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Sample records for transgenic leucaena leucocephala

  1. Leucaena leucocephala IN RUMINANT NUTRITION

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    M. Barros-Rodríguez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available It is a common situation in extensive ruminant production systems in tropical countries to have low production indicators due to nutrient deficiencies in the diet. An economic alternative to increase animal production is the incorporation of legumes (fodder and fruits in the diet. This review, presents an analysis of the positive and negative effects of Leucaena leucocephala consumption by ruminants, with particular emphasis on the secondary compound mimosine. Leucaena due to its high nutrient content, rumen by-pass protein supply and its possible effect on the reduction of greenhouse gas (attributed to tannins has become one of the legumes most commonly used in ruminant feeding practices. However, in countries where leucaena has been introduced, its use is still limited to levels below 30% inclusion in the diet, due to the secondary compound mimosine and its isomers (3,4 and 2,3 DHP, which can induce toxicity, even when animals are inoculated with rumen fluid containing the bacteria Synergistes jonesii reported as responsible for degrading these compounds in the rumen. In the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, ruminants consuming leucaena can tolerate more than 50% inclusion in the diet, without having a negative impact on production, attributed intake to mimosine and its isomers. We conclude that in animals not adapted, the intake would be limited to low inclusion levels (less than 30% inclusion in the diet, mainly because of mimosine and its derivatives. The decrease in intake or diet digestibility seem to better explain the reduction in methane production, however, in vivo studies are required to clearly establish the mechanism of action. It has been reported the presence of different bacteria to S. jonessi that would have the ability to degrade mimosine and its derivatives, however, the activity of these bacteria and its effectiveness must be confirmed in vivo.

  2. Nematode populations as influenced by Leucaena leucocephala ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study to determine the effect of Flemingia congesta and Leucaena leucocephala hedgerows, as sources of mulch, on the population of nematode species in an alley cropping system was conducted at the Crops Research Institute, Kumasi, Ghana from May 1991 to February 1994. Treatments comprised Leucaena ...

  3. Antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitor from Leucaena leucocephala ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The experimental design is divided into two parts: chemical analysis and bioactive assay. One antioxidant lupeol (4) and one inhibition of tyrosinase pheophorbide a methyl ester (7) were identified in Leucaena leucocephala. Both showed effective 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity compared ...

  4. Effect of Leucaena leucocephala tree management on maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Les résultats montrent que le paillage et la fréquence des coupes ont eu un effet significatif (p<0,05) sur la production en biomasse végétale de L. leucocephala et le rendement du maïs. La production de la biomasse totale de Leucaena leucocephala augmente avec les grands intervalles de coupe (6,62 Mg ha-1 pour 12 ...

  5. The flavonoid constituents of Leucaena Leucocephala growning in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Leucaena leucocephala were identified as Caffeic acid, Isorhamnetin, Chrysoeriol, Isorhamnetin 3-O-galactoside, Kaempferol-3-O-rubinoside, Quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside and Luteolin-7-glucoside. Chemical structures of the isolated compounds were identified by TLC, PC and spectral techniques (UV, 1H -NMR and MS).

  6. The value of Leucaena leucocephala bark in leucaena-grass hay diets for Thai goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Brian; Jones, Raymond J; Poathong, Somsak; Chobtang, Jeerasak

    2010-12-01

    The study assessed the value of Leucaena leucocephala bark in leucaena-grass hay diets fed to Thai goats. Thai goats in metabolism pens were fed diets containing leucaena leaf (55%) + pangola grass hay (hay, 45%); leucaena leaf (48%) + leucaena bark (9%) + hay (43%); leucaena bark (57%) + hay (43%); and hay only. Feed percentages are expressed on a dry weight basis. The digestibilities of dry matter (DM) and crude protein (CP) were measured for the four diets. Leucaena bark had lower CP concentration than the leaf (11.7 vs. 25.9), and the leucaena bark + hay diet had lower DM and CP digestibility than the other diets. The calculated bark digestibilities of DM and CP of 44.1% and 38.2%, respectively, were much lower than the values for the leucaena leaf of 62.9% and 89.1%, respectively. The lower than expected CP digestibility was attributed to higher tannin levels in the bark compared to the leaves. Despite this, the bark was well accepted by the goats and was often preferred to the hay. Stripping of the bark by goats also results in stems that dry quicker and have higher calorific value as fuel. However, if leucaena branches are fed as a sole diet, the goats may consume up to 30% of bark on a DM basis and this would reduce nutritive value and animal productivity.

  7. ALLOMETRIC RELATIONSHIPS IN Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. De Wit

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    Valdemir Aleixo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to calculate simple allometric equations in order to estimate above and below ground dry biomass from Leucaena leucocephala individuals. Results indicated that biomass components show the following pattern: stem > branches > roots > leaves. Independently from individual size, 24 % of total sampled dry biomass was located below-ground, and 76 % above-ground. Log transformed linear equations using CBH (circumference at breast height as independent variable was statistically significant (P<0.05 to estimate leucaena total dry biomass.

  8. Effect of cutting height and frequency on Leucaena leucocephala ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leucaena leucocephala is a fast-growing tree that can provide both high quality forage and firewood. The objective of this trial was to determine the optimum height and frequency of cutting for both wood and forage production. Cutting heights at 0.3m, 0.6m and 1.0 m were superimposed on 3-month and 6-month cutting ...

  9. STUDIES ON SOME PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF LEUCAENA LEUCOCEPHALA BARK GUM

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    Vijetha Pendyala

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Gum exudates from Leucaena Leucocephala (Family: Fabaceae plants grown all over India were investigated for its physicochemical properties such as pH, swelling capacity and viscosities at different temperatures using standard methods. Leucaena Leucocephala bark gum appeared to be colorless to reddish brown translucent tears. 5 % w/v mucilage has pH of 7.5 at 28°C. The gum is slightly soluble in water and practically insoluble in ethanol, acetone and chloroform. It swells to about 5 times its original weight in water. A 5 %w/v mucilage concentration gave a viscosity value which was unaffected at temperature ranges (28-40°C. At concentrations of 2 and 5 %w/v, the gum exhibited pseudo plastic flow pattern while at 10 %w/v concentration the flow behaviour was thixotropic. The results indicate that the swelling ability of Leucaena Leucocephala (LL bark gum may provide potentials for its use as a disintegrant in tablet formulation, as a hydro gel in modified release dosage forms and the rheological flow properties may also provide potentials for its use as suspending and emulsifying agents owing to its pseudo plastic and thixotropic flow patterns.

  10. Research Note: Predicting Leucaena leucocephala biomass from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The amount of leaf and stem material removed by browsers can be precisely (r2 >0.90) and accurately (within 11% of the mean) predicted from DPB, thus providing a simple means of estimating browse offtake from leucaena trees. Keywords: Browse, firewood, regression, tree height, twig diameter. African Journal of Range ...

  11. Thyroxine (T 4-RIA) and triiodothyronine (T 3-RIA) serum levels in sheep fed on Leucaena Leucocephala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessoa, J.M.; Rodriguez, N.M.; Cardoso, W.M.; Velez, C.E.S.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the toxicity of Leucaena leucocephala on thyroxine and triiodothyronine serum concentration. Results indicate that ovine T 4 and T 3 serum levels do not decrease with Leucaena leucocephala feeding, sohen proreided for 41 days. (author). 10 refs, 1 tab

  12. Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit (Fabaceae: invasora ou ruderal? Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit (Fabaceae: invasive or ruderal?

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    José Nicola Martorano Neves da Costa

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A utilização de espécies exóticas em plantios de recuperação de áreas degradadas tem sido condenada com base no argumento de que tais espécies podem se comportar como invasoras e contaminar os ecossistemas naturais ao redor das áreas onde forem plantadas. Leucaena leucocephala (leucena é espécie leguminosa exótica que tem sido frequentemente cultivada no Brasil para recuperação florestal, uma vez que apresenta simbiose com bactérias fixadoras de nitrogênio, melhorando a fertilidade dos solos. O potencial de invasão e persistência da leucena foi analisado a partir de um plantio misto, efetuado em 1983 em terreno com afloramento rochoso, parte do mosaico de uma paisagem dominada por matriz agrícola, com alguns fragmentos remanescentes de floresta estacional semidecidual e plantios arbóreos diversos. Em uma área de 200 ha, cada uma das 11 unidades do mosaico foi amostrada por meio de seis parcelas de 16 x 3 m (48 m², em que foram identificados e medidos (DAP todos os indivíduos de espécies arbóreas (altura mínima de 50 cm, para verificar se a área ocupada pela espécie está se expandindo. Na área em que foi utilizada leucena no plantio, analisou-se a estrutura da comunidade, com base na distribuição dos indivíduos em classes de tamanho, para verificar se a proporção da espécie exótica tende a aumentar com o tempo, configurando a persistência no ecossistema. Uma vez que nenhum indivíduo de L. leucocephala foi registrado entre os 4.599 amostrados além dos limites da área onde a espécie foi plantada, a conclusão é de que a espécie não está se comportando como invasora de ecossistemas naturais nessa condição ambiental, enquadrando-se melhor como ruderal. A análise da comunidade em regeneração sob as árvores plantadas evidenciou que a proporção da espécie exótica, que é intolerante à sombra, tende a diminuir com o tempo, ainda que lentamente, perdendo espaço para espécies nativas tolerantes

  13. Changes in dinitrogen fixation in maturing stands of Casuarina equisetifolia and Leucaena leucocephala

    Science.gov (United States)

    John A. Parrotta; Dwight D. Baker; Maurice Fried

    1996-01-01

    Biological dinitrogen fixation in Casuarina equisetifolia J .R. & G. Forst. and Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit was evaluated using the 15N-enrichment technique under field conditions in single-species and mixed-species plantings (with a nonfixing reference species, Eucalyptus X ...

  14. Estimation of nitrogen fixation in Leucaena leucocephala using 15N-enrichment methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    John A. Parrotta; Dwight D. Baker; Maurice Fried

    1994-01-01

    An estimation of biological nitrogen fixation by Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit in monoculture and mixed-species plantations (with Casuarina equisetifolia L. ex J.R. & G. Forst., and Eucalyptus robusta Sm.) was undertaken over a two-year period in Puerto Rico using the 15N-enrichment...

  15. Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) De Wit as a forage plant - a review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tropical legume Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) De Wit is reviewed with respect to distribution, botanical description, cytology, climatic response, soil and nutrient requirements, establishment, management, herbage production, nutrient value, animal distorders and animal performance. The conclusion drawn is that this ...

  16. Contribution of condensed tannins and mimosine to the methane mitigation caused by feeding Leucaena leucocephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltan, Yosra A; Morsy, Amr S; Sallam, Sobhy M A; Lucas, Ronaldo C; Louvandini, Helder; Kreuzer, Michael; Abdalla, Adibe L

    2013-06-01

    Leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala), a leguminous shrub promising to cope with feed scarcity in the tropics, may help in mitigating ruminal methane (CH4) emission in the tropics as well. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of Leucaena and major secondary compounds of this plant in ruminants. At first, effects of Leucaena tannins and mimosine on ruminal CH4 and nutrient degradability were tested in vitro. Incubations were made with Leucaena without or with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to exclude the tannins effects, as well as with Bermuda grass (Tifton) and lucerne hays, both either untreated or supplemented with mimosine at the same concentration that has been provided by the tested Leucaena (6.52 mg/g DM). Furthermore, in an in vivo experiment a control diet (per kg DM 700 g Tifton hay) and Leucaena diets (per kg DM 350 g Tifton hay and 350 g Leucaena), either with or without 20 g PEG/d per head, were evaluated in six Santa Inês sheep following a double Latin square design. In vitro, Leucaena resulted in the lowest (p nitrogen excretion, body nitrogen retention and the excretion of urinary purine derivatives as an indicator for microbial protein synthesis and availability. This was independent of PEG addition. Leucaena also decreased (p < 0.001) CH4 emission per unit of digested organic matter by 14.1% and 10.8%, without and with PEG, respectively. No significant diet differences were observed in total-tract nutrient digestibility. The study demonstrated efficiency of Leucaena to mitigate in vivo methane emission of sheep, but did not reveal which constituent of Leucaena was primarily responsible for that since no clear efficiency of either tannins or mimosine could be demonstrated.

  17. Rumen function in vivo and in vitro in sheep fed Leucaena leucocephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros-Rodríguez, Marcos Antonio; Solorio-Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Sandoval-Castro, Carlos Alfredo; Klieve, Athol; Rojas-Herrera, Rafael Antonio; Briceño-Poot, Eduardo Gaspar; Ku-Vera, Juan Carlos

    2015-04-01

    The effect of Leucaena leucocephala inclusion in sheep diets upon rumen function was evaluated. Nine Pelibuey sheep, 32.6 ± 5.33 kg live weight (LW), fitted with rumen cannula were used. A complete randomized block design was employed. Two experimental periods of 60 days each, with 60-day intervals between them, were used. Experimental treatments were as follows (n = 6): T1 (control), 100 % Pennisetum purpureum grass; T2, 20 % L. leucocephala + 80 % P. purpureum; T3, 40 % L. leucocephala + 60 % P. purpureum. In situ rumen neutral detergent fiber (aNDF) and crude protein (CP) degradation, dry matter intake (DMI), volatile fatty acids (VFA) production, estimated methane (CH4) yield, rumen pH, ammonia nitrogen (N-NH3), and protozoa counts were measured. The aNDF in situ rumen degradation of P. purpureum and leucaena was higher (P 0.05). Protozoa counts and in vitro gas production (48 h) were lower in T2 and T3 (P methane yield (mol CH4/day) was higher in sheep fed leucaena (P sheep diets did not modify rumen fermentation pattern (same VFA ratios) nor reduce the amount of CH4 per unit of DMI (mol CH4/g DMI). However, leucaena inclusion does increase rumen N-NH3, aNDF and CP digestibility, and voluntary intake.

  18. Analisis Karbohidrat, Protein, dan Lemak pada Pembuatan Kecap Lamtoro Gung (Leucaena leucocephala terfermentasi Aspergillus oryzae

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    TJAHJADI PURWOKO

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Leucaena leucocephala was one of Mimosaceae family which had high protein content nearly the same value as in Soya beans protein content. L. leucocephala could be used as the substitution of Soya beans in production of soy sauce. Soy sauce was one of fermentation liquid products which had flavor and aroma as meat, and had high nutrition value. The aims of the research were (i to analyze nutrition value in seeds, koji and moromi including carbohydrate, proteins and lipids and (ii to know the potency of L. leucocephala as raw material in production of soy sauce by fermentationmethod with Aspergillus oryzae as inoculums. Fermentation was one of soy sauce production processes that involved two steps: (i the solid stage fermentation and (ii the brine fermentation. L. leucocephala was fermented with A. oryzae for 3-5 days to produce koji. Koji was soaked in salt solution 20% (1:5 b/v then it was fermented for 30 days to produce moromi. Nutritional values in L. leucocephala seeds, koji, and moromi was analyzed, i.e. carbohydrate (sugar reduction and starch, protein, and lipids. Moromi filtrate was added by spices to Leucaena sauce. Finally, preferable Leucaena sauce was tested including flavor, aroma, and color. Preferable data was analyzed by non-parametric statistic; it was Friedman Test and followed Wilcoxon Ranking Method. The result showed that value of reducing sugar in L. leucocephala seeds, koji and moromi were 78.38 mg/g; 119.08 mg/g; and 164.29 mg/g. Starch value of seeds, koji and moromi were 274.36 mg/g; 260.92 mg/g and 179.50 mg/g. The value of dissolved protein in seeds, koji and moromi were 107.44 mg/g; 86.1 mg/g; and 208.56 mg/g. The value of lipids on seeds, koji and moromi was 158.87 mg/g; 51.35 mg/g; and 80.86 mg/g. The data of preferable test on Leucaena sauce’s taste was the same as ABC sauce but the aroma of Leucaena sauce had the lowest score than the others. More over, the four kinds of sauce were not different significantly

  19. Fermentasi Biji Lamtoro Gung (Leucaena Leucocephala) untuk Menghasilkan Tanin sebagai Komoditi Farmasi dan Lain-Lain

    OpenAIRE

    Bakti, I.A. Rivai

    2001-01-01

    Penelitian mengenai pengaruh konsentrasi ragi terhadap kandungan tanin biji lamtoro gung (Leucaena leucocephala) telah dilakukan untuk melakukan konsentrasi ragi tempe yang terbaik dalam menetapkan kandungan tanin dari biji lamtoro gung yang difermentasi dengan ragi tempe dalam berbagai dosis. Penelitian ini menggunakan rancang acak lengkap (RAL) dengan empat faktor dosis ragi tempe masing-masing 0%, 5%, 10% dan 15%. Setiap perlakuan diulang empat kali. Data yang diperoleh dianalisa dengan me...

  20. Utilization of Leucaena Leucocephala in Traditional Fattening Program of Bali Cattle in Amarasi

    OpenAIRE

    Lani, Mona Lastri; Abdullah, Luki; Priyanto, Rudi

    2015-01-01

    This field study was aimed to evaluate the availability and the utility of forage on Bali cattle in Amarasi system in dry land area such as Kupang. Amarasi system is a fattening production system (paronisasi), which traditionally utilizes Leucaena leucocephala forage in dry season of Amarasi region. This field study was conducted during the period of July to December 2013 in Oesena and Merbaun Villages. The method used in this research was field survey. This type of survey was used to identif...

  1. Mimosine, the Allelochemical from the Leguminous Tree Leucaena leucocephala, Selectively Enhances Cell Proliferation in Dinoflagellates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Patrick K. K.; Wong, Francis T. W.; Wong, Joseph T. Y.

    2002-01-01

    Mimosine, the allelochemical from the leguminous tree Leucaena leucocephala, is toxic to most terrestrial animals and plants. We report here that while mimosine inhibits major phytoplankton groups, it enhances cell proliferation in dinoflagellates. On addition to coastal seawater samples, mimosine is able to confer a growth advantage to dinoflagellates. The use of mimosine will promote the isolation and culture of this group of phytoplankton. PMID:12324368

  2. Growth of Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit favored by organic waste in the Brazilian semiarid region

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    Francisco H. C. Amaral

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of sources and rates of organic waste and their interaction on the growth of Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit, in the Southeast region of Piauí State. The treatments consisted of two sources (Copernicia prunifera (Mill. H.E. palm residue and plant compound and six organic waste rates. The study was conducted in the period of March-June 2011 and the following parameters were evaluated: stem diameter, height, number of leaves, shoot dry weight, root dry weight, total dry matter, root volume, shoot dry weight/root dry weight ratio, height/stem diameter ratio and the Dickson Quality Index. The Copernicia prunifera (Mill. H.E. palm residue and plant compound showed a great potential to be used in the manufacture of substrates for the production of seedlings Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit, since their initial development was influenced by the sources and proportions of these organic residues and by the interaction between these treatments. The substrate containing 50% of plant compound produced better quality of plants of Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit in their initial development stage.

  3. Variation of Particle Size and Pretreatment Temperature to the Crystallinity of Leucaena Leucocephala

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    Mohd Safaai Nor Sharliza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to determine the effect of different particle size and pretreatment temperature to the crystallinity of leucaena leucocephala. The leucaena was pretreated by ionic liquid [1-ethyl-3 methylimidazolium acetate [Emim]Ac. There were three different particle sizes that have been tested in this experiment; less than 0.3 mm, 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm. In the other hand, the pretreatment temperature tested were 30°C, 60°C and 90°C. The effect of particle size and pretreatment temperature to the crystallinity of leucaena was investigated by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The crystallinity index of the sample represents the percentage of crystalline materials. A lower in the cristallinity index indicated that the material has lower crystillinity, hence give more benefit to the cellulose hydrolysis. From XRD analysis, it shows that the cristallinity index of leucaena decreased with decreasing particle size and increasing pretreatment temperature. SEM analysis also shows that the structure of leucaena has more irregular, porous and destroyed structure with decreasing particle size and increasing pretreatment temperature. Thus, the result from this experiment shows that the smaller particle size and higher pretreatment temperature would provide a more accessible surface area to enhance the cellulose hydrolysis.

  4. Ovarian activity and estrus behavior in early postpartum cows grazing Leucaena leucocephala in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottini-Luzardo, Maria; Aguilar-Perez, Carlos; Centurion-Castro, Fernando; Solorio-Sanchez, Francisco; Ayala-Burgos, Armin; Montes-Perez, Ruben; Muñoz-Rodriguez, David; Ku-Vera, Juan

    2015-12-01

    The legume Leucaena leucocephala (Leucaena) is widely used to supplement forage in silvopastoral livestock systems in Latin America. Little is known about its possible effects on the cow reproductive dynamic. The aim was to evaluate the effect of Leucaena foliage intake on re-establishment of ovarian activity and estrus behavior in early postpartum (7-90 days) cows. Twenty-four multiparous Bos taurus × Bos indicus cows were divided into two homogenous groups and assigned to one of two treatments: a silvopastoral system (SS, n = 12), consisting of an association of Cynodon nlemfuensis grass and L. leucocephala; and a control system (CS, n = 12), consisting of C. nlemfuensis alone. Intake of Leucaena in the SS ranged from 3.80 to 6.43 kg DM/cow/day. Plasma mimosine concentrations ranged from 1270 to 1530 μg/mL, and those for 2,3-dihydroxypyridine (DHP) from 147 to 729 μg/mL. No 3,4-DHP was detected in plasma. No difference (P > 0.05) between treatments was observed for the number of cows exhibiting small, medium, or dominant follicles, or estrus behavior. The number of cows which re-established ovarian cyclicity (n = 6) was lower (P < 0.05) in the SS than in the CS (n = 9). Corpus luteum lifespan was longer (P < 0.05) in the SS than in the CS. Intake of Leucaena affected the number of cows exhibiting ovarian cyclicity and extended corpus luteum life, but did not affect follicular development and estrus behavior.

  5. Nitrogen fixation in Leucaena leucocephala and effects of pruning s on cereal yields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekunda, M.

    1998-01-01

    Leucaena leucocephala was interplanted with reference tree species, Cassia siamea and Cassia spectabilis, and estimates of percent N derived from N 2 fixation (%Ndfa) were made, by the isotope-dilution method, at 4, 6, 14, 20 and 30 months after transplanting. The %Ndfa values were low and variable throughout the growth period, except after thinning at 14 months when there was a five-fold increase. The two non-fixing reference species outperformed the N 2 -fixing Leucaena in above-ground vegetative production, and provided different fixed-N estimates. Prunings from the L. leucocephala and C. Siamea trees were applied separately to soil as green manure. Maize was planted to test the effects of the Leucaena green manure on soil fertility, and millet was the test crop for the Cassia. Whether surface-applied or incorporated, the prunings significantly improved yields, which were generally similar among rates and methods of application. The proportions of cereal N obtained from prunings ranged from 8 to 33%, with no cereal-yield correlation. The data indicate that multipurpose tree prunings are of potential use to farmers as organic sources of nutrients, even at relatively low application rates, without need for incorporation into the soil. (author)

  6. Efecto de la altura de poda en Leucaena leucocephala y su influencia en el rebrote y rendimiento de Panicum maximum

    OpenAIRE

    H. M. Bacab; F. J. Solorio; S. B. Solorio

    2012-01-01

    Una de las prácticas importantes de manejo en los sistemas de Leucaena leucocephala asociada con pastos tropicales, como Panicum maximum, es la poda; en la actualidad se continúan los estudios para determinar los efectos de esta práctica en el componente arbóreo y herbáceo. Por todo ello, en el presente trabajo se evaluó el efecto de tres alturas de poda en Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham y su influencia en la pastura asociada (Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania). El estudio se realizó en la é...

  7. IN VITRO FERMENTATION EFFICIENCY OF MIXTURES OF Cynodon nlemfuensis, Leucaena leucocephala AND TWO ENERGY SOURCES (MAIZE OR SUGAR CANE MOLASSES

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    Juan Martin Estrada-Liévano

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro fermentation efficiency of Cynodon nlemfuensis forage (star grass and Leucaena leucocephala foliage (leucaena and two energy sources (i.e. maize and sugar cane molasses mixture was evaluated. Mixture samples (1 g DM were incubated for 24 h. All the mixtures were added with 500 mg of polyetilenglycol (PEG. Adding molasses to star grass increased dry matter true digestibility and carbohydrate fermentation (P

  8. Utilization of Leucaena leucocephala in Traditional Fattening Program of Bali Cattle in Amarasi

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    M. L. Lani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This field study was aimed to evaluate the availability and the utility of forage on Bali cattle in Amarasi system in dry land area such as Kupang. Amarasi system is a fattening production system (paronisasi, which traditionally utilizes Leucaena leucocephala forage in dry season of Amarasi region. This field study was conducted during the period of July to December 2013 in Oesena and Merbaun Villages. The method used in this research was field survey. This type of survey was used to identify the forage availability and utility for Bali cattle; including determining the level of feed intake, measuring carrying capacity of both observe villages, and recording body weight of cattle. Cluster random sampling was applied in this study to determine sample used in the research, those were two villages with different altitudes, namely Oesena Village and Merbaun Village. Data were analyzed descriptively to describe the related existing conditions in the field. T-test was conducted to determine leucaena consumption and Bali cattle body weight in both villages. The results showed that during observation period, availability of leucaena forage for cattle was low based on dry matter intake 3.60 and 3.58 kg/head/day, which led to low consumption of cattle. Nevertheless, the use of leucaena in this system increased average body weight gain of Bali cattle up to 0.77 kg/day, due to high crude protein consumption. The conclusion of this study was the availability of leucaena as Bali cattle feed did not meet the cattle needs, but the use of leucaena increased the average of Bali cattle body weight gain.

  9. Influence De La Drêche De Brasserie Et De Leucaena leucocephala ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a été organisé en 3 lots de 2 animaux chacun. Chaque lot a reçu en pls du fourrage, une ration de complément alimentaire. Aux rations des lots 1 et 3 on a ajouté respectivement de la drêche de brasserie ou de folioles séchées de Leucaena leucocephala. Les animaux du lot 2 servant de témoin, n\\'ont reçu ni drêche de ...

  10. Valor nutritivo e utilização do feno de leucena (Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham para coelhos em crescimento Nutritional feeding value and use of Leucaena hay (Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham for growing rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Fontana Figueiredo

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Dois experimentos foram realizados com o objetivo de avaliar a utilização do feno de leucena (Leucaena leucocephala cv.Cunningham para coelhos em crescimento. No ensaio de digestibilidade foram utilizados 28 coelhos da raça Nova Zelândia Branco, com 40 dias de idade, distribuídos em um delineamento experimental inteiramente casualizado, com dois tratamentos e 14 repetições. Foram utilizadas duas dietas, uma referência e uma teste na qual o feno de leucena substituiu 25% da matéria seca da dieta-referência. Os teores de matéria seca digestível, matéria orgânica digestível, proteína digestível, fibra em detergente neutro digestível e energia digestível do feno de leucena foram, respectivamente, de 26,87%; 25,30%; 5,32%; 14,66% e 1.286Kcal/kg. No experimento de desempenho foram utilizados 80 coelhos da raça Nova Zelândia Branco, de 35 a 70 dias de idade. Os animais foram distribuídos num delineamento experimental inteiramente casualizado, com cinco tratamentos (cinco níveis de inclusão de feno de leucena: 0, 25, 50, 75 e 100%, em substituição ao feno de alfafa, oito repetições e dois animais por unidade experimental. Os níveis crescentes de substituição do feno de alfafa pelo feno de leucena, não afetaram o desempenho dos coelhos durante o período experimental. Os dados mostram que o feno de leucena substituiu eficientemente o feno de alfafa em dietas para coelhos em crescimento.Two trial were carried out to determine the performance of rabbits fed on diets which included Leucaena hay (Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunninghan. Twenty-eight 40-day old White New Zealand rabbits were employed for the digestibility trial, in a completely randomized design with two treatments and 14 replications. Reference and test diets were used in which Leucaena hay replaced 25% of the dry matter in the reference diet. Digestible dry matter, digestible organic matter, digestible protein, digestible F.D.N. and digestible energy contents of

  11. Cinnamate 4-Hydroxylase (C4H) genes from Leucaena leucocephala: a pulp yielding leguminous tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Omer, Sumita; Patel, Krunal; Khan, Bashir M

    2013-02-01

    Leucaena leucocephala is a leguminous tree species accounting for one-fourth of raw material supplied to paper and pulp industry in India. Cinnamate 4-Hydroxylase (C4H, EC 1.14.13.11) is the second gene of phenylpropanoid pathway and a member of cytochrome P450 family. There is currently intense interest to alter or modify lignin content of L. leucocephala. Three highly similar C4H alleles of LlC4H1 gene were isolated and characterized. The alleles shared more than 98 % sequence identity at amino acid level to each other. Binding of partial promoter of another C4H gene LlC4H2, to varying amounts of crude nuclear proteins isolated from leaf and stem tissues of L. leucocephala formed two loose and one strong complex, respectively, suggesting that the abundance of proteins that bind with the partial C4H promoter is higher in stem tissue than in leaf tissue. Quantitative Real Time PCR study suggested that among tissues of same age, root tissues had highest level of C4H transcripts. Maximum transcript level was observed in 30 day old root tissue. Among the tissues investigated, C4H activity was highest in 60 day old root tissues. Tissue specific quantitative comparison of lignin from developing seedling stage to 1 year old tree stage indicated that Klason lignin increased in tissues with age.

  12. Characterization analysis for leaves of Leucaena leucocephala by using phytochemical screening assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarina, Z.; Ghazali, C. M. R.; Sam, S. T.

    2017-09-01

    Leucaena Leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit (Petai Belalang) is a medium plant which belong in group of tropical breed that can survived in hot, dried and warm environment. In Malaysia, the plant is available abundantly. As there are still no commercial used, and no serious intention in finding the benefits of L. Leucocephala, this work come out with the idea to analyze the antioxidants contains in leaves of the plant by undergoes different extraction and chemical testing method. The phytochemical screening assay involved in this study are antioxidant activity by using free radical diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method, total phenolic content by using Folin-Ciocalteu method, total flavonoid content by using colorimetric assay with ascorbic acid and quercetin were used as reference standards while for phosphorus analysis, a molybdenum blue method or also known as ascorbic acid method was used. For antioxidant activity by using free radical diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method, higher concentration was recorded by extraction using methanol (dried sample) which is 8247.0 mg/L, for total phenolic content higher concentration was recorded by extraction using deionized water (dried sample) which is 4276.0 mg/L, for total flavonoid content by using colorimetric assay higher concentration was recorded by extraction using methanol (dried sample) which is 4439.0 mg/L, and for for phosphorus analysis higher concentration was recorded by extraction using methanol (dried sample) which is 71.057 mg/L.

  13. Intoxicação natural e experimental por Leucaena leucocephala em equinos

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    Mirna R. Porto

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Este trabalho investigou as principais alterações clínicas e dermatopatológicas de equinos intoxicados natural e experimentalmente por Leucaena leucocephala. Os surtos ocorreram nos estados de São Paulo e Goiás, onde seis cavalos após a ingestão de casca e/ou folhas de L. leucocephala apresentaram alopecia, principalmente na crina e cauda. Nesses animais o diagnóstico foi baseado na observação da ingestão da planta e dos sinais clínicos. Nos animais intoxicados experimentalmente, foi realizado o exame clínico, biópsias da pele das regiões de crina, dorso e cauda e foi feita dosagem sérica de tri-iodotironina (T3 e tiroxina (T4. Alopecia da crina e cauda foi o principal sinal clínico observado, seguido de anorexia, emagrecimento e apatia em todos os equinos. Os níveis de T3 e T4 total apresentaram redução significativa (p≤0,05 na terceira semana de ingestão da leucena quando comparado aos níveis basais. As alterações histológicas observadas nas biópsias de pele demonstram acentuada telogenização dos folículos pilosos ao final dos experimentos. Os achados clínico-patológicos em equinos intoxicados são semelhantes aos observados em ruminantes. A intoxicação experimental de equinos por L. leucocephala evidenciou o acentuado declínio dos níveis dos hormônios tireoideanos, sugerindo efeito bociogênico da mimosina e seus compostos derivados, com hipotireoidismo transitório e alopecia devido à acentuada redução da atividade folicular.

  14. Fertigation by capillary action in seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit = Fertirrigação por capilaridade em mudas de Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit.

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    Renata de Paiva Dantas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The leucena (Leucaena leucocephala, native to Central America, produces large quantities of viable seeds, which allows its propagation on a large scale; it is also fast-growing and can reach 7 m in height. The use of fertigation favours the absorption of nutrients, and the greater growth of the leucena seedlings, due to the application of less concentrated nutrient solutions of a consequently lower electrical conductivity. However, this practice requires a lot of manpower, and it is necessary to find alternative technologies that would allow a reduction in the costs of fertigation. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate the viability of fertigation by capillary action, using different concentrations of a standard nutrient solution in the production of seedlings of leucena. A completely randomised experimental design was used, with treatments comprising four concentrations of nutrient solution (0, 50, 100 and 150% applied by capillary fertigation. Two nondestructive evaluations of growth were carried out at 25 and 40 days after sowing (DAS, and one destructive evaluation at 55 DAS. The variables to be evaluated were: plant height, stem diameter, number of leaves and biomass accumulation, besides the quality indices of the seedlings. Analysis of the data leads to the conclusion that seedlings of leucena can be produced at concentrations of between 70 and 100% of the nutrient solution through fertigation by capillary action. = A leucena (Leucaena leucocephala, originária da América Central, produz grandes quantidades de sementes viáveis, o que permite sua propagação em larga escala, e possui crescimento rápido, podendo chegar a 7 metros de altura. O uso da fertirrigação favorece a absorção de nutrientes e o maior crescimento das mudas de leucena, devido à aplicação de solução nutritiva menos concentrada e, consequentemente, com menor condutividade elétrica. Nesse sentido, objetivou-se com este trabalho avaliar a viabilidade

  15. Efecto de la altura de poda en Leucaena leucocephala y su influencia en el rebrote y rendimiento de Panicum maximum

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    H. M. Bacab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Una de las prácticas importantes de manejo en los sistemas de Leucaena leucocephala asociada con pastos tropicales, como Panicum maximum, es la poda; en la actualidad se continúan los estudios para determinar los efectos de esta práctica en el componente arbóreo y herbáceo. Por todo ello, en el presente trabajo se evaluó el efecto de tres alturas de poda en Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham y su influencia en la pastura asociada (Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania. El estudio se realizó en la época poco lluviosa del año (marzo a mayo de 2010, se utilizó un diseño de bloques completos al azar con cuatro repeticiones. Al inicio del experimento se asignaron los tratamientos (alturas de poda de 20, 40 y 60 cm sobre el nivel del suelo para Leucaena leucocephala. En el caso de Panicum maximum, se realizó una poda a 5 cm sobre el nivel del suelo en todas las parcelas experimentales. Los resultados obtenidos indicaron que la poda de la leguminosa a 40 y 60 cm permitió obtener brotes de mayor talla, sin afectar a la gramínea asociada. De igual manera, al incrementar la altura de poda, la leguminosa presentó mayor rendimiento y proporción de forraje comestible; sin embargo, se afectó negativamente a la pastura asociada. Ante ello, considerándose el aspecto animal, se recomienda no reducir la altura de poda de Leucaena leucocephala a menos de 40 cm, ya que se reduce significativamente el rendimiento y la proporción de forraje comestible de esta leguminosa, el cual es de mayor calidad para la alimentación animal.

  16. Expression analysis of cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) gene in developing seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala: a pulp yielding tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sameer; Gupta, Ranadheer K; Arha, Manish; Vishwakarma, Rishi K; Rawal, Shuban K; Kavi Kishor, P B; Khan, Bashir M

    2011-02-01

    Removal of lignin is a major hurdle for obtaining good quality pulp. Leucaena leucocephala (subabul) is extensively used in paper industry in India; therefore, as a first step to generate transgenic plants with low lignin content, cDNA and genomic clones of CCR gene were isolated and characterized. The cDNA encoding CCR (EC 1.2.1.44) was designated as Ll-CCR; the sequence analysis revealed an Open Reading Frame (ORF) of 1005 bp. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Ll-CCR sequence is highly homologous to CCRs from other dicot plants. The 2992 bp genomic clone of Leucaena CCR consists of 5 exons and 4 introns. The haploid genome of L. leucocephala contains two copies as revealed by DNA blot hybridization. Ll-CCR gene was over-expressed in Escherichia coli, which showed a molecular mass of approximately 38 kDa. Protein blot analysis revealed that Ll-CCR protein is expressed at higher levels in root and in stem, but undetectable in leaf tissues. Expression of CCR gene in Leucaena increased up to 15 d in case of roots and stem as revealed by QRT-PCR studies in 0-15 d old seedlings. ELISA based studies of extractable CCR protein corroborated with QRT-PCR data. CCR protein was immuno-cytolocalized around xylem tissue. Lignin estimation and expression studies of 5, 10 and 15 d old stem and root suggest that CCR expression correlates with quantity of lignin produced, which makes it a good target for antisense down regulation for producing designer species for paper industry. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of combined inoculations of Rhizobium-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Leucaena leucocephala CV: Perú

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    Lázaro Jesús Ojeda Quintana

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The work was conducted at the Experimental Station of Soil and Fertilizer “Escambray” land of farmers and associated rural extension. The experimental design was randomized blocks, and treatments: Rizhobium loti V-4033 (Research Institute of Pastures and Forages, mycorrhizal fungi trainers, Rhizobium +mycorrhiza fungi trainers, nitrogen and total control. Inoculation with my corrhiza forming fungi was performed at 10 g/bag Certificate MicoFert Strain the Institute of Ecology and Systematics-3: Glomus spurcum, Topes de Collantes, 85 % colonization of rootlets, while the Rhizobium was inoculated in a dose of 50 g/kg of seed. Variant was nitrogen at 25 kg/ha of urea. The plots occupied 18m2 , with an area of 9 m2 evaluable. When the plants reached 7.5 months and an average height of 143.4 cm proceeded to make the Court of establishment and then four foliage cuts were made every 90 days. Each cut dry biomass yield, and phosphorus content was determined crude protein. The combined inoculation of Rhizobium and mycorrhiza fungi Makers increased the yield of dry biomass, and phosphorus content of crude protein. We conclude proposing the adoption of an alternative methodology using mycorrhiza formers Fungi and Rhizobium in Leucaena leucocephala as a way to increase the yield of dry biomass, decreasing mineral fertilization and contribute to environmental protection

  18. Combustion Characteristics of Torrefied Wood Samples of Pinus Carrebea and Leucaena Leucocephala Grown in Nigeria

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    Francis Akinyele FARUWA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Torrefaction of selected wood samples of Pinus Carrebea and Leucaena Leucocephala were carried out at temperatures ranging from 200 to 300°C to improve the energy parameters of biomass and to determine the effect of torrefication temperature on the physical and combustion properties of wood selected from Pinus carrebea and Leuceanea leucocephala grown in Nigeria. In this process the biomass hemicellulose is degraded, maintaining its cellulose and lignin content. The samples were dried and heated to 225, 250, 275, and 300°C. Then the torrefied mass was subjected to basic property testing on proximate analysis and heating value was calculated in order to understand the differences between raw material and its torrefied products. Specifically, the wood blocks changed from light brown to black, stemming from the partial carbonization at the wood surface. When the temperature is 225°C, the color of the wood is between dark brown and once the torrefaction temperatures are 250 and 275°C, the colors of the wood become dark and darker respectively. The results of the proximate analysis also showed that increasing of torrefied temperature; volatile fraction was reduced while fixed carbon was increased with increase in temperature from 21.34 to 52.74 and 18.58 to 56.83 for Leucaena leucocephala and Pinus carreabeanus respectively at 225 to 300°C. The volatile content is decreased from 78.58% to 62.76% with increase in temperature. Ash content of were within 1.57-3.41% of torrefied wood. It could be observed that the High calorific value (HCV for pine ranged between 19.80 and 28.06MJ/Kg for the top, 19.93and 24.96MJ/kg for middle with 19.72and 25.96MJ/Kg for base. The values recorded for raw sample and at 275°C been the lowest and highest respectively. The High calorific value (HCV were found to be on the increase and nose dive at 300°C for the tree parts used in this research. The result revealed that for Leuceana the value increased from raw up to

  19. COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF TORREFIED WOOD SAMPLES OF PINUS CARREBEA AND LEUCAENA LEUCOCEPHALA GROWN IN NIGERIA

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    Joseph Adeola FUWAPE

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Torrefaction of selected wood samples of Pinus Carrebea and Leucaena Leucocephala were carried out at temperatures ranging from 200 to 300°C to improve the energy parameters of biomass and to determine the effect of torrefication temperature on the physical and combustion properties of wood selected from Pinus carrebea and Leuceanea leucocephala grown in Nigeria. In this process the biomass hemicellulose is degraded, maintaining its cellulose and lignin content. The samples were dried and heated to 225, 250, 275, and 300°C. Then the torrefied mass was subjected to basic property testing on proximate analysis and heating value was calculated in order to understand the differences between raw material and its torrefied products. Specifically, the wood blocks changed from light brown to black, stemming from the partial carbonization at the wood surface. When the temperature is 225°C, the color of the wood is between dark brown and once the torrefaction temperatures are 250 and 275°C, the colors of the wood become dark and darker respectively. The results of the proximate analysis also showed that increasing of torrefied temperature; volatile fraction was reduced while fixed carbon was increased with increase in temperature from 21.34 to 52.74 and 18.58 to 56.83 for Leucaena leucocephala and Pinus carreabeanus respectively at 225 to 300°C. The volatile content is decreased from 78.58% to 62.76% with increase in temperature. Ash content of were within 1.57-3.41% of torrefied wood. It could be observed that the High calorific value (HCV for pine ranged between 19.80 and 28.06MJ/Kg for the top, 19.93and 24.96MJ/kg for middle with 19.72and 25.96MJ/Kg for base. The values recorded for raw sample and at 275°C been the lowest and highest respectively. The High calorific value (HCV were found to be on the increase and nose dive at 300°C for the tree parts used in this research. The result revealed that for Leuceana the value increased from raw up to

  20. Effects of supplementing Leucaena leucocephala and conserved forages from natural pasture on the performance of grazing calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Victoria Olubunmi A; Aina, Ayobami B J; Fasae, Oladapo A; Oni, Adebayo O; Aderinboye, Ronke Y; Dele, Peter A; Idowu, Oluwaseun J; Adelusi, Oludotun O; Shittu, Olalekan O; Okeniyi, Funmilayo A; Jolaosho, Alaba O

    2014-01-01

    Twelve white Fulani × N'dama cross-bred calves weighing 83.79 ± 1.16 kg were used in an 84-day experiment to investigate the utilization of forage resources from natural grazing land. The experimental diets were sole grazing, grazing + hay, grazing + silage and grazing + Leucaena leucocephala leaves. The calves were divided into four groups of three animals each and were randomly assigned to the four experimental diets. Crude protein (CP) contents of the forages ranged from 59 to 171 g/kg dry matter (DM). Neutral detergent fibre (NDF) and acid detergent fibre (ADF) contents of the forages ranged from 560 to 705 g/kg DM and 363 to 440 g/kg DM, respectively. Significantly (P forage resources. Variations (P forage resources from the natural pasture by the calves was attained on supplementation with conserved forages and L. leucocephala leaves without any deleterious effects on the haematological and serum parameters.

