (n = 28 for each alloy) were prepared by casting and heat treated to simulate a typical porcelain-firing cycle. Discs (n = 7) of each alloy were immersed in either 0%, 3%, 10% or 30% (w/v) HP solutions for 24 h at 37 degrees C. Samples were taken for metal ion release determination using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and the data analysed using a two-way anova followed by a one-way anova. The surface roughness of each disc was measured using a Talysurf contact profilometer before and after bleaching and the data analysed using a paired t-test. With the exception of gold, the differences in metal ion concentration after treatment with 0% (control) and each of 3%, 10% and 30% HP (w/v) were statistically significant (P Metal ion release from the two alloys increased with increasing HP concentrations (over 3000% increase in Ni and 1400% increase in Pd ions were recorded when HP concentration increased from 0% to 30%). Surface roughness values of the samples before and after bleaching were not significantly different (P > 0.05) Exposure of the two dental casting alloys to HP solutions increased metal ion release of all the elements except gold.

  10. Study of the embedded atom method of atomistic calculations for metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.A.

    1990-10-01

    Two projects were completed in the past year. The stability of a series of binary alloys was calculated using the embedded-atom method (EAM) with an analytic form for two-body potentials derived previously. Both disordered alloys and intermetallic compounds with the L1 0 and L1 2 structures were studied. The calculated heats of solution of alloys of Cu, Ag, Au, Ni, and Pt were satisfactory, while results for alloys containing Pd were too high. Atomistic calculations using the EAM were also carried out for point defects in hcp metals. By comparison with results in the literature, it was found that many body effects from the EAM significantly alter predicted physical properties of hcp metals. For example, the EAM calculations yield anisotropic vacancy diffusion with greater vacancy mobility in the basal plane, and imply that diffusion will start at a lower fraction of the melting temperature

  11. Comparison of laboratory and field experience of PWSCC in Alloy 182 weld metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, P.; Meunier, M.-C.; Steltzlen, F. [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, Paris La Defense (France); Calonne, O.; Foucault, M. [AREVA NP, Centre Technique, Le Creusot Cedex (France); Combrade, P. [ACXCOR, Saint Etienne (France); Amzallag, C. [EDF, SEPTEN, Villeurbanne (France)

    2007-07-01

    Laboratory studies of stress corrosion cracking of the nickel base weld metal, Alloy 182, in simulated PWR primary water suggest similar resistance to crack initiation and somewhat enhanced propagation rates relative to wrought Alloy 600. By contrast, field experience of cracking in the primary circuits of PWRs shows in general much better performance for Alloy 182 relative to Alloy 600 than would be anticipated from laboratory studies. This paper endeavours to resolve this apparent conundrum. It draws on the conclusions of recent research that has focussed on the role of surface finish, particularly cold work and residual stresses resulting from different fabrication processes, on the risk of initiating IGSCC in nickel base alloys in PWR primary water. It also draws on field experience of stress corrosion cracking that highlights the important role of surface finish for crack initiation. (author)

  12. Net Shaped Component Fabrication of Refractory Metal Alloys using Vacuum Plasma Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, S.; ODell, S.; Gorti, S.; Litchford, R.

    2006-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) technique was employed to produce dense and net shaped components of a new tungsten-rhenium (W-Re) refractory metal alloy. The fine grain size obtained using this technique enhanced the mechanical properties of the alloy at elevated temperatures. The alloy development also included incorporation of thermodynamically stable dispersion phases to pin down grain boundaries at elevated temperatures and thereby circumventing the inherent problem of recrystallization of refractory alloys at elevated temperatures. Requirements for such alloys as related to high temperature space propulsion components will be discussed. Grain size distribution as a function of cooling rate and dispersion phase loading will be presented. Mechanical testing and grain growth results as a function of temperature will also be discussed.

  13. Evaluation of Surface Roughness and Tensile Strength of Base Metal Alloys Used for Crown and Bridge on Recasting (Recycling).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Amit; Hashmi, Syed W; Rao, Yogesh; Garg, Akanksha

    2015-07-01

    Dental casting alloys play a prominent role in the restoration of the partial dentition. Casting alloys have to survive long term in the mouth and also have the combination of structure, molecules, wear resistance and biologic compatibility. According to ADA system casting alloys were divided into three groups (wt%); high noble, Noble and predominantly base metal alloys. To evaluate the mechanical properties such as tensile strength and surface roughness of the new and recast base metal (nickel-chromium) alloys. Recasting of the base metal alloys derived from sprue and button, to make it reusable has been done. A total of 200 test specimens were fabricated using specially fabricated jig of metal and divided into two groups- 100 specimens of new alloy and 100 specimens of recast alloys, which were tested for tensile strength on universal testing machine and surface roughness on surface roughness tester. Tensile strength of new alloy showed no statistically significant difference (p-value>0.05) from recast alloy whereas new alloy had statistically significant surface roughness (Maximum and Average surface roughness) difference (p-valuetensile strength will not be affected by recasting of nickel-chromium alloy whereas surface roughness increases markedly.

  14. The influence of surface condition on the metal dusting behavior of cast and wrought chromia forming alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermse, C.G.M.; Asteman, H.; Ijzerman, R.M.; Jakobi, D.

    2013-01-01

    The current work investigated the impact of surface condition on the metal dusting behavior of chromia forming alloys. Five commercial alloys were included in the study, wrought 800H, 353MA, and cast G4859, G4852 Micro, and ET45 Micro, these alloys have a chromium and nickel content in the range of

  15. Metal halide reduction with molten sodium/potassium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.

    1986-01-01

    A method of obtaining a desired metal, selected from the group consisting of titanium, aluminium, iron, manganese, hafnium, zirconium, tantalum, vanadium, uranium and tungsten, which comprises reacting a halide of the desired metal with an alkali metal reducing agent at temperature at which the reducing agent is molten, in order to produce the desired metal and halide of the metal reducing agent

  16. How absorbed hydrogen affects the catalytic activity of transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Kozlov, Sergey M; Schauermann, Swetlana; Vayssilov, Georgi N; Neyman, Konstantin M

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is commonly governed by surface active sites. Yet, areas just below the surface can also influence catalytic activity, for instance, when fragmentation products of catalytic feeds penetrate into catalysts. In particular, H absorbed below the surface is required for certain hydrogenation reactions on metals. Herein, we show that a sufficient concentration of subsurface hydrogen, H(sub) , may either significantly increase or decrease the bond energy and the reactivity of the adsorbed hydrogen, H(ad) , depending on the metal. We predict a representative reaction, ethyl hydrogenation, to speed up on Pd and Pt, but to slow down on Ni and Rh in the presence of H(sub) , especially on metal nanoparticles. The identified effects of subsurface H on surface reactivity are indispensable for an atomistic understanding of hydrogenation processes on transition metals and interactions of hydrogen with metals in general. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. ABOUT HEAT TREATMENTS APPLIED TO FERROUS ALLOYS AND METALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alin Stancioiu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Materials and non-ferrous alloys lends itself through more plastic deformation processes. It is known that after deformation the material structure, as well as properties that are no longer adequate therefore is applied recrystallization annealing for the purpose of restore the initial structure. To increase the hardness of non-ferrous alloys it must after hardening the cooling rate to be slow. This is explained by the fact that of chemical compounds give time to precipitate on the edge of grain to the base of the constituents of alloys.

  18. Bond strength of resin cements to noble and base metal alloys with different surface treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkhondeh Raeisosadat

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The bond strength of resin cements to metal alloys depends on the type of the metal, conditioning methods and the adhesive resins used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of resin cements to base and noble metal alloys after sand blasting or application of silano-pen.Cylinders of light cured Z 250 composite were cemented to "Degubond 4" (Au Pd and "Verabond" (Ni Cr alloys by either RelyX Unicem or Panavia F2, after sandblasting or treating the alloys with Silano-Pen. The shear bond strengths were evaluated. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t tests at a significance level of P<0.05.When the alloys were treated by Silano-Pen, RelyX Unicem showed a higher bond strength for Degubond 4 (P=0.021 and Verabond (P< 0.001. No significant difference was observed in the bond strength of Panavia F2 to the alloys after either of surface treatments, Degubond 4 (P=0.291 and Verabond (P=0.899. Panavia F2 showed a higher bond strength to sandblasted Verabond compared to RelyX Unicem (P=0.003. The bond strength of RelyX Unicem was significantly higher to Silano-Pen treated Verabond (P=0.011. The bond strength of the cements to sandblasted Degubond 4 showed no significant difference (P=0.59. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated Degubond 4 (P=0.035.The bond strength of resin cements to Verabond alloy was significantly higher than Degubond 4. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated alloys. Surface treatments of the alloys did not affect the bond strength of Panavia F2.

  19. The metal-rich sulfides and phosphides of the early transition metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzen, H.F. [Ames Lab., IA (United States)]|[Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-06-01

    Early work on the preparation of refractory metal-rich compounds of the early transition metals resulted in the understanding that metal-metal bonding results in a structural variety that plays an important role in the high-temperature chemistry of these systems. The binary metal-rich systems have been thoroughly studied at high temperatures, and the structures of most, if not all, of the refractory sulfides and phosphides are known. More recently new ternary phases have been discovered, and these have been shown to result from distributed fractional site occupation of metal atom sites in complex structures. The extent of metal-metal bonding has been quantified by Extended-Hueckel Tight-Bonding calculations using Mullikan Overlap Populations. Correlations of site occupancy with MOP based upon the DFSO model have been observed. 44 refs.

