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Sample records for transit time measurement

  1. Techniques for measuring renal transit time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, C.D. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, AL (United States)]|[Nuclear Medicine Service, V.A. Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (United States); Japanwalla, M. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, AL (United States)]|[Nuclear Medicine Service, V.A. Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (United States); Khan, S. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, AL (United States)]|[Nuclear Medicine Service, V.A. Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (United States); Scott, J.W. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, AL (United States)]|[Nuclear Medicine Service, V.A. Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (United States); Dubovsky, E.V. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, AL (United States)]|[Nuclear Medicine Service, V.A. Medical Center, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1995-12-01

    A variety of techniques have been used for quantitative estimation of renal transit time. We compared different indices of transit time in a group of 30 patients having baseline and ACE inhibitor technetium-99m mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG{sub 3}) renography prior to arteriography: Peak time, mean transit time, and the ratio of background-subtracted counts at 20 min to those at 3 min. Each index was calculated from whole-kidney ROI, cortical ROI, and cortical factor (by factor analysis). The strongest correlations between angiographic percent of stenosis and transit time index were observed for the peak time (Spearman {rho}=0.469, n=53) and for the R20/3 (again {rho}=0.469, n=53) using the whole-kidney ROI and using only the baseline data without captopril. (Spearman`s {rho} is simply the correlation coefficient calculated from rank in list, which allows for nonlinear correlation.) Thus simple indices of transit time (whole-kidney peak time and R20/3) correlated as well with the observed pathology as did more complicated methods that required deconvolution, factor analysis, or selection of a cortical ROI. (orig./MG)

  2. Chronopotentiometric chloride sensing using transition time measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbas, Yawar; de Graaf, D.B.; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Detection of chloride ions is crucial to accurately access the concrete structure durability[1]. The existing electrochemical method of chloride ions detection in concrete, potentiometry[1], is not suitable for in-situ measurement due to the long term stability issue of conventional reference

  3. Simplified scintigraphic methods for measuring gastrointestinal transit times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Brinch, K; Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2000-01-01

    To investigate whether simple transit measurements based on scintigraphy performed only 0, 2, 4 and 24 h after intake of a radiolabelled meal can be used to predict the mean transit time values for the stomach, the small intestine, and the colon, a study was conducted in 16 healthy volunteers...... intestinal and colonic mean transit times were calculated for both markers and compared with fractional gastric emptying at 2 h, fractional colonic filling at 4 h, and geometric centre of colonic content at 24 h, respectively. Highly significant correlations were found between gastric mean transit time...... and fractional gastric emptying at 2 h (111In: r=0.95, Ptransit time and fractional colonic filling at 4 h (111In: r=-0.97, Ptransit time and geometric centre of colonic content...

  4. Pharyngeal transit time measured by scintigraphic and biomagnetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miquelin, C.A.; Braga, F.J.H.N.; Baffa, O.

    1996-01-01

    A comparative evaluation between scintigraphic and biomagnetic method to measure the pharyngeal transit is presented. Three volunteers have been studied. The aliment (yogurt) was labeled with 9 9 m Technetium for the scintigraphic test and with ferrite for the biomagnetic one. The preliminary results indicate a difference between the values obtained, probably due to the biomagnetic detector resolution

  5. Flowrate measurements in closed pipes by the method of transit time measurement. Pt.1 Method of transit time of a radioactive tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubail, A.; Favennec, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Classical methods of flowrate measuring in closed pipes generally make use of indirect principles (for example: the measurements of the pressure loss through an orifice plate). Absolute or fundamental methods of the measurements of volume and time allow the ''in situ'' calibration and control of flowmeters in their nominal conditions of use. The method of transit-time measurements by fast injection of a radioactive tracer is described and analyzed [fr

  6. Measurement and evaluation of transit travel time reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Transportation system customers need consistency in their daily travel times to enable them to plan their daily : activities, whether that is a commuter on their way to work, a company setting up delivery schedules for justintime : manufacturin...

  7. Proof of Concept: Design and Initial Evaluation of a Device to Measure Gastrointestinal Transit Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert H; Savir-Baruch, Bital; Halama, James R; Venu, Mukund; Gabriel, Medhat S; Bova, Davide

    2017-09-01

    Chronic constipation and gastrointestinal motility disorders constitute a large part of a gastroenterology practice and have a significant impact on a patient's quality of life and lifestyle. In most cases, medications are prescribed to alleviate symptoms without there being an objective measurement of response. Commonly used investigations of gastrointestinal transit times are currently limited to radiopaque markers or electronic capsules. Repeated use of these techniques is limited because of the radiation exposure and the significant cost of the devices. We present the proof of concept for a new device to measure gastrointestinal transit time using commonly available and inexpensive materials with only a small amount of radiotracer. Methods: We assembled gelatin capsules containing a 67 Ga-citrate-radiolabeled grain of rice embedded in paraffin for use as a point-source transit device. It was tested for stability in vitro and subsequently was given orally to 4 healthy volunteers and 10 patients with constipation or diarrhea. Imaging was performed at regular intervals until the device was excreted. Results: The device remained intact and visible as a point source in all subjects until excretion. When used along with a diary of bowel movement times and dates, the device could determine the total transit time. The device could be visualized either alone or in combination with a barium small-bowel follow-through study or a gastric emptying study. Conclusion: The use of a point-source transit device for the determination of gastrointestinal transit time is a feasible alternative to other methods. The device is inexpensive and easy to assemble, requires only a small amount of radiotracer, and remains inert throughout the gastrointestinal tract, allowing for accurate determination of gastrointestinal transit time. Further investigation of the device is required to establish optimum imaging parameters and reference values. Measurements of gastrointestinal transit time

  8. A transit-time flow meter for measuring milliliter per minute liquid flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Canqian; Kymmel, Mogens; Søeberg, Henrik

    1988-01-01

    A transit-time flow meter, using periodic temperature fluctuations as tracers, has been developed for measuring liquid flow as small as 0.1 ml/min in microchannels. By injecting square waves of heat into the liquid flow upstream with a tiny resistance wire heater, periodic temperature fluctuations...

  9. The Measurement of Time: Children's Construction of Transitivity, Unit Iteration, and Conservation of Speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kathy; Kamii, Constance

    2001-01-01

    Interviews 120 children in kindergarten and grades 2, 4, and 6 with five Piagetian tasks to determine the grade level at which most have constructed transitive reasoning, unit iteration, and conservation of speed. Indicates that construction of the logic necessary to make sense of the measurement of time is generally not complete before sixth…

  10. Pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy: A comparison of experimental measurement and simulation prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Marie-Luise; Almualimi, Majdi A; Langton, Christian M

    2016-01-01

    Considering ultrasound propagation through complex composite media as an array of parallel sonic rays, a comparison of computer-simulated prediction with experimental data has previously been reported for transmission mode (where one transducer serves as transmitter, the other as receiver) in a series of 10 acrylic step-wedge samples, immersed in water, exhibiting varying degrees of transit time inhomogeneity. In this study, the same samples were used but in pulse-echo mode, where the same ultrasound transducer served as both transmitter and receiver, detecting both 'primary' (internal sample interface) and 'secondary' (external sample interface) echoes. A transit time spectrum was derived, describing the proportion of sonic rays with a particular transit time. A computer simulation was performed to predict the transit time and amplitude of various echoes created, and compared with experimental data. Applying an amplitude-tolerance analysis, 91.7% ± 3.7% of the simulated data were within ±1 standard deviation of the experimentally measured amplitude-time data. Correlation of predicted and experimental transit time spectra provided coefficients of determination (R(2)%) ranging from 100.0% to 96.8% for the various samples tested. The results acquired from this study provide good evidence for the concept of parallel sonic rays. Furthermore, deconvolution of experimental input and output signals has been shown to provide an effective method to identify echoes otherwise lost due to phase cancellation. Potential applications of pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy include improvement of ultrasound image fidelity by improving spatial resolution and reducing phase interference artefacts. © IMechE 2015.

  11. MEASUREMENTS OF INTRA-BEAM SCATTERING GROWTH TIMES WITH GOLD BEAM BELOW TRANSITION IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISCHER, W.; BAI, M.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; CAMERON, P.; CONNOLLY, R.; LEHRACH, A.; PARZEN, G.; TEPIKIAN, S.; ZENO, K.; VAN ZEIJTS, J.

    2001-01-01

    While RHIC is filled with beam, bunches are stored for up to several minutes at the injection energy before acceleration starts. In gold operation, the RHIC injection energy is below transition. A bunch length increase, and correspondingly an increase in the longitudinal emittance, can lead to particle loss during transition crossing and rebucketing into the storage buckets. The longitudinal growth of gold beams in RHIC at injection is dominated by intra-beam scattering. Measurements of longitudinal growth times are presented and compared with computations

  12. Relative renal uptake and transit time measurements using functional factor images and fuzzy regions of interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samal, M.; Nimmon, C.C.; Britton, K.E.; Bergmann, H.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was a quantitative comparison of relative renal uptake and both the whole-kidney and the parenchymal transit time derived from factor analysis of image sequences and provided by standard clinical procedures. In order to extract the stable, well-interpretable factors, factor analysis was performed locally in the problem-specific time and spatial windows and the resulting factor images either evaluated directly as functional images or used as fuzzy regions of interest (ROIs) for the subsequent extraction of time-activity curves from the analysed data. The values of relative renal uptake of the left kidney measured in the functional factor images. Whole-kidney transit time calculated using fuzzy ROI curves correlated well with the reference values; however, both its mean value (336.5 s) and the standard deviation (151.5 s) were substantially greater than those of the values provided by a standard procedure. Parenchymal transit time calculated using ROI curves correlated better with the transit time through a wider corticomedullary region rather than through a narrow cortical region, which is decisive in a differential diagnosis of renal disorders. In general, values of transit times provided by factor analysis correlated well with those provided by reference methods but with a shift towards the higher numerical values. Results of the study provide quantitative evidence that the factor analysis of dynamic data may yield clinically relevant information. However, some basic requirements have to be fullfilled if the method is to be successfully applied clinically.(orig./MG) (orig.)

  13. Smartphone-based Continuous Blood Pressure Measurement Using Pulse Transit Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamhosseini, Hamid; Meintjes, Andries; Baig, Mirza; Linden, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The increasing availability of low cost and easy to use personalized medical monitoring devices has opened the door for new and innovative methods of health monitoring to emerge. Cuff-less and continuous methods of measuring blood pressure are particularly attractive as blood pressure is one of the most important measurements of long term cardiovascular health. Current methods of noninvasive blood pressure measurement are based on inflation and deflation of a cuff with some effects on arteries where blood pressure is being measured. This inflation can also cause patient discomfort and alter the measurement results. In this work, a mobile application was developed to collate the PhotoPlethysmoGramm (PPG) waveform provided by a pulse oximeter and the electrocardiogram (ECG) for calculating the pulse transit time. This information is then indirectly related to the user's systolic blood pressure. The developed application successfully connects to the PPG and ECG monitoring devices using Bluetooth wireless connection and stores the data onto an online server. The pulse transit time is estimated in real time and the user's systolic blood pressure can be estimated after the system has been calibrated. The synchronization between the two devices was found to pose a challenge to this method of continuous blood pressure monitoring. However, the implemented continuous blood pressure monitoring system effectively serves as a proof of concept. This combined with the massive benefits that an accurate and robust continuous blood pressure monitoring system would provide indicates that it is certainly worthwhile to further develop this system.

  14. Measurement of small bowel transit time by 99Tcm-SC imaging: preliminary clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shaohua; Xu Jingying; Bei Lian; Zhu Chaohui; Ba Jiantao

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To develop a method of measuring small bowel transit time (SBTT) by 99 Tc m -sulfur collide (SC) imaging and to compare with the method of added lactose in the test meal. Methods: 20 healthy volunteers and 26 patients with gastrointestinal disorders were studied. In fasting state, the subjects were asked to ingest the 99 Tc m -SC labelled solid meal within 5 minutes, then the image acquisition was immediately started with SPECT. The images were acquired every 15 min during the first hour, at 30 min intervals during 2∼4 hours and hourly thereafter until 80% radioactivity had entered the colon. One week later, the same procedure of imaging with 15 g lactulose added in the test meal was performed. The regions of interest (ROIs) were taken at stomach and colon, and the SBTT was calculated by deconvolution or by subtraction of the 50% time of gastric emptying from the 50% time of colon filling. Results: 1) The mean SBTT of 20 healthy volunteers was (4.2 +- 0.5) h, oral-caecum transit time (OCTT) was (4.3 +- 0.6) h; lactulose shortened the SBTT by (1.8 +- 0.6) h; 2) 26 patients showed different results of SBTT due to their different gastrointestinal disorders bases. Conclusions: 99 Tc m -SC imaging was a noninvasive and useful method to measure SBTT. The added lactulose can shorten the examination time and help to identify the time of food to the ileocecal region

  15. An Investigation of Pulse Transit Time as a Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Measurement Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, B M; O'Flynn, B; Mathewson, A

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to examine the Pulse Transit Method (PTT) as a non-invasive means to track Blood Pressure over a short period of time. PTT was measured as the time it takes for an ECG R-wave to propagate to the finger, where it is detected by a photoplethysmograph sensor. The PTT method is ideal for continuous 24-hour Blood Pressure Measurement (BPM) since it is both cuff-less and non-invasive and therefore comfortable and unobtrusive for the patient. Other techniques, such as the oscillometric method, have shown to be accurate and reliable but require a cuff for operation, making them unsuitable for long term monitoring. Although a relatively new technique, the PTT method has shown to be able to accurately track blood pressure changes over short periods of time, after which re-calibration is necessary. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of the method.

  16. An Investigation of Pulse Transit Time as a Non-Invasive Blood Pressure Measurement Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, B M; O' Flynn, B; Mathewson, A, E-mail: brian.mccarthy@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, UCC, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland)

    2011-08-17

    The objective of this paper is to examine the Pulse Transit Method (PTT) as a non-invasive means to track Blood Pressure over a short period of time. PTT was measured as the time it takes for an ECG R-wave to propagate to the finger, where it is detected by a photoplethysmograph sensor. The PTT method is ideal for continuous 24-hour Blood Pressure Measurement (BPM) since it is both cuff-less and non-invasive and therefore comfortable and unobtrusive for the patient. Other techniques, such as the oscillometric method, have shown to be accurate and reliable but require a cuff for operation, making them unsuitable for long term monitoring. Although a relatively new technique, the PTT method has shown to be able to accurately track blood pressure changes over short periods of time, after which re-calibration is necessary. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of the method.

  17. Using a physically-based transit time distribution function to estimate the hydraulic parameters and hydraulic transit times of an unconfined aquifer from tritium measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farlin, Julien; Maloszewski, Piotr; Schneider, Wilfried; Gallé, Tom

    2014-05-01

    Groundwater transit time is of interest in environmental studies pertaining to the transport of pollutants from its source to the aquifer outlet (spring or pumping well) or to an observation well. Different models have been proposed to describe the distribution of transit times within groundwatersheds, the most common being the dispersion model, the exponential-piston-flow model (EPM) both proposed by Maloszewski and Zuber (Maloszewski and Zuber, 1982) and the (two or three parameter) gamma model (Amin and Campana, 1996; Kirchner et al., 1999). Choosing which function applies best is a recurrent and controversial problem in hydrogeology. The object of this study is to revisit the applicability of the EPM for unconfined aquifers, and to introduce an alternative model based explicitly on groundwater hydraulics. The alternative model is based on the transit time of water from any point at the groundwater table to the aquifer outlet, and is used to calculate inversely the hydraulic parameters of a fractured unconfined sandstone aquifer from tritium measurements made in a series of contact springs. This model is compared to the EPM, which is usually adopted to describe the transit time distribution of confined and unconfined aquifers alike. Both models are tested against observations, and it is shown that the EPM fails the test for some of the springs, and generally seems to overestimate the older water component. Amin, I. E., and M. E. Campana (1996), A general lumped parameter model for the interpretation of tracer data and transit time calculation in hydrologic systems, Journal of Hydrology, 179, 1-21, doi: 10.1016/0022-1694(95)02880-3. Kirchner, J. W., X. H. Feng, and C. Neal (1999), Fractal stream chemistry and its implications for contaminant transport in catchments, Nature physics, 403, 524-527, doi: 10.1038/35000537. Maloszewski, P., and A. Zuber (1982), Determining the turnover time of groundwater systems with the aid of environmental tracers, Journal of

  18. [PULSE WAVE TRANSIT TIME - ONE MORE ATTEMPT OF NON-INVASIVE CARDIAC OUTPUT MEASUREMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akselrod, B A; Tolstova, L A; Pshenichniy, T A; Fedulova, S V

    2017-09-01

    Estimated continuous cardiac output (esCCOTM) based on pulse wave transit time is one of alternative non-invasive CO measurement techniques. Randomized study included 23 scheduled patients operated upon due to cardiovascular diseases. Cardiac index (CI) was measured Comparative analyses of esCCO and others CO measurement methods used intraoperative was carried out. In the first group (n = 9) esCCO was compared with transpulmonary thermodilution (PiCCO-plus); in the second group (n = 8) - with pulmonary artery thermodilution; in the third group (n = 6) - with transoesophageal echocardiography (velocity-time integral). In the 1st group direct correlation was found (r = 0,773, p measurements were out of reference interval (more than ? 15%). Blend- Altman method showed the dispersion of results in all groups. 1. Estimated continuous cardiac output measurement technique based on PWTT has a direct correla- tion with prepulmonary thermodilution and transoesophageal echocardiography, medium and high power respectively. 2. esCCO has significant differences with the referential techniques during general anesthesia in cardiac surgery pa- tients. 3. Calibration based on invasive blood pressure and outside cardiac output measurement does not increase the accuracy of measurements. 4. esCCO has a negative diagnostic value and cannot be recommendedfor the cardiac out- put evaluation during cardiac surgery. 5. This method can be useful for analyze general effectiveness of perioperative hemodynamics.

  19. Assessment of the Variation Associated with Repeated Measurement of Gastrointestinal Transit Times and Assessment of the Effect of Oral Ranitidine on Gastrointestinal Transit Times Using a Wireless Motility Capsule System in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A. Lidbury

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the variation associated with repeated measurement of gastrointestinal (GI transit times and the effect of oral ranitidine on GI transit times in healthy dogs using a wireless motility capsule (WMC system. Eight privately owned healthy adult dogs were enrolled, and one developed diarrhea and was removed from the study. For the first 3 repetitions, each dog was fed a standard meal followed by oral administration of a WMC. For the 4th repetition, each dog was given ranitidine hydrochloride (75 mg PO every 12 hours prior to and during assessment of GI transit times. Mean between-subject coefficients of variation for gastric emptying time (GET, small and large bowel transit time (SLBTT, and total transit time (TTT were 26.9%, 32.3%, and 19.6%, respectively. Mean within-subject coefficients of variation for GET, SLBTT, and TTT were 9.3%, 19.6%, and 15.9%, respectively. Median GET, SLBTT, and TTT without ranitidine were 719, 1,636, and 2,735 minutes, respectively. Median GET, SLBTT, and TTT with ranitidine were 757, 1,227, and 2,083 minutes, respectively. No significant differences in GI transit times were found between any of the 4 repetitions. Under these experimental conditions, no significant effects of oral ranitidine on GI transit times were observed.

  20. Brain capillary transit time heterogeneity in healthy volunteers measured by dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Henrik B.W.; Vestergaard, Mark B.; Lindberg, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    based on a gamma-variate model of the capillary transit time distribution. In addition, we wanted to investigate if a subtle increase of the blood–brain barrier permeability can be incorporated into the model, still allowing estimation of CTH. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three healthy subjects were...... scanned at 3.0T MRI system applying DCE-MRI and using a gamma-variate model to estimate CTH as well as cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and permeability of the blood–brain barrier, measured as the influx constant Ki. For proof of principle we also investigated three patients...... response function. Conclusion: Our results open the possibility of characterizing brain perfusion by the capillary transit time distribution using DCE-MRI, theoretically a determinant of efficient blood to brain transport of important substances. Level of Evidence: 2. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;45:1809–1820....

  1. Endoscopic ultrasound duplex scanning for measurement of portal venous flow. Validation against transit time ultrasound flowmetry in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, E F; Strandberg, C; Bendtsen, F

    1999-01-01

    with that of transit time ultrasound (TTU) in healthy pigs. The ability of EUS to detect changes in the portal venous flow after pharmacologic intervention was also investigated. METHODS: Six anaesthetized pigs were studied. Portal venous flow was measured simultaneously by EUS duplex scanning, using a Pentax FG-32UA...... echoendoscope connected to a Hitachi EUB 515-A ultrasound scanner, and by TTU with a Cardiomed CM 4000 flowmeter probe placed on the portal vein. Terlipressin, 1 mg, and placebo were administered in a blind, randomized, crossover design. Measurements were taken at base line and 30 min after each drug...

  2. Tc-99m-Human Serum Albumin Transit Time as a Measure of Arm Breast Cancer-Related Lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid M; Hvidsten, Svend; Tabatabaeifar, Siavosh

    2017-01-01

    34-68 years, with unilateral arm lymphedema following breast cancer treatment underwent bilateral lymphoscintigraphy using intradermal injection in both hands of technetium-99m-labeled human serum albumin and sequential 5 min imaging for 5 hours. The mean transit time (MTT) in the arms was calculated...... based on time activity curves generated from injection site and arm regions. Visual lymphedema scoring was performed based on dermal backflow and lymph node presence. Excess arm volume was calculated from circumference measurements. RESULTS: The MTT (mean ± SD) was significantly longer in the lymphedema...

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound duplex scanning for measurement of portal venous flow. Validation against transit time ultrasound flowmetry in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Erik Feldager; Strandberg, C; Bendtsen, F

    1999-01-01

    with that of transit time ultrasound (TTU) in healthy pigs. The ability of EUS to detect changes in the portal venous flow after pharmacologic intervention was also investigated. METHODS: Six anaesthetized pigs were studied. Portal venous flow was measured simultaneously by EUS duplex scanning, using a Pentax FG-32UA...... correlated significantly (R = 0.88, P measurements. CONCLUSIONS: EUS measures portal venous flow with an acceptable correlation and agreement with TTU in anaesthetized pigs. The method is capable of monitoring the effects......BACKGROUND: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a new technique that makes it possible to measure portal venous flow when transabdominal ultrasound fails. As the technique has not been evaluated previously, we compared simultaneous measurements of portal venous flow using EUS Doppler...

  4. Identifiability analysis of rotational diffusion tensor and electronic transition moments measured in time-resolved fluorescence depolarization experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szubiakowski, Jacek P.

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this paper is studies of the deterministic identifiability of molecular parameters, such as rotational diffusion tensor components and orientation of electronic transition moments, resulting from the time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy experiment. In the most general case considered, a pair of perpendicularly polarized emissions enables the unique determination of all the rotational diffusion tensor's principal components. The influence of the tensor's symmetry and the associated degeneration of its eigenvalues on the identifiability of the electronic transitions moments is systematically investigated. The analysis reveals that independently of the rotational diffusion tensor's symmetry, the transition moments involved in photoselection and emission processes cannot be uniquely identified without a priori information about their mutual orientation or their orientation with respect to the principal axes of the tensor. Moreover, it is shown that increasing the symmetry of the rotational diffusion tensor deteriorates the degree of the transition moments identifiability. To obtain these results analytically, a novel approach to solve bilinear system of equations for Markov parameters is applied. The effect of the additional information, obtained from fluorescence measurements for different molecular mobilities, to improve the identifiability at various levels of analysis is shown. The effectiveness and reliability of the target analysis method for experimental determination of the molecular parameters is also discussed

  5. Transit-time flow measurement as a predictor of coronary bypass graft failure at one year angiographic follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehnert, Per; Møller, Christian H; Damgaard, Sune

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transit-time flow measurement (TTFM) is a commonly used intraoperative method for evaluation of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) anastomoses. This study was undertaken to determine whether TTFM can also be used to predict graft patency at one year postsurgery. METHODS: Three hundred...... forty-five CABG patients with intraoperative graft flow measurements and one year angiographic follow-up were analyzed. Graft failure was defined as more than 50% stenosis including the "string sign." Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the risk of graft failure after one year based.......00], p = 0.059) and AUC of 59.9%. There were no significant relationships between TTFM and graft failure in other graft types or graft configurations. CONCLUSION: The TTFM method has good discriminative ability for assessing the risk of graft failure in certain graft types within the first year after...

  6. Exploration and validation of alternate sensing methods for wearable continuous pulse transit time measurement using optical and bioimpedance modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Bassem; Nathan, Viswam; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2017-07-01

    In this work we explore the viability of a multimodal sensing device that can be integrated in a wearable form factor for daily, non-invasive ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring. A common approach in previous research has been to rely on measuring the pulse transit time (PTT), which has been shown to be correlated with the BP. In this work, we look into the feasibility of measuring PTT using sensors separated by a small distance on one arm so that any eventual realization of the system is convenient to wear and use over long periods of time. Moreover, we investigate the combined use of two different modalities for cardiovascular measurement: the optical photoplethysmogram (PPG) as well as the bio-potential based impedance (Bio-Z) measurement. These two modalities have been previously only studied on their own or in conjunction with the electrocardiogram (ECG) for the purpose of estimating PTT. We measure the PTT from the wrist to the finger using Bio-Z and PPG sensors, and compare it to the conventional PTT measured from the ECG to PPG at the finger, in order to prove that it can be an effective replacement for existing PTT measurement strategies. Moreover, successful measurement of PTT with two different modalities of sensors at close proximity will allow designs with multiple heterogeneous sensors on a more versatile wearable sensing platform that is optimized for power and is more robust to environmental or skin contact changes. This will enable the next generation of smart watches that capture PTT and BP. Experiments were conducted in vivo with simultaneous ECG, Bio-Z and PPG sensors, and results indicate that the PTT calculated from the Bio-Z and PPG sensors placed at a close distance correlates well with the more established PTT measurement using the ECG in conjunction with PPG, with correlation coefficient as high as 0.92.

  7. Transit timing observations from Kepler. V. Transit timing variation candidates in the first sixteen months from polynomial models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ford, E.B.; Ragozzine, D.; Holman, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Transit timing variations provide a powerful tool for confirming and characterizing transiting planets, as well as detecting non-transiting planets. We report the results of an updated transit timing variation (TTV) analysis for 1481 planet candidates based on transit times measured during...... find that the occurrence rate of planet candidates that show TTVs is significantly increased (~68%) for planet candidates transiting stars with multiple transiting planet candidates when compared to planet candidates transiting stars with a single transiting planet candidate....

  8. Progress in the development of the DTMROC time measurement chip for the ATLAS transition radiation tracker (TRT)

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, C; Dressnandt, N; Ekenberg, T; Farthouat, Philippe; Keener, P T; Lam, N; La Marra, D; Mann, J; Newcomer, F M; Ryzhov, V; Söderberg, M; Szczygiel, R; Van Berg, R; Williams, H H

    2001-01-01

    A 16-channel digital time-measurement readout chip (DTMROC) has been fabricated in the TEMIC/DM1LL left bracket 1 right bracket BI- CMOS radiation-hard process for the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC) Transition Radiation Tracker (ATLAS/TRT) at CERN left bracket 2 right bracket . The chip receives discriminated straw-drift-tube signals from bipolar amplifier-shaper-discriminator chips (ASDBLR). measures the arrival time in 3.125 ns increments ( plus or minus 1 ns), and stores the data in a pipeline for 3.3mus. A trigger signal (L1A) causes the data to be tagged with a time stamp and stored for readout- Up to 13 events may be stored in an on-chip buffer while data is being clocked out in a 40 MHz serial stream. The chip has been designed to function after exposure to 1x10**1**4 protons/cm**2 and 1 Mrad total dose. System beam-tests have demonstrated measurement of track positions with a resolution of 165mum and 85% efficiency at rates up to 18MHz. 6 Refs.

  9. Effects of cuff inflation and deflation on pulse transit time measured from ECG and multi-wavelength PPG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Li, Yao; Ding, Xiao-Rong; Dai, Wen-Xuan; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT), which refers to the time it takes a pulse wave to travel between two arterial sites is a promising index for cuff-less blood pressure (BP) estimation, as well as non-invasive assessment of arterial functions. However, it has not been investigated whether PTTs measured from ECG and different wavelength PPG are equally affected by the arterial status. Furthermore, comparison between the changes of different PTTs can provide enlightenment on the hardware implementation of the PTT-based BP estimation method. This work mainly studied the changes of PTTs calculated from electrocardiogram (ECG) and multi-wavelength photoplethysmogram (PPG) after exerting cuff pressure on the upper arm. A four-channel PPG acquisition system was developed to collect the multi-wavelength PPG signals of red, yellow, green and blue light at the fingertip simultaneously. Ten subjects participated in the experiment and their PTTs measured from different PPG and ECG signals before and after exerting cuff pressure were compared. This study found that within one minute after the four-minute cuff inflation and deflation process, the PTT measured from ECG and yellow PPG experienced a significant increase (p0.9) compared with that before exerting cuff pressure. This indicates that PTTs calculated from different wavelength PPG have different recoverability from smooth muscle relaxation. Another interesting finding is that the PTT calculated from ECG and yellow PPG had a strong correlation (|r|>0.7) with the time difference between yellow PPG and other PPG signals, which implies the potential of the time difference between yellow PPG and other PPGs as a complementary to PTT-based model for blood pressure estimation.

  10. TRANSIT TIMING VARIATION MEASUREMENTS OF WASP-12b AND QATAR-1b: NO EVIDENCE OF ADDITIONAL PLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Karen A.; Stassun, Keivan G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Kielkopf, John F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    WASP-12b and Qatar-1b are transiting hot Jupiters for which previous works have suggested the presence of transit timing variations (TTVs) indicative of additional bodies in these systems—an Earth-mass planet in WASP-12 and a brown-dwarf mass object in Qatar-1. Here, we present 23 new WASP-12b and 18 new Qatar-1b complete (or nearly complete) transit observations. We perform global system fits to all of our light curves for each system, as well as RV and stellar spectroscopic parameters from the literature. The global fits provide refined system parameters and uncertainties for each system, including precise transit center times for each transit. The transit model residuals of the combined and five minute binned light curves have an rms of 183 and 255 parts per million (ppm) for WASP-12b and Qatar-1b, respectively. Most of the WASP-12b system parameter values from this work are consistent with values from previous studies, but have ∼40%–50% smaller uncertainties. Most of the Qatar-1b system parameter values and uncertainties from this work are consistent with values recently reported in the literature. We find no convincing evidence for sinusoidal TTVs with a semi-amplitude of more than ∼35 and ∼25 s in the WASP-12b and Qatar-1b systems, respectively.

  11. The study of transit time measurement for flow through the central and southern canals of MADA using I-131 radioisotope technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roslan Mohd Ali; Md Shahid Ayub; Zainuddin Othman; Juhari Yusof; Mohd Asri Ramli; Eow Boon Tiak

    1996-01-01

    The measurement of breakthrough and transit time through the central and southern canals of Lembaga Kemajuan Pertanian Muda (MADA) by using radiotracer technique is discussed An estimated of 1700 cusec water was released from Pelubang regulator through central canal. The water is then distributed through several regulators down stream and finally ended through the SCD1 and SCD1a secondary canals. Radiotracer 1-131 with the activity of 250 mCi and 500 mCi were injected at several identified injection points by using glass breaker technique. The measurement of breakthrough and transit time were observed respectively at several measurement station. Results of the study indicated that the time travel from Pelubang regulator to SCD1a secondary canal would take about 3 days during normal operation. Detail of breakthrough and transit time at every regulators and other measurement stations were also presented

  12. Transit performance measures in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This research is the result of a California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) request to assess the most commonly : available transit performance measures in California. Caltrans wanted to understand performance measures and data used by : Metr...

  13. Transition Models with Measurement Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Magnac, Thierry; Visser, Michael

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we estimate a transition model that allows for measurement errors in the data. The measurement errors arise because the survey design is partly retrospective, so that individuals sometimes forget or misclassify their past labor market transitions. The observed data are adjusted for errors via a measurement-error mechanism. The parameters of the distribution of the true data, and those of the measurement-error mechanism are estimated by a two-stage method. The results, based on ...

  14. FT values measured to ±0.1% for superallowed beta transitions: Metrology at sub-second time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, J.C.; Iacob, V.E.; Park, H.I.; Chen, L.; Nica, N.; Horvat, V.; Tribble, R.E.; Towner, I.S.

    2014-01-01

    Because of angular-momentum conservation, superallowed β decay between 0 + analog states involves only the vector part of the weak interaction, so its measured ft value can be used to determine the vector coupling constant, G V . If many such transitions are measured, then the constancy of G V can be established and several important tests made on fundamentals of the electroweak Standard Model. We have developed apparatus that allows us to measure half-lives to ±0.03% and branching ratios to ±0.1% or better, for cyclotron-produced activities with half-lives as short as 100 ms. We present an overview of the equipment and a summary of more than 10 years of results. - Highlights: • Established metrology facility for accelerator-produced short-lived activities. • Measured half-lives and beta branching ratios to high precision. • Precision is 0.03% for half-lives and ∼0.1% for branching ratios. • Results have important impact on electroweak Standard Model

  15. Measurement of pulmonary transit time in healthy cats by use of ultrasound contrast media "Sonovue®": feasibility, reproducibility, and values in 42 cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streitberger, Andrea; Hocke, Verena; Modler, Peter

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of measuring pulmonary transit time (PTT) in healthy cats by transthoracic echocardiography using the ultrasound contrast agent Sonovue(®). To determine normalized PTT (nPTT) values in 42 healthy cats and to estimate the interobserver variability and the within-day repeatability of nPTT measurements. Forty-two privately owned healthy cats of different breeds, gender and age presented for cardiac examination. A bolus injection of contrast agent (Sonovue(®)) was administered intravenously. The right parasternal short axis echocardiographic view was used to record the contrast agent's transit time from the pulmonary artery to the left atrium. Pulmonary transit time and nPTT were determined independently by three examiners with different levels of experience. Normalized PTT was 4.12 ± 1.0 (mean ± SD) in our population. The median interobserver variability across our population was 6.8%, the median within-day variability for the three observers were 13.1%, 12.7% and 13%. No effect of the observer's experience on nPTT measurement was identified. Age, sex and body weight did not significantly influence nPTT. This study demonstrates that nPTT measurement is feasible in cats using ultrasound and the blood pool contrast media Sonovue(®). Measurements of nPTT can be performed in a clinical setting. Normalized PTT values in healthy cats are comparable with those reported in healthy dogs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cuff-less blood pressure measurement from dual-channel photoplethysmographic signals via peripheral pulse transit time with singular spectrum analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Zhiwen; Ma, Shaodong

    2018-02-28

    This paper proposes an unobtrusive blood pressure (BP) measurement system design with a motion artifact (MA) compensation strategy as a potential surrogate to the traditional cuff-based sphygmomanometer for self-monitoring in a less restricted environment. A dual-channel photoplethysmographic signal acquisition system is designed and implemented for cuff-less BP measurement based on the peripheral pulse transit time (PPTT) acquired from the forearm and wrist. Comprising a motion decision, singular spectrum analysis, PPTT calculation and BP measurement, a novel approach is proposed to realize BP measurements and suppress MA interference. Compared with the reference BP recorded by a cuff-based sphygmomanometer, our preliminary examinations on 30 subjects found that the correlation coefficients for systolic BP estimation and diastolic BP estimation were 0.75 and 0.78, and the mean absolute differences were 7.61 mmHg and 6.82 mmHg, respectively. Meanwhile, the proposed approach was compared with the other most widely used pulse transit time (PTT) measuring methods and BP-PTT models. All the results indicate that our work was highly effective in realizing the BP measurement. The proposed system and approach have resulted in remarkable progress in cuff-less BP measurements with MA removal, and have great potential value in wearable applications without environmental restrictions.

  17. Noninvasive tracking of systolic arterial blood pressure using pulse transit time measured with ECG and carotid doppler signals with intermittent calibration

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a non-invasive blood pressure measurement system using pulse transit time (PTT) from the heart to the common carotid artery, measured by using an electrocardiogram (ECG) R-wave and carotid arterial Doppler signals at the anterior neck. In this study, we examined the validity of our system by comparing PTT derived systolic blood pressure (Dopp_SBP) with invasive radial systolic arterial pressure (Inv_SBP) with calibration every 15 min in the ICU setting.Methods: 17 patients u...

  18. Phase transition phenomenon: A compound measure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bo Soo; Park, Chanhi; Ryu, Doojin; Song, Wonho

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the well-documented phenomenon of phase transition in financial markets using combined information from both return and volume changes within short time intervals. We suggest a new measure for the phase transition behaviour of markets, calculated as a return distribution conditional on local variance in volume imbalance, and show that this measure successfully captures phase transition behaviour under various conditions. We analyse the intraday trade and quote dataset from the KOSPI 200 index futures, which includes detailed information on the original order size and the type of each initiating investor. We find that among these two competing factors, the submitted order size yields more explanatory power on the phenomenon of market phase transition than the investor type.

  19. Measurement of extracellular volume and transit time heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced myocardial perfusion MRI in patients after acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Karl P; Rischpler, Christoph; Hayes, Carmel; Ibrahim, Tareq; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Haase, Axel; Schwaiger, Markus; Nekolla, Stephan G

    2017-06-01

    To assess the ability of dynamic contrast-enhanced myocardial perfusion MRI to measure extracellular volume (ECV) and to investigate the possibility of estimating capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH) in patients after myocardial infarction and successful revascularization. Twenty-four perfusion data sets were acquired on a 3 Tesla positron emission tomography (PET)/MRI scanner. Three perfusion models of different complexity were implemented in a hierarchical fashion with an Akaike information criterion being used to determine the number of fit parameters supported by the data. Results were compared sector-wise to ECV from an equilibrium T 1 mapping method (modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI)). ECV derived from the perfusion analysis correlated well with equilibrium measurements (R² = 0.76). Estimation of CTH was supported in 16% of sectors (mostly remote). Inclusion of a nonzero CTH parameter usually led to lower estimates of first-pass extraction and slightly higher estimates of blood volume and flow. Estimation of the capillary permeability-surface area product was feasible in 81% of sectors. Transit time heterogeneity has a measurable effect on the kinetic analysis of myocardial perfusion MRI data, and Gd-DTPA extravasation in the myocardium is usually not flow-limited in infarct-related pathology. Measurement of myocardial ECV using perfusion imaging could provide a scan-time efficient alternative to methods based on T 1 mapping. Magn Reson Med 77:2320-2330, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Characterization of dynamics in complex lyophilized formulations: I. Comparison of relaxation times measured by isothermal calorimetry with data estimated from the width of the glass transition temperature region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieng, Norman; Mizuno, Masayasu; Pikal, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The purposes of this study are to characterize the relaxation dynamics in complex freeze dried formulations and to investigate the quantitative relationship between the structural relaxation time as measured by thermal activity monitor (TAM) and that estimated from the width of the glass transition temperature (ΔT(g)). The latter method has advantages over TAM because it is simple and quick. As part of this objective, we evaluate the accuracy in estimating relaxation time data at higher temperatures (50 °C and 60 °C) from TAM data at lower temperature (40 °C) and glass transition region width (ΔT(g)) data obtained by differential scanning calorimetry. Formulations studied here were hydroxyethyl starch (HES)-disaccharide, HES-polyol, and HES-disaccharide-polyol at various ratios. We also re-examine, using TAM derived relaxation times, the correlation between protein stability (human growth hormone, hGH) and relaxation times explored in a previous report, which employed relaxation time data obtained from ΔT(g). Results show that most of the freeze dried formulations exist in single amorphous phase, and structural relaxation times were successfully measured for these systems. We find a reasonably good correlation between TAM measured relaxation times and corresponding data obtained from estimates based on ΔT(g), but the agreement is only qualitative. The comparison plot showed that TAM data are directly proportional to the 1/3 power of ΔT(g) data, after correcting for an offset. Nevertheless, the correlation between hGH stability and relaxation time remained qualitatively the same as found with using ΔT(g) derived relaxation data, and it was found that the modest extrapolation of TAM data to higher temperatures using ΔT(g) method and TAM data at 40 °C resulted in quantitative agreement with TAM measurements made at 50 °C and 60 °C, provided the TAM experiment temperature, is well below the Tg of the sample. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  1. Multicenter study verifying a method of noninvasive continuous cardiac output measurement using pulse wave transit time: a comparison with intermittent bolus thermodilution cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takashige; Tsutsui, Masato; Sugo, Yoshihiro; Sato, Tetsufumi; Akazawa, Toshimasa; Sato, Nobukazu; Yamashita, Koichi; Ishihara, Hironori; Takeda, Junzo

    2012-07-01

    Many technologies have been developed for minimally invasive monitoring of cardiac output. Estimated continuous cardiac output (esCCO) measurement using pulse wave transit time is one noninvasive method. Because it does not require any additional sensors other than those for conducting 3 basic forms of monitoring (electrocardiogram, pulse oximeter wave, and noninvasive (or invasive) arterial blood pressure measurement), esCCO measurement is potentially useful in routine clinical circulatory monitoring for any patient including low-risk patients. We evaluated the efficacy of noninvasive esCCO using pulse wave transit time in this multicenter study. We compared esCCO and intermittent bolus thermodilution cardiac output (TDCO) in 213 patients, 139 intensive care units (ICUs), and 74 operating rooms (ORs), at 7 participating institutions. We performed electrocardiogram, pulse oximetry, TDCO, and arterial blood pressure measurements in patients in ICUs and ORs; a single calibration was performed to measure esCCO continuously. TDCO measurement was performed once daily for ICU patients and every hour for OR patients, and just before the removal of the pulmonary arterial catheter from patients in both the ICU and OR. We evaluated esCCO against TDCO with correlation analysis and Bland and Altman analysis and also assessed the change of bias over time. Furthermore, we inspected the impact of change in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) on change in bias because abnormal SVR was assumed to be a factor contributing to the change of the bias. From among 588 esCCO and TDCO datasets (excluding calibration points), 587 datasets were analyzed for 213 patients. The analysis results show a correlation coefficient of 0.79 (P time intervals over 48 hours after calibration (repeated-measures analysis of variance P = 0.781) in the ICU. The influence of SVR on esCCO analysis showed a correlation coefficient between SVR and an error of 0.37 (P < 0.0001, 95% confidence interval 0

  2. Exploring the performance limits of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber and Transition Radiation Detector for measuring identified hadron production at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Xianguo

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) and Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) are the main tracking and particle identification devices in the ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC. This thesis studies aspects of their performance beyond the original designs. This includes extending the TPC momentum measurement for cosmic rays to sub-TeV scale, investigating a robust identification method for electrons and hadrons by the TRD, and developing new approaches to characterize the TPC and TRD signals. These studies lead to an intriguing observation of the transition radiation from sub-TeV cosmic muons, and a universal method -- the TPC coherent fit -- to extract yields of different particle species with momentum from 0.5 to above 20 GeV/c. With the TPC coherent fit, transverse momentum spectra (0.6 10 GeV/c) in Pb-Pb collisions are observed. The particle production is also studied in jets from pp collisions at 7 TeV and the results are well described by Perugia-0 tune of PYTHIA6.

  3. [Comparison of continuous cardiac output measurement methods: non-invasive estimated CCO using pulse wave transit time and CCO using thermodilution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Masato; Yamada, Takashige; Sugo, Yoshihiro; Sato, Tetsufumi; Akazawa, Toshimasa; Sato, Nobukazu; Yamashita, Koichi; Ishihara, Hironori; Kazama, Tomiei; Takeda, Junzo

    2012-09-01

    esCCO (estimated continuous cardiac output, Nihon Kohden, esCCO) is a new cardiac output measurement system which uses pulse wave transit time to calculate cardiac output continuously and non-invasively. One of the most commonly used methods to monitor cardiac output is continuous cardiac output CCO (Edwards Lifesciences) which has an accuracy equivalent to that of thermodilution method. We compared esCCO to CCO in 67 operating room patients and 128 intensive care unit patients. CCO and esCCO were measured simultaneously in patients with a pulmonary artery catheter inserted after admission to the operating room or intensive care unit. CCO and esCCO showed a high correlation with a correlation coefficient of 0.84 in 496 total data points, and 95% limits of agreement between these two methods were -2.49 to 2.35 l x min(-1). This result suggests that esCCO could be used to measure cardiac output accurately and non-invasively in different cases.

  4. Improvements in Low-cost Ultrasonic Measurements of Blood Flow in "by-passes" Using Narrow & Broad Band Transit-time Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, A.; Calas, H.; Diez, L.; Moreno, E.; Prohías, J.; Villar, A.; Carrillo, E.; Jiménez, A.; Pereira, W. C. A.; Von Krüger, M. A.

    The cardio-pathology by ischemia is an important cause of death, but the re-vascularization of coronary arteries (by-pass operation) is an useful solution to reduce associated morbidity improving quality of life in patients. During these surgeries, the flow in coronary vessels must be measured, using non-invasive ultrasonic methods, known as transit time flow measurements (TTFM), which are the most accurate option nowadays. TTFM is a common intra-operative tool, in conjunction with classic Doppler velocimetry, to check the quality of these surgery processes for implanting grafts in parallel with the coronary arteries. This work shows important improvements achieved in flow-metering, obtained in our research laboratories (CSIC, ICIMAF, COPPE) and tested under real surgical conditions in Cardiocentro-HHA, for both narrowband NB and broadband BB regimes, by applying results of a CYTED multinational project (Ultrasonic & computational systems for cardiovascular diagnostics). mathematical models and phantoms were created to evaluate accurately flow measurements, in laboratory conditions, before our new electronic designs and low-cost implementations, improving previous ttfm systems, which include analogic detection, acquisition & post-processing, and a portable PC. Both regimes (NB and BB), with complementary performances for different conditions, were considered. Finally, specific software was developed to offer facilities to surgeons in their interventions.

  5. Evaluation of a wireless ambulatory capsule (SmartPill®) to measure gastrointestinal tract pH, luminal pressure and temperature, and transit time in ponies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, A M; Lavie, N L; Keowen, M L; Gaschen, L; Gaschen, F P; Barthel, D; Andrews, F M

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated the use of a wireless ambulatory capsule (WAC; SmartPill(®) pH.p GI Monitoring System) to determine WAC-gastric emptying time (GET) in ponies. To measure WAC-GET and compare it to those findings with GET assessed by nuclear scintigraphy (S-GET). WAC-GET will be slower than S-GET, but will be significantly correlated. Seven healthy adult mixed-breed pony mares were used in this study. Feed was withheld for 12 h prior to the WAC administration. After administration, a complete-feed diet was fed to allow the WAC to pass into the stomach. Luminal pH, temperature and pressure were collected by a modified receiver secured to the pony. Once the pH reached a value of ≥ 8.0, it was determined that gastric emptying had occurred, and ponies were fed grass hay. After 5 days, data were downloaded and analysed using proprietary software. During the second period of the study, after at least 2 weeks, 4 of the ponies underwent a standard S-GET test. The WAC was successfully administered, and data were collected from all ponies. The mean percentage of data packets collected by the receiver was 84.9 ± 3.51% (range 66.8-95.1%). Mean WAC-GET was 7.38 h (range 0.15-46.65 h). Mean gastric pH was 4.75 (range 2.07-6.99). Mean small intestinal transit time was 4.6 h. The mean pH for the small intestine was 8.0. The mean S-GET time (in hours) when 10% of the radioactive feed is present in the stomach (T-90%) was 2.3 h. The S-GET did not correlate significantly with the WAC-GET. The WAC was safely administered to ponies, and data were collected using a modified receiver. The WAC-GET varied considerably between ponies, but was ≤ 3 h in 5 of the 6 ponies. The WAC used in this study provided a noninvasive technique that produced novel information about the pony gastrointestinal tract, but owing to the substantial variability in GET values and long transit time it may not be a reliable clinical tool at this time. © 2012 EVJ Ltd.

  6. Space-Time Transitions in String Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Witten, Edward

    1993-01-01

    Simple mean field methods can be used to describe transitions between different space-time models in string theory. These include transitions between different Calabi-Yau manifolds, and more exotic things such as the Calabi-Yau/Landau-Ginzberg correspondence.

  7. Late time phase transition as dark energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We show that the dark energy field can naturally be described by the scalar condensates of a non-abelian gauge group. This gauge group is unified with the standard model gauge groups and it has a late time phase transition. The small phase transition explains why the positive acceleration of the universe is ...

  8. An Aggregated Public Transit Accessibility Measure

    OpenAIRE

    Al Mamun, Md. Sha; Lownes, Nicholas E.

    2010-01-01

    Measuring the ease of access to the transit services is important in evaluating existing services, predicting travel demands, allocating transportation investments and making decisions on land use development. A new aggregated approach to assessing the accessibility of public transport is described to assist transit professionals in the planning and decision making process. It involves the use of readily available methods and represents a more holistic measure of transit accessibili-ty integr...

  9. A search for transit timing variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kramm U.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Photometric follow-ups of transiting exoplanets (TEPs may lead to discoveries of additional, less massive bodies in extrasolar systems. This is possible by detecting and then analysing variations in transit timing of transiting exoplanets. In 2009 we launched an international observing campaign, the aim of which is to detect and characterise signals of transit timing variation (TTV in selected TEPs. The programme is realised by collecting data from 0.6-2.2-m telescopes spread worldwide at different longitudes. We present our observing strategy and summarise first results for WASP-3b with evidence for a 15 Earth-mass perturber in an outer 2:1 orbital resonance.

  10. Late-time cosmological phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1990-11-01

    It is shown that the potential galaxy formation and large-scale structure problems of objects existing at high redshifts (Z approx-gt 5), structures existing on scales of 100M pc as well as velocity flows on such scales, and minimal microwave anisotropies (ΔT/T) approx-lt 10 -5 can be solved if the seeds needed to generate structure form in a vacuum phase transition after decoupling. It is argued that the basic physics of such a phase transition is no more exotic than that utilized in the more traditional GUT scale phase transitions, and that, just as in the GUT case, significant random gaussian fluctuations and/or topological defects can form. Scale lengths of ∼100M pc for large-scale structure as well as ∼1 M pc for galaxy formation occur naturally. Possible support for new physics that might be associated with such a late-time transition comes from the preliminary results of the SAGE solar neutrino experiment, implying neutrino flavor mixing with values similar to those required for a late-time transition. It is also noted that a see-saw model for the neutrino masses might also imply a tau neutrino mass that is an ideal hot dark matter candidate. However, in general either hot or cold dark matter can be consistent with a late-time transition. 47 refs., 2 figs

  11. Transition Icons for Time-Series Visualization and Exploratory Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Paul V; Baharloo, Raheleh; Wanigatunga, Amal A; Manini, Todd M; Tighe, Patrick J; Rashidi, Parisa

    2018-03-01

    The modern healthcare landscape has seen the rapid emergence of techniques and devices that temporally monitor and record physiological signals. The prevalence of time-series data within the healthcare field necessitates the development of methods that can analyze the data in order to draw meaningful conclusions. Time-series behavior is notoriously difficult to intuitively understand due to its intrinsic high-dimensionality, which is compounded in the case of analyzing groups of time series collected from different patients. Our framework, which we call transition icons, renders common patterns in a visual format useful for understanding the shared behavior within groups of time series. Transition icons are adept at detecting and displaying subtle differences and similarities, e.g., between measurements taken from patients receiving different treatment strategies or stratified by demographics. We introduce various methods that collectively allow for exploratory analysis of groups of time series, while being free of distribution assumptions and including simple heuristics for parameter determination. Our technique extracts discrete transition patterns from symbolic aggregate approXimation representations, and compiles transition frequencies into a bag of patterns constructed for each group. These transition frequencies are normalized and aligned in icon form to intuitively display the underlying patterns. We demonstrate the transition icon technique for two time-series datasets-postoperative pain scores, and hip-worn accelerometer activity counts. We believe transition icons can be an important tool for researchers approaching time-series data, as they give rich and intuitive information about collective time-series behaviors.

  12. Gibbs measures and phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Georgii, Hans-Otto

    2011-01-01

    From a review of the first edition: ""This book […] covers in depth a broad range of topics in the mathematical theory of phase transition in statistical mechanics. […] It is in fact one of the author's stated aims that this comprehensive monograph should serve both as an introductory text and as a reference for the expert."" (F. Papangelou, Zentralblatt MATH) The second edition has been extended by a new section on large deviations and some comments on the more recent developments in the area.

  13. The Transiting System GJ1214: High-Precision Defocused Transit Observations and a Search for Evidence of Transit Timing Variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kennet Bomann West; Hardis, S.; Hinse, T. C.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We present 11 high-precision photometric transit observations of the transiting super-Earth planet GJ1214b. Combining these data with observations from other authors, we investigate the ephemeris for possible signs of transit timing variations (TTVs) using a Bayesian approach. Methods......: The observations are used to determine the photometric parameters and the physical properties of the GJ1214 system. Our results are in good agreement with published values. Individual times of mid-transit are measured with uncertainties as low as 10s, allowing us to reduce the uncertainty in the orbital period...... by a factor of two. Conclusions: A Bayesian analysis reveals that it is highly improbable that the observed transit times is explained by TTV, when compared with the simpler alternative of a linear ephemeris....

  14. First measurements of electron-beam transit times and micropulse elongation in a photoelectric injector at the High-Brightness Accelerator FEL (HIBAF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Carlsten, B.E.; Feldman, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Key aspects of the dynamics of a photoelectric injector (PEI) on the Los Alamos High-Brightness Accelerator FEL (HIBAF) facility have been investigated using a synchroscan streak camera. By phase-locking the streak camera sweep to the reference 108.3 MHz rf signal, the variations of micropulse temporal elongations (30 to 80% over the drive-laser pulse length) and of transit times (25 ps for a 16{degree}-phase change) were observed for the first time. These results were in good agreement with PARMELA simulations. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Clinical value of radionuclide small intestine transit time measurement combined with lactulose hydrogen breath test for the diagnosis of bacterial overgrowth in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Yanli; Lou, Cen; Huang, Zhongke; Chen, Dongfang; Huang, Huacheng; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Bucheng; Dai, Ning; Zhao, Jianmin; Zhen, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) may be a pathogenetic factor for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This syndrome cannot be explained by structural abnormalities and has no specific diagnostic laboratory tests or biomarkers. We studied quantitatively and semi-quantitatively, using lactulose hydrogen breath test (LHBT), small intestinal transit time (SITT) (99m)technetium-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid ((99m)Tc-DTPA) in order to examine the mobility of small intestine as an indication of bacterial overgrowth in patients. Eighty nine consecutive patients who met Rome criteria for IBS were retrospectively studied. According to the diagnostic criteria, all patients were divided into two groups: the SIBO group and the non-SIBO group. The tracer was a mixture of 10g lactulose, 37MBq (99m)Tc-DTPA and 100mL water. The patient drank the whole mixture during 1min and the SITT study started immediately. The SITT and the LHBT followed every 15min for up to 3h after emptying the urine bladder. Spearman's rank correlation was applied to assess the correlation of oro-cecum transit time (OCTT) between imaging and LHBT. The semi-quantitative index between the SIBO group and the non-SIBO group was analyzed with Wilcoxon's rank sum test. If there was significant group difference, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used. Pintestinal transit time study using a lactose hydrogen breath test and (99m)Tc-DTPA is a real-time test for small intestine bacteria overgrowth in IBS patients and can be used as an indicator of the disease.

  16. Transition Path Time Distribution, Tunneling Times, Friction, and Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Eli

    2017-02-01

    A quantum mechanical transition path time probability distribution is formulated and its properties are studied using a parabolic barrier potential model. The average transit time is well defined and readily calculated. It is smaller than the analogous classical mechanical average transit time, vanishing at the crossover temperature. It provides a direct route for determining tunneling times. The average time may be also used to define a coarse grained momentum of the system for the passage from one side of the barrier to the other. The product of the uncertainty in this coarse grained momentum with the uncertainty in the location of the particle is shown under certain conditions to be smaller than the ℏ/2 formal uncertainty limit. The model is generalized to include friction in the form of a bilinear interaction with a harmonic bath. Using an Ohmic friction model one finds that increasing the friction, increases the transition time. Only moderate values of the reduced friction coefficient are needed for the quantum transition time and coarse grained uncertainty to approach the classical limit which is smaller than ℏ/2 when the friction is not too small. These results show how one obtains classical dynamics from a pure quantum system without invoking any further assumptions, approximations, or postulates.

  17. Techniques and standards in intraoperative graft verification by transit time flow measurement after coronary artery bypass graft surgery: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niclauss, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Transit time flow measurement (TTFM) is a quality control tool for intraoperative graft evaluation in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. A critical review of the literature available using TTFM in CABG surgery is the focus of this article. The main objectives will be to detail precise parameters for flow evaluation, to show limitations of TTFM and to prove its predictive impact on postoperative graft failure rate. Publications listed in the PubMed database were reviewed, searching for intraoperative graft verification in coronary surgery by TTFM, with postoperative imaging follow-up (FU) modality and with a special focus on publications released after European guidelines from 2010. Nine included publications revealed an overall graft failure rate of ∼12%. Mean graft flow had a positive predictive value in the largest study, and cut-offs, of at least 20 ml/min for internal mammary artery (IMA) grafts, therein partially confirming guidelines, and 30-40 ml/min for saphenous venous grafts (SVGs) were proposed. An explicit correlation between graft flow, patency rate and severity of coronary stenosis, by indicating the fractional flow reserve, was found for IMA grafts. Increased pulsatility index and increased systolic reverse flow probably predict worse outcome and may help identifying competitive flow. Diastolic filling, rarely indicated, could not be confirmed as the predictive marker. No significant correlation of TTFM and graft failure rate for radial and other arterial grafts could be found, partially due to the small number of these types of grafts analysed. Larger target vessels and lower postoperative CK-MB levels may predict better graft patency rates. Low sensitivity for TTFM to reliably detect graft failure is certainly a major issue, as found in randomized analyses. However, methodical limitations and varying threshold values for TTFM render a general consensus difficult. Influence of quantity (vessel territory distribution) and quality

  18. Transit time for third order resonance extraction

    CERN Document Server

    Pullia, M

    1996-01-01

    An important spin-off from accelerators is the use of synchrotrons for cancer therapy. A precise control of the extraction from the synchrotron is needed to satisfy the medical specifications and this has led to a renewed interest in the basic theory of third-order resonance extraction. In the present paper, a complete description of the transit time in the resonance (the time between a particle becoming unstable and reaching the electrostatic septum) is developed as a basis for future work predicting spill shapes and the influence of power supply ripple. The transit time is evaluated for constant tune and for a slowly varying tune. Both cases are subdivided into particles that start close simulation and are shown to be correct to within a few percent.

  19. Measurement of Magic Wavelengths for the ^{40}Ca^{+} Clock Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Liang; Huang, Yao; Bian, Wu; Shao, Hu; Guan, Hua; Tang, Yong-Bo; Li, Cheng-Bin; Mitroy, J; Gao, Ke-Lin

    2015-06-05

    We demonstrate experimentally the existence of magic wavelengths and determine the ratio of oscillator strengths for a single trapped ion. For the first time, two magic wavelengths near 396 nm for the ^{40}Ca^{+} clock transition are measured simultaneously with high precision. By tuning the applied laser to an intermediate wavelength between transitions 4s_{1/2}→4p_{1/2} and 4s_{1/2}→4p_{3/2}, the sensitivity of the clock transition Stark shift to the oscillator strengths is greatly enhanced. Furthermore, with the measured magic wavelengths, we determine the ratio of the oscillator strengths with a deviation of less than 0.5%. Our experimental method may be applied to measure magic wavelengths for other ion clock transitions. Promisingly, the measurement of these magic wavelengths paves the way to building all-optical trapped ion clocks.

  20. Constipation and Colonic Transit Times in Children With Morbid Obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Baan-Slootweg, Olga H.; Liem, Olivia; Bekkali, Noor; van Aalderen, Wim M. C.; Rijcken, Tammo H. Pels; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Benninga, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine the frequency of functional constipation according to the Rome III criteria in children with morbid obesity and to evaluate by measuring colonic transit times (CTTs) whether decreased colonic motility is present in these children. Patients and

  1. Room acoustic transition time based on reflection overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas; Jacobsen, Finn

    2013-01-01

    at time t, which is mainly controlled by the absorption characteristics of the boundary surfaces of the room. Scattering, diffuse reflections, and diffraction, which facilitate the overlapping process, have not been taken into account. Measured impulse responses show that the transition occurs earlier......A transition time is defined based on the temporal overlap of reflected pulses in room impulse responses. Assuming specular reflections only, the temporal distance between adjacent reflections, which is proportional to the volume of a room, is compared with the characteristic width of a pulse...... in a room with nonuniform absorption and furniture than in a room that satisfies the underlying assumptions....