  1. Chemical elements in Leucaena leucocephala leaves of riparian zones of the municipality of Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    França, Elvis J. de; Fernandes, Elisabete A.N.; Lira, Marcelo G.; Ferreira, Fabiano S.; Cavalca, Isabel P.O.; Rodrigues, Vanessa S.; Camilli, Leandro

    2017-01-01

    The species Leucaena leucocephala can be found in several riparian ecosystems, acting as one of the main invasive and harmful species for the forest restoration of the permanent preservation areas. It has also been studied for the phytoremediation of some chemical elements, due to their potential accumulation of chemical substances. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the accumulation of chemical elements in leaves of Leucaena leucocephala trees by Instrumental Neutronic Activation Analysis - INAA. Samples of leaves were collected in eight samples from riverside areas of the Piracicaba Municipality, São Paulo, Brazil, during the dry and rainy season. After collection, washing with water and drying in a forced circulation oven, the samples were comminuted and encapsulated in polyethylene capsules and subjected to a thermal neutron flux of 10 13 cm -2 s -1 for 8 hours in the Nuclear Research Reactor IEA-R1 of IPEN / CNEN. Thermal neutron flux monitoring was performed by Ni-Cr alloy fragments with known concentrations of the chemical monitors elements. After measurements of radioactivity induced by HPGe detectors, the concentrations of the chemical elements were calculated by the k0 method using the Quantu computer program. Certified reference materials were also analyzed for quality assurance of the analytical procedure. The results indicated high concentrations of La and lanthanoids (Ce, Eu, Sm, Tb and Yb) in leaves of L. leucocephala in both periods analyzed. It was possible to observe a decrease in the concentrations of the chemical elements in the rainy season, probably associated to the washing of the geological material deposited on the leaves of the trees by the rains, except for K, Mo, Rb, Sb and Zn, whose values remained or increased in the leaves collected during the rainy season. Considering the constant leaf production, L. leucocephala can greatly affect the cycling of chemical elements due to its accumulation capacity demonstrated by this

  2. Antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxic potential of condensed tannins from Leucaena leucocephala hybrid-Rendang

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    Mazni Abu Zarin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Condensed tannins (CTs are one of the promising compounds due to their potentially health-promoting qualities. In this study, CTs were extracted from a Leucaena leucocephala hybrid-Rendang and subjected to various biological studies including antioxidant (using Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP, DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging assay, anti-microbial (against different pathogens and cytotoxic activities (toward human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7, human colon carcinoma (HT29, human cervical carcinoma (HeLa and human liver carcinoma (HepG2 cell lines in cancer cells through in vitro experiments. The structural characteristics and purity of CTs extract were determined using 13C NMR. The results showed that CTs exhibited higher in vitro antioxidant activities (2257.12 ± 80.55 mg TEAC/g extract, 605.3 ± 1.82 mg TEAC/g extract and 1014.03 ± 1.20 mg TEAC/g extract in FRAP, ABTS and DPPH assay, respectively and demonstrated anti-microbial activities toward selected Gram's positive and Gram's negative bacteria tested with MIC and MBC value at 6.25–50 mg/mL. Furthermore, among other selected cancer cells, CTs also demonstrated cytotoxic activity toward human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 (IC50 = 38.33 ± 2.08 μg/mL. Characteristic of apoptosis such as cell shrinkage, nuclear condensation and apoptotic bodies were shown in MCF-7. These preliminary investigations have provided scientific rationale to use CTs as an alternative therapy for various oxidative and inflammatory associated diseases.

  3. Anatomy and ultrastructure alterations of Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) inoculated with mycorrhizal fungi in response to arsenic-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Jerusa, E-mail: jerusaschneider@hotmail.com [Departamento de Ciência do Solo, Universidade Federal de Lavras (UFLA), PO Box 3037, Lavras, Minas Gerais, 37200-000 (Brazil); Labory, Claudia Regina Gontijo [Departamento de Fitopatologia, Universidade Federal de Lavras, PO Box 3037, Lavras, Minas Gerais, 37200-000 (Brazil); Rangel, Wesley Melo [Departamento de Ciência do Solo, Universidade Federal de Lavras (UFLA), PO Box 3037, Lavras, Minas Gerais, 37200-000 (Brazil); Alves, Eduardo [Departamento de Fitopatologia, Universidade Federal de Lavras, PO Box 3037, Lavras, Minas Gerais, 37200-000 (Brazil); Guilherme, Luiz Roberto Guimarães [Departamento de Ciência do Solo, Universidade Federal de Lavras (UFLA), PO Box 3037, Lavras, Minas Gerais, 37200-000 (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: ► Inoculation of L. leucocephala improved plant growth in high-As soils. ► Plants inoculated with Glomus clarum were less sensitive to As. ► Ultrastructural changes in leaves of L. leucocephala. ► Modified structures in intracellular spaces in plants inoculated with G. clarum. ► Cell disruption and stacking of root cell walls at high As concentrations. -- Abstract: Many studies demonstrate the potential application of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) for remediation purposes, but little is known on AMF potential to enhance plant tolerance to arsenic (As) and the mechanisms involved in this process. We carried anatomical and ultrastructural studies to examine this symbiotic association and the characteristics of shoots and roots of Leucaena leucocephala in As-amended soils (35 and 75 mg As dm{sup −3}). The experiment used 3 AMF isolates from uncontaminated soils: Acaulospora morrowiae, Glomus clarum, and Gigaspora albida; a mixed inoculum derived from combining these 3 isolates (named Mix AMF); and, 3 AMF isolates from As-contaminated areas: A. morrowiae, G. clarum and Paraglomus occultum. Phytotoxicity symptoms due to arsenic contamination appeared during plant growth, especially in treatments without AMF application. Inoculation with G. clarum and the mixture of species (A. morrowiae, G. albida, and G. clarum) resulted in better growth of L. leucocephala in soils with high As concentrations, as well as significant As removal from the soil, showing a potential for using AMF in phytoextraction. Light microscopy (LS), transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopies (SEM) studies showed the colonization of the AMF in plant tissues and damage in all treatments, with ultrastructural changes being observed in leaves and roots of L. leucocephala, especially with the addition of 75 mg dm{sup −3} of As.

  4. Proteomic characterization and schizophyllan production by Schizophyllum commune ISTL04 cultured on Leucaena leucocephala wood under submerged fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manoj Kumar; Kumar, Madan; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2017-07-01

    In this study Schizophyllum commune ISTL04 was grown on Leucaena leucocephala wood (LLW) for secretome analysis and schizophyllan production. There is no report on extracellular protein profile and schizophyllan production on woody biomass by this fungus under submerged fermentation conditions. Leucaena leucocephala, a promising bioenergy crop having high holocellulose content was used as substrate without pretreatment. The maximum sugar, extracellular protein and exopolysaccharide (EPS) production during fermentation was found to be 8.53±0.07mgmL -1 , 391±7.51mgL -1 and 4.2±0.1gL -1 or 0.21gg -1 LLW on day 18 respectively. The secretome profile was dominated by glycoside hydrolases followed by carbohydrate esterase and other oxidative enzymes. EPS was further characterized by FTIR and GC-MS for functional group, monomer composition and linkage analysis and was identified as schizophyllan. The result indicated that LLW can be utilized as a low cost substrate for enzyme cocktail and schizophyllan production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Post-transplant reactions of mycorrhizal and mycorrhiza-free seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala to pH changes in an Oxisol and Ultisol of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Habte; G. Diarra; P.G. Scowcroft

    2011-01-01

    The extent to which pretransplant colonization of seedlings with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Glomus aggregatum Schenck and Smith emend. Koske could enhance the post-transplant growth of two cultivars of Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit (cv. K-8 and cv. K-636) in Al- and Mn-rich acid soils was evaluated in a...

  6. Crotalaria incana l. and leucaena leucocephala lam. (leguminosae): toxicity indicator species of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil; Crotalaria incana l. y leucaena leucocephala lam. (leguminosae): especies indicadoras de toxicidad por hidrocarburos de petroleo en el suelo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez Luna, Dinora; Castellan Estrada, Mepivoseth; Rivera Cruz, Maria del C.; Ortiz Ceballos, Angel I.; Izquierdo R., Francisco [Colegio de Postgraduados, Campus Montecillo, Montecillo, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: dinovaz@colpos.mx

    2010-07-01

    This study assesses the toxic effects produced by a Gleysol molic soil contaminated with crude oil on seedlings of two species of legumes. A phytotoxic impact index (IIF) was generated, which includes five parameters measured by relative rates of impact (IRIF{sub (x)}) for variables; emergency, height, root length, aboveground biomass and root biomass. Bioassays were conducted under a completely randomized design with three replications under semi-controlled conditions, to assess the sensitivity of Leucaena leucocephala and Crotalaria incana at different concentrations of TPH (total petroleum hydrocarbons). Effects were highly significant (P {<=} 0.01) with increasing concentrations of HTP in substrate. The emergence of L. leucocephala was 29 % lower with 80 000 mgkg{sup -1} HTP, while C. incana decreased 30 % with 32 000 mgkg{sup -1} TPH respect to control. Both species showed a five-day delay in the emergence of seedlings when exposed to high levels of TPH. A significant decrease in the accumulation of dry matter (DM) at concentrations above 20 000 mgkg{sup -1} TPH was observed in both species. The respective IIF declined of 50 % with 80 000 and 25 000 mgkg{sup -1} TPH, but L. leucocephala had no significant effect with 10 000 mgkg{sup -1} TPH. Finally, the EC50 in L. leucocephala, is presented with 80 000 mgkg{sup -1} TPH whereas in C. incana this parameter is noted from 25 000 mgkg{sup -1} TPH. [Spanish] En este estudio se evaluaron los efectos toxicos que produce un suelo Gleysol molico contaminado con petroleo crudo, sobre plantulas de dos especies de leguminosas. Para ello se genero un indice de impacto fitotoxico (IIF) que integra cinco parametros, medidos a traves de indices relativos de impacto (IRIF{sub (x)}) para las variables emergencia, altura, longitud radicular, biomasa aerea y biomasa radicular. Los bioensayos se realizaron bajo un diseno completamente al azar, con tres repeticiones, en condiciones semicontroladas, para evaluar la sensibilidad de

  7. Forage production and growing goats’ response under silvopastoral systems based on Guazuma ulmifolia, Leucaena leucocephala and Crescentia cujete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Rodríguez Fernández

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Grass monoculture, besides being unnatural to goat’s natural eating habits, exhibits low forage production during the dry season, with negative impacts on animal productivity. This research aimed to determine the productive advantages of silvopastoral system arrangements in goat production. A completely randomized design with repeated measurements through time was used. Six treatments were evaluated: kikuyina grass monoculture (Bothriochloa pertusa and guinea grass monoculture (Panicum maximum cv. Tanzania as control groups; guacimo (Guazuma ulmifolia based silvopastoral arrangement; calabash (Crescentia cujete based silvopastoral arrangement; lead tree (Leucaena leucocephala based silvopastoral arrangement; and a mixed based silvopastoralarrangement (guacimo, calabash and leucaena. The information was processed with analysis of variance. The results showed increased forage production in silvopastoral arrangements vs. Bothriochloa pertusa monoculture. The greater increase in height (p <0.05 at 9-14 months of age, was obtained with the leucaena silvopastoral arrangement. All silvopastoral arrangements showed forage yield advantages compared to B. pertusa. The higher dry matter production of guinea grass is highlighted. Overall weight gain of the growing goats was low; nevertheless, a differential response between treatments was observed. Silvopastoral arrangements had the highest (p <0.05 weight gain (22.5 to 33.6 g/animal per day relative to the guinea grass monoculture (13.2 g/animal per day. The growing goats had higher percentages of estrus and pregnancy in the mixed system (66.7% and those based on guacimo (66.7% and on lead tree (55.6%.

  8. Milk yield and blood urea nitrogen in crossbred cows grazing Leucaena leucocephala in a silvopastoral system in the Mexican tropics

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    Maria B. Bottini-Luzardo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess milk yields, estimate the intake of crude protein (CP and determine the concentrations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN in early post-partum crossbred cows grazing irrigated Leucaena leucocephala (leucaena in a silvopastoral system relative to those in an irrigated grass monoculture.  Twenty-four multiparous cows were randomly allotted at calving on the basis of previous milk yields to 2 grazing treatments: grass monoculture system (MS of Cynodon nlemfuensis (n=12; and an intensive silvopastoral system (ISS composed of leucaena and C. nlemfuensis (n=12.  Cows were supplemented with sorghum grain (ISS or a conventional concentrate (MS during milking to ensure availability of metabolizable energy (ME and CP required for milk production.  Mean estimated intake of leucaena was 5.1±1.3 kg DM/d and estimated CP intakes were 1,479±3.3 and 1,258±3.3 g/d for ISS and MS, respectively (P>0.05, while estimated intakes of ME were 161±1.3 and 131±1.4 MJ/d for ISS and MS, respectively (P<0.05.  Milk yields were 13.5 and 14.5 kg/cow/d for cows on ISS and MS, respectively (P>0.05.  Concentrations of BUN were 19.1 mg/dL for cows in ISS and 15.3 mg/dL for cows in MS (P<0.05.  We conclude that intake of leucaena and sorghum grain in an irrigated silvopastoral system was sufficient to substitute for expensive concentrate in the diets of lactating cows grazing irrigated grass monoculture.  However, the higher levels of BUN found in ISS suggest a lower efficiency of N utilization in this treatment.  Restricting consumption of leucaena might be a means of improving efficiency of its use and this warrants investigation. Keywords: Cattle, crude protein, Cynodon nlemfuensis, leucaena, tropical pasturesDOI: 10.17138/TGFT(4159-167

  9. Fermentation of phytic acid from lamtoro gung seeds (Leucaena leucocephala to produce inositol and tannin as pharmaceutical commodity

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    I. A.R. Bakti

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The research was done to define the effect of tempe yeast concentration on inositol and tannin contents of fermented lamtoro gung seeds (Leucaena leucocephala. This is a research with completely randomized design using four doses of tempe yeast, i.e. 0 %, 5 %, 10 %, and 15 %. Each treatment was replicated 4 times. The resulted data were analyzed by analysis of variance and the significant differences were tested by least significantly difference test. Tannin was analyzed by Lowenthal-Procter method. The result of the research showed that the treatment had significant effects (P<0.05 on the parameter measured. The highest inositol with lowest tannin contents were found by using 15 % tempe yeast and duration of fermentation 96 hours, that is 0.2631 %. (Med J Indones 2003; 12: 236-42Keywords: tempe yeast

  10. Effect of Different Salinityon Growthand Carotenoid Content of Dunaliella sp. In Lamtoro Leaves Extract Media (Leucaena leucocephala

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    Dharta Mahardani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Page Header User You are logged in as... jat My Journals My Profile Log Out Notifications View Manage Journal Content Search Search Scope Browse By Issue By Author By Title Other Journals Categories Font Size Make font size smaller Make font size default Make font size larger Home About User Home Categories Search Current Archives Announcements EDITORIAL TEAM Google Scholar SINTA SUBMISSIONS DOAJ PUBLICATION ETHICS FOCUS AND SCOPE PORTAL GARUDA Home > Vol 7, No 1 (2017 > Mahardani Effect of Different Salinityon Growthand Carotenoid Content of Dunaliella sp. In Lamtoro Leaves Extract Media (Leucaena leucocephala Dharta Mahardani, Berta Putri, Siti Hudaidah Abstract Dunaliella is a green microalgae that produces carotenoids, one of the carotenoid types produced is β-carotene which accumulated in very high amounts in some stressful conditions such as nitrogen limitations, high salinity and exposure high light intensity. Leucaena leucocephala is one of the natural ingredients that potential as a source of nutrition of Dunaliella sp. growth. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different salinity in Lamtoro Leaves Extract Media on growth and carotenoid content Dunaliella sp. The research was conducted in Aquaculture Laboratory, Agriculture Faculty, Lampung University. The design of research was used completely randomized design with 4 treatments and 3 repetitions. The treatments used was Lamtoro Leaves extract media with salinity 30 ppt, 35 ppt, 40 ppt, and 45 ppt. The result showed that media of Lamtoro Leaves extract with different salinity gave significant effect on cell density and carotenoid content of Dunaliella sp. (p<0,05. The results of this study showed that the best cell growth occurred in the treatment of salinity 30 ppt with cell density reached 5,09×10 6 cells/ml, while the highest carotenoid content was produced at 35 ppt salinity treatment of 1,0668 g/ml

  11. Carcass traits and meat quality of lamb fed on ration containing different levels of leucaena hay (Leucaena leucocephala L.)

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    El-Aal Abd H.A.; Suliman A.I.A.

    2008-01-01

    Twenty growing crossbred male lambs (3 chios. 1 ossimi and 1 chios. 1 ossimi) of 15.25 + 2.00 kg initial average body weight and three months old were divided into four groups. All groups were fed on concentrate feed mixture plus 1% of live body weight wheat straw for 169 days. Four levels (zero, 200g, 400g and 600g) of leucaena hay were used. Final weight and carcass traits were evaluated. Color (L, a, b), proximate composition, pH, acidity, expressible water, water holding capacity, cooking...

  12. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) alleviate heavy metal-induced toxicity in Leucaena leucocephala seedlings: A physiochemical analysis.

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    Venkatachalam, P; Jayaraj, M; Manikandan, R; Geetha, N; Rene, Eldon R; Sharma, N C; Sahi, S V

    2017-01-01

    The present study describes the role of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) in reversing oxidative stress symptoms induced by heavy metal (Cd and Pb) exposure in Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. Seedling growth was significantly enhanced with the augmentation of ZnONPs following Cd and Pb exposure. Heavy metal accumulations were recorded as 1253.1 mg Cd per kg DW and 1026.8 mg Pb per kg DW for the respective treatments. Results demonstrated that ZnONPs augmentation caused an increase in photosynthetic pigment and total soluble protein contents while a significant decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA-lipid peroxidation) content in leaves. Antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POX) were, in turn, elevated in heavy metal-exposed leaves amended with ZnONPs. The ameliorating effect of ZnO nanoparticles on oxidative stress induced toxicity was also confirmed by the reduced MDA content and the elevated level of antioxidative enzyme activities in leaf tissues of L. leucocephala seedlings. Further, addition of ZnONPs in combination with Cd and Pb metals induced distinct genomic alterations such as presence of new DNA bands and/or absence of normal bands in the RAPD pattern of the exposed plants. This study uniquely suggests a potential role of zinc oxide nanoparticles in the remediation of heavy metal contaminated media. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of Rhizobia Inoculation on Biomass Gain and Tissue Nitrogen Content of Leucaena leucocephala Seedlings under Drought

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    Gabriela Pereyra

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Anticipated increases in the frequency of heat waves and drought spells may have negative effects on the ability of leguminous trees to fix nitrogen (N. In seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala inoculated with Mesorhizobium loti or Rhizobium tropici, we investigated how the developmental stage and a short drought influenced overall biomass and the accumulation of carbon and N in plant tissues. In early developmental stages, the number of nodules and nodule biomass were correlated with total plant biomass and δ15N, and nodules and roots contributed 33%–35% of the seedling total N. Seedlings associated with R. tropici fixed more N and exhibited higher overall biomass compared with M. loti seedlings. Four and a half months after inoculation (140 days after inoculation, DAI, a short (15-day drought inhibited seedling growth and caused a decline in total plant N, with the smallest decline in R. tropici seedlings. After 15 days of drought, i.e., 155 DAI, the nodules had accumulated proline, but the total amino acid concentration did not change. Our results indicate that N-fixation is independent of seedlings growth. In addition, R. tropici is a better choice than M. loti as a symbiont for Leucaena seedlings for forest restoration and agroforestry applications under increasingly drier conditions.

  14. Ithome lassula Hodges (Lepidoptera: Cosmopterigidae, una nueva especie para Cuba asociada a Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit

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    O Alonso

    Full Text Available El nuevo informe para Cuba de Ithome lassula Hodges (Lepidoptera: Cosmopterigidae, especie asociada a la planta forrajera Leucaena leucocephala, se confirmó con la identificación de los adultos, mediante la utilización de una clave basada en la maculación de las escamas en la zona de la cabeza del insecto. Los adultos emergieron en el laboratorio, de las larvas colectadas en las inflorescencias; estas procedían de los diferentes sistemas ganaderos que se muestrearon en las provincias Matanzas y Mayabeque, los cuales estaban compuestos indistintamente por las cuatro variedades comerciales de la leguminosa y por gramíneas pratenses. Por otra parte, la detección de las lesiones que causaron las larvas de este cosmopterígido en las inflorescencias, y su repercusión en la producción de semillas de leucaena, constituyó el elemento más importante que se debía considerar para valorar su potencialidad como plaga y al estimar las posibles pérdidas en los sistemas ganaderos evaluados.

  15. Antidiabetic and antioxidant activities of seed extract from Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit

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    Pichaya Chowtivannakul

    2016-09-01

    These results indicated that seed extract from L. leucocephala has antidiabetic and antioxidant activities. The antioxidant activity is likely due to the phenolic content. An application of this extract should be considered as it can affect renal function by reducing the levels of albumin, ALP and total protein.

  16. Los sistemas silvopastoriles intensivos con Leucaena leucocephala: una opción para la ganadería tropical

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    H. M. Bacab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available En las regiones tropicales predominan los sistemas de doble propósito, extensivos o semi-extensivos, basados en monocultivo de pasturas; los cuales se caracterizan por su baja productividad e impacto negativo al ambiente. Ante esta problemática, en la última década se han promovido los sistemas silvopastoriles intensivos, mismos que son una modalidad de la agroforestería. Éstos se caracterizan por la presencia de altas densidades de arbustos forrajeros, como la leguminosa Leucaena leucocephala, asociado con pastos mejorados. Estudios han demostrado que son una opción importante para mejorar la ganadería debido a su alto rendimiento y calidad de forraje, lo cual permite incrementar la producción de carne y leche. Aunado a lo anterior, estos sistemas brindan múltiples servicios ambientales como la captura de carbono, reducción de la emisión de metano, fijación de nitrógeno atmosférico, entre otros. Sin embargo, existe cierto desconocimiento en su implementación debido a controversias que se han generado por la utilización de altas densidades, especialmente de L. leucocephala. Por ello, es necesario generar información con respecto a lo que representa este tipo de sistema para la ganadería tropical, considerándose sus fortalezas, debilidades y oportunidades, con el propósito de lograr una implementación exitosa con una mejora en la rentabilidad y sustentabilidad de los sistemas ganaderos en el trópico.

  17. Potential of tannin-rich plants, Leucaena leucocephala, Glyricidia sepium and Manihot esculenta, to reduce enteric methane emissions in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archimède, H; Rira, M; Barde, D J; Labirin, F; Marie-Magdeleine, C; Calif, B; Periacarpin, F; Fleury, J; Rochette, Y; Morgavi, D P; Doreau, M

    2016-12-01

    An in vivo trial was conducted in sheep to investigate the effect of three tropical tannin-rich plants (TRP) on methane emission, intake and digestibility. The TRP used were leaves of Glyricidia sepium, Leucaena leucocephala and Manihot esculenta that contained, respectively, 39, 75 and 92 g condensed tannins/kg DM. Methane was determined with the sulphur hexafluoride tracer technique. Eight rumen-cannulated sheep of two breeds (four Texel, four Blackbelly) were used in two 4 × 4 Latin square designs. Four experimental diets were tested. They consisted in a tropical natural grassland hay based on Dichanthium spp. fed alone (C) or in association with G. sepium (G), L. leucocephala (L) or M. esculenta (M) given as pellets at 44% of the daily ration. Daily organic matter intake was higher in TRP diets (686, 984, 1054 and 1186 g/day for C, G, L and M respectively; p  0.05). Methane emission was 47.1, 44.9, 33.3 and 33.5 g/kg digestible organic matter intake for C, G, L and M, respectively, and was significantly lower (p < 0.05) for L and M than for G and C. Our results confirm the potential of some TRP to reduce methane production. The strong decrease in methane and the increase in intake with TRPs may be due to their presentation as pellets. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Productive performance and urinary excretion of mimosine metabolites by hair sheep grazing in a silvopastoral system with high densities of Leucaena leucocephala.

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    Barros-Rodríguez, Marcos; Solorio-Sánchez, Javier; Ku-Vera, Juan; Ayala-Burgos, Armín; Sandoval-Castro, Carlos; Solís-Pérez, Georgina

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate daily weight gain (DWG), total dry matter (DM) intake, rumen degradability of forage, and urinary excretion of mimosine metabolites by hair sheep in a silvopastoral system with high densities of Leucaena leucocephala. A completely randomized design was carried out with two treatments: treatment 1 (T1) silvopastoral system with leucaena at a density of 35,000 plants/ha and treatment 2 (T2), leucaena at a density of 55,000 plants/ha. Leucaena was associated with tropical grasses Panicum maximum and Cynodon nlemfluensis. Twenty-four male Pelibuey lambs of 23.2 ± 3.4 kg live weight (LW) were used (12 lambs per treatment). Results showed differences (P < 0.05) in DWG of T1 (106.41 ± 11.66 g(-1) sheep(-1)) with respect to that of T2 (81.33 ± 11.81 g(-1) sheep). Voluntary intake was higher in lambs from T1 (83.81 ± 04.07 g DM/kg LW(0.75)) with respect to that from T2 (71.67 ± 8.12 g DM/kg LW(0.75)). There was a difference in color of urine between sheep of T1 and T2, the latter giving positive results for the presence of metabolites derived from mimosine (3-4 dihydroxypyridine and 2-3 dihydroxy pyridone). Rumen degradability of DM of L. leucocephala was higher (P < 0.05) compared to that of P. maximum and C. nlemfluensis (72.94 ± 0.40 vs. 67.06 ± 1.50 and 63.25 ± 1.51 %, respectively). It is concluded that grazing at high densities of L. leucocephala affects daily weight gain of hair sheep, possibly due to ingestion of high amounts of mimosine which may exert an adverse effect on voluntary intake.

  19. The first assessment of the stress inducible defense of Leucaena leucocephala with acaricidal potential effect against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae

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    Lêdia Feitosa Wanderley

    Full Text Available Abstract Plants respond to wounding caused by mechanical stress or herbivory by synthesizing defense proteins. There are no studies reporting the action of induced plant proteins against ticks. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of mechanically wounded Leucaena leucocephala leaves against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus. Initially, we carried out time course experiments to evaluate the impact of mechanical wounding on the protein content and the peroxidase, catalase and protease inhibitor activities in L. leucocephala. We then evaluated the acaricidal activity on R. (B. microplus from protein extract collected from L. leucocephala after mechanical wounding. L. leucocephala leaves were artificially wounded, and after 6, 12, 24 and 48h, the leaves were collected for protein extraction. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the proteins were performed. The protein content and peroxidase and protease activities increased 12h after wounding, and the acaricidal activity of this protein extract was evaluated using engorged R. (B. microplus females. The protein extract obtained after wounding reduced egg production (8.5% compared to those without wounding. Furthermore, the extract reduced egg hatching by 47.7% and showed an overall efficacy of 56.3% at 0.1 mgP/mL of the protein. We demonstrated that L. leucocephala defensive proteins could be effective against R. (B. microplus.

  20. Trypsin inhibitor from Leucaena leucocephala seeds delays and disrupts the development of Aedes aegypti, a multiple-disease vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida Filho, Luiz Cp; de Souza, Terezinha M; Tabosa, Pedro Ms; Soares, Nayana G; Rocha-Bezerra, Lady Cb; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Carvalho, Ana Fu

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, the Aedes aegypti mosquito represents a serious public health issue in view of the large outbreaks of the arboviral diseases zika, dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever. This holometabolous insect has midgut digestive enzymes that are trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like proteins. Protease inhibitors are able to bind to proteolytic enzymes and promote a blockage in digestion and nutrition, leading to death. Thus, we investigated the effect of trypsin inhibitor of Leucaena leucocephala (LTI) seeds on egg hatching, larval development and digestive midgut proteases. LTI was obtained by trichloroacetic acid precipitation followed by a single chromatography step on anhydrous trypsin sepharose. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate showed a single protein band with a molecular mass close to 20 kDa. After exposure of Ae. aegypti eggs to LTI (0.3 mg mL -1 ), egg hatching was reduced (50%). LTI did not show acute toxicity on newly hatched larvae incubated under the same conditions, but after 10 days of exposure a high mortality rate (86%) was observed and the surviving larvae had a 25% delay in development. LTI was able to inhibit in vitro the midgut enzymatic activity (70%), and when larvae were incubated with LTI solution we observed an inhibition of 56%. LTI is a promising new tool to control critical points of Ae. aegypti development. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Efecto del almacenamiento al ambiente en semillas de Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham sometidas a hidratación parcial Effect of storage under ambient conditions on seeds from Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham subject to partial hydration

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    Yolanda González

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del trabajo fue estudiar el efecto del almacenamiento al ambiente en la germinación de las semillas de Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham sometidas a hidratación parcial. Los tratamientos fueron: control, sin escarificación (T0; escarificación térmica (ET con H2O a 80°C, durante dos minutos (T1; ET más hidratación parcial, en bandeja con agua corriente por 28 horas (T2; ET más hidratación parcial, en saco de yute humedecido con agua corriente por 28 horas (T3; ET más hidratación parcial, en bandeja con agua corriente y TMTD al 0,1% (plaguicida por 28 horas (T4; ET más hidratación parcial, en saco de yute humedecido con agua corriente y TMTD al 0,1% (plaguicida por 28 horas (T5. Las semillas hidratadas se deshidrataron durante 72 horas al aire y a la sombra, antes de almacenarlas. Se midió la germinación y la viabilidad a 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 18, 30 y 42 meses. Se utilizó un diseño totalmente aleatorizado y cuatro réplicas por tratamiento. Hubo diferencias significativas (PThe objective of the work was to study the effect of storage under ambient conditions on the germination of seeds from Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham subject to partial hydration. The treatments were: control, no scarification (T0; thermal scarification (TS with H2O at 80ºC, for two minutes (T1; TS plus partial hydration, on tray with tap water for 28 hours (T2; TS plus partial hydration, in jute sac moist with tap water for 28 hours (T3; TS plus partial hydration in tray with tap water and TMTD at 0,1% (pesticide for 28 hours (T4; TS plus partial hydration, in jute sac moist with tap water and TMTD at 0,1% (pesticide for 28 hours (T5. The hydrated seeds were dehydrated during 72 hours exposed to air and under shade, before being stored. Germination and viability were measured after 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 18, 30 and 42 months. A completely randomized design and four replications per treatment were used. There were significant differences (P<0

  2. Conservation and chemical composition of Leucaena Leucocephala plus fresh or wilted Pennisetum purpureum mixed silages

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    Ángel Santana P

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Quantify the effects of mixing Leucaena (L with King grass forage, fresh (K or wilted (Kp, on the fermentation process and chemical composition of mixed silages. Materials and methods. Silos were produced mixing several proportions (kg:kg K:L and Kp:L (100:0; 75:25; 60:40; 50:50; 40:60 and 0:100 of both types of plants, under a completely randomized design of four replications. The quantity of organic acids (butyric, acetic, lactic, pH, ammonia nitrogen percent and some of the typical bromatologic nutrients of the forage before and after ensiling were measured. The treatment effects were evaluated through variance and regression analysis. Results. The results clearly proved the differences (p<0.05 between King grass and Leucaena which promote its mixing and wilting: better legume contents of crude protein (24 vs. 7%, dry matter (33.77 vs. 22.05% and crude fiber (26.53 vs. 32.5%. Clear benefits on the conservation process of mixed silages were also measured: higher lactic productions and less butyric, acceptable pH (4.02-4.8 and protein degradation (<8%. In addition, a positive effect on the chemical composition of the aforementioned silages was quantified (crude protein, dry matter and crude fiber progressive improvement. Conclusions. Mixed K+L silages are better than pure K if L is included below 25% in KL and up to 40% when K has been wilted. Higher inclusions of L will worsen the conservation process and will limit its elaboration.

  3. Feeding potential of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) peels ensiled with Leucaena leucocephala and Gliricidia sepium assessed with West African dwarf goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduguwa, Bamidele Omonuwa; Oni, Adebayo Olusoji; Arigbede, Oluwasanmi Moses; Adesunbola, Julius Olukunle; Sudekum, Karl Heinz

    2013-08-01

    Cassava peels (CaPe) were ensiled in mixtures with Gliricidia sepium and Leucaena leucocephala, and the utilization of the mixed silages by West African dwarf (WAD) goats was assessed. Five silages were composed, comprising of 100% ensiled CaPe (control), CaPe + G. sepium 2:1 (w/w; 2CGS), CaPe + G. sepium 1:1 (w/w; CGS), CaPe + L. leucocephala 2:1 (w/w; 2CLL) and CaPe + L. leucocephala 1:1 (w/w; CLL). All diets were supplemented with molasses (40 g/kg) before ensiling which lasted 3 months. Fifteen WAD goats (8.01 ± 0.12 kg body weight) were fed one of the experimental diets (50 g/kg body weight) for 8 weeks. The control had the lowest hydrocyanic acid content (0.05 mg/kg DM), while others ranged from 6.2 to 81.3 mg/kg. Condensed tannin concentration ranged from 1.7 to 8.4 mg/kg DM, while mimosine levels were 11.6 and 12.4 mg/kg DM in 2CLL and CLL, respectively. After fermentation, all silages showed low pH (Ensiling CaPe with foliages of G. sepium and L. leucocephala can be recommended for feeding WAD goats especially during the dry spells when there is little or no available forage for the animals.

  4. Estimating Apparent Nutrient Digestibility of Diets Containing Leucaena leucocephala or Moringa oleifera Leaf Meals for Growing Rabbits by Two Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safwat, A. M.; Sarmiento-Franco, L.; Santos-Ricalde, R. H.; Nieves, D.; Sandoval-Castro, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the nutrient digestibility of growing rabbits fed diets with different levels of either Leucaena leucocephala (LLM) or Moringa oleifera (MOLM) leaf meals and also to compare total collection and TiO2 marker methods for estimating digestibility. A total of 30 California growing rabbits (1.81±0.19 kg live weight on average) were randomly distributed into five experimental groups of six rabbits each and were housed in individual cages. The groups were control, 30% LLM, 40% LLM, 30% MOLM, and 40% MOLM. All groups received pelleted diets for two weeks; diets also contained 4 g/kg titanium dioxide as dietary marker. Daily feed intake was recorded during the whole experimental period and total feces were collected daily and weighed individually during four days. The results showed that there were no difference (p>0.05) in feed, dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM), crude protein (CP), digestible energy, and crude fiber (CF) intake between the control group and the other experimental groups. The apparent digestibility values of DM, OM, CP, CF, acid detergent fiber, and gross energy were the highest for control group (p = 0.001), meanwhile MOLM diets had generally higher nutrient digestibility coefficients than LLM diets. Increasing the inclusion level of leaf meal in the diet from 30% to 40% improved the digestibility of CF from 45.02% to 51.69% for LLM and from 48.11% to 55.89% for MOLM. Similar results for apparent nutrient digestibility coefficients were obtained when either total collection or indigestible marker method was used. In conclusion, the digestibility of MOLM containing diets were better than LLM diets, furthermore TiO2 as an external marker could be used as a simple, practical and reliable method to estimate nutrients digestibility in rabbit diets. PMID:26104524

  5. Cultivo de Gliricidia sepium e Leucaena leucocephala em alamedas visando a melhoria dos solos dos tabuleiros costeiros

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    Barreto Antônio Carlos

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a biomassa da parte aérea de gliricídia (Gliricidia sepium e leucena (Leucaena leucocephala em cultivos em alameda, e o efeito da adição dessa biomassa sobre propriedades químicas e físicas de um Latossolo Amarelo dos tabuleiros costeiros de Sergipe. A produção de mandioca nas alamedas dessas leguminosas também foi determinada. A gliricídia foi plantada, em 1994, por estacas, e a leucena, em 1995, por mudas, utilizando-se o espaçamento de 3 x 1 m, para ambas as espécies. Em intervalos de três a cinco meses, foram realizados cortes e incorporação do material ao solo. Caules com diâmetro superior a 1 cm foram desconsiderados na biomassa. A matéria seca desses cortes foi determinada anualmente, e em 1998 realizaram-se análises químicas e físicas do solo. Amostras de solo de área contígua foram utilizadas como controle. Foram produzidas, respectivamente, 4,87 e 5,80 t ha-1 ano-1 de parte aérea, em média, por leucena e gliricídia. A gliricídia exerceu menor competição com a mandioca na entrelinha. Com a incorporação dessas leguminosas ao solo elevaram-se o pH e os teores de Ca+Mg, não sendo alteradas, porém, a matéria orgânica e a CTC. Também foi observada redução de densidade e elevação da macroporosidade em resposta à adição das leguminosas. Esses efeitos foram mais acentuados em menores profundidades.

  6. Características Dendrométricas, Físicas e Químicas da Myracrodruon urundeuva e da Leucaena leucocephala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro Lavoisier Honorato da Silva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO Com o objetivo de avaliar características dendrométricas, físicas e químicas da Myracrodruon urundeuva e Leucaena leucocephala foi realizada supressão de cinco exemplares de cada espécie. Os parâmetros dendrométricos avaliados foram: DAP, altura, volume. Avaliou-se a densidade básica e foram feitas análises químicas da madeira. O experimento foi arranjado em delineamento inteiramente casualizado (DIC, com valores analisados pelo teste F ao nível de 5%. As espécies M. urundeuva e L. leucocephala apresentaram, respectivamente, média de DAP 10,00 cm; 14,08 cm; altura total 8,20 m; 12,93 m; altura comercial 4,90 m; 10,07 m; volume com casca (C/C 0,032 m3; 0,104 m3; volume sem casca (S/C 0,025 m3; 0,095 m3. M. urundeuva apresentou maior densidade básica. O teor de cinzas encontrado para M. urundeuva foi superior. Já os teores de extrativos totais e holocelulose da M. urundeuva e da L. leucocephala foram semelhantes. A L. leucocephala obteve maior teor de lignina total e poder calorífico superior. Portanto, as duas espécies apresentaram boas características físicas, químicas e energéticas.