  20. Electrocatalysis of Hydrogen Evolution by Transition Metal Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heyrovský, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 1 (2001), s. 67-80 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV204/97/K084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : transition metals * thiocyanate complexes * electroreduction Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 0.778, year: 2001

  1. Synthesis, spectral characterization of Schiff base transition metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Synthesis, spectral characterization of Schiff base transition metal complexes: DNA cleavage and antimicrobial activity studies. N RAMAN,* J DHAVEETHU RAJA and A SAKTHIVEL. Department of Chemistry, VHNSN College, Virudhunagar 626 001 e-mail: drn_ raman@yahoo.co.in. MS received 1 May 2007; revised 7 July ...

  2. Transition metal chemistry of hydroxy(–OH)-rich molecules ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Transition metal chemistry of hydroxy(–OH)-rich molecules: Syntheses, crystal structures and solution reactivity studies. MISHTU DEY 1, P K SAARENKETO 2, E KOLEHMAINEN 2,. K RISSANEN 2 and CHEBROLU P RAO 1. 1Bioinorganic Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of. Technology Bombay, Powai ...

  3. Mechanical failure and glass transition in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egami, T.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We review the recent results of molecular dynamics simulations on metallic glasses. → They show the equivalence of mechanical failure and glass transition. → We discuss the microscopic mechanism behind this equivalence. → We show that the density of defects in metallic glasses is as high as a quarter. → Our concepts about the defect state in glasses need to be changed. - Abstract: The current majority view on the phenomenon of mechanical failure in metallic glasses appears to be that it is caused by the activity of some structural defects, such as free-volumes or shear transformation zones, and the concentration of such defects is small, only of the order of 1%. However, the recent results compel us to revise this view. Through molecular dynamics simulation it has been shown that mechanical failure is the stress-induced glass transition. According to our theory the concentration of the liquid-like sites (defects) is well over 20% at the glass transition. We suggest that the defect concentration in metallic glasses is actually very high, and percolation of such defects causes atomic avalanche and mechanical failure. In this article we discuss the glass transition, mechanical failure and viscosity from such a point of view.

  4. Reactions of transition metal complexes with cyclic ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milstein, D.

    1977-02-01

    Three novel reactions of epoxides with homogeneous transition-metal catalysts have been explored: (a) the selective rearrangement of internal epoxides to ketones; (b) the cleavage of C-C bond in epoxides having electron-attracting substituents; (c) the transformation of terminal epoxides into esters. Based on an intensive kinetic study, a general mechanism for the transformations of epoxides is postulated

  5. Effect of transition metal elements on the structural and optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of transition metal elements on the structural and optical properties of ZnO nanoparticles. I KAZEMINEZHAD1, S SAADATMAND1 and RAMIN YOUSEFI2,∗. 1Nanotechnology Laboratory, Physics Department, Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran. 2Department of Physics, Islamic Azad University (IAU), ...

  6. Transport properties of transition metal impurities on gold nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Renato B.; da Silva, Edison Z.; Fazzio, Adalberto; da Silva, Antônio J. R.

    2009-03-01

    Performing first principles density functional theory (DFT) we calculated the electronic and transport properties of a Au thin nanowire with transition metal atoms (Mn, Fe, Ni or Co) bridging the two sides of the Au nanowire. We will show that these systems have strong spin dependent transport properties and that the local symmetry can dramatically change them, leading to a significant spin polarized conductance. This spin dependent transport is also associated with the transition metal in the nanowire, in particular with the d-level positioning. Using Co, for example [1], when the symmetry permits the mixing between the wire s-orbitals with the transition metal d-states, there are interference effects that resemble Fano-like resonances with an anisotropy of 0.07 at the Fermi level. On the other hand, if this symmetry decouples such states, we simply have a sum of independent transmission channels and the calculated anisotropy was 0.23. The anisotropies for the other transition metals, as well as calculated transmittances for two Co impurities will also be presented [1] R. B. Pontes, E. Z. da Silva, A. Fazzio and Antônio J. R. da Silva, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130 (30), 9897-903, 2008

  7. Vibrational properties of vacancy in bcc transition metals using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The embedded atom method (EAM) potentials, with the universal form of the embedding function along with the Morse form of pair potential, have been employed to determine the potential parameters for three bcc transition metals: Fe, Mo, and W, by fitting to Cauchy pressure (C12−C44)/2, shear constants ...

  8. Exciton ionization in multilayer transition-metal dichalcogenides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Garm; Latini, Simone; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2016-01-01

    Photodetectors and solar cells based on materials with strongly bound excitons rely crucially on field-assisted exciton ionization. We study the ionization process in multilayer transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) within the Mott-Wannier model incorporating fully the pronounced anisotropy...

  9. Biomass transition metal hydrogen-evolution electrocatalysts and electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wei-Fu; Iyer, Shweta; Iyer, Shilpa; Sasaki, Kotaro; Muckerman, James T.; Fujita, Etsuko

    2017-02-28

    A catalytic composition from earth-abundant transition metal salts and biomass is disclosed. A calcined catalytic composition formed from soybean powder and ammonium molybdate is specifically exemplified herein. Methods for making the catalytic composition are disclosed as are electrodes for hydrogen evolution reactions comprising the catalytic composition.

  10. Transition metal-free, base-promoted hydroalkoxylation: Synthesis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An efficient,transition metal-free method to synthesize substituted imidazo[2,1-c][1,4]oxazine derivatives via hydroalkoxylation of 1,5-alkynyl alcohol has been described. The reaction ... Muthusubramanian1. Department of Organic Chemistry, School of Chemistry, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, India ...

  11. Phenalenyl-based ligand for transition metal chemistry: Application ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mandal@iiserkol.ac.in. Abstract. We report the synthesis and characterization of the first transition metal complex of a phenalenyl- based ligand. The reaction of Cu(OAc)2.H2O with 9-N-methylamino-1-N -methylimino-phenalene (LH) in 1:1.

  12. Luminescent molecular rods - transition-metal alkynyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah; Wong, Keith Man-Chung

    2005-01-01

    A number of transition-metal complexes have been reported to exhibit rich luminescence, usually originating from phosphorescence. Such luminescence properties of the triplet excited state with a large Stoke's shift, long lifetime, high luminescence quantum yield as well as lower excitation energy, are envisaged to serve as an ideal candidate in the area of potential applications for chemosensors, dye-sensitized solar cells, flat panel displays, optics, new materials and biological sciences. Organic alkynes (poly-ynes), with extended or conjugatedπ-systems and rigid structure with linear geometry, have become a significant research area due to their novel electronic and physical properties and their potential applications in nanotechnology. Owing to the presence of unsaturated sp-hybridized carbon atoms, the alkynyl unit can serve as a versatile building block in the construction of alkynyl transition-metal complexes, not only throughσ-bonding but also viaπ-bonding interactions. By incorporation of linear alkynyl groups into luminescent transition-metal complexes, the alkynyl moiety with goodσ-donor,π-donor andπ-acceptor abilities is envisaged to tune or perturb the emission behaviors, including emission energy (color), intensity and lifetime by its role as an auxiliary ligand as well as to govern the emission origin from its direct involvement. This review summarizes recent efforts on the synthesis of luminescent rod-like alkynyl complexes with different classes of transition metals and details the effects of the introduction of alkynyl groups on the luminescence properties of the complexes.

  13. Tridentate Schiff base (ONO) transition metal complexes: Synthesis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 128; Issue 7. Tridentate Schiff base (ONO) transition metal complexes: Synthesis, crystal structure, spectroscopic and larvicidal studies. SUNDARAMURTHY SANTHA LAKSHMI KANNAPPAN GEETHA P MAHADEVI. Regular Article Volume 128 Issue 7 July 2016 pp ...

  14. Volume variation of Gruneisen parameters of fcc transition metals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    ultrasonic measurements and melting of solids (Mulargia and Boschi 1978 .... Several studies in the past based on model pseudo- potential suggest ... Volume variation of fcc transition metals. 65. The present value for Cu is in good agreement with the experimental values. Also, the presently obtained value agrees well with ...

  15. Spin, Charge, and Bonding in Transition Metal Mono Silicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marel, D. van der; Damascelli, A.; Schulte, K.; Menovsky, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Published in: Physica B 244 (1998) 138-147 citations recorded in [Science Citation Index] Abstract: We review some of the relevant physical properties of the transition metal mono-silicides with the FeSi structure (CrSi, MnSi, FeSi, CoSi, NiSi, etc) and explore the relation between their structural

  16. Effect of transition metal dopants on the optical and magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-06-02

    Jun 2, 2015 ... This review discusses the recent developments in doped semiconductor nanocrystals with a special emphasis on the effect of dopant on the electronic structure of the host nanocrystals. The review focusses on 3 transition metal dopants with unique electronic structure making them receptive for dramatic ...

  17. X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of some liquid alkali metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huijben, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental techniques and correction procedures have been searched for, which allow a reliable and accurate determination of the structure factors of simple liquid metals, particularly in the small-angle region. A study of binary alloys was carried out and showed that clustering of like atoms (a tendency to phase separation) occurs, indicating special structural aspects. The densities of Na-K, Na-Cs, K-Rb alloys were also measured. (C.F.)

  18. Anomalous effect of small doses of ionizing radiation on metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, I.P.; Mamontov, A.P.; Botaki, A.A.; Cherdantsev, P.A.; Chakhlov, B.V.; Sharov, S.R.; Timoshnikov, Yu.A.; Filipenko, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of small doses of 60 Co gamma rays on copper, tungsten, and WCo alloys has been investigated. A decrease in the concentration of material defects under the influence of small doses of ionizing radiation was found. Also the structural rearrangement of the crystal was found to be still in progress after irradiation ceased. The mechanism of the anomalous effect of small doses of ionizing radiation on metals and alloys is discussed in terms of the electron energy scheme. (U.K.)

