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Sample records for transient burning pain

  1. Acute pain management in burn patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamst-Jensen, Hejdi; Vedel, Pernille Nygaard; Lindberg-Larsen, Viktoria Oline

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Burn patients suffer excruciating pain due to their injuries and procedures related to surgery, wound care, and mobilization. Acute Stress Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, chronic pain and depression are highly prevalent among survivors of severe burns. Evidence-based pain...... patients. The most highly recommended guidelines provided clear and accurate recommendations for the nursing and medical staff on pain management in burn patients. We recommend the use of a validated appraisal tool such as the AGREE instrument to provide more consistent and evidence-based care to burn...

  2. Principles of Burn Pain Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Dominika Lipowska; Jowza, Maryam

    2017-10-01

    This article describes pathophysiology of burn injury-related pain and the basic principles of burn pain management. The focus is on concepts of perioperative and periprocedural pain management with extensive discussion of opioid-based analgesia, including patient-controlled analgesia, challenges of effective opioid therapy in opioid-tolerant patients, and opioid-induced hyperalgesia. The principles of multimodal pain management are discussed, including the importance of psychological counseling, perioperative interventional pain procedures, and alternative pain management options. A brief synopsis of the principles of outpatient pain management is provided. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Brief cognitive interventions for burn pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haythronthwaite, J A; Lawrence, J W; Fauerbach, J A

    2001-01-01

    This study tested the efficacy of 2 brief cognitive interventions in supplementing regular medical treatment for pain during burn dressing change. Forty-two burn inpatients were randomly assigned to 3 groups: sensory focusing, music distraction, and usual care. Patients reported pain, pain relief satisfaction with pain control, and pain coping strategies. The sensory focusing group reported greater pain relief compared to the music distraction group and a reduction in remembered pain compared to the usual care group, although group differences were not observed on serial pain ratings. In addition, after controlling for burn size and relevant covariates, regression analyses indicated that catastrophizing predicted pain, memory for pain, and satisfaction with pain control. Refinement of the sensory focusing intervention is warranted to reduce catastrophic thinking and improve pain relief

  4. [Qualitative research on pain experiences of adult burn patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Pan, Q; Xu, L; Lin, R Q; Dai, J X; Chen, Z H

    2018-03-20

    Objective: To explore the pain experiences of adult burn patients so as to lay foundation for practical analgesic measures. Methods: Using phenomenological method in qualitative research, semi-structured interviews were conducted on 12 adult burn patients hospitalized in our burn units from May to November 2015, aiming at pain experiences from immediately after burns to 3 to 7 months after being discharged from hospital. Then the Colaizzi's analysis method was applied to analyze, induce, and refine themes of interview data. Results: After analysis, pain experiences of adult burn patients were generalized into 6 themes: deep pain experiences, heavy psychological burden, limited daily life, poor assessment and treatment of pain, different attributions of pain, and different ways of coping of pain. Conclusions: Burn pain brings harm to the patients' physiology, mentality, and daily life. Nevertheless, pain processing modes of medical staff and patients themselves are the key factors affecting patients' pain experiences. Therefore, according to the deficiency of current situation of pain management, the targeted analgesic intervention measures should be carried out from the perspectives of medical staff and patients.

  5. Improvement of burn pain management through routine pain monitoring and pain management protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyeong Tae; Hur, Giyeun; Kwak, In-Suk; Yim, Haejun; Cho, Yong Suk; Kim, Dohern; Hur, Jun; Kim, Jong Hyun; Lee, Boung Chul; Seo, Cheong Hoon; Chun, Wook

    2013-06-01

    Pain management is an important aspect of burn management. We developed a routine pain monitoring system and pain management protocol for burn patients. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of our new pain management system. From May 2011 to November 2011, the prospective study was performed with 107 burn patients. We performed control group (n=58) data analysis and then developed the pain management protocol and monitoring system. Next, we applied our protocol to patients and performed protocol group (n=49) data analysis, and compared this to control group data. Data analysis was performed using the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) of background pain and procedural pain, Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Scale (STAIS), and Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale (HRSS). The NRS of background pain for the protocol group was significantly decreased compared to the control group (2.8±2.0 versus 3.9±1.9), and the NRS of procedural pain of the protocol group was significantly decreased compared to the control group (4.8±2.8 versus 3.7±2.5). CAPS and HDRS were decreased in the protocol group, but did not have statistical significance. STAIS and HRSS were decreased in the protocol group, but only the STAIS had statistical significance. Our new pain management system was effective in burn pain management. However, adequate pain management can only be accomplished by a continuous and thorough effort. Therefore, pain control protocol and pain monitoring systems need to be under constant revision and improvement using creative ideas and approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  6. A Study on the Correlation between Pain and Pain Anxiety during Wound Care in Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Reza Mazlom

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Wound care in burn patients is associated with severe anxiety that is characterized by feeling of fear and prediction of burn dressing pain. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between pain and pain anxiety in burn patients. Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study, 60 eligible patients hospitalized in men’s and women’s burn wards of Mashhad Imam Reza Hospital, were selected using available sampling. Pain anxiety and pain severity were measured using self-report pain anxiety questionnaire and visual analog scale, respectively, before and after burn dressing during three weeks (once a week. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and Pearson correlation test. Results: In this study, there was a significant linear correlation between pain and pain anxiety in the first week (r=0.512, p<0.001, but there was no significant linear correlation between these variables in the second (r=0.079, p=0.547 and third (r=0.167, p=0.203 weeks. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, assessment and treatment of pain anxiety are essential elements of pain care and management in burn patients.            

  7. Is Music Effective For Pain Relief In Burn Victims?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiane Souza Lima

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe the effect of music on pain of burn victims during the dressing change. Methods: applied, descriptive, exploratory and quantitative research held in a Burn Treatment Unit from October 2015 to April 2016. The study included 16 burn victims who were divided in three groups: A: patients heard music before dressing; B: patients hear music during dressing; C: patients did not hear music. Results: the average age was 31.8 years (± 14.1 and most of the subjects were male. Lower limbs and trunk were the most affected parts of the body, especially with second-degree burns and which affected an average of 15.8% (± 11.5 of the body surface. There was a predominance of gospel music (50.0%. The music reduced the average heart rate and oxygen saturation, but did not change ventilatory rate. There was a decrease in the average of pain intensity in groups GB (p = 0.0505 and GC (p = 0.0055. During the dressing, the burning was unanimous characteristic for all subjects, in the same manner as verbal reports was the form of manifestation. Conclusion: music proved to be a simple and effective resource in controlling pain in burn victims. Keywords: Burns; Music; Pain.

  8. Involvement of peripheral artemin signaling in tongue pain: possible mechanism in burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Takeda, Mamoru; Honda, Kuniya; Maruno, Mitsuru; Katagiri, Ayano; Satoh-Kuriwada, Shizuko; Shoji, Noriaki; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Iwata, Koichi

    2015-12-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by altered sensory qualities, namely tongue pain hypersensitivity. We found that the mRNA expression of Artemin (Artn) in the tongue mucosa of patients with burning mouth syndrome was significantly higher than that of control subjects, and we developed a mouse model of burning mouth syndrome by application of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) diluted with 50% ethanol to the dorsum of the tongue. TNBS treatment to the tongue induced persistent, week-long, noninflammatory tongue pain and a significant increase in Artn expression in the tongue mucosa and marked tongue heat hyperalgesia. Following TNBS treatment, the successive administration of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist SB366791 or neutralizing anti-Artn antibody completely inhibited the heat hyperalgesia. The number of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α3 (GFRα3)-positive and TRPV1-positive trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the tongue significantly increased following TNBS treatment and was significantly reduced by successive administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody. The capsaicin-induced current in TG neurons innervating the tongue was enhanced following TNBS treatment and was inhibited by local administration of neutralizing anti-Artn antibody to the tongue. These results suggest that the overexpression of Artn in the TNBS-treated tongue increases the membrane excitability of TG neurons innervating the tongue by increasing TRPV1 sensitivity, which causes heat hyperalgesia. This model may be useful for the study of tongue pain hypersensitivity associated with burning mouth syndrome.

  9. Pain Part 8: Burning Mouth Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneng, Kiran; Renton, Tara

    2016-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a rare but impactful condition affecting mainly post-menopausal women resulting in constant pain and significant difficulty with eating, drinking and daily function. The aetiology of BMS remains an enigma. Recent evidence suggests it likely to be neuropathic in origin, the cause of which remains unknown. There is no cure for this condition and the unfortunate patients remain managed on a variety of neuropathic pain medication, salivary substitutes and other non-medical interventions that help the patient 'get through the day'. Some simple strategies can assist both clinician and patient to manage this debilitating condition. CPD/Clinical Relevance: The dental team will recognize patients presenting with burning mouth syndrome. They are difficult patients to manage and are often referred to secondary care and, ultimately, depend on their general medical practitioners for pain management.

  10. Transients and burn dynamics in advanced tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantsinen, M.J.; Salomaa, R.R.E.

    1994-01-01

    Transient behavior of D 3 He-tokamak reactors is investigated numerically using a zero-dimensional code with prescribed profiles. Pure D 3 He start-up is compared to DT-assisted and DT-ignited start-ups. We have considered two categories of transients which could extinguish steady fusion burn: fuelling interruptions and sudden confinement changes similar to the L → H transients occurring in present-day tokamaks. Shutdown with various current and density ramp-down scenarios are studied, too. (author)

  11. HYPNOTHERAPY AS A TREATMENT FOR PAIN IN PATIENTS WITH BURNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F SHAKIBAEI

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Burning is an event with many psychosomatic complications. Pain is one of the most trouble matter in these patients that affect on their psychologic features. This study presents a hypnotherapeutics intervention for controlling pain in patients suffered from burning. Methods. In a randomized clinical trial (without placebo, two 22 members group burned patients were selected. In interventional group we conduct a 5 sessions hypnotherapy course. Severity of pain and itching were assessed by visual analogue scale before and after intervention and results were compaired between two groups. Results. All pain parameters were decreased more in interventional group (P < 0.05. Discussion. It seems that hypnotherapy can playa positive role in pain reduction of patients. It is recommended that it would be applied in adjunct to current medications in these patients.

  12. Nurses' perceptions and experiences regarding Morphine usage in burn pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuo, J; Agbenorku, P

    2015-06-01

    Morphine, a classical example of opioid has been described as one of the analgesics of choice for burn pain management but there have been reports of under utilization of the medication and subsequent poor pain management. Nurses have a pivotal role in successful burn pain management and should therefore possess positive perception as well as strong knowledge base of pain care. In light of this realization, this study sought to investigate the perception and experiences of nurses working in the burns unit possess towards the medication. Purposive sampling approach was used to select twenty (20) nurses. Descriptive and themed content analysis approaches were used to analyze data. Mean years in general nursing practice and practice in the burns unit were obtained as 7.4 and 3.4 years respectively. Results indicate that nurses have a clear understanding of the intensity of burn pain but perception towards morphine was mixed and some respondents were unsure about some of the pertinent facts of morphine and thus, would prefer other medications such as paracetamol, diclofenac and pethidine. Addiction to the medication and morphine causing death were major themes identified. The resultant effect of these perception and experiences imply and confirm the under usage of morphine. It is therefore recommended that nurses within the burn unit be taken through training modules on the suitability of morphine in burn pain management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuronal Plasticity Associated with Burn Injury and Its Relevance for Perception and Management of Pain in Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence J Coderre

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Through the introduction of the gate control theory and various subsequent works, Ronald Melzack has inspired many investigators worldwide to realize two important facts about pain. First, incoming pain messages are subject to both negative and positive modulation, which significantly affect its perception. Second, the progression of knowledge about the basic mechanisms underlying persistent and chronic pain is critically dependent on the increased understanding of the complexity of the symptoms experienced by pain patients. The present paper examines these two very important issues in an effort to understand better the mechanisms that underlie the pain suffered by burn patients. The physiological responses to burn injury involve many different mediators and mechanisms, all of which contribute to pain perception and development of neuronal plasticity underlying short and long term changes in pain sensitivity. While experimental burn injuries in humans and animals are typically well controlled and mild, in burn victims, the severity is much more variable, and clinical care involves repeated traumas and manipulations of the injured sites. Recurrent inputs from damaged and redamaged tissue impinge on a nervous system that becomes an active participant in the initiation of changes in sensory perception and maintenance of long term sensory disturbances. Recently acquired experimental evidence on postburn hyperalgesia, central hyperexcitability and changes in opioid sensitivity provides strong support that burn patients need an analgesic approach aimed at preventing or reducing the 'neural' memory of pain, including the use of more than one treatment modality. Burn injuries offer a unique opportunity to combine experimental and clinical research to understand pain mechanisms better. Over the years, Ronald Melzack has insisted that one of the most laudable enterprises in research is to span the gap between these two often separate worlds.

  14. Recurrent and Transient Spinal Pain Among Commercial Helicopter Pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Knut; Baardsen, Roald; Dalen, Ingvild; Larsen, Jan Petter

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to provide information on the occurrence of spinal pain, i.e., low back and neck pain, among commercial helicopter pilots, along with possible associations between pain and anthropometric and demographic factors and flying exposure. Data were collected through a subjective and retrospective survey among all the 313 (294 men, 19 women) full-time pilots employed by two helicopter companies. A questionnaire was used to assess the extent of spinal complaints in a transient and recurrent pain pattern along with information on physical activities, occupational flying experience, and airframes. The survey had 207 responders (194 men, 13 women). The pilots had extensive flying experience. Spinal pain was reported by 67%. Flying-related transient pain was reported among 50%, whereas recurrent spinal pain, not necessarily associated with flying, was reported by 52%. Women experienced more pain, but sample size prevented further conclusions. Male pilots reporting any spinal pain flew significantly more hours last year (median 500 h, IQR 400-650) versus men with no pain (median 445 h, IQR 300-550). Male pilots with transient or recurrent spinal pain did not differ from nonaffected male colleagues in the measured parameters. Spinal pain is a frequent problem among male and female commercial helicopter pilots. For men, no significant associations were revealed for transient or recurrent spinal pain with age, flying experience in years, total hours, annual flying time, type of aircraft, or anthropometric factors except for any spinal pain related to hours flown in the last year.

  15. Application of transient burning rate model of solid propellant in electrothermal-chemical launch simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-jie Ni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A 30 mm electrothermal-chemical (ETC gun experimental system is employed to research the burning rate characteristics of 4/7 high-nitrogen solid propellant. Enhanced gas generation rates (EGGR of propellants during and after electrical discharges are verified in the experiments. A modified 0D internal ballistic model is established to simulate the ETC launch. According to the measured pressure and electrical parameters, a transient burning rate law including the influence of EGGR coefficient by electric power and pressure gradient (dp/dt is added into the model. The EGGR coefficient of 4/7 high-nitrogen solid propellant is equal to 0.005 MW−1. Both simulated breech pressure and projectile muzzle velocity accord with the experimental results well. Compared with Woodley's modified burning rate law, the breech pressure curves acquired by the transient burning rate law are more consistent with test results. Based on the parameters calculated in the model, the relationship among propellant burning rate, pressure gradient (dp/dt and electric power is analyzed. Depending on the transient burning rate law and experimental data, the burning of solid propellant under the condition of plasma is described more accurately.

  16. Risk factors for hypertrophic burn scar pain, pruritus, and paresthesia development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yongqiang; Sun, Yu; Zhu, Banghui; Wang, Kangan; Liang, Pengfei; Liu, Wenjun; Fu, Jinfeng; Zheng, Shiqing; Xiao, Shichu; Xia, Zhaofan

    2018-05-02

    Hypertrophic scar pain, pruritus, and paresthesia symptoms are major and particular concerns for burn patients. However, because no effective and satisfactory methods exist for their alleviation, the clinical treatment for these symptoms is generally considered unsatisfactory. Therefore, their risk factors should be identified and prevented during management. We reviewed the medical records of 129 post-burn hypertrophy scar patients and divided them into two groups for each of three different symptoms based on the University of North Carolina "4P" Scar Scale: patients with scar pain requiring occasional or continuous pharmacological intervention (HSc pain, n=75) vs. patients without such scar pain (No HSc pain, n=54); patients with scar pruritus requiring occasional or continuous pharmacological intervention (HSc pruritus, n=63) vs. patients without such scar pruritus (No HSc pruritus, n=66); patients with scar paresthesia that influenced the patients' daily activities (HSc paresthesia, n=31) vs. patients without such scar paresthesia (No HSc paresthesia, n=98). Three multivariable logistic regression models were built, respectively, to identify the risk factors for hypertrophic burn scar pain, pruritus, and paresthesia development. Multivariable analysis showed that hypertrophic burn scar pain development requiring pharmacological intervention was associated with old age (odds ratio [OR]=1.046; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.011-1.082, p=0.009), high body mass index(OR=1.242; 95%CI,1.068-1.445, p=0.005), 2-5-mm-thick post-burn hypertrophic scars (OR=3.997; 95%CI, 1.523-10.487; p=0.005), and 6-12-month post-burn hypertrophic scars (OR=4.686; 95%CI; 1.318-16.653; p=0.017). Hypertrophic burn scar pruritus development requiring pharmacological intervention was associated with smoking (OR=3.239; 95%CI, 1.380-7.603; p=0.007), having undergone surgical operation (OR=2.236; 95%CI, 1.001-4.998; p=0.049), and firm scars (OR=3.317; 95%CI, 1.237-8.894; p=0.017). Finally

  17. Ciguatoxins activate specific cold pain pathways to elicit burning pain from cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Vetter, Irina; Touska, Filip; Hess, Andreas; Hinsbey, Rachel; Sattler, Simon; Lampert, Angelika; Sergejeva, Marina; Sharov, Anastasia; Collins, Lindon S; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Engel, Matthias; Cabot, Peter J; Wood, John N; Vlachová, Viktorie; Reeh, Peter W

    2012-01-01

    Ciguatoxins derived from fish lead to cold allodynia in humans, the perception of intense burning pain in response to mild cooling. A novel mouse model of ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia reveals that ciguatoxin activates the TRPA1 thermosensitive ion channel to mediate pain perception.

  18. Impact of a pain protocol including hypnosis in major burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Mette M; Davadant, Maryse; Marin, Christian; Wasserfallen, Jean-Blaise; Pinget, Christophe; Maravic, Philippe; Koch, Nathalie; Raffoul, Wassim; Chiolero, René L

    2010-08-01

    Pain is a major issue after burns even when large doses of opioids are prescribed. The study focused on the impact of a pain protocol using hypnosis on pain intensity, anxiety, clinical course, and costs. All patients admitted to the ICU, aged >18 years, with an ICU stay >24h, accepting to try hypnosis, and treated according to standardized pain protocol were included. Pain was scaled on the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) (mean of daily multiple recordings), and basal and procedural opioid doses were recorded. Clinical outcome and economical data were retrieved from hospital charts and information system, respectively. Treated patients were matched with controls for sex, age, and the burned surface area. Forty patients were admitted from 2006 to 2007: 17 met exclusion criteria, leaving 23 patients, who were matched with 23 historical controls. Altogether patients were 36+/-14 years old and burned 27+/-15%BSA. The first hypnosis session was performed after a median of 9 days. The protocol resulted in the early delivery of higher opioid doses/24h (ppatient. A pain protocol including hypnosis reduced pain intensity, improved opioid efficiency, reduced anxiety, improved wound outcome while reducing costs. The protocol guided use of opioids improved patient care without side effects, while hypnosis had significant psychological benefits.

  19. Performance of high burned PWR fuel during transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Fujishiro, Toshio

    1992-01-01

    In a majority of Japanese light water type commercial powder reactors (LWRs), UO 2 pellet sheathed by zircaloy cladding is used. Licensed discharged burn-up of the PWR fuel rod is going to be increased from 39 MWd/kgU to 48 MWd/kgU. This requests the increased reliability of cladding material as a strong barrier against fission product (FP). A long time usage in the neutron field and in the high temperature coolant will cause the zircaloy hardening and embrittlement. The cladding material is also degraded by waterside corrosion. These degradations are enhanced much by increased burn-up. A increased magnitude of the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) is of importance for increasing the stress of cladding material. In addition, aggressive FPs released from the fuel tends to attack the cladding material to cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC). At the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) in JAERI, 14 x 14 PWR type fuel rods preirradiation up to 42 MWd/kgU was prepared for the transient pulse irradiation under the simulated reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions. This will cause a prompt increase of the fuel temperature and stress on the highly burned cladding material. In the present paper, steady-state and transient behavior observed from the tested PWR fuel rod and calculational results obtained from the computer code FPRETAIN will be described. (author)

  20. Inflammatory pain in experimental burns in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L

    2000-01-01

    stimuli may be more reproducible. A methodological study also demonstrated that habituation to experimental pain developed as the study proceeded. Habituation is common in experimental pain models, and dividing analgesics and placebo evenly between the study days is one way of eliminating the effects......Human experimental pain models are important tools in pain research. The primary aims of pain research in normal man is 1) to provide insight in pain mechanisms, 2) to provide a rational basis for clinical trials of pain relieving interventions, and 3) to confirm the anti-nociceptive effects...... demonstrated in animal models. Most often clinical pain is due to tissue damage leading to acute inflammation and hyperalgesia, but only few human pain models have examined pain responses in injured tissues. Therefore, models with controlled and reversible tissue trauma are needed. The human burn model...

  1. Decreasing burned children's pain behavior: impacting the trauma of hydrotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, M L; Jarvie, G J; Middlebrook, J L; McNeer, M F; Drabman, R S

    1984-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of cartoon viewing with the use of a star feedback chart on two burned children's pain behavior during their physical therapy sessions. In addition, the degree to which the observational data corresponded with physical therapists' and mothers' ratings of the children's pain, fear, and cooperativeness was examined. Using a reversal single-subject design, the results showed that the children's pain behavior substantially decreased during experimental treatment sessions compared to their baseline levels. The rating scale data indicated that the physical therapist's and mother's rating of pain, anxiety, and cooperativeness were all correlated significantly with the observational data (p less than .05). The contributions of respondent and operant conditioning to the occurrence and treatment of pain behavior in burned children are discussed. PMID:6735948

  2. Itch and burning pain in women with partial vaginismus with or without vulvar vestibulitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engman, Maria; Wijma, Klaas; Wijma, Barbro

    2007-01-01

    Fifty-three women with partial vaginismus with or without vulvar vestibulitis and 27 asymptomatic women estimated sensations of burning pain and itch at 20 standardized moments during a standardized penetration situation, including vaginal muscle contractions. Forty-three women with partial vaginismus (81.1%) reported burning pain, 23 (43.4%) itch, and 22 (41.5%) both complaints, compared to 0% of the asymptomatic women. In 17 of 22 cases, burning pain preceded the appearance of itch and in four cases the two complaints coincided. The median time from the moment when burning pain started until itch appeared was 150 seconds.

  3. Pain and anxiety experiences of South African adult burn injury patients during physiotherapy management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.D. Morris

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A dequate management of procedural pain during physiotherapy management plays an important role in building a trusting relationship betweenthe burn victim and the physiotherapist, and in ensuring desirable functional outcomes. However, the burn pain management regimens currently utilized inburn units, primarily consist of traditional pharmacologic analgesics which areassociated with numerous side-effects and alone are often reported as inadequateto alleviate procedural pain, warranting safer and effective adjunct therapies.Prior to the introduction and implementation of adjunct therapies into a developing world, it is imperative that the current situation in a burn unit, in terms of whether or not the pain management regimens in place are adequate, is first assessed, due to cost concerns. The following short report exemplifies the pain and anxiety experiences of a small number of burn injury patients during physiotherapy at the Tygerberg Hospital adult burn unit, South A frica.  It was hypothesized that the results of this study would underpin whether adult burn injury patients in a developing countryrequire adjunct therapies during physiotherapy management to supplement traditional pharmacologic analgesics inmanaging their procedural pain and subsequent anxiety.

  4. Ketamine. A solution to procedural pain in burned children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeneveld, A; Inkson, T

    1992-09-01

    Our experience has shown ketamine to be a safe and effective method of providing pain relief during specific procedures in burned children. It renders high doses of narcotics unnecessary and offers children the benefit of general anesthesia without the requirement of endotracheal intubation and a trip to the operating room. The response of parents and staff to the use of ketamine has been positive. Parents often experience feelings of guilt following injury to a child and are eager to employ methods that reduce their child's pain. So far, no parent has refused the administration of ketamine; some have even asked that it be used during subsequent procedures on their child. With adequate pre-procedure teaching, parents are prepared for the possible occurrence of emergent reactions and can assist in reorienting the child during recovery. Staff have found that the stress of doing painful procedures on children is reduced when ketamine is used. The procedures tend to be quicker and the predicament of working on a screaming, agitated child is eliminated. At the same time, nursing staff have had to get used to the nystagmic gaze of the children and accept that these patients are truly anesthetized even though they might move and talk. Despite the success we and others have had with ketamine, several questions about its use in burn patients remain unanswered. The literature does not answer such questions as: Which nursing measures reduce the incidence of emergent reactions? How many ketamine anesthetics can safely be administered to one individual? How does the frequency of administration relate to tolerance in a burn patient? Are there detrimental effects of frequent or long-term use? Clearly, an understanding of these questions is necessary to determine the safe boundaries of ketamine use in burn patients. Ketamine is not a panacea for the problem of pain in burned children. But it is one means of managing procedural pain, which is, after all, a significant clinical

  5. Transient Diabetes Insipidus Following Thermal Burn; A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Suvashis; Ghosh, Shibajyoti

    2017-10-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a disease charaterised by increased urine production and thrist. Neurogenic diabetes insipidus following head trauma,autoimmune disease and infection is quite common but diabetes insipidus following thermal burn injury is a rare complication.We should know about this complication as its management need a comprehensive approach for satisfactory outcome. Thermal burn can cause different complications in early post burn period like electrolyte imbalance, dehydration, acute renal failure, but diabetes insipidus is a very rare and unusual complication that may come across in thermal burn. We should be aware about this condition to prevent and treat mortality and morbidity in burn patients. We have reported a case of transient diabetes insipidus in a patient of thermal burn in early post burn period. Patient was treated accordingly, leading to complete recovery.

  6. The application of neuropathic pain questionnaires in burning mouth syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jun-Young; Ok, Soo-Min; Ahn, Yong-Woo; Ko, Myung-Yun; Jeong, Sung-Hee

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the validity of the PainDETECT, DN4, and abbreviated DN4 (DN4i) neuropathic pain questionnaires for primary burning mouth syndrome (BMS), which is a burning sensation in the oral mucosa in the absence of any identifiable organic etiology. Eighty-one patients (42 with primary BMS and 39 with nociceptive pain) complaining of a burning sensation and pain in their oral mucosa were enrolled in this study. All of the patients completed the neuropathic pain questionnaires. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were estimated. Then the relationship between pain intensity and total neuropathic pain score was investigated. Data were analyzed with the chi-square test and independent t test for subjects' baseline characteristic differences, and with Pearson correlation coefficients for the relationship of variables. The mean area under the ROC curves (AUCs) for PainDETECT, DN4, and DN4i were 0.81, 0.79, and 0.81, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the AUCs among the questionnaires. PainDETECT, DN4, and DN4i had a lower sensitivity and specificity for BMS compared to previous validation studies. The total scores for PainDETECT, DN4, and DN4i in the primary BMS group were significantly associated with pain intensity. Although the results of this study suggest that neuropathic pain questionnaires, such as PainDETECT and DN4, are not ideal principal screening tools for BMS patients, a substantial proportion of neuropathic symptoms in primary BMS patients were identified.

  7. Pain and pain behavior in burning mouth syndrome: a pain diary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forssell, Heli; Teerijoki-Oksa, Tuija; Kotiranta, Ulla; Kantola, Rosita; Bäck, Marjaliina; Vuorjoki-Ranta, Tiina-Riitta; Siponen, Maria; Leino, Ari; Puukka, Pauli; Estlander, Ann-Mari

    2012-01-01

    To characterize pain related to primary burning mouth syndrome (BMS) in terms of intensity, interference, and distress caused by the pain, as well as factors influencing the pain across a period of 2 weeks, and to study the use of coping and management strategies on a daily basis. Fifty-two female patients with primary BMS completed a 2-week pain diary. Pain intensity, interference, distress, and mood on a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale (NRS), as well as pain amplifying and alleviating factors, were recorded three times a day. The use of treatments (medication or other means) and coping strategies were recorded at the end of each day. Coefficient of variation, repeated measures analysis of variance, and correlative methods were used to assess the between- and within-subject variation, pain patterns, and associations between various pain scores. The overall mean pain intensity score of the 14 diary days was 3.1 (SD: 1.7); there was considerable variation in pain intensity between patients. Most patients experienced intermittent pain. On average, pain intensity increased from the morning to the evening. Intercorrelations between pain intensity, interference, distress, and mood were high, varying between rs = .75 and rs = .93 (P < .001). Pungent or hot food or beverages, stress, and tiredness were the most frequently mentioned pain-amplifying factors. The corresponding pain-alleviating factors were eating, sucking pastilles, drinking cold beverages, and relaxation. Thirty (58%) patients used pain medication and 35% reported using other means to alleviate their BMS pain. There was large variation in the use of coping strategies -between subjects. There were considerable differences in pain, in factors influencing the pain, and in pain behavior across BMS patients. This indicates that patient information and education as well as treatment of BMS pain should be individualized.

  8. Curcumin: a novel therapeutic for burn pain and wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    given as an adjuvant with the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac, reduces spontaneous pain behaviors in a formalin-induced orofacial ...R, Hota D, Chakrabarti A. Evaluation of antihyperalgesic effect of curcumin on formalin-induced orofacial pain in rat. Phytother Res 2009;23:507-12...bioavailability 5. Curcumin delivery vehicles 6. Conclusion 7. Expert opinion Review Curcumin: a novel therapeutic for burn pain and wound healing Bopaiah

  9. Difficulties in Controlling Mobilization Pain Using a Standardized Patient-Controlled Analgesia Protocol in Burns

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Andreas; Kalman, Sigga; Arvidsson, Anders; Sjöberg, Folke

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pain relief for patients with burns during rest and mobilization with morphine according to a standard protocol for patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Eighteen patients with a mean (SD) burned TBSA% of 26 (20) were studied for 10 days. Using a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0 = no pain and 10 = unbearable pain), patients were asked to estimate their acceptable and worst experienced pain by specifying a number on a scale and at what point they would like addi...

  10. The Effect of Massage on Anticipatory Anxiety and Procedural Pain in Patients with Burn Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Mohades Ardebili, Fatimah; Rafii, Forough; Manafi, Farzad

    2017-01-01

    Pain related to burn injuries is one of the most troublesome pain intensity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of massage on anticipatory anxiety, procedural pain intensity, vital signs and relaxation level of patients with burn injury. In this quasi-experimental study, through convenience sampling, 60 hospitalized adult burn patients were selected from a specialized burn and reconstructive hospital. Subjects were assigned to massage and control groups through simple randomization. Massage was offered by using non aromatic oil about 10-15 minutes before wound care on intact part of the body once a day for 20 minutes on patients' bedside for 3 consecutive days. In the 3 days, the control group did not received any massage and were asked to stay at bed. Demographic and clinical characteristics and vital signs, Visual Analogue Scale and the Persian version of Burn Specific Pain Anxiety Scale were used to determine baseline and procedural pain, anxiety and relaxation levels and anticipatory anxiety. No significant difference was noted between mean score of pain intensity, anxiety and relaxation level, and vital signs in massage and control groups after intervention following wound care. In massage and control groups, there was no significant differences between mean scores of anticipatory anxiety before and after intervention. There was no significant difference between the mean scores of anticipatory anxiety in massage and control groups after intervention prior wound care. Massage was shown not to have any effect on anticipatory anxiety and procedural pain.

  11. Transient receptor potential channel polymorphisms are associated with the somatosensory function in neuropathic pain patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Binder

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential channels are important mediators of thermal and mechanical stimuli and play an important role in neuropathic pain. The contribution of hereditary variants in the genes of transient receptor potential channels to neuropathic pain is unknown. We investigated the frequency of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1, transient receptor potential melastin 8 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 single nucleotide polymorphisms and their impact on somatosensory abnormalities in neuropathic pain patients. Within the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (Deutscher Forscbungsverbund Neuropathischer Schmerz 371 neuropathic pain patients were phenotypically characterized using standardized quantitative sensory testing. Pyrosequencing was employed to determine a total of eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms in transient receptor potential channel genes of the neuropathic pain patients and a cohort of 253 German healthy volunteers. Associations of quantitative sensory testing parameters and single nucleotide polymorphisms between and within groups and subgroups, based on sensory phenotypes, were analyzed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms frequencies did not differ between both the cohorts. However, in neuropathic pain patients transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 710G>A (rs920829, E179K was associated with the presence of paradoxical heat sensation (p = 0.03, and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G (rs8065080, I585V with cold hypoalgesia (p = 0.0035. Two main subgroups characterized by preserved (1 and impaired (2 sensory function were identified. In subgroup 1 transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G led to significantly less heat hyperalgesia, pinprick hyperalgesia and mechanical hypaesthesia (p = 0.006, p = 0.005 and pG (rs222747, M315I to cold hypaesthesia (p = 0.002, but there was absence of associations in subgroup 2. In this study we found no evidence that genetic

  12. Co-occurrence of Pain Symptoms and Somatosensory Sensitivity in Burning Mouth Syndrome: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Moisset

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a chronic and spontaneous oral pain with burning quality in the tongue or other oral mucosa without any identifiable oral lesion or laboratory finding. Pathogenesis and etiology of BMS are still unknown. However, BMS has been associated with other chronic pain syndromes including other idiopathic orofacial pain, the dynias group and the family of central sensitivity syndromes. This would imply that BMS shares common mechanisms with other cephalic and/or extracephalic chronic pains. The primary aim of this systematic review was to determine whether BMS is actually associated with other pain syndromes, and to analyze cephalic and extracephalic somatosensory sensitivity in these patients.This report followed the PRISMA Statement. An electronic search was performed until January 2015 in PubMed, Cochrane library, Wiley and ScienceDirect. Searched terms included "burning mouth syndrome OR stomatodynia OR glossodynia OR burning tongue OR oral burning". Studies were selected according to predefined inclusion criteria (report of an association between BMS and other pain(s symptoms or of cutaneous cephalic and/or extracephalic quantitative sensory testing in BMS patients, and a descriptive analysis conducted.The search retrieved 1512 reports. Out of these, twelve articles met criteria for co-occurring pain symptoms and nine studies for quantitative sensory testing (QST in BMS patients. The analysis reveals that in BMS patients co-occurring pain symptoms are rare, assessed by only 0.8% (12 of 1512 of the retrieved studies. BMS was associated with headaches, TMD, atypical facial pain, trigeminal neuralgia, post-herpetic facial pain, back pain, fibromyalgia, joint pain, abdominal pain, rectal pain or vulvodynia. However, the prevalence of pain symptoms in BMS patients is not different from that in the age-matched general population. QST studies reveal no or inconsistent evidence of abnormal cutaneous cephalic and extracephalic

  13. [Advances in the research of effects of music therapy on pain and anxiety in burn patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinyi, Li; Yungui, Wang

    2015-06-01

    Pain and anxiety engender major psychic problems during all phases of treatment for burn patients. Analgesic alone does not allay these problems satisfactorily in these patients. Music therapy, as an important complementary and alternative therapy, has been widely used in multiple medical fields. However, its positive effect on alleviation of pain and anxiety in burn patients is undefined. The objective of this review is to summarize the feasibility, application fields, methods, and the effectiveness of music therapy in allaying pain and anxiety of burn patients during the whole course of treatment.

  14. Transient urinary retention and chronic neuropathic pain associated with genital herpes simplex virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haanpää, Maija; Paavonen, Jorma

    2004-10-01

    Genital herpes (GH) causes genital ulcer disease, severe transient pain, and often paresthesias. Whether or not GH can cause urinary retention or chronic neuropathic pain is not well known. We present two immunocompetent patients with GH associated with neuropathic symptoms. We also review the literature on GH and associated neurologic problems. Patient 1 had primary herpes simplex virus (HSV)-2 infection with transient urinary retention and chronic bilateral neuropathic pain in the sacral area. Patient 2 had recurrent HSV-1 associated with unitaleral chronic neuropathic pain in the sacral area. Although transient urinary retention associated with GH is not uncommon, chronic neuropathic pain has not been reported previously. Our cases show that chronic neuropathic pain, that is "pain initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction in the nervous system," can follow genital HSV infection.

  15. Burning Eye Syndrome: Do Neuropathic Pain Mechanisms Underlie Chronic Dry Eye?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalangara, Jerry P; Galor, Anat; Levitt, Roy C; Felix, Elizabeth R; Alegret, Ramon; Sarantopoulos, Constantine D

    2016-04-01

    Dry eye is a multi-factorial disorder that manifests with painful ocular symptoms and visual disturbances, which can only be partly attributed to tear dysfunction. This disorder may also involve neuroplasticity in response to neuronal injury. This review will emphasize the key characteristics of dry eye pain and its pathologic mechanisms, making the argument that a subset of dry eye represents a neuropathic pain disorder of the eye, more appropriately called "burning eye syndrome." A literature review was conducted using a PubMed search focusing on dry eye, corneal nociception, and neuropathic pain. Articles were reviewed and those discussing clinical course, pathophysiology, and neuronal regulation of chronic ocular pain as related to dry eye were summarized. We found that there is a discordance between ocular pain and dryness on the ocular surface. Although tear dysfunction may be one of the initial insults, its persistence may be associated with repeated ocular sensory nerve injury leading to an acute-to-chronic pain transition associated with neuropathologic changes (peripheral and central sensitization), neuronal dysfunction, and spontaneous ocular pain. Dry eye is becoming a major health concern due to its increasing incidence, significant morbidity, and economic burden. Recent evidence suggests that a subset of dry eye may be better represented as a chronic neuropathic pain disorder due to its features of dysesthesia, spontaneous pain, allodynia, and hyperalgesia. Future therapies targeted at the underlying neuroplasticity may yield improved efficacy for patients with this subset of dry eye, which we term "burning eye syndrome." © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Co-occurrence of Pain Symptoms and Somatosensory Sensitivity in Burning Mouth Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisset, Xavier; Calbacho, Valentina; Torres, Pilar; Gremeau-Richard, Christelle; Dallel, Radhouane

    2016-01-01

    Background Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic and spontaneous oral pain with burning quality in the tongue or other oral mucosa without any identifiable oral lesion or laboratory finding. Pathogenesis and etiology of BMS are still unknown. However, BMS has been associated with other chronic pain syndromes including other idiopathic orofacial pain, the dynias group and the family of central sensitivity syndromes. This would imply that BMS shares common mechanisms with other cephalic and/or extracephalic chronic pains. The primary aim of this systematic review was to determine whether BMS is actually associated with other pain syndromes, and to analyze cephalic and extracephalic somatosensory sensitivity in these patients. Methods This report followed the PRISMA Statement. An electronic search was performed until January 2015 in PubMed, Cochrane library, Wiley and ScienceDirect. Searched terms included “burning mouth syndrome OR stomatodynia OR glossodynia OR burning tongue OR oral burning”. Studies were selected according to predefined inclusion criteria (report of an association between BMS and other pain(s) symptoms or of cutaneous cephalic and/or extracephalic quantitative sensory testing in BMS patients), and a descriptive analysis conducted. Results The search retrieved 1512 reports. Out of these, twelve articles met criteria for co-occurring pain symptoms and nine studies for quantitative sensory testing (QST) in BMS patients. The analysis reveals that in BMS patients co-occurring pain symptoms are rare, assessed by only 0.8% (12 of 1512) of the retrieved studies. BMS was associated with headaches, TMD, atypical facial pain, trigeminal neuralgia, post-herpetic facial pain, back pain, fibromyalgia, joint pain, abdominal pain, rectal pain or vulvodynia. However, the prevalence of pain symptoms in BMS patients is not different from that in the age-matched general population. QST studies reveal no or inconsistent evidence of abnormal cutaneous cephalic

  17. Post-coital burning pain and pain at micturition: early symptoms of partial vaginismus with or without vulvar vestibulitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engman, Maria; Wijma, Klaas; Wijma, Barbro

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-four women with partial vaginismus with or without vulvar vestibulitis participated in a semi-structured telephone interview concerning early signs and development of their pain symptoms during/after intercourse. At the onset of the problem, pain after intercourse was more common than pain during penetration. Pain intensity during penetration increased from the onset of the problem to when the women ceased having intercourse. Pain during penetration lasted for 1 minute, and was most often described as sharp/incisive/bursting, while pain after intercourse had a duration of 2 hours and was described as burning and/or smarting. Post-coital pain during micturition was described by 70% of the women.

  18. The effectiveness of virtual reality on reducing pain and anxiety in burn injury patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Linzette Deidré; Louw, Quinette Abegail; Grimmer-Somers, Karen

    2009-01-01

    To systematically review the current evidence for the effectiveness of Virtual Reality (VR), in conjunction with pharmacologic analgesia on reducing pain and anxiety in burn injury patients undergoing wound dressing changes and physiotherapy management compared with pharmacologic analgesia alone or other forms of distraction. A comprehensive search was conducted between December 2007 and January 2008, and updated in January 2009, before publication. Computerized bibliographic databases were individually searched using specifically developed search strategies to identify eligible studies. Nine studies were deemed eligible for inclusion in this review. Wound dressing changes was the most common procedure during which VR was trialed. Pain was the primary outcome measure in all of the studies included. Anxiety was a secondary outcome measure in 3 of the 9 included studies. VR, in conjunction with pharmacologic analgesics, significantly reduced pain experienced by burn injury patients during wound dressing changes and physiotherapy. There is equivocal evidence for the effect of VR in conjunction with pharmacologic analgesics on reducing anxiety in burn injury patients during wound dressing changes and physiotherapy. This is the first known systematic review to report on the effectiveness of VR, in conjunction with pharmacologic analgesia on reducing pain and anxiety in burn injury patients undergoing wound dressing changes and physiotherapy management compared with pharmacologic analgesia alone or other forms of distraction. Used as an adjunct to the current burn pain management regimens, VR could possibly assist health professionals in making the rehabilitation process for burn patients less excruciating, thereby improving functional outcomes. Further research investigating the effect of VR on anxiety in burn injury patients is warranted.

  19. Computer tablet distraction reduces pain and anxiety in pediatric burn patients undergoing hydrotherapy: A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns-Nader, Sherwood; Joe, Lindsay; Pinion, Kelly

    2017-09-01

    Distraction is often used in conjunction with analgesics to minimize pain in pediatric burn patients during treatment procedures. Computer tablets provide many options for distraction items in one tool and are often used during medical procedures. Few studies have examined the effectiveness of tablet distraction in improving the care of pediatric burn patients. This study examines the effectiveness of tablet distraction provided by a child life specialist to minimize pain and anxiety in pediatric burn patients undergoing hydrotherapy. Thirty pediatric patients (4-12) undergoing hydrotherapy for the treatment of burns participated in this randomized clinical trial. The tablet distraction group received tablet distraction provided by a child life specialist while those in the control group received standard care. Pain was assessed through self-reports and observation reports. Anxiety was assessed through behavioral observations. Length of procedure was also recorded. Nurses reported significantly less pain for the tablet distraction group compared to the control group. There was no significant difference between groups on self-reported pain. The tablet distraction group displayed significantly less anxiety during the procedure compared to the control group. Also, the tablet distraction group returned to baseline after the procedure while those in the control group displayed higher anxiety post-procedure. There was no difference in the length of the procedure between groups. These findings suggest tablet distraction provided by a child life specialist may be an effective method for improving pain and anxiety in children undergoing hydrotherapy treatment for burns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  20. Difficulties in controlling mobilization pain using a standardized patient-controlled analgesia protocol in burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Andreas; Kalman, Sigga; Sonesson, Lena Karin; Arvidsson, Anders; Sjöberg, Folke

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pain relief for patients with burns during rest and mobilization with morphine according to a standard protocol for patient-controlled analgesia (PCA). Eighteen patients with a mean (SD) burned TBSA% of 26 (20) were studied for 10 days. Using a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0 = no pain and 10 = unbearable pain), patients were asked to estimate their acceptable and worst experienced pain by specifying a number on a scale and at what point they would like additional analgesics. Patients were allowed free access to morphine with a PCA pump device. Bolus doses were set according to age, (100 - age)/24 = bolus dose (mg), and 6 minutes lockout time. Degrees of pain, morphine requirements, doses delivered and demanded, oral intake of food, and antiemetics given were used as endpoints. Acceptable pain (mean [SD]) was estimated to be 3.8 (1.3) on the NRS, and additional treatment was considered necessary at scores of 4.3 (1.6) or more. NRS at rest was 2.7 (2.2) and during mobilization 4.7 (2.6). Required mean morphine per day was 81 (15) mg, and the number of doses requested increased during the first 6 days after the burn. The authors found no correlation between dose of morphine required and any other variables. Background pain can be controlled adequately with a standard PCA protocol. During mobilization, the pain experienced was too intense, despite having the already high doses of morphine increased. The present protocol must be refined further to provide analgesia adequate to cover mobilization as well.

  1. Multi-modal distraction. Using technology to combat pain in young children with burn injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kate; Rodger, Sylvia; Bucolo, Sam; Greer, Ristan; Kimble, Roy M

    2010-08-01

    The use of non-pharmacological pain management remains adhoc within acute paediatric burns pain management protocols despite ongoing acknowledgement of its role. Advancements in adult based pain services including the integration of virtual reality has been adapted to meet the needs of children in pain, as exemplified by the development of multi-modal distraction (MMD). This easy to use, hand held interactive device uses customized programs designed to inform the child about the procedure he/she is about to experience and to distract the child during dressing changes. (1) To investigate if either MMD procedural preparation (MMD-PP) or distraction (MMD-D) has a greater impact on child pain reduction compared to standard distraction (SD) or hand held video game distraction (VG), (2) to understand the impact of MMD-PP and MMD-D on clinic efficiency by measuring length of treatment across groups, and lastly, (3) to assess the efficacy of distraction techniques over three dressing change procedures. A prospective randomised control trial was completed in a paediatric tertiary hospital Burns Outpatient Clinic. Eighty participants were recruited and studied over their first three dressing changes. Pain was assessed using validated child report, caregiver report, nursing observation and physiological measures. MMD-D and MMD-PP were both shown to significantly relieve reported pain (ppositive effects of both MMD-D and MMD-PP were sustained with subsequent dressing changes. The use of MMD as a preparatory or a distraction tool in an outpatient burns clinic offered superior pain reduction across three dressing changes to children when compared to standard practices or hand held video games. This device has the potential to improve clinic efficiency with reductions in treatment lengths.

  2. The effects of electroacupuncture on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds in patients with burn scar pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuignet, Olivier; Pirlot, A; Ortiz, S; Rose, T

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to observe if the effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds are transposable from the model of heat pain in volunteers to the clinical setting of burn scar pain. After severe burns, pathological burn scars (PPBS) may occur with excruciating pain that respond poorly to treatment and prevent patients from wearing their pressure garments, thereby leading to unesthetic and function-limiting scars. EA might be of greater benefit in terms of analgesia and functional recovery, should it interrupt this vicious circle by counteracting the peripheral hyperalgesia characterizing PPBS. Therefore we enrolled 32 patients (22 males/10 females) aged of 46±11 years with clinical signs of PPBS and of neuropathic pain despite treatment. The study protocol consisted in 3 weekly 30-min sessions of standardized EA with extra individual needles in accordance to Traditional Chinese Medicine, in addition of previous treatments. We assessed VAS for pain and quantitative sensory testing (QST) twice: one week before and one after protocol. QST measured electrical thresholds for non-nociceptive A-beta fibers, nociceptive A-delta and C fibers in 2 dermatomes, respectively from the PPBS and from the contralateral pain-free areas. Based on heat pain studies, EA consisted in sessions at the extremity points of the main meridian flowing through PPBS (0.300s, 5Hz, sub noxious intensity, 15min) and at the bilateral paravertebral points corresponding to the same metameric level, 15min. VAS reduction of 3 points or below 3 on a 10 points scale was considered clinically relevant. Paired t-test compared thresholds (mean [SD]) and Wilcoxon test compared VAS (median [IQR]) pre and after treatment, significant ppatients - even those from the subgroup of non-responders to pain - that is worth to be mentioned and requires further studies to be confirmed. This observational study is the first that confirms the effects of acupuncture on

  3. Circadian rhythms variation of pain in burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Jornet, Pia; Molino Pagan, Diana; Andujar Mateos, Paz; Rodriguez Agudo, Consuelo; Pons-Fuster, Alvaro

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the intensity of pain and levels of disability at different times through the day in patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS) over a 14-day period. This was a prospective clinical study of 30 patients with BMS, 26 of whom completed the study. The parameters studied were pain intensity (using a visual analog scale), Disability Index (in the morning, afternoon and night), quality of life (using the Oral Health Impact Profile-14) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD). Mean pain was 5.1 ± 1.8 and disability was 2.09 ± 1.40. There were significant differences between the three pain measurements taken at different times of day: between morning and afternoon (P ≤ 0.001), morning and evening (P ≤ 0.001), and afternoon and evening (P ≤ 0.001). Regression analysis found that the mean Pain Disability Index (R(2) corrected = 0.329; F = 3.44; P = 0.02) was also affected by anxiety (P = 0.036). Pain and disability increase as the day progresses in patients with BMS, and are influenced by anxiety. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  4. Assessment and management of burn pain at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayuo, Jonathan; Munn, Zachary; Campbell, Jared

    2017-09-01

    Pain management is a significant issue in health facilities in Ghana. For burn patients, this is even more challenging as burn pain has varied facets. Despite the existence of pharmacological agents for pain management, complaints of pain still persist. The aim of this project was to identify pain management practices in the burns units of Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, compare these approaches to best practice, and implement strategies to enhance compliance to standards. Ten evidence-based audit criteria were developed from evidence summaries. Using the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence Software (PACES), a baseline audit was undertaken on a convenience sample of ten patients from the day of admission to the seventh day. Thereafter, the Getting Research into Practice (GRiP) component of PACES was used to identify barriers, strategies, resources and outcomes. After implementation of the strategies, a follow-up audit was undertaken using the same sample size and audit criteria. The baseline results showed poor adherence to best practice. However, following implementation of strategies, including ongoing professional education and provision of assessment tools and protocols, compliance rates improved significantly. Atlhough the success of this project was almost disrupted by an industrial action, collaboration with external bodies enabled the successful completion of the project. Pain management practices in the burns unit improved at the end of the project which reflects the importance of an audit process, education, providing feedback, group efforts and effective collaboration.

  5. Burning rates of hydrogen-air mixtures in containment buildings and the consequent pressure transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennankore, K.N.; Kumar, R.K.; Razzaghi, M.

    1987-01-01

    One-dimensional flame models are often used to predict the pressure transients caused by hydrogen combustion in containments during postulated severe accidents. In the absence of data, these models account for prevailing flame acceleration mechanisms, such as initial turbulence, venting and obstacle-induced turbulence, by using arbitrarily large burning velocities that are much higher than laminar burning velocities. Using an intermediate-scale test facility at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment we have obtained necessary data on the effects of flame acceleration mechanisms, to estimate the safety margin in the buring velocities used in the models. So far, data have been analyzed, with a one-dimensional model, to determine effective burning velocities and burning-rate enhancement factors. The results of the analyses indicate that the effect of initial turbulence on the burning rate can be bounded only if the effect of flame-generated turbulence is included. The effect of venting can be accounted for by using two burning velocities, one for the pre-vent duration and a second increased value during the vented-combustion stage. The enhancement factors due to these two mechanisms, for the different conditions analyzed, varied up to 5.4, and the effective burning velocities varied up to 8.4 m/s

  6. Effectiveness of medical hypnosis for pain reduction and faster wound healing in pediatric acute burn injury: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Stephen J; Stockton, Kellie; De Young, Alexandra; Kipping, Belinda; Tyack, Zephanie; Griffin, Bronwyn; Chester, Ralph L; Kimble, Roy M

    2016-04-29

    Burns and the associated wound care procedures can be extremely painful and anxiety-provoking for children. Burn injured children and adolescents are therefore at greater risk of experiencing a range of psychological reactions, in particular posttraumatic stress disorder, which can persist for months to years after the injury. Non-pharmacological intervention is critical for comprehensive pain and anxiety management and is used alongside pharmacological analgesia and anxiolysis. However, effective non-pharmacological pain and anxiety management during pediatric burn procedures is an area still needing improvement. Medical hypnosis has received support as a technique for effectively decreasing pain and anxiety levels in adults undergoing burn wound care and in children during a variety of painful medical procedures (e.g., bone marrow aspirations, lumbar punctures, voiding cystourethrograms, and post-surgical pain). Pain reduction during burn wound care procedures is linked with improved wound healing rates. To date, no randomized controlled trials have investigated the use of medical hypnosis in pediatric burn populations. Therefore this study aims to determine if medical hypnosis decreases pain, anxiety, and biological stress markers during wound care procedures; improves wound healing times; and decreases rates of traumatic stress reactions in pediatric burn patients. This is a single-center, superiority, parallel-group, prospective randomized controlled trial. Children (4 to 16 years, inclusive) with acute burn injuries presenting for their first dressing application or change are randomly assigned to either the (1) intervention group (medical hypnosis) or (2) control group (standard care). A minimum of 33 participants are recruited for each treatment group. Repeated measures of pain, anxiety, stress, and wound healing are taken at every dressing change until ≥95 % wound re-epithelialization. Further data collection assesses impact on posttraumatic stress

  7. Teenager male with burning pain in extremities--suspect Fabry disease, 2 case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Rajesh B; Joglekar, V K

    2014-01-01

    We present 2 cases of teenager males presented with burning pain in extremities and turned out to be cases of Fabry disease.The purpose of presenting this case is to highlight the fact that suspicion of Fabry disease in patients presenting with these symptoms will lead to early diagnosis and treatment of this condition before occurrences of complications. A 14-year-old male presented with severe burning pain in both hands and feet since last 4 yrs which persisted despite consumption of painkillers and becoming more disabling and without having any family history for such condition. On general examination patient had small reddish coloured lesions around the umbilicus, appearing like angiokeratomas. Skin biopsy confirmed the lesion. On enzyme assay his alpha galactosidase activity found to be '0' nmol/hr/mg of protein, confirming his diagnosis. Patient's creatinine and 2 D ECHO were normal and urine had 1+ proteinuria. Patient started on carbamazepine tablets for pain and referred to higher centre for genetic diagnosis and enzyme replacement therapy. CASE REPORT 2: An 18-year-old male referred to our hospital by general practitioner for fatigue and pedal oedema with deranged renal function tests. On history taking patient gave history of severe burning pain in both hands and feet since age of 9 yrs. Patient's general examination revealed hypertension with pallor, pedal oedema along with angiokeratomas in bathing suit distribution. Patient's ultrasonography of kidney revealed bilaterally normal sized kidneys with altered echotexture and urine examination showed fine granular foamy cells with sub nephrotic range proteinuria. 2 D ECHO revealed concentric left ventricular hypertrophy. Skin biopsy report supported the diagnosis of Fabry disease. Patient advised to undergo renal biopsy to confirm Fabry nephropathy but patient denied any further diagnostic workup for nephropathy or Fabry disease. Patient started on conservative treatment and carbamazepine in renal dose

  8. The effects of massage and music on pain, anxiety and relaxation in burn patients: Randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi Ghezeljeh, T; Mohades Ardebili, F; Rafii, F

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of massage and music on pain intensity, anxiety intensity and relaxation level in burn patients. Pain and anxiety are common among burn patients, but there are many physical and psychological consequences. This randomized controlled clinical trial with factorial design 2×2 included 240 burn patients admitted at Shahid Motahari Burns Hospital, Tehran, Iran, between September 2013 and May 2015. The patients were allocated into the following groups: (i) control (n=60) receiving the conventional primary care, (ii) music group (n=60) receiving their favorite songs, (iii) massage group (n=60) receiving Swedish massage, and (iv) music-plus-massage group (n=60) receiving a combination of their favorite songs and Swedish massage, for 20min once a day for 3 consecutive days, using random permuted blocks of sizes 4 with a 1:1 ratio. To collect the data before and after the intervention, a specific Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was applied for pain intensity, anxiety intensity, and relaxation level. The data were analyzed using SPSS, version 21. Our findings showed a decrease in pain and anxiety intensity and an increase in relaxation level in all three intervention groups as compared to the control group, indicating there was no significant difference among the interventions applied. Furthermore, following application of each intervention, pain and anxiety intensity decreased and relaxation level increased in the intervention groups as compared to before intervention. Our results revealed that music, massage and a combination of both interventions were effective on reducing pain and anxiety intensity and increasing relaxation level. Due to easy, low-cost and availability of the interventions applied, these complementary therapies are suggested for the burn patients. Although application of a single complementary therapy is cost-effective, further studies are required to determine the most effective and cost-effective method to

  9. Predicting the effectiveness of virtual reality relaxation on pain and anxiety when added to PCA morphine in patients having burns dressings changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantatos, A H; Angliss, M; Costello, V; Cleland, H; Stafrace, S

    2009-06-01

    Pain arising in burns sufferers is often severe and protracted. The prospect of a dressing change can heighten existing pain by impacting both physically and psychologically. In this trial we examined whether pre-procedural virtual reality guided relaxation added to patient controlled analgesia with morphine reduced pain severity during awake dressings changes in burns patients. We conducted a prospective randomized clinical trial in all patients with burns necessitating admission to a tertiary burns referral centre. Eligible patients requiring awake dressings changes were randomly allocated to single use virtual reality relaxation plus intravenous morphine patient controlled analgesia (PCA) infusion or to intravenous morphine patient controlled analgesia infusion alone. Patients rated their worst pain intensity during the dressing change using a visual analogue scale. The primary outcome measure was presence of 30% or greater difference in pain intensity ratings between the groups in estimation of worst pain during the dressing change. Of 88 eligible and consenting patients having awake dressings changes, 43 were assigned to virtual reality relaxation plus intravenous morphine PCA infusion and 43 to morphine PCA infusion alone. The group receiving virtual reality relaxation plus morphine PCA infusion reported significantly higher pain intensities during the dressing change (mean=7.3) compared with patients receiving morphine PCA alone (mean=5.3) (p=0.003) (95% CI 0.6-2.8). The addition of virtual reality guided relaxation to morphine PCA infusion in burns patients resulted in a significant increase in pain experienced during awake dressings changes. In the absence of a validated predictor for responsiveness to virtual reality relaxation such a therapy cannot be recommended for general use in burns patients having awake dressings changes.

  10. Laser linewidth narrowing using transient spectral hole burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiel, Charles W.; Cone, Rufus L. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59715 (United States); Böttger, Thomas, E-mail: tbottger@usfca.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 2130 Fulton Street, University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate significant narrowing of laser linewidths by high optical density materials with inhomogeneously broadened absorption. As a laser propagates through the material, the nonlinear spectral hole burning process causes a progressive self-filtering of the laser spectrum, potentially reaching values less than the homogeneous linewidth. The transient spectral hole dynamically adjusts itself to the instantaneous frequency of the laser, passively suppressing laser phase noise and side modes over the entire material absorption bandwidth without the need for electronic or optical feedback to the laser. Wide bandwidth laser phase noise suppression was demonstrated using Er{sup 3+} doped Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} and LiNbO{sub 3} at 1.5 μm by employing time-delayed self-heterodyne detection of an external cavity diode laser to study the spectral narrowing effect. Our method is not restricted to any particular wavelength or laser system and is attractive for a range of applications where ultra-low phase noise sources are required. - Highlights: • We demonstrate significant laser linewidths narrowing by high optical density materials. • Nonlinear spectral hole burning causes progressive self-filtering of laser spectrum. • Filter dynamically adjusts itself to the instantaneous frequency of the laser. • Demonstrated at 1.5 μm in Er{sup 3+} doped Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} and LiNbO{sub 3}. • Linewidth filtering is not restricted to any particular wavelength or laser system.

  11. Virtual restorative environment therapy as an adjunct to pain control during burn dressing changes: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Charlotte; Stone, Robert; Pilsbury, Jane; Bowden, Michael; Bion, Julian

    2015-08-05

    The pain of a severe burn injury is often characterised by intense background pain, coupled with severe exacerbations associated with essential procedures such as dressing changes. The experience of pain is affected by patients' psychological state and can be enhanced by the anxiety, fear and distress caused by environmental and visual inputs. Virtual Reality (VR) distraction has been used with success in areas such as burns, paediatrics and oncology. The underlying principle of VR is that attention is diverted from the painful stimulus by the use of engaging, dynamic 3D visual content and associated auditory stimuli. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies undertaken during VR distraction from experimental pain have demonstrated enhancement of the descending cortical pain-control system. The present study will evaluate the feasibility of introducing a novel VR system to the Burns Unit at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham for dressing changes: virtual restorative environment therapy (VRET). The study will also explore the system's impact on pain during and after the dressing changes compared to conventional analgesia for ward-based burn dressing changes. A within-subject crossover design will be used to compare the following three conditions: 1. Interactive VRET plus conventional analgesics. 2. Passive VRET with conventional analgesics. 3. Conventional analgesics alone. Using the Monte Carlo method, and on the basis of previous local audit data, a sample size of 25 will detect a clinically significant 33 % reduction in worst pain scores experienced during dressing changes. The study accrual rate is currently slower than predicted by previous audits of admission data. A review of the screening log has found that recruitment has been limited by the nature of burn care, the ability of burn inpatients to provide informed consent and the ability of patients to use the VR equipment. Prior to the introduction of novel interactive technologies for

  12. Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of a nursing-driven midazolam protocol for the management of procedural pain associated with burn injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwell, Katherine L; Miller, Sidney F; Coffey, Rebecca; Calvitti, Kristin; Porter, Kyle; Murphy, Claire V

    2013-01-01

    Burn pain is one of the most excruciating types of pain and can be difficult to manage. Benzodiazepines may be effective in reducing pain by minimizing anxiety associated with dressing changes. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of adjunctive midazolam during dressing changes in patients with uncontrolled pain using opioid monotherapy or significant anxiety associated with dressing changes. A retrospective cohort analysis comparing patients who received midazolam during dressing changes with control patients was performed. Each midazolam patient was matched with up to two control patients who did not receive midazolam on the basis of age, sex, TBSA burned, and grafting requirement. The primary endpoint was the oral morphine equivalents required during admission after initiation of midazolam. Thirty-six patients were included for evaluation (14 midazolam and 22 control patients). Baseline characteristics were similar between the two groups, although patients in the midazolam group had higher pain scores and oral morphine equivalent requirements at baseline. When adjusted for baseline pain, day postburn, age, sex, and grafting status, total oral morphine equivalents and mean pain scores during admission were similar between the groups. One midazolam patient experienced oxygen desaturation with midazolam, but did not require flumazenil for reversal. The use of midazolam during burn dressing changes in patients with poorly controlled pain and/or anxiety was not associated with reduced requirements for oral morphine equivalents or lower pain scores during admission. Further research into the role of benzodiazepines in burn pain management is warranted.

  13. Evaluation of the effect of patient-selected music on sleep quality and pain intensity in burn patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohaddes Ardabili Fatemeh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Sleep disturbances and pain are some of the most common problems among burn patients, which have adverse effects on recovery process and patient comfort. Given the use of music as a non-pharmacological approach to alleviate pain and provide comfort, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of patient-selected music on sleep quality and pain intensity in burn patients. Materials and Method: This clinical trial was conducted on burn patients hospitalized in one of the hospitals of Tehran, Iran in 2015. In total, 50 patients were selected using randomized convenience sampling and divided into two intervention (n=25 and control (n=25 groups. Intervention was carried out for the intervention group through playing instrumental music, selected by the patients, in three consecutive 45-minute sessions before sleep. Severity of pain in the participants was evaluated for three nights (before and five minutes after the intervention using visual analog scale (VAS. In addition, sleep quality of the samples was assessed three days before the intervention using Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI and during the post-intervention days through interviews. The mentioned scales were applied for the control group as well. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 18 using Chi-square, as well as paired and independent t-tests. Results: In this study, a significant improvement was observed in sleep quality (P<0.001  and pain intensity (P=0.012 in the participants of intervention group after listening to music. Moreover, a significant difference was observed between the study groups after the intervention in terms of mean sleep quality score (P<0.001 and pain intensity (P=0.046. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, application of patient-selected music therapy could be associated with a significant improve in sleep quality and decrease in pain intensity in burn patients. Therefore, it is recommended that this intervention

  14. Transient spectral hole burning observed on the single-molecule level in terrylene-doped biphenyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pärs, M.; Palm, V.; Kikas, J.