  2. Room acoustic transition time based on reflection overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas; Jacobsen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    at time t, which is mainly controlled by the absorption characteristics of the boundary surfaces of the room. Scattering, diffuse reflections, and diffraction, which facilitate the overlapping process, have not been taken into account. Measured impulse responses show that the transition occurs earlier......A transition time is defined based on the temporal overlap of reflected pulses in room impulse responses. Assuming specular reflections only, the temporal distance between adjacent reflections, which is proportional to the volume of a room, is compared with the characteristic width of a pulse...... in a room with nonuniform absorption and furniture than in a room that satisfies the underlying assumptions....

  3. Uncertainty evaluation in transition temperature measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brillaud, C. [Electricite de France, Avoine (France); Augendre, H. [Electricite de France, Clamart (France); Bethmont, M. [Electricite de France, Ecuelles (France)

    1996-12-31

    The pressure vessel surveillance program is mainly based on the transition temperature change assessment, a change which is induced by neutron irradiation. Uncertainties in Charpy test measurements are well known; however, the authors are less familiar with uncertainties due to general procedures governing experiments, which can be significant and therefore must be taken into account. In fact, procedures specify neither the number of specimens needed to obtain a transition curve, nor the choice of test temperatures, nor the fitting method for the transition curve. A study has been conducted to determine the influence of the experimental procedure on the accuracy of transition temperature determination, and the initial results are presented in this paper. Two EDF laboratories performed Charpy tests on the surveillance program reference metal, using 8, 16, 24, 32 and 64 specimens to evaluate how the number of specimens affects the transition temperature. The influence of the scatter of mechanical properties has also been studied at two levels of irradiation. The authors have evaluated the effect of different sampling strategies and investigated a new fitting method, which is based on a simultaneous fitting of all curves with common constraints on parameters.

  4. Measuring Business Cycle Time

    OpenAIRE

    Stock, James H.

    1987-01-01

    The business cycle analysis of Arthur F. Burns and Wesley C. Mitchell and the National Bureau of Economic Research presumed that aggregate economic variables evolve on a time scale defined by business cycle turning points rather than by months or quarters. Do macroeconomic variables appear to evolve on an economic rather than a calendar time scale? Evidence presented here suggests that they do. However, the estimated economic time scales are only weakly related to business cycle time scales, ...

  5. School polices, programmes and facilities, and objectively measured sedentary time, LPA and MVPA: associations in secondary school and over the transition from primary to secondary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Katie L; Corder, Kirsten; Suhrcke, Marc; Harrison, Flo; Jones, Andy P; van Sluijs, Esther M F; Atkin, Andrew J

    2016-04-26

    There is increasing policy interest in ensuring that the school environment supports healthy behaviours. We examined the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between schools' policies, programmes and facilities for physical activity (PA) and adolescents' objectively-measured activity intensity during the school day and lunchtime. Accelerometer-derived PA (proportion of time spent in sedentary (SED), light PA (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA)) during school hours and lunchtime from 325 participants in the SPEEDY study were obtained from baseline measurements (primary school, age 9/10 years) and +4y follow-up (secondary school). School environment characteristics were assessed by teacher questionnaire. Multivariable multi-level linear regression analyses accounting for school and adjusted for sex, age, BMI and family socio-economic status assessed cross-sectional associations with lunchtime and school-day SED, LPA and MVPA; effect modification by sex was investigated. The association of changes in school environment with changes in outcomes was examined using multivariable cross-classified linear regression models. There were significant differences between primary and secondary schools for 6/10 school environment characteristics investigated (including secondary schools reporting shorter breaks, more lunchtime PA opportunities, and higher number of sports facilities). Cross-sectional analyses showed that boys attending secondary schools with longer breaks spent significantly less time in SED and more time in MVPA during the school day. Longitudinally, an increase in break-time duration between primary and secondary school was associated with smaller reductions in MVPA during the school day. Moreover, participants who moved from a primary school that did not provide opportunities for PA at lunchtime to a secondary school that did provide such opportunities exhibited smaller increases in SED and smaller reductions in MVPA at lunchtime. Schools should

  6. Using connectivity for measuring equity in transit provision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Popoks, Dmitrijs; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    representation of the network (i.e., service lines, timetables, metro stations, train stations, and bus stops), and transit assignment results (i.e., level-of-service times, passenger flows). The assessment method proved effective in calculating location-based and potential-accessibility measures and Gini...

  7. FTA real-time transit information assessment : white paper on literature review of real-time transit information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real-time transit information systems are key technology applications within the transit industry designed to provide better customer service by disseminating timely and accurate information. Riders use this information to make various decisions abou...

  8. 'Stutter timing' for charge decay time measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubb, John; Harbour, John; Pavey, Ian

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the approach of 'stutter timing' that has been developed to improve the accuracy of measuring charge decay times in the presence of noise in compact and portable charge decay test instrumentation. The approach involves starting and stopping the timing clock as the noisy signal rises above and falls below the target threshold voltage level.

  9. Colonic transit time in patient with slow-transit constipation: Comparison of radiopaque markers and barium suspension method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Huimin; Han Jiagang; Na Ying; Zhao Bo; Ma Huachong; Wang Zhenjun

    2011-01-01

    Background: Colonic transit study provides valuable information before surgical treatment is considered for patient with constipation. The radiopaque markers method is the most common way for evaluating colon transit time. The aim of this study is to compare the barium suspension with the radiopaque makers to assess the colonic mobility in patient with constipation. Methods: Colonic transit time was measured in 11 female patients with slow-transit constipation using both radiopaque markers and barium suspension method. In radiopaque markers method, the patient ingested 20 markers on the first day, and an abdominal radiograph was performed every 24 h until 80% markers were excreted. In barium suspension method, the patient swallowed up to 50 ml of 200% (w/v) barium meal. The abdominal radiographs were taken at the same time point as the former. Results: The total or segmental colonic transit time were obviously prolonged in all patients. Segmental transits time spent in the right colon, left colon and rectosigmoid for radiopaque markers and barium suspension method was, respectively, 30 ± 6 h and 34 ± 7 h; 38 ± 9 h and 32 ± 6 h; 40 ± 8 h and 38 ± 10 h. In the radiopaque markers method, total colonic transit time was 108 ± 14 h and it was 103 ± 13 h in the barium suspension method (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The barium suspension and radiopaque markers gave the similar results for colonic transit time. The barium suspension was a simple and cheap method for evaluating the colonic mobility.

  10. Colonic transit time in patient with slow-transit constipation: Comparison of radiopaque markers and barium suspension method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Huimin [Department of General Surgery, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, No. 8 Gongtina Lu, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100020 (China); Department of General Surgery, Weifang People' s Hospital, ShanDong Province 261041 (China); Han Jiagang [Department of General Surgery, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, No. 8 Gongtina Lu, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100020 (China); Na Ying [Department of Medical Imaging, Weifang People' s Hospital, ShanDong Province 261041 (China); Zhao Bo; Ma Huachong [Department of General Surgery, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, No. 8 Gongtina Lu, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100020 (China); Wang Zhenjun, E-mail: wang3zj@sohu.com [Department of General Surgery, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Capital Medical University, No. 8 Gongtina Lu, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100020 (China)

    2011-08-15

    Background: Colonic transit study provides valuable information before surgical treatment is considered for patient with constipation. The radiopaque markers method is the most common way for evaluating colon transit time. The aim of this study is to compare the barium suspension with the radiopaque makers to assess the colonic mobility in patient with constipation. Methods: Colonic transit time was measured in 11 female patients with slow-transit constipation using both radiopaque markers and barium suspension method. In radiopaque markers method, the patient ingested 20 markers on the first day, and an abdominal radiograph was performed every 24 h until 80% markers were excreted. In barium suspension method, the patient swallowed up to 50 ml of 200% (w/v) barium meal. The abdominal radiographs were taken at the same time point as the former. Results: The total or segmental colonic transit time were obviously prolonged in all patients. Segmental transits time spent in the right colon, left colon and rectosigmoid for radiopaque markers and barium suspension method was, respectively, 30 {+-} 6 h and 34 {+-} 7 h; 38 {+-} 9 h and 32 {+-} 6 h; 40 {+-} 8 h and 38 {+-} 10 h. In the radiopaque markers method, total colonic transit time was 108 {+-} 14 h and it was 103 {+-} 13 h in the barium suspension method (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The barium suspension and radiopaque markers gave the similar results for colonic transit time. The barium suspension was a simple and cheap method for evaluating the colonic mobility.

  11. Taste and Temperature in Swallowing Transit Time after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula C. Cola

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oropharyngeal dysphagia is common in individuals after stroke. Taste and temperature are used in dysphagia rehabilitation. The influence of stimuli, such as taste and temperature, on swallowing biomechanics has been investigated in both healthy individuals and in individuals with neurological disease. However, some questions still remain unanswered, such as how the sequence of offered stimuli influences the pharyngeal response. The goal of the present study was to determine the influence of the sequence of stimuli, sour taste and cold temperature, on pharyngeal transit time during deglutition in individuals after stroke. Methods: The study included 60 individuals with unilateral ischemic stroke, 29 males and 31 females, aged 41–88 years (mean age: 66.2 years examined 0–50 days after ictus (median: 6 days, with mild to moderate oropharyngeal dysphagia. Exclusion criteria were hemorrhagic stroke patients, patients with decreased level of consciousness, and clinically unstable patients, as confirmed by medical evaluation. The individuals were divided into two groups of 30 individuals each. Group 1 received a nonrandomized sequence of stimuli (i.e. natural, cold, sour, and sour-cold and group 2 received a randomized sequence of stimuli. A videofluoroscopic swallowing study was performed to analyze the pharyngeal transit time. Four different stimuli (natural, cold, sour, and sour-cold were offered. The images were digitalized and specific software was used to measure the pharyngeal transit time. Since the values did not present regular distribution and uniform variances, nonparametric tests were performed. Results: Individuals in group 1 presented a significantly shorter pharyngeal transit time with the sour-cold stimulus than with the other stimuli. Individuals in group 2 did not show a significant difference in pharyngeal transit time between stimuli. Conclusions: The results showed that the sequence of offered stimuli influences

  12. Predictable Patterns in Planetary Transit Timing Variations and Transit Duration Variations Due to Exomoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Rene; Hippke, Michael; Placek, Ben; Angerhausen, Daniel; Agol, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We present new ways to identify single and multiple moons around extrasolar planets using planetary transit timing variations (TTVs) and transit duration variations (TDVs). For planets with one moon, measurements from successive transits exhibit a hitherto undescribed pattern in the TTV-TDV diagram, originating from the stroboscopic sampling of the planet's orbit around the planet-moon barycenter. This pattern is fully determined and analytically predictable after three consecutive transits. The more measurements become available, the more the TTV-TDV diagram approaches an ellipse. For planets with multiple moons in orbital mean motion resonance (MMR), like the Galilean moon system, the pattern is much more complex and addressed numerically in this report. Exomoons in MMR can also form closed, predictable TTV-TDV figures, as long as the drift of the moons' pericenters is suciently slow.We find that MMR exomoons produce loops in the TTV-TDV diagram and that the number of these loops is equal to the order of the MMR, or the largest integer in the MMR ratio.We use a Bayesian model and Monte Carlo simulations to test the discoverability of exomoons using TTV-TDV diagrams with current and near-future technology. In a blind test, two of us (BP, DA) successfully retrieved a large moon from simulated TTV-TDV by co-authors MH and RH, which resembled data from a known Kepler planet candidate. Single exomoons with a 10 percent moon-to-planet mass ratio, like to Pluto-Charon binary, can be detectable in the archival data of the Kepler primary mission. Multi-exomoon systems, however, require either larger telescopes or brighter target stars. Complementary detection methods invoking a moon's own photometric transit or its orbital sampling effect can be used for validation or falsification. A combination of TESS, CHEOPS, and PLATO data would offer a compelling opportunity for an exomoon discovery around a bright star.

  13. Measurement of the π0 electromagnetic transition form factor slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeroni, C.; Lurkin, N.; Romano, A.; Blazek, T.; Koval, M.; Ceccucci, A.; Danielsson, H.; Falaleev, V.; Gatignon, L.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hallgren, B.; Maier, A.; Peters, A.; Piccini, M.; Riedler, P.; Frabetti, P. L.; Gersabeck, E.; Kekelidze, V.; Madigozhin, D.; Misheva, M.; Molokanova, N.; Movchan, S.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Rubin, P.; Baldini, W.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fiorini, M.; Gianoli, A.; Norton, A.; Petrucci, F.; Savrié, M.; Wahl, H.; Bizzeti, A.; Bucci, F.; Iacopini, E.; Lenti, M.; Veltri, M.; Antonelli, A.; Moulson, M.; Raggi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Eppard, K.; Hita-Hochgesand, M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Renk, B.; Wanke, R.; Winhart, A.; Winston, R.; Bolotov, V.; Duk, V.; Gushchin, E.; Ambrosino, F.; Di Filippo, D.; Massarotti, P.; Napolitano, M.; Palladino, V.; Saracino, G.; Anzivino, G.; Imbergamo, E.; Piandani, R.; Sergi, A.; Cenci, P.; Pepe, M.; Costantini, F.; Doble, N.; Giudici, S.; Pierazzini, G.; Sozzi, M.; Venditti, S.; Balev, S.; Collazuol, G.; DiLella, L.; Gallorini, S.; Goudzovski, E.; Lamanna, G.; Mannelli, I.; Ruggiero, G.; Cerri, C.; Fantechi, R.; Kholodenko, S.; Kurshetsov, V.; Obraztsov, V.; Semenov, V.; Yushchenko, O.; D'Agostini, G.; Leonardi, E.; Serra, M.; Valente, P.; Fucci, A.; Salamon, A.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Peyaud, B.; Engelfried, J.; Coward, D.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bifani, S.; Biino, C.; Dellacasa, G.; Marchetto, F.; Numao, T.; Retière, F.; NA62 Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    The NA62 experiment collected a large sample of charged kaon decays in 2007 with a highly efficient trigger for decays into electrons. A measurement of the π0 electromagnetic transition form factor slope parameter from 1.11 ×106 fully reconstructed K± →π± πD0, πD0 →e+e- γ events is reported. The measured value a = (3.68 ± 0.57) ×10-2 is in good agreement with theoretical expectations and previous measurements, and represents the most precise experimental determination of the slope in the time-like momentum transfer region.

  14. Relationship between functional elongated colonic transit time and constipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yuchang; Qian Xuequn; Zhang Genfu

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze the role of colonic transit test in diagnosis and aetiology of constipation. Methods: 87 cases of constipation diagnosed under Agachan scoring system and having completed transit test at least once were enrolled. All cases were divided into two groups: group A have normal colonic transit time, group B have extended colonic transit time. A comparison of the ratio of rectosigmoid transit by total colon (RRT) between group A and B. Result: 32 cases were enrolled in group A and 55 in group B. Low value of RRT was presented in 10 cases out of 32 in group A (31.3%), while in group B the abnormality was observed in 9 cases out of 55 (16.4%). A statistical difference between the two group was revealed by x 2 test (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Colonic transit test helps the confirming the aetiology of constipation, and the evaluation of rectosigmoid transit function is especially valuable

  15. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler. VI. Potentially Interesting Candidate Systems from Fourier-based Statistical Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Holman, Matthew J.; Welsh, WIlliam F.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Ciardi, David R.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Kjeldsen, Hans; Koch, David G.; Prša, Andrej

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through Quarter six (Q6) of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the sy...

  16. Regional gastrointestinal transit times in severe ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, A M; Gregersen, T; Christensen, L A; Agnholt, J; Dahlerup, J F; Schlageter, V; Krogh, K

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility may present secondary to inflammatory bowel disease. The main aim of this study was to investigate GI motility in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients during severe disease activity. Twenty patients with severe UC were studied with a novel telemetric capsule system (3D-Transit) designed for minimally invasive, ambulatory assessment of total and regional GI transit times. Ten patients were available for follow-up during remission. Data were compared to those of 20 healthy subjects (HS). Total GI transit time was significantly longer in patients with severe UC (median 44.5 h [range 9.9-102.7 h]) than in HS (median 27.6 h [range 9.6-56.4 h]) (p = 0.032). Additionally, during severe UC, transit time was prolonged through the proximal colon (p = 0.003) and there were strong trends toward longer than normal small intestinal transit time (HS: median 4.9 h [range 3.4-8.3 h] vs severe UC patients: median 5.9 h [range 3.9-11.9 h]; p = 0.053) and colorectal transit times (HS: median 18.2 h [range 1.5-43.7] vs severe UC patients: median 34.9 h [range 0.4-90.9 h]; p = 0.056). Our data further indicate that total GI and colorectal transit times may be prolonged in UC during early remission. Total GI transit times are significantly prolonged during severe UC. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Scintigraphic measurement of regional gut transit in idiopathic constipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stivland, T.; Camilleri, M.; Vassallo, M.; Proano, M.; Rath, D.; Brown, M.; Thomforde, G.; Pemberton, J.; Phillips, S.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, total gut transit and regional colonic transit in patients with idiopathic constipation were measured scintigraphically. Eight patients with severe constipation were studied, none of whom had evidence of abnormal function of the pelvic floor. 99mTc-radiolabeled Amberlite resin particles with a mixed meal were used to assess gastric emptying and small bowel transit; similar particles labeled with 111In were ingested in a coated capsule that dispersed in the ileocecal region. These were used to quantify colonic transit. Five healthy volunteers were also studied. Two patients showed delayed gastric emptying and two had slow small bowel transit. Seven of the eight patients had slow colonic transit. In five, delay affected the whole colon (pancolonic inertia); in two, transit in the ascending and transverse colon was normal, but solids moved through the left colon slowly. Mean colonic transit was also measured using radiopaque markers; this technique identified the patients with slow transit, as shown by measurements of overall colonic transit by simultaneous scintigraphy. However, estimated transit through the ascending and transverse colons was considerably shorter by the radiopaque marker technique. In conclusion, idiopathic constipation is characterized by either exaggerated reservoir functions of the ascending and transverse colons and/or impairment of propulsive function in the descending colon. Particle size may influence the result of regional colonic transit tests. Transit delays in other parts of the gut suggest that, in some patients, the condition may be a more generalized motor dysfunction

  18. How many segments are necessary to characterize delayed colonic transit time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchoucha, Michel; Devroede, Ghislain; Bon, Cyriaque; Raynaud, Jean-Jacques; Bejou, Bakhtiar; Benamouzig, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Measuring colonic transit time with radiopaque markers is simple, inexpensive, and very useful in constipated patients. Yet, the algorithm used to identify colonic segments is subjective, rather than founded on prior experimentation. The aim of the present study is to describe a rational way to determine the colonic partition in the measurement of colonic transit time. Colonic transit time was measured in seven segments: ascending colon, hepatic flexure, right and left transverse colon, splenic flexure, descending colon, and rectosigmoid in 852 patients with functional bowel and anorectal disorders. An unsupervised algorithm for modeling Gaussian mixtures served to estimate the number of subgroups from this oversegmented colonic transit time. After that, we performed a k-means clustering that separated the observations into homogenous groups of patients according to their oversegmented colonic transit time. The Gaussian mixture followed by the k-means clustering defined 4 populations of patients: "normal and fast transit" (n = 548) and three groups of patients with delayed colonic transit time "right delay" (n = 82) in which transit is delayed in the right part of the colon, "left delay" (n = 87) with transit delayed in the left part of colon and "outlet constipation" (n = 135) for patients with transit delayed in the terminal intestine. Only 3.7 % of patients were "erroneously" classified in the 4 groups recognized by clustering. This unsupervised analysis of segmental colonic transit time shows that the classical division of the colon and the rectum into three segments is sufficient to characterize delayed segmental colonic transit time.

  19. Measuring the "triple aim" in transition care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Megan; McManus, Margaret; White, Patience; Davidson, Laurie

    2014-12-01

    Without adequate support, adolescents transitioning from the pediatric to the adult health care system are at increased risk for poor health outcomes. Numerous interventions attempt to improve this transition, yet few comprehensively evaluate efficacy. To advance evaluation methods and ultimately the quality of transition services, it is necessary to understand the current state of health care transition measurement. This study examines and categorizes transition measures by using the "Triple Aim" framework of experience of care, population health, and cost of care. Ovid Medline and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature were searched for articles published between 1995 and 2013. Two reviewers independently screened studies and included those that evaluated the impact of a health care transition intervention. Measures were subsequently classified according to population health, experience of care, and costs of care. Of the 2282 studies initially identified, 33 met inclusion criteria. Population health measures were used in 27 studies, with disease-specific measures collected most frequently. Fifteen studies measured cost, most often service utilization. Eight studies measured experience of care, with satisfaction assessed most commonly. Only 3 studies examined all 3 domains of the "Triple Aim." Transition interventions described in the gray literature were not reviewed. Transition programs are inconsistently evaluated in terms of their impact on population health, patient experience, and cost. To demonstrate improvement in the transition from pediatric to adult health care, a more robust and consistent set of measures is needed. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. The liner shipping berth scheduling problem with transit times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhardt, Line Blander; Plum, Christian E.M.; Pisinger, David

    2016-01-01

    In this paper speed optimization of an existing liner shipping network is solved by adjusting the port berth times. The objective is to minimize fuel consumption while retaining the customer transit times including the transhipment times. To avoid too many changes to the time table, changes of port...

  1. Colonic transit time in constipated children: does pediatric slow-transit constipation exist?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benninga, M. A.; Büller, H. A.; Tytgat, G. N.; Akkermans, L. M.; Bossuyt, P. M.; Taminiau, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    In adults, slow-transit constipation is a well-established form of constipation with abdominal pain and an empty rectum on examination. Marker studies in these patients, mainly women, show a markedly slowed transit time in all colonic segments. No studies in constipated children are available that

  2. Gastric transit and small intestinal transit time and motility assessed by a magnet tracking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsøe, Jonas; Fynne, Lotte; Gregersen, Tine; Schlageter, Vincent; Christensen, Lisbet A; Dahlerup, Jens F; Rijkhoff, Nico J M; Laurberg, Søren; Krogh, Klaus

    2011-12-29

    Tracking an ingested magnet by the Magnet Tracking System MTS-1 (Motilis, Lausanne, Switzerland) is an easy and minimally-invasive method to assess gastrointestinal transit. The aim was to test the validity of MTS-1 for assessment of gastric transit time and small intestinal transit time, and to illustrate transit patterns detected by the system. A small magnet was ingested and tracked by an external matrix of 16 magnetic field sensors (4 × 4) giving a position defined by 5 coordinates (position: x, y, z, and angle: θ, φ). Eight healthy subjects were each investigated three times: (1) with a small magnet mounted on a capsule endoscope (PillCam); (2) with the magnet alone and the small intestine in the fasting state; and (3) with the magnet alone and the small intestine in the postprandial state. Experiment (1) showed good agreement and no systematic differences between MTS-1 and capsule endoscopy when assessing gastric transit (median difference 1 min; range: 0-6 min) and small intestinal transit time (median difference 0.5 min; range: 0-52 min). Comparing experiments (1) and (2) there were no systematic differences in gastric transit or small intestinal transit when using the magnet-PillCam unit and the much smaller magnetic pill. In experiments (2) and (3), short bursts of very fast movements lasting less than 5% of the time accounted for more than half the distance covered during the first two hours in the small intestine, irrespective of whether the small intestine was in the fasting or postprandial state. The mean contraction frequency in the small intestine was significantly lower in the fasting state than in the postprandial state (9.90 min-1 vs. 10.53 min-1) (p = 0.03). MTS-1 is reliable for determination of gastric transit and small intestinal transit time. It is possible to distinguish between the mean contraction frequency of small intestine in the fasting state and in the postprandial state.

  3. Transitional Leadership: Leadership During Times of Transition, Key Principles, and Considerations for Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbash, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    To suggest a methodical approach for refining transitional management abilities, including empowerment of a growing leader, leading in an unfamiliar organization or leading in an organization that is changing. Management approaches based on the body of work dealing with leadership studies and transitions and dealing with leadership during times of transition and change management were consolidated and categorized. Transitional leaders can benefit from effective leadership training including defining and prospectively accruing necessary experiences and skills; strengthening information gathering skills; effectively self-assessing; valuing and implementing mentoring; formulating strategy; and communicating. A categorical approach to transitional leadership may be implemented through a systems-based and methodical approach to gaining the definable, and distinct sets of skills and abilities necessary for transitional leadership success. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Gastrointestinal transit times and motility in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedsund, Caroline; Gregersen, Tine; Jønsson, Iben

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) often suffer from gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction including obstructive symptoms, malabsorption and pain, but the underlying pathophysiology remains obscure. AIM: To compare GI motility and transit times in CF patients and healthy controls. MATERIAL...

  5. Precise measurement of dead time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenfeld, E.; Janssen, H.

    1994-01-01

    Four methods are discussed by which dead times of the non-extending type can be determined experimentally. Two methods using statistical pulses were improved by eliminating uncertainties due to counting statistics. However, it was concluded from a comparison of the four methods that those using periodical pulses are not only less time-consuming but are preferable if high-precision values are aimed at. A dead-time unit with quartz oscillator-based dead times of the non-extending type was tested using all of the four methods. Measurements within a period of three years indicated that the unit investigated here has subnanosecond stability for each of the adjusted dead-time values. (orig.)

  6. Problems measuring the underground economy in transition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanousek, Jan; Palda, F.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 4 (2006), s. 707-718 ISSN 0967-0750 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA402/04/0166 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : informal economy * macro estimates of shadow economy * transition Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2006 http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-0351.2006.00268.x

  7. Drift-time measurement electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pernicka, M.

    1978-01-01

    The aim of the construction was to improve the time resolution without using the facility of time stretching, to have a fast read-out possibility, and to be still cheaper in price in comparison to other systems. A possibility was thus foreseen for using the firm Fairchild. These integrated circuits (IC) have, for example, a propagation delay of 0.75 ns for a gate. One can expect therefore less time jitter and less time difference between the different inputs. Furthermore this IC offers a greater flexibility and therefore the number of ICs decreases and distances become smaller. Working with clock frequencies up to 166.6 MHz is easily possible without running into timing problems. On the other hand, to make full use of the advantages of this IC, it was necessary to build the print as a multilayer. The only risk could be in the use of a completely new product. A further aim was to build for this system a second type of drift-time module with a short time range for measuring drift time and pulse length in rotated multiwire proportional chambers. A brief outline of the specifications of the different modules is given in table 1. (Auth.)

  8. Daylight Saving Time Transitions and Road Traffic Accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuuli Lahti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythm disruptions may have harmful impacts on health. Circadian rhythm disruptions caused by jet lag compromise the quality and amount of sleep and may lead to a variety of symptoms such as fatigue, headache, and loss of attention and alertness. Even a minor change in time schedule may cause considerable stress for the body. Transitions into and out of daylight saving time alter the social and environmental timing twice a year. According to earlier studies, this change in time-schedule leads to sleep disruption and fragmentation of the circadian rhythm. Since sleep deprivation decreases motivation, attention, and alertness, transitions into and out of daylight saving time may increase the amount of accidents during the following days after the transition. We studied the amount of road traffic accidents one week before and one week after transitions into and out of daylight saving time during years from 1981 to 2006. Our results demonstrated that transitions into and out of daylight saving time did not increase the number of traffic road accidents.

  9. Bisimulation and Open Maps for Timed Transition Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens

    1999-01-01

    framework of open maps. We define a category of timed transition systems, and show how to characterise standard timed bisimulation in terms of spans of open maps with a natural choice of a path category. This allows us to apply general results from the theory of open maps, e.g. the existence of canonical......Formal models for real-time systems have been studied intensively over the past decade. Much of the theory of untimed systems have been lifted to real-time settings. One example is the notion of bisimulation applied to timed transition systems, which is studied here within the general categorical...... models and characteristic logics. Also, we obtain here an alternative proof of decidability of bisimulation for finite transition systems, and illustrate the use of open maps in finite presentations of bisimulations...

  10. Emittance measurements of FEL accelerators using optical transition radiation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorito, R.B.; Rule, D.W.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Tokar, R.L.; Dowell, D.H.; Sellyey, W.C.; Lowrey, A.R.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the emittance of the Boeing FEL accelerator operating at 107 Mev, were performed using optical transition radiation (OTR). The results of the three measurement methods: measurement of beam spot size as a function of magnetic quadrupole focusing strength, two screen beam spot measurements, and beam spot-divergence measurements using a OTR interferometer are compared and shown to be in excellent agreement

  11. Constipation and colonic transit times in children with morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    vd Baan-Slootweg, Olga H; Liem, Olivia; Bekkali, Noor; van Aalderen, Wim M C; Rijcken, Tammo H Pels; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Benninga, Marc A

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the frequency of functional constipation according to the Rome III criteria in children with morbid obesity and to evaluate by measuring colonic transit times (CTTs) whether decreased colonic motility is present in these children. Ninety-one children with morbid obesity ages 8 to 18 years, entering a prospective, randomized controlled study evaluating the effect of an outpatient versus inpatient treatment program of obesity, participated. All of the children filled out a standardized questionnaire regarding their bowel habits, and CTTs were measured using radioopaque markers. Food diaries were also recorded to evaluate their diet. A total of 19 children (21%) had functional constipation according to the Rome III criteria, whereas 1 child had functional nonretentive fecal incontinence. Total CTT exceeded 62 hours in only 10.5% of the children with constipation, and among them, 2 had a total CTT of >100 hours. In the nonconstipated group 8.3% had a delayed CTT. Furthermore, no difference was found between the diet of children with or without constipation, specifically not with respect to fiber and fat intake. Our study confirms a high frequency of functional constipation in children with obesity, using the Rome III criteria. However, abnormal colonic motility, as measured by CTT, was delayed in only a minority of patients. No relation was found between constipation in these children and fiber or fat intake.

  12. Measuring health inequalities over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Bergonzoli

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: several methodologies have been used to measure health inequalities. Most of them do so in a cross- sectional fashion, causing significant loss of information. None of them measure health inequalities in social territories over time. Methods: this article presents two approaches measure health inequalities: one approach consists of a refinement of cross-sectional study, by using the analysis of ANOVA variance (ANOVA procedure to explore whether the gap between social territories is real or due to chance. Several adjustments were made to limit errors inevitably found in multiple comparisons. Polynomial procedures were then applied to identify and evaluate any trends. The second sociales se utilizó approach measures the health gap between social territories or strata (as defined in this study over time using the Poisson regression. These approaches were applied using life expectancy and maternal mortality data from Venezuela. Results: a positive relationship between tendenterritories and life expectancy was found, with a significant cia linal trend. The relation between maternal mortality and materna y territorios sociales fue cuadrática. La medición desocial territories was quadratic. The measurement of the la brecha, gap between least developed social territory and the most, a developed territory showed a gap reduction from the first to the second decade, mainly because of an increase of territorio social maternal mortality in the more developed area, rather than a real improvement in the least developed. Conclusions: study helps to clarify the impact that public policies and interventions have in reducing the health gap. Knowledge that a health gap between social territories can decrease without showing improvement in the least developed sector , is an important finding for monitoring and evaluating health interventions for improving living and health conditions in the population.

  13. Modelling systematics of ground-based transit photometry I. Implications on transit timing variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Essen, C.; Cellone, S.; Mallonn, M.

    2016-01-01

    The transit timing variation technique (TTV) has been widely used to detect and characterize multiple planetary systems. Due to the observational biases imposed mainly by the photometric conditions and instrumentation and the high signal-to-noise required to produce primary transit observations...... the observing time at hand carrying out such follow-ups, or if the use of medium-to-low quality transit light curves, combined with current standard techniques of data analysis, could be playing a main role against exoplanetary search via TTVs. The purpose of this work is to investigate to what extent ground......-based observations treated with current modelling techniques are reliable to detect and characterize additional planets in already known planetary systems. To meet this goal, we simulated typical primary transit observations of a hot Jupiter mimicing an existing system, Qatar-1. To resemble ground-based observations...

  14. High-Cadence Transit Timing Variation Monitoring of Extrasolar Planets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naef D.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We report ground-based high-cadence transit timing observations of the extrasolar planet WASP-2b. We achieve a typical timing error of 15-30 sec. The data show no significant deviations from the predicted ephemeris.

  15. Relationship between transit time and mechanical properties of a cell through a stenosed microchannel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ting; Shi, Huixin; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Lim, Chwee Teck; Li, Yu

    2018-01-24

    The changes in the mechanical properties of a cell are not only the cause of some diseases, but can also be a biomarker for some disease states. In recent times, microfluidic devices with built-in constrictions have been widely used to measure these changes. The transit time in such devices, defined as the time that a cell takes to pass through a constriction, has been found to be a crucial factor associated with the cell mechanical properties. Here, we use smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD), a particle-based numerical method, to explore the relationship between the transit time and mechanical properties of a cell. Three expressions of the transit time are developed from our simulation data, with respect to the stenosed size of constrictions, the shear modulus and bending modulus of cells, respectively. We show that a convergent constriction (the inlet is wider than the outlet), and a sharp-corner constriction (the constriction outlet is narrow) are better in identifying the differences in the transit time of cells. Moreover, the transit time increases and gradually approaches a constant as the shear modulus of cells increases, but increases first and then decreases as the bending modulus increases. These results suggest that the mechanical properties of cells can indeed be measured by analyzing their transit time, based on the recommended microfluidic device.

  16. TEE, an estimator for the precision of eclipse and transit minimum times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeg, H. J.; Tingley, B.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Transit or eclipse timing variations have proven to be a valuable tool in exoplanet research. However, no simple way to estimate the potential precision of such timing measures has been presented yet, nor are guidelines available regarding the relation between timing errors and sampling rate. Aims: A timing error estimator (TEE) equation is presented that requires only basic transit parameters as input. With the TEE, estimating timing precision for actual data and for future instruments, such as the TESS and PLATO space missions, is straightforward. Methods: A derivation of the timing error based on a trapezoidal transit shape is given. We also verify the TEE on realistically modelled transits using Monte Carlo simulations and determine its validity range, exploring in particular the interplay between ingress/egress times and sampling rates. Results: The simulations show that the TEE gives timing errors very close to the correct value, as long as the temporal sampling is faster than transit ingress/egress durations and transits with very low S/N are avoided. Conclusions: The TEE is a useful tool for estimating eclipse or transit timing errors in actual and future data sets. In combination with a previously published equation to estimate period-errors, predictions for the ephemeris precision of long-coverage observations are possible as well. The tests for the TEE's validity range also led to implications for instrumental design. Temporal sampling has to be faster than transit ingress or egress durations, or a loss in timing precision will occur. An application to the TESS mission shows that transits close to its detection limit will have timing uncertainties that exceed 1 h within a few months of their acquisition. Prompt follow-up observations will be needed to avoid "losing" their ephemerides.

  17. Mean Transit Time and Mean Residence Time for Linear Diffusion–Convection–Reaction Transport System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Waniewski

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristic times for transport processes in biological systems may be evaluated as mean transit times (MTTs (for transit states or mean residence times (MRT (for steady states. It is shown in a general framework of a (linear reaction–diffusion–convection equation that these two times are related. Analytical formulas are also derived to calculate moments of exit time distribution using solutions for a stationary state of the system.

  18. Gastric transit and small intestinal transit time and motility assessed by a magnet tracking system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WorsØe Jonas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracking an ingested magnet by the Magnet Tracking System MTS-1 (Motilis, Lausanne, Switzerland is an easy and minimally-invasive method to assess gastrointestinal transit. The aim was to test the validity of MTS-1 for assessment of gastric transit time and small intestinal transit time, and to illustrate transit patterns detected by the system. Methods A small magnet was ingested and tracked by an external matrix of 16 magnetic field sensors (4 × 4 giving a position defined by 5 coordinates (position: x, y, z, and angle: θ, ϕ. Eight healthy subjects were each investigated three times: (1 with a small magnet mounted on a capsule endoscope (PillCam; (2 with the magnet alone and the small intestine in the fasting state; and (3 with the magnet alone and the small intestine in the postprandial state. Results Experiment (1 showed good agreement and no systematic differences between MTS-1 and capsule endoscopy when assessing gastric transit (median difference 1 min; range: 0-6 min and small intestinal transit time (median difference 0.5 min; range: 0-52 min. Comparing experiments (1 and (2 there were no systematic differences in gastric transit or small intestinal transit when using the magnet-PillCam unit and the much smaller magnetic pill. In experiments (2 and (3, short bursts of very fast movements lasting less than 5% of the time accounted for more than half the distance covered during the first two hours in the small intestine, irrespective of whether the small intestine was in the fasting or postprandial state. The mean contraction frequency in the small intestine was significantly lower in the fasting state than in the postprandial state (9.90 min-1 vs. 10.53 min-1 (p = 0.03. Conclusion MTS-1 is reliable for determination of gastric transit and small intestinal transit time. It is possible to distinguish between the mean contraction frequency of small intestine in the fasting state and in the postprandial state.

  19. Esophageal transit time in patients with chagasic megaesophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Paula; Ferreira, Cid Sergio; Cunha-Melo, José Renan

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the esophageal transit time in control individuals and in chagasic patients with or without megaesophagus. A total of 148 patients were allocated in 6 groups according to serological diagnostic of Chagas disease and the degree of esophageal dilatation: A, control healthy individuals (n = 34, 22.9%); B, indeterminate form (n = 23, 15.5%); C, megaesophagus I (n = 37, 25.0%); D, megaesophagus II (n = 19, 12.8%); E, megaesophagus III (n = 21, 14.2%); and F, megaesophagus IV (n = 14, 9.5%). After 8-hour fasting, patients were asked to swallow 75 mL of barium sulfate solution. x-Rays were obtained after 8, 30, 60, and 90 seconds, 5, 10, 30, 60, and 90 minutes, 2, 6, 12, 24 hours, and at every 12 hours until no more contrast was seen in the esophagus. This was the transit time. The transit time varied from 8 seconds to 36 hours (median = 90 seconds). A linear correlation was observed between transit time and megaesophagus grade: 8 seconds in groups A and B, 5 minutes in C, 30 minutes in D, 2 hours in E, and 9:15 hours in F. Dysphagia was not reported by 60 of 114 (52.6%) patients with positive serological tests for Chagas disease (37/91—40.7%—of patients with megaesophagus I–IV grades). The esophageal transit time increased with the grade of megaesophagus. The esophageal transit time has a direct correlation with the grade of megaesophagus; dysphagia complaint correlates with the grade of megaesophagus. However, many patients with megaesophagus do not report dysphagia. PMID:29517674

  20. Venus Elongation Measurements for the Transit of Venus, using the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 11. Venus Elongation Measurements for the Transit of Venus, using the Historical Jantar Mantar Observatory. N Rathnasree. Classroom Volume 9 Issue 11 November 2004 pp 46-55 ...

  1. Measure Guideline. Transitioning to a Tankless Water Heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozyna, K. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Rapport, A. [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This measure guideline provides information to help residential builders and retrofitters with the design, specification, selection, implementation, installation, and maintenance issues of transitioning from tank-type water heaters to tankless water heaters.

  2. Scintigraphic measurement of colonic transit in patients with idiopathic constipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, K. H.; Kim, C. K.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate usefulness of scintigraphic measurement of total and regional colonic transit in patients with idiopathic constipation. 25 patients who were complained chronic constipation underwent scintigraphic measurement of the total and regional colon transit. Of them 10 patients were diagnosed as idiopathic constipation, none of whom had evidence of abnormal function of the pelvic floor. Ten healthy volunteers were also studied. 67 Gallium-labelled Amberlite resin particles were ingested in a coated capsule with methacrylate that dispersed in the ileocecal region. Images were obtained using a gamma camera at regular intervals for the 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hours after the initial counting of the radioactivity in the cecum. We determined the geometric center in four regions of interest in the colon (ascending, transverse, descending, and rectosigmoid). Ten patients with colonic inertia showed significant retention of solid residue in the ascending and transverse colon over a 48-hour period. The median values for the healthy subjects at 2, 4, 8, and 24, and 48 hours were 1.44±0.2 (midway through ascending), 1.71±0.45 (midway through transverse), 2.64±0.95 (midway through descending), 3.94±0.89 (midway through rectosigmoid), and 4.52±0.76 (midway through the stool compartment). On the contrary, the values of ten patients with colonic inertia were 1.0±0.0 (midway through ascending), 1.0±0.0 (midway through ascending). 1.02 ±0.06 (midway through ascending), 1.70±0.36 (midway through transverse), and 2.33±0.31(midway through descending) at the same time (p<0.001). In patients with idiopathic constipation is characterized by exaggerated reservoir factions of the ascending and transverse colons. Scintigraphy using 67 Gallium-labelled pellets seems to be a useful tool to demonstrate the delayed colonic transit in patients with colonic inertia

  3. Scintigraphic measurement of colonic transit in patients with idiopathic constipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, K. H.; Kim, C. K. [College of Medicine, Wonkwang Univ., Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate usefulness of scintigraphic measurement of total and regional colonic transit in patients with idiopathic constipation. 25 patients who were complained chronic constipation underwent scintigraphic measurement of the total and regional colon transit. Of them 10 patients were diagnosed as idiopathic constipation, none of whom had evidence of abnormal function of the pelvic floor. Ten healthy volunteers were also studied. 67 Gallium-labelled Amberlite resin particles were ingested in a coated capsule with methacrylate that dispersed in the ileocecal region. Images were obtained using a gamma camera at regular intervals for the 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hours after the initial counting of the radioactivity in the cecum. We determined the geometric center in four regions of interest in the colon (ascending, transverse, descending, and rectosigmoid). Ten patients with colonic inertia showed significant retention of solid residue in the ascending and transverse colon over a 48-hour period. The median values for the healthy subjects at 2, 4, 8, and 24, and 48 hours were 1.44{+-}0.2 (midway through ascending), 1.71{+-}0.45 (midway through transverse), 2.64{+-}0.95 (midway through descending), 3.94{+-}0.89 (midway through rectosigmoid), and 4.52{+-}0.76 (midway through the stool compartment). On the contrary, the values of ten patients with colonic inertia were 1.0{+-}0.0 (midway through ascending), 1.0{+-}0.0 (midway through ascending). 1.02 {+-}0.06 (midway through ascending), 1.70{+-}0.36 (midway through transverse), and 2.33{+-}0.31(midway through descending) at the same time (p<0.001). In patients with idiopathic constipation is characterized by exaggerated reservoir factions of the ascending and transverse colons. Scintigraphy using 67 Gallium-labelled pellets seems to be a useful tool to demonstrate the delayed colonic transit in patients with colonic inertia.

  4. Decreased colonic transit time after transcutaneous interferential electrical stimulation in children with slow transit constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Melanie C C; Chase, Janet W; Gibb, Susie; Robertson, Val J; Catto-Smith, Anthony; Hutson, John M; Southwell, Bridget R

    2009-02-01

    Idiopathic slow transit constipation (STC) describes a clinical syndrome characterised by intractable constipation. It is diagnosed by demonstrating delayed colonic transit on nuclear transit studies (NTS). A possible new treatment is interferential therapy (IFT), which is a form of electrical stimulation that involves the transcutaneous application of electrical current. This study aimed to ascertain the effect of IFT on colonic transit time. Children with STC diagnosed by NTS were randomised to receive either 12 real or placebo IFT sessions for a 4-week period. After a 2-month break, they all received 12 real IFT sessions-again for a 4-week period. A NTS was repeated 6 to 8 weeks after cessation of each treatment period where able. Geometric centres (GCs) of activity were calculated for all studies at 6, 24, 30, and 48 hours. Pretreatment and posttreatment GCs were compared by statistical parametric analysis (paired t test). Thirty-one pretreatment, 22 postreal IFT, and 8 postplacebo IFT studies were identified in 26 children (mean age, 12.7 years; 16 male). Colonic transit was significantly faster in children given real treatment when compared to their pretreatment NTS at 24 (mean CG, 2.39 vs 3.04; P interferential therapy can significantly speed up colonic transit in children with slow transit constipation.

  5. Transit timing observations from Kepler. VI. Potentially interesting candidate systems from fourier-based statistical tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffen, J.H.; Ford, E.B.; Rowe, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through quarter six of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify...... several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies....

  6. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. VI. POTENTIALLY INTERESTING CANDIDATE SYSTEMS FROM FOURIER-BASED STATISTICAL TESTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Jason H. [Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics, P.O. Box 500, MS 127, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Ford, Eric B. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States); Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David G.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Seader, Shawn; Twicken, Joseph D. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Fabrycky, Daniel C. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Holman, Matthew J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Welsh, William F. [Astronomy Department, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1221 (United States); Batalha, Natalie M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute/California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kjeldsen, Hans [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Prsa, Andrej, E-mail: jsteffen@fnal.gov [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 East Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through quarter six of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

  7. Modeling hyporheic exchange and in-stream transport with time-varying transit time distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, A.; Harman, C. J.; Ward, A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Transit time distributions (TTD) are used to understand in-stream transport and exchange with the hyporheic zone by quantifying the probability of water (and of dissolved material) taking time T to traverse the stream reach control volume. However, many studies using this method assume a TTD that is time-invariant, despite the time-variability of the streamflow. Others assume that storage is 'randomly sampled' or 'well-mixed' with a fixed volume or fixed exchange rate. Here we present a formulation for a time-variable TTD that relaxes both the time-invariant and 'randomly sampled' assumptions and only requires a few parameters. The framework is applied to transient storage, representing some combination of in-stream and hyporheic storage, along a stream reach. This approach does not assume that hyporheic and dead-zone storage is fixed or temporally-invariant, and allows for these stores to be sampled in more physically representative ways determined by the system itself. Instead of using probability distributions of age, probability distributions of storage (ranked by age) called Ω functions are used to describe how the off-stream storage is sampled in the outflow. Here the Ω function approach is used to describe hyporheic exchange during diurnal fluctuations in streamflow in a gaining reach of the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest. The breakthrough curves of salt slugs injected four hours apart over a 28-hour period show a systematic variation in transit time distribution. This new approach allows us to relate these salt slug TTDs to a corresponding time-variation in the Ω function, which can then be related to changes in in-stream storage and hyporheic zone mobilization under varying flow conditions. Thus, we can gain insights into how channel storage and hyporheic exchange are changing through time without having to specify difficult to measure or unmeasurable quantities of our system, such as total storage.

  8. Pixel-by-pixel mean transit time without deconvolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbeleir, Andre A; Piepsz, Amy; Ham, Hamphrey R

    2008-04-01

    Mean transit time (MTT) within a kidney is given by the integral of the renal activity on a well-corrected renogram between time zero and time t divided by the integral of the plasma activity between zero and t, providing that t is close to infinity. However, as the data acquisition of a renogram is finite, the MTT calculated using this approach might result in the underestimation of the true MTT. To evaluate the degree of this underestimation we conducted a simulation study. One thousand renograms were created by convoluting various plasma curves obtained from patients with different renal clearance levels with simulated retentions curves having different shapes and mean transit times. For a 20 min renogram, the calculated MTT started to underestimate the MTT when the MTT was higher than 6 min. The longer the MTT, the greater was the underestimation. Up to a MTT value of 6 min, the error on the MTT estimation is negligible. As normal cortical transit is less than 2 min, this approach is used for patients to calculate pixel-to-pixel cortical mean transit time and to create a MTT parametric image without deconvolution.

  9. Validation of a 1-mm transit time flow probe and the potential for use in microsurgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Christian T; Elberg, Jens J; Holstein-Rathlou, N.-H.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate a prototype transit time ultrasound flow probe (Medi-Stim Butterfly Flowmeter BF 2004) of only 1 mm and to evaluate its potential for use in microsurgery. Knowledge of the ability of this kind of system to measure flow in small vessels and at small flow....../min. Transit time flow was measured continuously. The results showed very accurate flow measurements at all flow rates when compared to the known infusion rate of the Gemini pump. However, at flow rates below 4 ml/min, variation became a problem....

  10. Computation of transit times using the milestoning method with applications to polymer translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Alexander T.; Konda, Sai Sriharsha M.; Makarov, Dmitrii E.

    2013-08-01

    Milestoning is an efficient approximation for computing long-time kinetics and thermodynamics of large molecular systems, which are inaccessible to brute-force molecular dynamics simulations. A common use of milestoning is to compute the mean first passage time (MFPT) for a conformational transition of interest. However, the MFPT is not always the experimentally observed timescale. In particular, the duration of the transition path, or the mean transit time, can be measured in single-molecule experiments, such as studies of polymers translocating through pores and fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies of protein folding. Here we show how to use milestoning to compute transit times and illustrate our approach by applying it to the translocation of a polymer through a narrow pore.

  11. Real-time rescheduling and disruption management for public transit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, D.S.W.; Leung, Janny M.Y.

    2017-01-01

    This research is motivated by the operations of a public transit company in Hong Kong. We investigate how real-time information can be utilized in combination with historical data to improve routing and scheduling decisions practically. A dynamic integrated vehicle and crew scheduling problem is

  12. Medical management and leadership: a time of transition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Helen; Phelps, Grant; Loh, Erwin; Bismark, Marie

    2017-07-01

    Perspectives on medical management and leadership are in a time of transition, but there is much we still need to understand better. This paper explores some of the tensions and dilemmas inherent in understandings of medical management and leadership. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  13. Assessment of colonic transit time using MRI: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhmann, Sonja; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Lienemann, Andreas; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Ladurner, Roland; Mussack, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate a new, non-invasive examination method using MRI for the quantification of the colonic transit time after oral administration of gadolinium-saline solution filled capsules. Healthy volunteers without previous or acute symptoms of gastrointestinal disorders were enrolled. After a 3-day diet for the standardization of gastrocolonic content the volunteers swallowed five Gd-DTPA/saline 0.9%-filledcapsules. Seven different concentrations of Gd-DTPA/saline 0.9% solution between 1:0 and 0:1 were tested in a dilution series. Following ingestion of capsules, coronal Flash T1 and True Fisp sequences using a 1.5 Tesla system were obtained at 0 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 36 h and 60 h. Sequences were analyzed by two independent experts for locating the capsules. Overall colonic transit time was separately analyzed for both genders. Fifteen healthy volunteers (7 females, 8 males; mean age 34±13 years) were enrolled. The phantom study provided the best contrast in both the T1-and T2-weighted sequences defining a ratio of 1:10 for Gd-DTPA/saline 0.9% solution. The mean transit time accounted for 41±9 h in women and for 31±10 h in men. MRI is an adequate method for the assessment of colonic transit time offering the advantages of no exposure to radiation, short examination time, possible dynamic evaluation of the transit and the practicability in terms of a future adoption to clinical routine. (orig.)

  14. The phase transition method for SAR measurement in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, R.; Canonico, R.; Acernese, F.; Giordano, G.; Barone, F.

    2014-03-01

    During an MR procedure, the patient absorbs a portion of the transmitted RF energy, which may result in tissue heating and other adverse effects, such as alterations in visual, auditory and neural functions. The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), in W/kg, is the RF power absorbed per unit mass of tissue and is one of the most important parameters related with thermal effects and acts as a guideline for MRI safety. Strict limits to the SAR levels are imposed by patient safety international regulations (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33) and SAR measurements are required in order to verify its respect. The recommended methods for mean SAR measurement are quite problematic and often require a maintenance man intervention and long stop machine. For example, in the CEI recommended pulse energy method, the presence of a maintenance man is required in order to correctly connect the required instrumentation; furthermore, the procedure is complex and requires remarkable processing and calculus. Simpler are the calorimetric methods, also if in this case long acquisition times are required in order to have significant temperature variations and accurate heat capacity knowledge (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33). The phase transition method is a new method to measure SAR in MRI which has the advantages to be very simple and to overcome all the typical calorimetric method problems. It does not require in gantry temperature measurements, any specific heat or heat capacity knowledge, but only mass and time measurement. Nevertheless, in order to consider this method it is necessary to verify that all deposited SAR power can be considered acquired and measured. In this paper considerations about this aspect are conducted.

  15. Postfoundational practical theology for a time of transition

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    2010-09-01

    Sep 1, 2010 ... 67(1), Art. #837, 5 pages. DOI: 10.4102/hts.v67i1.837 ... The language that I used and am using in order to express this transition, also changed through the years. Going back on my ... Since 1990, I was involved in full time teaching and my focus was on pastoral narrative therapy. As time went by, I felt a ...

  16. Transition in adolescents across time, disease and gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Hanne; Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid; Svanholm, Jette Rolf

    Background: Despite a growing number of studies on transition to adulthood in adolescents, literature is scarce on qualitative, longitudinal studies of transitions in adolescents with severe chronic diseases. The aim is to study transition in adolescents with cystic fibrosis, congenital heart......: This is a longitudinal ethnographic study running from 2012 to 2017. Adolescents are consecutively included at the age between 13 and 14, 8-10 participants in each group. The fieldwork is based on participant observation of consultations between the adolescent and healthcare professionals and individual qualitative...... interview with the adolescent at outpatient clinics at Aarhus University Hospital. Follow-up is planned at 15 and 18 years of age. A comparative approach is employed to show central characteristics across time, disease and gender. Results: Results from analysis inspired by Ricoeur's phenomenological...

  17. Integrated response and transit time distributions of watersheds by combining hydrograph separation and long-term transit time modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Roa-García

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a new modeling approach analyzing and predicting the Transit Time Distribution (TTD and the Response Time Distribution (RTD from hourly to annual time scales as two distinct hydrological processes. The model integrates Isotope Hydrograph Separation (IHS and the Instantaneous Unit Hydrograph (IUH approach as a tool to provide a more realistic description of transit and response time of water in catchments. Individual event simulations and parameterizations were combined with long-term baseflow simulation and parameterizations; this provides a comprehensive picture of the catchment response for a long time span for the hydraulic and isotopic processes. The proposed method was tested in three Andean headwater catchments to compare the effects of land use on hydrological response and solute transport. Results show that the characteristics of events and antecedent conditions have a significant influence on TTD and RTD, but in general the RTD of the grassland dominated catchment is concentrated in the shorter time spans and has a higher cumulative TTD, while the forest dominated catchment has a relatively higher response distribution and lower cumulative TTD. The catchment where wetlands concentrate shows a flashier response, but wetlands also appear to prolong transit time.

  18. Quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno effects measured by transition probabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenxian, E-mail: wxzhang@whu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Kofman, A.G. [CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States); Zhuang, Jun [Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); You, J.Q. [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 10084 (China); Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nori, Franco [CEMS, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States)

    2013-10-30

    Using numerical calculations, we compare the transition probabilities of many spins in random magnetic fields, subject to either frequent projective measurements, frequent phase modulations, or a mix of modulations and measurements. For various distribution functions, we find the transition probability under frequent modulations is suppressed most if the pulse delay is short and the evolution time is larger than a critical value. Furthermore, decay freezing occurs only under frequent modulations as the pulse delay approaches zero. In the large pulse-delay region, however, the transition probabilities under frequent modulations are highest among the three control methods.

  19. Transic time measures in scattering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacMillan, L.W.; Osborn, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper studies the time evolution of state vectors that are the solutions of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, characterized by a Hamiltonian h. We employ trace-theorem methods to prove that the transit time of state vectors through a finite space region, Σ, may be used to construct a family in the energy variable, epsilon, of unique, positive, trace-class operators. The matrix elements of these operators, give the transit time of any vector through Σ, It is proved that the trace of these operators, for a fixed energy epsilon, provide a function which simultaneously gives the sum of all orbital transit times through region Σ and represents the state density of all vectors that have support on Σ and energy epsilon. We use the transit-time operators to recover the usual theory of time delay for single-channel scattering systems. In the process we extend the known results on time delay to include scattering by fixed impurities in a periodic medium

  20. Physiological variation of normal transit time in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivian, G.; Iodd-Pokropek, A.; Gordon, I.; Hospital for Sick Children, London

    1985-01-01

    Quantitation of the sup(99m)Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic Acid (DTPA) scan yields by uptake analysis an estimate of individual kidney glomerular filtration rate (IKGFR) and by deconvolutional analysis an estimate of the mean transit time (MTT) of the non-reabsorbable tracer through the kidney. The whole kidney MTT is compounded of the renal parenchymal MTT and the rate of pelvic clearance; both functions are influenced by prevailing rates of salt and water excretion. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of physiological variations on the normal DTPA scan. The contralateral normal kidney in 11 children with suspected unilateral urinary tract obstruction were studied twice, first with an early morning scan (EMS) and second, 24 h later, following hypotonic volume expansion (HVE). A strong correlation was shown between urine osmolality and MTT. IKGFR was independent of the state of hydration, but in comparison to mild hydration, HVE shortened significantly (P<0.001) the normal whole kidney MTT, with less effect on parenchymal MTT (P<0.01) and therefore has its predominant effect on pelvic clearance. We advise caution in the interpretation of whole kidney transit time analysis without standardization of salt and water excretion rates. Parenchymal transit time offers a potentially useful clinical index. (orig.)

  1. Assessment of chronic constipation: colon transit time versus defecography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokesch, R.W.; Breitenseher, M.J.; Kettenbach, J.; Herbst, F.; Maier, A.; Lechner, G.; Mahieu, P.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the value of radiological colon transit time (CTT) measurements in relation to defecography (DFG) in chronically constipated patients. Materials and methods: In 30 patients with chronic constipation, total and segmental CTT was determined using radiopaque markers. In all of these patients defecography (DFG) was obtained. The patients were divided into three groups: In group I, 11 patients were classified with idiopathic constipation based on low stool frequency, normal DFG, or absence of symptoms of abnormal defecation. In group II, ten patients with rectal intussusception were diagnosed by DFG. In group III, there were nine patients with rectal prolapse or spastic pelvic floor syndrome, based on results of DFG. Results: Group I, idiopathic constipation (n=11), showed increased total CTT (mean, 93 h) and segmental CTT (right colon, 33 h (36%), left colon, 31 h (33%), rectosigmoid, 29 h (31%)). In group II, intussusception (n=10), patients had normal mean total CTT (54 h) and a relative decrease in rectosigmoid CTT (mean, 13 h (24%)). In group III (n=9), rectal prolapse (n=5) or spastic pelvic floor syndrome (n=4), patients showed elevated total (mean, 167 h) and rectosigmoidal CTT (mean, 95 h (57%)). Mean total CTT was significantly different between groups I and II and between groups II and III, and mean rectosigmoidal CTT was significantly different between all three groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: The use of total and rectosigmoidal CTT helps to identify the underlying pathophysiology of chronic constipation. Furthermore CTT helps to identify patients, who may benefit from DFG

  2. Assessment of chronic constipation: colon transit time versus defecography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokesch, R.W. E-mail: rupert.prokesch@univie.ac.at; Breitenseher, M.J.; Kettenbach, J.; Herbst, F.; Maier, A.; Lechner, G.; Mahieu, P

    1999-12-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the value of radiological colon transit time (CTT) measurements in relation to defecography (DFG) in chronically constipated patients. Materials and methods: In 30 patients with chronic constipation, total and segmental CTT was determined using radiopaque markers. In all of these patients defecography (DFG) was obtained. The patients were divided into three groups: In group I, 11 patients were classified with idiopathic constipation based on low stool frequency, normal DFG, or absence of symptoms of abnormal defecation. In group II, ten patients with rectal intussusception were diagnosed by DFG. In group III, there were nine patients with rectal prolapse or spastic pelvic floor syndrome, based on results of DFG. Results: Group I, idiopathic constipation (n=11), showed increased total CTT (mean, 93 h) and segmental CTT (right colon, 33 h (36%), left colon, 31 h (33%), rectosigmoid, 29 h (31%)). In group II, intussusception (n=10), patients had normal mean total CTT (54 h) and a relative decrease in rectosigmoid CTT (mean, 13 h (24%)). In group III (n=9), rectal prolapse (n=5) or spastic pelvic floor syndrome (n=4), patients showed elevated total (mean, 167 h) and rectosigmoidal CTT (mean, 95 h (57%)). Mean total CTT was significantly different between groups I and II and between groups II and III, and mean rectosigmoidal CTT was significantly different between all three groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: The use of total and rectosigmoidal CTT helps to identify the underlying pathophysiology of chronic constipation. Furthermore CTT helps to identify patients, who may benefit from DFG.

  3. Photoperiodic time measurement in insects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, David

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 7, Feb 02 (2015), s. 98-103 ISSN 2214-5745 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC14-32654J; GA MŠk LH14029 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : photoperiodic time Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.719, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214574514001576

  4. A search for transit timing variations and orbital decay in WASP-46b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucci, R.; Jofré, E.; Ferrero, L. V.; Cúneo, V.; Saker, L.; Lovos, F.; Gómez, M.; Mauas, P.

    2018-02-01

    We present 12 new transit observations of the exoplanet WASP-46b obtained with the 1.54-m telescope at Estación Astrofísica de Bosque Alegre (EABA, Argentina) and the 0.40-m Horacio Ghielmetti and 2.15-m Jorge Sahade telescopes at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO, Argentina). We analyse them together with 37 light curves from the literature to re-determine the physical parameters and search for additional planets via transit timing variations (TTVs). We consider the 31 transits with uncertainties in their mid-transit times (e_T0) value of σ is that the stellar activity could be affecting the measured mid-transit times. This value of dispersion allows us to rule out the presence of additional bodies with masses larger than 2.3, 4.6, 7 and 9.3 M_{\\oplus} at the first-order mean-motion resonances 2:1, 3:2, 4:3 and 5:4 with the transiting planet, respectively. Despite the 6 yr baseline and a typical light-curve precision of 2 × 10-3, we find that we cannot significantly demonstrate a slow decrease of the orbital period of WASP-46b. We place a lower limit of Q⋆ > 7 × 103 on the tidal quality factor and determine that an additional 6 yr baseline is required to rule out Q⋆ < 105.