  19. On the thermodynamics of phase transitions in metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Vita, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Metal hydrides are solutions of hydrogen in a metal, where phase transitions may occur depending on temperature, pressure etc. We apply Le Chatelier's principle of thermodynamics to a particular phase transition in TiH x , which can approximately be described as a second-order phase transition. We show that the fluctuations of the order parameter correspond to fluctuations both of the density of H+ ions and of the distance between adjacent H+ ions. Moreover, as the system approaches the transition and the correlation radius increases, we show -with the help of statistical mechanics-that the statistical weight of modes involving a large number of H+ ions (`collective modes') increases sharply, in spite of the fact that the Boltzmann factor of each collective mode is exponentially small. As a result, the interaction of the H+ ions with collective modes makes a tiny suprathermal fraction of the H+ population appear. Our results hold for similar transitions in metal deuterides, too. A violation of an -insofar undisputed-upper bound on hydrogen loading follows.

  20. Covalent bonds against magnetism in transition metal compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsov, Sergey V; Khomskii, Daniel I

    2016-09-20

    Magnetism in transition metal compounds is usually considered starting from a description of isolated ions, as exact as possible, and treating their (exchange) interaction at a later stage. We show that this standard approach may break down in many cases, especially in 4d and 5d compounds. We argue that there is an important intersite effect-an orbital-selective formation of covalent metal-metal bonds that leads to an "exclusion" of corresponding electrons from the magnetic subsystem, and thus strongly affects magnetic properties of the system. This effect is especially prominent for noninteger electron number, when it results in suppression of the famous double exchange, the main mechanism of ferromagnetism in transition metal compounds. We study this mechanism analytically and numerically and show that it explains magnetic properties of not only several 4d-5d materials, including Nb2O2F3 and Ba5AlIr2O11, but can also be operative in 3d transition metal oxides, e.g., in CrO2 under pressure. We also discuss the role of spin-orbit coupling on the competition between covalency and magnetism. Our results demonstrate that strong intersite coupling may invalidate the standard single-site starting point for considering magnetism, and can lead to a qualitatively new behavior.

  1. Screened Coulomb interactions in metallic alloys. I. Universal screening in the atomic-sphere approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    2002-01-01

    We have used the locally self-consistent Green's-function (LSGF) method in supercell calculations to establish the distribution of the net charges assigned to the atomic spheres of the alloy components in metallic alloys with different compositions and degrees of order. This allows us to determine......-site local interaction zone. We demonstrate that the basic mechanism that governs the charge distribution is the screening of the net charges of the alloy components that makes the direct Coulomb interactions short ranged. In the atomic-sphere approximation, this screening appears to be almost independent...

  2. Effect of base metal alloys recasting on marginal integrity of castable crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajoghli, Farshad; Nosouhian, Saeid; Badrian, Hamid; Goroohi, Hossein; Saberian, Amir; Gadesi, Leyla

    2013-03-01

    Base metals have a wide use in casting methods. Sometimes they are reused in laboratories which may have an adverse effect on the restoration marginal integrity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of recasting of alloys on marginal integrity of restorations. Models with two types of finishing lines shoulder bevel 45° and shoulder 135° were produced and 15 wax copings were formed on each one of them. Each group containing 15 copings was divided into three subgroups A, B and C. Group A was casted with 100% new alloy, group B with 50% new and 50% recasted alloy and group C with 100% recasted alloy. Obtained metal copings were placed on dies and marginal gap size between restoration margin and the dies finishing line was measured using metric microscope and Moticam camera in four points, buccal, lingual, mesial and distal. A significant difference in mean marginal gap size exists among three types of alloys used (p-value = 0.036). A significant difference is observed between mean marginal gap size of two types of finishing lines for different alloys (p-value = 0.001). Using 100% recasted alloy is not recommended for any of the two types of finishing lines.

  3. Empirical prediction of optical transitions in metallic armchair SWCNTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Ahmed Jamal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a quick and effective method to calculate the second and third optical transition energies of metallic armchair single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT is presented. In this proposed method, the transition energy of any armchair SWCNT can be predicted directly by knowing its one chiral index as both of its chiral indices are same. The predicted results are compared with recent experimental data and found to be accurate over a wide diameter range from 2 to 4.8 nm. The empirical equation proposed here is also compared with that proposed in earlier works. The proposed way may help the research works or applications where information of optical transitions of armchair metallic nanotubes is needed.

  4. Disorder-Driven Metal-Insulator Transitions in Deformable Lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Domenico; Fratini, Simone; Dobrosavljević, Vladimir; Ciuchi, Sergio

    2017-01-20

    We show that, in the presence of a deformable lattice potential, the nature of the disorder-driven metal-insulator transition is fundamentally changed with respect to the noninteracting (Anderson) scenario. For strong disorder, even a modest electron-phonon interaction is found to dramatically renormalize the random potential, opening a mobility gap at the Fermi energy. This process, which reflects disorder-enhanced polaron formation, is here given a microscopic basis by treating the lattice deformations and Anderson localization effects on the same footing. We identify an intermediate "bad insulator" transport regime which displays resistivity values exceeding the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit and with a negative temperature coefficient, as often observed in strongly disordered metals. Our calculations reveal that this behavior originates from significant temperature-induced rearrangements of electronic states due to enhanced interaction effects close to the disorder-driven metal-insulator transition.

  5. Life cycle assessment of metal alloys for structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malovrh Rebec, K.; Markoli, B.; Leskovar, B.

    2018-03-01

    The study compared environmental footprints of two types of Al-alloys: well-known 5083 aluminium alloy with magnesium and traces of manganese and chromium in its composition. This material is highly resistant to seawater corrosion and the influence of industrial chemicals. Furthermore, it retains exceptional strength after welding. The comparisons were made to an innovative alloy where the aluminium based matrix is reinforced by metastable quasicrystals (QC), thus avoiding magnesium in its composition. Furthermore, we checked other aluminium ingots’ footprints and compared European average and Germany country specific production data. Environmental footprints were assessed via cradle to gate life cycle assessment. Our findings normalized to 1 m2 plate suggest, that newly proposed alloy could save around 50 % in value of parameters abiotic resources depletion of fossil fuels, acidification, eutrophication, global warming potential and photochemical ozone creation potential if we compare Qc5 to 6 mm 5083 alloy plate. Only abiotic resources depletion of elements and ozone depletion parameters increase for Qc5 compared to 6 mm 5083 alloy plate.

  6. Formation and stability of aluminum-based metallic glasses in Al-Fe-Gd alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Y.; Poon, S.J.; Shiflet, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    Metallic glasses, a class of amorphous alloys made by rapid solidification, have been studied quite extensively for almost thirty years. It has been recognized for a long time that metallic glasses are usually very strong and ductile, and exhibit high corrosion resistance relative to crystalline alloys with the same compositions. Recently, metallic glasses containing as much as 90 atomic percent aluminum have been discovered independently by two groups. This discovery has both scientific and technological implications. The formability of these new glasses have been found to be unusual. Studies of mechanical properties in these new metallic glasses show that many of them have tensile strengths over 800MPa, greatly exceeding the strongest commercial aluminum alloys. The high strengths of aluminum-rich metallic glasses can be of significant importance in obtaining high strength low density materials. Therefore, from both scientific and technological standpoints, it is important to understand the formation and thermal stability of these metallic glasses. Al-Fe-Gd alloys were chosen for a more detailed study since they exhibit high tensile strengths

  7. Influence of Alloy and Solidification Parameters on Grain Refinement in Aluminum Weld Metal due to Inoculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schempp, Philipp [BAM, Germany; Tang, Z. [BIAS, Germany; Cross, Carl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seefeld, T. [BIAS, Germany; Pittner, A. [BAM, Germany; Rethmeier, M. [BAM, Germany

    2012-06-28

    The goals are: (1) Establish how much Ti/B grain refiner is need to completely refine aluminum weld metal for different alloys and different welding conditions; (2) Characterize how alloy composition and solidification parameters affect weld metal grain refinement; and (3) Apply relevant theory to understand observed behavior. Conclusions are: (1) additions of Ti/B grain refiner to weld metal in Alloys 1050, 5083, and 6082 resulted in significant grain refinement; (2) grain refinement was more effective in GTAW than LBW, resulting in finer grains at lower Ti content - reason is limited time available for equiaxed grain growth in LBW (inability to occlude columnar grain growth); (3) welding travel speed did not markedly affect grain size within GTAW and LBW clusters; and (4) application of Hunt CET analysis showed experimental G to be on the order of the critical G{sub CET}; G{sub CET} was consistently higher for GTAW than for LBW.

  8. Low power electrocorrosion for sample preparation: identification of metals in alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charleton, Kimberly; Buffie, Tyler; Goltz, Douglas M

    2007-11-15

    Rapid surface oxidation of a metal was carried out using a low voltage (9-18 V dc) power supply to examine the feasibility of low power electrocorrosion as an alternative to current metal sampling techniques such as acid digestion. Potential was applied between a metal alloy and a cellulose electrode that was made conductive using an aqueous solution (NH4NO3, KCl). Metal ions diffuse into the cellulose as rapid surface oxidation of the metal occurs. The metal ions can then be extracted and analyzed using atomic spectroscopy (e.g. GFAAS). Steel (316L, SRM 663), brass and aluminum alloys were electro-corroded using constant potential. At short intervals (metal increased linearly with time. Corrosion rates for Cr, Ni, Cu and Mn ranged from 870 to 34 pg s(-1). The mass of metal corroded increased as applied potential/current increased and depends on the surface area of the cellulose-metal contact. Experiments showed that preferential metal corrosion does not occur in steel samples. SEM images show that there is a relatively large area ( approximately 1mm(2)) of homogenous corrosion and that the most damage occurs closest to the edge of filter paper/metal contact. Low power electrocorrosion was used to identify metals in a fork of unknown composition. Multiple techniques (GFAAS, FAAS and SN-ICP-MS) were used for analysis and it was found that Ag and Cu were the primary metals in the alloy, in a ratio of 3:1. Trace amounts of other metals (<1%) were found but not quantified.