    2014-01-01

    We use the method of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to analyze the single-molecule (SM) spectroscopy data earlier recorded for a special type of terrylene SM impurity center (referred as “spectrally confined unstable molecule”, SCM) in an incommensurate single crystal of biphenyl. The SCM's SM line seems to be chaotically jumping around within a broad “spectral envelope” and was first considered being subject to a peculiar spectral diffusion behavior. However, our correlation analysis reveals that all the features observed for SCM at 1.8 K are consistent with an assumption that this SM center participates in a process of reversible (transient) spectral hole burning (THB) earlier observed for terrylene-doped polycrystalline biphenyl. No observations of THB processes on SM level have been so far reported for this impurity system, partially due to a low concentration of relevant impurity centers. Another reason making searching for such centers experimentally challenging is an unusual SM line behavior: the photoinduced transition to a metastable “dark state” leads to the SM line saturational broadening, which is much stronger than the triplet broadening. Hence required prolonged observation is often prevented by an SM act of persistent spectral hole burning. - Highlights: • SCM—special type of terrylene single-molecule center in incommensurate biphenyl. • An unusually stable SCM was investigated during several hours at T=1.8 K. • SCM undergoes photoinduced transitions to an unknown metastable “dark state” (DS). • The long DS lifetime causes strong saturational broadening of SCM spectral line. • SCM participates in an earlier observed process of transient hole burning

  15. Feasibility of articulated arm mounted Oculus Rift Virtual Reality goggles for adjunctive pain control during occupational therapy in pediatric burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Hunter G; Meyer, Walter J; Ramirez, Maribel; Roberts, Linda; Seibel, Eric J; Atzori, Barbara; Sharar, Sam R; Patterson, David R

    2014-06-01

    For daily burn wound care and therapeutic physical therapy skin stretching procedures, powerful pain medications alone are often inadequate. This feasibility study provides the first evidence that entering an immersive virtual environment using very inexpensive (∼$400) wide field of view Oculus Rift Virtual Reality (VR) goggles can elicit a strong illusion of presence and reduce pain during VR. The patient was an 11-year-old male with severe electrical and flash burns on his head, shoulders, arms, and feet (36 percent total body surface area (TBSA), 27 percent TBSA were third-degree burns). He spent one 20-minute occupational therapy session with no VR, one with VR on day 2, and a final session with no VR on day 3. His rating of pain intensity during therapy dropped from severely painful during no VR to moderately painful during VR. Pain unpleasantness dropped from moderately unpleasant during no VR to mildly unpleasant during VR. He reported going "completely inside the computer generated world", and had more fun during VR. Results are consistent with a growing literature showing reductions in pain during VR. Although case studies are scientifically inconclusive by nature, these preliminary results suggest that the Oculus Rift VR goggles merit more attention as a potential treatment for acute procedural pain of burn patients. Availability of inexpensive but highly immersive VR goggles would significantly improve cost effectiveness and increase dissemination of VR pain distraction, making VR available to many more patients, potentially even at home, for pain control as well as a wide range of other VR therapy applications. This is the first clinical data on PubMed to show the use of Oculus Rift for any medical application.

  16. Sedation and Analgesia in Burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özkan Akıncı

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Burn injury is one of the most serious injuries that mankind may face. In addition to serious inflammation, excessive fluid loss, presence of hemodynamic instability due to intercurrent factors such as debridements, infections and organ failure, very different levels and intensities of pain, psychological problems such as traumatic stress disorder, depression, delirium at different levels that occur in patient with severe burn are the factors which make it difficult to provide the patient comfort. In addition to a mild to moderate level of baseline permanent pain in burn patients, which is due to tissue damage, there is procedural pain as well, which occurs by treatments such as grafting and dressings, that are severe, short-term burst style 'breakthrough' pain. Movement and tactile stimuli are also seen in burn injury as an effect to sensitize the peripheral and central nervous system. Even though many burn centers have established protocols to struggle with the pain, studies show that pain relief still inadequate in burn patients. Therefore, the treatment of burn pain and the prevention of possible emergence of future psychiatric problems suc as post-traumatic stress disorder, the sedative and anxiolytic agents should be used as a recommendation according to the needs and hemodynamic status of individual patient. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 26-30

  17. The effect of inhalation aromatherapy with damask rose (Rosa damascena) essence on the pain intensity after dressing in patients with burns: A clinical randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Harorani, Mehdi; Roshanaei, Ghodratollah; Moradkhani, Shirin; Falahinia, Golam Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Pain is one of the common problems encountered by patients with burns, which increases after each dressing. This study aimed to investigate the effect of inhalation aromatherapy with damask rose essence on the pain of patients with burns that is caused after dressing. A randomized clinical trial was conducted on 50 patients with second- and third-degree burn wounds. The baseline pain of the patients was assessed 30 min before they entered into the dressing room on the first and second days of intervention. The patients in the experimental group inhaled five drops of damask rose essence 40% in distilled water, while those in the control group inhaled five drops of distilled water as placebo. The pain intensity was assessed using Visual Analogue Scale at 15 and 30 min after the patients exited from the dressing room. Data were analyzed by SPSS (version 18) using descriptive and inferential statistics. There was significant difference between the mean of pain intensity before and after intervention at 15 and 30 min after dressing (P rose could be effective for relieving the pain caused after dressing in patients with burns. Therefore, it could be suggested as a complementary therapy in burn patients for pain relief.

  18. Translation and psychometric evaluation of Persian versions of Burn Specific Pain Anxiety Scale and Impact of Event Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezeljeh, Tahereh Najafi; Ardebili, Fatimah Mohades; Rafii, Forough; Hagani, Hamid

    2013-09-01

    Burn as a traumatic life incident manifests severe pain and psychological problems. Specific instruments are needed to evaluate burn patients' psychological issues related to the injury. The aim of this study was to translate and evaluate the reliability and validity of the Persian versions of Impact of Burn Specific Pain Anxiety scale (BSPAS) and Impact of Event Scale (IES). In this cross-sectional study, convenience sampling method was utilized to select 55 Iranian hospitalized burn patients. Combined translation was utilized for translating scales. Alpha cronbach, item-total correlation, convergent and discriminative validity were evaluated. The Cronbach's α for both BSPAS- and IES-Persian version was 0.96. Item-total correlation coefficients ranged from 0.70 to 0.90. Convergent construct validity was confirmed by indicating high correlation between the scales designed to measure the same concepts. The mean score of BSPAS- and IES-Persian version was lower for individuals with a lower TBSA burn percentage which assessed discriminative construct validity of scales. BSPAS- and IES-Persian version showed high internal consistency and good validity for the assessment of burn psychological outcome in hospitalized burn patients. Future studies are needed to determine repeatability, factor structure, sensitivity and specificity of the scales. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  19. The Effects of Music Intervention on Background Pain and Anxiety in Burn Patients: Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi Ghezeljeh, Tahereh; Mohades Ardebili, Fatimah; Rafii, Forough; Haghani, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of music on the background pain, anxiety, and relaxation levels in burn patients. In this pretest-posttest randomized controlled clinical trial, 100 hospitalized burn patients were selected through convenience sampling. Subjects randomly assigned to music and control groups. Data related to demographic and clinical characteristics, analgesics, and physiologic measures were collected by researcher-made tools. Visual analog scale was used to determine pain, anxiety, and relaxation levels before and after the intervention in 3 consecutive days. Patients' preferred music was offered once a day for 3 days. The control group only received routine care. Data were analyzed using SPSS-PC (V. 20.0). According to paired t-test, there were significant differences between mean scores of pain (P < .001), anxiety (P < .001), and relaxation (P < .001) levels before and after intervention in music group. Independent t-test indicated a significant difference between the mean scores of changes in pain, anxiety, and relaxation levels before and after intervention in music and control groups (P < .001). No differences were detected in the mean scores of physiologic measures between groups before and after music intervention. Music is an inexpensive, appropriate, and safe intervention for applying to burn patients with background pain and anxiety at rest. To produce more effective comfort for patients, it is necessary to compare different types and time lengths of music intervention to find the best approach.

  20. Comparing the effects of aromatherapy massage and inhalation aromatherapy on anxiety and pain in burn patients: A single-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyyed-Rasooli, Alehe; Salehi, Feridoon; Mohammadpoorasl, Asghar; Goljaryan, Sakineh; Seyyedi, Zahra; Thomson, Brian

    2016-12-01

    Anxiety and pain are recognized as major problems of burn patients; because pharmaceutical treatments for controlling anxiety and pain symptoms lead to complications and an increase in health costs, nonpharmacological nursing interventions were considered for this group of patients. This led to the present study aimed at comparing the effect of aromatherapy massage with inhalation aromatherapy for anxiety and pain in burn patients. This single-blind clinical trial was carried out on 90 patients with burns aromatherapy massage, inhalation aromatherapy, and control group. The patients assigned to the aromatherapy massage group received a massage for half an hour using a blend of lavender and almond oils, while a blend of rose and lavender aroma was used for the inhalation aromatherapy group. Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory was used for measuring anxiety and the visual analog scale (VAS) scale was used for measuring pain. The results showed that three groups were equal in terms of demographics, disease characteristics, and scores of anxiety and pain at the baseline. The mean decreases of anxiety scores were -0.04±5.08, 6.33±12.55, and 6.43±10.60 in the control group, aromatherapy massage group, and inhalation group, respectively (p=0.007). The mean decrease of pain scores were -0.10±0.96, 1.70±1.84, and 0.97±1.56 in the control group, aromatherapy massage group, and inhalation group, respectively (paromatherapy massage and inhalation aromatherapy compared with the control group in reducing both anxiety and pain of burn patients. Therefore, both interventions, which are inexpensive, and noninvasive nursing tasks can be proposed for alleviating anxiety and pain of burn patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. Topical Mannitol Reduces Capsaicin-Induced Pain: Results of a Pilot-Level, Double-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Helene; Kyriazis, Marylene; Reeves, K Dean; Lyftogt, John; Rabago, David

    2015-11-01

    Capsaicin specifically activates, and then gradually exhausts, the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor, a key receptor in neuropathic pain. Activation of the TRPV-1 receptor is accompanied by burning pain. A natural substance or medication that can reduce the burning pain resulting from capsaicin application may have therapeutic potential in neuropathic pain. To assess the pain-relieving effects of a mannitol-containing cream in a capsaicin-based pain model. Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial. Outpatient pain clinic. Twenty-five adults with pain-free lips. Capsaicin .075% cream was applied to both halves of each participant's upper lip, inducing pain via stimulation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1, capsaicin) receptor, then removed after 5 minutes or when participants reported a burning pain of 8/10, whichever came first. A cream containing mannitol and the same cream without mannitol (control) were then immediately applied, 1 on each side of the lip, in an allocation-masked manner. Participants self-recorded a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0-10) pain score for each side of the lip per minute for 10 minutes. A t-test was performed to evaluate the pain score change from baseline between each side of the lip at each recording. Area under the curve (AUC) analysis was used to determine the overall difference between groups. Participants reached a capsaicin-induced pain level of 7.8 ± 1.0 points in 3.3 ± 1.6 minutes that was equal on both sides of the lip. Both groups reported progressive diminution of pain over the 10-minute study period. However, participants reported significantly reduced pain scores on the mannitol cream half-lip compared to control at 3 through 10 minutes (P < .05) and in AUC analysis (P < .001). Mannitol cream reduced self-reported pain scores in a capsaicin pain model more rapidly than a control cream, potentially via a TRPV1 receptor effect. Copyright © 2015 American

  2. Five Patients With Burning Mouth Syndrome in Whom an Antidepressant (Serotonin-Noradrenaline Reuptake Inhibitor) Was Not Effective, but Pregabalin Markedly Relieved Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Mikiko; Tokura, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Keizo; Nagashima, Wataru; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Umemura, Eri; Tachibana, Masako; Miyauchi, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Yuka; Arao, Munetaka; Ozaki, Norio; Kurita, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) causes idiopathic pain or a burning sensation in clinically normal oral mucosa. Burning mouth syndrome is a chronic disease with an unknown etiology. Burning mouth syndrome is also idiopathic, and a consensus regarding diagnosis/treatment has not been reached yet. Recent studies have supported the suggestion that BMS is a neuropathic pain disorder in which both the peripheral and central nervous systems are involved. Tricyclic antidepressants (nortriptyline and amitriptyline), serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) (duloxetine and milnacipran), and antiepileptic drugs, potential-dependent calcium channel α2δ subunit ligands (gabapentine and pregabalin), are currently recommended as the first-choice drugs for neuropathic pain. In this study, we report 5 patients with BMS in whom there was no response to SNRI (milnacipran or duloxetine), or administration was discontinued because of adverse reactions, but in whom pregabalin therapy markedly reduced or led to the disappearance of pain in a short period. Pregabalin, whose mechanism of action differs from that of SNRIs, may become a treatment option for BMS patients who are not responsive to or are resistant to SNRIs.

  3. The effect of inhalation aromatherapy with damask rose (Rosa damascena essence on the pain intensity after dressing in patients with burns: A clinical randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bikmoradi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Inhalation aromatherapy with damask rose could be effective for relieving the pain caused after dressing in patients with burns. Therefore, it could be suggested as a complementary therapy in burn patients for pain relief.

  4. The efficacy of playing a virtual reality game in modulating pain for children with acute burn injuries: A randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN87413556

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McRae Sarah E

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of burn injuries is reported as painful, distressing and a cause of anxiety in children and their parents. Child's and parents' pain and anxiety, often contributes to extended time required for burns management procedures, in particular the process of changing dressings. The traditional method of pharmacologic analgesia is often insufficient to cover the burnt child's pain, and it can have deleterious side effects 12. Intervention with Virtual Reality (VR games is based on distraction or interruption in the way current thoughts, including pain, are processed by the brain. Research on adults supports the hypothesis that virtual reality has a positive influence on burns pain modulation. Methods This study investigates whether playing a virtual reality game, decreases procedural pain in children aged 5–18 years with acute burn injuries. The paper reports on the findings of a pilot study, a randomised trial, in which seven children acted as their own controls though a series of 11 trials. Outcomes were pain measured using the self-report Faces Scale and findings of interviews with parent/carer and nurses. Results The average pain scores (from the Faces Scale for pharmacological analgesia only was, 4.1 (SD 2.9, while VR coupled with pharmacological analgesia, the average pain score was 1.3 (SD 1.8 Conclusion The study provides strong evidence supporting VR based games in providing analgesia with minimal side effects and little impact on the physical hospital environment, as well as its reusability and versatility, suggesting another option in the management of children's acute pain.

  5. The effect of inhalation aromatherapy with damask rose (Rosa damascena) essence on the pain intensity after dressing in patients with burns: A clinical randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Harorani, Mehdi; Roshanaei, Ghodratollah; Moradkhani, Shirin; Falahinia, Golam Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pain is one of the common problems encountered by patients with burns, which increases after each dressing. This study aimed to investigate the effect of inhalation aromatherapy with damask rose essence on the pain of patients with burns that is caused after dressing. Materials and Methods: A randomized clinical trial was conducted on 50 patients with second- and third-degree burn wounds. The baseline pain of the patients was assessed 30 min before they entered into the dressing room on the first and second days of intervention. The patients in the experimental group inhaled five drops of damask rose essence 40% in distilled water, while those in the control group inhaled five drops of distilled water as placebo. The pain intensity was assessed using Visual Analogue Scale at 15 and 30 min after the patients exited from the dressing room. Data were analyzed by SPSS (version 18) using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: There was significant difference between the mean of pain intensity before and after intervention at 15 and 30 min after dressing (P aromatherapy in the experimental group (P aromatherapy with damask rose could be effective for relieving the pain caused after dressing in patients with burns. Therefore, it could be suggested as a complementary therapy in burn patients for pain relief. PMID:27186201

  6. Randomized-controlled trial of esomeprazole in functional dyspepsia patients with epigastric pain or burning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talley, N J; Vakil, N; Lauritsen, K

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early identification of true responders to acid suppression in functional dyspepsia patients with symptoms of epigastric pain or burning may enable clinicians to optimally tailor treatment. AIM: To evaluate whether a 1-w acid suppression trial is useful for identifying true responders...

  7. Projector-based virtual reality dome environment for procedural pain and anxiety in young children with burn injuries: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadra, Christelle; Ballard, Ariane; Déry, Johanne; Paquin, David; Fortin, Jean-Simon; Perreault, Isabelle; Labbe, David R; Hoffman, Hunter G; Bouchard, Stéphane; LeMay, Sylvie

    2018-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) is a non-pharmacological method to distract from pain during painful procedures. However, it was never tested in young children with burn injuries undergoing wound care. We aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the study process and the use of VR for procedural pain management. From June 2016 to January 2017, we recruited children from 2 months to 10 years of age with burn injuries requiring a hydrotherapy session in a pediatric university teaching hospital in Montreal. Each child received the projector-based VR intervention in addition to the standard pharmacological treatment. Data on intervention and study feasibility and acceptability in addition to measures on pain (Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability scale), baseline (Modified Smith Scale) and procedural (Procedure Behavior Check List) anxiety, comfort (OCCEB-BECCO [behavioral observational scale of comfort level for child burn victims]), and sedation (Ramsay Sedation Scale) were collected before, during, and after the procedure. Data analyses included descriptive and non-parametric inferential statistics. We recruited 15 children with a mean age of 2.2±2.1 years and a mean total body surface area of 5% (±4). Mean pain score during the procedure was low (2.9/10, ±3), as was the discomfort level (2.9/10, ±2.8). Most children were cooperative, oriented, and calm. Assessing anxiety was not feasible with our sample of participants. The prototype did not interfere with the procedure and was considered useful for procedural pain management by most health care professionals. The projector-based VR is a feasible and acceptable intervention for procedural pain management in young children with burn injuries. A larger trial with a control group is required to assess its efficacy.

  8. Evaluation of the effects of patient-selected music therapy on the sleep quality and pain intensity of burn patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Muhaddith Ardabili

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep disturbances and pain are some of the most common problems among burn patients, which have adverse effects on recovery process and patient comfort. Given the use of music as a non-pharmacological approach to alleviate pain and provide comfort, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of patient-selected music on sleep quality and pain intensity in burn patients. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on burn patients hospitalized in one of the hospitals of Tehran, Iran in 2015. In total, 50 patients were selected using randomized convenience sampling and divided into two intervention (n=25 and control (n=25 groups. Intervention was carried out for the intervention group through playing instrumental music, selected by the patients, in three consecutive 45-minute sessions before sleep. Severity of pain in the participants was evaluated for three nights (before and five minutes after the intervention using visual analog scale (VAS. In addition, sleep quality of the samples was assessed three days before the intervention using Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI and during the post-intervention days through interviews. The mentioned scales were applied for the control group as well. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 18 using Chi-square, as well as paired and independent t-tests. Results: In this study, a significant improvement was observed in sleep quality (P<0.001 and pain intensity (P=0.012 in the participants of intervention group after listening to music. Moreover, a significant difference was observed between the study groups after the intervention in terms of mean sleep quality score (P<0.001 and pain intensity (P=0.046. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, application of patient-selected music therapy could be associated with a significant improve in sleep quality and decrease in pain intensity in burn patients. Therefore, it is recommended that this intervention approach be applied by

  9. Serum Interleukin-6 in Patients with Burning Mouth Syndrome and Relationship with Depression and Perceived Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianming Chen

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions. Serum interleukin-6 in patients with burning mouth syndrome is decreased and negatively correlated to chronic pain. Both psychological and neuropathic disorders might act as precipitating factors in BMS etiopathogenesis.

  10. Evaluating Burning Mouth Syndrome as a Comorbidity of Atypical Odontalgia: The Impact on Pain Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Trang T H; Miura, Anna; Shinohara, Yukiko; Mikuzuki, Lou; Kawasaki, Kaoru; Sugawara, Shiori; Suga, Takayuki; Watanabe, Takeshi; Watanabe, Motoko; Umezaki, Yojiro; Yoshikawa, Tatsuya; Motomura, Haruhiko; Takenoshita, Miho; Toyofuku, Akira

    2018-06-01

    This study aimed (1) to investigate the differences in clinical characteristics of patients between 2 groups, those who have atypical odontalgia (AO) only and those who have AO with burning mouth syndrome (BMS), and (2) to assess the influence of psychiatric comorbidity factors on patients' experiences. Medical records and psychiatric referral forms of patients visiting the Psychosomatic Dentistry Clinic of Tokyo Medical and Dental University between 2013 and 2016 were reviewed. The final sample included 2 groups of 355 patients: those who have AO only (n = 272) and those who have AO with BMS (AO-BMS; n = 83). Clinicodemographic variables (gender, age, comorbid psychiatric disorders, and history of headache or sleep disturbances) and pain variables (duration of illness, pain intensity, and severity of accompanying depression) were collected. Initial pain assessment was done using the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, and depressive state was determined using the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale. The average age, female ratio, and sleep disturbance prevalence in the AO-only group were significantly lower than those in AO-BMS group. AO-BMS patients rated overall pain score and present pain intensity significantly higher than did the AO-only patients (P = 0.033 and P = 0.034, respectively), emphasizing sharp (P = 0.049), hot-burning (P = 0.000), and splitting (P = 0.003) characteristics of pain. Patients having comorbid psychiatric disorders had a higher proportion of sleep disturbance in both groups and a higher proportion of depressive state in the AO-only group. AO-BMS patients have different epidemiological characteristics, sleep quality, and pain experiences compared to AO-only patients. The presence of psychiatric comorbidities in both groups may exacerbate sleep quality. We suggest that BMS as a comorbid oral disorder in AO patients contributes to a more intensively painful experience. © 2017 The Authors. Pain Practice published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  11. Monocytes/Macrophages Control Resolution of Transient Inflammatory Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemen, Hanneke L. D. M.; Eijkelkamp, Niels; Carbajal, Anibal Garza; Wang, Huijing; Mack, Matthias; Zijlstra, Jitske; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Kavelaars, Annemieke

    2014-01-01

    Insights into mechanisms governing resolution of inflammatory pain are of great importance for many chronic pain–associated diseases. Here we investigate the role of macrophages/monocytes and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) in the resolution of transient inflammatory pain. Depletion of mice from peripheral monocytes/macrophages delayed resolution of intraplantar IL-1β- and carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia from 1 to 3 days to >1 week. Intrathecal administration of a neutralizing IL-10 antibody also markedly delayed resolution of IL-1β- and carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. Recently, we showed that IL-1β- and carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia is significantly prolonged in LysM-GRK2+/− mice, which have reduced levels of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) in LysM+ myeloid cells. Here we show that adoptive transfer of wild-type, but not of GRK2+/−, bone marrow-derived monocytes normalizes the resolution of IL-1β-induced hyperalgesia in LysM-GRK2+/− mice. Adoptive transfer of IL-10−/− bone marrow-derived monocytes failed to normalize the duration of IL-1β-induced hyperalgesia in LysM-GRK2+/− mice. Mechanistically, we show that GRK2+/− macrophages produce less IL-10 in vitro. In addition, intrathecal IL-10 administration attenuated IL-1β-induced hyperalgesia in LysM-GRK2+/− mice, whereas it had no effect in wild-type mice. Our data uncover a key role for monocytes/macrophages in promoting resolution of inflammatory hyperalgesia via a mechanism dependent on IL-10 signaling in dorsal root ganglia. Perspective We show that IL-10-producing monocytes/macrophages promote resolution of transient inflammatory hyperalgesia. Additionally, we show that reduced monocyte/macrophage GRK2 impairs resolution of hyperalgesia and reduces IL-10 production. We propose that low GRK2 expression and/or impaired IL-10 production by monocytes/macrophages represent peripheral biomarkers for the risk of developing

  12. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Home Health Info Health Topics Burning Mouth Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a painful, complex condition often described ... or other symptoms. Read More Publications Cover image Burning Mouth Syndrome Publication files Download Language English PDF — Number of ...

  13. Psychiatric aspects of burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalal P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries and their subsequent treatment cause one of the most excruciating forms of pain imaginable. The psychological aspects of burn injury have been researched in different parts of the world, producing different outcomes. Studies have shown that greater levels of acute pain are associated with negative long-term psychological effects such as acute stress disorder, depression, suicidal ideation, and post-traumatic stress disorder for as long as 2 years after the initial burn injury. The concept of allostatic load is presented as a potential explanation for the relationship between acute pain and subsequent psychological outcomes. A biopsychosocial model is also presented as a means of obtaining better inpatient pain management and helping to mediate this relationship.

  14. The modelling of BLEVE fireball transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shield, S.R. [Shell Research Ltd., Chester (United Kingdom). Thornton Research Centre

    1995-12-31

    An existing physically based BLEVE fireball model has been developed to predict the shape of the transient heat pulse to a receiver, to model ``cold`` BLEVEs, and to assess the consequences to structures and people. This has been achieved by finding a correlation to predict the size of a characteristic liquid drop within the flashing cloud. These drops burn out to predict the time to fireball break-up and extinction, and their height is tracked to find the rise of the fireball, agreement with small and large scale data being satisfactory. The model is semi-empirical in that, when the level of pre-heating is low, a heat balance cannot predict the development of fireball temperature with time since the fuel is pyrolising. Also, the modelling of the transition from ``cold`` BLEVE fireball to pool fire is a cautious best estimate. Using both traditional and more recent models, the prediction of pain, burns and fatality have been incorporated into the model. Whatever criterion for a safety distance is used, the effect of modelling the transient is to reduce the calculated safety distances by up to a factor of two, which brings fatality predictions for real incidents much more in line with the historical record. (author)

  15. Rare Cause of Hip Pain: Transient Osteoporosis of the Hip-Two Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senem Şaş

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH is a rare disease affecting especially middle-aged men and women in the third trimester of pregnancy with unknown etiology. It has a benign course with spontaneous resolution. Transient osteoporosis may be confused with other diseases such as avascular necrosis. Early diagnosis is important to identify and plan correct treatment. In this report, two male cases with complaint of hip pain and difficulty in walking, which were diagnosed with TOH was presented by reviewing current literature.

  16. Can live music therapy reduce distress and pain in children with burns after wound care procedures? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Marianne J E; Jeekel, Johannes; Rode, Heinz; Cox, Sharon; van Rosmalen, Joost; Hunink, Myriam G M; van Dijk, Monique

    2018-06-01

    Burn wound care procedures are very painful and lead to distress. Live music therapy has shown beneficial effects on distress and pain in specific pediatric patient populations. In this study we measured whether live music therapy has beneficial effects in terms of less distress and pain in children with burns after wound care procedures. This randomized assessor-blinded controlled trial (RCT) took place at the burns unit of the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa. It included newly admitted inpatients between the ages of 0 and 13 years undergoing their first or second wound care procedures. Excluded were children with a hearing impairment or low level of consciousness. The intervention group received one live music therapy session directly after wound care in addition to standard care. The control group received standard care only. The primary outcome was distress measured with the Observational Scale of Behavioral Distress-revised (OSBD-r). The secondary outcome was pain measured with the COMFORT-behavioral scale (COMFORT-B). In addition, in children older than 5 years self-reported distress with the validated Wong-Baker scale (FACES) and pain with the Faces Pain Scale-Revised (FPS-R) were measured. Patients in both groups were videotaped for three minutes before wound care; during the music therapy or the control condition; and for two minutes thereafter. Two researchers, blinded to the study condition, independently scored the OSBD-r and the COMFORT-B from the video footage before and after music therapy. We included 135 patients, median age 22.6 months (IQR 15.4-40.7 months). Change scores did not significantly differ between the intervention and the control groups for either distress (p=0.53; d=0.11; 95% CI -0.23 to 0.45) or pain (p=0.99; d=0.04; 95% CI -0.30 to 0.38). Self-reported distress in a small group of children (n=18) older than 5 years indicated a significant reduction in distress after live music therapy (p=0

  17. Burning mouth syndrome: Present perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh Parajuli

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by chronic oral pain or burning sensation affecting the oral mucosa in the absence of obvious visible mucosal lesions. Patient presenting with the burning mouth sensation or pain is frequently encountered in clinical practice which poses a challenge to the treating clinician. Its exact etiology remains unknown which probably has multifactorial origin. It often affects middle or old age women and it may be accompanied by xerostomia and alte...

  18. Chronic Orofacial Pain: Burning Mouth Syndrome and Other Neuropathic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Raymond C; Ferguson, McKenzie; Herndon, Christopher M

    2017-01-01

    Chronic orofacial pain is a symptom associated with a wide range of neuropathic, neurovascular, idiopathic, and myofascial conditions that affect a significant proportion of the population. While the collective impact of the subset of the orofacial pain disorders involving neurogenic and idiopathic mechanisms is substantial, some of these are relatively uncommon. Hence, patients with these disorders can be vulnerable to misdiagnosis, sometimes for years, increasing the symptom burden and delaying effective treatment. This manuscript first reviews the decision tree to be followed in diagnosing any neuropathic pain condition, as well as the levels of evidence needed to make a diagnosis with each of several levels of confidence: definite, probable, or possible. It then examines the clinical literature related to the idiopathic and neurogenic conditions that can occasion chronic orofacial pain, including burning mouth syndrome, trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, post-herpetic neuralgia, and atypical odontalgia. Temporomandibular disorders also are examined as are other headache conditions, even though they are not neurologic conditions, because they are common and can mimic symptoms of the latter disorders. For each of these conditions, the paper reviews literature regarding incidence and prevalence, physiologic and other contributing factors, diagnostic signs and symptoms, and empirical evidence regarding treatments. Finally, in order to improve the quality and accuracy of clinical diagnosis, as well as the efficiency with which effective treatment is initiated and delivered, criteria are offered that can be instrumental in making a differential diagnosis. PMID:28638895

  19. Chronic Orofacial Pain: Burning Mouth Syndrome and Other Neuropathic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Raymond C; Ferguson, McKenzie; Herndon, Christopher M

    2017-03-01

    Chronic orofacial pain is a symptom associated with a wide range of neuropathic, neurovascular, idiopathic, and myofascial conditions that affect a significant proportion of the population. While the collective impact of the subset of the orofacial pain disorders involving neurogenic and idiopathic mechanisms is substantial, some of these are relatively uncommon. Hence, patients with these disorders can be vulnerable to misdiagnosis, sometimes for years, increasing the symptom burden and delaying effective treatment. This manuscript first reviews the decision tree to be followed in diagnosing any neuropathic pain condition, as well as the levels of evidence needed to make a diagnosis with each of several levels of confidence: definite, probable, or possible. It then examines the clinical literature related to the idiopathic and neurogenic conditions that can occasion chronic orofacial pain, including burning mouth syndrome, trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, post-herpetic neuralgia, and atypical odontalgia. Temporomandibular disorders also are examined as are other headache conditions, even though they are not neurologic conditions, because they are common and can mimic symptoms of the latter disorders. For each of these conditions, the paper reviews literature regarding incidence and prevalence, physiologic and other contributing factors, diagnostic signs and symptoms, and empirical evidence regarding treatments. Finally, in order to improve the quality and accuracy of clinical diagnosis, as well as the efficiency with which effective treatment is initiated and delivered, criteria are offered that can be instrumental in making a differential diagnosis.

  20. Altered structural connectivity of pain-related brain network in burning mouth syndrome-investigation by graph analysis of probabilistic tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Akihiko; Shizukuishi, Takashi; Kikuta, Junko; Yamada, Haruyasu; Watanabe, Yusuke; Imamura, Yoshiki; Shinozaki, Takahiro; Dezawa, Ko; Haradome, Hiroki; Abe, Osamu

    2017-05-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic intraoral pain syndrome featuring idiopathic oral pain and burning discomfort despite clinically normal oral mucosa. The etiology of chronic pain syndrome is unclear, but preliminary neuroimaging research has suggested the alteration of volume, metabolism, blood flow, and diffusion at multiple brain regions. According to the neuromatrix theory of Melzack, pain sense is generated in the brain by the network of multiple pain-related brain regions. Therefore, the alteration of pain-related network is also assumed as an etiology of chronic pain. In this study, we investigated the brain network of BMS brain by using probabilistic tractography and graph analysis. Fourteen BMS patients and 14 age-matched healthy controls underwent 1.5T MRI. Structural connectivity was calculated in 83 anatomically defined regions with probabilistic tractography of 60-axis diffusion tensor imaging and 3D T1-weighted imaging. Graph theory network analysis was used to evaluate the brain network at local and global connectivity. In BMS brain, a significant difference of local brain connectivity was recognized at the bilateral rostral anterior cingulate cortex, right medial orbitofrontal cortex, and left pars orbitalis which belong to the medial pain system; however, no significant difference was recognized at the lateral system including the somatic sensory cortex. A strengthened connection of the anterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex with the basal ganglia, thalamus, and brain stem was revealed. Structural brain network analysis revealed the alteration of the medial system of the pain-related brain network in chronic pain syndrome.

  1. Investigating the burning characteristics of electric cables used in the nuclear power plant by way of 3-D transient FDS code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferng, Y.M., E-mail: ymferng@ess.nthu.edu.t [Department of Engineering and System Science, Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2. Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Liu, C.H. [Department of Engineering and System Science, Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Sec. 2. Kuang-Fu Rd., Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2011-01-15

    Burning characteristics of electrical cables are one of the key parameters for the fire hazard assessment of nuclear power plants (NPPs) since the cables are the essential sources of fire in the plants. A three-dimensional (3-D) transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code{sub F}DS is adopted in this paper to simulate these characteristics related to the cable burning. Being one of the NRC licensing fire codes, the FDS includes the thermal-hydraulic equations, the turbulence model and the chemical combustion model, etc. In order to assess the CFD fire models used in this code, a burning test using the control cable with the outer jacket of polyvinylchloride (PVC) and the inner insulation of cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) is conducted. The measured parameters associated with the burning characteristics include the heat release rate (HRR), O{sub 2} depletion, and CO and CO{sub 2} production, etc. Except the amount of O{sub 2} consumption, the predicted transient behaviors of other parameters can reproduce the measured data. Based on the chemical combustion model in the FDS code, this discrepancy may be essentially resulted from the default value of hydrogen fraction (H{sub frac}) contained in the soot since the soot yield for the burning of PVC material is high enough that the uncertainty in the H{sub frac} value has a prominent effect on the amount of O{sub 2} consumption. This explanation can be confirmed by a benchmark calculation for simulating a burning test with the polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) fuel of low-soot yield. The present simulation works can provide the useful information for the plant staff or the researcher as they would perform the fire hazard analysis in the NPPs using the FDS code.

  2. Grey matter changes of the pain matrix in patients with burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinding, Charlotte; Gransjøen, Anne Mari; Schlumberger, Gina; Grushka, Miriam; Frasnelli, Johannes; Singh, Preet Bano

    2016-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterized by a burning sensation in the mouth, usually in the absence of clinical and laboratory findings. Latest findings indicate that BMS could result from neuropathic trigeminal conditions. While many investigations have focused on the periphery, very few have examined possible central dysfunctions. To highlight changes of the central system of subjects with BMS, we analysed the grey matter concentration in 12 subjects using voxel-based morphometry. Data were compared with a control group (Ct). To better understand the brain mechanisms underlying BMS, the grey matter concentration of patients was also compared with those of dysgeusic patients (Dys). Dysgeusia is another oral dysfunction condition, characterized by a distorted sense of taste and accompanied by a reduced taste function. We found that a major part of the 'pain matrix' presented modifications of the grey matter concentration in subjects with BMS. Six regions out of eight were affected [anterior and posterior cingulate gyrus, lobules of the cerebellum, insula/frontal operculum, inferior temporal area, primary motor cortex, dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex (DLPFC)]. In the anterior cingulate gyrus, the lobules of the cerebellum, the inferior temporal lobe and the DLPFC, pain intensity correlated with grey matter concentration. Dys also presented changes in grey matter concentration but in different areas of the brain. Our results suggest that a deficiency in the control of pain could in part be a cause of BMS and that BMS and dysgeusia conditions are not linked to similar structural changes in the brain. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The relationship between numbness, tingling and shooting/burning pain in patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) as measured by the EORTC QLQ-CIPN20 instrument, N06CA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, S.L.; Barton, D.L.; Qin, R.; Wos, E.J.; Sloan, J.A.; Liu, H.; Aaronson, N.K.; Satele, D.V.; Mattar, B.I.; Green, N.B.; Loprinzi, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is characterized by numbness, tingling, and shooting/burning pain. This analysis was performed to describe the relationship between numbness, tingling, and shooting/burning pain in patients with CIPN, as reported using the EORTC

  4. Projector-based virtual reality dome environment for procedural pain and anxiety in young children with burn injuries: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadra C

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Christelle Khadra,1,2 Ariane Ballard,1,2 Johanne Déry,1,3 David Paquin,4 Jean-Simon Fortin,5 Isabelle Perreault,6 David R Labbe,7 Hunter G Hoffman,8 Stéphane Bouchard,9 Sylvie LeMay1,2 1Faculty of Nursing, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 2Research Center, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU Sainte-Justine, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3Direction of Nursing, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU Sainte-Justine, Montreal, QC, Canada; 4Department in Creation and New Media, Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue, Rouyn-Noranda, QC, Canada; 5Emergency Department, Hôpital de Granby, Granby, QC, Canada; 6Department of Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU Sainte-Justine, Montreal, QC, Canada; 7Department of Software and IT Engineering, École de Technologie Supérieure, Montreal, QC, Canada; 8Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 9Department of Psychoeducation and Psychology, Université du Québec en Outaouais, Gatineau, QC, Canada Background: Virtual reality (VR is a non-pharmacological method to distract from pain during painful procedures. However, it was never tested in young children with burn injuries undergoing wound care.Aim: We aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the study process and the use of VR for procedural pain management.Methods: From June 2016 to January 2017, we recruited children from 2 months to 10 years of age with burn injuries requiring a hydrotherapy session in a pediatric university teaching hospital in Montreal. Each child received the projector-based VR intervention in addition to the standard pharmacological treatment. Data on intervention and study feasibility and acceptability in addition to measures on pain (Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability scale, baseline (Modified Smith Scale and procedural (Procedure Behavior Check List anxiety, comfort (OCCEB-BECCO [behavioral observational scale of comfort level for child burn

  5. Serum Interleukin-6 in Patients with Burning Mouth Syndrome and Relationship with Depression and Perceived Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qianming; Xia, Juan; Lin, Mei; Zhou, Hongmei; Li, Bingqi

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To examine alteration of serum interleukin-6 and its clinical significance in burning mouth syndrome (BMS) patients. Methods. 48 BMS patients and 31 healthy controls participated in the study. Serum interleukin-6 was measured by means of ELISA. Hamilton rating scale of depression (HRSD) and visual analogue scale (VAS) were used to quantitiate depressive status and pain levels of subjects, respectively. Results. 15 (31%) patients displayed substantial depressive symptoms (HRSD ≧ 16). HRSD scores of patients were significantly higher than controls and positively correlated to their VAS values (P = .002). Serum interleukin-6 in patients was much lower than controls and negatively correlated to their VAS values (P = .011). However, no significant relations were found between interleukin-6 and HRSD scores (P = .317). Conclusions. Serum interleukin-6 in patients with burning mouth syndrome is decreased and negatively correlated to chronic pain. Both psychological and neuropathic disorders might act as precipitating factors in BMS etiopathogenesis. PMID:17641729

  6. Impact of reassurance on pain perception in patients with primary burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailo, V; Firić, M; Vučićević Boras, V; Andabak Rogulj, A; Krstevski, I; Alajbeg, I

    2016-09-01

    In spite of extensive research, no effective treatment of primary burning mouth syndrome (BMS) still exists. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of informative intervention/reassurance on pain perception and quality of life in patients with primary BMS. Informative intervention/reassurance was undertaken in 28 patients diagnosed with primary BMS. Patients received information about all aspects of BMS verbally and in an informative leaflet. Numerical scale (0-10), Pain Catastrophizing Scale and Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14) were used to assess pain intensity, pain perception, and quality of life before the intervention and 6 months after. No other treatment was given to the patients. Significant reduction in symptom intensity, pain catastrophizing along with positive increase in the quality of life compared with baseline, was observed on a follow-up examination 6 months after the informative intervention (P < 0.001). The results of this study confirm that objective informing/reassurance of patients with primary BMS can result in decreased catastrophizing and improvement in the quality of life. By eliminating/changing negative patterns of behavior, a reduction in symptoms comparable with pharmacological treatment can be achieved. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Feasibility and potential effect of a low-cost virtual reality system on reducing pain and anxiety in adult burn injury patients during physiotherapy in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Linzette Deidré; Louw, Quinette Abegail; Crous, Lynette Christine

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the feasibility and potential effect of a low-cost VR system (eMagin Z800 3DVisor), used in conjunction with pharmacological analgesia, on reducing pain and anxiety in adult burn patients undergoing physiotherapy treatment, compared to pharmacologic analgesia alone at a South African hospital. Single-blind, within-subject study design. Pain and anxiety outcome measures were measured by a blinded assessor using the Numeric Pain Rating Scale and Burn Specific Pain and Anxiety Scale. Box-and-whisker plot method, Chi-square tests as well as the Student's paired t-test were used to analyze data. Eleven eligible adult burn patients consented to participate in this study (3 female, 8 male; median age 33 years: range 23-54 years). A marginal (p=0.06) to insignificant (p=0.13) difference between the two sessions (analgesia with VR and analgesia without VR) in reducing pain was found. No significant difference (p=0.58) was found between the two sessions (analgesia with VR and analgesia without VR) for anxiety. There seems to be a trend that the low-cost VR system, when added to routine pharmacological analgesics, is a safe technique and could be of considerable benefit if implemented into the pain management regime of burn units at a South African hospital.

  8. Analgesic effects of dexamethasone in burn injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Lassen, Birgit Vibeke; Kehlet, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    and secondary hyperalgesia. RESULTS: The burn injury induced significant increases in erythema (P burn did not differ between dexamethasone and placebo treatments (P >.6). There were no significant......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Glucocorticoids are well-known adjuvant analgesics in certain chronic pain states. There is, however, a paucity of data on their analgesic efficacy in acute pain. Therefore, the aim of the study was to examine the analgesic effects of dexamethasone in a validated burn...... model of acute inflammatory pain in humans. METHODS: Twenty-two volunteers were investigated in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over study. Intravenous dexamethasone 8 mg or placebo was administered on 2 separate study days. Two hours after drug administration, a first-degree burn...

  9. Burns (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... small, and have sensitive skin that needs extra protection. Although some minor burns aren't cause for concern and can ... burns, the mildest of the three, are limited to the top layer of skin: Signs ... pain, and minor swelling. The skin is dry without blisters. Healing ...

  10. Effectiveness of Aloe Vera gel compared with 1% silver sulphadiazine cream as burn wound dressing in second degree burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Muhammad Naveed; Ahmed, Naheed

    2013-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of Aloe Vera gel compared with 1% silver sulfadiazine cream as a burn dressing for the treatment of superficial and partial thickness burns. This Interventional Comparative study was carried out at the Burn unit and Plastic surgery department, Nishtar Hospital Multan, Pakistan from July 2008 to December 2010. A total of 50 patients with superficial and partial thickness burns were divided into two equal groups randomly by consecutive sampling method, one group was dressed with Aloe Vera gel while the other was treated with 1% silversulphadiazine cream, and the results regarding duration of wound epithelialization, pain relief and cost of treatment were compared. In patients treated with Aloe Vera gel, healing of burn wounds were remarkably early than those patients treated with 1% silver sulfadiazine. All the patients of Aloe Vera group were relieved of pain earlier than those patients who were treated with SSD. Thermal burns patients dressed with Aloe Vera gel showed advantage compared to those dressed with SSD regarding early wound epithelialization, earlier pain relief and cost-effectiveness.

  11. Low-dose aripiprazole for refractory burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umezaki Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yojiro Umezaki,1 Miho Takenoshita,2 Akira Toyofuku2 1Psychosomatic Dentistry Clinic, Dental Hospital, 2Psychosomatic Dentistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: We report a case of refractory burning mouth syndrome (BMS ameliorated with low dose of aripiprazole. The patient was a 66-year-old female who had suffered from chronic burning pain in her tongue for 13 months. No abnormality associated with the burning sensation was detected in the laboratory tests and the oral findings. Considering the clinical feature and the history together, we diagnosed the burning sensation as BMS. The BMS pain was decreased by aripiprazole (powder 1.0 mg/d, though no other antidepressants had satisfying pain relief. It could be supposed that the efficacy of aripiprazole is caused by dopamine stabilization in this case, and BMS might have a subtype that is reactive to aripiprazole. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of aripiprazole for BMS. Keywords: burning mouth syndrome, low-dose aripiprazole, chronic pain

  12. Burning mouth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    K A Kamala; S Sankethguddad; S G Sujith; Praveena Tantradi

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is multifactorial in origin which is typically characterized by burning and painful sensation in an oral cavity demonstrating clinically normal mucosa. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. As the symptom of oral burning is seen in various pathological conditions, it is essential for a clinician to be aware of how to different...

  13. Burning mouth syndrome: etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerchiari, Dafne Patrícia; de Moricz, Renata Dutra; Sanjar, Fernanda Alves; Rapoport, Priscila Bogar; Moretti, Giovana; Guerra, Marja Michelin

    2006-01-01

    The Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is an oral mucosa pain--with or without inflammatory signs--without any specific lesion. It is mostly observed in women aged 40-60 years. This pain feels like a moderate/severe burning, and it occurs more frequently on the tongue, but it may also be felt at the gingiva, lips and jugal mucosa. It may worsen during the day, during stress and fatigue, when the patient speaks too much, or through eating of spicy/hot foods. The burning can be diminished with cold food, work and leisure. The goal of this review article is to consider possible BMS etiologies and join them in 4 groups to be better studied: local, systemic, emotional and idiopathic causes of pain. Knowing the different diagnoses of this syndrome, we can establish a protocol to manage these patients. Within the local pain group, we must investigate dental, allergic and infectious causes. Concerning systemic causes we need to look for connective tissue diseases, endocrine disorders, neurological diseases, nutritional deficits and salivary glands alterations that result in xerostomia. BMS etiology may be of difficult diagnosis, many times showing more than one cause for oral pain. A detailed interview, general physical examination, oral cavity and oropharynx inspection, and lab exams are essential to avoid a try and error treatment for these patients.

  14. Transient osteoporosis of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWalter, Patricia; Hassan Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip is an uncommon cause of hip pain, mostly affecting healthy middle-aged men and also women in the third trimester of pregnancy. We present a case of transient osteoporosis of the hip in a 33-year-old non-pregnant female patient. This case highlights the importance of considering a diagnosis of transient osteoporosis of the hip in patients who present with hip pain. (author)

  15. Ketamine hydrochloride - an adjunct for analgesia in dogs with burn wounds : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Joubert

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available The management of pain in patients with burn wounds is complex and problematic. Burn-wound pain is severe, inconsistent and underestimated. Patients experience severe pain, especially during procedures, until wound healing has occurred. A multi-modality approach is needed for effective management of pain, which requires an understanding of the mechanisms of pain. Altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in burn-wound patients makes drug actions unpredictable. Opioids alone are seldom sufficient for pain control. The multi-modality approach includes the use of opioids and non-steroidal antiinflammatory, anxiolytic and alternative drugs. Ketamine has been found to be a useful agent for analgesia in burn-wound patients; a dose of 10 mg/kg qid per os was found to be an effective adjunct to pain therapy.

  16. Transient hardened power FETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawes, W.R. Jr.; Fischer, T.A.; Huang, C.C.C.; Meyer, W.J.; Smith, C.S.; Blanchard, R.A.; Fortier, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    N-channel power FETs offer significant advantages in power conditioning circuits. Similiarily to all MOS technologies, power FET devices are vulnerable to ionizing radiation, and are particularily susceptible to burn-out in high dose rate irradiations (>1E10 rads(Si)/sec.), which precludes their use in many military environments. This paper will summarize the physical mechanisms responsible for burn-out, and discuss various fabrication techniques designed to improve the transient hardness of power FETs. Power FET devices were fabricated with several of these techniques, and data will be presented which demonstrates that transient hardness levels in excess of 1E12 rads(Si)/sec. are easily achievable

  17. Tratamento da dor em queimados Tratamiento del dolor en quemados Pain management in burn patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo José Alencar de Castro

    2013-02-01

    paciente en tratamiento de quemadura es el primer paso para alcanzar el éxito en su manejo analgésico.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Despite advances, inappropriate analgesic treatment for burn patients is still seen. The objective of this review was to collect data on pain management in burn patients. CONTENT: We reviewed the mechanisms of pain, burn patient assessment, as well as pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment. CONCLUSION: Pain management in burn patients is still a challenge for the multidisciplinary team. Frequent and continuous evaluation of the patient's response is very important due to the various stages that the hospitalized burn patient goes through, as well as a combination therapy with analgesic and non-pharmacological measures. Understanding the complexity of the pathophysiological, psychological, and biochemical changes a burn patient presents is the first step to achieve success in analgesic management.

  18. Low-dose aripiprazole for refractory burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Takenoshita, Miho; Toyofuku, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of refractory burning mouth syndrome (BMS) ameliorated with low dose of aripiprazole. The patient was a 66-year-old female who had suffered from chronic burning pain in her tongue for 13 months. No abnormality associated with the burning sensation was detected in the laboratory tests and the oral findings. Considering the clinical feature and the history together, we diagnosed the burning sensation as BMS. The BMS pain was decreased by aripiprazole (powder) 1.0 mg/d, though no other antidepressants had satisfying pain relief. It could be supposed that the efficacy of aripiprazole is caused by dopamine stabilization in this case, and BMS might have a subtype that is reactive to aripiprazole. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of aripiprazole for BMS.

  19. Ciguatoxins activate specific cold pain pathways to elicit burning pain from cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Irina; Touska, Filip; Hess, Andreas; Hinsbey, Rachel; Sattler, Simon; Lampert, Angelika; Sergejeva, Marina; Sharov, Anastasia; Collins, Lindon S; Eberhardt, Mirjam; Engel, Matthias; Cabot, Peter J; Wood, John N; Vlachová, Viktorie; Reeh, Peter W; Lewis, Richard J; Zimmermann, Katharina

    2012-10-03

    Ciguatoxins are sodium channel activator toxins that cause ciguatera, the most common form of ichthyosarcotoxism, which presents with peripheral sensory disturbances, including the pathognomonic symptom of cold allodynia which is characterized by intense stabbing and burning pain in response to mild cooling. We show that intraplantar injection of P-CTX-1 elicits cold allodynia in mice by targeting specific unmyelinated and myelinated primary sensory neurons. These include both tetrodotoxin-resistant, TRPA1-expressing peptidergic C-fibres and tetrodotoxin-sensitive A-fibres. P-CTX-1 does not directly open heterologously expressed TRPA1, but when co-expressed with Na(v) channels, sodium channel activation by P-CTX-1 is sufficient to drive TRPA1-dependent calcium influx that is responsible for the development of cold allodynia, as evidenced by a large reduction of excitatory effect of P-CTX-1 on TRPA1-deficient nociceptive C-fibres and of ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia in TRPA1-null mutant mice. Functional MRI studies revealed that ciguatoxin-induced cold allodynia enhanced the BOLD (Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent) signal, an effect that was blunted in TRPA1-deficient mice, confirming an important role for TRPA1 in the pathogenesis of cold allodynia.

  20. Covering techniques for severe burn treatment: lessons for radiological burn accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsin, H.; Stephanazzi, J.; Lambert, F.; Curet, P.M.; Gourmelon, P.

    2002-01-01

    Covering techniques for severe burn treatment: lessons for radiological burn accidents. After a severe burn, the injured person is weakened by a risk of infection and a general inflammation. The necrotic tissues have to be removed because they are toxic for the organism. The injured person also needs to be covered by a cutaneous envelope, which has to be done by a treatment centre for burned people. The different techniques are the following: - auto grafts on limited burned areas; - cutaneous substitutes to cover temporary extended burned areas. Among them: natural substitutes like xenografts (pork skin, sheep skin,..) or allografts (human skin), - treated natural substitutes which only maintain the extracellular matrix. Artificial skins belong to this category and allow the development of high quality scars, - cell cultures in the laboratory: multiplying the individual cells and grafting them onto the patient. This technique is not common but allows one to heal severely injured patients. X-ray burns are still a problem. Their characteristics are analysed: intensive, permanent, antalgic resistant pain. They are difficult to compare with heat burns. In spite of a small number of known cases, we can give some comments and guidance on radio necrosis cures: the importance of the patients comfort, of ending the pain, of preventing infection, and nutritional balance. At the level of epidermic inflammation and phlyctena (skin blisters), the treatment may be completed by the use of growth factors. At the level of necrosis, after a temporary cover, an auto graft can be considered only if a healthy basis is guaranteed. The use of cellular cultures in order to obtain harmonious growth factors can be argued. (author)

  1. Plasma IL-8 signature correlates with pain and depressive symptomatology in patients with burning mouth syndrome: Results from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Alison; O'Halloran, Ken D; McKenna, Joseph P; McCreary, Christine; Downer, Eric J

    2018-02-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a neuropathic orofacial pain condition of unknown aetiology that encompasses intra-oral burning pain without abnormal clinical findings. Psychological, neural and inflammatory processes are associated with BMS pathogenesis. Currently, studies characterising plasma cytokine/chemokine profiles with pain and depression in patients with BMS are lacking. Considering that inflammation is associated with the pathophysiology of BMS, and that inflammation is closely associated with pain and depression, we aimed to correlate depressive symptomatology and oral cavity pain with plasma cytokine/chemokine signatures in a cohort of patients with BMS. In this study, plasma protein levels of Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-12p70, TNF-α), Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-10, IL-6, IL-13) and the chemokine IL-8 were assessed in patients with BMS (n = 10) and healthy volunteers (n = 10), using pro-inflammatory-10-plex assays. Clinical histories, alongside self-rated oral cavity pain intensities and depressive symptomatology were assessed using a visual analogue scale and the 16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology questionnaires, respectively. We present evidence that BMS is associated with increased depressive symptomatology and enhanced oral cavity pain. Plasma isolated from BMS patients display enhanced expression of the pro-inflammatory chemokine IL-8, when compared to plasma from healthy individuals. Plasma IL-8 signature correlates with pain and depressive symptomatology in the study cohort. Overall, these findings indicate that plasma IL-8 profiles are dysregulated in BMS and that modulation of IL-8 production in the disorder may be a tool in the management of BMS symptomatology. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Sodium channel Nav1.7 immunoreactivity in painful human dental pulp and burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiangou Yiangos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voltage gated sodium channels Nav1.7 are involved in nociceptor nerve action potentials and are known to affect pain sensitivity in clinical genetic disorders. Aims and Objectives To study Nav1.7 levels in dental pulpitis pain, an inflammatory condition, and burning mouth syndrome (BMS, considered a neuropathic orofacial pain disorder. Methods Two groups of patients were recruited for this study. One group consisted of patients with dental pulpitis pain (n = 5 and controls (n = 12, and the other patients with BMS (n = 7 and controls (n = 10. BMS patients were diagnosed according to the International Association for the Study of Pain criteria; a pain history was collected, including the visual analogue scale (VAS. Immunohistochemistry with visual intensity and computer image analysis were used to evaluate levels of Nav1.7 in dental pulp tissue samples from the dental pulpitis group, and tongue biopsies from the BMS group. Results There was a significantly increased visual intensity score for Nav1.7 in nerve fibres in the painful dental pulp specimens, compared to controls. Image analysis showed a trend for an increase of the Nav1.7 immunoreactive % area in the painful pulp group, but this was not statistically significant. When expressed as a ratio of the neurofilament % area, there was a strong trend for an increase of Nav1.7 in the painful pulp group. Nav1.7 immunoreactive fibres were seen in abundance in the sub-mucosal layer of tongue biopsies, with no significant difference between BMS and controls. Conclusion Nav1.7 sodium channel may play a significant role in inflammatory dental pain. Clinical trials with selective Nav1.7 channel blockers should prioritise dental pulp pain rather than BMS.

  3. Sodium channel Nav1.7 immunoreactivity in painful human dental pulp and burning mouth syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Voltage gated sodium channels Nav1.7 are involved in nociceptor nerve action potentials and are known to affect pain sensitivity in clinical genetic disorders. Aims and Objectives To study Nav1.7 levels in dental pulpitis pain, an inflammatory condition, and burning mouth syndrome (BMS), considered a neuropathic orofacial pain disorder. Methods Two groups of patients were recruited for this study. One group consisted of patients with dental pulpitis pain (n = 5) and controls (n = 12), and the other patients with BMS (n = 7) and controls (n = 10). BMS patients were diagnosed according to the International Association for the Study of Pain criteria; a pain history was collected, including the visual analogue scale (VAS). Immunohistochemistry with visual intensity and computer image analysis were used to evaluate levels of Nav1.7 in dental pulp tissue samples from the dental pulpitis group, and tongue biopsies from the BMS group. Results There was a significantly increased visual intensity score for Nav1.7 in nerve fibres in the painful dental pulp specimens, compared to controls. Image analysis showed a trend for an increase of the Nav1.7 immunoreactive % area in the painful pulp group, but this was not statistically significant. When expressed as a ratio of the neurofilament % area, there was a strong trend for an increase of Nav1.7 in the painful pulp group. Nav1.7 immunoreactive fibres were seen in abundance in the sub-mucosal layer of tongue biopsies, with no significant difference between BMS and controls. Conclusion Nav1.7 sodium channel may play a significant role in inflammatory dental pain. Clinical trials with selective Nav1.7 channel blockers should prioritise dental pulp pain rather than BMS. PMID:20529324

  4. Suicidal Behavior in a Patient with Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Kontoangelos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic pain of the oral cavity is a long-term condition and like all other types of chronic pain is associated with numerous comorbidities such as depression or anxiety. Case Presentation. This is a case of a 93-year-old patient suffering from chronic oral cavity pain who repeatedly stabbed his palate due to ongoing local pain, over the last few months, which he could not further tolerate. The patient was suffering from depression and also a diagnosis of “burning mouth syndrome” (BMS was made. Discussion. Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is characterized by a burning sensation in the tongue or other oral sites. BMS has high psychiatric comorbidity but can occur in the absence of psychiatric diagnosis. Patients with multiple forms of pain must be considered as potential candidates for underdiagnosed depression (major and suicidal thoughts.

  5. Burning mouth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Zakrzewska, Joanna; Buchanan, John A. G.

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a debilitating medical condition affecting nearly 1.3 million of Americans. Its common features include a burning painful sensation in the mouth, often associated with dysgeusia and xerostomia, despite normal salivation. Classically, symptoms are better in the morning, worsen during the day and typically subside at night. Its etiology is largely multifactorial, and associated medical conditions may include gastrointestinal, urogenital, psychiatric, neurologic and met...

  6. Biobrane versus 1% silver sulfadiazine in second-degree pediatric burns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, JP; Dziewulski, P; Ramzy, PI; Wolf, SE; Desai, MH; Herndon, DN

    Partial-thickness burns in children have been treated for many years by daily, painful rubbing, washing, and cleansing of the burn wound, followed by topical application of antimicrobial creams. Pain and impaired wound healing are the main problems. We hypothesized that the treatment of

  7. Involvement of transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 in intra-oral incisional pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urata, K; Shinoda, M; Ikutame, D; Iinuma, T; Iwata, K

    2018-03-05

    To examine whether transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) contributes to the changes in intra-oral thermal and mechanical sensitivity following the incision of buccal mucosa. Buccal mucosal pain threshold was measured after the incision. Changes in the number of TRPV2-immunoreactive (IR) trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons which innervate the whisker pad skin and buccal mucosa, changes in the number of isolectin B4-negative/isolectin B4-positive TRPV2-IR TG neurons which innervate the whisker pad skin and the buccal mucosa, and the effect of peripheral TRPV2 antagonism on the pain threshold of incisional whisker pad skin and buccal mucosa were examined after these injuries. Buccal mucosal pain hypersensitivities were induced on day 3 following the incision. The total number of TRPV2-IR TG neurons and the number of isolectin B4-negative TRPV2-IR TG neurons which innervate the whisker pad skin and buccal mucosa were increased. Buccal mucosal TRPV2 antagonism completely suppressed the heat and mechanical hypersensitivities, but not cold hypersensitivity. TRPV2 antagonist administration to the incisional whisker pad skin only partially suppressed pain hypersensitivities. The increased expression of TRPV2 in peptidergic TG neurons innervating the incisional buccal mucosa is predominantly involved in buccal mucosal heat hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia following buccal mucosal incision. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K A Kamala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is multifactorial in origin which is typically characterized by burning and painful sensation in an oral cavity demonstrating clinically normal mucosa. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. As the symptom of oral burning is seen in various pathological conditions, it is essential for a clinician to be aware of how to differentiate between symptom of oral burning and BMS. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this study was to provide the practitioner with an understanding of the local, systemic, and psychosocial factors which may be responsible for oral burning associated with BMS, and review of treatment modalities, therefore providing a foundation for diagnosis and treatment of BMS.

  9. Cross-cultural adaptation of the Burns Specific Pain Anxiety Scale - BSPAS to be used with Brazilian burned patients Adaptación transcultural de la "Burns Specific Pain Anxiety Scale - BSPAS" para ser aplicada en pacientes quemados brasileños Adaptação transcultural da "Burns Specific Pain Anxiety Scale - BSPAS" para ser aplicada em pacientes queimados brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Echevarría-Guanilo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at translating and adapting the Burns Specific Pain Anxiety Scale - BSPAS and the Impact of Event Scale - IES into Portuguese; making available two simple, short and easily applicable instruments and describing the study participants according to their scores on the Visual Analogue Scale and the Trait-State Anxiety Inventory. The cross-cultural adaptation process involved the following steps: translation of the scales; reaching a consensus in Portuguese; evaluation by an expert committee; back-translation; obtaining a consensus in Dutch; comparing the original versions with the consensus in Dutch; semantic analysis and pretest of the Portuguese versions. The results showed that both scales present high values of internal consistency between the scale items. Participants' average pain scores were higher after bathing and wound dressing. Participants' average anxiety scores were low or medium.Los objetivos del estudio fueron traducir y adaptar la "Burns Specific Pain Anxiety Scale - SPAS" y la "Impact Event Scale - IES" para el portugués, poner a disposición dos instrumentos simples, cortos y de fácil aplicación y describir los participantes del estudio, según los scores obtenidos por medio de la aplicación de la Escala Visual Analógica y del Inventario de Ansiedad Trazo-Estado. El proceso de adaptación de las escalas siguió las siguientes etapas: traducción de las escalas; obtención del consenso en portugués; evaluación por un comité de jueces; "back-translation"; obtención del consenso en holandés; comparación de las versiones originales y en holandés; análisis semántica y pretest de las versiones en portugués. Los resultados mostraron índices elevados de consistencia interna de los ítems de la escala. La media de los escores de dolor fueron más altos después del baño y curaciones. Los scores medios de ansiedad fueron clasificados como bajos o medios.Este estudo teve como objetivos traduzir e adaptar a

  10. Burning mouth syndrome: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Kumar Ambaldhage; Jaishankar Homberhalli Puttabuddi; Purnachandrarao Naik Nunsavath

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterized by an oral burning sensation in the absence of any organic disorders of the oral cavity. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. It is observed principally in middle-aged patients and postmenopausal women and is characterized by an intense burning type of pain, preferably on the tongue and in other areas of the ...

  11. Orofacial pain conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge; Forssell, Heli; Grinde, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Pain of the oral mucosa is a common accompanying symptom of various oral mucosal lesions caused by local and systemic diseases. Pain of the oral mucosa is usually associated with a known cause of tissue damage, e.g. mucosal ulcer or erosion, and it generally responds to adequate treatment...... and dissolves after healing. Chronic pain, on the other hand, persists months and years after apparent tissue healing, and attempts to alleviate pain are challenging. Neuropathic pain occurs due to damage neurogenic structures in the peripheral and/or the central nervous system. It may occur in the absence...... of any obvious noxious stimuli, and in the oral mucosal, the pain is often described as tingling and burning. In the oral cavity, burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is presently considered to have neuropathic background. It is important for dental practitioners to have a clear understanding of the various...