  5. Comparison of L-H transition measurements with physics models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlstrom, T.N.; Burrell, K.H.; Groebner, R.J.; Leonard, A.W.; Osborne, T.H.; Thomas, D.M.

    1998-12-01

    A technique of fitting a modified hyperbolic tangent to the edge profiles has improved the localization of plasma edge parameters. Non-dimensional edge parameters are broadly consistent with several theories of the L-H transition that use edge gradients in their formulation of a critical threshold parameter. The ion ∇B drift direction has only a small effect on the edge plasma conditions measured near the plasma midplane but a large effect on the divertor plasma. The dramatic change of power threshold with the direction of the ion ∇B drift implies that phenomena in the divertor region may be critical for the L-H transition

  6. Deliquescence phase transition measurements by quartz crystal microbalance frequency shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Kathleen Jane L; Schill, Steven R; Malla, Ammaji; Hudson, Paula K

    2012-07-26

    Measurements of the hygroscopic properties of aerosols are needed to better understand the role of aerosols as cloud condensation nuclei. Several techniques have been used to measure deliquescence (solid to liquid) phase transitions in particular. In this study, we have measured the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) of organic and inorganic salts, organic acids (glutaric and succinic acid), and mixtures of organic acids with ammonium sulfate using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The QCM allows for measurement of the deliquescence phase transition due to inherent measurement differences between solids and liquids in the oscillation frequency of a quartz crystal. The relative humidity dependent frequency measurements can be used to identify compounds that adsorb monolayer amounts of water or form hydrates prior to deliquescence (e.g., lithium chloride, potassium and sodium acetate). Although the amount of water uptake by a deliquescing material cannot be quantified with this technique, deliquescence measurements of mixtures of hygroscopic and nonhygroscopic components (e.g., ammonium sulfate and succinic acid (DRH > 95%)) show that the mass fraction of the deliquescing portion of the sample can be quantitatively determined from the relative change in oscillation frequency at deliquescence. The results demonstrate the use of this technique as an alternative method for phase transition measurements and as a direct measurement of the mass fraction of a sample that undergoes deliquescence. Further, deliquescence measurements by the QCM may provide improved understanding of discrepancies in atmospheric particle mass measurements between filter samples and the tapered element oscillating microbalance given the similar measurement principle employed by the QCM.

  7. Transit timing effects due to an exomoon - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipping, David M.

    2009-07-01

    In our previous paper, we evaluated the transit duration variation (TDV) effect for a co-aligned planet-moon system at an orbital inclination of i = 90°. Here, we will consider the effect for the more general case of i inclined from the planet-star plane by Euler rotation angles α,β and γ. We find that the TDV signal has two major components, one due to the velocity variation effect described in our first paper and one new component due to transit impact parameter variation. By evaluating the dominant terms, we find the two effects are additive for prograde exomoon orbits, and deductive for retrograde orbits. This asymmetry could allow for future determination of the orbital sense of motion. We re-evaluate the ratio of TDV and transit timing variation effects, η, in the more general case of an inclined planetary orbit with a circular orbiting moon and find that it is still possible to directly determine the moon's orbital separation from just the ratio of the two amplitudes, as first proposed in our previous paper.

  8. TRANSIT TIMING VARIATIONS FOR INCLINED AND RETROGRADE EXOPLANETARY SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, Matthew J.; Ford, Eric B.; Veras, Dimitri

    2010-01-01

    We perform numerical calculations of the expected transit timing variations (TTVs) induced on a hot-Jupiter by an Earth-mass perturber. Motivated by the recent discoveries of retrograde transiting planets, we concentrate on an investigation of the effect of varying relative planetary inclinations, up to and including completely retrograde systems. We find that planets in low-order (e.g., 2:1) mean-motion resonances (MMRs) retain approximately constant TTV amplitudes for 0 deg. 170 deg. Systems in higher order MMRs (e.g., 5:1) increase in TTV amplitude as inclinations increase toward 45 deg., becoming approximately constant for 45 deg. 135 deg. Planets away from resonance slowly decrease in TTV amplitude as inclinations increase from 0 deg. to 180 deg., whereas planets adjacent to resonances can exhibit a huge range of variability in TTV amplitude as a function of both eccentricity and inclination. For highly retrograde systems (135 deg. < i ≤ 180 deg.), TTV signals will be undetectable across almost the entirety of parameter space, with the exceptions occurring when the perturber has high eccentricity or is very close to an MMR. This high inclination decrease in TTV amplitude (on and away from resonance) is important for the analysis of the known retrograde and multi-planet transiting systems, as inclination effects need to be considered if TTVs are to be used to exclude the presence of any putative planetary companions: absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

  9. Comparison of L-H transition measurements with physics models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlstrom, T.N.; Burrell, K.H.; Groebner, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Sawteeth and neutrals are found to have a significant influence on the H-mode power threshold scaling. The ion ∇B drift direction has only a small effect on the edge plasma conditions measured near the plasma midplane but a large effect on the divertor plasma. Since the power threshold changes dramatically with the direction of the ion ∇B drift, this implies that phenomena in the divertor region are critical for the L-H transition. Local conditions at the plasma edge are consistent with several theories of the L-H transition that use edge gradients in their formulation of a critical threshold parameter. However, scatter in the database is too large to distinguish between conditions that lead to an L-H transition and those that remain in L-mode. (author)

  10. Comparison of L-H transition measurements with physics models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlstrom, T.N.; Burrell, K.H.; Carreras, B.A.

    1999-01-01

    Sawteeth and neutrals are found to have a significant influence on the H-mode power threshold scaling. The ion ∇B drift direction has only a small effect on the edge plasma conditions measured near the plasma midplane but a large effect on the divertor plasma. Since the power threshold changes dramatically with the direction of the ion ∇B drift, this implies that phenomena in the divertor region are critical for the L-H transition. Local conditions at the plasma edge are consistent with several theories of the L-H transition that use edge gradients in their formulation of a critical threshold parameter. However, scatter in the database is too large to distinguish between conditions that lead to an L-H transition and those that remain in L-mode. (author)

  11. Optimal time window for measurement of renal output parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyvenhoven, Jacob D; Ham, Hamphrey R; Piepsz, Amy

    2002-01-01

    Although normalised residual activity (NORA) and output efficiency (OE) are usually measured at a fixed time t, their dependency on t may affect the prediction of mean transit time (MTT). This study aimed to evaluate their degree of dependency on t and to determine an optimal time of measurement by assessment of their relationship with MTT for various times t. A simulation model generated 232 cortical renograms by convolving one plasma disappearance curve with 232 created cortical retention functions. The results show that considerable changes are observed for NORA and OE, depending on the time of measurement t. The choice of this time significantly influences the predictive value of these parameters for estimating MTT. The optimal time for measurement of NORA and OE should be close to the MTT, at the moment when emptying takes place. In the clinical practice, it should be adapted to the clinical problem under investigation.

  12. Analysis of transit time spread on FBK silicon photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acerbi, F.; Gola, A.; Ferri, A.; Zorzi, N.; Paternoster, G.; Piemonte, C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we studied one of the aspects potentially limiting the single-photon time-resolution (SPTR) of the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM): the transit time spread (TTS). We illuminated the SiPM in different positions with a fast-pulsed laser collimated to a circular spot of 0.2 mm-diameter and acquired bi-dimensional maps of the avalanche-signal arrival time of RGB and RGB-HD SiPMs, produced at FBK. We studied the effect of both the number of bonding wires connecting the device to the package and the layout of the top-metal connection (on the device). We found that the TTS does not simply depend on the trace length between the cell and the bonding pad and it could vary in the range between tens of picoseconds (with 3 bonding connections) to more than one hundred of picoseconds (with one connection)

  13. Effects of barium concentration on oropharyngeal swallow timing measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokely, Shauna L; Molfenter, Sonja M; Steele, Catriona M

    2014-02-01

    Videofluoroscopy is commonly used for evaluating oropharyngeal swallowing but requires radiopaque contrast (typically barium). Prior studies suggest that some aspects of swallowing, including timing measures of oral and pharyngeal bolus transit, vary depending on barium concentration. The aim of our study was to identify timing differences in healthy swallowing between "thin" (40 % w/v concentration) and "ultrathin" (22 % w/v concentration) barium solutions. Twenty healthy adults (Ten women; mean age = 31 years) each performed a series of three noncued 5-ml swallows each of ultrathin and thin liquid barium solutions in videofluoroscopy. Timing measures were compared between barium concentrations using a mixed-model ANOVA. The measures of interest were stage transition duration, pharyngeal transit time, and duration of upper esophageal sphincter opening. Significant differences were observed in the timing measures of swallowing with respect to barium concentration. In all cases, longer durations were seen with the higher barium concentration. Barium concentration influences timing parameters in healthy swallowing, even between ultrathin and thin concentrations. Clinicians need to understand and control for the impact of different barium stimuli on swallowing physiology.

  14. Transit time dispersion in pulmonary and systemic circulation: effects of cardiac output and solute diffusivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Michael; Krejcie, Tom C; Avram, Michael J

    2006-08-01

    We present an in vivo method for analyzing the distribution kinetics of physiological markers into their respective distribution volumes utilizing information provided by the relative dispersion of transit times. Arterial concentration-time curves of markers of the vascular space [indocyanine green (ICG)], extracellular fluid (inulin), and total body water (antipyrine) measured in awake dogs under control conditions and during phenylephrine or isoproterenol infusion were analyzed by a recirculatory model to estimate the relative dispersions of transit times across the systemic and pulmonary circulation. The transit time dispersion in the systemic circulation was used to calculate the whole body distribution clearance, and an interpretation is given in terms of a lumped organ model of blood-tissue exchange. As predicted by theory, this relative dispersion increased linearly with cardiac output, with a slope that was inversely related to solute diffusivity. The relative dispersion of the flow-limited indicator antipyrine exceeded that of ICG (as a measure of intravascular mixing) only slightly and was consistent with a diffusional equilibration time in the extravascular space of approximately 10 min, except during phenylephrine infusion, which led to an anomalously high relative dispersion. A change in cardiac output did not alter the heterogeneity of capillary transit times of ICG. The results support the view that the relative dispersions of transit times in the systemic and pulmonary circulation estimated from solute disposition data in vivo are useful measures of whole body distribution kinetics of indicators and endogenous substances. This is the first model that explains the effect of flow and capillary permeability on whole body distribution of solutes without assuming well-mixed compartments.

  15. Optimization of Advanced ACTPol Transition Edge Sensor Bolometer Operation Using R(T,I) Transition Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salatino, Maria

    2017-06-01

    In the current submm and mm cosmology experiments the focal planes are populated by kilopixel transition edge sensors (TESes). Varying incoming power load requires frequent rebiasing of the TESes through standard current-voltage (IV) acquisition. The time required to perform IVs on such large arrays and the resulting transient heating of the bath reduces the sky observation time. We explore a bias step method that significantly reduces the time required for the rebiasing process. This exploits the detectors' responses to the injection of a small square wave signal on top of the dc bias current and knowledge of the shape of the detector transition R(T,I). This method has been tested on two detector arrays of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). In this paper, we focus on the first step of the method, the estimate of the TES %Rn.

  16. Noise Performance of Millimeter-wave Silicon Based Mixed Tunneling Avalanche Transit Time(MITATT) Diode

    OpenAIRE

    Aritra Acharyya; Moumita Mukherjee; J. P. Banerjee

    2010-01-01

    A generalized method for small-signal simulation of avalanche noise in Mixed Tunneling Avalanche Transit Time (MITATT) device is presented in this paper where the effect of series resistance is taken into account. The method is applied to a millimeter-wave Double Drift Region (DDR) MITATT device based on Silicon to obtain noise spectral density and noise measure as a function of frequency for different values of series resistance. It is found that noise measure of the dev...

  17. Effects of Barium Concentration on Oropharyngeal Swallow Timing Measures

    OpenAIRE

    Stokely, Shauna L.; Molfenter, Sonja M.; Steele, Catriona M.

    2013-01-01

    Videofluoroscopy is commonly used for evaluating oropharyngeal swallowing but requires radiopaque contrast (typically barium). Prior studies suggest that some aspects of swallowing, including timing measures of oral and pharyngeal bolus transit, vary depending on barium concentration. The aim of our study was to identify timing differences in healthy swallowing between “thin” (40 % w/v concentration) and “ultrathin” (22 % w/v concentration) barium solutions. Twenty healthy adults (Ten women; ...

  18. Transiting Exoplanet Monitoring Project (TEMP). II. Refined System Parameters and Transit Timing Analysis of HAT-P-33b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Hao; Wang, Songhu; Liu, Hui-Gen; Hinse, Tobias C.; Laughlin, Gregory; Wu, Dong-Hong; Zhang, Xiaojia; Zhou, Xu; Wu, Zhenyu; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Eastman, Jason; Zhang, Hui; Hori, Yasunori; Narita, Norio; Chen, Yuanyuan; Ma, Jun; Peng, Xiyan; Zhang, Tian-Meng; Zou, Hu; Nie, Jun-Dan; Zhou, Zhi-Min

    2017-08-01

    We present 10 R-band photometric observations of eight different transits of the hot Jupiter HAT-P-33b, which has been targeted by our Transiting Exoplanet Monitoring Project. The data were obtained by two telescopes at the Xinglong Station of National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) from 2013 December through 2016 January, and exhibit photometric scatter of 1.6{--}3.0 {mmag}. After jointly analyzing the previously published photometric data, radial-velocity (RV) measurements, and our new light curves, we revisit the system parameters and orbital ephemeris for the HAT-P-33b system. Our results are consistent with the published values except for the planet to star radius ratio ({R}{{P}}/{R}* ), the ingress/egress duration (τ) and the total duration (T 14), which together indicate a slightly shallower and shorter transit shape. Our results are based on more complete light curves, whereas the previously published work had only one complete transit light curve. No significant anomalies in Transit Timing Variations (TTVs) are found, and we place upper mass limits on potential perturbers, largely supplanting the loose constraints provided by the extant RV data. The TTV limits are stronger near mean-motion resonances, especially for the low-order commensurabilities. We can exclude the existence of a perturber with mass larger than 0.6, 0.3, 0.5, 0.5, and 0.3 {M}\\oplus near the 1:3, 1:2, 2:3, 3:2, and 2:1 resonances, respectively.

  19. Accuracy of single photoelectron time spread measurement of fast photomultipliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1975-01-01

    The accuracy of time spread measurements of fast photomultipliers was investigated, using single photoelectrons. The effect of the finite light pulse width on the measurement accuracy was determined and discussed. Experimental data were obtained on a special measuring system for light pulse widths ranging from 200 psec to 10 nsec, using fast photomultipliers 8850 and C31024 with optimized operating conditions for minimum transit time spread. A modified exponential function expression and curve-fitting parameters are given, which fit closely the experimentally obtained data over a wide dynamic range of light pulse widths. (U.S.)

  20. Ultrasonic measurement of milk coagulation time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkali, F.; Moudden, A.; Faiz, B.; Amghar, A.; Maze, G.; Montero de Espinosa, F.; Akhnak, M.

    2001-12-01

    Using a pulse reflection technique an ultrasonic system has been developed to monitor in situ the coagulation process of rennetted milk. The velocity and attenuation of ultrasonic waves through coagulating milk were continuously monitored. The observed changes in ultrasonic velocity during coagulation were used to predict the coagulation time. The coagulation time is indicative of the transition from the enzymatic phase to the physicochemical phase. The determination of coagulation time has a decisive role in determining the qualities of the end product in cheesemaking.

  1. Fluctuation of similarity (FLUS) to detect transitions between distinct dynamical regimes in short time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Nishant; Marwan, Norbert; Zou, Yong; Mucha, Peter J.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    A method to identify distinct dynamical regimes and transitions between those regimes in a short univariate time series was recently introduced [1], employing the computation of fluctuations in a measure of nonlinear similarity based on local recurrence properties. In the present work, we describe the details of the analytical relationships between this newly introduced measure and the well known concepts of attractor dimensions and Lyapunov exponents. We show that the new measure has linear dependence on the effective dimension of the attractor and it measures the variations in the sum of the Lyapunov spectrum. To illustrate the practical usefulness of the method, we identify various types of dynamical transitions in different nonlinear models. We present testbed examples for the new method’s robustness against noise and missing values in the time series. We also use this method to analyze time series of social dynamics, specifically an analysis of the U.S. crime record time series from 1975 to 1993. Using this method, we find that dynamical complexity in robberies was influenced by the unemployment rate until the late 1980’s. We have also observed a dynamical transition in homicide and robbery rates in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s, leading to increase in the dynamical complexity of these rates. PMID:25019852

  2. The effects of hypercapnia on cortical capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH) in anesthetized mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutiérrez-Jiménez, Eugenio; Angleys, Hugo; Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup

    2018-01-01

    Capillary flow patterns are highly heterogeneous in the resting brain. During hyperemia, capillary transit-time heterogeneity (CTH) decreases, in proportion to blood's mean transit time (MTT) in passive, compliant microvascular networks. Previously, we found that functional activation reduces...

  3. Effect of Laparoscopic-assisted Gastropexy on Gastrointestinal Transit Time in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsa, I M; Culp, W T N; Drobatz, K J; Johnson, E G; Mayhew, P D; Marks, S L

    2017-11-01

    Prophylactic gastropexy has been promoted as a means of preventing gastric volvulus during gastric dilatation and volvulus (GDV) syndrome. Little is known about the impact of gastropexy on gastrointestinal transit time. Laparoscopic-assisted gastropexy (LAG) will not alter gastrointestinal transit times when comparing gastric (GET), small and large bowel (SLBTT), and whole gut transit times (TTT) before and after surgery. 10 healthy client-owned large-breed dogs. Prospective clinical trial. Before surgery, all dogs underwent physical examination and diagnostic evaluation to ensure normal health status. Dogs were fed a prescription diet for 6 weeks before determination of gastrointestinal transit with a wireless motility capsule. LAG was then performed, and dogs were fed the diet for 6 additional weeks. Measurement of transit times was repeated 6 weeks after surgery. Ten dogs of various breeds at-risk for GDV were enrolled. No complications were encountered associated with surgery or capsule administration. There were no significant differences in GET 429 [306-1,370] versus 541 [326-1,298] (P = 0.80), SLBTT 1,243 [841-3,070] versus 1,540 [756-2,623] (P = 0.72), or TTT 1,971 [1,205-3,469] versus 1,792 [1,234-3,343] minutes (median, range) (P = 0.65) before and after LAG. An effect of LAG on gastrointestinal transit time was not identified, and wireless motility capsule can be safely administered in dogs after LAG. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  4. Effects of snowmelt on watershed transit time distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Z.; Carroll, R. W. H.; Harman, C. J.; Wilusz, D. C.; Schumer, R.

    2017-12-01

    Snowmelt is the principal control of the timing and magnitude of water flow through alpine watersheds, but the streamflow generated may be displaced groundwater. To quantify this effect, we use a rank StorAge Selection (rSAS) model to estimate time-dependent travel time distributions (TTDs) for the East River Catchment (ERC, 84 km2) - a headwater basin of the Colorado River, and newly designated as the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Watershed Function Science Focus Area (SFA). Through the SFA, observational networks related to precipitation and stream fluxes have been established with a focus on environmental tracers and stable isotopes. The United Stated Geological Survey Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) was used to estimate spatially- and temporally-variable boundary fluxes of effective precipitation (snowmelt & rain), evapotranspiration, and subsurface storage. The DiffeRential Evolution Adaptive Metropolis (DREAM) algorithm was used to calibrate the rSAS model to observed stream isotopic concentration data and quantify uncertainty. The sensitivity of the simulated TTDs to systematic changes in the boundary fluxes was explored. Different PRMS and rSAS model parameters setup were tested to explore how they affect the relationship between input precipitation, especially snowmelt, and the estimated TTDs. Wavelet Coherence Analysis (WCA) was applied to investigate the seasonality of TTD simulations. Our ultimate goal is insight into how the Colorado River headwater catchments store and route water, and how sensitive flow paths and transit times are to climatic changes.

  5. Time variance effects and measurement error indications for MLS measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jiyuan

    1999-01-01

    Mathematical characteristics of Maximum-Length-Sequences are discussed, and effects of measuring on slightly time-varying systems with the MLS method are examined with computer simulations with MATLAB. A new coherence measure is suggested for the indication of time-variance effects. The results...... of the simulations show that the proposed MLS coherence can give an indication of time-variance effects....

  6. A methodology for rearranging transit stops for enhancing transit users generalized travel time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nurul Hassan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study develops a methodology to consolidate transit stops. It develops a mathematical model and a program which takes stop consolidation decision(s according to users generalized travel time savings and desired accessibility. The model iterates until the users generalized travel time savings are maximized. The study tests this mathematical model in different hypothetical scenarios. Six factors (distance between stops, passenger activity, average cruising speed, maximum walking distance, service frequency, and percentage of decreased passengers with multiple levels were set to build the scenarios. Three responses (percentage of consolidated stops, percentages of travel time and operating time savings were observed. The findings showed that the distance between the stops the passenger activity, and the probable demand change (or the percentage of decreased passengers are the most influential factors. The frequency of service was found to be influential as well. The average cruising speed has very little influence on the response variables. Finally, the model is tested on two routes (route 900 and 930 of Al Ain City public bus service. It shows that 22 and 32 out of 98 and 126 stops can be consolidated in route 900 and 930 respectively. This can save considerable amounts of users travel and operating times. In monetary values, the savings are about $329,827 and $491,094 per year for routes 900 and 930, respectively.

  7. Water Storage, Mixing and Transit Times During a Multiyear Drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Velde, Y.; Visser, A.; Thaw, M.; Safeeq, M.

    2017-12-01

    From 2012 to 2016, a five year intensive drought occurred in the Californian Sierra Nevada. We use this drought period as an opportunity to investigate how catchment water storage, mixing and transit times changes from wet to dry conditions using long term datasets of river discharge, evapotranspiration, water quality, and multiple cosmogenic radioactive isotopes. Characteristic features of the test catchment (4.6 km2 , altitude 1660-2117 m) include a thick (>5m) unsaturated zone in deeply weathered granite mountain soils, snow melt and events of high intensity rainfall, dry summers and numerous wetland meadows along the stream. Our data and model analysis suggest that under drought conditions, river flow predominantly consist of deep groundwater tapped by deeply incised sections of the stream, while the wetlands hold on to their water just below the root system of its shallow rooting vegetation. In contrast, during wet periods, most runoff is generated on the flat riparian wetland meadows, while the regional groundwater system slowly refills itself as water makes its way through the thick unsaturated zones. Antecedent wet or dry years play an crucial role as antecedent wet years cause a substantial regional groundwater flow towards the riparian wetlands, filling up the riparian wetlands and yielding a much stronger discharge response of the wetlands to rainfall events than under antecedent dry years This interaction between the regional groundwater system and the local wetland systems weakens as the drought progresses and regional groundwater flow to the wetlands lessens. Although, due to the wet events in 2016-2017, the catchment fills up rapidly to pre-drought conditions, we show that water transit times and therefore likely the water quality will contain drought signs for several years to come. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS- XXXXXX

  8. Funding Over Time: Measuring Institutional Finance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, William H.

    1986-01-01

    Determining the level of "real" resources over time is discussed. Measuring the impact of inflation on higher education, measuring the impact of workload changes, and identifying the proper base year are described. (MLW)

  9. arXiv Measurement of the $\\pi^0$ electromagnetic transition form factor slope

    CERN Document Server

    Lazzeroni, C.; Romano, A.; Blazek, T.; Koval, M.; Ceccucci, A.; Danielsson, H.; Falaleev, V.; Gatignon, L.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hallgren, B.; Maier, A.; Peters, A.; Piccini, M.; Riedler, P.; Frabetti, P.L.; Gersabeck, E.; Kekelidze, V.; Madigozhin, D.; Misheva, M.; Molokanova, N.; Movchan, S.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Rubin, P.; Baldini, W.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fiorini, M.; Gianoli, A.; Norton, A.; Petrucci, F.; Savrié, M.; Wahl, H.; Bizzeti, A.; Bucci, F.; Iacopini, E.; Lenti, M.; Veltri, M.; Antonelli, A.; Moulson, M.; Raggi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Eppard, K.; Hita-Hochgesand, M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Renk, B.; Wanke, R.; Winhart, A.; Winston, R.; Bolotov, V.; Duk, V.; Gushchin, E.; Ambrosino, F.; Di Filippo, D.; Massarotti, P.; Napolitano, M.; Palladino, V.; Saracino, G.; Anzivino, G.; Imbergamo, E.; Piandani, R.; Sergi, A.; Cenci, P.; Pepe, M.; Costantini, F.; Doble, N.; Giudici, S.; Pierazzini, G.; Sozzi, M.; Venditti, S.; Balev, S.; Collazuol, G.; DiLella, L.; Gallorini, S.; Goudzovski, E.; Lamanna, G.; Mannelli, I.; Ruggiero, G.; Cerri, C.; Fantechi, R.; Kholodenko, S.; Kurshetsov, V.; Obraztsov, V.; Semenov, V.; Yushchenko, O.; D'Agostini, G.; Leonardi, E.; Serra, M.; Valente, P.; Fucci, A.; Salamon, A.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Peyaud, B.; Engelfried, J.; Coward, D.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bifani, S.; Biino, C.; Dellacasa, G.; Marchetto, F.; Numao, T.; Retière, F.

    2017-05-10

    The NA62 experiment collected a large sample of charged kaon decays in 2007 with a highly efficient trigger for decays into electrons. A measurement of the $\\pi^{0}$ electromagnetic transition form factor slope parameter from $1.11\\times10^{6}$ fully reconstructed $K^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0_D, \\; \\pi^0_D \\to e^+ e^- \\, \\gamma$ events is reported. The measured value $a = \\left(3.68 \\pm 0.57\\right)\\times 10^{-2}$ is in good agreement with theoretical expectations and previous measurements, and represents the most precise experimental determination of the slope in the time-like momentum transfer region.

  10. Lesions Responsible for Delayed Oral Transit Time in Post-stroke Dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyun Im; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Yi, Tae Im; Jeong, Yoon Jeong; Cho, Tae Hwan

    2017-10-11

    Some stroke patients show oral phase dysphagia, characterized by a markedly prolonged oral transit time that hinders oral feeding. The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical characteristics and lesions responsible for delayed swallowing. We reviewed 90 patients with stroke. The oral processing time plus the postfaucial aggregation time required to swallow semisolid food was assessed. The patients were divided into two groups according to oral transit time, and we analyzed the differences in characteristics such as demographic factors, lesion factors, and cognitive function. Logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the predictors of delayed oral transit time. Lesion location and volume were measured on brain magnetic resonance images. We generated statistic maps of lesions related to delayed oral phase in swallowing using voxel-based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM). The group of patients who showed delayed oral transit time had significantly low cognitive function. Also, in a regression model, delayed oral phase was predicted with low K-MMSE (Korean version of the Mini Mental Status Exam). Using VLSM, we found the lesion location to be associated with delayed oral phase after adjusting for K-MMSE score. Although these results did not reach statistical significance, they showed the lesion pattern with predominant distribution in the left frontal lobe. Delayed oral phase in post-stroke patients was not negligible clinically. Patients' cognitive impairments affect the oral transit time. When adjusting it, we found a trend that the lesion responsible for delayed oral phase was located in the left frontal lobe, though the association did not reach significance. The delay might be related to praxis function.

  11. Transit-time and age distributions for nonlinear time-dependent compartmental systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Holger; Müller, Markus; Sierra, Carlos A

    2018-02-06

    Many processes in nature are modeled using compartmental systems (reservoir/pool/box systems). Usually, they are expressed as a set of first-order differential equations describing the transfer of matter across a network of compartments. The concepts of age of matter in compartments and the time required for particles to transit the system are important diagnostics of these models with applications to a wide range of scientific questions. Until now, explicit formulas for transit-time and age distributions of nonlinear time-dependent compartmental systems were not available. We compute densities for these types of systems under the assumption of well-mixed compartments. Assuming that a solution of the nonlinear system is available at least numerically, we show how to construct a linear time-dependent system with the same solution trajectory. We demonstrate how to exploit this solution to compute transit-time and age distributions in dependence on given start values and initial age distributions. Furthermore, we derive equations for the time evolution of quantiles and moments of the age distributions. Our results generalize available density formulas for the linear time-independent case and mean-age formulas for the linear time-dependent case. As an example, we apply our formulas to a nonlinear and a linear version of a simple global carbon cycle model driven by a time-dependent input signal which represents fossil fuel additions. We derive time-dependent age distributions for all compartments and calculate the time it takes to remove fossil carbon in a business-as-usual scenario.

  12. Automated measurement of nuclear relaxation times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, A.G.; Mazitov, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe a method for determination of nuclear relaxation times T 1 and T 2 that is based on the linear relationship between these times and the areas bounded by the relaxation curves. A circuit for automated measurement of time T 1 using a B3-35 microcalculator is presented. They have used the described method for a number of years to measure the relaxation times of various nuclei in solutions - in particular, those of 7 Li and 133 Cs in aqueous solutions. The method has proven to be highly effective and accurate and has greatly reduced the measurement time, especially in the case of long T 1

  13. Measurements of Compton Scattered Transition Radiation at High Lorentz Factors

    CERN Document Server

    Case, Gary L.; Cherry, Michael L.; Isbert, Joachim; Mitchell, John W.; Patterson, Donald; Case, Gary L.; Cherry, Michael L.; Isbert, Joachim; Mitchell, John W.; Patterson, Donald

    2004-01-01

    X-ray transition radiation can be used to measure the Lorentz factor of relativistic particles. Standard transition radiation detectors (TRDs) typically incorporate thin plastic foil radiators and gas-filled x-ray detectors, and are sensitive up to \\gamma ~ 10^4. To reach higher Lorentz factors (up to \\gamma ~ 10^5), thicker, denser radiators can be used, which consequently produce x-rays of harder energies (>100 keV). At these energies, scintillator detectors are more efficient in detecting the hard x-rays, and Compton scattering of the x-rays out of the path of the particle becomes an important effect. The Compton scattering can be utilized to separate the transition radiation from the ionization background spatially. The use of conducting metal foils is predicted to yield enhanced signals compared to standard nonconducting plastic foils of the same dimensions. We have designed and built a Compton Scatter TRD optimized for high Lorentz factors and exposed it to high energy electrons at the CERN SPS. We pres...

  14. Use of a large time-compensated scintillation detector in neutron time-of-flight measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    A scintillator for neutron time-of-flight measurements is positioned at a desired angle with respect to the neutron beam, and as a function of the energy thereof, such that the sum of the transit times of the neutrons and photons in the scintillator are substantially independent of the points of scintillations within the scintillator. Extrapolated zero timing is employed rather than the usual constant fraction timing. As a result, a substantially larger scintillator can be employed that substantially increases the data rate and shortens the experiment time. 3 claims

  15. A pair spectrometer for measuring multipolarities of energetic nuclear transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Gulyás, J.; Krasznahorkay, A.J.; Csatlós, M.; Csige, L.; Gácsi, Z.; Hunyadi, M.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Vitéz, A.; Tornyi, T.G.

    2016-02-01

    A multi-detector array has been designed and constructed for the simultaneous measurement of energy- and angular correlations of electron-positron pairs. Experimental results are obtained over a wide angular range for high-energy transitions in 16O, 12C and 8Be. A comparison with GEANT simulations demonstrates that angular correlations between 50 and 180 degrees of the electron-positron pairs in the energy range between 6 and 18 MeV can be determined with sufficient resolution and efficiency.

  16. Measurements of the frequency spectrum of transition radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M. L.; Mueller, D.

    1977-01-01

    We report a measurement of the frequency spectrum of X-ray transition radiation. X rays were generated by electrons of 5 and 9 GeV in radiators of multiple polypropylene foils, and detected in the range 4 to 30 keV with a calibrated single-crystal Bragg spectrometer. The experimental results closely reproduce the features of the theoretically predicted spectrum. In particular, the pronounced interference pattern of multifoil radiators and the expected hardening of the radiation with increasing foil thickness are clearly observed. The overall intensity of the radiation is somewhat lower than predicted by calculations.

  17. Laser transit anemometer measurements of a JANNAF nozzle base velocity flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Russ, C. E., Jr.; Clemmons, J. I., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Velocity flow fields of a nozzle jet exhausting into a supersonic flow were surveyed. The measurements were obtained with a laser transit anemometer (LTA) system in the time domain with a correlation instrument. The LTA data is transformed into the velocity domain to remove the error that occurs when the data is analyzed in the time domain. The final data is shown in velocity vector plots for positions upstream, downstream, and in the exhaust plane of the jet nozzle.

  18. A non-destructive method to measure the thermal properties of frozen soils during phase transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Frozen soils cover about 40% of the land surface on the earth and are responsible for the global energy balances affecting the climate. Measurement of the thermal properties of frozen soils during phase transition is important for analyzing the thermal transport process. Due to the involvement of phase transition, the thermal properties of frozen soils are rather complex. This paper introduces the uses of a multifunctional instrument that integrates time domain reflectometry (TDR sensor and thermal pulse technology (TPT to measure the thermal properties of soil during phase transition. With this method, the extent of phase transition (freezing/thawing was measured with the TDR module; and the corresponding thermal properties were measured with the TPT module. Therefore, the variation of thermal properties with the extent of freezing/thawing can be obtained. Wet soils were used to demonstrate the performance of this measurement method. The performance of individual modules was first validated with designed experiments. The new sensor was then used to monitor the properties of soils during freezing–thawing process, from which the freezing/thawing degree and thermal properties were simultaneously measured. The results are consistent with documented trends of thermal properties variations.

  19. Transit time homogenization in ischemic stroke - A novel biomarker of penumbral microvascular failure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engedal, Thorbjørn S; Hjort, Niels; Hougaard, Kristina D

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia causes widespread capillary no-flow in animal studies. The extent of microvascular impairment in human stroke, however, is unclear. We examined how acute intra-voxel transit time characteristics and subsequent recanalization affect tissue outcome on follow-up MRI in a historic...... cohort of 126 acute ischemic stroke patients. Based on perfusion-weighted MRI data, we characterized voxel-wise transit times in terms of their mean transit time (MTT), standard deviation (capillary transit time heterogeneity - CTH), and the CTH:MTT ratio (relative transit time heterogeneity), which...... tissue, prolonged mean transit time (>5 seconds) and very low cerebral blood flow (≤6 mL/100 mL/min) was associated with high risk of infarction, largely independent of recanalization status. In the remaining mismatch region, low relative transit time heterogeneity predicted subsequent infarction...

  20. Time measurements for thermalequilibrium in spodumene crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, A.T.; Isotani, S.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments for measurement of time taken to reach thermal equilibrium in Spodumene crystals - 2mm to 5,4mm thick - in the temperature range 100 0 to 250 0 C are described. The measurements indicate a linear relationship between time and thickenes for heating as well as for cooling. Difference in thermal equilibrium time for heating and for cooling is about of 20 seconds. (author) [pt

  1. Is direct measurement of time possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    Is direct measurement of time possible? The answer to this question may depend upon how one understands time. Is time an essential constituent of physical reality? Or is what scientists are talking about when they use the symbol ‘t’ or the word ‘time’ an human cultural construct, as the Chief of the USA NIST Divisions of Time and Frequency and of Quantum Physics has suggested. Few aspects of physics do not reference activity to time, but many discussions within either view of time seem to use one same, largely traditional, language of time. Briefly considering the question of measurement, including from a formal measure-theoretic point of view, clarifies the situation.

  2. Additive measures of travel time variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelson, Leonid; Fosgerau, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    This paper derives a measure of travel time variability for travellers equipped with scheduling preferences defined in terms of time-varying utility rates, and who choose departure time optimally. The corresponding value of travel time variability is a constant that depends only on preference...... parameters. The measure is unique in being additive with respect to independent parts of a trip. It has the variance of travel time as a special case. Extension is provided to the case of travellers who use a scheduled service with fixed headway....

  3. Using Moon Phases to Measure Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Janet; Lutz, Tracie; LaLonde, Donna E.

    2015-01-01

    Cultures need to accurately record dates and times for various societal purposes, ranging from knowing when to plant crops to planning travel. In ancient times, the sun and moon were used as measurement devices because of the scientific understanding of the physical world at that time. Ancient timekeepers monitored celestial events and either used…

  4. Measurement of the gamma gamma* -> pi0 transition form factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2009-06-02

    We study the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} in the single tag mode and measure the differential cross section d{sigma}/dQ{sup 2} and the {gamma}{gamma}* {yields} {pi}{sup 0} transition form factor in the mometum transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV{sup 2}. At Q{sup 2} > 10 GeV{sup 2} the measured form factor exceeds the asymptotic limit predicted by perturbative QCD. The analysis is based on 442 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  5. Precise frequency measurements of iodine hyperfine transitions at 671 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yao-Chin; Chen, Hsuan-Chen; Chen, Shih-En; Shy, Jow-Tsong; Wang, Li-Bang

    2013-03-01

    We report absolute frequency measurements on the a(1), a(10), and a(15) hyperfine components of the R(78) 4-6 line of (127)I(2). An external-cavity diode laser system at 671 nm is frequency-stabilized to the saturated absorption center obtained by modulation transfer spectroscopy in an iodine vapor cell. Its absolute frequency is measured by an optical frequency comb. The effect of pressure shift is investigated to obtain the absolute transition frequency at zero pressure. Our determination of the line centers reaches a precision of better than 40 kHz and will provide useful input for theoretical calculations. This frequency-stabilized laser can be used as a reference laser for the spectroscopy of lithium D lines.

  6. Colonic transit time and pressure based on Bernoulli's principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yoshiharu

    2018-01-01

    Variations in the caliber of human large intestinal tract causes changes in pressure and the velocity of its contents, depending on flow volume, gravity, and density, which are all variables of Bernoulli's principle. Therefore, it was hypothesized that constipation and diarrhea can occur due to changes in the colonic transit time (CTT), according to Bernoulli's principle. In addition, it was hypothesized that high amplitude peristaltic contractions (HAPC), which are considered to be involved in defecation in healthy subjects, occur because of cecum pressure based on Bernoulli's principle. A virtual healthy model (VHM), a virtual constipation model and a virtual diarrhea model were set up. For each model, the CTT was decided according to the length of each part of the colon, and then calculating the velocity due to the cecum inflow volume. In the VHM, the pressure change was calculated, then its consistency with HAPC was verified. The CTT changed according to the difference between the cecum inflow volume and the caliber of the intestinal tract, and was inversely proportional to the cecum inflow volume. Compared with VHM, the CTT was prolonged in the virtual constipation model, and shortened in the virtual diarrhea model. The calculated pressure of the VHM and the gradient of the interlocked graph were similar to that of HAPC. The CTT and HAPC can be explained by Bernoulli's principle, and constipation and diarrhea may be fundamentally influenced by flow dynamics.

  7. Bayesian Nonparametric Estimation for Dynamic Treatment Regimes with Sequential Transition Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanxun; Müller, Peter; Wahed, Abdus S; Thall, Peter F

    2016-01-01

    We analyze a dataset arising from a clinical trial involving multi-stage chemotherapy regimes for acute leukemia. The trial design was a 2 × 2 factorial for frontline therapies only. Motivated by the idea that subsequent salvage treatments affect survival time, we model therapy as a dynamic treatment regime (DTR), that is, an alternating sequence of adaptive treatments or other actions and transition times between disease states. These sequences may vary substantially between patients, depending on how the regime plays out. To evaluate the regimes, mean overall survival time is expressed as a weighted average of the means of all possible sums of successive transitions times. We assume a Bayesian nonparametric survival regression model for each transition time, with a dependent Dirichlet process prior and Gaussian process base measure (DDP-GP). Posterior simulation is implemented by Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling. We provide general guidelines for constructing a prior using empirical Bayes methods. The proposed approach is compared with inverse probability of treatment weighting, including a doubly robust augmented version of this approach, for both single-stage and multi-stage regimes with treatment assignment depending on baseline covariates. The simulations show that the proposed nonparametric Bayesian approach can substantially improve inference compared to existing methods. An R program for implementing the DDP-GP-based Bayesian nonparametric analysis is freely available at https://www.ma.utexas.edu/users/yxu/.

  8. H/L transition time estimation in JET using conformal predictors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, S., E-mail: sergio.gonzalez@ciemat.es [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Vega, J. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM/ENEA per la Fusione, Padova 4-25127 (Italy); Pereira, A. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Dormido-Canto, S.; Ramirez, J.M. [Departamento de Informatica y Automatica, UNED, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H/L transitions have been predicted using H/L and L/H models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Models have been built using conformal predictors to hedge the prediction with confidence and credibility measures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Models have been trained using linear and radial basis function kernels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conformal measures have proven their usefulness to validate data-driven models. - Abstract: Recent advances in data mining allow the automatic recognition of physical phenomena in the databases of fusion devices without human intervention. This is important to create large databases of physical events (thereby increasing the statistical relevance) in an unattended manner. Important examples are the L/H and H/L transitions. In this contribution, a novel technique is introduced to automatically locate H/L transitions in JET by using conformal predictors. The focus is on H/L transitions because typically there is not a clear signature in the time series of the most widely available signals to recognize the change of confinement. Conformal predictors hedge their prediction by means of two parameters: confidence and credibility. The technique has been based on binary supervised classifiers to separate the samples of the respective confinement modes. Results with several underlying classifiers are presented.

  9. Impedance measurements on a fast transition-edge sensor for optical and near-infrared range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taralli, E; Portesi, C; Lolli, L; Monticone, E; Rajteri, M; Novikov, I; Beyer, J

    2010-01-01

    Impedance measurements of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs) are a powerful tool to obtain information about the TES thermal and electrical properties. We apply this technique to a 20 μm x 20 μm Ti/Au TES, suitable for application in the optical and near-infrared range, and extend the measurements up to 250 kHz in order to obtain a complete frequency response in the complex plane. From these measurements we obtain important thermal and electrical device parameters such as heat capacity C, thermal conductance G and effective thermal time constant τ eff that will be compared with the corresponding values obtained from noise measurements.

  10. Double threshold discriminator for timing measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, A.R.; Oslopova, T.V.; Pestov, Yu.N.

    1995-01-01

    The new type of a discriminator is based on the idea of simultaneous time measurements at two different thresholds for each pulse. Instead of using two independent electronic TDC channels this discriminator produces an output pulse with the timing taking into account the information from two time measurements ''on-line''. The operation principle, analytical calculations and experimental results are presented. The time walk of the discriminator at the level of 10 ps in the range of the input pulse height of 0.2-1.5 V has been obtained. ((orig.))

  11. Simultaneous Boundary-Layer Transition, Tip Vortex, and Blade Deformation Measurements of a Rotor in Hover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineck, James; Schairer, Edward; Ramasamy, Manikandan; Roozeboom, Nettie

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes simultaneous optical measurements of a sub-scale helicopter rotor in the U.S. Army Hover Chamber at NASA Ames Research Center. The measurements included thermal imaging of the rotor blades to detect boundary layer transition; retro-reflective background-oriented schlieren (RBOS) to visualize vortices; and stereo photogrammetry to measure displacements of the rotor blades, to compute spatial coordinates of the vortices from the RBOS data, and to map the thermal imaging data to a three-dimensional surface grid. The test also included an exploratory effort to measure flow near the rotor tip by tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo PIV)an effort that yielded valuable experience but little data. The thermal imaging was accomplished using an image-derotation method that allowed long integration times without image blur. By mapping the thermal image data to a surface grid it was possible to accurately locate transition in spatial coordinates along the length of the rotor blade.

  12. Gastrointestinal mean transit times in young and middle-aged healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Brinch, K; Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the effects of age and gender on gastric, small intestinal and colonic mean transit times, a study was conducted in 32 healthy volunteers: eight young women (22-30 years), eight young men (20-28 years), eight middle-aged women (43-51 years) and eight middle-aged men (38-53 years......, small intestinal and colonic mean transit times were calculated. The gastric, small intestinal and colonic mean transit times were significantly longer in women. Ageing was shown to accelerate the gastric and small intestinal transit significantly. In the group of men the colonic mean transit time...... was unaffected by age, but middle-aged women had a significantly slower colonic transit than young women. We therefore conclude that both age and gender have to be considered when reference values for gastric, small intestinal and colonic mean transit times have to be established....

  13. Transition in adolescents across time, disease and gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svanholm, Jette Rolf; Ludvigsen, Mette Spliid; Aagaard, Hanne

    University, Denmark Jeanette.Svanholm@skejby.rm.dk, Mette.Ludvigsen@skejby.rm.dk, Hanne.Aagaard@skejby.rm.dk Background: Adolescents do not get involved in the preparation and planning of their health care transition, which leaves them with negative experiences and feelings of not having their health care...... needs met. Despite a growing number of studies on transition in adolescents, literature is scarce on longitudinal studies (Kralik, Visentin & van Loon 2006).To qualify health care interventions this longitudinal study contributes to the development of knowledge about transition from the adolescents......’ with congenial heart diseases, chronic kidney diseases and cystic fibrosis perspective. Objective: To study experiences of transition in adolescents with severe chronic diseases in the context of child-centred health care to adult-centred health care Research questions: • What are the adolescents’ experiences...

  14. The climate of HD 189733b from fourteen transits and eclipses measured by Spitzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agol, E.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Santa Barbara, KITP /UC, Santa Barbara; Cowan, Nicolas B.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Knutson, Heather A.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept.; Deming, Drake; /NASA, Goddard; Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Henry, Gregory W.; /Tennessee State U.; Charbonneau, David; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2010-07-01

    We present observations of six transits and six eclipses of the transiting planet system HD 189733 taken with the Spitzer Space Telescope IRAC camera at 8 microns, as well as a re-analysis of previously published data. We use several novel techniques in our data analysis, the most important of which is a new correction for the detector 'ramp' variation with a double-exponential function which performs better and is a better physical model for this detector variation. Our main scientific findings are: (1) an upper limit on the variability of the day-side planet flux of 2.7% (68% confidence); (2) the most precise set of transit times measured for a transiting planet, with an average accuracy of 3 seconds; (3) a lack of transit-timing variations, excluding the presence of second planets in this system above 20% of the mass of Mars in low-order mean-motion resonance at 95% confidence; (4) a confirmation of the planet's phase variation, finding the night side is 64% as bright as the day side, as well as an upper limit on the night-side variability of 17% (68% confidence); (5) a better correction for stellar variability at 8 micron causing the phase function to peak 3.5 hours before secondary eclipse, confirming that the advection and radiation timescales are comparable at the 8 micron photosphere; (6) variation in the depth of transit, which possibly implies variations in the surface brightness of the portion of the star occulted by the planet, posing a fundamental limit on non-simultaneous multi-wavelength transit absorption measurements of planet atmospheres; (7) a measurement of the infrared limb-darkening of the star, which is in good agreement with stellar atmosphere models; (8) an offset in the times of secondary eclipse of 69 seconds, which is mostly accounted for by a 31 second light travel time delay and 33 second delay due to the shift of ingress and egress by the planet hot spot; this confirms that the phase variation is due to an offset hot

  15. Alteration of gastrointestinal transit time in the rat after bile duct cannulation surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, P.H.; Medinsky, M.A.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Bond, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Alteration of gastrointestinal (GI) transit time could affect the bioavailability of a toxicant if the toxicant is absorbed in the GI tract. The effect of surgery on GI transit time was investigated using radiographic imaging of barium during passage through the GI tract of the rat. Bile duct cannulation surgery delayed transit of barium to over 18 h, whereas in the normal animal, transit required approximately 6 h. GI transit time was only moderately affected by laparotomy after an 18-h postsurgery recovery period. These results suggest that the gastrointestinal absorption of orally administered toxicants could be affected by bile duct cannulation. 3 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  16. Simplified assessment of segmental gastrointestinal transit time with orally small amount of barium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Weitang; Zhang, Zhiyong; Liu, Jinbo; Li, Zhen; Song, Junmin; Wu, Changcai [Department of Colorectal Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Zhengzhou University, 450052 Zhengzhou (China); Wang, Guixian, E-mail: guixianwang@hotmail.com [Department of Colorectal Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital and Institute of Clinical Medicine, Zhengzhou University, 450052 Zhengzhou (China)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness and advantage of small amount of barium in the measurement of gastrointestinal transmission function in comparison with radio-opaque pallets. Methods: Protocal 1: 8 healthy volunteers (male 6, female 2) with average age 40 ± 6.1 were subjected to the examination of radio-opaque pellets and small amount of barium with the interval of 1 week. Protocol 2: 30 healthy volunteers in group 1 (male 8, female 22) with average age 42.5 ± 8.1 and 50 patients with chronic functional constipation in group 2 (male 11, female 39) with average age 45.7 ± 7.8 were subjected to the small amount of barium examination. The small amount of barium was made by 30 g barium dissolved in 200 ml breakfast. After taking breakfast which contains barium, objectives were followed with abdominal X-ray at 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96 h until the barium was evacuated totally. Results: Small amount of barium presented actual chyme or stool transit. The transit time of radio-opaque pallets through the whole gastrointestinal tract was significantly shorter than that of barium (37 ± 8 h vs. 47 ± 10 h, P < 0.05) in healthy people. The transit times of barium in constipation patients were markedly prolonged in colon (61.1 ± 22 vs. 37.3 ± 11, P < 0.01) and rectum (10.8 ± 3.7 vs. 2.3 ± 0.8 h, P < 0.01) compared with unconstipated volunteers. Transit times in individual gastrointestinal segments were also recorded by using small amount of barium, which allowed identifying the subtypes of constipation. Conclusion: The small amount barium examination is a convenient and low cost method to provide the most useful and reliable information on the transmission function of different gastrointestinal segments and able to classify the subtypes of slow transit constipation.

  17. Simplified assessment of segmental gastrointestinal transit time with orally small amount of barium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Weitang; Zhang, Zhiyong; Liu, Jinbo; Li, Zhen; Song, Junmin; Wu, Changcai; Wang, Guixian

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness and advantage of small amount of barium in the measurement of gastrointestinal transmission function in comparison with radio-opaque pallets. Methods: Protocal 1: 8 healthy volunteers (male 6, female 2) with average age 40 ± 6.1 were subjected to the examination of radio-opaque pellets and small amount of barium with the interval of 1 week. Protocol 2: 30 healthy volunteers in group 1 (male 8, female 22) with average age 42.5 ± 8.1 and 50 patients with chronic functional constipation in group 2 (male 11, female 39) with average age 45.7 ± 7.8 were subjected to the small amount of barium examination. The small amount of barium was made by 30 g barium dissolved in 200 ml breakfast. After taking breakfast which contains barium, objectives were followed with abdominal X-ray at 4, 8, 12, 24, 48, 72, 96 h until the barium was evacuated totally. Results: Small amount of barium presented actual chyme or stool transit. The transit time of radio-opaque pallets through the whole gastrointestinal tract was significantly shorter than that of barium (37 ± 8 h vs. 47 ± 10 h, P < 0.05) in healthy people. The transit times of barium in constipation patients were markedly prolonged in colon (61.1 ± 22 vs. 37.3 ± 11, P < 0.01) and rectum (10.8 ± 3.7 vs. 2.3 ± 0.8 h, P < 0.01) compared with unconstipated volunteers. Transit times in individual gastrointestinal segments were also recorded by using small amount of barium, which allowed identifying the subtypes of constipation. Conclusion: The small amount barium examination is a convenient and low cost method to provide the most useful and reliable information on the transmission function of different gastrointestinal segments and able to classify the subtypes of slow transit constipation

  18. Markov transition probability-based network from time series for characterizing experimental two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Zhong-Ke; Hu Li-Dan; Jin Ning-De

    2013-01-01

    We generate a directed weighted complex network by a method based on Markov transition probability to represent an experimental two-phase flow. We first systematically carry out gas—liquid two-phase flow experiments for measuring the time series of flow signals. Then we construct directed weighted complex networks from various time series in terms of a network generation method based on Markov transition probability. We find that the generated network inherits the main features of the time series in the network structure. In particular, the networks from time series with different dynamics exhibit distinct topological properties. Finally, we construct two-phase flow directed weighted networks from experimental signals and associate the dynamic behavior of gas-liquid two-phase flow with the topological statistics of the generated networks. The results suggest that the topological statistics of two-phase flow networks allow quantitative characterization of the dynamic flow behavior in the transitions among different gas—liquid flow patterns. (general)

  19. Real time refractive index measurement by ESPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torroba, R.; Joenathan, C.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a method to measure refractive index variations in real time is reported. A technique to introduce reference fringes in real time is discussed. Both the theoretical and experimental results are presented and an example with phase shifting is given. (author). 8 refs, 5 figs

  20. Sensitive Measurement of the Kosterlitz-Thouless Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ezra, Shalva; Glaberson, William I.

    2006-09-01

    We have developed a new technique for probing the Kosterlitz - Thouless transition in thin helium films. The technique is based on operation of a single quartz crystal microbalance at two different harmonic frequencies simultaneously. The technique is insensitive to surface effects, and provides the means for monitoring the heating of the film. By suppressing heating and surface effects we were able to systematically compare the results with the existing theories of ANHS, Bowley, Armour and Benedict, and Armour and Bowley. Substantial agreement with the last model of Armour and Bowley was observed. To the best our knowledge this is the first time that the experimental data in the frequency range 10-30MHz is compared to theoretical models.

  1. Measuring multiscaling in financial time-series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buonocore, R.J.; Aste, T.; Di Matteo, T.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the origin of multiscaling in financial time-series and investigate how to best quantify it. Our methodology consists in separating the different sources of measured multifractality by analyzing the multi/uni-scaling behavior of synthetic time-series with known properties. We use the results from the synthetic time-series to interpret the measure of multifractality of real log-returns time-series. The main finding is that the aggregation horizon of the returns can introduce a strong bias effect on the measure of multifractality. This effect can become especially important when returns distributions have power law tails with exponents in the range (2, 5). We discuss the right aggregation horizon to mitigate this bias.

  2. Colonic transit time relates to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism, and its importance for host health, although stool consistency, a proxy for colonic transit time, has recently been negatively associated with gut microbial richness. To address the relationships between colonic...... transit time and the gut microbial composition and metabolism, we assessed the colonic transit time of 98 subjects using radiopaque markers, and profiled their gut microbiota by16S rRNA gene sequencingand their urine metabolome by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Based...... on correlation analyses,we show that colonic transit time is associated with overall gutmicrobial composition, diversity and metabolism. A relatively prolonged colonic transit time associates with high microbial species richness and a shift in colonic metabolismfrom carbohydrate fermentation to protein...

  3. Colonic transit time is related to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism, and its importance for host health, although stool consistency, a proxy for colonic transit time, has recently been negatively associated with gut microbial richness. To address the relationships between colonic...... transit time and the gut microbial composition and metabolism, we assessed the colonic transit time of 98 subjects using radiopaque markers, and profiled their gut microbiota by16S rRNA gene sequencing and their urine metabolome by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Based...... on correlation analyses, we show that colonic transit time is associated with overall gut microbial composition, diversity and metabolism. A relatively prolonged colonic transit time associates with high microbial species richness and a shift in colonic metabolism from carbohydrate fermentation to protein...

  4. Relationship between gastrointestinal transit time and anesthetic fasting protocols in the captive chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardente, A; Chinnadurai, S; De Voe, R; Stringer, E; Webb, T; Ireland, J; Saker, K

    2011-06-01

    Lengthy social separation and prolonged fasting time contribute to increased risks associated with anesthesia in captive primates. This study is an initial attempt to identify a safe pre-anesthetic fasting procedure by identifying gastric emptying time (GET) and gastrointestinal transit time (GTT) of captive chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes. Seven adult chimpanzees at the North Carolina Zoo immobilized for annual physical examinations were fed barium-impregnated polyethylene spheres to measure GET. Eleven animals were individually fed a color dye marker and fecal passage was observed to determine GTT. Gastric emptying time (GET) was approximated to be >3 hours but fasting time of 3 hours would allow for complete gastric emptying and could potentially replace the current overnight fast (≥16 hour) to help minimize complications associated with pre-anesthetic fasting in captive primates. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: III. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by a Fourier-Domain Study of Anti-correlated Transit Timing Variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /Lick Observ.; Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Fressin, Francois; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Holman, Matthew J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Lissauer, Jack J.; /NASA, Ames; Rowe, Jason F.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames; Ragozzine, Darin; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Welsh, William F.; /Caltech; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames /UC, Santa Barbara

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to confirm the planetary nature of objects in systems with multiple transiting exoplanet candidates. This method involves a Fourier-domain analysis of the deviations in the transit times from a constant period that result from dynamical interactions within the system. The combination of observed anticorrelations in the transit times and mass constraints from dynamical stability allow us to claim the discovery of four planetary systems, Kepler-25, Kepler-26, Kepler-27 and Kepler-28, containing eight planets and one additional planet candidate.

  6. Colonic transit time is related to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism and its importance for host health, although a firm stool consistency, a proxy for a long colonic transit time, has recently been positively associated with gut microbial richness. Here, we show that colonic transit...... time in humans, assessed using radio-opaque markers, is associated with overall gut microbial composition, diversity and metabolism. We find that a long colonic transit time associates with high microbial richness and is accompanied by a shift in colonic metabolism from carbohydrate fermentation...

  7. Decreasing Transition Times in Elementary School Classrooms: Using Computer-Assisted Instruction to Automate Intervention Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, Jeffrey F.; Ardoin, Scott P.; Foster, Tori E.

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests that students spend a substantial amount of time transitioning between classroom activities, which may reduce time spent academically engaged. This study used an ABAB design to evaluate the effects of a computer-assisted intervention that automated intervention components previously shown to decrease transition times. We examined…

  8. Long time behaviour of a singular phase transition model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, Pavel; Sprekels, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2006), s. 1119-1135 ISSN 1078-0947 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : phase transition * nonlocal model * integrodifferential heat equation Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.087, year: 2006

  9. Hepatic vein transit time of SonoVue: a comparative study with Levovist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Adrian K P; Patel, Nayna; Eckersley, Robert J; Goldin, Robert D; Thomas, Howard C; Cosgrove, David O; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D; Blomley, Martin J K

    2006-07-01

    To prospectively compare transit times of Levovist and SonoVue in healthy volunteers and patients with biopsy-proved hepatitis C-related liver disease. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. Forty patients and 25 healthy volunteers were examined. Subjects fasted, a bolus of SonoVue (0.6 mL) was injected into a cubital fossa vein, and hepatic venous time-intensity profiles were measured with spectral Doppler tracing. This was repeated with two injections of Levovist (2 g) and another injection of SonoVue. Time-intensity curves of spectral Doppler signals of right and middle hepatic veins were analyzed. A sustained signal intensity increase of 10% above baseline levels indicated hepatic vein transit time (HVTT). Carotid artery audio intensity was measured in volunteers. Analysis of variance and t tests were used for statistical analysis. Twelve patients had mild hepatitis; 18, moderate or severe hepatitis; and 10, cirrhosis. Mean HVTTs in control, mild hepatitis, moderate or severe hepatitis, and cirrhosis groups were 38.3 seconds +/- 2.4 (standard error), 47.5 seconds +/- 6.5, 29.5 seconds +/- 10.8, and 17.6 seconds +/- 5.0, respectively, with Levovist (P SonoVue (P SonoVue; however, there were significant differences in HVTT between all patient groups with Levovist. HVTT of SonoVue was shorter than that of Levovist in all groups (P SonoVue or Levovist (9.1 seconds +/- 2.4 [standard error] and 8.4 seconds +/- 2.5, respectively, P = .18). HVTT was significantly shorter with SonoVue than with Levovist; there was no significant difference in cardiopulmonary transit time. RSNA, 2006

  10. The progress of prothrombin time measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Juha Eero Horsti

    2009-01-01

    Warfarin is the most widely used medicine for oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT). It inhibits the synthesis of coagulation factors II, VII, IX, and X in the liver and results in the production of inactive or partially active versions of these factors. Inactive coagulation factors interfere with prothrombin time measurement (Quick and Owren PT) measuring the sum of coagulation activity and inhibition. The narrow therapeutic range here involves a danger of serious complications and the risk of bl...