  7. Acumulación de hojarasca en un pastizal de Panicum maximum y en un sistema silvopastoril de Panicum maximum y Leucaena leucocephala Litter accumulation in a Panicum maximum grassland and in a silvopastoral system of Panicum maximum and Leucaena leucocephala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saray Sánchez

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio en la Estación Experimental de Pastos y Forrajes "Indio Hatuey", Matanzas, Cuba, con el objetivo de determinar la acumulación de la hojarasca en un pastizal de Panicum maximum Jacq cv. Likoni y en un sistema silvopastoril de Panicum maximum y Leucaena leucocephala (Lam de Wit cv. Cunningham. En los pastizales de P. maximum de ambos sistemas se determinó la acumulación de la hojarasca según la técnica propuesta por Bruce y Ebershon (1982, mientras que la hojarasca de L. leucocephala acumulada en el sistema silvopastoril se determinó según Santa Regina et al. (1997. De forma general, los resultados demostraron que en ambos pastizales la guinea acumuló una menor cantidad de hojarasca durante el período junio-diciembre, etapa en la que se produce su mayor desarrollo vegetativo. En la leucaena la mayor producción de hojarasca ocurrió en el período de diciembre a enero, asociada con la caída natural de sus hojas que se produce por efecto de las temperaturas más bajas y la escasa humedad en el suelo. En el sistema silvopastoril la hojarasca de leucaena representó el mayor porcentaje de peso dentro de la producción total, con un contenido más alto de nitrógeno y de calcio que el de la hojarasca del estrato herbáceo. En la guinea la lluvia fue el factor climático que mayor correlación negativa presentó con la producción de hojarasca en ambos sistemas, y en la leucaena la mayor correlación negativa se encontró con la temperatura mínima.A study was carried out at the Experimental Station of Pastures and Forages "Indio Hatuey", Matanzas, Cuba, with the objective of determining the litter accumulation in a pastureland of Panicum maximum Jacq cv. Likoni and in a silvopastoral system of Panicum maximum and Leucaena leucocephala (Lam de Wit cv. Cunningham. In the P. maximum pasturelands of both systems the litter accumulation was determined by means of the technique proposed by Bruce and Ebershon (1982, while

  8. Chemical elements in Leucaena leucocephala leaves of riparian zones of the municipality of Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brazil; Elementos químicos em folhas de Leucaena leucocephala de zonas ripárias do município de Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    França, Elvis J. de; Fernandes, Elisabete A.N.; Lira, Marcelo G.; Ferreira, Fabiano S.; Cavalca, Isabel P.O.; Rodrigues, Vanessa S.; Camilli, Leandro, E-mail: ejfranca@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: liramarcelo@hotmail.com, E-mail: biologofabiano10@gmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The species Leucaena leucocephala can be found in several riparian ecosystems, acting as one of the main invasive and harmful species for the forest restoration of the permanent preservation areas. It has also been studied for the phytoremediation of some chemical elements, due to their potential accumulation of chemical substances. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the accumulation of chemical elements in leaves of Leucaena leucocephala trees by Instrumental Neutronic Activation Analysis - INAA. Samples of leaves were collected in eight samples from riverside areas of the Piracicaba Municipality, São Paulo, Brazil, during the dry and rainy season. After collection, washing with water and drying in a forced circulation oven, the samples were comminuted and encapsulated in polyethylene capsules and subjected to a thermal neutron flux of 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} for 8 hours in the Nuclear Research Reactor IEA-R1 of IPEN / CNEN. Thermal neutron flux monitoring was performed by Ni-Cr alloy fragments with known concentrations of the chemical monitors elements. After measurements of radioactivity induced by HPGe detectors, the concentrations of the chemical elements were calculated by the k0 method using the Quantu computer program. Certified reference materials were also analyzed for quality assurance of the analytical procedure. The results indicated high concentrations of La and lanthanoids (Ce, Eu, Sm, Tb and Yb) in leaves of L. leucocephala in both periods analyzed. It was possible to observe a decrease in the concentrations of the chemical elements in the rainy season, probably associated to the washing of the geological material deposited on the leaves of the trees by the rains, except for K, Mo, Rb, Sb and Zn, whose values remained or increased in the leaves collected during the rainy season. Considering the constant leaf production, L. leucocephala can greatly affect the cycling of chemical elements due to its accumulation capacity

  9. EXTRA��O E CARACTERIZA��O FISICO-QU�MICA DOS POLISSACARIDEOS DE Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) DE Wit

    OpenAIRE

    Ivone Garros Rosa; UFMA; Andressa Almeida Santana; N�uton Silva Souza; Herm�nio de Sousa Lima

    2008-01-01

    A Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit � uma Mimosasea, cujas sementes s�o ricas em polissacar�deos que sugerem a predomin�ncia de galactose e manose. Esses polissacar�deos possuem caracter�sticas espec�ficas, tais como: teor de umidade 8,8%, teor de cinzas 7,51%, �ndice de refra��o variando de 1.335� a 1.338,75� e a capacidade de formar g�is e solu��es coloidais �s quais poder�o ser utilizados nos mais variados ramos da ind�stria de alimento, farmac�utica, t�xtil, m�dica, cosm�tico, papel e m...

  10. Growth and N-uptake in sorghum plants manured with different amounts of Leucaena Leucocephala shoots as affected by time of application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurdali, F.; Al-Shamma'a, M.

    2007-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted throughout two successive years to determine the impact of adding four rates of nitrogen (0, 60, 120 and 180 kg N/ha) in the form of Leucaena leucocephala (lam.) de Wit green manure as affected by different time (T0, T15 and T30) of application (just before sowing, 15 and 30 days before sowing, respectively) on the performance of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) using the indirect N-15 isotopic dilution technique. Results showed that leucaena leaves, used as a green manure, significantly increased dry matter production and N yield of sorghum. The effect was more pronounced in panicles than shoots. In the first year, N recoveries in sorghum of the total N contained in leucaena green manure ranged between 17-24% in T0, 14-24% in T15 and 15-19% in T30. The highest N recovery value was obtained in lowest rate of n treatment (N60). Moreover, soil incorporated with leucaena green manure one month before planting enhanced both soil and mineral N fertilizer in sorghum plants. In the second year, total N uptake in sorghum (eg., panicles and the entire plant) increased with increasing amounts of N added as a leucaena green manure. N recoveries in sorghum ranged between 26-47% in T0, about 24% in T15 and 23-325 in T30 of the total N contained in leucaena green manure (LGM). As shown in the first year, the highest value of N recovery was obtained in lowest rate of N treatment. The beneficial effects of leucaena green manure on dry matter and N yield in sorghum was attributed not only to the additional N availability to the plant, but also to effects on the enhancement of soil N uptake, particularly when the incorporation was made before a sufficient time from sowing. The beneficial effect of green manuring with leucaena leaves at T15 and T30 was mainly resulted from enhancement of N uptake from this added material, as well as from soil and fertilizer N. Whereas, it was only attributed to N uptake from green manure in the T0 treatment. Incorporation

  11. Growth and N-uptake in sorghum plants manured with different amounts of Leucaena Leucocephala shoots as affected by time of application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurdali, F.; Al-Shamma'a, M.

    2006-08-01

    A pot experiment was conducted throughout two successive years to determine the impact of adding four rates of nitrogen (0, 60, 120 and 180 kg N/ha) in the form of Leucaena leucocephala (lam.) de Wit green manure as affected by different time (T0, T15 and T30) of application (just before sowing, 15 and 30 days before sowing, respectively) on the performance of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) using the indirect N-15 isotopic dilution technique. Results showed that leucaena leaves, used as a green manure, significantly increased dry matter production and N yield of sorghum. The effect was more pronounced in panicles than shoots. In the first year, N recoveries in sorghum of the total N contained in leucaena green manure ranged between 17-24% in T0, 14-24% in T15 and 15-19% in T30. The highest N recovery value was obtained in lowest rate of n treatment (N 60 ). Moreover, soil incorporated with leucaena green manure one month before planting enhanced both soil and mineral N fertilizer in sorghum plants. In the second year, total N uptake in sorghum (eg., panicles and the entire plant) increased with increasing amounts of N added as a leucaena green manure. N recoveries in sorghum ranged between 26-47% in T0, about 24% in T15 and 23-325 in T30 of the total N contained in leucaena green manure (LGM). As shown in the first year, the highest value of N recovery was obtained in lowest rate of N treatment. The beneficial effects of leucaena green manure on dry matter and N yield in sorghum was attributed not only to the additional N availability to the plant, but also to effects on the enhancement of soil N uptake, particularly when the incorporation was made before a sufficient time from sowing. The beneficial effect of green manuring with leucaena leaves at T15 and T30 was mainly resulted from enhancement of N uptake from this added material, as well as from soil and fertilizer N; whereas, it was only attributed to N uptake from green manure in the T0 treatment. Incorporation

  12. Abiotic stress induces change in Cinnamoyl CoA Reductase (CCR) protein abundance and lignin deposition in developing seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sameer; Vishwakarma, Rishi K; Arafat, Yasir Ali; Gupta, Sushim K; Khan, Bashir M

    2015-04-01

    Aboitic stress such as drought and salinity are class of major threats, which plants undergo through their lifetime. Lignin deposition is one of the responses to such abiotic stresses. The gene encoding Cinnamoyl CoA Reductase (CCR) is a key gene for lignin biosynthesis, which has been shown to be over-expressed under stress conditions. In the present study, developing seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala (Vernacular name: Subabul, White popinac) were treated with 1 % mannitol and 200 mM NaCl to mimic drought and salinity stress conditions, respectively. Enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) based expression pattern of CCR protein was monitored coupled with Phlorogucinol/HCl activity staining of lignin in transverse sections of developing L. leucocephala seedlings under stress. Our result suggests a differential lignification pattern in developing root and stem under stress conditions. Increase in lignification was observed in mannitol treated stems and corresponding CCR protein accumulation was also higher than control and salt stress treated samples. On the contrary CCR protein was lower in NaCl treated stems and corresponding lignin deposition was also low. Developing root tissue showed a high level of CCR content and lignin deposition than stem samples under all conditions tested. Overall result suggested that lignin accumulation was not affected much in case of developing root however developing stems were significantly affected under drought and salinity stress condition.

  13. High-resolution transcriptomic analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 bacteroids in determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata and indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Feng; Wang, Lei; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Xin

    2013-01-01

    The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing), succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate) biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system) and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone), cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata.

  14. High-resolution transcriptomic analyses of Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 bacteroids in determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata and indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    Full Text Available The rhizobium-legume symbiosis is a model system for studying mutualistic interactions between bacteria and eukaryotes. Sinorhizobium sp. NGR234 is distinguished by its ability to form either indeterminate nodules or determinate nodules with diverse legumes. Here, we presented a high-resolution RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis of NGR234 bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Leucaena leucocephala and determinate nodules of Vigna unguiculata. In contrast to exponentially growing free-living bacteria, non-growing bacteroids from both legumes recruited several common cellular functions such as cbb3 oxidase, thiamine biosynthesis, nitrate reduction pathway (NO-producing, succinate metabolism, PHB (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate biosynthesis and phosphate/phosphonate transporters. However, different transcription profiles between bacteroids from two legumes were also uncovered for genes involved in the biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, T3SS (type three secretion system and effector proteins, cytochrome bd ubiquinol oxidase, PQQ (pyrroloquinoline quinone, cytochrome c550, pseudoazurin, biotin, phasins and glycolate oxidase, and in the metabolism of glutamate and phenylalanine. Noteworthy were the distinct expression patterns of genes encoding phasins, which are thought to be involved in regulating the surface/volume ratio of PHB granules. These patterns are in good agreement with the observed granule size difference between bacteroids from L. leucocephala and V. unguiculata.

  15. Potential of different AM fungi (native from As-contaminated and uncontaminated soils) for supporting Leucaena leucocephala growth in As-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jerusa; Bundschuh, Jochen; Rangel, Wesley de Melo; Guilherme, Luiz Roberto Guimarães

    2017-05-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi inoculation is considered a potential biotechnological tool for an eco-friendly remediation of hazardous contaminants. However, the mechanisms explaining how AM fungi attenuate the phytotoxicity of metal(oid)s, in particular arsenic (As), are still not fully understood. The influence of As on plant growth and the antioxidant system was studied in Leucaena leucocephala plants inoculated with different isolates of AM fungi and exposed to increasing concentrations of As (0, 35, and 75 mg dm -3 ) in a Typic Quartzipsamment soil. The study was conducted under greenhouse conditions using isolates of AM fungi selected from uncontaminated soils (Acaulospora morrowiae, Rhizophagus clarus, Gigaspora albida; and a mixed inoculum derived from combining these isolates, named AMF Mix) as well as a mix of three isolates from an As-contaminated soil (A. morrowiae, R. clarus, and Paraglomus occultum). After 21 weeks, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and glutathione reductase (GR) were determined in the shoots in addition to measuring plant height and mineral contents. In general, AM fungi have shown multiple beneficial effects on L. leucocephala growth. Although the activity of most of the stress-related enzymes increased in plants associated with AM fungi, the percentage increase caused by adding As to the soil was even greater for non-mycorrhizal plants when compared to AM-fungi inoculated ones, which highlights the phytoprotective effect provided by the AM symbiosis. The highest P/As ratio observed in AM-fungi plants, compared to non-mycorrhizal ones, can be considered a good indicator that the AM fungi alter the pattern of As(V) uptake from As-contaminated soil. Our results underline the role of AM fungi in increasing the tolerance of L. leucocephala to As stress and emphasize the potential of the symbiosis L. leucocephala-R. clarus for As-phytostabilization at moderately As

  16. Evaluación del establecimiento de Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham en una finca ganadera del municipio de Perico, Matanzas, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Bover

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar el establecimiento de Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham en una finca de la cooperativa de créditos y servicios (CCS Ramón Rodríguez Milián, del municipio de Perico. Se trabajó en un área de 6 ha, dividida en cinco cuartones, y se realizó una preparación en franjas de 2 m de ancho. Se determinó la supervivencia después del trasplante, la altura, el número de ramas y la composición florística del pastizal; así como el efecto de las labores de limpieza y el daño causado por los animales en la altura. Se aplicó un análisis de varianza y los datos se procesaron con el paquete estadístico SPSS® versión 10.0 para Windows XP. La supervivencia de las plantas fue de 98 %; la labor de limpieza tuvo un efecto positivo en el crecimiento, mientras que la defoliación de la planta por los animales afectó el establecimiento. La población de pastos naturales (jiribilla y pitilla se mantuvo alrededor de 66 % y la de las principales leguminosas volubles (teramnus, glycine y siratro disminuyó de 12 % en el tercer mes después de realizado el trasplante, a 6 % en el decimoquinto mes. El sistema se consideró establecido cuando las plantas sobrepasaron los 2 m de altura. Se concluye que la labor de limpieza influyó positivamente en el comportamiento de la altura y el establecimiento de L. leucocephala, mientras que las defoliaciones causadas por los animales lo retrasaron.

  17. Descomposición de la hojarasca en un sistema silvopastoril de Panicum maximum y Leucaena leucocephala (Lam de Wit cv. Cunningham: I. Influencia de su composición química Litter decomposition in a silvopastoral system of Panicum maximum and Leucaena leucocephala (Lam de Wit cv. Cunningham: I. Influence of their chemical composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saray Sánchez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de determinar la descomposición de la hojarasca y su relación con la composición química de Panicum maximum y Leucaena leucocephala en un sistema silvopastoril, se realizó este experimento en la EEPF "Indio Hatuey". La descomposición de la hojarasca se determinó como la pérdida de biomasa a través del tiempo, con relación al peso inicial. Para el estudio de la dinámica de la descomposición se utilizó el método de bolsas de hojarasca (litter bags. En cada especie se presentó un patrón diferente de descomposición de la hojarasca; la tasa promedio de descomposición de la hojarasca en leucaena fue mayor que en la guinea. En ambas especies se encontró una rápida pérdida de peso durante los primeros 30 días y después el proceso fue más lento. Este comportamiento puede estar relacionado con la composición química de los pastos, pues el porcentaje de biomasa perdida de la hojarasca de L. leucocephala presentó una mayor correlación con las concentraciones del contenido celular, la relación lignina/nitrógeno, la celulosa y el Nt. Se observó una dependencia significativa y negativa de la hojarasca de P. maximum con las concentraciones de la FND y la hemicelulosa; mientras que se relacionó de forma positiva con las de N-FND y la relación lignina/nitrógenoWith the objective of determining the litter decomposition and its relationship to the chemical composition of Panicum maximum and Leucaena leucocephala in a silvopastoral system, this trial was conducted at the EEPF «Indio Hatuey». Litter decomposition was determined as biomass loss through time, with regards to initial weight. For studying the decomposition dynamics, the method of litter bags was used. In each species a different litter decomposition pattern appeared; the average litter decomposition rate was higher in leucaena than in Guinea grass. Rapid weight loss was found in both species during the first 30 days and afterwards the process was slower

  18. Characterization of chemical elements of fruits of Leucaena leucocephala in riverside areas of the Piracicaba River Basin, São Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    França, Elvis J.; Magalhães, Marcelo R.L. de; Ferreira, Fabiano S.; Fernandes, Elisabete A. de N.; Fonseca, Felipe Y.; Rodrigues, Vanessa S.; Cavalca, Isabel P.O.; Camilli, Leandro; Silva, Bruno F.

    2017-01-01

    The species Leucaena leucocephala is present in several environments. Its fruit is widely used in cattle feed. However, it is classified as an invasive species, causing problems in the restoration of impacted areas. The Piracicaba River Basin is heavily affected by urbanization and industrialization, which shows the proliferation of this species. Considering the importance of this tree species for Brazil, the present study quantifies chemical elements in fruits of this species by applying Instrumental Neutronic Activation Analysis, method k 0 . Samples were collected in riverside areas of the Piracicaba Municipality, São Paulo, Brazil, at different periods (dry and rainy season). After collection, the samples were shattered and transferred to polyethylene capsules and irradiated with neutrons. Certified reference materials were used to evaluate the quality of the analytical procedure, all material was irradiated under a thermal neutron flux of 10 13 cm-2s-1 for 8 hours. Ni-Cr alloy was used for the monitoring of thermal neutron flux. High Resolution Range Spectrometry with HPG detectors was employed for the measurement of the induced radioactivity, allowing the quantification of the chemical elements. Compared with available results of chemical analysis of pods, the chemical elements Ca, K, Ba, Cr and Se presented high concentrations. We also quantified chemical elements of environmental relevance such as As, Hg, Br, Ce, Cs, Eu, Hf, La, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th and Yb, indicating the need for element dynamics studies in the environments occupied by this invasive species

  19. Eficiência da Madeira de Leucena (Leucaena leucocephala Tratada com CCB Contra Cupins Xilófagos em Ensaio de Laboratório

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juarez Benigno Paes

    Full Text Available A pesquisa objetivou analisar a eficiência do CCB-Óxido na resistência da madeira de leucena (Leucaena leucocephala ao cupim Nasutitermes corniger, em ensaio de preferência alimentar. Foram colhidas 12 árvores com diâmetro de 6,0 a 12,0 cm, tomado a 1,30 m do solo, em Patos, Paraíba. Os troncos foram seccionados em peças de 2,0 m e descascados. Foi utilizada uma solução de 2% de ingredientes ativos de CCB-Óxido. As peças foram submersas (50 cm da base na solução de tratamento por 3, 6, 9 e 12 dias, e determinaram-se a penetração e a retenção do produto a 50 e 100 cm da base das peças. Foram retiradas amostras de 1,5 × 1,5 × 15,0 cm entre essas posições, sendo submetidas durante 45 dias ao ataque dos cupins. O tratamento conferiu melhorias na resistência da madeira de leucena ao cupim, tendo o tempo de tratamento de 12 dias promovido proteção adequada à madeira.

  20. Nutrient Dynamics and Litter Decomposition in Leucaena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutrient contents and rate of litter decomposition were investigated in Leucaena leucocephala plantation in the University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria. Litter bag technique was used to study the pattern and rate of litter decomposition and nutrient release of Leucaena leucocephala. Fifty grams of oven-dried ...

  1. Los sistemas silvopastoriles intensivos con Leucaena leucocephala: una opción para la ganadería tropical

    OpenAIRE

    H. M. Bacab; N. B. Madera; F. J. Solorio; F. Vera; D. F. Marrufo

    2013-01-01

    En las regiones tropicales predominan los sistemas de doble propósito, extensivos o semi-extensivos, basados en monocultivo de pasturas; los cuales se caracterizan por su baja productividad e impacto negativo al ambiente. Ante esta problemática, en la última década se han promovido los sistemas silvopastoriles intensivos, mismos que son una modalidad de la agroforestería. Éstos se caracterizan por la presencia de altas densidades de arbustos forrajeros, como la leguminosa Leucaena leucocephal...

  2. Comportamiento ecofisiológico de Brachiaria decumbens en monocultivo y en asociación con Leucaena leucocephala Ecophysiological performance of Brachiaria decumbens in monocrop and in association with Leucaena leucocephala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rodríguez-Petit

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Con el objeto de estudiar las relaciones ecofisiológicas que determinan el crecimiento de B. decumbens en monocultivo (MO y asociada a L. leucocephala (AS, se realizaron evaluaciones de radiación fotosintéticamente activa (RFA, asimilación (A, conductancia estomática (Gs, transpiración (E, humedad relativa (HR, po­tencial hídrico de la hoja (Øh, diferencial de presión vapor (DPV e índice de área foliar (IAF en ambas condiciones (AS y MO, en una zona de bosque húmedo tropical; estas evaluaciones se hicieron a los 5, 10 y 22 días después del pastoreo en ambas condiciones. Los valores más positivos de Øh se encontraron en AS, al igual que los valores más bajos de RFA, con diferencias significativas (PIn order to study the ecophysiological relations that affect the growth of B. decumbens in monocrop (MO and associated with L. leucocephala (AS, evaluations of photosynthetic active radiation (PAR, assimilation (A stomatic conductance (Gs, transpiration (E, relative humidity (RH, water potential (Øh, differential of steam pressure (DSP and leaf area index (LAI were made in a tropical humid forest zone. The evaluations were made 5, 10 and 22 days after grazing under both conditions (MO and AS. The most positive values of Øh (P<0,05 were found in AS, as well as the lowest values of PAR (P<0,05 in all the evaluated dates. RH and DSP did not show differences (P 0,05. The gas exchange parameters (E, Gs and A showed significantly higher values in MO (P<0,05 in all dates. LAI was higher in MO after 10 and 22 days of evaluation. Due to the limitation of the photosynthetic capacity exerted by the light decrease on the grass, that PAR is concluded to be the most important factor that determine growth and development of B. decumbens in AS.

  3. Descomposición de la hojarasca en un sistema silvopastoril de Panicum maximum y Leucaena leucocephala (Lam de Wit cv. Cunningham: II. Influencia de los factores climáticos Litter decomposition in a silvopastoral system of Panicum maximum and Leucaena leucocephala (Lam de Wit cv. Cunningham: II. Influence of climatic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saray Sánchez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de determinar la descomposición de la hojarasca en un sistema silvopastoril de Panicum maximum y Leucaena leucocephala y su relación con algunos factores del clima, se realizó este experimento en la EEPF «Indio Hatuey». La descomposición de la hojarasca se determinó como la pérdida de biomasa a través del tiempo, con relación al peso inicial. Para el estudio de la dinámica de la descomposición se utilizó el método de bolsas de hojarasca (litter bags; se registró diariamente el comportamiento de la temperatura media, la humedad relativa, la precipitación y los días con lluvias, en la estación metereológica situada a 1 km del área experimental. Se utilizó el análisis de correlación y regresión para conocer la interrelación entre las variables y los modelos de mejor ajuste. Se consideró, como variables independientes, los factores climáticos estudiados, y como variable dependiente el porcentaje de biomasa perdida. De forma general, los resultados demostraron que el comportamiento de la descomposición de la hojarasca, tanto en la guinea como en la leucaena, estuvo relacionado con los factores climáticos que prevalecieron durante el período experimental y, por tanto, es posible explicar este proceso en ambos pastizales a partir de la acción conjunta de la temperatura, la humedad relativa y la precipitación.With the objective of determining the litter decomposition in a silvopastoral system of Panicum maximum and Leucaena leucocephala and its relationship to some climate factors, this trial was conducted at the EEPF «Indio Hatuey». Litter decomposition was determined as the loss of biomass through time, with regards to initial weight. For studying the decomposition dynamics the method of litter bags was used; the performance of mean temperature, relative humidity, rainfall and days with rain, was daily recorded at the meteorological station located 1 km away from the experimental area. . The

  4. Comportamiento productivo de vacas lecheras Mambí de Cuba en una asociación de gramíneas y Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham Productive performance of Cuban Mambí dairy cows in an association of grasses and Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Sánchez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó el comportamiento de los indicadores productivos de vacas Mambí (¾ Holstein x ¼ Cebú de Cuba en una asociación de gramíneas mejoradas y Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham, en una vaquería de la Empresa Genética de Matanzas. El pesaje de leche se realizó durante dos años al 100% de los animales en ordeño, con una frecuencia mensual. Se determinó la producción de leche por vaca en ordeño y la producción por vaca total, así como la influencia del bimestre de producción, la época del año, el número de la lactancia y el año, en el comportamiento productivo. Se alcanzó coincidencia entre la curva real y potencial de producción de leche, con una eficiencia superior al 85%; los mayores valores se obtuvieron en el período lluvioso. Al analizar la producción de leche por bimestre los mejores resultados se alcanzaron en julio-agosto. Además se lograron valores de producción por lactancia de 2 030-2 159 kg y por hectárea de 2 744-3 025 kg. A su vez, cuando se analizó el efecto de la época del año en el peso de los terneros al nacer no se encontraron diferencias significativas; los valores fueron superiores a 37,5 kg para ambos períodos. Se concluye que con la asociación de gramíneas mejoradas y leucaena se obtuvieron producciones totales, por lactancia y por hectárea aceptables, lo cual conllevó un adecuado nivel de rentabilidad en la vaquería, con ganancias superiores a los 1 000 pesos por hectárea.The performance of the productive indicators of Mambí cows (3/4 Holstein x ¼ Zebu from Cuba was evaluated in an association of improved grasses and Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham, at a dairy unit of the Genetic Livestock Production Enterprise of Matanzas. The milk weighing was performed for two years in 100% of the milking animals, with a monthly frequency. Milk production per milking cow and total production per cow were determined, as well as the influence of production two-month period, season

  5. Evaluation of herbicides for use in transplanting leucaena leucocephala and prosopis alba on semi-arid lands without irrigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, P.; Smith, D.; Smith, M.; Bingham, R.L.; Reyes, I.

    1984-01-01

    Five herbicides were applied to plots at 2 rates in April 1982, and 3-month old seedlings planted 2 days later. Basal diameter was measured after 110 days and converted to dry weight using published equations. Percent weed cover was recorded 45, 75, and 105 days after planting. All herbicides increased survival over untreated controls. The greatest biomass production of both species was obtained with oryzalin treatment at 2.8 kg/ha active ingredient, which increased production 4-5X compared with control plots. Oryzalin was second to napropamide (2.24 kg/ha active ingredient) in grass control and equal to oxyfluorfen (1.12 kg/ha active ingredient) in forb control, oxyfluorfen at this rate also gave the second best biomass production. Oryzalin increased survival from 71 to 87% for Leucaena and from 81-94% for Prosopis, and is considered to be the best herbicide tested, followed by oxyfluorfen and metolachlor. Alachlor was considered to be too short-lived and napropamide too expensive.

  6. Characterization of chemical elements of fruits of Leucaena leucocephala in riverside areas of the Piracicaba River Basin, São Paulo, Brazil; Caracterização de elementos químicos de frutos de Leucaena leucocephala em áreas ribeirinhas da Bacia do Rio Piracicaba, São Paulo, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    França, Elvis J.; Magalhães, Marcelo R.L. de; Ferreira, Fabiano S., E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: marcelo_rlm@hotmail.com, E-mail: biologofabiano10@gmail.com [Centro de Ciência Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Fernandes, Elisabete A. de N.; Fonseca, Felipe Y.; Rodrigues, Vanessa S.; Cavalca, Isabel P.O.; Camilli, Leandro, E-mail: lis@cena.usp.br, E-mail: vsrodrigues89@gmail.com, E-mail: i-cavalcante@uol.com.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Silva, Bruno F., E-mail: brunodasilva1996@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The species Leucaena leucocephala is present in several environments. Its fruit is widely used in cattle feed. However, it is classified as an invasive species, causing problems in the restoration of impacted areas. The Piracicaba River Basin is heavily affected by urbanization and industrialization, which shows the proliferation of this species. Considering the importance of this tree species for Brazil, the present study quantifies chemical elements in fruits of this species by applying Instrumental Neutronic Activation Analysis, method k{sup 0}. Samples were collected in riverside areas of the Piracicaba Municipality, São Paulo, Brazil, at different periods (dry and rainy season). After collection, the samples were shattered and transferred to polyethylene capsules and irradiated with neutrons. Certified reference materials were used to evaluate the quality of the analytical procedure, all material was irradiated under a thermal neutron flux of 10{sup 13} cm-2s-1 for 8 hours. Ni-Cr alloy was used for the monitoring of thermal neutron flux. High Resolution Range Spectrometry with HPG detectors was employed for the measurement of the induced radioactivity, allowing the quantification of the chemical elements. Compared with available results of chemical analysis of pods, the chemical elements Ca, K, Ba, Cr and Se presented high concentrations. We also quantified chemical elements of environmental relevance such as As, Hg, Br, Ce, Cs, Eu, Hf, La, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th and Yb, indicating the need for element dynamics studies in the environments occupied by this invasive species.

  7. CARACTERIZACIÓN DE DIEZ CULTIVARES FORRAJEROS DE Leucaena leucocephala BASADA EN LA COMPOSICIÓN QUÍMICA Y LA DEGRADABILIDAD RUMINAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny García M

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Estudiar las variaciones en la composición química y la degradabilidad ruminal de diez cultivares de Leucaena leucocephala Lam. de Wit. mediante el análisis de componentes principales (ACP. Materiales y métodos. Se tomaron muestras durante tres años para evaluar la composición química, los niveles de metabolitos secundarios y la degradabilidad ruminal en ovinos. Los datos fueron analizados con el paquete estadístico SPSS y mediante el diagrama tridimensional se obtuvieron las agrupaciones de las accesiones en dependencia de sus características nutritivas. Resultados. Con los primeros tres componentes del ACP se explicó el 85.83 % de la variabilidad. La concentración de proteínas, fracción fibrosa, minerales, polifenoles, fitatos y la degradación ruminal presentaron las mayores fluctuaciones. Las agrupaciones formadas permitieron identificar seis grupos con características químicas diferentes (G1: elevada cantidad de proteínas, baja proporción de fibra y de metabolitos secundarios y elevada degradación -cv. CNIA-250 y cv. K-28-; G-2: elevado contenido de materia seca, proteínas y fenoles, poca fracción de fibra y taninos y baja degradabilidad ruminal -cv. Ipil-Ipil-; G-3: composición nutricional promedio -cv. México-; G-4: bajo contenido de materia seca, fenoles, mimosina y elevada degradación ruminal -cv. Cunningham, cv. 7 y cv. América-; G-5: elevado contenido de materia seca, fenoles y valor nutritivo medio -cv. K-8 y cv. K-67-; G-6: elevado porcentaje de materia seca y taninos, y baja degradabilidad -cv. Perú-. Conclusiones. La biomasa comestible de los cultivares Cunningham, América, 7, México, CNIA-250 y K-28 constituyen las mejores opciones para la alimentación de rumiantes.

  8. Respuesta de Leucaena leucocephala cv. Perú a la aplicación de diferentes dosis de MicoFert agrícola

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    L Ojeda

    Full Text Available Se realizó una investigación en la Empresa Pecuaria El Tablón (Cumanayagua, provincia Cienfuegos, Cuba, con el objetivo de evaluar el efecto que ejerce la aplicación de diferentes dosis de MicoFert agrícola sobre la producción de materia seca (MS y el contenido de fósforo foliar en Leucaena leucocephala cv. Perú. El diseño fue de bloques al azar, con seis tratamientos y tres réplicas. Los tratamientos estuvieron constituidos por cuatro dosis de MicoFert (250, 500, 750 y 1 000 g/m-1, una variante a razón de 25 kg de N ha-1, y el control. El experimento tuvo una duración de dos años; se realizaron cuatro cortes por año, con una frecuencia de 90 días, a una altura de 25 cm sobre el suelo. La aplicación de MicoFert agrícola incrementó el rendimiento de MS entre 13 y 40 %, de forma proporcional a las dosis aplicadas, respecto al control. El rendimiento más alto de MS (18,44 t ha-1 se obtuvo con la aplicación de nitrógeno, y difirió significativamente del resto de los tratamientos. Fue evidente el efecto que ejerció la inoculación con el biofertilizante en el contenido de fósforo foliar, el cual mostró diferencias significativas entre las variantes con MicoFert y el control. La colonización de raicillas por los hongos micorrízicos arbusculares (HMA fue proporcional al incremento de las dosis de biofertilizante, con valores de 34, 38, 44 y 49 %, respectivamente. La fertilización con nitrógeno y el control presentaron 28 y 26 % de colonización micorrízica, lo que indicó la presencia de HMA nativos.

  9. Caracterización cultural y morfológica e identificación de 12 aislamientos fungosos de semillas de Leucaena leucocephala cv. Perú Cultural and morphological characterization and identification of 12 fungal isolations in seeds of Leucaena leucocephala cv. Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C Lezcano

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available La presente investigación tuvo como objetivo identificar los agentes fungosos asociados a las semillas de Leucaena leucocephala cv. Perú almacenadas al ambiente, a partir de la caracterización cultural y morfológica de 12 aislamientos puros; estos se obtuvieron de la siembra de las estructuras fúngicas (vegetativas y/o reproductivas, en placas Petri (9 cm de diámetro que contenían Agar Papa Dextrosa (APD y Agar Malta (AM. Las placas se incubaron durante 10 días a 25ºC, con alternancia de 8 h luz/16 h oscuridad o a oscuridad constante, según los requerimientos de cada organismo. Se identificaron siete agentes fungosos asociados a las semillas, los cuales se clasificaron teniendo en cuenta los caracteres culturales y morfológicos, y se corroboraron con las claves taxonómicas. Ello permitió agrupar: Penicillium expansum Link, Rhizopus stolonifer Ehrenb. ex Fr., Cladosporium sphaerospermum Penz., Chaetomium indicum Corda, Alternaria alternata (Fr Keissl., Pestalotia sp. y Trichoderma sp. Dichos caracteres constituyen una herramienta importante para la identificación de los hongos hasta el nivel de especie, por lo que se recomienda realizar nuevos estudios con los aislamientos #9 y #11 con vista a completar la identificación hasta la especie en el caso de los géneros Trichoderma y Pestalotia; así como identificar las especies fungosas del resto de los aislamientos.The objective of this study was to identify the fungal agents associated to seeds of Leucaena leucocephala cv. Peru stored under ambient conditions, from the cultural and morphological characterization of 12 pure isolations; they were obtained from planting the fungal structures (vegetative and/or reproductive, in Petri dishes (9 cm diameter which contained Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA and Malt Agar (MA. The dishes were incubated for 10 days at 25ºC, alternating 8 h light/16 h darkness or at constant darkness, according to the requirements of each organism. Seven fungal

  10. Descomposición de la hojarasca en un sistema silvopastoril de Panicum maximum y Leucaena leucocephala (Lam de Wit cv. Cunningham: III. Influencia de la densidad y diversidad de la macrofauna asociada Litter decomposition in a silvopastoral system of Panicum maximum and Leucaena leucocephala (Lam de Wit cv. Cunningham: III. Influence of density and diversity of the associated macrofauna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saray Sánchez

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de determinar la descomposición de la hojarasca en un sistema silvopastoril de Panicum maximum y Leucaena leucocephala y su relación con la densidad y la diversidad de la macrofauna asociada, se realizó este experimento en la EEPF «Indio Hatuey». Esta se determinó como la pérdida de biomasa a través del tiempo, con relación al peso inicial. Para el estudio de la dinámica de la descomposición se utilizó el método de bolsas de hojarasca (litter bags. Se escogieron al azar cuatro bolsas a los 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180 y 210 días de situadas en el pastizal. En cada fecha de recolección, a la hojarasca remanente de cada bolsa se le determinó la población de macrofauna (organismos con diámetro mayor que 2 mm mediante la separación manual, y se calculó el valor promedio de la densidad (individuos/m², así como la abundancia proporcional (% para cada taxón. Se utilizó el análisis de correlación y regresión para conocer la interrelación entre las variables y los modelos de mejor ajuste. De acuerdo con los resultados se concluye que las condiciones de humedad y temperatura que genera el árbol en este sistema, así como la calidad de su hojarasca, posibilitan la presencia de una diversa y estable fauna asociada a las bolsas, la cual influyó en el proceso de descomposición.The trial was conducted at the EEPF «Indio Hatuey» in order to determine the litter decomposition in a silvopastoral system of Panicum maximum and Leucaena leucocephala and its relation to the density and diversity of the associated macrofauna. It was determined as biomass loss through time, with regards to initial weight. For the study of the decomposition dynamics the litter bag method was used. Four bags were randomly chosen 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180 and 210 days after being placed in the pastureland. In each collection date, to the remnant litter of each bag, the macrofauna (organisms with diameter higher than 2 mm population was

  11. Producción de leche de una asociación de Leucaena leucocephala, Morus alba y Pennisetum purpureum CT-115 bajo condiciones de riego Milk production from an association of Leucaena leucocephala, Morus alba and Pennisetum purpureum CT-115 with irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Lamela

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available En la vaquería "El Rancho"de la Empresa de Cítricos "Victoria de Girón" del municipio Jagüey Grande, en la provincia de Matanzas, Cuba, se realizó un estudio con el objetivo de determinar la producción de leche en una asociación de la gramínea Pennisetum purpureum CT-115 con los árboles forrajeros Leucaena leucocephala y Morus alba, en condiciones de riego. Se emplearon vacas de mediano potencial (Holstein x Cebú del grupo de alta producción, las cuales tuvieron acceso al sistema hasta los 150 días de lactancia. Se utilizó un modelo multiplicativo para analizar la producción de leche con efecto en la curva de lactancia; se analizaron las variables: bimestre de producción, época y número de lactancias, y se midió la disponibilidad de materia seca. La oferta de materia seca en el área de la asociación fue superior a 30 kg de MS/animal/rotación como promedio durante el período de evaluación, y hubo diferencias entre las épocas del año. Los mayores resultados se encontraron en el bimestre julio-agosto y los menores en enero-febrero y marzo-abril, con diferencias significativas (PIn the dairy unit "El Rancho" of the Citrus Fruit Firm "Victoria de Girón" of the Jagüey Grande municipality, in Matanzas province, Cuba, a study was conducted in order to determine milk production in an association of the grass Pennisetum purpureum CT-115 with the forage trees Leucaena leucocephala and Morus alba, with irrigation. Moderate-potential cows (Holstein x Zebu from the high-production group, which had access to the system until 150 days of lactation, were used. A multiplicative model was used to analyze the milk production with lactation curve effect; the following variables were analyzed: production two-month period, season and number of lactations; and dry matter availability was measured. The dry matter offer in the area of association was higher than 30 kg DM/animal/rotation as average during the evaluation period, and there were

  12. Alelopathic effect of aqueous extracts of leucena (Leucaena leucocephala Wit leave and fruit on germination and root growth of canafistula (Peltophorum dubium Spreng/ Efeito alelopático do extrato aquoso de folha e de fruto de leucena (Leucaena leucocephala Wit sobre a germinação e crescimento de raiz da canafístula (Peltophorum dubium Spreng.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Maria Teixeira Fortes

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays exotic plants represent a big threat to biodiversity because when they are present in favorable environments, they can influence the development of native plants, as well as they can change the natural functions of the environment. Wrong management practices are some of the main factors that support the environment invasions by exotic species. Leucena (Leucaena leucocephala Wit. is an exotic species that takes part in Itaipu Dam recuperation riparian areas. Exotic species may have allelopathic effects. The objective of this study has been to verify allelopathic effects of aqueous extracts of leucena leaves and fruits upon germination and root growth of canafistula (Peltophorum dubium Spreng., a native species. Twelve treatments with four replications have been used, divided in two stages, six treatments each. The utilized treatments were: water, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% extract. All the seeds were scared mechanically. The germinated seeds have been counted daily. The length of the roots has been evaluated at the third and seventh day of experiment. The fruit extract presented more allelopathic effects than the leaves extract. The roots were sensitive both to the fruits and leaves extract.Atualmente as plantas exóticas representam uma grande ameaça à biodiversidade pois, quando presente em ambientes que lhe são favoráveis, influenciam no desenvolvimento das plantas nativas, além de alterar o funcionamento natural daquele ambiente. Práticas de manejo erradas são um dos principais fatores que favorecem a invasão do ambiente pelas espécies exóticas. A leucena (Leucaena leucocephala Wit. é uma espécie exótica que foi introduzida na recuperação da mata ciliar da Hidrelétrica de Itaipu, e pode possuir efeitos alelopáticos. Objetivou-se neste trabalho verificar a presença de efeitos alelopáticos do extrato aquoso de folha e fruto da leucena sobre a germinação e crescimento de raiz da canafístula (Peltophorum dubium

  13. Consideraciones acerca de la Leucaena leucocephala cv. X: una nueva opción forrajera para un ecosistema ganadero con suelos ácidos e infértiles Considerations about Leucaena leucocephala cv. X: A new forage choice for a livestock ecosystem with acid and infertile soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Pérez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El presente estudio se realizó a partir de una búsqueda de información por diversas páginas Web, revistas de impacto, otras de carácter nacional e internacional, así como las más diversas fuentes de información, relacionada con la capacidad de adaptación del género Leucaena a los diferentes tipos de suelo, con énfasis en la acidez y el grado de encharcamiento. La revisión proporcionó las limitantes de adaptación del género y de la especie L. leucocephala a dichas condiciones. El descubrimiento de las posibilidades de germoplasma adaptables a esos tipos de suelos, abrió un preámbulo para encontrar plantas arbóreas para los ecosistemas con acidez y humedad, de los que Cuba y el Trópico poseen más del 33% en las áreas cultivadas. Se brinda información internacional, así como resultados de investigación acerca de variedades de esta especie, la fase de establecimiento, la fenología de la planta, la adaptación a diferentes tipos de suelo, la respuesta a la poda y el comportamiento con animales, fundamentalmente en la producción de leche, como respuesta al consumo y suministro de L. leucocephala cv. X. Los resultados permiten afirmar que el cv. X, junto a otras gramíneas y leguminosas importantes para este tipo de ecosistema ganadero, puede contribuir significativamente a transformar el panorama económico, productivo y ambiental del entorno de las zonas que presenten similares condiciones. Se concluye que esta leguminosa arbórea puede ser un buen árbol forrajero para suelos ácidos (pH entre 4,6 y 5,1, húmedos e infértiles, lo que le confiere una plasticidad ecológica superior a la considerada hasta el momento. Se recomienda que este cultivar continúe extendiéndose a otras zonas con condiciones similares a las estudiadas. Además, debe continuarse su evaluación para proponerla como variedad comercial.The study was carried out from a search for information through different Web pages, impact journals, other national

  14. Rhizobium grahamii sp. nov., from nodules of Dalea leporina, Leucaena leucocephala and Clitoria ternatea, and Rhizobium mesoamericanum sp. nov., from nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris, siratro, cowpea and Mimosa pudica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, Aline; Rogel-Hernández, Marco A; Barois, Isabelle; Ortiz Ceballos, Angel I; Martínez, Julio; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2012-09-01

    Two novel related Rhizobium species, Rhizobium grahamii sp. nov. and Rhizobium mesoamericanum sp. nov., were identified by a polyphasic approach using DNA-DNA hybridization, whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic and phenotypic characterization including nodulation of Leucaena leucocephala and Phaseolus vulgaris (bean). As similar bacteria were found in the Los Tuxtlas rainforest in Mexico and in Central America, we suggest the existence of a Mesoamerican microbiological corridor. The type strain of Rhizobium grahamii sp. nov. is CCGE 502(T) (= ATCC BAA-2124(T) = CFN 242(T) = Dal4(T) = HAMBI 3152(T)) and that of Rhizobium mesoamericanum sp. nov. is CCGE 501(T) (= ATCC BAA-2123(T) = HAMBI 3151(T) = CIP 110148(T) = 1847(T)).