  12. Burning mouth syndrome due to herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Maria A; Choe, Alexander; Traktinskiy, Igor; Gilden, Don

    2015-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterised by chronic orofacial burning pain. No dental or medical cause has been found. We present a case of burning mouth syndrome of 6 months duration in a healthy 65-year-old woman, which was associated with high copy numbers of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) DNA in the saliva. Her pain resolved completely after antiviral treatment with a corresponding absence of salivary HSV-1 DNA 4 weeks and 6 months later. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Steroid dysregulation and stomatodynia (burning mouth syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Alain; Dao, Thuan; Gremeau-Richard, Christelle

    2009-01-01

    Stomatodynia ( burning mouth syndrome) is characterized by a spontaneous, continuous burning pain felt in the oral mucosa typically of anxiodepressive menopausal women. Because there is no obvious organic cause, it is considered a nonspecific pain. This Focus Article proposes a hypothesis based on the following pathophysiological cascade: chronic anxiety or post traumatic stress leads to a dysregulation of the adrenal production of steroids. One consequence is a decreased or modified production of some major precursors for the neuroactive steroid synthesis occurring in the skin, mucosa, and nervous system. At menopause, the drastic fall of the other main precursor supply , the gonadal steroids, leads to a brisk alteration of the production of neuroactive steroids. This results in neurodegenerative alterations of small nerves fibers of the oral mucosa and /or some brain areas involved in oral somatic sensations. These neuropathic changes become irreversible and precipitate the burning pain, dysgeusia, and xerostomia associated with stomatodynia, which all involve thin nerve fibers.

  14. Burning mouth disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Bala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth disorder (BMD is a burning or stinging sensation affecting the oral mucosa, lips and/or tongue, in the absence of clinically visible mucosal lesions. There is a strong female predilection, with the age of onset being approximately 50 years. Affected patients often present with multiple oral complaints, including burning, dryness and taste alterations. The causes of BMD are multifactorial and remain poorly understood. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in this disorder with the discovery that the pain of burning mouth syndrome (BMS may be neuropathic in origin and originate both centrally and peripherally. The most common sites of burning are the anterior tongue, anterior hard palate and lower lip, but the distribution of oral sites affected does not appear to affect the natural history of the disorder or the response to treatment BMS may persist for many years. This article provides updated information on BMS and presents a new model, based on taste dysfunction, for its pathogenesis.

  15. One-week acid suppression trial in uninvestigated dyspepsia patients with epigastric pain or burning to predict response to 8 weeks' treatment with esomeprazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Zanten, S V; Flook, N; Talley, N J

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While empiric acid-suppressive therapy for uninvestigated dyspepsia patients with symptoms of epigastric pain or burning is standard practice, it is unknown whether an early response to therapy predicts outcome. AIM: To evaluate whether a 1-w acid suppression trial is effective...... for predicting 8-w response in such patients. METHODS: Helicobacter pylori-negative patients (aged 18-50 years) in primary care with uninvestigated epigastric pain or burning were randomized to esomeprazole 40 mg q.d.s. or b.d. for 1w, followed by esomeprazole 40 mg q.d.s. or placebo for 7w. Each day, patients......, respectively, and 47% (339 of 716) and 34% (124 of 368), respectively, at 8w (both P treatment were 58% and 70%, respectively, at 8w. CONCLUSION: A 1-w acid suppression trial is of limited clinical value for predicting 8-w response...

  16. Local cooling does not prevent hyperalgesia following burn injury in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Lassen, Birgit Vibeke; Pedersen, Juri L

    2002-01-01

    One of the oldest methods of pain relief following a burn injury is local application of ice or cold water. Experimental data indicate that cooling may also reduce the severity of tissue injury and promote wound healing, but there are no controlled studies in humans evaluating the anti-inflammato......One of the oldest methods of pain relief following a burn injury is local application of ice or cold water. Experimental data indicate that cooling may also reduce the severity of tissue injury and promote wound healing, but there are no controlled studies in humans evaluating the anti...... and mechanical detection thresholds, thermal and mechanical pain responses, area of secondary hyperalgesia), first degree burn injuries were induced on both calves by contact thermodes (12.5 cm(2), 47 degrees C for 7 min). Eight minutes after the burn injury, contact thermodes (12.5 cm(2)) were again applied...... on the burns. One of the thermodes cooled the burn (8 degrees C for 30 min) whereas the other thermode was a non-active dummy on the control burn. Inflammatory and sensory variables were followed for 160 min after end of the cooling procedure. The burn injury induced significant increases in skin temperature...

  17. How diagnostic tests help to disentangle the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain symptoms in painful neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truini, Andrea; Cruccu, Giorgio

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathic pain, ie, pain arising directly from a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory afferent pathway, manifests with various symptoms, the commonest being ongoing burning pain, electrical shock-like sensations, and dynamic mechanical allodynia. Reliable insights into the mechanisms underlying neuropathic pain symptoms come from diagnostic tests documenting and quantifying somatosensory afferent pathway damage in patients with painful neuropathies. Neurophysiological investigation and skin biopsy studies suggest that ongoing burning pain primarily reflects spontaneous activity in nociceptive-fiber pathways. Electrical shock-like sensations presumably arise from high-frequency ectopic bursts generated in demyelinated, nonnociceptive, Aβ fibers. Although the mechanisms underlying dynamic mechanical allodynia remain debatable, normally innocuous stimuli might cause pain by activating spared and sensitized nociceptive afferents. Extending the mechanistic approach to neuropathic pain symptoms might advance targeted therapy for the individual patient and improve testing for new drugs.

  18. Treatment of burning mouth syndrome with a low-level energy diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Wen; Huang, Yu-Feng

    2011-02-01

    To test the therapeutic efficacy of low-level energy diode laser on burning mouth syndrome. Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by burning and painful sensations in the mouth, especially the tongue, in the absence of significant mucosal abnormalities. Although burning mouth syndrome is relatively common, little is known regarding its etiology and pathophysiology. As a result, no treatment is effective in all patients. Low-level energy diode laser therapy has been used in a variety of chronic and acute pain conditions, including neck, back and myofascial pain, degenerative osteoarthritis, and headache. A total of 17 patients who had been diagnosed with burning mouth syndrome were treated with an 800-nm wavelength diode laser. A straight handpiece was used with an end of 1-cm diameter with the fiber end standing 4 cm away from the end of handpiece. When the laser was applied, the handpiece directly contacted or was immediately above the symptomatic lingual surface. The output used was 3 W, 50 msec intermittent pulsing, and a frequency of 10 Hz, which was equivalent to an average power of 1.5 W/cm(2) (3 W × 0.05 msec × 10 Hz = 1.5 W/cm(2)). Depending on the involved area, laser was applied to a 1-cm(2) area for 70 sec until all involved area was covered. Overall pain and discomfort were analyzed with a 10-cm visual analogue scale. All patients received diode laser therapy between one and seven times. The average pain score before the treatment was 6.7 (ranging from 2.9 to 9.8). The results showed an average reduction in pain of 47.6% (ranging from 9.3% to 91.8%). The burning sensation remained unchanged for up to 12 months. Low-level energy diode laser may be an effective treatment for burning mouth syndrome.

  19. Properties and Types of Significant Thermal Skin Burn Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    The deep burn category includes deep second, deep third and deep fourth-degree burns. Table 2: Burn Classification and Injury Outcome ( Rice ...Subcutaneous tissue  Entire dermis destroyed  No to low pain due to nerve destruction  Waxy white to leathery gray to charred black skin  Dry...Richard R.L. (2009) Rehabilitation of the Burned Hand. Hand Clinics, 25, 529- 541 Rice P.L. & Orgill, D.P. (2015).Classification of burns. (Ed

  20. AN UPDATE ON BURNING MOUTH SYNDROME (A SELECTIVE REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febrina Rahmayanti

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is one of the orofacial pain problems. BMS has been fefined as burning pain in the tongue or oral mucous membranes, usually without accompanying clinical and laboratory findings. BMS affecting mostly women, is a constant and aggravating source of discomfort for more than 1 million adults in the world. This paper provides updated information on burning mouth syndrome and current etiopathogenesis and treatment options are discussed.

  1. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 in Electroacupuncture Analgesia on Chronic Inflammatory Pain in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory pain may result from peripheral tissue injury or inflammation, increasing the release of protons, histamines, adenosine triphosphate, and several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 is known to be involved in acute to subacute neuropathic and inflammatory pain; however, its exact mechanisms in chronic inflammatory pain are not elucidated. Our results showed that EA significantly reduced chronic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in the chronic inflammatory pain model. Chronic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia were also abolished in TRPV1−/− mice. TRPV1 increased in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG and spinal cord (SC at 3 weeks after CFA injection. The expression levels of downstream molecules such as pPKA, pPI3K, and pPKC increased, as did those of pERK, pp38, and pJNK. Transcription factors (pCREB and pNFκB and nociceptive ion channels (Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 were involved in this process. Inflammatory mediators such as GFAP, S100B, and RAGE were also involved. The expression levels of these molecules were reduced in EA and TRPV1−/− mice but not in the sham EA group. Our data provided evidence to support the clinical use of EA for treating chronic inflammatory pain.

  2. Peripheral analgesic effects of ketamine in acute inflammatory pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L; Galle, T S; Kehlet, H

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND. This study examined the analgesic effect of local ketamine infiltration, compared with placebo and systemic ketamine, in a human model of inflammatory pain. METHODS: Inflammatory pain was induced by a burn (at 47 degrees C for 7 min; wound size, 2.5 x 5 cm) on the calf in 15 volunteers...... on 3 separate days with 7-day intervals. They received either (1) subcutaneous infiltration with ketamine in the burn area (local treatment) and contralateral placebo injections, or (2) subcutaneous ketamine contralateral to the burn (systemic treatment) and placebo in the burn area, or (3) placebo...... hyperalgesia. Local ketamine infiltration reduced pain during the burn injury compared with systemic treatment and placebo (P ketamine treatment compared with placebo immediately after injection (P

  3. Burning mouth syndrome: a review on diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coculescu, E C; Radu, A; Coculescu, B I

    2014-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is defined as a chronic pain condition characterized by a burning sensation in the clinically healthy oral mucosa. It is difficult to diagnose BMS because there is a discrepancy between the severity, extensive objective pain felt by the patient and the absence of any clinical changes of the oral mucosa. This review presents some aspects of BMS, including its clinical diagnosis, classification, differential diagnosis, general treatment, evolution and prognosis.

  4. A novel dual-wavelength laser stimulator to elicit transient and tonic nociceptive stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoxi; Liu, Tianjun; Wang, Han; Yang, Jichun; Chen, Zhuying; Hu, Yong; Li, Yingxin

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to develop a new laser stimulator to elicit both transient and sustained heat stimulation with a dual-wavelength laser system as a tool for the investigation of both transient and tonic experimental models of pain. The laser stimulator used a 980-nm pulsed laser to generate transient heat stimulation and a 1940-nm continuous-wave (CW) laser to provide sustained heat stimulation. The laser with 980-nm wavelength can elicit transient pain with less thermal injury, while the 1940-nm CW laser can effectively stimulate both superficial and deep nociceptors to elicit tonic pain. A proportional integral-derivative (PID) temperature feedback control system was implemented to ensure constancy of temperature during heat stimulation. The performance of this stimulator was evaluated by in vitro and in vivo animal experiments. In vitro experiments on totally 120 specimens fresh pig skin included transient heat stimulation by 980-nm laser (1.5 J, 10 ms), sustained heat stimulation by 1940-nm laser (50-55 °C temperature control mode or 1.5 W, 5 min continuous power supply), and the combination of transient/sustained heat stimulation by dual lasers (1.5 J, 10 ms, 980-nm pulse laser, and 1940-nm laser with 50-55 °C temperature control mode). Hemoglobin brushing and wind-cooling methods were tested to find better stimulation model. A classic tail-flick latency (TFL) experiment with 20 Wistar rats was used to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of transient and tonic pain stimulation with 15 J, 100 ms 980-nm single laser pulse, and 1.5 W constant 1940-nm laser power. Ideal stimulation parameters to generate transient pain were found to be a 26.6 °C peak temperature rise and 0.67 s pain duration. In our model of tonic pain, 5 min of tonic stimulation produced a temperature change of 53.7 ± 1.3 °C with 1.6 ± 0.2% variation. When the transient and tonic stimulation protocols were combined, no significant difference was observed depending on the order

  5. Observing the Peripheral Burning of Cigarettes by an Infrared Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu C

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A modern infrared camera was used to observe the peripheral burning of cigarettes during puffing and smouldering. The computer-controlled infrared system captured thermal images with recording rates up to 50 Hz at 8-bit (256-colour resolution. The response time was less than 0.04 s at ca. 780 °C. The overall performance of the system was superior to most infrared systems used in previously reported investigations. The combined capacity allowed us to capture some faster, smaller high-temperature burning events on the periphery of a cigarette during puffing, which was first described by Egertion et al. in 1963 using an X-ray method. These transient burning events were caused by tobacco shreds near the coal surface experiencing the maximum air influx. The temperature of these transient burning events could be ca. 200 to 250 °C higher than the average peripheral temperature of the cigarette. The likelihood of these high-temperature burning events occurring during smouldering was significantly less. Some other details of the cigarette's combustion were also observed with improved simplicity and clarity.

  6. Burning mouth syndrome: Clinical dilemma?

    OpenAIRE

    Kanchan R Patil; R S Sathawane

    2008-01-01

    Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a chronic orofacial burning pain condition usually in the absence of clinical and laboratory findings that affects many adults worldwide, yet its etiology and treatment remain poorly understood. Though it has been associated with numerous oral and systemic conditions, there has been no clear consensus on its etiology, pathogenesis and treatment. As a result, patients with inexplicable oral complaints are often referred from one health care professional to anoth...

  7. Influence of upper extremity positioning on pain, paresthesia, and tolerance: advancing current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Mark E; Hazelton, Jill; Dewey, William S; Casey, James C; Richard, Reginald

    2013-01-01

    Loss of upper extremity motion caused by axillary burn scar contracture is a major complication of burn injury. Positioning acutely injured patients with axillary burns in positions above 90° of shoulder abduction may improve shoulder motion and minimize scar contracture. However, these positions may increase injury risk to the nerves of the brachial plexus. This study evaluated the occurrence of paresthesias, pain, and positional intolerance in four shoulder abduction positions in healthy adults. Sixty men and women were placed in four randomly assigned shoulder abduction positions for up to 2 hours: 1) 90° with elbow extension (90 ABD); 2) 130° with elbow flexion at 110° (130 ABD); 3) 150° with elbow extension (150 ABD); and 4) 170° with elbow extension (170 ABD). Outcome measures were assessed at baseline and every 30 minutes and included the occurrence of upper extremity paresthesias, position comfort/tolerance, and pain. Transient paresthesias, lasting less than 3 minutes, occurred in all test positions in 10 to 37% of the cases. Significantly fewer subjects reported paresthesias in the 90 ABD position compared with the other positions (P < .01). Pain was reported more frequently in the 170° position (68%) compared with the other positions (P < .01). Positioning with the elbow flexed or in terminal extension is not recommended, regardless of the degree of shoulder abduction. Positioning patients in a position of 150° of shoulder abduction was shown to be safe and well tolerated. Consideration of positions above this range should be undertaken cautiously and only with strict monitoring in alert and oriented patients for short time periods.

  8. Changes in the vibration sensitivity and pressure pain thresholds in patients with burning mouth syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda de Souza Moura

    Full Text Available To investigate the presence of changes in vibration detection and pressure pain threshold in patients with burning-mouth syndrome (BMS.Case-control study. The sample was composed of 30 volunteers, 15 with BMS and 15 in the control group. The pressure-pain threshold (PPT and vibration-detection threshold (VDT were examined. The clinical evaluation was complemented with the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ, Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4 and Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories (BDI and BAI, respectively.BMS subjects showed a statistically significant higher PPT in the tongue (p = 0.002, right (p = 0.001 and left (p = 0.004 face, and a significant reduction of the VDT in the tongue (p = 0.013 and right face (p = 0.030. Significant differences were also found when comparing the PPT and the VDT of distinct anatomical areas. However, a significant interaction (group × location was only for the PPT. BMS subjects also showed significantly higher levels of depression (p = 0.01, as measured by the BDI, compared to controls; and a significant inverse correlation between the VDT in the left face and anxiety levels was detected.The study of somatosensory changes in BMS and its correlations with the clinical features as well as the levels of anxiety and depression expands current understanding of the neuropathic origin and the possible contribution of psychogenic factors related to this disease.

  9. A rare chemical burn due to Ranunculus arvensis: three case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocak, Abdullah O; Saritemur, Murat; Atac, Kenan; Guclu, Sibel; Ozlu, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Ranunculus arvensis, a plant that is a member of Ranunculaceae family, generally used for local treatment of joint pain, muscle pain, burns, lacerations, edema, abscess drainage, hemorrhoids, and warts among the population. In this case report, we presented three patients who developed chemical skin burns after using R. arvensis plant locally for knee pain. The destructive effect of the plant has been reported previously to be more in fresh plants and less in dried plants. Although protoanemonin, which is considered as the main toxic substance, was reported to be absent in dried or boiled plants, the plant was boiled, cooled, and wrapped over the region with pain in our cases. Therefore, we thought that protoanemonin may be considered to be heat resistant. Also, the burn management proceeded up to surgery by using the flap technique in one of our patients in contrast to the cases found in published reports who were treated by antibiotics and dressings.

  10. Peripheral antinociceptive effects of morphine after burn injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Dahl, J B; Kehlet, H

    1993-01-01

    In a double-blind study, 2 mg of morphine in saline, or saline only, was given subcutaneously into a second-degree bilateral leg-burn injury in 12 volunteers. Heat-pain thresholds and pressure-pain thresholds were significantly increased by local morphine administration. These results confirm...

  11. Prediction of postoperative pain by preoperative nociceptive responses to heat stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Duun, Preben; Kehlet, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    , secondary hyperalgesia area, thermal and mechanical pain perception, and pain thresholds. Postoperative analgesia consisted of ibuprofen and acetaminophen. Pain ratings (visual analog scale) at rest and during limb movement were followed for 10 days after surgery. RESULTS: The burn injury was associated......BACKGROUND: Despite major advances in the understanding of the neurobiologic mechanisms of pain, the wide variation in acute pain experience has not been well explained. Therefore, the authors investigated the potential of a preoperatively induced heat injury to predict subsequent postoperative...... pain ratings in patients undergoing knee surgery. METHODS: Twenty patients were studied. The burn injury was induced 6 days before surgery with a contact thermode (12.5 cm2, 47 degrees C for 7 min). The sensory testing, before and 1 h after the injury, included pain score during induction of the burn...

  12. Managing a patient with burning mouth syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Danny; Trudgill, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman presented with an increasing frequency of symptoms of heartburn and retrosternal pain over the last few months, and a constant and intense burning pain affecting her tongue tip, mouth and lips for the past 5 years. She found consuming hot drinks exacerbated the burning oral pain and chewing gum seemed to alleviate some of her symptoms. She thought these oral sensations were caused by frequently licking her finger tips to separate prints in her work in publishing. She had been previously diagnosed with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), and her heartburn symptoms had been controlled until recently with lansoprazole 15 mg daily. Her past medical history included irritable bowel syndrome and depression, for which she had been treated with mebeverine and paroxetine for a number of years. She was a non-smoker and did not consume alcohol. Clinical examination was unremarkable with no oral lesions on examination. Her routine laboratory tests, including autoimmune serology, haematinics and thyroid function tests were all within normal limits. She underwent a gastroscopy, which revealed moderate reflux oesophagitis, and following commencing omeprazole 20 mg twice daily, her heartburn resolved. However, her oral burning symptoms were not affected and a diagnosis of burning mouth syndrome (BMS) was made. Following explanation and reassurance concerning the cause of her BMS symptoms, she chose not to receive treatment for this but to access cognitive behavioural therapy in the future if her symptoms worsened. PMID:28839812

  13. A case-control evaluation of fungiform papillae density in burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naud, Jason M; Benca, Laura; Drangsholt, Mark T; LeResche, Linda; Coldwell, Susan E

    2018-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that high fungiform papillae density may be a risk factor for developing the taste and pain alterations characteristic of burning mouth syndrome. Evaluate whether fungiform papillae density, taste sensitivity, and mechanical pain sensitivity differ between burning mouth syndrome cases and controls. This case-control study compared cases diagnosed with primary burning mouth syndrome with pain-free controls. Participants (17 female cases and 23 female controls) rated the intensity of sucrose, sodium chloride, citric acid, and quinine applied separately to each side of the anterior tongue and sampled whole mouth. Mechanical pain sensitivity was assessed separately for each side of the tongue using weighted pins. Digital photographs of participants' tongues were used to count fungiform papillae. Burning mouth syndrome cases had increased whole mouth taste intensity. Cases also had increased sensitivity to quinine on the anterior tongue, as well as increased mechanical pain sensitivity on the anterior tongue. Fungiform papillae density did not differ significantly between cases and controls. Fungiform papillae density on the left and right sides of the tongue were correlated in controls; however, there was no left/right side correlation in cases. Cases had increased pain and taste perception on the anterior tongue. The lack of correlation between left and right fungiform papillae density in cases may be an indication of asymmetrical lingual innervation in these patients. 3b. Laryngoscope, 128:841-846, 2018. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Current Treatment Options in Challenging Oral Diseases: Burning Mouth Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bilgen Erdoğan; Murat Yılmaz

    2012-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a chronic condition characterized by burning pain without any signs of an oral mucosal pathology, that usually affects postmenopausal women. Burning sensation is often accompanied by dysgeusia and xerostomia. The pathogenesis of the disease is unknown and an effective treatment option for most of the patients has not been defined yet. The aim of this review is to present current pharmacological and physicological treatments of burning mouth syndrome.

  15. Current Treatment Options in Challenging Oral Diseases: Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilgen Erdoğan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome is a chronic condition characterized by burning pain without any signs of an oral mucosal pathology, that usually affects postmenopausal women. Burning sensation is often accompanied by dysgeusia and xerostomia. The pathogenesis of the disease is unknown and an effective treatment option for most of the patients has not been defined yet. The aim of this review is to present current pharmacological and physicological treatments of burning mouth syndrome.

  16. Application of a film flow model to predicting burnout under transient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leslie, D.C.; Kirby, G.J.

    1967-08-01

    The film flow model developed previously has been generalised to transient situations by assuming that only convection is changed by the transient; evaporation, deposition and entrainment are assumed to be unaffected. A computer code TRABUT computes the time behaviour of the mass velocity and the quality by the method of characteristics, and then integrates the film flow equations along the same characteristics until the point of burn-out or zero film flow is reached. The time delay between the onset of a transient and burn-out has been computed both for flux and flow transients. These computations have been compared with those made using the standard local conditions hypothesis. The film flow model gives shorter delays in almost all cases, but the difference would not be detectable with present experimental techniques. (author)

  17. Burning mouth syndrome: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Ambaldhage

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is characterized by an oral burning sensation in the absence of any organic disorders of the oral cavity. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. It is observed principally in middle-aged patients and postmenopausal women and is characterized by an intense burning type of pain, preferably on the tongue and in other areas of the oral mucosa. As the symptom of oral burning is seen in various pathological conditions, it is essential for a clinician to be aware of how to differentiate between symptom of oral burning and BMS. This article provides an overview of the literature on this syndrome with special reference to the etiological factors, clinical aspects, diagnostic criteria that should be followed and the therapeutic management with reference to the most recent studies.

  18. Changes in the vibration sensitivity and pressure pain thresholds in patients with burning mouth syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Natália dos Reis; Janini, Maria Elisa Rangel

    2018-01-01

    Objective To investigate the presence of changes in vibration detection and pressure pain threshold in patients with burning-mouth syndrome (BMS). Design of the study Case-control study. The sample was composed of 30 volunteers, 15 with BMS and 15 in the control group. The pressure-pain threshold (PPT) and vibration-detection threshold (VDT) were examined. The clinical evaluation was complemented with the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ), Douleur Neuropathique 4 (DN4) and Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories (BDI and BAI, respectively). Results BMS subjects showed a statistically significant higher PPT in the tongue (p = 0.002), right (p = 0.001) and left (p = 0.004) face, and a significant reduction of the VDT in the tongue (p = 0.013) and right face (p = 0.030). Significant differences were also found when comparing the PPT and the VDT of distinct anatomical areas. However, a significant interaction (group × location) was only for the PPT. BMS subjects also showed significantly higher levels of depression (p = 0.01), as measured by the BDI, compared to controls; and a significant inverse correlation between the VDT in the left face and anxiety levels was detected. Conclusions The study of somatosensory changes in BMS and its correlations with the clinical features as well as the levels of anxiety and depression expands current understanding of the neuropathic origin and the possible contribution of psychogenic factors related to this disease. PMID:29782537

  19. Burning mouth syndrome: an enigmatic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javali, M A

    2013-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic oral pain or burning sensation affecting the oral mucosa, often unaccompanied by mucosal lesions or other evident clinical signs. It is observed principally in middle-aged patients and postmenopausal women and may be accompanied by xerostomia and altered taste. Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by an intense burning or stinging sensation, preferably on the tongue or in other areas of mouth. This disorder is one of the most common, encountered in the clinical practice. This condition is probably of multifactorial origin; however the exact underlying etiology remains uncertain. This article discusses several aspects of BMS, updates current knowledge about the etiopathogenesis and describes the clinical features as well as the diagnosis and management of BMS patients.

  20. Burning mouth syndrome: Current concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Zagury, Julyana Gomes; Thomas, Davis; Ananthan, Sowmya

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition. It has been described by the International Headache Society as "an intra-oral burning or dysesthetic sensation, recurring daily for more than 2 h/day for more than 3 months, without clinically evident causative lesions." BMS is frequently seen in women in the peri-menopausal and menopausal age group in an average female/male ratio of 7:1. The site most commonly affected is the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The patient may also rep...

  1. Prevalence of burning mouth syndrome in adult Turkish population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Çolak

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is defined as a chronic orofacial pain condition, characterized symptomatically by burning pain localized to the tongue and lips or may involve the entire oral cavity. The prevalence of burning mouth symptoms reported from international studies ranges from 0.6% to 15%. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of burning mouth syndrome in adult Turkish population.Materials and methods: A questionnaire was designed to collect data on demographic characteristics, medical history and drugs taken by the patients and clinical examination was performed. A cross-sectional study was carried out on 1000 (500 men and 500 women randomly selected patients who attended attending to Kırıkkale University Dental Faculty Department of Restorative Dentistry.Results: BMS was diagnosed in 12 patients with 0.12% prevalence in 2 man and 10 women, with 1:5 ratio respectively. The most common site for BMS was tongue. Para functional habits were the most common local factor. According to visual analogue scale (VAS mean (±SD level of burning intensity was 5.45 (±1.69.Conclusions: Burning Mouth Syndrome in Turkish population has low prevalence and is more frequent in females.

  2. A pragmatic evidence-based clinical management algorithm for burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yohanan; Yoo, Timothy; Han, Peter; Liu, Yuan; Inman, Jared C

    2018-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a poorly understood disease process with no current standard of treatment. The goal of this article is to provide an evidence-based, practical, clinical algorithm as a guideline for the treatment of burning mouth syndrome. Using available evidence and clinical experience, a multi-step management algorithm was developed. A retrospective cohort study was then performed, following STROBE statement guidelines, comparing outcomes of patients who were managed using the algorithm and those who were managed without. Forty-seven patients were included in the study, with 21 (45%) managed using the algorithm and 26 (55%) managed without. The mean age overall was 60.4 ±16.5 years, and most patients (39, 83%) were female. Cohorts showed no statistical difference in age, sex, overall follow-up time, dysgeusia, geographic tongue, or psychiatric disorder; xerostomia, however, was significantly different, skewed toward the algorithm group. Significantly more non-algorithm patients did not continue care (69% vs. 29%, p =0.001). The odds ratio of not continuing care for the non-algorithm group compared to the algorithm group was 5.6 [1.6, 19.8]. Improvement in pain was significantly more likely in the algorithm group ( p =0.001), with an odds ratio of 27.5 [3.1, 242.0]. We present a basic clinical management algorithm for burning mouth syndrome which may increase the likelihood of pain improvement and patient follow-up. Key words: Burning mouth syndrome, burning tongue, glossodynia, oral pain, oral burning, therapy, treatment.

  3. Prior stress exposure increases pain behaviors in a rat model of full thickness thermal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, Jennifer E; McLean, Samuel A; Averitt, Dayna L

    2015-12-01

    Thermal burns among individuals working in highly stressful environments, such as firefighters and military Service Members, are common. Evidence suggests that pre-injury stress may exaggerate pain following thermal injury; however current animal models of burn have not evaluated the potential influence of pre-burn stress. This sham-controlled study evaluated the influence of prior stress exposure on post-burn thermal and mechanical sensitivity in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were exposed to 20 min of inescapable swim stress or sham stress once per day for three days. Exposure to inescapable swim stress (1) increased the intensity and duration of thermal hyperalgesia after subsequent burn and (2) accelerated the onset of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia after subsequent burn. This stress-induced exacerbation of pain sensitivity was reversed by pretreatment and concurrent treatment with the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) duloxetine. These data suggest a better understanding of mechanisms by which prior stress augments pain after thermal burn may lead to improved pain treatments for burn survivors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. An overview of burning mouth syndrome for the dermatologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, A K; Prime, S S; Cohen, S N

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by an idiopathic burning pain affecting the oral mucosa, with no clinically apparent changes. It can present to a variety of health professionals including dermatologists. This article summarizes the important aspects of the condition, including theories of pathogenesis, diagnosis and management. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  5. Gastric pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drugs and drug classes are also linked to a range of mechanisms through which the drugs ... meal, occurring several times per ... Burning or distressing pain, relieved by food ..... antimicrobial agents, and several other drug interactions are.

  6. Combined Acupuncture and Auriculotherapy in Burning Mouth Syndrome Treatment: A Preliminary Single-Arm Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Faraína Rodrigues Vasconcelos; Castro, Luciano Alberto; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Silveira, Erika Aparecida; Ribeiro-Rotta, Rejane Faria

    2017-02-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain disorder that is difficult to diagnose and refractory to treatment; it is more prevalent in pre- and postmenopausal women. Acupuncture and auriculotherapy have been suggested as options for the treatment of pain because they promote analgesia and allow for the reduction of symptoms with lower doses of drugs; this leads to greater patient compliance with treatment and has a positive effect on quality of life. Clinical trials investigating the effectiveness of acupuncture in the treatment of BMS are scarce in the literature. To investigate the effect of combined acupuncture and auriculotherapy on pain management and quality of life in patients with BMS. Sixty patients with BMS were subjected to a thorough differential diagnosis. Of these, 12 met the inclusion criteria and agreed to participate. Eight patients completed treatment with acupuncture and auriculotherapy using a previously established protocol. The outcome variables were analyzed before and after treatment: pain/burning (visual analog scale; VAS), salivary flow (unstimulated sialometry), and quality of life (Short-Form Oral Health Impact Profile [OHIP-14]). Two-year follow-up was carried out by assessing VAS and OHIP-14. The intensity of pain/burning decreased significantly after the first treatment sessions, as shown by low values on the VAS (0-2) and a subjective indicator of quality of life (mean = 5.37 ± 3.50). There was no relationship between salivary flow and the intensity of pain/burning. At 2-year follow-up, no statistically significant difference was observed for VAS, but improvement on OHIP-14 was seen. Combined acupuncture/auriculotherapy was effective in reducing the intensity of burning and improving quality of life. There was no relationship between salivary flow and the intensity of burning mouth. Patients' status improved after acupuncture and auriculotherapy at 2-year follow-up.

  7. Effects of serum immunoglobulins from patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) on depolarisation-induced calcium transients in isolated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Joanne M; Dharmalingam, Backialakshmi; Marsh, Stephen J; Thompson, Victoria; Goebel, Andreas; Brown, David A

    2016-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is thought to have an auto-immune component. One such target recently proposed from the effects of auto-immune IgGs on Ca(2+) transients in cardiac myocytes and cell lines is the α1-adrenoceptor. We have tested whether such IgGs exerted comparable effects on nociceptive sensory neurons isolated from rat dorsal root ganglia. Depolarisation-induced [Ca(2+)]i transients were generated by applying 30 mM KCl for 2 min and monitored by Fura-2 fluorescence imaging. No IgGs tested (including 3 from CRPS patients) had any significant effect on these [Ca(2+)]i transients. However, IgG from one CRPS patient consistently and significantly reduced the K(+)-induced response of cells that had been pre-incubated for 24h with a mixture of inflammatory mediators (1 μM histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, bradykinin and PGE2). Since this pre-incubation also appeared to induce a comparable inhibitory response to the α1-agonist phenylephrine, this is compatible with the α1-adrenoceptor as a target for CRPS auto-immunity. A mechanism whereby this might enhance pain is suggested. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Emergency department management of patients with thermal burns [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolles, Juliana; Gupta, Nachi; Nusbaum, Jeffrey

    2018-02-01

    Thermal burn injuries are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to treatment of the burns, emergency clinicians must assess for inhalation injury, exposure to toxic gases, and related traumatic injuries. Priorities for emergency resuscitation include stabilization of airway and breathing, intravenous fluid administration, pain control, and local wound care. Special populations, including children and pregnant women, require additional treatment considerations. Referral to specialized burn care for select patients is necessary to improve long-term outcomes. This article reviews thermal burn classification and evidence-based treatment strategies. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice.].

  9. Altered structure and function in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex in patients with burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shariq A; Keaser, Michael L; Meiller, Timothy F; Seminowicz, David A

    2014-08-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a debilitating, idiopathic chronic pain condition. For many BMS patients, burning oral pain begins in late morning and becomes more intense throughout the day, peaking by late afternoon or evening. We investigated brain gray matter volume (GMV) with voxel-based morphometry (VBM), white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and functional connectivity in resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) in a tightly screened, homogeneous sample of 9 female, postmenopausal/perimenopausal BMS patients and 9 matched healthy control subjects. Patients underwent 2 scanning sessions in the same day: in the morning, when ongoing pain/burning was low, and in the afternoon, when pain/burning was significantly higher. Patients had increased GMV and lower FA in the hippocampus (Hc), and decreased GMV in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). rsfMRI revealed altered connectivity patterns in different states of pain/burning, with increased connectivity between mPFC (a node in the default mode network) and anterior cingulate cortex, occipital cortex, ventromedial PFC, and bilateral Hc/amygdala in the afternoon compared with the morning session. Furthermore, mPFC-Hc connectivity was higher in BMS patients than control subjects for the afternoon but not the morning session. mPFC-Hc connectivity was related to Beck depression inventory scores both between groups and between burning states within patients, suggesting that depression and anxiety partially explain pain-related brain dysfunction in BMS. Overall, we provide multiple lines of evidence supporting aberrant structure and function in the mPFC and Hc, and implicate a circuit involving the mPFC and Hc in regulating mood and depressive symptoms in BMS. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterizing neuropathic pain profiles: enriching interpretation of painDETECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cappelleri JC

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Joseph C Cappelleri,1 Vijaya Koduru,2 E Jay Bienen,3 Alesia Sadosky4 1Pfizer Inc, Groton, CT, USA; 2Eliassen Group, New London, CT, USA; 3Outcomes Research Consultant, New York, NY, USA; 4Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA Purpose: To psychometrically evaluate painDETECT, a patient-reported screening questionnaire for neuropathic pain (NeP, for discriminating among sensory pain symptoms (burning, tingling/prickling, light touching, sudden pain attacks/electric shock-type pain, cold/heat, numbness, and slight pressure. Methods: The seven-item version of painDETECT provides an overall score that targets only sensory symptoms, while the nine-item version adds responses on two items to the overall score, covering pain course pattern and pain radiation. Both versions have relevance in terms of characterizing broad NeP. The nine- and seven-item versions of painDETECT were administered to subjects with confirmed NeP across six conditions identified during office visits to US community-based physicians. Responses on the sensory symptom items were dichotomized into “at least moderate” (ie, moderate, strongly, very strongly relative to the combined other responses (never, hardly noticed, slightly. Logistic regression of dichotomized variables on the total painDETECT score provided probabilities of experiencing each symptom across the range of painDETECT scores. Results: Both painDETECT versions discriminated among the symptoms with similar probabilities across the score ranges. Using these data, the probability of moderately experiencing each pain sensory item was estimated for a particular score, providing a pain profile. Additionally, the likelihood of experiencing each sensation was determined for a discrete increase in score, ie, the odds of at least a moderate sensation of burning (versus less than a moderate sensation was 1.29 for a 1-point increase, 3.52 for a 5-point increase, and 12.42 for every 10-point increase in the nine-item painDETECT score

  11. Pediatric Thermal Burns and Treatment: A Review of Progress and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elton Mathias

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries are a devastating critical care problem. In children, burns continue to be a major epidemiologic problem around the globe resulting in significant morbidity and death. Apparently, treating these burn injuries in children and adults remains similar, but there are significant physiological and psychological differences. The dermal layer of the skin is generally thinner in neonates, infants, and children than in adults. Enhanced evaporative loss and need for isotonic fluids increases the risk of hypothermia in the pediatric population. The pain management of the children with major burns challenges the skills of the personnel of every unit. Managing these wounds requires intensive therapeutic treatment for multi-organ dysfunction, and surgical treatment to prevent sepsis and other complications that further delay wound closure. Alternatives to the practice of donor site harvest and autografting for the treatment of severe burns and other complex skin defects are urgently needed for both adult and pediatric populations. This review article focuses on thermal burn pathophysiology and pain management and provides an overview of currently approved products used for the treatment of pediatric burn wounds. A new promising approach has been presented as a first-line therapy in the treatment of burns to reduce surgical autografting in pediatric patients.

  12. Burning Mouth Syndrome and Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Parveen; Kamal, Reet; Kumar, Mukesh; Niti; Gupta, Rajan; Chaudhary, Karun

    2013-01-01

    Menopause is a physiological process typically occurring in the fifth decade of life. One of the most annoying oral symptoms in this age group is the burning mouth syndrome (BMS), which may be defined as an intraoral burning sensation occurring in the absence of identifiable oral lesion or laboratory findings. Pain in burning mouth syndrome may be described as burning, tender, tingling, hot, scalding, and numb sensation in the oral mucosa. Multiple oral sites may be involved, but the anterior two-third part and the tip of tongue are most commonly affected site. There is no definite etiology for BMS other than the precipitating causative factors, and it is still considered idiopathic. Various treatment options like use of benzodiazepine, anti-depressants, analgesics, capsaicin, alpha lipoic acids, and cognitive behavioral therapy are found to be effective, but definite treatment is still unknown. The present article discusses some of the recent concepts of etiopathogenesis of BMS as well as the role of pharmacotherapeutic management in this disorder. PMID:23411996

  13. Pain (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intravenous chemotherapy. Mucositis (sores or inflammation in the mouth or other parts of the digestive system ) caused by chemotherapy or targeted therapy. Skin pain, rash, or hand-foot syndrome (redness, tingling, or burning in the palms of the hands and/or ...

  14. Adult survivors' lived experience of burns and post-burn health: A qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Thereasa E; Ogletree, Roberta J; Ratnapradipa, Dhitinut; Neumeister, Michael W

    2016-02-01

    The individual implications of major burns are likely to affect the full spectrum of patients' physical, emotional, psychological, social, environmental, spiritual and vocational health. Yet, not all of the post-burn health implications are inevitably negative. Utilizing a qualitative approach, this heuristic phenomenological study explores the experiences and perceptions early (ages 18-35) and midlife (ages 36-64) adults providing insight for how participants perceived their burns in relationship to their post-burn health. Participants were interviewed using semi-structured interview questions framed around seven domains of health. Interview recordings were transcribed verbatim then coded line by line, identifying dominant categories related to health. Categories were analyzed identifying shared themes among the study sample. Participants were Caucasian, seven males and one female. Mean age at time of interviews was 54.38 and 42.38 at time of burns. Mean time since burns occurred was 9.38 years with a minimum of (20%) total body surface area (TBSA) burns. Qualitative content analysis rendered three emergent health-related categories and associated themes that represented shared meanings within the participant sample. The category of "Physical Health" reflected the theme physical limitations, pain and sensitivity to temperature. Within the category of "Intellectual Health" were themes of insight, goal setting and self-efficacy, optimism and humor and within "Emotional Health" were the themes empathy and gratitude. By exploring subjective experiences and perceptions of health shared through dialog with experienced burned persons, there are opportunities to develop a more complete picture of how holistic health may be affected by major burns that in turn could support future long-term rehabilitative trajectories of early and midlife adult burn patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Trigeminal pain and quantitative sensory testing in painful peripheral diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arap, Astrid; Siqueira, Silvia R D T; Silva, Claudomiro B; Teixeira, Manoel J; Siqueira, José T T

    2010-07-01

    To evaluate patients with Diabetes Mellitus type 2 and painful peripheral neuropathy in order to investigate oral complaints and facial somatosensory findings. Case-control study; 29 patients (12 women, mean age 57.86 yo) with Diabetes Mellitus type 2 and 31 age-gender-matched controls were evaluated with a standardized protocol for general characteristics, orofacial pain, research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders, visual analogue scale and McGill Pain questionnaire, and a systematic protocol of quantitative sensory testing for bilateral facial sensitivity at the areas innervated by the trigeminal branches, which included the thermal detection by ThermoSensi 2, tactile evaluation with vonFrey filaments, and superficial pain thresholds with a superficial algometer (Micromar). Statistical analysis was performed with Wilcoxon, chi-square, confidence intervals and Spearman (ppain was reported by 55.2% of patients, and the most common descriptor was fatigue (50%); 17.2% had burning mouth. Myofascial temporomandibular disorders were diagnosed in 9 (31%) patients. The study group showed higher sensory thresholds of pain at the right maxillary branch (p=0.017) but sensorial differences were not associated with pain (p=0.608). Glycemia and HbA(1c) were positively correlated with the quantitative sensory testing results of pain (ppain thresholds were correlated with higher glycemia and glycated hemoglobin (p=0.027 and p=0.026). There was a high prevalence of orofacial pain and burning mouth was the most common complaint. The association of loss of pain sensation and higher glycemia and glycated hemoglobin can be of clinical use for the follow-up of DM complications. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Catastrophizing in Patients with Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana ANDABAK ROGULJ

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is an idiopathic painful condition which manifests with burning sensations in the oral cavity in patients with clinically normal oral mucosa and without any local and/or systemic causative factor. Catastrophizing is defined as an exaggerated negative orientation toward pain stimuli and pain experience. The aim of this study was to examine the association between catastrophizing and clinical parameters of BMS, and to examine the association between catastrophizing and the quality of life in patients with BMS. Materials and methods: Anonymous questionnaire consisting of 3 parts (demographic and clinical data with 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS, Croatian version of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14 scale and Croatian version of the Pain Catastrophizing scale (PC, was distributed to 30 patients diagnosed with BMS. Results: A higher level of catastrophizing was clinically significant in 30% of the patients. Total catastrophizing score and all three subcomponents of catastrophizing significantly correlated with the intensity of symptoms, but did not correlate with the duration of symptoms. Gender and previous treatment did not affect the catastrophizing. Conclusion: Obtaining the information about catastrophizing could help a clinician to identify patients with negative behavioural patterns. Additional psychological intervention in these individuals could reduce/eliminate negative cognitive factors and improve coping with chronic painful condition such as BMS.

  17. Case of Transient Osteoporosis of the Hip in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Sucuoğlu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Transient osteoporosis of the hip is an uncommon disease, the cause is not known. It is usually seen in women in the third trimester of pregnancy and in middle-aged men. Patients present with acute, severe hip pain which generally resulting in gait disorder. Prognosis of transient osteoporosis of the hip is good. Within few months of appropriate conservative aproach and bed rest patient’s complains can be fully recovered. In this article; we present the clinical features, diagnosis and treatment options of patients presented to our clinic with severe bilateral hip pain during the third trimester of pregnancy diagnosed as transient osteoporosis accompanied by literature review.

  18. Burning mouth syndrome: A diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panat, Sunil R.

    2012-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) has been considered an enigmatic condition because the intensity of pain rarely corresponds to the clinical signs of the disease. Various local, systemic and psychological factors are associated with BMS, but its etiology is not fully understood. Also there is no consensus on the diagnosis and classification of BMS. A substantial volume of research has been focused on BMS during the last two decades. Progress has been made but the condition remains a fascinating, yet poorly understood area, in the field of oral medicine. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in this disorder with the discovery that the pain of BMS may be neuropathic in origin and originate both centrally and peripherally. The aim of this paper is to explore the condition of BMS with the specific outcome of increasing awareness of the condition. Key words:Burning mouth syndrome, stomatodynia, oral dysesthesia, pain management. PMID:24558551

  19. Managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Farrah-Hani; Karim, Rahamah; Maat, Noor Hidayah

    2016-05-12

    Successful wound healing depends on various factors, including exudate control, prevention of microbial contaminants, and moisture balance. We report two cases of managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam dressing. In Case 1, a 2-year-old Asian girl presented with a delayed (11 days) wound on her right leg. She sustained a thermal injury from a hot iron that was left idle on the floor. Clinical inspection revealed an infected wound with overlying eschar that traversed her knee joint. As her parents refused surgical debridement under general anesthesia, hydrotherapy and wound dressing using SMARTPORE Technology Polyurethane foam were used. Despite the delay in presentation of this linear thermal pediatric burn injury that crossed the knee joint, the patient's response to treatment and its outcome were highly encouraging. She was cooperative and tolerated each dressing change without the need of supplemental analgesia. Her wound was healed by 24 days post-admission. In Case 2, a 25-year-old Asian man presented with a mixed thickness thermal flame burn on his left leg. On examination, the injury was a mix of deep and superficial partial thickness burn, comprising approximately 3% of his total body surface area. SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam was used on his wound; his response to the treatment was very encouraging as the dressing facilitated physiotherapy and mobility. The patient rated the pain during dressing change as 2 on a scale of 10 and his pain score remained the same in every subsequent change. His wound showed evidence of epithelialization by day 7 post-burn. There were no adverse events reported. Managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam resulted in reduced pain during dressing changes and the successful healing of partial and mixed thickness wounds. The use of SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam dressings showed encouraging results and requires further research as a desirable management option in

  20. Topical Pain Relievers May Cause Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... joint pain relievers containing the active ingredients menthol, methyl salicylate and capsaicin. These cases were uncovered by FDA ... people who purchase these products, Tan notes. Menthol, methyl salicylate and capsaicin create sensations of local warmth or ...

  1. Care of the burn wound: As I do it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Madhusudan Vartak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin covers the entire body. It is the most important protective organ. Since the burn injury is most painful of all injuries, dressings play an important part of the management. Dressing of the burn wound is very essential to provide pain relief, to promote early healing, to prevent contractures, and to help early mobilization. Many workers from time immemorial have used different types of dressings so as to provide desired results. I use sterile polyethylene drape as a dressing material after covering it with the first layer of gauze soaked in silver sulfadiazine cream. The results are encouraging as there is near total absence of pain experienced by patients and removal is totally pain-free without any bleeding. There is no need for escharotomies, and there is early removal of the slough with no contracture. The polyethylene drapes are easily available in the market, easy to store, available sterile, and totally cost-effective. They help reduce the hospital stay of the patient. The need of anesthesia for surgeries such as escharotomies and debridement is significantly reduced.

  2. Burning mouth syndrome: A review on its diagnostic and therapeutic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Aravindhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS, a chronic and intractable orofacial pain syndrome is characterized by the presence of burning sensation of the oral mucosa in the absence of specific oral lesion. This condition affects chiefly of middle aged and elderly woman with hormonal changes or psychological disorders. In addition to burning sensation, patient with BMS also complains of oral mucosal pain, altered taste sensation, and dry mouth. This condition is probably of multifactorial origin, often idiopathic and its exact etiopathogenesis remains unclear. So far, there is no definitive cure for this condition and most of the treatment approaches, medications remains unsatisfactory. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this article is to present a review of epidemiology, clinical presentation, classification, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and management of BMS.

  3. Burning mouth syndrome: A review on its diagnostic and therapeutic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravindhan, R.; Vidyalakshmi, Santhanam; Kumar, Muniapillai Siva; Satheesh, C.; Balasubramanium, A. Murali; Prasad, V. Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS), a chronic and intractable orofacial pain syndrome is characterized by the presence of burning sensation of the oral mucosa in the absence of specific oral lesion. This condition affects chiefly of middle aged and elderly woman with hormonal changes or psychological disorders. In addition to burning sensation, patient with BMS also complains of oral mucosal pain, altered taste sensation, and dry mouth. This condition is probably of multifactorial origin, often idiopathic and its exact etiopathogenesis remains unclear. So far, there is no definitive cure for this condition and most of the treatment approaches, medications remains unsatisfactory. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this article is to present a review of epidemiology, clinical presentation, classification, etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and management of BMS. PMID:25210377

  4. Thermal and mechanical quantitative sensory testing in Chinese patients with burning mouth syndrome--a probable neuropathic pain condition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xueyin; Zhang, Jinglu; Fan, Yuan; Svensson, Peter; Wang, Kelun

    2015-01-01

    To explore the hypothesis that burning mouth syndrome (BMS) probably is a neuropathic pain condition, thermal and mechanical sensory and pain thresholds were tested and compared with age- and gender-matched control participants using a standardized battery of psychophysical techniques. Twenty-five BMS patients (men: 8, women: 17, age: 49.5 ± 11.4 years) and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy control participants were included. The cold detection threshold (CDT), warm detection threshold (WDT), cold pain threshold (CPT), heat pain threshold (HPT), mechanical detection threshold (MDT) and mechanical pain threshold (MPT), in accordance with the German Network of Neuropathic Pain guidelines, were measured at the following four sites: the dorsum of the left hand (hand), the skin at the mental foramen (chin), on the tip of the tongue (tongue), and the mucosa of the lower lip (lip). Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA with repeated measures to compare the means within and between groups. Furthermore, Z-score profiles were generated, and exploratory correlation analyses between QST and clinical variables were performed. Two-tailed tests with a significance level of 5 % were used throughout. CDTs (P < 0.02) were significantly lower (less sensitivity) and HPTs (P < 0.001) were significantly higher (less sensitivity) at the tongue and lip in BMS patients compared to control participants. WDT (P = 0.007) was also significantly higher at the tongue in BMS patients compared to control subjects . There were no significant differences in MDT and MPT between the BMS patients and healthy subjects at any of the four test sites. Z-scores showed that significant loss of function can be identified for CDT (Z-scores = -0.9±1.1) and HPT (Z-scores = 1.5±0.4). There were no significant correlations between QST and clinical variables (pain intensity, duration, depressions scores). BMS patients had a significant loss of thermal function but not

  5. Numerical modeling of optical coherent transient processes with complex configurations-III: Noisy laser source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Tiejun; Tian Mingzhen

    2007-01-01

    A previously developed numerical model based on Maxwell-Bloch equations was modified to simulate optical coherent transient and spectral hole burning processes with noisy laser sources. Random walk phase noise was simulated using laser-phase sequences generated numerically according to the normal distribution of the phase shift. The noise model was tested by comparing the simulated spectral hole burning effect with the analytical solution. The noise effects on a few typical optical coherence transient processes were investigated using this numerical tool. Flicker and random walk frequency noises were considered in accumulation process

  6. Burning mouth syndrome: a systematic review of treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y F; Kim, Y; Yoo, T; Han, P; Inman, J C

    2018-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic oral pain syndrome that primarily affects peri- and postmenopausal women. It is characterized by oral mucosal burning and may be associated with dysgeusia, paresthesia, dysesthesia, and xerostomia. The etiology of the disease process is unknown, but is thought to be neuropathic in origin. The goal of this systematic review was to assess the efficacy of the various treatments for BMS. Literature searches were conducted through PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases, which identified 22 randomized controlled trials. Eight studies examined alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), three clonazepam, three psychotherapy, and two capsaicin, which all showed modest evidence of potentially decreasing pain/burning. Gabapentin was seen in one study to work alone and synergistically with ALA. Other treatments included vitamins, benzydamine hydrochloride, bupivacaine, Catuama, olive oil, trazodone, urea, and Hypericum perforatum. Of these other treatments, Catuama and bupivacaine were the only ones with significant positive results in symptom improvement. ALA, topical clonazepam, gabapentin, and psychotherapy may provide modest relief of pain in BMS. Gabapentin may also boost the effect of ALA. Capsaicin is limited by its side effects. Catuama showed potential for benefit. Future studies with standardized methodology and outcomes containing more patients are needed. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Epidemiological and etiological aspects of burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coculescu, E C; Tovaru, S; Coculescu, B I

    2014-09-15

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is defined as a chronic pain condition characterized by a burning sensation in clinically healthy oral mucosa. Incidence BMS diagnosed in the Department of Oral Medicine - Oral Pathology Dental Faculty of Medicine, "Carol Davila" University of Medicine and Pharmacy Bucharest is 16,23%. The etiology of BMS remains far less known. This article makes an overview of the latest theories about possible etiopathogenic factors involved in the occurrence of BMS.

  8. Local cooling does not prevent hyperalgesia following burn injury in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Mads U; Lassen, Birgit Vibeke; Pedersen, Juri L

    2002-01-01

    One of the oldest methods of pain relief following a burn injury is local application of ice or cold water. Experimental data indicate that cooling may also reduce the severity of tissue injury and promote wound healing, but there are no controlled studies in humans evaluating the anti-inflammato......One of the oldest methods of pain relief following a burn injury is local application of ice or cold water. Experimental data indicate that cooling may also reduce the severity of tissue injury and promote wound healing, but there are no controlled studies in humans evaluating the anti...

  9. Burning mouth syndrome and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Dahiya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is a physiological process typically occurring in the fifth decade of life. One of the most annoying oral symptoms in this age group is the burning mouth syndrome (BMS, which may be defined as an intraoral burning sensation occurring in the absence of identifiable oral lesion or laboratory findings. Pain in burning mouth syndrome may be described as burning, tender, tingling, hot, scalding, and numb sensation in the oral mucosa. Multiple oral sites may be involved, but the anterior two-third part and the tip of tongue are most commonly affected site. There is no definite etiology for BMS other than the precipitating causative factors, and it is still considered idiopathic. Various treatment options like use of benzodiazepine, anti-depressants, analgesics, capsaicin, alpha lipoic acids, and cognitive behavioral therapy are found to be effective, but definite treatment is still unknown. The present article discusses some of the recent concepts of etiopathogenesis of BMS as well as the role of pharmacotherapeutic management in this disorder.

  10. Daily left prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for medication-resistant burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezaki, Y; Badran, B W; Gonzales, T S; George, M S

    2015-08-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a persistent and chronic burning sensation in the mouth in the absence of any abnormal organic findings. The pathophysiology of BMS is unclear and its treatment is not fully established. Although antidepressant medication is commonly used for treatment, there are some medication-resistant patients, and a new treatment for medication-resistant BMS is needed. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technology approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of depression. Recent studies have found beneficial effects of TMS for the treatment of pain. A case of BMS treated successfully with daily left prefrontal rTMS over a 2-week period is reported here. Based on this patient's clinical course and a recent pain study, the mechanism by which TMS may act to decrease the burning pain is discussed. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of burn rehabilitation massage therapy on hypertrophic scar after burn: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoon Soo; Jeon, Jong Hyun; Hong, Aram; Yang, Hyeong Tae; Yim, Haejun; Cho, Yong Suk; Kim, Do-Hern; Hur, Jun; Kim, Jong Hyun; Chun, Wook; Lee, Boung Chul; Seo, Cheong Hoon

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of burn rehabilitation massage therapy on hypertrophic scar after burn. One hundred and forty-six burn patients with hypertrophic scar(s) were randomly divided into an experimental group and a control group. All patients received standard rehabilitation therapy for hypertrophic scars and 76 patients (massage group) additionally received burn scar rehabilitation massage therapy. Both before and after the treatment, we determined the scores of visual analog scale (VAS) and itching scale and assessed the scar characteristics of thickness, melanin, erythema, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), sebum, and elasticity by using ultrasonography, Mexameter(®), Tewameter(®), Sebumeter(®), and Cutometer(®), respectively. The scores of both VAS and itching scale decreased significantly in both groups, indicating a significant intragroup difference. With regard to the scar characteristics, the massage group showed a significant decrease after treatment in scar thickness, melanin, erythema, TEWL and a significant intergroup difference. In terms of scar elasticity, a significant intergroup difference was noted in immediate distension and gross skin elasticity, while the massage group significant improvement in skin distensibility, immediate distension, immediate retraction, and delayed distension. Our results suggest that burn rehabilitation massage therapy is effective in improving pain, pruritus, and scar characteristics in hypertrophic scars after burn. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. Stability of Ignition Transients

    OpenAIRE

    V.E. Zarko

    1991-01-01

    The problem of ignition stability arises in the case of the action of intense external heat stimuli when, resulting from the cut-off of solid substance heating, momentary ignition is followed by extinction. Physical pattern of solid propellant ignition is considered and ignition criteria available in the literature are discussed. It is shown that the above mentioned problem amounts to transient burning at a given arbitrary temperature distribution in the condensed phase. A brief survey...

  13. A case report of burning mouth syndrome: A diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan M Al-Iryani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral dysaesthesia syndrome called burning mouth syndrome (BMS causes chronic pain in the orofacial region without presence of any of the detectable organic causes. Common features of BMS are burning sensation in the mouth, xerostomia, dysgeusia, etc. These symptoms ideally show a diurnal pattern, were they are less in the morning and worsen as the day progresses and classically subside at the night time. BMS have multifactorial etiology. This report describes a case of burning mouth syndrome in a 60 year old female patient.

  14. Peripheral Neuropathy and Nerve Compression Syndromes in Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Amy L; Agarwal, Shailesh; Cederna, Paul S; Levi, Benjamin

    2017-10-01

    Peripheral neuropathy and nerve compression syndromes lead to substantial morbidity following burn injury. Patients present with pain, paresthesias, or weakness along a specific nerve distribution or experience generalized peripheral neuropathy. The symptoms manifest at various times from within one week of hospitalization to many months after wound closure. Peripheral neuropathy may be caused by vascular occlusion of vasa nervorum, inflammation, neurotoxin production leading to apoptosis, and direct destruction of nerves from the burn injury. This article discusses the natural history, diagnosis, current treatments, and future directions for potential interventions for peripheral neuropathy and nerve compression syndromes related to burn injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of three different dressings for partial thickness burns in children: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee Kee, Emma; Kimble, Roy M; Cuttle, Leila; Stockton, Kellie

    2013-11-25

    In the paediatric population, pain and distress associated with burn injuries during wound care procedures remain a constant challenge. Although silver dressings are the gold standard for burn care in Australasia, very few high-level trials have been conducted that compare silver dressings to determine which will provide the best level of care clinically. Therefore, for paediatric patients in particular, identifying silver dressings that are associated with lower levels of pain and rapid wound re-epithelialisation is imperative. This study will determine whether there is a difference in time to re-epithelialisation and pain and distress experienced during wound care procedures among Acticoat™, Acticoat™ combined with Mepitel™ and Mepilex Ag™ dressings for acute, paediatric partial thickness burns. Children aged 0 to 15 years with an acute partial thickness (superficial partial to deep partial thickness inclusive) burn injury and a burn total body surface area of ≤ 10% will be eligible for the trial. Patients will be randomised to one of the three dressing groups: (1) Acticoat™ or (2) Acticoat™ combined with Mepitel™ or (3) Mepilex Ag™. A minimum of 28 participants will be recruited for each treatment group. Primary measures of pain, distress and healing will be repeated at each dressing change until complete wound re-epithelialisation occurs or skin grafting is required. Additional data collected will include infection status at each dressing change, physical function, scar outcome and scar management requirements, cost effectiveness of each dressing and staff perspectives of the dressings. The results of this study will determine the effects of three commonly used silver and silicone burn dressing combinations on the rate of wound re-epithelialisation and pain experienced during dressing procedures in acute, paediatric partial thickness burn injuries. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12613000105741.

  16. Correlation between Burning Mouth Syndrome and Anxiety in the Elderly Inmates of Sanitaria in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedighe Bakhtiari

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a chronic pain disorder characterized by a chief complaint of oral burning/pain with no clinically observable oral mucosal lesions. The prevalence of BMS has been reported to be 2.5- 5.1% in the general population and several psychological disorders have been reported as associated or predisposing factors for BMS. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between BMS and anxiety in the elderly residents of sanitaria in Tehran, Iran. Materials and methods. In a cross-sectional analytical study, 50 patients with BMS were included along with 50 healthy individuals as controls. Inclusion criteria were: age over 60 years, burning sensation in the mouth, normal oral mucosa, absence of diabetes, satisfactory prosthesis, absence of iron deficiency and other nutrients, and no heavy smoking habits. Similar inclusion criteria were considered for the control group without any oral complaints. Burning/pain severity was assessed by a 100-mm visual analog scale and the severity of anxiety (state, trait, and total was determined by Cattell's Anxiety Scale. Data was analyzed by t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results. Individuals with BMS assessed their burning/pain severity to be 27.4 mm (95% CI=25.2 - 29.6 mm. Standardized total anxiety scale in individuals with and without BMS (±SE for mean was 5.9±0.2 and 4.6±0.3 with significant differences (p=0.001. Similar significant differences were observed in state and trait anxiety between the two groups. Conclusion. It seems that both state and trait anxiety are associated with burning mouth syndrome.

  17. Correlation between Burning Mouth Syndrome and Anxiety in the Elderly Inmates of Sanitaria in Tehran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiari, Sedighe; Khalighi, Hamid Reza; Azimi, Somayyeh; Alavi, Kaveh; Ayoobi Valoogerdi, Hasan; Namazi, Zahra

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain disorder characterized by a chief complaint of oral burning/pain with no clinically observable oral mucosal lesions. The prevalence of BMS has been reported to be 2.5-5.1% in the general population and several psychological disorders have been reported as associated or predisposing factors for BMS. The aim of this study was to determine the correlation between BMS and anxiety in the elderly residents of sani-taria in Tehran, Iran. Materials and methods In a cross-sectional analytical study, 50 patients with BMS were included along with 50 healthy individuals as controls. Inclusion criteria were: age over 60 years, burning sensation in the mouth, normal oral mu-cosa, absence of diabetes, satisfactory prosthesis, absence of iron deficiency and other nutrients, and no heavy smoking habits. Similar inclusion criteria were considered for the control group without any oral complaints. Burning/pain severity was assessed by a 100-mm visual analog scale and the severity of anxiety (state, trait, and total) was determined by Cattell's Anxiety Scale. Data was analyzed by t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Results Individuals with BMS assessed their burning/pain severity to be 27.4 mm (95% CI=25.2 - 29.6 mm). Standard-ized total anxiety scale in individuals with and without BMS (±SE for mean) was 5.9±0.2 and 4.6±0.3 with significant dif-ferences (p=0.001). Similar significant differences were observed in state and trait anxiety between the two groups. Conclusion It seems that both state and trait anxiety are associated with burning mouth syndrome. PMID:22991594

  18. Pain trajectory and exercise-induced pain flares during 8 weeks of neuromuscular exercise in individuals with knee and hip pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandal, L F; Roos, E M; Bøgesvang, S J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients considering or engaged in exercise as treatment may expect or experience transient increases in joint pain, causing fear of exercise and influencing compliance. This study investigated the pain trajectory during an 8-week neuromuscular exercise (NEMEX) program together with ac...... to educate and balance patient expectation when starting supervised neuromuscular exercise....

  19. Continuous neurophatic orofacial pain: A retrospective study of 23 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotorra-Figuerola, Dídac; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2016-04-01

    To determine the clinical characteristics of Continuous Neuropathic Orofacial Pain in patients that suffer Persistent Idiopathic Facial Pain (PIFP), Painful Post-Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy (PPTTN) or Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) and to describe their treatment. A retrospective observational study was made, reviewing the clinical history of the patients diagnosed with Continuous Neuropathic Orofacial Pain between 2004 and 2011 at the Orofacial Pain Unit of the Master of Oral Surgery and Implantology of the University of Barcelona and at the Orofacial Pain Unit of the Teknon Medical Center of Barcelona. The average age of the patients with Continuous Neuropathic Orofacial Pain was 54.5, with a clear female predominance (86.9%, n=20). Of all patients, 60.9% (n=14) were suffering a PIFP, 21.7% (n=5) had a BMS and 17.4% (n=4) were presenting a PPTTN. The pain quality described by the patients with Continuous Neuropathic Orofacial Pain was oppressive (43.47%, n=10), widely represented by patients with PIFP, and burning (39.13%, n=9) being the only quality that described patients with BMS. The treatment carried out with the patients was only pharmacologic. The most used drugs for the treatment of PIFP and PPTTN were clonazepam (50%, n=9) and amitriptyline (44.44%, n=8). However, a 55.5% (n=10) of the patients with PIFP or PPTTN required the association of two or more drugs for a correct pain control. All the patients with BMS responded satisfactorily to clonazepam. Continuous Neuropathic Orofacial Pain is a little known condition among the general population, physicians and dentists. This favors a late diagnosis and inaccurate treatments which entail unnecessary suffering. It is important to inform both the general population and health professionals concerning this painful condition. Continuous neuropathic orofacial pain, persistent idiopathic facial pain, painful post-traumatic trigeminal neuropathy, burning mouth syndrome, atypical odontalgia.