  11. Wireless capsule motility: comparison of the SmartPill GI monitoring system with scintigraphy for measuring whole gut transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Sabba; Parkman, Henry P; Friedenberg, Frank K

    2009-10-01

    Assessment of whole gut transit, by radio-opaque markers or scintigraphy, is used to evaluate patients with constipation for slow gastrointestinal transit. Wireless capsule motility, using the SmartPill GI monitoring system, samples and transmits intraluminal pH, pressure, and temperature data from a capsule at regular intervals as it traverses through the gastrointestinal tract; from these, gastric emptying and whole gastrointestinal tract transit can be assessed. The objective of this study was to compare the SmartPill with whole gut transit scintigraphy to determine whether the SmartPill system could serve as a test for measurement of whole gut motility and transit. Ten healthy, asymptomatic subjects underwent simultaneous whole gut scintigraphy and SmartPill assessment of whole gut transit. All subjects completed the study per protocol and experienced natural passage of the pill. Capsule residence time in the stomach correlated very strongly with percent gastric retention of the Tc-99 radiolabel at 120 min (r = 0.95) and at 240 min (r = 0.73). Small bowel contraction-min(-1) measured by the SmartPill correlated with small bowel transit % (r = 0.69; P = 0.05) and with isotopic colonic geometric center at 24 h after ingestion (r = 0.70, P = 0.024). Capsule transit time correlated with scintigraphic assessment of whole gut transit. SmartPill capsule assessment of gastric emptying and whole gut transit compares favorably with that of scintigraphy. Wireless capsule motility shows promise as a useful diagnostic test to evaluate patients for GI transit disorders and to study the effect of prokinetic agents on GI transit.

  12. The measurement of time and income poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Zacharias, Ajit

    2011-01-01

    Official poverty thresholds are based on the implicit assumption that the household with poverty-level income possesses sufficient time for household production to enable it to reproduce itself as a unit. Several authors have questioned the validity of the assumption and explored alternative methods to account for time deficits in the measurement of poverty. I critically review the alternative approaches within a unified framework to highlight the commonalities and relative merits of individu...

  13. Using connectivity for measuring equity in transit provision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Popoks, Dmitrijs; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    . In addition, transit connectivity weighs the impedance components according to their relative importance to travelers. The assessment of equity was performed for the multi-modal transit system in the Greater Copenhagen Area, renowned for its transit-oriented finger-plan. The assessment method used a GIS...... coefficients of inequality in the Greater Copenhagen Area. Results show that the transit-oriented development contributes to spatial equity with high connectivity in densely populated zones, vertical equity with comparable connectivity in high income and low income zones, inter-generational equity with good...

  14. Regional Gastrointestinal Transit Times in Patients With Carcinoid Diarrhea: Assessment With the Novel 3D-Transit System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Tine; Haase, Anne-Mette; Schlageter, Vincent; Gronbaek, Henning; Krogh, Klaus

    2015-07-30

    The paucity of knowledge regarding gastrointestinal motility in patients with neuroendocrine tumors and carcinoid diarrhea re-stricts targeted treatment. 3D-Transit is a novel, minimally invasive, ambulatory method for description of gastrointestinal motility. The system has not yet been evaluated in any group of patients. We aimed to test the performance of 3D-Transit in patients with carcinoid diarrhea and to compare the patients' regional gastrointestinal transit times (GITT) and colonic motility patterns with those of healthy subjects. Fifteen healthy volunteers and seven patients with neuroendocrine tumor and at least 3 bowel movements per day were inves-tigated with 3D-Transit and standard radiopaque markers. Total GITT assessed with 3D-Transit and radiopaque markers were well correlated (Spearman's rho = 0.64, P = 0.002). Median total GITT was 12.5 (range: 8.5-47.2) hours in patients versus 25.1 (range: 13.1-142.3) hours in healthy (P = 0.007). There was no difference in gastric emptying (P = 0.778). Median small intestinal transit time was 3.8 (range: 1.4-5.5) hours in patients versus 4.4 (range: 1.8-7.2) hours in healthy subjects (P = 0.044). Median colorectal transit time was 5.2 (range: 2.9-40.1) hours in patients versus 18.1 (range: 5.0-134.0) hours in healthy subjects (P = 0.012). Median frequency of pansegmental co-lonic movements was 0.45 (range: 0.03-1.02) per hour in patients and 0.07 (range: 0-0.61) per hour in healthy subjects (P = 0.045). Three-dimensional Transit allows assessment of regional GITT in patients with diarrhea. Patients with carcinoid diarrhea have faster than normal gastrointestinal transit due to faster small intestinal and colorectal transit times. The latter is caused by an increased frequency of pansegmental colonic movements.

  15. NO TIMING VARIATIONS OBSERVED IN THIRD TRANSIT OF SNOW-LINE EXOPLANET KEPLER-421b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalba, Paul A.; Muirhead, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    We observed Kepler-421 during the anticipated third transit of the snow-line exoplanet Kepler-421b in order to constrain the existence and extent of transit timing variations (TTVs). Previously, the Kepler spacecraft only observed two transits of Kepler-421b, leaving the planet’s transit ephemeris unconstrained. Our visible light, time-series observations from the 4.3 m Discovery Channel Telescope were designed to capture pre-transit baseline and the partial transit of Kepler-421b, barring significant TTVs. We use the light curves to assess the probabilities of various transit models using both the posterior odds ratio and the Bayesian Information Criterion, and find that a transit model with no TTVs is favored to 3.6 σ confidence. These observations suggest that Kepler-421b is either alone in its system or is only experiencing minor dynamic interactions with an unseen companion. With the Kepler-421b ephemeris constrained, we calculate future transit times and discuss the opportunity to characterize the atmosphere of this cold, long-period exoplanet via transmission spectroscopy. Our investigation emphasizes the difficulties associated with observing long-period exoplanet transits and the consequences that arise from failing to refine transit ephemerides.

  16. Modelling of transit-time ultrasonic flow meters under multi-phase flow conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simurda, Matej; Duggen, Lars; Lassen, Benny

    2016-01-01

    of the background flow are included. Spatial derivatives are calculated by a Fourier collocation scheme allowing the use of the Fast Fourier transform. The method is compared against analytical solutions and experimental measurements. Additionally, a study of clamp-on and in-line ultrasonic flowmeters operating......A pseudospectral model for transit time ultrasonic flowmeters under multiphase flow conditions is presented. The method solves first order stress-velocity equations of elastodynamics, with acoustic media being modelled by setting shear modulus to zero. Additional terms to account for the effect...... under multiphase flow conditions is carried out....

  17. Effect of Epidural Block under General Anesthesia on Pulse Transit Time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Byeong Cheol; Kim, Seong Min; Jung, Dong Keun; Kim, Gi Ryon; Lee, He Jeong; Jeon, Gye Rock

    2005-01-01

    Epidural block under general anesthesia has been widely used to control postoperative pain. In this anesthetic state many hemodynamic parameters are changed. Moreover pulse transit time is influenced by this memodynamic change. PPT change in the finger and the toe due to relaxation of arterial wall muscle after general anesthesia and epidural block under general anesthesia. This study, in the both general anesthesia and epidural block under general anesthesia, ΔPTT of the toe and of the finger are measured. In addition, ΔPTT(toe-finger) of the epidural block under general anesthesia and of the general anesthesia were compared

  18. Sphaleron transitions and baryon asymmetry: A numerical, real time analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambjoern, J.; Askgaard, T.; Porter, H.; Shaposhnikov, M.E.

    1990-08-01

    We estimate by numerical simulations the rate Γ of sphaleron-like transitions in the electroweak theory in the phase with restored symmetry. There is no suppression and Γ=κ(α W T) 4 with κ ≅ 0.1-1.0. We further address the question of a spontaneous CP-breaking in this phase of the electroweak theory, but have not yet found any evidence in this direction. (orig.)

  19. Boltzmann babies in the proper time measure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bousso, Raphael; Bousso, Raphael; Freivogel, Ben; Yang, I-Sheng

    2007-12-20

    After commenting briefly on the role of the typicality assumption in science, we advocate a phenomenological approach to the cosmological measure problem. Like any other theory, a measure should be simple, general, well defined, and consistent with observation. This allows us to proceed by elimination. As an example, we consider the proper time cutoff on a geodesic congruence. It predicts that typical observers are quantum fluctuations in the early universe, or Boltzmann babies. We sharpen this well-known youngness problem by taking into account the expansion and open spatial geometry of pocket universes. Moreover, we relate the youngness problem directly to the probability distribution for observables, such as the temperature of the cosmic background radiation. We consider a number of modifications of the proper time measure, but find none that would make it compatible with observation.

  20. Potentiometric Measurement of Transition Ranges and Titration Errors for Acid/Base Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Paul A.

    1997-07-01

    Sophomore analytical chemistry courses typically devote a substantial amount of lecture time to acid/base equilibrium theory, and usually include at least one laboratory project employing potentiometric titrations. In an effort to provide students a laboratory experience that more directly supports their classroom discussions on this important topic, an experiment involving potentiometric measurement of transition ranges and titration errors for common acid/base indicators has been developed. The pH and visually-assessed color of a millimolar strong acid/base system are monitored as a function of added titrant volume, and the resultant data plotted to permit determination of the indicator's transition range and associated titration error. Student response is typically quite positive, and the measured quantities correlate reasonably well to literature values.

  1. Scintigraphic determination of gastrointestinal transit times. A comparison with breath hydrogen and radiologic methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J L; Larsen, N E; Hilsted, J

    1991-01-01

    A scintigraphic method for determination of gastrointestinal transit times was compared with the breath hydrogen test and a multiple-bolus, single-radiograph technique. A close temporal association was found between the caecal appearance of radioactivity and the onset of breath hydrogen excretion...... in eight healthy subjects. Neither mean small-intestinal nor mean orocaecal transit times of the radiolabelled marker were correlated with the magnitude of hydrogen peak, hydrogen peak time, or the area under hydrogen curve. No correlation was noted between whole-gut transit time of the radiolabelled...... marker and mean whole-gut transit time calculated from a 6-day administration of the radiopaque marker in 16 healthy subjects. The stool weight was inversely correlated with the mean colonic (r = -0.46, p = 0.009) and the mean whole-gut (r = -0.45, p = 0.011) transit times of the radiolabelled marker...

  2. Measure Guideline: Transitioning to a Tankless Water Heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozyna, K.; Rapport, A.

    2012-09-01

    This Measure Guideline provides information to help residential builders and retrofitters with the design, specification, selection, implementation, installation, and maintenance issues of transitioning from tank-type water heaters to tankless water heaters. The report compares the differences between tankless and tank-type water heaters, highlighting the energy savings that can be realized by adopting tankless water heaters over tank-type water heaters. Selection criteria and risks discussed include unit sizing and location, water distribution system, plumbing line length and diameter, water quality, electrical backup, and code issues. Cost and performance data are provided for various types of tankless and tank-type water heaters, both natural gas fired and electric. Also considered are interactions between the tankless water heater and other functional elements of a house, such as cold water supply and low-flow devices. Operating costs and energy use of water distribution systems for single- and two-story houses are provided, along with discussion of the various types of distribution systems that can be used with tankless water heaters. Finally, details to prepare for proper installation of a tankless water heater are described.

  3. Laser transit anemometer measurements on a slender cone in the Langley unitary plan wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Hunter, William W., Jr.; Covell, Peter F.; Nichols, Cecil E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A laser transit anemometer (LTA) system was used to probe the boundary layer on a slender (5 degree half angle) cone model in the Langley unitary plan wind tunnel. The anemometer system utilized a pair of laser beams with a diameter of 40 micrometers spaced 1230 micrometers apart to measure the transit times of ensembles of seeding particles using a cross-correlation technique. From these measurements, boundary layer profiles around the model were constructed and compared with CFD calculations. The measured boundary layer profiles representing the boundary layer velocity normalized to the edge velocity as a function of height above the model surface were collected with the model at zero angle of attack for four different flow conditions, and were collected in a vertical plane that bisected the model's longitudinal center line at a location 635 mm from the tip of the forebody cone. The results indicate an excellent ability of the LTA system to make velocity measurements deep into the boundary layer. However, because of disturbances in the flow field caused by onboard seeding, premature transition occurred implying that upstream seeding is mandatory if model flow field integrity is to be maintained. A description and results of the flow field surveys are presented.

  4. A Matheuristic for the Liner Shipping Network Design Problem with Transit Time Restrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouer, Berit Dangaard; Desaulniers, Guy; Karsten, Christian Vad

    2015-01-01

    We present a mathematical model for the liner shipping network design problem with transit time restrictions on the cargo flow. We extend an existing matheuristic for the liner shipping network design problem to consider transit time restrictions. The matheuristic is an improvement heuristic, where...

  5. The time-varying shortest path problem with fuzzy transit costs and speedup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezapour Hassan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we focus on the time-varying shortest path problem, where the transit costs are fuzzy numbers. Moreover, we consider this problem in which the transit time can be shortened at a fuzzy speedup cost. Speedup may also be a better decision to find the shortest path from a source vertex to a specified vertex.

  6. Time-resolved absorption measurements on OMEGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaanimagi, P.A.; DaSilva, L.; Delettrez, J.; Gregory, G.G.; Richardson, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Time-resolved measurements of the incident laser light that is scattered and/or refracted from targets irradiated by the 24 uv-beam OMEGA laser at LLE, have provided some interesting features related to time-resolved absorption. The decrease in laser absorption characteristic of irradiating a target that implodes during the laser pulse has been observed. The increase in absorption expected as the critical density surface moves from a low to a high Z material in the target has also been noted. The detailed interpretation of these results is made through comparisons with simulation using the code LILAC, as well as with streak data from time-resolved x-ray imaging and spectroscopy. In addition, time and space-resolved imaging of the scattered light yields information on laser irradiation uniformity conditions on the target. The report consists of viewgraphs

  7. An Evaluation of the Technical Adequacy of a Revised Measure of Quality Indicators of Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morningstar, Mary E.; Lee, Hyunjoo; Lattin, Dana L.; Murray, Angela K.

    2016-01-01

    This study confirmed the reliability and validity of the Quality Indicators of Exemplary Transition Programs Needs Assessment-2 (QI-2). Quality transition program indicators were identified through a systematic synthesis of transition research, policies, and program evaluation measures. To verify reliability and validity of the QI-2, we…

  8. Time response measurements of LASL diagnostic detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocker, L.P.

    1970-07-01

    The measurement and data analysis techniques developed under the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory's detector improvement program were used to characterize the time and frequency response of selected LASL Compton, fluor-photodiode (NPD), and fluor-photomultiplier (NPM) diagnostic detectors. Data acquisition procedures and analysis methods presently in use are summarized, and detector time and frequency data obtained using the EG and G/AEC electron linear accelerator fast pulse (approximately 50 psec FWHM) as the incident radiation driving function are presented. (U.S.)

  9. Relaxation time measurements by an electronic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brousseau, R.; Vanier, J.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a simple electronic system that permits the direct measurement of time constants of decaying signals. The system was used in connection with relaxation experiments on hydrogen and rubidium masers and was found to operate well. The use of a computing counter in the systems gives the possibility of making averages on several experiments and obtaining the standard deviation of the results from the mean. The program for the computing counter is given.

  10. Time-resolved brightness measurements by streaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrance, Joshua S.; Speirs, Rory W.; McCulloch, Andrew J.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2018-03-01

    Brightness is a key figure of merit for charged particle beams, and time-resolved brightness measurements can elucidate the processes involved in beam creation and manipulation. Here we report on a simple, robust, and widely applicable method for the measurement of beam brightness with temporal resolution by streaking one-dimensional pepperpots, and demonstrate the technique to characterize electron bunches produced from a cold-atom electron source. We demonstrate brightness measurements with 145 ps temporal resolution and a minimum resolvable emittance of 40 nm rad. This technique provides an efficient method of exploring source parameters and will prove useful for examining the efficacy of techniques to counter space-charge expansion, a critical hurdle to achieving single-shot imaging of atomic scale targets.

  11. Comparing Transition-Edge Sensor Response Times in a Modified Contact Scheme with Different Support Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, A. D.; Kenyon, M. E.; Bumble, B.; Runyan, M. C.; Echternach, P. E.; Holmes, W. A.; Bock, J. J.; Bradford, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of the thermal conductance, G, and effective time constants, tau, of three transition-edge sensors (TESs) populated in arrays operated from 80-87mK with T(sub C) approximately 120mK. Our TES arrays include several variations of thermal architecture enabling determination of the architecture that demonstrates the minimum noise equivalent power (NEP), the lowest tau and the trade-offs among designs. The three TESs we report here have identical Mo/Cu bilayer thermistors and wiring structures, while the thermal architectures are: 1) a TES with straight support beams of 1mm length, 2) a TES with meander support beams of total length 2mm and with 2 phononfilter blocks per beam, and 3) a TES with meander support beams of total length 2mm and with 6 phonon-filter blocks per beam. Our wiring scheme aims to lower the thermistor normal state resistance R(sub N) and increase the sharpness of the transition alpha=dlogR/dlogT at the transition temperature T(sub C). We find an upper limit of given by (25+/-10), and G values of 200fW/K for 1), 15fW/K for 2), and 10fW/K for 3). The value of alpha can be improved by slightly increasing the length of our thermistors.

  12. VIDEO CAPSULE ENDOSCOPY: A TOOL FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF SMALL BOWEL TRANSIT TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza A Hejazi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Video capsule endoscopy (VCE is a procedure that uses a wireless camera to take pictures of the gastrointestinal tract. A wireless motility capsule (WMC of a similar size has been developed, which measures pH, pressure, and temperature, and can be used to assess regional and total gastrointestinal transit times. VCE could also potentially be used as a tool for measuring small bowel transit time (SBTT.Methods: This study was designed to obtain SBTT from VCE and compare it with historical data generated by WMC. Gastric transit time (GTT was also measured. Patients were included if the indication for VCE was either iron deficiency anemia (IDA or overt obscure GI bleed (OOGIB and they did not have any known motility disorder. Results from VCE were also compared in diabetic versus non-diabetic patients. Results: There were a total of 147 VCE studies performed, including 42 for OOGIB and 105 for IDA. Median GTT and SBTT were 0.3 and 3.6 hours, respectively. The overall median GTT and SBTT were 0.3 and 3.6 hours, respectively, in the IDA group compared with 0.3 and 3.4 hours in the OOGIB group. When compared with WMC, the GTT and SBTT were significantly faster in both groups (GTT: 3.6 hours and SBTT: 4.6 hours. The median GTT and SBTT were not significantly different in diabetics versus non-diabetics: (GTT: 17.5 vs. 18.0 minutes (P=0.86 and SBTT: 3.9 hours (237 minutes vs. 3.8 hours (230 minutes, respectively (P=0.90.Conclusion: SBTT as measured using VCE is not significantly different in OOGIB compared with IDA. Both GTT and SBTT are significantly faster as assessed by VCE, which is initiated in the fasting state, compared with WMC measurement, which is initiated after a standard meal. In summary, VCE could potentially be used for measuring SBTT in the fasting state.

  13. Investigation of Timing to Switch Control Mode in Powered Knee Prostheses during Task Transitions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhang

    Full Text Available Current powered prosthetic legs require switching control modes according to the task the user is performing (e.g. level-ground walking, stair climbing, walking on slopes, etc.. To allow prosthesis users safely and seamlessly transition between tasks, it is critical to determine when to switch the prosthesis control mode during task transitions. Our previous study defined critical timings for different types of task transitions in ambulation; however, it is unknown whether it is the unique timing that allows safe and seamless transitions. The goals of this study were to (1 systematically investigate the effects of mode switch timing on the prosthesis user's performance in task transitions, and (2 identify appropriate timing to switch the prosthesis control mode so that the users can seamlessly transition between different locomotion tasks. Five able-bodied (AB and two transfemoral (TF amputee subjects were tested as they wore a powered knee prosthesis. The prosthesis control mode was switched manually at various times while the subjects performed different types of task transitions. The subjects' task transition performances were evaluated by their walking balance and success in performing seamless task transitions. The results demonstrated that there existed a time window within which switching the prosthesis control mode neither interrupted the subjects' task transitions nor disturbed their walking balance. Therefore, the results suggested the control mode switching of a lower limb prosthesis can be triggered within an appropriate time window instead of a specific timing or an individual phase. In addition, a generalized criterion to determine the appropriate mode switch timing was proposed. The outcomes of this study could provide important guidance for future designs of neurally controlled powered knee prostheses that are safe and reliable to use.

  14. Signatures of Quantum Phase Transitions via Quantum Information Theoretic Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, I.; Tribedi, A.

    Quantum phase transitions (QPTs) in many body systems occur at T = 0 brought about by tuning a non-thermal parameter, e.g. pressure, chemical composition or external magnetic field [1, 2]. In a QPT, the ground state wave function undergoes qualitative changes at the transition point. The transition is driven by quantum fluctuations whereas ordinary phase transitions occurring at nonzero temperatures are driven by thermal fluctuations. Like a thermal phase transition, a QPT can be first order, second order or higher order. The thermal critical point, associated with a second-order phase transition, is characterized by the presence of thermal fluctuations on all length scales resulting in a divergent correlation length. The free energy and the thermodynamic functions develop singularities as temperature Trightarrow T_{textrm{c}} , the critical temperature. At the quantum critical point (QCP), quantum fluctuations occur on all length scales leading to a divergent correlation length. The ground state and related physical quantities become non-analytic as the tuning parameter g tends to the critical value g c . The influence of QPTs extends into the finite T part of the phase diagram so that experimental detection of QPTs is possible.

  15. Effects of anatomical position on esophageal transit time: A biomagnetic diagnostic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova-Fraga, Teodoro; Sosa, Modesto; Wiechers, Carlos; la Roca-Chiapas, Jose Maria De; Moreles, Alejandro Maldonado; Bernal-Alvarado, Jesus; Huerta-Franco, Raquel

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the esophageal transit time (ETT) and compare its mean value among three anatomical inclinations of the body; and to analyze the correlation of ETT to body mass index (BMI). METHODS: A biomagnetic technique was implemented to perform this study: (1) The transit time of a magnetic marker (MM) through the esophagus was measured using two fluxgate sensors placed over the chest of 14 healthy subjects; (2) the ETT was assessed in three anatomical positions (at upright, fowler, and supine positions; 90º, 45º and 0º, respectively). RESULTS: ANOVA and Tuckey post-hoc tests demonstrated significant differences between ETT mean of the different positions. The ETT means were 5.2 ± 1.1 s, 6.1 ± 1.5 s, and 23.6 ± 9.2 s for 90º, 45º and 0º, respectively. Pearson correlation results were r = -0.716 and P 0.05 according the subject’s BMI. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated that using this biomagnetic technique, it is possible to measure the ETT and the effects of the anatomical position on the ETT. PMID:18837088

  16. Impact of orocecal transit time on patient´s perception of lactose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casellas, Francesc; Aparici, Anna; Casaus, Maite; Rodríguez, Purificación; Malagelada, Juan R

    2013-01-01

    symptoms attributed to the lactose intolerance are an important public health issue because of their prevalence and social relevance. Also because they may cause undue rejection of dairy products consume with potential health consequences. Transit time is a putative factor implied in the severity of symptoms associated with lactose. to elucidate the relation between orocecal transit time (OCTT) and lactose intolerance symptoms. observational study in patients referred to a lactose hydrogen breath test who showed an increase in breath H2 excretion higher than 25 ppm. OCTT was measured with the breath test and symptoms of lactose tolerance with a validated scale. Symptoms were measured twice: before receiving the lactose, inquiring about self perceived symptoms when patients consumed dairy products at home ("home symptoms"), and again after completing the lactose breath test ("test symptoms"). 161 patients were included. There was no correlation between OCTT and home symptoms (r = -0.1). When OCTT was faster than 60 minutes, intensity of "test symptoms" was similar to "home symptoms". However, in patients with normal or slow OCTT, the "home symptoms" were more intense than the "test symptoms" (p lactose test load the symptoms were proportionately more intense with faster OCTT. in lactose maldigesters, selfreported symptoms of lactose intolerance are more pronounced at home than after a high lactose challenge. Intolerance symptoms that patients attributed to lactose consume at home are due to factors other than fast OCTT.

  17. Doppler limited rotational transitions of OH and SH radicals measured by continuous-wave terahertz photomixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliet, Sophie; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Guinet, Mickaël; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gaël; Bocquet, Robin; Cuisset, Arnaud

    2011-12-01

    A continuous-wave terahertz (CW-THz) source generated by photomixing has been employed to detect and quantify radicals produced in a cold plasma probing their spin-rotation transitions. Due to their dual interest for both atmospherists and astrophysicists, the hydroxyl OH and the mercapto SH radicals have been chosen. The photomixing technique which can access the largest range of THz frequencies of any known coherent source, allowed to resolve the Doppler-limited hyperfine transitions of OH in the 2.5 THz frequency region. Line profile analysis of the hyperfine components demonstrated that OH radicals have been detected in this region at a ppm level at a temperature close to 490 K. The hyperfine structure of SH has been resolved for the first time above 1 THz. Ten new frequency transitions have been measured in the 1.3-2.6 THz frequency range using the CW-THz synthesizer based on a frequency comb. With relative uncertainties better than 10 -7, the CW-THz frequencies measured in this study are now competitive with those measured by other instruments such as frequency multiplication chains or FT-FIR spectrometers and are now capable to improve the predictions of the complete high-resolution spectra of these radicals collected in the atmospheric and astrophysical spectroscopic databases. versioncorrigeeAC 2011-07-18 17:32 2011 Arnaud Cuisset.

  18. Determination of electron bunch shape using transition radiation and phase-energy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosson, E.R.; Berryman, K.W.; Richman, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    We present data comparing microbunch temporal information obtained from electron beam phase-energy measurements with that obtained from transition radiation auto-correlation measurements. The data was taken to resolve some of the ambiguities in previous transition radiation results. By measuring the energy spectrum of the electron beam as a function of its phase relative to the accelerating field, phase-energy information was extracted. This data was analyzed using tomographic techniques to reconstruct the phase-space distribution assuming an electron energy dependence of E(var-phi) = E o + E acc cos(var-phi), where E o is the energy of an electron entering the field, E acc is the peak energy gain, and var-phi is the phase between the crest of the RF wave and an electron. Temporal information about the beam was obtained from the phase space distribution by taking the one dimensional projection along the time axis. We discuss the use of this technique to verify other transition radiation analysis methods

  19. Determination of electron bunch shape using transition radiation and phase-energy measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosson, E.R.; Berryman, K.W.; Richman, B.A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    We present data comparing microbunch temporal information obtained from electron beam phase-energy measurements with that obtained from transition radiation auto-correlation measurements. The data was taken to resolve some of the ambiguities in previous transition radiation results. By measuring the energy spectrum of the electron beam as a function of its phase relative to the accelerating field, phase-energy information was extracted. This data was analyzed using tomographic techniques to reconstruct the phase-space distribution assuming an electron energy dependence of E({var_phi}) = E{sub o} + E{sub acc}cos({var_phi}), where E{sub o} is the energy of an electron entering the field, E{sub acc} is the peak energy gain, and {var_phi} is the phase between the crest of the RF wave and an electron. Temporal information about the beam was obtained from the phase space distribution by taking the one dimensional projection along the time axis. We discuss the use of this technique to verify other transition radiation analysis methods.

  20. A congested and dwell time dependent transit corridor assignment model

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Oreña, Borja; Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Ibeas Portilla, Ángel; Moura Berodia, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    This research proposes an equilibrium assignment model for congested public transport corridors in urban areas. In this model, journey times incorporate the effect of bus queuing on travel times and boarding and alighting passengers on dwell times at stops. The model also considers limited bus capacity leading to longer waiting times and more uncomfortable journeys. The proposed model is applied to an example network, and the results are compared with those obtained in a recent study. This is...

  1. The progress of prothrombin time measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Eero Horsti

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Warfarin is the most widely used medicine for oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT. It inhibits the synthesis of coagulation factors II, VII, IX, and X in the liver and results in the production of inactive or partially active versions of these factors. Inactive coagulation factors interfere with prothrombin time measurement (Quick and Owren PT measuring the sum of coagulation activity and inhibition. The narrow therapeutic range here involves a danger of serious complications and the risk of bleeding or thrombosis. The new-generation PT method can measure coagulation activity and inhibition separately. This new technique promotes patient care and anticoagulant medication (warfarin, dicoumarol based on coagulation activity in vivo. Both therapy and laboratory controls should be unquestionably accurate and based solely on in vivo coagulation activity. Inactive coagulation factors (inhibition render measurement, calibration, and harmonization. The use of the new-generation PT method based on measurement of coagulation activity in vivo could develop vitamin K antagonist (VKA therapy for the marked benefit of patients.

  2. Total and Segmental Colon Transit Time Study in Functional Constipation: Comparison With Healthy Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Bhate, Prasad A.; Patel, Jatin A.; Parikh, Pathik; Ingle, Meghraj A.; Phadke, Anniruddha; Sawant, Prabha D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Constipation is a common problem worldwide. Constipation can be primary or secondary. Primary constipation is subdivided in slow transit constipation, normal transit constipation, and dyssynergic defecation. Colon transit time (CTT) is the most basic and primary tool in evaluating disorders of colonic motility. CTT helps to differentiate between types of constipation and plan the treatment. Methods Fifty functional constipation patients and 25 healthy controls were asked to ingest ...

  3. Are anomalously short tunnelling times measurable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, V.; Muga, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    Low and Mende have analyzed the conditions that would make possible an actual measurement of an anomalously short traversal time through a potential barrier concluding that such a measurement cannot be made because it is not possible to describe the tunnelling of a wave packet initially close to the barrier by the open-quote open-quote usual wave packet space time analysis close-quote close-quote. We complement this work in several ways: It is argued that the described failure of the usual formalism occurs under a set of too restrictive conditions, some of them not physically motivated, so it does not necessarily imply the impossibility of such a measurement. However, by retaining only conditions well motivated on physical grounds we have performed a systematic numerical check which shows that the conclusion by Low and Mende is indeed generally valid. It is shown that, as speculated by Low and Mende, the process is dominated by over the barrier transmission. Copyright copyright 1996 Academic Press, Inc

  4. Time Resolved Deposition Measurements in NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, C.H.; Kugel, H.; Roquemore, A.L.; Hogan, J.; Wampler, W.R.

    2004-01-01

    Time-resolved measurements of deposition in current tokamaks are crucial to gain a predictive understanding of deposition with a view to mitigating tritium retention and deposition on diagnostic mirrors expected in next-step devices. Two quartz crystal microbalances have been installed on NSTX at a location 0.77m outside the last closed flux surface. This configuration mimics a typical diagnostic window or mirror. The deposits were analyzed ex-situ and found to be dominantly carbon, oxygen, and deuterium. A rear facing quartz crystal recorded deposition of lower sticking probability molecules at 10% of the rate of the front facing one. Time resolved measurements over a 4-week period with 497 discharges, recorded 29.2 (micro)g/cm 2 of deposition, however surprisingly, 15.9 (micro)g/cm 2 of material loss occurred at 7 discharges. The net deposited mass of 13.3 (micro)g/cm 2 matched the mass of 13.5 (micro)g/cm 2 measured independently by ion beam analysis. Monte Carlo modeling suggests that transient processes are likely to dominate the deposition

  5. Daylight Savings Time Transitions and the Incidence Rate of Unipolar Depressive Episodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bertel Teilfeldt; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar; Hageman, Ida

    2017-01-01

    : Using time series intervention analysis of nationwide data from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register from 1995 to 2012, we compared the observed trend in the incidence rate of hospital contacts for unipolar depressive episodes after the transitions to and from summer time to the predicted...... trend in the incidence rate. Results: The analyses were based on 185,419 hospital contacts for unipolar depression and showed that the transition from summer time to standard time were associated with an 11% increase (95% CI = 7%, 15%) in the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes......Background: Daylight savings time transitions affect approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide. Prior studies have documented associations between daylight savings time transitions and adverse health outcomes, but it remains unknown whether they also cause an increase in the incidence rate...

  6. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Overview and In-Situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.; Garske, Michael T.; Saucedo, Luis A.; Kinder, Gerald R.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLT FE) Project, a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for the flights of STS-119, STS-128 and STS-131. Additional instrumentation was installed in order to obtain more spatially resolved measurements downstream of the protuberance. This paper provides an overview of the BLT FE Project. Significant efforts were made to place the protuberance at an appropriate location on the Orbiter and to design the protuberance to withstand the expected environments. A high-level overview of the in-situ flight data is presented, along with a summary of the comparisons between pre- and post-flight analysis predictions and flight data. Comparisons show that predictions for boundary layer transition onset time closely match the flight data, while predicted temperatures were significantly higher than observed flight temperatures.

  7. Weighing Scale-Based Pulse Transit Time is a Superior Marker of Blood Pressure than Conventional Pulse Arrival Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stephanie L.-O.; Carek, Andrew M.; Kim, Chang-Sei; Ashouri, Hazar; Inan, Omer T.; Hahn, Jin-Oh; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-12-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is being widely pursued for cuff-less blood pressure (BP) monitoring. Most efforts have employed the time delay between ECG and finger photoplethysmography (PPG) waveforms as a convenient surrogate of PTT. However, these conventional pulse arrival time (PAT) measurements include the pre-ejection period (PEP) and the time delay through small, muscular arteries and may thus be an unreliable marker of BP. We assessed a bathroom weighing scale-like system for convenient measurement of ballistocardiography and foot PPG waveforms - and thus PTT through larger, more elastic arteries - in terms of its ability to improve tracking of BP in individual subjects. We measured “scale PTT”, conventional PAT, and cuff BP in humans during interventions that increased BP but changed PEP and smooth muscle contraction differently. Scale PTT tracked the diastolic BP changes well, with correlation coefficient of -0.80 ± 0.02 (mean ± SE) and root-mean-squared-error of 7.6 ± 0.5 mmHg after a best-case calibration. Conventional PAT was significantly inferior in tracking these changes, with correlation coefficient of -0.60 ± 0.04 and root-mean-squared-error of 14.6 ± 1.5 mmHg (p < 0.05). Scale PTT also tracked the systolic BP changes better than conventional PAT but not to an acceptable level. With further development, scale PTT may permit reliable, convenient measurement of BP.

  8. Time-Varying Transition Probability Matrix Estimation and Its Application to Brand Share Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Tomoaki; Akaho, Shotaro; Murata, Noboru

    2017-01-01

    In a product market or stock market, different products or stocks compete for the same consumers or purchasers. We propose a method to estimate the time-varying transition matrix of the product share using a multivariate time series of the product share. The method is based on the assumption that each of the observed time series of shares is a stationary distribution of the underlying Markov processes characterized by transition probability matrices. We estimate transition probability matrices for every observation under natural assumptions. We demonstrate, on a real-world dataset of the share of automobiles, that the proposed method can find intrinsic transition of shares. The resulting transition matrices reveal interesting phenomena, for example, the change in flows between TOYOTA group and GM group for the fiscal year where TOYOTA group’s sales beat GM’s sales, which is a reasonable scenario. PMID:28076383

  9. Time-Varying Transition Probability Matrix Estimation and Its Application to Brand Share Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Tomoaki; Hino, Hideitsu; Akaho, Shotaro; Murata, Noboru

    2017-01-01

    In a product market or stock market, different products or stocks compete for the same consumers or purchasers. We propose a method to estimate the time-varying transition matrix of the product share using a multivariate time series of the product share. The method is based on the assumption that each of the observed time series of shares is a stationary distribution of the underlying Markov processes characterized by transition probability matrices. We estimate transition probability matrices for every observation under natural assumptions. We demonstrate, on a real-world dataset of the share of automobiles, that the proposed method can find intrinsic transition of shares. The resulting transition matrices reveal interesting phenomena, for example, the change in flows between TOYOTA group and GM group for the fiscal year where TOYOTA group's sales beat GM's sales, which is a reasonable scenario.

  10. Time-Varying Transition Probability Matrix Estimation and Its Application to Brand Share Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Chiba

    Full Text Available In a product market or stock market, different products or stocks compete for the same consumers or purchasers. We propose a method to estimate the time-varying transition matrix of the product share using a multivariate time series of the product share. The method is based on the assumption that each of the observed time series of shares is a stationary distribution of the underlying Markov processes characterized by transition probability matrices. We estimate transition probability matrices for every observation under natural assumptions. We demonstrate, on a real-world dataset of the share of automobiles, that the proposed method can find intrinsic transition of shares. The resulting transition matrices reveal interesting phenomena, for example, the change in flows between TOYOTA group and GM group for the fiscal year where TOYOTA group's sales beat GM's sales, which is a reasonable scenario.

  11. Daylight saving time transitions and hospital treatments due to accidents or manic episodes

    OpenAIRE

    Lahti, Tuuli A; Haukka, Jari; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Partonen, Timo

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Daylight saving time affects millions of people annually but its impacts are still widely unknown. Sleep deprivation and the change of circadian rhythm can trigger mental illness and cause higher accident rates. Transitions into and out of daylight saving time changes the circadian rhythm and may cause sleep deprivation. Thus it seems plausible that the prevalence of accidents and/or manic episodes may be higher after transition into and out of daylight saving time. The ai...

  12. Daylight Savings Time Transitions and the Incidence Rate of Unipolar Depressive Episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Bertel T; Sønderskov, Kim M; Hageman, Ida; Dinesen, Peter T; Østergaard, Søren D

    2017-05-01

    Daylight savings time transitions affect approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide. Prior studies have documented associations between daylight savings time transitions and adverse health outcomes, but it remains unknown whether they also cause an increase in the incidence rate of depressive episodes. This seems likely because daylight savings time transitions affect circadian rhythms, which are implicated in the etiology of depressive disorder. Therefore, we investigated the effects of daylight savings time transitions on the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes. Using time series intervention analysis of nationwide data from the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register from 1995 to 2012, we compared the observed trend in the incidence rate of hospital contacts for unipolar depressive episodes after the transitions to and from summer time to the predicted trend in the incidence rate. The analyses were based on 185,419 hospital contacts for unipolar depression and showed that the transition from summer time to standard time were associated with an 11% increase (95% CI = 7%, 15%) in the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes that dissipated over approximately 10 weeks. The transition from standard time to summer time was not associated with a parallel change in the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes. This study shows that the transition from summer time to standard time was associated with an increase in the incidence rate of unipolar depressive episodes. Distress associated with the sudden advancement of sunset, marking the coming of a long period of short days, may explain this finding. See video abstract at, http://links.lww.com/EDE/B179.

  13. Extended Coherence Time on the Clock Transition of Optically Trapped Rubidium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleine Büning, G.; Will, J.; Ertmer, W.

    2011-01-01

    Optically trapped ensembles are of crucial importance for frequency measurements and quantum memories but generally suffer from strong dephasing due to inhomogeneous density and light shifts. We demonstrate a drastic increase of the coherence time to 21 s on the magnetic field insensitive clock...... transition of 87Rb by applying the recently discovered spin self-rephasing [C. Deutsch et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 020401 (2010)]. This result confirms the general nature of this new mechanism and thus shows its applicability in atom clocks and quantum memories. A systematic investigation of all relevant...... frequency shifts and noise contributions yields a stability of 2.4×10-11τ-1/2, where τ is the integration time in seconds. Based on a set of technical improvements, the presented frequency standard is predicted to rival the stability of microwave fountain clocks in a potentially much more compact setup....

  14. Analysis in measurements of gastric emptying time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choon Ho; Lee, Man Koo

    1997-01-01

    Scintigraphic measurement of gastric emptying time has been reported to be influenced by the variation in depth of radionuclide within the stomach. This study was designed to clarify whether a part of the variability in gastric emptying could be ascribed to a relationship between anterior image, the total anteroposterior image and the tissue attenuation correction(geometric mean). A dual-head scintillation camera(ADAC, USA) was used to investigate effect of such changes. We were performed 16 normal subject gastric emptying studies with 99 mTC labelled scramble egg, milk and solid meal(610 Kcal, 300 g). The results are as follows; On anterior image, T 1/2 emptying time was delayed by 5 min, 6.5%(range : 3 ∼ 18 min, 5∼31.4%) compared with the geometric mean. But there was no different gastric emptying time between the total anteroposterior image and geometric mean. Therefore, if will be useful to use the method of geometric mean or the total anteroposterior image to evaluate the gastric emptying time accurately

  15. Tile Surface Thermocouple Measurement Challenges from the Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Berger, Karen; Anderson, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Hypersonic entry flight testing motivated by efforts seeking to characterize boundary layer transition on the Space Shuttle Orbiters have identified challenges in our ability to acquire high quality quantitative surface temperature measurements versus time. Five missions near the end of the Space Shuttle Program implemented a tile surface protuberance as a boundary layer trip together with tile surface thermocouples to capture temperature measurements during entry. Similar engineering implementations of these measurements on Discovery and Endeavor demonstrated unexpected measurement voltage response during the high heating portion of the entry trajectory. An assessment has been performed to characterize possible causes of the issues experienced during STS-119, STS-128, STS-131, STS-133 and STS-134 as well as similar issues encountered during other orbiter entries.

  16. Measurements of a vortex transitional ndro Josephson memory cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, S.; Ishida, I.; Hidaka, M.; Nagasawa, S.; Ajisawa, Y.; Wada, Y.

    1988-01-01

    A novel vortex transitional NDRO Jospehson memory cell has been successfully fabricated and tested. The memory cell consists of two superconducting loops and a two-junction interferometer gate as a sense gate. The superconducting loop contains one Josephson junction and inductances, and stores single flux quantum. The memory cell employs vortex transitions in the superconducting loops for writing and reading data. The memory cell chips have been fabricated using niobium planarization process. The +-21 percent address signal current margin and the +-33 percent sense gate current margin have been obtained experimentally. The memory operation of the cell driven by the two-junction interferometer gates has been accurately demonstrated

  17. Time-Lapse Measurement of Wellbore Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguid, A.

    2017-12-01

    Well integrity is becoming more important as wells are used longer or repurposed. For CO2, shale gas, and other projects it has become apparent that wells represent the most likely unintended migration pathway for fluids out of the reservoir. Comprehensive logging programs have been employed to determine the condition of legacy wells in North America. These studies provide examples of assessment technologies. Logging programs have included pulsed neutron logging, ultrasonic well mapping, and cement bond logging. While these studies provide examples of what can be measured, they have only conducted a single round of logging and cannot show if the well has changed over time. Recent experience with time-lapse logging of three monitoring wells at a US Department of Energy sponsored CO2 project has shown the full value of similar tools. Time-lapse logging has shown that well integrity changes over time can be identified. It has also shown that the inclusion of and location of monitoring technologies in the well and the choice of construction materials must be carefully considered. Two of the wells were approximately eight years old at the time of study; they were constructed with steel and fiberglass casing sections and had lines on the outside of the casing running to the surface. The third well was 68 years old when it was studied and was originally constructed as a production well. Repeat logs were collected six or eight years after initial logging. Time-lapse logging showed the evolution of the wells. The results identified locations where cement degraded over time and locations that showed little change. The ultrasonic well maps show clearly that the lines used to connect the monitoring technology to the surface are visible and have a local effect on cement isolation. Testing and sampling was conducted along with logging. It provided insight into changes identified in the time-lapse log results. Point permeability testing was used to provide an in-situ point

  18. Transitions in the computational power of thermal states for measurement-based quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, Sean D.; Bartlett, Stephen D.; Jennings, David; Doherty, Andrew C.; Rudolph, Terry

    2009-01-01

    We show that the usefulness of the thermal state of a specific spin-lattice model for measurement-based quantum computing exhibits a transition between two distinct 'phases' - one in which every state is a universal resource for quantum computation, and another in which any local measurement sequence can be simulated efficiently on a classical computer. Remarkably, this transition in computational power does not coincide with any phase transition, classical, or quantum in the underlying spin-lattice model.

  19. CMS High Level Trigger Timing Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Clint

    2015-01-01

    The two-level trigger system employed by CMS consists of the Level 1 (L1) Trigger, which is implemented using custom-built electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a farm of commercial CPUs running a streamlined version of the offline CMS reconstruction software. The operational L1 output rate of 100 kHz, together with the number of CPUs in the HLT farm, imposes a fundamental constraint on the amount of time available for the HLT to process events. Exceeding this limit impacts the experiment's ability to collect data efficiently. Hence, there is a critical need to characterize the performance of the HLT farm as well as the algorithms run prior to start up in order to ensure optimal data taking. Additional complications arise from the fact that the HLT farm consists of multiple generations of hardware and there can be subtleties in machine performance. We present our methods of measuring the timing performance of the CMS HLT, including the challenges of making such measurements. Results for the performance of various Intel Xeon architectures from 2009-2014 and different data taking scenarios are also presented. (paper)

  20. Critical capacity, travel time delays and travel time distribution of rapid mass transit systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legara, Erika Fille; Monterola, Christopher; Lee, Kee Khoon; Hung, Gih Guang

    2014-07-01

    We set up a mechanistic agent-based model of a rapid mass transit system. Using empirical data from Singapore's unidentifiable smart fare card, we validate our model by reconstructing actual travel demand and duration of travel statistics. We subsequently use this model to investigate two phenomena that are known to significantly affect the dynamics within the RTS: (1) overloading in trains and (2) overcrowding in the RTS platform. We demonstrate that by varying the loading capacity of trains, a tipping point emerges at which an exponential increase in the duration of travel time delays is observed. We also probe the impact on the rail system dynamics of three types of passenger growth distribution across stations: (i) Dirac delta, (ii) uniform and (iii) geometric, which is reminiscent of the effect of land use on transport. Under the assumption of a fixed loading capacity, we demonstrate the dependence of a given origin-destination (OD) pair on the flow volume of commuters in station platforms.

  1. Sport Transition of JPSS VIIRS Imagery for Night-time Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuell, Kevin; LeRoy, Anita; Smith, Matt; Miller, Steve; Kann, Diedre; Bernhardt, David; Reydell, Nezette; Cox, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The NASA/Short-term Prediction, Research, and Transition (SPoRT) Program and NOAA/Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) work within the NOAA/Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Proving Ground to demonstrate the unique capabilities of the VIIRS instrument. Very similar to MODIS, the VIIRS instrument provides many high-resolution visible and infrared channels in a broad spectrum. In addition, VIIRS is equipped with a low-light sensor that is able to detect light emissions from the land and atmosphere as well as reflected sunlight by the lunar surface. This band is referred to as the Day-Night Band due to the sunlight being used at night to see cloud and topographic features just as one would typically see in day-time visible imagery. NWS forecast offices that collaborate with SPoRT and CIRA have utilized MODIS imagery in operations, but have longed for more frequent passes of polar-orbiting data. The VIIRS instrument enhances SPoRT collaborations with WFOs by providing another day and night-time pass, and at times two additional passes due to its large swath width. This means that multi-spectral, RGB imagery composites are more readily available to prepare users for their use in GOES-R era and high-resolution imagery for use in high-latitudes is more frequently able to supplement standard GOES imagery within the SPoRT Hybrid GEO-LEO product. The transition of VIIRS also introduces the new Day-Night Band capability to forecast operations. An Intensive Evaluation Period (IEP) was conducted in Summer 2013 with a group of "Front Range" NWS offices related to VIIRS night-time imagery. VIIRS single-channel imagery is able to better analyze the specific location of fire hotspots and other land features, as well as provide a more true measurement of various cloud and aerosol properties than geostationary measurements, especially at night. Viewed within the SPoRT Hybrid imagery, the VIIRS data allows forecasters to better interpret the more frequent, but

  2. Ellipsometry measurements of glass transition breadth in bulk films of random, block, and gradient copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, M M; Kim, J; Marrou, S R; Torkelson, J M

    2010-03-01

    Bulk films of random, block and gradient copolymer systems were studied using ellipsometry to demonstrate the applicability of the numerical differentiation technique pioneered by Kawana and Jones for studying the glass transition temperature (T (g)) behavior and thermal expansivities of copolymers possessing different architectures and different levels of nanoheterogeneity. In a series of styrene/n -butyl methacrylate (S/nBMA) random copolymers, T (g) breadths were observed to increase from approximately 17( degrees ) C in styrene-rich cases to almost 30( degrees ) C in nBMA-rich cases, reflecting previous observations of significant nanoheterogeneity in PnBMA homopolymers. The derivative technique also revealed for the first time a substantial increase in glassy-state expansivity with increasing nBMA content in S/nBMA random copolymers, from 1.4x10(-4) K-1 in PS to 3.5x10(-4) K-1 in PnBMA. The first characterization of block copolymer T (g) 's and T (g) breadths by ellipsometry is given, examining the impact of nanophase-segregated copolymer structure on ellipsometric measurements of glass transition. The results show that, while the technique is effective in detecting the two T (g) 's expected in certain block copolymer systems, the details of the glass transition can become suppressed in ellipsometry measurements of a rubbery minor phase under conditions where the matrix is glassy; meanwhile, both transitions are easily discernible by differential scanning calorimetry. Finally, broad glass transition regions were measured in gradient copolymers, yielding in some cases extraordinary T (g) breadths of 69- 71( degrees ) C , factors of 4-5 larger than the T (g) breadths of related homopolymers and random copolymers. Surprisingly, one gradient copolymer demonstrated a slightly narrower T (g) breadth than the S/nBMA random copolymers with the highest nBMA content. This highlights the fact that nanoheterogeneity relevant to the glass transition response in selected

  3. First-time viewers' comprehension of films: bridging shot transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ildirar, Sermin; Schwan, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    Which perceptual and cognitive prerequisites must be met in order to be able to comprehend a film is still unresolved and a controversial issue. In order to gain some insights into this issue, our field experiment investigates how first-time adult viewers extract and integrate meaningful information across film cuts. Three major types of commonalities between adjacent shots were differentiated, which may help first-time viewers with bridging the shots: pictorial, causal, and conceptual. Twenty first-time, 20 low-experienced and 20 high-experienced viewers from Turkey were shown a set of short film clips containing these three kinds of commonalities. Film clips conformed also to the principles of continuity editing. Analyses of viewers' spontaneous interpretations show that first-time viewers indeed are able to notice basic pictorial (object identity), causal (chains of activity), as well as conceptual (links between gaze direction and object attention) commonalities between shots due to their close relationship with everyday perception and cognition. However, first-time viewers' comprehension of the commonalities is to a large degree fragile, indicating the lack of a basic notion of what constitutes a film. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  4. Takeover Time in Highly Automated Vehicles: Noncritical Transitions to and From Manual Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Alexander; Stanton, Neville A

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to review existing research into driver control transitions and to determine the time it takes drivers to resume control from a highly automated vehicle in noncritical scenarios. Contemporary research has moved from an inclusive design approach to adhering only to mean/median values when designing control transitions in automated driving. Research into control transitions in highly automated driving has focused on urgent scenarios where drivers are given a relatively short time span to respond to a request to resume manual control. We found a paucity in research into more frequent scenarios for control transitions, such as planned exits from highway systems. Twenty-six drivers drove two scenarios with an automated driving feature activated. Drivers were asked to read a newspaper, or to monitor the system, and to relinquish, or resume, control from the automation when prompted by vehicle systems. Significantly longer control transition times were found between driving with and without secondary tasks. Control transition times were substantially longer than those reported in the peer-reviewed literature. We found that drivers take longer to resume control when under no time pressure compared with that reported in the literature. Moreover, we found that drivers occupied by a secondary task exhibit larger variance and slower responses to requests to resume control. Workload scores implied optimal workload. Intra- and interindividual differences need to be accommodated by vehicle manufacturers and policy makers alike to ensure inclusive design of contemporary systems and safety during control transitions.

  5. Laminar microvascular transit time distribution in the mouse somatosensory cortex revealed by Dynamic Contrast Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Conrad W; Srinivasan, Vivek J

    2016-01-15

    The transit time distribution of blood through the cerebral microvasculature both constrains oxygen delivery and governs the kinetics of neuroimaging signals such as blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (BOLD fMRI). However, in spite of its importance, capillary transit time distribution has been challenging to quantify comprehensively and efficiently at the microscopic level. Here, we introduce a method, called Dynamic Contrast Optical Coherence Tomography (DyC-OCT), based on dynamic cross-sectional OCT imaging of an intravascular tracer as it passes through the field-of-view. Quantitative transit time metrics are derived from temporal analysis of the dynamic scattering signal, closely related to tracer concentration. Since DyC-OCT does not require calibration of the optical focus, quantitative accuracy is achieved even deep in highly scattering brain tissue where the focal spot degrades. After direct validation of DyC-OCT against dilution curves measured using a fluorescent plasma label in surface pial vessels, we used DyC-OCT to investigate the transit time distribution in microvasculature across the entire depth of the mouse somatosensory cortex. Laminar trends were identified, with earlier transit times and less heterogeneity in the middle cortical layers. The early transit times in the middle cortical layers may explain, at least in part, the early BOLD fMRI onset times observed in these layers. The layer-dependencies in heterogeneity may help explain how a single vascular supply manages to deliver oxygen to individual cortical layers with diverse metabolic needs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Noncontact sphygmomanometer based on pulse-wave transit time between the face and hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kazuya; Ohnishi, Takashi; Nishidate, Izumi; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2018-02-01

    Systolic blood pressure (SBP) is highly sensitive to various factors such as psychological stress, and hence its continuous monitoring is essential to evaluate different health conditions. However, conventional sphygmomanometers cannot continuously measure SBP given the time-consuming setup based on a pressure cuff. Moreover, continuous biological signal monitoring is more comfortable when no sensors are attached. A solution for continuous SBP estimation is based on pulse transit time (PTT), which determines the time difference between two pulse waves at different body parts. In previous studies, we successfully measured the PTT using a contactless setup composed by two digital color cameras recording the face and hand of subjects. Then, the acquired images were transformed into blood volume by combining multiple regression analysis and a Monte Carlo method. As a result, the delay among images allowed to determine the PPT from pulse waves. In this study, we simultaneously measured SBP and PTT by using a sphygmomanometer and the two cameras, respectively. We evaluated SBP increases (i.e., stressful situations) and the corresponding PPT by asking participants to either grasp a handgrip or momentarily interrupting breath. We also determined the SBP and PTT without asking for such exercises. Comparison results show that the mean PTT under stress was significantly lower than that without stress, which is consistent with an increased SBP. Finally, we related the SBP and PTT by a nonlinear formula with a coefficient of determination of 0.59, thus confirming the effectiveness of the proposed system.

  7. Out-of-equilibrium dynamics driven by localized time-dependent perturbations at quantum phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelissetto, Andrea; Rossini, Davide; Vicari, Ettore

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the quantum dynamics of many-body systems subject to local (i.e., restricted to a limited space region) time-dependent perturbations. If the system crosses a quantum phase transition, an off-equilibrium behavior is observed, even for a very slow driving. We show that, close to the transition, time-dependent quantities obey scaling laws. In first-order transitions, the scaling behavior is universal, and some scaling functions can be computed exactly. For continuous transitions, the scaling laws are controlled by the standard critical exponents and by the renormalization-group dimension of the perturbation at the transition. Our protocol can be implemented in existing relatively small quantum simulators, paving the way for a quantitative probe of the universal off-equilibrium scaling behavior, without the need to manipulate systems close to the thermodynamic limit.

  8. Dual-Priced Modal Transition Systems with Time Durations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beneš, Nikola; Kretínsky, Jan; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2012-01-01

    intervals. We further equip the model with two kinds of quantitative aspects: each action has its own running cost per time unit, and actions may require several hardware components of different costs. We ask the question, given a fixed budget for the hardware components, what is the implementation...

  9. Neutral Pion Transition Form Factor Measurement and Run Control at the NA62 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082375; Goudzovski, Evgueni

    The measurement of the 0 electromagnetic transition form factor (TFF) slope a is performed in the time-like region of momentum transfer using a sample of 1.1 $10^6$ $\\pi^0 \\to e^+ e^- \\gamma$ Dalitz decays collected at the NA62-RK experiment in 2007. The event selection, the fit procedure and the study of the systematic ffects are presented. The final result obtained $a = (3.68 \\pm 0.51stat \\pm 0.25syst) \\times 10^{-2} $ is the most precise to date and represents the first evidence of a non-zero $\\pi^0$ TFF slope with more than 3 $\\sigma$ significance. The NA62 experiment based at the CERN SPS is currently taking data and aims at measuring the branching fraction of the $K \\to \\pi \

  10. Frequency ratio of two optical clock transitions in 171Yb+ and constraints on the time variation of fundamental constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godun, R M; Nisbet-Jones, P B R; Jones, J M; King, S A; Johnson, L A M; Margolis, H S; Szymaniec, K; Lea, S N; Bongs, K; Gill, P

    2014-11-21

    Singly ionized ytterbium, with ultranarrow optical clock transitions at 467 and 436 nm, is a convenient system for the realization of optical atomic clocks and tests of present-day variation of fundamental constants. We present the first direct measurement of the frequency ratio of these two clock transitions, without reference to a cesium primary standard, and using the same single ion of 171Yb+. The absolute frequencies of both transitions are also presented, each with a relative standard uncertainty of 6×10(-16). Combining our results with those from other experiments, we report a threefold improvement in the constraint on the time variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio, μ/μ=0.2(1.1)×10(-16)  yr(-1), along with an improved constraint on time variation of the fine structure constant, α/α=-0.7(2.1)×10(-17)  yr(-1).

  11. Calculation model for 16N transit time in the secondary side of steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Songyu; Xu Jijun; Xu Ming

    1998-01-01

    The 16 N transit time is essential to determine the leak-rate of steam generator tubes leaks with 16 N monitoring system, which is a new technique. A model was developed for calculation 16 N transit time in the secondary side of steam generators. According to the flow characters of secondary side fluid, the transit times divide into four sectors from tube sheet to the sensor on steam line. The model assumes that 16 N is moving as vapor phase in the secondary-side. So the model for vapor velocity distribution in tube bundle is presented in detail. The 16 N transit time calculation results of this model compare with these of EDF on steam generator of Qinshan NPP

  12. The transition time induced narrow linewidth of the electromagnetically induced transparency in caesium vapour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Luming; Peng Xiang; Liu Cheng; Guo Hong; Chen Xuzong

    2004-01-01

    We observed a narrow linewidth (∼60 kHz) in a Doppler-broadened system showing electromagnetically induced transparency in caesium atomic vapour. The transition time induced reduction of the linewidth is illustrated both theoretically and experimentally

  13. Dating of streamwater using tritium in a post nuclear bomb pulse world: continuous variation of mean transit time with streamflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Morgenstern

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Tritium measurements of streamwater draining the Toenepi catchment, a small dairy farming area in Waikato, New Zealand, have shown that the mean transit time of the water varies with the flow rate of the stream. Mean transit times through the catchment are 2–5 years during high baseflow conditions in winter, increasing to 30–40 years as baseflow decreases in summer, and then dramatically older water during drought conditions with mean transit time of more than 100 years. Older water is gained in the lower reaches of the stream, compared to younger water in the headwater catchment. The groundwater store supplying baseflow was estimated from the mean transit time and average baseflow to be 15.4 × 106 m3 of water, about 1 m water equivalent over the catchment and 2.3 times total annual streamflow. Nitrate is relatively high at higher flow rates in winter, but is low at times of low flow with old water. This reflects both lower nitrate loading in the catchment several decades ago as compared to current intensive dairy farming, and denitrification processes occurring in the older groundwater. Silica, leached from the aquifer material and accumulating in the water in proportion to contact time, is high at times of low streamflow with old water. There was a good correlation between silica concentration and streamwater age, which potentially allows silica concentrations to be used as a proxy for age when calibrated by tritium measurements. This study shows that tritium dating of stream water is possible with single tritium measurements now that bomb-test tritium has effectively disappeared from hydrological systems in New Zealand, without the need for time-series data.

  14. Estimating subsurface water volumes and transit times in Hokkaido river catchments, Japan, using high-accuracy tritium analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusyev, Maksym; Yamazaki, Yusuke; Morgenstern, Uwe; Stewart, Mike; Kashiwaya, Kazuhisa; Hirai, Yasuyuki; Kuribayashi, Daisuke; Sawano, Hisaya

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this study is to estimate subsurface water transit times and volumes in headwater catchments of Hokkaido, Japan, using the New Zealand high-accuracy tritium analysis technique. Transit time provides insights into the subsurface water storage and therefore provides a robust and quick approach to quantifying the subsurface groundwater volume. Our method is based on tritium measurements in river water. Tritium is a component of meteoric water, decays with a half-life of 12.32 years, and is inert in the subsurface after the water enters the groundwater system. Therefore, tritium is ideally suited for characterization of the catchment's responses and can provide information on mean water transit times up to 200 years. Only in recent years has it become possible to use tritium for dating of stream and river water, due to the fading impact of the bomb-tritium from thermo-nuclear weapons testing, and due to improved measurement accuracy for the extremely low natural tritium concentrations. Transit time of the water discharge is one of the most crucial parameters for understanding the response of catchments and estimating subsurface water volume. While many tritium transit time studies have been conducted in New Zealand, only a limited number of tritium studies have been conducted in Japan. In addition, the meteorological, orographic and geological conditions of Hokkaido Island are similar to those in parts of New Zealand, allowing for comparison between these regions. In 2014, three field trips were conducted in Hokkaido in June, July and October to sample river water at river gauging stations operated by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT). These stations have altitudes between 36 m and 860 m MSL and drainage areas between 45 and 377 km2. Each sampled point is located upstream of MLIT dams, with hourly measurements of precipitation and river water levels enabling us to distinguish between the snow melt and baseflow contributions

  15. Physiologic Measures of Animal Stress during Transitional States of Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Meyer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the humaneness of methods used to produce unconsciousness in animals, whether for anesthesia, euthanasia, humane slaughter, or depopulation, relies on our ability to assess stress, pain, and consciousness within the contexts of method and application. Determining the subjective experience of animals during transitional states of consciousness, however, can be quite difficult; further, loss of consciousness with different agents or methods may occur at substantially different rates. Stress and distress may manifest behaviorally (e.g., overt escape behaviors, approach-avoidance preferences [aversion] or physiologically (e.g., movement, vocalization, changes in electroencephalographic activity, heart rate, sympathetic nervous system [SNS] activity, hypothalamic-pituitary axis [HPA] activity, such that a one-size-fits-all approach cannot be easily applied to evaluate methods or determine specific species applications. The purpose of this review is to discuss methods of evaluating stress in animals using physiologic methods, with emphasis on the transition between the conscious and unconscious states.