  15. Siembra directa con Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit. Para producción de forraje en el jardín botánico “Carlos Liscano”, Mérida, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Petit-Aldana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available La siembra directa es un método económico para establecer programas de producción de forraje con leguminosas arbustivas, La Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit. es una leguminosa de tipo arbustivo, utilizada en agricultura, ganadería y en la recuperación de tierras, tiene gran adaptabilidad, alto valor forrajero y se cataloga entre las principales especies de uso múltiple en agroforestería. El objetivo fue establecer un ensayo de siembra directa utilizando los métodos de siembra al voleo, surcos y hoyos con Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit en un área del Jardín Botánico “Carlos Liscano” de la Facultad de Ciencias Forestales y Ambientales de la Universidad de Los Andes, Venezuela, a fin de probar su efectividad para planes futuros de establecimiento de bancos forrajeros. Se estableció el ensayo en un diseño completamente al azar en un experimento factorial (2 x 3, con 4 bloques (repeticiones. Los factores experimentales fueron: Factor A: 1 terreno arado 2 terreno no arado y Factor B: 1 siembra al voleo, 2 siembra en hoyos y 3 siembra en surcos. Se encontró que el método más exitoso de siembra es el surco, tanto en terreno arado como no arado. Se determinó que la emergencia está entre el día cuatro y dieciocho después de la siembra. Tres meses después la mayor abundancia de plantas se presentó en los bloques arados con sistema de siembra al voleo, aunque los mejores promedios de altura se encontraron en los bloques con arado y la siembra en surcos.

  16. DESCOMPOSICIÓN Y LIBERACIÓN DE NITRÓGENO Y MATERIA ORGÁNICA EN HOJAS DE Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit, Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. Y Moringa oleifera Lam. EN UN BANCO MIXTO DE FORRAJE

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    Judith Petit-Aldana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluaron las tasas de descomposición, la liberación de N y MO en hojas de Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit, Guazuma ulmifolia Lam. y Moringa oleifera Lam. en un banco mixto de forraje en Yucatán, México, en las épocas de lluvias y sequía, en un diseño de bloques completos al azar, cinco tratamientos y cuatro repeticiones. Se llenaron 120 bolsas con hojas frescas de las especies colectadas, y se colocaron en cada unidad experimental. Se evaluaron tres periodos de incubación para cada tratamiento: cuatro, ocho, y 16 semanas por cada época. A finales del experimento se observó que el proceso de descomposición fue más rápido en la temporada de lluvias. La pérdida de peso y la liberación de N y MO fueron más aceleradas en M. oleifera en monocultivo y en la asociación L. leucocephala con M. oleifera. Los patrones de descomposición de todas las especies siguieron el modelo exponencial simple, con más del 80 % de la masa inicial incorporada al final del periodo de estudio. Se concluye que L. leucocephala, G. ulmifolia y M. oleifera en monocultivo y asociadas, demostraron su capacidad para producir considerables cantidades de materia orgánica y liberar importantes cantidades de N en cortos periodos.

  17. Cinética de fermentación in vitro de Leucaena leucocephala y Megathyrsus maximus y sus mezclas, con o sin suplementación energética

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    Xiomara Gaviria

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de caracterizar la cinética de fermentación in vitro de mezclas de Leucaena leucocephala y Megathyrsus maximus, se realizó un experimento in vitro de producción de gas en el que se incluyeron cinco tratamientos: 100 % de L. leucocephala (L100, 100 % de M. maximus (G100, 100 % de suplemento a base de harina de arroz y melaza (S100, y dos proporciones: L23-G77 y L26-G70-S4. Los forrajes se recolectaron durante ocho meses en un sistema silvopastoril intensivo (SSPi, perteneciente al Centro Agropecuario Cotové de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia. La producción máxima de gas varió en un rango de 156 (L100 a 247 mL g-1 sustrato (L26-G70-S4. El menor volumen de gas al punto de inflexión (57,5 mL se observó en L100, el cual fue diferente al de las mezclas y el suplemento (p < 0,05. La desaparición de la MS a las 96 h varió entre 53,8 % y 66,9 %, y fue mayor en L100 que en el resto de los tratamientos (p < 0,05. El menor valor de la producción de gas (1,31 mL por cada gramo de MS, fermentada a las 96 h, se observó en L100 (p < 0,05. Los resultados sugieren que la inclusión de leucaena aumentó la concentración de proteína de la dieta y redujo el contenido de FDN, lo que resulta positivo desde el punto de vista de la productividad animal. Se concluye que la utilización de forrajes de mayor calidad nutricional, como el de leucaena, modifica el perfil de fermentación de la dieta; por lo que la respuesta de las mezclas forraje-gramínea es diferente a la esperada, ya que depende de la respuesta individual de cada forraje.

  18. Caracterización cultural y morfológica e identificación de diez aislamientos de Fusarium procedentes de semillas de Leucaena leucocephala cv. Perú almacenadas Cultural and morphological characterization and identification of ten Fusarium isolates from stored Leucaena leucocephala cv. Peru seeds

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    J. C Lezcano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue caracterizar cultural y morfológicamente diez aislamientos de Fusarium, obtenidos de semillas de L. leucocephala cv. Perú almacenadas, con vistas a su clasificación taxonómica. Sus cultivos puros se conservaron en tubos Eppendorf con medio Agar Papa y Dextrosa (APD, en cámara fría a 10°C. La siembra de cada aislamiento se realizó en tres placas Petri, esterilizadas, de 9 cm de diámetro; estas contenían, separadamente, los medios APD y Agar Papa Sacarosa (APS, que constituyeron las réplicas; se colocó en su centro un disco micelial de 7 mm de diámetro, procedente de cultivos con 10-15 días de edad, sembrados también en dichos medios. Posteriormente, las placas se sellaron con papel parafinado y se incubaron durante diez días a 25°C, con alternancia de 8 h de luz/16 h de oscuridad, o a oscuridad constante. Las variables culturales medidas fueron: el color de la colonia en el anverso y el reverso, la textura y el crecimiento lineal y aéreo; y como morfológicas se evaluaron: el tamaño, la forma y el color de las estructuras vegetativas y reproductivas que aparecieron en los cultivos. Se utilizó un diseño completamente aleatorizado y los datos se procesaron estadísticamente a través de un análisis descriptivo. Para la identificación de los hongos se utilizaron diferentes claves taxonómicas. Los aislamientos 10, 18 y 29 se correspondieron con las características descritas en la literatura científica para la especie Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht; el 17, el 28 y el 30, con Fusarium sambucinum Fuckel; el 27, con Fusarium semitectum Berk & Rav.; el 25 y el 26, con Fusarium incarnatum (Rob Sacc, y el 31, con Fusarium chlamydosporum Wollenw & Reinking, lo que permitió la identificación de cinco especies de Fusarium asociadas a las simientes almacenadas.The objective of this work was to characterize cultural and morphologically ten Fusarium isolates, obtained from stored Leucaena leucocephala cv

  19. Caracterización cultural y morfológica e identificación de especies deAspergillus asociadas a semillas de Leucaena leucocephala cv. Perú

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    J. C Lezcano

    Full Text Available Se evaluaron, desde el punto de vista cultural y morfológico, diez aislamientos puros de Aspergillus, obtenidos de semillas previamente desinfectadas de Leucaena leucocephala cv. Perú, con el objetivo de identificar a qué especie(s pertenecían. La siembra de los hongos se realizó a partir de discos miceliales de 7 mm de diámetro, procedentes de cultivos de 10-15 días de edad, que fueron colocados en el centro de placas Petri de cristal de 9 cm de diámetro y se incubaron durante 10 días a 25 °C, con alternancia de 8 h luz por 6 h oscuridad. El diseño experimental fue completamente aleatorizado, y para cada aislamiento se utilizaron como réplicas tres placas. Los aspectos culturales medidos fueron: el color de la colonia en el anverso y el reverso, el diámetro, la textura, el crecimiento lineal (cm/día, el crecimiento aéreo y la pigmentación del sustrato; y los morfológicos: el tamaño, la forma y el color de las estructuras con valor taxonómico para la determinación de las especies de Aspergillus. Los aislamientos No. 2, No. 3, No. 4 y No. 5 se correspondieron con la especie Aspergillus flavus Link; el No. 19, conAspergillus wentii Wehmer; y los tratamientos No. 7, No. 20 y No. 21, con Aspergillus niger van Tieghem. Se concluye que tres especies deAspergillus se asociaron a las simientes de leucaena almacenadas. Se recomienda continuar los estudios para lograr la identificación de los aislamientos No. 6 y No. 22 hasta el nivel de especie.

  20. PENGARUH PENAMBAHAN EKSTRAK ENZIM CAIRAN RUMEN DOMBA PADA KOMPONEN SERAT KASAR, KANDUNGAN ASAM FITAT TEPUNG DAUN LAMTORO GUNG (Leucaena leucocephala (The Effect of Addition Sheep Rumen Liquor Enzyme Extract On Fiber Component and Fitate Acid Content Leucaena Leaf Meal

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    Indira Fitriliyani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the nutrient quality of  leucaena leaf meal (LLM with addition of sheep rumen liquor enzyme for nile tilapia feed which incubated 24 hours (in vitro; This experiment was designed in completely randomized design with 6 treatments and 3 replications each with different level of enzyme addition (0; 20; 40; 60; 80; and 100 ml/kg LLM.  Results of the experiment showed that nutrient quality of LLM  with addition of sheep rumen liquor enzyme which incubated for 24 hours, where significantly affected (P<0.05 on decrease of crude fiber (53,640%, NDF, ADF component and phytic acid (68,088%.  Over all conclusion is a great potential for using sheep rumen liquor enzyme for improving nutrition quality of leucaena leaf meal

  1. Farinha de folha de leucena (Leucaena leucocephala Lam. de wit como fonte de proteína para juvenis de tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum CUVIER, 1818 Leucaena leaf flour (Leucaena leucocephala Lam. of wit as a protein source for juveniles of tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum Cuvier, 1818

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    Geraldo Pereira Junior

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available O tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum é um peixe onívoro, natural da bacia amazônica, que possui elevado valor comercial. Características de rusticidade e desempenho produtivo destacam esta espécie para criação em cativeiro. Contudo, em criações comerciais de peixes, os custos com alimentação podem corresponder de 60 a 80% dos custos totais de produção, sendo a proteína o nutriente mais caro da dieta. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o desempenho produtivo de juvenis de tambaqui alimentados com rações contendo farinha de folha de leucena como fonte protéica. 240 juvenis foram distribuídos em 12 aquários experimentais (350 L, em um delineamento experimental inteiramente casualizado com quatro tratamentos (0%, 8%, 16%, 24% de inclusão de farinha de folha de leucena na ração e três repetições. Foram determinados o ganho de peso, conversão alimentar aparente, taxa de crescimento específico, taxa de eficiência protéica e custo de produção do quilograma de peso vivo ganho. Para as variáveis estudadas, não houve diferença significativa (p>0,05 entre os tratamentos, indicando que é possível incluir até 24% de farinha de folha de leucena em rações para juvenis de tambaqui, sem comprometimento das variáveis estudadas, embora a substituição não tenha representado redução no custo de produção do quilograma de peixe.The tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum is an omnivorous fish native to the Amazon basin, which has high commercial value. Characteristics of rusticity and desirable growth in farming highlight this species for breeding in captivity. However, in commercial fish breeding, feed costs may represent 60-80% of total costs of production, being the protein the most expensive nutrient in the diet. The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth of juvenile tambaqui fed with diets containing leucaena leaf flour as protein source. A total of 240 juveniles were distributed in 12 experimental aquaria (350 L in

  2. Effet de Leucaena leucocephala, des fientes de volaille ou du fumier de bovins sur la productivité du maïs cultivé sur "terre de barre" au sud Bénin

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    Mallouhi, N.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Leucaena leucocephala, Poultry Manure or Cattle Manure on Maize Productivity on Feralitic Soil "terre de barre" in South Benin. Our work has consisted on the study of post-effect of Leucaen's prunings and poultry manure buried last year and also on the study of the direct effect of cattle manure and its interaction with Leucaen's pruning on maize productivity on feralitic soil "terre de barre". - The mixture of Leucaen's prunings and poultry manure had positive post-effect giving a yield of fresh ears and grains significantly higher (9 % to the reference and other treatments in the plots over the alley. - The supply of 5 t/ha of cattle manure appears insufficient. On the other hand the mixture of Leucaen's prunings and cattle manure gave the best results related to the soil's properties such as organic matter's content or total exchange capacity of the soil and also concerning the yields. In this case we notice that ail the results are significantly higher to the other treatments. These results emphasize the importance of a supply of organic matter's to the soil thereby fertilizing it in humus and mineral elements.

  3. Potential contribution of leucaena hedgerows intercropped with maize to the production of organic nitrogen and fuelwood in the lowland tropics. [L. leucocephala

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, F.

    1983-01-01

    Data from the literature was analysed. Annual N-production by L. leucocephala hedgerows planted more than 150 cm apart and cut every 8 weeks to 15-30 cm was estimated to be 45 g/linear m of hedgerow. The system is thought to be useful where soil-N availability is a limiting factor and where maize productivity is less than 1000 kg/ha (when increases of 112% for 1.5 m hedge spacings to 28% for 6 m spacings are predicted).

  4. Characterization of Leucaena (Leucaena leucephala) oil by direct analysis in real time (DART) ion source and gas chromatography; Caracterización del aceite de Leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala) por análisis directo en tiempo real (DART) y cromatografía de gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, M.; Alandis, N.M.; Sharmin, E.; Ahmad, N.; Alrayes, B.F.; Ali, D.

    2017-07-01

    For the first time, we report the characterization of triacylglycerols and fatty acids in Leucaena (Leucaena leucephala) oil [LUCO], an unexplored nontraditional non-medicinal plant belonging to the family Fabaceae. LUCO was converted to fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). We analyzed the triacylglycerols (TAGs) of pure LUCO and their FAMEs by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) followed by multivariate analysis for discrimination among the FAMEs. Our investigations for the analysis of LUCO samples represent noble features of glycerides. A new type of ion source, coupled with high-resolution TOF-MS was applied for the comprehensive analysis of triacylglycerols. The composition of fatty acid based LUCO oil was studied using Gas Chromatography (GC-FID). The major fatty acid components of LUCO oil are linoleic acid (52.08%) oleic acid (21.26%), palmitic acid (7.91%) and stearic acid (6.01%). A metal analysis in LUCO was done by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The structural elucidation and thermal stability of LUCO were studied by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques and TGA-DSC, respectively. We also measured the cytotoxicity of LUCO [Spanish] Se presenta por primera vez la caracterización de triacilgliceroles y ácidos grasos del aceite de Leucaena (Leucaena leucephala) [LUCO], una planta no medicinal, no tradicional y no explorada, perteneciente a la familia Fabaceae. Se analizaron triacilgliceroles (TAGs) de LUCO y sus FAMEs por espectrometría de masas de tiempo de vuelo (TOF-MS) seguido de análisis multivariante para discriminación entre los FAME. Nuestras investigaciones para el análisis de muestras de LUCO presentaron características propias de los glicéridos. Un nuevo tipo de fuente de iones, junto con alta resolución TOF-MS se aplicó para el análisis exhaustivo de triacilgliceroles. La composición de aceite de LUCO basado en ácidos grasos se estudió usando Cromatografía de Gas (GC-FID). Los principales

  5. Costos y beneficios de un sistema silvopastoril intensivo (sspi, con base en Leucaena leucocephala (Estudio de caso en el municipio de Tepalcatepec, Michoacán, México

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    J. M. González

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Se analizaron los costos en que se incurren y los beneficios económicos que se generan en un SSPi con base en Leucaena leucocephala, en terrenos de riego por gravedad, con el fin de evaluar la rentabilidad económica de las inversiones y hacer una comparación entre el SSPi y el sistema que tradicionalmente operaba o línea base (40% monocultivo de pasto Tanzania Panicum maximum, 30% de sorgo forrajero Sorghum vulgar bajo el sistema de corte y 30% de agostadero con pastos nativos. Complementando la alimentación del ganado suizo de doble propósito en el SSPi con pulido de arroz a razón de 1.50 kg diarios por vaca durante la ordeña; y en la línea base se utilizó 3.50 kg de alimento comercial diario por vaca ordeñada. Resultando, para el SSPi, una TIR del 13.30% y el VAN al 10%, un saldo positivo de $2’202,170 (pesos mexicanos y en la situación inicial o línea base se obtuvo una TIR del 0.70% y el VAN al 10% resultó negativo, con $-4’717,022 (pesos mexicanos. El SSPi incrementó de manera importante la productividad y la rentabilidad del rancho haciéndolo lucrativo, ya que con el sistema tradicional no era rentable económicamente.

  6. The potential of classical biological control against Leucaena Psyllid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Leucaena psyllid Heteropsylla cubana Crawford (Homoptera: Psyllidae) has caused damaging effects to Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit in Tanzania since its outbreak in 1992. Cultural, genetic and chemical controls have been tried in some localised areas. In 1995, a hymenopterous parasitoids, Tamarixia ...

  7. Status of industrial pollution and their effect on seed germination and growth performance of albizia lebbek (benth.) and leucaena leucocephala (LAM) de wit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiuli, M.D.; Alam, S.; Mohiuddin, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    contamination than in soil contaminated with effluents of tanneries (57%, 11.91 cm, 2.97 cm, 7.5 gm and 25, respectively) textiles (53%, 13.99 cm, 3.2 cm, 6.5 gm and 28, respectively) and fisheries (60%, 13.35 cm, 3.66 cm, 5 gm and 31, respectively). The soils contaminated by the effluents of textiles and fisheries has positive influence on the seed germination and growth performance of leaucaena leucocephala. In this case, seed germination, height growth, collar diameter. Total biomass and nodule numbers were 97%. 24.33 cm, 2.8 mm, 8.8 gm and 67 respectively in soils contaminated with effluents of textiles and fisheries (96%, 23.42 cm, 23.42 cm, 2.6 mm, 9.13 gm and 62 respectively) as compared to that of control soils (95%, 19.3 cm, 2.0 mm, 8.23 gm and 54, respectively) and contaminated soils of tanneries effluents (95%, 19.7 cm, 1.7 mm, 6.8 gm and 39, respectively). These indicate that the response of different tree species to similar pollution prone area could be different. (author)

  8. Persistence of Rhizobium inoculants originating from Leucaena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ten core soil samples were collected from experimental plots at IITA, SW Nigeria that were previously inoculated with Rhizobium strains (IRC1045 and IRC 1050) specific for Leucaena leucocephala at two depths; 0—15 cm and 15—30 cm. The control soil samples were collected at similar depths from an adjacent field with ...

  9. INFLUENCE DE LA DRÊCHE DE BRASSERIE ET DE Leucaena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AISA

    ou de folioles séchées de Leucaena leucocephala. Les animaux du lot 2 servant de témoin, n'ont reçu ni drêche de brasserie ni Leucaena leucocephala. Chaque aulacode a reçu une ration quotidienne faite de 83 g de complément alimentaire. L'analyse bromatologique des ingrédients alimentaires a révélé une teneur en ...

  10. Response of rabbits to varying levels of cassava and Leucaena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Response of rabbits to varying levels of cassava and Leucaena leucocephala leaf meal diets. ... Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa ... An experiment was carried out to determine the performance, haematology, carcass characteristics and sensory evaluation of meat from rabbits (n = 30) fed varying levels of ...

  11. EFFECT OF Dactyladenia barteri (Hook. f. ex Oliv.), Leucaena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A two year field study was conducted to investigate the effects of prunings of Dactyladenia barteri (Hook. f. ex Oliv.), Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit, Gliricidia sepium (Jacq.), and Senna siamea (Lam.) on the activity of earthworms and soil and worm cast properties. Earthworm activity was measured by quantifying ...

  12. Anatomical changes in the cell-wall structure of Leucaena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The structural changes in the cell wall and delignification pattern caused by Trametes versicolor and Trametes hirsuta in the sap wood of Leucaena leucocephala were examined by light and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The in vitro decay test was conducted for 12 weeks. Both species of Trametes used in this study ...

  13. Reproductive indices of Merino rams fed sun-cured Leucaena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reproductive indices of Merino rams fed sun-cured Leucaena leucocephala forage. I.V. Nsahlai, B.K. Byebwa, M.L.K. Bonsi. Abstract. (South African J of Animal Science, 2000, 30, Supplement 1: 111-112). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  14. Expressão dos genes nod de Rhizobium tropici, R. etli e R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli e estabelecimento da nodulação do feijoeiro na presença de exsudatos de sementes de Mimosa flocculosa e Leucaena leucocephala

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    F. M. Mercante

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Na etapa inicial da troca de sinais moleculares entre macro e microssimbiontes, a interação do feijoeiro e estirpes de Rhizobium tropici, R. etli e R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli foi avaliada pela expressão dos genes nod de estirpes bacterianas, contendo a fusão nodA::gusA. Esta avaliação foi efetuada por meio da atividade da enzima ß-glucuronidase, utilizando, como indutores, exsudatos liberados pelas sementes de Mimosa flocculosa e Leucaena leucocephala. Além disso, avaliou-se o efeito da adição desses exsudatos no estabelecimento da nodulação do feijoeiro, cv. Carioca. Nos testes "in vitro", a mistura de exsudatos de sementes de feijoeiro e M. flocculosa promoveu aumentos sinergísticos significativos na expressão dos genes nod, tanto das estirpes de R. tropici (CIAT 899/pGUS 32 e F 98.5/pGUS 32 quanto de R. etli (CFN 42/pGUS 32. Em condições controladas, a adição dos exsudatos, tanto de M. flocculosa quanto de L. leucocephala, proporcionou aumento significativo na nodulação inicial do feijoeiro, quando foi inoculada a estirpe CFN 42 (R. etli. A nodulação do feijoeiro cultivado em vasos com solo não foi inibida pelo suprimento de N-mineral, quando se inoculou a estirpe CIAT 899 (R. tropici e foram fornecidos exsudatos de sementes de M. flocculosa.

  15. Nutrient partitioning and seedling development in the genus Leucaena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dovel, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Slow establishment of the genus Leucaena from seed has been attributed to law seedling vigor and late nodulation. Observation of early seedling growth indicated that partitioning of a large proportion of resources to the root of young Leucaena seedlings could account, in part, for the slow initial shoot growth observed in this genus. Therefore, a series of experiments were conducted to examine the partitioning of stored seed reserves, photosynthate, and nitrogen in developing Leucaena seedlings. The effects of nodulation and nitrogen fertilization on partitioning of nutrients in the seedling were also examined. Seed reserves were initially used for radicle growth in dark grown seedlings; however, partitioning soon shifted to the hypocotyl. By four days after imbibition, hypocotyl weight exceeded radicle weight in both species tested (L. leucocephala and L. retusa), at all temperatures above 20 0 C. Two experiments were conducted examining the carbon partitioning of L. leucocephala cultivar K-8 using 14 CO 2 pulse labeling techniques

  16. Potential contribution of Leucaena hedgerows intercropped with maize to the production of organic nitrogen and fuelwood in the lowland humid tropics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, F.

    1983-01-01

    From a brief literature review, it is concluded that intercropping rows of Leucaena leucocephala would increase productivity in systems where existing production of maize is less than 1500 kg/ha. At between-row spacing of 150 cm. Leucaena hedgerows on one ha would produce enough fuelwood to satisfy the annual needs of four people. 10 references.

  17. Recria de bovinos nelore em pastos de Brachiaria brizantha com suplementação protéica ou com acesso a banco de proteína de Leucaena lecocephala: desempenho animal Post-weaning nelore cattle grazing Brachiaria brizantha with protein supplement or free access to a protein bank of Leucaena leucocephala: animal performance

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    Marcelo Queiroz Manella

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Foi avaliado o desempenho de 192 bovinos Nelore recém desmamados em pastos de brachiaria exclusiva (Teste ou suplementados durante a estação seca (Seca, o ano todo (Ano ou com acesso a banco de leucaena (Banco, em delineamento de blocos casualisados com quatro repetições. O suplemento fornecido na seca continha 46,9 % de PB, 70 % degradável no rúmen e o das águas 43,9% PB, 60 % degradável. No período das secas, os animais dos tratamentos Ano e Seca tiveram ganhos maiores que os dos tratamentos Banco e Teste (0,534 e 0,486 vs 0,277 e 0,201 kg/d, respectivamente. Nas águas os animais dos tratamentos Ano e Banco ganharam mais peso que os de Seca e Teste (0,782 e 0,741 vs 0,584 e 0,645 kg/d. O ganho de peso vivo por unidade de área apresentou as mesmas tendências que os ganhos médios diários. A suplementação com fontes protéicas pouco degradáveis nas águas e o banco mostraram-se alternativas eficientes a serem exploradas.The performance of 192 weaned Nelore steers grazing on Brachiaria brizantha pastures(Teste, or supplemented during the dry season (Seca, all year around (Ano or with free access to a leucaena bank (Banco, was evaluated in a random block design with four replications. The dry season supplement had 46.9% CP, 70% rumen degradable, and the wet season supplement, 43.9% CP, 60% degradable. During the dry season, the animals of Ano and Seca showed higher gains than Banco and Teste (.534 and .486 vs .277 and .201 kg/day, respectively. In the wet season animals on Ano and Bank had higher gains than Seca and Teste (.782 and .741 vs .584 and .645 kg/day. The live weight gain per unit of area showed the same behavior of daily gain. Supplements with escape protein or access to a leucaena bank during the wet season showed an efficient alternative.

  18. Utilization of leucaena leaf meal as a protein supplement in broiler ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ninety finisher broiler birds averaging 586.06g and 28-days old were randomly assigned into three dietary treatments in which a multipurpose tree (MPTs) Leucaena leucocephala leaf meal (LLM) replaced soybean meal (SBM) at levels of 0.00, 5.25 and 10.50% for a period of 42 days using performance characteristics and ...

  19. Albizia lebbeck, Leucaena leucocephala, Morinda lucida and Senna si

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2017-09-30

    Sep 30, 2017 ... BP 941 Franceville, Gabon. 2Laboratoire de Nutrition et d'Alimentation animale, Département des productions animales, FASA, Université de. Dschang. BP 222 Dschang, Cameroun. ..... of Recent German Contributions Concerning. Development through Animal Research Vol. 33 ed. Bittner A., editor.

  20. Antioxidant activity and cytotoxicity study of Leucaena leucocephala ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gallate (1) along with two quercetin glycosides: quercetin-3-O-arabinofuranoside (2) and quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside (3) together with apigenin (4). The structures of the isolated compounds were elucidated using spectroscopic techniques NMR (1D ...

  1. Performance of rabbits fed Leucaena leucocephala and concentrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four fryers which were fed the same % of concentrates and Aspilia africana served as the control. Growth rate decreased at the beginning of the study followed by satisfactory growth thereafter. The control animals had a higher growth rate compared to the other two groups (P< 0.05). Alopecia and decreased appetite were ...

  2. FORAGE PRODUCTION OF SOME LESSER-KNOWN LEUCAENA SPECIES GROWN ON ACID SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhayati D. Purwantari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Leucaena leucocephala leaves are nutritious and palatable for ruminants. However, the plant is poorly adapted on acid soil, water logged, and susceptible to psyllid (Heteropsylla cubana. Leucaena favours soils with pH >5. It performs best on calcareous soils. This study aimed to evaluate adaptability of several Leucaena species on acid soils. The study was conducted at the experimental field in Ciawi, Bogor, altitude 500 m above sea level, rainfall 1500-2000 mm year-1, on Latosol soil with pH 5.2. Leucaena species evaluated were L. leucocephala K28, L. leucocephala (local type, Leucaena KX2 hybrid, L. collinsii, L. trichandra, and L. diversifolia. Experiment was designed in a randomized complete block, four replications. All the seedlings were grown in the nursery for 2.5 months before being transplanted to the field. The plants were grown in row plots of 5 m x 1 m with planting distance 0.5 m and spacing between row plot was 3 m. One unit replicate was 5 m x 21 m. In wet season, the plants were pruned at 50 cm height every 3 months, whilst in dry season pruning was done every 5 months. Parameter measured were plant regrowth and forage production (edible part and non-edible part of the plant, as well as N and P content of the edible part. The result showed that Leucaena KX2 hybrid was superior to other leucaenas. Regrowth of KX2 hybrid was the fastest and produced highest forage. The highest fresh weight forage production for 1 year (four times harvests, i.e. 33.93 t ha-1 year-1 equal to 12.48 t ha- 1 year-1 of dry weight, was obtained from Leucaena KX2 hybrid, whereas the lowest was produced by L. diversifolia, i.e. 3.12 t ha-1 year-1 of fresh weight or 1.01 t ha-1 year-1 of dry weight. Production of non-edible part followed the pattern of production of edible part. N and P content in the edible part of all Leucaena species did not show any significant difference except for L. trichandra which contained the lowest. This study implies that

  3. Recria de bovinos Nelore em pastos de Brachiaria brizantha com suplementação protéica ou com acesso a banco de proteína de Leucaena lecocephala: características de fermentação ruminal Post-weaning performance of Nelore cattle grazing Brachiaria brizantha with proteic supplement or free access to a protein bank of Leucaena leucocephala: ruminal fermentation characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Queiroz Manella

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Foram avaliadas as características de fermentação ruminal de bovinos Nelore com peso médio inicial de 152 kg, submetidos durante 314 dias aos seguintes tratamentos: pastos de Brachiaria brizantha exclusiva (Teste, pasto de Brachiaria mais suplementação durante o período de seca (Seca, pasto de Brachiaria mais suplementação na seca e águas (Ano ou pasto de Brachiaria com acesso a banco de Leucaena (Banco. O delineamento experimental foi o de blocos ao acaso com quatro repetições. O suplemento fornecido na seca continha 46,9% de PB e o das águas, 43,9% PB. As coletas de líquido ruminal foram realizadas em agosto, novembro, fevereiro e maio de três animais aleatórios de cada parcela. As porcentagens molares de propionato foram maiores para os animais suplementados, sendo que em agosto foi maior para os tratamentos Ano e Seca; nos outros períodos os animais do tratamento Ano apresentaram as maiores proporções. Similarmente, a relação acetato:propionato diminui nos tratamentos com suplemento em todas épocas. Houve interação dos valores de N-NH3 entre época do ano e tratamento, sendo que os animais suplementados apresentaram concentração mais elevada em agosto (Ano e Seca, fevereiro e maio (Ano. Houve também interação entre época do ano e tratamento para N-uréia, em que os tratamentos suplementados apresentaram valores mais elevados em agosto (Ano e Seca, fevereiro e maio (Ano que os demais tratamentos e, em novembro, o Ano foi maior apenas no tratamento Teste.The rumen fermentative characteristics of Nelore steers grazing Brachiaria Brizantha pastures (Teste, or supplemented during the dry season (Seca, dry and wet seasons (Ano or with free access to a Leucaena bank (Banco, in a randomized block design with four replications, were evaluated. The dry season supplement had 46.9% CP, 70% rumen degradable, and the wet season supplement, 43.9%CP, 60% degradable. Rumen liquor was collected on August, November, February and

  4. Determinación de compuestos hidrocarbonados en la pared celular de P. maximum y L. leucocephala en silvopastoreo Determination of hydrocarbonated compounds in the cell wall from P. maximum and L. leucocephala under silvopastoral system conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Sánchez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de determinar la concentración de n-alcanos y alcoholes de cadena larga en la pared celular de Panicum maximum cv. Likoni y Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham, se realizó un estudio en una asociación de gramíneas mejoradas y leucaena de 10 años de establecida, la cual ocupa un área de 1,6 ha. Se seleccionaron dichas especies por ser las más representativas en la composición florística. Las muestras se colectaron de enero a diciembre del 2005 y se secaron. La concentración de n-alcanos de cadena impar fue de 167,97 y 222,96 mg/kg de MS y 134,11 y 137,27 mg/kg de MS para guinea y leucaena, en el período poco lluvioso y en el lluvioso, respectivamente. A su vez la concentración de alcoholes de cadena par para la leucaena presentó un valor mayor(2 754,60 y 3 830,18 mg/kg de MS para el período poco lluvioso y lluvioso, respectivamente, que en la guinea (2 571,73-3 679,65 mg/kg de MS para cada período, respectivamente. Se concluye que la concentración de n-alcanos de cadena larga impar fue baja para P. maximum y L. leucocephala en ambos períodos del año; sin embargo, presentaron concentraciones elevadas de alcoholes de cadena larga par, que pudieran ser utilizados como marcadores naturales en las dos especies.With the objective of determining the concentration of n-alkanes and long-chain alcohols in the cell wall of Panicum maximum cv. Likoni and Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham, a study was conducted in an association of improved grasses and leucaena ten years after being established, which occupies an area of 1,6 ha. Such species were selected for being the most representative ones in the floristic composition. The samples were collected from January to December, 2005 and were dried. The concentration of odd-chain n-alkanes was 167,97 and 222,96 mg/kg DM and 134,11 and 137,27 mg/kg DM for Guinea grass and leucaena in the dry and rainy season, respectively. In turn, the concentration of even-chain alcohols for

  5. Efecto bioestimulante de Trichoderma harzianum Rifai en posturas de Leucaena, Cedro y Samán

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    Leonides Castellanos González

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo evaluó el efecto bioestimulante de Trichoderma harzianum Rifai en la producción de postura de Leucaena leucocephala (Lam de Wit., Cedrela odorata L. y Albizia saman (Jacq. Merr. Se desarrollaron tres experimentos en condiciones de vivero, uno para cada especie. Se empleó un diseño completamente aleatorio con cuatro parcelas por tratamiento. En cada experimento los tratamientos fueron: Trichoderma harzianum a razón de 20 g.L-1, 40 g.L-1 y un testigo. Se evaluó el porcentaje de germinación y las variables morfométricas diámetro y altura del tallo, así como biomasa seca en raíz y parte aérea de la planta. Los tratamientos con Trichoderma no incrementaron el porcentaje de germinación en cedro, samán y leucaena. T. harzianum incrementó la altura, el número de hojas y la biomasa seca del área foliar en las plántulas de cedro, mientras que en leucaena y samán solo provocó incrementos del diámetro basal de las plántulas.

  6. Dormancia y tratamientos pregerminativos en las semillas de Leucaena spp. cosechadas en suelo ácido Dormancy and pregerminative treatments in Leucaena spp. seeds harvested on acid soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda González

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Se desarrolló un experimento con semillas de accesiones de Leucaena spp. cosechadas en suelo ácido y almacenadas bajo condiciones ambientales, para determinar el período e intensidad de la dormancia y su ruptura. Para ello se empleó un diseño de clasificación simple y cuatro réplicas, con los siguientes tratamientos: 1 semilla sin tratar (control; 2 corte de cubierta; y 3 agua a 80°C durante 2 minutos. En cada una de las accesiones hubo diferencias significativas entre los tratamientos aplicados y los mayores valores de germinación se encontraron con el corte de cubierta. Todas las accesiones mostraron estado dormático (entre 10 y 98%, el cual se apreció en la germinación del control y en la viabilidad con el corte de cubierta. Los mayores valores de dormancia en las semillas cosechadas en el 2006 se detectaron en L. macrophylla CIAT 17233, L. macrophylla CIAT 17231, L. diversifolia CIAT 17270 y L. leucocephala IH-1140, cuya dureza fue de 98,0; 97,0; 80,0 y 74,7%, respectivamente; en las cosechadas en el 2003 y 2004, los porcentajes de dureza fueron de 89,0; 69,0 y 60,0% para L. lanceolata CIAT 17252, L. macrophylla CIAT 17238 y L. leucocephala cv. K-67, respectivamente. Se concluye que las semillas de las accesiones presentaron dormancia poscosecha, que varió entre 10 y 98%. Además la escarificación térmica provocó su ruptura, por lo que se recomienda aplicar este procedimiento antes de la siembra a las semillas de Leucaena spp. que se cosechen en suelo ácido de Cascajal.A trial was conducted with seeds of Leucaena spp accessions harvested on acid soil and stored under ambient conditions, in order to determine the period and intensity of dormancy and its breaking. For that purpose a simple classification design and four replications were used, with the following treatments: 1 untreated seed (control; 2 coat cut; and 3 water at 80ºC for 2 minutes. In each one of the accessions there were significant differences among the

  7. Ruminal and Intestinal Digestibility of Leucaena Foliage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pramote

    2013-12-30

    Dec 30, 2013 ... The rate of ruminal disappearances of DM and CP, and the potential degradation of CP from nylon bags of both Madras thorn and moringa fodders were significantly higher than that for leucaena fodder. Potential degradation (A+B) values of CP were 45.6%, 54.2% and 52.8% for leucaena, Madras thorn ...