  20. Dual Etiologic Back Pain in Pregnancy: A Case Report with Lumbar Disc Herniation and Transient Osteoporosis of the Bilateral Hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Aydoğan İzol

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain in pregnancy is a common complaint. It has been reported that the pregnancy is an independent risk factor for lomber disc herniation and may worsen the existing herniation. Transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH, is a rare, self-limiting and gestational disease of unknown cause. In this article, we report a case of acute lomber disc hernia and later bilateral temporal osteoporosis of the hip that was treated with conservative methods during the same gestational period. With this pathologic case it is emphasized that, two pathological phenomenon can be seen in the same patient at the same time. It should be kept in mind TOH and radiculopathy should be considered in the differential diagnosis in pregnant patients who complains back and hip pain.

  1. Burn Depth Estimation Using Thermal Excitation and Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickey, F.M.; Holswade, S.C.; Yee, M.L.

    1998-12-17

    Accurate estimation of the depth of partial-thickness burns and the early prediction of a need for surgical intervention are difficult. A non-invasive technique utilizing the difference in thermal relaxation time between burned and normal skin may be useful in this regard. In practice, a thermal camera would record the skin's response to heating or cooling by a small amount-roughly 5{degrees} Celsius for a short duration. The thermal stimulus would be provided by a heat lamp, hot or cold air, or other means. Processing of the thermal transients would reveal areas that returned to equilibrium at different rates, which should correspond to different burn depths. In deeper thickness burns, the outside layer of skin is further removed from the constant-temperature region maintained through blood flow. Deeper thickness areas should thus return to equilibrium more slowly than other areas. Since the technique only records changes in the skin's temperature, it is not sensitive to room temperature, the burn's location, or the state of the patient. Preliminary results are presented for analysis of a simulated burn, formed by applying a patch of biosynthetic wound dressing on top of normal skin tissue.

  2. An assessment of early Child Life Therapy pain and anxiety management: A prospective randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Ela J; D'Cruz, Rachel; Harvey, John G; Moir, Jordyn; Parkinson, Christina; Holland, Andrew J A

    2015-12-01

    Burns remain extremely painful and distressing in young children. The consequences of poorly managed pain and anxiety can be life-long. Whilst Child Life Therapy (CLT) has been shown to be effective in many situations, few studies have looked at the effectiveness of CLT in regard to reducing pain and anxiety in children undergoing burn dressing changes. A prospective, randomised controlled trial was conducted, comparing CLT versus standard care in relation to pain and anxiety scores of children undergoing their initial burn dressing change. Pain and anxiety were assessed by an independent observer and questionnaires completed by the child, parent/caregiver and nursing staff. 50 subjects were recruited in each treatment group; median age 2.3 years (CLT) and 2.2 years (standard care). The median total body surface area (TBSA) burnt was 0.8% (CLT) and 0.5% (standard care). The majority were partial thickness dermal burns (88% CLT, 94% standard care). Rates of parent anxiety and pre-procedural child pain and anxiety were similar. Combined and scaled pain and anxiety scores in the CLT group were significantly less than in the standard treatment group (p=0.03). Whilst pain was significantly better in the CLT group (p=0.02), fear scores, wound outcomes and the need for skin grafting were not statistically different in either group. The presence of a Child Life Therapist, with their ability to adapt to the environment, the child and their family, significantly reduced the experience of pain during paediatric burn dressings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  3. Using education and support strategies to improve the way nurses assess regular and transient pain - A quality improvement study of three hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Anna; Carlfjord, Siw; Schaller, Anne; Gerdle, Björn; Larsson, Britt

    2017-07-01

    of pain assessments. Further research is needed that examines the large discrepancy between patient-reported pain management and documentation in the medical recording system of transient pain. Copyright © 2017 Scandinavian Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Burning Mouth Syndrome and Other Oral Sensory Disorders: A Unifying Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Grushka

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS is a sensory disorder which results in constant, bilateral burning pain of the tongue, lips, and other oral mucous membranes. Atypical odontalgia (AO is another sensory disorder, usually defined as a toothache-like pain for which no dental cause can be identified. Previous literature has suggested that AO is often associated with a concomitant temporomandibular disorder (TMD. This hypothesis paper explores the possibility that BMS, AO and TMD can be related through hyperactivity of both the sensory and motor components of the trigeminal nerve following loss of central inhibition as a result of taste damage in the chorda tympani and/or the glossopharyngeal nerves.

  5. [Multimodal distraction to relieve pain in children undergoing acute medical procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kate; Rodger, Sylvia; Bucolo, Sam; Wang, Xue-Qing; Kimble, Roy M

    2009-10-01

    Non-pharmacological approaches to pain management have been used by therapists for decades to reduce the anxiety and pain experienced by children during burn care procedures. With a greater understanding of pain and the principles behind what causes a child to be distracted, combined with access to state of the art technology, we have developed an easy to use, hand held multimodal distraction device (MMD). MMD is an interactive device that prepares the child for a procedure and uses developmentally appropriate distraction stories and games during the procedures to alleviate anxiety and pain. This paper summarizes the results of three randomized control trials. The trials aimed to understand the effectiveness of MMD as a distraction and preparation tool in reducing anxiety and pain in children undergoing burns and non-burns medical procedures compared to pure pharmacological approaches Standard Distraction (SD) and off the shelf video games (VG). Three separate prospective randomized control trials involving 182 children having 354 dressing changes were conducted in the burns and orthopedic departments at Royal Children's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, to address the above aims. Pain and anxiety scores were completed for the child, caregiver and nursing staff according to the Modified Faces, Legs, Activity, Cry and Consolability Scale, Faces Pain Scale-Revised, Visual Analogue Scale and Wong-Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale. Procedural length was recorded. MMD as a preparation and distraction tool were shown to have a significant impact on child, parent and nursing staff reported anxiety and pain during procedures compared to standard care and video games (P positive effect on clinical time and was shown to sustain its impact on pain and time with further dressing changes. MMD is more effective in reducing the pain and anxiety experienced by children in acute medical procedures as compared with SD and VG. MMD is continuing to be trialed and is continuing to show

  6. Custom-fit polymeric membrane dressing masks in the treatment of second degree facial burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Oren; Hundeshagen, Gabriel; Harats, Moti; Farber, Nimrod; Millet, Eran; Winkler, Eyal; Zilinsky, Isaac; Haik, Josef

    2013-09-01

    Second degree facial burns usually impart high wound site pain levels and patient discomfort due to the abundance of facial sensory innervation, as well as the development of edema and inflammation that accompany wound healing. Frequent changing of adherent dressings causes additional procedural pain and may prolong healing due to recurring damage to the wound bed. We applied face masks, made on-site from a drug free polymeric membrane dressing, to 8 patients with superficial and deep 2nd degree facial burns. Time to full re-epithlialization was recorded during treatment. Pain, overall comfort, and result satisfaction were evaluated using a questionnaire (10-point Likert scales. From 1=minimum to 10=maximum) on follow-up (mean follow up 14.4 months, range 9-18). These results were compared to a historical cohort of patients with facial burns that were treated with an antibiotic ointment. Results showed mean re-epithelialization time of 6.5 days (as compared to 8.5 days in the cohort group), low pain ratings (mean: 2.6; range: 4.7 in the control group), mixed comfort levels (mean: 4.7/10; 4 in the control group) and high result satisfaction (mean: 7.8; 6.2 in the control group). Nursing staff described pain-free dressing changes and positively noted non-adherence and high absorbance capacity of the polymer, necessitating less dressing changes. Inflammation was contained to the actual site of injury. No complications in terms of infection or allergic reaction were observed. Overall, the polymeric membrane facial dressing seems to be a promising means of reducing pain and ensuring uninterrupted wound healing in 2nd degree facial burns. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. On the rate determining step in fission gas release from high burn-up water reactor fuel during power transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, C.T.; Mogensen, M.

    1987-01-01

    The radial distribution of grain boundary gas in a PWR and a BWR fuel is reported. The measurements were made using a new approach involving X-ray fluorescence analysis and electron probe microanalysis. In both fuels the concentration of grain boundary gas was much higher than hitherto suspected. The gas was mainly contained in the bubble/pore structure. The factors that determined the fraction of gas released from the grains and the level of gas retention on the grain boundaries are identified and discussed. The variables involved are the local fuel stoichiometry, the amount of open porosity, the magnitude of the local compressive hydrostatic stress and the interaction of metallic precipitates with gas bubbles on the grain faces. It is concluded that under transient conditions the interlinkage of gas bubbles on the grain faces and the subsequent formation of grain edge tunnels is the rate determining step for gas release; at least when high burn-up fuel is involved. (orig.)

  8. An overview of burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Carmen; Di Stasio, Dario; Petruzzi, Massimo; Lauritano, Dorina; Gentile, Enrica; Guida, Agostino; Maio, Claudio; Tammaro, Mariasofia; Serpico, Rosario; Lucchese, Alberta

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterised by the presence of a burning sensation in the oral mucosa in the absence of any clinically apparent mucosal sign. It occurs more commonly in older women and often affects the tongue tip and lateral borders, lips, and hard and soft palates. Besides the burning sensation, patients with BMS may complain of unremitting oral mucosal pain, dysgeusia, and xerostomia. The exact pathophysiology of primary BMS remains unknown. A major challenge for the clinician is the treatment of BMS: identifying possible causative factors is the first step, but BMS is often idiopathic. Drug therapy, in addition to behavioural therapy and psychotherapy, may help to eliminate the symptoms. Considering the growing incidence of BMS in older people, further research is required to determine the true efficacy of current management strategies for patients with this disorder.

  9. A Review of Neuropathic Pain: From Diagnostic Tests to Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Truini, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain develops when the somatosensory nervous system is affected by a lesion or disease. Diagnostic tests aimed at assessing somatosensory afferent pathway damage are therefore useful for diagnosing neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain manifests with a range of different symptoms such as ongoing burning pain, squeezing or pressure pain, paroxysmal electric shock-like sensations, stabbing pain, or mechanical dynamic allodynia. The various types of neuropathic pain are associated with ...

  10. Effect of fusion burn cycle on first wall swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.H.; Bement, A.L.; Russell, K.C.

    1976-01-01

    A mathematical simulation of first wall swelling has been performed for stainless steel under a hypothetical duty cycle of 50 sec burn, 50 sec cool. In most instances steady state nucleation conditions were not established during the burn cycle, thereby necessitating the use of transient nucleation theory. The effects of transmutation helium and of surface active impurities were modelled in an approximate way. Both kinds of impurity were found to give large increases in the void nucleation rate. Suggestions for refining and extending the calculations are also given

  11. Feasibility of monomodal analgesia with IV alfentanil during burn dressing changes at bedside (in spontaneously breathing non-intubated patients).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Mathieu; Latarjet, Jacques; Payre, Jacqueline; Poupelin, Jean-Charles; Ravat, François

    2017-03-01

    The severe pain related to repeated burn dressing changes at bedside is often difficult to manage. However these dressings can be performed at bedside on spontaneously breathing non-intubated patients using powerful intravenous opioids with a quick onset and a short duration of action such as alfentanil. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the efficacy and safety of the protocol which is used in our burn unit for pain control during burn dressing changes. Cohort study began after favorable opinion from local ethic committee has been collected. Patient's informed consent was collected. No fasting was required. Vital signs for patients were continuously monitored (non-invasive blood pressure, ECG monitoring, cutaneous oxygen saturation, respiratory rate) all over the process. Boluses of 500 (±250) mcg IV alfentanil were administered. A continuous infusion was added in case of insufficient analgesia. Adverse reactions were collected and pain intensity was measured throughout the dressing using a ten step verbal rating scale (VRS) ranging from 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain conceivable). 100 dressings (35 patients) were analyzed. Median age was 45 years and median burned area 10%. We observed 3 blood pressure drops, 5 oxygen desaturations (treated with stimulation without the necessity of ventilatory support) and one episode of nausea. Most of the patients (87%) were totally conscious during the dressing and 13% were awakened by verbal stimulation. Median total dose of alfentanil used was 2000μg for a median duration of 35min. Pain scores during the procedure were low or moderate (VRS mean=2.0 and maximal VRS=5). Median satisfaction collected 2h after the dressing was 10 on a ten step scale. Pain control with intravenous alfentanil alone is efficient and appears safe for most burn bedside repeated dressings in hospitalized patients. It achieves satisfactory analgesia during and after the procedure. It is now our standard analgesic method to provide repeated

  12. Transient neutrons flux behaviour in a spherical reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, A.W.A. de.

    1978-11-01

    This work studies the transient neutron flux in a fast reactor of spherical geometry. The burning of U 235 nuclei is equated and two kinds of reflector were studied. The numeric solutions are then compared with the results for those reflectors. (author) [pt

  13. Painful stimulation and transient blocking of nerve transduction due to local anesthesia evoke perceptual distortions of the face in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyt, Ina; Dagsdóttir, Lilja; Vase, Lene; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Castrillon, Eduardo; Roepstorff, Andreas; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Svensson, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Anecdotally, orofacial pain patients sometimes report that the painful face area feels "swollen." Because there are no clinical signs of swelling, such illusions may represent perceptual distortions. In this study, we examine whether nociceptive stimulation can lead to perceptual distortion of the face in a way similar to that of local anesthesia. Sixteen healthy participants received injections of .4 mL hypertonic saline to induce short-term nociceptive stimulation, .4 mL mepivacaine (local anesthetic) to transiently block nerve transduction, and .4 mL isotonic saline as a control condition. Injections were administered in both the infraorbital and the mental nerve regions. Perceptual distortions were conceptualized as perceived changes in magnitude of the injected areas and the lips, and they were measured using 1) a verbal subjective rating scale and 2) a warping procedure. Prior to the study, participants filled in several psychological questionnaires. This study shows that both nociceptive stimulation (P blocking of nerve transduction (P face. A test-retest experiment including 9 new healthy subjects supported the results. Perceptual distortions were positively correlated with the psychological variable of dissociation in several conditions (P face is important to understand the possible implications of perceptual distortions in orofacial pain disorders (and possibly other chronic pain states). Such information may ultimately open up new avenues of treatment for persistent orofacial pain. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transient osteoporosis of the hip: A mysterious cause of hip pain in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju Vaishya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH is a poorly understood and forgotten clinical entity. The diagnosis is often delayed, and inappropriate treatment is provided, due to the lack of its awareness among the clinicians. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients (11 male and one female within the age group of 35–50 years, were identified retrospectively from the hospital records between July 2011 and June 2015 who had evidence of TOH on clinical and radiological parameters. Results: All the patients were treated conservatively by nonweight bearing mobilization, anti-inflammatory drugs, bisphosphonates, calcium, and Vitamin D supplements. None of our patients had any symptoms after 6 months of conservative management. The disease did not progress, and there was no evidence of hip joint involvement in any of the cases. Plain radiographs were not diagnostic in the early detection of TOH. Magnetic resonance imaging was found to be highly specific and sensitive in diagnosing TOH. The clinical condition of TOH is characterized by its acute onset of hip pain in middle-aged people, and its symptoms are out of proportion to the radiological findings. Conclusion: The TOH is a nondestructive and self-limiting condition of the hip, which responds well to the conservative treatment. We believe that TOH could be a subset of complex regional pain syndrome type 1, as it has many similarities in clinical presentation and management. Awareness of this entity is important to the clinicians for an early diagnosis and to avoid unnecessary treatment for other mimicking conditions.

  15. Use of Topical PC-NSAIDs to Treat Burn Injury and Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    termination of the study. At days 3, 5, 10 and 15 post-burn, the animals were again tested for sensitivity to a stimulus (von Frey hair of varying stiffness...special cages so that one hind paw was exposed to stimulations with up to eight different force von Frey hairs using the Dixon up/down method. The...in the dermal layers. Skin tissue dissected from animals in the untreated burn group shows an intermittent loss of epidermis and disrupted and

  16. Reasons for Distress Among Burn Survivors at 6, 12, and 24 Months Postdischarge: A Burn Injury Model System Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechman, Shelley A; McMullen, Kara; Carrougher, Gretchen J; Fauerbach, Jame A; Ryan, Colleen M; Herndon, David N; Holavanahalli, Radha; Gibran, Nicole S; Roaten, Kimberly

    2017-12-16

    To identify important sources of distress among burn survivors at discharge and 6, 12, and 24 months postinjury, and to examine if the distress related to these sources changed over time. Exploratory. Outpatient burn clinics in 4 sites across the country. Participants who met preestablished criteria for having a major burn injury (N=1009) were enrolled in this multisite study. Participants were given a previously developed list of 12 sources of distress among burn survivors and asked to rate on a 10-point Likert-type scale (0=no distress to 10=high distress) how much distress each of the 12 issues was causing them at the time of each follow-up. The Medical Outcomes Study 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey was administered at each time point as a measure of health-related quality of life. The Satisfaction With Appearance Scale was used to understand the relation between sources of distress and body image. Finally, whether a person returned to work was used to determine the effect of sources of distress on returning to employment. It was encouraging that no symptoms were worsening at 2 years. However, financial concerns and long recovery time are 2 of the highest means at all time points. Pain and sleep disturbance had the biggest effect on ability to return to work. These findings can be used to inform burn-specific interventions and to give survivors an understanding of the temporal trajectory for various causes of distress. In particular, it appears that interventions targeted at sleep disturbance and high pain levels can potentially effect distress over financial concerns by allowing a person to return to work more quickly. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Transient temperature response of in-vessel components due to pulsed operation in tokamak fusion experimental reactor (FER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Akio; Tone, Tatsuzo

    1985-12-01

    A transient temperature response of the in-vessel components (first wall, blanket, divertor/limiter and shielding) surrounding plasma in Tokamak Fusion Experimental Reactor (FER) has been analysed. Transient heat load during start up/shut down and pulsed operation cycles causes the transient temperature response in those components. The fatigue lifetime of those components significantly depends upon the resulting cyclic thermal stress. The burn time affects the temperature control in the solid breeder (Li 2 O) and also affects the thermo-mechanical design of the blanket and shielding which are constructed with thick structure. In this report, results of the transient temperature response obtained by the heat transfer and conduction analyses for various pulsed operation scenarios (start up, shut down, burn and dwell times) have been investigated in view of thermo-mechanical design of the in-vessel components. (author)

  18. Neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakipoglu-Yuzer, Guidal F; Atçı, Nermin; Ozgirgin, Nese

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have described pain prevalence, risk factors, pain and medical variables in spinal cord injury (SCI) populations. In this study on traumatic SCI in Turkey, we surveyed the neuropathic pain experiences during in-patient rehabilitation and defined the relationships between neuropathic pain and demographic and SCI characteristics of patients. To survey the neuropathic pain experiences during in-patient rehabilitation in traumatic SCI and to define the relationships between neuropathic pain and demographic and SCI-related characteristics of patients. Descriptive study. Physicial Medicine and Rehabilitation inpatient clinic, Ankara, Turkey Sixty-nine SCI patients as inpatients were included in this descriptive study. All patients demographic and SCI-related characteristics were enrolled. The diagnosis of neuropathic pain was made with the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) Pain Scale. Location of pain and pain description, relation to time and severity according to McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) were enrolled. The neuropathic pain localization was below the lesion level in 67 (97.1%) and at the lesion level in 2 (2.9%) patients. The pain was at the hip and leg regions in 36 (52.2%) patients. The neuropathic pain was defined as burning in 27 (39.1%), aching in 26 (37.7%), sharp in 4 (5.8%), stinging in 3 (4.3%), and cramping in 3 (4.3%). We did not find a significant difference between demographic and SCI-related characteristics and the localization of neuropathic pain for the patients (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference according to pain description by MPQ and pain localization (P > 0.05). We found a significant relationship between the patient's lesion level and the region of pain (P neuropathic pain due to SCI to be mostly below the lesion level with a burning or aching character and we did not find a significant relationship between the demographic and SCI-related characteristics of the patient and the pain

  19. Transient Safety Analysis of Fast Spectrum TRU Burning LWRs with Internal Blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downar, Thomas [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Zazimi, Mujid [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hill, Bob [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-31

    The objective of this proposal was to perform a detailed transient safety analysis of the Resource-Renewable BWR (RBWR) core designs using the U.S. NRC TRACE/PARCS code system. This project involved the same joint team that has performed the RBWR design evaluation for EPRI and therefore be able to leverage that previous work. And because of their extensive experience with fast spectrum reactors and parfait core designs, ANL was also part the project team. The principal outcome of this project was the development of a state-of-the-art transient analysis capability for GEN-IV reactors based on Monte Carlo generated cross sections and the US NRC coupled code system TRACE/PARCS, and a state-of-the-art coupled code assessment of the transient safety performance of the RBWR.

  20. Hyperalgesia in a human model of acute inflammatory pain: a methodological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L; Kehlet, H

    1998-01-01

    as significant for all variables with fewer than 12 subjects in a cross-over design (2alpha = 5% and power = 80%). Between-day comparisons demanded up to 25 subjects to detect changes of the same magnitude. The burns caused mild to moderate pain (VAS: mean 29, SD 14) and the subjects (all right-handed) were more......The aim of the study was to examine reproducibility of primary and secondary hyperalgesia in a psychophysical model of human inflammatory pain. Mild burns were produced on the crura of 12 volunteers with a 50 x 25 mm thermode (47 degrees C, 7 min). Assessments of (i) cold and warm detection...... thresholds, (ii) mechanical and heat pain thresholds, (iii) pain to heat (43 degrees C and 45 degrees C, 5 s), (iv) secondary hyperalgesia, and (v) skin erythema were made 1.75 and 0.5 h before, and 0, 1, 2, 4, and 6 h after a burn injury. Sensory thresholds and hyperalgesia to heat and mechanical stimuli...

  1. The neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jeffrey A

    2014-04-01

    This article reviews the definition, etiology and evaluation, and medical and neurosurgical treatment of neuropathic facial pain. A neuropathic origin for facial pain should be considered when evaluating a patient for rhinologic surgery because of complaints of facial pain. Neuropathic facial pain is caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve in the prepontine cistern and is characterized by an intermittent prickling or stabbing component or a constant burning, searing pain. Medical treatment consists of anticonvulsant medication. Neurosurgical treatment may require microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Operative treatment of painful neuromas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokvis, Annemieke; Coert, J Henk

    2011-01-01

    3-5% of patients with traumatic or iatrogenic peripheral nerve injury develop a painful neuroma, especially following trauma of small cutaneous sensory nerve branches. Neuroma pain is difficult to treat and often leads to loss of function and reduction of quality of life. Patients with a painful neuroma present with spontaneous electric, shooting or burning pain, allodynia, hyperalgesia and cold intolerance. The diagnosis is based on the medical history and physical examination, supplemented by Tinel's test and a diagnostic nerve blockade. Lasting pain relief is possible by means of surgical neuroma treatment performed by a plastic surgeon. Surgical treatment consists of repair or denervation of the nerve with relocation of the nerve stump in bone or muscle tissue or a vein. Referral of neuroma patients without delay to a plastic surgeon or multidisciplinary consultation is important, because the symptoms become increasingly difficult to treat over time. 3-5% of patients with traumatic or iatrogenic peripheral nerve injury develop a painful neuroma, especially following trauma of small cutaneous sensory nerve branches. Neuroma pain is difficult to treat and often leads to loss of function and reduction of quality of life. Patients with a painful neuroma present with spontaneous electric, shooting or burning pain, allodynia, hyperalgesia and cold intolerance. The diagnosis is based on the medical history and physical examination, supplemented by Tinel's test and a diagnostic nerve blockade. Lasting pain relief is possible by means of surgical neuroma treatment performed by a plastic surgeon. Surgical treatment consists of repair or denervation of the nerve with relocation of the nerve stump in bone or muscle tissue or a vein. Referral of neuroma patients without delay to a plastic surgeon or multidisciplinary consultation is important, because the symptoms become increasingly difficult to treat over time.

  3. Burning mouth syndrome: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra G Patil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome is a condition characterized by chronic orofacial pain without any mucosal abnormalities or other organic disease. There are numerous synonyms for this ailment such as stomatodynia, stomatopyrosis, glossodynia, glossopyrosis, sore mouth, sore tongue, oral dysesthesia, and scalding mouth syndrome. Patients usually present with burning, stinging, or numbness on the tongue or other areas of oral mucosa. The complex etiology and lack of characteristic signs and symptoms makes the diagnosis difficult. As a result of which managing such patients become a herculean task. Moreover, lack of understanding of the disease leads to misdiagnosis and unnecessary referral of patients. In this article, the authors have described the etiopathogenesis, diagnostic algorithm and management of this confusing ailment.

  4. Secondary hyperalgesia to heat stimuli after burn injury in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L; Kehlet, H

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the presence of hyperalgesia to heat stimuli within the zone of secondary hyperalgesia to punctate mechanical stimuli. A burn was produced on the medial part of the non-dominant crus in 15 healthy volunteers with a 50 x 25 mm thermode (47 degrees C, 7 min......), and assessments were made 70 min and 40 min before, and 0, 1, and 2 h after the burn injury. Hyperalgesia to mechanical and heat stimuli were examined by von Frey hairs and contact thermodes (3.75 and 12.5 cm2), and pain responses were rated with a visual analog scale (0-100). The area of secondary hyperalgesia...... to punctate stimuli was assessed with a rigid von Frey hair (462 mN). The heat pain responses to 45 degrees C in 5 s (3.75 cm2) were tested in the area just outside the burn, where the subjects developed secondary hyperalgesia, and on the lateral crus where no subject developed secondary hyperalgesia (control...

  5. Transient osteoporosis: Not just the hip to worry about

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Berman, MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Transient osteoporosis (TO is a clinical syndrome characterized by joint pain and the presence of bone marrow edema on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, both of which spontaneously resolve over time. Transient osteoporosis most commonly affects the hip, but also may involve other lower extremity sites. TO likely represents a disorder that may be monoarticular or “migratory” with involvement of two or more lower extremity sites sequentially affected over a number of months. We report on two cases of transient osteoporosis, one involving the knee and one involving the hip, demonstrating the utility of serial bone mineral density measurements at both sites. Additionally, we are able to report on the microarchitectural changes seen at the distal femur on ultra-high resolution (7 T MRI. Case #1 describes a recurrence of transient osteoporosis of the hip three years after a similar presentation at the contralateral hip and highlights the findings of rapidly changing bone mineral density in this clinical syndrome. In contrast to the spine, hip and forearm, peripheral bone density measurements at the knee are rarely reported and to our knowledge Case #2 represents the first report of transient osteoporosis of the knee demonstrating bone density findings similar to that seen in the hip. We postulate that transient osteoporosis of the knee is part of a clinical spectrum most commonly seen in the hip and one that is marked by lower extremity joint pain, bone marrow edema on MRI and transient decreases in bone mineral density all of which spontaneously resolve without sequelae. Keywords: Transient osteoporosis, Transient osteoporosis of the hip, Transient osteoporosis of the knee, Bone marrow edema, High resolution 7 T MRI

  6. A prospective intra-individual evaluation of silk compared to Biobrane for the treatment of superficial burns of the hand and face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefer, Jennifer Lynn; Arens, Elena; Grigutsch, Daniel; Rath, Rebekka; Hoffmann, Alexandra; Fuchs, Paul Christian; Schulz, Alexandra

    2017-05-01

    An ever-increasing number of commercially available dressings have been applied to treat superficial burns with the aim to reduce pain and inflammation and lead to a fast wound healing and scar reduction. Nevertheless the search for cheap and effective wound dressing proceeds. Dressilk ® consisting of silkworm silk showed good results for wound healing in regards to scarring, biocompatibility and reduction of inflammation and pain. Therefore it seemed to be an interesting product for the treatment of superficial burns. In a prospective intra-individual study the healing of superficial burns was evaluated after the treatment with Dressilk ® and Biobrane ® in 30 patients with burns of the hand and face. During wound healing pain, active bleeding, exudation, dressing change and inflammation were evaluated using the Verbal Rating Scale 1-10. Three months later scar appearance was assessed by VSS (Vancouver Scar Scale) and POSAS (Patient and Observer Scar Scale). With regard to re-epithelialization, pain, inflammation and acute bleeding both dressings were equivalent. High subjective satisfaction rates were reported for both Dressilk ® and Biobrane ® dressings in regard to comfort and mobility of the face. Biobrane ® , applied as a glove was subjectively preferred for burns of the hand. Regarding their cost efficiency Dressilk ® was clearly superior to Biobrane ® . Long-term results were similar. The "ideal" wound dressing maximizes patients' comfort while reducing pain and promoting wound healing. Dressilk ® and Biobrane ® both provided an effective and safe healing environment, showing low overall complication rates with respect to infection and exudation on superficial burns of the hand and face. Therefore Dressilk ® , being clearly superior to Biobrane ® in cost efficiency is an interesting alternative especially for the treatment of superficial burns of faces. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. A dor da queimadura: terrível para quem sente, estressante para quem cuida El dolor de la quemadura: terrible para quien siente estresante para quien cuida Burn pain: terrible for the ones who feel, stressful for the ones who care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lídia Aparecida Rossi

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos deste foram identificar os significados culturais atribuídos pela equipe de enfermagem às manifestações de dor apresentadas pelos pacientes portadores de queimaduras e identificar as percepções dos pacientes frente à dor provocada pela queimadura e à assistência de enfermagem prestada nestas situações. Foram realizadas observações participantes e entrevistados quatro enfermeiros, cinco auxiliares e 12 pacientes, em uma unidade de queimados. A dor da queimadura foi compreendida pelos enfermeiros como: física e emocional. Para todos os profissionais o banho e curativo são procedimentos estressantes. Para os pacientes a dor é terrível e não pode ser explicada, mas necessita ser suportada.Los objetivos de este estudio fueron identificar los significados culturales que el equipo de enfermería atribuye a las manifestaciones de dolor expresadas por los pacientes portadores de quemadura e identificar las percepciones de los mismos frente al dolor provocado por la quemadura y la atención de enfermería prestada en estas condiciones. Fueron realizadas observaciones participantes y entrevistados cuatro enfermeros, cinco auxiliares y 12 pacientes en una Unidad de Quemados. El dolor de la quemadura fue comprendido por los enfermeros como: física y emocional. Para todos los profesionales y pacientes el baño y la curación son procedimientos estresantes. Para los pacientes el dolor es terrible y no consiguen explicarlo, pero deben soportarlo.The goals of the study were to understand the cultural meaning that the nursing team and burn patients attribute to burn pain. Participant observations were carried out during one year at a Burn Unit. Semi-structured interviews with four nurses, five nursing auxiliaries and 12 patients were recorded. The burn pain is understood by nurses as physical and emotional pain. For professionals and patients, bath and dressing changes are stressful. For patients, burn pain is terrible and they can

  8. Benchmarks for multidimensional recovery after burn injury in young adults: the development, validation, and testing of the American Burn Association/Shriners Hospitals for Children young adult burn outcome questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Colleen M; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Kazis, Lewis E; Lee, Austin; Li, Nien-Chen; Hinson, Michelle; Bauk, Helena; Peck, Michael; Meyer, Walter J; Palmieri, Tina; Pidcock, Frank S; Reilly, Debra; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2013-01-01

    Although data exist on burn survival, there are little data on long-term burn recovery. Patient-centered health outcomes are useful in monitoring and predicting recovery and evaluating treatments. An outcome questionnaire for young adult burn survivors was developed and tested. This 5-year (2003-2008) prospective, controlled, multicenter study included burned and nonburned adults ages 19 to 30 years. The Young Adult Burn Outcome Questionnaires were completed at initial contact, 10 days, and 6 and 12 months. Factor analysis established construct validity. Reliability assessments used Cronbach α and test-retest. Recovery patterns were investigated using generalized linear models, with generalized estimating equations using mixed models and random effects. Burned (n = 153) and nonburned subjects (n = 112) completed 620 questionnaires (47 items). Time from injury to first questionnaire administration was 157 ± 36 days (mean ± SEM). Factor analysis included 15 factors: Physical Function, Fine Motor Function, Pain, Itch, Social Function Limited by Physical Function, Perceived Appearance, Social Function Limited by Appearance, Sexual Function, Emotion, Family Function, Family Concern, Satisfaction With Symptom Relief, Satisfaction With Role, Work Reintegration, and Religion. Cronbach α ranged from 0.72 to 0.92, with 11 scales >0.8. Test-retest reliability ranged from 0.29 to 0.94, suggesting changes in underlying health status after burns. Recovery curves in five domains, Itch, Perceived Appearance, Social Function Limited by Appearance, Family Concern, and Satisfaction with Symptom Relief, remained below the reference group at 24 months. The Young Adult Burn Outcome Questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for multidimensional functional outcomes assessment. Recovery in some domains was incomplete.

  9. Demonstration test on the safety of a cell ventilation system during a hypothetical explosive burning in a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Nishio, Gunji; Takada, Junichi; Tsukamoto, Michio; Koike, Tadao

    1993-01-01

    To demonstrate the safety of an air ventilation system of cells in a fuel reprocessing plant under a postulated explosive burning caused by solvent fire or by thermal decomposition of nitrated solvent, four types of demonstration tests have been conducted using a large-scale facility simulating a cell ventilation system of an actual reprocessing plant, thus revealing effective mitigation by cell and duct structures on the pressure and temperature pulses generated by explosive burning. In boilover burning tests, solvent fire in a model cell was observed with various sizes of burning surface area as a main parameter, and analysis was performed on the factors dominating the magnitude of boilover burning, revealing that the magnitude strongly depends on accumulated amounts and their ratio of oxygen and solvent vapor present in the cell. In deflagration tests, solid rocket fuel was burned in the cell to simulate the explosive source. The generated pressure and temperature pulses were effectively declined by the cell and duct structures and the integrity of the ventilation system was kept. In blower tests, a centrifugal turbo blower was imposed by a lump of air with a larger flow rate than the rated one by about six times to observe the transient response of the blower fan and motor. It was found that integrity of the blower was kept. In pressure transient tests, compressed air was blown into the cell to induce a mild transient state of fluid dynamics inside the facility, and a variety of data were successfully obtained to be used for the verification and improvement of a computer code. In all the tests, transient overloading of gas caused no damage on HEPA filters, and overloading on the blower motor was avoided either by the slipping of transmission belt or by the acceleration of blower fan rotation during peak flow. (author)

  10. Assessing the feasibility of implementing low-cost virtual reality therapy during routine burn care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Cameron G; Manegold, Ellen M; Randall, Cameron L; Aballay, Ariel M; Duncan, Christina L

    2018-06-01

    Burn care often involves procedures that result in significant pain experiences for patients which, in turn, can lead to poorer physical and psychological health outcomes. Distraction and virtual reality (VR) are an effective adjunct to pharmacological interventions in reducing pain. Much of the research that has demonstrated efficacy for VR in burn care has involved expensive and extensive technology. Thus, identifying cost-effective, feasible, acceptable, and effective approaches to apply distraction within routine burn care is important. The objective of this mixed-methods study was to evaluate key stakeholder (i.e., patients, providers) perceptions of feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness for the use of low-cost VR technology during routine burn care with adult patients. Ten adult patients used VR during burn care dressing changes in an outpatient clinic setting, after which they completed a satisfaction survey and individual qualitative interview. Providers also completed a satisfaction/perception survey after each participant's care. Quantitative and qualitative results from both patient and provider perspectives consistently supported the feasibility and utility of applying low-cost VR technology in this outpatient burn clinic setting. Special considerations (e.g., aspects to consider when choosing an apparatus or application) stemming from stakeholder feedback are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. [Burning sensation in oral cavity--burning mouth syndrome in everyday medical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlinger, Imre

    2012-09-30

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) refers to chronic orofacial pain, unaccompanied by mucosal lesions or other evident clinical signs. It is observed principally in middle-aged patients and postmenopausal women. BMS is characterized by an intense burning or stinging sensation, typically on the tongue or in other areas of the oral mucosa. It can be accompanied by other sensory disorders such as dry mouth or taste alterations. Probably of multifactorial origin, and often idiopathic, with a still unknown etiopathogenesis in which local, systemic and psychological factors are implicated. Currently there is no consensus on the diagnosis and classification of BMS. This study reviews the literature on this syndrome, with special reference to the etiological factors that may be involved and the clinical aspects they present. The diagnostic criteria that should be followed and the therapeutic management are discussed with reference to the most recent studies.

  12. A comparison of three different physiotherapy modalities used in the physiotherapy of burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sar, Zübeyir; Polat, Mine Gülden; Özgül, Bahar; Aydoğdu, Onur; Camcoğlu, Burcu; Acar, Ahmet Hakan; Yurdalan, Saadet Ufuk

    2013-01-01

    The present study compared the effectiveness of matrix rhythm therapy, ultrasound treatment (UT), laser treatment (LT) used in the physiotherapy of burns. The study was conducted at the Wound and Burn Healing Center, Dr. Lütfi Kırdar Kartal Education and Research Hospital (Turkey) from June 2009 to January 2012. The case series comprised 39 individuals with second- and third-degree upper-limb burns, whose burn traumas ended approximately 1 to 3 months previously. Participants were separated into three groups: matrix rhythm treatment (MRT), UT and LT; each group was also applied a treatment protocol including whirlpool and exercise. Pain, range of motion (ROM), muscular strength, skin elasticity, and sensory functions were evaluated before and after the treatment. Pressure sense and passive ROM were higher in the MRT group than in the LT group (P < .05). Pain was lower in the LT group than in the UT group, and passive ROM was higher in the UT group than the in LT group (P < .05). Active ROM was found to increase in all treatment groups, whereas passive ROM increased only in the MRT and UT groups; pressure sense increased only in the MRT group, and pain decreased only in the LT group (P < .05). MRT was found to be more effective in the restoration of sensory functions than LT, whereas LT was more effective in reducing pain than UT. No significant difference was observed in terms of skin elasticity according to the results of three treatment modalities. It is suggested that further research with more cases should be conducted to examine the long-term effect of treatment modalities.

  13. Investigation on the transient enthalpy of coal combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Pei-fang; Wang, Na; Yu, Bo; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Huai-chun [Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Lab. of Coal Combustion

    2013-07-01

    The transient enthalpy ({Delta}h) of coal/char combustion of the three different coals (including anthracite, bituminous, and lignite) during the process of combustion is determined as a function of burn-off degree by using thermo-gravimetric-differential scanning calorimeter (TG-DSC) simultaneous thermal analyzer, and The error of determining calorific values of coals/chars is less 5% compared the results of TG-DSC with that of an automatic isoperibol calorimeter. It is found that In the initial stage, all the {Delta}h of coals are greater than that of the char pyrolysized from parent coal for many of volatiles contained more a great deal of heat per unit mass oxidized at low temperature, it also imply that coal is more easily ignited than char corresponded; And in the middle stage, all the {Delta}h of coals is lower than that of the char pyrolysized, so the pyrolysized char oxidation can supply much more of thermo-energy per unit mass. {Delta}h are almost a constant when the burn-off degree is equal to between 0.35/0.15 and 0.95/0.85 for ZCY bituminous coal/char and JWY anthracite/char, between 0.35/0.35 and 0.75/0.9 for SLH lignite/char; In the later stage, the {Delta}h of the coal/char decreased with the burn-off degree, it imply that the activity of the coal/char decreases. Therefore, coal pyrolysis changes not only the structure of char, but also the property of release heat; the transient enthalpy of coal/char combustion has been in change with the burn-out degree.

  14. Burning mouth syndrome: Current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Nasri-Heir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a chronic pain condition. It has been described by the International Headache Society as "an intra-oral burning or dysesthetic sensation, recurring daily for more than 2 h/day for more than 3 months, without clinically evident causative lesions." BMS is frequently seen in women in the peri-menopausal and menopausal age group in an average female/male ratio of 7:1. The site most commonly affected is the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The patient may also report taste alterations and oral dryness along with the burning. The etiopathogenesis is complex and is not well-comprehended. The more accepted theories point toward a neuropathic etiology, but the gustatory system has also been implicated in this condition. BMS is frequently mismanaged, partly because it is not well-known among healthcare providers. Diagnosis of BMS is made after other local and systemic causes of burning have been ruled out as then; the oral burning is the disease itself. The management of BMS still remains a challenge. Benzodiazepines have been used in clinical practice as the first-line medication in the pharmacological management of BMS. Nonpharmacological management includes cognitive behavioral therapy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. The aim of this review is to familiarize healthcare providers with the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and general characteristics of primary BMS while updating them with the current treatment options to better manage this group of patients.

  15. Burning mouth syndrome: Current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Zagury, Julyana Gomes; Thomas, Davis; Ananthan, Sowmya

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition. It has been described by the International Headache Society as "an intra-oral burning or dysesthetic sensation, recurring daily for more than 2 h/day for more than 3 months, without clinically evident causative lesions." BMS is frequently seen in women in the peri-menopausal and menopausal age group in an average female/male ratio of 7:1. The site most commonly affected is the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The patient may also report taste alterations and oral dryness along with the burning. The etiopathogenesis is complex and is not well-comprehended. The more accepted theories point toward a neuropathic etiology, but the gustatory system has also been implicated in this condition. BMS is frequently mismanaged, partly because it is not well-known among healthcare providers. Diagnosis of BMS is made after other local and systemic causes of burning have been ruled out as then; the oral burning is the disease itself. The management of BMS still remains a challenge. Benzodiazepines have been used in clinical practice as the first-line medication in the pharmacological management of BMS. Nonpharmacological management includes cognitive behavioral therapy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of this review is to familiarize healthcare providers with the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and general characteristics of primary BMS while updating them with the current treatment options to better manage this group of patients.

  16. The use of video capture virtual reality in burn rehabilitation: the possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haik, Josef; Tessone, Ariel; Nota, Ayala; Mendes, David; Raz, Liat; Goldan, Oren; Regev, Elli; Winkler, Eyal; Mor, Elisheva; Orenstein, Arie; Hollombe, Ilana

    2006-01-01

    We independently explored the use of the Sony PlayStation II EyeToy (Sony Corporation, Foster City, CA) as a tool for use in the rehabilitation of patients with severe burns. Intensive occupational and physical therapy is crucial in minimizing and preventing long-term disability for the burn patient; however, the therapist faces a difficult challenge combating the agonizing pain experienced by the patient during therapy. The Sony PlayStation II EyeToy is a projected, video-capture system that, although initially developed as a gaming environment for children, may be a useful application in a rehabilitative context. As compared with other virtual reality systems the EyeToy is an efficient rehabilitation tool that is sold commercially at a relatively low cost. This report presents the potential advantages for use of the EyeToy as an innovative rehabilitative tool with mitigating effects on pain in burn rehabilitation. This new technology represents a challenging and motivating way for the patient to immerse himself or herself in an alternate reality while undergoing treatment, thereby reducing the pain and discomfort he or she experiences. This simple, affordable technique may prove to heighten the level of patient cooperation and therefore speed the process of rehabilitation and return of functional ability.

  17. [Pain in humans: experimental facts and hypotheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, P

    1994-09-15

    The description of painful phenomena in humans has to take into account its different components: sensory component (relevant to nociception), affective and emotional components. Nociceptor's (physiology is best understood with electrophysiological and neurochemical methods allowing a clear description of hyperalgesia, with its peripheral and spinal mechanisms. A functional model is partly available to explain allodynia, spontaneous burning pain and lightning pain, the three main consequences following deafferentation. At the thalamo-cortical level, one can describe nociceptive pathways and other pathways or neuronal networks involved in the affective and emotional components of pain.

  18. Burning Mouth Syndrome: A Review of the Etiopathologic Factors and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellappally, Sajith

    2016-02-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterized by pain in the mouth with or with no inflammatory signs and no specific lesions. Synonyms found in literature include glossodynia, oral dysesthesia, glossopyrosis, glossalgia, stomatopyrosis, and stomatodynia. Burning mouth syndrome generally presents as a triad: Mouth pain, alteration in taste, and altered salivation, in the absence of visible mucosal lesions in the mouth. The syndrome generally manifests spontaneously, and the discomfort is typically of a continuous nature but increases in intensity during evening and at night. The etiopathogenesis seems to be complex and in a large number of patients probably involves interactions among local, systemic, and/or psychogenic factors. The differential diagnosis requires the exclusion of oral mucosal lesions or blood test alterations that can produce burning mouth sensation. Management is always based on the etiological agents involved. If burning persists after local or systemic conditions are treated, then treatment is aimed at controlling neuropathic symptoms. Treatment of BMS is still unsatisfactory, and there is no definitive cure. As a result, a multidisciplinary approach is required to bring the condition under better control. The aim of this review was to discuss several aspects of BMS, update current knowledge, and provide guidelines for patient management.

  19. Cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddappa K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The cutaneous and mucosal pain syndromes are characterized by pain, burning sensation, numbness or paraesthesia of a particular part of the skin or mucosal surface without any visible signs. They are usually sensory disorders, sometimes with a great deal of psychologic overlay. In this article various conditions have been listed and are described. The possible causative mechanisms are discussed when they are applicable and the outline of their management is described.

  20. Prevention of neural hypersensitivity after acute upper limb burns: Development and pilot of a cortical training protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Dale; Zorzi, Lisa M; Wand, Ben M; Brockman, Nathalie; Griggs, Carolyn; Clifford, Matthew; Wood, Fiona

    2011-06-01

    Acute burn patients suffer pain and secondary hyperalgesia. This alters movement patterns and impairs function. Non-pharmacological methods of treatment are limited and lack rigorous testing and evidence for use. The treatment in this case series was designed to direct conscious attention to, and normalise sensation of, the injured limb in pain free way. The aim of the study was to describe a cortical training programme (CTP) in acute upper limb burn patients and to investigate the efficacy, safety and feasibility of the protocol. The study is a descriptive case series (n=6). Study tasks engaged sensory and motor nerves to influence the perception of the injured area. Visual and tactile inputs to maintain and, or normalise the homuncular map were central to the intervention. One patient, who commenced the study without resting pain, responded negatively. The remaining five patients had reduced pain and fear avoidance behaviours with associated improvement in arm function. The CTP approach is safe and feasible for use with acute burn patients where pain is reported at rest. Comparative studies are required to determine the relative efficacy of the program to usual interventions and the patients who may benefit from the technique. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  1. The evidence-based topical therapies for management of minor burns in outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siphora Dien

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Burns are often seen in clinics or hospitals. Majority of burns are minor burns, which can be managed in outpatient setting with satisfactory result. The healing outcome depends on physician’s knowledge and competencies in burn pathogenesis and basic principles of burn care. Initial treatment of burns consists of emergency evaluation, assessment of depth and severity of burns and considerations for referral. The principles of minor wound therapy include cooling, cleansing, pain management, and topical therapy. Recently, many topical agents are available and indicated for first to second degree burn. Silver sulfadiazine (SSD is the standard treatment; however, it has some limitations. Scientific evidences showed that topical antibiotics do not reduce the incidence of local infection, invasive infection, and mortality of infection. Burns heal faster with hydrogel dressings and some other dressings compared to SSD. There are insufficient evidences to support the use of aloe vera, honey, and negative pressure wound therapy in burns. Moist exposed burn ointment (MEBO® has been demonstrated to have equal efficacy to SSD.

  2. [Pathophysiology and treatment of orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masamichi; Noma, Noboru

    "Pain" is one of body defense mechanisms and crucial for the life support. However, orofacial pain such as myofascial pain syndrome, burning mouth syndrome and trigeminal neuralgia plays no part in body defense mechanisms and requires therapeutic intervention. Recent studies have indicated that plastic changes in the activities of trigeminal neurons, satellite glial cells in trigeminal ganglion, secondary neurons, microglia and astrocytes in trigeminal spinal subnucleus following orofacial inflammation and trigeminal nerve injury are responsible for orofacial pain mechanisms. Clinically, it is well known that the etiologic differential diagnosis which consists of careful history-taking and physical examination is essential for therapeutic decision in patients with orofacial pain. This report outlines the current knowledge on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment of orofacial pain.

  3. The Treatment of Thermal Burns with the Antibiotic Powder "Nebisep" - USSR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valigura, Ya

    1960-01-01

    There exist many methods of treating burns. At their basis lies the struggle against shock, pain, the loss of plasma and proteins, intoxication of the organism, prophylaxis of secondary infection and late complications...

  4. Pain chronification: what should a non-pain medicine specialist know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlion, Bart; Coluzzi, Flaminia; Aldington, Dominic; Kocot-Kepska, Magdalena; Pergolizzi, Joseph; Mangas, Ana Cristina; Ahlbeck, Karsten; Kalso, Eija

    2018-04-12

    Pain is one of the most common reasons for an individual to consult their primary care physician, with most chronic pain being treated in the primary care setting. However, many primary care physicians/non-pain medicine specialists lack enough awareness, education and skills to manage pain patients appropriately, and there is currently no clear, common consensus/formal definition of "pain chronification". This article, based on an international Change Pain Chronic Advisory Board meeting which was held in Wiesbaden, Germany, in October 2016, provides primary care physicians/non-pain medicine specialists with a narrative overview of pain chronification, including underlying physiological and psychosocial processes, predictive factors for pain chronification, a brief summary of preventive strategies, and the role of primary care physicians and non-pain medicine specialists in the holistic management of pain chronification. Based on currently available evidence, we propose the following consensus-based definition of pain chronification which provides a common framework to raise awareness among non-pain medicine specialists: "Pain chronification describes the process of transient pain progressing into persistent pain; pain processing changes as a result of an imbalance between pain amplification and pain inhibition; genetic, environmental and biopsychosocial factors determine the risk, the degree, and time-course of chronification." Early intervention plays an important role in preventing pain chronification and, as key influencers in the management of patients with acute pain, it is critical that primary care physicians are equipped with the necessary awareness, education and skills to manage pain patients appropriately.

  5. A qualitative study of health professionals’ views on using iPads to facilitate distraction during paediatric burn dressing changes

    OpenAIRE

    Green, E.; Cadogan, J.; Harcourt, D.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Distraction is a non-pharmacologic pain management technique commonly used to avert a person’s attention from procedural pain and distress during stressful procedures such as treatment after a burn injury. In recent years, computer tablets (such as iPads) have been used within paediatric burns services to facilitate distraction by way of apps, games, cartoons and videos during dressing changes. However, we know very little about health professionals’ experiences of using them in...

  6. Use of combined paracetamol and low dose ketamine in pain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of Paracetamol and low dose Ketamine in controlling burn pain during dressings. Setting: The burns ward of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, a 750 bed capacity tertiary centre in Western Kenya. Subjects: Consenting patients were recruited to the study on admission. Babies and ...

  7. Low-intensity LED therapy (658 nm) on burn healing: a series of cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rauirys Alencar; Boson, Luara Lis Barbosa; Portela, Seísa Marina Martins; Filho, Antônio Luiz Martins Maia; de Oliveira Santiago, Denyberg

    2018-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of LED on burns healing. Five patients with skin burns were submitted to photobiomodulation by LED, GaAsIP diode, (λ 658 nm) with 40 mW, 7 J/cm 2 on every other day. Biopsies of burned skin were performed and the healing process was photographed. Patients with bilateral burns were used as self-control, having one limb being irradiated and the contralateral limb irradiated with placebo. The burns treated with LED showed higher epithelization, with keratinocytes and fibroblasts proliferation, increased collagen synthesis, decreased pain, and pruritus. In conclusion, there was a faster clinical improvement in the irradiated limbs.

  8. Hydrofluoric acid burn resulting from ignition of gas from a compressed air duster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kevin N; Jones, LouAnn; Caruso, Daniel M

    2003-01-01

    A young female suffered burns to her hand after the ignition of gas from a compressed air duster. After debridement and dressing, the patient continued to have pain out of proportion to injury that was refractory to intravenous morphine. The material safety data sheet revealed that the chemical used was 1,1-difluoroethane. High temperatures can cause decompensation to form hydrofluoric acid. Calcium gluconate gel was applied topically to the patient's burns, which caused prompt and complete relief of her pain. A review of different compressed air duster products revealed that the main ingredient in each was a halogenated hydrocarbon. Although not considered flammable, all products have warnings regarding the possibility of ignition under various circumstances. Ignition of the gas in compressed air cleaners not only can cause flame burns, it can also cause chemical damage from exposure to hydrogen and fluoride ions. Prompt recognition and treatment is necessary to prevent severe injury.

  9. Use of a combined oxygen/nitrous oxide/morphine chlorydrate protocol for analgesia in burned children requiring painful local care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozil, Camille; Vialle, Raphaël; Thevenin-Lemoine, Camille; Conti, Elvira; Annequin, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    We present the results of the use of a protocol of inhalational oxygen/nitrous oxide mixtures associated with oral opioids on a prospective cohort of 33 children undergoing local care for acute but limited burned skin lesions. All the children were orally administered 0.4 mg/kg morphine chlorydrate, and nitrous oxide was administered as an equimolar mixture (50% N2O, 50% O2) via a face mask during the procedure. Pain and comfort of the patient were evaluated by the use of a validated behavioural score. After the end of the procedure, child and parent satisfactions were noted. Mean age was 3 years 6 months (10 months-11 years). A successful detersion procedure was performed in all the cases. Behavioural score was 6 in 15 cases out of 33, comprising between 7 and 9 in 15 patients and 10 in three patients. Subjective satisfaction of pain management was noted in 16 out of 20 patients after the procedure. Subjective satisfaction of the parents was noted in all the cases. Our study demonstrates that the use of a simple protocol of inhalational oxygen/nitrous oxide mixtures associated with oral opioids could be safe and effective. This association was well tolerated without any adverse effect.

  10. Initial evaluation and management of the critical burn patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivó, C; Galeiras, R; del Caz, Ma D P

    2016-01-01

    The major improvement in burn therapy is likely to focus on the early management of hemodynamic and respiratory failures in combination with an aggressive and early surgical excision and skin grafting for full-thickness burns. Immediate burn care by first care providers is important and can vastly alter outcomes, and it can significantly limit burn progression and depth. The goal of prehospital care should be to cease the burning process as well as prevent future complications and secondary injuries for burn shock. Identifying burn patients appropriate for immediate or subacute transfer is an important step in reducing morbidity and mortality. Delays in transport to Burn Unit should be minimized. The emergency management follows the principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support Guidelines for assessment and stabilization of airway, breathing, circulation, disability, exposure and environment control. All patients with suspected inhalation injury must be removed from the enclosure as soon as possible, and immediately administer high-flow oxygen. Any patient with stridor, shortness of breath, facial burns, singed nasal hairs, cough, soot in the oral cavity, and history of being in a fire in an enclosed space should be strongly considered for early intubation. Fibroscopy may also be useful if airway damage is suspected and to assess known lung damage. Secondary evaluation following admission to the Burn Unit of a burned patient suffering a severe thermal injury includes continuation of respiratory support and management and treatment of inhalation injury, fluid resuscitation and cardiovascular stabilization, pain control and management of burn wound. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  11. Prehospital treatment of burns: a qualitative study of experiences, perceptions and reactions of victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi Bazargani, H; Fouladi, N; Alimohammadi, H; Sadeghieh Ahari, S; Agamohammadi, M; Mohamadi, R

    2013-08-01

    The manner in which burns are initially managed, at an incident scene, can affect the extent and depth of burn wounds and their final prognosis. The aim of this study was to understand people's experiences, perceptions and reactions towards the initial management of burns and fire accidents in Ardabil Province, Iran. In a qualitative study, 48 burn victims accompanied by their caregivers were enrolled. Focus group discussion (FGD) was used to collect data. All the interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using content analysis method. Four categories of information were retrieved in this study, including fire control, scald and burn wound management, seeking medical consultation and severity indicators. Uncertainty regarding what to do when someone catches fire was an evident finding that was explored through the discussions. The results revealed that transferring the patient to the hospital most often takes place after initial treatments administered at home. People believed that cooling a burn wound for a time longer than a few seconds may harm the wound. A strong belief in the efficacy of traditional remedies was disclosed when the statements of participants revealed that traditional or home-made remedies were widely used either to control pain immediately after burn and later during the wound repair process to accelerate the repair or to control the infection and prevent oedema and scar. Among these remedies, pennyroyal and grated potatoes seemed to be the most popular ones. Pennyroyal was thought to prevent infection and potatoes were used to relieve pain. People doubted the capability of health-care workers who work in rural health houses. People considered electrical burns and burns on the chest to be the most severe types of burns. Inappropriate perceptions regarding initial management of burns existed among the participants that should be addressed in future quantitative research or through developing programmes on secondary prevention of burns

  12. Measuring children’s distress during burns dressing changes: literature search for measures appropriate for indigenous children in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louw QA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Quinette Louw1,2, Karen Grimmer-Somers2, Angie Schrikk31Department of Physiotherapy, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa; 2International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; 3Red Cross Children’s Hospital, Cape Town, South AfricaBackground: Virtual reality is consistently reported as effective in reducing pain and anxiety in children during burns dressing changes in recent Western studies. Pain scales are a commonly reported outcome measure. Virtual reality is persuasive for all children in distress during medical procedures, because it is a nonaddictive, novel, and inexpensive form of distraction which can be applied repeatedly with good effect. We intend to use virtual reality in South Africa for the many children hospitalized with severe burns from mechanisms rarely seen in the Western world (paraffin/kerosene stoves exploding, electrical fires, shack/township fires, boiling liquid spills. Many severely burnt children are indigenous South Africans who did not speak English, and whose illiteracy levels, cultures, family dynamics, and experiences of pain potentially invalidate the use of conventional pain scales as outcome measures. The purpose of this study was to identify objective measures with sound psychometric properties and strong clinical utility, to assess distress during burns dressing changes in hospitalized indigenous South African children. Choice of measures was constrained by the burns dressing change environment, the ethics of doing no harm whilst measuring distress in vulnerable children, and of capturing valid measures of distress over the entire burns dressing change procedure.Methods: We conducted two targeted systematic reviews of the literature. All major library databases were searched, and measures with strong psychometric properties and sound clinical utility were sought.Results: Seven potentially useful measures were identified, ie

  13. Pain management in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Not only burdened by the limited overall survival, lung cancer patient also suffer from various symptoms, such as pain, that implicated in the quality of life. Cancer pain is a complicated and transiently dynamic symptom that results from multiple mechanisms. This review will describe the pathophysiology of cancer pain and general approach in managing a patient with lung cancer pain. The use of opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and adjuvant analgesia, as part of the pharmacology therapy along with interventional strategy, will also be discussed.

  14. Control of pain with topical plant medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James David Adams Jr.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pain is normally treated with oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and opioids. These drugs are dangerous and are responsible for many hospitalizations and deaths. It is much safer to use topical preparations made from plants to treat pain, even severe pain. Topical preparations must contain compounds that penetrate the skin, inhibit pain receptors such as transient receptor potential cation channels and cyclooxygenase-2, to relieve pain. Inhibition of pain in the skin disrupts the pain cycle and avoids exposure of internal organs to large amounts of toxic compounds. Use of topical pain relievers has the potential to save many lives, decrease medical costs and improve therapy.

  15. Temperature threshold for burn injury: an oximeter safety study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, David G; Lawless, Mary Beth; Chew, Bradford B; Crone, Willem A; Fein, Michael E; Palmieri, Tina L

    2004-01-01

    Pulse oximeters have become essential devices for evaluating and monitoring patient oxygenation. The probe emits a small amount of heat into the skin in the process of signal detection. Regulations set by the Food and Drug Administration currently limit the maximum allowable temperature of an oximeter probe to 41 degrees C. As a result of the prolonged exposure of extremities to these devices, we sought to determine the actual temperature threshold for burn injury in patients. Eighteen patients undergoing surgery for removal of redundant skin (abdominoplasty, breast reduction) consented to the application of a temperature-controlled custom probe with four light-emitting diodes that had temperatures set randomly at the expected threshold for burn injury (42.5 degrees C, 43 degrees C, 43.5 degrees C, and 44 degrees C). The probe was left in place for 8 hours (or less if significant pain was noted). The sites covered by the probes were then checked for signs of injury. On the next day, the redundant skin was removed as a scheduled procedure, and histopathology was performed to detect the extent of burn injury. The study was approved by the local institutional research board. Two patients were excluded because of technical problems with the probe, one of whom had the probe turned off because of pain. The only observed sign of injury was either erythema or a superficial blister that was usually unobservable or slightly red at operation. These subtle signs of a burn were noted in one patient at 43 degrees C, four at 43.5 degrees C, and nine at 44 degrees C. No burns were noted in two patients. Minimal or no signs of injury frequently were noted by histopathology. Pulse oximeter probes are safe up to a temperature of 43 degrees C for at least 8 hours in well-perfused skin. Above that temperature, there is a risk of burn injury. Performing temperature threshold tests in redundant skin that is planned for excision is a potential method for testing the safety of devices or

  16. Burn Depth Estimation Based on Infrared Imaging of Thermally Excited Tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickey, F.M.; Hoswade, S.C.; Yee, M.L.

    1999-03-05

    Accurate estimation of the depth of partial-thickness burns and the early prediction of a need for surgical intervention are difficult. A non-invasive technique utilizing the difference in thermal relaxation time between burned and normal skin may be useful in this regard. In practice, a thermal camera would record the skin's response to heating or cooling by a small amount-roughly 5 C for a short duration. The thermal stimulus would be provided by a heat lamp, hot or cold air, or other means. Processing of the thermal transients would reveal areas that returned to equilibrium at different rates, which should correspond to different burn depths. In deeper thickness burns, the outside layer of skin is further removed from the constant-temperature region maintained through blood flow. Deeper thickness areas should thus return to equilibrium more slowly than other areas. Since the technique only records changes in the skin's temperature, it is not sensitive to room temperature, the burn's location, or the state of the patient. Preliminary results are presented for analysis of a simulated burn, formed by applying a patch of biosynthetic wound dressing on top of normal skin tissue.

  17. Efficacy of a children’s procedural preparation and distraction device on healing in acute burn wound care procedures: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Nadia J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intense pain and anxiety triggered by burns and their associated wound care procedures are well established in the literature. Non-pharmacological intervention is a critical component of total pain management protocols and is used as an adjunct to pharmacological analgesia. An example is virtual reality, which has been used effectively to dampen pain intensity and unpleasantness. Possible links or causal relationships between pain/anxiety/stress and burn wound healing have previously not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to investigate these relationships, specifically by determining if a newly developed multi-modal procedural preparation and distraction device (Ditto™ used during acute burn wound care procedures will reduce the pain and anxiety of a child and increase the rate of re-epithelialization. Methods/design Children (4 to 12 years with acute burn injuries presenting for their first dressing change will be randomly assigned to either the (1 Control group (standard distraction or (2 Ditto™ intervention group (receiving Ditto™, procedural preparation and Ditto™ distraction. It is intended that a minimum of 29 participants will be recruited for each treatment group. Repeated measures of pain intensity, anxiety, stress and healing will be taken at every dressing change until complete wound re-epithelialization. Further data collection will aid in determining patient satisfaction and cost effectiveness of the Ditto™ intervention, as well as its effect on speed of wound re-epithelialization. Discussion Results of this study will provide data on whether the disease process can be altered by reducing stress, pain and anxiety in the context of acute burn wounds. Trial registration ACTRN12611000913976

  18. The role of grain boundary fission gases in high burn-up fuel under reactivity initiated accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemoine, F.; Papin, J.; Frizonnet, J.M.; Cazalis, B.; Rigat, H.