  9. Coherent potential approximation treatment of the Sm valence transition in SmS induced by alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spronken, G.

    1982-01-01

    The Sm valence transition, similar to the pressure-induced transition in pure SmS, has been observed in a large number of cases by substituting a trivalent rare earth, B, for Sm, thereby forming isostructural alloys with a lattice constant smaller than that of semiconducting SmS. Such substitutions are expected to exert a 'chemical' pressure which simulates the external pressure. However, divalent substitutions (Yb, Eu and Ca), although having a favourable 'size' factor, do not induce any valence transition. Accordingly, band structure effects, essentially due to the relative position of the conduction bands of SmS and BS, should also be taken into consideration. In order to clarify the role which the lattice constant and the electronic structure play in the valence transition, these alloys have been studied using the coherent potential approximation (CPA) including both the crystal field effect and the Coulomb interaction between localised and itinerant states as driving mechanisms. For Sm, the 'homogeneous' picture is considered, each Sm site having the average valence; then the Smsub(1-x)Bsub(x)S system is reduced to a binary alloy. Charge transfer between the f states of Sm and the alloy conduction band (i.e. Sm valence change) is determined self-consistently. The calculations are consistent with the experimental behaviour and allow us to understand qualitatively the variation of the critical concentration xsub(c) for the transition as a function of the difference Δa between the lattice parameters of SmS and BS. (author)

  10. Transition Metal d-Orbital Splitting Diagrams: An Updated Educational Resource for Square Planar Transition Metal Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo¨rgel, Jonas; Campbell, Michael G.; Ritter, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The presentation of d-orbital splitting diagrams for square planar transition metal complexes in textbooks and educational materials is often inconsistent and therefore confusing for students. Here we provide a concise summary of the key features of orbital splitting diagrams for square planar complexes, which we propose may be used as an updated…

  11. Design of Hydrogen Storage Alloys/Nanoporous Metals Hybrid Electrodes for Nickel-Metal Hydride Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M M; Yang, C C; Wang, C C; Wen, Z; Zhu, Y F; Zhao, M; Li, J C; Zheng, W T; Lian, J S; Jiang, Q

    2016-06-07

    Nickel metal hydride (Ni-MH) batteries have demonstrated key technology advantages for applications in new-energy vehicles, which play an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the world's dependence on fossil fuels. However, the poor high-rate dischargeability of the negative electrode materials-hydrogen storage alloys (HSAs) limits applications of Ni-MH batteries in high-power fields due to large polarization. Here we design a hybrid electrode by integrating HSAs with a current collector of three-dimensional bicontinuous nanoporous Ni. The electrode shows enhanced high-rate dischargeability with the capacity retention rate reaching 44.6% at a discharge current density of 3000 mA g(-1), which is 2.4 times that of bare HSAs (18.8%). Such a unique hybrid architecture not only enhances charge transfer between nanoporous Ni and HSAs, but also facilitates rapid diffusion of hydrogen atoms in HSAs. The developed HSAs/nanoporous metals hybrid structures exhibit great potential to be candidates as electrodes in high-performance Ni-MH batteries towards applications in new-energy vehicles.

  12. Phase transition and hydrogen storage properties of Mg–Ga alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Daifeng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials of Guangdong Province, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Ouyang, Liuzhang, E-mail: meouyang@scut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials of Guangdong Province, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Energy & Environmental Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Wu, Cong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials of Guangdong Province, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Wang, Hui; Liu, Jiangwen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials of Guangdong Province, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Energy & Environmental Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Sun, Lixian [Guangxi Collaborative Innovation Center of Structure and Property for New Energy and Materials, Guilin 541004 (China); Zhu, Min [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Storage Materials of Guangdong Province, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); China-Australia Joint Laboratory for Energy & Environmental Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China)

    2015-09-05

    Highlights: • A fully reversible transformation in Mg–Ga–H system with reduced dehydrogenation enthalpy is realized. • The mechanism of phase transformation in the de/hydrogenation of Mg–Ga alloy is revealed. • The de/hydrogenation process of Mg{sub 5}Ga{sub 2} compound is expressed as: Mg{sub 5}Ga{sub 2} + H{sub 2} ↔ 2Mg{sub 2}Ga + MgH{sub 2}. - Abstract: Mg-based alloys are viewed as one of the most promising candidates for hydrogen storage; however, high desorption temperature and the sluggish kinetics of MgH{sub 2} hinder their practical application. Alloying and changing the reaction pathway are effective methods to solve these issues. As the solid solubility of Ga in Mg is 5 wt% at 573 K, the preparation of a Mg(Ga) solid solution at relatively high temperatures was designed in this paper. The phase transition and hydrogen storage properties of the MgH{sub 2} and Mg{sub 5}Ga{sub 2} composite (hereafter referred to as Mg–Ga alloy) were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), pressure–composition-isotherm (PCI) measurements, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The reversible hydrogen storage capacity of Mg–Ga alloy is 5.7 wt% H{sub 2}. During the dehydrogenation process of Mg–Ga alloy, Mg{sub 2}Ga reacts with MgH{sub 2}, initially releasing H{sub 2} and forming Mg{sub 5}Ga{sub 2}; subsequently, MgH{sub 2} decomposes into Mg with further release of H{sub 2}. The phase transition mechanism of the Mg{sub 5}Ga{sub 2} compound during the dehydrogenation process was also investigated by using in situ XRD analysis. In addition, the dehydrogenation enthalpy and entropy changes, and the apparent activation energy were also calculated.

  13. A Fundamental Approach to Developing Aluminium based Bulk Amorphous Alloys based on Stable Liquid Metal Structures and Electronic Equilibrium - 154041

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-28

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0027 A Fundamental Approach to Developing Aluminium -based Bulk Amorphous Alloys based on Stable Liquid-Metal Structures and...to 16 Dec 2016 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Fundamental Approach to Developing Aluminium -based Bulk Amorphous Alloys based on Stable Liquid-Metal...Air Force Research Laboratory for accurately predicting compositions of new amorphous alloys specifically based on aluminium with properties superior

  14. Ultra-dense energy storage utilizing high melting point metallic alloys and photovoltaic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Datas Medina, Alejandro; Martí Vega, Antonio; Cañizo Nadal, Carlos del; Luque López, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    A novel concept for energy storage utilizing high melting point metallic alloys and photovoltaic cells is presented. In the proposed system, the energy is stored in the form of latent heat of metallic alloys and converted to electricity upon demand by infrared sensitive photovoltaic cells. Silicon is considered in this paper due to its extremely high latent heat (1800 J/g), melting point (1410ºC), low cost (~$1.7/kg) and abundance on earth. The proposed solution enables an enormous energy sto...

  15. Experimental determination of systems suitable for study as monotectic binary metallic alloy solidification models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Transparent binary metallic alloy solidification models are important in attempts to understand the processes causing liquid-liquid and solid-liquid phase transformations in metallic alloy systems. These models permit visual observation of the phase transformation and the processes proceding solidification. The number of these transparent monotectic binary models needs to be expanded to distinguish between the unique and general phenomena observed. The expansion of the number of accurately determined monotectic phase diagrams of model systems, and contribution to a data base for eventual use with UNIFAC group contribution methods is examined.

  16. Corrosion-resistant amorphous metallic films of Mo49Cr33B18 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesham, R.; Distefano, S.; Fitzgerald, D.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    Corrosion-resistant amorphous metallic alloy films of Mo49Cr33B18 with a crystallization temperature of 590 C were deposited onto glass and quartz substrates by magnetron sputter-quench technique. The amorphous nature of the films was confirmed by their diffuse X-ray diffraction patterns. The deposited films are densely packed (zone T) and exhibit low stress and good adhesion to the substrate. Corrosion current of as-deposited coating of MoCrB amorphous metallic alloy is approximately three orders of magnitude less than the corrosion current of 304 stainless steel in 1N H2SO4 solution.

  17. METHOD FOR OBTAINING PLUTONIUM METAL AND ALLOYS OF PLUTONIUM FROM PLUTONIUM TRICHLORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavis, J.G.; Leary, J.A.; Maraman, W.J.

    1962-11-13

    A process is given for both reducing plutonium trichloride to plutonium metal using cerium as the reductant and simultaneously alloying such plutonium metal with an excess of cerium or cerium and cobalt sufficient to yield the desired nuclear reactor fuel composition. The process is conducted at a temperature from about 550 to 775 deg C, at atmospheric pressure, without the use of booster reactants, and a substantial decontamination is effected in the product alloy of any rare earths which may be associated with the source of the plutonium. (AEC)

  18. Alkali metal ion templated transition metal formate framework materials: synthesis, crystal structures, ion migration, and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikeland, Espen; Lock, Nina; Filsø, Mette; Stingaciu, Marian; Shen, Yanbin; Overgaard, Jacob; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2014-10-06

    Four transition metal formate coordination polymers with anionic frameworks, namely, Na[Mn(HCOO)3], K[Mn(HCOO)3], Na2[Cu3(HCOO)8], and K2[Cu5(HCOO)12], were synthesized using a mild solution chemistry approach. Multitemperature single-crystal (100-300 K) and powder X-ray diffraction studies of the compounds reveal structures of large diversity ranging from cubic chiral Na-Mn formate to triclinic Na-Cu formate. The structural variety is caused by the nature of the transition metals, the alkali metal ion templation, and the versatility of the formate group, which offers metal-metal coordination through three different O-C-O bridging modes (syn-syn, syn-anti, anti-anti) in addition to metal-metal bridging via a single oxygen atom. The two manganese(II) compounds contain mononuclear, octahedrally coordinated moieties, but the three-dimensional connectivity between the manganese octahedra is very different in the two structures. The two copper frameworks, in contrast, consist of binuclear and mononuclear moieties (Na-Cu formate) and trinuclear and mononuclear moieties (K-Cu formate), respectively. Procrystal electron density analysis of the compounds indicates one-dimensional K(+)-ion conductivity in K-Mn and K-Cu, and the nature of the proposed potassium ion migration is compared with results from similar analysis on known Na(+) and K(+) ion conductors. K-Mn and Na-Mn were tested as cathode materials, but this resulted in poor reversibility due to low conductivity or structural collapse. The magnetic properties of the compounds were studied by vibrating sample magnetometric measurements, and their thermal stabilities were determined by thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. Despite structural differences, the metal formates that contain the same transition metal have similar magnetic properties and thermal decomposition pathways, that is, the nature of the transition metal controls the compound properties.