  8. Caracterización morfoagronómica e isoenzimática de 23 accesiones de Leucaena spp. Morphoagronomic and isoenzymatic characterization of 23 Leucaena spp. accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda B Wencomo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue valorar el grado de diversidad existente en 23 accesiones de Leucaena, atendiendo a los caracteres morfoagronómicos e isoenzimáticos. Se incluyeron cinco especies de este género (L. leucocephala, L. lanceolata, L. diversifolia, L. macrophylla y L. esculenta, además de los cultivares comerciales. Se evaluó: la altura de la planta, el número de ramas, el grosor del tallo, el comportamiento de los patrones fenológicos de floración y fructificación, el número de pinnas por hoja y de pínulas por pinna, entre otros. Se realizaron además los análisis electroforéticos peroxidasas (Prx,α- y ß- esterasas (Est, malato deshidrogenasa (Mdh y alcohol deshidrogenasa (Adh. Las accesiones cumplieron con los criterios de selección predeterminados en cuanto a los caracteres morfoagronómicos, aunque no en el mismo tiempo. En este sentido, se destacaron L. leucocephala cv. Cunningham, cv. Perú, CIAT-9119, CIAT-9438, CIAT-751, CIAT-7988, CIAT-7384, CIAT-7929, CIAT-17480, cv. Ipil-Ipil y cv. CNIA-250; L. lanceolata CIAT-17255 y CIAT-17501, y L. diversifolia CIAT-17270. Se pudo detectar la existencia de variabilidad genética dentro de la colección. Los sistemas isoenzimáticos (esterasas y peroxidasas resultaron polimórficos en la muestra estudiada, principalmente las esterasas. Por otra parte, el análisis de diversidad genética permitió diferenciar L. leucocephala con una mayor claridad respecto al resto de las especies estudiadas, aunque no se ganó en discriminación dentro de la especie.The objective of this work was to evaluate the existing diversity degree in 23 Leucaena accessions, regarding the morphoagronomic and isoenzymatic characteristics. Five species of this genus were included (L. leucocephala, L. lanceolata, L. diversifolia, L. macrophylla and L. esculenta, in addition to the commercial cultivars. The following aspects were evaluated: plant height, number of branches, stem diameter, performance of

  9. Biomass production of Prosopis species (mesquite), leucaena, and other leguminous trees grown under heat/drought stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, P.; Cannell, G.H.; Clark, P.R.; Osborn, J.F.; Nash, P.

    1983-01-01

    Leguminous trees were examined for use on hot/arid lands in field trials in the Califronia Imperial Valley where July daily maximum temperatures are 42/sup 0/C (108/sup 0/F). Two field trials were carried out to rank 55 accessions in biomass per tree and to evaluate biomass production per unit area with four of the more productive accessions identified in earlier trials. The trial with 55 accessions compared Prosopis (mesquite) to widely recommended species for arid lands such as Leucaena leucocephala (K-8), Parkinsonia aculeata, and Prosopis tamarugo and to other drought adapted tree legume species of California/Arizona deserts such as Cercidium fluoridium and Olneya tesota. Prosopis selections were identified that had greater productivity than either Leucaena leucocephala (K-8) or Parkinsonia aculeata. The mean ovendry biomass per accession ranged from 0.2 kg/tree for Prosopis tamarugo to 29 kg/tree for P. alba (0166) when measured 2 years from germination in the greenhouse. Clones were obtained from trees in this trial which had 45-56 kg/tree (ovendry) in two seasons. The plots designed to measure biomass production per unit area were on a 1.5 m spacing and had productivities of 7, 11.2, 14.3, and 14.5 ovendry T ha/sup -1/ yr/sup -1/ for P. glandulosa var torreyana (0001), P. alba (0163), P. chilensis (0009), and P. alba (0039), respectively, when measured 2 years from germination in the greenhouse.

  10. Biomass production of Prosopis species (mesquite), Leucaena, and other leguminous trees grown under heat/drought stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felker, P.; Cannell, G.H.; Clark, P.R.; Osborn, J.F.; Nash, P.

    1983-09-01

    Leguminous trees were examined for use of hot/arid lands in field trials in the California Imperial Valley where July daily maximum temperatures are 42 degrees C (108 degrees F). Two field trials were carried out to rank 55 accessions in biomass per tree and to evaluate biomass production per unit area with four of the more productive accessions identified in earlier trials. The trial with 55 accessions compared Prosopis (mesquite) to widely recommended species for arid lands such as Leucaena leucocephala (K-8), Parkinsonia aculeata, and Prosopis tamarugo and to other drought adapted tree legume species of California/Arizona deserts such as Cercidium floridium and Olneya tesota. Prosopis selections were identified that had greater productivity than either Leucaena leucocephala (K-8) or Parkinsonia aculeata. The mean oven-dry biomass per accession ranged from 0.2 kg/tree for Prosospis tamarugo to 29 kg/tree for P. alba (0166) when measured 2 years from germination in the greenhouse. Clones were obtained from trees in this trial which had 45-56 kg/tree (oven-dry) in two seasons. The plots designed to measure biomass production per unit area were on a 1.5 m spacing and had productivities of 7, 11.2, 14.3, and 14.5 oven-dry T ha-1 yr-1 for P. glandulosa var torreyana (0001), P. alba (0163), P. chilensis (0009), and P. alba(0039), respectively, when measured 2 years from germination in the greenhouse. 30 references

  11. Capacidad de recuperación de 23 accesiones de Leucaena spp. después de la poda Recovery capacity of 23 Leucaena spp. accessions after pruning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda B Wencomo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluaron 23 accesiones de Leucaena spp. durante dos años, con el objetivo de conocer la variabilidad existente en la población en cuanto a la capacidad de recuperación después de la poda. Cuando las plantas sobrepasaban los 2 m, se realizó la poda de uniformidad a un 1 m de altura sobre el nivel del suelo. Las mediciones fueron: el grosor del tallo, el número de rebrotes y su longitud con una frecuencia semanal, a partir de lo cual se calculó la velocidad de crecimiento de cada accesión; además se determinó el rendimiento. El análisis de componentes principales, el de conglomerados y el de regresión lineal simple se realizaron a través del programa estadístico SPSS versión 11.5 para Microsoft Windows®. Se observó variabilidad en los indicadores evaluados (86,11% acumulado en la componente y todos contribuyeron a su explicación. A su vez, el análisis de conglomerados permitió la formación de tres grupos. Se concluye que todas las accesiones presentaron capacidad de recuperación después de la poda, con diferencias entre ellas. Las accesiones Leucaena leucocephala cv. Cunningham, cv. Perú, CIAT-9119, CIAT-9438, CIAT-751, CIAT-7988, CIAT-7384, CIAT-7929, CIAT-17480, cv. Ipil-Ipil y cv. CNIA-250; L. lanceolata CIAT-17255 y CIAT-17501 y L. diversifolia CIAT-17270 fueron las de mayor capacidad de recuperación. Por ello se recomienda, en futuras investigaciones relacionadas con la caracterización, evaluación y selección de estas especies, realizar estudios que incluyan su persistencia en el tiempo bajo condiciones de poda, así como su empleo en el fomento de nuevos sistemas silvopastoriles.Twenty three Leucaena spp. accessions were evaluated for two years, in order to know the variability existing in the population regarding the recovery capacity after pruning. When the plants were higher than 2 m, the uniformity pruning was made at 1 m above the soil level. The measurements were: stem diameter, number of regrowths and

  12. Study on Leucaena leocochepala seed during fermentation : sensory characteristic and changes on anti nutritional compounds and mimosine level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursiwi, A.; Ishartani, D.; Sari, AM; Nisyah, K.

    2018-01-01

    Lamtoro (Leucaena leucocephala) seed is one of the leguminosae which have high level of protein but it contains toxic compound such as mimosine and some anti nutritional compounds such as phitic acid and tannin. The objectives of the research was to investigate the sensory characteristic and the changes onanti nutritional compounds and mimosine level in Leucaena leucochepala seed during fermentation. Lamtoro tempeh processing was carried out by boiling the seed, crushing to separate the hull, soaking, boiling, and fermentation. The best concentration inoculum in lamtoro tempeh processing was determined by hedonic test. Fermentation was carried out in 36 hours and every 6 hours mimosine, tannin, and phitic acid content was analyzed. From hedonic test, inoculum concentration of 1% was used in lamtoro tempeh processing. During 36 hours fermentation, phytic acid content and mimosine content was decreased significantly, from 0.0558 % to 0.0453 % and from 0.00393 % to 0.00173 % respectively. Whereas tannin content was increased signifacantly, from 0.0822 % to 0.00173 %.

  13. The Potential of Leucaena leococaphala alley Cropping as an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A three-year old leucaena leococephala alley cropping with maize was evaluated with respect to soil chemical pro-perties and grain and stover yields on a Coastal Savanna Soil of Ghana. The four treatments established between the leucaena hedgerows were: half rate of recommended fertilizer for maize (T1); full rate of ...

  14. Evaluating the performance of Leucaena accessions for agroforestry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The performance of Leucaena accessions on acid soils in eastern coast Tanzania for agroforestry was evaluated for three years. Plant tree parameters assessed were fodder yield and plant stem height, stem girth, the number of total branches and poles production. Also, Leucaena psyllid, a common pest threatening the ...

  15. Ácidos grasos, fermentación ruminal y producción de metano, de forrajes de silvopasturas intensivas con Leucaena.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Prieto-Manrique

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente trabajo fue determinar el efecto de los forrajes sobre los ácidos grasos de cadena larga, fermentación ruminal y producción de metano de un sistema silvopastoril intensivo de Leucaena leucocephala. La investigación se desarrolló en el laboratorio NUTRILAB–GRICA, perteneciente a la Facultad de Ciencias Agrarias, de la Universidad de Antioquia, Medellín–Colombia, en julio del 2013. Se utilizó la técnica de producción de gas in vitro, utilizando como sustrato de fermentación las gramíneas (C. plectostachyus y/o M. maximus cv. Tanzania y leucaena (L. leucocephala, solas o en sus combinaciones, con una relación forraje:concentrado 70:30 y gramínea: leucaena 56:14, para un total de siete tratamientos. No se encontró efecto de los forrajes (p>0,05, sobre el contenido de ácido linoleico conjugado (ALC, C18:2 c9t11 o ruménico en la digesta. La inclusión de 14% de leucaena aumentó el contenido de ácido linoleico (C18:2 c9, 12 y linolénico (C18:3 c9, 12, 15 en el alimento y de transvaccénico (ATV, C18:1 t11, esteárico (C18:0, linoleico y linolénico en la digesta (p<0,05, y no afectó la cinética de fermentación, digestibilidad de la materia seca (MS, pH, total y proporción de ácidos grasos volátiles, ni redujo la producción de metano. Las gramíneas, C. plectostachyus y M. maximus, se comportaron similar en las variables evaluadas (p>0,05. Los sistemas silvopastoriles pueden ser una opción para aumentar los ácidos grasos benéficos en la leche.

  16. Nutritional Characteristics of Important Dwarf Shrubs and Value of Leucaena leueocephala seeds as Protein Supplement for Goats in Marsabit District, Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuria, S.G; Karue, C.N

    1999-01-01

    A study on the nutritional characteristics of Indigofera spinosa and Duosperma eremophilum dwarf shrubs was carried out in Southwest Marsabit district of Kenya to establish the digestibility intake by goats and their chemical composition for management purposes. The value of Leucaena leucocephala seeds as protein supplement for goats was also tested where three levels, 0 (control), 50 and 100 g/goat/day were used. Intake and digestibility of the shrubs were assessed by difference and conventional methods respectively. Proximate analysis and Van Soest fibre analysis were done for chemical composition. Goats on l. spinosa had 330+ or -34. 5 g/day Dry Matter Intake (DMI) while those on D. eremophilum had 175+or-89.0 g/day. Dry Matter of l. spinosa was 40.3+or-2.9 % digestible while that of D. eremophilum was 45.0+or-6.6 % digestible. Indigofera spinosa contained 8.8 % Crude Protein (CP), 55.4 % Neutral Detergent Fibre (NDF) and 4.1 KCal/gDM energy compared to 7.6 % CP, 29.3 % Neutral Detergent Fibre (NDP) and 3.1 KCal/gDM energy for D. eremophililum. In reference to the controls, DMI increased by 124g and 55g for D. eremophilum and I. spinosa respectively for every 50g increase in L. lecocephala seeds for l. spinosa. From the results it was concluded that in terms of intake, digestibility and CP, both shrubs are medium quality. Leucaena leucocephala seeds are rich in CP (26.0%) and increased both DMI and DMD for the shrubs. It is thus suitable for use as protein supplement in small ruminant feeding especially during the dry season when it will increase intake and digestibility of the shrubs

  17. Caracterización de la calidad nutritiva de 53 accesiones del género Leucaena en condiciones tropicales Characterization of the nutritional quality of 53 accessions from the Leucaena genus under tropical conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.E García

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Mediante el análisis descriptivo, de componentes principales y de clasificación automática (ACA, se llevó a cabo un experimento para caracterizar la composición nutricional del follaje de 53 accesiones del género Leucaena (37 L. leucocephala, 7 L. macrophylla, 5 L. lanceolata, 2 L. diversifolia, 1 L. glauca y 1 L. esculenta establecidas en Matanzas, Cuba. Se determinó la composición química, los niveles de metabolitos secundarios y la degradabilidad ruminal. En general, las accesiones presentaron excelente composición química para ser utilizadas como suplemento en la alimentación de rumiantes (PC: 25,71 ±3,94%; FDN: 46,91 ±2,09%; cenizas: 7,48 ±0,96%; DMS: 60,24 ±9,90%. Los indicadores que explicaron mejor las variaciones entre las accesiones fueron los componentes de la fracción fibrosa y la polifenólica, la concentración de mimosina y la degradabilidad ruminal. Sin embargo, la fracción proteica, los niveles de materia seca, de fitatos, minerales y las cenizas presentaron pocas fluctuaciones. Mediante el ACA se identificaron tres grupos con características nutricionales diferenciadas entre sí. Las accesiones de L. macrophylla, L. diversifolia y L. esculenta presentaron mayor concentración de metabolitos secundarios y menor degradabilidad ruminal que las pertenecientes a L. leucocephala, L. lanceolata y L. glauca, las cuales mostraron los mejores resultados. La degradación de la MS, PC y FDN se vio afectada por los contenidos de fibra, polifenoles totales, taninos precipitantes y taninos condensados.Through the descriptive analysis, main component analysis and automatic classification, a trial was conducted to characterize the nutritional composition of the foliage of 53 accessions from the Leucaena genus (37 L. leucocephala, 7 L. macrophylla, 5 L. lanceolata, 2 L. diversifolia, 1 L. glauca and 1 L. esculenta established in Matanzas, Cuba. The chemical composition, levels of secondary metabolites and ruminal degradability

  18. Forage production and growing goats’ response under silvopastoral systems based on Guazuma ulmifolia, Leucaena leucocephala and Crescentia cujete

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo Rodríguez Fernández; Belisario Roncallo Fandiño

    2013-01-01

    Grass monoculture, besides being unnatural to goat’s natural eating habits, exhibits low forage production during the dry season, with negative impacts on animal productivity. This research aimed to determine the productive advantages of silvopastoral system arrangements in goat production. A completely randomized design with repeated measurements through time was used. Six treatments were evaluated: kikuyina grass monoculture (Bothriochloa per...

  19. Efecto de la suplementación con residuos de destilería del maíz en el comportamiento de novillas en una asociación de gramínea y leucaena Effect of supplementation with corn distillery residues on the performance of heifers in an association of grass and leucaena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Sánchez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente trabajo fue evaluar el efecto de la suplementación con residuos de destilería del maíz en el comportamiento de novillas, en una asociación de gramínea y leucaena. El estudio se realizó en un área de la Estación Experimental "Indio Hatuey", en el municipio de Perico, provincia de Matanzas, Cuba. La especie de pasto predominante fue Panicum maximum cv. Likoni y como leguminosa Leucaena leucocephala. Se estudiaron 18 novillas, distribuidas en un diseño completamente aleatorizado en tres grupos de seis animales; el grupo control no recibió suplementación (A y los otros dos grupos se suplementaron con residuos de destilería del maíz en un 10% (B y 20% (C de los requerimientos de proteína con relación al peso vivo. Se determinó la composición química, la disponibilidad de materia seca, la ganancia de peso vivo, la infestaci��n parasitaria y el hematocrito. Al analizar las ganancias diarias por tratamiento se encontraron diferencias significativas (PThe objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of supplementation with corn distillery residues on the performance of heifers in an association of grass and leucaena. The study was conducted in an area of the Experimental Station "Indio Hatuey" , Perico municipality, Matanzas province, Cuba. The prevailing pasture species was Panicum maximum cv. Likoni and as legume, Leucaena leucocephala. Eighteen heifers, distributed in a completely randomized design in three groups of six animals, were used; the control group did not receive supplementation (A, and the other two groups were supplemented with corn distillery residues in 10% (B and 20% (C of the protein requirements with regards to live weight. The chemical composition, dry matter availability, live weight gain, parasite infestation and hematocrit were determined. When analyzing the daily gain per treatments, significant differences (P<0,05 were found and the highest values were obtained in treatment C

  20. Efeito do extrato aquoso de leucena na germinação e no desenvolvimento do milho Effect of aqueous extract of leucaena on germination and growth of corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HÉLIO TEIXEIRA PRATES

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Foram desenvolvidos bioensaios, na Embrapa-Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Milho e Sorgo (CNPMS, para avaliar o efeito de extratos aquosos, a frio e a quente, da parte aérea de leucena (Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. De Wit., sobre a germinação e o desenvolvimento das plantas de milho (Zea mays L.. Os extratos foram preparados na concentração 20% (p/v, e avaliados em solo e papel- germiteste, em casa de vegetação, e em papel-filtro em laboratório. O extrato obtido com água fria (EF e aplicado ao solo não causou nenhum efeito fitotóxico sobre a germinação e o desenvolvimento das plantas de milho. O extrato obtido com água quente (EQ, quando aplicado em papel-germiteste ou papel-filtro, causou redução no comprimento da raiz seminal, mas não interferiu na germinação das sementes de milho. O comprimento da raiz seminal foi um indicador mais sensível aos efeitos do EQ do que a germinação.Bioassays were carried out at Embrapa-Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Milho e Sorgo (CNPMS, to evaluate the effect of leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. De Wit. cold and hot aqueous extracts on germination and growth of corn (Zea mays L.. Extracts at 20% (w/v concentration were used in greenhouse on soil and germitest paper, and on filter paper under laboratory conditions. Results indicated that extract obtained with cold water (EC when applied in soil had no phytotoxic effect on germination and plant growth. Extraction with hot water (EH caused reduction in root length, but had no effect on maize seeds germination. The root length was more efficient as a sensitive indicator to EH than germination.

  1. Variación interespecífica de la calidad nutricional de diecisiete accesiones de Leucaena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. García

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un experimento para evaluar, mediante el análisis de componentes principales (ACP, la variabilidad de la composición nutricional del follaje de diecisiete accesiones del género Leucaena (8 L. leucocephala, 5 L. lanceolata, 2 L. diversifolia, 1 L. glauca y 1 L. esculenta establecidas en Matanzas, Cuba, en condiciones tropicales y suelo Ferralítico Rojo Lixiviado. Se determinó el perfil bromatológico, los niveles de metabolitos secundarios y la degradabilidad ruminal. Mediante el ACP se formaron tres componentes y se extrajo un porcentaje de varianza intermedio (64.83. Los indicadores que explicaron mejor las variaciones entre las accesiones fueron la fracción proteica (PC y PV, la lignina, los compuestos polifenólicos (FT, TPP, TC, los fitatos y la degradabilidad ruminal (DMS, DPC, DFDN. Sin embargo, los niveles de MS, fracción fibrosa (FDN, FDA, FC, celulosa, mimosina y minerales presentaron variaciones menos importantes. Se identificaron tres grupos variabilicon características nutricionales diferenciadas. Aunque todas las accesiones presentaron buena composición proximal, las accesiones de L. diversifolia y L. esculenta presentaron mayor concentración de metabolitos secundarios y menor degradabilidad ruminal. En todos los casos la degradación de la MS, PC y FDN se vio afectada por los contenidos de polifenoles y fitatos. Las accesiones de L. leucocephala (LPIII-187, IH- 164, IH-449, IH-1069, IH-1140, Ecotec, IRI- 3164, IRI-3219, L. lanceolata (CIAT-17223, CIAT-17501, CIAT-17252, CIAT-17255, CIAT-17256 y L. glauca presentaron los mejores resultados

  2. Valor nutritivo del pasto estrella solo y en asociación con leucaena a diferentes edades de corte durante el año

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ararat J. Enrique

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluaron hojas (H, tallo (T y planta entera de pasto estrella Cynodon nlemfuensis solo y asociado con Leucaena leucocephala a 28, 35 y 42 días de corte en la hacienda Lucerna, norte del Valle del Cauca, Colombia (960 msnm, 24°C, 1100 mm/año, humedad relativa 75-80%, evaporación promedia diaria al año de 3.6 mm. Se utilizó el método de subparcelas divididas, teniendo en cuenta dos épocas secas (apoyadas con riego y dos lluviosas. En proteína cruda (PC estrella asociada superó a estrella sola (14.48 vs 11.90; 13.60 vs 10.98; 11.68 vs 9.67% a los 28, 35 y 42 días, mientras que leucaena fue estable (29.88, 29.31 y 29.01%. La proteína verdadera (PV tendió a ser mayor que nitrógeno no proteico (NNP en estrella asociada y leucaena. Extracto etéreo (EE, fibra cruda (FC, cenizas y extracto libre de nitrógeno (ELN no tuvieron diferencias significativas entre estrella sola y asociada. Entre especies hubo diferencias (P<0.05 en FC y cenizas. En fibra detergente ácida (FDA y fibra detergente neutra (FDN leucaena presentó en general diferencias (P<0.05 para H+T y H. En digestibilidad in situ de materia seca (DISMS a los 35 días estrella asociada fue mayor que sola sin ser significativo; leucaena fue más digestible (P<0.05 que estrella sola y asociada para H+T y H a los 28 días y en energía metabolizable (EM fue superior para H+T a 28, 35 y 42 días y H a 28 y 35 días. Entre estrella sola y asociada hubo significancia (P<0.05 a los 42 días en H+T. El sistema estrella+leucaena fue superior a los 35 días. Abstract Nutritive value of stargrass Cynodon nlemfuensis pure and in association with leucaen Leucaena leucocephala at different ages during year. Pure stargrass and associated with leucaen at 28, 35 and 42 days of cutting were evaluated at “ Lucerna “ farm, north of Cauca Valley, Colombia (960 m.a.s.l., 24°C, 1100 mm/year, relative humidity 75-80%, average 3.6 mm of daily evaporation during year. The method of

  3. Evaluación de dos especies de Leucaena, asociadas a Brachiaria brizantha y Clitoria ternatea en un sistema silvopastoril de Nayarit, México: I. Comportamiento agronómico Evaluation of two Leucaena species, associated to Brachiaria brizantha and Clitoria ternatea in a silvopastoral system from Nayarit, Mexico: I. Agronomic performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Bugarín

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de evaluar el comportamiento agronómico de dos especies de Leucaena, asociadas a Brachiaria brizantha y Clitoria ternatea en un sistema silvopastoril en la llanura costera norte del estado de Nayarit, en México, se desarrolló la presente investigación. Se utilizó un diseño de bloques al azar con cuatro repeticiones por tratamiento (proporción de leguminosa:gramínea: 1 L. leucocephala-B. brizantha (30:70; 2 L. glauca-B. brizantha (30:70; 3 L. leucocephala-B. brizantha- C. ternatea (28:52:20; 4 L. glauca-B. brizantha-C. ternatea (28:52:20; 5 B. brizantha (100. Con una frecuencia mensual se midió el crecimiento de las especies arbóreas, además de la supervivencia y el comportamiento de la relación leguminosa:gramínea en el sistema. L. glauca mostró una mayor altura (66 cm y diámetro (0,98 cm cuando se combinó con brachiaria y clitoria, y L. leucocephala un mayor número de ramas (8,7 y altura (4,5 cm. En la sobrevivencia se observaron valores de 70 a 80% después de un año de implementado el sistema. De acuerdo con los resultados se concluye que la mezcla de las leguminosas arbóreas con C. ternatea y B. brizantha es una importante opción en las condiciones ecológicas del trópico seco mexicano.This study was conducted with the objective of evaluating the agronomic performance of two Leucaena species, associated to Brachiaria brizantha and Clitoria ternatea in a silvopastoral system in the northern coastal prairie of the Nayarit state, Mexico. A randomized block design was used with four repetitions per treatment (legume:grass proportion: 1 L. leucocephala-B. brizantha (30:70; 2 L. glauca-B. brizantha (30:70; 3 L. leucocephala-B. brizantha- C. ternatea (28:52:20; 4 L. glauca-B. brizantha-C. ternatea (28:52:20; 5 B. brizantha (100. Tree growth was measured on a monthly basis, in addition to survival and the performance of the legume:grass relationship in the system. L. glauca showed more height (66 cm and diameter

  4. Molecular sex identification of painted storks (Mycteria leucocephala ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ONLINE RESOURCES. Molecular sex identification of painted storks (Mycteria leucocephala): using FTA cards, horizontal PAGE and quick silver staining. ELSIE Y. S. YEE1∗, ZAINAL ZAHARI ZAINUDDIN2, AHMAD ISMAIL3, CHEE KONG YAP3 and SOON GUAN TAN1. 1Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Science ...

  5. Molecular sex identification of painted storks (Mycteria leucocephala ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    [Yee E. Y. S., Zainuddin Z. Z., Ismail A., Yap C. K. and Tan S. G. 2013 Molecular sex identification of painted storks. (Mycteria leucocephala): ... or blood collected in anticoagulant tubes as source of DNA. Here, we used dried blood .... of Higher Education, Malaysia and partially by Malaysian Wildlife. Department. Thanks to ...

  6. Evaluación de dos especies de Leucaena, asociadas a Brachiaria brizantha y Clitoria ternatea en un sistema silvopastoril de Nayarit, México: II. Producción y composición bromatológica de la biomasa Evaluation of two Leucaena species, associated to Brachiaria brizantha and Clitoria ternatea in a silvopastoral system from Nayarit, Mexico: II. Biomass production and bromatological composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Bugarín

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de caracterizar la producción y la calidad nutricional de la biomasa en un sistema silvopastoril de la llanura costera norte del estado de Nayarit, México, se desarrolló la presente investigación. Los tratamientos fueron: 1 Leucaena leucocephala-B. brizantha (30:70; 2 Leucaena glauca-B. brizantha (30:70; 3 L. leucocephala-B. brizantha-C. ternatea (28:52:20; 4 L. glauca-B. brizantha-C. ternatea (28:52:20; 5 B. brizantha (100. Se estimó la producción de biomasa y se determinó: materia seca, cenizas, materia orgánica, proteína bruta, hemicelulosa y las fracciones de fibra ácido y neutro detergente. Los valores más bajos en cuanto a la producción de biomasa, a los seis meses de establecido el sistema, fueron para el testigo (0,78 t/ha, con diferencias significativas. A su vez, la combinación de las tres especies aportó los mejores resultados (1,64 y 1,69 t/ha para los tratamientos 3 y 4, respectivamente y a los nueve meses triplicaron la producción de biomasa. Hubo diferencias significativas en la composición bromatológica en todas las combinaciones evaluadas. No obstante, todas las especies mostraron características nutricionales adecuadas y constituyen una alternativa para los sistemas silvopastoriles tropicales en esta región.This study was conducted with the objective of characterizing the biomass production and nutritional quality in a silvopastoral system of the northern coastal plain of the Nayarit state, Mexico. The treatments were: 1 Leucaena leucocephala-B. brizantha (30:70; 2 Leucaena glauca-B. brizantha (30:70; 3 L. leucocephala-B. brizantha- C. ternatea (28:52:20; 4 L. glauca-B. brizantha-C. ternatea (28:52:20; 5 B. brizantha (100. The biomass production was estimated and the following indicators were determined: dry matter, ashes, organic matter, crude protein, hemicellulose and the fractions of acid and neutral detergent fiber. The lowest values regarding biomass production, six months after

  7. evaluating the performance of leucaena accessions for agroforestry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mgina

    Institute of Resource Assessment (IRA), P.O Box 35097, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ABSTRACT. The performance of Leucaena accessions on acid soils in eastern coast Tanzania ..... in the fields of pure and applied science as full research papers or notes (short communications). Comprehensive reviews and book reviews.

  8. Leucaena pallidas (Berth) seedling vigour indices as influenced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five (5) presowing dormancy breaking treatments viz: intact seed (UNT), sand paper box scarification (SPB), soaking in sulpluric acid for 30 seconds (SA 30), soaking in boiled water for 30seconds (SB30) and 60 seconds (SB60) were used to break the dormancy of Leucaena pallida (L. pallida) test the effect on seeding ...

  9. Growth performance of lesser-known Leucaena species ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on these findings, provenances L. diversifolia Batch (15551), L. diversifolia Ex. Mexico, L. diversifolia Ex. Veracruz and L. pallida Ex. Oaxaca are recommended for Gairo and similar sites. Keywords: Lesser-known Leucaena, survival, growth, biomass production and psyllid resistance No Abstract. Southern African ...

  10. Biomass of elephant grass and leucaena for bioenergy production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Aparecida Sales

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the biomass production of elephant grass and leucaena in Paraná state, Brazil, for the generation of renewable energy. Two field studies were conducted in the municipality of Ibiporã (23° S, 51° 01?W. In the first study, the dry matter accumulation curves were calculated, with sampling at 30, 60, 90, 120, and 180 days after cultivation. The second study was conducted in a randomized complete block design with split plots. The total aboveground biomass production of elephant grass and leucaena was estimated in the main plot. Cutting times of 60 and 120 days after cultivation were evaluated in the subplots. The productivity of dry matter (kg.ha-1 was estimated using the biomass data. In addition, the potential production of energy from the burning of elephant grass biomass, and the potential production of total aboveground biomass and energy of elephant grass (in Paraná was estimated using an agrometeorological model. Elephant grass can be potentially used as an alternative energy source. Leucaena has slow initial growth, and it must therefore be evaluated over a longer period in order to determine its potential. Simulation analyses of the capability of power generation, conducted based on the annual dry matter production, revealed that elephant grass could be an important source of renewable energy in the state of Paraná.

  11. Characterization of Leucaena (Leucaena leucephala) oil by direct analysis in real time (DART) ion source and gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, M.; Alandis, N.M.; Sharmin, E.; Ahmad, N.; Alrayes, B.F.; Ali, D.

    2017-01-01

    For the first time, we report the characterization of triacylglycerols and fatty acids in Leucaena (Leucaena leucephala) oil [LUCO], an unexplored nontraditional non-medicinal plant belonging to the family Fabaceae. LUCO was converted to fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). We analyzed the triacylglycerols (TAGs) of pure LUCO and their FAMEs by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) followed by multivariate analysis for discrimination among the FAMEs. Our investigations for the analysis of LUCO samples represent noble features of glycerides. A new type of ion source, coupled with high-resolution TOF-MS was applied for the comprehensive analysis of triacylglycerols. The composition of fatty acid based LUCO oil was studied using Gas Chromatography (GC-FID). The major fatty acid components of LUCO oil are linoleic acid (52.08%) oleic acid (21.26%), palmitic acid (7.91%) and stearic acid (6.01%). A metal analysis in LUCO was done by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). The structural elucidation and thermal stability of LUCO were studied by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques and TGA-DSC, respectively. We also measured the cytotoxicity of LUCO [es

  12. CARACTERÍSTICAS HEMATOLÓGICAS DE JUVENIS DE TAMBAQUI (Colossoma macropomum Cuvier, 1818 ALIMENTADOS COM RAÇÕES CONTENDO FARINHA DE FOLHA DE LEUCENA (Leucaena leucocephala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Pereira JUNIOR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as características hematológicas de juvenis de tambaqui alimentados com rações contendo farinha de folha de leucena. O estudo foi conduzido seguindo um delineamento experimental inteiramente casualizado com quatro tratamentos (0%, 8%, 16% e24% de inclusão de farinha de folha de leucena e três repetições. Foram distribuídos 250 juvenis de tambaqui com peso inicial médio de 41,1 g, em 12caixas plásticas redondas. Após 60 dias de cultivo, seis peixes por tratamento foram capturados e anestesiados para a coleta de sangue da veia caudal e determinação dos parâmetros hematológicos. Os resultados mostraram que a inclusão de farinha de folha de leucena nas rações alterou significativamente (p<0,05os parâmetros hematológicos (hematócrito, eritrócito, hemoglobina, volume corpuscular médio, concentração de hemoglobina corpuscular média e glicose plasmática dos peixes nos diferentes tratamentos. A conclusão desta pesquisa é que a inclusão de farinha de folha de leucena em rações para juvenis de tambaqui comprometeu as características hematológicas desta espécie.

  13. Replacement of alfalfa hay (Medicago sativa L.) with subabul (Leucaena leucocephala) leaf meal in diets of Najdi goats: effect on digestion activity of rumen microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadabadi, Tahereh; Jolazadeh, Alireza

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of replacing alfalfa hay by subabul leaf meal (SLM) on digestion, fermentation parameters and rumen bacteria and fungi activity of Najdi goats. Six Najdi goats (150 ± 15 days of age and initial body weight of 35 ± 1.1 kg) were randomly assigned to one of two dietary treatments in a balanced completely randomized design (three goats per treatment) for 56 days. Experimental treatments included alfalfa hay as control group and diet containing SLM (SLM replacing alfalfa hay at 50% level). Bacterial and fungi activity and rumen fermentation parameters of animals fed experimental diets were determined. Dry matter disappearance (DMD) was unaffected by replacing SLM with alfalfa hay for both rumen bacteria and fungi in different incubation times, except for 48 h of incubation in specific culture medium of mixed rumen bacteria, which decreased for SLM group (P > 0.05). NDF disappearance (NDFD) and ADF disappearance (ADFD) after 24 and 48 h of incubation in specific culture medium of mixed rumen bacteria was not affected by experimental diets (P > 0.05). However, 72 h after incubation, NDFD in SLM treatment decreased (P > 0.05). Gas production parameters of rumen bacteria were similar for both experimental diets, but partitioning factor (PF), efficiency microbial biomass production (EMBP), microbial protein production (MP), and organic matter truly digested (OMTD) decreased (p replacement of alfalfa hay by SLM had no major effect on rumen microorganisms' activity of Najdi goats, so it may be used as an alternative for alfalfa (at 50% level) in susceptible areas.

  14. GROWTH AND NODULATION OF LEUCAENA AND PROSOPIS SEEDLINGS IN SOIL PLUS TANNERY SLUDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademir Sérgio Ferreira de Araújo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to evaluate the growth and nodulation of Leucaena and Prosopis seedlings in soil plus tannery sludge. The study was conducted in a greenhouse, using bags containing soil plus tannery sludge. Seedlings of Leucaena and Prosopis inoculated with Bradyrhizobium sp were used. Results were evaluated 90 days after plant emergency. The application of tannery sludge, in the rate of 11.250 kg per hectare significantly increased plant height, stem diameter, and above ground dry mass ofLeucaena. Regarding Prosopis, there were no significant increases in these variables with tannery sludge application, except for aerial dry mass. No significant differences were seen between the treatments with sludge and inoculated with Bradyrhizobium sp. as to nodule number and dry mass. Tannery sludge evaluated in this work did not affect nodulation, besides favoring Leucaena and Prosopis seedling growth.

  15. Transgen kunst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    Oversættelse af kunstneren Eduardo Kac' tekst "Transgenic Art" i Passepartout #27. Interfacekulturens æstetik. Udgivelsesdato: 28.04.07......Oversættelse af kunstneren Eduardo Kac' tekst "Transgenic Art" i Passepartout #27. Interfacekulturens æstetik. Udgivelsesdato: 28.04.07...

  16. Effect of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG on Blood Parameters of Sheep Given Leucaena Pallida Leaves Base Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusdi Rusdi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengevaluasi kemampuan PEG dalam mengurangi pengaruh negatif dari pemberian daun Leucaena pallida pada ternak domba melalui pengamatan parameter darah.  Sebanyak 12 ekor domba ditempatkan secara acak pada dua perlakuan dengan 6 ulangan. Domba diberi pakan dasar daun Leucaena pallida dengan tambahan PEG atau tanpa PEG selama empat minggu melalui automatic feeders. Data parameter darah antar perlakuan dianalisa dengan uji t. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa PEG secara konsisten meningkatkan kecernaan makanan terkonsumsi dalam saluran pencernaan domba yang ditunjukan dengan meningkatnya konsentrasi urea darah, glukosa darah dan b-hydroxybutyrat darah.  Dengan demikian dapat dikatakan bahwa penambahan PEG ke dalam ransum yang mengandung tannin berpotensi untuk meningkatkan nilai hayati pakan.  (Animal Production 9(1: 18-22 (2007   Kata Kunci : PEG, darah, tannin

  17. Effects of Leucaena pallida and Sesbania sesban supplementation on testicular histology of tropical sheep and goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldemeskel, M.; Tegegne, A.; Umunna, N.N.; Kaitho, R.J.; Tamminga, S.

    2001-01-01

    Thirty Ethiopian highland rams with an average body weight of 23.7 kg (S.D.=1.23) and age of 18 months and 25 East African bucks with an average body weight of 18.6 kg (S.D.=2.06) and age of 14 months were used to study the long term effects of supplementation with the leaves of Leucaena pallida and

  18. Economic evaluation of alley cropping leucaena with maize - maize and maize - cowpea in southern Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngambeki, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    Alley cropping is an aspect of agroforestry being developed for small farmers in the tropics. It consists of establishing fast-growing leguminous shrubs or tree species in rows, then controlling the shading from the trees during cropping by pruning the branches which can be used as mulch or green manure to benefit the companion crops planted between the alleys. This paper attempts to assess the economic implications on labour utilization for the management of the leucaena hedgerows, on crop yields and the overall benefits from alley cropping with leucaena. The results show that although the management of leucaena trees increases labour requirements by about 50% the system can sustain and increase maize yields by over 60%, reduce the use of nitrogenous fertilizers and give an attractive net income and marginal rate of return per unit cost. It gave a reasonable benefit-cost ratio of 1.23 to 1.32 and looks promising, especially for maize production in tropical areas. 16 references.

  19. Characteristics of bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of the leguminous tree Leucaena glauca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Hironobu; Koriyama, Hiroki; Osawa, Atsushi; Zehirov, Grigor; Yamaura, Masatoshi; Kucho, Ken-ichi; Abe, Mikiko; Higashi, Shiro; Kondorosi, Eva; Mergaert, Peter; Uchiumi, Toshiki

    2011-01-01

    Rhizobia establish symbiosis with legumes. Bacteroids in indeterminate nodules of Inverted Repeat Lacking Clade (IRLC) legumes undergo terminal differentiation caused by Nodule-specific Cysteine-Rich peptides (NCRs). Microscopic observations of bacteroids and the detection of NCRs in indeterminate nodules of the non-IRLC legume Leucaena glauca were performed. A portion of the bacteroids showed moderate cell elongation, loss of membrane integrity, and multiple nucleoids. The symbiosome contained multiple bacteroids and NCR-like peptides were not detectable. These results indicate that bacteroid differentiation in L. glauca is different from that in IRLC legumes although both hosts form indeterminate nodules.

  20. Leaf litter production and decomposition of native forest and Leucaena sp. systems in Codazzi, Cesar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Bonilla

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Indiscriminate forest logging is associatedwith soil erosion processes, due, among otherfactors, to the interruption of the recyclingprocess. By this mechanism, plant species,individually or in community, can contributewith the nutrient return to agroecosystems.The purpose of this research was to evaluatethe leaf liter production and decompositionand to determine the factors involved.Leaf litter production and decomposition,identification and quantification of soilorganisms were done. The relationshipbetween environmental factors and leaf fallwas analyzed by the Pearson correlationcoefficient. For leaf decomposition, regressionanalysis was performed. Estimated leaf litterproduction was 16.7 and 13.2 t/ha/yr in atropical dry secondary and a Leucaena sp.system, respectively. At the forest systemno significant correlation was found fortemperature, humidity and precipitation withleaf liter, but a significant correlation wasfound for wind. The greater component ofthe necromass was due to leaf, correspondingto 62.2% and 73.5% in the forest and theLeucaena sp. system respectively. The highestdensity of organism was found at the dryforest, increased during the wet season in bothsystems and decreased with soil depth. Highdecomposition rates were registered in bothsystems and followed an exponential model.The highest rate was recorded at the Leucaenasp. system with 7.8 x 10–5 t/ha/yr.