  16. Using Dielectric Relaxation Spectroscopy to Characterize the Glass Transition Time of Polydextrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Martin G; Kindle, Michael L; Carter, Brady P

    2015-06-01

    Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy was used to characterize the glass transition time, tg , of polydextrose, where the glass transition temperature, Tg , and water activity, aw (relative humidity), were held constant during polydextrose relaxation. The tg was determined from a shift in the peak frequency of the imaginary capacitance spectrum with time. It was found that when the peak frequency reaches 30 mHz, polydextrose undergoes glass transition. Glass transition time, tg , is the time for polydextrose to undergo glass transition at a specific Tg and aw . Results lead to a modified state diagram, where Tg is depressed with increasing aw . This curve forms a boundary: (a) below the boundary, polydextrose does not undergo glass transition and (b) above the boundary, polydextrose rapidly undergoes glass transition. As the boundary curve is specified by a tg value, it can assist in the selection of storage conditions. An important point on the boundary curve is at aw = 0, where Tg0 = 115 °C. The methodology can also be used to calculate the stress-relaxation viscosity of polydextrose as a function of Tg and aw , which is important when characterizing the flow properties of polydextrose initially in powder form. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. TransitVision: Approximating Vehicle Locations Using SIRI-SM Real-Time Data

    OpenAIRE

    Nakken, Ole Kristian; Bakke, Sofia Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    Many public transportation agencies around the world track their vehicles using GPS. However, the GPS data is usually not directly accessible by passengers, but is used to provide real-time arrival estimates. This thesis attempts to approximate the locations of vehicles using the available real-time arrival estimates, through a smartphone application named TransitVision. By utilizing the SIRI standard(www.siri.org.uk), TransitVision is interoperable with other public transportation agencies. ...

  18. Effect of realistic and filtered stellar photometric noise on the detection of moons using photometric transit timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis K.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The photometric transit timing technique was proposed by Szabó et al. (2006 as a method for discovering moons of transiting extrasolar planets. In the preliminary analysis of this technique, it was assumed that the noise in the transit lightcurve was well described by uncorrelated white noise. However, this assumption is not necessarily realistic. To determine the effect of using more realistic lightcurves, transit timing uncertainties are calculated for the case of white noise, measured solar photometric noise and measured solar photometric noise that has been filtered. It is found that for light curves contaminated with realistic photometric noise, the transit timing uncertainties are dramatically increased (and thus moon detection reduced. In addition, we find that while filtering reduced this problem, it did not negate it.

  19. Scintigraphic Small Intestinal Transit Time and Defaecography in Patients with J-Pouch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mie Dilling Kjaer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective methods for examination of pouch function are warranted for a better understanding of the functional result and treatment of dysfunction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of scintigraphic intestinal transit time and defaecography compared to the results of pouch function, mucosal condition and a questionnaire on quality of life (QoL. This cross-sectional study included 21 patients. Scintigraphic transit time and defaecography was determined with the use of Tc-99m. Pouch function was assessed by number of bowel movements, pouch volume, and continence. Pouch mucosal condition was evaluated by endoscopy and histology. Median transit time was 189 min (105–365. Median ejection fraction at defaecography (EF was 49% (3–77 and 62% (17–98 after first and second defecation. Median pouch volume was 223 mL (100–360. A median daily stool frequency of nine (4–25 was reported and three (14% patients suffered from daytime incontinence. No patients had symptomatic or endoscopic pouchitis; however, the histology showed unspecific inflammation in 19 (90% patients. There was no correlation between transit time, evacuation fraction (EF and pouch function in univariate analysis. However, we found a high body mass index (BMI and a low bowel movement frequency to be associated with a longer transit time by multivariate analysis. Scintigraphic determination of transit time and defaecography are feasible methods in patients with ileal pouch anal anastomosis, but the clinical relevance is yet doubtful.

  20. Assessment of bolus transit with intraluminal impedance measurement in patients with esophageal motility disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogte, A; Bredenoord, A J; Oors, J; Siersema, P D; Smout, A J P M

    2015-10-01

    The clinical management of patients with non-obstructive dysphagia is notoriously difficult. Esophageal impedance measurement can be used to measure esophageal bolus transit without the use of radiation exposure to patients. However, validation of measurement of bolus transit with impedance monitoring has only been performed in healthy subjects with normal motility and not in patients with dysphagia and esophageal motility disorders. The aim was, therefore, to investigate the relationship between transit of swallowed liquid boluses in healthy controls and in patients with dysphagia. Twenty healthy volunteers and 20 patients with dysphagia underwent concurrent impedance measurement and videofluoroscopy. Each subject swallowed five liquid barium boluses. The ability of detecting complete or incomplete bolus transit by means of impedance measurement was assessed, using radiographic bolus transit as the gold standard. Impedance monitoring recognized stasis and transit in 80.5% of the events correctly, with 83.9% of bolus transit being recognized and 77.2% of stasis being recognized correctly. In controls 79.8% of all swallows were scored correctly, whereas in patients 81.3% of all swallows were scored correctly. Depending on the contractility pattern, between 77.0% and 94.3% of the swallows were scored correctly. Impedance measurement can be used to assess bolus clearance patterns in healthy subjects, but can also be used to reliably assess bolus transit in patients with dysphagia and motility disorders. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. On the use of spring baseflow recession for a more accurate parameterization of aquifer transit time distribution functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Farlin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Baseflow recession analysis and groundwater dating have up to now developed as two distinct branches of hydrogeology and have been used to solve entirely different problems. We show that by combining two classical models, namely the Boussinesq equation describing spring baseflow recession, and the exponential piston-flow model used in groundwater dating studies, the parameters describing the transit time distribution of an aquifer can be in some cases estimated to a far more accurate degree than with the latter alone. Under the assumption that the aquifer basis is sub-horizontal, the mean transit time of water in the saturated zone can be estimated from spring baseflow recession. This provides an independent estimate of groundwater transit time that can refine those obtained from tritium measurements. The approach is illustrated in a case study predicting atrazine concentration trend in a series of springs draining the fractured-rock aquifer known as the Luxembourg Sandstone. A transport model calibrated on tritium measurements alone predicted different times to trend reversal following the nationwide ban on atrazine in 2005 with different rates of decrease. For some of the springs, the actual time of trend reversal and the rate of change agreed extremely well with the model calibrated using both tritium measurements and the recession of spring discharge during the dry season. The agreement between predicted and observed values was however poorer for the springs displaying the most gentle recessions, possibly indicating a stronger influence of continuous groundwater recharge during the summer months.

  2. The effect of conjunctions on the transit timing variations of exoplanets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nesvorný, David [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Vokrouhlický, David, E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.edu, E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, CZ-18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2014-07-20

    We develop an analytic model for transit timing variations produced by orbital conjunctions between gravitationally interacting planets. If the planetary orbits have tight orbital spacing, which is a common case among the Kepler planets, the effect of a single conjunction can be best described as: (1) a step-like change of the transit timing ephemeris with subsequent transits of the inner planet being delayed and those of the outer planet being sped up, and (2) a discrete change in sampling of the underlying oscillations from eccentricity-related interaction terms. In the limit of small orbital eccentricities, our analytic model gives explicit equations for these effects as a function of the mass and orbital separation of planets. We point out that a detection of the conjunction effect in real data is of crucial importance for the physical characterization of planetary systems from transit timing variations.

  3. The role of nuclear energy in times of energy transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Since the reactor catastrophe in Fukushima, the risk of nuclear power has once again become more evident to the public and has also led to a rethinking of politics in Europe. Slogans like ''Nuclear Power, No Thanks!'', ''Get Out of Euratom'' are making more and more the rounds. The phase-out of nuclear energy is the topic that is increasingly provoking people to think. But how should one handle this? What role will nuclear energy play in a distant future? Central factors such as the economic viability of renewable energy sources and the environmental and social compatibility of production and distribution must be taken into account, while at the same time the reduction of pollutants and greenhouse gases must continue. If this is done without nuclear energy, is the rapid abandonment of nuclear energy even necessary or does nuclear energy generation have to be used as a temporary solution? (roessner)

  4. Education and fertility decline in China during transitional times: A cohort approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Martin; Tong, Yuying

    2016-01-01

    We examine the effect of education on birth outcomes in China during the period of economic transition and large-scale changes in mass education and population control measures. Retrospective micro data from the 2008 Chinese General Social Survey and discrete time event history analysis are used to examine the fertility history of several cohorts of women born between 1945 and 1968. We observed births at different parities, distinguishing the education effect across cohorts and rural/urban sectors. We found differences across cohorts consistent with unique features of the Chinese context, such as the radical egalitarian era of educational expansion, and the Reform Era. We also found that despite the increase in some education levels across cohorts (e.g., junior high school in rural areas), birth chances were more likely to be concentrated among less educated women, suggesting the impact of factors related to returns to education and hence the desire for children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Further time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source Accelerator Systems Div.; Wilke, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-12-31

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatialposition and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kick effects are reported as a function of charge.

  6. Further time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source Accelerator Systems Div.); Wilke, M.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 [mu]s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatialposition and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kick effects are reported as a function of charge.

  7. Time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Wilke, M.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatial position and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kicks are reported as a function of charge.

  8. Time-resolved electron-beam characterizations with optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wilke, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-09-01

    Time-resolved characterizations of electron beams using optical transition radiation (OTR) as a prompt conversion mechanism have recently been extended on the Los Alamos Free-electron Laser (FEL) facility 40-MeV linac. Two key timescales for rf-linac driven FELs are the micropulse (10 ps) and the macropulse (5 {mu}s to 1 ms). In the past we have used gated, intensified cameras to select a single or few micropulses (25 to 400 ns gate width) out of the pulse train to evaluate submacropulse effects. Recently, we have obtained some of the first measurements of micropulse bunch length (7 to 10 ps) and submacropulse spatial position and profile using OTR and a Hamamatsu streak camera. Additionally, micropulse elongation effects and head-to-tail transverse kicks are reported as a function of charge.

  9. Assessing the controls and uncertainties on mean transit times in contrasting headwater catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Ian; Irvine, Dylan; Burton, Chad; Morgenstern, Uwe

    2018-02-01

    Estimating the time required for water to travel through headwater catchments from where it recharges to where it discharges into streams (the transit time) is important for understanding catchment behaviour. This study uses tritium (3H) activities of stream water to estimate the mean transit times of water in the upper Latrobe and Yarra catchments, southeast Australia, at different flow conditions. The 3H activities of the stream water were between 1.26 and 1.99 TU, which are lower than those of local rainfall (2.6 to 3.0 TU). 3H activities in individual subcatchments are almost invariably lowest at low streamflows. Mean transit times calculated from the 3H activities using a range of lumped parameter models are between 7 and 62 years and are longest during low streamflows. Uncertainties in the estimated mean transit times result from uncertainties in the geometry of the flow systems, uncertainties in the 3H input, and macroscopic mixing. In addition, simulation of 3H activities in FEFLOW indicates that heterogeneous hydraulic conductivities increase the range of mean transit times corresponding to a specific 3H activity. The absolute uncertainties in the mean transit times may be up to ±30 years. However, differences between mean transit times at different streamflows in the same catchment or between different subcatchments in the same area are more reliably estimated. Despite the uncertainties, the conclusions that the mean transit times are years to decades and decrease with increasing streamflow are robust. The seasonal variation in major ion geochemistry and 3H activities indicate that the higher general streamflows in winter are sustained by water displaced from shallower younger stores (e.g., soils or regolith). Poor correlations between 3H activities and catchment area, drainage density, mean slope, distance to stream, and landuse, imply that mean transit times are controlled by a variety of factors including the hydraulic properties of the soils and

  10. Daylight saving time transitions and hospital treatments due to accidents or manic episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahti, Tuuli A; Haukka, Jari; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Partonen, Timo

    2008-02-26

    Daylight saving time affects millions of people annually but its impacts are still widely unknown. Sleep deprivation and the change of circadian rhythm can trigger mental illness and cause higher accident rates. Transitions into and out of daylight saving time changes the circadian rhythm and may cause sleep deprivation. Thus it seems plausible that the prevalence of accidents and/or manic episodes may be higher after transition into and out of daylight saving time. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of transitions into and out of daylight saving time on the incidence of accidents and manic episodes in the Finnish population during the years of 1987 to 2003. The nationwide data were derived from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register. From the register we obtained the information about the hospital-treated accidents and manic episodes during two weeks before and two weeks after the transitions in 1987-2003. The results were negative, as the transitions into or out of daylight saving time had no significant effect on the incidence of accidents or manic episodes. One-hour transitions do not increase the incidence of manic episodes or accidents which require hospital treatment.

  11. Daylight saving time transitions and hospital treatments due to accidents or manic episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lönnqvist Jouko

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Daylight saving time affects millions of people annually but its impacts are still widely unknown. Sleep deprivation and the change of circadian rhythm can trigger mental illness and cause higher accident rates. Transitions into and out of daylight saving time changes the circadian rhythm and may cause sleep deprivation. Thus it seems plausible that the prevalence of accidents and/or manic episodes may be higher after transition into and out of daylight saving time. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of transitions into and out of daylight saving time on the incidence of accidents and manic episodes in the Finnish population during the years of 1987 to 2003. Methods The nationwide data were derived from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register. From the register we obtained the information about the hospital-treated accidents and manic episodes during two weeks before and two weeks after the transitions in 1987–2003. Results The results were negative, as the transitions into or out of daylight saving time had no significant effect on the incidence of accidents or manic episodes. Conclusion One-hour transitions do not increase the incidence of manic episodes or accidents which require hospital treatment.

  12. Daylight saving time transitions and hospital treatments due to accidents or manic episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahti, Tuuli A; Haukka, Jari; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Partonen, Timo

    2008-01-01

    Background Daylight saving time affects millions of people annually but its impacts are still widely unknown. Sleep deprivation and the change of circadian rhythm can trigger mental illness and cause higher accident rates. Transitions into and out of daylight saving time changes the circadian rhythm and may cause sleep deprivation. Thus it seems plausible that the prevalence of accidents and/or manic episodes may be higher after transition into and out of daylight saving time. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of transitions into and out of daylight saving time on the incidence of accidents and manic episodes in the Finnish population during the years of 1987 to 2003. Methods The nationwide data were derived from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register. From the register we obtained the information about the hospital-treated accidents and manic episodes during two weeks before and two weeks after the transitions in 1987–2003. Results The results were negative, as the transitions into or out of daylight saving time had no significant effect on the incidence of accidents or manic episodes. Conclusion One-hour transitions do not increase the incidence of manic episodes or accidents which require hospital treatment. PMID:18302734

  13. Gastrointestinal Transit Time, Glucose Homeostasis and Metabolic Health: Modulation by Dietary Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Mattea; Canfora, Emanuel E; Blaak, Ellen E

    2018-02-28

    Gastrointestinal transit time may be an important determinant of glucose homeostasis and metabolic health through effects on nutrient absorption and microbial composition, among other mechanisms. Modulation of gastrointestinal transit may be one of the mechanisms underlying the beneficial health effects of dietary fibers. These effects include improved glucose homeostasis and a reduced risk of developing metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this review, we first discuss the regulation of gastric emptying rate, small intestinal transit and colonic transit as well as their relation to glucose homeostasis and metabolic health. Subsequently, we briefly address the reported health effects of different dietary fibers and discuss to what extent the fiber-induced health benefits may be mediated through modulation of gastrointestinal transit.

  14. Critical Time Intervention for Homeless People Making the Transition to Community Living: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vet, R. de; Beijersbergen, M.D.; Jonker, I.E.; Lako, D.A.M.; Hemert, A.M. van; Herman, D.B.; Wolf, J.R.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    To help create an evidence base in Europe for effective interventions that improve the well-being of homeless people, we tested whether critical time intervention (CTI), a time-limited intervention developed to support vulnerable people during times of transition, is effective outside the United

  15. On the fast estimation of transit times application to BWR simulated data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonopoulos-Domis, M.; Marseguerra, M.; Padovani, E.

    1996-01-01

    Real time estimators of transit times are proposed. BWR noise is simulated including a global component due to rod vibration. The time obtained form the simulation is used to investigate the robustness and noise immunity of the estimators. It is found that, in presence of a coincident (global) signal, the cross-correlation function is the worst estimator. (authors)

  16. Ultra Fast Timing Measurements at $^{78}$Ni and $^{132}$Sn

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    We propose to measure level lifetimes in the exotic nuclei of $^{81}$Ga and $^{80}$Ga in the vicinity of $^{78}$Ni and of $^{135}$Sb and $^{134}$Sb above $^{132}$Sn by the time-delayed technique. These are relatively simple nuclear systems with a few particles and/or holes outside of the doubly-magic core thus can be treated rather precisely within the shell model. The anticipated new structure information on these nuclei, and in particular the lifetime results will put constraints on the model parameters and will serve to verify their predictions. The selected nuclei are some of the most exotic ones just above $^{78}$Ni or $^{132}$Sn, where the transition rates can be studied at present. Of the strongest interest is the nucleus of $^{81}$Ga, which has only 3 valence protons outside of $^{78}$Ni with the lowest proton orbits being $p_{3/2}$ and $f_{5/2}$. The Ml transition between these states, although allowed by the selection rules, should be $\\textit{l}$-forbidden thus very slow. This should give rise to a...

  17. TRANSIT

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. TRANSIT. SYSTEM: DETERMINE 2D-POSITION GLOBALLY BUT INTERMITTENT (POST-FACTO). IMPROVED ACCURACY. PRINCIPLE: POLAR SATELLITES WITH INNOVATIONS OF: GRAVITY-GRADIENT ATTITUDE CONTROL; DRAG COMPENSATION. WORKS ...

  18. Accident rates and the impact of daylight saving time transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, David; Barnes, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    One-third of nations have adopted some form of Daylight Saving Time (DST). Associated costs and benefits include impacts on accident rates. Using data from 12.6 million accident claims in New Zealand during 2005-2016, we model accident rates as a function of various date-based predictors including days before/after the start and end of DST, holidays, day of week, and month of year. This is the first study to consider multiple accident categories (Road, Work, Falls and Home & Community), and the first in the southern hemisphere. The start of DST is associated with significantly higher rates of road accidents (first day +16% and second day +12%). Evidence that accident rates for Falls and Home & Community decline (increase) prior to the start (end) of DST suggest potential behavioural adaption from anticipating the change. While Work accidents show limited impact from DST changes, they exhibit a significant decline over the course of the week (Friday 13% lower than Monday), whereas Road accidents exhibit a significant increase (Friday 19% higher than Monday). Our results have implications for both DST implementation and policy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Channel noise-induced temporal coherence transitions and synchronization transitions in adaptive neuronal networks with time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yubing; Xie, Huijuan

    2017-09-01

    Using spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), we study the effect of channel noise on temporal coherence and synchronization of adaptive scale-free Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks with time delay. It is found that the spiking regularity and spatial synchronization of the neurons intermittently increase and decrease as channel noise intensity is varied, exhibiting transitions of temporal coherence and synchronization. Moreover, this phenomenon depends on time delay, STDP, and network average degree. As time delay increases, the phenomenon is weakened, however, there are optimal STDP and network average degree by which the phenomenon becomes strongest. These results show that channel noise can intermittently enhance the temporal coherence and synchronization of the delayed adaptive neuronal networks. These findings provide a new insight into channel noise for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  20. On entropy change measurements around first order phase transitions in caloric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Luana; Ba Doan, Nguyen; Ranno, Laurent

    2017-02-22

    In this work we discuss the measurement protocols for indirect determination of the isothermal entropy change associated with first order phase transitions in caloric materials. The magneto-structural phase transitions giving rise to giant magnetocaloric effects in Cu-doped MnAs and FeRh are used as case studies to exemplify how badly designed protocols may affect isothermal measurements and lead to incorrect entropy change estimations. Isothermal measurement protocols which allow correct assessment of the entropy change around first order phase transitions in both direct and inverse cases are presented.

  1. Validity and reliability of the Palliative Care Transition Measure for Caregivers (PCTM-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Daniela; Mastroianni, Chiara; Artico, Marco; Biagioli, Valentina; Latina, Roberto; Guarda, Michela; Piredda, Michela; De Marinis, Maria Grazia

    2018-01-21

    Patients suffering from advanced disease face different care transitions. The transition from acute to palliative care is challenging and may lead to the discontinuity of care. Family caregivers become important sources of information, as patients begin to experience difficulties in coping with emotional transition events. The Care Transition Measure was developed to evaluate care transitions as experienced by the elderly. It has never been used in palliative care. The aim of this study was to test the validity and reliability of a modified version of the Palliative Care Transition Measure, specifically the Palliative Care Transition Measure for Caregivers (PCTM-C). The study included two main phases. Phase I focused on the construction of a modified version of the Palliative Care Transition Measure through two focus groups and by computing the content validity index. Phase II focused on testing the psychometric properties of the PCTM-C on 272 family caregivers through confirmatory factor analysis. Result The content validity index for each of the items was higher than 0.80, whereas that for the scale was 0.95. The model tested with confirmatory factor analysis fitted the data well and confirmed that the transition measures referred to communication, integrated care and a trusting-relationship, and therefore the core dimensions of continuity according to existing conceptual models. The internal consistency was high (Cronbach's alpha = 0.94). Significance of results The PCTM-C proved to be a suitable measure of the quality of such transitions. It may be used in clinical practice as a continuity quality indicator and has the potential to guide interventions to enhance family caregivers' experience of care continuity.

  2. Using Forbush Decreases to Derive the Transit Time of ICMEs Propagating from 1 AU to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiherr von Forstner, Johan L.; Guo, Jingnan; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; Hassler, Donald M.; Temmer, Manuela; Dumbović, Mateja; Jian, Lan K.; Appel, Jan K.; Čalogović, Jaša.; Ehresmann, Bent; Heber, Bernd; Lohf, Henning; Posner, Arik; Steigies, Christian T.; Vršnak, Bojan; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2018-01-01

    The propagation of 15 interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) from Earth's orbit (1 AU) to Mars (˜1.5 AU) has been studied with their propagation speed estimated from both measurements and simulations. The enhancement of magnetic fields related to ICMEs and their shock fronts causes the so-called Forbush decrease, which can be detected as a reduction of galactic cosmic rays measured on ground. We have used galactic cosmic ray (GCR) data from in situ measurements at Earth, from both STEREO A and STEREO B as well as GCR measurements by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) instrument on board Mars Science Laboratory on the surface of Mars. A set of ICME events has been selected during the periods when Earth (or STEREO A or STEREO B) and Mars locations were nearly aligned on the same side of the Sun in the ecliptic plane (so-called opposition phase). Such lineups allow us to estimate the ICMEs' transit times between 1 and 1.5 AU by estimating the delay time of the corresponding Forbush decreases measured at each location. We investigate the evolution of their propagation speeds before and after passing Earth's orbit and find that the deceleration of ICMEs due to their interaction with the ambient solar wind may continue beyond 1 AU. We also find a substantial variance of the speed evolution among different events revealing the dynamic and diverse nature of eruptive solar events. Furthermore, the results are compared to simulation data obtained from two CME propagation models, namely the Drag-Based Model and ENLIL plus cone model.

  3. Thermophysical Property Measurements of Silicon-Transition Metal Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banish, R. Michael; Erwin, William R.; Sansoucie, Michael P.; Lee, Jonghyun; Gave, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Metals and metallic alloys often have high melting temperatures and highly reactive liquids. Processing reactive liquids in containers can result in significant contamination and limited undercooling. This is particularly true for molten silicon and it alloys. Silicon is commonly termed "the universal solvent". The viscosity, surface tension, and density of several silicon-transition metal alloys were determined using the Electrostatic Levitator system at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The temperature dependence of the viscosity followed an Arrhenius dependence, and the surface tension followed a linear temperature dependence. The density of the melts, including the undercooled region, showed a linear behavior as well. Viscosity and surface tension values were obtain for several of the alloys in the undercooled region.

  4. Usage of the micropixel detector TimePix for observation of the dynamics of phase transitions in metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Pugach

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The results for the test of a TimePix hybrid detector as a tool for measuring and imaging in real time dynamics of phase transitions in metal alloys under heating or cooling are presented. The X-rays ( ~ 10 keV experimental setup explored for the diffraction studies at the Institute for Problems of Material Science NASU (Kyiv is briefly described. An evolution of the diffraction maxima position (~ 20 μm accuracy of the scattered X-rays was ob-served with exposures from a few dozen to a few hundred milliseconds under heating or cooling of the samples of Armco iron at a rate of 100 to 250 C/s. Data for the phase transitions (alpha-, gamma-phases observed during heating/cooling (20 - 1250 °C using the X-ray diffraction were measured.

  5. Total and segmental colonic transit time in constipated patients with Chagas’ disease without megaesophagus or megacolon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Santos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Manometric and pharmacological tests have shown that motor abnormalities may occur in the non-dilated colons of chagasic patients. In order to investigate the presence of abnormalities of colonic function in constipated patients with Chagas’ disease (ChC without megaesophagus or megacolon, studies of total and segmental colonic transit time with radiopaque markers were performed on 15 ChC patients, 27 healthy volunteers and 17 patients with idiopathic constipation (IC. The values obtained for the control group were similar to those reported in the literature (total colonic time: 34.1 ± 15.6 h; right colon: 9.9 ± 7.3 h; left colon: 10.8 ± 10 h, and rectosigmoid: 12.6 ± 9.9 h. Colonic transit time data permitted us to divide both IC and ChC patients into groups with normal transit and those with slow colonic transit. Colonic inertia was detected in 41% of IC patients and in 13% of ChC patients; left colon isolated stasis (hindgut dysfunction was detected in 12% of IC patients and 7% of ChC patients, and outlet obstruction was detected in 6% of IC patients and 7% of ChC patients. There were no significant differences in total or segmental colonic transit times between slow transit IC and slow transit ChC patients. In conclusion, an impairment of colonic motility was detected in about 30% of constipated patients with Chagas’ disease without megaesophagus or megacolon. This subgroup of patients presented no distinctive clinical feature or pattern of colonic dysmotility when compared to patients with slow transit idiopathic constipation.

  6. Change in mean transit time, apparent diffusion coefficient, and cerebral blood volume during pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilala, Monica S; Marro, Ken I; Richards, Todd L; Roberts, Joan S; Curry, Parichat; Pihoker, Catherine; Bradford, Heidi; Shaw, Dennis

    2011-11-01

    Cerebral edema is a devastating complication of pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis. We examined measures describing potential causes of whole brain and regional brain edema (mean transit time, apparent diffusion coefficient, and relative cerebral blood volume) during treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis in children. Prospective observational study. Regional children's hospital. None. After Institutional Review Board approval, children admitted with diabetic ketoacidosis (pH 300 mg/dL, and ketosis) underwent two serial paired contrast-enhanced (gadolinium) and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging scans. Change in whole brain and regional (frontal lobe, occipital lobe, and basal ganglia) mean transit time, apparent diffusion coefficient, and relative cerebral blood volume between the two time periods (12-24 hrs) and (36-72 hrs) after start of insulin treatment (time 0) were determined. Thirteen children (median age, 10.3 ± 1.1 yrs; 7 female) with diabetic ketoacidosis were examined. Overall, whole brain and regional mean transit time decreased from time 1 (first magnetic resonance imaging after time 0) to time 2 (second magnetic resonance imaging after time 0) by 51% ± 59% (p = .01), without differences between the brain regions examined. Whole brain apparent diffusion coefficient increased by 4.7% ± 3.4% (p = .001), without differences between the brain regions examined. There was no change in relative cerebral blood volume for the whole brain and for the three brain regions examined. In this study, whole brain mean transit time decreased and apparent diffusion coefficient increased, suggesting a vasogenic process between the two study periods during diabetic ketoacidosis treatment.

  7. Determination of Gastrointestinal Transit Times in Barred Owls ( Strix varia ) by Contrast Fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Grayson A; Williams, Jackie M; Mans, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Contrast imaging studies are routinely performed in avian patients when an underlying abnormality of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is suspected. Fluoroscopy offers several advantages over traditional radiography and can be performed in conscious animals with minimal stress and restraint. Although birds of prey are commonly encountered as patients, little is known about GI transit times and contrast imaging studies in these species, especially owls. Owls are commonly encountered in zoological, educational, and wildlife settings. In this study, 12 adult barred owls ( Strix varia ) were gavage fed a 30% weight-by-volume barium suspension (25 mL/kg body weight). Fluoroscopic exposures were recorded at 5, 15, 30, 60, 120, 180, 240, and 300 minutes after administration. Overall GI transit time and transit times of various GI organs were recorded. Median (interquartile range [IQR]) overall GI transit time was 60 minutes (IQR: 19-60 minutes) and ranged from 5-120 minutes. Ventricular and small intestinal contrast filling was rapid. Ventricular emptying was complete by a median of 60 minutes (IQR: 30-120 minutes; range: 30-240 minutes), whereas small intestinal emptying was not complete in 9/12 birds by 300 minutes. Median small intestinal contraction rate was 15 per minute (IQR: 13-16 minutes; range: 10-19 minutes). Median overall GI transit time in barred owls is more rapid than mean transit times reported for psittacine birds and red-tailed hawks ( Buteo jamaicensis ). Fluoroscopy is a safe, suitable method for investigating GI motility and transit in this species.

  8. The determination of allowed outage time using the evaluation of transition risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, D. I.; Kim, K. Y.; Jang, S. C.

    2001-03-01

    he objectives of this study are to propose a new evaluation method for transition risk and to determine the AOT using the new method. We review and compare the evaluation methods of transition risk which was previously studied. We also identify important assumptions used in previous studies for the evaluation of transition risk. We select general items required for the development of evaluation method for the transition risk. Based on the items selected, we propose a new evaluation method for transition risk. The new evaluation method for the transition risk is based on following assumptions; 1)For the same time span, the risk occurred from the failure to the completion of component repair during power operation is the same as the total risk including the risk occurred from power operation to specific shutdown/low power operation and the risk from specific shutdown/low power operation to power operation. 2)Shutdown operation and the repair of components are initiated just after the identification of the failure of components. The evaluation of the transition risk is performed to incorporate the characteristics of shutdown operation into Ulchin Units 3 and 4 Level 1 internal PSA for power operation. The application results of the new method to the HPSIS and the LPSIS for Ulchin Units 3 and 4 show that the AOT of HPSIS is properly determined and the AOT of LPSIS can be greatly increased. In this study, the main factors affecting the determination of AOT using the evaluation for transition risk are identified as the time of shutdown operation, the consideration of the change on common cause failure probability, and the risk of shutdown operation. It is expected that the evaluation method for the transition risk proposed in this study will be used for the determination of AOT and for the decision, in the case of the components unavailable, whether power operation is continuously performed or shutdown operation is initiated

  9. Systolic Time Intervals and New Measurement Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakolian, Kouhyar

    2016-06-01

    Systolic time intervals have been used to detect and quantify the directional changes of left ventricular function. New methods of recording these cardiac timings, which are less cumbersome, have been recently developed and this has created a renewed interest and novel applications for these cardiac timings. This manuscript reviews these new methods and addresses the potential for the application of these cardiac timings for the diagnosis and prognosis of different cardiac diseases.

  10. Reactive scattering theory for molecular transitions in time-dependent fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peskin, U.; Miller, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    A new approach is introduced for computing probabilities of molecular transitions in time-dependent fields. The method is based on the stationary (t,t') representation of the Schroedinger equation and is shown to be equivalent to infinite order time-dependent perturbation theory. Bound-to-bound (i.e., photoexcitation) and bound-to-continuum (i.e., photoreaction) transitions are regarded as reactive collisions with the ''time coordinate'' as the reaction coordinate in an extended Hilbert space. A numerical method based on imposing absorbing boundary conditions for the time coordinate in a discrete variable representation framework is introduced. A single operation of the Green's operator provides all the state-specific transition probabilities as well as partial state-resolved (inclusive) reaction probabilities. Illustrative numerical applications are given for model systems

  11. The Ebb and Flow of Filipino First-Time Fatherhood Transition Space: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamor, Neil Jupiter E; de Guzman, Allan B; Matienzo, Evangeline T

    2016-11-01

    Fatherhood, as a developmental process, is both a human experience and a text that needs to be read. For developing nations like the Philippines, little is known about the process undergone by first-time fathers on their transition to fatherhood, and how nurses can play a significant role in assisting them. This grounded theory study purported to conceptualize the multifaceted process of transition from the lens of Filipino first-time fathers' lived experiences. A total of 20 first-time fathers from Metro Manila, Philippines, were purposively selected to take part in an individual, semistructured, and in-depth interview. The Glaserian (classical) method of analysis was specifically used, and field texts were inductively analyzed using a repertory grid. Member checking and correspondence were done to validate the findings of the study. Six surfacing stages emerged relative to the process of transition. Interestingly, The B.R.I.D.G.E. Theory of First-Time Fatherhood Transition Space describes how these fathers progress from the beholding, reorganizing, inhibiting, delivering, grasping, and embracing phases toward successful transition. This emerged theoretical model can be used in framing health care programs where the needs of fathers during this period are met and addressed. Finally, it can also be used in guiding nurses in their provision of a more empathetic care for first-time fathers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. TASTE. III. A homogeneous study of transit time variations in WASP-3b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimbeni, V.; Cunial, A.; Murabito, S.; Sada, P. V.; Aparicio, A.; Piotto, G.; Bedin, L. R.; Milone, A. P.; Rosenberg, A.; Zurlo, A.; Borsato, L.; Damasso, M.; Granata, V.; Malavolta, L.

    2013-01-01

    The TASTE project is searching for low-mass planets with the transit timing variation (TTV) technique by gathering high-precision, short-cadence light curves for a selected sample of transiting exoplanets. It has been claimed that the "hot Jupiter" WASP-3b could be perturbed by a second planet. Presenting eleven new light curves (secured at the IAC80 and UDEM telescopes) and re-analyzing thirty-eight archival light curves in a homogeneous way, we show that new data do not confirm the previously claimed TTV signal. However, we bring evidence that measurements are not consistent with a constant orbital period, though no significant periodicity can be detected. Additional dynamical modeling and follow-up observations are planned to constrain the properties of the perturber or to put upper limits to it. We provide a refined ephemeris for WASP-3b and improved orbital/physical parameters. A contact eclipsing binary, serendipitously discovered among field stars, is reported here for the first time. This article is based on observations made with the IAC80 telescope operated on the island of Tenerife by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) in the Spanish Observatorio del Teide.Tables 1 and 3 and Appendix A are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgPhotometric data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/549/A30

  13. Long Spin-Relaxation Times in a Transition-Metal Atom in Direct Contact to a Metal Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermenau, Jan; Ternes, Markus; Steinbrecher, Manuel; Wiesendanger, Roland; Wiebe, Jens

    2018-03-14

    Long spin-relaxation times are a prerequisite for the use of spins in data storage or nanospintronics technologies. An atomic-scale solid-state realization of such a system is the spin of a transition-metal atom adsorbed on a suitable substrate. For the case of a metallic substrate, which enables the direct addressing of the spin by conduction electrons, the experimentally measured lifetimes reported to date are on the order of only hundreds of femtoseconds. Here, we show that the spin states of iron atoms adsorbed directly on a conductive platinum substrate have a surprisingly long spin-relaxation time in the nanosecond regime, which is comparable to that of a transition metal atom decoupled from the substrate electrons by a thin decoupling layer. The combination of long spin-relaxation times and strong coupling to conduction electrons implies the possibility to use flexible coupling schemes to process the spin information.

  14. Long Spin-Relaxation Times in a Transition-Metal Atom in Direct Contact to a Metal Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermenau, Jan; Ternes, Markus; Steinbrecher, Manuel; Wiesendanger, Roland; Wiebe, Jens

    2018-03-01

    Long spin relaxation times are a prerequisite for the use of spins in data storage or nanospintronics technologies. An atomic-scale solid-state realization of such a system is the spin of a transition metal atom adsorbed on a suitable substrate. For the case of a metallic substrate, which enables directly addressing the spin by conduction electrons, the experimentally measured lifetimes reported to date are on the order of only hundreds of femtoseconds. Here, we show that the spin states of iron atoms adsorbed directly on a conductive platinum substrate have an astonishingly long spin relaxation time in the nanosecond regime, which is comparable to that of a transition metal atom decoupled from the substrate electrons by a thin decoupling layer. The combination of long spin relaxation times and strong coupling to conduction electrons implies the possibility to use flexible coupling schemes in order to process the spin-information.

  15. Spin time-relaxation within strongly coupled paramagnetic systems exhibiting paramagnetic-ferrimagnetic transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Chahid, M

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present work is a quantitative study of the spin time relaxation within superweak ferrimagnetic materials exhibiting a paramagnetic-ferrimagnetic transition, when the temperature is changed from an initial value T sub i to a final one T sub f very close to the critical temperature T sub c. From a magnetic point of view, the material under investigation is considered to be made of two strongly coupled paramagnetic sublattices of respective moments phi (cursive,open) Greek and psi. Calculations are made within a Landau mean-field theory, whose free energy involves, in addition to quadratic and quartic terms in both moments phi (cursive,open) Greek and psi, a lowest-order coupling - Cphi (cursive,open) Greek psi, where C<0 stands for the coupling constant measuring the interaction between the two sublattices. We first determine the time dependence of the shifts of the order parameters delta phi (cursive,open) Greek and delta psi from the equilibrium state. We find that this time dependence ...

  16. Association of rumination time with subclinical ketosis in transition dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, E I; LeBlanc, S J; McBride, B W; Duffield, T F; DeVries, T J

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the relationship between rumination and subclinical ketosis (SCK) in transition dairy cows. A study was conducted on 4 commercial dairy farms in eastern Ontario, Canada. A total of 339 Holstein dairy cows (107 primiparous and 232 multiparous) were monitored for rumination activity and SCK from 14 d before calving until 28 d after calving. Rumination was recorded daily using an automated monitoring system. A blood sample was taken from the coccygeal vein of each cow for measurement of β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) once weekly throughout the 6-wk observation period. Cows with BHB ≥1.2mmol/L in any of the 4 postpartum samples were considered to have SCK. Cases of retained placenta, metritis, milk fever, or mastitis during the study period were also recorded. Cows were categorized into 1 of 4 groups: healthy cows (HLT) that had no SCK or any other recorded health problem (n=139); cows treated for at least one health issue other than SCK (HLT+; n=50); cows with SCK (hyperketonemia; HYK) with no other health problems during transition (n=97); or cows (HYK+) that had SCK and one or more other health problems (n=53). Daily rumination time was summarized by week and comparisons were made between HLT and HYK and HYK+. From 2 wk before calving (wk -2) to 4 wk after calving (wk +4), there was no difference in rumination time (409±9.8min/d) among HLT, HYK, and HYK+ cows in their first lactation. Multiparous cows in HLT spent an average of 459±11.3min/d ruminating from wk -2 to wk +4. Multiparous HYK cows ruminated 25±12.8min/d less than HLT cows, whereas HYK+ cows ruminated 44±15.6min/d less than HLT cows. The largest differences in rumination time between HLT and HYK+ cows were seen during wk -1, +1, and +2, when HYK+ cows ruminated 48±17.2, 73±16.0, and 65±19.4min/d less than HLT cows, respectively. In multiparous cows, increased odds of HYK were associated with greater milk yield in the previous lactation, greater loss of

  17. Magnet tracking allows assessment of regional gastrointestinal transit times in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedsund, Caroline; Joensson, Iben Moeller; Gregersen, Tine; Fynne, Lotte; Schlageter, Vincent; Krogh, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Data on small intestinal transit time in healthy children are lacking, and normal values for gastric emptying and colonic transit time are sparse. Conventional methods, including radiopaque markers, scintigraphy, and PillCam™ involve radiation or require the child to swallow a large pill. The minimally invasive, radiation-free Motility Tracking System-1 (MTS-1) has been introduced for description of gastrointestinal motility in adults. The aim of the study was to evaluate the MTS-1 for assessment of gastrointestinal transit times and motility patterns in healthy children. Twenty-one healthy children (nine girls), median age 10 (range 7-12) years were included. For evaluation with MTS-1, a small magnetic pill was ingested and tracked through the gastrointestinal tract by a matrix of 16 magnetic sensors placed behind a nonmagnetic bed. The children were investigated for 8 hours after swallowing the magnetic pill and again for 4 hours the following morning. After leaving the unit, each child came back after every bowel movement to determine if the pill had been expelled. Nineteen children could swallow the pill. Characteristic contraction patterns were identified for the stomach (three per minute), small intestine (9-11 per minute), and colon (4-5 per minute). Median total gastrointestinal transit time was 37.7 (range 9.5-95.8) hours, median gastric emptying time was 37 (range 2-142) minutes, median small intestinal transit time was 302 (range 164 to >454) minutes, and median colorectal transit time was 38.1 (range 5.6-90.0) hours. MTS-1 allows minimally invasive evaluation of gastrointestinal motility in children. Use of the method is, however, restricted by the nonambulatory setup.

  18. Attosecond transient absorption instrumentation for thin film materials: Phase transitions, heat dissipation, signal stabilization, timing correction, and rapid sample rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jager, Marieke F.; Ott, Christian; Kaplan, Christopher J.; Kraus, Peter M.; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2018-01-01

    We present an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) transient absorption apparatus tailored to attosecond and femtosecond measurements on bulk solid-state thin-film samples, specifically when the sample dynamics are sensitive to heating effects. The setup combines methodology for stabilizing sub-femtosecond time-resolution measurements over 48 h and techniques for mitigating heat buildup in temperature-dependent samples. Single-point beam stabilization in pump and probe arms and periodic time-zero reference measurements are described for accurate timing and stabilization. A hollow-shaft motor configuration for rapid sample rotation, raster scanning capability, and additional diagnostics are described for heat mitigation. Heat transfer simulations performed using a finite element analysis allow comparison of sample rotation and traditional raster scanning techniques for 100 Hz pulsed laser measurements on vanadium dioxide, a material that undergoes an insulator-to-metal transition at a modest temperature of 340 K. Experimental results are presented confirming that the vanadium dioxide (VO2) sample cannot cool below its phase transition temperature between laser pulses without rapid rotation, in agreement with the simulations. The findings indicate the stringent conditions required to perform rigorous broadband XUV time-resolved absorption measurements on bulk solid-state samples, particularly those with temperature sensitivity, and elucidate a clear methodology to perform them.

  19. Measuring Corruption in Infrastructure: Evidence from Transition and Developing Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines what we can say about the extent and impact of corruption in infrastructure using existing evidence. There is evidence that most perceptions measures appear to be very weak proxies for the actual extent of corruption in the infrastructure sector, largely (but inaccurately) measuring petty rather than grand corruption. Survey evidence is more reliable, but limited as a tool for differentiating countries in terms of access to infrastructure finance or appropriate policy mode...

  20. Theoretical determination of transit time locus curves for ultrasonic pulse echo testing - ALOK. Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grohs, B.

    1983-01-01

    The ALOK-technique allows the simultaneous detection of flaws and their evaluation with respect to type, location and dimension by interpretation of the transit time behaviour during scanning of the reflector. The accuracy of information obtained by means of this technique can be further improved both during interference elimination and reconstruction owing to the ability of exact calculation of possible transit time locus curves of given reflectors. The mathematical solution of transit time locus curve calculations refers here to pulse echo testing in consideration of the refraction of sound on the forward wedge/test object - interface. The method of solving the problem is equivalent to the Fermat's principle in optics. (orig.) [de

  1. Decreasing transition times in elementary school classrooms: Using computer-assisted instruction to automate intervention components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, Jeffrey F; Ardoin, Scott P; Foster, Tori E

    2015-09-01

    Research suggests that students spend a substantial amount of time transitioning between classroom activities, which may reduce time spent academically engaged. This study used an ABAB design to evaluate the effects of a computer-assisted intervention that automated intervention components previously shown to decrease transition times. We examined the effects of the intervention on the latency to on-task behavior of 4 students in 2 classrooms. Data also were collected on students' on-task behavior during activities and teachers' use of prompts and praise statements. Implementation of the intervention substantially decreased students' latencies to on-task behavior and increased on-task behavior overall. Further, the 2 teachers used fewer prompts to cue students to transition and stay on task and provided more praise during intervention phases. We discuss how automating classroom interventions may affect student and teacher behavior as well as how it may increase procedural fidelity. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  2. The Transit-Time Distribution from the Northern Hemisphere Midlatitude Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbe, Clara; Waugh, Darryn W.; Newman, Paul A.; Strahan, Susan; Steenrod, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of transit times from the Northern Hemisphere (NH) midlatitude surface is a fundamental property of tropospheric transport. Here we present an analysis of the transit time distribution (TTD) since air last contacted the northern midlatitude surface layer, as simulated by the NASA Global Modeling Initiative Chemistry Transport Model. We find that throughout the troposphere the TTD is characterized by long flat tails that reflect the recirculation of old air from the Southern Hemisphere and results in mean ages that are significantly larger than the modal age. Key aspects of the TTD -- its mode, mean and spectral width -- are interpreted in terms of tropospheric dynamics, including seasonal shifts in the location and strength of tropical convection and variations in quasi-isentropic transport out of the northern midlatitude surface layer. Our results indicate that current diagnostics of tropospheric transport are insufficient for comparing model transport and that the full distribution of transit times is a more appropriate constraint.

  3. Scintigraphic small intestinal transit time and defaecography in patients with J-pouch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Mie Dilling; Simonsen, Jane Angel; Hvidsten, Svend

    2015-01-01

    Objective methods for examination of pouch function are warranted for a better understanding of the functional result and treatment of dysfunction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of scintigraphic intestinal transit time and defaecography compared to the results of pouch...... function, mucosal condition and a questionnaire on quality of life (QoL). This cross-sectional study included 21 patients. Scintigraphic transit time and defaecography was determined with the use of Tc-99m. Pouch function was assessed by number of bowel movements, pouch volume, and continence. Pouch...... mucosal condition was evaluated by endoscopy and histology. Median transit time was 189 min (105–365). Median ejection fraction at defaecography (EF) was 49% (3–77) and 62% (17–98) after first and second defecation. Median pouch volume was 223 mL (100–360). A median daily stool frequency of nine (4...

  4. Finite-time thermodynamics and the gas-liquid phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, M; Schön, J C; Jansen, M

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we study the application of the concept of finite-time thermodynamics to first-order phase transitions. As an example, we investigate the transition from the gaseous to the liquid state by modeling the liquification of the gas in a finite time. In particular, we introduce, state, and solve an optimal control problem in which we aim at achieving the gas-liquid first-order phase transition through supersaturation within a fixed time in an optimal fashion, in the sense that the work required to supersaturate the gas, called excess work, is minimized by controlling the appropriate thermodynamic parameters. The resulting set of coupled nonlinear differential equations is then solved for three systems, nitrogen N2, oxygen O2, and water vapor H2O.

  5. Physical activity during video capsule endoscopy correlates with shorter bowel transit time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanich, Peter P; Peck, Joshua; Murphy, Christopher; Porter, Kyle M; Meyer, Marty M

    2017-09-01

     Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is limited by reliance on bowel motility for propulsion, and lack of physical activity has been proposed as a cause of incomplete studies. Our aim was to prospectively investigate the association between physical activity and VCE bowel transit.  Ambulatory outpatients receiving VCE were eligible for the study. A pedometer was attached at the time of VCE ingestion and step count was recorded at the end of the procedure. VCE completion was assessed by logistic regression models, which included step count (500 steps as one unit). Total transit time was analyzed by Cox proportional hazards models. The hazard ratios (HR) with 95 % confidence interval (CI) indicated the "hazard" of completion, such that HRs > 1 indicated a reduced transit time.  A total of 100 patients were included. VCE was completed in 93 patients (93 %). The median step count was 2782 steps. Step count was not significantly associated with VCE completion (odds ratio 1.45, 95 %CI 0.84, 2.49). Pedometer step count was significantly associated with shorter total, gastric, and small-bowel transit times (HR 1.09, 95 %CI 1.03, 1.16; HR 1.05, 95 %CI 1.00, 1.11; HR 1.07, 95 %CI 1.01, 1.14, respectively). Higher body mass index (BMI) was significantly associated with VCE completion (HR 1.87, 95 %CI 1.18, 2.97) and shorter bowel transit times (HR 1.05, 95 %CI 1.02, 1.08).  Increased physical activity during outpatient VCE was associated with shorter bowel transit times but not with study completion. In addition, BMI was a previously unreported clinical characteristic associated with VCE completion and should be included as a variable of interest in future studies.

  6. Latent Transition Analysis with a Mixture Item Response Theory Measurement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sun-Joo; Cohen, Allan S.; Kim, Seock-Ho; Bottge, Brian

    2010-01-01

    A latent transition analysis (LTA) model was described with a mixture Rasch model (MRM) as the measurement model. Unlike the LTA, which was developed with a latent class measurement model, the LTA-MRM permits within-class variability on the latent variable, making it more useful for measuring treatment effects within latent classes. A simulation…

  7. Squid measurement of the Verwey transition on epitaxial (1 0 0) magnetite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dediu, V.; Arisi, E.; Bergenti, I.; Riminucci, A.; Solzi, M.; Pernechele, C.; Natali, M.

    2007-01-01

    We report results on epitaxial magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) thin films grown by electron beam ablation on (1 0 0) MgAl 2 O 4 substrates. At 120 K magnetite undergoes a structural and electronic transition, the so-called Verwey transition, at which magnetic and conducting properties of the material change. We observed the Verwey transition on epitaxial films with a thickness of 50 nm by comparing zero-field cooling (ZFC) and field cooling (FC) curves measured with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Observation of the Verwey transition by SQUID measurements in the films is sign of their high crystalline quality. Room temperature ferromagnetism has also been found by magneto-optical Kerr rotation (MOKE) and confirmed by SQUID measurements, with a hysteresis loop showing a coercive field of hundreds of Oe

  8. Measuring the Gap Between Car and Transit Accessibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benenson, I.; Martens, C.J.C.M.; Rofé, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Accessibility is increasingly identified in the academic literature and in planning practice as a key criterion to assess transport policies and urban land use development. This paper contributes in two respects to the growing body of literature on accessibility and accessibility measurement. First,

  9. Lifetime measurements in shape transition nucleus {sup 188}Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohilla, Aman; Gupta, C.K.; Chamoli, S.K. [University of Delhi, Department of Physics and Astrophysics, New Delhi (India); Singh, R.P.; Muralithar, S. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi (India); Chakraborty, S.; Sharma, H.P. [Banaras Hindu University, Department of Physics, Varanasi (India); Kumar, A.; Govil, I.M. [Panjab University, Department of Physics, Chandigarh (India); Biswas, D.C. [Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Nuclear Physics Division, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    2017-04-15

    Nuclear level lifetimes of high spin states in yrast and non-yrast bands of {sup 188}Pt nucleus have been measured using recoil distance plunger setup present at IUAC, Delhi. In the experiment nuclear states of interest were populated via {sup 174}Yb({sup 18}O,4n){sup 188}Pt reaction at a beam energy of 79MeV provided by 15 UD Pelletron accelerator. The extracted B(E2 ↓) values show an initial rise up to 4{sup +} state and then a nearly constant behavior with spin along yrast band, indicating change of nuclear structure in {sup 188}Pt at low spins. The good agreement between experimental and TPSM model B(E2 ↓) values up to 4{sup +} state suggests an increase in axial deformation of the nucleus. The average absolute β{sub 2} = 0.20 (3) obtained from measured B(E2 ↓) values matches well the values predicted by CHFB and IBM calculations for oblate (β{sub 2} ∝ -0.19) and prolate (β{sub 2} ∝ 0.22) shapes. As the lifetime measurements do not yield the sign of β{sub 2}, no definite conclusion can be drawn on the prolate or oblate collectivity of {sup 188}Pt on the basis of present measurements. (orig.)

  10. Lifetime measurements in shape transition nucleus 188Pt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohilla, Aman; Gupta, C. K.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Chakraborty, S.; Sharma, H. P.; Kumar, A.; Govil, I. M.; Biswas, D. C.; Chamoli, S. K.

    2017-04-01

    Nuclear level lifetimes of high spin states in yrast and non-yrast bands of 188Pt nucleus have been measured using recoil distance plunger setup present at IUAC, Delhi. In the experiment nuclear states of interest were populated via 174Yb(18O,4 n)188Pt reaction at a beam energy of 79MeV provided by 15 UD Pelletron accelerator. The extracted B(E2\\downarrow) values show an initial rise up to 4+ state and then a nearly constant behavior with spin along yrast band, indicating change of nuclear structure in 188Pt at low spins. The good agreement between experimental and TPSM model B(E2\\downarrow) values up to 4^+ state suggests an increase in axial deformation of the nucleus. The average absolute β2 = 0.20 (3) obtained from measured B(E2\\downarrow) values matches well the values predicted by CHFB and IBM calculations for oblate ( β2 ˜ -0.19) and prolate (β2 ˜ 0.22) shapes. As the lifetime measurements do not yield the sign of β2, no definite conclusion can be drawn on the prolate or oblate collectivity of 188Pt on the basis of present measurements.

  11. Dwell Time Modelling and Optimized Simulations for Crowded Rail Transit Lines Based on Train Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Jiang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the nature of rail transit dwell time has potential benefits for both the users and the operators. Crowded passenger trains cause longer dwell times and may prevent some passengers from boarding the first available train that arrives. Actual dwell time and the process of passenger alighting and boarding are interdependent through the sequence of train stops and propagated delays. A comprehensive and feasible dwell time simulation model was developed and optimized to address the problems associated with scheduled timetables. The paper introduces the factors that affect dwell time in urban rail transit systems, including train headway, the process and number of passengers alighting and boarding the train, and the inability of train doors to properly close the first time because of overcrowded vehicles. Finally, based on a time-driven micro-simulation system, Shanghai rail transit Line 8 is used as an example to quantify the feasibility of scheduled dwell times for different stations, directions of travel and time periods, and a proposed dwell time during peak hours in several crowded stations is presented according to the simulation results.

  12. Superhilac real-time velocity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinberg, B.; Meaney, D.; Thatcher, R.; Timossi, C.

    1987-03-01

    Phase probes have been placed in several external beam lines at the LBL heavy ion linear accelerator (SuperHILAC) to provide non-destructive velocity measurements independent of the ion being accelerated. The existing system has been improved to provide the following features: a display refresh rate better than twice per second, a sensitive pseudo-correlation technique to pick out the signal from the noise, simultaneous measurements of up to four ion velocities when more than one beam is being accelerated, and a touch-screen operator interface. These improvements allow the system to be used as a routine tuning aid and beam velocity monitor

  13. Transit Time Flowmetry in Coronary Surgery-An Important Tool in Graft Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir Mujanović

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the Transit time flow measurement (TTFM experience in the first 1000 CABG operations. First 1000 patients had coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG performed in Cardiovascular Clinic, University Clinical Centre Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina, between September, 1998 and September, 2003. CABG without use of cardio-pulmonary bypass (CPB-(OPCAB was used as the preferential surgical method both because this method is reported to have equal or better results than CABG with use of CPB (ONCAB, and because of the significant cost savings realized. TTFM was routinely used in all grafts as a quality assurance measure. Criteria for a poor functioning graft were: low mean flow (MF, pul-satility index (PI above 5 and a poor diastolic flow pattern. When no reversible cause of poor TTFM results were identified the graft was revised. A total of 1394 grafts in OPCAB group and 1478 in ONCAB group were performed. A total of 38 grafts (2,72% in 37 patients (7,07% were revised in OPCAB group, and 26 grafts (1,75% in 26 patients (5,45% in ONCAB group. 1 patient in OPCAB group needed 2 graft revisions. Graft revisions were more common in OPCAB, but with no significant difference (p=0,1035. The most frequently revised graft was LAD graft in both groups. Although the percentage of grafts revised are relatively low, it is still very important to record TTFM. More than 5% of patients in both groups needed graft revision. Although TTFM does not guarantee that grafts will stay open for a prolonged period of time we certainly believe that grafts that are occluded at the time of surgery will continue to stay occluded. TTFM is especially critical in OPCAB surgery where the technical challenge of grafting is higher then in ONCAB.

  14. Unconventional Topological Phase Transition in Two-Dimensional Systems with Space-Time Inversion Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Junyeong; Yang, Bohm-Jung

    2017-04-01

    We study a topological phase transition between a normal insulator and a quantum spin Hall insulator in two-dimensional (2D) systems with time-reversal and twofold rotation symmetries. Contrary to the case of ordinary time-reversal invariant systems, where a direct transition between two insulators is generally predicted, we find that the topological phase transition in systems with an additional twofold rotation symmetry is mediated by an emergent stable 2D Weyl semimetal phase between two insulators. Here the central role is played by the so-called space-time inversion symmetry, the combination of time-reversal and twofold rotation symmetries, which guarantees the quantization of the Berry phase around a 2D Weyl point even in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling. Pair creation and pair annihilation of Weyl points accompanying partner exchange between different pairs induces a jump of a 2D Z2 topological invariant leading to a topological phase transition. According to our theory, the topological phase transition in HgTe /CdTe quantum well structure is mediated by a stable 2D Weyl semimetal phase because the quantum well, lacking inversion symmetry intrinsically, has twofold rotation about the growth direction. Namely, the HgTe /CdTe quantum well can show 2D Weyl semimetallic behavior within a small but finite interval in the thickness of HgTe layers between a normal insulator and a quantum spin Hall insulator. We also propose that few-layer black phosphorus under perpendicular electric field is another candidate system to observe the unconventional topological phase transition mechanism accompanied by the emerging 2D Weyl semimetal phase protected by space-time inversion symmetry.

  15. Unconventional Topological Phase Transition in Two-Dimensional Systems with Space-Time Inversion Symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Junyeong; Yang, Bohm-Jung

    2017-04-14

    We study a topological phase transition between a normal insulator and a quantum spin Hall insulator in two-dimensional (2D) systems with time-reversal and twofold rotation symmetries. Contrary to the case of ordinary time-reversal invariant systems, where a direct transition between two insulators is generally predicted, we find that the topological phase transition in systems with an additional twofold rotation symmetry is mediated by an emergent stable 2D Weyl semimetal phase between two insulators. Here the central role is played by the so-called space-time inversion symmetry, the combination of time-reversal and twofold rotation symmetries, which guarantees the quantization of the Berry phase around a 2D Weyl point even in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling. Pair creation and pair annihilation of Weyl points accompanying partner exchange between different pairs induces a jump of a 2D Z_{2} topological invariant leading to a topological phase transition. According to our theory, the topological phase transition in HgTe/CdTe quantum well structure is mediated by a stable 2D Weyl semimetal phase because the quantum well, lacking inversion symmetry intrinsically, has twofold rotation about the growth direction. Namely, the HgTe/CdTe quantum well can show 2D Weyl semimetallic behavior within a small but finite interval in the thickness of HgTe layers between a normal insulator and a quantum spin Hall insulator. We also propose that few-layer black phosphorus under perpendicular electric field is another candidate system to observe the unconventional topological phase transition mechanism accompanied by the emerging 2D Weyl semimetal phase protected by space-time inversion symmetry.

  16. Trip time prediction in mass transit companies. A machine learning approach

    OpenAIRE

    João M. Moreira; Alípio Jorge; Jorge Freire de Sousa; Carlos Soares

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we discuss how trip time prediction can be useful foroperational optimization in mass transit companies and which machine learningtechniques can be used to improve results. Firstly, we analyze which departmentsneed trip time prediction and when. Secondly, we review related work and thirdlywe present the analysis of trip time over a particular path. We proceed by presentingexperimental results conducted on real data with the forecasting techniques wefound most adequate, and concl...

  17. Study of signal discrimination for timing measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Krepelkova, Marta

    2017-01-01

    The timing detectors of the CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS) are currently read out using discrete components, separated into three boards; the first board hosts the sensors and the amplifiers, the second one hosts the discriminators and the third is dedicated to the Time to Digital Converter (TDC) and to the interface with the data acquisition system (DAQ). This work proposes a new front-end electronics for the timing detector, with sensors, amplifiers and discriminators integrated on the same board. We simulated an updated version of the amplifier together with a discriminator designed using commercial components. We decided to use an LVDS buffer as a discriminator, because of its cost, availability, speed and lo w power consumption. As a proof of concept, we used the LVDS input of an FPGA to discriminate signals produced by a detector prototype, using a radioactive source.