    2002-01-01

    In the frame of reactivity-initiated accidents (RIA) studies, the CABRI REP-Na programme is currently performed, focused on high burn-up UO 2 and MOX fuel behaviour. From 1993 to 1998, seven tests were performed with UO 2 fuel and three with MOX fuel. In all these tests, particular attention has been devoted to the role of fission gases in transient fuel behaviour and in clad loading mechanisms. From the analysis of experimental results, some basic phenomena were identified and a better understanding of the transient fission gas behaviour was obtained in relation to the fuel and clad thermo-mechanical evolution in RIA, but also to the initial state of the fuel before the transient. A high burn-up effect linked to the increasing part of grain boundary gases is clearly evidenced in the final gas release, which would also significantly contribute to the clad loading mechanisms. (authors)

  19. Transient Osteoporosis of the Hip in Pregnancy: A Case Report - Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Ekim

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Transient osteoporosis of the hip is an uncommon disease, the cause is not known. This condition is reversible. Because generally the hip joint is effected it is named as “transient osteoporosis of the hip”. It is usually seen in women in the third trimester of pregnancy and in middle-aged men. The patients admitts with acute, severe, and progressive hip pain and these complaints are generally severe limiting their ambulations. Prognose of transient osteoporosis of the hip is good. In treatment; conservative treament approaches, bed rest is recommended and generally complaints are disappear in a few months. In this article; a case is presented which has applied with acut hip pain in one side, in the third trimester of pregnancy. The case has been diagnosed as transient osteoporosis of the hip according to clinical examination and radilogical investigation results. And cured with conservative approaches. (From the World of Osteoporosis 2009;15:48-51

  20. Opiorphin in burning mouth syndrome patients: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salarić, Ivan; Sabalić, Maja; Alajbeg, Ivan

    2017-09-01

    Opiorphin is a pentapeptide isolated from human saliva that suppresses pain from chemically induced inflammation and acute physical pain. Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic condition of a burning sensation in the mouth, where no underlying dental or medical cause can be identified. We aimed to measure the level of opiorphin in whole unstimulated (UWS) and stimulated (SWS) saliva of patients with BMS. Originally developed and validated LC-MS/MS method was used for opiorphin quantification. Samples were obtained from 29 BMS patients and 29 age- and sex-matched controls. The average concentration of opiorphin in UWS and SWS in the BMS group was 8.13 ± 6.45 and 5.82 ± 3.59 ng/ml, respectively. Opiorphin in BMS patients' UWS was significantly higher, compared to the control group (t = 2.5898; p = 0.0122). SWS opiorphin levels were higher, but not significantly, in BMS patients than in controls. Our results indicate that higher quantities of salivary opiorphin in BMS may be a consequence of chronic pain, but we cannot exclude that they occur as a result of emotional and behavioral imbalances possibly associated with BMS. To our knowledge, this is the first original article measuring opiorphin in a pain disorder. Opiorphin may be a measurable biomarker for chronic pain, which could help in objectifying otherwise exclusively a subjective experience. Increased opiorphin could serve as a universal objective indicator of painful conditions. Since opiorphin may also reflect emotional and socio-relational imbalances occurring with BMS, it could as well represent a biomarker for BMS. Knowledge on opiorphin's involvement in pain pathways could contribute to developing new clinical diagnostic methods for BMS.

  1. Thermonuclear model for high energy transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    The thermonuclear model for x- and γ-ray bursts is discussed. Different regimes of nuclear burning are reviewed, each appropriate to a given range of (steady state) accretion rate. Accretion rates in the range 10 -14 to 10 -8 Msub solar y -1 all appear capable of producing x-ray transients of various durations and intervals. Modifications introduced by radiatively driven mass loss, the thermal inertia of the envelope, different burning mechanisms, and two-dimensional considerations are discussed as are difficulties encountered when the thermonuclear model is confronted with observations of rapidly recurrent bursts (less than or equal to 10 min), and super-Eddington luminosities and temperatures. Results from a numerical simulation of a combined hydrogen-helium runaway initiated at pycnonuclear density are presented for the first time. The thermonuclear model for γ-ray bursts is also reviewed and updated, particularly with regard to the breakdown of the steady state hypothesis employed in previous work. Solely on the basis of nuclear instability, γ-ray bursts of various types appear possible for a very broad variety of accretion rates (approx. 10 -17 to approx. 10 -11 Msub solar y -1 ) although other considerations may restrict this range. The thermonuclear model appears capable of yielding a great diversity of high energy transient phenomena for various accretion rates, magnetic field configurations, and neutron star envelope histories

  2. The Relationship Between Gabapentin and Pregabalin and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Burned Servicemembers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    nor the beta - blocker propanolol affected subsequent PTSD development compared with pla- cebo.18 In an animal study, pregabalin was found to have...treatments for trigeminal neu- ralgia, postherpetic neuralgia, diabetic neuropathy, migraine, bipolar disorder, neuropathic pain, and anxiety .19,28...who have suffered from severe burns, which require numerous debridements, excisions, grafts, and other painful, anxiety -generating pro- cedures

  3. Pain trajectory and exercise-induced pain flares during 8 weeks of neuromuscular exercise in individuals with knee and hip pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandal, L F; Roos, E M; Bøgesvang, S J; Thorlund, J B

    2016-04-01

    Patients considering or engaged in exercise as treatment may expect or experience transient increases in joint pain, causing fear of exercise and influencing compliance. This study investigated the pain trajectory during an 8-week neuromuscular exercise (NEMEX) program together with acute exercise-induced pain flares in persons with knee or hip pain. Individuals above 35 years self-reporting persistent knee or hip pain for the past 3 months were offered 8 weeks of supervised NEMEX, performed in groups twice weekly. The program consisted of 11 exercises focusing on joint stability and neuromuscular control. Participants self-reported joint pain on a 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS) at baseline and 8-weeks follow-up. NRS pain ratings were also collected before and immediately after every attended exercise session. Joint pain was reduced from baseline (NRS 3.6; 95% CI 3.2-4.1) to 8-weeks follow-up (2.6; 95% CI 2.1-3.1), (P neuromuscular exercise. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic Widespread Pain Drawn on a Body Diagram is a Screening Tool for Increased Pain Sensitization, Psycho-Social Load, and Utilization of Pain Management Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Eric J; Ramachenderan, Jonathan; Davies, Stephanie J; Parsons, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that chronic widespread pain, (CWP) drawn by patients on a body diagram, could be used as a screening tool for increased pain sensitization, psycho-social load, and utilization of pain management strategies. The triage questionnaires of 144 adults attending a chronic pain outpatients' clinic were audited and the percentage pain surface area (PPSA) drawn on their body diagrams was calculated using the "rule of nines" (RON) method for burns area assessment. Outcomes were measured using the painDETECT Questionnaire (PD-Q) and other indices and compared using a nonrandomized, case-control method. It was found that significantly more subjects with CWP (defined as a PPSA ≥ 20%) reported high (≥ 19) PD-Q scores (suggesting pain "sensitization" or neuropathic pain) (P = 0.0002), "severe" or "extremely severe" anxiety scores on the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 Items Questionnaire (P = 0.0270), ≥ 5 psycho-social stressors (P = 0.0022), ≥ 5 significant life events (P = 0.0098), and used ≥ 7 pain management strategies (PMS) (P psycho-social load, and utilizing pain management resources. © 2014 World Institute of Pain.

  5. Characterizing individual painDETECT symptoms by average pain severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadosky A

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Alesia Sadosky,1 Vijaya Koduru,2 E Jay Bienen,3 Joseph C Cappelleri4 1Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, 2Eliassen Group, New London, CT, 3Outcomes Research Consultant, New York, NY, 4Pfizer Inc, Groton, CT, USA Background: painDETECT is a screening measure for neuropathic pain. The nine-item version consists of seven sensory items (burning, tingling/prickling, light touching, sudden pain attacks/electric shock-type pain, cold/heat, numbness, and slight pressure, a pain course pattern item, and a pain radiation item. The seven-item version consists only of the sensory items. Total scores of both versions discriminate average pain-severity levels (mild, moderate, and severe, but their ability to discriminate individual item severity has not been evaluated.Methods: Data were from a cross-sectional, observational study of six neuropathic pain conditions (N=624. Average pain severity was evaluated using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form, with severity levels defined using established cut points for distinguishing mild, moderate, and severe pain. The Wilcoxon rank sum test was followed by ridit analysis to represent the probability that a randomly selected subject from one average pain-severity level had a more favorable outcome on the specific painDETECT item relative to a randomly selected subject from a comparator severity level.Results: A probability >50% for a better outcome (less severe pain was significantly observed for each pain symptom item. The lowest probability was 56.3% (on numbness for mild vs moderate pain and highest probability was 76.4% (on cold/heat for mild vs severe pain. The pain radiation item was significant (P<0.05 and consistent with pain symptoms, as well as with total scores for both painDETECT versions; only the pain course item did not differ.Conclusion: painDETECT differentiates severity such that the ability to discriminate average pain also distinguishes individual pain item severity in an interpretable manner. Pain

  6. Flight Lieutenant Peach's observations on Burning Feet Syndrome in Far Eastern Prisoners of War 1942-45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roocroft, N T; Mayhew, E; Parkes, M; Frankland, A W; Gill, G V; Bouhassira, D; Rice, A S C

    2017-03-01

    'Burning Feet Syndrome' affected up to one third of Far Eastern Prisoners of War in World War 2. Recently discovered medical records, produced by RAF Medical Officer Nowell Peach whilst in captivity, are the first to detail neurological examinations of patients with this condition. The 54 sets of case notes produced at the time were analysed using modern diagnostic criteria to determine if the syndrome can be retrospectively classed as neuropathic pain. With a history of severe malnutrition raising the possibility of a peripheral polyneuropathy, and a neuroanatomically plausible pain distribution, this analysis showed that Burning Feet Syndrome can now be described as a 'possible' neuropathic pain syndrome. After 70 years, the data painstakingly gathered under the worst of circumstances have proved to be of interest and value in modern diagnostics of neuropathic pain. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  7. [The burn-out syndrome and restoring mental health at the working place].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Joachim; Häfner, Steffen; Kächele, Horst; Wirsching, Michael; Dahlbender, Reiner W

    2003-05-01

    This paper reviews the scientific concepts and the clinical aspects of the burn-out syndrome. According to recent studies, up to 25 % of the German working population appear to suffer from what the Amercan physician and psychoanalyst, Herbert Freudenberger, has designated in 1974 as "burn-out syndrome". Characteristic features of this syndrome are emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low personal accomplishment. People affected by the burn-out syndrome may suffer from depressive or anxious symptoms, from sleep disorders, chronic pain syndromes, or functional disorders of the cardiovascular or gastrointestinal system. Primary causes of the burnout syndrome include high demand combined with low influence, a high level of engagement without sufficient rewards or gratification, and a low level of social support. Preventive measures against burn-out include Balint-like supervision groups. In cases of a fully developed burn-out syndrome, affected persons should undergo either psychotherapy or a multimodal psychosomatic therapy.

  8. Psychological factors in oral mucosal and orofacial pain conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrashdan, Mohammad S; Alkhader, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    The psychological aspects of chronic pain conditions represent a key component of the pain experience, and orofacial pain conditions are not an exception. In this review, we highlight how psychological factors affect some common oral mucosal and orofacial pain conditions (namely, oral lichen planus, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, burning mouth syndrome, and temporomandibular disorders) with emphasis on the significance of supplementing classical biomedical treatment modalities with appropriate psychological counseling to improve treatment outcomes in targeted patients. A literature search restricted to reports with highest relevance to the selected mucosal and orofacial pain conditions was carried out to retrieve data.

  9. PAIN INTENSITY AND PAIN INTERFERENCE AMONG TRAUMA PATIENTS: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deya Prastika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of trauma has been high and has gained attention worldwide. The energy involved in trauma results in specific tissue damage. Such tissue damage generally leads to pain. The high pain intensity possibly is consequence of trauma due to transfer energy to the body from external force and absorbed in wide area. This pain affected patients’ physical and psychological function, in which well known as pain interference. Objective: The aim of this review is to describe the pain intensity and pain interference among trauma patients. Method: A systematic search of electronic databases (CINHAL, ProQuest, Science Direct, and Google scholar was conducted for quantitative and qualitative studies measuring pain intensity and pain interference. The search limited to hospitalized trauma patients in adult age. Results: The search revealed 678 studies. A total of 10 descriptive studies examined pain intensity and pain interference and met inclusion criteria. The pain intensity and pain interference was assessed using Brief Pain Inventory (BPI. Pain intensity of hospitalized trauma patients were moderate to severe. These including 6 studies in orthopedic trauma, one study in musculoskeletal, two in studies in combinational between orthopedic and musculoskeletal, and two studies in burn injury. Moreover, the patients also reported pain was relentless & unbearable. In accordance, data showed that pain interference was moderate to severe from six studies. These studies result in vary of functional interference. However, those studies examined pain interference on sleep, enjoyment of life, mood, relationship with other, walking, general activity, and walking. Conclusion: The evidence from 10 studies included in this review indicates that hospitalized trauma patients perceived moderate to severe pain intensity and pain interference. Further research is needed to better evaluate the pain of hospitalized trauma patients.

  10. 77 FR 13582 - Disability and Rehabilitation Research Project; Burn Model Systems Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2012 and later years. We take this action to focus research attention on areas... Psychology, 54, 211-216. Wiechman, S.A. (2011). Psychosocial recovery, pain, and itch after burn injuries. In...

  11. Symptom-Based Treatment of Neuropathic Pain in Spinal Cord-Injured Patients: A Randomized Crossover Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyunghoon; Oh, Yoongul; Lee, Sang-Hyuk; Ryu, Ju Seok

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the differences in medication effect according to pain characteristics in spinal cord-injured patients. This study is a prospective, randomized, crossover study. Fifty-five patients and 66 locations of neuropathic pain were included. Pain was classified into four spontaneous characteristics and three evoked pain characteristics. Oxcarbazepine (Na channel blocker) and pregabalin (calcium channel α2-δ ligand medication) were tried. Patients were divided into two groups: evoked pain present and evoked pain absent. Overall average visual analog scale was obtained. Oxcarbazepine was significantly more effective for patients without evoked pain than in those with it for electrical, burning, and pricking pain. The effect of pregabalin was not different regarding the presence or absence of evoked pain for all pain categories, except burning pain. In patients with evoked pain, pregabalin was shown to be significantly more effective for electrical pain, allodynia, and heat hyperalgesia than oxcarbazepine. In the evoked pain absent group, oxcarbazepine showed greater improvement than pregabalin but was not significant. In summary, the phenotype of neuropathic pain was associated with the efficacy of different pharmacologic treatments. Symptom-based treatment, therefore, can lead to more efficient analgesia.

  12. Risk factors for frequent work-related burn and cut injuries and low back pain among commercial kitchen workers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Shigeru; Muto, Takashi; Matsuzuki, Hiroe; Haruyama, Yasuo; Ito, Akiyoshi; Muto, Shigeki; Haratani, Takashi; Seo, Akihiko; Ayabe, Makoto; Katamoto, Shizuo

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated risk factors for frequent work-related burn and cut injuries and low back pain (LBP) among kitchen workers including personal, work-related and environmental factors. Subjects were 991 kitchen workers in 103 schools, 17 hospitals and nursing homes, and 6 restaurants in central Japan. A cross-sectional survey was carried out using a structured self-administered questionnaire. Logistic regression models were used to examine associations between frequent injuries/LBP and risk factors. The effective response rate was 75.1% (n=744), the mean age was 40.7 (SD 11.7) and 77.2% were female. Burn injury was associated with a smaller kitchen (OR 1.94; 95%CI, 1.13-3.33), and gas kitchens rather than electric kitchens (OR 2.30; 95%CI, 1.17-4.52). LBP was associated with female gender (OR 2.46; 95%CI, 1.37-4.43), high body height (>160 cm) (OR 2.03; 95%CI, 1.22-3.36), and large number of meals produced per person (≥ 150 meals) (OR 1.83; 95%CI, 1.12-3.00). The results of this study suggest that securing adequate work space and introducing electric kitchen systems may reduce the risk to kitchen workers, as well as the importance of adequate height of cooking equipment and selecting an appropriate volume of meals to produce per person to prevent LBP in kitchen workers.

  13. Evaluation of Transient Pin-Stress Requirements for Spacecraft Launching in Lightning Environments. Pain Free Analysis to Alleviate Those Pin Stress Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Paul; Terseck, Alex; Trout, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Spacecraft are generally protected from direct lightning attachment by encapsulation within the payload fairing of a launch vehicle and the ground structures that exist at the launch site. Regardless of where lightning strikes, potentially damaging indirect effects prevail from the coupling of electromagnetic fields into a loop created by outer shield of the payload umbilical. The energy coupled into individual spacecraft circuits is dependent on the umbilical current drive, the cable transfer impedance and the source/ load circuitry, and the reference potential used. Lightning induced transient susceptibility of the spacecraft avionics needs to be fully understood in order to define realistic re-test criteria in the event of a lightning occurrence during the launch campaign. Use of standards such as RTCA/DO-160 & SAE 5412 has some applicability but do not represent the indirect environment adequately. This paper evaluates the launch pad environments, the measurement data available, and computer simulations to provide pain-free analysis to alleviate the transient pin-stress headaches for spacecraft launching in Lightning environments.

  14. The Attack on Psychosomatic Integrity: a Study of the Psychological Sequelae of Burn Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaleri, V.; Epifanio, M.S.; Benigno, A.; Conte, F.; Di Pasquale, A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Burns pathology is characterized not only by insidious damage to the patients' outward appearance but also by the equally painful emotional difficulties they encounter as they reorganize their identity and their personal history. This exploratory survey, combining research work with medical action, considers the cases of 41 outpatients who were hospitalized and subjected to skin grafting. The patients were recruited through the database of the Palermo Civic Hospital Plastic Surgery and Burns Therapy Operative Unit. The questionnaires were compiled 6 and 12 months post-burn (12 months' observation). The main objective of the research was to investigate the quality of life of burn patients in relation to the way they handled their condition on the emotional level, in order to cope with the stress caused by the burn. PMID:21991160

  15. [Pain and emotional dysregulation: Cellular memory due to pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Minoru; Watanabe, Moe; Hamada, Yusuke; Tamura, Hideki; Ikegami, Daigo; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Igarashi, Katsuhide

    2015-08-01

    Genetic factors are involved in determinants for the risk of psychiatric disorders, and neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Chronic pain stimuli and intense pain have effects at a cellular and/or gene expression level, and will eventually induce "cellular memory due to pain", which means that tissue damage, even if only transient, can elicit epigenetically abnormal transcription/translation and post-translational modification in related cells depending on the degree or kind of injury or associated conditions. Such cell memory/transformation due to pain can cause an abnormality in a fundamental intracellular response, such as a change in the three-dimensional structure of DNA, transcription, or translation. On the other hand, pain is a multidimensional experience with sensory-discriminative and motivational-affective components. Recent human brain imaging studies have examined differences in activity in the nucleus accumbens between controls and patients with chronic pain, and have revealed that the nucleus accumbens plays a role in predicting the value of a noxious stimulus and its offset, and in the consequent changes in the motivational state. In this review, we provide a very brief overview of a comprehensive understanding of chronic pain associated with emotional dysregulation due to transcriptional regulation, epigenetic modification and miRNA regulation.

  16. Improving burn care and preventing burns by establishing a burn database in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzaylov, Gennadiy; Murthy, Sushila; Dunaev, Alexander; Savchyn, Vasyl; Knittel, Justin; Zabolotina, Olga; Dylewski, Maggie L; Driscoll, Daniel N

    2014-08-01

    Burns are a challenge for trauma care and a contribution to the surgical burden. The former Soviet republic of Ukraine has a foundation for burn care; however data concerning burns in Ukraine has historically been scant. The objective of this paper was to compare a new burn database to identify problems and implement improvements in burn care and prevention in this country. Retrospective analyses of demographic and clinical data of burn patients including Tukey's post hoc test, analysis of variance, and chi square analyses, and Fisher's exact test were used. Data were compared to the American Burn Association (ABA) burn repository. This study included 1752 thermally injured patients treated in 20 hospitals including Specialized Burn Unit in Municipal Hospital #8 Lviv, Lviv province in Ukraine. Scald burns were the primary etiology of burns injuries (70%) and burns were more common among children less than five years of age (34%). Length of stay, mechanical ventilation use, infection rates, and morbidity increased with greater burn size. Mortality was significantly related to burn size, inhalation injury, age, and length of stay. Wound infections were associated with burn size and older age. Compared to ABA data, Ukrainian patients had double the length of stay and a higher rate of wound infections (16% vs. 2.4%). We created one of the first burn databases from a region of the former Soviet Union in an effort to bring attention to burn injury and improve burn care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Canadian Orofacial Pain Team workshop report on the Global Year Against Orofacial Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Gilles J; Sessle, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    The year 2013–2014 has been designated the Global Year Against Orofacial Pain by the International Association for the Study of Pain. Accordingly, a multidisciplinary Canadian and international group of clinical, research and knowledge-transfer experts attended a workshop in Montreal, Quebec. The workshop had two aims: to identify new pathways for innovative diagnosis and management of chronic orofacial pain states; and to identify opportunities for further collaborative orofacial pain research and education in Canada. Three topics related to chronic orofacial pain were explored: biomarkers and pain signatures for chronic orofacial pain; misuse of analgesic and opioid pain medications for managing chronic orofacial pain; and complementary alternative medicine, topical agents and the role of stress in chronic orofacial pain. It was determined that further research is needed to: identify biomarkers of chronic orofacial post-traumatic neuropathic pain, with a focus on psychosocial, physiological and chemical-genetic factors; validate the short-and long-term safety (ie, no harm to health, and avoidance of misuse and addiction) of opioid use for two distinct conditions (acute and chronic orofacial pain, respectively); and promote the use of topical medications as an alternative treatment in dentistry, and further document the benefits and safety of complementary and alternative medicine, including stress management, in dentistry. It was proposed that burning mouth syndrome, a painful condition that is not uncommon and affects mainly postmenopausal women, should receive particular attention. PMID:25522352

  18. Canadian Orofacial Pain Team workshop report on the global year against orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, Gilles J; Sessle, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    The year 2013-2014 has been designated the Global Year Against Orofacial Pain by the International Association for the Study of Pain. Accordingly, a multidisciplinary Canadian and international group of clinical, research and knowledge-transfer experts attended a workshop in Montreal, Quebec. The workshop had two aims: to identify new pathways for innovative diagnosis and management of chronic orofacial pain states; and to identify opportunities for further collaborative orofacial pain research and education in Canada. Three topics related to chronic orofacial pain were explored: biomarkers and pain signatures for chronic orofacial pain; misuse of analgesic and opioid pain medications for managing chronic orofacial pain; and complementary alternative medicine, topical agents and the role of stress in chronic orofacial pain. It was determined that further research is needed to: identify biomarkers of chronic orofacial post-traumatic neuropathic pain, with a focus on psychosocial, physiological and chemical-genetic factors; validate the short- and long-term safety (i.e., no harm to health, and avoidance of misuse and addiction) of opioid use for two distinct conditions (acute and chronic orofacial pain, respectively); and promote the use of topical medications as an alternative treatment in dentistry, and further document the benefits and safety of complementary and alternative medicine, including stress management, in dentistry. It was proposed that burning mouth syndrome, a painful condition that is not uncommon and affects mainly postmenopausal women, should receive particular attention.

  19. Accidental radioisotope burns - Management of late sequelae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varghese Bipin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Accidental radioisotope burns are rare. The major components of radiation injury are burns, interstitial pneumonitis, acute bone marrow suppression, acute renal failure and adult respiratory distress syndrome. Radiation burns, though localized in distribution, have systemic effects, and can be extremely difficult to heal, even after multiple surgeries. In a 25 year old male who sustained such trauma by accidental industrial exposure to Iridium192 the early presentation involved recurrent haematemesis, pancytopenia and bone marrow suppression. After three weeks he developed burns in contact areas in the left hand, left side of the chest, abdomen and right inguinal region. All except the inguinal wound healed spontaneously but the former became a non-healing ulcer. Pancytopenia and bone marrow depression followed. He was treated with morphine and NSAIDs, epidural buprinorphine and bupivicaine for pain relief, steroids, antibiotics followed by wound excision and reconstruction with tensor fascia lata(TFL flap. Patient had breakdown of abdominal scar later and it was excised with 0.5 cm margins up to the underlying muscle and the wound was covered by a latissimis dorsi flap. Further scar break down and recurrent ulcers occurred at different sites including left wrist, left thumb and right heel in the next two years which needed multiple surgical interventions.

  20. Use of a copolymer dressing on superficial and partial-thickness burns in a paediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M; Massand, S; Davis, W; Burkey, B; Glat, P M

    2015-07-01

    Despite extensive research into the treatment of partial-thickness burns, to date there has not been the emergence of a preeminent modality. This pilot study, the first such study to be performed in a burn unit in the US, was designed to evaluate the efficacy and outcomes of the application of copolymer dressing (Suprathel; PolyMedics Innovations Corporation, Stuttgart, Germany) for both superficial and deeper partial-thickness burns. The copolymer dressing was used as a primary wound dressing to treat superficial and deep partial-thickness burns (average 5% total body surface area) in paediatric patients. Burns were debrided within 24 hours, at bedside, in the burn unit or in the operating room. The copolymer dressing was then applied directly to the wound and covered with a non-adherent second layer and an absorptive outer dressing. After discharge, patients were seen every 5-7 days until healed. Parameters evaluated included average hospital length of stay, average number of intravenous doses of narcotics administered, pain score at first follow-up visit, average time to complete re epithelialisation, incidence of burn wound infection, and patient/parent satisfaction on a 4-point scale. We also evaluated our experience with the dressing. Data were evaluated retrospectively under an Investigational Review Board approved protocol. Of the 17 patients assessed the average hospital length of stay was 1.4 days during which the average number of intravenous narcotic doses administered before copolymer dressing application was 1.5 and after was 0.1 doses. At the first follow-up visit, average pain score was 1.2 on a 10-point scale and the average time to re epithelialisation was 9.5 days. There was no incidence of burn wound infection. Patient/parent satisfaction was average of 3.66 on a 4-point scale. The staff had found that the self-adherence and elasticity of the dressing made it easy to apply and stay adherent, especially in areas of difficult contour. There were

  1. Self-injury, converting emotional distress into physical pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhl, Bo; Rubæk, Lotte

    2017-01-01

    Self-inflicted pain by cutting, hitting or burning oneself has become a common way to regulate emotions and to serve as coping strategy. 21.5-32% of adolescents in non-clinical populations have a history of non-suicidal self-injury. Non-suicidal self-injury has a momentarily relieving effect and ...... and is an important predictor of suicidal behaviour; even superficial self-injury should be taken seriously. There is an urgent need for organized treatment programmes for young people who self-harm.......Self-inflicted pain by cutting, hitting or burning oneself has become a common way to regulate emotions and to serve as coping strategy. 21.5-32% of adolescents in non-clinical populations have a history of non-suicidal self-injury. Non-suicidal self-injury has a momentarily relieving effect...

  2. Effect of lingual nerve block on burning mouth syndrome (stomatodynia): a randomized crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grémeau-Richard, Christelle; Dubray, Claude; Aublet-Cuvelier, Bruno; Ughetto, Sylvie; Woda, Alain

    2010-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (stomatodynia) is associated with changes of a neuropathic nature the main location of which, peripheral or central, remains unknown. A randomised, double-blind crossover design was used to investigate the effects of lingual nerve block on spontaneous burning pain and a possible correlation with the effects of topical clonazepam, the patient's response to a psychological questionnaire, and the taste and heat thresholds. The spontaneous burning was measured with a visual analogue scale (VAS) just before and 15 min after injection. The decreases in VAS score after lidocaine or saline injection were not significantly different (2.7+/-3.9 and 2.0+/-2.6, respectively; n=20). However, two groups of patients could be identified: in a "peripheral group" (n=10) the VAS decrease due to lingual nerve injection was 4.3+/-3.1cm after lidocaine and 0.9+/-0.3 cm after saline (p=0.02). In a "central group" (n=7), there were an increase in pain intensity score (-0.8+/-2.6 cm) after lidocaine and a decrease (1.5+/-3.0 cm) after saline (p=0.15). An increase in the hospital anxiety and depression (HAD) score and a decreased taste sensitivity and heat pain threshold of painful oral area were seen in patients compared with age-and-sex-matched controls (p<0.05). Topical clonazepam treatment tended to be more effective (p=0.07) and HAD score lower (p<0.03) in the peripheral than in the central group. These results suggest that the neuropathic disorder associated with stomatodynia may be predominantly peripheral, central or mixed depending on the individual. Topical application of clonazepam and HAD may serve as indicators of which mechanism is dominating. Copyright 2009 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of some antecipated transients without scram for a pressurized water cooled reactor (PWR) using coupling of the containment code CORAN to the system model code ALMOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, F. de A.T. de.

    1985-01-01

    Some antecipated transients without scram (ATWS) for a pressurized water cooled reactor, model KWU 1300 MWe, are studied using coupling of the containment code CORAN to the system model code ALMOD, under severe random conditions. This coupling has the objective of including containment model as part of a unified code system. These severe conditions include failure of reactor scram, following a station black-out and emergency power initiation for the burn-up status at the beginning and end of the cycle. Furthermore, for the burn-up status at the end of the cycle a failure in the closure of the pressurizer relief valve was also investigated. For the beginning of the cycle, the containment participates actively during the transient. It is noted that the effect of the burn-up in the fuel is to reduce the seriousness of these transients. On the other hand, the failure in the closure of the pressurized relief valve makes this transients more severe. Moreover, the containment safety or radiological public safety is not affected in any of the cases. (Author) [pt

  4. Development of clinical process measures for pediatric burn care: Understanding variation in practice patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazis, Lewis E; Sheridan, Robert L; Shapiro, Gabriel D; Lee, Austin F; Liang, Matthew H; Ryan, Colleen M; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Lydon, Martha; Soley-Bori, Marina; Sonis, Lily A; Dore, Emily C; Palmieri, Tina; Herndon, David; Meyer, Walter; Warner, Petra; Kagan, Richard; Stoddard, Frederick J; Murphy, Michael; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2018-04-01

    There has been little systematic examination of variation in pediatric burn care clinical practices and its effect on outcomes. As a first step, current clinical care processes need to be operationally defined. The highly specialized burn care units of the Shriners Hospitals for Children system present an opportunity to describe the processes of care. The aim of this study was to develop a set of process-based measures for pediatric burn care and examine adherence to them by providers in a cohort of pediatric burn patients. We conducted a systematic literature review to compile a set of process-based indicators. These measures were refined by an expert panel of burn care providers, yielding 36 process-based indicators in four clinical areas: initial evaluation and resuscitation, acute excisional surgery and critical care, psychosocial and pain control, and reconstruction and aftercare. We assessed variability in adherence to the indicators in a cohort of 1,076 children with burns at four regional pediatric burn programs in the Shriners Hospital system. The percentages of the cohort at each of the four sites were as follows: Boston, 20.8%; Cincinnati, 21.1%; Galveston, 36.0%; and Sacramento, 22.1%. The cohort included children who received care between 2006 and 2010. Adherence to the process indicators varied both across sites and by clinical area. Adherence was lowest for the clinical areas of acute excisional surgery and critical care, with a range of 35% to 48% across sites, followed by initial evaluation and resuscitation (range, 34%-60%). In contrast, the clinical areas of psychosocial and pain control and reconstruction and aftercare had relatively high adherence across sites, with ranges of 62% to 93% and 71% to 87%, respectively. Of the 36 process indicators, 89% differed significantly in adherence between clinical sites (p measures represents an important step in the assessment of clinical practice in pediatric burn care. Substantial variation was observed

  5. Outcome After Pituitary Radiosurgery for Thalamic Pain Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Motohiro; Chernov, Mikhail F.; Taira, Takaomi; Ochiai, Taku; Nakaya, Kotaro; Tamura, Noriko; Goto, Shinichi; Yomo, Shoji; Kouyama, Nobuo; Katayama, Yoko; Kawakami, Yoriko; Izawa, Masahiro; Muragaki, Yoshihiro

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes after pituitary radiosurgery in patients with post-stroke thalamic pain syndrome. Methods and Materials: From 2002 to 2006, 24 patients with thalamic pain syndrome underwent pituitary radiosurgery at Tokyo Women's Medical University and were followed at least 12 months thereafter. The radiosurgical target was defined as the pituitary gland and its connection with the pituitary stalk. The maximum dose varied from 140 to 180 Gy. Mean follow-up after treatment was 35 months (range, 12-48 months). Results: Initial pain reduction, usually within 48 h after radiosurgery, was marked in 17 patients (71%). However, in the majority of cases the pain recurred within 6 months after treatment, and at the time of the last follow-up examination durable pain control was marked in only 5 patients (21%). Ten patients (42%) had treatment-associated side effects. Anterior pituitary abnormalities were marked in 8 cases and required hormonal replacement therapy in 3; transient diabetes insipidus was observed in 2 cases, transient hyponatremia in 1, and clinical deterioration due to increase of the numbness severity despite significant reduction of pain was seen once. Conclusions: Pituitary radiosurgery for thalamic pain results in a high rate of initial efficacy and is accompanied by acceptable morbidity. It can be used as a primary minimally invasive management option for patients with post-stroke thalamic pain resistant to medical therapy. However, in the majority of cases pain recurrence occurs within 1 year after treatment

  6. Burning mouth syndrome – a common dental problem in perimenopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szponar, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterized by the presence of burning, paresthesia or pain of the oral mucosa in the absence of pathologic lesions revealed during the clinical examination. Moreover, the pain may be accompanied by oral dryness, hypersensitivity to some food compounds and taste disorders. Etiopathogenesis of this condition remains unclear. Potential local causative factors include among the others mechanical irritation, parafunctions and dysfunctions of the stomatognathic system, contact allergy to dental materials and electro-galvanic phenomena. Potential systemic causes include diabetes mellitus, B group vitamin deficiency (vitamins B1, B2, B6 and B12), folic acid and iron deficiency, hormonal imbalance, gastrointestinal diseases, psychiatric and neurological disorders and drug-induced side effects. The hypothesis concerning the role of hormonal changes in the development of BMS seems to be confirmed by a high incidence of this condition in perimenopausal women. Up to now, due to an unclear etiology of the disease, the treatment is very often ineffective and mainly symptomatic, which may exacerbate patient's anxiety and discomfort. In this paper we present the main etiologic factors of the burning mouth syndrome. We discuss the basic diagnostic and therapeutic methods and the influence of hormonal replacement therapy on the course of BMS based on the current medical reports. PMID:26327855

  7. Usage of lidocaine-prilocaine cream in the treatment of postburn pain in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargi, Eksal; Tekerekoğlu, Bülent

    2010-05-01

    Facial burns are quite common among children. Many different wound-covers can be used for dressing burn wounds, which is usually painful for the patients. These covers can also be combined with local anesthetic creams. Lidocaine-prilocaine cream 5% (LPC) is commonly used as a topical anesthetic by physicians performing plastic surgery. In the present study, we investigated the effects of topical LPC on pain cessation in pediatric patients with face burn and compared results with a control group in which LPC was not used in the wound dressing. Thirty pediatric patients (average age 11.3, range 8-15) among those who admitted to our emergency service and plastic surgery outpatient clinic between 2003 and 2006 were included in this study. The patient's burned areas ranged between 1 and 5% percent of their total body surface. The need for analgesic medicine was recorded in the first, second and third 8-hour periods postburn in both groups, and pain level was evaluated at these time points using a verbal rating scale. There was a significant difference between the two groups with respect to values of the first and second 8-hour periods, while in the third 8-hour period, no significant difference was observed. We conclude that topical local anesthetics administered for 16 hours postburn significantly reduce the duration of pain after injury, which suggests a potential use in clinical practice in the treatment of children with face burn. While LPC was found to have an ameliorating effect in the first 16 hours, we recommend oral analgesic co-therapy support since it loses its efficacy in the last 8-hour period.

  8. To review the transient osteoporosis of the hip due to a case report - Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Faruk Şendur

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Transient osteoporosis of hip is a rare disease of unknown etiology. It is usually seen in middle-aged men and women in the third trimester of pregnancy and is associated with hip pain. It typically runs a benign course with eventual resolution of symptoms. In this paper, a male patient with a complaint of left hip pain which was diagnosed as transient osteoporosis of the hip was presented by reviewing current literatures. (Osteoporoz Dünyasından 2006; 12 (1: 15-17

  9. Evaluation of salivary function in patients with burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y C; Hong, I K; Na, S Y; Eun, Y G

    2015-04-01

    To investigate salivary function in patients with primary burning mouth syndrome (BMS) compared with control and to evaluate salivary hypofunction using salivary gland scintigraphy (SGS). A total of 33 patients with primary BMS and 30 control subjects were enrolled in our study. The severity of the pain and the burning sensation on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14) were assessed. Unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rates (SFRs) were measured. (99m) Tc pertechnetate SGS was used to evaluate salivary gland function. Unstimulated SFR in patients with BMS was significantly lower than that in the control group (0.11 ± 0.15 vs 0.21 ± 0.16 ml min(-1) , P = 0.014). There was no significant difference in stimulated SFR between the two groups. The VAS scores for oral pain and burning sensation, the total OHIP-14 score, and salivary gland function by salivary scintigraphy were not significantly different between BMS patients with normal flow rate and hyposalivation. Patients with primary BMS exhibited a significant decrease in unstimulated SFR compared with control group. In addition, we could not find any difference in salivary gland function between BMS patients with or without hyposalivation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The Temporomandibular Pain-Dysfunction Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    feeling in the ear and tinnitus; neuralgia in the distribution of the second and third divisions of the fifth cranial nerve; and headache, pain, or a burning sensation of the tongue. Those who rejected Costen's anatomical explanation"· suggested a disturbance of the TM joint. Since the time of Costen, many theories have been.

  11. Adenoviral gene delivery to primary human cutaneous cells and burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Tobias; von Peter, Sebastian; Dubin, Grzegorz; Mittler, Dominik; Jacobsen, Frank; Lehnhardt, Markus; Eriksson, Elof; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Steinstraesser, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The adenoviral transfer of therapeutic genes into epidermal and dermal cells is an interesting approach to treat skin diseases and to promote wound healing. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro and in vivo transfection efficacy in skin and burn wounds after adenoviral gene delivery. Primary keratinocytes (HKC), fibroblasts (HFB), and HaCaT cells were transfected using different concentrations of an adenoviral construct (eGFP). Transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity was determined up to 30 days. Expression was quantified by FACS analysis and fluorimeter. Cytotoxicity was measured using the trypan blue exclusion method. 45 male Sprague Dawley rats received 2x10(8) pfu of Ad5-CMV-LacZ or carrier control intradermally into either superficial partial thickness scald burn or unburned skin. Animals were euthanized after 48 h, 7 or 14 days posttreatment. Transgene expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry and bioluminescent assays. The highest transfection rate was observed 48 h posttransfection: 79% for HKC, 70% for HFB, and 48% for HaCaT. The eGFP expression was detectable in all groups over 30 days (P>0.05). Cytotoxic effects of the adenoviral vector were observed for HFB after 10 days and HaCaT after 30 days. Reporter gene expression in vivo was significantly higher in burned skin compared with unburned skin (P=0,004). Gene expression decreases from 2 to 7 days with no significant expression after 14 days. This study demonstrates that effective adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of epidermal primary cells and cell-lines is feasible. Ex vivo gene transfer in epithelial cells might have promise for the use in severely burned patients who receive autologous keratinocyte sheets. Transient cutaneous gene delivery in burn wounds using adenoviral vectors causes significant concentrations in the wound tissue for at least 1 week. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that transient cutaneous adenoviral gene delivery of wound healing promoting factors has

  12. Idiopathic facial pain related with dental implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Geon Kwon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain after dental implantation is rare but difficult issue for the implant practitioner. Patients with chronic pain who had been performed previous implant surgery or related surgical intervention sometimes accompany with psychological problem and difficult to adequately manage. According to the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD 3rd eds, Cepalagia 2013, painful neuropathies and other facial pains are subdivided into the 12 subcategories; 13.1. Trigeminal neuralgia; 13.2 Glossopharyngeal neuralgia; 13.3 Nervus intermedius (facial nerve neuralgia; 13.4 Occipital neuralgia; 13.5 Optic neuritis; 13.6 Headache attributed to ischaemic ocular motor nerve palsy; 13.7 Tolosa-Hunt syndrome; 13.8 Paratrigeminal oculo-sympathetic (Raeder’s syndrome; 13.9 Recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy; 13.10 Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS; 13.11 Persistent Idiopathic Facial Pain (PIFP; 13.12 Central neuropathic pain. Chronic orofacial pain after dental implant surgery can be largely into the two main categories that can be frequently encountered in clinical basis ; 1 Neuropathic pain, 2 Idiopathic pain. If there is no direct evidence of the nerve injury related with the implant surgery, the clinician need to consider the central cause of pain instead of the peripheral cause of the pain. There might be several possibilities; 1 Anaesthesia dolorosa, 2 Central post-stroke pain, 3 Facial pain attributed to multiple sclerosis, 4 Persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP, 5 Burning mouth syndrome. In this presentation, Persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP, the disease entity that can be frequently encountered in the clinic would be discussed. Persistent idiopathic facial pain (PIFP can be defined as “persistent facial and/or oral pain, with varying presentations but recurring daily for more than 2 hours per day over more than 3 months, in the absence of clinical neurological deficit”. ‘Atypical’ pain is a diagnosis of

  13. Burns From Hot Wheat Bags: A Public Safety Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Anna; Amprayil, Mathew; Solanki, Nicholas S.; Greenwood, John Edward

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Wheat bags are therapeutic devices that are heated in microwaves and commonly used to provide relief from muscle and joint pain. The Royal Adelaide Hospital Burns Unit has observed a number of patients with significant burn injuries resulting from their use. Despite their dangers, the products come with limited safety information. Methods: Data were collected from the Burns Unit database for all patients admitted with burns due to hot wheat bags from 2004 to 2009. This was analyzed to determine the severity of the burn injury and identify any predisposing factors. An experimental study was performed to measure the temperature of wheat bags when heated to determine their potential for causing thermal injury. Results: 11 patients were admitted with burns due to hot wheat bags. The median age was 52 years and the mean total body surface area was 1.1%. All burns were either deep dermal (45.5%) or full thickness (54.5%). Ten patients required operative management. Predisposing factors (eg, neuropathy) to thermal injury were identified in 7 patients. The experimental study showed that hot wheat bags reached temperatures of 57.3°C (135.1°F) when heated according to instructions, 63.3°C (145.9°F) in a 1000 W microwave and 69.6°C (157.3°F) on reheating. Conclusions: Hot wheat bags cause serious burn injury. When heated improperly, they can reach temperatures high enough to cause epidermal necrosis in a short period of time. Patients with impaired temperature sensation are particularly at risk. There should be greater public awareness of the dangers of wheat bag use and more specific safety warnings on the products. PMID:21915357

  14. Medical management of radiation burns - some experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, G.K.

    2014-01-01

    Localized exposure resulting in radiation burns are serious injuries, seen not only in this country but all over the world. All of these injuries have resulted from accidents in Industrial Radiography (non-destructive testing). In our country all these injuries have occurred in the private sectors who handle these radiography sources. These sources can be of Iridium-192 or Cobalt-60. Some of these accidents have occurred involving trained radiographers but sometimes casual workers have been exposed. Skin is highly vulnerable to the external radiation exposure. Damage of varying extent can be seen following radiotherapy and accidents involving X- and gamma-ray sources. The reaction is related to the absorbed dose, which in turn is dependent upon the energy of radiation and weather it is particulate or electromagnetic radiation. Beta particles give up their energy within a short range and hence are more hazardous. Radiation burns develop slowly and blister formation occurs usually after 4 weeks. After exposure the skin response occurs in the form of transient erythema, fixed erythema, transepidermal burns, full thickness radiation burns and epilation. In radiation accidents, particularly those involving X-ray machines, the patients may not be aware of the time of accident and the dose may not be known in those circumstances. The medical management and treatment of such patients, therefore, has its own challenges. This talk will share some experiences on treatment of radiation injuries. (author)

  15. Burning mouth syndrome: Evaluation of clinical and laboratory findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halac, Gulistan; Tekturk, Pinar; Eroglu, Saliha; Cikrikcioglu, Mehmet Ali; Cimendur, Ozlem; Kilic, Elif; Asil, Talip

    2016-07-30

    Burning mouth syndrome is a chronic and persistent painful condition characterized by burning sensation in the oral mucosa. We investigated the etiological factors of patients presented with the history of burning in the mouth who admitted our outpatient clinics over the 8-years period and who had no underlying identifiable local factors. We also tried to determine their demographic and clinical characteristics. Our aim was to investigate the association between burning mouth and psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety, chronic diseases like diabetes mellitus (DM) and other laboratory studies in patients complaining of solely burning in the mouth. The study included patients with the history of burning in mouth who presented in our outpatient clinic between 2005 and 2012. They were evaluated by a neurologist, a psychiatrist, an internist, and a dentist. Complete blood counts, biochemical analysis and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed for all patients. A total of 26 (22 (84%) females, 4 (15%) males; mean age 55.9 years) patients were enrolled in this study. Five (19.2%) of the patients had depression, 2 (7.7%) had anxiety disorder, 2 (7.7%) had diabetes mellitus, 8 (30%) had B12 vitamin deficiency, 3 (11.5%) had decreased ferritin levels in blood, and 1 (3.8%) had folic acid deficiency. Cranial MRI of all patients were normal. Nine patients (34.6%) had no etiological causes. A multidisciplinary approach in the management of burning mouth and establishment of common criteria for the diagnosis would provide insight into the underlying pathophysiological mechanism.

  16. Two-year follow-up of outcomes related to scarring and distress in children with severe burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzer, Paul; Forbes, Abigail A; Hundeshagen, Gabriel; Andersen, Clark R; Epperson, Kathryn M; Meyer, Walter J; Kamolz, Lars P; Branski, Ludwik K; Suman, Oscar E; Herndon, David N; Finnerty, Celeste C

    2017-08-01

    We assessed the perception of scarring and distress by pediatric burn survivors with burns covering more than one-third of total body surface area (TBSA) for up to 2 years post-burn. Children with severe burns were admitted to our hospital between 2004 and 2012, and consented to this IRB-approved-study. Subjects completed at least one Scars Problems and/or Distress questionnaire between discharge and 24 months post burn. Outcomes were modeled with generalized estimating equations or using mixed linear models. Significance was accepted at p body areas over time (p self-conscious with respect to their body image even 2 years after burn injury. Implications for Rehabilitation According to self-assessment questionnaires, severely burned children perceive significant improvements in scarring and distress during the first 2 years post burn. Significant improvements were seen in reduction of pain, itching, sleeping disturbances, tightness, range of motion, and strength (p body areas. The rehabilitation team should provide access to wigs or other aids to pediatric burn survivors to address these needs.

  17. Correction to: Ephedra Herb extract activates/desensitizes transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and reduces capsaicin-induced pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamori, Shunsuke; Takahashi, Jun; Hyuga, Sumiko; Tanaka-Kagawa, Toshiko; Jinno, Hideto; Hyuga, Masashi; Hakamatsuka, Takashi; Odaguchi, Hiroshi; Goda, Yukihiro; Hanawa, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Yoshinori

    2018-03-01

    The article Ephedra Herb extract activates/desensitizes transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and reduces capsaicin-induced pain, written by Shunsuke Nakamori, Jun Takahashi, Sumiko Hyuga, Toshiko Tanaka-Kagawa, Hideto Jinno, Masashi Hyuga, Takashi Hakamatsuka, Hiroshi Odaguchi, Yukihiro Goda, Toshihiko Hanawa and Yoshinori Kobayashi, was originally published Online First without open access. After publication in volume 71, issue 1, page 105-113 the author decided to opt for Open Choice and to make the article an open access publication. Therefore, the copyright of the article has been changed to © The Author(s) 2018 and the article is forthwith distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ ), which permits use, duplication, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

  18. A Soft Casting Technique for Managing Pediatric Hand and Foot Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Mee; Nederveld, Cindy; Campbell, Kristen; Moulton, Steven

    2018-04-04

    Hand and foot burns in children are difficult to dress. The authors have developed a soft casting technique to manage burns to these areas. The aim of this study is to report the outcomes using weekly dressing changes with a soft casting technique to manage pediatric hand and foot burns in the outpatient setting. A retrospective chart review was performed on children with burns to the hands or feet, who underwent dressing changes with a soft casting technique at the Children's Hospital Colorado Burn Center. Soft casting was performed by placing antibiotic ointment-impregnated nonadherent gauze over the burn wound(s), wrapping the extremity using rolled gauze, applying soft cast pad, plaster, soft cast tape, and an elastic bandage. This was changed weekly. Two hundred ninety-eight children with hand burns had a mean age of 16.8 ± 2 months. Two hundred forty-eight children had partial thickness burn injuries (83%), 50 had full thickness burn injuries (17%), and the mean total body surface area (TBSA) was 1 ± 2.4%. The mean time to heal was 10.1 ± 1.7 days for all subjects. Sixty-six children with foot burns were identified with a mean age of 24 ± 2.6 months. Forty-six children had partial thickness injuries (70%), 20 had full thickness burn injuries (30%), and the mean TBSA was 2.3 ± 2.9%. The mean time to heal was 14.1 ± 2.2 days for all subjects. Weekly dressing changes using a soft casting technique are effective for the outpatient management of pediatric hand and foot burns. This method avoids costly inpatient hospital care, reduces the number of painful dressing changes, and allows children to heal in their own environment.

  19. Transient osteoporosis of hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh M Choudhary

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH in a 50-year-old man including the clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, management, and clinical progress. TOH is a rare self-limiting condition that typically affects middle-aged men or, less frequently, women in the third trimester of pregnancy. Affected individuals present clinically with acute hip pain, limping gait, and limited ranges of hip motion. TOH may begin spontaneously or after a minor trauma. Radiographs are typically unremarkable but magnetic resonance (MR imaging studies yield findings consistent with bone marrow edema. TOH is referred to as regional migratory osteoporosis (RMO if it travels to other joints or the contralateral hip. TOH often resembles osteonecrosis but the two conditions must be differentiated due to different prognoses and management approaches. The term TOH is often used interchangeably and synonymously with transient bone marrow edema (TBME.

  20. Relationship between oxidative stress and "burning mouth syndrome" in female patients: a scientific hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatullo, M; Marrelli, M; Scacco, S; Lorusso, M; Doria, S; Sabatini, R; Auteri, P; Cagiano, R; Inchingolo, F

    2012-09-01

    Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is characterized by burning sensation and pain in the mouth with or without inflammatory signs and specific lesions. Aim of the present study was to investigate about a possible correlation between the Burning Mouth Syndrome and oxidative stress. We recruited 18 healthy female patients between 54 and 68 years of age with a diagnosis of Burning Mouth Syndrome. Oxidative stress assessment was performed by means of an integrated analytical system composed of a photometer and a mini-centrifuge (FRAS4, H and D s.r.l., Parma, Italy). Samples of whole capillary blood were taken by a finger puncture in a heparinized tube and immediately centrifuged; a small amount of samples plasma (10 microL) were thereafter tested for total oxidant capacity (d-ROMs test) and biological antioxidant potential as iron-reducing activity (BAP test) (Diacron International s.r.l., Grosseto, Italy). Our results indicate that female patients affected by Burning Mouth Syndrome show significantly different d-ROMs and BAP levels, similar to those present in oxidative stress condition with respect to the general population. It was also emphasized that, after the most painful phase, the levels representing the present oxidative stress, progressively return to normal, even if still significantly higher 7 days after, with respect to the normal population. No similar study was performed up to now. This study confirms the effectiveness of antioxidant treatments in the patients affected by BMS, in order to prevent or decrease the onset of oxidative stress and the consequent increased risk of oxidative-related systemic diseases.

  1. Evaluation of long term health-related quality of life in extensive burns: a 12-year experience in a burn center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bing; Xiao, Shi-chu; Zhu, Shi-hui; Xia, Zhao-fan

    2012-05-01

    We sought to evaluate the long term health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients survived severely extensive burn and identify their clinical predicting factors correlated with HRQOL. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 20 patients survived more than 2 years with extensive burn involving ≥70% total body surface area (TBSA) between 1997 and 2009 in a burn center in Shanghai. Short Form-36 Medical Outcomes Survey (SF-36), Brief Version of Burn Specific Health Scale (BSHS-B) and Michigan Hand Outcome Questionnaire (MHQ) were used for the present evaluation. SF-36 scores were compared with a healthy Chinese population, and linear correlation analysis was performed to screen the clinical relating factors predicting physical and mental component summary (PCS and MCS) scores from SF-36. HRQOL scores from SF-36 were significantly lower in the domains of physical functioning, role limitations due to physical problems, pain, social functioning and role limitations due to emotional problems compared with population norms. Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that only return to work (RTW) predicted improved PCS. While age at injury, facial burns, skin grafting and length of hospital stay were correlated with MCS. Work, body image and heat sensitivity obtained the lowest BSHS-B scores in all 9 domains. Improvements of HRQOL could still be seen in BSHS-B scores in domains of simple abilities, hand function, work and affect even after a quite long interval between burns and testing. Hand function of extensive burn patients obtained relatively poor MHQ scores, especially in those without RTW. Patients with extensive burns have a poorer quality of life compared with that of general population. Relatively poor physical and psychological problems still exist even after a long period. Meanwhile, a trend of gradual improvements was noted. This information will aid clinicians in decision-making of comprehensive systematic regimens for long term rehabilitation

  2. Burning mouth syndrome – a common dental problem in perimenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzanna Ślebioda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is characterized by the presence of burning, paresthesia or pain of the oral mucosa in the absence of pathologic lesions revealed during the clinical examination [1-3]. Moreover, the pain may be accompanied by oral dryness, hypersensitivity to some food compounds and taste disorders [4-6]. Etiopathogenesis of this condition remains unclear. Potential local causative factors include among the others mechanical irritation, parafunctions and dysfunctions of the stomatognathic system, contact allergy to dental materials and electro-galvanic phenomena. Potential systemic causes include diabetes mellitus, B group vitamin deficiency (vitamins B1, B2, B6 and B12, folic acid and iron deficiency, hormonal imbalance, gastrointestinal diseases, psychiatric and neurological disorders and drug-induced side effects. The hypothesis concerning the role of hormonal changes in the development of BMS seems to be confirmed by a high incidence of this condition in perimenopausal women [2, 7, 8]. Up to now, due to an unclear etiology of the disease, the treatment is very often ineffective and mainly symptomatic, which may exacerbate patient’s anxiety and discomfort. In this paper we present the main etiologic factors of the burning mouth syndrome. We discuss the basic diagnostic and therapeutic methods and the influence of hormonal replacement therapy on the course of BMS based on the current medical reports.

  3. Risk of Incidence of Hock Burn and Pododermatitis in Broilers Reared under Commercial Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, FG; Baracho, MS; Nääs, IA; Lima, NSD; Salgado, DD; Souza, R

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The most common lesions observed in commercial broiler farms are hock burns and pododermatitis, defined as necrotic lesions on the plantar surface of the footpads and in the hock of growing broilers, causing pain and compromising broiler welfare. The present study aimed at identifying the risks of hock burns and pododermatitis in broilers reared under commercial conditions on new or reused litter. Twenty-four 40-d-old broilers reared in two houses in a commercial broiler farm. The pl...

  4. Nurses' emotional experience of caring for children with burns.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hilliard, Carol

    2012-02-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this phenomenological study was to explore the emotions experienced by children\\'s nurses when caring for children with burns, in addition to ascertaining how the nurses dealt with these emotions. BACKGROUND: The nature of nursing practice is such that it inevitably generates some form of emotional response in nurses. The literature reveals that the manner nurses deal with their emotional experiences can impact on their nursing care. DESIGN: The study used Husserlian phenomenology to explore the emotional experiences of eight purposively selected children\\'s nurses who have worked on the burns unit of an Irish paediatric hospital. METHODS: Data were collected using in-depth, unstructured interviews and analysed using Colaizzi\\'s seven stage framework. RESULTS: The phenomenon of participants\\' emotional experiences is captured in four themes: (1) caring for children with burns, (2) supporting parents, (3) sustaining nurses\\' emotional well-being, and (4) learning to be a burns nurse. Nursing children with burns generated a myriad of emotions for participants. Burns dressing-changes, managing burn-related pain, supporting parents and the impact of busy workloads on the emotional care of children and their parents emerged as the most emotionally challenging aspects of participants\\' role. Participants recognised the need to manage their emotional responses and spoke of the benefits of a supportive nursing team. CONCLUSIONS: The findings offer insights into both the rewarding and challenging aspects of nursing children with burns. Nurses in this environment must be supported to recognise and manage their emotional responses to their work. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Helping nurses to manage the emotional consequences of their work will help to sustain their emotional well-being, enhance the care received by children and also enable nurses to support parents in their role as partners in care.

  5. Making of a burn unit: SOA burn center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant Kumar Dash

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Each year in India, burn injuries account for more than 6 million hospital emergency department visits; of which many require hospitalization and are referred to specialized burn centers. There are few burn surgeons and very few burn centers in India. In our state, Odisha, there are only two burn centers to cater to more than 5000 burn victims per year. This article is an attempt to share the knowledge that I acquired while setting up a new burn unit in a private medical college of Odisha.

  6. [Psychiatric co-morbidity, body image problems and psychotherapeutic interventions for burn survivors: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Stefanie; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver; de Zwaan, Martina

    2013-11-01

    Due to progress in burn treatment, more patients even with severe burn injuries survive. Despite this positive development, however, there are still negative somatic and mental consequences. These include the life-long care of scars and pain. In addition, posttraumatic-stress disorder and depression are common consequences. Also distress due to disfigurement and body image problems have to be considered, since this is likely to result in social withdrawal, low self-esteem, and reduction of quality of life. Overall, the impact of mental strain on burn victims is quite high. Therefore, psychotherapeutic treatment approaches should be integrated into the care of patients with burns. This might be helpful for both coping and compliance with long-term treatment. This paper provides a review of the mental co-morbidity of burn victims and of psychotherapeutic treatment approaches focusing on changes in body image and the respective social consequences. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. The implementation and evaluation of therapeutic touch in burn patients: an instructive experience of conducting a scientific study within a non-academic nursing setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Martine; Visser, Adriaan; Eybrechts, Maggie; van Komen, Rob; Oen, Irma; Olff, Miranda; Dokter, Jan; Boxma, Han

    2012-12-01

    Evaluation of therapeutic touch (TT) in the nursing of burn patients; post hoc evaluation of the research process in a non-academic nursing setting. 38 burn patients received either TT or nursing presence. On admission, days 2, 5 and 10 of hospitalization, data were collected on anxiety for pain, salivary cortisol, and pain medication. Interviews with nurses were held concerning research in a non-academic setting. Anxiety for pain was more reduced on day 10 in the TT-group. The TT-group was prescribed less morphine on day 1 and 2. On day 2 cortisol level before dressing changes was higher in the TT-group. The situational challenges of this study led to inconsistencies in data collection and a high patient attrition rate, weakening its statistical power. Conducting an effect study within daily nursing practice should not be done with a nursing staff inexperienced in research. Analysis of the remaining data justifies further research on TT for burn patients with pain, anxiety for pain, and cortisol levels as outcomes. Administering and evaluating TT during daily care requires nurses experienced both in TT and research, thus leading to less attrition and missing data, increasing the power of future studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Towards Development of a Dermal Pain Model: In Vitro Activation of Rat and Human Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin Repeat 1 and Safe Dermal Injection of o-Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile to Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annas, Anita; Berg, Anna-Lena; Nyman, Eva; Meijer, Thomas; Lundgren, Viveka; Franzén, Bo; Ståhle, Lars

    2015-12-01

    During clinical development of analgesics, it is important to have access to pharmacologically specific human pain models. o-Chlorobenzylidene malononitrile (CS) is a selective and potent agonist of the transient receptor potential ankyrin repeat 1 (TRPA1), which is a transducer molecule in nociceptors sensing reactive chemical species. While CS has been subject to extensive toxicological investigations in animals and human beings, its effects on intradermal or subcutaneous injection have not previously been reported. We have investigated the potential of CS to be used as an agonist on TRPA1 in human experimental pain studies. A calcium influx assay was used to confirm the capacity of CS to activate TRPA1 with >100,000 times the selectivity over the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1. CS dose-dependently (EC50 0.9 μM) released calcitonin gene-related peptide in rat dorsal root ganglion cultures, supporting involvement in pain signalling. In a local tolerance study, injection of a single intradermal dose of 20 mM CS to rats resulted in superficial, circular crusts at the injection sites after approximately 4 days. The histopathology evaluation revealed a mild, acute inflammatory reaction in the epidermis and dermis at the intradermal CS injection site 1 day after administration. After 14 days, the epidermal epithelium was fully restored. The symptoms were not considered to be adverse, and it is suggested that doses up to 20 μL of 20 mM CS can be safely administered to human beings. In conclusion, our data support development of a CS human dermal pain model. © 2015 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  9. The Significance of Brain Transcranial Sonography in Burning Mouth Syndrome: a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavoreo, Iris; Vučićević, Vanja; Boras; Zadravec, Dijana; Bašić, Vanja; Kes; Ciliga, Dubravka; Gabrić, Dragana

    2017-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic disorder which is affecting mostly postmenopausal women and is characterized by burning symptoms in the oral cavity on the clinically healthy oral mucosa. Also, the results of previous studies suggested a possible role of peripheral and/or central neurological disturbances in these patients. The aim of this study was to analyze patients with burning mouth syndrome using transcranial sonography. By use of transcranial sonography of the brain parenchyma, substantia nigra , midbrain raphe and brain nucleus were evaluated in 20 patients with BMS (64.7±12.3 years) and 20 controls with chronic pain in the lumbosacral region (61.5±15). Statistical analysis was performed by use of Student t test with significance set at pburning mouth syndrome might reflect central disturbances within this syndrome. Burning Mouth Syndrome; Transcranial Sonography; substantia nigra; Midbrain Raphe Nuclei; Red Nucleus.

  10. Analgesic and antisympathetic effects of clonidine in burn patients, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostadalipour Abbas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Unlike most other Analgesic drugs, α2 adrenoceptor agonists are capable of producing analgesia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Analgesic and antisympathetic effects of clonidine, an α2 adrenoceptor agonist in burn patients. Materials and Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial performed on one hundred burn patients in Zarea Hospital, Mazandaran, Iran from august 2004 to July 2005. All patients divided in two groups. Case group (n=50 received oral clonidine, 3.3μg/kg TDS and controls (n=50 received placebo. Heart rate and systolic blood pressure and pain severity Visual analogue score (VAS, were recorded after clonidine administration. Statistical analysis was done by means of Mann Witney U test. Results: 50 patients (mean age 28.96±10 years in case group, and 50 patients (mean age 27.60±11.4 years in control group were studied. VAS pain scores and heart rate in the clonidine group were significantly lower than the control group (P< 0.0001, P< 0.02.there were no significant difference in systolic blood pressure between the two groups on the first and second day but on third day the systolic blood pressure in clonidine group, was lower than controls significantly (P=0.002. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the use of oral clonidine affects the hemodynamic response to pain in burn patients. Our study demonstrated that clonidine can produce good analgesia and decreased in sympathetic over activity in burn patients, and also reduce opioid dose requirements.

  11. [Surgical treatment of burns : Special aspects of pediatric burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bührer, G; Beier, J P; Horch, R E; Arkudas, A

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of pediatric burn patients is very important because of the sheer frequency of burn wounds and the possible long-term ramifications. Extensive burns need special care and are treated in specialized burn centers. The goal of this work is to present current standards in burn therapy and important innovations in the treatment of burns in children so that the common and small area burn wounds and scalds in pediatric patients in day-to-day dermatological practice can be adequately treated. Analysis of current literature, discussion of reviews, incorporation of current guidelines. Burns in pediatric patients are common. Improvement of survival can be achieved by treatment in burn centers. The assessment of burn depth and area is an important factor for proper treatment. We give an overview for outpatient treatment of partial thickness burns. New methods may result in better long-term outcome. Adequate treatment of burn injuries considering current literature and guidelines improves patient outcome. Rational implementation of new methods is recommended.

  12. Third degree skin burns caused by a MRI conditional electrocardiographic monitoring system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brix L

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Two unusual cases of third degree skin burns are reported using MRI approved electrocardiographic leads. This is very uncommon as it is most often the electrodes which are the source of heat related issues. Both patients were sedated due to pain related issues of their lower spine. The burns were caused by a combination of using a 3 Tesla MRI scanner and the inability to cry out during scanning. We would like to bring forward a message that even when using MRI conditional equipment, clinical staff must be extremely careful in order to secure safe image acquisition using MRI.

  13. Phenytoin Cream for the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain: Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Kopsky

    2018-05-01

    minutes after the test application, the mean pain reduction on the NRS in the areas where the phenytoin 10% cream and the placebo cream were applied was 3.3 (CI: 2.3 to 4.4, p < 0.01 and 1.1 (CI: 0.4 to 1.9, p < 0.05, respectively. In all 16 patients, the phenytoin plasma levels were below the limit of detection. So far, no systemic side effects were reported. Two patients only reported local side effects: a transient burning aggravation and skin rash. CONCLUSION: In this case series, the phenytoin cream had reduced neuropathic pain considerably, with a fast onset of analgesic effect.