  1. Mimosine, a Toxin Present in Leguminous Trees (Leucaena spp.), Induces a Mimosine-Degrading Enzyme Activity in Some Rhizobium Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soedarjo, Muchdar; Hemscheidt, Thomas K.; Borthakur, Dulal

    1994-01-01

    Thirty-seven Rhizobium isolates obtained from the nodules of leguminous trees (Leucaena spp.) were selected on the basis of their ability to catabolize mimosine, a toxin found in large quantities in the seeds, foliage, and roots of plants of the genera Leucaena and Mimosa. A new medium containing mimosine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen was used for selection. The enzymes of the mimosine catabolic pathway were inducible and were present in the soluble fraction of the cell extract of induced cells. On the basis of a comparison of the growth rates of Rhizobium strains on general carbon and nitrogen sources versus mimosine, the toxin appears to be converted mostly to biomass and carbon dioxide. Most isolates able to grow on mimosine as a source of carbon and nitrogen are also able to utilize 3-hydroxy-4-pyridone, a toxic intermediate of mimosine degradation in other organisms. PMID:16349454

  2. Molecular Analyses of Transgenic Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trijatmiko, Kurniawan Rudi; Arines, Felichi Mae; Oliva, Norman; Slamet-Loedin, Inez Hortense; Kohli, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in plant molecular biology is to generate transgenic plants that express transgenes stably over generations. Here, we describe some routine methods to study transgene locus structure and to analyze transgene expression in plants: Southern hybridization using DIG chemiluminescent technology for characterization of transgenic locus, SYBR Green-based real-time RT-PCR to measure transgene transcript level, and protein immunoblot analysis to evaluate accumulation and stability of transgenic protein product in the target tissue.

  3. Expansión del rango de la Paloma Coroniblanca Columba leucocephala al territorio continental de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno José Gregorio

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Entre las 32 especies de la familia Columbidae anotadas para Colombia, Hilty & Brown (1986 incluyeron a la Paloma Coroniblanca Columba leucocephala L. como restringida al archipiélago de San Andrés y Providencia. Esta especie, de amplia distribución en las Antillas, ha sido registrada en algunas islas continentales o localidades costeras en el sur de la Florida, Costa Rica y Panamá (Bond 1950, 1961, Wetmore 1968, Stiles & Skutch 1989. En Colombia C leucocephala fue encontrada en las islas de San Bernardo, a menos de 30 km del litoral Caribe del Departamento de Sucre (9° 40'Norte, 75° 45'Oeste en 1980 y 1981 por Moreno & López (1982, hallazgo que no fue reseñado en la literatura ornitológica de amplia circulación. En esta nota formalizamos la ampliación del rango geográfico de esta especie al territorio continental colombiano, agregando registros adicionales recientes.

  4. Performance of biomass availability and chemical composition of 23 Leucaena spp. accessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wencomo, Hilda B.; Ortiz, R.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted with 23 Leucaena spp. accessions in an area which had been planted six years before. The objective was to determine, in the established plants, total biomass, edible biomass, ligneous biomass, stem diameter and number of branches in each accession, and its bromatological composition under simulated grazing conditions. The research was conducted at the EEPF 'Indio Hatuey' during two years, on a hydrated ferruginous nodular humic lixiviated Ferralitic Red soil. Simple 3 m x 6 m plots were used. In the edible biomass and its components (leaves and fresh stems), there were significant differences (P<0,05) between the seasons of the two years. It could be observed that production was higher in the rainy season than in the dry season, although there were no differences among the mean biomass production of the accessions; in the case of total biomass no significant differences were found between seasons. To continue the studies is recommended, to determine, in the long term, the effect of the evaluated indicators on the availability and persistence of the tree. (author)

  5. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    seedlings of different NFT species and genotypes (b) of different NFT species and genotypes. (L.I. = grown in pots. (L.I. = Leucaena leucocephala; Leucaena leucocephala; Vertical bars =LSD,5%). Vertical bars = LSD, 5%). was no response to inoculation with TAL 169. significant differences between the two treatments.

  6. Untitled

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    seedlings of different NFT species and genotypes (b) of different NFT species and genotypes. (L.I. = grown in pots. (L.I. = Leucaena leucocephala; Leucaena leucocephala; Vertical bars =LSD,5%). Vertical bars = LSD, 5%). was no response to inoculation with TAL 169. significant differences between the two treatments.

  7. Propagação vegetativa de Hyptis leucocephala Mart. ex Benth. e Hyptis platanifolia Mart. ex Benth. (Lamiaceae Vegetative propagation of Hyptis leucocephala Mart. ex Benth. and Hyptis platanifolia Mart. ex Benth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O gênero Hyptis (Lamiaceae apresenta metabolismo especial de notável variabilidade, possuindo predominância de óleos essenciais, que têm muito valor junto a diversas comunidades que utilizam essas plantas pelas propriedades terapêuticas. Diversos estudos com esse gênero têm demonstrado que os óleos essenciais apresentam propriedades antimicrobiana, antifúngica, citotóxica, antiinflamatória, anti-HIV e inseticida, entretanto, poucos são os estudos voltados para a exploração sustentável dessas espécies. O objetivo desse trabalho foi avaliar o efeito de diferentes tipos de estaca e diferentes concentrações de ácido indolbutírico (AIB sobre a taxa de sobrevivência, crescimento e enraizamento de estacas de Hyptis leucocephala Mart. ex Benth. e Hyptis platanifolia Mart. ex Benth., espécies endêmicas do semi-árido nordestino cujo valor medicinal tem sido amplamente comprovado. O experimento teve duração de quatro meses. Foram utilizadas estacas apicais, médio-apicais, médio-basais e basais tratadas com soluções de 0, 1000, 2000 e 4000 mg L-1 de ácido indolbutírico (AIB, durante 5 minutos. A utilização de estacas apicais, médio/apicais e médio/basais induzidas com 2000 e 4000 mg L-1 de AIB possibilitaram melhores resultados para propagação vegetativa de Hyptis leucocephala. Para Hyptis platanifolia os melhores resultados foram obtidos com a utilização de estacas médio/basais e basais tratadas com AIB na concentração de 2000 e 4000 mg L-1.The genus Hyptis (Lamiaceae has a special metabolism with remarkable variability and predominance of essential oils of great value to the various communities that use these plants due to their therapeutic properties. A number of studies on this genus have demonstrated that its essential oils present antimicrobial, antifungal, cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory, anti-HIV and insecticidal activities. However, few studies have focused on the sustainable exploitation of these species

  8. Leucaena allelopathy on weeds and soybean seed germination / Alelopatia de Leucena sobre soja e plantas invasoras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Leszczynski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available With the advance of agriculture, there was consequent rising in environment degradation. Therefore, It is interesting the use of plants which have in their chemical composition substances capable of helping in the control of weeds to minimize the use of pesticides. Hence, the objective of this paper was to evaluate solutions of leucena extract on weeds that are frequent on soybean crop. The treatments were leucena extracts at 0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% at room temperature water and water heated to 80°C. The extracts were obtained by crushing 200g of leucena leaves and mixing them with one liter of distilled water with the help of a blender. Seeds were kept in B.O.D. at a temperature of 25°C, with a photoperiod of 12 hours of light. Evaluations were done on a daily basis, from the first to the last day of the experiment, varying according to the species. Results show a negative interference of the extracts, both hot and cold, in the root length of Ipomoea grandifolia, in the percentage of germination and in the root length of Arrowleaf sida and Hair beggarticks. There was no negative interference in the analyzed parameters for soybean seeds. Thus, the results indicate allelopatic potential of Leucaena leuucocephala as an alternative for the management of weeds without interfering on the development of the soybean crop.Com o desenvolvimento da agricultura surgiram os conseqüentes aumentos na degradação ambiental. Assim, estuda-se a utilização de plantas que possuam em sua composição química substâncias capazes de auxiliar no controle de plantas invasoras, amenizando o uso de agrotóxicos. Desta forma, o objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar soluções de extratos de leucena sobre plantas invasoras que freqüentemente ocorrem na cultura da soja. Foram utilizados como tratamentos os seguintes extratos de leucena nas proporções de: 0, 20, 40, 60, 80 e 100% com água à temperatura ambiente e com água aquecida à 80°C. Os extratos foram

  9. Leucaena lanceolata S. Watson ssp. lanceolata, ESPECIE FORESTAL CON POTENCIAL PARA SER INTRODUCIDA EN SISTEMAS SILVOPASTORILES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María L. Román-Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available La utilización de especies forestales en los sistemas de producción agropecuaria contribuye a reducir la presión en los bosques naturales y se pueden incorporar en áreas no arboladas. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar la calidad nutritiva, germinación, desarrollo de plántula en vivero y diversidad de usos de Leucaena lanceolata S. Watson ssp. lanceolata. El material comestible y las semillas se colectaron en Tomatlán, Jalisco. Se realizaron análisis bromatológicos, pruebas de escarificación y evaluación de plántula en vivero sobre tres suelos con diferente pH. El experimento se analizó en un diseño completamente al azar con comparación de medias de Tukey (P ≤ 0.05. Además, se hicieron entrevistas a productores, una revisión bibliográfica y consulta de ejemplares en los herbarios para conocer los usos locales y potenciales de la especie. Los resultados indican alto contenido de materia seca (97.40 % y proteína cruda (29.05 %, mayor germinación en los tratamientos térmicos, mejor desarrollo de la plántula en el suelo ligeramente ácido (6.57 y la diversidad de usos incluye leña, forraje y madera, entre otros. Por el alto valor nutritivo y diversidad de usos en el medio rural, L. lanceolata representa una opción viable para utilizarse en sistemas silvopastoriles del trópico seco.

  10. Effect of Leucaena and Sesbania supplementation on body growth and scrotal circumference of Ethiopian highland sheep and goats fed teff straw basal diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaitho, R.J.; Tegegne, A.; Umunna, N.N.; Nsahlai, I.V.; Tamminga, S.; Bruchem, J. van; Arts, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The long term effect of supplementation of Leucaena pallida and Sesbania sesban on growth and reproduction performance was determined on 30 male Ethiopian highland sheep and 25 East African goats. Unchopped teff straw (Eragrostis tef) was given ad libitum and supplemented with either wheat bran (150

  11. Determinants of tree species preference for foraging by insectivorous birds in a novel Prosopis - Leucaena woodland in Puerto Rico: the role of foliage palatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Beltran; J.M. Wunderle Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The foliage palatability hypothesis predicts that avian insectivores will preferentially forage in tree species with the greatest abundance of their arthropod prey, which in turn are associated with the tree’s foliage nutrition and palatability. We tested this hypothesis in a novel Prosopis–Leucaena woodland in Puerto Rico by determining foraging preferences of five...

  12. Transgene mus som sygdomsmodeller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuster, Mikkel Bruhn; Porse, Bo Torben

    2003-01-01

    Transgenic animal models have proven to be useful tools in understanding both basic biology and the events associated with disease. Recent technical advances in the area of genomic manipulation in combination with the availability of the human and murine genomic sequences now allow the precise...... tailoring of the mouse genome. In this review we describe a few systems in which transgenic animal models have been employed for the purpose of studying the etiology of human diseases. Udgivelsesdato: 2003-Feb-17...

  13. Weeding with transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Stephen O

    2003-05-01

    Transgenes promise to reduce insecticide and fungicide use but relatively little has been done to significantly reduce herbicide use through genetic engineering. Recently, three strategies for transgene utilization have been developed that have the potential to change this. These are the improvement of weed-specific biocontrol agents, enhancement of crop competition or allelopathic traits, and production of cover crops that will self-destruct near the time of planting. Failsafe risk mitigation technologies are needed for most of these strategies.

  14. THE TRIAL OF TRANSGENICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio f. Díaz García

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discloses the uncertainty with which transgenic uses are authorized.  It provides a list of reasons showing that there is no absolute proof of the benefits of transgenic use.  Moreover it discusses the need to provide more credibility to safety studies and reports on results of various tests of GMOs.  Finally it proposes the establishment of higher penalties for specialists that omit relevant information in their studies and reports on this matter.

  15. The Potential of ClaSsical Biological Control Against Leu~ena

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asia causing severe damage t9 leucaena. Leucaena, Leucaena leucocephala, a multipur- (Napompeth, 1994). In 1992 it was recorded in pose tree, which is native to Central and East Africa, the· first record of the pest from. South America is widely planted in the tropics. In mainland Africa (Raynolds and Bimbuzi, 1992;.

  16. (Leucaenaleucocephala (Lam.) De Wit) during ensiling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fermentation quality and nutritive value of leucaena ensiled either as whole forage or separate stem and leaf fractions were investigated. About 10-month-old leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) De Wit.) grown in Okinawa Island, Japan, was used.Samples were chopped to about 4 cm lengths and stuffed into ...

  17. Comportamiento de la disponibilidad de biomasa y la composición química en 23 accesiones de Leucaena spp. Performance of biomass availability and chemical composition of 23 Leucaena spp. accessions

    OpenAIRE

    Hilda B Wencomo; R Ortiz

    2012-01-01

    Se realizó un estudio con 23 accesiones de Leucaena spp. en un área que tenía seis años de sembrada. El objetivo fue determinar, en las plantas establecidas, la biomasa total, la biomasa comestible, la biomasa leñosa, el grosor del tallo y el número de ramas de cada accesión, y su composición bromatológica en condiciones de pastoreo simulado. La investigación se realizó en la EEPF "Indio Hatuey" durante dos años, en un suelo Ferralítico Rojo lixiviado, húmico nodular ferruginoso hidratado. Se...

  18. Diversidad zoológica asociada a un silvopastoreo leucaena-guinea con diferentes edades de establecimiento Zoological diversity associated to a silvopastural system leucaena-guinea grass with different establishment times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatnel Alonso Lazo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la diversidad zoológica asociada a un silvopastoreo con leucaena-guinea, por medio de la caracterización de la composición y estructura de las aves, insectos y la macrofauna del suelo, en cuatro edades de establecimiento (3, 4, 5 y 6 años de explotación. Con las especies registradas en cada uno de estos grupos zoológicos, se calcularon los índices ecológicos: número de individuos, riqueza, diversidad y abundancia de especies, en diferentes edades del sistema. En todos los grupos, se apreció el aumento significativo en la riqueza de especies y en el índice de diversidad biológica de Shannon, en la medida que se desarrolló el sistema. Se observó incremento en la abundancia de insectos biorreguladores y, en relación con las aves, el horario de muestreo no mostró interacción con los distintos años de siembra. La macrofauna se incrementó, observándose dominancia de anélidos al 6º y 7º año de explotación, caracterizado por Polyferetrina elongata y Oligochaeta elegans. El desarrollo del silvopastoreo leucaena-guinea logra sistemas productivos pecuarios que aumentan la producción de biomasa y de otros componentes biológicos y contribuir para crear un sistema sostenible y compatible con el ambiente.The aim of this work was to evaluate the associated zoological diversity of a silvopastural system leucaena-guinea grass, by characterizing the composition and structures of the birds, insects and the macrofauna of the soil, in four establishment times of the silvopastural systems (3, 4, 5 and 6 years of exploitation. For the species recorded in each zoological group, the following ecological indices were determined: number of individuals, richness, diversity and abundance of species, in each establishment times of the system. A significant increase, in all the zoological groups, was observed for the richness of species and for the index of biological diversity of Shannon, as the system

  19. Performance of Dairy Goats Fed Rhodes Grass Hay and Supplemented with Leucaena or Gliricidia-Based Concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondiek, J.O.; Tuitoek, J.K.; Abdulrazak, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the performance of dairy goats supplemented with fodder based diets. Six lactating does of Saanen, Toggenburg and Saanen X Toggenburg breed types weighing 46 + or - 7.1 at late stage of lactation were allocated to three dietary treatments in a double 3*3 Latin square design to examine the value of leucaena and gliricidia forages as nitrogen sources in supplementing Rhodes grass hay. Three supplements: Leucaena-based (L), gliricidia-based (G) or commercial concentrate (C) were used. Voluntary feed intake, milk yield, milk composition and live weight changes were measured. Total dry matter intake (DMI) was significantly higher in group G than C (1385 vs 1331 g day -1 ). Hay DMI was higher in G (835 g d -1 than L or C (789, 782 g day -1 , respectively). Diets had no effect on milk yield, crude protein or butterfat content. Total solid was higher in L than C while that of G was intermediate (15.7, 14.7, 13.7%). Weight changes were least affected although resulted in positive gain (11 g day -1 ) while the others lost (-13,-19 g day -, for L and C respectively). In the digestibility trial 6 female goats weighing 22.3 kg (sd 1.1), were allocated to the three treatments in a completely randomised block design where each goat received a different supplement in each of two periods. Thee were no differences in nutrient digestibility except for DM, which was in C compared to the other treatments (615, 622, 720 g-kg for L, G and C, respectively). It si concluded that fodder based supplement compared well with the commercial concentrate in supporting milk yield and body weight gain of dairy goats. Therefore, locally available tree fodders can be incorporated in supplement diets and utilized without any detrimental effects to substitute the expensive concentrates to improve the performance of dairy goats

  20. Genome of Rhizobium leucaenae strains CFN 299(T) and CPAO 29.8: searching for genes related to a successful symbiotic performance under stressful conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Gomes, Douglas Fabiano; Del Cerro, Pablo; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Canchaya, Carlos; Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga Paula; Mercante, Fabio Martins; Ollero, Francisco Javier; Megías, Manuel; Hungria, Mariangela

    2016-08-02

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important legume cropped worldwide for food production and its agronomic performance can be greatly improved if the benefits from symbiotic nitrogen fixation are maximized. The legume is known for its high promiscuity in nodulating with several Rhizobium species, but those belonging to the Rhizobium tropici "group" are the most successful and efficient in fixing nitrogen in tropical acid soils. Rhizobium leucaenae belongs to this group, which is abundant in the Brazilian "Cerrados" soils and frequently submitted to several environmental stresses. Here we present the first high-quality genome drafts of R. leucaenae, including the type strain CFN 299(T) and the very efficient strain CPAO 29.8. Our main objective was to identify features that explain the successful capacity of R. leucaenae in nodulating common bean under stressful environmental conditions. The genomes of R. leucaenae strains CFN 299(T) and CPAO 29.8 were estimated at 6.7-6.8 Mbp; 7015 and 6899 coding sequences (CDS) were predicted, respectively, 6264 of which are common to both strains. The genomes of both strains present a large number of CDS that may confer tolerance of high temperatures, acid soils, salinity and water deficiency. Types I, II, IV-pili, IV and V secretion systems were present in both strains and might help soil and host colonization as well as the symbiotic performance under stressful conditions. The symbiotic plasmid of CPAO 29.8 is highly similar to already described tropici pSyms, including five copies of nodD and three of nodA genes. R. leucaenae CFN 299(T) is capable of synthesizing Nod factors in the absence of flavonoids when submitted to osmotic stress, indicating that under abiotic stress the regulation of nod genes might be different. A detailed study of the genes putatively related to stress tolerance in R. leucaenae highlighted an intricate pattern comprising a variety of mechanisms that are probably orchestrated to tolerate

  1. Transgenic mice susceptible to poliovirus.

    OpenAIRE

    Koike, S; Taya, C; Kurata, T; Abe, S; Ise, I; Yonekawa, H; Nomoto, A

    1991-01-01

    Poliovirus-sensitive transgenic mice were produced by introducing the human gene encoding cellular receptors for poliovirus into the mouse genome. Expression of the receptor mRNAs in tissues of the transgenic mice was analyzed by using RNA blot hybridization and the polymerase chain reaction. The human gene is expressed in many tissues of the transgenic mice just as in tissues of humans. The transgenic mice are susceptible to all three poliovirus serotypes, and the mice inoculated with poliov...

  2. Transgenic Crops for Herbicide Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since their introduction in 1995, crops made resistant to the broad-spectrum herbicides glyphosate and glufosinate with transgenes are widely available and used in much of the world. As of 2008, over 80% of the transgenic crops grown world-wide have this transgenic trait. This technology has had m...

  3. Growth and Nitrogen Uptake in Sorghum Plants Manured with Leucaena Leucocaphala Leaves as Affected by Nitrogen Rate and Time of Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurd Ali, F.; Al-Shammaa, M.

    2011-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to determine the effect of four rates of nitrogen (N) in the form of leucaena leaves and the time of application on the performance of sorghum plants using the 15 N isotopic dilution technique. Results showed that leucaena green manure (LGM) increased dry matter and N yield of sorghum. Nitrogen recoveries of LGM ranged between 23 and 47%. An additional beneficial effect of LGM was attributed to the enhancement of soil N uptake. The best timing of LGM incorporation for obtaining more N derived from LGM, less soil N uptake, and greater dry matter and N in sorghum leaves seemed to be at planting. However, the appropriate timing and rate of LGM to obtain greater dry matter and N yield in panicles, as well as in the whole plant of sorghum, appeared to be at 30 days before planting, particularly a rate of 120 kg N ha - 1. (author)

  4. [Progress on transgenic mosquitoes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pin

    2011-04-30

    The genetically modified mosquitoes have been developed aiming to control mosquito-borne diseases by either reducing population sizes or replacing existing populations with vectors unable to transmit the disease. introduces some progress on the generation of transgenic mosquitoes and their fitness in wild population. This paper

  5. Transgenics in Agriculture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 2. Transgenics in Agriculture. D Rex Arunraj B Gajendra Babu. Classroom Volume 6 Issue 2 February 2001 pp 83-92. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/02/0083-0092 ...

  6. Transgenics in Agriculture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 2. Transgenics in Agriculture. D Rex Arunraj B Gajendra Babu. Classroom Volume 6 Issue 2 February 2001 pp 83-92. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/02/0083-0092 ...

  7. Stomatal Conductance and Chlorophyll Characteristics and Their Relationship with Yield of Some Cocoa Clones Under Tectona grandis, Leucaena sp., and Cassia surattensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhrusy Zakariyya

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available An optimum physiological condition will support high yield and quality of cocoa production. The research was aimed to study the effects of stomatal conductance and chlorophyll content related to cocoa production under three shade regimes.This research was conducted in Kaliwining Experimental Station, elevation of 45 m above sea level with D climate type based on Schmidt & Fergusson. Cocoa trees which were planted in 1994 at a spacing of 3 X 3 m were used in the study planted by using split plot design. The shade tree species were teak (Tectona grandis, krete (Cassiasurattensis, and lamtoro (Leucaena sp. as the main plots, and cocoa clones of Sulawesi 01,Sulawesi 02, KKM 22 and KW 165 as sub plots. This study showed that there was interaction between cocoa clone and shade species for stomatal conductance where stomatal diffusive resistance of KKM 22 was the best under Leucaena sp.and Cassiasurattensis with the values of 1.38 and 1.34 s.cm -1, respectively. The highest chlorophyll content, stomatal index and transpiration values was under Leucaena sp. shade. There was positive correlation between chlorophyll content and transpiration with pod yield of cocoa. The highest yield and the lowest bean count wereobtainedon Sulawesi 01 clone under Leucaenasp. shade.Keywords: stomatal conductance, transpiration, diffusive resistance, shades trees, clones,pod yield

  8. Transgenics in crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Wu, Y. H.; McAvoy, R.; Duan, H.

    2001-01-01

    With rapid world population growth and declining availability of fresh water and arable land, a new technology is urgently needed to enhance agricultural productivity. Recent discoveries in the field of crop transgenics clearly demonstrate the great potential of this technology for increasing food production and improving food quality while preserving the environment for future generations. In this review, we briefly discuss some of the recent achievements in crop improvement that have been made using gene transfer technology.

  9. Transgenic algae engineered for higher performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkefer, Pat J; Anderson, Penelope S; Knight, Thomas J

    2014-10-21

    The present disclosure relates to transgenic algae having increased growth characteristics, and methods of increasing growth characteristics of algae. In particular, the disclosure relates to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and a glutamine synthetase.

  10. Plant biotechnology: transgenic crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewry, Peter R; Jones, Huw D; Halford, Nigel G

    2008-01-01

    Transgenesis is an important adjunct to classical plant breeding, in that it allows the targeted manipulation of specific characters using genes from a range of sources. The current status of crop transformation is reviewed, including methods of gene transfer, the selection of transformed plants and control of transgene expression. The application of genetic modification technology to specific traits is then discussed, including input traits relating to crop production (herbicide tolerance and resistance to insects, pathogens and abiotic stresses) and output traits relating to the composition and quality of the harvested organs. The latter include improving the nutritional quality for consumers as well as the improvement of functional properties for food processing.

  11. Evaluación de las propiedades de materiales compuestos fabricados a partir de fibras semiquímicas de Leucaena collinsii y polipropileno

    OpenAIRE

    Granda Garcia, Luis Angel

    2016-01-01

    La presente tesis estudia el efecto que produce reforzar una fibra semiquímica de Leucaena collinsii en las propiedades mecánicas, térmicas y de sorción de agua de materiales compuestos de polipropileno. Se obtienen probetas de materiales compuestos con distinto contenido de refuerzo y se estabilizan en una cámara climática durante 48 horas antes de ser ensayadas a tracción, flexión e impacto, y se analiza la morfologia de la fractura mediante SEM. Posteriormente se estudian sus propieda...

  12. TL transgenic mouse strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, Y.; Matsudaira, Y.; Hasegawa, H.; Tamaki, H.; Takahashi, T.; Morita, A.; Kasai, K.

    1993-01-01

    As a result of abnormal development of the thymus of these mice, TCR αβ lineage of the T cell differentiation is disturbed and cells belonging to the TCR γδ CD4 - CD8 - double negative (DN) lineage become preponderant. The γδ DN cells migrate into peripheral lymphoid organs and constitute nearly 50% of peripheral T cells. Immune function of the transgenic mice is severely impaired, indicating that the γδ cells are incapable of participating in these reactions. Molecular and serological analyses of T-cell lymphomas reveal that they belong to the γδ lineage. Tg.Tla a -3-1 mice should be useful in defining the role of TL in normal and abnormal T cell differentiation as well as in the development of T-cell lymphomas, and further they should facilitate studies on the differentiation and function of γδ T cells. We isolated T3 b -TL gene from B6 mice and constructed a chimeric gene in which T3 b -TL is driven by the promoter of H-2K b . With the chimeric gene, two transgenic mouse strains, Tg. Con.3-1 and -2 have been derived in C3H background. Both strains express TL antigen in various tissues including skin. The skin graft of transgenic mice on C3H and (B6 X C3H)F 1 mice were rejected. In the mice which rejected the grafts, CD8 + TCRαβ cytotoxic T cells (CTL) against TL antigens were recognized. The recognition of TL by CTL did not require the antigen presentation by H-2 molecules. The results indicated that TL antigen in the skin becomes a transplantation antigen and behaves like a typical allogeneic MHC class I antigen. The facts that (B6 X C3H)F 1 mice rejected the skin expressing T3 b -TL antigen and induced CTL that killed TL + lymphomas of B6 origin revealed that TL antigen encoded by T3 b -TL is recognized as non-self in B6 mice. Experiments are now extended to analyze immune responses to TL antigen expressed on autochthonous T cell lymphomas. (J.P.N.)

  13. study on agroforestry practices in abak local government area, akwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    Manihot esculenta. Gambeya albida. Eucalyptus sp Newbouldia laevis. Spondias mombin. Gliricidia sepium. Telfaria occidentalis. Calliandra calothyrsus. Carica papaya Albizzia sp. Gmelina arborea. Bambusa vulgaris. Leucaena leucocephala. Discorea spp. Sesbania grandiflora. Ananas comosus. Masanga cecropoides.

  14. Establishment and early persistence of ten forage legumes under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Establishment and early persistence of ten forage legumes under three grazing regimes in southern Mozambique. JP Muir. Abstract. Leucaena leucocephala, Clitoria ternatea, Macroptilium atropurpureum cv. Siratro, Cassia rotundifolia cv. Wynn, Macrotyloma axillare cv. Archer, Stylosanthes guianensis var. guianensis cv.

  15. Population size of Cuban Parrots Amazona leucocephala and Sandhill Cranes Grus canadensis and community involvement in their conservation in northern Isla de la Juventud, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, X.G.; Alvarez, V.B.; Wiley, J.W.; Rosales, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    The Cuban Sandhill Crane Grus canadensis nesiotes and Cuban Parrot Amazona leucocephala palmarum are considered endangered species in Cuba and the Isla de la Juventud (formerly Isla de Pinos). Coincident with a public education campaign, a population survey for these species was conducted in the northern part of the Isla de la Juventud on 17 December 1995, from 06hoo to 10hoo. Residents from throughout the island participated, manning 98 stations, with 1-4 observers per station. Parrots were observed at 60 (61.2%) of the stations with a total of 1320, maximum (without correction for duplicate observations), and 1100, minimum (corrected), individuals counted. Sandhill cranes were sighted at 38 (38.8%) of the stations, with a total of 115 individuals. Cranes and parrots co-occurred at 20 (20.4%) of the stations.

  16. Transgenics, agroindustry and food sovereignty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Alejandro León Vega

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Food sovereignty has been implemented constitutionally in Ecuador; however, many of the actions and policies are designed to benefit the dominant model of food production, based in agroindustry, intensive monocultures, agrochemicals and transgenics. This article reflects upon the role of family farming as a generator of food sovereignty, and secondly the threat to them by agroindustry agriculture based in transgenic. The role played by food aid in the introduction of transgenic in Latin America and other regions of the world is also analyzed.

  17. Digestibility and Egg Yolk Pigment Intensity of Local Ducks Fed Shrimps Head Meal, Leucaena Leaf Meal and L-Carnitine Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Widiyastuti

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to determine the nutrient digestibility and egg yolk pigment intensity of local ducks which fed shrimps head meal, leucaena leaf meal and L-Carnitine supplement. The experimental method used was a Completely Randomized Design (CRD with four treatments i.e : R0 (feed with leucaena leaf meal, R1 (feed with 25 ppm L-Carnitine supplement, R2 (feed with 2% shrimps head meal and R3 (feed with 4% shrimps head meal. A total of 0,20% FeSO4/kg feed were supplemented to all treatments. The results showed that L-Carnitine supplements and fed shrimps head meal (2% and 4% have no significant effects (P>0,05 on crude fat and crude protein digestibility but have significant (P<0.05 effects on yolk pigment intensity. L-Carnitine supplements resulted in 86,69% crude fat and 90,78% crude protein digestibility. Ducks fed with 4% shrimps head meal (R3 produced eggs with highest yolk pigment intensity (10,55. (Animal Production 9(1: 30-35 (2007 Key Words : shrimps head meal, L-Carnitine, digestibility, yolk pigment intensity

  18. Transgenic mice in developmental toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woychik, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Advances in molecular biology and embryology are being utilized for the generation of transgenic mice, animals that contain specific additions, deletions, or modifications of genes or sequences in their DNA. Mouse embryonic stem cells and homologous recombination procedures have made it possible to target specific DNA structural alterations to highly localized region in the host chromosomes. The majority of the DNA structural rearrangements in transgenic mice can be passed through the germ line and used to establish new genetic traits in the carrier animals. Since the use of transgenic mice is having such an enormous impact on so many areas of mammalian biological research, including developmental toxicology, the objective of this review is to briefly describe the fundamental methodologies for generating transgenic mice and to describe one particular application that has direct relevance to the field of genetic toxicology.

  19. Transgene teknikker erstatter problematisk avl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Hansen, Axel Kornerup

    2016-01-01

    Dyremodeller har ofte været baseret på avl, der ud fra et alment velfærdsmæssigt synspunkt var problematisk. Transgene teknikker kan ofte forbedre dyrevelfærden ved at erstatte disse traditionelle avlsmetoder.......Dyremodeller har ofte været baseret på avl, der ud fra et alment velfærdsmæssigt synspunkt var problematisk. Transgene teknikker kan ofte forbedre dyrevelfærden ved at erstatte disse traditionelle avlsmetoder....

  20. Contrasting bee pollination in two co-occurring distylic species of Cordia (Cordiaceae, Boraginales in the Brazilian semi-arid Caatinga: generalist in C. globosa vs. specialist in C. leucocephala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel C. Machado

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we compare the reproductive biology of Cordia globosa and C. leucocephala (Cordiaceae, Boraginales; formerly referred to Boraginaceae to understand the functioning of the floral morphs and the relations with their effective pollinators. The species are synchronopatric, distylic, and self-incompatible. Though they share melittophilous traits, the main visitor and pollinator of C. globosa was the generalist and exotic bee Apis mellifera, while the only one of C. leucocephala was the oligoletic bee Ceblurgus longipalpis. These two latter species are restricted to the Caatinga of NE Brazil, contrasting with the wide distribution of Cordia globosa. While the fruit-set for C. globosa was high, independently if the pollen donor/stigma receptor was a pin (long-styled or thrum (short-styled individual, in C. leucocephala the fruit-set was low and occurred only when a thrum individual was the pollen donor. This raises the possibility of this species moving towards dioecy. The high natural fruit-set of C. globosa confirms the generalist bee as its effective pollinator. The low fruit-set after manual crosses in C. leucocephala may be due to low pollen viability. Additionally, the low natural fruit-set (two times lower than after crosses may be related with the foraging behavior of the specialist pollinator.Neste estudo comparamos a biologia reprodutiva de Cordia globosa e C. leucocephala para entender a função dos orfos florais e as relações com seus polinizadores efetivos. As espécies são sincronopátricas, distílicas e auto-incompatíveis. Embora elas compartilhem atributos melitófilos, o principal visitante e polinizador de C. globosa foi Apis mellifera, abelha generalista e exótica, enquanto o de C. leucocephala foi a abelha oligolética Ceblurgus longipalpis. Essas duas últimas espécies são restritas à Caatinga do Nordeste do Brasil, contrastando com a ampla distribuição de C. globosa. Enquanto a formação de frutos de C

  1. Enantioselective synthesis of possible diastereomers of heptadeca-1-ene-4,6-diyne-3,8,9,10-tetrol; putative structure of a conjugated diyne natural product isolated from Hydrocotyle leucocephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kavirayani R; Swain, Bandita

    2011-04-01

    Enantioselective synthesis of possible diastereomers of heptadeca-1-ene-4,6-diyne-3,8,9,10-tetrol, a structure proposed for the natural product isolated from Hydrocotyle leucocephala is accomplished. The reported spectral data of the natural product did not match those of any of the isomers that were synthesized and established that the structure proposed for the natural product is not correct and requires revision.

  2. Can transgenic mosquitoes afford the fitness cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Louis; Koella, Jacob C; Boëte, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    In a recent study, SM1-transgenic Anopheles stephensi, which are resistant partially to Plasmodium berghei, had higher fitness than non-transgenic mosquitoes when they were maintained on Plasmodium-infected blood. This result should be interpreted cautiously with respect to malaria control using transgenic mosquitoes because, despite the evolutionary advantage conferred by the transgene, a concomitant cost prevents it from invading the entire population. Indeed, for the spread of a resistance transgene in a natural situation, the transgene's fitness cost and the efficacy of the gene drive will be more crucial than any evolutionary advantage.

  3. Comparison of the fermentation quality and nutritive value of silage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    About 10-month-old leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) De Wit.) grown in Japan and 52-day-old regrowth of guinea grass (Panicum maximum var. maximum cv. Gatton) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor Moench cv. FS40IR), were chopped up to 3-5 cm lengths and ensiled in laboratory silos of 1.4-1.5 kg capacity.

  4. Intestinal digestibility of enriched-protein fodders measured by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ruminal, intestinal and total tract digestibility of dry matter (DM) and crude protein (CP) of leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala), Madras thorn (Pithecellobium dulce) and moringa (Moringa oleifera) fodders were measured in this study, using nylon bag and mobile bag techniques. Three cattle were fitted with permanent ...

  5. The reproductive performance of South African indigenous goats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    leucocephala pasture and natural veld during gestation. A. A. Akingbade. 1 ... Afful, 1994) characterised by low production rates resulting from nutritional constraints. Leucaena species ... average daily gains of pregnant goats on Leucaena-grass pasture showed that the pasture was nutritionally superior to natural veld.

  6. Effect of different processing methods on nutritional composition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: The potentials of Leucaena leucocephala leaf-meal as a supplementary protein in fish feed was evaluated. Leucaena leaves were subjected to two processing methods (sun- drying and boiling) to determine the effect of these treatments on proximate composition and anti-nutritional factors. Five samples of ...

  7. How To Produce and Characterize Transgenic Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savka, Michael A.; Wang, Shu-Yi; Wilson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Explains the process of establishing transgenic plants which is a very important tool in plant biology and modern agriculture. Produces transgenic plants with the ability to synthesize opines. (Contains 17 references.) (YDS)

  8. Will transgenic plants adversely affect the environment?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transgenic insecticidal plants based on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) endotoxins, on proteinase inhibitors and on lectins, and transgenic herbicide tolerant plants are widely used in modern agriculture. The results of the studies on likelihood and non-likelihood of adverse effects of transgenic plants on the environment including ...

  9. Progress on researches of transgenic alfalfa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Huiqin; Wang Mi; Ren Weibo; Xu Zhu; Chen Libo

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the progress on the researches of transgenic alfalfa in the past two decades had been reviewed in the aspects of regeneration system, transformation, improvement of the important traits and so on. Moreover, such problems as variation of transgene expression and safety of transgenic plant had also been discussed and propose had been given for the future research work. (authors)

  10. Biotechnology network promotes knowledge of transgenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco Picado, Patricia; Valdez Melara, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Red de Ingenieria Genetica Aplicada al Mejoramiento de Cultivos Tropicales (Rigatrop) integrated by a group of scientists from the Universidad de Costa Rica (UCR), Universidad Nacional (UNA) and of the Instituto Tecnologico de Costa Rica (TEC) have organized two forums on the topic of transgenics. The first forum has shown successful experiences of development of transgenic crops in Latin America, as for example: the transgenic bean, project realized in Brazil and transgenic eggplant in Bangladesh. The second forum has been about transgenics and environment effected at the UCR, on the occasion of World Environment Day. Rigatrop members are working currently in two projects applying biotechnological tools to coffee [es

  11. Avaliação de genótipos de Leucaena spp. nas condições edafoclimáticas de São Carlos,SP: II. determinações bromatológicas no período de estabelecimento Evaluation of Leucaena spp. genotypes in the edaphic and climatic conditions of São Carlos, SP: II. bromatological determinations at the establishment period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C.P. de A. Primavesi

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available Em experimento conduzido em Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo distrófico, em área da EMBRAPA - CPPSE em São Carlos, situada a 22°01'S e 47°53'W, com altitude de 856 m e média de precipitação anual de 1502 mm, procedeu-se a determinação da composição bromatológicade folhas, hastes com diâmetro menor que 6 mm e vagens, de genótipos de leucena. Os genótipos avaliados, foram: L.leucocephala cv. Texas 1074 (TI, L.leucocephala 29 A9 (T2, L.leucocephala 11 x L.dlversifolia 25 (T3, L.leucocephala 11 x L.diversifolia 26 (T4, L.leucocephala 24-19/2-39 x L.diverstfolia 26 (T5 e L.leucocephala c v. Cunningham (testemunha. Verificou-se que: os genótipos avahados não apresentaram diferenças nas determinações bromatológicas, realizadas nas folhas e talos finos; o genótipo T3 registrou o maior teor de proteína bruta (28,06%, de fósforo (0,29% e a maior relação PB/FDN e o menor teor de FDN para vagens; os genótipos apresentaram os seguintes teores médios, em porcentagem, para a composição bromatológicadas folhas, vagens e talos finos, respectivamente: Proteína bruta (18,57; 21,68; 6,41; Fibra detergente neutro (29,09; 41,58; 71,01; Fósforo (0,12; 0,22; 0,06; Cálcio (1,39; 0,36; 0,49; Magnesio (0,51; 0,28; 0,24; Tanino (1,32; 1,15; 0,28 e Digestibilidade "in vitro" (58,39; 61,22; 33,61; os teores de proteína e fósforo apresentaram a seguinte ordem decrescente nas partes das plantas: vagens > folhas > talos finos; os teores de cálcio: folhas > talos finos > vagens e de magnésio: folhas > vagens > talos finos.In a trial conducted on a distrofic Red-Yellow Latossol, at EMBRAPA-CPPSE, São Carlos, located at 22°01'S and 47'53'W, altitude of 856 m and with a mean annual rainfall of 1502 mm, the bromatological composition of leaves, stems smaller than 6 mm diameter and pods of leucena genotypes was determined. The genotypes evaluated were: L.leucocephala cv. Texas 1074 (T1, L.leucocephala 29 A9 (T2, L.leucocephala 11 x L.dlversifolia 25

  12. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  13. Agribusiness Perspectives on Transgenic Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Bill

    2017-01-01

    Declining yields of the major human food crops, looming growth in global population and rise of populism, and ill-founded bans on agricultural and horticultural crops and foodstuffs which are genetically modified have potentially serious implications. It makes the chance less than otherwise would be the case that agribusiness value chains in the future will meet the growing demand around the world for more and different foods from more and wealthier people. In the agribusiness value chain, transgenic wheat, meeting a consumer "trigger need" also must meet the "experience" and "credence," risk-related criteria of well-informed consumers. Public policy that rejects science-based evidence about the reductions in costs of production and price of genetically modified agricultural products and the science about the safety of genetically modified foods, including transgenic wheat, has imposed significant costs on producers and consumers. If the science-based evidence is accepted, transgenic wheat has potential to improve significantly the well-being of grain growers and consumers all over the world.