  18. Time versus frequency domain measurements: layered model ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of receiver coil alignment errors δ on the response of electromagnetic measurements in a layered earth model is studied. The statistics of generalized least square inverse was employed to analyzed the errors on three different geophysical applications. The following results were obtained: (i) The FEM ellipiticity is ...

  19. Potential of public transit as a transportation control measure: Case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sillings, M.

    1998-07-01

    This report is the final product of the Clean Air Project of the National Association of Regional Councils/NARC. It documents a nationwide study of transit projects and programs initiated in the wake of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments/CAAA and the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991/ISTEA. The study purpose was to assess the experience, limitations, and value of public transit as a potential transportation control measure/TCM, i.e., generates significant air quality benefits by eliminating or reducing emissions from motor vehicles. Four in-depth case studies and six additional projects featured as innovations in transportation are offered as examples investigating the potential of transit as a TCM. These case studies and innovations highlight the efforts of ten metropolitan areas and transit agencies which have succeed in developing and implementing innovative transit strategies.

  20. Morphing Wing: Experimental Boundary Layer Transition Determination and Wing Vibrations Measurements and Analysis =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondji Chendjou, Yvan Wilfried

    This Master's thesis is written within the framework of the multidisciplinary international research project CRIAQ MDO-505. This global project consists of the design, manufacture and testing of a morphing wing box capable of changing the shape of the flexible upper skin of a wing using an actuator system installed inside the wing. This changing of the shape generates a delay in the occurrence of the laminar to turbulent transition area, which results in an improvement of the aerodynamic performances of the morphed wing. This thesis is focused on the technologies used to gather the pressure data during the wind tunnel tests, as well as on the post processing methodologies used to characterize the wing airflow. The vibration measurements of the wing and their real-time graphical representation are also presented. The vibration data acquisition system is detailed, and the vibration data analysis confirms the predictions of the flutter analysis performed on the wing prior to wind tunnel testing at the IAR-NRC. The pressure data was collected using 32 highly-sensitive piezoelectric sensors for sensing the pressure fluctuations up to 10 KHz. These sensors were installed along two wing chords, and were further connected to a National Instrument PXI real-time acquisition system. The acquired pressure data was high-pass filtered, analyzed and visualized using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Standard Deviation (SD) approaches to quantify the pressure fluctuations in the wing airflow, as these allow the detection of the laminar to turbulent transition area. Around 30% of the cases tested in the IAR-NRC wind tunnel were optimized for drag reduction by the morphing wing procedure. The obtained pressure measurements results were compared with results obtained by infrared thermography visualization, and were used to validate the numerical simulations. Two analog accelerometers able to sense dynamic accelerations up to +/-16g were installed in both the wing and the aileron boxes

  1. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering of a micelle-to-vesicle transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egelhaaf, S.U. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 -Grenoble (France); Schurtenberger, P. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-04-01

    Amphiphilic molecules spontaneously self-assemble in solution to form a variety of aggregates. Only limited information is available on the kinetics of the structural transitions as well as on the existence of non-equilibrium or metastable states. Aqueous mixtures of lecithin and bile salt are very interesting biological model-systems which exhibit a spontaneous transition from polymer-like mixed micelles to vesicles upon dilution. The small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument D22, with its very high neutron flux and the broad range of scattering vectors covered in a single instrumental setting, allowed us for the first time to perform time-resolved scattering experiments in order to study the micelle-to-vesicle transition. The temporal evolution of the aggregate structures were followed and detailed information was obtained even on molecular length-scales. (author). 5 refs.

  2. Seasonal analysis of the planetary boundary-layer afternoon and evening transition through observational measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, Mariano; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Yagüe, Carlos; Arrillaga, Jon A.; Maqueda, Gregorio

    2016-04-01

    From a typically convective diurnal situation to a stably stratified nocturnal one, the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) experiences the so-called afternoon and evening transition. This period is complex to study due to the presence of many different forcings, usually weak and opposite [1]. In this work, the transitional processes are studied by using 6-year data from permanent instrumentation at CIBA, a research center located in the Spanish Northern plateau. These measurements include particulate matter (PM) and turbulent records. Certain variables display a twin pattern in their time evolution for all the seasons, only differing in their absolute values. On the contrary, the air specific humidity behaves differently for each season, which is distinct to the results from a previous study at a different location [2]. Besides, a common pattern of increasing PM values near sunset is found, with a number of influences playing a role in PM concentrations: stability, turbulence and ABL thickness among others. In particular, the competing thermal and mechanical turbulent effects result in PM concentration reduction (settling on the ground or being advected) or increase, depending in each case on the specific season and particle group. Furthermore, the relative importance of the bigger PM (between 2.5 and 10 μm) is linked to the wind minimum around sunset, especially during summer. [1] Lothon, M. and coauthors (2014): The BLLAST field experiment: Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 10931-10960. [2] Wingo, S. M. and Knupp, K. R. (2015): Multi-platform observations characterizing the afternoon-to-evening transition of the planetary boundary layer in Northern Alabama, USA, Boundary-Layer Meteorol., 155, 29-53.

  3. Time-Resolved Studies of Laser-Induced Phase Transitions in Gallium Arsenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Yakir

    This thesis describes a series of time-resolved experiments of the linear and nonlinear optical properties of GaAs during laser-induced phase transitions. The first set of experiments consists of a direct determination of the behavior of the linear dielectric constant at photon energies of 2.2 eV and 4.4 eV following excitation of the sample with 1.9-eV, 70-fs laser pulses spanning a fluence range from 0 to 2.5 kJ/m^2. The results from this set of experiments were used to extract the behavior of the second-order optical susceptibility from second-harmonic generation measurements made under identical excitation conditions. These experiments are unique because they provide explicit information on the behavior of intrinsic material properties--the linear and nonlinear optical susceptibilities--during laser-induced phase transitions in semiconductors without the ambiguities in interpretation that are generally inherent in reflectivity and second-harmonic generation measurements. The dielectric constant data indicate a drop in the average bonding-antibonding splitting of GaAs following the laser pulse excitation. This behavior leads to a collapse of the band-gap on a picosecond time scale for excitation at fluences near the damage threshold of 1.0 kJ/m ^2 and even faster at higher excitation fluences. The changes in the electronic band structure result from a combination of electronic screening by the excited free carriers and structural deformation of the lattice caused by the destabilization of the covalent bonds. The behavior of the second-order susceptibility shows that the material loses long-range order before the average bonding-antibonding splitting, which is more sensitive to short-range structure, changes significantly. Loss of long-range order and a drop of more than 2 eV in the average bonding-antibonding splitting are seen even at fluences below the damage threshold, a regime in which the laser-induced changes are reversible.

  4. Transit timing observations from Kepler – VII. Confirmation of 27 planets in 13 multiplanet systems via transit timing variations and orbital stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Jason H. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States). Accelerator Physics Center; Fabrycky, Daniel C. [Lick Observ.; Agol, Eric [Washington U., Seattle; Ford, Eric B.; Morehead, Robert C. [Florida U.; Cochran, William D. [Texas U.; Lissauer, Jack J. [NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA (United States); Adams, Elisabeth R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Borucki, William J. [NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA (United States); Bryson, Steve [NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA (United States); Caldwell, Douglas A. [SETI Inst., Mrn. View; Dupree, Andrea [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Jenkins, Jon M. [NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA (United States); Robertson, Paul [Texas U.; Rowe, Jason F. [NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA (United States); Seader, Shawn [NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA (United States); Thompson, Susan [NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA (United States); Twicken, Joseph D. [NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Moffett Field, Mountain View, CA (United States)

    2012-10-27

    We confirm 27 planets in 13 planetary systems by showing the existence of statistically significant anti-correlated transit timing variations (TTVs), which demonstrates that the planet candidates are in the same system, and long-term dynamical stability, which places limits on the masses of the candidates---showing that they are planetary. %This overall method of planet confirmation was first applied to \\kepler systems 23 through 32. All of these newly confirmed planetary systems have orbital periods that place them near first-order mean motion resonances (MMRs), including 6 systems near the 2:1 MMR, 5 near 3:2, and one each near 4:3, 5:4, and 6:5. In addition, several unconfirmed planet candidates exist in some systems (that cannot be confirmed with this method at this time). A few of these candidates would also be near first order MMRs with either the confirmed planets or with other candidates. One system of particular interest, Kepler-56 (KOI-1241), is a pair of planets orbiting a 12th magnitude, giant star with radius over three times that of the Sun and effective temperature of 4900 K---among the largest stars known to host a transiting exoplanetary system.

  5. Characterization measurements of Ti-SS bimetallic transition joint samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budagov, Yu.; Sabirov, B.; Sisakyan, A.

    2008-01-01

    A small set of bimetallic tubes has been investigated for the purpose to determine characteristics of samples at different conditions of tests for more statistics. Nine bimetallic samples have been manufactured at the Russian Federal Nuclear Center - VNIIEF (Sarov, Russia) using explosion technology for welding titanium and stainless steel tubes. During the tests eight samples have shown an excellent behaviour. This result is very good and we believe that these samples can be used for the construction of the cavity vessels. A preliminary measurement on the residual magnetic moment around junction line between the two materials has been carried out

  6. Measuring Passenger Travel Time Reliability using Smartcard Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagherian, M.; Cats, O.; van Oort, N.; Hickman, M

    2016-01-01

    Service reliability is a key performance measure for transit agencies in increasing their service quality and thus ridership. Conventional reliability metrics are established based on vehicle movements and thus do not adequately reflect passenger’s experience. In the past few years, the growing

  7. Magnet tracking allows assessment of regional gastrointestinal transit times in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedsund C

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Caroline Hedsund,1,2 Iben Moeller Joensson,2 Tine Gregersen,1 Lotte Fynne,1 Vincent Schlageter,3 Klaus Krogh1 1Neurogastroenterology Unit, Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, 2Department of Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 3Motilis Medica SA, Lausanne, Switzerland Background: Data on small intestinal transit time in healthy children are lacking, and normal values for gastric emptying and colonic transit time are sparse. Conventional methods, including radiopaque markers, scintigraphy, and PillCam™ involve radiation or require the child to swallow a large pill. The minimally invasive, radiation-free Motility Tracking System-1 (MTS-1 has been introduced for description of gastrointestinal motility in adults. The aim of the study was to evaluate the MTS-1 for assessment of gastrointestinal transit times and motility patterns in healthy children. Methods: Twenty-one healthy children (nine girls, median age 10 (range 7–12 years were included. For evaluation with MTS-1, a small magnetic pill was ingested and tracked through the gastrointestinal tract by a matrix of 16 magnetic sensors placed behind a nonmagnetic bed. The children were investigated for 8 hours after swallowing the magnetic pill and again for 4 hours the following morning. After leaving the unit, each child came back after every bowel movement to determine if the pill had been expelled. Results: Nineteen children could swallow the pill. Characteristic contraction patterns were identified for the stomach (three per minute, small intestine (9–11 per minute, and colon (4–5 per minute. Median total gastrointestinal transit time was 37.7 (range 9.5–95.8 hours, median gastric emptying time was 37 (range 2–142 minutes, median small intestinal transit time was 302 (range 164 to >454 minutes, and median colorectal transit time was 38.1 (range 5.6–90.0 hours. Conclusion: MTS-1 allows minimally invasive evaluation of gastrointestinal motility in

  8. Long-term transit timing monitoring and homogenous study of WASP-32

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Lei-Lei; Gu Sheng-Hong; Wang Xiao-Bin; Cao Dong-Tao; Wang Yi-Bo; Xiang Yue; Cameron Andrew Collier; Hui Ho-Keung; Kwok Chi-Tai; Yeung Bill; Leung Kam-Cheung

    2015-01-01

    We report new photometric observations of the transiting exoplanetary system WASP-32 made by using CCD cameras at Yunnan Observatories and Ho Koon Nature Education cum Astronomical Centre, China from 2010 to 2012. Following our usual procedure, the observed data are corrected for systematic errors according to the coarse decorrelation and SYSREM algorithms so as to enhance the signal of the transit events. Combined with radial velocity data presented in the literature, our newly observed data and earlier photometric data in the literature are simultaneously analyzed to derive the physical parameters describing the system by employing the Markov chain Monte Carlo technique. The derived parameters are consistent with the result published in the original paper about WASP-32b, but the uncertainties of the new parameters are smaller than those in the original paper. Moreover, our modeling result supports a circular orbit for WASP-32b. Through the analysis of all available mid-transit times, we have refined the orbital period of WASP-32b; no evident transit timing variation is found in these transit events. (research papers)

  9. Ages and transit times as important diagnostics of model performance for predicting carbon dynamics in terrestrial vegetation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos-Núñez, Verónika; Richardson, Andrew D.; Sierra, Carlos A.

    2018-03-01

    The global carbon cycle is strongly controlled by the source/sink strength of vegetation as well as the capacity of terrestrial ecosystems to retain this carbon. These dynamics, as well as processes such as the mixing of old and newly fixed carbon, have been studied using ecosystem models, but different assumptions regarding the carbon allocation strategies and other model structures may result in highly divergent model predictions. We assessed the influence of three different carbon allocation schemes on the C cycling in vegetation. First, we described each model with a set of ordinary differential equations. Second, we used published measurements of ecosystem C compartments from the Harvard Forest Environmental Measurement Site to find suitable parameters for the different model structures. And third, we calculated C stocks, release fluxes, radiocarbon values (based on the bomb spike), ages, and transit times. We obtained model simulations in accordance with the available data, but the time series of C in foliage and wood need to be complemented with other ecosystem compartments in order to reduce the high parameter collinearity that we observed, and reduce model equifinality. Although the simulated C stocks in ecosystem compartments were similar, the different model structures resulted in very different predictions of age and transit time distributions. In particular, the inclusion of two storage compartments resulted in the prediction of a system mean age that was 12-20 years older than in the models with one or no storage compartments. The age of carbon in the wood compartment of this model was also distributed towards older ages, whereas fast cycling compartments had an age distribution that did not exceed 5 years. As expected, models with C distributed towards older ages also had longer transit times. These results suggest that ages and transit times, which can be indirectly measured using isotope tracers, serve as important diagnostics of model structure

  10. Ages and transit times as important diagnostics of model performance for predicting carbon dynamics in terrestrial vegetation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ceballos-Núñez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The global carbon cycle is strongly controlled by the source/sink strength of vegetation as well as the capacity of terrestrial ecosystems to retain this carbon. These dynamics, as well as processes such as the mixing of old and newly fixed carbon, have been studied using ecosystem models, but different assumptions regarding the carbon allocation strategies and other model structures may result in highly divergent model predictions. We assessed the influence of three different carbon allocation schemes on the C cycling in vegetation. First, we described each model with a set of ordinary differential equations. Second, we used published measurements of ecosystem C compartments from the Harvard Forest Environmental Measurement Site to find suitable parameters for the different model structures. And third, we calculated C stocks, release fluxes, radiocarbon values (based on the bomb spike, ages, and transit times. We obtained model simulations in accordance with the available data, but the time series of C in foliage and wood need to be complemented with other ecosystem compartments in order to reduce the high parameter collinearity that we observed, and reduce model equifinality. Although the simulated C stocks in ecosystem compartments were similar, the different model structures resulted in very different predictions of age and transit time distributions. In particular, the inclusion of two storage compartments resulted in the prediction of a system mean age that was 12–20 years older than in the models with one or no storage compartments. The age of carbon in the wood compartment of this model was also distributed towards older ages, whereas fast cycling compartments had an age distribution that did not exceed 5 years. As expected, models with C distributed towards older ages also had longer transit times. These results suggest that ages and transit times, which can be indirectly measured using isotope tracers, serve as important

  11. Phase transition traced by conductivity measurements: quantitative analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keding, Ralf; Ruessel, Christian; Tauch, Diana

    2008-01-01

    to the electrodes, all in a cylindrical geometry. The electrical resistivity of a sample in the system BaAl2B2O7 was measured during cooling between liquidus temperature (T-l) and transformation temperature (T-g) using a fixed frequency of 3.7 Hz. The melt crystallised in this temperature range during cooling...... starting from the electrodes. The change in the conductivity as a function of the temperature was fitted with VFT-equation for both the melt and the crystalline phase. An extrapolation of the resistance of the melt as well as of the crystalline material allows to separate the temperature dependent changes...... of conductivity and the resistance changes caused by phase transformation. This enables to determine the crystal growth velocity in the temperature range between 750 and 860 degrees C in a single experiment....

  12. Phase transition traced by conductivity measurements: quantitative analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keding, Ralf; Ruessel, Christian; Tauch, Diana

    2008-01-01

    starting from the electrodes. The change in the conductivity as a function of the temperature was fitted with VFT-equation for both the melt and the crystalline phase. An extrapolation of the resistance of the melt as well as of the crystalline material allows to separate the temperature dependent changes...... of conductivity and the resistance changes caused by phase transformation. This enables to determine the crystal growth velocity in the temperature range between 750 and 860 degrees C in a single experiment.......The measurement of the crystal growth velocity is carried out by analysing the change in the resistivity of the sample. The calculation of the crystal growth velocity is developed for crystal formation in the volume, crystal growth initiated at the electrodes as well as perpendicular...

  13. Addressing fear of crime in public space: gender differences in reaction to safety measures in train transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Nilay; Welch, Eric W

    2010-01-01

    Research has identified several factors that affect fear of crime in public space. However, the extent to which gender moderates the effectiveness of fear-reducing measures has received little attention. Using data from the Chicago Transit Authority Customer Satisfaction Survey of 2003, this study aims to understand whether train transit security practices and service attributes affect men and women differently. Findings indicate that, while the presence of video cameras has a lower effect on women's feelings of safety compared with men, frequent and on-time service matters more to male passengers. Additionally, experience with safety-related problems affects women significantly more than men. Conclusions discuss the implications of the study for theory and gender-specific policies to improve perceptions of transit safety.

  14. Dating Violence, Bullying, and Sexual Harassment: Longitudinal Profiles and Transitions over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Shari; Williams, Jason; Cutbush, Stacey; Gibbs, Deborah; Clinton-Sherrod, Monique; Jones, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Although there is growing recognition of the problem of dating violence, little is known about how it unfolds among young adolescents who are just beginning to date. This study examined classes (subgroups) and transitions between classes over three time points based on dating violence, bullying, and sexual harassment perpetration and victimization…

  15. Simultaneous Optimization of Container Ship Sailing Speed and Container Routing with Transit Time Restrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsten, Christian Vad; Røpke, Stefan; Pisinger, David

    We introduce a decision support tool for liner shipping companies to optimally determine the sailing speed and needed fleet for a global network. As a novelty we incorporate cargo routing decisions with tight transit time restrictions on each container such that we get a realistic picture...

  16. Influence of orocaecal transit time on hydrogen excretion after carbohydrate malabsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Hamberg, O; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether changes in orocaecal transit time (OCTT) affect the magnitude of the breath hydrogen (H2) excretion after ingestion of unabsorbable carbohydrate. We studied eight healthy subjects by interval sampling of end expiratory H2 concentration for 12...

  17. Splitting the scotoperiod: effects on feeding behaviour, intestinal fill and digestive transit time in broiler chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duve, Linda Rosager; Steenfeldt, Sanna; Thodberg, Karen

    2011-01-01

    points (n¼192). Digestive transit time was estimated on d 29 using a chromic oxide marker; production variables and the extent of foot pad dermatitis were also recorded. 4. In the 3 h prior to a scotoperiod, feeding activity increased in chickens from DARK 8 but not DARK 4þ4. This increase was reflected...

  18. Linearity Testing in Time-Varying Smooth Transition Autoregressive Models under Unknown Degree of Persistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandberg, Rickard; Kruse, Robinson

    Building upon the work of Vogelsang (1998) and Harvey and Leybourne (2007) we derive tests that are invariant to the order of integration when the null hypothesis of linearity is tested in time-varying smooth transition models. As heteroscedasticity may lead to spurious rejections of the null...

  19. Limit Properties of Transition Functions of Continuous-Time Markov Branching Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam A. Imomov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Consider the Markov Branching Process with continuous time. Our focus is on the limit properties of transition functions of this process. Using differential analogue of the Basic Lemma we prove local limit theorems for all cases and observe invariant properties of considering process.

  20. Influence of Convective Effect of Solar Winds on the CME Transit Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lu-yuan

    2017-10-01

    Based on an empirical model for predicting the transit time of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) proposed by Gopalswamy, 52 CME events which are related to the geomagnetic storms of Dst Dst < -200 nT) in 1996- 2007 are selected, and combined with the observational data of the interplanetary solar winds that collected by the ACE satellite at 1AU, to analyze the influence of convective effect of ambient solar winds on the prediction of the CME transit time when it arrives at a place of 1 AU. After taking the convective effect of ambient solar winds into account, the standard deviation of predictions is reduced from 16.5 to 11.4 hours for the 52 CME events, and the prediction error is less than 15 hours for 68% of these events; while the standard deviation of predictions is reduced from 10.6 to 6.5 hours for the 10 CME events that caused extremely strong geomagnetic storms, and the prediction error is less than 5 hours for 6 of the 10 events. These results show that taking the convective effect of ambient solar winds into account can reduce the standard deviation of the predicted CME transit time, hence the convective effect of solar winds plays an important role for predicting the transit times of CME events.

  1. Time evolution of chiral phase transition at finite temperature and density in the linear sigma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Koide, Tomoi; Maruyama, Masahiro [Tohoku Univ., Faculty of Science, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    There are various approaches to nonequilibrium system. We use the projection operator method investigated by F. Shibata and N. Hashitsume on the linear sigma model at finite temperature and density. We derive a differential equation of the time evolution for the order parameter and pion number density in chiral phase transition. (author)

  2. Nonparametric estimation in an "illness-death" model when all transition times are interval censored

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydman, Halina; Gerds, Thomas; Grøn, Randi

    2013-01-01

    veneers. Using the self-consistency algorithm we obtain the maximum likelihood estimators of the cumulative incidences of the times to events 1 and 2 and of the intensity of the 1 → 2 transition. This work generalizes previous results on the estimation in an "illness-death" model from interval censored...

  3. Estimating and Testing Continuous-Time Models in Finance: The Role of Transition Densities

    OpenAIRE

    Yacine Aït-Sahalia

    2009-01-01

    This article surveys recent developments to estimate and test continuous-time models in finance using discrete observations on the underlying asset price or derivative securities' prices. Both parametric and nonparametric methods are described. All these methods share a common focus on the transition density as the central object for inference and testing of the model.

  4. The effect of coffee on gastric emptying and oro-caecal transit time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, P. J.; Lo, B.; Samsom, M.; Akkermans, L. M.; Smout, A. J.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The consumption of coffee allegedly induces or aggravates gastrointestinal symptoms. In order to investigate the effect of coffee on gastrointestinal motility we studied the effect of coffee on gastric emptying and oro-caecal transit time. METHODS: In a randomised, controlled, cross-over

  5. Transit time for water distribution in the northern part of the Muda irrigation scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Md Shahid Ayub; Kamarudin Samuding; Kamisah Alias

    2002-01-01

    This study was carried out to establish the transit times for high and low flow from the Pedu Dam through the northern part of the Muda irrigation Scheme. The result of the study would assist in the management of water released from the Pedu Dam into the irrigation system thus sustaining the rice production in the area. Peak to peak method was employed and I was used as a tracer. At high discharge, it took 3.3 days for the water from the Pedu Dam to reach the end of the system, whereas at low discharge it took 7.5 days. The transit time at high discharge seems to be more linear with distance as compared to the low discharge. For low discharge, the linearity was observed to hold only from Pedu to Kampong Kubu, after which the gradient of transit time against distance curve increased with increase of distance along the North Canal, and then decreased along the Arau Canal. For high discharge, the transit time gradient could be divided into three portions, but the differences were not significant. (Author)

  6. Timing, cause and consequences of mid-Holocene climate transition in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saraswat, R.; Naik, Dinesh K.; Nigam, R.; Gaur, A.S.

    the timing, consequences and possible causes of the mid-Holocene climate transition (MHCT). A distinct shift in evaporation-precipitation (E-P) is observed at 6.4 ka, accompanied by a net cooling of SST. The shift in SST and E-P is synchronous with a change...

  7. Soundgate: A sound device to measure time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Takeco Gobara

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available At  the  present  article  we  refer  to  the  pedagogical  use  and the construction of an experimental device whose cost is minimum to measure periods, specifically of a simple pendulum. In this case the low-cost instruments are  available to the teachers at schools. Its operation is similar to the Photogate, an electronics device that contains  emission  and  reception  of  infrared  light.  The  new suggested device changes light into sound during its operation so we denominated it, Soundgate.

  8. Measurement and Simulation of Coaxial to Microstrip Transitions' Radiation Properties and Substrate Influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Moravek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A radiation and electro-magnetic (EM field analysis of coaxial-to-microstrip transitions is presented. Radiation is quantified by simulation and measurement of a crosstalk between two Omni-Spectra's transitions using microstrip 'open' calibration standards at different positions. Simulation results are compared to the measured data and good agreement is reported on two different substrates. The evaluation method which is used to analyze quality of the transition and its radiation properties was already developed and verified on a grounded coplanar waveguide (CPWG transmission line. Results can be used to estimate uncertainty budget of the calibrated measurement with respect to the measured radiation. Results on different substrates show interesting behaviour and can prove useful when choosing suitable substrate for specific test-fixture.

  9. Thermally activated state transition technique for femto-Newton-level force measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng-Jung; Wong, Jhih-Sian; Hsu, Ken Y; Hsu, Long

    2012-05-01

    We develop and test a thermally activated state transition technique for ultraweak force measurement. As a force sensor, the technique was demonstrated on a classical Brownian bead immersed in water and restrained by a bistable optical trap. A femto-Newton-level flow force imposed on this sensor was measured by monitoring changes in the transition rates of the bead hopping between two energy states. The treatment of thermal disturbances as a requirement instead of a limiting factor is the major feature of the technique, and provides a new strategy by which to measure other ultraweak forces beyond the thermal noise limit.

  10. Bunching transition in a time-headway model of a bus route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, T

    2001-03-01

    A time-headway model is presented to mimic bus behavior on the bus route. The motion of a bus is described in terms of the time headway between its bus and the bus in front. We study the bunching behavior of buses induced by interacting with other buses and passengers. It is shown that the dynamical phase transitions among the inhomogeneous bunching phase, the homogeneous free phase, the coexisting phase, and the homogeneous congested phase occur with varying the initial time headway. We study the effect of not stopping at bus stops on the time-headway profile. It is found that the bunching transition lines are consistent with the neutral stability curves obtained by the linear stability analysis.

  11. Ownership of consumer electronics is associated with measures of adiposity during health transition in Vanuatu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng; Pomer, Alysa; Dancause, Kelsey N; Chan, Chim W; Olszowy, Kathryn M; Silverman, Harold; Lee, Gwang; Tarivonda, Len; Taleo, George; Regenvanu, Ralph; Kaneko, Akira; Weitz, Charles A; Garruto, Ralph M; Lum, J Koji

    2017-03-01

    The Republic of Vanuatu, like many developing nations, is undergoing a rapid health transition. Our previous study identified several behavioral risk factors for the rising prevalence of obesity. Unexpectedly, daily time spent using television and radio was revealed as a protective factor for obesity in 2007. In this study, we sought to explore associations between ownership of consumer electronics (CE) and measures of adiposity in Vanuatu in 2011. We surveyed 873 adults from five islands varying in level of economic development. Height, weight, and waist circumferences; triceps, subscapular, and suprailiac skinfolds; and percent body fat by bioelectrical impedance were measured. Ownership of eight types of CE, diet through 24-h dietary recall and leisure-time activity patterns were assessed using a questionnaire. Participants from more developed islands owned more types of CE, and revealed higher measures of adiposity on average as well as higher prevalence of obesity/central obesity. When controlling for demographic factors, and dietary and activity patterns, increased measures of adiposity and risk for obesity/central obesity were associated with ownership of cellphones, music players, televisions, video players, microwaves, and/or refrigerators. Positive correlations between CE ownership and measures of adiposity were mainly observed among men on the two most developed islands. The results of this study indicate a possible role of CE use in the rising prevalence of obesity and the shift to a sedentary lifestyle in Vanuatu and many other modernizing regions, where prevention efforts including education on healthy use of CE are imperative. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Enzyme reactions and their time resolved measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajdu, Janos

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses experimental strategies in data collection with the Laue method and summarises recent results using synchrotron radiation. Then, an assessment is made of the progress towards time resolved studies with protein crystals and the problems that remain. The paper consists of three parts which respectively describe some aspects of Laue diffraction, recent examples of structural results from Laue diffraction, and kinetic Laue crystallography. In the first part, characteristics of Laue diffraction is discussed first, focusing on the harmonics problems, spatials problem, wavelength normalization, low resolution hole, data completeness, and uneven coverage of reciprocal space. Then, capture of the symmetry unique reflection set is discussed focusing on the effect of wavelength range on the number of reciprocal lattice points occupying diffracting positions, effect of crystal to film distance and the film area and shape on the number of reflections captured, and effect of crystal symmetry on the number of unique reflections within the number of reflections captured. The second part addresses the determination of the structure of turkey egg white lysozyme, and calcium binding in tomato bushy stunt virus. The third part describes the initiation of reactions in enzyme crystals, picosecond Laue diffraction at high energy storage rings, and detectors. (N.K.)

  13. Scintigraphic determination of the effect of metoclopramide and morphine on small intestinal transit time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokop, E.K.; Caride, V.J.; Winchenbach, K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    To determine if a scintigraphic method could detect pharmacologic changes in small intestinal transit time (SITT), 10 male volunteers were studied at baseline and after intravenously administered metoclopramide (10 mg) and morphine (8 mg). Five of these volunteers were studied with the hydrogen breath test method for comparison. For each of the scintigraphic studies, the volunteers were positioned supine under a large-field-of-view gamma camera after ingesting an isosmotic lactulose solution containing 99mtechnetium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). Data were collected and stored in a computer. Both gastric emptying and SITT were determined. SITT was 81 +/- 11 min (mean +/- S.E.M.; N = 10) during baseline studies, was decreased significantly to 50 +/- 6 min (N = 10; P less than 0.01) after metoclopramide, and was increased significantly to 161 +/- 15 min (N = 8; P less than 0.01) after morphine. Baseline mean values were 86.3 +/- 15 min (N = 15) for the hydrogen breath tests, 47 +/- 8 min (N = 5) for metoclopramide, and 183 +/- 16 min (N = 5) for morphine. For gastric emptying, there was no significant difference in percentage emptying at 1 hr for baseline and metochopramide (82 +/- 5% vs. 88 +/- 4%). Morphine prolonged gastric emptying at 1 hr to 63 +/- 8%. We conclude that the scintigraphic method for measuring SITT permits accurate investigation of the pharmacologic effects on intestinal motility and, in addition, may be a useful research and clinical method for SITT determination.

  14. The pursuit of new role: A study of luxury products consumption during the liminal transition into first time employment

    OpenAIRE

    Chucherd, Sunong

    2008-01-01

    Consumer behaviour research on role transition has so far been limited to the negative life changes and the changes-specific consequences towards the consumption pattern. Moreover, although young adult customers have recently been the new target customer for many luxury brands, no research has been conducted concerning the impacts of role transition during the transition into first-time employment and the role of luxury products in dealing with those effects. Liminal transition is also a new ...

  15. Sleep discontinuity and impaired sleep continuity affect transition to and from obesity over time: results from the Alameda county study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Maria; Kaplan, Robert M

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the impact of development in sleep continuity on transition to and from obesity over time. The study used self-reported sleep and body mass index (BMI) measures from the 1965, 1974, 1983, and 1994 waves of the longitudinal Alameda County Study. Sleep continuity was assessed by a question on whether the participants had any troubles falling or staying asleep. Change in sleep and BMI were estimated from the sleep and BMI questions in 1965 and 1994 respectively. Multinomial regression analyses were used to examine the risk/chance for a transition to and from obesity (BMI >or=30 kg/m(2)) due to development in sleep continuity. After adjustment for confounding variables, consistent sleep discontinuity both increases the risk for a transition to obesity and reduces the chance of losing weight, whereas impaired sleep continuity lowers the chance for weight loss. Effects for obesity were non-significant for those with improved sleep continuity. Consistent sleep discontinuity and impaired sleep continuity increases the risk of transition to obesity or of remaining obese.

  16. Measurements of transition probabilities in the range from vacuum ultraviolet to infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peraza Fernandez, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    In this memory we describe the design, testing and calibration of different spectrometers to measure transition probabilities from the vacuum ultraviolet to the infrared spectral region. For the infrared measurements we have designed and performed a phase sensitive detection system, using an InGaAs photodiode like detector. With this system we have determined the transition probabilities of infrared lines of KrI and XeI. For these lines we haven't found previous measurements. In the vacuum ultraviolet spectral region we have designed a 3 m normal incidence monochromator where we have installed an optical multichannel analyzer. We have tested its accurate working, obtaining the absorption spectrum of KrI. In the visible region we have obtained the emission spectrum of Al using different spectral: hallow-cathode lamp and Nd: YAG laser produced Al plasma. With these spectra we have determined different atomic parameters like transition probabilities and electron temperatures.(author). 83 refs

  17. Time-frequency analysis of the restricted three-body problem: transport and resonance transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vela-Arevalo, Luz V; Marsden, Jerrold E

    2004-01-01

    A method of time-frequency analysis based on wavelets is applied to the problem of transport between different regions of the solar system, using the model of the circular restricted three-body problem in both the planar and the spatial versions of the problem. The method is based on the extraction of instantaneous frequencies from the wavelet transform of numerical solutions. Time-varying frequencies provide a good diagnostic tool to discern chaotic trajectories from regular ones, and we can identify resonance islands that greatly affect the dynamics. Good accuracy in the calculation of time-varying frequencies allows us to determine resonance trappings of chaotic trajectories and resonance transitions. We show the relation between resonance transitions and transport in different regions of the phase space

  18. Detection of weak transitions in signal dynamics using recurrence time statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, J.B.; Cao Yinhe; Gu Lingyun; Harris, J.G.; Principe, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Signal detection in noisy and nonstationary environments is very challenging. In this Letter, we study why the two types of recurrence times [Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 3178] may be very useful for detecting weak transitions in signal dynamics. We particularly emphasize that the recurrence times of the second type may be more powerful in detecting transitions with very low energy. These features are illustrated by studying a number of speech signals with fricatives and plosives. We have also shown that the recurrence times of the first type, nevertheless, has the distinguished feature of being more robust to the noise level and less sensitive to the parameter change of the algorithm. Since throughout our study, we have not explored any features unique to the speech signals, the results shown here may indicate that these tools may be useful in many different applications

  19. Particle identification using the time-over-threshold method in the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akesson, T.; Arik, E.; Assamagan, K.; Baker, K.; Barberio, E.; Barberis, D.; Bertelsen, H.; Bytchkov, V.; Callahan, J.; Catinaccio, A.; Danielsson, H.; Dittus, F.; Dolgoshein, B.; Dressnandt, N.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eerola, P.; Farthouat, P.; Froidevaux, D.; Grichkevitch, Y.; Hajduk, Z.; Hansen, J. R.; Keener, P. T.; Kekelidze, G.; Konovalov, S.; Kowalski, T.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Krivchitch, A.; Laritchev, A.; Lichard, P.; Lucotte, A.; Lundberg, B.; Luehring, F.; Mailov, A.; Manara, A.; McFarlane, K.; Mitsou, V. A.; Morozov, S.; Muraviev, S.; Nadtochy, A.; Newcomer, F. M.; Olszowska, J.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Peshekhonov, V.; Rembser, C.; Romaniouk, A.; Rousseau, D.; Rust, D. R.; Schegelsky, V.; Sapinski, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Smirnov, S.; Smirnova, L. N.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Soutchkov, S.; Spiridenkov, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; Van Berg, R.; Vassilakopoulos, V.; Wang, C.; Williams, H. H.

    2001-12-01

    Test-beam studies of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) straw tube performance in terms of electron-pion separation using a time-over-threshold method are described. The test-beam data are compared with Monte Carlo simulations of charged particles passing through the straw tubes of the TRT. For energies below 10 GeV, the time-over-threshold method combined with the standard transition-radiation cluster-counting technique significantly improves the electron-pion separation in the TRT. The use of the time-over-threshold information also provides some kaon-pion separation, thereby significantly enhancing the B-physics capabilities of the ATLAS detector.

  20. Measurement of the Dead-Time in a Multichannel Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, L.; Olsen, J.

    1973-01-01

    By means of two simple measurements three different dead-times are determined: the normal dead-time, a dead-time coming from the pile-up, and a dead-time due to the finite width of the timing pulses.......By means of two simple measurements three different dead-times are determined: the normal dead-time, a dead-time coming from the pile-up, and a dead-time due to the finite width of the timing pulses....

  1. Accelerating the transit time of barium sulphate suspensions in small bowel examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, David S.; Roger, Mark D.; Allan, Paul L.; Murchison, John T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether hyperosmolar and effervescent agents proven individually to accelerate transit time in the barium small bowel examination have an additive effect when combined, surpassing that of either agent alone. Materials and methods: One hundred and forty-nine patients were randomised to four groups. Three hundred milliliters of barium sulphate alone was given to the first group. Fifteen milliliters of iodinated hyperosmolar contrast agent (Gastrografin, meglumine/sodium diatrizoate, Schering) was given in addition to barium sulphate to the second group while six packets of effervescent granules (Carbex, Ferring) were added for the third group. The final group was given a combination of both additives and barium sulphate. The time taken following ingestion for the contrast column to reach the caecum, as assessed by frequent interval fluoroscopy, was recorded. A subgroup of 32 patients were selected randomly from the four groups, 8 from each and assessed for quality of examination. Statistical assessments were made using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: One hundred and nineteen patients were analysed after exclusions. The addition of accelerant to barium sulphate, both individually and in combination significantly reduced the small bowel transit time (p < 0.001). No significant difference existed between the additives when used with barium alone. The combined group had significantly faster transit times compared to the hyperosmolar group (p = 0.02). Differences between combined and effervescent groups tended towards significance (p = 0.09). No significant difference existed between groups when examination quality was assessed. Conclusion: These results suggest that the addition of combined effervescent and hyperosmolar agents to the barium suspension may significantly shorten the small bowel transit time without adversely affecting examination quality. This has implications for patient acceptability of the examination as well as

  2. Challenges to Rainfall-Runoff and Transit Time Distribution Modeling Within the Southeastern Coastal Plain, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, P.; Cohen, M. J.; Jawitz, J. W.

    2017-12-01

    Previous hydrologic studies primarily focus on processes related to montane catchments with significant runoff ratios, low evapotranspiration rates, and reasonably short travel times. There is a significant lack of research for hydrologic processes occurring within the United States Southeastern Coastal Plain landscape where low-relief and high rates of evapotranspiration impact water fluxes. Hydrologic modeling efforts within this region may elucidate possible interactions and timescales of solute travel where much of the landscape is managed for agricultural crops, namely plantation forestry. A long-term paired watershed study carried out in northern Florida monitored two second-order blackwater streams for five years. Rainfall-runoff models for both catchments were created using daily discharge, precipitation, and modeled evapotranspiration as input parameters. Best fit occurred (NSE = 0.8) when the catchments were modeled as two-storage (shallow and deep) reservoirs in parallel and overland flow was allowed to contribute to streamflow in periods were shallow groundwater storage was at capacity. In addition, streamflow and rainfall chloride concentrations were used to model in-variable transit time distributions using spectral methods. In both catchments this transit time was unresolvable because output spectral power exceeded input spectral power, a result assumed to be driven by the evaporative demand of the region. A modeled chloride time series from random input concentration and modeled output through the rainfall-runoff model was used to alter the evaporation ratio. Once evaporation rates equaled known rates found in cool, high-relief catchments, spectral analysis illustrated higher input spectral power and therefore resolvable transit times. Findings from this study illustrate significant effects from evaporation within the catchment - often exceeding the signal from the background catchment process itself. Calculations illustrate a proposed mean transit

  3. Coast-down time measuring system based on photoelectric method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei-min; Wang, Da-yong; Qi, Fang

    2010-10-01

    Coast-down time measuring system can measure the time when speed values of Chassis Dynamometers for Automobile Emissions Testing change from initial velocity to end velocity under different load in a given speed range. This coast-down time will represent characters of Chassis Dynamometers for Automobile Emissions Testing such as Dynamometer inertia weight, constant load coast-down time, variable load coast-down time, Chassis Dynamometers for Automobile Emissions Testing can be calibrated by comparing these coast-down time with theoretical values. Working principle of coast-down time measuring system is a photoelectric sampler of coast-down time measuring system collects speed values information of Chassis Dynamometers for Automobile Emissions Testing. Then, determine speed values through calculation. When the velocity is equal to initial velocity Vb value, measuring system starts a timer. When speed reaches end velocity Ve value, measuring system stops the timer. So time interval is coast-down time from Vb to Ve. It is obvious that accuracy of coast-down time measurement lies on whether start and end velocity can be judged accurately and determined quickly, whether accuracy of timing can be admitted, and lies on how long these can be done. Coast-down time measuring system with photoelectric sampler proposed in this paper involves all the above factors, as well as improves measurement accuracy of coast-down time.

  4. Measuring alcohol use across the transition to adulthood: Racial/ethnic, sexual identity, and educational differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Jessica N; Pollitt, Amanda M; Schulenberg, John E; Russell, Stephen T

    2018-02-01

    Patterns of alcohol use change from adolescence to adulthood and may differ based on race/ethnicity, sexual identity, and education. If alcohol use measures do not operate consistently across groups and developmental periods, parameter estimates and conclusions may be biased. To test the measurement invariance of a multi-item alcohol use measure across groups defined by race/ethnicity, sexual identity, and college education during the transition to adulthood. Using three waves from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, we tested configural, metric, and scalar invariance of a 3-item alcohol use measure for groups defined by race/ethnicity, sexual identity, and college education at three points during the transition to adulthood. We then assessed longitudinal measurement invariance to test the feasibility of modeling developmental changes in alcohol use within groups defined by these characteristics. Overall, findings confirm notable variability in the construct reliability of a multi-item alcohol use measure during the transition to adulthood. The alcohol use measure failed tests of metric and scalar invariance, increasingly across ages, both between- and within-groups defined by race/ethnicity, sexual identity, and college education, particularly among females. Measurement testing is a critical step when utilizing multi-item measures of alcohol use. Studies that do not account for the effects of group or longitudinal measurement non-invariance may be statistically biased, such that recommendations for risk and prevention efforts could be misguided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Probiotic supplementation decreases intestinal transit time: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Larry E; Ouwehand, Arthur C

    2013-08-07

    To determine the efficacy of probiotic supplementation on intestinal transit time (ITT) and to identify factors that influence these outcomes. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of probiotic supplementation that measured ITT in adults was conducted by searching MEDLINE and EMBASE using relevant key word combinations. Main search limits included RCTs of probiotic supplementation in healthy or constipated adults that measured ITT. Study quality was assessed using the Jadad scale. A random effects meta-analysis was performed with standardized mean difference (SMD) of ITT between probiotic and control groups as the primary outcome. Meta-regression and subgroup analyses were conducted to examine the impact of moderator variables on ITT SMD. A total of 11 clinical trials with 13 treatment effects representing 464 subjects were included in this analysis. Probiotic supplementation was associated with decreased ITT in relation to controls, with an SMD of 0.40 (95%CI: 0.20-0.59, P probiotics in meta-regression. Subgroup analyses demonstrated statistically greater reductions in ITT with probiotics in subjects with vs without constipation and in older vs younger subjects [both SMD: 0.59 (95%CI: 0.39-0.79) vs 0.17 (95%CI: -0.08-0.42), P = 0.01]. Medium to large treatment effects were identified with Bifidobacterium Lactis (B. lactis) HN019 (SMD: 0.72, 95%CI: 0.27-1.18, P products yielded small treatment effects. Overall, short-term probiotic supplementation decreases ITT with consistently greater treatment effects identified in constipated or older adults and with certain probiotic strains.

  6. Examining the Experiences of Athletic Trainers as they transition into their First Full-Time Position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M. Mazerolle

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Transition to clinical practice is an important topic in athletic training, as it can be a period of time that presents challenges for the athletic trainer. Most of the research pertaining to transition to practice focuses on the skills and knowledge necessary for clinical practice, yet we know that stress can manifest from not only being an independent practitioner but also from learning how to balance one’s roles. We wanted to understand the perspective of today’s novice athletic trainers and how they feel in their first full-time position, specifically relating to their professional development and establishment or maintenance of work-life balance (WLB. Using a qualitative paradigm, we phone interviewed athletic trainers who were categorized as career starters by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association. Using a purposive recruitment strategy we were able to recruit 20 (12 female, 8 male athletic trainers meeting this classification. General inductive analyses were used to code the data from our interviews, and we satisfied credibility though saturation of the data, peer review, and researcher triangulations during the coding process. Our findings suggest that while confidence in clinical skills is apparent, some of the more administrative aspects of clinical practice present challenges. We found that various employment settings offered various expectations or challenges that had the potential to impact WLB. A blend of professional and organizational processes helped transition the athletic trainer, and although both were helpful each also could be bolstered to improve transitioning for the newly credentialed athletic trainer. Employers of early career starters should be aware of the stress related to transition to practice, and the time it can take to acclimate.

  7. Shock-induced phase transition of Tin: Experimental study with velocity and temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Camille; Bouchkour, Zakaria; Sinatti, Frédéric; Petit, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    To investigate polymorphic transition and melting on release of Tin, experiments under shock wave compression have been carried out from 10 GPa to 44 GPa with both velocity and temperature measurements. Interface Sn/LiF velocity has been recorded using Photon Doppler Velocimeter (PDV) measurement technique and interface Sn/LiF temperature has been performed thanks to an optical pyrometer appropriate to detect low and high temperatures (respectively 1000 K). While PDV measurements are common and accurate, temperature remains often imprecise due to the lack of knowledge on the emissivity of the sample. The use of an emissive layer at the interface Sn/LiF helps to estimate an accurate temperature measurement which can be compared to our numerical simulations. The profiles of both velocity and radiance records are in good agreement and display the polymorphic transition and the melting on release of Tin. Besides, temperature profiles can show complementary singularities particularly during phase transition, not visible on velocity profiles. This paper will discuss the evidence of phase transitions on temperature measurements, the complementarity with velocity measurements and the advantages of an emissive layer.

  8. The cost of travel time variability: three measures with properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelson, Leonid; Fosgerau, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the relationships between three types of measures of the cost of travel time variability: measures based on scheduling preferences and implicit departure time choice, Bernoulli type measures based on a univariate function of travel time, and mean-dispersion measures. We...... characterise measures that are both scheduling measures and mean-dispersion measures and measures that are both Bernoulli and mean-dispersion. There are no measures that are both scheduling and Bernoulli. We consider the impact of requiring that measures are additive or homogeneous, proving also a new strong...... result on the utility rates in an additive scheduling measure. These insights are useful for selecting cost measures to use in applications....

  9. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: IV. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by Simple Physical Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Rowe, Jason F.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Moorhead, Althea V.; /Florida U.; Batalha, Natalie M.; /San Jose State U.; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames; Bryson, Steve; /NASA, Ames; Buchhave, Lars A.; /Bohr Inst. /Copenhagen U.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames /Caltech

    2012-01-01

    Eighty planetary systems of two or more planets are known to orbit stars other than the Sun. For most, the data can be sufficiently explained by non-interacting Keplerian orbits, so the dynamical interactions of these systems have not been observed. Here we present 4 sets of lightcurves from the Kepler spacecraft, which each show multiple planets transiting the same star. Departure of the timing of these transits from strict periodicity indicates the planets are perturbing each other: the observed timing variations match the forcing frequency of the other planet. This confirms that these objects are in the same system. Next we limit their masses to the planetary regime by requiring the system remain stable for astronomical timescales. Finally, we report dynamical fits to the transit times, yielding possible values for the planets masses and eccentricities. As the timespan of timing data increases, dynamical fits may allow detailed constraints on the systems architectures, even in cases for which high-precision Doppler follow-up is impractical.

  10. Transition into daylight saving time influences the fragmentation of the rest-activity cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuulio-Henriksson Annamari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Daylight saving time is widely adopted. Little is known about its influence on the daily rest-activity cycles. We decided to explore the effects of transition into daylight saving time on the circadian rhythm of activity. Methods We monitored the rest-activity cycles with the use of wrist-worn accelerometer on a sample of ten healthy adults for ten days around the transition into summer time. Identical protocols were carried out on the same individuals in two consecutive years, yielding data on 200 person-days for analysis in this study. Results There was no significant effect on the rest-activity cycle in the sample as a whole. Fragmentation of the rest-activity cycle was enhanced in a subgroup of persons having sleep for eight hours or less (P = 0.04 but reduced in those who preferred to sleep for more than eight hours per night (P = 0.05. The average level of motor activity was increased in persons having the morning preference for daily activity patterns (P = 0.01. Conclusion Transition into daylight saving time may have a disruptive effect on the rest-activity cycle in those healthy adults who are short-sleepers or more of the evening type.

  11. Non-adiabatic transition of the fissioning nucleus at scission: the time scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carjan, N.; Rizea, M.

    2012-01-01

    The sudden approximation has been recently used to calculate the microscopic scission-properties during low-energy fission of 236 U. In this approach the scission process, i.e., the transition from two fragments connected by a thin neck to two separated fragments was considered to happen suddenly. The approach is stationary (the time evolution is not explicitly treated) and it only involves the two sets of neutron eigenstates for the two nuclear configurations considered: just before scission (α i ) and immediately after scission (α f ). The purpose of the present paper is to go beyond this mathematical approximation considering the real physical situation in which the above mentioned transition takes place in a time interval ΔT ≠ 0. For this we need to follow the evolution from α i to αf of all occupied neutron states by solving numerically the two-dimensional time-dependent Schroedinger equation with time-dependent potential. Calculations are performed for mass divisions from A L = 70 to A L = 118 (A L being the light fragment mass) taking into account all the neutron states (Ω = 1/2, 3/2,..., 11/2) that are bound in 236 U at α i . The diabatic-dissipative dynamics of the neck rupture is very complicated and its exact duration is un-known. ΔT is therefore taken as parameter having values from 0.25 x 10 -22 to 6 x 10 -22 sec. The resulting scission neutron multiplicities - sc and primary fragments' excitation energies E sc * are compared with those obtained in the frame of the sudden approximation (that corresponds to ΔT = 0). As expected, shorter is the transition time more excited are the fragments and more neutrons are emitted, the sudden approximation being an upper limit. For ΔT = 10 -22 sec, which is a realistic value, the time dependent results are 20% below this limit. For transition times longer than 5 x 10 -22 sec the adiabatic limit is reached: no scission neutrons are emitted anymore and the excitation energy at α f is negligible. The

  12. Measurement of peripheral electron temperature by electron cyclotron emission during the H-mode transition in JFT-2M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Katsumichi; Yamamoto, Takumi; Kawashima, Hisato

    1987-01-01

    Time evolution and profile of peripheral electron temperature during the H-mode like transition in a tokamak plasma is measured using the second and third harmonic of electron cyclotron emission (ECE). The so called ''H-mode'' state which has good particle/energy confinement is characterized by sudden decrease in the spectral line intensity of deuterium molecule. Such a sudden decrease in the line intensity of D α with good energy confinement is found not only in divertor discharges, but also in limiter dischargs in JFT-2M tokamak. It is found by the measurement of ECE that the peripheral electron temperature suddenly increases in both of such phases. The relation between H-transition and the peripheral electron temperature or its profile is investigated. (author)

  13. Changes to Workflow and Process Measures in the PICU During Transition From Semi to Full Electronic Health Record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salib, Mina; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Dasgupta, Mahua; Zimmerman, Haydee; Hanson, Sheila

    2015-10-01

    Studies showing the changes in workflow during transition from semi to full electronic medical records are lacking. This objective study is to identify the changes in workflow in the PICU during transition from semi to full electronic health record. Prospective observational study. Children's Hospital of Wisconsin Institutional Review Board waived the need for approval so this study was institutional review board exempt. This study measured clinical workflow variables at a 72-bed PICU during different phases of transition to a full electronic health record, which occurred on November 4, 2012. Phases of electronic health record transition were defined as follows: pre-electronic health record (baseline data prior to transition to full electronic health record), transition phase (3 wk after electronic health record), and stabilization (6 mo after electronic health record). Data were analyzed for the three phases using Mann-Whitney U test with a two-sided p value of less than 0.05 considered significant. Seventy-two bed PICU. All patients in the PICU were included during the study periods. Five hundred and sixty-four patients with 2,355 patient days were evaluated in the three phases. Duration of rounds decreased from a median of 9 minutes per patient pre--electronic health record to 7 minutes per patient post electronic health record. Time to final note decreased from 2.06 days pre--electronic health record to 0.5 days post electronic health record. Time to first medication administration after admission also decreased from 33 minutes pre--electronic health record and 7 minutes post electronic health record. Time to Time to medication reconciliation was significantly higher pre-electronic health record than post electronic health record and percent of medication reconciliation completion was significantly lower pre--electronic health record than post electronic health record and percent of medication reconciliation completion was significantly higher pre

  14. Using latent transition analysis in nursing research to explore change over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Tonya J; Ward, Sandra E

    2011-01-01

    Latent transition analysis is a method of modeling change over time in categorical variables. It has been used in the social sciences for many years, but not in nursing research. The purposes of this study were to illustrate the utility of latent transition analysis for nursing research by presenting a case example (a secondary analysis of data from a previously conducted randomized control trial testing the effectiveness of a tailored psychoeducational intervention to decrease patient-related attitudinal barriers to cancer pain management) and to understand for whom and in what direction the tailored intervention resulted in change with respect to attitudinal barriers and pain symptoms. The model was developed by (a) defining a class structure on the basis of individuals' barrier patterns, (b) adding demographic predictors and distal pain outcomes, and (c) modeling and testing transitions across classes. There were two classes of individuals: Low Barriers and High Barriers. Older, less educated individuals were more likely to be in the High Barriers class at Time 1. Individuals in either class did not have different pain outcomes at the end of the study. Of those individuals that transitioned across classes, those who received the intervention were statistically more likely to move in a favorable direction (to the Low Barriers class). Furthermore, there is evidence that some individuals in the control group had unfavorable outcomes. The results from the example provide useful information about for whom and in what direction the intervention resulted in change. Latent transition analysis is a valuable procedure for nurse researchers because it collapses large arrays of categorical data into meaningful patterns. It is a flexible modeling procedure with extensions allowing further understanding of a change process.

  15. Gastrointestinal transit of a solid indigestible capsule as measured by radiotelemetry and dual gamma scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mojaverian, P.; Chan, K.; Desai, A.; John, V.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate gastric and small bowel transit times of an indigestible solid matrix and to characterize the specific changes in intraluminal pH as a function of transit time through the gastrointestinal tract. Particular attention was paid to the lag time at the ileocecal junction. A Heidelberg capsule (HC), labeled with 10 microCi Indium-111, was given orally to six healthy male subjects 15 min after oral ingestion of 100 microCi of 99mTc-sulfur colloid as a liquid fatty meal (4 ml/kg). Intraluminal pH was monitored continuously via the HC. Gastric and small bowel transit of the radionuclides was monitored via external scintigraphy at 0.5-hr intervals. Gastric residence times (GRT) of the HC ranged from 2.8 to 4.8 hr. with a mean (+/- SD) of 3.6 +/- 0.8 hr. These values were independent of the individual's weight, height, or body surface area. Small bowel transit times of the HC ranged from 2.8 to greater than 5.5 hr. which were consistent with the reported values of 3 to 5 hr. The lag times of the HC at ileocecal junction ranged from 0.8 to greater than 2.5 hr. The presence of the lag times at the ileocecal junction in all subjects confirmed that it acts as a valve or sphincter. Mouth-to-cecum transit times of the HC occurred within 9.0 hr in 50% of the subjects. In general, following a sharp rise upon pyloric passage of HC the pH dropped slightly but then increased linearly throughout the small intestine

  16. Gastrointestinal transit of a solid indigestible capsule as measured by radiotelemetry and dual gamma scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mojaverian, P.; Chan, K.; Desai, A.; John, V. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The objectives of the present study were to evaluate gastric and small bowel transit times of an indigestible solid matrix and to characterize the specific changes in intraluminal pH as a function of transit time through the gastrointestinal tract. Particular attention was paid to the lag time at the ileocecal junction. A Heidelberg capsule (HC), labeled with 10 microCi Indium-111, was given orally to six healthy male subjects 15 min after oral ingestion of 100 microCi of 99mTc-sulfur colloid as a liquid fatty meal (4 ml/kg). Intraluminal pH was monitored continuously via the HC. Gastric and small bowel transit of the radionuclides was monitored via external scintigraphy at 0.5-hr intervals. Gastric residence times (GRT) of the HC ranged from 2.8 to 4.8 hr. with a mean (+/- SD) of 3.6 +/- 0.8 hr. These values were independent of the individual's weight, height, or body surface area. Small bowel transit times of the HC ranged from 2.8 to greater than 5.5 hr. which were consistent with the reported values of 3 to 5 hr. The lag times of the HC at ileocecal junction ranged from 0.8 to greater than 2.5 hr. The presence of the lag times at the ileocecal junction in all subjects confirmed that it acts as a valve or sphincter. Mouth-to-cecum transit times of the HC occurred within 9.0 hr in 50% of the subjects. In general, following a sharp rise upon pyloric passage of HC the pH dropped slightly but then increased linearly throughout the small intestine.

  17. Super-High Resolution Time Interval Measurement Method Based on Time-Space Relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao-Qiang, Du; Wei, Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Based on the principle of quantized delay-time, a super-high resolution time interval measurement method is proposed based on time-space relationships. Using the delay-time stability that time and frequency signal travel in a specific medium, the measured time interval can be quantized. Combined with the phase coincidence detection technique, the measurement of time can be changed into the measurement of space length. The resolution and the stability of the measurement system are easily improved. Experimental results show that the measurement resolution of the measured time interval depends on the length difference of the double delay-time unit. When the length difference is set up on millimeter level or sub-millimeter level, super-high measurement resolution from hundreds of picosecond to tens of picosecond can be obtained

  18. Measurements of branching fractions for electromagnetic transitions involving the χbJ(1P) states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kornicer, M.; Mitchell, R. E.; Tarbert, C. M.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Hietala, J.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T.; Brisbane, S.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Spradlin, P.; Wilkinson, G.; Mendez, H.; Ge, J. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Using (9.32, 5.88) million Υ(2S,3S) decays taken with the CLEO III detector, we obtain five product branching fractions for the exclusive processes Υ(2S)→γχ b0,1,2 (1P)→γγΥ(1S) and Υ(3S)→γχ b1,2 (1P)→γγΥ(1S). We observe the transition χ b0 (1P)→γΥ(1S) for the first time. Using the known branching fractions for B[Υ(2S)→γχ bJ (1P)], we extract values for B[χ bJ (1P)→γΥ(1S)] for J=0, 1, 2. In turn, these values can be used to unfold the Υ(3S) product branching fractions to obtain values for B[Υ(3S)→γχ b1,2 (1P)] for the first time individually. Comparison of these with each other and with the branching fraction B[Υ(3S)→γχ b0 ] previously measured by CLEO provides tests of relativistic corrections to electric dipole matrix elements.

  19. Time for change? Food choices in the transition to cohabitation and parenthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Christina; Dohle, Simone; Siegrist, Michael

    2014-12-01

    We compared the dietary behaviour of three different household types and explored developmental trends in food choices following a life event. The study is based on data from three Swiss Food Panel survey periods. A cross-sectional comparison between household types was conducted by using a one-way independent ANOVA. Repeated measures were analysed with a mixed ANCOVA to examine changes in dietary behaviour following a life event. Participants in the survey filled in a questionnaire in the years 2010, 2011 and 2012. The final sample consisted of 3559 persons with a mean age of 56 years (range 22-94 years; 46 % men). Seventy-two people moved in with their partner and sixty-five people reported the birth of their first child. Cross-sectional evidence confirmed that women living in households with a partner reported higher consumption frequencies for meat and processed meats compared with those living alone. Men living in cohabitation had a higher vegetable intake. The transitional effect of moving in with a partner, however, resulted in a higher intake of processed meats for both genders and a higher intake of pork and savoury items for men. Transition to motherhood was linked to an increase in vegetable consumption, while the transition to fatherhood did not change consumption patterns significantly. Individuals in life-stage transitions are more likely to change their nutritional strategies and life events can be a window of opportunity for changes towards better food choices.