  14. [The treatment of the phantom pain syndrome with tizanidine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobeĭchik, Ia M; Kukushkin, M L; Reshetniak, V K; Ovechkin, A M; Gnezdilov, A V

    1997-01-01

    The authors carried out estimation of analgetic effect of tisanidin by double blind test in patients with phantom limb pain syndrome. 14 patients took the medicine in a dose of 12 mg/day and 5 patients took placebo at the same dose. Characteristics and intensity of pain were estimated in accordance with McGill pain questionnaire and visual analogue scale. Pain possessed more than one sensory characteristics in the majority of patients. Tisanidin had a significant analgetic influence on all type of phantom limb pain: "neuralgic"--acute, shooting, transitory, "causalgic"--hot, burning, searing, "cramping" pain. Pain sensation did not decrease only in one of 14 patients treated with tisanidin. The authors explain the effectivity of the drug for treatment of phantom limb pain of different sensory modality by variety of the mechanisms of its therapeutic action, the capacity to decrease the releasing of excitatory neurotransmitter amino acids and the influence on alpha 2-adrenoceptors.

  15. Effect of a local anesthetic lozenge in relief of symptoms in burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treldal, C; Jacobsen, C B; Mogensen, S; Rasmussen, M; Jacobsen, J; Petersen, J; Lynge Pedersen, A M; Andersen, O

    2016-03-01

    Patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS) often represent a clinical challenge as available agents for symptomatic treatment are few and often ineffective. The aim was to evaluate the effect of a bupivacaine lozenge on oral mucosal pain, xerostomia, and taste alterations in patients with BMS. Eighteen patients (4 men and 14 women) aged 39-71 years with BMS were included in this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. Lozenges (containing bupivacaine or placebo) were administrated three times a day for 2 weeks for two separate treatment periods. Assessment of oral mucosal pain, xerostomia, and taste alterations was performed in a patient diary on a visual analog scale (ranging from 0 to 100 mm) before and after the lozenge was dissolved. The bupivacaine lozenge significantly reduced the burning oral pain (P < 0.001), increased the sense of taste disturbances (P < 0.001), and had no impact on xerostomia, when adjusted for the treatment period. Our results indicate that the bupivacaine lozenge offers a novel therapeutic modality to patients with BMS, although without alleviating effect on the associated symptoms, taste alterations, and xerostomia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Pathophysiology of primary burning mouth syndrome with special focus on taste dysfunction: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkka-Palomaa, M; Jääskeläinen, S K; Laine, M A; Teerijoki-Oksa, T; Sandell, M; Forssell, H

    2015-11-01

    Primary burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic oral condition characterized by burning pain often accompanied with taste dysfunction and xerostomia. The most compelling evidence concerning BMS pathophysiology comes from studies on the somatosensory system using neurophysiologic or psychophysical methods such as blink reflex, thermal quantitative sensory testing, as well as functional brain imaging. They have provided convincing evidence for neuropathic involvement at several levels of the somatosensory system in BMS pain pathophysiology. The number of taste function studies trying to substantiate the subjective taste disturbances or studies on salivary factors in BMS is much more limited, and most of them suffer from definitional and methodological problems. This review aims to critically evaluate the existing literature on the pathophysiology of BMS, paying special attention to the correctness of case selection and the methodology used in published studies, and to summarize the current state of knowledge. Based on the recognition of several gaps in the current understanding of the pathophysiology of BMS especially as regards taste and pain system interactions, the review ends with future scenarios for research in this area. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Pharmacological treatment of diabetic neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard S; Argoff, Charles E

    2011-03-26

    Neuropathic pain continues to be a difficult and challenging clinical issue to deal with effectively. Painful diabetic polyneuropathy is a complex pain condition that occurs with reasonable frequency in the population and it may be extremely difficult for clinicians to provide patients with effective analgesia. Chronic neuropathic pain may occur in approximately one of every four diabetic patients. The pain may be described as burning or a deep-seated ache with sporadic paroxysms of lancinating painful exacerbations. The pain is often constant, moderate to severe in intensity, usually primarily involves the feet and generally tends to worsen at night. Treatment may be multimodal but largely involves pharmacological approaches. Pharmacological therapeutic options include antidepressants (tricyclic antidepressants, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors), α2δ ligands and topical (5%) lidocaine patch. Other agents may be different antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, topiramate), topical capsaicin, tramadol and other opioids. Progress continues with respect to understanding various mechanisms that may contribute to painful diabetic neuropathy. Agents that may hold some promise include neurotrophic factors, growth factors, immunomodulators, gene therapy and poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase inhibitors. It is hoped that in the future clinicians will be able to assess patient pathophysiology, which may help them to match optimal therapeutic agents to target individual patient aberrant mechanisms.

  18. MR imaging of transient synovitis: differentiation from septic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.J.; Im, S.A.; Lim, G.Y.; Chun, H.J.; Jung, N.Y.; Sung, M.S.; Choi, B.G.

    2006-01-01

    Transient synovitis is the most common cause of acute hip pain in children. However, MR imaging findings in transient synovitis and the role of MR imaging in differentiating transient synovitis from septic arthritis have not been fully reported. To describe the MR findings of transient synovitis and to determine whether the MR characteristics can differentiate this disease entity from septic arthritis. Clinical findings and MR images of 49 patients with transient synovitis (male/female 36/13, mean age 6.1 years) and 18 patients with septic arthritis (male/female 10/8, mean age 4.9 years) were retrospectively reviewed. MR findings of transient synovitis were symptomatic joint effusion, synovial enhancement, contralateral joint effusion, synovial thickening, and signal intensity (SI) alterations and enhancement in surrounding soft tissue. Among these, SI alterations and enhancement in bone marrow and soft tissue, contralateral joint effusion, and synovial thickening were statistically significant MR findings in differentiating transient synovitis from septic arthritis. The statistically significant MR findings in transient synovitis are contralateral (asymptomatic) joint effusions and the absence of SI abnormalities of the bone marrow. It is less common to have SI alterations and contrast enhancement of the soft tissues. The statistically significant MR findings in septic arthritis are SI alterations of the bone marrow, and SI alterations and contrast enhancement of the soft tissue. Ipsilateral effusion and synovial thickening and enhancement are present in both diseases

  19. Central poststroke pain: somatosensory abnormalities and the presence of associated myofascial pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Oliveira Rogério Adas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central post-stroke pain (CPSP is a neuropathic pain syndrome associated with somatosensory abnormalities due to central nervous system lesion following a cerebrovascular insult. Post-stroke pain (PSP refers to a broader range of clinical conditions leading to pain after stroke, but not restricted to CPSP, including other types of pain such as myofascial pain syndrome (MPS, painful shoulder, lumbar and dorsal pain, complex regional pain syndrome, and spasticity-related pain. Despite its recognition as part of the general PSP diagnostic possibilities, the prevalence of MPS has never been characterized in patients with CPSP patients. We performed a cross-sectional standardized clinical and radiological evaluation of patients with definite CPSP in order to assess the presence of other non-neuropathic pain syndromes, and in particular, the role of myofascial pain syndrome in these patients. Methods CPSP patients underwent a standardized sensory and motor neurological evaluation, and were classified according to stroke mechanism, neurological deficits, presence and profile of MPS. The Visual Analogic Scale (VAS, McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ, and Beck Depression Scale (BDS were filled out by all participants. Results Forty CPSP patients were included. Thirty-six (90.0% had one single ischemic stroke. Pain presented during the first three months after stroke in 75.0%. Median pain intensity was 10 (5 to 10. There was no difference in pain intensity among the different lesion site groups. Neuropathic pain was continuous-ongoing in 34 (85.0% patients and intermittent in the remainder. Burning was the most common descriptor (70%. Main aggravating factors were contact to cold (62.5%. Thermo-sensory abnormalities were universal. MPS was diagnosed in 27 (67.5% patients and was more common in the supratentorial extra-thalamic group (P Conclusions The presence of MPS is not an exception after stroke and may present in association with CPSP

  20. [Assessment of the use of racemic ketamine and its S(+) isomer, associated or not with low doses of fentanyl, in balneotherapy for major burn patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantinho, Fernando Antônio de Freitas; Silva, Antonio Carlos Pereira da

    2009-01-01

    The care of the wounds of major burn patients triggers severe painful stimuli. The objective of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of different drug combinations in anesthesia for balneotherapy. After approval by the Ethics Commission, 200 procedures of balneotherapy in 87 major burn adult patients were evaluated. Midazolam was used in all cases. The vials of ketamine were numbered and, therefore, at the time of the use, one did not know whether racemic or S(+)ketamine was being used. Each morning it was decided by drawing lots whether fentanyl would be used or not in the procedures of that day. Patients were included in one of four groups: ISO/sf (S(+) isomer without fentanyl), ISO/cf (S(+) isomer with fentanyl), RAC/sf (racemic ketamine without fentanyl), and RAC/cf (racemic ketamine with fentanyl). The initial doses proposed were as follows: midazolam, 0.06 mg.kg-1; ketamine, 1.0 to 1.1 mg.kg-1; and fentanyl, 0.8 (1/4)g.kg1-1; additional doses were administered as needed. Only one patient recalled the pain of balneotherapy. In the group that received S(+)ketamine, the use of fentanyl did not bring additional advantages; however, when associated with racemic ketamine, fentanyl reduced the total dose and the number of ketamine boluses. The extension of body surface burned was the main determinant of the severity of post-procedure pain. Reduced pain severity was the main factor considered by patients when grading their satisfaction with the anesthesia. The four different drug combinations proved to be safe and guaranteed the absence of pain during balneotherapy. Characteristics not directly related to the anesthetics proved to be more important in the incidence of post-procedure pain, which was the main factor considered by major burn patient to define their satisfaction with the anesthesia used.

  1. Pain perception description after advanced surface ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobas EM

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Eva M Sobas,1,2 Sebastián Videla,3,4 Amanda Vázquez,1 Itziar Fernández,1,5 Miguel J Maldonado,1 José-Carlos Pastor1,6,7 1Instituto Universitario de Oftalmobiología Aplicada (IOBA, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain; 2Facultad de Enfermería, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid Spain; 3Laboratorios Dr. Esteve S.A., Barcelona, Spain; 4Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud y de la Vida, Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain; 5Networking Research Center on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN, Valladolid, Spain; 6Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Clínico Universitario, Valladolid, Spain; 7Department of Surgery, Ophthalmology, Otorhinolaryngology and Physiotherapy, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid, Spain Purpose: The objective of this study was to characterize the evolution of ocular pain after advanced surface ablation (ASA to improve strategies in postoperative pain management.Methods: This was a multicenter, prospective, descriptive, cohort study. The inclusion criteria were healthy individuals ≥18 years old receiving bilateral alcohol-assisted surface ablation with epithelial removal. Pain intensity was evaluated with the visual analog scale (VAS and the numeric pain rating scale before and after surgery. Comorbidities (photophobia, burning, tearing, and foreign body sensation and Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD questionnaire were evaluated before and at 6 hours after surgery. Postoperative treatments included cold patch, topical cold antibiotics, topical steroids, and benzodiazepines.Results: Thirty-two consecutive patients having similar profiles of postoperative pain evolution were included. At 0.5 hour after ASA, the pain score by VAS was 37±20 mm, and the maximum pain, 61±31 mm, occurred at 24 hours. Afterward, it decreased progressively until 72 hours after surgery (19±20 mm. Most patients (81% scored >60 mm, and

  2. Effect of peripheral morphine in a human model of acute inflammatory pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillesø, J; Hammer, N A; Pedersen, J L

    2000-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the presence of opioid inducible receptors on peripheral nerves and peripheral antinociceptive effects of opioids. However, the effects of peripheral opioid administration in man are controversial. Our study used a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, th......Several studies have demonstrated the presence of opioid inducible receptors on peripheral nerves and peripheral antinociceptive effects of opioids. However, the effects of peripheral opioid administration in man are controversial. Our study used a randomized, double-blind, placebo......-controlled, three-way crossover design in a human model of acute inflammatory pain (heat injury). We studied 18 healthy volunteers who each received morphine locally (2 mg), morphine systemically (2 mg), or placebo on three separate study days. The subjects received morphine infiltration subcutaneously (s.c.). 1 h......, but local morphine infiltration neither reduced pain during the burn, nor primary or secondary hyperalgesia to mechanical and heat stimuli after the burn. In conclusion, peripherally applied morphine had no acute antinociceptive effects in this human model of acute inflammatory pain....

  3. Bilateral CT-guided percutaneous cordotomy for cancer pain relief

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yegul, I. E-mail: iyegul@med.ege.edu.tr; Erhan, E. E-mail: elvanerhan@yahoo.com

    2003-11-01

    AIM: CT-guided percutaneous cordotomy is a useful procedure for treating unilateral cancer pain, however, bilateral cordotomy can be required on some occasions. We evaluated the effectiveness and complications of bilateral cordotomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two hundred and thirty-four patients who suffered from unilateral cancer pain underwent CT-guided percutaneous cordotomy. The procedure was repeated in 22 patients, and nine patients had bilateral cordotomy. Effectiveness and complications were recorded after each procedure. RESULTS: Of nine patents (three women and six men) having bilateral percutaneous cordotomy in our study, four patients had mirror pain after the first procedure. In the remaining five patients the contralateral pain was due to new pain sites. The pain scores before and after the first procedure were 9.3 (range 7-10) and 1.2 (range 0-3), respectively. After the first procedure complete or satisfactory pain relief was achieved in all patients. The duration between the two procedures ranged from 7-243 days (mean 59.8 days). The pain scores before and after the second procedure were 8.4 (range 5-10) and 1.6 (range 0-4), respectively. After the second procedure complete or satisfactory pain relief was reported in all patients. There were no complications in four patients. One patient developed transient motor deficit after the first procedure. Other complications (nausea/vomiting, headache, ipsilateral neck pain, postcordotomy dysesthesia) were mild and transient. CONCLUSION: CT-guided percutaneous cordotomy is a useful procedure for the treatment of severe unilateral cancer pain syndromes. The procedure can be repeated on the other side at least 1 week later. These results show that the success on the second side appears to be similar to the first side with low complication rate for both procedures.

  4. Bilateral CT-guided percutaneous cordotomy for cancer pain relief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yegul, I.; Erhan, E.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: CT-guided percutaneous cordotomy is a useful procedure for treating unilateral cancer pain, however, bilateral cordotomy can be required on some occasions. We evaluated the effectiveness and complications of bilateral cordotomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two hundred and thirty-four patients who suffered from unilateral cancer pain underwent CT-guided percutaneous cordotomy. The procedure was repeated in 22 patients, and nine patients had bilateral cordotomy. Effectiveness and complications were recorded after each procedure. RESULTS: Of nine patents (three women and six men) having bilateral percutaneous cordotomy in our study, four patients had mirror pain after the first procedure. In the remaining five patients the contralateral pain was due to new pain sites. The pain scores before and after the first procedure were 9.3 (range 7-10) and 1.2 (range 0-3), respectively. After the first procedure complete or satisfactory pain relief was achieved in all patients. The duration between the two procedures ranged from 7-243 days (mean 59.8 days). The pain scores before and after the second procedure were 8.4 (range 5-10) and 1.6 (range 0-4), respectively. After the second procedure complete or satisfactory pain relief was reported in all patients. There were no complications in four patients. One patient developed transient motor deficit after the first procedure. Other complications (nausea/vomiting, headache, ipsilateral neck pain, postcordotomy dysesthesia) were mild and transient. CONCLUSION: CT-guided percutaneous cordotomy is a useful procedure for the treatment of severe unilateral cancer pain syndromes. The procedure can be repeated on the other side at least 1 week later. These results show that the success on the second side appears to be similar to the first side with low complication rate for both procedures

  5. Effects of fluoxetine on changes of pain sensitivity in chronic stress model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Yan-Na; Chang, Jin-Long; Lu, Qi; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Feng-Min

    2017-06-09

    Exposure to stress could facilitate or inhibit pain responses (stress-induced hyperalgesia or hypoalgesia, respectively). Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor antidepressant. There have been contradictory reports on whether fluoxetine produces antinociceptive effects. The purpose of this study was to elucidate changes in pain sensitivity after chronic stress exposure, and the effects of fluoxetine on these changes. We measured thermal, mechanical, and formalin-induced acute and inflammatory pain by using the tail-flick, von Frey, and formalin tests respectively. The results showed that rats exposed to chronic stress exhibited thermal and formalin-induced acute and inflammatory hypoalgesia and transient mechanical hyperalgesia. Furthermore, fluoxetine promoted hypoalgesia in thermal and inflammatory pain and induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Our results indicate that the 5-HT system could be involved in hypoalgesia of thermal and inflammatory pain and induce transient mechanical hyperalgesia after stress exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Duloxetine Plasma Concentrations and Its Effectiveness in the Treatment of Nonorganic Chronic Pain in the Orofacial Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Nagashima, Wataru; Tokura, Tatsuya; Yoshida, Keizo; Umemura, Eri; Miyauchi, Tomoya; Arao, Munetaka; Ito, Mikiko; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Kurita, Kenichi; Ozaki, Norio

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the pain-relieving effects of duloxetine and its plasma concentrations in patients with burning mouth syndrome and atypical odontalgia characterized by chronic nonorganic pain in the orofacial region. We administered duloxetine to 77 patients diagnosed as having burning mouth syndrome or atypical odontalgia for 12 weeks. The initial dose of duloxetine was established as 20 mg/d and was increased to 40 mg/d after week 2. We evaluated pain using the visual analog scale and depressive symptoms using the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale at weeks 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 and measured plasma concentrations of duloxetine 12 weeks after the start of its administration. Visual analog scale scores were significantly lower 12 weeks after than at the start of the administration of duloxetine (paired t test, t = 6.65, P pain in patients with chronic nonorganic pain in the orofacial region. However, no relationship was observed between its pain-relieving effects and plasma concentrations.

  7. The Effects of Yin, Yang and Qi in the Skin on Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, James David

    2016-01-29

    The most effective and safe treatment site for pain is in the skin. This chapter discusses the reasons to treat pain in the skin. Pain is sensed in the skin through transient receptor potential cation channels and other receptors. These receptors have endogenous agonists (yang) and antagonists (yin) that help the body control pain. Acupuncture works through modulation of these receptor activities (qi) in the skin; as do moxibustion and liniments. The treatment of pain in the skin has the potential to save many lives and improve pain therapy in most patients.

  8. The Effects of Yin, Yang and Qi in the Skin on Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James David Adams

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The most effective and safe treatment site for pain is in the skin. This chapter discusses the reasons to treat pain in the skin. Pain is sensed in the skin through transient receptor potential cation channels and other receptors. These receptors have endogenous agonists (yang and antagonists (yin that help the body control pain. Acupuncture works through modulation of these receptor activities (qi in the skin; as do moxibustion and liniments. The treatment of pain in the skin has the potential to save many lives and improve pain therapy in most patients.

  9. Neurovascular Unit in Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Mihaela Radu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a debilitating condition with major socioeconomic impact, whose neurobiological basis is still not clear. An involvement of the neurovascular unit (NVU has been recently proposed. In particular, the blood-brain barrier (BBB and blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB, two NVU key players, may be affected during the development of chronic pain; in particular, transient permeabilization of the barrier is suggested by several inflammatory- and nerve-injury-based pain models, and we argue that the clarification of molecular BBB/BSCB permeabilization events will shed new light in understanding chronic pain mechanisms. Possible biases in experiments supporting this theory and its translational potentials are discussed. Moving beyond an exclusive focus on the role of the endothelium, we propose that our understanding of the mechanisms subserving chronic pain will benefit from the extension of research efforts to the NVU as a whole. In this view, the available evidence on the interaction between analgesic drugs and the NVU is here reviewed. Chronic pain comorbidities, such as neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, are also discussed in view of NVU changes, together with innovative pharmacological solutions targeting NVU components in chronic pain treatment.

  10. Corticostriatal Regulation of Acute Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Martinez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms for acute pain regulation in the brain are not well understood. The prefrontal cortex (PFC provides top-down control of emotional processes, and it projects to the nucleus accumbens (NAc. This corticostriatal projection forms an important regulatory pathway within the brain’s reward system. Recently, this projection has been suggested to control both sensory and affective phenotypes specifically associated with chronic pain. As this projection is also known to play a role in the transition from acute to chronic pain, we hypothesized that this corticostriatal circuit can also exert a modulatory function in the acute pain state. Here, we used optogenetics to specifically target the projection from the PFC to the NAc. We tested sensory pain behaviors with Hargreaves’ test and mechanical allodynia, and aversive pain behaviors with conditioned place preference (CPP test. We found that the activation of this corticostriatal circuit gave rise to bilateral relief from peripheral nociceptive inputs. Activation of this circuit also provided important control for the aversive response to transient noxious stimulations. Hence, our results support a novel role for corticostriatal circuitry in acute pain regulation.

  11. Self-injury, converting emotional distress into physical pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhl, Bo; Rubæk, Lotte

    2017-01-01

    Self-inflicted pain by cutting, hitting or burning oneself has become a common way to regulate emotions and to serve as coping strategy. 21.5-32% of adolescents in non-clinical populations have a history of non-suicidal self-injury. Non-suicidal self-injury has a momentarily relieving effect...

  12. A diagnostic and therapeutic approach to primary burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam-Kia, Siamak; Fazel, Nasim

    Primary burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is an oral mucosal disorder that is characterized by a chronic and often debilitating intraoral burning sensation for which no localized or systemic cause can be found. BMS most commonly affects postmenopausal women. The pathophysiology of primary BMS is not well understood. Diagnosing BMS can prove to be challenging. BMS patients can also pose a therapeutic challenge to clinicians who are consulted to evaluate these patients. Most commonly used therapies include tricyclic antidepressants, α-lipoic acid, clonazepam, and cognitive-behavioral therapy. Clinical judgment, patient counseling, and monitoring of pain are important. Further research is required to assess the effectiveness of serotonin and newer serotonin-noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Transient Osteoporosis of the Hip: A Case Report - Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Bahadır

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Transient osteoporosis is a process in which peri-articuler osteoporosis occurs, with cartilage remaining intact. A painful disease, it is more common in males than females, may be migratory and is self-limited, with complete resolution of symptoms and all imaging findings. Characterized by pain and functional limitation mainly affecting weight-bearing joints of the lower limbs. Routine laboratory investigations are unremarkable. Middle aged men and women during the last months of pregnancy or in the immediate post-partum period are principally affected. Diagnosis is made upon clinical presentation and x-ray evidence of diffuse osteopenia in the affected bone area followed by spontaneous healing after several months. Magnetic resonance imaging and techneticum-99 bone scan may be helpful in diagnosis especially in early phase of the disease. In this case report 41 year old male patient who had transient osteoporosis of the hip was evaluated in the light of relevant literature. (From the World of Osteoporosis 2007;13:19-22

  14. An investigation into fuel pulverization with specific reference to high burn-up LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagnik, Suresh; Turnbull, James; Noirot, Jean; Walker, Clive; Hallstadius, Lars; Waeckel, N.; Blanpain, P.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the phenomenon of high burn-up fuel pellet material potentially disintegrating into powder under a rapid temperature transient, such as in a LOCA-type accident scenario, two independent scoping studies were commissioned. The first was to investigate the effect of hydrostatic restraint pressure on Fission Gas Release (FGR) from small samples of highly irradiated fuel (71 MWd/kgU) during a series of rapid temperature ramps. Experimentally, when the FGR increased rapidly during the temperature transients, the fuel was assumed to be 'pulverized', i.e., fragmented into powder. In the second series of experiments, laser heating of small samples was used to investigate the temperature at which fuel pulverization was initiated. Subsequent to fuel disintegration, there was always a spectrum of particle sizes present. The significance of this observation was recognized in the context of extended burn-up operation in commercial reactors. Based on the observation from these investigations, a fuel fragmentation threshold has been discussed and developed. We conclude that fuel disintegration could be of potential importance in limiting the performance and productive lifetime of nuclear fuel. However, since only fuel closely adjacent to ballooned or ruptured cladding would be released in a LOCA-type transient, expulsion of pulverized fuel from the ruptured fuel rod is not considered a safety issue; cooling of the defected assembly remains possible and there is no issue with respect to local criticality. (author)

  15. Assessment of anxiety and depression in patients with burning mouth syndrome: A clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Rohit; Goel, Sumit; Misra, Deepankar; Panjwani, Sapna; Misra, Akansha

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Burning mouth syndrome is a chronic pain syndrome primarily affecting elderly women with hormonal changes or psychological disorders. It is multifactorial in origin, often idiopathic and its etiopathogenesis, majorly being neuropathic, largely remains enigmatic. Aim: To determine the prevalence of burning mouth symptom, in elderly women and evaluate local and systemic causes responsible for burning sensation. Materials and Methods: 100 elderly postmenopausal women were included in the study out of which 56 had a chief complaint of burning sensation. These patients were evaluated for the levels of anxiety and depression by means of questionnaire. The severity of burning and the response to the treatment was assessed with a five point Visual Analog Scale. The results were analyzed using “Chi-square test”. Results: There was statistically significant increase in the levels of anxiety and depression in the study group. Conclusion: The present study clearly indicates that most of the patients had moderate to severe levels of depression, which suggests that anxiety and depression are constant features in postmenopausal female patients. PMID:22923978

  16. Delayed dermal burns caused by dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slovak, A J; Payne, A R

    1984-07-01

    A chemical operator handling dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate (DMAD) developed delayed and pain-free burns on one of his feet 2 days after a supposed spillage of DMAD. The injuries were confirmed to be associated with DMAD by chemical analysis of the operator's safety boot and patch tests. DMAD easily penetrates some protective clothing and dilute solutions can still be hazardous: the toxic effect is compounded by being delayed and painless. The lachrymatory irritant properties of undiluted DMAD are not adequate warning of its presence or spillage in quantities sufficient to cause significant skin damage.

  17. Comparison of two silver dressings for wound management in pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jester, Ingo; Bohn, Ingo; Hannmann, Thorsten; Waag, Karl-Ludwig; Loff, Steffan

    2008-11-01

    Purpose. Silver wound dressings are widely used in the treatment of burns. Dressings differ in material characteristics, various antimicrobial activities, and ease of use. The purpose of this study was to evaluate both dressing performance and amount of pain during the dressing changes of 2 silver dressings Urgotul SSD® (Laboratoires Urgo, Chenove, France), and Contreet Ag® (Coloplast, Minneapolis, MN) in children. A retrospective cohort study was performed with 2 groups of 20 burns treated with Urgotul SSD and Contreet Ag until the wounds were healed or grafted. Seventy dressing changes in the Contreet Ag group and 67 dressing changes in the Urgotul group were evaluated. Every dressing change was assessed regarding the dressing performance (exudate, adherence, bleeding, and dressing application/removal), and pain. Pain was "absent or slight" in 61 (92%) dressing changes with Urgotul SSD, and in 60 (85%) of the dressing changes with Contreet Ag. Dressing application in the Urgotul group was more often "very easy" (n = 33; 49%) or "easy" (n = 32; 48%) than in the Contreet Ag group, "very easy" (n = 25; 35%), and "easy" (n = 42; 60%). Contreet Ag had a greater ability to absorb exudate ("very good" n = 60; 85%, and "good" n = 11; 15%) than Urgotul SSD ("very good" n = 34; 51%, and "good" n = 13; 19%). Urgotul SSD and Contreet Ag are comparable regarding pain during dressing change. The dressings differ in their ability to absorb exudate and ease of application. Both dressings provided nearly painless wound management, and therefore were highly accepted by the nurses and especially the children being treated.

  18. Comparison between topical honey and mafenide acetate in treatment of auricular burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Basir; Bayat, Akbar; Kazemei, Tayebe; Azarpira, Negar

    2011-01-01

    The auricle is a frequently injured part of the head and neck during thermal injury leading to ear deformity. The burned ear represents one of the most difficult problems for reconstructive surgeons. Mafenide acetate is a topical agent used routinely for these patients, but it has some disadvantages including painful application and allergic rash. Some authors have reported the healing effect and antibacterial activity of honey. The study reported here was undertaken to compare the effect of honey and mafenide acetate on auricular burn in rabbit. In our study, although the pathologic score of the honey group was better than that of the mafenide group both on 14 and 21 days after burning, it was not statistically significant. In the mafenide acetate group, deep complication of burn (chondritis) was significantly lower than that of the honey group. In conclusion, in contrast to healing and antibiotic activity reported for honey, it may have failure in preventing deep bacterial complications of wound (like chondritis). So in deep wounds, the use of honey as dressing is not recommended. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome.

  20. Burning mouth syndrome: Clinical dilemma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchan R Patil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS is a chronic orofacial burning pain condition usually in the absence of clinical and laboratory findings that affects many adults worldwide, yet its etiology and treatment remain poorly understood. Though it has been associated with numerous oral and systemic conditions, there has been no clear consensus on its etiology, pathogenesis and treatment. As a result, patients with inexplicable oral complaints are often referred from one health care professional to another without effective management having significant emotional impact on patients. As the dental profession expands its scope of care to oral medicine and geriatrics, BMS will be more effectively diagnosed and managed by these dental surgeons. Hence, they should be more involved in evaluation and management of these patients. The present article provides updated information on BMS including possible etiological factors and current treatment options, although data on the effectiveness of these treatment modalities remain limited. Recently researchers found that treatment with a familiar nutritional supplement- lipoic acid- is of remarkable benefit with minimal adverse effects. ALA (alpha-lipoic acid may be the effective treatment modality in management of BMS.

  1. On the behaviour of dissolved fission gases prior to transient testing of fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, M.H.; Matthews, J.R.

    1978-10-01

    The TREAT and CABRI series of reactor safety experiments on irradiated fuel require the transfer of fuel pins from the reactor in which the fuel has achieved some burn-up to the test facility. Subsequently, the fuel is restored to power in the test facility for some time before transient heating is initiated. Such pre-test manoeuvres, where the fuel is subjected to changes in the fission rate and temperature, may have important consequences for the fission gas behaviour during the transient experiment. The results of rate theory calculations are used to assess these effects. (author)

  2. EFNS guidelines on neurostimulation therapy for neuropathic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    EFNS Panel on Neuropathic Pain, Vienna; Cruccu, Giorgio; Aziz, T. Z.

    2007-01-01

    and to produce relevant recommendations. We searched the literature from 1968 to 2006, looking for neurostimulation in neuropathic pain conditions, and classified the trials according to the EFNS scheme of evidence for therapeutic interventions. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is efficacious in failed back surgery......Pharmacological relief of neuropathic pain is often insufficient. Electrical neurostimulation is efficacious in chronic neuropathic pain and other neurological diseases. European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) launched a Task Force to evaluate the evidence for these techniques......TMS) has transient efficacy in central and peripheral neuropathic pains (level B). Motor cortex stimulation (MCS) is efficacious in central post-stroke and facial pain (level C). Deep brain stimulation (DBS) should only be performed in experienced centres. Evidence for implanted peripheral stimulations...

  3. Aquacel(®) Ag dressing versus Acticoat™ dressing in partial thickness burns: a prospective, randomized, controlled study in 100 patients. Part 1: burn wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, Jozef; Hoeksema, Henk; Heyneman, Alexander; Pirayesh, Ali; Monstrey, Stan

    2014-05-01

    Studies comparing contemporary silver dressings in burns are scarce. In a prospective, randomized, controlled study, counting 50 patients/research group, we compared two frequently used silver dressings, Acticoat™ and Aquacel(®) Ag, in the management of partial thickness burns with a predicted healing time between 7 and 21 days as assessed by laser Doppler imaging between 48 and 72h after burn. Variables investigated were related to baseline research group characteristics, wound healing, bacteriology, economics, nurse, and patient experience. Both research groups were comparably composed taking into account gender, age and burn characteristics. Similar results were obtained as to healing time and bacterial control with both silver dressings. A statistically significant difference in favor of the Aquacel(®) Ag dressing was found for average ease of use (p<0.001), average ease of application (p=0.001), patient pain (p<0.001), patient comfort with the dressing (p=0.017), silver staining (p<0.001), and cost effectiveness (p<0.001). Both silver dressings resulted in comparable healing times and bacterial control but the Aquacel(®) Ag dressing significantly increased comfort for patients as well as nurses and was significantly more cost-effective than the Acticoat™ dressing for the given indication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. From "breakthrough" to "episodic" Cancer Pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løhre, Erik Torbjørn; Klepstad, Pål; Bennett, Michael I

    2016-01-01

    consensus on definitions, terminology, and subclassification of transient cancer pain exacerbations. Methods The most frequent authors on BTCP literature were identified using the same search strategy as in a systematic review and invited to participate in a two-round Delphi survey. Topics with a low degree...

  5. To burn or not to burn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, L.

    1993-01-01

    While taking a match to an oil slick may sound like the making of a chaotic inferno, emergency response specialists say burning may be the most efficient way to remove large oil spills from the ocean's surface. But tests of this technique are being resisted by environmentalists as well as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which has final authority over the matter. The debate over test burning arose most recently in Alaska when a proposal to spill and then ignite 1,000 barrels of crude on the Arctic Ocean this past summer was rejected by the EPA. The EPA didn't object to the technique or to the notion of burning spilled oil. However, it contends that it's not necessary to spill thousands of gallons of oil to conduct tests, and unnecessarily pollute the environment, when plenty of oil is already available from accidental spills. Researchers disagree, claiming they won't be able to use the burning technique on an actual spill until it has been tested in a controlled experiment. Despite such concerns, the Canadian government is going ahead with a test burn off the coast of Newfoundland next year. Faced with a choice of test burning or the kind of shoreline contamination left in the wake of the Exxon Valdez disaster, Environment Canada opts for testing. Learning valuable lessons about rapid oil-spill cleanup is worth the relatively minor risks to the environment that test burning would pose

  6. Effect of Oral Care Gel for Burning Mouth Syndrome in a Patient with Hepatitis C: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Yumiko; Kawahigashi, Yuji; Kimura, Kanae; Sata, Michio

    2017-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a burning sensation in the mouth with no underlying dental or medical cause. To date, there is no satisfactory treatment for BMS. Herein, we present the case of a 42-year-old female presenting with hepatitis C virus infection along with BMS. Despite two interferon therapies and a sustained virologic response, the discomfort in her oral mucosa persisted. At the age of 51, the patient complained of burning sensation and tingling pain in the tongue; a thin layer of REFRECARE-H®, an oral care gel (therapeutic dentifrice), was applied on the oral membrane after each meal for 60 days. Application of REFRECARE-H® decreased the various symptoms including tingling pain, oral discomfort, breath odor, sleep disorder, depressive mood, and jitteriness. The improvement in quality of life continued for 30 days after application of the gel. These findings indicate that REFRECARE-H® may be effective in reducing the symptoms associated with BMS. Long-term follow-up studies with larger number of patients are required to elucidate the therapeutic effects of this gel.

  7. Effect of Oral Care Gel for Burning Mouth Syndrome in a Patient with Hepatitis C: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumiko Nagao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a burning sensation in the mouth with no underlying dental or medical cause. To date, there is no satisfactory treatment for BMS. Herein, we present the case of a 42-year-old female presenting with hepatitis C virus infection along with BMS. Despite two interferon therapies and a sustained virologic response, the discomfort in her oral mucosa persisted. At the age of 51, the patient complained of burning sensation and tingling pain in the tongue; a thin layer of REFRECARE-H®, an oral care gel (therapeutic dentifrice, was applied on the oral membrane after each meal for 60 days. Application of REFRECARE-H® decreased the various symptoms including tingling pain, oral discomfort, breath odor, sleep disorder, depressive mood, and jitteriness. The improvement in quality of life continued for 30 days after application of the gel. These findings indicate that REFRECARE-H® may be effective in reducing the symptoms associated with BMS. Long-term follow-up studies with larger number of patients are required to elucidate the therapeutic effects of this gel.

  8. Evaluation of the efficacy of low-level laser in improving the symptoms of burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabi-Kalati, Fateme; Bakhshani, Nour-Mohammad; Rasti, Maryam

    2015-10-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is common conditions that affects menopause women, patients suffer from sever burning sensation. Up to now there is no definitive treatment for this disease. Present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of low-level laser (LLL) in improving the symptoms of burning mouth syndrome. Twenty patients with BMS were enrolled in this study; they were divided in two groups randomly. In the laser group, in each patient, 10 areas on the oral mucosa were selected and underwent LLL irradiation at a wavelength of 630 nm, and a power of 30 mW for 10 seconds twice a week for 4 weeks. In the placebo group, silent/off laser therapy was carried out during the same period in the same areas. Burning sensation and quality of life were evaluated. Burning sensation severity and quality of life in the two groups after intervention were different significant statistically, (p= 0.004, p= 0.01 respectively) .Patients in laser group had better results. It can be concluded that low level laser might decrease the intensity of burning mouth syndrome. Pain, low-level laser, burning mouth syndrome, oral mucosa.

  9. Novel burn device for rapid, reproducible burn wound generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J Y; Dunham, D M; Supp, D M; Sen, C K; Powell, H M

    2016-03-01

    Scarring following full thickness burns leads to significant reductions in range of motion and quality of life for burn patients. To effectively study scar development and the efficacy of anti-scarring treatments in a large animal model (female red Duroc pigs), reproducible, uniform, full-thickness, burn wounds are needed to reduce variability in observed results that occur with burn depth. Prior studies have proposed that initial temperature of the burner, contact time with skin, thermal capacity of burner material, and the amount of pressure applied to the skin need to be strictly controlled to ensure reproducibility. The purpose of this study was to develop a new burner that enables temperature and pressure to be digitally controlled and monitored in real-time throughout burn wound creation and compare it to a standard burn device. A custom burn device was manufactured with an electrically heated burn stylus and a temperature control feedback loop via an electronic microstat. Pressure monitoring was controlled by incorporation of a digital scale into the device, which measured downward force. The standard device was comprised of a heat resistant handle with a long rod connected to the burn stylus, which was heated using a hot plate. To quantify skin surface temperature and internal stylus temperature as a function of contact time, the burners were heated to the target temperature (200±5°C) and pressed into the skin for 40s to create the thermal injuries. Time to reach target temperature and elapsed time between burns were recorded. In addition, each unit was evaluated for reproducibility within and across three independent users by generating burn wounds at contact times spanning from 5 to 40s at a constant pressure and at pressures of 1 or 3lbs with a constant contact time of 40s. Biopsies were collected for histological analysis and burn depth quantification using digital image analysis (ImageJ). The custom burn device maintained both its internal

  10. Transient osteoporosis of pregnancy of the bilateral hips in twin gestation: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Maria E; Fitzgerald, Colleen; Hynes, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Transient osteoporosis of pregnancy has been described as a rare, self-limiting disease of unclear etiology that presents as severe pain, which typically affects pregnant women in their third trimester. We describe 3 cases of primigravid pregnant women with twin gestation who reported unilateral hip pain and who were diagnosed with transient osteoporosis of pregnancy of the hip by magnetic resonance imaging. These women were advised to undergo limited weight bearing and activity modification to minimize the risk of fracture. Each patient was able to proceed through her pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum course without complication, with symptom resolution, and return to unrestricted activity. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Burns education for non-burn specialist clinicians in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Tania; Hendricks, Joyce; Twigg, Di; Wood, Fiona

    2015-03-01

    Burn patients often receive their initial care by non-burn specialist clinicians, with increasingly collaborative burn models of care. The provision of relevant and accessible education for these clinicians is therefore vital for optimal patient care. A two phase design was used. A state-wide survey of multidisciplinary non-burn specialist clinicians throughout Western Australia identified learning needs related to paediatric burn care. A targeted education programme was developed and delivered live via videoconference. Pre-post-test analysis evaluated changes in knowledge as a result of attendance at each education session. Non-burn specialist clinicians identified numerous areas of burn care relevant to their practice. Statistically significant differences between perceived relevance of care and confidence in care provision were reported for aspects of acute burn care. Following attendance at the education sessions, statistically significant increases in knowledge were noted for most areas of acute burn care. Identification of learning needs facilitated the development of a targeted education programme for non-burn specialist clinicians. Increased non-burn specialist clinician knowledge following attendance at most education sessions supports the use of videoconferencing as an acceptable and effective method of delivering burns education in Western Australia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. Is proportion burned severely related to daily area burned?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birch, Donovan S; Morgan, Penelope; Smith, Alistair M S; Kolden, Crystal A; Hudak, Andrew T

    2014-01-01

    The ecological effects of forest fires burning with high severity are long-lived and have the greatest impact on vegetation successional trajectories, as compared to low-to-moderate severity fires. The primary drivers of high severity fire are unclear, but it has been hypothesized that wind-driven, large fire-growth days play a significant role, particularly on large fires in forested ecosystems. Here, we examined the relative proportion of classified burn severity for individual daily areas burned that occurred during 42 large forest fires in central Idaho and western Montana from 2005 to 2007 and 2011. Using infrared perimeter data for wildfires with five or more consecutive days of mapped perimeters, we delineated 2697 individual daily areas burned from which we calculated the proportions of each of three burn severity classes (high, moderate, and low) using the differenced normalized burn ratio as mapped for large fires by the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity project. We found that the proportion of high burn severity was weakly correlated (Kendall τ = 0.299) with size of daily area burned (DAB). Burn severity was highly variable, even for the largest (95th percentile) in DAB, suggesting that other variables than fire extent influence the ecological effects of fires. We suggest that these results do not support the prioritization of large runs during fire rehabilitation efforts, since the underlying assumption in this prioritization is a positive relationship between severity and area burned in a day. (letters)

  13. Commercially available interactive video games in burn rehabilitation: therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Ingrid S; Bagley, Anita; Kawada, Jason; Sen, Soman; Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2012-06-01

    Commercially available interactive video games (IVG) like the Nintendo Wii™ (NW) and PlayStation™II Eye Toy (PE) are increasingly used in the rehabilitation of patients with burn. Such games have gained popularity in burn rehabilitation because they encourage range of motion (ROM) while distracting from pain. However, IVGs were not originally designed for rehabilitation purposes but rather for entertainment and may lack specificity for achieving rehabilitative goals. Objectively evaluating the specific demands of IVGs in relation to common burn therapy goals will determine their true therapeutic benefit and guide their use in burn rehabilitation. Upper extremity (UE) motion of 24 normal children was measured using 3D motion analysis during play with the two types of IVGs most commonly described for use after burn: NW and PE. Data was analyzed using t-tests and One-way Analysis of Variance. Active range of motion for shoulder flexion and abduction during play with both PE and NW was within functional range, thus supporting the idea that IVGs offer activities with therapeutic potential to improve ROM. PE resulted in higher demands and longer duration of UE motion than NW, and therefore may be the preferred tool when UE ROM or muscular endurance are the goals of rehabilitation. When choosing a suitable IVG for application in rehabilitation, the user's impairment together with the therapeutic attributes of the IVG should be considered to optimize outcome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of methylnaltrexone to induce laxation in acutely injured patients with burns and necrotizing soft-tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Kelly; Lin, Hsin; Faraklas, Iris; Morris, Stephen; Cochran, Amalia; Saffle, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The routine use of high-dose opioids for analgesia in patients with acute burns and soft-tissue injuries often leads to the development of opioid-induced constipation. The opioid antagonist methylnaltrexone (MLTX) reverses narcotic-related ileus without affecting systemic pain treatment. The authors' burn center developed a bowel protocol that included administration of MLTX for relief of opioid-induced constipation after other methods failed. The authors performed a retrospective review of patients with acute burns or necrotizing soft-tissue infections, who had been given subcutaneous MLTX to induce laxation. All patients who received MLTX were included and all administrations of the drug were included in the analysis. The primary outcome examined was time to laxation from drug administration. Forty-eight patients received MLTX a total of 112 times. Six patients were admitted with soft-tissue injuries and the rest suffered burns with an average TBSA of 17%. The median patient age was 41 years and the majority (75%) were men. Administration of a single dose of MLTX resulted in laxation within 4 hours in 38% of cases, and within 24 hours in 68%. Patients given MLTX received an average of 174 mg morphine equivalents daily for pain control. MLTX was given after an average of 52 hours since the last bowel movement. As this experience has evolved, it has been incorporated into an organized bowel protocol, which includes MLTX administration after other laxatives have failed. MLTX is an effective laxation agent in patients with burn and soft-tissue injuries, who have failed conventional agents.

  15. Burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskeläinen, Satu K; Woda, Alain

    2017-06-01

    Objective To review the clinical entity of primary burning mouth syndrome (BMS), its pathophysiological mechanisms, accurate new diagnostic methods and evidence-based treatment options, and to describe novel lines for future research regarding aetiology, pathophysiology, and new therapeutic strategies. Description Primary BMS is a chronic neuropathic intraoral pain condition that despite typical symptoms lacks clear clinical signs of neuropathic involvement. With advanced diagnostic methods, such as quantitative sensory testing of small somatosensory and taste afferents, neurophysiological recordings of the trigeminal system, and peripheral nerve blocks, most BMS patients can be classified into the peripheral or central type of neuropathic pain. These two types differ regarding pathophysiological mechanisms, efficacy of available treatments, and psychiatric comorbidity. The two types may overlap in individual patients. BMS is most frequent in postmenopausal women, with general population prevalence of around 1%. Treatment of BMS is difficult; best evidence exists for efficacy of topical and systemic clonazepam. Hormonal substitution, dopaminergic medications, and therapeutic non-invasive neuromodulation may provide efficient mechanism-based treatments for BMS in the future. Conclusion We present a novel comprehensive hypothesis of primary BMS, gathering the hormonal, neuropathic, and genetic factors presumably required in the genesis of the condition. This will aid in future research on pathophysiology and risk factors of BMS, and boost treatment trials taking into account individual mechanism profiles and subgroup-clusters.

  16. An assessment of burn care professionals' attitudes to major burn.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, A D

    2008-06-01

    The resuscitation of severe burn remains a controversial area within the burn care profession. There is ongoing debate as to what percentage burn is associated with a sufficient quality of life to support initial resuscitation efforts. We conducted a survey of delegates at the 39th Annual Meeting of the British Burns Association (2005), regarding attitudes towards resuscitation following major burns. Respondents were asked the maximum percentage total body surface area (TBSA) burn beyond which they would not wish to be resuscitated. They were also asked what maximum TBSA they perceived to be commensurate with an acceptable quality of life (QOL). One hundred and forty three of 300 delegates responded to the questionnaire. Thirty three percent of respondents would not wish to be resuscitated with 50-75% TBSA burns or greater. A further 35% would not wish to have life-sustaining intervention with 75-95% TBSA burns or greater. The remaining 32% indicated that they would not want resuscitation with TBSA burns>95%. Regardless of TBSA affected, 16% would not wish resuscitation if they had full thickness facial burns, a further 10% did not want resuscitation if both their hands and faces were affected. Our survey demonstrates the diversity of personal preference amongst burn care professionals. This would suggest that a unifying philosophy regarding the resuscitation of extensive burns will remain elusive.

  17. Air-Freshener Burns: A New Paradigm in Burns Etiology?

    OpenAIRE

    Sarwar, Umran; Nicolaou, M.; Khan, M. S.; Tiernan, E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: We report a rare case of burns following the use of automated air-fresheners. Methods: We present a case report with a brief overview of the literature relating to burns associated with air-fresheners. The mechanism and treatment of these types of injuries are also described. Results: A 44 year-old female was admitted under the care of the burns team following burns secondary to an exploding air-freshener canister. The patient sustained burns to the face, thorax and arms re...

  18. Air-freshener burns: a new paradigm in burns etiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Umran; Nicolaou, M; Khan, M S; Tiernan, E

    2011-10-01

    We report a rare case of burns following the use of automated air-fresheners. We present a case report with a brief overview of the literature relating to burns associated with air-fresheners. The mechanism and treatment of these types of injuries are also described. A 44 year-old female was admitted under the care of the burns team following burns secondary to an exploding air-freshener canister. The patient sustained burns to the face, thorax and arms resulting in a seven-day hospital admission. The burns were treated conservatively. To our knowledge this is one of the few documented cases of burns as a result of air-fresheners. As they become more ubiquitous, we anticipate the incidence of such cases to increase. As such, they pose a potential public health concern on a massive scale.

  19. Transient Osteoporosis in a Young Man: Case report – Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barış Nacır

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Although osteoporosis is defined as being a painless and progressive condition, one special subtype of osteoporosis is reversible and painful. Because it isn’t permanent and is obvious in the hip joint, this condition is called transient osteoporosis of the hip. Typically, the paitents are women in the third trimester of pregnancy and middle-aged men who are seen initially with acute progressive pain, antalgic gait, and severe functional disability involving the affected extremity. Its aetiology remains a matter of speculation, and the same remains true for its treatment. Many researchers have proposed different surgical and non-surgical treatment strategies; but the conservative approach, which takes the form of analgesics, intermittent traction, range of motion exercises, abductor strengthening exercises and restricted weight bearing, is preferred. In this paper we report a 22 years old man with transient osteoporosis of the hip who showed excellent recovery following a conservative approach. (From the World of Osteoporosis 2008;14:35-9

  20. A multicenter study of preventable contact burns from glass fronted gas fireplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibbenmeyer, Lucy; Gittelman, Michael A; Kluesner, Karen; Liao, Junlin; Xing, Yunfan; Faraklas, Iris; Anyan, Walter; Gamero, Chelsea; Moulton, Steven; Nederveld, Cindy; Banks, Ashley; Ryan, Colleen M; Conway, Jennifer A; Reilly, Debra A; Fish, Joel; Kelly, Charis; Peltier, George; Schwantke, Emily; Conrad, Peggie F; Caruso, Daniel M; Richey, Karen J; McCrory, Kristine; Elfar, Mohamed S A; Pittinger, Timothy; Sadie, Christine; Greenhalgh, David; Palmieri, Tina; Grossman, Peter H; Richards, Kurt M; Joyce, Teresa; Pozez, Andrea L; Savetamal, Alisa; Harrington, David T; Duncan, Kimberley; Pomerantz, Wendy J; Dillard, B Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Glass fronted gas fireplaces (GFGFs) have exterior surfaces that can reach extremely high temperatures. Burn injuries from contact with the glass front can be severe with long-term sequelae. The Consumer Product Safety Commission reported that these injuries are uncommon, whereas single-center studies indicate a much higher frequency. The purpose of this multi-institutional study was to determine the magnitude and severity of GFGF injuries in North America. Seventeen burn centers elected to participate in this retrospective chart review. Chart review identified 402 children ≤10 years of age who sustained contact burns from contact with GFGF, who were seen or admitted to the study hospitals from January 2006 to December 2010. Demographic, burn, treatment, and financial data were collected. The mean age of the study group was 16.8 ± 13.3 months. The majority suffered burns to their hands (396, 98.5%), with burns to the face being the second, much less common site (14, 3.5%). Two hundred and sixty-nine required rehabilitation therapy (66.9%). The number of GFGF injuries reported was 20 times greater than the approximately 30 injuries estimated by the Consumer Product Safety Commission's 10-year review. For the affected children, these injuries are painful, often costly and occasionally can lead to long-term sequelae. Given that less than a quarter of burn centers contributed data, the injury numbers reported herein support a need for broader safety guidelines for gas fireplaces in order to have a significant impact on future injuries.

  1. Radiosterilization of freeze-dried human amniotic Membrane and its use in the treatment of burn wound. Algerian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djefal, A.; Mahlous, M.; Nacer Khodja, A.; Larbi, M.; Larbi Daho Bachir, M.

    2001-01-01

    The present study evaluates the usefulness of human amniotic membrane as biological dressing and its efficacy in the treatment of burns comparatively to the conventional dressing. We reported the practical methods of preparation, preservation and radiation sterilisation of amnion, and the clinical results of its successful use in the treatment of 80 cases of superficial and intermediate depth dermal burns. The increased rate of healing, pain relief, good adhesion to the bed wound and absence of infection were observed

  2. In-situ burning of Orimulsion : small scale burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.F.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the feasibility of burning Orimulsion. In-situ burning has always been a viable method for cleaning oil spills on water because it can effectively reduce the amount of spilled oil and eliminate the need to collect, store, transport and dispose of recovered oil. Orimulsion, however, behaves very differently from conventional oil when it is spilled because of its composition of 70 per cent bitumen in 30 per cent water. In-situ burning of this surfactant-stablized oil-in-water emulsion has never been seriously considered because of the perception that Orimulsion could not be ignited, and if it could, ignition would not be sustained. In this study, burn tests were conducted on 3 scales in a Cleveland Open Cup apparatus of 5 cm, 10 cm and 50 cm diameters. Larger scale burns were conducted in specially built pans. All tests were conducted on salt water which caused the bitumen to separate from the water. The objective was to determine if sufficient vapours could be generated to ignite the Orimulsion. The study also measured if a sustained flame would result in successful combustion. Both objectives were successfully accomplished. Diesel fuel was used to ignite the Orimulsion in the specially designed pan for large scale combustion. Quantitative removal of Orimulsion was achieved in all cases, but in some burns it was necessary to re-ignite the Orimulsion. It was noted that when Orimulsion burns, some trapped water droplets in the bitumen explode with enough force to extinguish a small flame. This did not occur on large-scale burns. It was concluded that the potential for successful in-situ burning increases with size. It was determined that approximately 1 mm in thickness of diesel fuel is needed to ignite a burn. 5 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs

  3. Use of Essential Oils Following Traumatic Burn Injury: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jopke, Kathleen; Sanders, Heather; White-Traut, Rosemary

    Hospital admissions related to burn injury reach 40,000 annually. Patients who experience extensive burns require longer hospital stays and are at increased risk for infection and hospital acquired conditions. This comparative case study is a two patient matched case control design that follows the hospital course of two children who experienced burn injuries. For one of these patients, with the consent of the child's parents, the grandmother treated her granddaughter with essential oils. Essential oils have the potential to inhibit microbial growth, support treatment of wounds, and facilitate healing. However, there have been no large scale studies on essential oils. Data for the two cases were retrieved from the electronic medical record at a Midwestern Pediatric Hospital. Retrieved data included burn site description, treatment for burns, number of days on the ventilator, white blood cell count, length of hospital stay, number of ICU days, infections diagnosed by positive culture and pain ratings. While the goals for treatment were the same for both children, the child who received only standard care was diagnosed with two blood stream infections and four hospital acquired conditions while the child who received supplemental treatment with essential oils did not develop any blood stream infections, was diagnosed with one hospital acquired condition, was in the PICU one day less, and had a four day shorter length of hospital stay. While these case findings are intriguing, research is needed to expand understanding of the role of essential oils in the treatment of burns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Introducing a patient-controlled analgesia-based acute pain relief ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 10 months after the introduction of the first acute pain relief service (APRS) in southern Africa is described. Seven hundred patients were treated with morphine by means of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), administered to patients after major surgery or extensive burns via the intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SC) ...

  5. Comparative Analysis of Psychological, Hormonal, and Genetic Factors Between Burning Mouth Syndrome and Secondary Oral Burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    das Neves de Araújo Lima, Emeline; Barbosa, Natália Guimarães; Dos Santos, Ana Celly Souza; AraújoMouraLemos, Telma Maria; de Souza, Cleber Machado; Trevilatto, Paula Cristina; da Silveira, Ericka Janine Dantas; de Medeiros, Ana Miryam Costa

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between psychological, hormonal, and genetic factors with the development of burning mouth syndrome (BMS) and secondary oral burning (SOB) in order to provide a better characterization and classification of these conditions. Cross sectional study. Patients with complaints of mouth burning registered at the Oral Diagnostic Service of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte between 2000 and 2013. The sample consisted of 163 subjects divided into a group of patients with BMS (n = 64) and a group of subjects with SOB (n = 99). The following variables were analyzed: passive and stimulated saliva flow, stress levels and phase, depression, anxiety, serum cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels, and the presence of polymorphisms in the interleukin 6 (IL-6) gene. The results showed significant differences in the presence of xerostomia (p = 0.01), hyposalivation at rest (p < 0.001) and symptoms of depression (p = 0.033) between the two groups, which were more prevalent in the BMS group. DHEA levels were lower in the BMS group (p = 0.003) and were sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of this condition. Genetic analysis revealed no significant association between the polymorphisms analyzed and the development of BMS. These results suggest a possible role of depression, as well as of reduced DHEA levels, as associated factors for development of BMS. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Melittin, the Major Pain-Producing Substance of Bee Venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Guan, Su-Min; Sun, Wei; Fu, Han

    2016-06-01

    Melittin is a basic 26-amino-acid polypeptide that constitutes 40-60% of dry honeybee (Apis mellifera) venom. Although much is known about its strong surface activity on lipid membranes, less is known about its pain-producing effects in the nervous system. In this review, we provide lines of accumulating evidence to support the hypothesis that melittin is the major pain-producing substance of bee venom. At the psychophysical and behavioral levels, subcutaneous injection of melittin causes tonic pain sensation and pain-related behaviors in both humans and animals. At the cellular level, melittin activates primary nociceptor cells through direct and indirect effects. On one hand, melittin can selectively open thermal nociceptor transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor channels via phospholipase A2-lipoxygenase/cyclooxygenase metabolites, leading to depolarization of primary nociceptor cells. On the other hand, algogens and inflammatory/pro-inflammatory mediators released from the tissue matrix by melittin's pore-forming effects can activate primary nociceptor cells through both ligand-gated receptor channels and the G-protein-coupled receptor-mediated opening of transient receptor potential canonical channels. Moreover, subcutaneous melittin up-regulates Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 subunits, resulting in the enhancement of tetrodotoxin-resistant Na(+) currents and the generation of long-term action potential firing. These nociceptive responses in the periphery finally activate and sensitize the spinal dorsal horn pain-signaling neurons, resulting in spontaneous nociceptive paw flinches and pain hypersensitivity to thermal and mechanical stimuli. Taken together, it is concluded that melittin is the major pain-producing substance of bee venom, by which peripheral persistent pain and hyperalgesia (or allodynia), primary nociceptive neuronal sensitization, and CNS synaptic plasticity (or metaplasticity) can be readily induced and the molecular and cellular mechanisms

  7. Idiopathic ophthalmodynia and idiopathic rhinalgia: two topographic facial pain syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Juan A; Cuadrado, María L; Porta-Etessam, Jesús; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Gili, Pablo; Caminero, Ana B; Cebrián, José L

    2010-09-01

    To describe 2 topographic facial pain conditions with the pain clearly localized in the eye (idiopathic ophthalmodynia) or in the nose (idiopathic rhinalgia), and to propose their distinction from persistent idiopathic facial pain. Persistent idiopathic facial pain, burning mouth syndrome, atypical odontalgia, and facial arthromyalgia are idiopathic facial pain syndromes that have been separated according to topographical criteria. Still, some other facial pain syndromes might have been veiled under the broad term of persistent idiopathic facial pain. Through a 10-year period we have studied all patients referred to our neurological clinic because of facial pain of unknown etiology that might deviate from all well-characterized facial pain syndromes. In a group of patients we have identified 2 consistent clinical pictures with pain precisely located either in the eye (n=11) or in the nose (n=7). Clinical features resembled those of other localized idiopathic facial syndromes, the key differences relying on the topographic distribution of the pain. Both idiopathic ophthalmodynia and idiopathic rhinalgia seem specific pain syndromes with a distinctive location, and may deserve a nosologic status just as other focal pain syndromes of the face. Whether all such focal syndromes are topographic variants of persistent idiopathic facial pain or independent disorders remains a controversial issue.

  8. Frequency, character, intensity and impact of neuropathic pain in a cohort of spinal cord injury patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, H.; Akhtar, N.; Matee, S.; Butt, A.W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine frequency, character, approximate location and intensity of neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury and its impact on the quality of life. Study Design: A cross-sectional survey Place and Duration of Study: Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (AFIRM), Rawalpindi from Feb 2009 to Feb 2010. Material and Methods: Through non-probability convenience sampling 87 patients of both genders diagnosed with spinal cord injury based on American Spinal Injury Association criteria and admitted within a year of injury were included. Those in spinal shock, having poor cognition, inability to communicate, concurrent brain injury and history of chronic pain before injury were excluded. The history, localization and characteristics of the pain and interference with life activities were recorded. Neuropathic pain of patients was evaluated with Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs Pain Scale. Visual analogue scale was used to measure the severity of pain. Results: Out of 87 patients (mean age 36.9 years) seventy four were male and 13 were female. Seventy patients (80%) were AIS-A, 6 (7%) were AIS-B and 11 (13%) were AIS-C. Neuropathic pain was present in 57.5% (n=50). Most of the patients localized their pain below the neurological level of injury (78%) and rated pain intensity as moderate pain (54%). Majority (48%) described the pain as burning followed by electric shock like (42%), stabbing (8%) and pricking (2%). 48% patients reported that their quality of life was affected due to pain. 52% required two analgesics of different groups to relieve pain followed by 40% requiring three analgesics and 8% requiring one analgesic. Conclusion: Neuropathic pain is prevalent in people with spinal cord injury and adversely affects life quality. Neuropathic pain is primarily described as a burning sensation of moderate intensity mostly referred to below the neurological level of injury. (author)

  9. Long-term Results of the Patients with Regional Transient Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Akgün

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient regional osteoporosis is an uncommon cause of hip pain. It affects mostly healthy middle-aged men, and women in the third trimester of pregnancy. The aetiology is unknown. Eight patients (3 females, 5males who were diagnosed as transient regional osteoporosis of hip were included in the study. Long-term results of all the patients were evaluated. Their mean follow-up duration was 5.1 years. Following every hip involvement, after a mean duration of 6.6 months, all the patients were asymptomatic and returned to full activitiy without residual effects. Both hips were affected in 5 patients, in 4 of which the involvement was migratory. Migratory involvement duration ranged from 3 months to 4 years. In conclusion, Transient regional osteoporosis is self-limiting and resolves symptomatically and radiologically within some months of presentation.

  10. Biomass burning in Africa: As assessment of annually burned biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delmas, R.A.; Loudjani, P.; Podaire, A.; Menaut, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    It is now established that biomass burning is the dominant phenomenon that controls the atmospheric chemistry in the tropics. Africa is certainly the continent where biomass burning under various aspects and processes is the greatest. Three different types of burnings have to be considered-bush fires in savanna zones which mainly affect herbaceous flora, forest fires due to forestation for shifting agriculture or colonization of new lands, and the use of wood as fuel. The net release of carbon resulting from deforestation is assumed to be responsible for about 20% of the CO 2 increase in the atmosphere because the burning of forests corresponds to a destorage of carbon from the biospheric reservoir. The amount of reactive of greenhouse gases emitted by biomass burning is directly proportional, through individual emission factors, to the biomass actually burned. This chapter evaluates the biomass annually burned on the African continent as a result of the three main burning processes previously mentioned

  11. Transient regional osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Trotta

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient osteoporosis of the hip and regional migratory osteoporosis are uncommon and probably underdiagnosed bone diseases characterized by pain and functional limitation mainly affecting weight-bearing joints of the lower limbs. These conditions are usually self-limiting and symptoms tend to abate within a few months without sequelae. Routine laboratory investigations are unremarkable. Middle aged men and women during the last months of pregnancy or in the immediate post-partum period are principally affected. Osteopenia with preservation of articular space and transitory edema of the bone marrow provided by magnetic resonance imaging are common to these two conditions, so they are also known by the term regional transitory osteoporosis. The appearance of bone marrow edema is not specific to regional transitory osteoporosis but can be observed in several diseases, i.e. trauma, reflex sympathetic dystrophy, avascular osteonecrosis, infections, tumors from which it must be differentiated. The etiology of this condition is unknown. Pathogenesis is still debated in particular the relationship with reflex sympathetic dystrophy, with which regional transitory osteoporosis is often identified. The purpose of the present review is to remark on the relationship between transient osteoporosis of the hip and regional migratory osteoporosis with particular attention to the bone marrow edema pattern and relative differential diagnosis.

  12. Management of Neuropathic Chronic Pain with Methadone Combined with Ketamine: A Randomized, Double Blind, Active-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, Flavia Karine; Trevisan, Gabriela; Godoy, Maria C; Rossato, Mateus Fortes; Dalmolin, Gerusa D; Silva, Mariane A; Menezes, Mirian S; Caumo, Wolnei; Ferreira, Juliano

    2017-03-01

    Methadone and ketamine are used in neuropathic pain management. However, the benefits of both drugs association are uncertain in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Our primary objective was test the hypothesis that oral methadone combined with oral ketamine is more effective than oral methadone or ketamine alone in reducing neuropathic pain. We conducted a randomized, double blind, active-controlled parallel-group clinical trial. Forty-two patients with neuropathic pain refractory to conventional therapy were randomly assigned to receive oral methadone (n = 14), ketamine (n = 14), or methadone plus ketamine (n = 14) over a 3-month period. During these 90 days, we observed pain scores using a visual analogical scale (VAS), allodynia, burning/shooting pain, and some side effects. All treatments were effective in reducing pain scores by at least 40%. However, a significant improvement in pain was observed only in the ketamine alone group compared with both the methadone or methadone/ketamine groups. No significant differences were observed among the treatment groups for the reduction of burning or shooting pain, while ketamine alone was more effective than methadone or methadone/ketamine for the reduction of allodynia. Formal assessment for awareness of the allocation was not performed, some co-intervention bias may have occurred, our results could be only relevant to the patient population investigated and the use of VAS as the primary outcome detect changes in pain intensity but not to assess neuropathic pain symptoms. This study indicates that ketamine was better than methadone or methadone/ketamine for treating neuropathic pain.Key words: Multimodal analgesia, refractory pain, NMDA receptor, opioid.