  19. Shear bond strength of a ceromer to noble and base metal alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorriz H.

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The improvement of the physical and chemical properties of resins as well as great advances achieved in the field of chemical bonding of resin to metal has changed the trend of restorative treatments. Today the second generation of laboratory resins have an important role in the restoration of teeth. The clinical bond strength should be reliable in order to gain successful results. In this study the shear bond strength (SBS between targis (a ceromer and two alloys (noble and base metal was studied and the effect of thermocycling on the bond investigated. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, alloys samples were prepared according to the manufacturer. After sandblasting of bonding surfaces with 50µ AI2o3 Targis was bonded to the alloy using Targis I link. All of the samples were placed in 37°C water for a period of 24 hours. Then half of the samples were subjected to 1000 cycles of thermocycling at temperatures of 5°C and 55°C. Planear shear test was used to test the bond strength in the Instron machine with the speed rate of 0.5mm/min. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. Two-way analysis of variance was used to compare the bond strength among the groups. T test was used to compare the alloys. The influence of thermocycling and alloy type on bond strength was studied using Mann Whitney test. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Result: The studied alloys did not differ significantly, when the samples were not thermocycled (P=0.136 but after thermocycling a significant difference was observed in SBS of resin to different alloys (P=000.1. Thermal stress and alloy type had significant interaction, with regard to shear bond strength (P=0.003. There was a significant difference in SBS before and after thermocycling in noble alloys (P=0.009, but this was not true in base metals (P=0.29. Maximum SBS (19.09 Mpa belonged to Degubond 4, before thermocycling. Minimum SBS (8.21 Mpa was seen in Degubond 4

  20. Experimental partitioning of Zr, Ti, and Nb between silicate liquid and a complex noble metal alloy and the partitioning of Ti between perovskite and platinum metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurewicz, Stephen R.; Jones, John H.

    1993-01-01

    El Goresy et al.'s observation of Nb, Zr, and Ta in refractory platinum metal nuggets (RPMN's) from Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAI's) in the Allende meteorite led them to propose that these lithophile elements alloyed in the metallic state with noble metals in the early solar nebula. However, Grossman pointed out that the thermodynamic stability of Zr in the oxide phase is vastly greater than metallic Zr at estimated solar nebula conditions. Jones and Burnett suggested this discrepancy may be explained by the very non-ideal behavior of some lithophile transition elements in noble metal solutions and/or intermetallic compounds. Subsequently, Fegley and Kornacki used thermodynamic data taken from the literature to predict the stability of several of these intermetallic compounds at estimated solar nebula conditions. Palme and Schmitt and Treiman et al. conducted experiments to quantify the partitioning behavior of certain lithophile elements between silicate liquid and Pt-metal. Although their results were somewhat variable, they did suggest that Zr partition coefficients were too small to explain the observed 'percent' levels in some RPMN's. Palme and Schmitt also observed large partition coefficients for Nb and Ta. No intermetallic phases were identified. Following the work of Treiman et al., Jurewicz and Jones performed experiments to examine Zr, Nb, and Ti partitioning near solar nebula conditions. Their results showed that Zr, Nb, and Ti all have an affinity for the platinum metal, with Nb and Ti having a very strong preference for the metal. The intermetallic phases (Zr,Fe)Pt3, (Nb,Fe)Pt3, and (Ti,Fe)Pt3 were identified. Curiously, although both experiments and calculations indicate that Ti should partition strongly into Pt-metal (possibly as TiPt3), no Ti has ever been observed in any RPMN's. Fegley and Kornacki also noticed this discrepancy and hypothesized that the Ti was stabilized in perovskite which is a common phase in Allende CAI's.

  1. Ab initio modelling of transition metals in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, M; Mainwood, A

    2003-01-01

    Transition metals (TM) from the first transition series are commonly used as solvent catalysts in the synthesis of diamond by high pressure, high temperature processes. Ab initio calculations on these metals, in finite clusters of tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, enable us to investigate trends in their stability and properties. By carrying out systematic studies of interstitial, substitutional and semi-vacancy TM defects, we show that the electronic structure of the TMs is complicated by the presence of 'dangling bonds' when the TM disrupts the crystal lattice: interstitial defects conform to the Ludwig-Woodbury (LW) model, whilst substitutional and semi-vacancy defects move from approximating the LW model early in the transition series to approaching the vacancy model for the heavier metals. Multi-configurational self-consistent field methods allow genuine many-electron states to be modelled; for neutral interstitial, and all substitutional TMs, the crystal fields are found to exceed the exchange energies in strength. Consequently, low spin states are found for these defects. We find substitutional defects to be the most stable, but that semi-vacancy TMs are very similar in energy to the substitutional defects late in the transition series; interstitial defects are only metastable in diamond. Given appropriate charge compensators neutral and positively charged interstitial TM defects were stable, while negatively charged species appeared to be strongly disfavoured

  2. Glass Transition Kinetics of 2714A amorphous alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker Rao, T.; Lilly Shanker Rao, T.; Shaker, A. M.; Venkataraman, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present study is related to the kinetics of onset crystallization, Tx and peak crystallization Tp of cobalt based metallic glass 2714A (Co65Si15B14Fe4Ni2) using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Non-isothermal measurements were performed at different heating rates (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 K/min).The experimental results of the crystallization were studied by two most frequently used methods, i.e., Moynihan and Kissinger. The onset crystallization was also studied by VFT and Lasock’s approaches in addition to the above two methods. The activation energy of crystallization Ec was found to be 622.86 and 638.28 kJ/mol and Ex the activation energy of onset crystallization to be 676.34 and 688.93 kJ/mol respectively. Here Tx is used as a substitution of Tg to calculate the fragility index m of the cobalt based metallic glass in the absence of Tg. The fragility index, m which is a measure of glass forming ability (GFA) is also calculated and the value falls between 20 and 60. This indicates the studied metallic glass is an intermediate strong glass.

  3. Metal Forming of Lightweight Magnesium Alloys for Aviation Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Śliwa R.E.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The work presents an analysis of selected magnesium alloys as structural materials to be used in production of aircraft parts as well as their technological parameters in some manufacturing processes. Upsetting test, backward extrusion and Kobo extrusion of complex cross-sectional profiles and forging process were realized using magnesium alloys AZ31, AZ61, AZ80, WE 43 and Mg alloy with Li for production of thin - walled aircraft profiles and forged aviation parts. The range of temperatures and extrusion rate for the manufacturing these profiles were determined. Tests also covered the analysis of microstructure of Mg alloys in the initial state as well as after the extrusion process. It has been proved that the proper choice of parameters in the case of a specific profile extruded from magnesium alloys allows the manufacturing of products of complex cross-sections and the quality required in aerospace industry. This has been demonstrated on the examples of complex cross-sectional profiles using elements of varied wall thickness and examples of forged aviation parts: aircraft wheel hub and helicopter lever for control system.

  4. The effect of transition metals additions on the temperature coefficient of linear expansion of titanium and vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesnaya, M.I.; Volokitin, G.G.; Kashchuk, V.A.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported of an experimental research into the influence of small additions of α-transition metals on the temperature coefficient of linear expansion of titanium and vanadium. Using the configuration model of substance as the basis, expeained are the lowering of the critical liquefaction temperature or the melting point of vanadium and the raising of it, as caused by the addition of metals of the 6 group of the periodic chart and by the addition of metals of the 8 group, respectively, and also a shift in the temperature of the polymorphic α-β-transformation of titanium. Suggested as the best alloying metal for vanadium are tungsten and tantalum; for titaniums is vanadium whose admixtures lower the melting point and shift the polymorphic transformation temperature by as much as 100 to 120 degrees

  5. The glass transition, crystallization and melting in Au-Pb-Sb alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. C.; Allen, J. L.; Fecht, H. J.; Perepezko, J. H.; Ohsaka, K.

    1988-01-01

    The glass transition, crystallization and melting of Au(55)Pb(22.5)Sb(22.5) alloys have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry DSC. Crystallization on heating above the glass transition temperature Tg (45 C) begins at 64 C. Further crystallization events are observed at 172 C and 205 C. These events were found to correspond to the formation of the intermetallic compounds AuSb2, Au2Pb, and possibly AuPb2, respectively. Isothermal DSC scans of the glassy alloy above Tg were used to monitor the kinetics of crystallization. The solidification behavior and heat capacity in the glass-forming composition range were determined with droplet samples. An undercooling level of 0.3T(L) below the liquidus temperature T(L) was achieved, resulting in crystallization of different stable and metastable phases. The heat capacity C(P) of the undercooled liquid was measured over an undercooling range of 145 C.