  20. The Use of Stable Isotope Tracers to Quantify the Transit Time Distribution of Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, T. M.; Troch, P. A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Water pollution is an important societal problem because it can have harmful effects on human and ecological health. In order to improve water quality, scientists must develop land management methods that can avoid or mitigate environmental pollution. State of the art tools to develop such methods are flow and transport models that trace water and other solutes through the landscape. These models deliver important information that can lead to remediation efforts, and improve the quality of water for humans, plants, and animals. However, these models may be difficult to apply since many details about the catchment may not be available. Instead, a lumped approach is often used to find the water transit time using stable isotope tracers such as 18O and 2H that are naturally applied by precipitation to a catchment. The transit time distribution of water is an important indicator for the amount of solutes soil water and groundwater can contain, and thus a predictor of water quality. We conducted a 2-week long experiment using a tilted weighing lysimeter at Biosphere 2 to observe the breakthrough curves of deuterium and specific artificial DNA particles. We show that hydrological parameters can be computed in order to provide an estimate for the transit time distribution of deuterium. The convolution integral is then used to determine the distribution of the water transit time in the system. Unfortunately, stable isotopes such as deuterium make it difficult to pinpoint a specific flowpath since they naturally occur in the environment. Recent studies have shown that DNA tracers are able to trace water through the landscape. We found that DNA has a similar breakthrough curve happening at similar timescales as the deuterium. Therefore, DNA tracers may be able to identify sources of nonpoint source pollution in the future.

  1. The Transition to Parenthood: Predictors of Father Involvement and Marital Satisfaction for First-Time Parents

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Jerry L.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined some of the factors that influence father involvement for first time parent s. These variables included: general or cultural attitudes of father involvement, personal expectations for father involvement, and level of satisfaction with the marriage. A secondary purpose was to examine factors that buffer the decline of marital satisfaction associated with the transition to parenthood. It was proposed that marital satisfaction was associated with having similar expectations f...

  2. Picosecond time measurement using ultra fast analog memories

    OpenAIRE

    Breton, D.; Delagnes, E.; Maalmi, J.

    2009-01-01

    International audience; The currently existing electronics dedicated to precise time measurement is mainly based on the use of constant fraction discriminators (CFD) associated with Time to Digital Converters (TDC). The constant fraction technique minimizes the time walk effect (dependency of timing on the pulse amplitude). Several attempts have been made to integrate CFD in multi-channel ASICs. But the time resolution measured on the most advanced one is of the order of 30 ps rms. Two main t...

  3. Dynamic phase transitions in a cylindrical Ising nanowire under a time-dependent oscillating magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deviren, Bayram; Kantar, Ersin; Keskin, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic phase transitions in a cylindrical Ising nanowire system under a time-dependent oscillating external magnetic field for both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions are investigated within the effective-field theory with correlations and the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics approach. The effective-field dynamic equations for the average longitudinal magnetizations on the surface shell and core are derived by employing the Glauber transition rates. Temperature dependence of the dynamic magnetizations, the dynamic total magnetization, the hysteresis loop areas and the dynamic correlations are investigated in order to characterize the nature (first- or second-order) of the dynamic transitions as well as the dynamic phase transition temperatures and the compensation behaviors. The system strongly affected by the surface situations. Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the ratio of the physical parameters in the surface shell and the core. According to the values of Hamiltonian parameters, five different types of compensation behaviors in the Néel classification nomenclature exist in the system. The system also exhibits a reentrant behavior. - Highlights: ► The dynamic aspects of a cylindrical Ising nanowire are investigated in detail. ► The dynamic magnetizations, hysteresis loop areas and correlations are calculated. ► We studied both the FM and AFM interactions within the EFT with correlations. ► Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the interaction parameters. ► We obtained five different types of compensation behaviors and reentrant behavior.

  4. Dynamic phase transitions in a cylindrical Ising nanowire under a time-dependent oscillating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deviren, Bayram [Department of Physics, Nevsehir University, 50300 Nevsehir (Turkey); Kantar, Ersin [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Keskin, Mustafa, E-mail: keskin@erciyes.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2012-07-15

    The dynamic phase transitions in a cylindrical Ising nanowire system under a time-dependent oscillating external magnetic field for both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions are investigated within the effective-field theory with correlations and the Glauber-type stochastic dynamics approach. The effective-field dynamic equations for the average longitudinal magnetizations on the surface shell and core are derived by employing the Glauber transition rates. Temperature dependence of the dynamic magnetizations, the dynamic total magnetization, the hysteresis loop areas and the dynamic correlations are investigated in order to characterize the nature (first- or second-order) of the dynamic transitions as well as the dynamic phase transition temperatures and the compensation behaviors. The system strongly affected by the surface situations. Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the ratio of the physical parameters in the surface shell and the core. According to the values of Hamiltonian parameters, five different types of compensation behaviors in the Neel classification nomenclature exist in the system. The system also exhibits a reentrant behavior. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamic aspects of a cylindrical Ising nanowire are investigated in detail. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dynamic magnetizations, hysteresis loop areas and correlations are calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied both the FM and AFM interactions within the EFT with correlations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some characteristic phenomena are found depending on the interaction parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We obtained five different types of compensation behaviors and reentrant behavior.

  5. Efficient Transition Probability Computation for Continuous-Time Branching Processes via Compressed Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jason; Minin, Vladimir N

    2015-07-01

    Branching processes are a class of continuous-time Markov chains (CTMCs) with ubiquitous applications. A general difficulty in statistical inference under partially observed CTMC models arises in computing transition probabilities when the discrete state space is large or uncountable. Classical methods such as matrix exponentiation are infeasible for large or countably infinite state spaces, and sampling-based alternatives are computationally intensive, requiring integration over all possible hidden events. Recent work has successfully applied generating function techniques to computing transition probabilities for linear multi-type branching processes. While these techniques often require significantly fewer computations than matrix exponentiation, they also become prohibitive in applications with large populations. We propose a compressed sensing framework that significantly accelerates the generating function method, decreasing computational cost up to a logarithmic factor by only assuming the probability mass of transitions is sparse. We demonstrate accurate and efficient transition probability computations in branching process models for blood cell formation and evolution of self-replicating transposable elements in bacterial genomes.

  6. Gravitational waves from a supercooled electroweak phase transition and their detection with pulsar timing arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobakhidze, Archil; Lagger, Cyril; Manning, Adrian [University of Sydney, ARC Centre of Excellence for Particle Physics at the Terascale, School of Physics, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Yue, Jason [National Taiwan Normal University, Department of Physics, Taipei (China)

    2017-08-15

    We investigate the properties of a stochastic gravitational wave background produced by a first-order electroweak phase transition in the regime of extreme supercooling. We study a scenario whereby the percolation temperature that signifies the completion of the transition, T{sub p}, is as low as a few MeV (nucleosynthesis temperature), while most of the true vacuum bubbles are formed much earlier at the nucleation temperature, T{sub n} ∝ 50 GeV. This implies that the gravitational wave spectrum is mainly produced by the collisions of large bubbles and characterised by a large amplitude and a peak frequency as low as f ∝ 10{sup -9}-10{sup -7} Hz. We show that such a scenario can occur in (but not limited to) a model based on a non-linear realisation of the electroweak gauge group, so that the Higgs vacuum configuration is altered by a cubic coupling. In order to carefully quantify the evolution of the phase transition of this model over such a wide temperature range we go beyond the usual fast transition approximation, taking into account the expansion of the Universe as well as the behaviour of the nucleation probability at low temperatures. Our computation shows that there exists a range of parameters for which the gravitational wave spectrum lies at the edge between the exclusion limits of current pulsar timing array experiments and the detection band of the future Square Kilometre Array observatory. (orig.)

  7. Insights into the photochemical disproportionation of transition metal dimers on the picosecond time scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomont, Justin P; Nguyen, Son C; Harris, Charles B

    2013-05-09

    The reactivity of five transition metal dimers toward photochemical, in-solvent-cage disproportionation has been investigated using picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy. Previous ultrafast studies on [CpW(CO)3]2 established the role of an in-cage disproportionation mechanism involving electron transfer between 17- and 19-electron radicals prior to diffusion out of the solvent cage. New results from time-resolved infrared studies reveal that the identity of the transition metal complex dictates whether the in-cage disproportionation mechanism can take place, as well as the more fundamental issue of whether 19-electron intermediates are able to form on the picosecond time scale. Significantly, the in-cage disproportionation mechanism observed previously for the tungsten dimer does not characterize the reactivity of four out of the five transition metal dimers in this study. The differences in the ability to form 19-electron intermediates are interpreted either in terms of differences in the 17/19-electron equilibrium or of differences in an energetic barrier to associative coordination of a Lewis base, whereas the case for the in-cage vs diffusive disproportionation mechanisms depends on whether the 19-electron reducing agent is genuinely characterized by 19-electron configuration at the metal center or if it is better described as an 18 + δ complex. These results help to better understand the factors that dictate mechanisms of radical disproportionation and carry implications for radical chain mechanisms.

  8. Time-gated single-photon detection module with 110 ps transition time and up to 80 MHz repetition rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttafava, Mauro, E-mail: mauro.buttafava@polimi.it; Boso, Gianluca; Ruggeri, Alessandro; Tosi, Alberto [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Dalla Mora, Alberto [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-08-15

    We present the design and characterization of a complete single-photon counting module capable of time-gating a silicon single-photon avalanche diode with ON and OFF transition times down to 110 ps, at repetition rates up to 80 MHz. Thanks to this sharp temporal filtering of incoming photons, it is possible to reject undesired strong light pulses preceding (or following) the signal of interest, allowing to increase the dynamic range of optical acquisitions up to 7 decades. A complete experimental characterization of the module highlights its very flat temporal response, with a time resolution of the order of 30 ps. The instrument is fully user-configurable via a PC interface and can be easily integrated in any optical setup, thanks to its small and compact form factor.

  9. A Framework for Relating Timed Transition Systems and Preserving TCTL Model Checking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lasse; Jacobsen, Morten; Møller, Mikael Harkjær

    2010-01-01

    Many formal translations between time dependent models have been proposed over the years. While some of them produce timed bisimilar models, others preserve only reachability or (weak) trace equivalence. We suggest a general framework for arguing when a translation preserves Timed Computation Tree...... Logic (TCTL) or its safety fragment.The framework works at the level of timed transition systems, making it independent of the modeling formalisms and applicable to many of the translations published in the literature. Finally, we present a novel translation from extended Timed-Arc Petri Nets...... to Networks of Timed Automata and using the framework argue that itpreserves the full TCTL. The translation has been implemented in the verification tool TAPAAL....

  10. Measurement of Sub-Picosecond Electron Bunches via Electro-Optic Sampling of Coherent Transition Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Timothy John [Northern Illinois U.

    2012-01-01

    Future collider applications as well as present high-gradient laser plasma wakefield accelerators and free-electron lasers operating with picosecond bunch durations place a higher demand on the time resolution of bunch distribution diagnostics. This demand has led to significant advancements in the field of electro-optic sampling over the past ten years. These methods allow the probing of diagnostic light such as coherent transition radiation or the bunch wakefields with sub-picosecond time resolution. We present results on the single-shot electro-optic spectral decoding of coherent transition radiation from bunches generated at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector laboratory. A longitudinal double-pulse modulation of the electron beam is also realized by transverse beam masking followed by a transverse-to-longitudinal phase-space exchange beamline. Live profile tuning is demonstrated by upstream beam focusing in conjunction with downstream monitoring of single-shot electro-optic spectral decoding of the coherent transition radiation.

  11. Regional Gastrointestinal Transit Times in Patients With Carcinoid Diarrhea: Assessment With the Novel 3D-Transit System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Tine; Haase, Anne-Mette; Schlageter, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: The paucity of knowledge regarding gastrointestinal motility in patients with neuroendocrine tumors and carcinoid diarrhea re-stricts targeted treatment. 3D-Transit is a novel, minimally invasive, ambulatory method for description of gastrointestinal motility. The system has...... and seven patients with neuroendocrine tumor and at least 3 bowel movements per day were inves-tigated with 3D-Transit and standard radiopaque markers. RESULTS: Total GITT assessed with 3D-Transit and radiopaque markers were well correlated (Spearman's rho = 0.64, P = 0.002). Median total GITT was 12...

  12. A new methodology for measuring time correlations and excite states of atoms and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcante, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    A system for measuring time correlation of physical phenomena events in the range of 10 -7 to 10 5 sec is proposed, and his results presented. This system, is based on a sequential time scale which is controlled by a precision quartz oscillator; the zero time of observation is set by means of a JK Flip-Flop, which is operated by a negative transition of pulse in coincidence with the pulse from a detector which marks the time zero of the event (precedent pulse). This electronic system (named digital chronoanalizer) was used in the measurement of excited states of nuclei as well as for the determination of time fluctuations in physical phenomena, such as the time lag in a halogen Geiger counter and is the measurement of the 60 KeV excited state of N P 237 . (author)

  13. Femtosecond Near Edge X-ray Absorption Measurement of the VO2 Phase Transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalleri, A.; Chong, H.H.W.; Fourmaux, S.; Glover, T.E.; Heimann, P.A; Kieffer, J.C.; Padmore, H.A.; Schoenlein, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    The authors measure the insulator-to-metal transition in VO 2 using femtosecond Near-Edge X-ray Absorption. Sliced pulses of synchrotron radiation are used to detect the photo-induced dynamics at the 516-eV Vanadium L 3 edge

  14. MEASURING TRANSIT SIGNAL RECOVERY IN THE KEPLER PIPELINE. I. INDIVIDUAL EVENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, Jessie L.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Burke, Christopher J.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Haas, Michael R.; Seader, Shawn; Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph D.; Thompson, Susan E. [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Barclay, Thomas S. [Bay Area Environmental Research Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Ford, Eric B. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States); Sabale, Anima; Uddin, Akm Kamal, E-mail: jessie.l.christiansen@nasa.gov [Orbital Sciences Corporation/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    The Kepler mission was designed to measure the frequency of Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. A crucial component for recovering the underlying planet population from a sample of detected planets is understanding the completeness of that sample-the fraction of the planets that could have been discovered in a given data set that actually were detected. Here, we outline the information required to determine the sample completeness, and describe an experiment to address a specific aspect of that question, i.e., the issue of transit signal recovery. We investigate the extent to which the Kepler pipeline preserves individual transit signals by injecting simulated transits into the pixel-level data, processing the modified pixels through the pipeline, and comparing the measured transit signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) to that expected without perturbation by the pipeline. We inject simulated transit signals across the full focal plane for a set of observations for a duration of 89 days. On average, we find that the S/N of the injected signal is recovered at MS = 0.9973({+-} 0.0012) Multiplication-Sign BS - 0.0151({+-} 0.0049), where MS is the measured S/N and BS is the baseline, or expected, S/N. The 1{sigma} width of the distribution around this correlation is {+-}2.64%. This indicates an extremely high fidelity in reproducing the expected detection statistics for single transit events, and provides teams performing their own periodic transit searches the confidence that there is no systematic reduction in transit signal strength introduced by the pipeline. We discuss the pipeline processes that cause the measured S/N to deviate significantly from the baseline S/N for a small fraction of targets; these are primarily the handling of data adjacent to spacecraft re-pointings and the removal of harmonics prior to the measurement of the S/N. Finally, we outline the further work required to characterize the completeness of the Kepler pipeline.

  15. Contrast fluoroscopic evaluation of gastrointestinal transit times with and without the use of falconry hoods in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doss, Grayson A; Williams, Jackie M; Mans, Christoph

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate gastrointestinal transit times in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) by use of contrast fluoroscopic imaging and investigate the effect of falconry hooding in these hawks on gastrointestinal transit time. DESIGN Prospective, randomized, blinded, complete crossover study. ANIMALS 9 healthy red-tailed hawks. PROCEDURES Hawks were gavage-fed a 30% weight-by-volume barium suspension (25 mL/kg [11.3 mL/lb]) into the crop. Fluoroscopic images were obtained at multiple time points after barium administration. Time to filling and emptying of various gastrointestinal tract organs and overall transit time were measured. The effect of hooding (hooded vs nonhooded) on these variables was assessed in a randomized complete crossover design. RESULTS In nonhooded birds, overall gastrointestinal transit time ranged from 30 to 180 minutes (mean ± SD, 100 ± 52 min). Time to complete crop emptying ranged from 30 to 180 minutes (83 ± 49 min). Contrast medium was present in the ventriculus in all birds within 5 minutes of administration and in the small intestines within 5 to 15 minutes (median, 5 min). Hooding of red-tailed hawks resulted in a significant delay of complete crop emptying (no hood, 83 ± 49 minutes; hood, 133 ± 48 minutes), but no significant effects of hooding were found on other measured variables. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE These results indicated that overall gastrointestinal transit times are faster in red-tailed hawks than has been reported for psittacines and that the use of a falconry hood in red-tailed hawks may result in delayed crop emptying. Hooding did not exert significant effects on overall gastrointestinal transit time in this raptorial species.

  16. Runoff Generation Mechanisms and Mean Transit Time in a High-Elevation Tropical Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, G.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding runoff generation processes in tropical mountainous regions remains poorly understood, particularly in ecosystems above the tree line. Here, we provide insights on the process dominating the ecohydrology of the tropical alpine biome (i.e., páramo) of the Zhurucay River Ecohydrological Observatory. The study site is located in south Ecuador between 3400-3900 m in elevation. We used a nested monitoring system with eight catchments (20-753 ha) to measure hydrometric data since December 2010. Biweekly samples of rainfall, streamflow, and soil water at low tension were collected for three years (May 2011-May2014) and analyzed for water stable isotopes. We conducted an isotopic characterization of rainfall, streamflow, and soil waters to investigate runoff generation. These data were also integrated into a lumped model to estimate the mean transit time (MTT) and to investigate landscape features that control its variability. The isotopic characterization evidenced that the water stored in the shallow organic horizon of the Histosol soils (Andean wetlands) located near the streams is the major contributor of water to the streams year-round, whereas the water draining through the hillslope soils, the Andosols, regulates discharge by recharging the wetlands at the valley bottoms. The MTT evaluation indicated relatively short MTTs (0.15-0.73 yr) linked to short subsurface flow paths of water. We also found evidence for topographic controls on the MTT variability. These results reveal that: 1) the ecohydrology of this ecosystem is dominated by shallow subsurface flow in the organic horizon of the soils and 2) the combination of the high storage capacity of the Andean wetlands and the slope of the catchments controls runoff generation and the high water regulation capacity of the ecosystem.

  17. Influence of Sensor Ingestion Timing on Consistency of Temperature Measures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goodman, Daniel A; Kenefick, Robert W; Cadarette, Bruce S; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2009-01-01

    ... (ITS) to measure core body temperature have been demonstrated. However, the effect of elapsed time between ITS ingestion and Tint measurement has not been thoroughly studied. Methods: Eight volunteers...

  18. The Hetu'u Global Network: Measuring the Distance to the Sun with the Transit of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, David; Faherty, J.

    2013-01-01

    In the spirit of historic astronomical endeavors, we invited school groups across the globe to collaborate in a solar distance measurement using the 2012 transit of Venus. In total, our group (stationed at Easter Island, Chile) recruited 19 school groups spread over 6 continents and 10 countries to participate in our Hetu’u Global Network. Applying the methods of French astronomer Joseph-Nicolas Delisle, we used individual second and third Venus-Sun contact times to calculate the distance to the Sun. Ten of the sites in our network had amiable weather; 8 of which measured second contact and 5 of which measured third contact leading to consistent solar distance measurements of 152+/-30 million km and 163+/-30 million km respectively. The distance to the Sun at the time of the transit was 152.25 million km; therefore, our measurements are also consistent within 1-sigma of the known value. The goal of our international school group network was to inspire the next generation of scientists using the excitement and accessibility of such a rare astronomical event. In the process, we connected hundreds of participating students representing a diverse, multi-cultural group with differing political, economic, and racial backgrounds.

  19. An autocorrelation technique for measuring sub-picosecond bunch length using coherent transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, W.

    1991-01-01

    A new technique for determining sub-picosecond bunch length using infrared transition radiation and interferometry is proposed. The technique makes use of an infrared Michelson interferometer for measuring the autocorrelation of transition radiation emitted from a thin conducting foil placed in the beam path. The theory of coherent radiation from a charged particle beam passing through a thin conducting foil is presented. Subsequently, the analysis of this radiation through Michelson interferometry is shown to provide the autocorrelation of the longitudinal bunch profile. An example relevant to the CEBAF front end test is discussed. (author)

  20. Transit timing variations for planets co-orbiting in the horseshoe regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vokrouhlický, David [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, CZ-18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Nesvorný, David, E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz, E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.edu [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    Although not yet detected, pairs of exoplanets in 1:1 mean motion resonance probably exist. Low eccentricity, near-planar orbits, which in the comoving frame follow horseshoe trajectories, are one of the possible stable configurations. Here we study transit timing variations (TTVs) produced by mutual gravitational interaction of planets in this orbital architecture, with the goal to develop methods that can be used to recognize this case in observational data. In particular, we use a semi-analytic model to derive parametric constraints that should facilitate data analysis. We show that characteristic traits of the TTVs can directly constrain the (1) ratio of planetary masses and (2) their total mass (divided by that of the central star) as a function of the minimum angular separation as seen from the star. In an ideal case, when transits of both planets are observed and well characterized, the minimum angular separation can also be inferred from the data. As a result, parameters derived from the observed transit timing series alone can directly provide both planetary masses scaled to the central star mass.

  1. Transit timing variations for planets co-orbiting in the horseshoe regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vokrouhlický, David; Nesvorný, David

    2014-01-01

    Although not yet detected, pairs of exoplanets in 1:1 mean motion resonance probably exist. Low eccentricity, near-planar orbits, which in the comoving frame follow horseshoe trajectories, are one of the possible stable configurations. Here we study transit timing variations (TTVs) produced by mutual gravitational interaction of planets in this orbital architecture, with the goal to develop methods that can be used to recognize this case in observational data. In particular, we use a semi-analytic model to derive parametric constraints that should facilitate data analysis. We show that characteristic traits of the TTVs can directly constrain the (1) ratio of planetary masses and (2) their total mass (divided by that of the central star) as a function of the minimum angular separation as seen from the star. In an ideal case, when transits of both planets are observed and well characterized, the minimum angular separation can also be inferred from the data. As a result, parameters derived from the observed transit timing series alone can directly provide both planetary masses scaled to the central star mass.

  2. Period, epoch, and prediction errors of ephemerides from continuous sets of timing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeg, H. J.

    2015-06-01

    Space missions such as Kepler and CoRoT have led to large numbers of eclipse or transit measurements in nearly continuous time series. This paper shows how to obtain the period error in such measurements from a basic linear least-squares fit, and how to correctly derive the timing error in the prediction of future transit or eclipse events. Assuming strict periodicity, a formula for the period error of these time series is derived, σP = σT (12 / (N3-N))1 / 2, where σP is the period error, σT the timing error of a single measurement, and N the number of measurements. Compared to the iterative method for period error estimation by Mighell & Plavchan (2013), this much simpler formula leads to smaller period errors, whose correctness has been verified through simulations. For the prediction of times of future periodic events, usual linear ephemeris were epoch errors are quoted for the first time measurement, are prone to an overestimation of the error of that prediction. This may be avoided by a correction for the duration of the time series. An alternative is the derivation of ephemerides whose reference epoch and epoch error are given for the centre of the time series. For long continuous or near-continuous time series whose acquisition is completed, such central epochs should be the preferred way for the quotation of linear ephemerides. While this work was motivated from the analysis of eclipse timing measures in space-based light curves, it should be applicable to any other problem with an uninterrupted sequence of discrete timings for which the determination of a zero point, of a constant period and of the associated errors is needed.

  3. Identifying timescales and possible precursors of the awake to asleep transition in EOG time series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carniel, Roberto; Del Pin, Enrico; Budai, Riccardo; Pascolo, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    In this work we study the awake to asleep state transition in eye blinking activity. In this perspective the human electroculographic activity (EOG) was first experimentally investigated by means of a spectral analyses of the time series resulting for processes underlying both the brain activity and the eye dynamics. We studied the evolution of the spectral content both via the classical spectrogram and with the computation of summarizing scalar parameters: mean frequency, maximum frequency, spectral variance. With these tools we highlighted a significative dynamical change appearing before the transition from the awake to the asleep state, characterized by a general widening of the spectrum, that translates into a decrease of the maximum frequency, an increase of the average frequency and an increase of the spectral variance. Due to inherently high non-linearities involved, chaotic patterns were likely to occur in the experimental time series. These were analyzed therefore with the chaos theory. In particular we studied the time evolution of dynamical parameters as computed on different windows of the time series, i.e. optimal delay time as suggested by autocorrelation and mutual information on one side, embedding quality evaluation as suggested by the False Nearest Neighbours percentage on the other

  4. Television viewing, leisure-time exercise and acute coronary syndrome in transitional Albania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burazeri, Genc; Goda, Artan; Kark, Jeremy D

    2008-07-01

    To assess the association of leisure-time exercise and television (TV) viewing, a sedentary marker, with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in Albania, a transitional country in Southeast Europe. A population-based case-control study was conducted among Tirana residents in 2003-2006. Information on leisure-time exercise (transformed into kilocalories of energy expenditure) and daily hours of TV viewing was obtained by interviewer-administered questionnaire. 460 non-fatal ACS patients (368 men, 92 women) and 628 coronary heart disease-free controls (413 men, 215 women) were studied. Adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics, conventional coronary risk factors and leisure-time exercise, TV viewing was associated with ACS in women (OR=1.66, 95%CI=1.12-2.46 per hour/day viewing), but not in men (OR=0.93, 95%CI=0.81-1.07; P for sex-interaction=0.02). A low level of leisure-time exercise (adjusted also for TV viewing) was associated with ACS similarly in men and women (pooled sexes OR=2.03, 95%CI=1.29-3.22 for bottom vs top tertile of energy expenditure). Leisure-time inactivity is confirmed as an important risk factor for ACS also in Southeastern Europe. TV viewing may be an informative coronary risk marker in transitional societies, especially in women.

  5. Central aortic blood pressure, augmentation index, and reflected wave transit time: reproducibility and repeatability of data obtained by oscillometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ageenkova O

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Olga A Ageenkova, Marina A Purygina Department of Therapy, Functional and Ultrasound Diagnostics, Postgraduate Training Faculty of Smolensk State Medical Academy, Smolensk, Russian Federation Background: The evidence suggests that arterial stiffness acts as an independent predictor of general as well as cardiovascular mortality, strokes in patients with arterial hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus in the elderly, and in the general population. The oscillometric method measures parameters of arterial stiffness by applying special methods of processing oscillograms. This is a study of the reproducibility and repeatability of central aortic systolic blood pressure (SBP, augmentation index, and reflected wave transit time measured by Vasotens® technology. Methods: Anthropometric and hemodynamic measurements for 90 volunteers were made by two observers using the 24-hour blood pressure monitoring system, BPLab®, with Vasotens technology in "office" mode, over a period of two days and always at the same time in the morning. Initialization of the device was performed prior to each measurement cycle for each participant. Results: Analysis of short-term repeatability and reproducibility data for central aortic systolic blood pressure, reflected wave transit time, and augmentation index did not reveal any statistically significant differences. For observer A, SBP was 0.11 ± 7.53 mmHg and aortic SBP was 0.26 ± 6.11 mmHg; for observer B, SBP was 0.14 ± 8.42 and aortic SBP was 0.2 ± 7.25 mmHg. Short-term reproducibility for the different observers with averaging of both measurements was 0.36 ± 5.69 mmHg for SBP and 0.37 ± 6.7 mmHg for aortic SBP; the next day, repeatability for observer A was 0.52 ± 10.7 mmHg for SBP and 0.73 ± 8.98 mmHg for aortic SBP. Conclusion: BPLab with Vasotens technology has good reproducibility and repeatability, and can be recommended for clinical vascular risk estimation. Keywords: arterial stiffness, central aortic

  6. Transit time of river water in the Bering and Chukchi Seas estimated from δ18O and radium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Chen, Min; Jia, Renming; Zeng, Jian; Lin, Hui; Zheng, Minfang; Qiu, Yusheng

    2017-12-01

    Seawater samples for the measurements of 226Ra, 228Ra and stable oxygen isotope (δ18O) were collected from the Bering and Chukchi Seas in the summer of 2014. The fractions of meteoric water (fMW) and sea-ice melted water (fSIM) were estimated based on the mass balance of salinity and δ18O with a three end-member mixing model. Our results showed that the average fMW increased northward from the Bering Basin to the Canada Basin while the fSIM distributed homogeneously. The lowest fMW and 228Ra/226Ra)A.R. values were found in the upper Bering Basin with little terrestrial input. The highest fMW but low 228Ra/226Ra)A.R. appeared in the northern Chukchi Sea and the Canada Basin, ascribing to the current-driven accumulation of freshwater and its long residence time. More abundant sea-ice melted water was found on the pack-ice edge, indicating the trap of earlier melted waters by the ice pack. Based upon the linear relationships between 228Ra/226Ra)A.R. and fMW in the Bering Shelf and the Chukchi Shelf, the transit time for the Pacific inflow was constrained. The transit time of river water from the Bering Shelf to the Chukchi Shelf was estimated as 0.2-4.4 years with an average of 1.6 ± 1.5 years, while that from the Chukchi Shelf to the Canada Basin was 10.2-13.2 years with an average of 11.8 ± 1.1 years. The spatial variation of the transit time was mainly affected by the current intensity. Our study highlights the importance of in-depth evaluation for the subarctic-arctic exchange.

  7. Raman measurements of phase transitions in dense solid hydrogen and deuterium to 325 GPa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Chang-sheng; Cohen, R E; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, Russell J

    2014-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy of dense hydrogen and deuterium performed to 325 GPa at 300 K reveals previously unidentified transitions. Detailed analysis of the spectra from multiple experimental runs, together with comparison with previous infrared and Raman measurements, provides information on structural modifications of hydrogen as a function of density through the I-III-IV transition sequence, beginning near 200 GPa at 300 K. The data suggest that the transition sequence at these temperatures proceeds by formation of disordered stacking of molecular and distorted layers. Weaker spectral changes are observed at 250, 285, and 300 GPa, that are characterized by discontinuities in pressure shifts of Raman frequencies, and changes in intensities and linewidths. The results indicate changes in structure and bonding, molecular orientational order, and electronic structure of dense hydrogen at these conditions. The data suggest the existence of new phases, either variations of phase IV, or altogether new structures.

  8. Preferred gait and walk-run transition speeds in ostriches measured using GPS-IMU sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Monica A; Channon, Anthony J; Nolan, Grant S; Hall, Jade

    2016-10-15

    The ostrich (Struthio camelus) is widely appreciated as a fast and agile bipedal athlete, and is a useful comparative bipedal model for human locomotion. Here, we used GPS-IMU sensors to measure naturally selected gait dynamics of ostriches roaming freely over a wide range of speeds in an open field and developed a quantitative method for distinguishing walking and running using accelerometry. We compared freely selected gait-speed distributions with previous laboratory measures of gait dynamics and energetics. We also measured the walk-run and run-walk transition speeds and compared them with those reported for humans. We found that ostriches prefer to walk remarkably slowly, with a narrow walking speed distribution consistent with minimizing cost of transport (CoT) according to a rigid-legged walking model. The dimensionless speeds of the walk-run and run-walk transitions are slower than those observed in humans. Unlike humans, ostriches transition to a run well below the mechanical limit necessitating an aerial phase, as predicted by a compass-gait walking model. When running, ostriches use a broad speed distribution, consistent with previous observations that ostriches are relatively economical runners and have a flat curve for CoT against speed. In contrast, horses exhibit U-shaped curves for CoT against speed, with a narrow speed range within each gait for minimizing CoT. Overall, the gait dynamics of ostriches moving freely over natural terrain are consistent with previous lab-based measures of locomotion. Nonetheless, ostriches, like humans, exhibit a gait-transition hysteresis that is not explained by steady-state locomotor dynamics and energetics. Further study is required to understand the dynamics of gait transitions. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Measurement of Voice Onset Time in Maxillectomy Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Hattori

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective speech evaluation using acoustic measurement is needed for the proper rehabilitation of maxillectomy patients. For digital evaluation of consonants, measurement of voice onset time is one option. However, voice onset time has not been measured in maxillectomy patients as their consonant sound spectra exhibit unique characteristics that make the measurement of voice onset time challenging. In this study, we established criteria for measuring voice onset time in maxillectomy patients for objective speech evaluation. We examined voice onset time for /ka/ and /ta/ in 13 maxillectomy patients by calculating the number of valid measurements of voice onset time out of three trials for each syllable. Wilcoxon’s signed rank test showed that voice onset time measurements were more successful for /ka/ and /ta/ when a prosthesis was used (Z=−2.232, P=0.026 and Z=−2.401, P=0.016, resp. than when a prosthesis was not used. These results indicate a prosthesis affected voice onset measurement in these patients. Although more research in this area is needed, measurement of voice onset time has the potential to be used to evaluate consonant production in maxillectomy patients wearing a prosthesis.

  10. Comparable Measures of Accessibility to Public Transport Using the General Transit Feed Specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjoo Bok

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Public transport plays a critical role in the sustainability of urban settings. The mass mobility and quality of urban lives can be improved by establishing public transport networks that are accessible to pedestrians within a reasonable walking distance. Accessibility to public transport is characterized by the ease with which inhabitants can reach means of transportation such as buses or metros. By measuring the degree of accessibility to public transport networks using a common data format, a comparative study can be conducted between different cities or metropolitan areas with different public transit systems. The General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS by Google Developers allows this by offering a common format based on text files and sharing the data set voluntarily produced and contributed by the public transit agencies of many participating cities around the world. This paper suggests a method to assess and compare public transit accessibility in different urban areas using the GTFS feed and demographic data. To demonstrate the value of the new method, six examples of metropolitan areas and their public transit accessibility are presented and compared.

  11. The importance of water transit time and mineral dissolution kinetics for the flux of weathering products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsson, Martin; Bishop, Kevin; Köhler, Stephan; Amvrosiadi, Nino

    2016-04-01

    Soil mineral weathering is one of the major sources of base cations (BC), which play a dual role for a forest ecosystem; they function both as plant nutrients, and for buffering against acidification of catchment runoff. On a long-term basis, the soil weathering rates will determine the highest sustainable forest productivity without causing acidification. It is believed that the hydrologic residence time play a key role in determining weathering rates on a landscape scale. In this study, we investigate the significance of the water transit residence time (WTT) distribution for the transport of base cations to catchment runoff. By modelling hillslope flowpaths with different transit times, using the geochemical computing code PHREEQC, we demonstrate how in-stream dynamics as exemplified by elemental ratios can be explained by mineral dissolution kinetics and equilibria. Specifically, we hypothesize that equilibrium of plagioclase regulates the delivery of base cations and silica to catchment runoff. These patters can be seen in field data from 10 years of sampling from a nested-catchment, where the Na+/BC and the Si/BC-ratios vary systematically with WTT on both a temporal and a spatial scale. This behavior has implications for the total transport of products from mineral dissolution to catchment runoff. As the water entering the stream is a mixture of water with different transit times, the composition of stream water will not only be dependent on the average WTT, but also on the shape of the WTT distribution. For the base cations associated with minerals that becomes supersaturated or with precipitating secondary phases within the range of WTT, i.e. Na+ and K+, the tails of "old water" of the WRT-distribution will not contribute to any extra transport of these elements. Finally, we use the derived relationships to estimate the transport of weathering products from a forested hillslope, given the modelled WRT distribution.

  12. Analysis of thermal fluctuations in the semiscale tests to determine flow transit delay times using a transfer function cross-correlation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raptis, A.C.; Popper, G.F.

    1977-08-01

    On April 14, 1976, EG and G performed the Semiscale Blowdown 29-1 experiment to try to establish the feasibility of using a transit time flowmeter (TTF) to measure transient blowdown two-phase flow rates. The recorded signals from that experiment were made available to and analyzed by the Argonne National Laboratory using the transfer function cross-correlation technique. The theoretical background for the transfer function method of analysis and the results of the data analysis are presented. Histograms of transit time during the blowdown are shown and topics for further investigation are identified

  13. The impact of international trade on environmental quality in transition countries: evidence from time series data during 1991-2013.

    OpenAIRE

    Halicioglu, Ferda; Ketenci, Natalya

    2015-01-01

    This research presents first empirical time series evidence of the impact of international trade on environmental quality in the case of transition countries. The linkages between international trade and environmental quality are well established both theoretically and empirically in the literature. However, the empirical evidence relating to transition countries is non-existent as far as this study is concerned. Thus, our research aims at filling this gap. To this extent, fifteen transition ...

  14. Thermal lens and interferometric method for glass transition and thermo physical properties measurements in Nd2O3 doped sodium zincborate glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrath, N G C; Steimacher, A; Rohling, J H; Medina, A N; Bento, A C; Baesso, M L; Jacinto, C; Catunda, T; Lima, S M; Karthikeyan, B

    2008-12-22

    In this work the time resolved thermal lens method is combined with interferometric technique, the thermal relaxation calorimetry, photoluminescence and lifetime measurements to determine the thermo physical properties of Nd(2)O(3) doped sodium zincborate glass as a function of temperature up to the glass transition region. Thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity, fluorescence quantum efficiency, linear thermal expansion coefficient and thermal coefficient of electronic polarizability were determined. In conclusion, the results showed the ability of thermal lens and interferometric methods to perform measurements very close to the phase transition region. These techniques provide absolute values for the measured physical quantities and are advantageous when low scan rates are required.

  15. Ion trap measurement of U64+ x-ray transition spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Grande, N.K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Henderson, J.R.; Osterheld, A.L.; Scofield, J.H.; Swenson, J.K.

    1990-09-01

    Highly-charged uranium ions with a dominant nickel-like component (U 64+ ) were produced using the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) with an electron bombardment energy of 7.4 keV. A comparison of the measured n=4 to n=3 x-ray transition spectra with calculations for U 64+ gave excellent qualitative agreement. The low-energy region of the 4-3 spectrum for the Ni-like ions was characterized by a strong electric quadrupole 4s-3d transition, about as large as the leading dipole 4f-3d transition, which tagged the abundance of U 64+ ions. High resolution spectroscopy was used to measure 4f-3d transition energies for ten charge states: U 60+ -U 69+ excited by 6.4-8.9 keV electrons. The ionization balance for 8.9 keV electron excitation was mostly from five charge states: U 64+ -U 68+ in qualitative agreement with a separate analysis of extracted ions. 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Quality in transitional care of the elderly: Key challenges and relevant improvement measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Storm

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elderly people aged over 75 years with multifaceted care needs are often in need of hospital treatment. Transfer across care levels for this patient group increases the risk of adverse events. The aim of this paper is to establish knowledge of quality in transitional care of the elderly in two Norwegian hospital regions by identifying issues affecting the quality of transitional care and based on these issues suggest improvement measures.Methodology: Included in the study were elderly patients (75+ receiving health care in the municipality admitted to hospital emergency department or discharged to community health care with hip fracture or with a general medical diagnosis. Participant observations of admission and discharge transitions (n = 41 were carried out by two researchers.Results: Six main challenges with belonging descriptions have been identified: (1 next of kin (bridging providers, advocacy, support, information brokering, (2 patient characteristics (level of satisfaction, level of insecurity, complex clinical conditions, (3 health care personnel's competence (professional, system, awareness of others’ roles, (4 information exchange (oral, written, electronic, (5 context (stability, variability, change incentives, number of patient handovers and (6 patient assessment (complex clinical picture, patient description, clinical assessment.Conclusion: Related to the six main challenges, several measures have been suggested to improve quality in transitional care, e.g. information to and involvement of patients and next of kin, staff training, standardisation of routines and inter-organisational staff meetings.

  17. Quality in transitional care of the elderly: Key challenges and relevant improvement measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Storm

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Elderly people aged over 75 years with multifaceted care needs are often in need of hospital treatment. Transfer across care levels for this patient group increases the risk of adverse events. The aim of this paper is to establish knowledge of quality in transitional care of the elderly in two Norwegian hospital regions by identifying issues affecting the quality of transitional care and based on these issues suggest improvement measures. Methodology: Included in the study were elderly patients (75+ receiving health care in the municipality admitted to hospital emergency department or discharged to community health care with hip fracture or with a general medical diagnosis. Participant observations of admission and discharge transitions (n = 41 were carried out by two researchers. Results: Six main challenges with belonging descriptions have been identified: (1 next of kin (bridging providers, advocacy, support, information brokering, (2 patient characteristics (level of satisfaction, level of insecurity, complex clinical conditions, (3 health care personnel's competence (professional, system, awareness of others’ roles, (4 information exchange (oral, written, electronic, (5 context (stability, variability, change incentives, number of patient handovers and (6 patient assessment (complex clinical picture, patient description, clinical assessment. Conclusion: Related to the six main challenges, several measures have been suggested to improve quality in transitional care, e.g. information to and involvement of patients and next of kin, staff training, standardisation of routines and inter-organisational staff meetings.

  18. Measurement of time of travel in streams by dye tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, F.A.; Wilson, James F.

    1989-01-01

    The use of fluorescent dyes and tracing techniques provides a means for measuring the time-of-travel and dispersion characteristics of steady and gradually varied flow in streams. Measurements of the dispersion and concentration of dyes give insight into the behavior of soluble contaminants that may be introduced into a stream. This manual describes methods of measuring time of travel of water and waterborne solutes by dye tracing. The fluorescent dyes, measuring equipment used, and the field and laboratory procedures are also described. Methods of analysis and presentation to illustrate time-oftravel and dispersion characteristics of streams are provided.

  19. Critical space-time networks and geometric phase transitions from frustrated edge antiferromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trugenberger, Carlo A.

    2015-12-01

    Recently I proposed a simple dynamical network model for discrete space-time that self-organizes as a graph with Hausdorff dimension dH=4 . The model has a geometric quantum phase transition with disorder parameter (dH-ds) , where ds is the spectral dimension of the dynamical graph. Self-organization in this network model is based on a competition between a ferromagnetic Ising model for vertices and an antiferromagnetic Ising model for edges. In this paper I solve a toy version of this model defined on a bipartite graph in the mean-field approximation. I show that the geometric phase transition corresponds exactly to the antiferromagnetic transition for edges, the dimensional disorder parameter of the former being mapped to the staggered magnetization order parameter of the latter. The model has a critical point with long-range correlations between edges, where a continuum random geometry can be defined, exactly as in Kazakov's famed 2D random lattice Ising model but now in any number of dimensions.

  20. Characterisation of two-phase horizontal flow regime transition by the application of time-frequency analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seleghim, Paulo

    1996-01-01

    This work concerns the development of a methodology which objective is to characterize and diagnose two-phase flow regime transitions. The approach is based on the fundamental assumption that a transition flow is less stationary than a flow with an established regime. In a first time, the efforts focused on: 1) the design and construction of an experimental loop, allowing to reproduce the main horizontal two-phase flow patterns, in a stable and controlled way, 2) the design and construction of an electrical impedance probe, providing an imaged information of the spatial phase distribution in the pipe, the systematic study of the joint time-frequency and time-scale analysis methods, which permitted to define an adequate parameter quantifying the un-stationary degree. In a second time, in order to verify the fundamental assumption, a series of experiments were conducted, which objective was to demonstrate the correlation between un-stationary and regime transition. The un-stationary degree was quantified by calculating the Gabor's transform time-frequency covariance of the impedance probe signals. Furthermore, the phenomenology of each transition was characterized by the joint moments and entropy. The results clearly show that the regime transitions are correlated with local-time frequency covariance peaks, which demonstrates that these regime transitions are characterized by a loss of stationarity. Consequently, the time-frequency covariance constitutes an objective two-phase flow regime transition indicator. (author) [fr

  1. Objective quality measurement for audio time-scale modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Lee, Jae-Joon; Kuo, C. C. J.

    2003-11-01

    The recent ITU-T Recommendation P.862, known as the Perceptual Evaluation of Speech Quality (PESQ) is an objective end-to-end speech quality assessment method for telephone networks and speech codecs through the measurement of received audio quality. To ensure that certain network distortions will not affect the estimated subjective measurement determined by PESQ, the algorithm takes into account packet loss, short-term and long-term time warping resulted from delay variation. However, PESQ does not work well for time-scale audio modification or temporal clipping. We investigated the factors that impact the perceived quality when time-scale modification is involved. An objective measurement of time-scale modification is proposed in this research, where the cross-correlation values obtained from time-scale modification synchronization are used to evaluate the quality of a time-scaled audio sequence. This proposed objective measure has been verified by a subjective test.

  2. Time Delay for Aerial Ammonia Concentration Measurements in Livestock Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Rom; Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Correct measurements of ammonia concentration in air still present considerable challenges. The high water solubility and polarity can cause it to adsorb on surfaces in the entire sampling system, including sampling lines, filters, valves, pumps and instruments, causing substantial measuring errors and time delays. To estimate time delay characteristics of a Photo Acoustic Multi Gas Monitor 1312 and a Multi Point Sampler continuous measurement of aerial ammonia concentrations at different lev...

  3. How does landscape structure influence catchment transit time across different geomorphic provinces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, D.; Seibert, J.; McGuire, K.J.; Laudon, H.; Burns, Douglas A.; Dunn, S.M.; Soulsby, C.

    2009-01-01

    Despite an increasing number of empirical investigations of catchment transit times (TTs), virtually all are based on individual catchments and there are few attempts to synthesize understanding across different geographical regions. Uniquely, this paper examines data from 55 catchments in five geomorphic provinces in northern temperate regions (Scotland, United States of America and Sweden). The objective is to understand how the role of catchment topography as a control on the TTs differs in contrasting geographical settings. Catchment inverse transit time proxies (ITTPs) were inferred by a simple metric of isotopic tracer damping, using the ratio of standard deviation of ??18O in streamwater to the standard deviation of ??18O in precipitation. Quantitative landscape analysis was undertaken to characterize the catchments according to hydrologically relevant topographic indices that could be readily determined from a digital terrain model (DTM). The nature of topographic controls on transit times varied markedly in different geomorphic regions. In steeper montane regions, there are stronger gravitational influences on hydraulic gradients and TTs tend to be lower in the steepest catchments. In provinces where terrain is more subdued, direct topographic control weakened; in particular, where flatter areas with less permeable soils give rise to overland flow and lower TTs. The steeper slopes within this flatter terrain appear to have a greater coverage of freely draining soils, which increase sub-surface flow, therefore increasing TTs. Quantitative landscape analysis proved a useful tool for intercatchment comparison. However, the critical influence of sub-surface permeability and connectivity may limit the transferability of predictive tools of hydrological function based on topographic parameters alone. Copyright ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Regional Gastrointestinal Transit Times in Patients With Carcinoid Diarrhea: Assessment With the Novel 3D-Transit System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Tine; Haase, Anne-Mette; Schlageter, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: The paucity of knowledge regarding gastrointestinal motility in patients with neuroendocrine tumors and carcinoid diarrhea re-stricts targeted treatment. 3D-Transit is a novel, minimally invasive, ambulatory method for description of gastrointestinal motility. The system has not ...

  5. Novel computation of pulse transit time from multi-channel PPG signals by wavelet transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pielmuş Alexandru-Gabriel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Being able to accurately monitor blood pressure in a reliable, truly non-invasive manner is a highly sought after goal within the biomedical community. In this paper we propose and assess a system, methodology and algorithm for unobtrusively obtaining true pulse transit time data from readily accessible peripheral locations, such as the hand, using a highly synchronous body-sensor-network encompassing an electrocardiogram- and dual mode photoplethysmogram sensor node. The results suggest the feasibility of acquiring such data, which strongly correlates with the recorded reference blood pressure, and can therefore be further employed to track changes thereof.

  6. The muddle of ages, turnover, transit, and residence times in the carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Carlos A; Müller, Markus; Metzler, Holger; Manzoni, Stefano; Trumbore, Susan E

    2017-05-01

    Comparisons among ecosystem models or ecosystem dynamics along environmental gradients commonly rely on metrics that integrate different processes into a useful diagnostic. Terms such as age, turnover, residence, and transit times are often used for this purpose; however, these terms are variably defined in the literature and in many cases, calculations ignore assumptions implicit in their formulas. The aim of this opinion piece was i) to make evident these discrepancies and the incorrect use of formulas, ii) highlight recent results that simplify calculations and may help to avoid confusion, and iii) propose the adoption of simple and less ambiguous terms. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Historical Memory and Transitional Justice in Spain: the Time as Actor of Criminal Justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Tamarit Sumalla

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article addresses the political, criminal and legal challenges posed by accountability demands for past crimes by studying the singularities that the Spanish transition from Franco’s dictatorship to democracy has raised. Especially, it is analysed the Historical Memory Law of 2007 and the most problematic points of the criminal justice actions that have emerged due to offenses committed during the dictatorship. Despite the existence of international crimes, the elapsed time has brought difficult to overcome, factual and legal difficulties for effective prosecution. This problem, focusing on the prohibition of retroactivity, prescription and effects of the Amnesty Act of 1977 is examined here.

  8. Changes in sleep duration, timing, and quality as children transition to kindergarten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Alyssa; Harsh, John

    2014-01-01

    Sleep can be seen as a biologically driven behavior shaped by cultural context. A "poor fit" occurs when contextual demands for the timing and duration sleep periods are incompatible with the underlying biology. Such contextual factors are well-known for adults, yet little is known of the contextual factors that shape young children's sleep health and to what degree such factors impact sleep duration, timing, and quality. This study attempted to identify how the transition to kindergarten was associated with changes in sleep timing, duration, and quality for children enrolled in preschool prior to attending kindergarten vs. those who were not. Wrist actigraphy in 38 5-year-old children was collected at three longitudinal points before and after the start of kindergarten. Our data suggested that the transition to kindergarten was associated with a reduction in weekday sleep (mostly due to lost napping) and an advance in the weekday nocturnal sleep period that was most pronounced for children not enrolled in preschool prior to kindergarten. These sleep changes paralleled objective and caregiver-reported data of increased sleep pressure that lasted well into the first month of kindergarten.

  9. Changes in Sleep Duration, Timing, and Quality as Children Transition to Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Alyssa; Harsh, John

    2014-01-01

    Sleep can be seen as a biologically driven behavior shaped by cultural context. A “poor fit” occurs when contextual demands for the timing and duration sleep periods are incompatible with the underlying biology. Such contextual factors are well-known for adults, yet little is known of the contextual factors that shape young children’s sleep health and to what degree such factors impact sleep duration, timing, and quality. This study attempted to identify how the transition to kindergarten was associatedwith changes in sleep timing, duration, and quality for children enrolled in preschool prior to attending kindergarten vs. those who were not. Wrist actigraphy in 38 5-yearold children was collected at three longitudinal points before and after the start of kindergarten. Our data suggested that the transition to kindergarten was associated with a reduction in weekday sleep (mostly due to lost napping) and an advance in the weekday nocturnal sleep period that was most pronounced for children not enrolled in preschool prior to kindergarten. These sleep changes paralleled objective and caregiver-reported data of increased sleep pressure that lasted well into the first month of kindergarten. PMID:24364713

  10. Sensitivity of Catchment Transit Times to Rainfall Variability Under Present and Future Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilusz, Daniel C.; Harman, Ciaran J.; Ball, William P.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrologists have a relatively good understanding of how rainfall variability shapes the catchment hydrograph, a reflection of the celerity of hydraulic head propagation. Much less is known about the influence of rainfall variability on catchment transit times, a reflection of water velocities that control solute transport. This work uses catchment-scale lumped parameter models to decompose the relationship between rainfall variability and an important metric of transit times, the time-varying fraction of young water (environmental tracer data from neighboring headwater catchments in Plynlimon, Wales from 1999 to 2008. At both sites, the mean annual FYW increased more than 13 percentage points from the driest to the wettest year. Yearly mean rainfall explained most between-year variation, but certain signatures of rainfall pattern were also associated with higher FYW including: more clustered storms, more negatively skewed storms, and higher covariance between daily rainfall and discharge. We show that these signatures are symptomatic of an "inverse storage effect" that may be common among watersheds. Looking to the future, changes in rainfall due to projected climate change caused an up to 19 percentage point increase in simulated mean winter FYW and similarly large decreases in the mean summer FYW. Thus, climate change could seasonally alter the ages of water in streams at these sites, with concomitant impacts on water quality.

  11. Direct simulation of groundwater transit-time distributions using the reservoir theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheverry, David; Perrochet, Pierre

    Groundwater transit times are of interest for the management of water resources, assessment of pollution from non-point sources, and quantitative dating of groundwaters by the use of environmental isotopes. The age of water is the time water has spent in an aquifer since it has entered the system, whereas the transit time is the age of water as it exits the system. Water at the outlet of an aquifer is a mixture of water elements with different transit times, as a consequence of the different flow-line lengths. In this paper, transit-time distributions are calculated by coupling two existing methods, the reservoir theory and a recent age-simulation method. Based on the derivation of the cumulative age distribution over the whole domain, the approach accounts for the whole hydrogeological framework. The method is tested using an analytical example and its applicability illustrated for a regional layered aquifer. Results show the asymmetry and multimodality of the transit-time distribution even in advection-only conditions, due to the aquifer geometry and to the velocity-field heterogeneity. Résumé Les temps de transit des eaux souterraines sont intéressants à connaître pour gérer l'évaluation des ressources en eau dans le cas de pollution à partir de sources non ponctuelles, et aussi pour dater quantitativement les eaux souterraines au moyen des isotopes du milieu. L'âge de l'eau est le temps qu'elle a passé dans un aquifère depuis qu'elle est entrée dans le système, alors que le temps de transit est l'âge de l'eau au moment où elle quitte le système. L'eau à la sortie d'un aquifère est un mélange d'eaux possédant différents temps de transit, du fait des longueurs différentes des lignes de courant suivies. Dans ce papier, les distributions des temps de transit sont calculées en couplant deux méthodes, la théorie du réservoir et une méthode récente de simulation des âges. Basée sur la dérivation de la distribution cumulées des âges sur

  12. MEASURING THE EFFECTS OF THE "TIMING OF TIME" ON SHADOW VALUES OF LEISURE TIME

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, Douglas M.; Lew, Daniel K.; Barrett, James M.

    2002-01-01

    The "timing of leisure time" is important to determining its opportunity cost. Shadow values of different leisure activities from a model of consumer choice subject to multiple binding time constraints are estimated from survey data on peoples' preferences for different activities, their time and money costs, and their consumption choices.

  13. Direct measurement and modulation of single-molecule coordinative bonding forces in a transition metal complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, Xian; Zhu, Nan; Gschneidtner, Tina

    2013-01-01

    remain a daunting challenge. Here we demonstrate an interdisciplinary and systematic approach that enables measurement and modulation of the coordinative bonding forces in a transition metal complex. Terpyridine is derived with a thiol linker, facilitating covalent attachment of this ligand on both gold...... substrate surfaces and gold-coated atomic force microscopy tips. The coordination and bond breaking between terpyridine and osmium are followed in situ by electrochemically controlled atomic force microscopy at the single-molecule level. The redox state of the central metal atom is found to have......Coordination chemistry has been a consistently active branch of chemistry since Werner's seminal theory of coordination compounds inaugurated in 1893, with the central focus on transition metal complexes. However, control and measurement of metal-ligand interactions at the single-molecule level...

  14. Frequency Comb Driven Raman Transitions in the THz Range: High Precision Isotope Shift Measurements in Ca+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    to picoseconds in the previous experiments. For the broad spectrum, the additional effect of group delay dispersion (GDD) has to be taken into account, since the Raman process relies on the coherent interaction of all frequency components of the spectrum, with GDD influencing the relative phase which leads...... and frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) are used, and the two frequency comb systems used for the experiments are thoroughly characterized, a Coherent Mira Ti:sapph oscillator and a MenloSystems fiber based frequency comb system. The potential of frequency comb driven Raman transitions is shown...... isotope shifts are extracted. To complement these measurements, the isotopes shifts of the 729 nm S-D transition for the same series of isotopes are also determined with a relative accuracy of 5e-12, using a different technique. To the best of my knowledge, these measurements represent the most accurate...

  15. Gastrointestinal transit measurements in mice with 99mTc-DTPA-labeled activated charcoal using NanoSPECT-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Grosse, Johannes; Asad, Abu Bakar Md Ali; Radda, George K; Golay, Xavier

    2013-08-02

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders are commonly associated with chronic conditions such as diabetes, obesity, and hypertension. Direct consequences are obstipation or diarrhea as opposite aspects of the irritable bowel syndrome, and more indirectly, alteration of appetite, feeling of fullness, flatulence, bloatedness, and eventually leading to altered absorption of nutrients. Moreover, GI retention and passage times have been recognized as important factors in determining the release site and hence the bioavailability of orally administered drugs. To facilitate the understanding of physiological and pathological processes involved, it is necessary to monitor the gut motility in animal models. Here, we describe a method for studying the GI transit time using technetium-labeled activated charcoal diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (99mTc-Ch-DTPA) detected by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Tc-DTPA was adsorbed onto activated charcoal and administered orally to trypan blue-tainted (n = 4) 129SvEv mice (50 to 80 MBq/animal, n = 11). The exact distribution and movement of radioactivity in the gastrointestinal tract was measured at intervals of 1, 3, 6, 12, and 22 h by SPECT-CT. In addition, in order to validate the imaging of GI transient time, loperamide (0.25 mg/animal, n = 3) was used to delay the GI transit. The transit time measured as the peak radioactivity occurring in the rectum was 6 to 7 h after gavaging of 99mTc-Ch-DTPA. After 1 h, the bolus had passed into the small intestine and entered the cecum and the colon. At 6 and 8 h, the cecum, the ascending, transverse, and descending colon, and the rectum showed significant labeling. Several pellets were stored in the rectum for defecation. After 22 h, little activity remained in the stomach and none was detected in the transverse colon or other GI locations. In contrast, 6 h after administration of loperamide, only the cecum and part of the transverse colon were labeled. After 22 h, both

  16. Objectively measured sedentary time and academic achievement in schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Luís; Santos, Rute; Mota, Jorge; Pereira, Beatriz; Lopes, Vítor

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between objectively measured total sedentary time and academic achievement (AA) in Portuguese children. The sample comprised of 213 children (51.6% girls) aged 9.46 ± 0.43 years, from the north of Portugal. Sedentary time was measured with accelerometry, and AA was assessed using the Portuguese Language and Mathematics National Exams results. Multilevel linear regression models were fitted to assess regression coefficients predicting AA. The results showed that objectively measured total sedentary time was not associated with AA, after adjusting for potential confounders.

  17. System security assessment in real-time using synchrophasor measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jóhannsson, Hjörtur; Wache, Markus

    2013-01-01

    measures to ensure stable and secure operation of the system are necessary. Time stamped synchrophasor measurements lay the foundation for development of new real-time applications for security and stability assessment. The paper provides overview of existing solutions for synchrophasor based security...... assessment and sheds light on ongoing research activities that focus on exploiting wide-area synchrophasor measurements for real-time security assessment of sustainable power systems. At last, an mathematical mapping enabling informative visualization of the system state in respect to aperiodic rotor angle...

  18. Food transit time, nutrient digestibility and nitrogen retention in farmed and feral American mink (Neovison vison)--a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugołek, A; Zalewski, D; Strychalski, J; Konstantynowicz, M

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether farming leads to changes in gastrointestinal function and nitrogen metabolism in farmed mink (FA), as compared with their wild-living counterparts. Three digestibility and balance trials were carried out. Experiment I was performed in May, and experiments II and III were conducted in September 2011. Farmed mink with the standard coat colour were purchased from a production farm in south-eastern Poland. Feral mink were harvested using cages in the hunting grounds of the Polish Hunting Association, Branch in Olsztyn. The experimental materials comprised of the following: trial I - adult males (eight animals per group), trial II - young females (six animals per group), trial III-young animals (five males and five females per group). Food transit time was measured during digestibility trials, on 10 consecutive days. The coefficients of nutrient and energy digestibility and daily nitrogen balance values were compared between groups in each experiment. It was found that farming contributed to changes in gastrointestinal function and nitrogen metabolism in mink. Farmed animals were characterized by a longer bowel transit time, a tendency towards higher nutrient digestibility and higher nitrogen retention, which resulted from selection for higher productivity. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Time-Resolved Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Reveals Millisecond Transitions of a DNA Origami Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruetzel, Linda K; Walker, Philipp U; Gerling, Thomas; Dietz, Hendrik; Lipfert, Jan

    2018-04-11

    Self-assembled DNA structures enable creation of specific shapes at the nanometer-micrometer scale with molecular resolution. The construction of functional DNA assemblies will likely require dynamic structures that can undergo controllable conformational changes. DNA devices based on shape complementary stacking interactions have been demonstrated to undergo reversible conformational changes triggered by changes in ionic environment or temperature. An experimentally unexplored aspect is how quickly conformational transitions of large synthetic DNA origami structures can actually occur. Here, we use time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering to monitor large-scale conformational transitions of a two-state DNA origami switch in free solution. We show that the DNA device switches from its open to its closed conformation upon addition of MgCl 2 in milliseconds, which is close to the theoretical diffusive speed limit. In contrast, measurements of the dimerization of DNA origami bricks reveal much slower and concentration-dependent assembly kinetics. DNA brick dimerization occurs on a time scale of minutes to hours suggesting that the kinetics depend on local concentration and molecular alignment.