  13. Effects of gabapentin in acute inflammatory pain in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, M U; Perkins, F M; Holte, Kathrine

    2001-01-01

    ,200 mg or placebo was given on 2 separate study days. Three hours after drug administration, a first-degree burn injury was produced on the medial aspect of the nondominant calf (12.5 cm(2), 47 degrees C for 7 minutes). Quantitative sensory testing (QST) included pain ratings to thermal and mechanical...

  14. Virtual reality for pain and anxiety management in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arane, Karen; Behboudi, Amir; Goldman, Ran D

    2017-12-01

    Question Pain and anxiety are common in children who need procedures such as administering vaccines or drawing blood. Recent reports have described the use of virtual reality (VR) as a method of distraction during such procedures. How does VR work in reducing pain and anxiety in pediatric patients and what are the potential uses for it? Answer Recent studies explored using VR with pediatric patients undergoing procedures ranging from vaccinations and intravenous injections to laceration repair and dressing changes for burn wounds. Interacting with immersive VR might divert attention, leading to a slower response to incoming pain signals. Preliminary results have shown that VR is effective, either alone or in combination with standard care, in reducing the pain and anxiety patients experience compared with standard care or other distraction methods. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  15. Development of advanced diagnostics for characterization of burning droplets in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Subramanian; Buermann, Dale H.; Bachalo, William D.

    1995-01-01

    Diagnostic techniques currently used for microgravity research are generally not as advanced as those used in earth based gravity experiments. Diagnostic techniques for measuring the instantaneous radial temperature profile (or temperature gradients) within the burning droplet do not exist. Over the past few years, Aerometrics has been researching and developing a rainbow thermometric technique for measuring the droplet temperatures of burning droplets. This technique has recently been integrated with the phase Doppler interferometric technique to yield a diagnostic instrument that can be used to simultaneously measure the size, velocity, and temperature of burning droplets in complex spray flames. Also, the rainbow thermometric technique has been recently integrated with a point-diffraction interferometric technique for measuring the instantaneous gas phase temperature field surrounding a burning droplet. These research programs, apart from being very successful, have also helped us identify other innovative techniques for the characterization of burning droplets. For example, new techniques have been identified for measuring the instantaneous regression rate of burning droplets. Also, there is the possibility of extracting the instantaneous radial temperature distribution or the temperature gradients within a droplet during transient heating. What is important is that these diagnostic techniques have the potential for making use of inexpensive, light-weight, and rugged devices such as diode lasers and linear CCD arrays. As a result, they can be easily packaged for incorporation into microgravity drop-test and flight-test facilities. Furthermore, with the use of linear CCD arrays, data rates as high as 10-100 kHz can be easily achieved. This data rate is orders of magnitude higher than what is currently achievable. In this research and development program, a compact and rugged diagnostic system will be developed that can be used to measure instantaneous fuel

  16. Effects of burn location and investigator on burn depth in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Adam J; Toussaint, Jimmy; Chung, Won Taek; Thode, Henry C; McClain, Steve; Raut, Vivek

    2016-02-01

    In order to be useful, animal models should be reproducible and consistent regardless of sampling bias, investigator creating burn, and burn location. We determined the variability in burn depth based on biopsy location, burn location and investigator in a porcine model of partial thickness burns. 24 partial thickness burns (2.5 cm by 2.5 cm each) were created on the backs of 2 anesthetized pigs by 2 investigators (one experienced, one inexperienced) using a previously validated model. In one of the pigs, the necrotic epidermis covering each burn was removed. Five full thickness 4mm punch biopsies were obtained 1h after injury from the four corners and center of the burns and stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin and Masson's trichrome for determination of burn depth by a board certified dermatopathologist blinded to burn location and investigator. Comparisons of burn depth by biopsy location, burn location and investigator were performed with t-tests and ANOVA as appropriate. The mean (SD) depth of injury to blood vessels (the main determinant of burn progression) in debrided and non-debrided pigs pooled together was 1.8 (0.3)mm, which included 75% of the dermal depth. Non-debrided burns were 0.24 mm deeper than debrided burns (Plocations, in debrided burns. Additionally, there were also no statistical differences in burn depths from midline to lateral in either of these burn types. Burn depth was similar for both investigators and among biopsy locations. Burn depth was greater for caudal locations in non-debrided burns and overall non-debrided burns were deeper than debrided burns. However, burn depth did not differ based on investigator, biopsy site, and medial-lateral location. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Rigorous, robust and systematic: Qualitative research and its contribution to burn care. An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhaber, Rachel Anne; de Jong, A E E; McLean, L

    2015-12-01

    Qualitative methods are progressively being implemented by researchers for exploration within healthcare. However, there has been a longstanding and wide-ranging debate concerning the relative merits of qualitative research within the health care literature. This integrative review aimed to exam the contribution of qualitative research in burns care and subsequent rehabilitation. Studies were identified using an electronic search strategy using the databases PubMed, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Excerpta Medica database (EMBASE) and Scopus of peer reviewed primary research in English between 2009 to April 2014 using Whittemore and Knafl's integrative review method as a guide for analysis. From the 298 papers identified, 26 research papers met the inclusion criteria. Across all studies there was an average of 22 participants involved in each study with a range of 6-53 participants conducted across 12 nations that focussed on burns prevention, paediatric burns, appropriate acquisition and delivery of burns care, pain and psychosocial implications of burns trauma. Careful and rigorous application of qualitative methodologies promotes and enriches the development of burns knowledge. In particular, the key elements in qualitative methodological process and its publication are critical in disseminating credible and methodologically sound qualitative research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. 30 CFR 816.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or burned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted disposal...

  19. Analgesia induced by morphine microinjected into the nucleus raphe magnus: effects on tonic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dualé, Christian; Sierralta, Fernando; Dallel, Radhouane

    2007-07-01

    One of the possible sites of action of the analgesic effect of morphine is the Nucleus Raphe Magnus, as morphine injected into this structure induces analgesia in transient pain models. In order to test if morphine in the Nucleus Raphe Magnus is also analgesic in a tonic pain model, 5 microg of morphine or saline (control) were microinjected into the Nucleus Raphe Magnus of the rat. Analgesic effects were assessed following nociceptive stimulation using transient heating of the tail (phasic pain) and subcutaneous orofacial injection of 1.5 % formalin (tonic pain). While morphine was strongly analgesic for the tail-flick response (p <0.0001 compared to control), analgesia on the response to formalin was also observed for both early (p = 0.007) and late responses (p = 0.02). However, the response to formalin was not completely blunted. These results suggest that the Nucleus Raphe Magnus is not the exclusive site of action of morphine-induced analgesia in clinical conditions.

  20. Neuropathic ocular pain: an important yet underevaluated feature of dry eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galor, A; Levitt, R C; Felix, E R; Martin, E R; Sarantopoulos, C D

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye has gained recognition as a public health problem given its prevalence, morbidity, and cost implications. Dry eye can have a variety of symptoms including blurred vision, irritation, and ocular pain. Within dry eye-associated ocular pain, some patients report transient pain whereas others complain of chronic pain. In this review, we will summarize the evidence that chronicity is more likely to occur in patients with dysfunction in their ocular sensory apparatus (ie, neuropathic ocular pain). Clinical evidence of dysfunction includes the presence of spontaneous dysesthesias, allodynia, hyperalgesia, and corneal nerve morphologic and functional abnormalities. Both peripheral and central sensitizations likely play a role in generating the noted clinical characteristics. We will further discuss how evaluating for neuropathic ocular pain may affect the treatment of dry eye-associated chronic pain. PMID:25376119

  1. Topical Drugs for Pain Relief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Srinivasan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Topical therapy helps patients with oral and perioral pain problems such as ulcers, burning mouth syndrome, temporomandibular disorders, neuromas, neuropathies and neuralgias. Topical drugs used in the field of dentistry are topical anaesthetics, topical analgesics, topical antibiotics and topical corticosteroids. It provides symptomatic/curative effect. Topical drugs are easy to apply, avoids hepatic first pass metabolism and more sites specific. But it can only be used for medications that require low plasma concentrations to achieve a therapeutic effect.

  2. Pain in interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome: do characteristics differ in ulcerative and non-ulcerative subtypes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killinger, Kim A; Boura, Judith A; Peters, Kenneth M

    2013-08-01

    Key differences between interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) subtypes (with and without Hunner's ulcer) have been noted. We hypothesized that pain characteristics in women grouped by IC/BPS subtype would differ. A survey was mailed to 749 women to assess IC/BPS pain and other characteristics. Cystoscopy/hydrodistention reports were reviewed for presence/absence of Hunner's ulcer. The McGill Pain Questionnaire Short Form© (MPQ-SF), Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and Interstitial Cystitis Symptom and Problem Indices (ICSI-PI) assessed symptoms. Data were analyzed with Pearson's chi-square, Fisher's exact, t tests, and Wilcoxon rank tests. Of the 214 women that returned a survey (36 ulcerative and 178 non-ulcerative IC/BPS), similar proportions in each group reported that certain foods, exercise, and/or stress triggered symptoms. Fewer ulcerative patients reported pain with vaginal penetration than non-ulcerative (5/33, 15.2 % vs 76/160, 47.5 %; p = 0.0006). On the BPI, the ulcerative and non-ulcerative groups reported similar numbers of painful areas (mean 4.1 ± 6.1 and 4.1 ± 3.8; p = 0.33), and lower abdominal/pelvic pain was reported most (13/35, 37 % vs 79/172, 46 %; p = 0.34) followed by lower back pain (12/35, 34 % vs 69/172, 40 %; p = 0.52). Even though ICSI-PI, MPQ-SF, and BPI scores/responses did not differ, on the MPQ-SF the three words most frequently used by ulcerative patients to describe their pain were sharp, stabbing, and hot burning, and in non-ulcerative were aching, cramping, and tender. These measures did not reveal any significant differences in pain between subtypes. More research is needed in larger samples to determine whether differences exist.

  3. Impact of a Newly Implemented Burn Protocol on Surgically Managed Partial Thickness Burns at a Specialized Burns Center in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Khwee-Soon Vincent; Chong, Si-Jack; Tan, Bien-Keem

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluated the impact of a newly implemented protocol for superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns which involves early surgery and rapid coverage with biosynthetic dressing in a specialized national burns center in Singapore. Consecutive patients with 5% or greater total body surface area (TBSA) superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns injury admitted to the Burns Centre at the Singapore General Hospital between August and December 2014 for surgery within 48 hours of injury were prospectively recruited into the study to form the protocol group. Comparable historical cases from the year 2013 retrieved from the burns center audit database were used to form the historical control group. Demographics (age, sex), type and depth of burns, %TBSA burnt, number of operative sessions, and length of stay were recorded for each patient of both cohorts. Thirty-nine burns patients managed under the new protocol were compared with historical control (n = 39) comparable in age and extensiveness of burns. A significantly shorter length of stay (P burns was observed in the new protocol group (0.74 day/%TBSA) versus historical control (1.55 day/%TBSA). Fewer operative sessions were needed under the new protocol for burns 10% or greater TBSA burns (P protocol for surgically managed burns patients which involves early surgery and appropriate use of biosynthetic dressing on superficial to mid-dermal partial thickness burns. Clinically, shorter lengths of stay, fewer operative sessions, and decreased need for skin grafting of burns patient were observed.

  4. Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    A burn is damage to your body's tissues caused by heat, chemicals, electricity, sunlight, or radiation. Scalds from hot ... and gases are the most common causes of burns. Another kind is an inhalation injury, caused by ...

  5. The Efficacy of Daily Prefrontal Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) for Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS): A Randomized Controlled Single-blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezaki, Yojiro; Badran, Bashar W; DeVries, William H; Moss, Jkeonye; Gonzales, Theresa; George, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a burning oral sensation without any corresponding abnormal findings. In some cases, BMS is refractory to pharmacologic treatments. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over left prefrontal cortex induces analgesic effect in both acute and chronic pain. However, its effect for BMS has not been evaluated. The aim of this randomized, controlled, single-blind study was to assess the efficacy of prefrontal rTMS for BMS. Twenty patients with BMS were recruited and randomized to receive 30,000 pulses in total at 10 Hz TMS (n = 12) or sham TMS (n = 8). We assessed the change of BMS pain condition, functional status and mood until 2 months after the beginning of treatment. In the real group, the BMS pain intensity decreased 67%, and 75% of the patients reported >50% pain decrease on final assessment compared to baseline, without heavy side effects. There was significant pain reduction in subjects in the real group immediately after 1 week of treatment, whereas there was none in those in the sham group. Similar tendency was confirmed in change of functional status. Mood and the affective aspect of pain were not changed in this study. BMS pain was significantly improved with 2 weeks of treatment of high frequency rTMS over left DLPFC compared to sham stimulation. Further study is needed to refine and improve TMS as a potential treatment of BMS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Significance of Brain Transcranial Sonography in Burning Mouth Syndrome: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Zavoreo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a chronic disorder which is affecting mostly postmenopausal women and is characterized by burning symptoms in the oral cavity on the clinically healthy oral mucosa. The results of previous studies suggested a possible role of peripheral and/or central neurological disturbances in these patients. The aim of this study was to analyze patients with burning mouth syndrome using transcranial sonography. Methods: By use of transcranial sonography of the brain parenchyma, substantia nigra, midbrain raphe and brain nucleus were evaluated in 20 patients with BMS (64.7±12.3 years and 20 controls with chronic pain in the lumbosacral region (61.5±15. Statistical analysis was performed by use of Student t test with significance set at p<0.05. Results: The results of this study have shown hypoechogenicity of the substantia nigra and midbrain raphe as well as hyperechogenicity of the brain nucleus in BMS patients (p<0,05 as compared to controls. Conclusions: Altered transcranial sonography findings of the brain parenchyma, midbrain raphe and brain nucleus in patients with burning mouth syndrome might reflect central disturbances within this syndrome.

  7. Phytocontact Dermatitis due to Mustard Seed Mimicking Burn Injury: Report of a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Yabanoglu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mustard seeds have been used in traditional folk medicine as a stimulant, diuretic, and purgative and to treat a variety of ailments including peritonitis and neuralgia. Mustards are still used today in mustard plasters to treat rheumatism, arthritis, chest congestion, aching back, and sore muscles. To make a mustard plaster, mix equal parts of flour and powdered mustard and spread it as a paste on a doubled piece of soft cloth. Apply mustard plaster to the affected area for a maximum of 15 minutes. Prolonged application can result in burns to the skin and nerve damage. Skin lesions occur within hours after exposure, and there is no significant therapy procedure. This case report is about a patient with second-degree burn, occurred when a mixture including mustard seed was exposed to her skin in the pain therapy of the osteoarthritis in her left knee. There are no studies analyzing treatment of skin burns induced by mustard seed in the literature. While in this type of burns our experience is limited, we think that conservative approach should be first choice of treatment.

  8. Transient Regional Osteoporosis of the Hip: Case Report - Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlknur Aktaş

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Transient regional osteoporosis of the hip (TOH is an uncommon cause of hip pain. It affects mostly healthy middle-aged men, and women in the third trimester of pregnancy. The aetiology is unknown. Differential diagnosis includes avascular necrosis, stress fracture, septic arthritis, malignancy, soft-tissue injury, osteoarthrosis and radiculopathy. Due to its association with bone marrow oedema, TOH is a pathology in which magnetic resonans imaging is extremely important in differential diagnosis. In this paper, a male patient with complaint of hip pain and difficulty in walking, which was diagnosed as TOH was presented by reviewing current literature. (Osteoporoz Dünyasından 2006;12:87-90

  9. Burning mouth syndrome and oral health-related quality of life: is there a change over time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni Riordain, R; Moloney, E; O'Sullivan, K; McCreary, C

    2010-10-01

    The symptoms associated with burning mouth syndrome can be quite varied and can interfere with the every day lives of patients. Management of the condition can be challenging for clinicians. To determine the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQOL) implications of BMS on patients over a period of time whilst undergoing treatment and to evaluate whether treatment interventions had a positive effect on OHRQOL. Thirty-two individuals (26 females, 6 males, mean age 61 years, range 38-83 years) were enrolled in this study. Individuals were interviewed using Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SFMPQ), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14), at weeks 0, 8 and 16. Scores from all outcome measures used decreased over the 16 weeks of the study. Statistically significant differences were found between time points for VAS pain scores (P < 0.001), HADS depression scores (P = 0.029), SFMPQ sensory pain scores (P < 0.01) and total scores for OHIP-14 (P < 0.05). Burning mouth syndrome has a negative impact on OHRQOL; however, individually tailored management of the condition can result in an improvement in patient-reported outcome measures including quality of life.

  10. In-situ burning of heavy oils and Orimulsion : mid-scale burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.F.; Fieldhouse, B.; Brown, C.E.; Gamble, L.

    2004-01-01

    In-situ burning is considered to be a viable means to clean oil spills on water. In-situ burning, when performed under the right conditions, can reduce the volume of spilled oil and eliminate the need to collect, store, transport and dispose of the recovered oil. This paper presented the results of bench-scale in-situ burning tests in which Bunker C, Orimulsion and weathered bitumen were burned outdoors during the winter in burn pans of approximately 1 square metre. Each test was conducted on salt water which caused the separation of the bitumen from the water in the Orimulsion. Small amounts of diesel fuel was used to ignite the heavy oils. Quantitative removal of the fuels was achieved in all cases, but re-ignition was required for the Orimulsion. Maximum efficiency was in the order of 70 per cent. The residue was mostly asphaltenes and resins which cooled to a solid, glass like material that could be readily removed. The study showed that the type of oil burned influences the behaviour of the burns. Bunker C burned quite well and Orimulsion burned efficiently, but re-ignition was necessary. It was concluded that there is potential for burning heavy oils of several types in-situ. 6 refs., 7 tabs., 18 figs

  11. Assessing burn depth in tattooed burn lesions with LASCA Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezdorn, N.; Limbourg, A.; Paprottka, F.J.; Könneker; Ipaktchi, R.; Vogt, P.M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tattoos are on the rise, and so are patients with tattooed burn lesions. A proper assessment with regard to burn depth is often impeded by the tattoo dye. Laser speckle contrast analysis (LASCA) is a technique that evaluates burn lesions via relative perfusion analysis. We assessed the effect of tattoo skin pigmentation on LASCA perfusion imaging in a multicolour tattooed patient. Depth of burn lesions in multi-coloured tattooed and untattooed skin was assessed using LASCA. Relative perfusion was measured in perfusion units (PU) and compared to various pigment colours, then correlated with the clinical evaluation of the lesion. Superficial partial thickness burn (SPTB) lesions showed significantly elevated perfusion units (PU) compared to normal skin; deep partial thickness burns showed decreased PU levels. PU of various tattoo pigments to normal skin showed either significantly lower values (blue, red, pink) or significantly increased values (black) whereas orange and yellow pigment showed values comparable to normal skin. In SPTB, black and blue pigment showed reduced perfusion; yellow pigment was similar to normal SPTB burn. Deep partial thickness burn (DPTB) lesions in tattoos did not show significant differences to normal DPTB lesions for black, green and red. Tattoo pigments alter the results of perfusion patterns assessed with LASCA both in normal and burned skin. Yellow pigments do not seem to interfere with LASCA assessment. However proper determination of burn depth both in SPTB and DPTB by LASCA is limited by the heterogenic alterations of the various pigment colours. PMID:28149254

  12. Satisfaction with life after burn: A Burn Model System National Database Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goverman, J; Mathews, K; Nadler, D; Henderson, E; McMullen, K; Herndon, D; Meyer, W; Fauerbach, J A; Wiechman, S; Carrougher, G; Ryan, C M; Schneider, J C

    2016-08-01

    While mortality rates after burn are low, physical and psychosocial impairments are common. Clinical research is focusing on reducing morbidity and optimizing quality of life. This study examines self-reported Satisfaction With Life Scale scores in a longitudinal, multicenter cohort of survivors of major burns. Risk factors associated with Satisfaction With Life Scale scores are identified. Data from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) Burn Model System (BMS) database for burn survivors greater than 9 years of age, from 1994 to 2014, were analyzed. Demographic and medical data were collected on each subject. The primary outcome measures were the individual items and total Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS) scores at time of hospital discharge (pre-burn recall period) and 6, 12, and 24 months after burn. The SWLS is a validated 5-item instrument with items rated on a 1-7 Likert scale. The differences in scores over time were determined and scores for burn survivors were also compared to a non-burn, healthy population. Step-wise regression analysis was performed to determine predictors of SWLS scores at different time intervals. The SWLS was completed at time of discharge (1129 patients), 6 months after burn (1231 patients), 12 months after burn (1123 patients), and 24 months after burn (959 patients). There were no statistically significant differences between these groups in terms of medical or injury demographics. The majority of the population was Caucasian (62.9%) and male (72.6%), with a mean TBSA burned of 22.3%. Mean total SWLS scores for burn survivors were unchanged and significantly below that of a non-burn population at all examined time points after burn. Although the mean SWLS score was unchanged over time, a large number of subjects demonstrated improvement or decrement of at least one SWLS category. Gender, TBSA burned, LOS, and school status were associated with SWLS scores at 6 months

  13. Sexual pain in women: exploring the manifestations of vaginismus versus vulvodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghizzani, Anna; Sestini, Piersante

    2017-02-01

    Sexual pain is frequently seen in gynecological practice as a consequence of lower tract pathology. When organic causes are ruled out, we must think of a functional pain syndrome such as the genital pelvic pain/penetration disorder (GPPD). Vaginismus and vulvodynia require different treatments. Even if gynecologists do not usually manage functional sexual pain, they can easily reach the differential diagnosis through the sexual pain anamnesis, because some symptoms are specific of one or the other condition. To verify our hypothesis we retrospectively evaluated the clinical records of 44 women affected by functional sexual pain. The words patients, used to describe their pain, were categorized in the following symptoms: dyspareunia, burning pain, stabbing pain, dryness, itching, and obstacle to penetration, each coded as present or absent. The unsupervised cluster analysis of the reported symptoms identified two groups: 19 out of 20 women were clinically diagnosed as having vaginismus, while the second group included all the 24 women clinically diagnosed with vulvodynia, plus one vaginismic patient. The high adherence between clinical and statistical findings supports that the differential diagnosis between vaginismus and vulvodynia can be reached on the basis of the elements collected during intake, including pain history.

  14. Burning issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raloff, J.

    1993-01-01

    The idea of burning oil slicks at sea has intrigued oil-cleanup managers for more than a decade, but it wasn't until the advent of fireproof booms in the mid-1980's and a major spill opportunity (the March 1989 Exxon Valdez) that in-situ burning got a real sea trial. The results of this and other burning experiments indicate that, when conditions allow it, nothing can compete with fire's ability to remove oil from water. Burns have the potential to remove as much oil in one day as mechanical devices can in one month, along with minimal equipment, labor and cost. Reluctance to burn in appropriate situations comes primarily from the formation of oily, black smoke. Analysis of the potentially toxic gases have been done, indicating that burning will not increase the levels of polluting aldehydes, ketones, dioxins, furans, and PAHs above those that normally evaporate from spilled oil. This article contains descriptions of planned oil fires and the discussion on the advantages and concerns of such a policy

  15. 30 CFR 817.87 - Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste...-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.87 Coal mine waste: Burning and burned waste utilization. (a) Coal mine... extinguishing operations. (b) No burning or unburned coal mine waste shall be removed from a permitted disposal...

  16. In vivo studies of antibacterial effect of human amniotic membrane use in treatment of burns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zobiri, A.; Moussi, W.; Djeffal, A.; Larbi Daho Bachir, M.

    2001-01-01

    The present study consist to put in evidence one of essential characteristic of amniotic membrane in occurrence the antibacterial effect. The article describes a study which compared the microbiological and clinical results of the application of freeze-dried gamma sterilized amniotic membrane with that of the conventional treatment(flamazine, greased gauze), in 100 patients with intermediate burns and deep burns with small surface, the bacterial population of various types of microorganisms was well controlled using quantitative bacterial culture techniques, immediately after accident, during treatment and at the last of treatment. The bacterial counts were significantly diminished mean of 10 4 UFC/cm2 to mean of 10 3 UFC/cm2, after 4 days in no infected burns and mean of 10 6 UFC/cm2 to mean of 10 3 UFC/cm2, after 5 days in infected burns, the same reduction was registered after 16 to 25 days with the conventional treatment. It is concluded that use of amniotic membrane control infection, minimize pain and promote wound healing

  17. Walking with Neuropathic Pain: Paradoxical Shift from Burden to Support?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Kopsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Baclofen 5% cream can be used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. We describe an unusual case of a neuropathic pain patient with spinal cord injury. A 71-year-old woman with a partial spinal cord injury lesion at L4 complained of tingling, pins and needles, and burning in her legs. She scored her pain as 6 before adding baclofen 5% cream to her pain medication (pregabalin 450 mg, acetaminophen 3000 mg, and diclofenac 150 mg daily. One month later she experienced complete pain relief, though experienced increased difficulties in walking, leading to frequent falls. Her steadier walking without stumbling and falling was more important to her than pain reduction. Thus she decided to stop using baclofen. This unusual case report discusses two important issues that relate to pain medicine and rehabilitation in patients with painful spinal cord lesions: (1 the presence of wide areas of sensory loss “covered” by the presence of painful sensations and (2 pathological sensations that can be used and integrated in the body schema to create an improved spatiovisual orientation and thus mobility. Both these aspects have to be taken into account when treating pain and design rehabilitation programs.

  18. Following the clues to neuropathic pain. Distribution and other leads reveal the cause and the treatment approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgrade, M J

    1999-11-01

    Neuropathic pain can seem enigmatic at first because it can last indefinitely and often a cause is not evident. However, heightened awareness of typical characteristics, such as the following, makes identification fairly easy: The presence of certain accompanying conditions (e.g., diabetes, HIV or herpes zoster infection, multiple sclerosis) Pain described as shooting, stabbing, lancinating, burning, or searing Pain worse at night Pain following anatomic nerve distribution Pain in a numb or insensate site The presence of allodynia Neuropathic pain responds poorly to standard pain therapies and usually requires specialized medications (e.g., anticonvulsants, tricyclic antidepressants, opioid analgesics) for optimal control. Successful pain control is enhanced with use of a systematic approach consisting of disease modification, local or regional measures, and systemic therapy.

  19. Optimal treatment of partial thickness burns in children: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vloemans, A F P M; Hermans, M H E; van der Wal, M B A; Liebregts, J; Middelkoop, E

    2014-03-01

    A large part of the patient population of a burn centre consists of children, most of whom are younger than four years. The majority of these young children suffer from superficial and deep partial thickness scald burns that may easily deepen to full thickness burns. A proper wound therapy, that prevents infection and ensures a moist wound condition, might prevent the deterioration of the wound. Therefore, we performed a systematic review of wound management and dressing materials to select the best treatment option for children with burns. A search in Medline and Embase revealed 51 articles for a critical appraisal. The articles were divided into randomized controlled trials, cohort studies and a group of case-reports. Total appraisal did not differ much amongst the groups; the level of evidence was highest in the randomized controlled trials and lowest in the case-reports. In 16 out of 34 comparative studies, silver sulfadiazine or a silver sulfadiazine/chlorhexidine-gluconate combination was the standard of wound care treatment. The competitor dressing was Biobrane(®) in six studies and amnion membrane in three. Tulle gauze, or tulle gauze impregnated with an antibacterial addition were the standard of care treatment in seven studies. In general, membranous dressings like Biobrane(®) and amnion membrane performed better than the standard of care on epithelialization rate, length of hospital stay and pain for treatment of partial thickness burns in children. However, hardly any of the studies investigated long-term results like scar formation. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A case of burn encephalopathy with reversible brain atrophy on brain computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Hisaaki; Suzuki, Koh-ichirou; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Kido, Kun-ichi; Sato, Masaharu; Fujii, Chiho; Kohama, Akitsugu

    1985-01-01

    We present an interesting case of burn encephalopathy. The patient is a three-year-old girl with second to third degree and 30 % scald burn. She developed central nervous symptom on the second day with high fever and systemic convulsions and was transferred to our clinic on the third day from a local hospital. Her level of consciousness was 30 to 100 (3-3-9 formula) and she developed extra-pyramidal involuntary movement; these neurological signs persisted untill 66th day when she spoke for the first time since admission. Her EEG showed diffuse brain dysfunction and CT showed marked brain atrophy. She began to improve after around 50 days systematically as well as neurologically and was discharged after four months. EEG, CT findings and neurological signs were normal 1.5 years later. We could not find a case of reversible brain atrophy in the reports on burn encephalopathy or other neurological disorders except for the cases of long-term steroid administration on autoimmune diseases or ACTH therapy on infantile spasm. In our case, the reversible brain atrophy might be caused by the rise of endogenous steroid under burn stress, or transient malfunction of cerebro-spinal fluid absorption, or some other causes. (author)

  1. Evaluation of the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire at baseline as a predictor for time to pain improvement in two clinical trials of pregabalin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushmakin, A G; Cappelleri, J C; Chandran, A B; Zlateva, G

    2013-01-01

    The Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) is a patient-reported outcome that evaluates the impact of fibromyalgia (FM) on daily life. This study evaluated the relationships between the functional status of FM patients, measured with the FIQ at baseline, and median time to a clinically relevant pain reduction. Data were derived from two randomised, placebo-controlled trials that evaluated pregabalin 300, 450 and 600 mg/day for the treatment of FM. The Kaplan-Meier (nonparametric) method was applied to estimate median times to 'transient' and 'stable' events. The transient event was defined as a ≥ 27.9% improvement on an 11-point daily pain diary scale (0 = no pain, 10 = worst possible pain), and the stable event was defined as the mean of the daily improvements ≥ 27.9% relative to baseline over the subsequent study duration starting on the day of the transient event. A parametric model using time-to-event analysis was developed for evaluating the relationship between baseline FIQ score and the median time to these events. Median time was longer among patients treated with placebo relative to pregabalin for the transient events (11-12 days vs. 5-7 days) and stable events (86 days vs. 13-29 days). A significant association was observed between baseline FIQ scores and median time to transient and stable events (p FIQ scores of 10, and 9.1-9.6 days for FIQ scores of 100; for stable pain reduction events, the median time ranged from 11.0 to 13.0 days and from 27.0 to 28.5 days for baseline FIQ scores of 10 and 100 respectively. Time to a clinically relevant reduction in pain was significantly associated with FM severity at baseline as measured by the FIQ. Such an analysis can inform patient and physician expectations in clinical practice. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Efficacy of low level laser therapy in the treatment of burning mouth syndrome: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Javed, Fawad; Kalakonda, Butchibabu; AlAizari, Nader A; Al-Soneidar, Walid; Al-Akwa, Ameen

    2017-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition with indefinite cure, predominantly affecting post-menopausal women. The aim of this study was to systematically review the efficacy of low level laser therapy in the treatment of burning mouth syndrome (BMS). PubMed, Embase and Scopus were searched from date of inception till and including October 2016 using various combinations of the following keywords: burning mouth syndrome, BMS, stomatodynia, laser therapy, laser treatment and phototherapy. The inclusion criteria were: Prospective, retrospective and case series studies. Letter to editors, reviews, experimental studies, studies that were not published in English, theses, monographs, and abstracts presented in scientific events were excluded. Due to heterogeneity of data no statistical analyses were performed. Ten clinical studies fulfilled the eligibility criteria, five of which were randomized clinical trials. In these studies, the laser wavelengths, power output and duration of irradiation ranged between 630-980nm, 20-300mW, 10s-15min, respectively. Most of studies reported laser to be an effective therapy strategy for management of BMS. Majority of the studies showed that laser therapy seemed to be effective in reducing pain in BMS patients. However, due to the varied methodologies and substantial variations in laser parameters among these studies, more clinical trials are required to ascertain the efficacy of laser for treating BMS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Do multiple body modifications alter pain threshold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamotová, A; Hrabák, P; Hříbek, P; Rokyta, R

    2017-12-30

    In recent years, epidemiological data has shown an increasing number of young people who deliberately self-injure. There have also been parallel increases in the number of people with tattoos and those who voluntarily undergo painful procedures associated with piercing, scarification, and tattooing. People with self-injury behaviors often say that they do not feel the pain. However, there is no information regarding pain perception in those that visit tattoo parlors and piercing studios compared to those who don't. The aim of this study was to compare nociceptive sensitivity in four groups of subjects (n=105, mean age 26 years, 48 women and 57 men) with different motivations to experience pain (i.e., with and without multiple body modifications) in two different situations; (1) in controlled, emotionally neutral conditions, and (2) at a "Hell Party" (HP), an event organized by a piercing and tattoo parlor, with a main event featuring a public demonstration of painful techniques (burn scars, hanging on hooks, etc.). Pain thresholds of the fingers of the hand were measured using a thermal stimulator and mechanical algometer. In HP participants, information about alcohol intake, self-harming behavior, and psychiatric history were used in the analysis as intervening variables. Individuals with body modifications as well as without body modifications had higher thermal pain thresholds at Hell Party, compared to thresholds measured at control neutral conditions. No such differences were found relative to mechanical pain thresholds. Increased pain threshold in all HP participants, irrespectively of body modification, cannot be simply explained by a decrease in the sensory component of pain; instead, we found that the environment significantly influenced the cognitive and affective component of pain.

  4. Psychiatric diagnoses in patients with burning mouth syndrome and atypical odontalgia referred from psychiatric to dental facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenoshita, Miho; Sato, Tomoko; Kato, Yuichi; Katagiri, Ayano; Yoshikawa, Tatsuya; Sato, Yusuke; Matsushima, Eisuke; Sasaki, Yoshiyuki; Toyofuku, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Background Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) and atypical odontalgia (AO) are two conditions involving chronic oral pain in the absence of any organic cause. Psychiatrically they can both be considered as “somatoform disorder”. From the dental point of view, however, the two disorders are quite distinct. BMS is a burning or stinging sensation in the mouth in association with a normal mucosa whereas AO is most frequently associated with a continuous pain in the teeth or in a tooth socket after extraction in the absence of any identifiable cause. Because of the absence of organic causes, BMS and AO are often regarded as psychogenic conditions, although the relationship between oral pain and psychologic factors is still unclear. Some studies have analyzed the psychiatric diagnoses of patients with chronic oral pain who have been referred from dental facilities to psychiatric facilities. No study to date has investigated patients referred from psychiatric facilities to dental facilities. Objective To analyze the psychiatric diagnoses of chronic oral pain patients, diagnosed with BMS and AO, and referred from psychiatric facilities to dental facilities. Study design Psychiatric diagnoses and disease conditions of BMS or AO were investigated in 162 patients by reviewing patients’ medical records and referral forms. Psychiatric diagnoses were categorized according to the International Statistical Classification of Disease and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision. Results The proportion of F4 classification (neurotic, stress-related, and somatoform disorders) in AO patients was significantly higher than in BMS patients. BMS patients were more frequently given a F3 classification (mood/affective disorders). However, 50.8% of BMS patients and 33.3% of AO patients had no specific psychiatric diagnoses. Conclusion Although BMS and AO are both chronic pain disorders occurring in the absence of any organic cause, the psychiatric diagnoses of patients with BMS and AO differ

  5. Global Burned Area and Biomass Burning Emissions from Small Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; vanderWerf, G. R.; Rogers, B. M.; Morton, D. C.

    2012-01-01

    In several biomes, including croplands, wooded savannas, and tropical forests, many small fires occur each year that are well below the detection limit of the current generation of global burned area products derived from moderate resolution surface reflectance imagery. Although these fires often generate thermal anomalies that can be detected by satellites, their contributions to burned area and carbon fluxes have not been systematically quantified across different regions and continents. Here we developed a preliminary method for combining 1-km thermal anomalies (active fires) and 500 m burned area observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to estimate the influence of these fires. In our approach, we calculated the number of active fires inside and outside of 500 m burn scars derived from reflectance data. We estimated small fire burned area by computing the difference normalized burn ratio (dNBR) for these two sets of active fires and then combining these observations with other information. In a final step, we used the Global Fire Emissions Database version 3 (GFED3) biogeochemical model to estimate the impact of these fires on biomass burning emissions. We found that the spatial distribution of active fires and 500 m burned areas were in close agreement in ecosystems that experience large fires, including savannas across southern Africa and Australia and boreal forests in North America and Eurasia. In other areas, however, we observed many active fires outside of burned area perimeters. Fire radiative power was lower for this class of active fires. Small fires substantially increased burned area in several continental-scale regions, including Equatorial Asia (157%), Central America (143%), and Southeast Asia (90%) during 2001-2010. Globally, accounting for small fires increased total burned area by approximately by 35%, from 345 Mha/yr to 464 Mha/yr. A formal quantification of uncertainties was not possible, but sensitivity

  6. The rhizosphere microbiome of burned holm-oak: potential role of the genus Arthrobacter in the recovery of burned soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-González, Antonio J; Martínez-Hidalgo, Pilar; Cobo-Díaz, José F; Villadas, Pablo J; Martínez-Molina, Eustoquio; Toro, Nicolás; Tringe, Susannah G; Fernández-López, Manuel

    2017-07-20

    After a forest wildfire, the microbial communities have a transient alteration in their composition. The role of the soil microbial community in the recovery of an ecosystem following such an event remains poorly understood. Thus, it is necessary to understand the plant-microbe interactions that occur in burned soils. By high-throughput sequencing, we identified the main bacterial taxa of burnt holm-oak rhizosphere, then we obtained an isolate collection of the most abundant genus and its growth promoting activities were characterised. 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing showed that the genus Arthrobacter comprised more than 21% of the total community. 55 Arthrobacter strains were isolated and characterized using RAPDs and sequencing of the almost complete 16S rRNA gene. Our results indicate that isolated Arthrobacter strains present a very high genetic diversity, and they could play an important ecological role in interaction with the host plant by enhancing aerial growth. Most of the selected strains exhibited a great ability to degrade organic polymers in vitro as well as possibly presenting a direct mechanism for plant growth promotion. All the above data suggests that Arthrobacter can be considered as an excellent PGP rhizobacterium that may play an important role in the recovery of burned holm-oak forests.

  7. The relationship between the clinical features of idiopathic burning mouth syndrome and self-perceived quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braud, Adeline; Boucher, Yves

    2016-01-01

    In this descriptive study, we investigated the relationship between the clinical characteristics of idiopathic burning mouth syndrome (iBMS) and the quality of life. Eighteen iBMS patients were interviewed about their experience with pain, oral-associated complaints, cognitive status, and self-perceived quality of life using the French versions of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Global Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI). The Spearman coefficient was used to analyze correlations. The level of significance was fixed at P burning sensations with other oral complaints, including dry mouth (77.8%), tactile abnormalities (66.7%), thermal abnormalities (44.5%), and taste disturbances (38.9%). HAD-anxiety scores were higher than 10 in 38.8% of iBMS patients and HAD-depression scores were higher than 10 in 33.3% of patients. A significant correlation was found between the number of associated complaints and HAD-depression scores. The mean GOHAI-add score was 37.9 ± 9.6 (mean ± SD), and 94.5% of iBMS patients had a score lower than 50. GOHAI-add scores strongly correlated with pain intensity, which was calculated using a visual analog scale and duration of pain. Our findings indicate a strong correlation between iBMS-related pain and self-perceived oral health-related quality of life. In addition, a correlation was observed between iBMS-associated oral complaints and cognitive status.(J Oral Sci 58, 475-481, 2016).

  8. Expression-dependent pharmacology of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rivera-Acevedo, Ricardo E; Pless, Stephan Alexander; Schwarz, Stephan K W

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 channels are polymodal sensors of noxious stimuli and integral players in thermosensation, inflammation and pain signaling. It has been shown previously that under prolonged stimulation, these channels show dynamic pore dilation, providing...

  9. Orofacial complex regional pain syndrome: pathophysiologic mechanisms and functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Kyung Mi; Kim, Hyug-Gi; Kang, Soo-Kyung; Auh, Q-Schick; Hong, Jyung-Pyo; Chun, Yang-Hyun

    2017-08-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is one of the most challenging chronic pain conditions and is characterized by burning pain, allodynia, hyperalgesia, autonomic changes, trophic changes, edema, and functional loss involving mainly the extremities. Until recently, very few reports have been published concerning CRPS involving the orofacial area. We report on a 50-year-old female patient who presented with unbearable pain in all of her teeth and hypersensitivity of the facial skin. She also reported intractable pain in both extremities accompanied by temperature changes and orofacial pain that increased when the other pains were aggravated. In the case of CRPS with trigeminal neuropathic pain, protocols for proper diagnosis and prompt treatment have yet to be established in academia or in the clinical field. We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging for a thorough analysis of the cortical representation of the affected orofacial area immediately before and immediately after isolated light stimulus of the affected hand and foot and concluded that CRPS can be correlated with trigeminal neuropathy in the orofacial area. Furthermore, the patient was treated with carbamazepine administration and stellate ganglion block, which can result in a rapid improvement of pain in the trigeminal region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Burn mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third-degree b......Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third...... with infected burn wound compared with the burn wound only group. The burn mouse model resembles the clinical situation and provides an opportunity to examine or develop new strategies like new antibiotics and immune therapy, in handling burn wound victims much....

  11. Emerging targets and therapeutic approaches for the treatment of osteoarthritis pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Wahida; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-06-01

    Osteoarthritis is a complex and often painful disease that is inadequately controlled with current analgesics. This review discusses emerging targets and therapeutic approaches that may lead to the development of better analgesics. Aberrant excitability in peripheral and central pain pathways drives osteoarthritis pain, reversing this via modulation of nerve growth factor, voltage-gated sodium channel, voltage-gated calcium channel and transient receptor potential vanilloid one activity, and increasing inhibitory mechanisms through modulation of cannabinoid and descending modulatory systems hold promise for osteoarthritis pain therapy. Somatosensory phenotyping of chronic pain patients, as a surrogate of putative pain generating mechanisms, may predict patient response to treatment. Identification of new targets will inform and guide future research, aiding the development of more effective analgesics. Future clinical trial designs should implement sensory phenotyping of patients, as an inclusion or stratification criterion, in order to establish an individualized, mechanism-based treatment of osteoarthritis pain.

  12. Correlation between Burning Mouth Syndrome and Psychological Symptoms in Patients Attending to Zahedan Dental School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NM Bakhshan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by an oral burning sensation , usually in the absence of clinical and laboratory findings. BMS is estimated to involve 1 to 5% of the adult population and is mostly reported within middle-aged women. The etiology of this disease is not thoroughly identified yet and there is a debate over the significance of Psychological factors in creating BMS. This study intended to examine the relationship between psychological factors with pain reports and psychosocial profiles of BMS patients to determine whether psychological factors are related to pain reports and burning mouth of patients. Therefore frequencies of psychological factors were analyzed. Methods: 30 patients with BMS participated in this study. They were homogenous regarding age, sex with the control group. In addition, education was possibly homogenized. The participants completed SCL-90 questionnaire for their anxiety, depression, somatic and psychotic symptoms to be scrutinized. Then, t-test was applied to analyze the research data. Results: Mean of anxiety(case20/8, control 9/53, depression(case 26/53, control 13/40, somatic(case 23/7, control 15/26 and psychotic(case 19/60, control 8/10 symptoms were higher in BMS group rather than in control groups. T-test results indicated there was no statically significant difference between BMS and control group in regard to psychological symptoms(p< 0.0001. Conclusion: The study findings indicate that psychological disorders may predispose the patients to the development of BMS.

  13. The Evolution and Utility of the Burn Specific Health Scale: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    and family/ social relationships 0.55 [16]. The creators of the instrument made a number of assumptions when they developed the BSHS: the instrument...Image 0.83, psychological health 0.92, sexual health 0.86, physical activities 0.74, and family/ social relationships 0.55 - Internal consistency... social relationships in survivors of burns, it did not adequately address problems with skin, work, treatment regimens, pain, and itching. Furthermore

  14. Development of continuous energy Monte Carlo burn-up calculation code MVP-BURN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Sasaki, Makoto

    2001-01-01

    Burn-up calculations based on the continuous energy Monte Carlo method became possible by development of MVP-BURN. To confirm the reliably of MVP-BURN, it was applied to the two numerical benchmark problems; cell burn-up calculations for High Conversion LWR lattice and BWR lattice with burnable poison rods. Major burn-up parameters have shown good agreements with the results obtained by a deterministic code (SRAC95). Furthermore, spent fuel composition calculated by MVP-BURN was compared with measured one. Atomic number densities of major actinides at 34 GWd/t could be predicted within 10% accuracy. (author)

  15. The incidence of transient neurologic syndrome after spinal anesthesia with lidocaine or bupivacaine: The effects of needle type and surgical position: brief report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etezadi F

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBurning Transient Neurologic Syndrome (TNS which was first described by Schneider et al in 1993, is defined as a transient pain and dysesthesia in waist, buttocks and the lower limbs after spinal anesthesia.1,2 The incidence of TNS after spinal anesthesia with lidocaine is reported to be as high as 10-40%.3,4 This prospective study was designed to determine the incidence of TNS with two different types of drugs, lidocaine and bupivacaine, in lithotomy or supine positions as the primary outcomes and to determine the association between two different types of needles and surgical positions with the occurrence of TNS as the secondary outcome."nThe present study was conducted on 250 patients (ASA I-II, aged 18-60 years old, who were candidates for surgery in supine or lithotomy positions. According to the needle type (Sprotte or Quincke and the local anesthetic (lidocaine or bupivacaine all patients were randomly divided into four groups. After establishing standard monitoring, spinal anesthesia was performed in all sitting patients by attending anesthesiologists at L2-L3 or L3-L4 levels. The patients were placed in supine or lithotomy position, in regards to the surgical procedure. During the first three postoperative days, patients were observed for post spinal anesthesia complications, especially TNS. Any sensation of pain, dysesthesia, paresthesia or hyperalgesia in the low back area, buttocks, the anterior or posterior thigh, knees, either foot or both feet were recorded. Moreover, duration of pain, its radiation and its relation to sleep and the patients' position were all carefully considered. Ultimately, the patients' response to opioid (pethidine for analgesia was determined."nThe incidence of TNS was higher when spinal anesthesia was induced with lidocaine (68% vs. 22%, P=0.003. TNS developed in 85% of the patients in lidocaine group and 58% in bupivacaine group after surgery in lithotomy position (P=0.002. In 77 patients pain

  16. Pleuritic Chest Pain: Sorting Through the Differential Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reamy, Brian V; Williams, Pamela M; Odom, Michael Ryan

    2017-09-01

    Pleuritic chest pain is characterized by sudden and intense sharp, stabbing, or burning pain in the chest when inhaling and exhaling. Pulmonary embolism is the most common serious cause, found in 5% to 21% of patients who present to an emergency department with pleuritic chest pain. A validated clinical decision rule for pulmonary embolism should be employed to guide the use of additional tests such as d-dimer assays, ventilation-perfusion scans, or computed tomography angiography. Myocardial infarction, pericarditis, aortic dissection, pneumonia, and pneumothorax are other serious causes that should be ruled out using history and physical examination, electrocardiography, troponin assays, and chest radiography before another diagnosis is made. Validated clinical decision rules are available to help exclude coronary artery disease. Viruses are common causative agents of pleuritic chest pain. Coxsackieviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza, parainfluenza, mumps, adenovirus, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus are likely pathogens. Treatment is guided by the underlying diagnosis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are appropriate for pain management in those with virally triggered or nonspecific pleuritic chest pain. In patients with persistent symptoms, persons who smoke, and those older than 50 years with pneumonia, it is important to document radiographic resolution with repeat chest radiography six weeks after initial treatment.

  17. Bacterial infections in burn patients at a burn hospital in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekrami, Alireza; Kalantar, Enayat

    2007-12-01

    The major challenge for a burn team is nosocomial infection in burn patients, which is known to cause over 50% of burn deaths. Most studies on infection in burn patients focus on burn wound infection, whereas other nosocomial infections in these patients are not well described. We undertook this study to determine three types of nosocomial infections viz., burn wound infection, urinary tract infection, and blood stream infection in burn patients in a burn hospital in Iran. During the one year period (May 2003 to April 2004), 182 patients were included in this study. Blood, urine and wound biopsy samples were taken 7 and 14 days after admission to Taleghani Burn hospital. Isolation and identification of microorganisms was done using the standard procedure. Disk diffusion test were performed for all the isolates for antimicrobial susceptibility. Of the 182 patients, 140 (76.9%) acquired at least one type of infection of the 140, 116 patients (82.8%) were culture positive on day 7 while 24 (17.2%) on 14 days after admission. Primary wound infection was most common (72.5%), followed by blood stream (18.6%) and urinary tract infections (8.9 %). The microorganisms causing infections were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (37.5%), Staphylococcus aureus (20.2%), and Acinetobacter baumanni (10.4%). Among these isolates P. aeruginosa was found to be 100 per cent resistant to amikacin, gentamicin , carbenicillin, ciprofloxacin, tobramycin and ceftazidime; 58 per cent of S. aureus and 60 per cent of coagulase negative Staphylococcus were methicillin resistant. High prevalence of nosocomial infections and the presence of multidrug resistant bacteria, and methicillin resistant S. aureus in patients at Taleghani Burn Hospital suggest continuous surveillance of burn infections and develop strategies for antimicrobial resistance control and treatment of infectious complications.

  18. Comparing the reported burn conditions for different severity burns in porcine models: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Christine J; Cuttle, Leila

    2017-12-01

    There are many porcine burn models that create burns using different materials (e.g. metal, water) and different burn conditions (e.g. temperature and duration of exposure). This review aims to determine whether a pooled analysis of these studies can provide insight into the burn materials and conditions required to create burns of a specific severity. A systematic review of 42 porcine burn studies describing the depth of burn injury with histological evaluation is presented. Inclusion criteria included thermal burns, burns created with a novel method or material, histological evaluation within 7 days post-burn and method for depth of injury assessment specified. Conditions causing deep dermal scald burns compared to contact burns of equivalent severity were disparate, with lower temperatures and shorter durations reported for scald burns (83°C for 14 seconds) compared to contact burns (111°C for 23 seconds). A valuable archive of the different mechanisms and materials used for porcine burn models is presented to aid design and optimisation of future models. Significantly, this review demonstrates the effect of the mechanism of injury on burn severity and that caution is recommended when burn conditions established by porcine contact burn models are used by regulators to guide scald burn prevention strategies. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Silent Aortic Dissection Presenting as Transient Locked-In Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadour, Wadih; Goldwasser, Brian; Biederman, Robert W.; Taffe, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a medical emergency. Without prompt recognition and treatment, the mortality rate is high. An atypical presentation makes timely diagnosis difficult, especially if the patient is experiencing no characteristic pain. Many patients with aortic dissection are reported to have presented with various neurologic manifestations, but none with only a presentation of transient locked-in syndrome. Herein, we report a case of completely painless aortic dissection in a woman who presented with a transient episode of anarthria, quadriplegia, and preserved consciousness. On physical examination, she had a 40-point difference in blood pressure between her left and right arms, and a loud diastolic murmur. The diagnosis of acute aortic dissection was reached via a combination of radiography, computed tomography, echocardiography, and a high index of clinical suspicion. The patient underwent emergency surgery and ultimately experienced a successful outcome. To our knowledge, this is the 1st report of aortic dissection that presented solely as locked-in syndrome. We suggest that silent aortic dissection be added to the differential diagnosis for transient locked-in syndrome. PMID:18941610

  20. Neural and psychosocial mechanisms of pain sensitivity in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Brian

    2014-06-01

    Fibromyalgia is a chronic musculoskeletal pain disorder that affects an estimated 5 million adults in the U.S. The hallmark is burning, searing, tingling, shooting, stabbing, deep aching, or sharp pain. Fibromyalgia is generally considered to be a "central sensitivity syndrome" where central sensitization is regarded as the cause of pain in its own right. Nonetheless, the case continues to be made that all central and spatially distributed peripheral components of fibromyalgia pain would fade if the peripheral generators could be silenced. Although neural mechanisms are clearly important in pain sensitivity, cognitive and social mechanisms also need to be considered. The aim of this review is to examine four mechanisms responsible for heightened pain sensitivity in fibromyalgia: peripheral sensitization, central sensitization, cognitive-emotional sensitization, and interpersonal sensitization. The purpose of framing the review in terms of pain sensitivity in fibromyalgia is to highlight that different mechanisms of sensitization are appropriately regarded as intervening variables when it comes to understanding individual differences in the experience of pain. The paper concludes by considering the implications of the findings of the review for explanations of fibromyalgia pain by nurses working in multidisciplinary teams. The trend appears to be able to explain the cause of fibromyalgia pain in terms of sensitization per se. The recommended alternative is to explain fibromyalgia pain in terms of changes in pain sensitivity and the role of underlying neural and psychosocial mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Perceived stereotyping and seeking care for chronic vulvar pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ruby H N; Turner, Rachael M; Rydell, Sarah A; Maclehose, Richard F; Harlow, Bernard L

    2013-10-01

    We examined stereotyping of chronic pain sufferers among women aged 18-40 years and determined whether perceived stereotyping affects seeking care for women with chronic vulvar pain. Cross-sectional study using a community-based survey of vulvodynia asking if "Doctors think that people with chronic pain exaggerate their pain," and if "People believe that vulvar pain is used as an excuse to avoid having sex". Twelve thousand eight hundred thirty-four women aged 18-40 years in metropolitan Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota. Women were considered to have a history of chronic vulvar pain if they reported vulvar burning lasting more than 3 months or vulvar pain on contact. Four thousand nine hundred eighty-seven (38.9%) women reported a chronic pain condition; 1,651 had chronic vulvar pain. Women experiencing chronic pain were more likely than those without to perceive stereotyping from both doctors and others; a dose-response with the number of pain conditions existed. Women with chronic vulvar pain were more likely to believe that people think vulvar pain is an excuse to avoid intercourse. Half of the women with chronic vulvar pain did not seek medical care for it; of these, 40.4% perceived stereotyping from doctors. However, it was women who actually sought care (45.1%) who were more likely to feel stigmatized by doctors (adjusted relative risk = 1.11, 95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.23). Perceived negative stereotyping among chronic pain sufferers is common, particularly negative perceptions about physicians. In fact, chronic vulvar pain sufferers who felt stigmatized were more likely to have sought care than those who did not feel stigmatized. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Thermal-Hydraulic Analyses of Transients in an Actinide-Burner Reactor Cooled by Forced Convection of Lead Bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Cliff Bybee

    2003-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are investigating the suitability of lead or lead–bismuth cooled fast reactors for producing low-cost electricity as well as for actinide burning. The current analysis evaluated a pool type design that relies on forced circulation of the primary coolant, a conventional steam power conversion system, and a passive decay heat removal system. The ATHENA computer code was used to simulate various transients without reactor scram, including a primary coolant pump trip, a station blackout, and a step reactivity insertion. The reactor design successfully met identified temperature limits for each of the transients analyzed.

  3. use of combined paracetamol and low dose ketamine in pain control

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Setting: The burns ward of Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, a 750 bed capacity tertiary centre in Western ... Results: Of the Fifty nine patients who were recruited into the study, seventy percent of them were ... in a cylinder, self inflating bag for ventilation, face masks .... Behavioral Tool in Assessing Acute Pain in Critically.

  4. DEMONSTRATION IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK OF AN ALTERNATE BASELINE SCENARIO FOR ITER AND OTHER BURNING PLASMA EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LUCE, T.C.; WADE, M.R.; FERRON, J.R.; HYATT, A.W.; KELLMAN, A.G.; KINSEY, J.E.; LAHAY, R.J.; LASNIER, C.J.; MURAKAMI, M.; POLITZER, P.A.; SCOVILLE, J.T.

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 DEMONSTRATION IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK OF AN ALTERNATE BASELINE SCENARIO FOR ITER AND OTHER BURNING PLASMA EXPERIMENTS. Discharges which can satisfy the high gain goals of burning plasma experiments have been demonstrated in the DIII-D tokamak in stationary conditions with relatively low plasma current (q 95 > 4). A figure of merit for fusion gain Β N H 89 /q 95 2 has been maintained at values corresponding to Q = 10 operation in a burning plasma for > 6 s or 36 τ E and 2 τ R . The key element is the relaxation of the current profile to a stationary state with q min > 1, which allows stable operation up to the no-wall ideal β limit. These plasmas maintain particle balance by active pumping rather than transient wall conditions. The reduced current lessens significantly the potential for structural damage in the event of a major disruption

  5. Nonsuicidal self-injury and diminished pain perception: the role of emotion dysregulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franklin, J.C.; Aaron, R.V.; Arthur, M.S.; Shorkey, S.P.; Prinstein, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is the deliberate destruction of one's own body tissue in the absence of suicidal intent (e.g., cutting or burning the skin). Previous studies have found that people with a history of NSSI display diminished pain perception. However, it remains unclear why this effect

  6. Macrophage-to-sensory neuron crosstalk mediated by Angiotensin II type-2 receptor elicits neuropathic pain

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Eric; Shepherd, Andrew; Mickle, Aaron; Copits, Bryan; Karlsson, Pall; Kadunganattil, Suraj; Golden, Judith; Tadinada, Satya; Mack, Madison; Haroutounian, Simon; De Kloet, Annette; Samineni, Vijay; Valtcheva, Manouela; Mcilvried, Lisa; Sheahan, Tayler

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral nerve damage initiates a complex series of cellular and structural processes that culminate in chronic neuropathic pain. Our study defines local angiotensin signaling via activation of the Angiotensin II (Ang II) type-2 receptor (AT2R) on macrophages as the critical trigger of neuropathic pain. An AT2R-selective antagonist attenuates neuropathic, but not inflammatory pain hypersensitivity in mice, and requires the cell damage-sensing ion channel transient receptor potential family-...

  7. Deep brain stimulation for phantom limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittar, Richard G; Otero, Sofia; Carter, Helen; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2005-05-01

    Phantom limb pain is an often severe and debilitating phenomenon that has been reported in up to 85% of amputees. Its pathophysiology is poorly understood. Peripheral and spinal mechanisms are thought to play a role in pain modulation in affected individuals; however central mechanisms are also likely to be of importance. The neuromatrix theory postulates a genetically determined representation of body image, which is modified by sensory input to create a neurosignature. Persistence of the neurosignature may be responsible for painless phantom limb sensations, whereas phantom limb pain may be due to abnormal reorganisation within the neuromatrix. This study assessed the clinical outcome of deep brain stimulation of the periventricular grey matter and somatosensory thalamus for the relief of chronic neuropathic pain associated with phantom limb in three patients. These patients were assessed preoperatively and at 3 month intervals postoperatively. Self-rated visual analogue scale pain scores assessed pain intensity, and the McGill Pain Questionnaire assessed the quality of the pain. Quality of life was assessed using the EUROQOL EQ-5D scale. Periventricular gray stimulation alone was optimal in two patients, whilst a combination of periventricular gray and thalamic stimulation produced the greatest degree of relief in one patient. At follow-up (mean 13.3 months) the intensity of pain was reduced by 62% (range 55-70%). In all three patients, the burning component of the pain was completely alleviated. Opiate intake was reduced in the two patients requiring morphine sulphate pre-operatively. Quality of life measures indicated a statistically significant improvement. This data supports the role for deep brain stimulation in patients with phantom limb pain. The medical literature relating to the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of this clinical entity is reviewed in detail.

  8. Pain catastrophizing as a risk factor for chronic pain after total knee arthroplasty: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burns LC

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay C Burns,1–3 Sarah E Ritvo,1 Meaghan K Ferguson,1 Hance Clarke,3–5 Ze’ev Seltzer,3,5 Joel Katz1,3–5 1Department of Psychology, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Arthritis Research Centre of Canada, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3Department of Anesthesia and Pain Management, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada; 4Department of Anesthesia, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 5Centre for the Study of Pain, Faculties of Dentistry and Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Background: Total knee arthroplasty (TKA is a common and costly surgical procedure. Despite high success rates, many TKA patients develop chronic pain in the months and years following surgery, constituting a public health burden. Pain catastrophizing is a construct that reflects anxious preoccupation with pain, inability to inhibit pain-related fears, amplification of the significance of pain vis-à-vis health implications, and a sense of helplessness regarding pain. Recent research suggests that it may be an important risk factor for untoward TKA outcomes. To clarify this impact, we systematically reviewed the literature to date on pain catastrophizing as a prospective predictor of chronic pain following TKA. Methods: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases to identify articles related to pain catastrophizing, TKA, risk models, and chronic pain. We reviewed titles and abstracts to identify original research articles that met our specified inclusion criteria. Included articles were then rated for methodological quality. including methodological quality. Due to heterogeneity in follow-up, analyses, and outcomes reported across studies, a quantitative meta-analysis could not be performed. Results: We identified six prospective longitudinal studies with small-to-mid-sized samples that met the inclusion criteria. Despite considerable variability in reported pain outcomes, pain catastrophizing was identified as a significant

  9. Full Core Burn-up Calculation at JRR-3 with MVP-BURN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komeda, Masao; Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Research reactors use a burnable poison to suppress an excess reactivity in the beginning of reactor lifetime. The JRR-3 (Japan Research Reactor No.3) has used cadmium wires of radius 0.02 cm as a burnable poison. This report describes burn-up calculations of plate fuel models and full core models with MVP-BURN, which is a burn-up calculation code using Monte Carlo method and has been developed in JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency). As the results of calculations of plate models, between a model composed of one burn-up region along the radius direction and a model composed of a few burn-up regions along the radius direction, the effective absorption cross section of 113 Cd has had different tendency on reaching approximate 40. day (10000 MWd/t). And as results of calculations of full core model, it has been indicated that k eff is almost same till approximate 80. day (22000 MWd/t) between a model composed of one burn-up region along the vertical direction and a model composed of a few burn-up regions along the vertical direction. However difference of 113 Cd burn-up becomes pronounced and each k eff makes a difference after 80. day. (authors)

  10. Educational Materials - Burn Wise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn Wise outreach material. Burn Wise is a partnership program of that emphasizes the importance of burning the right wood, the right way, in the right wood-burning appliance to protect your home, health, and the air we breathe.

  11. HECTR [Hydrogen Event: Containment Transient Response] analyses of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) premixed combustion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.C.

    1988-11-01

    The HECTR (Hydrogen Event: Containment Transient Response) computer code has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to predict the transient pressure and temperature responses within reactor containments for hypothetical accidents involving the transport and combustion of hydrogen. Although HECTR was designed primarily to investigate these phenomena in LWRs, it may also be used to analyze hydrogen transport and combustion experiments as well. It is in this manner that HECTR is assessed and empirical correlations, such as the combustion completeness and flame speed correlations for the hydrogen combustion model, if necessary, are upgraded. In this report, we present HECTR analyses of the large-scale premixed hydrogen combustion experiments at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and comparison with the test results. The existing correlations in HECTR version 1.0, under certain conditions, have difficulty in predicting accurately the combustion completeness and burn time for the NTS experiments. By combining the combustion data obtained from the NTS experiments with other experimental data (FITS, VGES, ACUREX, and Whiteshell), a set of new and better combustion correlations was generated. HECTR prediction of the containment responses, using a single-compartment model and EPRI-provided combustion completeness and burn time, compares reasonably well against the test results. However, HECTR prediction of the containment responses using a multicompartment model does not compare well with the test results. This discrepancy shows the deficiency of the homogeneous burning model used in HECTR. To overcome this deficiency, a flame propagation model is highly recommended. 16 refs., 84 figs., 5 tabs

  12. Transient osteoporosis or femoral head necrosis Early diagnosis via MRI. Transitorische Osteoporose oder Femurkopfnekrose Fruehdiagnose mit der MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higer, H P; Grimm, J; Pedrosa, P; Apel, R; Bandilla, K [Stiftung Deutsche Klinik fuer Diagnostik, Wiesbaden (Germany, F.R.). Fachbereich Kernspintomographie; Stiftung Deutsche Klinik fuer Diagnostik, Wiesbaden (Germany, F.R.). Fachbereich Rheumatologie; Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Orthopaedische Klinik und Poliklinik)

    1989-04-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip is a syndrome that does not seem to be widely known; this is also true for its radiological appearance. It is often mistaken for avascular necrosis of the femoral head, metastatic or inflammatory disease. These differential diagnoses lead to more or less invasive procedures, although transient osteoporosis does not require more than immobilisation for complete remission. MRI was done in 38 patients with acute hip pain, 13 had femoral head necrosis and 8 transient osteoporosis. Follow-up studies via MRI in patients with transient osteoporosis revealed 3 stages (diffuse, focal, residual) during the clinical course of which stage II is similar to femoral head necrosis but always without the typical sclerotic rim. (orig.).