  14. Transgenic mouse offspring generated by ROSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOREIRA, Pedro; PÉREZ-CEREZALES, Serafín; LAGUNA, Ricardo; FERNÁNDEZ-GONZALEZ, Raúl; SANJUANBENITO, Belén Pintado; GUTIÉRREZ-ADÁN, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    The production of transgenic animals is an important tool for experimental and applied biology. Over the years, many approaches for the production of transgenic animals have been tried, including pronuclear microinjection, sperm-mediated gene transfer, transfection of male germ cells, somatic cell nuclear transfer and the use of lentiviral vectors. In the present study, we developed a new transgene delivery approach, and we report for the first time the production of transgenic animals by co-injection of DNA and round spermatid nuclei into non-fertilized mouse oocytes (ROSI). The transgene used was a construct containing the human CMV immediate early promoter and the enhanced GFP gene. With this procedure, 12% of the live offspring we obtained carried the transgene. This efficiency of transgenic production by ROSI was similar to the efficiency by pronuclear injection or intracytoplasmic injection of male gamete nuclei (ICSI). However, ICSI required fewer embryos to produce the same number of transgenic animals. The expression of Egfp mRNA and fluorescence of EGFP were found in the majority of the organs examined in 4 transgenic lines generated by ROSI. Tissue morphology and transgene expression were not distinguishable between transgenic animals produced by ROSI or pronuclear injection. Furthermore, our results are of particular interest because they indicate that the transgene incorporation mediated by intracytoplasmic injection of male gamete nuclei is not an exclusive property of mature sperm cell nuclei with compact chromatin but it can be accomplished with immature sperm cell nuclei with decondensed chromatin as well. The present study also provides alternative procedures for transgene delivery into embryos or reconstituted oocytes. PMID:26498042

  15. Manganese (Mn) stress toward hyperaccumulators plants combination (HPC) using Jatropha curcas and lamtoro gung (L. leucocephala) in mychorrizal addition on soybean (Glycine max) seedling stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawan, Tania Sylviana; Zahroh, Tata Taqiyyatuz; Merindasya, Mirza; Masfaridah, Ririn; Hartanti, Dyah Ayu Sri; Arum, Sekar; Nurhatika, Sri; Muhibuddin, Anton; Surtiningsih, Tini; Arifiyanto, Achmad

    2017-06-01

    Heavy metals were a metal bracket which had a specific gravity greater than 5 g / cm3. Manganese was one of them because it has a specific gravity of 7.4 g / cm3. Together with widespread cases of soil contamination caused by heavy metals as well as increased development of the science of breeding ground rapidly, then the alternative rehabilitation techniques were relatively cheap and effective it needs to be developed and even some cases of contaminated management soil using a combination of plants with microorganisms to be more effective. Thus it was necessary to develop research on plants that were able to accumulate heavy metals and other toxic materials, such as Mn so that the land becomes safe for health and the environment. Based on above reason this research aimed to see the influence of hyperaccumulators combination of plants using Jatropha curcas and lamtoro gung (L. leucocephala) in mychorrizal addition to stressed by manganese (Mn) on soybean (Glycine max). Observations of growth, chlorophyll content and heavy metals analysis performed on nine treatments (P1-P9) and one control (P0). The results showed a combination of hyperaccumulators under mychorrizal helped overcome the stress of manganese (Mn) in the leaves of soybean (G. max). It gave an influence on the number of leaves and chlorophyll content of soybean (G. max), but no effect performed on the height and the roots of soybean (G. max). The use of plants in small amounts hyperaccumulators (P1;1 jatropha and 1 lamtoro) was sufficient to cope with stress of Mn in the leaves of soybean (G. max).

  16. Promoter Sequences for Defining Transgene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Huw D.; Sparks, Caroline A.

    The design of reverse genetic experiments that utilize transgenic approaches often requires transgenes to be expressed in a predefined pattern and there is limited information regarding the gene expression profile for specific promoters. It is important that expression patterns are predetermined in the specific genotype targeted for transformation because the same promoter-transgene construct can produce different expression patterns in different host species. This chapter compares constitutive, targeted, or inducible promoters that have been characterized in specific cereal species.

  17. Optimization of Biofuel Production From Transgenic Microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2013-0145 OPTIMIZATION OF BIOFUEL PRODUCTION FROM TRANSGENIC MICROALGAE Richard Sayre Donald Danforth...Technical 20080815 to 20120630 OPTIMIZATION OF BIOFUEL PRODUCTION FROM TRANSGENIC MICROALGAE FA9550-08-1-0451 Richard Sayre Donald Danforth Plant...BIOFUEL PRODUCTION FROM TRANSGENIC MICROALGAE Grant/Contract Number: FA9550-08-1-0451 Reporting Period: Final Report Abstract: We have compared the

  18. [New advances in animal transgenic technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhen-Hong; Miao, Xiang-Yang; Zhu, Rui-Liang

    2010-06-01

    Animal transgenic technology is one of the fastest growing biotechnology in the 21st century. It is used to integrate foreign genes into the animal genome by genetic engineering technology so that foreign genes can be expressed and inherited to the offspring. The transgenic efficiency and precise control of gene expression are the key limiting factors on preparation of transgenic animals. A variety of transgenic techniques are available, each of which has its own advantages and disadvantages and still needs further study because of unresolved technical and safety issues. With the in-depth research, the transgenic technology will have broad application prospects in the fields of exploration of gene function, animal genetic improvement, bioreactor, animal disease models, organ transplantation and so on. This article reviews the recently developed animal gene transfer techniques, including germline stem cell mediated method to improve the efficiency, gene targeting to improve the accuracy, RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing technology, and the induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) transgenic technology. The new transgenic techniques can provide a better platform for the study of trans-genic animals and promote the development of medical sciences, livestock production, and other fields.

  19. Positron emission tomography : measurement of transgene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, EFJ; Vaalburg, W

    Noninvasive and repetitive imaging of transgene expression can play a pivotal role in the development of gene therapy strategies, as it offers investigators a means to determine the effectiveness of their gene transfection protocols. In the last decade, imaging of transgene expression using positron

  20. Transcription-dependent silencing of inducible convergent transgenes in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calero-Nieto Fernando J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Silencing of transgenes in mice is a common phenomenon typically associated with short multi-copy transgenes. We have investigated the regulation of the highly inducible human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating-factor gene (Csf2 in transgenic mice. Results In the absence of any previous history of transcriptional activation, this transgene was expressed in T lineage cells at the correct inducible level in all lines of mice tested. In contrast, the transgene was silenced in a specific subset of lines in T cells that had encountered a previous episode of activation. Transgene silencing appeared to be both transcription-dependent and mediated by epigenetic mechanisms. Silencing was accompanied by loss of DNase I hypersensitive sites and inability to recruit RNA polymerase II upon stimulation. This pattern of silencing was reflected by increased methylation and decreased acetylation of histone H3 K9 in the transgene. We found that silenced lines were specifically associated with a single pair of tail-to-tail inverted repeated copies of the transgene embedded within a multi-copy array. Conclusions Our study suggests that epigenetic transgene silencing can result from convergent transcription of inverted repeats which can lead to silencing of an entire multi-copy transgene array. This mechanism may account for a significant proportion of the reported cases of transgene inactivation in mice.

  1. Transgenes and their contributions to epigenetic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Shortly after gene transfer technologies had been established for different plant species, the first reports emerged about transgenes showing unexpected segregation patterns due to unstable expression. Initially, the erratic expression behavior of transgenes was considered a nuisance that impeded the impact and efficiency of a new technology. With the investigation of transgene silencing effects, however, it soon became clear that transgenes had helped us in a rather unexpected way to identify novel molecular pathways that were highly relevant to plant development and evolution. This article gives an account of a journey that started with the analysis of transgene-related silencing events and that led to the discovery of a new molecular world of small RNAs and epigenetic marks that regulate plant gene expression and adaptation to environmental changes.

  2. Protein Binding Capacity of Different Forages Tannin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusiati, L. M.; Kurniawati, A.; Hanim, C.; Anas, M. A.

    2018-02-01

    Eight forages of tannin sources(Leucaena leucocephala, Arachis hypogaea, Mimosa pudica, Morus alba L, Swietenia mahagoni, Manihot esculenta, Gliricidia sepium, and Bauhinia purpurea)were evaluated their tannin content and protein binding capacity. The protein binding capacity of tannin were determined using precipitation of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Swietenia mahagonihas higest total tannin level and condensed tannin (CT) compared with other forages (Ptannin (HT) level (Ptannin content of Swietenia mahagoni were 11.928±0.04 mg/100 mg and 9.241±0.02mg/100mg dry matter (DM) of leaves. The hydrolysable tannin content of Leucaena leucocephala was 5.338±0.03 mg/100 mg DM of leaves. Binding capacity was highest in Swietenia mahagoni and Leucaena leucocephala compared to the other forages (Ptannin in Leucaena leucocephala and Swietenia mahagoniwere1.181±0.44 and 1.217±0.60mg/mg dry matter of leaves. The present study reports that Swietenia mahagoni has highest of tannin content and Leucaena leucocephala and Swietenia mahagoni capacity of protein binding.

  3. Transgenic parasites accelerate drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ana; Tarleton, Rick L.

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic neglected diseases are in dire need of new drugs either to replace old drugs rendered ineffective because of resistance development, to cover clinical needs that had never been addressed or to tackle other associated problems of existing drugs such as high cost, difficult administration, restricted coverage or toxicity. The availability of transgenic parasites expressing reporter genes facilitates the discovery of new drugs through high throughput screenings, but also by allowing rapid screening in animal models of disease. Taking advantage of these, we propose an alternative pathway of drug development for neglected diseases, going from high throughput screening directly into in vivo testing of the top ranked compounds selected by medicinal chemistry. Rapid assessment animal models allow for identification of compounds with bona fide activity in vivo early in the development chain, constituting a solid basis for further development and saving valuable time and resources. PMID:22277131

  4. Rapid characterization of transgenic and non-transgenic soybean oils by chemometric methods using NIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Aderval S.; da Silva, Arnaldo P.; Pinho, Jéssica S. A.; Ferré, Joan; Boqué, Ricard

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy and multivariate classification were applied to discriminate soybean oil samples into non-transgenic and transgenic. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to extract relevant features from the spectral data and to remove the anomalous samples. The best results were obtained when with Support Vectors Machine-Discriminant Analysis (SVM-DA) and Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) after mean centering plus multiplicative scatter correction. For SVM-DA the percentage of successful classification was 100% for the training group and 100% and 90% in validation group for non transgenic and transgenic soybean oil samples respectively. For PLS-DA the percentage of successful classification was 95% and 100% in training group for non transgenic and transgenic soybean oil samples respectively and 100% and 80% in validation group for non transgenic and transgenic respectively. The results demonstrate that NIR spectroscopy can provide a rapid, nondestructive and reliable method to distinguish non-transgenic and transgenic soybean oils.

  5. Generation of transgenic Hydra by embryo microinjection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Celina E; Lin, Haifan; Steele, Robert E

    2014-09-11

    As a member of the phylum Cnidaria, the sister group to all bilaterians, Hydra can shed light on fundamental biological processes shared among multicellular animals. Hydra is used as a model for the study of regeneration, pattern formation, and stem cells. However, research efforts have been hampered by lack of a reliable method for gene perturbations to study molecular function. The development of transgenic methods has revitalized the study of Hydra biology(1). Transgenic Hydra allow for the tracking of live cells, sorting to yield pure cell populations for biochemical analysis, manipulation of gene function by knockdown and over-expression, and analysis of promoter function. Plasmid DNA injected into early stage embryos randomly integrates into the genome early in development. This results in hatchlings that express transgenes in patches of tissue in one or more of the three lineages (ectodermal epithelial, endodermal epithelial, or interstitial). The success rate of obtaining a hatchling with transgenic tissue is between 10% and 20%. Asexual propagation of the transgenic hatchling is used to establish a uniformly transgenic line in a particular lineage. Generating transgenic Hydra is surprisingly simple and robust, and here we describe a protocol that can be easily implemented at low cost.

  6. Glyphostate-drift but not herbivory alters the rate of transgene flow from single and stacked trait transgenic canola (Brassica napus L.) to non-transgenic B. napus and B. rapa

    Science.gov (United States)

    While transgenic plants can offer agricultural benefits, the escape of transgenes out of crop fields is a major environmental concern. Escape of transgenic herbicide resistance has occurred between transgenic Brassica napus (canola) and weedy species in numerous locations. In t...

  7. Expression of multiple proteins in transgenic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vierstra, Richard D.; Walker, Joseph M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for the production of multiple proteins in transgenic plants. A DNA construct for introduction into plants includes a provision to express a fusion protein of two proteins of interest joined by a linking domain including plant ubiquitin. When the fusion protein is produced in the cells of a transgenic plant transformed with the DNA construction, native enzymes present in plant cells cleave the fusion protein to release both proteins of interest into the cells of the transgenic plant. Since the proteins are produced from the same fusion protein, the initial quantities of the proteins in the cells of the plant are approximately equal.

  8. Expression of bgt gene in transgenic birch (Betula platyphylla Suk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study on the characteristics of integration and expression is the basis of genetic stability of foreign genes in transgenic trees. To obtain insight into the relationship of transgene copy number and expression level, we screened 22 transgenic birch lines. Southern blot analysis of the transgenic birch plants indicated that the ...

  9. Expression of bgt gene in transgenic birch (Betula platyphylla Suk.)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... Study on the characteristics of integration and expression is the basis of genetic stability of foreign genes in transgenic trees. To obtain insight into the relationship of transgene copy number and expression level, we screened 22 transgenic birch lines. Southern blot analysis of the transgenic birch.

  10. Transgenic plants with enhanced growth characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Anderson, Penelope S.; Knight, Thomas J.

    2018-01-09

    The invention relates to transgenic plants exhibiting dramatically enhanced growth rates, greater seed and fruit/pod yields, earlier and more productive flowering, more efficient nitrogen utilization, increased tolerance to high salt conditions, and increased biomass yields. In one embodiment, transgenic plants engineered to over-express both glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase (GPT) and glutamine synthetase (GS) are provided. The GPT+GS double-transgenic plants of the invention consistently exhibit enhanced growth characteristics, with T0 generation lines showing an increase in biomass over wild type counterparts of between 50% and 300%. Generations that result from sexual crosses and/or selfing typically perform even better, with some of the double-transgenic plants achieving an astounding four-fold biomass increase over wild type plants.

  11. Transgenic plants with enhanced growth characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkefer, Pat J.; Anderson, Penelope S.; Knight, Thomas J.

    2016-09-06

    The invention relates to transgenic plants exhibiting dramatically enhanced growth rates, greater seed and fruit/pod yields, earlier and more productive flowering, more efficient nitrogen utilization, increased tolerance to high salt conditions, and increased biomass yields. In one embodiment, transgenic plants engineered to over-express both glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase (GPT) and glutamine synthetase (GS) are provided. The GPT+GS double-transgenic plants of the invention consistently exhibit enhanced growth characteristics, with T0 generation lines showing an increase in biomass over wild type counterparts of between 50% and 300%. Generations that result from sexual crosses and/or selfing typically perform even better, with some of the double-transgenic plants achieving an astounding four-fold biomass increase over wild type plants.

  12. Accumulation of nickel in transgenic tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidik, Nik Marzuki; Othman, Noor Farhan

    2013-11-01

    The accumulation of heavy metal Ni in the roots and leaves of four T1 transgenic lines of tobacco (T(1)20E, T(1)24C, T(1)18B1 and T(1)20B) expressing eiMT1 from E.indica was assessed. The aim of the study was to investigate the level of Ni accumulation in the leaves and roots of each transgenic lines and to evaluate the eligibility of the plants to be classified as a phytoremediation agent. All of the transgenic lines showed different ability in accumulating different metals and has translocation factor (TF) less than 1 (TFtransgenic lines, transgenic line T(1)24C showed the highest accumulation of Ni (251.9 ± 0.014 mg/kg) and the lowest TF value (TFT(1)24C=0.0875) at 60 ppm Ni.

  13. Transgenic animals and their application in medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Bagle TR, Kunkulol RR, Baig MS, More SY

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic animals are animals that are genetically altered to have traits that mimic symptoms of specific human pathologies. They provide genetic models of various human diseases which are important in understanding disease and developing new targets. In early 1980 Gordon and co-workers described the first gene addition experiment using the microinjection technology and since then the impact of transgenic technology on basic research has been significant. Within 20 years of its inception, AT...

  14. Comparison of nutritional value of transgenic peanut expressing bar and rcg3 genes with non-transgenic counterparts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robab, U.E.; )

    2014-01-01

    The transgenic peanut plants expressing bar and rcg3 genes were subjected to assessment of any change in nutritional value of the crop at various locations. The protein and fat contents of transgenic lines were compared with the non-transgenic parent varieties. Protein content in the transgenic lines was higher as compared to that in non-transgenic counterparts and differences among locations for fat and protein content were significant. No differences among fatty acids were recorded for genes, events and locations. Irrespective of small differences, all the values were in range described for this crop and transgenic lines appeared to be substantially equivalent to non-transgenic parent varieties. (author)

  15. Transgene flow: Facts, speculations and possible countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryffel, Gerhart U

    2014-01-01

    Convincing evidence has accumulated that unintended transgene escape occurs in oilseed rape, maize, cotton and creeping bentgrass. The escaped transgenes are found in variant cultivars, in wild type plants as well as in hybrids of sexually compatible species. The fact that in some cases stacked events are present that have not been planted commercially, implies unintended recombination of transgenic traits. As the consequences of this continuous transgene escape for the ecosystem cannot be reliably predicted, I propose to use more sophisticated approaches of gene technology in future. If possible GM plants should be constructed using either site-directed mutagenesis or cisgenic strategies to avoid the problem of transgene escape. In cases where a transgenic trait is needed, efficient containment should be the standard approach. Various strategies available or in development are discussed. Such a cautious approach in developing novel types of GM crops will enhance the sustainable potential of GM crops and thus increase the public trust in green gene technology. PMID:25523171

  16. Transgenic technologies to induce sterility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wimmer Ernst A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The last few years have witnessed a considerable expansion in the number of tools available to perform molecular and genetic studies on the genome of Anopheles mosquitoes, the vectors of human malaria. As a consequence, knowledge of aspects of the biology of mosquitoes, such as immunity, reproduction and behaviour, that are relevant to their ability to transmit disease is rapidly increasing, and could be translated into concrete benefits for malaria control strategies. Amongst the most important scientific advances, the development of transgenic technologies for Anopheles mosquitoes provides a crucial opportunity to improve current vector control measures or design novel ones. In particular, the use of genetic modification of the mosquito genome could provide for a more effective deployment of the sterile insect technique (SIT against vector populations in the field. Currently, SIT relies on the release of radiation sterilized males, which compete with wild males for mating with wild females. The induction of sterility in males through the genetic manipulation of the mosquito genome, already achieved in a number of other insect species, could eliminate the need for radiation and increase the efficiency of SIT-based strategies. This paper provides an overview of the mechanisms already in use for inducing sterility by transgenesis in Drosophila and other insects, and speculates on possible ways to apply similar approaches to Anopheles mosquitoes.

  17. Selenoprotein-Transgenic Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazuan Ni

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se deficiency is associated with the occurrence of many diseases. However, excessive Se supplementation, especially with inorganic Se, can result in toxicity. Selenoproteins are the major forms of Se in vivo to exert its biological function. Expression of those selenoproteins, especially with the application of a newly developed system, is thus very important for studying the mechanism of Se in nutrition. The use of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (C. reinhardtii as a biological vector to express an heterogeneous protein is still at the initial stages of development. In order to investigate the possibility of using this system to express selenoproteins, human 15-KDa selenoprotein (Sep15, a small but widely distributed selenoprotein in mammals, was chosen for the expression platform test. Apart from the wild-type human Sep15 gene fragment, two Sep15 recombinants were constructed containing Sep15 open reading frame (ORF and the selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS element from either human Sep15 or C. reinhardtii selenoprotein W1, a highly expressed selenoprotein in this alga. Those Sep15-containing plasmids were transformed into C. reinhardtii CC-849 cells. Results showed that Sep15 fragments were successfully inserted into the nuclear genome and expressed Sep15 protein in the cells. The transgenic and wild-type algae demonstrated similar growth curves in low Se culture medium. To our knowledge, this is the first report on expressing human selenoprotein in green alga.

  18. Directed microspore-specific recombination of transgenic alleles to prevent pollen-mediated transmission of transgenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlynarova, L.; Conner, A.J.; Nap, J.P.H.

    2006-01-01

    A major challenge for future genetically modified (GM) crops is to prevent undesired gene flow of transgenes to plant material intended for another use. Recombinase-mediated auto excision of transgenes directed by a tightly controlled microspore-specific promoter allows efficient removal of either

  19. Stability of transgenes in long-term micropropagation of plants of transgenic birch (Betula platyphylla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fansuo; Qian, Jingjing; Luo, Wei; Zhan, Yaguang; Xin, Ying; Yang, Chuanping

    2010-01-01

    The stability of integration and expression level of transgenes in long-term micropropagation clones of transgenic birch (Betula platyphylla Suk.) was examined. Multiplexed PCR and reverse primer PCR demonstrated stable integration of transgenes into regenerated plants. Expression levels of the bgt and gus genes among shoot plantlets, subcultured 4, 7, 9 and 15 times, were significantly different. The transcriptional expression level of extraneous genes in regenerated plants decreased with increasing subculture number. Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) occured in regenerated transgenic lines. The silencing rate of GUS in the 5th subculture plants was 22-65%. TGS in regenerated plants could be reactivated with 5-azacytidine (Azac) at 50-200 microM. GUS and BGT protein expression was reactivated in the micropropagated transgenic birch plants when treated with Azac. A decrease in expression level with increasing number of subcultures is thus associated with DNA methylation.

  20. Growth factor transgenes interactively regulate articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuiliang; Mercer, Scott; Eckert, George J; Trippel, Stephen B

    2013-04-01

    Adult articular chondrocytes lack an effective repair response to correct damage from injury or osteoarthritis. Polypeptide growth factors that stimulate articular chondrocyte proliferation and cartilage matrix synthesis may augment this response. Gene transfer is a promising approach to delivering such factors. Multiple growth factor genes regulate these cell functions, but multiple growth factor gene transfer remains unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that multiple growth factor gene transfer selectively modulates articular chondrocyte proliferation and matrix synthesis. We tested the hypothesis by delivering combinations of the transgenes encoding insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1), bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and bone morphogenetic protien-7 (BMP-7) to articular chondrocytes and measured changes in the production of DNA, glycosaminoglycan, and collagen. The transgenes differentially regulated all these chondrocyte activities. In concert, the transgenes interacted to generate widely divergent responses from the cells. These interactions ranged from inhibitory to synergistic. The transgene pair encoding IGF-I and FGF-2 maximized cell proliferation. The three-transgene group encoding IGF-I, BMP-2, and BMP-7 maximized matrix production and also optimized the balance between cell proliferation and matrix production. These data demonstrate an approach to articular chondrocyte regulation that may be tailored to stimulate specific cell functions, and suggest that certain growth factor gene combinations have potential value for cell-based articular cartilage repair. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The transgenic animal platform for biopharmaceutical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, L R; Meade, H; Lazzarotto, C R; Martins, L T; Tavares, K C; Bertolini, M; Murray, J D

    2016-06-01

    The recombinant production of therapeutic proteins for human diseases is currently the largest source of innovation in the pharmaceutical industry. The market growth has been the driving force on efforts for the development of new therapeutic proteins, in which transgenesis emerges as key component. The use of the transgenic animal platform offers attractive possibilities, residing on the low production costs allied to high productivity and quality of the recombinant proteins. Although many strategies have evolved over the past decades for the generation of transgenic founders, transgenesis in livestock animals generally faces some challenges, mainly due to random transgene integration and control over transgene copy number. But new developments in gene editing with CRISPR/Cas system promises to revolutionize the field for its simplicity and high efficiency. In addition, for the final approval of any given recombinant protein for animal or human use, the production and characterization of bioreactor founders and expression patterns and functionality of the proteins are technical part of the process, which also requires regulatory and administrative decisions, with a large emphasis on biosafety. The approval of two mammary gland-derived recombinant proteins for commercial and clinical use has boosted the interest for more efficient, safer and economic ways to generate transgenic founders to meet the increasing demand for biomedical proteins worldwide.

  2. Toxins for Transgenic Resistance to Hemipteran Pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryony C. Bonning

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The sap sucking insects (Hemiptera, which include aphids, whiteflies, plant bugs and stink bugs, have emerged as major agricultural pests. The Hemiptera cause direct damage by feeding on crops, and in some cases indirect damage by transmission of plant viruses. Current management relies almost exclusively on application of classical chemical insecticides. While the development of transgenic crops expressing toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt has provided effective plant protection against some insect pests, Bt toxins exhibit little toxicity against sap sucking insects. Indeed, the pest status of some Hemiptera on Bt-transgenic plants has increased in the absence of pesticide application. The increased pest status of numerous hemipteran species, combined with increased prevalence of resistance to chemical insecticides, provides impetus for the development of biologically based, alternative management strategies. Here, we provide an overview of approaches toward transgenic resistance to hemipteran pests.

  3. Advances in transgenic animal models and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménoret, Séverine; Tesson, Laurent; Remy, Séverine; Usal, Claire; Ouisse, Laure-Hélène; Brusselle, Lucas; Chenouard, Vanessa; Anegon, Ignacio

    2017-10-01

    On May 11th and 12th 2017 was held in Nantes, France, the international meeting "Advances in transgenic animal models and techniques" ( http://www.trm.univ-nantes.fr/ ). This biennial meeting is the fifth one of its kind to be organized by the Transgenic Rats ImmunoPhenomic (TRIP) Nantes facility ( http://www.tgr.nantes.inserm.fr/ ). The meeting was supported by private companies (SONIDEL, Scionics computer innovation, New England Biolabs, MERCK, genOway, Journal Disease Models and Mechanisms) and by public institutions (International Society for Transgenic Technology, University of Nantes, INSERM UMR 1064, SFR François Bonamy, CNRS, Région Pays de la Loire, Biogenouest, TEFOR infrastructure, ITUN, IHU-CESTI and DHU-Oncogeffe and Labex IGO). Around 100 participants, from France but also from different European countries, Japan and USA, attended the meeting.

  4. Microbial Biomass Changes during Decomposition of Plant Residues in a Lixisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kachaka, SK.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A lixisol was amended with four different alley cropping species: Senna siamea, Leucaena leucocephala, Dactyladenia barteri and Flemingia macrophylla. Soil samples were incubated for 140 days at 25 °C and the soil microbial biomass was determined by the ninhydrin extraction method along the incubation period. The soil microbial biomass values ranged between 80 and 600 mg.kg-1 and followed, in all cases, the decreasing order: Leucaena> Senna> Flemingia> Dactyladenia.

  5. Generation of BAC transgenic epithelial organoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Schwank

    Full Text Available Under previously developed culture conditions, mouse and human intestinal epithelia can be cultured and expanded over long periods. These so-called organoids recapitulate the three-dimensional architecture of the gut epithelium, and consist of all major intestinal cell types. One key advantage of these ex vivo cultures is their accessibility to live imaging. So far the establishment of transgenic fluorescent reporter organoids has required the generation of transgenic mice, a laborious and time-consuming process, which cannot be extended to human cultures. Here we present a transfection protocol that enables the generation of recombinant mouse and human reporter organoids using BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome technology.

  6. Production of homozygous transgenic rainbow trout with enhanced disease resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies conducted in our laboratory showed that transgenic medaka expressing cecropin B transgenes exhibited resistant characteristic to fish bacterial pathogens, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Vibrio anguillarum. To confirm whether antimicrobial peptide gene will also exhibit antibacterial an...

  7. Lectin cDNA and transgenic plants derived therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2000-10-03

    Transgenic plants containing cDNA encoding Gramineae lectin are described. The plants preferably contain cDNA coding for barley lectin and store the lectin in the leaves. The transgenic plants, particularly the leaves exhibit insecticidal and fungicidal properties.

  8. Maize transgenes containing zein promoters are regulated by opaque2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenes have great potential in crop improvement, but relatively little is known about the epistatic interaction of transgenes with the native genes in the genome. Understanding these interactions is critical for predicting the response of transgenes to different genetic backgrounds and environm...

  9. Development of transgenic finger millet (Eleusine coracana (L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In segregation analysis, the transgenic R1 lines produced three resistant and one sensitive for hygromycin, confirming the normal Mendelian pattern of transgene segregation. Transgenic plants showed high level of resistance to leaf blast disease compared to control plants. This is the first study reporting the introduction of ...

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF ESCAPED TRANSGENIC CREEPING BENTGRASS IN OREGON

    Science.gov (United States)

    When transgenic plants are cultivated near wild species that are sexually compatible with the crop, gene flow between the crop and wild plants is possible. A resultant concern is that transgene flow and transgene introgression within wild populations could have unintended ecologi...

  11. Will transgenic plants adversely affect the environment?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    *Corresponding author (Fax, (0967) 330-528; Email, vvvelkov@rambler.ru). Transgenic insecticidal plants based on .... Authors claimed that these results suggested that. Bt corn can have adverse sublethal effects on ..... provide resistance against the Mexican rice borer, Eore- uma loftini (Dyar), the primary pest of south ...

  12. Exobiopolymer from polyhydroxyalkanoate-producing transgenic yeast

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recently, the wild type yeast Kloeckera sp. strain KY1 was equipped in their cytoplasm with the phaABC operon containing genes phbA, phbB and phbC of the PHA biosynthetic pathway of Ralstonia eutropha. Unpredicted, resulted transgenic yeast strain KY1/PHA was able to synthesize another exopolymer beside the ...

  13. Can Transgenic Maize Affect Soil Microbial Communities?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Christian; Wouterse, Marja; Raubuch, Markus; Roelofs, Willem; Rutgers, Michiel

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the experiment was to determine if temporal variations of belowground activity reflect the influence of the Cry1Ab protein from transgenic maize on soil bacteria and, hence, on a regulatory change of the microbial community (ability to metabolize sources belonging to different chemical

  14. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  15. Assessing the value of transgenic crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Hugh

    2002-10-01

    In the current controversy about the value of transgenic crops, matters open to empirical inquiry are centrally at issue. One such matter is a key premise in a common argument (that I summarize) that transgenic crops should be considered to have universal value. The premise is that there are no alternative forms of agriculture available to enable the production of sufficient food to feed the world. The proponents of agroecology challenge it, claiming that agroecology provides an alternative, and they deny the claim that it is well founded on empirical evidence. It is, therefore, a matter of both social and scientific importance that this premise and the criticisms of it be investigated rigorously and empirically, so that the benefits and disadvantages of transgenic-intensive agriculture and agroecology can be compared in a reliable way. Conducting adequate investigation about the potential contribution of agroecology requires that the cultural conditions of its practice (and, thus, of the practices and movements of small-scale farmers in the "third world") be strengthened--and this puts the interests of investigation into tension with the socio-economic interests driving the development of transgenics. General issues about relationship between ethical argument and empirical (scientific) investigation are raised throughout the article.

  16. A transgenic mouse model for trilateral retinoblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Brien, J.M.; Marcus, D.M.; Bernards, R.A.; Carpenter, J.L.; Windle, J.J.; Mellon, P.; Albert, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    We present a murine model of trilateral retinoblastoma. Ocular retinoblastoma and central nervous system tumors are observed in a line of mice formed by the transgenic expression of SV40 T-antigen. An oncogenic protein known to bind to the retinoblastoma gene product (p105-Rb) is specifically

  17. Metal resistance sequences and transgenic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Richard Brian; Summers, Anne O.; Rugh, Clayton L.

    1999-10-12

    The present invention provides nucleic acid sequences encoding a metal ion resistance protein, which are expressible in plant cells. The metal resistance protein provides for the enzymatic reduction of metal ions including but not limited to divalent Cu, divalent mercury, trivalent gold, divalent cadmium, lead ions and monovalent silver ions. Transgenic plants which express these coding sequences exhibit increased resistance to metal ions in the environment as compared with plants which have not been so genetically modified. Transgenic plants with improved resistance to organometals including alkylmercury compounds, among others, are provided by the further inclusion of plant-expressible organometal lyase coding sequences, as specifically exemplified by the plant-expressible merB coding sequence. Furthermore, these transgenic plants which have been genetically modified to express the metal resistance coding sequences of the present invention can participate in the bioremediation of metal contamination via the enzymatic reduction of metal ions. Transgenic plants resistant to organometals can further mediate remediation of organic metal compounds, for example, alkylmetal compounds including but not limited to methyl mercury, methyl lead compounds, methyl cadmium and methyl arsenic compounds, in the environment by causing the freeing of mercuric or other metal ions and the reduction of the ionic mercury or other metal ions to the less toxic elemental mercury or other metals.

  18. Transgenic plants with increased calcium stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah (Inventor); Tsou, Pei-Lan (Inventor); Robertson, Dominique (Inventor); Boss, Wendy (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides transgenic plants over-expressing a transgene encoding a calcium-binding protein or peptide (CaBP). Preferably, the CaBP is a calcium storage protein and over-expression thereof does not have undue adverse effects on calcium homeostasis or biochemical pathways that are regulated by calcium. In preferred embodiments, the CaBP is calreticulin (CRT) or calsequestrin. In more preferred embodiments, the CaBP is the C-domain of CRT, a fragment of the C-domain, or multimers of the foregoing. In other preferred embodiments, the CaBP is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by operatively associating the transgene encoding the CaBP with an endoplasmic reticulum localization peptide. Alternatively, the CaBP is targeted to any other sub-cellular compartment that permits the calcium to be stored in a form that is biologically available to the plant. Also provided are methods of producing plants with desirable phenotypic traits by transformation of the plant with a transgene encoding a CaBP. Such phenotypic traits include increased calcium storage, enhanced resistance to calcium-limiting conditions, enhanced growth and viability, increased disease and stress resistance, enhanced flower and fruit production, reduced senescence, and a decreased need for fertilizer production. Further provided are plants with enhanced nutritional value as human food or animal feed.

  19. First-Generation Transgenic Plants and Statistics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nap, Jan-Peter; Keizer, Paul; Jansen, Ritsert

    1993-01-01

    The statistical analyses of populations of first-generation transgenic plants are commonly based on mean and variance and generally require a test of normality. Since in many cases the assumptions of normality are not met, analyses can result in erroneous conclusions. Transformation of data to

  20. Transgenic cassava lines carrying heterologous alternative oxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Afuape

    2013-07-03

    Jul 3, 2013 ... Organized embryogenic callus development: In our experiment, somatic embryos were developed from leaf lobes collected from transgenic cassava lines carrying the AtAOX1a gene. Immature leaf lobes measuring about 1 to 6 mm obtained from about six weeks old in vitro derived plants were used.

  1. Generation of antiviral transgenic chicken using spermatogonial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted in order to generate anti-viral transgenic chickens through transfected spermatogonial stem cell with fusion gene EGFP-MMx. After injecting fusion gene EGFP-MMx into testes, tissues frozen section, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and dot blot of testes was performed at 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 ...

  2. Transgenic cassava lines carrying heterologous alternative oxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Messenger RNA was extracted from selected PCR-positive lines for reverse transcription-PCR analysis for gene expression. To screen positive lines for gene function, leaf lobes from two transgenic lines with a line carrying an empty vector and the wild type were subjected to somatic embryogenesis (SE), a known oxidative ...

  3. Generation of antiviral transgenic chicken using spermatogonial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR TONUKARI NYEROVWO

    2011-11-09

    Nov 9, 2011 ... This study was conducted in order to generate anti-viral transgenic chickens through transfected spermatogonial stem cell with fusion gene EGFP-MMx. After injecting fusion gene EGFP-MMx into testes, tissues frozen section, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and dot blot of testes was performed at. 30, 40 ...

  4. Effect of transgene number of spontaneous and radiation-induced micronuclei in lacl transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Loughlin, K.G.; Hamer, J.D.; Winegar, R.A.; Mirsalis, J.C.; Short, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Lacl transgenic mice are widely used for the measurement of mutations in specific target issues. The lacl transgene is present in mice as 40 tandem repeats; this sequence is homozygous (contained in both copies of chromosome 5) in C57Bl/6 mice, and is hemizygous in B6C3F1 mice. Previous reports have indicated that tandem repeats can produce chromosome instability, fragile sites, and other effects. To determine whether the presence of the transgene effects micronucleus induction we compared the response of nontransgenic (NTR) to hemizygous (HEMI) transgenic B6C3F1 mice and to hemizygous and homozygous (HOMO) transgenic C57Bl/6 mice. Five mice/group were irradiated with 500 cGy from a 137 Cs source. Bone marrow was harvested 24 hr after treatment and 2000 polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) were analyzed per animal. The presence or absence of the lacl transgene had no effect in unirradiated mice on the percent of micronucleated PCE (MN) or on the ratio of PCE to total red blood cells for either strain: B6C3F1 mice had MN frequencies of 0.26% and 0.20% for NTR and HEMI mice, respectively; C57Bl/6 mice had MN frequencies of 0.34%, 0.32%, and 0.38% for NTR, HEMI, and HOMO mice, respectively. Radiation-induced micronucleus frequencies were significantly higher in HEMI lacl B6C3F1 mice (2.85%) than in NTR litter mates (1.59%); the converse was true in C57Bl/6 mice: NTR were 2.45%, HEMI were 1.25%, HOMO were 1.65%. These data suggest that the lacl transgene does not cause chromosome instability as measured by spontaneous micronucleus levels. However, the response of these transgenic mice to a variety of clastogenic agents needs to be investigated before they are integrated into standard in vivo assays for chromosome damage

  5. Primary transgenic bovine cells and their rejuvenated cloned equivalents show transgene-specific epigenetic differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-González, Lucia; Couldrey, Christine; Meinhardt, Marcus W; Cole, Sally A; Wells, David N; Laible, Götz

    2012-01-01

    Cell-mediated transgenesis, based on somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), provides the opportunity to shape the genetic make-up of cattle. Bovine primary fetal fibroblasts, commonly used cells for SCNT, have a limited lifespan, and complex genetic modifications that require sequential transfections can be challenging time and cost-wise. To overcome these limitations, SCNT is frequently used to rejuvenate the cell lines and restore exhausted growth potential. We have designed a construct to be used in a 2-step cassette exchange experiment. Our transgene contains a puromycin resistance marker gene and an enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) expression cassette, both driven by a strong mammalian promoter, and flanked by loxP sites and sequences from the bovine β-casein locus. Several transgenic cell lines were generated by random insertion into primary bovine cell lines. Two of these original cell lines were rederived by SCNT and new primary cells, with the same genetic makeup as the original donors, were established. While the original cell lines were puromycin-resistant and had a characteristic EGFP expression profile, all rejuvenated cell lines were sensitive to puromycin, and displayed varied EGFP expression, indicative of various degrees of silencing. When the methylation states of individual CpG sites within the transgene were analyzed, a striking increase in transgene-specific methylation was observed in all rederived cell lines. The results indicate that original transgenic donor cells and their rejuvenated derivatives may not be equivalent and differ in the functionality of their transgene sequences.