  20. Mode transition in bubbly Taylor-Couette flow measured by PTV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K; Tasaka, Y; Murai, Y; Takeda, T

    2009-01-01

    The drag acting to the inner cylinder in Taylor-Couette flow system can be reduced by bubble injection. In this research, relationship between drag reduction and change of vortical structure in a Taylor-Couette flow is investigated by Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV). The velocity vector field in the r-z cross section and the bubble concentration in the front view (z-θ plane) are measured. This paper describes the change of vortical structures with bubbles, and the mode transition that is sensitively affected by the bubbles is discussed. The bubbles accumulate in the three parts relative to vortex position by the interaction between bubbles and vortices. The status of bubble's distribution is different depending on position. This difference affects mode transition as its trigger significantly. The presence of bubbles affects the transition from toroidal mode to spiral mode but does not induce the transition from spiral mode to toroidal mode. Further we found that Taylor vortex bifurcates and a pair of vortices coalesces when the flow switches between spiral mode and toroidal mode.

  1. Easily adaptable complexity measure for finite time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Da-Guan; Tong, Qin-Ye

    2008-06-01

    We present a complexity measure for any finite time series. This measure has invariance under any monotonic transformation of the time series, has a degree of robustness against noise, and has the adaptability of satisfying almost all the widely accepted but conflicting criteria for complexity measurements. Surprisingly, the measure is developed from Kolmogorov complexity, which is traditionally believed to represent only randomness and to satisfy one criterion to the exclusion of the others. For familiar iterative systems, our treatment may imply a heuristic approach to transforming symbolic dynamics into permutation dynamics and vice versa.

  2. Suppression of the Transit -Time Instability in Large-Area Electron Beam Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Matthew C.; Friedman, Moshe; Swanekamp, Stephen B.; Chan, Lop-Yung; Ludeking, Larry; Sethian, John D.

    2002-12-01

    Experiment, theory, and simulation have shown that large-area electron-beam diodes are susceptible to the transit-time instability. The instability modulates the electron beam spatially and temporally, producing a wide spread in electron energy and momentum distributions. The result is gross inefficiency in beam generation and propagation. Simulations indicate that a periodic, slotted cathode structure that is loaded with resistive elements may be used to eliminate the instability. Such a cathode has been fielded on one of the two opposing 60 cm × 200 cm diodes on the NIKE KrF laser at the Naval Research Laboratory. These diodes typically deliver 600 kV, 500 kA, 250 ns electron beams to the laser cell in an external magnetic field of 0.2 T. We conclude that the slotted cathode suppressed the transit-time instability such that the RF power was reduced by a factor of 9 and that electron transmission efficiency into the laser gas was improved by more than 50%.

  3. Relationship between faecal character and intestinal transit time in normal dogs and diet-sensitive dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, V E; Adams, C A; Butterwick, R F; Batt, R M

    2002-07-01

    The relationship between stool character and whole gut transit time (WGTT), which is the average time for the passage of material through the lumen of the alimentary tract from ingestion to defecation, was studied in eight control dogs and 12 dogs with non-specific dietary sensitivity. Dogs were fed four diets in a cross-over design, and faecal quality was assessed daily and WGTT determined using plastic pellets. Faecal quality was unaffected by diet in the control dogs. Dogs with dietary sensitivity produced looser faeces compared with the control dogs, and this was significant for two of the diets. There was no significant effect of diet on mean WGTT within or between groups. Minimum WGTT, which was the interval to the first appearance of markers in faeces, was shorter in sensitive dogs compared with controls, and this was significant for two of the four diets. There were significant, inverse relationships between minimum WGTT and both mean faeces score and percentage unacceptable defecations. These data suggest that rapid transit of certain dietary components may impact negatively on stool quality and contribute to loose faeces in dogs with non-specific dietary sensitivity.

  4. Phase transition of the susceptible-infected-susceptible dynamics on time-varying configuration model networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Onge, Guillaume; Young, Jean-Gabriel; Laurence, Edward; Murphy, Charles; Dubé, Louis J.

    2018-02-01

    We present a degree-based theoretical framework to study the susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) dynamics on time-varying (rewired) configuration model networks. Using this framework on a given degree distribution, we provide a detailed analysis of the stationary state using the rewiring rate to explore the whole range of the time variation of the structure relative to that of the SIS process. This analysis is suitable for the characterization of the phase transition and leads to three main contributions: (1) We obtain a self-consistent expression for the absorbing-state threshold, able to capture both collective and hub activation. (2) We recover the predictions of a number of existing approaches as limiting cases of our analysis, providing thereby a unifying point of view for the SIS dynamics on random networks. (3) We obtain bounds for the critical exponents of a number of quantities in the stationary state. This allows us to reinterpret the concept of hub-dominated phase transition. Within our framework, it appears as a heterogeneous critical phenomenon: observables for different degree classes have a different scaling with the infection rate. This phenomenon is followed by the successive activation of the degree classes beyond the epidemic threshold.

  5. An Inflection Point Method for the Determination of Pulmonary Transit Time From Contrast Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronyak, Steven M; Monahan, Ken; Brittain, Evan L; Merryman, W David

    2015-07-01

    Indicator-dilution curves (IDCs) for the estimation of pulmonary transit times (PTTs) can be generated noninvasively using contrast echocardiography. Currently, these IDCs are analyzed by manual inspection, which is not feasible in a clinical setting, or fit to a statistical model to derive parameters of interest. However, IDCs generated from patients are frequently subject to significant low-frequency noise and recirculation artifacts that obscure the first-pass signal and render model fitting impractical or inaccurate. Thus, the objective of this paper was to develop alternative computational methods to determine PTT using noisy clinical data in which the signal decay is not adequately visible. We report on a method that uses a model fit to the rise portion of the IDCs to determine the signal inflection point. Additionally, a signal truncation algorithm was developed that enables automated analysis of the IDCs. We compare PTTs derived from our inflection point method to those obtained by manual inspection in 25 patients (R(2) = 0.86) and to those obtained by mean transit time calculation following fitting to a local density random walk model (R(2) = 0.80) in a subset of this cohort. Combined with a signal truncation algorithm, the inflection point method provides robust, automated determination of PTT from noisy IDCs containing recirculation artifacts. The inflection point method addresses the need for computational analysis of IDCs obtained from contrast echocardiograms that are not amenable to first-pass model fitting.

  6. Effect of closed loop cooling water transit time on containment cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.P.; Vossahlik, J.E.; Goodwin, E.F.

    1996-01-01

    Long term containment cooling analyses in nuclear plant systems are usually conducted assuming a quasi steady-state process, that is, a steady state evaluation of the cooling system is completed for each calculational step. In reality, fluid transport in the system, and heat addition to system components may affect the heat removal rate of the system. Transient effects occurring during system startup may affect the maximum temperatures experienced in the system. It is important to ensure that such transient effects do not affect operation of the system (e.g., cause a high temperature trip). To evaluate the effect of fluid transit delays, a closed loop cooling water system model has been developed that incorporates the fluid transport times when determining the closed loop cooling system performance. This paper describes the closed loop cooling system model as implemented in the CONTEMPT-LT/028 code. The evaluation of the transient temperature response of the closed loop cooling system using the model is described. The paper also describes the effect of fluid transit time on the overall containment cooling performance

  7. Mass determination of K2-19b and K2-19c from radial velocities and transit timing variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nespral, D.; Gandolfi, D.; Deeg, H. J.

    2017-03-01

    We present FIES@NOT and HARPS-N@TNG radial velocity follow-up observations of K2-19, a compact planetary system hosting three planets, of which the two larger ones, namely K2-19b and K2-19c, are close to the 3:2 mean motion resonance. The masses of these larger planets have previously been derived from transit timing only. An analysis considering only the radial velocity measurements is able to detect only K2-19b, the largest and more massive planet in the system, with a mass of 71.7 ± 6.3 M_{Jupiter}. We also used the TRADES code to simultaneously model both our RV measurements and the existing transit-timing measurements. We derived a mass of K2-19b of 59.5^{+7.2} _{-11.4} M_{Jupiter} and of K2-19c of 9.7 ^{+3.9} _{-2.0} M_{oplus}. A prior K2-19b mass estimated by Barros et al. (2015), based exclusively on transit timing measurements, is only consistent with our combined TTV and RV analysis, but not with our analysis based purely on RV measurements. K2-19b supports the suspicion that planet masses and densities involving TTV data are systematically lower than those based purely on RV measurements.

  8. Transitions among Health States Using 12 Measures of Successful Aging in Men and Women: Results from the Cardiovascular Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Thielke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Successful aging has many dimensions, which may manifest differently in men and women at different ages. Methods. We characterized one-year transitions among health states in 12 measures of successful aging among adults in the Cardiovascular Health Study. The measures included self-rated health, ADLs, IADLs, depression, cognition, timed walk, number of days spent in bed, number of blocks walked, extremity strength, recent hospitalizations, feelings about life as a whole, and life satisfaction. We dichotomized variables into “healthy” or “sick,” states, and estimated the prevalence of the healthy state and the probability of transitioning from one state to another, or dying, during yearly intervals. We compared men and women and three age groups (65–74, 75–84, and 85–94. Findings. Measures of successful aging showed similar results by gender. Most participants remained healthy even into advanced ages, although health declined for all measures. Recuperation, although less common with age, still occurred frequently. Men had a higher death rate than women regardless of health status, and were also more likely to remain in the healthy state. Discussion. The results suggest a qualitatively different experience of successful aging between men and women. Men did not simply “age faster” than women.

  9. Validation of a new non-invasive blood pressure measurement method on mice via pulse wave propagation time measurement on a cuff

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Xuan P.; Kronemayer, Ralf; Herrmann, Peter; Mejía, Atila; Daw, Zamira; Nguyen, Xuan D.; Kränzlin, Bettina; Gretz, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    In the present article, we describe the validation of a new non-invasive method for measuring blood pressure (BP) which also enables to determine the three BP values: systolic, diastolic and mean value. Our method is based on the pulse transit time (PTT) measurement along an artery directly at the BP cuff. The accuracy of this method was evaluated by comparison with the direct simultaneous measurement of blood pressure from 40 anesthetized female mice. Close correlation ...

  10. Promoting physiologic transition at birth: re-examining resuscitation and the timing of cord clamping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niermeyer, Susan; Velaphi, Sithembiso

    2013-12-01

    Delayed clamping of the umbilical cord is recommended for term and preterm infants who do not require resuscitation. However, the approach to the newly born infant with signs of fetal compromise, prematurity and extremely low birthweight, or prolonged apnea is less clear. Human and experimental animal data show that delaying the clamping of the umbilical cord until after the onset of respirations promotes cardiovascular stability in the minutes immediately after birth. Rather than regarding delayed cord clamping as a fixed time period before resuscitation begins, a more physiologic concept of transition at birth should encompass the relative timing of onset of respirations and cord occlusion. Further research to explore the potential benefits of resuscitation with the cord intact is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  12. Absolute frequency measurement of the 1S0 - 3P0 transition of 171Yb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzocaro, Marco; Thoumany, Pierre; Clivati, Cecilia; Levi, Filippo; Calonico, Davide; Rauf, Benjamin; Bregolin, Filippo; Milani, Gianmaria

    2017-01-01

    We report the absolute frequency measurement of the unperturbed transition 1 S 0 - 3 P 0 at 578 nm in 171 Yb realized in an optical lattice frequency standard relative to a cryogenic caesium fountain. The measurement result is 518 295 836 590 863.59(31) Hz with a relative standard uncertainty of 5.9 10 * 10 -16 . This value is in agreement with the ytterbium frequency recommended as a secondary representation of the second in the International System of Units. (authors)

  13. Real-time personal dose measurement and management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhiyong; Cheng Chang; Liu Zhengshan; Yang Huating; Deng Changming; Zhang Xiu; Guo Zhanjie

    2001-01-01

    The composition and design of a real-time personal dose measurement and management system are described. Accordingly, some pertinent hardware circuits and software codes including their operation modes are presented

  14. Optical Efficiency and R(T,I) Measurements of ACTPol TESes Using Time Domain Multiplexing Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, C. G.; Beall, J.; Brevick, J.; Cho, H. M.; Devlin, M. J.; Fox, A.; Grace, E. A.; Hilton, G. C.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; Klein, J.; Li, D.; Lungu, M.; Newburgh, L. B.; Nibarger, J. P.; Niemack, M. D.; McMahon, J. J.; Page, L. A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Staggs, S. T.; Van Lanen, J.; Wollack, E. J.

    2014-09-01

    We present new data on feedhorn-coupled transition-edge sensor devices fabricated for the second-generation receiver (ACTPol) for the Atacama cosmology telescope (ACT). First, we describe optical efficiency measurements of the latest ACTPol detector wafer, which has a average optical efficiency. Next, we discuss measurements of the TES resistance as a function of temperature and bias current () using the ACTPol time-domain multiplexing electronics. Qualitative agreement between data at low bias current and the two-fluid model prediction is shown. Using the two-fluid model and low bias current data, and at our operating bias current are calculated.

  15. Objectively measured sedentary time and academic achievement in schoolchildren

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Luís Carlos Oliveira; Santos, Rute; Mota, Jorge; Pereira, Beatriz Oliveira; Lopes, Vítor

    2016-01-01

    Published online: 26 Apr 2016. [Epub ahead of print] This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between objectively measured total sedentary time and academic achievement (AA) in Portuguese children. The sample comprised of 213 children (51.6% girls) aged 9.46 ± 0.43 years, from the north of Portugal. Sedentary time was measured with accelerometry, and AA was assessed using the Portuguese Language and Mathematics National Exams results. Multilevel linear regression models were fitted to...

  16. Contrasting transit times of water from peatlands and eucalypt forests in the Australian Alps determined by tritium: implications for vulnerability and the source of water in upland catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Ian; Morgenstern, Uwe

    2016-12-01

    Peatlands are a distinctive and important component of many upland regions that commonly contain distinctive flora and fauna which are different from those of adjacent forests and grasslands. Peatlands also represent a significant long-term store of organic carbon. While their environmental importance has long since been recognised, water transit times within peatlands are not well understood. This study uses tritium (3H) to estimate the mean transit times of water from peatlands and from adjacent gullies that contain eucalypt forests in the Victorian Alps (Australia). The 3H activities of the peatland water range from 2.7 to 3.3 tritium units (TUs), which overlap the measured (2.9 to 3.0 TU) and expected (2.8 to 3.2 TU) average 3H activities of rainfall in this region. Even accounting for seasonal recharge by rainfall with higher 3H activities, the mean transit times of the peatland waters are < 6.5 years and may be less than 2 years. Water from adjacent eucalypt forest streams has 3H activities of 1.6 to 2.1 TU, implying much longer mean transit times of 5 to 29 years. Cation / Cl and Si / Cl ratios are higher in the eucalypt forest streams than the peatland waters and both of these water stores have higher cation / Cl and Si / Cl ratios than rainfall. The major ion geochemistry reflects the degree of silicate weathering in these catchments that is controlled by both transit times and aquifer lithology. The short transit times imply that, unlike the eucalypt forests, the peatlands do not represent a long-lived store of water for the local river systems. Additionally, the peatlands are susceptible to drying out during drought, which renders them vulnerable to damage by the periodic bushfires that occur in this region.

  17. Measuring Transit Oriented Development of Existing Urban Areas around Metro Stations in Faridabad City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sat Pal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban population in Indian cities is encouraging auto reliance and having unsafe economic, social and environmental consequences. Land-use-change patterns are the outcome of the complex relations between the human and the physical surroundings. To address these issues the planners are moving beyond land use planning to a sustainable development. Transit and Land use planning are important components to achieve sustainable future of urban development. TOD is a planning tool to encourage this integration. This paper discusses the land use scenario and opportunity around four Metro transit stations in Faridabad city. Different methods and various sets of indicators are considered to evaluate and measure TOD index in this study. This study will evaluate and measure the Faridabad city in the context of land use around Metro Stations to support TOD. This paper seeks to answer how to promote walkable communities, compact and transit-oriented development (TOD that incorporates mixed land use development, including neighbourhood schools, retail and business related space and a mix range of housing types within walkable distance. This paper concludes that the stations area which had a low TOD score needs to have policy for improvement. If planned efficiently, TODs can realize the sustainable development with considerable change in the urban development that focuses on pedestrian based neighbourhood planning.

  18. [A new measurement method of time-resolved spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhi-gang; Huang, Shi-hua; Liang, Chun-jun; Lei, Quan-sheng

    2007-02-01

    A new method for measuring time-resolved spectrum (TRS) is brought forward. Programming with assemble language controlled the micro-control-processor (AT89C51), and a kind of peripheral circuit constituted the drive circuit, which drived the stepping motor to run the monochromator. So the light of different kinds of expected wavelength could be obtained. The optical signal was transformed to electrical signal by optical-to-electrical transform with the help of photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu 1P28). The electrical signal of spectrum data was transmitted to the oscillograph. Connecting the two serial interfaces of RS232 between the oscillograph and computer, the electrical signal of spectrum data could be transmitted to computer for programming to draw the attenuation curve and time-resolved spectrum (TRS) of the swatch. The method for measuring time-resolved spectrum (TRS) features parallel measurement in time scale but serial measurement in wavelength scale. Time-resolved spectrum (TRS) and integrated emission spectrum of Tb3+ in swatch Tb(o-BBA)3 phen were measured using this method. Compared with the real time-resolved spectrum (TRS). It was validated to be feasible, credible and convenient. The 3D spectra of fluorescence intensity-wavelength-time, and the integrated spectrum of the swatch Tb(o-BBA)3 phen are given.

  19. Short-Term Interferential Transabdominal Electrical Stimulation Did Not Change Oral-Rectal Transit Time in Piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andre Y F; Sourial, Magdy; Hutson, John M; Southwell, Bridget R

    2018-03-02

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) using interferential current (IFC) is a new therapeutic treatment for constipation. Clinical studies show that TES-IFC for 3-6 months improves colonic transit, but it is not clear if short-term stimulation affects transit or the effect requires longer to develop. The aim of this study was to determine if TES-IFC for only four days affects oral-rectal transit time in healthy pigs. Twenty-two 4-5-week old large white female piglets had transit studies during week 4 and week 5 by placing a capsule containing 18 radiopaque plastic markers in the esophagus under anesthetic followed by x-rays at 6, 30, 54, and 78 hours. Animals were randomly assigned to active or control groups. The active group received TES for 30 min daily for four days. Interferential current was applied through four electrodes (4 × 4 cm), with two para-spinal just below the last rib and two on the belly at the same level. Stimulation was at 4000 Hz and 4080-4160 Hz with currents crossing through the abdominal cavity. Whole bowel transit times ranged from 7.7 to 72.2 hours, stomach transit from transit time from 5 to 53 hours. Transit times were the same for the control (median 28.4 hours) and TES-IFC (23.0 hours) groups in the prestimulation and stimulation weeks (control 23.0, TES-IFC 19.8 hours) with no change within or between groups. Four days of half-hour TES-IFC daily in healthy 5-week-old piglets did not change oral-rectal transit time. © 2018 International Neuromodulation Society.

  20. Measurements of the spectrum and energy dependence of X-ray transition radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    The results of experiments designed to test the theory of X-ray transition radiation and to verify the predicted dependence of the characteristic features of the radiation on the radiator dimensions are presented. The X-ray frequency spectrum produced by 5- to 9-GeV electrons over the range 4 to 30 keV was measured with a calibrated single-crystal Bragg spectrometer, and at frequencies up to 100 keV with an NaI scintillator. The interference pattern in the spectrum and the hardening of the radiation with increasing foil thickness are clearly observed. The energy dependence of the total transition-radiation intensity was studied using a radiator with large dimensions designed to yield energy-dependent signals at very high particle energies, up to E/mc-squared approximately equal to 100,000. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  1. The scintigraphic determination of small intestinal transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marano, A.R.; Caride, V.J.; Shah, R.V.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Diffuse disturbance in gastrointestinal motility may be present in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To further investigate small intestinal motility in IBS patients small intestinal transit time (SITT) was determined and related to the symptom status. 11 female patients with IBS (mean age 29 years) were divided into those whose predominate symptom was diarrhea (N=6), and those with only constipation (N=5). All subjects ingested an isosmotic solution of lactulose (10 gm in 150cc of water) labeled with 99m-Tc-DTPA (Sn). The patient was studied supine under a 25 inch gamma camera with data collected at 1 frame per minute for 180 minutes or until activity appeared in the ascending colon. Regions of interest were selected over the cecum and ascending colon. The time of first appearance of radioactivity in the region of the cecum was taken as the small intestinal transit time. SITT in the 5 normal females was 98.7 +- 13 min (mean +- SEM). SITT in the IBS patients with diarrhea, 67.3 +- 7 min was significantly faster (p< 0.08). SITT in the constipated IBS patients, 126 +- 12 min, was slower than normals and significantly different from diarrhea patients (p< 0.001). These studies show that IBS patients with diarrhea have significantly faster SITT than normals while constipated IBS patients have significantly slower SITT than the diarrhea subgroup. Further, this study emphasizes the need to study the various symptomatic subgroups of IBs patients independently and indicates a possible role for abnormal SITT in the pathogenesis of IBS

  2. The scintigraphic determination of small intestinal transit time in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marano, A.R.; Caride, V.J.; Shah, R.V.; Prokop, E.K.; Troncale, F.J.; McCallum, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Diffuse disturbance in gastrointestinal motility may be present in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To further investigate small intestinal motility in IBS patients small intestinal transit time (SITT) was determined and related to the symptom status. 11 female patients with IBS (mean age 29 years) were divided into those whose predominate symptom was diarrhea (N=6), and those with only constipation (N=5). All subjects ingested an isosmotic solution of lactulose (10 gm in 150cc of water) labeled with 99m-Tc-DTPA (Sn). The patient was studied supine under a 25 inch gamma camera with data collected at 1 frame per minute for 180 minutes or until activity appeared in the ascending colon. Regions of interest were selected over the cecum and ascending colon. The time of first appearance of radioactivity in the region of the cecum was taken as the small intestinal transit time. SITT in the 5 normal females was 98.7 +- 13 min (mean +- SEM). SITT in the IBS patients with diarrhea, 67.3 +- 7 min was significantly faster (p< 0.08). SITT in the constipated IBS patients, 126 +- 12 min, was slower than normals and significantly different from diarrhea patients (p< 0.001). These studies show that IBS patients with diarrhea have significantly faster SITT than normals while constipated IBS patients have significantly slower SITT than the diarrhea subgroup. Further, this study emphasizes the need to study the various symptomatic subgroups of IBs patients independently and indicates a possible role for abnormal SITT in the pathogenesis of IBS.

  3. Field signatures of non-Fickian transport processes: transit time distributions, spatial correlations, reversibility and hydrogeophysical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Borgne, T.; Kang, P. K.; Guihéneuf, N.; Shakas, A.; Bour, O.; Linde, N.; Dentz, M.

    2015-12-01

    Non-Fickian transport phenomena are observed in a wide range of scales across hydrological systems. They are generally manifested by a broad range of transit time distributions, as measured for instance in tracer breakthrough curves. However, similar transit time distributions may be caused by different origins, including broad velocity distributions, flow channeling or diffusive mass transfer [1,2]. The identification of these processes is critical for defining relevant transport models. How can we distinguish the different origins of non-Fickian transport in the field? In this presentation, we will review recent experimental developments to decipher the different causes of anomalous transport, based on tracer tests performed at different scales in cross borehole and push pull conditions, and time lapse hydrogeophysical imaging of tracer motion [3,4]. References:[1] de Anna-, P., T. Le Borgne, M. Dentz, A. M. Tartakovsky, D. Bolster, P. Davy (2013) Flow Intermittency, Dispersion and Correlated Continuous Time Random Walks in Porous Media, Phys. Rev. Lett., 110, 184502 [2] Le Borgne T., Dentz M., and Carrera J. (2008) Lagrangian Statistical Model for Transport in Highly Heterogeneous Velocity Fields. Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 090601 [3] Kang, P. K., T. Le Borgne, M. Dentz, O. Bour, and R. Juanes (2015), Impact of velocity correlation and distribution on transport in fractured media : Field evidence and theoretical model, Water Resour. Res., 51, 940-959 [4] Dorn C., Linde N., Le Borgne T., O. Bour and L. Baron (2011) Single-hole GPR reflection imaging of solute transport in a granitic aquifer Geophys. Res. Lett. Vol.38, L08401

  4. Subtleties in the BABAR measurement of time-reversal violation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efrati, Aielet

    2015-01-01

    A first measurement of time-reversal (T) asymmetries that are not also CP asymmetries has been recently achieved by the B A B AR collaboration. In this talk, which follows the work done in Ref. [1], I discuss the subtleties of this measurement in the presence of direct CP violation, CPT violation, wrong strangeness decays and wrong sign semi-leptonic decays. In particular, I explain why, in order to identify the measured asymmetries with time-reversal violation, one needs to assume (i) the absence of wrong strangeness decays or of CPT violation in strangeness changing decays, and (ii) the absence of wrong sign decays. (paper)

  5. Incorporation of Time Delayed Measurements in a Discrete-time Kalman Filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Dall; Andersen, Nils Axel; Ravn, Ole

    1998-01-01

    In many practical systems there is a delay in some of the sensor devices, for instance vision measurements that may have a long processing time. How to fuse these measurements in a Kalman filter is not a trivial problem if the computational delay is critical. Depending on how much time there is a......In many practical systems there is a delay in some of the sensor devices, for instance vision measurements that may have a long processing time. How to fuse these measurements in a Kalman filter is not a trivial problem if the computational delay is critical. Depending on how much time...... there is at hand, the designer has to make trade offs between optimality and computational burden of the filter. In this paper various methods in the literature along with a new method proposed by the authors will be presented and compared. The new method is based on “extrapolating” the measurement to present time...

  6. Diffusion in quasi-one-dimensional channels: A small system n, p, T, transition state theory for hopping times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Sheida; Bowles, Richard K.

    2017-04-01

    Particles confined to a single file, in a narrow quasi-one-dimensional channel, exhibit a dynamic crossover from single file diffusion to Fickian diffusion as the channel radius increases and the particles begin to pass each other. The long time diffusion coefficient for a system in the crossover regime can be described in terms of a hopping time, which measures the time it takes for a particle to escape the cage formed by its neighbours. In this paper, we develop a transition state theory approach to the calculation of the hopping time, using the small system isobaric-isothermal ensemble to rigorously account for the volume fluctuations associated with the size of the cage. We also describe a Monte Carlo simulation scheme that can be used to calculate the free energy barrier for particle hopping. The theory and simulation method correctly predict the hopping times for a two-dimensional confined ideal gas system and a system of confined hard discs over a range of channel radii, but the method breaks down for wide channels in the hard discs' case, underestimating the height of the hopping barrier due to the neglect of interactions between the small system and its surroundings.

  7. Validity of self-reported measures of workplace sitting time and breaks in sitting time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Bronwyn K; Thorp, Alicia A; Winkler, Elisabeth A H; Gardiner, Paul A; Healy, Genevieve N; Owen, Neville; Dunstan, David W

    2011-10-01

    To understand the prevalence and potential health effect of prolonged workplace sedentary (sitting) time, valid measures are required. Here, we examined the criterion validity of a brief self-reported measure of workplace sitting time and breaks in sitting time. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to assess workplace sitting time (h·d(-1)) and breaks from sitting per hour at work in a convenience sample of 121 full-time workers (36% men, mean age = 37 yr, 53% office based). These self-reported measures were compared with accelerometer-derived sedentary time (hours per day, workplace sitting time and breaks in sitting time using objective criterion measures. The workplace sitting measure has acceptable properties for use in observational studies concerned with sedentary behavior in groups of workers; however, the wide limits of agreement suggest caution in estimating individuals' sitting time with high precision. Using self-reported measures to capture patterns of workplace sitting (such as breaks in sitting time) requires further development.

  8. Measurement error in stylised and diary data on time use

    OpenAIRE

    Kan, Â Man Yee; Pudney, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the nature of measurement error in time use data. Analysis of ‘stylised’ recall questionnaire estimates and diary-based estimates of housework time from the same respondents gives evidence of systematic biases in the stylised estimates and large random errors in both types of data. We examine the effect of these measurement problems on three common types of statistical analyses in which the time use variable is used as: (i) a dependent variable, (ii) an explanatory variable...

  9. Remote noncontacting measurements of heat transfer coefficients for detection of boundary layer transition in wind tunnel tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, D. Michele; Winfree, William P.; Carraway, Debra L.; Heyman, Joseph S.

    1987-01-01

    An infrared measurement system is used that consists of a laser heating source, an infrared camera for data acquisition, and a video recorder for data storage. A laser beam is scanned over an airfoil, heating its surface to a few degrees above ambient. An infrared camera then measures the temperature of the airfoil over a two-dimensional field, and these temperatures are stored as a function of time on a video recorder. The resulting temperature pictures are digitized and an iterative approximation algorithm is used to extract the heat transfer coefficient. The resulting values are normalized to the natural convection condition. The technique has been applied in low-speed wind tunnel tests and compared to well-established hot-film measurements which were made simultaneously to confirm the flow conditions. Heat transfer coefficients were determined using a linear scanning pattern, to indicate the position of natural and of artificially induced transition on an airfoil, at various wind speeds. The technique is shown to be sensitive to transition at low Mach numbers. The advantages of the technique are discussed.

  10. A time-to-amplitude converter with constant fraction timing discriminators for short time interval measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostamovaara, J.; Myllylae, R.

    1985-01-01

    The construction and the performance of a time-to-amplitude converter equipped with constant fraction discriminators is described. The TAC consists of digital and analog parts which are constructed on two printed circuit boards, both of which are located in a single width NIM module. The dead time of the TAC for a start pulse which is not followed by a stop pulse within the time range of the device (proportional100 ns) is only proportional100 ns, which enables one to avoid counting rate saturation even with a high random input signal rate. The differential and integral nonlinearities of the TAC are better than +-1.5% and 0.05%, respectively. The resolution for input timing pulses of constant shape is 20 ps (fwhm), and less than 10 ps (fwhm) with a modification in the digital part. The walk error of the constant fraction timing discriminators is presented and various parameters affecting it are discussed. The effect of the various disturbances in linearity caused by the fast ECL logic and their minimization are also discussed. The time-to-amplitude converter has been used in positron lifetime studies and for laser range finding. (orig.)

  11. Detectors for timing measurements 2. Streak cameras and fast photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshihito; Adachi, Shin-ichi

    2009-01-01

    Measuring methods of the pulse structure and its stability of the synchrotron radiation, and the method of time resolving measurement by synchronizing the external signal with the synchrotron radiation pulse are explained. The synchrotron radiation pulse width ranges from some ten to some hundred pico-seconds, and the time resolution of the detectors should be better than some pico-seconds. The streak camera is such a fast detector. Instead of the streak camera which is large-scaled and expensive, fast photo-detectors can be employed to know entire time structures. Some examples of time-synchronized measurements using the streak camera and the fast photo-detector are presented. (K.Y.)

  12. Strategies for Time-resolved X-ray Diffraction of Phase Transitions with Laser Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Laura Robin; Eggert, J. H.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P. M.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Palmer, N.; Petre, R. B.; Rygg, J. R.; Sorce, C.; Collins, G. W.; Boehly, T. R.

    2017-10-01

    As part of a program to document kinetics of phase transitions under laser-driven dynamic compression, we are designing a platform to make multiple x-ray diffraction measurements during a single laser experiment. Our plans include experimental development at Omega-EP and eventual implementation at NIF. We will present our strategy for designing a robust platform that can effectively document a wide variety of phase transformations by utilizing both streaked and multiple-frame imaging detectors. Preliminary designs utilize a novel CMOS detector designed by Sandia National Lab. Our initial experiments include scoping studies that will focus on photometrics and shielding requirements in the high EMP environment close to the target. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, LLNL-ABS-734470.

  13. Life Course Transitions and Housework: Marriage, Parenthood, and Time on Housework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Janeen; Hewitt, Belinda; Haynes, Michele

    2008-01-01

    We examine the effects of transitions in marital and parenthood status on 1,091 men's and women's housework hours using two waves of data from an Australian panel survey titled Negotiating the Life Course. We examine transitions between cohabitation and marriage, and from cohabitation or marriage to separation, as well as transitions to first and…

  14. Comparison of Travel-Time and Amplitude Measurements for Deep-Focusing Time-Distance Helioseismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourabdian, Majid; Fournier, Damien; Gizon, Laurent

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of deep-focusing time-distance helioseismology is to construct seismic measurements that have a high sensitivity to the physical conditions at a desired target point in the solar interior. With this technique, pairs of points on the solar surface are chosen such that acoustic ray paths intersect at this target (focus) point. Considering acoustic waves in a homogeneous medium, we compare travel-time and amplitude measurements extracted from the deep-focusing cross-covariance functions. Using a single-scattering approximation, we find that the spatial sensitivity of deep-focusing travel times to sound-speed perturbations is zero at the target location and maximum in a surrounding shell. This is unlike the deep-focusing amplitude measurements, which have maximum sensitivity at the target point. We compare the signal-to-noise ratio for travel-time and amplitude measurements for different types of sound-speed perturbations, under the assumption that noise is solely due to the random excitation of the waves. We find that, for highly localized perturbations in sound speed, the signal-to-noise ratio is higher for amplitude measurements than for travel-time measurements. We conclude that amplitude measurements are a useful complement to travel-time measurements in time-distance helioseismology.

  15. Phase transitions between lower and higher level management learning in times of crisis: an experimental study based on synergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liening, Andreas; Strunk, Guido; Mittelstadt, Ewald

    2013-10-01

    Much has been written about the differences between single- and double-loop learning, or more general between lower level and higher level learning. Especially in times of a fundamental crisis, a transition between lower and higher level learning would be an appropriate reaction to a challenge coming entirely out of the dark. However, so far there is no quantitative method to monitor such a transition. Therefore we introduce theory and methods of synergetics and present results from an experimental study based on the simulation of a crisis within a business simulation game. Hypothesized critical fluctuations - as a marker for so-called phase transitions - have been assessed with permutation entropy. Results show evidence for a phase transition during the crisis, which can be interpreted as a transition between lower and higher level learning.

  16. Spike-timing-dependent plasticity enhanced synchronization transitions induced by autapses in adaptive Newman-Watts neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yubing; Wang, Baoying; Xie, Huijuan

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we numerically study the effect of spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) on synchronization transitions induced by autaptic activity in adaptive Newman-Watts Hodgkin-Huxley neuron networks. It is found that synchronization transitions induced by autaptic delay vary with the adjusting rate A p of STDP and become strongest at a certain A p value, and the A p value increases when network randomness or network size increases. It is also found that the synchronization transitions induced by autaptic delay become strongest at a certain network randomness and network size, and the values increase and related synchronization transitions are enhanced when A p increases. These results show that there is optimal STDP that can enhance the synchronization transitions induced by autaptic delay in the adaptive neuronal networks. These findings provide a new insight into the roles of STDP and autapses for the information transmission in neural systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Time delay for aerial ammonia concentration measurements in livestock buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Hans Benny; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    Correct measurements of ammonia concentration in air still present considerable challenges. The high water solubility and polarity can cause it to adsorb on surfaces in the entire sampling system, including sampling lines, filters, valves, pumps and instruments, causing substantial measuring errors and time delays. To estimate time delay characteristics of a Photo Acoustic Multi Gas Monitor 1312 and a Multi Point Sampler continuous measurement of aerial ammonia concentrations at different levels was performed. In order to obtain reproducible data, a wind tunnel was used to generate selected concentrations inside and a background concentration representing the air inlet of the tunnel. Four different concentration levels (0.8 ppm, 6.2 ppm, 9.7 ppm and 13.7 ppm) were used in the experiments, with an additional outdoor concentration level as background. The results indicated a substantial time delay when switching between the measuring positions with high and low concentration and vice versa. These properties may course serious errors for estimation of e.g. gas emissions whenever more than one measuring channel is applied. To reduce the measurement errors, some suggestions regarding design of the measurement setup and measuring strategies were presented.

  18. Time Delay for Aerial Ammonia Concentration Measurements in Livestock Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Benny Rom

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Correct measurements of ammonia concentration in air still present considerable challenges. The high water solubility and polarity can cause it to adsorb on surfaces in the entire sampling system, including sampling lines, filters, valves, pumps and instruments, causing substantial measuring errors and time delays. To estimate time delay characteristics of a Photo Acoustic Multi Gas Monitor 1312 and a Multi Point Sampler continuous measurement of aerial ammonia concentrations at different levels was performed. In order to obtain reproducible data, a wind tunnel was used to generate selected concentrations inside and a background concentration representing the air inlet of the tunnel. Four different concentration levels (0.8 ppm, 6.2 ppm, 9.7 ppm and 13.7 ppm were used in the experiments, with an additional outdoor concentration level as background. The results indicated a substantial time delay when switching between the measuring positions with high and low concentration and vice versa. These properties may course serious errors for estimation of e.g. gas emissions whenever more than one measuring channel is applied. To reduce the measurement errors, some suggestions regarding design of the measurement setup and measuring strategies were presented.

  19. Theory for Transitions Between Exponential and Stationary Phases: Universal Laws for Lag Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himeoka, Yusuke; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2017-04-01

    The quantitative characterization of bacterial growth has attracted substantial attention since Monod's pioneering study. Theoretical and experimental works have uncovered several laws for describing the exponential growth phase, in which the number of cells grows exponentially. However, microorganism growth also exhibits lag, stationary, and death phases under starvation conditions, in which cell growth is highly suppressed, for which quantitative laws or theories are markedly underdeveloped. In fact, the models commonly adopted for the exponential phase that consist of autocatalytic chemical components, including ribosomes, can only show exponential growth or decay in a population; thus, phases that halt growth are not realized. Here, we propose a simple, coarse-grained cell model that includes an extra class of macromolecular components in addition to the autocatalytic active components that facilitate cellular growth. These extra components form a complex with the active components to inhibit the catalytic process. Depending on the nutrient condition, the model exhibits typical transitions among the lag, exponential, stationary, and death phases. Furthermore, the lag time needed for growth recovery after starvation follows the square root of the starvation time and is inversely related to the maximal growth rate. This is in agreement with experimental observations, in which the length of time of cell starvation is memorized in the slow accumulation of molecules. Moreover, the lag time distributed among cells is skewed with a long time tail. If the starvation time is longer, an exponential tail appears, which is also consistent with experimental data. Our theory further predicts a strong dependence of lag time on the speed of substrate depletion, which can be tested experimentally. The present model and theoretical analysis provide universal growth laws beyond the exponential phase, offering insight into how cells halt growth without entering the death phase.

  20. The City: Spaces, Times and Subjects in the Global Transition (edited by Niccolò Cuppini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niccolò Cuppini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Within the entering in the global era, the city is come back again as a strategic architrave of the world's infrastructure – while the State, the historical figure through which Modernity was organized, has been declared in crisis long time ago. Despite the broad spectrum of urban reflections, there still is a deep lack of political theory of the city. The globalization of the city – within the pathway of the planetary urbanization – is the object of the article, that elaborates on a twofold level: on one hand, a genealogical trace of that process is proposed – articulating it by distilling urban political thought from different authors and historical episodes; on the other hand, the article suggests a theoretical and methodological horizon through which to grasp the contemporary global transitions, labelled as “seeing like a city”.

  1. Continuous-time quantum walk on an extended star graph: Trapping and superradiance transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalouz, Saad; Pouthier, Vincent

    2018-02-01

    A tight-binding model is introduced for describing the dynamics of an exciton on an extended star graph whose central node is occupied by a trap. On this graph, the exciton dynamics is governed by two kinds of eigenstates: many eigenstates are associated with degenerate real eigenvalues insensitive to the trap, whereas three decaying eigenstates characterized by complex energies contribute to the trapping process. It is shown that the excitonic population absorbed by the trap depends on the size of the graph, only. By contrast, both the size parameters and the absorption rate control the dynamics of the trapping. When these parameters are judiciously chosen, the efficiency of the transfer is optimized resulting in the minimization of the absorption time. Analysis of the eigenstates reveals that such a feature arises around the superradiance transition. Moreover, depending on the size of the network, two situations are highlighted where the transport efficiency is either superoptimized or suboptimized.

  2. Performance of joint modelling of time-to-event data with time-dependent predictors: an assessment based on transition to psychosis data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hok Pan Yuen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Joint modelling has emerged to be a potential tool to analyse data with a time-to-event outcome and longitudinal measurements collected over a series of time points. Joint modelling involves the simultaneous modelling of the two components, namely the time-to-event component and the longitudinal component. The main challenges of joint modelling are the mathematical and computational complexity. Recent advances in joint modelling have seen the emergence of several software packages which have implemented some of the computational requirements to run joint models. These packages have opened the door for more routine use of joint modelling. Through simulations and real data based on transition to psychosis research, we compared joint model analysis of time-to-event outcome with the conventional Cox regression analysis. We also compared a number of packages for fitting joint models. Our results suggest that joint modelling do have advantages over conventional analysis despite its potential complexity. Our results also suggest that the results of analyses may depend on how the methodology is implemented.

  3. 'Stutter timing' for charge decay time measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubb, John [Infostatic, 2 Monica Drive, Pittville, Cheltenham, GL50 4NQ (United Kingdom); Harbour, John [Hawthorne Technical Design, The Hawthornes, Startley, Chippenham, SN15 5HG,UK (United Kingdom); Pavey, Ian, E-mail: jchubb@infostatic.co.uk [Chilworth Technology Ltd, Beta House, Southampton Science Park, Southampton, SO16 7NS (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-23

    The paper describes the approach of 'stutter timing' that has been developed to improve the accuracy of measuring charge decay times in the presence of noise in compact and portable charge decay test instrumentation. The approach involves starting and stopping the timing clock as the noisy signal rises above and falls below the target threshold voltage level.

  4. DA-9701 improves colonic transit time and symptoms in patients with functional constipation: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Young; Woo, Hyun Sun; Kim, Kyoung Oh; Choi, Sung Han; Kwon, Kwang An; Chung, Jun-Won; Kim, Yoon Jae; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Su Ji; Park, Dong Kyun

    2017-12-01

    DA-9701, a newly developed prokinetic agent formulated with Pharbitis Semen and Corydalis Tuber, has been shown to effectively treat functional dyspepsia. Recently, it has also been suspected to improve gastrointestinal motor function. The aims of this study were to assess the effect of DA-9701 on colonic transit time (CTT) and symptoms of functional constipation. Thirty-three patients with functional constipation based on the Rome III criteria were prospectively enrolled. The patients received 30-mg DA-9701 three times a day for 24 days. CTT was estimated initially and at the end of treatment. Symptoms such as spontaneous bowel movements, straining, stool form, feeling of incomplete emptying and anorectal blockage, abdominal discomfort and pain, overall defecation satisfaction, and incidence of adverse events were also analyzed. Twenty-seven patients completed the study. DA-9701 was associated with a significantly reduced CTT from 34.9 ± 17.6 to 23.7 ± 19.1 h (P = 0.001). Segmental CTT also significantly decreased after treatment (right CTT: from 16.8 [0.0-28.8] to 6.0 [0.0-25.2] hours, P constipation-related subjective symptoms, including spontaneous bowel movement frequency, significantly improved compared with those before treatment. Serious adverse events did not occur. DA-9701 accelerates colonic transit and safely improves symptoms in patients with functional constipation. Therefore, we suggest that this novel agent could help to treat patients with this condition. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Influence of timing algorithm on brachialankle pulse wave velocity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Li, Ke; Ren, Hongwei; Li, Peng; Wang, Xinpei; Liu, Changchun

    2014-01-01

    The baPWV measurement is a non-invasive and convenient technique in an assessment of arterial stiffness. Despite its widespread application, the influence of different timing algorithms is still unclear. The present study was conducted to investigate the influence of six timing algorithms (MIN, MAX, D1, D2, MDP and INS) on the baPWV measurement and to evaluate the performance of them. Forty-five CAD patients and fifty-five healthy subjects were recruited in this study. A PVR acquisition apparatus was built up for baPWV measurement. The baPWV and other related parameters were calculated separately by the six timing algorithms. The influence and performance of the six algorithms was analyzed. The six timing algorithms generate significantly different baPWV values (left: F=29.036, Pvalue (≥ 18.6%) than the other methods, while the INS has the lowest CV value (≤ 2.7%). On the performance of classification, the INS produces the highest AUC values (left: 0.854; right: 0.872). The MIN and D2 also have a passable performance (AUC > 0.8). The choice of timing algorithm affects baPWV values and the quality of measurement. The INS method is recommended for baPWV measurement.

  6. Energy transition is an opportunity to be seized. Proposals and actual measures to speed up energy transition in France - May 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-05-01

    After having outlined that energy transition could bring actual answers to essential concerns perceived by French people (economy revitalisation, purchasing power, employment, safety, life quality, democracy), this publication contains proposals and suggests measures which aim at making the energy sector evolve, can be either transverse, sector-based or specific, and could give an impulse to the French energy transition. More particularly, these measures and proposals aim at amplifying and speeding up the evolutions of the legal framework, at setting the initiative of economic actors free, at organising the financing of energy transition, at improving the quality of life for all citizen, at ensuring the sharing of benefits, and at considering the different relevant scales (from the local one to the global one)

  7. Use of Response Time for Measuring Cognitive Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C. Kyllonen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to review some of the key literature on response time as it has played a role in cognitive ability measurement, providing a historical perspective as well as covering current research. We discuss the speed-level distinction, dimensions of speed and level in cognitive abilities frameworks, speed–accuracy tradeoff, approaches to addressing speed–accuracy tradeoff, analysis methods, particularly item response theory-based, response time models from cognitive psychology (ex-Gaussian function, and the diffusion model, and other uses of response time in testing besides ability measurement. We discuss several new methods that can be used to provide greater insight into the speed and level aspects of cognitive ability and speed–accuracy tradeoff decisions. These include item-level time limits, the use of feedback (e.g., CUSUMs, explicit scoring rules that combine speed and accuracy information (e.g., count down timing, and cognitive psychology models. We also review some of the key psychometric advances in modeling speed and level, which combine speed and ability measurement, address speed–accuracy tradeoff, allow for distinctions between response times on items responded to correctly and incorrectly, and integrate psychometrics with information-processing modeling. We suggest that the application of these models and tools is likely to advance both the science and measurement of human abilities for theory and applications.

  8. Measurement of the complete core plasma flow across the LOC–SOC transition at ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebschy, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Angioni, C.; Geiger, B.; Prisiazhniuk, D.; Cavedon, M.; Conway, G. D.; Dux, R.; Dunne, M. G.; Kappatou, A.; Pütterich, T.; Stroth, U.; Viezzer, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2018-02-01

    A newly installed core charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostic at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) enables the evaluation of the core poloidal rotation (upol ) through the inboard-outboard asymmetry of the toroidal rotation with an accuracy of 0.5 to 1 km s-1 . Using this technique, the total plasma flow has been measured in Ohmic L-mode plasmas across the transition from the linear to saturated ohmic confinement (LOC–SOC) regimes. The core poloidal rotation of the plasma around mid-radius is found to be always in the ion diamagnetic direction, in disagreement with neoclassical (NC) predictions. The edge rotation is found to be electron-directed and consistent with NC codes. This measurement provides as well the missing ingredient to evaluate the core E×B velocity (uE×B ) from data only, which can then be compared to measurements of the perpendicular velocity of the turbulent fluctuations (u\\perp ) to gain information on the turbulent phase velocity (vph ). The non neoclassical upol from CXRS leads to good agreement between uE×B and u\\perp indicating that vph is small and at similar values as found with gyrokinetic simulations. Moreover, the data shows a shift of vph in the ion-diamagnetic direction at the edge after the transition from LOC to SOC consistent with a change in the dominant turbulence regime. The upgrade of the core CXRS system provides as well a deeper insight into the intrinsic rotation. This paper shows that the reversal of the core toroidal rotation occurs clearly after the LOC–SOC transition and concomitant with the peaking of the electron density.

  9. How to measure the agroecological performance of farming in order to assist with the transition process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trabelsi, Meriam; Mandart, Elisabeth; Le Grusse, Philippe; Bord, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The use of plant protection products enables farmers to maximize economic performance and yields, but in return, the environment and human health can be greatly affected because of their toxicity. There are currently strong calls for farmers to reduce the use of these toxic products for the preservation of the environment and the human health, and it has become urgent to invest in more sustainable models that help reduce these risks. One possible solution is the transition toward agroecological production systems. These new systems must be beneficial economically, socially, and environmentally in terms of human health. There are many tools available, based on a range of indicators, for assessing the sustainability of agricultural systems on conventional farm holdings. These methods are little suitable to agroecological farms and do not measure the performance of agroecological transition farms. In this article, we therefore develop a model for the strategic definition, guidance, and assistance for a transition to agroecological practices, capable of assessing performance of this transition and simulating the consequences of possible changes. This model was built by coupling (i) a decision-support tool and a technico-economic simulator with (ii) a conceptual model built from the dynamics of agroecological practices. This tool is currently being tested in the framework of a Compte d'Affectation Spéciale pour le Développement Agricole et Rural (CASDAR) project (CASDAR: project launched in 2013 by the French Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Forestry, on the theme "collective mobilisation for agroecology," http://agriculture.gouv.fr/Appel-a-projets-CASDAR ) using data from farms, most of which are engaged in agroenvironmental process and reducing plant protection treatments since 2008.

  10. Precise Measurements of the Density and Critical Phenomena Near Phase Transitions in Liquid Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Nai-Chang

    1997-01-01

    The first-year progress for the project of precise measurements of the density and critical phenomena of helium near phase transitions is summarized below: (1) completion of a cryogenic sample probe for the proposed measurements, and the rehabilitation of a designated laboratory at Caltech for this project; (2) construction and testing of a superconducting niobium cavity; (3) acquisition of one phase-locked-loop system for high-resolution frequency control and read- out; (4) setting up high-resolution thermometry (HRT) for temperature readout and control; (5) developing new approaches for calibrating the coefficient between the resonant frequency shift (delta f) and the helium density (rho), as well as for measuring the effect of gravity on T(sub lambda) to a much better precision; (6) programming of the interface control of all instruments for automatic data acquisition; and (7) improving data analyses and fitting procedures.

  11. Performance measurement of the gas tax and public transit funds : final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Federal funding for the gas tax fund and public transit fund are provided through Infrastructure Canada for municipal infrastructure across Canada in a broad range of municipal service projects. In order to identify appropriate outcomes that would meet reporting requirements for the gas tax fund and public transit fund, this report outlined a performance measurement approach that would allow for the reporting of projects under both funds and provide a structured methodology for multiple year analysis of benefits. The report discussed the performance measures process review and outcomes approach logic model. It also provided an outline of information sourcing strategies including an overview of the project types and expenditures; information sourcing strategy; typical municipal information sources by project type; performance measurement framework assumptions and limitations; and modeling of outcomes from outputs. Conclusions and recommendations were also offered. It was concluded that based on a comprehensive review of ancillary benefits and outcomes of various historic funding programs, there are 3 foundational outcomes that should be considered to assess all initial program outcomes. These include cleaner air, cleaner water and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. tabs., figs

  12. Identifying time measurement tampering in the traversal time and hop count analysis (TTHCA) wormhole detection algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Jonny; Dooley, Laurence S; Pulkkis, Göran

    2013-05-17

    Traversal time and hop count analysis (TTHCA) is a recent wormhole detection algorithm for mobile ad hoc networks (MANET) which provides enhanced detection performance against all wormhole attack variants and network types. TTHCA involves each node measuring the processing time of routing packets during the route discovery process and then delivering the measurements to the source node. In a participation mode (PM) wormhole where malicious nodes appear in the routing tables as legitimate nodes, the time measurements can potentially be altered so preventing TTHCA from successfully detecting the wormhole. This paper analyses the prevailing conditions for time tampering attacks to succeed for PM wormholes, before introducing an extension to the TTHCA detection algorithm called ∆T Vector which is designed to identify time tampering, while preserving low false positive rates. Simulation results confirm that the ∆T Vector extension is able to effectively detect time tampering attacks, thereby providing an important security enhancement to the TTHCA algorithm.

  13. Identifying Time Measurement Tampering in the Traversal Time and Hop Count Analysis (TTHCA Wormhole Detection Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonny Karlsson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Traversal time and hop count analysis (TTHCA is a recent wormhole detection algorithm for mobile ad hoc networks (MANET which provides enhanced detection performance against all wormhole attack variants and network types. TTHCA involves each node measuring the processing time of routing packets during the route discovery process and then delivering the measurements to the source node. In a participation mode (PM wormhole where malicious nodes appear in the routing tables as legitimate nodes, the time measurements can potentially be altered so preventing TTHCA from successfully detecting the wormhole. This paper analyses the prevailing conditions for time tampering attacks to succeed for PM wormholes, before introducing an extension to the TTHCA detection algorithm called ∆T Vector which is designed to identify time tampering, while preserving low false positive rates. Simulation results confirm that the ∆T Vector extension is able to effectively detect time tampering attacks, thereby providing an important security enhancement to the TTHCA algorithm.

  14. Enhancing pairwise state-transition weights: A new weighting scheme in simulated tempering that can minimize transition time between a pair of conformational states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Qin; Zhang, Hou-Dao; Huang, Xuhui

    2016-04-01

    Simulated tempering (ST) is a widely used enhancing sampling method for Molecular Dynamics simulations. As one expanded ensemble method, ST is a combination of canonical ensembles at different temperatures and the acceptance probability of cross-temperature transitions is determined by both the temperature difference and the weights of each temperature. One popular way to obtain the weights is to adopt the free energy of each canonical ensemble, which achieves uniform sampling among temperature space. However, this uniform distribution in temperature space may not be optimal since high temperatures do not always speed up the conformational transitions of interest, as anti-Arrhenius kinetics are prevalent in protein and RNA folding. Here, we propose a new method: Enhancing Pairwise State-transition Weights (EPSW), to obtain the optimal weights by minimizing the round-trip time for transitions among different metastable states at the temperature of interest in ST. The novelty of the EPSW algorithm lies in explicitly considering the kinetics of conformation transitions when optimizing the weights of different temperatures. We further demonstrate the power of EPSW in three different systems: a simple two-temperature model, a two-dimensional model for protein folding with anti-Arrhenius kinetics, and the alanine dipeptide. The results from these three systems showed that the new algorithm can substantially accelerate the transitions between conformational states of interest in the ST expanded ensemble and further facilitate the convergence of thermodynamics compared to the widely used free energy weights. We anticipate that this algorithm is particularly useful for studying functional conformational changes of biological systems where the initial and final states are often known from structural biology experiments.

  15. Enhancing pairwise state-transition weights: A new weighting scheme in simulated tempering that can minimize transition time between a pair of conformational states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, Qin; Zhang, Hou-Dao; Huang, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    Simulated tempering (ST) is a widely used enhancing sampling method for Molecular Dynamics simulations. As one expanded ensemble method, ST is a combination of canonical ensembles at different temperatures and the acceptance probability of cross-temperature transitions is determined by both the temperature difference and the weights of each temperature. One popular way to obtain the weights is to adopt the free energy of each canonical ensemble, which achieves uniform sampling among temperature space. However, this uniform distribution in temperature space may not be optimal since high temperatures do not always speed up the conformational transitions of interest, as anti-Arrhenius kinetics are prevalent in protein and RNA folding. Here, we propose a new method: Enhancing Pairwise State-transition Weights (EPSW), to obtain the optimal weights by minimizing the round-trip time for transitions among different metastable states at the temperature of interest in ST. The novelty of the EPSW algorithm lies in explicitly considering the kinetics of conformation transitions when optimizing the weights of different temperatures. We further demonstrate the power of EPSW in three different systems: a simple two-temperature model, a two-dimensional model for protein folding with anti-Arrhenius kinetics, and the alanine dipeptide. The results from these three systems showed that the new algorithm can substantially accelerate the transitions between conformational states of interest in the ST expanded ensemble and further facilitate the convergence of thermodynamics compared to the widely used free energy weights. We anticipate that this algorithm is particularly useful for studying functional conformational changes of biological systems where the initial and final states are often known from structural biology experiments.

  16. Enhancing pairwise state-transition weights: A new weighting scheme in simulated tempering that can minimize transition time between a pair of conformational states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Qin, E-mail: qqiao@ust.hk; Zhang, Hou-Dao [Department of Chemistry, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Huang, Xuhui, E-mail: xuhuihuang@ust.hk [Department of Chemistry, Division of Biomedical Engineering, Center of Systems Biology and Human Health, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); The HKUST Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen (China)

    2016-04-21

    Simulated tempering (ST) is a widely used enhancing sampling method for Molecular Dynamics simulations. As one expanded ensemble method, ST is a combination of canonical ensembles at different temperatures and the acceptance probability of cross-temperature transitions is determined by both the temperature difference and the weights of each temperature. One popular way to obtain the weights is to adopt the free energy of each canonical ensemble, which achieves uniform sampling among temperature space. However, this uniform distribution in temperature space may not be optimal since high temperatures do not always speed up the conformational transitions of interest, as anti-Arrhenius kinetics are prevalent in protein and RNA folding. Here, we propose a new method: Enhancing Pairwise State-transition Weights (EPSW), to obtain the optimal weights by minimizing the round-trip time for transitions among different metastable states at the temperature of interest in ST. The novelty of the EPSW algorithm lies in explicitly considering the kinetics of conformation transitions when optimizing the weights of different temperatures. We further demonstrate the power of EPSW in three different systems: a simple two-temperature model, a two-dimensional model for protein folding with anti-Arrhenius kinetics, and the alanine dipeptide. The results from these three systems showed that the new algorithm can substantially accelerate the transitions between conformational states of interest in the ST expanded ensemble and further facilitate the convergence of thermodynamics compared to the widely used free energy weights. We anticipate that this algorithm is particularly useful for studying functional conformational changes of biological systems where the initial and final states are often known from structural biology experiments.

  17. Characterization of type, position and dimension of flaws by transit time locus curves of ultrasonic inspections - ALOK. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grohs, B.; Barbian, O.A.; Kappes, W.; Paul, H.

    1981-01-01

    With automatic ultrasonic testing, flaws can be detected and described and thus characterized according to their type, position and dimensions. During scanning of a test object, the flaws are registered by many different pathways and many different acoustic irradiation directions. The transit time locus curve represents the distance between the relfecting points of a flaw and the source in dependence of the probe position; hence, information on flaw position and dimensions can be derived from this curve. If the sound velocity is known, the transit path can then be calculated from the transit time. This requires, above all, a constant sound velocity along the whole transit path. Various methods are presented for reconstructing the flaw border in the plane of incidence. (orig./RW) [de

  18. Real-time background suppression during frequency domain lifetime measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Petr; Maliwal, Badri P; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Maliwal, Baldri P

    2002-10-01

    We describe real time background suppression of autofluorescence from biological samples during frequency domain or phase modulation measurements of intensity decays. For these measurements the samples were excited with a train of light pulses with widths below 1 ps. The detector was gated off for a short time period of 10 to 40 ns during and shortly after the excitation pulse. The reference signal needed for the frequency domain measurement was provided by a long-lifetime reference fluorophore which continues to emit following the off-gating pulse. Both the sample and the reference were measured under identical optical and electronic conditions avoiding the need for correction of the photomultiplier tube signal for the gating sequence. We demonstrate frequency domain background suppression using a mixture of short- and long-lifetime probes and for a long-lifetime probe in human plasma with significant autofluorescence.

  19. Time Synchronized Wireless Sensor Network for Vibration Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchimura, Yutaka; Nasu, Tadashi; Takahashi, Motoichi

    Network based wireless sensing has become an important area of research and various new applications for remote sensing are expected to emerge. One of the promising applications is structural health monitoring of building or civil engineering structure and it often requires vibration measurement. For the vibration measurement via wireless network, time synchronization is indispensable. In this paper, we introduce a newly developed time synchronized wireless sensor network system. The system employs IEEE 802.11 standard based TSF counter and sends the measured data with the counter value. TSF based synchronization enables consistency on common clock among different wireless nodes. We consider the scale effect on the synchronization accuracy and the effect is evaluated by stochastic analysis and simulation studies. A new wireless sensing system is developed and the hardware and software specifications are shown. The experiments are conducted in a reinforced concrete building and results show good performance enough for vibration measurement purpose.

  20. Optical transition measurements in laser active medium candidates: application to color centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, E.

    1990-01-01

    In the present work we describe a spectroscopy method that can determine the energy level diagram of the species under investigation, the decay time, quantum efficiency and emission cross section. Firstly, the decay time was measured by using a sinusoidal pumping excitation and phase sensitive detection. Using a specially home design cryostat we were able to measure the decay time in the temperature range of 77K to 310K, and therefore, the temperature dependence of the quantum efficiency. (author)