  13. Cognitive profile of patients with burning mouth syndrome in the Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Hirofumi; Himachi, Mika; Furukawa, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Shiho; Shoki, Harumi; Motoya, Ryo; Saito, Masato; Abiko, Yoshihiro; Sakano, Yuji

    2010-07-01

    The present study investigated which cognitive characteristics, including cancer phobia, self-efficacy, pain-related catastrophizing, and anxiety sensitivity, affect burning mouth syndrome (BMS) symptoms in the Japanese population. A total of 46 BMS patients (44 women and 2 men; mean age, 59.98 +/- 9.57 years; range, 30-79 years) completed a battery of questionnaires, including measures of pain severity, oral-related quality of life (QOL), stress-response, pain-related catastrophizing, self-efficacy, anxiety sensitivity, and tongue cancer phobia. The Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), and Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) scores in the BMS patients were compared with the scores of Japanese healthy participants (PCS, n = 449; GSES, n = 278; ASI, n = 9603) reported in previous studies. Catastrophizing and anxiety sensitivity were significantly higher in the BMS patients than in the healthy subjects (P disability, social disability, and handicap. Cancer phobia was significantly correlated with psychological disability and handicap. Since catastrophizing showed a higher correlation with BMS symptoms than cancer phobia, catastrophizing might be a more significant cognitive factor affecting symptoms than cancer phobia in BMS patients in the Japanese population.

  14. Transient osteoporosis of the hip, complete resolution after treatment with Alendronate as observed by MRI Description of 8 cases and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emad, Y.; Ragab, Y.; El Shaarawy, Nashwa; Rasker, Johannes J.

    2012-01-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH), also referred to as transient bone marrow edema syndrome, is most common in middle-aged men and often after trivial trauma or sport-related injuries. Diagnosis is usually made by eliminating other possible causes of hip pain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

  15. Burning mouth syndrome and associated factors: A case-control retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenos-Küstner, Eduardo; de Luca-Monasterios, Fiorella; Schemel-Suárez, Mayra; Rodríguez de Rivera-Campillo, María E; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro M; López-López, José

    2017-02-23

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) can be defined as burning pain or dysesthesia on the tongue and/or other sites of the oral mucosa without a causative identifiable lesion. The discomfort is usually of daily recurrence, with a higher incidence among people aged 50 to 60 years, affecting mostly the female sex and diminishing their quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between several pathogenic factors and burning mouth syndrome. 736 medical records of patients diagnosed of burning mouth syndrome and 132 medical records for the control group were studied retrospectively. The study time span was from January 1990 to December 2014. The protocol included: sex, age, type of oral discomfort and location, among other factors. Analysis of the association between pathogenic factors and BMS diagnosis revealed that only 3 factors showed a statistically significant association: triggers (P=.003), parafunctional habits (P=.006), and oral hygiene (P=.012). There were neither statistically significant differences in BMS incidence between sex groups (P=.408) nor association of BMS with the pathogenic factors of substance abuse (P=.915), systemic pathology (P=.685), and dietary habits (P=.904). Parafunctional habits like bruxism and abnormal movements of tongue and lips can explain the BMS main symptomatology. Psychological aspects and systemic factors should be always considered. As a multifactorial disorder, the treatment of BMS should be executed in a holistic way. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. A study of transient jet and spray using a Schlieren method and digital image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulsen, H.

    1995-12-31

    This thesis discusses visualization and image-based data acquisition and analyses on transient gas jet, evaporating spray and burning jet in an attempt to find a method of measuring the transient behaviour of these phenomena, which influence the combustion process in diesel engines. The experimental approach is based on visualization of the injection process inside a constant volume air chamber. The influence of different experimental conditions such as fuel type, injection conditions, temperature and pressure of the chamber is investigated. To control the dynamics of the injection, a constant pressure injection system is used. The dynamics of the fuel injection system itself is not discussed. A full-field classical Schlieren technique is used, and the data recorded by means of a CCD camera and frame-grabber combination. The method has the unusual property of being particularly useful for measurements on a dynamic system, since the gradients in the light refraction index used by the Schlieren method are enhanced by the dynamics. The method was used to measure local gas concentration inside a room temperature methane gas jet, and vapour phase concentration evaporating propane spray. The system was also used to measure the local temperature of burning methane jet based on calculated density distribution. 47 refs., 92 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Towards a mechanistic understanding of transient fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, J.R.; Small, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent experimental results on transient fission gas release from oxide fuels are briefly reviewed. These together with associated microstructural observations are compared with the main models for fission gas behaviour. Single gas atom diffusion, bubble migration, heterogeneous percolation and grain boundary sweeping are examined as possible release mechanisms. The role of gas trapping in bubbles and re-solution by irradiation and thermal processes are included in the comparison. As much of the data, and the main range of interest for light water reactor fuels, is for release during mild transients in fuel with a burn-up below 4%, the role of gas retention on grain boundaries is very important and in some cases dominant. The grain boundaries are found to respond very differently to various gas arrival rates and to local temperature conditions. This can lead to early interlinkage and release in some cases, but retention with accompanying large swelling in others. The role of fission products and the local oxygen content of the fuel are found to be important. The effective fuel stoichiometry is likely to change significantly during transients with substantial effects on the transport processes controlling fission gas behaviour. The results of the evaluation of the models are summarized in mechanism maps for intragranular and grain boundary behaviour. (author). 36 refs, 8 figs

  18. Clinical effectiveness, quality of life and cost-effectiveness of Flaminal® versus Flamazine® in the treatment of partial thickness burns: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashaan, Zjir M; Krijnen, Pieta; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; van Baar, Margriet E; Vloemans, Adrianus F P; Dokter, Jan; Tempelman, Fenike R H; van der Vlies, Cees H; Breederveld, Roelf S

    2016-03-05

    Partial thickness burns are painful, difficult to manage and can have a negative effect on quality of life through scarring, permanent disfigurement and loss of function. The aim of burn treatment in partial thickness burns is to save lives, stimulate wound healing by creating an optimumly moist wound environment, to have debriding and analgesic effects, protect the wound from infection and be convenient for the patient and caregivers. However, there is no consensus on the optimal treatment of partial thickness wounds. Flaminal® and Flamazine® are two standard treatment options that provide the above mentioned properties in burn treatment. Nevertheless, no randomized controlled study has yet compared these two common treatment modalities in partial thickness burns. Thus, the aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical effectiveness, quality of life and cost-effectiveness of Flaminal® versus Flamazine® in the treatment of partial thickness burns. In this two-arm open multi-center randomized controlled trial, 90 patients will be randomized between Flaminal® and Flamazine® and followed for 12 months. The study population will consist of competent or temporarily non-competent (because of sedation and/or intubation) patients, 18 years of age or older, with acute partial thickness burns and a total body surface area (TBSA) of less than 30 %. The main study outcome is time to complete re-epithelialization (greater than 95 %). Secondary outcome measures include need for grafting, wound colonization/infection, number of dressing changes, pain and anxiety, scar formation, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and costs. This study will contribute to the optimal treatment of patients with partial thickness burn wounds and will provide evidence on the (cost-)effectiveness and quality of life of Flaminal® versus Flamazine® in the treatment of partial thickness burns. Netherlands Trial Register NTR4486 , registered on 2 April 2014.

  19. Deciding Where to Burn: Stakeholder Priorities for Prescribed Burning of a Fire-Dependent Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K. Costanza

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiagency partnerships increasingly work cooperatively to plan and implement fire management. The stakeholders that comprise such partnerships differ in their perceptions of the benefits and risks of fire use or nonuse. These differences inform how different stakeholders prioritize sites for burning, constrain prescribed burning, and how they rationalize these priorities and constraints. Using a survey of individuals involved in the planning and implementation of prescribed fire in the Onslow Bight region of North Carolina, we examined how the constraints and priorities for burning in the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris ecosystem differed among three stakeholder groups: prescribed burn practitioners from agencies, practitioners from private companies, and nonpractitioners. Stakeholder groups did not differ in their perceptions of constraints to burning, and development near potentially burned sites was the most important constraint identified. The top criteria used by stakeholders to decide where to burn were the time since a site was last burned, and a site's ecosystem health, with preference given to recently burned sites in good health. Differences among stakeholder groups almost always pertained to perceptions of the nonecological impacts of burning. Prescribed burning priorities of the two groups of practitioners, and particularly practitioners from private companies, tended to be most influenced by nonecological impacts, especially through deprioritization of sites that have not been burned recently or are in the wildland-urban interface (WUI. Our results highlight the difficulty of burning these sites, despite widespread laws in the southeast U.S. that limit liability of prescribed burn practitioners. To avoid ecosystem degradation on sites that are challenging to burn, particularly those in the WUI, conservation partnerships can facilitate demonstration projects involving public and private burn practitioners on those sites. In summary

  20. Epidemiology of burns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dokter, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to understand the epidemiology, treatment and outcomes of specialized burn care in The Netherlands. This thesis is mainly based on historical data of the burn centre in Rotterdam from 1986, combined with historical data from the burn centres in Groningen and Beverwijk from

  1. Burns and military clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, A D

    2001-02-01

    Burn injury is a ubiquitous threat in the military environment. The risks during combat are well recognised, but the handling of fuel, oil, munitions and other hot or flammable materials during peacetime deployment and training also imposes an inherent risk of accidental burn injury. Over the last hundred years, the burn threat in combat has ranged from nuclear weapons to small shoulder-launched missiles. Materials such as napalm and white phosphorus plainly present a risk of burn, but the threat extends to encompass personnel in vehicles attacked by anti-armour weapons, large missiles, fuel-air explosives and detonations/conflagrations on weapons platforms such as ships. Large numbers of burn casualties were caused at Pearl Harbor, in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Vietnam, during the Arab/Israeli Wars and in the Falkland Islands conflict. The threat from burns is unlikely to diminish, indeed new developments in weapons seek to exploit the vulnerability of the serviceman and servicewoman to burns. Clothing can be a barrier to some types of burn--both inherently in the properties of the material, but also by trapping air between clothing layers. Conversely, ignition of the clothing may exacerbate a burn. There is hearsay that burnt clothing products within a wound may complicate the clinical management, or that materials that melt (thermoplastic materials) should not be worn if there is a burn threat. This paper explores the incidence of burn injury, the mechanisms of heat transfer to bare skin and skin covered by materials, and the published evidence for the complication of wound management by materials. Even light-weight combat clothing can offer significant protection to skin from short duration flash burns; the most vulnerable areas are the parts of the body not covered--face and hands. Multilayered combat clothing can offer significant protection for short periods from engulfment by flames; lightweight tropical wear with few layers offers little protection. Under

  2. Ceruloplasmin and Hypoferremia: Studies in Burn and Non-Burn Trauma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-06

    ceruloplasmin; ferroxidase; iron status; oxidant stress; burn; trauma 1. Introduction Iron is an essential element for life that facilitates...899–906. 45. Shakespeare , P.G. Studies on the serum levels of iron, copper and zinc and the urinary excretion of zinc after burn injury. Burns Incl

  3. Simulation of burning plasma dynamics in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.F.; Amano, T.; Ogawa, Y.; Inoue, N.

    1996-02-01

    Dynamics of burning plasma for various transient situations in ITER plasma has been simulated with a 1.5-dimensional up-down asymmetry Tokamak Transport Simulation Code (TTSC). We have mainly paid attention to intrinsic plasma transport processes such as the confinement improvement and the change of plasma profiles. It is shown that a large excursion of the fusion power takes place with a small improvement of the plasma confinement; e.g., an increase of the global energy confinement by a factor of 1.22 yields the fusion power excursion of ∼ 30% within a few seconds. Any feedback control of fueling D-T gas is difficult to respond to this short time scale of fusion power transient. The effect of the plasma profile on the fusion power excursion has been studied, by changing the particle transport denoted by the inward pinch parameter C V . It is found that the fusion power excursion is mild and slow, and the feedback control is quite effective in suppressing the fusion power excursion and in shortening the duration time of power transient in this case. The change in the pumping efficiency has also been studied and a large excursion of the fusion power has not been observed, because of the decrease in the fuel density itself in the case of the increase in the pumping efficiency, and the helium ash accumulation in the case of the decrease in the pumping efficiency. Finally it is shown that the MHD sawteeth activity leads to the fusion power fluctuation of ± 20%, although it is helpful for the helium ash exhaust. (author)

  4. The effectiveness of virtual reality distraction for pain reduction: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Kevin M; Milling, Leonard S

    2010-12-01

    Virtual reality technology enables people to become immersed in a computer-simulated, three-dimensional environment. This article provides a comprehensive review of controlled research on the effectiveness of virtual reality (VR) distraction for reducing pain. To be included in the review, studies were required to use a between-subjects or mixed model design in which VR distraction was compared with a control condition or an alternative intervention in relieving pain. An exhaustive search identified 11 studies satisfying these criteria. VR distraction was shown to be effective for reducing experimental pain, as well as the discomfort associated with burn injury care. Studies of needle-related pain provided less consistent findings. Use of more sophisticated virtual reality technology capable of fully immersing the individual in a virtual environment was associated with greater relief. Overall, controlled research suggests that VR distraction may be a useful tool for clinicians who work with a variety of pain problems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanical sensitivity and psychological factors in patients with burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Mika; Iida, Takashi; Kamiyama, Hirona; Masuda, Manabu; Kawara, Misao; Svensson, Peter; Komiyama, Osamu

    2018-05-18

    The aim of this study was to compare mechanical sensitivity on the tongue using quantitative sensory testing (QST) and psychological factors using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) between burning mouth syndrome (BMS) patients and healthy participants. Participants comprised 20 female BMS patients (68.1 ± 7.4 years) and 20 healthy females (65.4 ± 4.6 years). Psychological factors were evaluated with GHQ. Tactile detection thresholds (TDT) and filament-prick pain detection thresholds (FPT) were used to evaluate mechanical sensitivity on the tongue in all participants. TDT and FPT were measured on the tongue within both the painful area and the non-painful area in BMS patients, and on the tongue on both sides in healthy participants. As controls, TDT and FPT were measured with Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments on the skin of the mentum and palm in all participants. GHQ scores were significantly higher in BMS patients than in healthy participants (P = 0.024). No significant differences in TDT or FPT on the tongue, mentum, or palm were seen between BMS patients and healthy participants (P > 0.05). BMS patients showed no significant differences in TDT or FPT between the painful and non-painful areas on the tongue (P > 0.05). There were no significant correlations among TDT/FPT and GHQ score in BMS patients (P > 0.05). These findings could indicate a more important role for psychological factors than mechanical sensitivity in BMS pathophysiology. Pain on the tongue in elderly female patients with BMS may be more related to psychological factors.

  6. Burn Wise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn Wise is a partnership program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that emphasizes the importance of burning the right wood, the right way, in the right appliance to protect your home, health, and the air we breathe.

  7. Risk of Incidence of Hock Burn and Pododermatitis in Broilers Reared under Commercial Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FG Jacob

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The most common lesions observed in commercial broiler farms are hock burns and pododermatitis, defined as necrotic lesions on the plantar surface of the footpads and in the hock of growing broilers, causing pain and compromising broiler welfare. The present study aimed at identifying the risks of hock burns and pododermatitis in broilers reared under commercial conditions on new or reused litter. Twenty-four 40-d-old broilers reared in two houses in a commercial broiler farm. The plantar surface of the footpads and the hocks of broiler were recorded using infrared thermal images. The incidence of hock burns in broilers reared on new litter was 0.72 times lower than those on reused litter. Broilers reared on new litter presented lower risk (0.75, RR<1 of presenting pododermatitis when compared to those reared on reused litter. When simulating the risk using a larger sample, the simulated risk of broilers presenting footpad and hock lesions when reared on new litter was 38% higher those reared on reused litter.

  8. Effects of radiation, burn and combined radiation-burn injury on hemodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Benlan; Cheng Tianming; Xiao Jiasi

    1996-01-01

    Changes in hemodynamics after radiation, burn and combined radiation burn injury within eight hours post injury were studied. The results indicate: (1) Shock of rats in the combined injury group is more severe than that in the burn group. One of the reasons is that the blood volume in the combined injury group is less than that in the burn group. Radiation injury plays an important role in this effect, which enhances the increase in vascular permeability and causes the loss of plasma. (2) Decrease in cardiac output and stroke work and increase in vascular resistance in the combined radiation burn group are more drastic than those in the burn group, which may cause and enhance shock. Replenishing fluid is useful for recovery of hemodynamics. (3) Rb uptake is increased in the radiation group which indicates that compensated increase of myocardial nutritional blood flow may take place before the changes of hemodynamics and shock. Changes of Rb uptake in the combined injury group is different from that in the radiation groups and in the burn group. The results also suggest that changes of ion channel activities may occur to a different extent after injury. (4) Verapamil is helpful to the recovery of hemodynamics post injury. It is better to combine verapamil with replenishing fluid

  9. Duloxetine in the treatment of burning mouth syndrome refractory to conventional treatment: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon-Dong; Lee, Ji-Hye; Shim, Jee-Hoon

    2014-06-01

    Patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS) report burning sensation and pain involving the tongue and oral mucosa without any apparent medical or dental cause. The pathogenesis of this syndrome remains unclear and there is currently no standard treatment. BMS is, therefore, often misdiagnosed and its management is complex. This lack of clinical expertise may result in decreased health-related quality of life and increased psychological distress among patients with BMS. The present case report involves a 77-year-old female patient with BMS refractory to conventional treatment with nerve block and medication, who was successfully treated with duloxetine. Duloxetine may become a new therapeutic option in the management of BMS. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. CLINICAL STUDY OF ELECTRICAL BURNS AMONG ALL BURNS CASES- 3 YEARS’ EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagabathula Durga Prasad

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND With the advances in technology, electrical injuries are becoming more common and are the leading cause of work-related traumatic death. One third of all electrical traumas and most high-voltage injuries are job related and more than 50% of these injuries result from power line contact. The management of the major burn injury represents a significant challenge to every member of the burns team. Most of electrical burns present with gangrene of toes and limbs with eschar over body parts. Their presentation is mostly due to contact with high-voltage electricity at their work places. MATERIALS AND METHODS A retrospective study was made to study the clinico-social profile of patients suffering electric burns admitted into Department of General Surgery. RESULTS 92 cases were evaluated and studied. Majority of patients developed gangrene of limbs and toes. Amputations and skin grafting was done. Most patients who suffered electric burns were males of age group 21 to 40 years. All cases are accidental and mostly occurred at work places. Most electric burns are high-voltage based and caused deep burns. Major complications like acute renal failure and septicaemia were encountered. Most of them suffered 16 to 30% burns. Most commonly isolated organism from wounds is pseudomonas. Most of them suffered a hospital stay of 1 to 2 months. CONCLUSION Electric burns are a burden to the society. Prevention is the best way to deal with them. Electricity-based employees have to be trained properly regarding safety measures to be taken. General education of public regarding safety measures can prevent electrical burn injuries.

  11. Outcomes of burns in the elderly: revised estimates from the Birmingham Burn Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wearn, Christopher; Hardwicke, Joseph; Kitsios, Andreas; Siddons, Victoria; Nightingale, Peter; Moiemen, Naiem

    2015-09-01

    Outcomes after burn have continued to improve over the last 70 years in all age groups including the elderly. However, concerns have been raised that survival gains have not been to the same magnitude in elderly patients compared to younger age groups. The aims of this study were to analyze the recent outcomes of elderly burn injured patients admitted to the Birmingham Burn Centre, compare data with a historical cohort and published data from other burn centres worldwide. A retrospective review was conducted of all patients ≥65 years of age, admitted to our centre with cutaneous burns, between 2004 and 2012. Data was compared to a previously published historical cohort (1999-2003). 228 patients were included. The observed mortality for the study group was 14.9%. The median age of the study group was 79 years, the male to female ratio was 1:1 and median Total Body Surface Area (TBSA) burned was 5%. The incidence of inhalation injury was 13%. Median length of stay per TBSA burned for survivors was 2.4 days/% TBSA. Mortality has improved in all burn size groups, but differences were highly statistically significant in the medium burn size group (10-20% TBSA, p≤0.001). Burn outcomes in the elderly have improved over the last decade. This reduction has been impacted by a reduction in overall injury severity but is also likely due to general improvements in burn care, improved infrastructure, implementation of clinical guidelines and increased multi-disciplinary support, including Geriatric physicians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. Alice in Wonderland Syndrome, Burning Mouth Syndrome, Cold Stimulus Headache, and HaNDL: Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valença, Marcelo M; de Oliveira, Daniella A; Martins, Hugo André de L

    2015-10-01

    Unusual headache syndromes are not as infrequent in clinical practice as was generally believed. About three fourths of the classified headache disorders found in the ICHD-II can be considered rare. The aim of this narrative review was to perform a literature review of the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic criteria, and treatment of the following unusual headache disorders: Alice in Wonderland syndrome, burning mouth syndrome, cold stimulus headache, and the syndrome of transient headache and neurologic deficits with cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis. A literature review was performed using PubMed for each of the abovementioned headache disorders. The unusual headache syndromes as a distinct group of disorders are not as infrequent in clinical practice as was generally believed. Some of them, albeit considered as unusual, may occur with relative frequency, such as cold stimulus headache and burning mouth syndrome. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  13. Wound management and outcome of 595 electrical burns in a major burn center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haisheng; Tan, Jianglin; Zhou, Junyi; Yuan, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jiaping; Peng, Yizhi; Wu, Jun; Luo, Gaoxing

    2017-06-15

    Electrical burns are important causes of trauma worldwide. This study aims to analyze the clinical characteristics, wound management, and outcome of electric burns. This retrospective study was performed at the Institute of Burn Research of the Third Military Medical University during 2013-2015. Data including the demographics, injury patterns, wound treatment, and outcomes were collected and analyzed. A total of 595 electrical burn patients (93.8% males) were included. The average age was 37.3 ± 14.6 y, and most patients (73.5%) were aged 19∼50 years. Most patients (67.2%) were injured in work-related circumstances. The mean total body surface area was 8.8 ± 11.8% and most wounds (63.5%) were full-thickness burns. Operation times of high-voltage burns and current burns were higher than those of low-voltage burns and arc burns, respectively. Of the 375 operated patients, 83.2% (n = 312) underwent skin autografting and 49.3% (n = 185) required skin flap coverage. Common types of skin flaps were adjacent (50.3%), random (42.2%), and pedicle (35.7%). Amputation was performed in 107 cases (18.0%) and concentrated on the hands (43.9%) and upper limbs (39.3%). The mean length of stay was 42.9 ± 46.3 d and only one death occurred (0.2%). Current burns and higher numbers of operations were major risk factors for amputation and length of stay, respectively. Electrical burns mainly affected adult males with occupational exposures in China. Skin autografts and various skin flaps were commonly used for electric burn wound management. More standardized and effective strategies of treatment and prevention are still needed to decrease amputation rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of burn-specific health-related quality of life and patient scar status following burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyunjin; Boo, Sunjoo

    2017-11-01

    This study assessed patient-perceived levels of scar assessment and burn-specific quality of life (QOL) in Korean burn patients admitted to burn care centers and identified differences in scar assessment and QOL based on various patient characteristics. A cross-sectional descriptive study using anonymous paper-based survey methods was conducted with 100 burn patients from three burn centers specializing in burn care in South Korea. Mean subject age was 44.5 years old, and 69% of the subjects were men. The overall mean QOL was 2.91 out of 5. QOL was lowest for the work subdomain (2.25±1.45) followed by the treatment regimen subdomain (2.32±1.16). The subjects' mean total scar assessment score was 35.51 out of 60, and subjects were most unsatisfied with scar color. Subjects with low income, flame-source burns, severe burns, visible scars, and scars on face or hand reported significantly lower QOL. Subjects with severe burn degree and burn range perceived their burn scar condition to be worse than that of others. The results show that burn subjects experience the most difficulties with their work and the treatment regimen. Subjects with severe burn and visible scarring have a reduced QOL and a poor scar status. Scar management intervention may improve QOL of burn patients especially those with severe burn and visible scars. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the relationship between scar assessment and QOL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Migrating transient osteoporosis of the hip in a 30-year-old man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient osteoporosis of hip is a condition of unknown etiology, presenting as painful limping, and characterized by osteopenia of the involved joint without preexisting disease or immobilization. Most of the cases were reported in middle-aged men, and one-third of the cases develop in women in the third trimester of pregnancy. The hypothesis that this condition leads to avascular necrosis of the hip has been disproved by various reports and hence does not warrant any surgical interference. This is a self limiting condition, which needs regular follow-up. The authors report a case of migrating transient osteoporosis of the hip in a 30-year-old man successfully treated with antiresorptive treatment.

  16. HTR core physics and transient analyses by the Panthermix code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, J.B.M. de; Kuijper, J.C.; Oppe, J.

    2005-01-01

    At NRG Petten, core physics analyses on High Temperature gas-cooled Reactors (HTRs) are mainly performed by means of the PANTHERMIX code system. Since some years NRG is developing the HTR reactor physics code system WIMS/PANTHERMIX, based on the lattice code WIMS (Serco Assurance, UK), the 3-dimensional steady-state and transient core physics code PANTHER (British Energy, UK) and the 2-dimensional R-Z HTR thermal hydraulics code THERMIX-DIREKT (Research Centre FZJ Juelich, Germany). By means of the WIMS code nuclear data are being generated to suit the PANTHER code's neutronics. At NRG the PANTHER code has been interfaced with THERMIX-DIREKT to form PANTHERMIX, to enable core-follow/fuel management and transient analyses in a consistent manner on pebble bed type HTR systems. Also provisions have been made to simulate the flow of pebbles through the core of a pebble bed HTR, according to a given (R-Z) flow pattern. As examples of the versatility of the PANTHERMIX code system, calculations are presented on the PBMR, the South African pebble bed reactor design, to show the transient capabilities, and on a plutonium burning MEDUL-reactor, to demonstrate the core-follow/fuel management capabilities. For the investigated cases a good agreement is observed with the results of other HTR core physics codes

  17. Burning mouth syndrome associated with varicella zoster virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Maria A; Gilden, Don

    2016-07-05

    We present two cases of burning mouth syndrome (BMS)-of 8-month duration in a 61-year-old woman and of 2-year duration in a 63-year-old woman-both associated with increased levels of antivaricella zoster virus (VZV) IgM antibodies in serum and with pain that improved with antiviral treatment. Combined with our previous finding of BMS due to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, we recommend evaluation of patients with BMS not only for VZV or HSV-1 DNA in the saliva, but also for serum anti-VZV and anti-HSV-1 IgM antibodies. Both infections are treatable with oral antiviral agents. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  18. Epidemiology, etiology and outcomes of burn patients in a Referral Burn Hospital, Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Soltan Dallal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burns and its complications are regarded as a major problem in the society. Skin injuries resulted from ultraviolet radiation, radioactivity, electricity or chemicals as well as respiratory damage from smoke inhalation are considered burns. This study aimed to determine the epidemiology and outcome of burn patients admitted to Motahari Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Methods: Two hundred patients with second-degree burns admitted to Motahari Referral Center of Burn in Tehran, Iran. They were studied during a period of 12 months from May 2012 to May 2013. During the first week of treatment swabs were collected from the burn wounds after cleaning the site with sterile normal saline. Samples were inoculated in blood agar and McConkey agar, then incubation at 37 C for 48 hours. Identification was carried out according to standard conventional biochemical tests. Treatment continued up to epithelial formation and wound healing. Results of microbial culture for each patient was recorded. Healing time of the burn wounds in patients was recorded in log books. Chi-square test and SPSS Software v.19 (IBM, NY, USA were used for data analysis. Results: Our findings indicate that the most causes of burns are hot liquids in 57% of cases and flammable liquid in 21% of cases. The most cases of burns were found to be in the range of 21 to 30 percent with 17.5% and 7% in male and female respectively. Gram-negative bacteria were dominated in 85.7% and among them pseudomonas spp. with 37.5% were the most common cause of infected burns, followed by Enterobacter, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter and Klebsiella spp. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the most cause of burns in both sex is hot liquid. Men were more expose to burn than women and this might be due to the fact that men are involved in more dangerous jobs than female. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common organism encountered in burn infection.

  19. Refractory burning mouth syndrome: clinical and paraclinical evaluation, comorbiities, treatment and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsikostas, Dimos D; Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan; Deligianni, Christina I

    2017-12-01

    Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition characterized by persistent intraoral burning without related objective findings and unknown etiology that affects elderly females mostly. There is no satisfactory treatment for BMS. We aimed to observe the long-term efficacy of high velanfaxine doses combined with systemic and topical administered clonazepam in a particular subgroup of BMS patients who do not respond to current clinical management. Eight (66.1 ± 6.2 years old females) out of 14 BMS patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were treated with venlafaxine (300 mg/d) and clonazepam (5 mg/d) for 35.4 ± 12.1 (mean ± SD) months. The average duration of the symptoms at baseline was 4.3 ± 1.4 years and the overall mean daily pain intensity score was 8.6 ± 1.3 (VAS); pain was in tongue and within the oral mucosa, accompanying by oral and facial dysesthesia. In five patients tasting was abnormal. All patients had positive history of concomitant primary headache. The average score of Hamilton Rating scale for Anxiety and Depression was 21 ± 4.2, and 26.1 ± 2.9, respectively. Previous ineffective treatments include anticonvulsants and anti-depressants. All patients responded (more than 50% decrease in VAS) after three months treatment (mean VAS 3.2 ± 2.2) with no remarkable adverse events. BMS deserves bottomless psychiatric evaluation and management when current available treatments fail. Treatment with venlafaxine combined with topical and systemic clonazepam may be effective in refractory BMS cases but further investigation in a large-scale controlled study is needed to confirm these results.

  20. Analysis of some antecipated transients without scram for PWR type reactors by coupling of the CORAN code to the ALMOD code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, F. de A.T. de.

    1985-01-01

    This study investigates some antecipated transients without scram for a pressurized water cooled reactor, using coupling of the containment CORAN code to the ALMOD code system, under severe random conditions. This coupling has the objective of including containment model as part of an unified code system. These severe conditions include failure of reactor scram, following a station black-out and emergency power initiation for the burn-up status at the beginning and end of the cycle. Furthermore, for the burn-up status at the end of the cycle, a failure in the closure of the pressurizer relief valve was also investigated. (Author) [pt

  1. Conditioned pain modulation dampens the thermal grill illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, D E; Hollins, M

    2017-10-01

    The thermal grill illusion (TGI) refers to the perception of burning heat and often pain that arises from simultaneous cutaneous application of innocuous warm and cool stimuli. This study utilized conditioned pain modulation (CPM) to help elucidate the TGI's underlying neural mechanisms, including the debated role of ascending nociceptive signals in generating the illusion. To trigger CPM, subjects placed the left hand in noxious cold (6 °C) water before placing the right volar forearm onto a thermal grill. Lower pain and unpleasantness ratings of the grill in this CPM run compared to those in a control run (i.e. 33 °C water) were taken as evidence of CPM. To determine whether CPM reduces noxious heat pain and illusory heat pain equally, an experimental group of subjects rated pain and unpleasantness of a grill consisting of innocuous alternating warm (42 °C) and cool (18 °C) bars, while a control group rated a grill with all bars controlled to a noxious temperature (45 °C). CPM produced significant and comparable reductions in pain, unpleasantness and perceived heat of both noxious heat and the TGI. This result suggests that the TGI results from signals in nociceptive dorsal horn convergent neurons, since CPM involves descending inhibition with high selectivity for this neuronal population. More broadly, CPM's ability to produce a shift in perceived thermal sensation of both noxious heat and the TGI from 'hot' to 'warm' implies that nociceptive signals generated by a cutaneous stimulus can contribute to its perceived thermal intensity. Conditioned pain modulation reduces the perceived painfulness, unpleasantness and heat of the thermal grill illusion and noxious heat similarly. The results have important theoretical implications for both types of pain. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  2. Potential of Endocannabinoids to Control Bladder Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale E. Bjorling

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Bladder-related pain is one of the most common forms of visceral pain, and visceral pain is among the most common complaints for which patients seek physician consultation. Despite extensive studies of visceral innervation and treatment of visceral pain, opioids remain a mainstay for management of bladder pain. Side effects associated with opioid therapy can profoundly diminish quality of life, and improved options for treatment of bladder pain remain a high priority. Endocannabinoids, primarily anandamide (AEA and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG, are endogenously-produced fatty acid ethanolamides with that induce analgesia. Animal experiments have demonstrated that inhibition of enzymes that degrade AEA or 2-AG have the potential to prevent development of visceral and somatic pain. Although experimental results in animal models have been promising, clinical application of this approach has proven difficult. In addition to fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH; degrades AEA and monacylglycerol lipase (MAGL; degrades 2-AG, cyclooxygenase (COX acts to metabolize endocannabinoids. Another potential limitation of this strategy is that AEA activates pro-nociceptive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 channels. Dual inhibitors of FAAH and TRPV1 or FAAH and COX have been synthesized and are currently undergoing preclinical testing for efficacy in providing analgesia. Local inhibition of FAAH or MAGL within the bladder may be viable options to reduce pain associated with cystitis with fewer systemic side effects, but this has not been explored. Further investigation is required before manipulation of the endocannabinoid system can be proven as an efficacious alternative for management of bladder pain.

  3. The epidemology of burn injuries of children and the importance of modern burn centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Mohar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burns represent the major percentage of injuries to children. Their incidence level, injury mechanisms and treatment often differ from the burn injuries of adults.Methods: From the medical records of the Department for Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery of the Ljubljana Medical Centre we gathered, analyzed and compared the burn injuries of children up to the age of 15 who were admitted to hospital in the year 2003 to those who were treated as outpatients. Moreover, we compared the burn injuries of hospitalized children at the same department in the years 2003, 1993 and 1983 respectively. We compared their gender, age, the total body surface area of burns, the depth of burns, frequency of the mechanisms of injury, the affected parts of the body and the length and mode of treatment. Finally, we compared our results with the results of similar studies from other burn centres.Results: The number of children treated for burns at the department has declined. In all the years studied, the injured children were younger than 5 and the majority of them were boys. The number of children admitted with substantial total body surface areas of burns was also declining. However, there was an increase in the number of children admitted with burns less than 10 % of their total body surface area. The number of burns treated by surgery slightly increased over the years studied. There was a similar sex and age distribution among the hospitalized children and those treated as outpatients.Conclusions: The number of children hospitalized with burns is in decline. In the years 1983, 1993 and 2003, there was no significant difference in the percentage of children who were treated surgically and those who were treated conservatively (P = 0.247. The Burn Centre at the Department for Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery of the Ljubljana Medical Centre which together with the Burn Department of the Maribor General Hospital covers the population of two million

  4. Capsaicin 8% Patch for Central and Peripheral Neuropathic Pain of Persons with Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury: Two Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trbovich, Michelle; Yang, Huiqing

    2015-08-01

    Neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury is common and often refractory to standard treatments. The capsaicin 8% patch is a Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment of neuropathic pain in postherpetic neuralgia and has demonstrated significant efficacy in human immunodeficiency virus-autonomic neuropathy. The patch defunctionalizes transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors, impairing cutaneous nociceptors for a prolonged period (i.e., 8-12 wks) with no systemic side effects. A retrospective review was conducted on the effects of the patch in two patients with spinal cord injury and neuropathic pain refractory to standard treatments. Two weeks after application, both patients reported complete pain relief. Average onset of relief of 4 days and average duration of relief of 197 days, requiring only one to four applications per year, paralleled findings reported in postherpetic neuralgia and human immunodeficiency virus-autonomic neuropathy trials. Upregulation of capsaicin-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors after spinal cord injury has been reported. The capsaicin 8% patch is a promising therapeutic agent for neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury.

  5. Genitofemoral neuralgia: adding to the burden of chronic vulvar pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verstraelen H

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hans Verstraelen,1 Eline De Zutter,1 Martine De Muynck2 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Vulvovaginal Disease Clinic, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium; 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium Abstract: The vulva is a particularly common locus of chronic pain with neuropathic characteristics that occurs in women of any age, though most women with neuropathic type chronic vulvar pain will remain undiagnosed even following multiple physician visits. Here, we report on an exemplary case of a middle-aged woman who was referred to the Vulvovaginal Disease Clinic with debilitating vulvar burning and itching over the right labium majus that had been persisting for 2 years and was considered intractable. Careful history taking and clinical examination, followed by electrophysiological assessment through somatosensory evoked potentials was consistent with genitofemoral neuralgia, for which no obvious cause could be identified. Adequate pain relief was obtained with a serotonin–noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor and topical gabapentin cream. We briefly discuss the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of genitofemoral neuralgia and provide a series of clues to guide clinicians in obtaining a presumptive diagnosis of specific neuropathic pain syndromes that may underlie chronic vulvar pain. We further aim to draw attention to the tremendous burden of chronic, unrecognized vulvar pain. Keywords: vulvar pain, genitofemoral nerve, neuropathic pain, vulvodynia, vulvar disease

  6. Emissions from the burning of vegetative debris in air curtain destructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, C Andrew; Lemieux, Paul M

    2007-08-01

    Although air curtain destructors (ACDs) have been used for quite some time to dispose of vegetative debris, relatively little in-depth testing has been conducted to quantify emissions of pollutants other than CO and particulate matter. As part of an effort to prepare for possible use of ACDs to dispose of the enormous volumes of debris generated by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, the literature on ACD emissions was reviewed to identify potential environmental issues associated with ACD disposal of construction and demolition (C&D) debris. Although no data have been published on emissions from C&D debris combustion in an ACD, a few studies provided information on emissions from the combustion of vegetative debris. These studies are reviewed, and the results compared with studies of open burning of biomass. Combustion of vegetative debris in ACD units results in significantly lower emissions of particulate matter and CO per unit of mass of debris compared with open pile burning. The available data are not sufficient to make general estimates regarding emissions of organic or metal compounds. The highly transient nature of the ACD combustion process, a minimal degree of operational control, and significant variability in debris properties make accurate prediction of ACD emissions impossible in general. Results of scoping tests conducted in preparation for possible in-depth emissions tests demonstrate the challenges associated with sampling ACD emissions and highlight the transient nature of the process. The environmental impacts of widespread use of ACDs for disposal of vegetative debris and their potential use to reduce the volume of C&D debris in future disaster response scenarios remain a considerable gap in understanding the risks associated with debris disposal options.

  7. Pediatric burns: Kids' Inpatient Database vs the National Burn Repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Tahereh; Evans, Tyler A; Sood, Rajiv; Hartman, Brett C; Hadad, Ivan; Tholpady, Sunil S

    2016-04-01

    Burn injuries are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in young children. The Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) and National Burn Repository (NBR) are two large national databases that can be used to evaluate outcomes and help quality improvement in burn care. Differences in the design of the KID and NBR could lead to differing results affecting resultant conclusions and quality improvement programs. This study was designed to validate the use of KID for burn epidemiologic studies, as an adjunct to the NBR. Using the KID (2003, 2006, and 2009), a total of 17,300 nonelective burn patients younger than 20 y old were identified. Data from 13,828 similar patients were collected from the NBR. Outcome variables were compared between the two databases. Comparisons revealed similar patient distribution by gender, race, and burn size. Inhalation injury was more common among the NBR patients and was associated with increased mortality. The rates of respiratory failure, wound infection, cellulitis, sepsis, and urinary tract infection were higher in the KID. Multiple regression analysis adjusting for potential confounders demonstrated similar mortality rate but significantly longer length of stay for patients in the NBR. Despite differences in the design and sampling of the KID and NBR, the overall demographic and mortality results are similar. The differences in complication rate and length of stay should be explored by further studies to clarify underlying causes. Investigations into these differences should also better inform strategies to improve burn prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Review article: transient receptor potential channels as possible therapeutic targets in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, A B; Weerts, Z Z R M; Helyes, Z; Masclee, A A M; Keszthelyi, D

    2017-11-01

    Abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) remains challenging to treat effectively. Researchers have attempted to elucidate visceral nociceptive processes in order to guide treatment development. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been implied in the generation (TRPV1, TRPV4, TRPA1) and inhibition (TRPM8) of visceral pain signals. Pathological changes in their functioning have been demonstrated in inflammatory conditions, and appear to be present in IBS as well. To provide a comprehensive review of the current literature on TRP channels involved in visceral nociception. In particular, we emphasise the clinical implications of these nociceptors in the treatment of IBS. Evidence to support this review was obtained from an electronic database search via PubMed using the search terms "visceral nociception," "visceral hypersensitivity," "irritable bowel syndrome" and "transient receptor potential channels." After screening the abstracts the articles deemed relevant were cross-referenced for additional manuscripts. Recent studies have resulted in significant advances in our understanding of TRP channel mediated visceral nociception. The diversity of TRP channel sensitization pathways is increasingly recognised. Endogenous TRP agonists, including poly-unsaturated fatty acid metabolites and hydrogen sulphide, have been implied in augmented visceral pain generation in IBS. New potential targets for treatment development have been identified (TRPA1 and TRPV4,) and alternative means of affecting TRP channel signalling (partial antagonists, downstream targeting and RNA-based therapy) are currently being explored. The improved understanding of mechanisms involved in visceral nociception provides a solid basis for the development of new treatment strategies for abdominal pain in IBS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW ON EFFICACY OF KINESIOTAPING IN PAIN MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most common complaint of an individual is pain, which can be with or without injury. It is the key that enables human being to figure out disease ordisorders that is interfering normal life. Pain can be because of numerous reasons but known pathways for pain can be physiological, nociceptive, neuropathic or mixed, which may be experienced as aching pain, burning pain, stabbing pain, etc. Although there are various clinical methods to reduce pain but the main objective of present study was to find if taping can reduce pain be it musculoskeletal or neurological pain. Also to summarise all evaluated work done in various studies. Methods: various studies have been taken from pub med, Google scholar that includes relief of pain with application of taping irrespective to technique used. Study selection, data extraction, and assessment of methodological quality and clinical relevance were performed independently by two reviewers. All the data extracted from randomised controlled trials included in the review has been used to synthesise the results. Therefore the results are based on facts laid down by the articles included. Results: Pedro scoring has been used to asses various studies which show the use of taping for relief of pain on various musculoskeletal disorders and neurological disorders. Conclusions: Although there are various modalities which can help in reducing pain but present review shows that taping can be used as very useful tool for reducing pain. Further it is cheap, less time consuming and easy to manage with excellent results. taping can be used as an adjunct to modalities present to reduce pain.

  10. Improved Survival of Patients With Extensive Burns: Trends in Patient Characteristics and Mortality Among Burn Patients in a Tertiary Care Burn Facility, 2004-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassle, Paula D; Williams, Felicia N; Napravnik, Sonia; van Duin, David; Weber, David J; Charles, Anthony; Cairns, Bruce A; Jones, Samuel W

    Classic determinants of burn mortality are age, burn size, and the presence of inhalation injury. Our objective was to describe temporal trends in patient and burn characteristics, inpatient mortality, and the relationship between these characteristics and inpatient mortality over time. All patients aged 18 years or older and admitted with burn injury, including inhalation injury only, between 2004 and 2013 were included. Adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the relationship between admit year and inpatient mortality. A total of 5540 patients were admitted between 2004 and 2013. Significant differences in sex, race/ethnicity, burn mechanisms, TBSA, inhalation injury, and inpatient mortality were observed across calendar years. Patients admitted between 2011 and 2013 were more likely to be women, non-Hispanic Caucasian, with smaller burn size, and less likely to have an inhalation injury, in comparison with patients admitted from 2004 to 2010. After controlling for patient demographics, burn mechanisms, and differential lengths of stay, no calendar year trends in inpatient mortality were detected. However, a significant decrease in inpatient mortality was observed among patients with extensive burns (≥75% TBSA) in more recent calendar years. This large, tertiary care referral burn center has maintained low inpatient mortality rates among burn patients over the past 10 years. While observed decreases in mortality during this time are largely due to changes in patient and burn characteristics, survival among patients with extensive burns has improved.

  11. The Burning Saints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xygalatas, Dimitris

    . Carrying the sacred icons of the saints, participants dance over hot coals as the saint moves them. The Burning Saints presents an analysis of these rituals and the psychology behind them. Based on long-term fieldwork, The Burning Saints traces the historical development and sociocultural context......, The Burning Saints presents a highly original analysis of how mental processes can shape social and religious behaviour....

  12. Síndrome da boca ardente: etiologia Burning mouth syndrome: etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafne Patrícia Cerchiari

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A Síndrome da Boca Ardente (SBA é caracterizada por dor na cavidade oral, com ou sem sinais inflamatórios, mas sem lesões específicas. Acomete geralmente mulheres na faixa etária entre 40 a 60 anos. A dor é do tipo queimação, de intensidade moderada a severa, sendo a língua o local mais acometido, podendo haver sensação dolorosa também em gengivas, lábios e mucosa jugal. Pode haver piora da intensidade dolorosa no decorrer do dia, nos estados de tensão, fadiga, ao falar muito, à ingestão de alimentos picantes e/ou quentes e melhora com alimentos frios, trabalho e distração. O objetivo desta revisão é contemplar as possíveis etiologias da SBA, agrupando-as em 4 grandes grupos para que melhor possam ser estudados: dor oral de causa local, sistêmica, emocional e idiopática. Sabendo dos diagnósticos diferenciais da síndrome, estabelecemos um protocolo para o manejo destes pacientes. Dentre as etiologias de dor bucal local, deve-se pesquisar as de causa dentária, alérgicas e infecciosas. Para as causas sistêmicas, pesquisar doenças do tecido conectivo, doenças endócrinas, neurológicas, deficiências nutricionais e as alterações das glândulas salivares que levam à xerostomia. A etiologia da SBA pode ser de difícil diagnóstico, muitas vezes com mais de um fator causando dor na boca. A realização de anamnese detalhada, exame físico geral, inspeção minuciosa da cavidade oral e orofaringe, além de exames laboratoriais são de fundamental importância, para evitar que o tratamento dos pacientes com esta síndrome, seja baseado em tentativa e erro.The Burning Month Syndrome (BMS is an oral mucosa pain - with or without inflammatory signs - without any specific lesion. It is mostly observed in women aged 40-60 years. This pain feels like a moderate/severe burning, and it occurs more frequently on the tongue, but it may also be felt at the gingiva, lips and jugal mucosa. It may worsen during the day, during stress

  13. Transient osteoporosis of the hip : Presentation of (a)typical cases and a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, M; van Leeuwen, MA; van Rijswijk, MH

    1999-01-01

    Transient osteoporosis of the hip (TOH) is a rare disorder affecting primarily middle-aged men and women during the last trimester of pregnancy. The disease is character-ized by pain in the involved joint with temporary osteopenia apparent on radiology without joint space narrowing or destruction,

  14. [Combined burn trauma in the array of modern civilian and combat burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivchenko, E V; Borisov, D N; Golota, A S; Krassiĭ, A B; Rusev, I T

    2015-02-01

    The current article positions the combined burn and non-burn injuries in the general array of civilian and combat burns. For that purpose the official state statistics and scientific medical publications, domestic as well as foreign, have been analyzed. It has been shown that in peace time the combined burn/trauma injuries are infrequent. But the same type of injury becomes routine especially among the civilian population in the conditions of the modern so called "hybrid war". And the medical service should be prepared for it.

  15. Pyogenic cervical spondylitis with quadriplegia as a complication of severe burns: Report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakage, Naoki; Katami, Atsuo; Takekawa, Satoru; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Goto, Michitoshi; Fukai, Ryuta

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of cervical pyogenic spondylitis complicated by epidural abscess with quadriplegia during treatment of severe burns. The patient was a 49-year-old man with 3rd-degree burns to 20% of his body, involving the lower extremities. We performed escharectomy of the 3rd-degree necrosis on days 7 and 16, followed by the first skin graft on day 23. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected in the postoperative graft wound culture. On day 23 after the skin graft, he became febrile and began to experience cervical pain and muscle weakness of the extremities. By day 24, quadriplegia had developed. A cervical vertebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed pyogenic spondylitis with an epidural abscess, which was causing the quadriplegia. We treated the patient by performing curettage of the pyogenic lesion and anterior fixation of the cervical vertebral bodies. The fact that P. aeruginosa was detected in the pyogenic focus culture indicated that burn wound sepsis was responsible for the infection. This case reinforces that acting on a strong suspicion helps to establish a diagnosis and initiate appropriate treatment early.

  16. Survival after burn in a sub-Saharan burn unit: Challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Anna F.; Boschini, Laura P.; Kiser, Michelle M.; Samuel, Jonathan C.; Mjuweni, Steven N.; Cairns, Bruce A.; Charles, Anthony G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Burns are among the most devastating of all injuries and a major global public health crisis, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. In developed countries, aggressive management of burns continues to lower overall mortality and increase lethal total body surface area (TBSA) at which 50% of patients die (LA50). However, lack of resources and inadequate infrastructure significantly impede such improvements in developing countries. Methods This study is a retrospective analysis of patients admitted to the burn center at Kamuzu Central Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi between June 2011 and December 2012. We collected information including patient age, gender, date of admission, mechanism of injury, time to presentation to hospital, total body surface area (TBSA) burn, comorbidities, date and type of operative procedures, date of discharge, length of hospital stay, and survival. We then performed bivariate analysis and logistic regression to identify characteristics associated with increased mortality. Results A total of 454 patients were admitted during the study period with a median age of 4 years (range 0.5 months to 79 years). Of these patients, 53% were male. The overall mean TBSA was 18.5%, and average TBSA increased with age—17% for 0–18 year olds, 24% for 19–60 year olds, and 41% for patients over 60 years old. Scald and flame burns were the commonest mechanisms, 52% and 41% respectively, and flame burns were associated with higher mortality. Overall survival in this population was 82%; however survival reduced with increasing age categories (84% in patients 0–18 years old, 79% in patients 19–60 years old, and 36% in patients older than 60 years). TBSA remained the strongest predictor of mortality after adjusting for age and mechanism of burn. The LA50 for this population was 39% TBSA. Discussion Our data reiterate that burn in Malawi is largely a pediatric disease and that the high burn mortality and relatively low LA50 have modestly improved

  17. Quantifying Risk Factors for Long-Term Sleep Problems After Burn Injury in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Austin F; Ryan, Colleen M; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Kazis, Lewis E; Li, Nien Chen; Rose, Mary; Liang, Matthew H; Wang, Chao; Palmieri, Tina; Meyer, Walter J; Pidcock, Frank S; Reilly, Debra; Sheridan, Robert L; Tompkins, Ronald G

    Restorative sleep is an important component of quality of life. Disturbances in sleep after burn injury were reported but all based on uncontrolled or nonstandardized data. The occurrence and the effect of long-term sleep problems in young adult burn survivors have not been well defined. This 5-year (2003-2008) prospective multicenter longitudinal study included adults with burn injuries ages 19 to 30 years who completed the Young Adult Burn Outcome Questionnaire (YABOQ) up to 36 months after injury. The items measured 15 patient-reported outcomes including physical, psychological, and social statuses and symptoms such as itch and pain. Scores of these 15 YABOQ outcome domains were standardized to a mean of 50 and a SD of 10 based on an age-matched nonburned reference group of young adults. Sleep quality was assessed using the item 'How satisfied are you now with your sleep,' rated by a 5-point Likert scale. Patients responding with very and somewhat dissatisfied were classified as having sleep dissatisfaction and the remaining as less or not dissatisfied. The associations between sleep dissatisfaction (yes/no) and YABOQ outcome domains were analyzed longitudinally using mixed-effect generalized linear models, adjusted for %TBSA burned, age, gender, and race. Generalized estimating equations were used to take into account correlated error resulting from repeated surveys on each patient over time. One hundred and fifty-two burn survivors participated in the YABOQ survey at baseline and during the follow-up who had at least one survey with a response to the sleep item. Among them, sleep dissatisfaction was twice as prevalent (76/152, 50%) when compared with the nonburned reference group (29/112, 26%). The likelihood of a burn survivor being dissatisfied with sleep was reduced over time after the burn injury. Sleep dissatisfaction following burns was significantly associated, in a dose-dependent manner, with increasing burn size (P = .001). Better sleep was associated

  18. Children with burns referred for child abuse evaluation: Burn characteristics and co-existent injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, Marie-Christin; Kemp, Alison; Maguire, Sabine; Nuttall, Diane; Feldman, Kenneth W; Lindberg, Daniel M

    2016-05-01

    Intentional burns represent a serious form of physical abuse that must be identified to protect children from further harm. This study is a retrospectively planned secondary analysis of the Examining Siblings To Recognize Abuse (ExSTRA) network data. Our objective was to describe the characteristics of burns injuries in children referred to Child Abuse Pediatricians (CAPs) in relation to the perceived likelihood of abuse. We furthermore compare the extent of diagnostic investigations undertaken in children referred to CAPs for burn injuries with those referred for other reasons. Within this dataset, 7% (215/2890) of children had burns. Children with burns were older than children with other injuries (median age 20 months vs. 10 months). Physical abuse was perceived as likely in 40.9% (88) and unlikely in 59.1% (127). Scalds accounted for 52.6% (113) and contact burns for 27.6% (60). Several characteristics of the history and burn injury were associated with a significantly higher perceived likelihood of abuse, including children with reported inflicted injury, absent or inadequate explanation, hot water as agent, immersion scald, a bilateral/symmetric burn pattern, total body surface area ≥10%, full thickness burns, and co-existent injuries. The rates of diagnostic testing were significantly lower in children with burns than other injuries, yet the yield of skeletal survey and hepatic transaminases testing were comparable between the two groups. This would imply that children referred to CAPs for burns warrant the same level of comprehensive investigations as those referred for other reasons. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of amniotic and polyurethane membrane dressings in the treatment of burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adly, O A; Moghazy, A M; Abbas, A H; Ellabban, A M; Ali, O S; Mohamed, B A

    2010-08-01

    As allograft and xenografts are not available in Islamic countries, amniotic membrane seems to be an effective alternative in the management of deep burns. Its proven bioactivities and modest price suggest that it might be superior to synthetic dressings. Forty-six patients were enrolled in this randomized, controlled clinical trial conducted in the Burn Unit at Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt. All age groups and both gender were included in the study. Only patients with less than 50% total body surface area burned were included, thus minimizing the dropouts in both groups. All were either second or third degree. These patients were randomly assigned either to group I: amniotic membrane (Biomembrane) dressing, or group II: polyurethane membrane (Tegaderm) dressing. Those in group I demonstrated a significantly lower rate of infection and required less frequent dressing changes than those in group II. They also sustained less electrolyte and albumin loss. The rate of healing in the amniotic membrane group was significantly faster than in the polyurethane group. Furthermore, pain was significantly less when Biomembrane was used. Based on these findings, we recommend the use of lyophilized gamma-irradiated amniotic membrane as an effective alternative for allograft and xenografts in Islamic countries and the Jewish population.

  20. Reliability and validity of the Impact of Event Scale (IES): version for Brazilian burn victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria-Guanilo, Maria E; Dantas, Rosana A S; Farina, Jayme A; Alonso, Jordi; Rajmil, Luis; Rossi, Lídia A

    2011-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the internal reliability (internal consistency), construct validity, sensitivity and ceiling and floor effects of the Brazilian-Portuguese version of the Impact of Event Scale (IES). Methodological research design. The Brazilian-Portuguese version of the IES was applied to a group of 91 burned patients at three times: the first week after the burn injury (time one), between the fourth and the sixth months (time two) and between the ninth and the 12th months (time three). The internal consistency, construct validity (convergent and dimensionality), sensitivity and ceiling and floor effects were tested. Cronbach's alpha coefficients showed high internal consistency for the total scale (0·87) and for the domains intrusive thoughts (0·87) and avoidance responses (0·76). During the hospitalisation (time one), the scale showed low and positive correlations with pain measures immediately before (r=0·22; pnegative correlations with self-esteem (r=-0·52; plow and negative with the Bodily pain (r=-0·24; pimpact of the event in the group of patients under analysis. The Impact of Event Scale can be used in research and clinical practice to assess nursing interventions aimed at decreasing stress during rehabilitation. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Hypothalamic GPR40 Signaling Activated by Free Long Chain Fatty Acids Suppresses CFA-Induced Inflammatory Chronic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamoto, Kazuo; Nishinaka, Takashi; Sato, Naoya; Mankura, Mitsumasa; Koyama, Yutaka; Kasuya, Fumiyo; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2013-01-01

    GPR40 has been reported to be activated by long-chain fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). However, reports studying functional role of GPR40 in the brain are lacking. The present study focused on the relationship between pain regulation and GPR40, investigating the functional roles of hypothalamic GPR40 during chronic pain caused using a complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory chronic pain mouse model. GPR40 protein expression in the hypothalamus was transiently inc...

  2. The impacts of prescribed moorland burning on water colour and dissolved organic carbon: a critical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, J; Chapman, P J; Palmer, S M; Kay, P; Grayson, R

    2012-06-30

    Discolouration of natural surface waters due to the humic component of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a costly problem for water supply companies. This paper reviews what is known about the impacts of prescribed moorland vegetation burning on water colour. Relevant research has taken place at three scales: laboratory experiments on peat cores, plot scale sampling of soil waters and catchment scale sampling of stream waters. While laboratory studies suggest burning increases colour production, the evidence from catchment and plot studies is contradictory. Plot studies suggest colour production may decrease or remain unchanged following burning although there is evidence for some transient changes. Catchment studies suggest prescribed moorland burning causes stream water colour to increase, although in most cases the evidence is not clear cut since most studies could not clearly disentangle the effects of burning from those of vegetation cover. The differences in findings between plot and catchment studies may be explained by: i) the short-term nature of some studies which do not measure long-term response and recovery times to burning; ii) the lack of colour measurements from shallow soil depths which contribute more to streamflow than soil water from deeper in the peat; and iii) the possibility of hydrological interactions occurring between different experimental plots at some sites. Additionally, the increase in recent patch burning in some catchments that has been statistically attributed by some authors to increases in stream water colour cannot be reconciled with theoretical calculations. When dilution with waters derived from other parts of the catchment are taken into account, large values of colour have to be theoretically derived from those recently burnt areas that occupy a small proportion of the catchment area in order to balance the change in stream water colour observed in recent years. Therefore, much further process-based work is required to

  3. Evaluation of Amniotic Membrane Effectiveness in Skin Graft Donor Site Dressing in Burn Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Seyed Hamid; As'adi, Kamran; Mousavi, Seyed Jaber; Shoar, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    Although the recipient site in burn wounds is dressed with universally accepted materials, the ideal management of split-thickness skin donor sites remains controversial. The aim of our study is to compare two methods of wound dressing in donor sites of split-thickness skin graft in patients undergoing burn wound reconstructive surgery. Forty-two consecutive patients with second- and third-degree burns with a total body surface area between 20 and 40 % were enrolled in this randomized clinical trial conducted in Motahari Burn Hospital in Tehran, Iran. In each patient, two anatomic areas with similar features were randomly selected as intervention and control donor sites. The intervention site was dressed with amniotic membrane, whereas the control site was treated with Vaseline-impregnated gauze. Wounds were examined daily by expert surgeons to measure the clinical outcomes including duration of healing, severity of pain, and infection rate. The mean ± SD age of patients was 31.17 ± 13.72 years; furthermore, burn percentage had a mean ± SD of 31.19 ± 10.56. The mean ± SD of patients' cooperation score was 1.6 ± 0.79 in the intervention group compared with 2.93 ± 0.71 in the control group, revealing a statistically significant difference (P  0.05). Amniotic membrane as an alternative for dressing of skin graft donor sites provides significant benefits by increasing patients' comfort via diminishing the number of dressing changes and facilitating the process of wound healing.

  4. Foot burns: epidemiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemington-Gorse, S; Pellard, S; Wilson-Jones, N; Potokar, T

    2007-12-01

    This is a retrospective study of the epidemiology and management of isolated foot burns presenting to the Welsh Centre for Burns from January 1998 to December 2002. A total of 289 were treated of which 233 were included in this study. Approximately 40% were in the paediatric age group and the gender distribution varied dramatically for adults and children. In the adult group the male:female ratio was 3.5:1, however in the paediatric group the male:female ratio was more equal (1.6:1). Scald burns (65%) formed the largest group in children and scald (35%) and chemical burns (32%) in adults. Foot burns have a complication rate of 18% and prolonged hospital stay. Complications include hypertrophic scarring, graft loss/delayed healing and wound infection. Although isolated foot burns represent a small body surface area, over half require treatment as in patients to allow for initial aggressive conservative management of elevation and regular wound cleansing to avoid complications. This study suggests a protocol for the initial acute management of foot burns. This protocol states immediate referral of all foot burns to a burn centre, admission of these burns for 24-48 h for elevation, regular wound cleansing with change of dressings and prophylactic antibiotics.

  5. Multi-dimensionality of chronic pain of the oral cavity and face

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial pain in its broadest definition can affect up to 7% of the population. Its diagnosis and initial management falls between dentists and doctors and in the secondary care sector among pain physicians, headache neurologists and oral physicians. Chronic facial pain is a long term condition and like all other chronic pain is associated with numerous co-morbidities and treatment outcomes are often related to the presenting co-morbidities such as depression, anxiety, catastrophising and presence of other chronic pain which must be addressed as part of management . The majority of orofacial pain is continuous so a history of episodic pain narrows down the differentials. There are specific oral conditions that rarely present extra orally such as atypical odontalgia and burning mouth syndrome whereas others will present in both areas. Musculoskeletal pain related to the muscles of mastication is very common and may also be associated with disc problems. Trigeminal neuralgia and the rarer glossopharyngeal neuralgia are specific diagnosis with defined care pathways. Other trigeminal neuropathic pain which can be associated with neuropathy is caused most frequently by trauma but secondary causes such as malignancy, infection and auto-immune causes need to be considered. Management is along the lines of other neuropathic pain using accepted pharmacotherapy with psychological support. If no other diagnostic criteria are fulfilled than a diagnosis of chronic or persistent idiopathic facial pain is made and often a combination of antidepressants and cognitive behaviour therapy is effective. Facial pain patients should be managed by a multidisciplinary team. PMID:23617409

  6. Microbiological Monitoring and Proteolytic Study of Clinical Samples From Burned and Burned Wounded Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toema, M.A.; El-Bazza, Z.E.; El-Hifnawi, H.N.; Abd-El-Hakim, E.E.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, clinical samples were collected from 100 patients admitted to Burn and Plastic Surgery Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Egypt, over a period of 12 months. The proteolytic activity of 110 clinical samples taken from surfaces swabs which taken from burned and burned wounded patients with different ages and gender was examined. Screening for the proteolytic activity produced by pathogenic bacteria isolated from burned and burned wounded patients was evaluated as gram positive Bacilli and gram negative bacilli showed high proteolytic activity (46.4%) while 17.9% showed no activity. The isolated bacteria proved to have proteolytic activity were classified into high, moderate and weak. The pathogenic bacteria isolated from burned and burned wounded patients and showing proteolytic activity were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella ozaeanae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas fluoresces.

  7. Spatial frequency domain imaging of burn wounds in a preclinical model of graded burn severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, John Quan; Crouzet, Christian; Mai, Tuan; Riola, Kathleen; Uchitel, Daniel; Liaw, Lih-Huei; Bernal, Nicole; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Choi, Bernard; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2013-06-01

    Frequent monitoring of early-stage burns is necessary for deciding optimal treatment and management. Both superficial and full thickness burns are relatively easy to diagnose based on clinical observation. In between these two extremes are superficial-partial thickness and deep-partial thickness burns. These burns, while visually similar, differ dramatically in terms of clinical treatment and are known to progress in severity over time. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) for noninvasively mapping quantitative changes in chromophore and optical properties that may be an indicative of burn wound severity. A controlled protocol of graded burn severity was developed and applied to 17 rats. SFDI data was acquired at multiple near-infrared wavelengths over a course of 3 h. Burn severity was verified using hematoxylin and eosin histology. From this study, we found that changes in water concentration (edema), deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration, and optical scattering (tissue denaturation) to be statistically significant at differentiating superficial partial-thickness burns from deep-partial thickness burns.

  8. Analgesic effect of topical oral capsaicin gel in burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Mette Rose; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of repeated topical application of oral capsaicin gel in two different concentrations