  6. Cross-linking proteins with bimetallic tetracarboxylate compounds of transition metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostic, N.M.; Chen, J.

    1991-03-05

    Stable cross-linked complexes of transition-metal tetracarboxylates and proteins are formed. The preferred transition-metal is rhodium. The protein may be collagen or an enzyme such as a proteolytic enzyme. No Drawings

  7. Calcium metal as a scavenger for antimony from aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Daniels, E.J.; Wu, C.T.

    1994-10-04

    Previous work has shown that trace amounts of antimony (Sb) can affect the mechanical properties of strontium (Sr) modified aluminum castings. ANL has been investigating technology to remove or neutralize Sb to reduce its negative effect on the physical properties of those alloys. Review of past work on processing and recovery of scrap aluminum inferred that calcium (Ca) is an effective scavenger of Sb, bismuth, lead and cadmium. Following up on that lead, we have found that Ca is, indeed, effective for removing Sb from molten aluminum alloys although its effectiveness can be compromised by a wide range of processing conditions. A minimum ratio of about four to one, by weight, of Ca to Sb appears necessary to insure an effective scavenging of contained Sb.in 356 aluminum alloys.

  8. Atomic-level Electron Microscopy of Metal and Alloy Electrocatalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deiana, Davide

    , the elemental distribution of the PtxY, before and after the electrochemical tests, has been determined. A core-shell structure is formed after the ORR chemical treatment, with an alloyed core embedded by a ~1 nm Pt-rich shell, due to the segregation of the Y from the first few atomic layers of the particle...... was the only matching structure. In the case of Pd−Hg, a core-shell structure has been found, with a pure Pd core and a Pd-Hg shell. Through atomic resolution STEM, the structure of the alloy in the shell of different particles has been revealed, showing the formation of an ordered alloy structure....... flat surfaces and exposed to different sintering conditions. Ex situ STEM imaging has been used to monitor the variation of the particle dimensions through the analysis of particle area distributions. Clusters with a monomodal size distribution exhibited intrinsic sintering resistance on different...

  9. Nanofluid based on self-nanoencapsulated metal/metal alloys phase change materials with tuneable crystallisation temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Nuria; Gimeno-Furio, Alexandra; Mondragon, Rosa; Hernandez, Leonor; Cabedo, Luis; Cordoncillo, Eloisa; Julia, J Enrique

    2017-12-14

    Nanofluids using nanoencapsulated Phase Change Materials (nePCM) allow increments in both the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the base fluid. Incremented heat capacity is produced by the melting enthalpy of the nanoparticles core. In this work two important advances in this nanofluid type are proposed and experimentally tested. It is firstly shown that metal and metal alloy nanoparticles can be used as self-encapsulated nePCM using the metal oxide layer that forms naturally in most commercial synthesis processes as encapsulation. In line with this, Sn/SnOx nanoparticles morphology, size and thermal properties were studied by testing the suitability and performance of encapsulation at high temperatures and thermal cycling using a commercial thermal oil (Therminol 66) as the base fluid. Secondly, a mechanism to control the supercooling effect of this nePCM type based on non-eutectic alloys was developed.

  10. Sample preparation of metal alloys by electric discharge machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, G. B., II; Gordon, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Electric discharge machining was investigated as a noncontaminating method of comminuting alloys for subsequent chemical analysis. Particulate dispersions in water were produced from bulk alloys at a rate of about 5 mg/min by using a commercially available machining instrument. The utility of this approach was demonstrated by results obtained when acidified dispersions were substituted for true acid solutions in an established spectrochemical method. The analysis results were not significantly different for the two sample forms. Particle size measurements and preliminary results from other spectrochemical methods which require direct aspiration of liquid into flame or plasma sources are reported.

  11. Effect of recasting on the thickness of metal-ceramic interface of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Nemanja

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Aim. This research was done to establish recasting effects of nickel-chromium and cobalt-chromium alloys on the thickness of their metal-ceramic interface in making fixed partial dentures. Metal-ceramic interface determines their functional integrity and prevents damages on ceramics during mastication. Investigation of metal-ceramic samples is supposed to show if base metal alloys for metalceramics are successfully recycled without any risk of reduction of metal-ceramic interface thickness. Methods. The research was performed as an experimental study. Per six metal-ceramic samples of nickel-chromium alloy (Wiron99 and cobalt-chromium alloy (Wirobond C were made each. Alloy residues were recycled through twelve casting generations with the addition of 50% of new alloy on the occasion of every recasting. Analysis Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX (Oxford Instruments and Scanning Electon Microscop (SEM analysis (JEOL were used to determine thickness of metal-ceramic interface together with PC Software for quantification of visual information's (KVI POPOVAC. Results. Results of this research introduced significant differences between thickness of metal-ceramic interface in every examined recycle generation. Recasting had negative effect on thickness of metal-ceramic interface of the examined alloys. This research showed almost linear reduction of elastic modulus up to the 12th generation of recycling. Conclusion. Recasting of nickel-chromium and cobaltchromium alloys is not recommended because of reduced thickness of metal-ceramic interface of these alloys. Instead of recycling, the alloy residues should be returned to the manufacturers.

  12. Texture characterisation of hexagonal metals: Magnesium AZ91 alloy, welded by laser processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouadri, A.; Barrallier, L.

    2006-01-01

    Cooled and cast magnesium AZ91 alloy was welded using a CO 2 laser. The changes in the microstructure were analysed by optical and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Modification of the anisotropic properties was evaluated by the characterization of the texture in the base metal, in the core of the welded zone and in the welded zone close to the surface. In the two former zones, we have not observed a texture. Laser welding only leads to a change of the grain size and a disappearance of the eutectic phase. By contrast, in the welded zone close to the surface, the laser process leads both to a finer microstructure, to a loss of the Al-content and to the presence of several texture components. In this zone, our results showed that these textures are on pyramidal {101-bar 1} and prismatic {101-bar 0} planes. Much of the explanation for such texture rests with the fact that during the laser welding, material solidifies in strong non-equilibrium conditions. The kinetics of the nucleation and the growth are partly controlled by the high-rise and high fall of the temperature and the power produced by the laser process. The nature of the texture has been explained by the presence of a columnar to equiaxed transition in the welded zone

  13. Multifunctional properties related to magnetostructural transitions in ternary and quaternary Heusler alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubenko, Igor, E-mail: igor_doubenko@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States); Quetz, Abdiel; Pandey, Sudip; Aryal, Anil; Eubank, Michael [Department of Physics, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States); Rodionov, Igor; Prudnikov, Valerii; Granovsky, Alexander [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, Vorob' evy Gory, 11999I Moscow (Russian Federation); Lahderanta, Erkki [Lappeenranta University of Technology, 53851 (Finland); Samanta, Tapas; Saleheen, Ahmad; Stadler, Shane [Department of Physics & Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Ali, Naushad [Department of Physics, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    In this report, the results of a study on the effects of compositional variations induced by the small changes in concentrations of the parent components and/or by the substitution of Ni, Mn, or In by an extra element Z, on the phase transitions, and phenomena related to the magnetostructural transitions in off-stoichiometric Ni–Mn–In based Heusler alloys are summarized. The crystal structures, phase transitions temperatures, and magnetic and magnetocaloric properties were analyzed for representative samples of the following systems (all near 15 at% indium concentration): Ni–Mn–In, Ni–Mn–In–Si, Ni–Mn–In–B, Ni–Mn–In–Cu, Ni–Mn–In–Cu–B, Ni–Mn–In–Fe, Ni–Mn–In–Ag, and Ni–Mn–In–Al. - Highlights: • The experimental results on phase transitions temperatures, adiabatic temperature changes, magnetoresistance and heat flow for the ternary and quaternary Heusler alloys based on Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} demonstrate high sensitivity of magnetic properties to the small changes in concentrations of the parent components and/or by the substitution of Ni, Mn, or In by an additional element Z. • The phenomena related to the magnetostructural transitions strongly depend on the weighted average radius of constituent ions.

  14. Conductive transition metal oxide nanostructured electrochromic material and optical switching devices constructed thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattox, Tracy M.; Koo, Bonil; Garcia, Guillermo; Milliron, Delia J.; Trizio, Luca De; Dahlman, Clayton

    2017-10-10

    An electrochromic device includes a nanostructured transition metal oxide bronze layer that includes one or more transition metal oxide and one or more dopant, a solid state electrolyte, and a counter electrode. The nanostructured transition metal oxide bronze selectively modulates transmittance of near-infrared (NIR) spectrum and visible spectrum radiation as a function of an applied voltage to the device.

  15. The 1s x-ray absorption pre-edge structures in transition metal oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Frank|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/08747610X; Vanko, Gyoergy; Glatzel, Pieter

    2009-01-01

    We develop a general procedure to analyse the pre-edges in 1s x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) of transition metal oxides and coordination complexes. Transition metal coordination complexes can be described from a local model with one metal ion. The 1s 3d quadrupole transitions are

  16. Electron scattering characteristics of polycrystalline metal transition films by in-situ electrical resistance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, I.G. [Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Physics Department, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); IFIMUP and IN, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: i_trindade@msn.com; Leitao, D. [IFIMUP and IN, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Fermento, R. [Instituto de Microelectronica de Madrid, Isaac Newton 8, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain); Pogorelev, Y.; Sousa, J.B. [Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Physics Department, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); IFIMUP and IN, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2009-08-15

    In-situ electrical resistance measurements were performed to obtain the scattering characteristics of very thin polycrystalline metal transition magnetic alloys grown by ion beam deposition (IBD) on specific underlayers. The experimental curves show size effects at small film thicknesses and important differences between Co{sub 85}Fe{sub 15} and Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} thin layers grown on identical underlayers of Ta70 A/Ru13 A. The largest difference was observed in Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} films grown on underlayers of amorphous Ta70 A. The experimental curves of electrical resistivity/conductivity variation with layer thickness were well fit within the Mayadas and Shatzkes (M-S) model, assuming specific formulations for grain growth with layer thickness.

  17. Synthesis and structure of two-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Yumeng

    2015-07-13

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) exhibit unique electrical, optical, thermal, and mechanical properties, which enable them to be used as building blocks in compact and lightweight integrated electronic systems. The controllable and reliable synthesis of atomically thin TMDCs is essential for their practical application. Recent progress in large-area synthesis of monolayer TMDCs paves the way for practical production of various 2D TMDC layers. The intrinsic optical and electrical properties of monolayer TMDCs can be defined by stoichiometry during synthesis. By manipulating the lattice structure or layer stacking manner, it is possible to create atomically thin van der Waals materials with unique and unexplored physical properties. In this article, we review recent developments in the synthesis of TMDC monolayers, alloys, and heterostructures, which shine light on the design of novel TMDCs with desired functional properties.

  18. Does the casting mode influence microstructure, fracture and properties of different metal ceramic alloys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, José Roberto de Oliveira; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda; Rodrigues-Filho, Leonardo Eloy; Pinto, Marcelo Mendes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the tensile strength, elongation, microhardness, microstructure and fracture pattern of various metal ceramic alloys cast under different casting conditions. Two Ni-Cr alloys, Co-Cr and Pd-Ag were used. The casting conditions were as follows: electromagnetic induction under argon atmosphere, vacuum, using blowtorch without atmosphere control. For each condition, 16 specimens, each measuring 25 mm long and 2.5 mm in diameter, were obtained. Ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation (EL) tests were performed using a Kratos machine. Vickers Microhardness (VM), fracture mode and microstructure were analyzed by SEM. UTS, EL and VM data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. For UTS, alloy composition had a direct influence on casting condition of alloys (Wiron 99 and Remanium CD), with higher values shown when cast with Flame/Air (p alloy" and 'casting condition" influenced the EL and VM results, generally presenting opposite results, i.e., alloy with high elongation value had lower hardness (Wiron 99), and casting condition with the lowest EL values had the highest VM values (blowtorch). Both factors had significant influence on the properties evaluated, and prosthetic laboratories should select the appropriate casting method for each alloy composition to obtain the desired property.

  19. Does the casting mode influence microstructure, fracture and properties of different metal ceramic alloys?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto de Oliveira Bauer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the tensile strength, elongation, microhardness, microstructure and fracture pattern of various metal ceramic alloys cast under different casting conditions. Two Ni-Cr alloys, Co-Cr and Pd-Ag were used. The casting conditions were as follows: electromagnetic induction under argon atmosphere, vacuum, using blowtorch without atmosphere control. For each condition, 16 specimens, each measuring 25 mm long and 2.5 mm in diameter, were obtained. Ultimate tensile strength (UTS and elongation (EL tests were performed using a Kratos machine. Vickers Microhardness (VM, fracture mode and microstructure were analyzed by SEM. UTS, EL and VM data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. For UTS, alloy composition had a direct influence on casting condition of alloys (Wiron 99 and Remanium CD, with higher values shown when cast with Flame/Air (p < 0.05. The factors 'alloy" and 'casting condition" influenced the EL and VM results, generally presenting opposite results, i.e., alloy with high elongation value had lower hardness (Wiron 99, and casting condition with the lowest EL values had the highest VM values (blowtorch. Both factors had significant influence on the properties evaluated, and prosthetic laboratories should select the appropriate casting method for each alloy composition to obtain the desired property.

  20. Marrying Excitons and Plasmons in Monolayer Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tuan, Dinh; Scharf, Benedikt; Žutić, Igor; Dery, Hanan

    2017-10-01

    Just as photons are the quanta of light, plasmons are the quanta of orchestrated charge-density oscillations in conducting media. Plasmon phenomena in normal metals, superconductors, and doped semiconductors are often driven by long-wavelength Coulomb interactions. However, in crystals whose Fermi surface is comprised of disconnected pockets in the Brillouin zone, collective electron excitations can also attain a shortwave component when electrons transition between these pockets. In this work, we show that the band structure of monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides gives rise to an intriguing mechanism through which shortwave plasmons are paired up with excitons. The coupling elucidates the origin for the optical sideband that is observed repeatedly in monolayers of WSe2 and WS2 but not understood. The theory makes it clear why exciton-plasmon coupling has the right conditions to manifest itself distinctly only in the optical spectra of electron-doped tungsten-based monolayers.

  1. Induction skull melting facility: an advanced system for electromagnetic processing of metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugilal, G.; Agarwal, K.

    2017-01-01

    Induction Skull Melting (ISM) is an advanced technology for processing highly refractory and extremely reactive metals and their alloys to produce ultra-high purity products. In ISM, the metallic charge is melted in a water-cooled, copper crucible. The crucible is segmented so that the magnetic field can penetrate into the metallic charge to be melted. By virtue of the strong electromagnetic stirring, the ISM technology can also be used to homogenize alloys of metals, which are difficult to be combined uniformly in composition due to large difference in specific gravity. In view of various important applications in frontier areas of material research, development and production, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre developed the ISM technology indigenously

  2. [Cervical adaptation of complete cast crowns of various metal alloys, with and without die spacers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephano, C B; Roselino, R F; Roselino, R B; Campos, G M

    1989-01-01

    A metallic replica from a dental preparation for crown was used to make 8 class-IV stone dies. The wax patterns for the casting of the crowns were obtained in two conditions: a) from the stone die with no spacer; and b) from the stone die with an acrylic spacer. Thus, 64 metallic crowns were casted, using 4 different alloys: DURACAST (Cu-Al), NICROCAST (Ni-Cr) and DURABOND (Ni-Cr), and gold. The casted crowns were fitted in the metallic replica and measured as to the cervical discrepance of fitting. The results showed that the use of die spacers decreases the clinical discrepancies of fitting of the casted crowns (in a statistically significant level), no matter the metallic alloy employed.

  3. Compositional disorder, magnetism, and their interplay in metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, D.D.; Staunton, J.B.; Pinski, F.J.; Gyorffy, B.L.; Stocks, G.M.

    1992-01-01

    Chemical disorder leads to a variety of intriguing phenomena in alloys which have yet to be fully understood, particularly those phenomena occurring when chemical and magnetic effects interplay with one another. For example, magnetic order gives rise to chemical ordering in alloys, as in Ni-rich NiFe alloys. Two examples of the interplay of chemical disorder and magnetism will be discussed. Our recently developed ab-initio Landau (mean-field) theory for calculating the chemical-chemical, magneto-chemical, and magnetic-magnetic correlation functions in substitutional random alloys is used to describe electronic/magnetic mechanisms (e.g. in FeV) which give rise to the chemical short-range order as determined by neutron, X-ray, or electron diffuse scattering intensities. New developments within this approach that account for charge rearrangement effect will be mentioned. These calculations are performed within the multiple-scattering framework, developed by Korringa, Kohn, and Rostoker (KKR), combined with the coherent potential approximation (CPA) to describe the disorder. This approach allows a first-principles description of the electronic structure of the high-temperature, chemically disordered state and its instability to ordering a low temperatures. This paper reports that this method provides not only a direct comparison of diffuse scattering data with theory but a means to understand more fully the underlying mechanisms which drive chemical and/or magnetic ordering

  4. Peruvian perovskite Between Transition-metal to PGM/PlatinumGroupMetal Catalytic Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksoed, Wh-

    2016-11-01

    Strongly correlated electronic materials made of simple building blocks, such as a transition-metal ion in an octahedral oxygen cage forming a perovskite structure- Dagotto & Tokura for examples are the high-temperature superconductivity & the CMR/Colossal Magnetoresistance . Helium-4 denotes from LC Case,ScD: "Catalytic Fusion of Deuterium into Helium-4"- 1998 dealt with gaseous D2- "contacted with a supported metallic catalyst at superatmospheric pressure". The catalyst is a platinum-group metal, at about 0.5% - 1% by weight, on activated C. Accompanies Stephen J Geier, 2010 quotes "transition metal complexes", the Energy thus produced is enormous, and because the deuterium is very cheap in the form of heavy water (less than US 1/g), the fuel cost is very low (seas &Deuteronomy to be eternally preserves. Heartfelt Gratitudes to HE. Mr. Prof. Ir. HANDOJO.

  5. Examination of Solubility Models for the Determination of Transition Metals within Liquid Alkali Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Isler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The experimental solubility of transition metals in liquid alkali metal was compared to the modeled solubility calculated using various equations for solubility. These equations were modeled using the enthalpy calculations of the semi-empirical Miedema model and various entropy calculations. The accuracy of the predicted solubility compared to the experimental data is more dependent on which liquid alkali metal is being examined rather than the transition metal solute examined. For liquid lithium the calculated solubility by the model was generally larger than experimental values, while for liquid cesium the modeling solubility was significantly smaller than the experimental values. For liquid sodium, potassium, and rubidium the experimental solubilities were within the range calculated by this study. Few data approached the predicted temperature dependence of solubility and instead most data exhibited a less pronounced temperature dependence.

  6. Transition Metal Oxides: Many Body Physics Meets Solid State ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    New two-fluid (localized + band electron) model for manganites · Slide 19 · Picturizing the ferro-insulator to ferro-metal transition and the 2-fluid model · Material Systematics (varying Do) ( For fixed EJT = 0.5 eV , U = 5 eV, JF ~ (Do)2 ) · Real space structure in the presence of long range Coulomb interactions · Slide 23.

  7. The dynamic behavior of the exohedral transition metal complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 129; Issue 7. The dynamic behavior of the exohedral transition metal complexes of B₄₀ : η⁶- and η⁷-B₄₀Cr(CO) ₃ and Cr(CO) ₃η⁷-B₄η₀-Cr(CO) ₃. NAIWRIT KARMODAK ELUVATHINGAL D JEMMIS. REGULAR ARTICLE Volume 129 Issue 7 July 2017 pp ...

  8. Liquid state properties of certain noble and transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuiyan, G.M.; Rahman, A.; Khaleque, M.A.; Rashid, R.I.M.A.; Mujibur Rahman, S.M.

    1998-07-01

    Certain structural, thermodynamic and atomic transport properties of a number of liquid noble and transition metals are reported. The underlying theory combines together a simple form of the N-body potential and the thermodynamically self-consistent variational modified hypernetted chain (VMHNC) theory of liquid. The static structure factors calculated by using the VMHNC resemble the hard sphere (HS) values. Consequently the HS model is used to calculate the thermodynamic properties viz. specific heat, entropy, isothermal compressibility and atomic transport properties. (author)

  9. Thermomagnetic marking of rare-earth-transition-metal thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomeusz, Brian Josef

    1989-01-01

    Analytical derivation of temperature profiles in laser-irradiated thin-film structures is hindered by the nature of the heat source terms and by the geometrical complexity that often exists. This study utilizes a combined Laplace-transform-Fourier-integral method to obtain approximate solutions for a number of simple cases. The results are used to study the thermomagnetic marking process in rare-earth-transition-metal (RE-TM) thin films, and the predictions are compared with experimental observations.

  10. Methanol Oxidation on Model Elemental and Bimetallic Transition Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritsaris, G. A.; Rossmeisl, J.

    2012-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells are a key enabling technology for clean energy conversion. Using density functional theory calculations, we study the methanol oxidation reaction on model electrodes. We discuss trends in reactivity for a set of monometallic and bimetallic transition metal surfaces, flat...... sites on the surface and to screen for novel bimetallic surfaces of enhanced activity. We suggest platinum copper surfaces as promising anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells....

  11. Large-Grain Tin-Rich Perovskite Films for Efficient Solar Cells via Metal Alloying Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Mahdi; Zakeeruddin, Shaik Mohammed; Grätzel, Michael; Fan, Zhiyong

    2018-03-01

    Fast research progress on lead halide perovskite solar cells has been achieved in the past a few years. However, the presence of lead (Pb) in perovskite composition as a toxic element still remains a major issue for large-scale deployment. In this work, a novel and facile technique is presented to fabricate tin (Sn)-rich perovskite film using metal precursors and an alloying technique. Herein, the perovskite films are formed as a result of the reaction between Sn/Pb binary alloy metal precursors and methylammonium iodide (MAI) vapor in a chemical vapor deposition process carried out at 185 °C. It is found that in this approach the Pb/Sn precursors are first converted to (Pb/Sn)I 2 and further reaction with MAI vapor leads to the formation of perovskite films. By using Pb-Sn eutectic alloy, perovskite films with large grain sizes up to 5 µm can be grown directly from liquid phase metal. Consequently, using an alloying technique and this unique growth mechanism, a less-toxic and efficient perovskite solar cell with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 14.04% is demonstrated, while pure Sn and Pb perovskite solar cells prepared in this manner yield PCEs of 4.62% and 14.21%, respectively. It is found that this alloying technique can open up a new direction to further explore different alloy systems (binary or ternary alloys) with even lower melting point. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Effect of Rare Earth Metals on the Microstructure of Al-Si Based Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh A. Alkahtani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was performed on A356 alloy [Al-7 wt %Si 0.0.35 wt %Mg]. To that La and Ce were added individually or combined up to 1.5 wt % each. The results show that these rare earth elements affect only the alloy melting temperature with no marked change in the temperature of Al-Si eutectic precipitation. Additionally, rare earth metals have no modification effect up to 1.5 wt %. In addition, La and Ce tend to react with Sr leading to modification degradation. In order to achieve noticeable modification of eutectic Si particles, the concentration of rare earth metals should exceed 1.5 wt %, which simultaneously results in the precipitation of a fairly large volume fraction of insoluble intermetallics. The precipitation of these complex intermetallics is expected to have a negative effect on the alloy performance.

  13. Design and Characterisation of Metallic Glassy Alloys of High Neutron Shielding Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, J. C.; Daisenberger, D.; Burca, G.; Kockelmann, W.; Tremsin, A. S.; Mi, J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the design, making and characterisation of a series of Fe-based bulk metallic glass alloys with the aim of achieving the combined properties of high neutron absorption capability and sufficient glass forming ability. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function methods were used to characterise the crystalline or amorphous states of the samples. Neutron transmission and macroscopic attenuation coefficients of the designed alloys were measured using energy resolved neutron imaging method and the very recently developed microchannel plate detector. The study found that the newly designed alloy (Fe48Cr15Mo14C15B6Gd2 with a glass forming ability of Ø5.8 mm) has the highest neutron absorption capability among all Fe-based bulk metallic glasses so far reported. It is a promising material for neutron shielding applications. PMID:27848991

  14. New vistas in the determination of hydrogen in aerospace engine metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danford, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    The application of diffusion theory to the analysis of hydrogen desorption data has been studied. From these analyses, important information concerning hydrogen solubilities and the nature of the hydrogen distributions in the metal has been obtained. Two nickel base alloys, Rene' 41 and Waspaloy, and one ferrous alloy, 4340 steel, were studied in this work. For the nickel base alloys, it was found that the hydrogen distributions after electrolytic charging conformed closely to those which would be predicted by diffusion theory. The hydrogen distributions in electrolytically charged 4340 steel, on the other hand, were essentially uniform in nature, which would not be predicted by diffusion theory. Finally, it has been found that the hydrogen desorption is completely explained by the nature of the hydrogen distribution in the metal, and that the 'fast' hydrogen is not due to surface and subsurface hydride formation, as was originally proposed.

  15. Half-metallic ferromagnetism in (Z B, Al, Ga, and In) Heusler alloys ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K H SADEGHI

    2018-01-03

    Jan 3, 2018 ... in AlCu2Mn-type structure in non-magnetic state. Ti2IrZ (Z = B, Al, Ga, and In) ... All the four compounds were half-metals in a wide range of lattice constants indicating that they may be ... Half-metals; Heusler alloys; ab-initio calculations; electronic structure; magnetic properties. PACS Nos 71.15.Mb; 71.20.

  16. Study of solubility of akaline earth metals in liquid iron and in alloys on its base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ageev, Yu.A.; Archugov, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Solubility of magnesium, calcium, strontium and barium in liquid iron and its alloys with aluminium, silicon, nickel, chromium and carbon at 1600 deg C has been measured. Interaction parameters taking account of the effect of added elements on alkaline earth metal solubility in liquid iron have been estimated

  17. Analytical EAM alloy models for FCC metals. | Azi | Journal of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An analytic electron density function (r) and pair potential function (r) have been developed for FCC metals from their experimental binary alloy data. Values of the electron densities, derived from exact dilute limit heat of solution, were used to determine the pair potentials via the equation of state of Rose et al [3].

  18. Corrosion behavior of metals and alloys in marine-industrial environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariappan Natesan, Subbiah Selvaraj, Tharmakkannu Manickam and Gopalachari Venkatachari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with atmospheric corrosion to assess the degrading effects of air pollutants on ferrous and non-ferrous metals and alloys, which are mostly used as engineering materials. An exposure study was conducted in the Tuticorin port area located on the east coast of South India, in the Gulf of Mannar with Sri Lanka to the southeast. Common engineering materials, namely mild steel, galvanized iron, Zn, Al, Cu and Cu–Zn alloys (Cu–27Zn, Cu–30Zn and Cu–37Zn, were used in the investigation. The site was chosen where the metals are exposed to marine and industrial atmospheres. Seasonal 1 to 12 month corrosion losses of these metals and alloys were determined by a weight loss method. The weight losses showed strong corrosion of mild steel, galvanized iron, Cu and Zn and minor effect on Al and Cu–Zn alloys. Linear regression analysis was conducted to study the mechanism of corrosion. The composition of corrosion products formed on the metal surfaces was identified by x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  19. Corrosion behavior of metals and alloys in marine-industrial environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Mariappan; Selvaraj, Subbiah; Manickam, Tharmakkannu; Venkatachari, Gopalachari

    2008-12-01

    This work deals with atmospheric corrosion to assess the degrading effects of air pollutants on ferrous and non-ferrous metals and alloys, which are mostly used as engineering materials. An exposure study was conducted in the Tuticorin port area located on the east coast of South India, in the Gulf of Mannar with Sri Lanka to the southeast. Common engineering materials, namely mild steel, galvanized iron, Zn, Al, Cu and Cu-Zn alloys (Cu-27Zn, Cu-30Zn and Cu-37Zn), were used in the investigation. The site was chosen where the metals are exposed to marine and industrial atmospheres. Seasonal 1 to 12 month corrosion losses of these metals and alloys were determined by a weight loss method. The weight losses showed strong corrosion of mild steel, galvanized iron, Cu and Zn and minor effect on Al and Cu-Zn alloys. Linear regression analysis was conducted to study the mechanism of corrosion. The composition of corrosion products formed on the metal surfaces was identified by x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  20. T5 heat treatment of semi-solid metal processed aluminium alloy F357

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Moller, H

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The T5 heat treatment of semi-solid metal (SSM) processed alloy F357 was investigated by considering the effects of cooling rate and natural aging after casting, as well as artificial aging parameters on tensile properties. In addition, the tensile...