  6. Molecular characterization of transgene integration by next-generation sequencing in transgenic cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ran; Yin, Yinliang; Zhang, Yujun; Li, Kexin; Zhu, Hongxia; Gong, Qin; Wang, Jianwu; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Li, Ning

    2012-01-01

    As the number of transgenic livestock increases, reliable detection and molecular characterization of transgene integration sites and copy number are crucial not only for interpreting the relationship between the integration site and the specific phenotype but also for commercial and economic demands. However, the ability of conventional PCR techniques to detect incomplete and multiple integration events is limited, making it technically challenging to characterize transgenes. Next-generation sequencing has enabled cost-effective, routine and widespread high-throughput genomic analysis. Here, we demonstrate the use of next-generation sequencing to extensively characterize cattle harboring a 150-kb human lactoferrin transgene that was initially analyzed by chromosome walking without success. Using this approach, the sites upstream and downstream of the target gene integration site in the host genome were identified at the single nucleotide level. The sequencing result was verified by event-specific PCR for the integration sites and FISH for the chromosomal location. Sequencing depth analysis revealed that multiple copies of the incomplete target gene and the vector backbone were present in the host genome. Upon integration, complex recombination was also observed between the target gene and the vector backbone. These findings indicate that next-generation sequencing is a reliable and accurate approach for the molecular characterization of the transgene sequence, integration sites and copy number in transgenic species.

  7. Split-Cre complementation restores combination activity on transgene excision in hair roots of transgenic tobacco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengling Wen

    Full Text Available The Cre/loxP system is increasingly exploited for genetic manipulation of DNA in vitro and in vivo. It was previously reported that inactive ''split-Cre'' fragments could restore Cre activity in transgenic mice when overlapping co-expression was controlled by two different promoters. In this study, we analyzed recombination activities of split-Cre proteins, and found that no recombinase activity was detected in the in vitro recombination reaction in which only the N-terminal domain (NCre of split-Cre protein was expressed, whereas recombination activity was obtained when the C-terminal (CCre or both NCre and CCre fragments were supplied. We have also determined the recombination efficiency of split-Cre proteins which were co-expressed in hair roots of transgenic tobacco. No Cre recombination event was observed in hair roots of transgenic tobacco when the NCre or CCre genes were expressed alone. In contrast, an efficient recombination event was found in transgenic hairy roots co-expressing both inactive split-Cre genes. Moreover, the restored recombination efficiency of split-Cre proteins fused with the nuclear localization sequence (NLS was higher than that of intact Cre in transgenic lines. Thus, DNA recombination mediated by split-Cre proteins provides an alternative method for spatial and temporal regulation of gene expression in transgenic plants.

  8. Molecular characterization of transgene integration by next-generation sequencing in transgenic cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Zhang

    Full Text Available As the number of transgenic livestock increases, reliable detection and molecular characterization of transgene integration sites and copy number are crucial not only for interpreting the relationship between the integration site and the specific phenotype but also for commercial and economic demands. However, the ability of conventional PCR techniques to detect incomplete and multiple integration events is limited, making it technically challenging to characterize transgenes. Next-generation sequencing has enabled cost-effective, routine and widespread high-throughput genomic analysis. Here, we demonstrate the use of next-generation sequencing to extensively characterize cattle harboring a 150-kb human lactoferrin transgene that was initially analyzed by chromosome walking without success. Using this approach, the sites upstream and downstream of the target gene integration site in the host genome were identified at the single nucleotide level. The sequencing result was verified by event-specific PCR for the integration sites and FISH for the chromosomal location. Sequencing depth analysis revealed that multiple copies of the incomplete target gene and the vector backbone were present in the host genome. Upon integration, complex recombination was also observed between the target gene and the vector backbone. These findings indicate that next-generation sequencing is a reliable and accurate approach for the molecular characterization of the transgene sequence, integration sites and copy number in transgenic species.

  9. Diversity of arthropod community in transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D J; Lu, Z Y; Liu, J X; Li, C L; Yang, M S

    2015-12-02

    Poplar-cotton agro-ecosystems are the main agricultural planting modes of plain cotton fields in China. Here, we performed a systematic survey of the diversity and population of arthropod communities in four different combination of poplar-cotton eco-systems, including I) non-transgenic poplar and non-transgenic cotton fields; II) non-transgenic poplar and transgenic cotton fields [Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) cotton]; III) Bt transgenic poplar (high insect resistant strain Pb29) and non-transgenic cotton; and IV) transgenic poplar and transgenic cotton fields, over a period of 3 years. Based on the statistical methods used to investigate community ecology, the effects of transgenic ecosystems on the whole structure of the arthropod community, on the structure of arthropods in the nutritive layer, and on the similarity of arthropod communities were evaluated. The main results were as follows: the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem has a stronger inhibitory effect on insect pests and has no impact on the structure of the arthropod community, and therefore, maintains the diversity of the arthropod community. The character index of the community indicated that the structure of the arthropod community of the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem was better than that of the poplar-cotton ecosystem, and that system IV had the best structure. As for the abundance of nutritional classes, the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem was also better than that of the non-transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystem. The cluster analysis and similarity of arthropod communities between the four different transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystems illustrated that the structure of the arthropod community excelled in the small sample of the transgenic poplar-cotton ecosystems.

  10. A preliminary study of cross-amplified microsatellite loci using molted feathers from a near-threatened Painted Stork (Mycteria leucocephala) population of north India as a DNA source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bharat Bhushan; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Urfi, Abdul Jamil

    2017-11-21

    In continuation of an earlier study in which we reported the cross-amplification of Wood stork microsatellites on the DNA obtained from molted feathers of Painted stork (Mycteria leucocephala), here we investigated the nature of cross-amplified microsatellites and the effect of non-invasive samples on cross-amplification success. In a limited manner, we also addressed the genetic diversity and differentiation in a north Indian population of the Painted Stork examined over three nesting seasons. Among the nine cross-amplified loci, only 5 were polymorphic. Three and 6 loci exhibited low ( 80), respectively. For 36 of 145 samples most of the loci failed to amplify. For genetic diversity, only 3 loci could be used since others exhibited low amplification and linkage disequilibrium. Probability of identity (0.034) was not low enough to develop a confidence that the similar genotypes originate from the same individual. Forty-two unique genotypes were identified. In 3 loci, a low to moderate level of genetic diversity (mean He = 0.435) was reported. Non-significant Fst (0.003, P = 0.230), G'stH (0.005, P = 0.247) and Dest (0.003, P = 0.250) values indicate a lack of structuring in temporally distributed populations of Delhi Zoo. The limitations and uniqueness of this study are discussed.

  11. Assessment of peanut quality and compositional characteristics among transgenic sclerotinia blight-resistant and non-transgenic susceptible cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiahuai; Telenko, Darcy E P; Phipps, Patrick M; Grabau, Elizabeth A

    2014-08-06

    This study presents the results of a comparison that includes an analysis of variance and a canonical discriminant analysis to determine compositional equivalence and similarity between transgenic, sclerotinia blight-resistant and non-transgenic, susceptible cultivars of peanut in 3 years of field trials. Three Virginia-type cultivars (NC 7, Wilson, and Perry) and their corresponding transgenic lines (N70, W73, and P39) with a barley oxalate oxidase gene were analyzed for differences in key mineral nutrients, fatty acid components, hay constituents, and grade characteristics. Results from both analyses demonstrated that transgenic lines were compositionally similar to their non-transgenic parent cultivar in all factors as well as market-grade characteristics and nutritional value. Transgenic lines expressing oxalate oxidase for resistance to sclerotinia blight were substantially equivalent to their non-transgenic parent cultivar in quality and compositional characteristics.

  12. Phytoremediation of selenium using transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H; LeDuc, Danika L

    2009-04-01

    Selenium (Se) is a micronutrient for many organisms but also toxic at higher concentrations. Both selenium deficiency and toxicity are serious problems worldwide. Owing to the similarity of selenium to sulfur, plants readily take up and assimilate selenate via sulfur transporters and enzymes and can even volatilize selenium. Selenium accumulating or volatilizing plants may be used for phytoremediation of selenium pollution and as fortified foods. Several transgenic approaches have been used successfully to further enhance plant selenium accumulation, tolerance, and volatilization: upregulation of genes involved in sulfur/selenium assimilation and volatilization, methylation of selenocysteine, and conversion of selenocysteine to elemental Se. Lab and field trials with different transgenic plants have yielded promising results, showing up to ninefold higher levels of selenium accumulation and up to threefold faster volatilization rates.

  13. Chromatin organisation of transgenes in Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhof, I M; Dubin, M J; Nellen, W

    2013-07-01

    The introduction of transgenes in Dictyostelium discoideum typically results in the integration of the transformation vector into the genome at one or a few insertion sites as tandem arrays of approximately 100 copies. Exceptions are extrachromosomal vectors, which do not integrate into chromosomes, and vectors containing resistance markers such as blasticidin, which integrate as single copies at one or a few sites. Here we report that low copy number vector inserts display typical euchromatic features while high copy number insertions are enriched for modifications associate with heterochromatin. Interestingly, high copy number insertions also colocalise with heterochromatin, are enriched for the centromeric histone CenH3 and display centromere-like behaviour during mitosis. We also found that the chromatin organisation on extrachromosmal transgenes is different from those integrated into the chromosomes.

  14. Dolly: a New Form of Transgenic Breedwealth

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Franklin

    1997-01-01

    Public debate in Britain surrounding the cloning of Dolly the sheep has primarily focused on the legitimacy of cloning humans, not sheep. This bracketing of the human question relies on a distinction between humans and animals belied by the very constitution of transgenic animals who are made with human DNA, such as Polly. Moreover, the ways in which human beings think about, manipulate and classify animals have distinct cultural consequences, for example in relation to cultural understanding...

  15. Transgenic nonhuman primates for neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Anthony WS

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Animal models that represent human diseases constitute an important tool in understanding the pathogenesis of the diseases, and in developing effective therapies. Neurodegenerative diseases are complex disorders involving neuropathologic and psychiatric alterations. Although transgenic and knock-in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD and Huntington's disease (HD have been created, limited representation in clinical aspects has been recognized and the rodent models lack true neurodegeneration. Chemical induction of HD and PD in nonhuman primates (NHP has been reported, however, the role of intrinsic genetic factors in the development of the diseases is indeterminable. Nonhuman primates closely parallel humans with regard to genetic, neuroanatomic, and cognitive/behavioral characteristics. Accordingly, the development of NHP models for neurodegenerative diseases holds greater promise for success in the discovery of diagnoses, treatments, and cures than approaches using other animal species. Therefore, a transgenic NHP carrying a mutant gene similar to that of patients will help to clarify our understanding of disease onset and progression. Additionally, monitoring disease onset and development in the transgenic NHP by high resolution brain imaging technology such as MRI, and behavioral and cognitive testing can all be carried out simultaneously in the NHP but not in other animal models. Moreover, because of the similarity in motor repertoire between NHPs and humans, it will also be possible to compare the neurologic syndrome observed in the NHP model to that in patients. Understanding the correlation between genetic defects and physiologic changes (e.g. oxidative damage will lead to a better understanding of disease progression and the development of patient treatments, medications and preventive approaches for high risk individuals. The impact of the transgenic NHP model in understanding the role which

  16. Generation of cyanogen-free transgenic cassava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siritunga, Dimuth; Sayre, Richard T

    2003-07-01

    Cassava ( Manihot esculenta Crantz.) is the major source of calories for subsistence farmers in sub-Saharan Africa. Cassava, however, contains potentially toxic levels of the cyanogenic glucoside, linamarin. The cyanogen content of cassava foods can be reduced to safe levels by maceration, soaking, rinsing and baking; however, short-cut processing techniques can yield toxic food products. Our objective was to eliminate cyanogens from cassava so as to eliminate the need for food processing. To achieve this goal we generated transgenic acyanogenic cassava plants in which the expression of the cytochrome P450 genes ( CYP79D1 and CYP79D2), that catalyze the first-dedicated step in linamarin synthesis, was inhibited. Using a leaf-specific promoter to drive the antisense expression of the CYP79D1/ CYP79D2 genes we observed up to a 94% reduction in leaf linamarin content associated with an inhibition of CYP79D1 and CYP79D2 expression. Importantly, the linamarin content of roots also was reduced by 99% in transgenic plants having between 60 and 94% reduction in leaf linamarin content. Analysis of CYP79D1/ CYP79D2 transcript levels in transgenic roots indicated they were unchanged relative to wild-type plants. These results suggest that linamarin is transported from leaves to roots and that a threshold level of leaf linamarin production is required for transport.

  17. Potential transgenic routes to increase tree biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubouzet, Joseph G; Strabala, Timothy J; Wagner, Armin

    2013-11-01

    Biomass is a prime target for genetic engineering in forestry because increased biomass yield will benefit most downstream applications such as timber, fiber, pulp, paper, and bioenergy production. Transgenesis can increase biomass by improving resource acquisition and product utilization and by enhancing competitive ability for solar energy, water, and mineral nutrients. Transgenes that affect juvenility, winter dormancy, and flowering have been shown to influence biomass as well. Transgenic approaches have increased yield potential by mitigating the adverse effects of prevailing stress factors in the environment. Simultaneous introduction of multiple genes for resistance to various stress factors into trees may help forest trees cope with multiple or changing environments. We propose multi-trait engineering for tree crops, simultaneously deploying multiple independent genes to address a set of genetically uncorrelated traits that are important for crop improvement. This strategy increases the probability of unpredictable (synergistic or detrimental) interactions that may substantially affect the overall phenotype and its long-term performance. The very limited ability to predict the physiological processes that may be impacted by such a strategy requires vigilance and care during implementation. Hence, we recommend close monitoring of the resultant transgenic genotypes in multi-year, multi-location field trials. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Transgenics and vertebrate cloning as tools for species conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenfeld, David

    2006-06-01

    It has been suggested that transgenics and vertebrate cloning have a role to play in conservation. Now is the time to evaluate their risks and benefits, before these technologies are widely implemented in our field. Direct risks of transgenics include escape and introgression of transgenes into wild populations; weedy invasion by transgenic organisms; toxicity or pathogenicity of engineered organisms and their products; and human error in the field testing and tracking of transgenic organisms. Indirect risks include environmental effects of increased herbicide use; the danger that engineered organisms may aid the development of bioweapons; the likelihood that gene patenting will lead to the privatization of natural resources; and the diversion of support from less glamorous forms of conservation. Formal risk assessments are commonly used to evaluate transgenic procedures, but our incomplete understanding of both ecosystem processes and the action of transgenes renders most of these assessments scientifically and socially unjustified. Nevertheless, a few, low-risk applications of transgenics may be possible: for example, "super-sterile" ornamental cultivars. Vertebrate cloning poses little risk to the environment, but it can consume scarce conservation resources, and its chances of success in preserving species seem poor To date, the conservation benefits of transgenics and vertebrate cloning remain entirely theoretical, but many of the risks are known and documented. Conservation biologists should devote their research and energies to the established methods of conservation, none of which require transgenics or vertebrate cloning.

  19. Welfare assessment in transgenic pigs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Reinhard C.; Remuge, Liliana; Carlisle, Ailsa

    2012-01-01

    Since large animal transgenesis has been successfully attempted for the first time about 25 years ago, the technology has been applied in various lines of transgenic pigs. Nevertheless one of the concerns with the technology—animal welfare—has not been approached through systematic assessment...... and statements regarding the welfare of transgenic pigs have been based on anecdotal observations during early stages of transgenic programs. The main aim of the present study was therefore to perform an extensive welfare assessment comparing heterozygous transgenic animals expressing GFP with wildtype animals...... months. The absence of significant differences between GFP and wildtype animals in the parameters observed suggests that the transgenic animals in question are unlikely to suffer from deleterious effects of transgene expression on their welfare and thus support existing anecdotal observations of pigs...

  20. Sheep response to sugar cane tops supplemented with varying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty WAD sheep averaging 10.14kg were randomly divided into four groups of 5 replicates, and each group was fed sugarcane tops (SCT) supplemented with varying levels (0%, 25%, 50 and 75%) of Leucaena leucocephala foliage (LLF) in a completely randomized design. Results showed that sugarcane tops (SCT) ...

  1. Cameroon Journal of Agricultural Science - Vol 1, No 1 (2004)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Leucaena leucocephala tree management on maize/cowpea performances in a ferric acrisol of Southern Ghana · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. T Tiki Manga, J Quashie-Sam, B Duguma, 26-30 ...

  2. 942-IJBCS-Article-Dr Babatunde Olufemi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR GATSING

    This study investigated the suitability of Gmelina arborea, low-density wood species and Leucaena leucocephala, high-density wood species for the production of 6 mm thick Inorganic-bonded flake-boards. Flake-boards were made at three levels of curing reagent and board density to get nine experimental flake- boards for ...

  3. Comparison of the Performance, Haematology and Serum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparison of four nutrition-based strategies to improve rabbit performance and health was the objective of this study. Two antibiotics: tylosin and Neoteramycin at 100 mg kg-1 and Leucaena leucocephala forage served fresh at 50 g/day were added to experimental diets for rabbits. The control diet contained neither ...

  4. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quarshie-Sam, S J. Vol 27, No 2 (2007) - Articles Evaluation of the effect of hedgerow intercropping using Leucaena leucocephala and fertilizer application on growth and yield of garden eggs (Solanum melongena) Abstract PDF. ISSN: 0855-0395. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for ...

  5. Nigerian Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences vol. 16 No. 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-02

    Dec 2, 2008 ... Ishola. O., Eneji, A.E. and Agboola, A.A (1998). Soil fertility changes under hedgerows of. Senna Siamea and leucaena leucocephala in Ayepe, South Western Nigeria. Global. J. Pure Applied Sciences, 4(2): 101-104. Lena, Q.M., Willie, H. and Arthur, H. (1997). Background concentrations of trace metals.

  6. JUST Vol. 28 No. 2, August, 2007

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-08-02

    Aug 2, 2007 ... forestry (alley cropping) systems, it became nec- essary to evaluate/assess the performance of gar- den eggs growing in hedgerows of Leucaena leucocephala. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Study Area and components of the study. The study was in two parts: i) Laboratory Analysis on determination of dry.

  7. Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana) - Vol 27, No 2 (2007)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of the effect of hedgerow intercropping using Leucaena leucocephala and fertilizer application on growth and yield of garden eggs (Solanum melongena) · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. T F Insaidoo, S J Quarshie-Sam, 64-72.

  8. Symbiotic specificity of tropical tree rhizobia for host legumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bala, A.; Giller, K.E.

    2001-01-01

    The host range and specificity is reported of a genetically diverse group of rhizobia isolated from nodules of Calliandra calothyrsus, Gliricidia sepium, Leucaena leucocephala and Sesbania sesban. Nodule number and nitrogen content was measured in seedlings of herbaceous and woody legume species

  9. Effect of feeding graded levels of biscuit waste based diet on non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    100%) were formulated with combined biscuit waste and Leucaena leucocephala meals and fed to 20 Yankasa rams for 91 days to evaluate their effects on non-carcass components of the rams. The rams were slaughtered at the expiration of ...

  10. Effect of different processing methods on nutritional composition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Key Words: Leucaena leucocephala, anti-nutritional factors, nutritional composition, supplementary protein, ... forage section of the National Animal Production ... protein content of the samples was determined using the Microkjeldahl method of (AOAC, 1990) which involved protein digestion and distillation. a. Protein.

  11. Light fraction of soil organic matter under different management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study on light fraction organic matter was carried out on the soil from three different management systems namely; Gmelina arborea, Tectona grandis and Leucaena leucocephala plantations in the University of Agriculture, Abeokuta Nigeria. Soil samples were collected in each of the three management site at five auger ...

  12. Evaluation of the meat quality Yankasa rams fed graded levels of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty Yankasa rams aged between 10 and 12 months with average weight of 12.15kg were used to evaluate the effect of different levels of biscuit waste and Leucaena leucocephala meal inclusion in diets on the quality of their meat samples. The rams were randomly assigned to five treatment diets of 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% ...

  13. Preliminary investigation of the effect of Rhizophora racemosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-20

    Aug 20, 2007 ... D'Mello JPF, Thomas D (1978). The nutritive value of dried Leucaena leucocephala leaf meal from Malawi, studied with young chicks. Tropical Agriculture (Trinidad) 55: 45-50. Gill VL (1979). Design and Analysis of experiments in Animal and. Medical Sciences. 1st edn. Vol.3. Aines, Iowa State Univ. Press,.

  14. Variation of the chemical composition of four forage shrubs ( Albizia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study is conducted, to know the chemical composition at different periods of the dry season, of four major fodder shrubs (Albizia lebbeck, Leucaena leucocephala, Morinda lucida and Senna siamea), used to supplement poor fodders in animal feed, in the conditions of southeast Gabon. Methodology and ...

  15. Effect of lead and cadmium on germination and seedling growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of different concentrations of lead and cadmium on seed germination and seedling growth of Leucaena leucocephala. Seed were grown under laboratory conditions at 25, 50, 75 and 100 ppm of metal ions of lead and cadmium. Both lead and cadmium treatments showed toxic ...

  16. Nodulation and Rhizobium Population in Root Nodules of Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nodulation and rhizobium population in root nodules of 5- year old Leucaena leucocephala; Gliricidia sepium and Acacia mangium were assessed. Nodules of these tree legumes were quantified in terms of their numbers, lateral and vertical distribution while the rhizobium population in cultured nodules was counted as ...

  17. Nodulation, chlorophyll content and nitrogen yield of two woody ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two field studies were conducted at the Teaching and Research Farm, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria between 2000 and 2002 to compare the growth, nodulation, chlorophyll content and nitrogen accumulation of Leucaena leucocephala (Lam) de Wit cv. 28 and Gliricidia sepium (Jacq.) Walp cv. ILG50 at the ...

  18. Effects of selected multipurpose, medicinal and aromatic plants on in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to evaluate the effects of selected multipurpose, medicinal and aromatic plants on the in vitro methane production and microbial diversity. The plants include multi-purpose trees; Pterocarpus santallinoides, Leucaena leucocephala, Albizia lebbek, Albizia saman, Enterolobium cyclocarpum, ...

  19. Evaluation of three indigenous Multi-purpose tree species for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agronomic evaluation of three indigenous Multi-purpose tree species (MPTS) namely Pterocarpus santalinoides (PS), Grewia pubescens (GP) and Enterolobium cyclocarpum (EC) and one exotic Leucaena leucocephala (LL) which acted as the control were investigated to determine their growth performance and biomass ...

  20. Southern Forests: a Journal of Forest Science - Vol 77, No 4 (2015)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anatomical changes in the cell-wall structure of Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit as caused by the decay fungi Trametes versicolor and Trametes hirsuta · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Isha M Bhatt, S Pramod, Rina D Koyani, Kishore S Rajput, 297-303.

  1. South African Journal of Animal Science - Vol 30 (2000)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The reproductive performance of South African indigenous goats grazing Leucaena leucocephala pasture and natural veld during gestation · EMAIL FREE FULL ... Crossbreeding Holstein-Friesian with Ethiopian Boran cattle in a tropical highland environment: preliminary estimates of additive and heterotic effects on milk ...

  2. High frequency shoot regeneration of Sterculia urens Roxb. an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-07-18

    Jul 18, 2007 ... Similar result was reported by Dhawan and Bhojwani (1985) in Leucaena leucocephala. Hence, the present study showed that cytokinins were indispensable for shoot multiplication and growth. This was supported by the works of Patnaik and Debata (1996) and Aliou et al. (2006). Within 10 days following ...

  3. Changes In Soil Properties Under Alley Cropping System Of Three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study to evaluate the changes in soil properties, under existing alley cropping system with three leguminous crops (Leucaena leucocephala, Gliricidia sepium, and Cajanus cajan) was conducted in the experimental farm of the Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources Management, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki ...

  4. THE NUTRITIONAL COMPOSITION AND ACCEPTABILITY OF CACTI (Opuntia ficus indica)-LEGUME MIXED SILAGE

    OpenAIRE

    J. GUSHA; S. KATSANDE; P.I. ZVINOROVA; S. NCUBE

    2013-01-01

    The potential of making silage using dry browse legume hay (Acacia angustissima, Leucaena leucocephala, Calliandra callothrysus and Macroptilium Atropurpureum) mixed with fresh cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica) for winter supplementation of veld grass was evaluated using the proximate, tannins and the pH analyses. Chemical analysis revealed that N values were significantly increased (P

  5. Effects of soil microarthropods on nutrient release of decomposing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was set up at the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan, to study the effects of litter quality on the role of soil microarthropods in litter decomposition and nutrient release. Leaf litters from Dactyladenia bateri, Senna siamea, Leucaena leucocephala, Cajanus cajan, Centrosema pubescens and ...

  6. Browses (legume-legume mixture) as dry season feed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increasing competition between man and animals(monogasters, polygasters, microlivestock and wild/feral) for high quality feed(proteinaceous and carbonaceous concentrate) excessive pressure on land from urbanisation , hence the need of multipurpose browse-legumes (Leucaena leucocephala, Gliricidia sepium and ...

  7. A Short-term Comparative Analysis of Enhanced Biodegradation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A short term comparative ecological study of the use of two agro-forestry species, Leucaena leucocephala, Lam De. Wit and Bauhinia monandra, Kurz, in bioremediation of oil polluted environment was carried out, focusing on the evaluation and enhancing potential of the macrophytic species for degradation of hydrocarbon ...

  8. Influence of Tannin in Selected Forages on the Growth Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 56 day experiment was carried out to determine the effect of using forages of cassava, Gliricidia sepium and Leucaena leucocephala containing tannin on the growth performance and faecal egg count (FEC) of semi-intensively managed West African Dwarf (WAD) sheep. Sixteen WAD sheep with an average body weight ...

  9. Proximate composition and tannin content of some multipurpose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaves from tree legumes Enterolobium cyclocarpum (EC), Pterocarpus santalonoides (Ps), Gliricidia sepium (Gs), Leucaena leucocephala (LL) and Senna sIamea (Ss) were analysed for ash, crude protein (CP), crude fibre (CF), Ether entract (EE) neutral detergent fibre (NDF), acid detergent fibre (ADF) and tannins.

  10. Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Content (TPH) As an Index ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    post-phytoremediated crude oil contaminated soil. Plant and soil analysis were carried out using the photometric method of American Petroleum Institute (API). Result has shown that Leucaena leucocephala treated soil at various. (0, 25, 50, & 100mls) levels of pollution had TPH (mg/kg) content of 75.33±38.42, ...

  11. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 201 - 250 of 683 ... Vol 58, No 4 (2010), Effects of Tripsacum Laxum and Leucaena Leucocephala Supplementary Feeding on Growth of Wad Sheep and Goats Grazing Natural Pasture. Abstract. KJN Ndamukong, ET Pamo, HN Pamo, AN Nfi, EN Fai. Vol 59, No 1 (2011), Effects on performance of growing pigs fed diets ...

  12. Evaluation of the Nutritional Potentials of Selected Multipurpose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the nutritional potentials of selected multipurpose fodder trees for use in livestock diets. Fresh leaves from five fodder tree species notably Gmelina arborea, Leucaena leucocephala, Tectona grandis, Persea americana and Dactyledila barteri obtained from the forestry unit of Imo ...

  13. Effect Of Feeding Hordeum jabatum Hay Supplemented With ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There were no differences (P>0.05) in the dry matter, organic matter, neutral detergent fibre, acid detergent fibre and hemicellulose intake among treatments. There were however, significant (P<0.05) differences in the digestibility of nutrients among treatments. It was concluded that dried leaves of Leucaena leucocephala ...

  14. Nigerian Journal of Animal Production - Vol 24, No 1 (1997)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance of rabbits fed Leucaena leucocephala and concentrate between 9th and 25th weeks of age. EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL ... Preliminary studies on simulation models for determining protein requirements of weanling and growing pigs in temperate and tropical environments. EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL ...

  15. Assessment of the effect of board density and species on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Homogenous cement-bonded flake-boards were made from exotic plantation hardwood species (Gmelina arborea and Leucaena leucocephala) and the combination of the two species at equal weight ratio. Flake-boards were produced from each of the raw materials at three density levels of 1000 kg/m3, 1100 kg/m3 and ...

  16. In vitro fermentation characteristics and acceptability by West African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proximate composition, acceptability using twenty four West African dwarf (WAD) goats and in vitro gas production of dry season forages were determined. Crude protein content ranged from 7.9% in Panicum maximum to 25.7% in Leucaena leucocephala. Crude fibre composition was generally high (range 56.8 - 74.1%) ...

  17. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 117 ... Vol 5, No 2 (2004), Comparative economic competitiveness in rice production in Ogun State, Nigeria, Abstract. JOY Aihonsu, AA Adesimi ... Vol 4, No 1 (2003), Effect of feeding raw and cooked Leucaena leucocephala seed bean based diets on the performance of rabbits, Abstract. WO Biobaku, A Aivegbo, ...

  18. Benefits of Transgenic Insect Resistance in Brassica Hybrids under Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia L. Sagers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Field trials of transgenic crops may result in unintentional transgene flow to compatible crop, native, and weedy species. Hybridization outside crop fields may create novel forms with potential negative outcomes for wild and weedy plant populations. We report here the outcome of large outdoor mesocosm studies with canola (Brassica napus, transgenic canola, a sexually compatible weed B. rapa, and their hybrids. Brassica rapa was hybridized with canola and canola carrying a transgene for herbivore resistance (Bt Cry1Ac and grown in outdoor mesocosms under varying conditions of competition and insect herbivory. Treatment effects differed significantly among genotypes. Hybrids were larger than all other genotypes, and produced more seeds than the B. rapa parent. Under conditions of heavy herbivory, plants carrying the transgenic resistance were larger and produced more seeds than non-transgenic plants. Pollen derived gene flow from transgenic canola to B. rapa varied between years (5%–22% and was not significantly impacted by herbivory. These results confirm that canola-weed hybrids benefit from transgenic resistance and are aggressive competitors with congeneric crops and ruderals. Because some crop and crop-weed hybrids may be competitively superior, escapees may alter the composition and ecological functions of plant communities near transgenic crop fields.

  19. From transgene expression to public acceptance of transgenic plants: a matter of predictability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nap, J.P.H.; Mlynárová, L.; Stiekema, W.J.

    1996-01-01

    A good strategy for acceptable legislation of transgenic plants can be thought to be composed of several stacked levels of decision-making. These levels range from global to individual to cellular to nuclear and beyond. Any decision will depend on decisions made on the level below. Various examples

  20. Comparative Proteomics of Leaves from Phytase-transgenic Maize and the Non-transgenic Isogenic Variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua Tan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To investigate unintended effects in genetically modified crops (GMCs, a comparative proteomics analysis between the leaves of the phytase-transgenic maize and those of non-transgenic plants was performed by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. A total of 57 differentially expressed protein spots (DEPs were successfully identified, which represented 44 unique proteins. Functional classification of the identified unique proteins showed that these proteins were predominantly involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism, followed by post-translational modification. KEGG pathway analysis revealed that most of the DEPs participated in carbon fixation in photosynthesis. Comparison of the changes in the protein and gene transcript levels of the identified unique proteins showed that most proteins had a similar pattern of changes between proteins and transcripts. Our results suggested that although some significant differences were observed, the proteomic patterns were not substantially altered between the leaves of phytase-transgenic maize and its non-transgenic isogenic type. Moreover, none of the DEPs was identified as a new toxic protein or an allergenic protein. The differences of proteome between the two kinds of maize leaves might be attributed to both genetic modification and hybrid influence.

  1. Comparative Proteomics of Leaves from Phytase-Transgenic Maize and Its Non-transgenic Isogenic Variety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yanhua; Yi, Xiaoping; Wang, Limin; Peng, Cunzhi; Sun, Yong; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Jiaming; Guo, Anping; Wang, Xuchu

    2016-01-01

    To investigate unintended effects in genetically modified crops (GMCs), a comparative proteomic analysis between the leaves of the phytase-transgenic maize and the non-transgenic plants was performed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. A total of 57 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were successfully identified, which represents 44 unique proteins. Functional classification of the identified proteins showed that these DEPs were predominantly involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism category, followed by post-translational modification. KEGG pathway analysis revealed that most of the DEPs participated in carbon fixation in photosynthesis. Among them, 15 proteins were found to show protein-protein interactions with each other, and these proteins were mainly participated in glycolysis and carbon fixation. Comparison of the changes in the protein and tanscript levels of the identified proteins showed that most proteins had a similar pattern of changes between proteins and transcripts. Our results suggested that although some significant differences were observed, the proteomic patterns were not substantially different between the leaves of the phytase-transgenic maize and the non-transgenic isogenic type. Moreover, none of the DEPs was identified as a new toxic protein or an allergenic protein. The differences between the leaf proteome might be attributed to both genetic modification and hybrid influence.

  2. Intein-mediated Cre protein assembly for transgene excision in hybrid progeny of transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jia; Wang, Lijun; Yang, Chen; Ran, Lingyu; Wen, Mengling; Fu, Xianan; Fan, Di; Luo, Keming

    2016-10-01

    An approach for restoring recombination activity of complementation split-Cre was developed to excise the transgene in hybrid progeny of GM crops. Growing concerns about the biosafety of genetically modified (GM) crops has currently become a limited factor affecting the public acceptance. Several approaches have been developed to generate selectable-marker-gene-free GM crops. However, no strategy was reported to be broadly applicable to hybrid crops. Previous studies have demonstrated that complementation split-Cre recombinase restored recombination activity in transgenic plants. In this study, we found that split-Cre mediated by split-intein Synechocystis sp. DnaE had high recombination efficiency when Cre recombinase was split at Asp232/Asp233 (866 bp). Furthermore, we constructed two plant expression vectors, pCA-NCre-In and pCA-Ic-CCre, containing NCre866-In and Ic-CCre866 fragments, respectively. After transformation, parent lines of transgenic Arabidopsis with one single copy were generated and used for hybridization. The results of GUS staining demonstrated that the recombination activity of split-Cre could be reassembled in these hybrid progeny of transgenic plants through hybridization and the foreign genes flanked by two loxP sites were efficiently excised. Our strategy may provide an effective approach for generating the next generation of GM hybrid crops without biosafety concerns.

  3. An Empirical Assessment of Transgene Flow from a Bt Transgenic Poplar Plantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Hu

    Full Text Available To assess the possible impact of transgenic poplar plantations on the ecosystem, we analyzed the frequency and distance of gene flow from a mature male transgenic Populus nigra plantation carrying the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin gene (Bt poplar and the survival of Bt poplar seeds. The resultant Bt poplar seeds occurred at a frequency of ~0.15% at 0 m to ~0.02% at 500 m from the Bt poplar plantation. The germination of Bt poplar seeds diminished within three weeks in the field (germination rate from 68% to 0% compared to 48% after three weeks of storage at 4°C. The survival rate of seedlings in the field was 0% without any treatment but increased to 1.7% under the addition of four treatments (cleaning and trimming, watering, weeding, and covering with plastic film to maintain moisture after being seeded in the field for eight weeks. The results of this study indicate that gene flow originating from the Bt poplar plantation occurred at an extremely low level through pollen or seeds under natural conditions. This study provides first-hand field data on the extent of transgene flow in poplar plantations and offers guidance for the risk assessment of transgenic poplar plantations.

  4. Characterization of a Maize Wip1 Promoter in Transgenic Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengxue Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Maize Wip1 gene encodes a wound-induced Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI protein which is a type of serine protease inhibitor, and its expression is induced by wounding or infection, conferring resistance against pathogens and pests. In this study, the maize Wip1 promoter was isolated and its function was analyzed. Different truncated Wip1 promoters were fused upstream of the GUS reporter gene and transformed into Arabidopsis, tobacco and rice plants. We found that (1 several truncated maize Wip1 promoters led to strong GUS activities in both transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco leaves, whereas low GUS activity was detected in transgenic rice leaves; (2 the Wip1 promoter was not wound-induced in transgenic tobacco leaves, but was induced by wounding in transgenic rice leaves; (3 the truncated Wip1 promoter had different activity in different organs of transgenic tobacco plants; (4 the transgenic plant leaves containing different truncated Wip1 promoters had low GUS transcripts, even though high GUS protein level and GUS activities were observed; (5 there was one transcription start site of Wip1 gene in maize and two transcription start sites of GUS in Wip1::GUS transgenic lines; (6 the adjacent 35S promoter which is present in the transformation vectors enhanced the activity of the truncated Wip1 promoters in transgenic tobacco leaves, but did not influence the disability of truncated Wip1231 promoter to respond to wounding signals. We speculate that an ACAAAA hexamer, several CAA trimers and several elements similar to ACAATTAC octamer in the 5'-untranslated region might contribute to the strong GUS activity in Wip1231 transgenic lines, meanwhile, compared to the 5'-untranslated region from Wip1231 transgenic lines, the additional upstream open reading frames (uORFs in the 5'-untranslated region from Wip1737 transgenic lines might contribute to the lower level of GUS transcript and GUS activity.

  5. Comparative characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from eGFP transgenic and non-transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunnell Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipose derived- and bone marrow-derived murine mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs may be used to study stem cell properties in an in vivo setting for the purposes of evaluating therapeutic strategies that may have clinical applications in the future. If these cells are to be used for transplantation, the question arises of how to track the administered cells. One solution to this problem is to transplant cells with an easily identifiable genetic marker such as enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP. This protein is fluorescent and therefore does not require a chemical substrate for identification and can be visualized in living cells. This study seeks to characterize and compare adipose derived- and bone marrow-derived stem cells from C57Bl/6 mice and eGFP transgenic C57Bl/6 mice. Results The expression of eGFP does not appear to affect the ability to differentiate along adipogenic or osteogenic lineages; however it appears that the tissue of origin can influence differentiation capabilities. The presence of eGFP had no effect on cell surface marker expression, and mMSCs derived from both bone marrow and adipose tissue had similar surface marker profiles. There were no significant differences between transgenic and non-transgenic mMSCs. Conclusion Murine adipose derived and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells from non-transgenic and eGFP transgenic C57Bl/6 mice have very similar characterization profiles. The availability of mesenchymal stem cells stably expressing a genetic reporter has important applications for the advancement of stem cell research.

  6. Microbial activity in soil cultivated with different summer legumes in coffee crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio Liborio Balota

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted for ten years in a sandy soil in the north part of the Paraná State, Brazil. The soil samples were collected at 0-10 cm depth, both under the coffee canopy and in the inter row space between the coffee plants, in the following treatments: Control, Leucaena leucocephala, Crotalaria spectabilis, Crotalaria breviflora, Mucuna pruriens, Mucuna deeringiana, Arachis hypogaea and Vigna unguiculata. The legume crops influenced the microbial activity, both under the coffee canopy and in the inter row space. The cultivation of Leucaena leucocephala increased the microbial biomass C, N and P. Although L. leucocephala and Arachis hypogaea provided higher microbial biomass, the qCO2 decreased by up to 50% under the coffee canopy and by about 25% in the inter row space. The soil microbial biomass was enriched in N and P due to green manure residue addition.

  7. Identification of abnormal gene expression in bovine transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Jongki; Kang, Sungkeun; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the expression of three genes related to early embryonic development in bovine transgenic cloned embryos. To accomplish this, development of bovine transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos was compared with non-transgenic embryos. Next, mRNA transcription of three specific genes (DNMT1, Hsp 70.1, and Mash2) related to early embryo development in transgenic SCNT embryos was compared between transgenic and non-transgenic SCNTs, parthenogene...

  8. [Biofuels, food security and transgenic crops].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Orlando; Chaparro-Giraldo, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Soaring global food prices are threatening to push more poor people back below the poverty line; this will probably become aggravated by the serious challenge that increasing population and climate changes are posing for food security. There is growing evidence that human activities involving fossil fuel consumption and land use are contributing to greenhouse gas emissions and consequently changing the climate worldwide. The finite nature of fossil fuel reserves is causing concern about energy security and there is a growing interest in the use of renewable energy sources such as biofuels. There is growing concern regarding the fact that biofuels are currently produced from food crops, thereby leading to an undesirable competition for their use as food and feed. Nevertheless, biofuels can be produced from other feedstocks such as lingo-cellulose from perennial grasses, forestry and vegetable waste. Biofuel energy content should not be exceeded by that of the fossil fuel invested in its production to ensure that it is energetically sustainable; however, biofuels must also be economically competitive and environmentally acceptable. Climate change and biofuels are challenging FAO efforts aimed at eradicating hunger worldwide by the next decade. Given that current crops used in biofuel production have not been domesticated for this purpose, transgenic technology can offer an enormous contribution towards improving biofuel crops' environmental and economic performance. The present paper critically presents some relevant relationships between biofuels, food security and transgenic plant technology.

  9. Modifying Bananas: From Transgenics to Organics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Dale

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bananas are one of the top ten world food crops. Unlike most other major food crops, bananas are difficult to genetically improve. The challenge is that nearly all banana cultivars and landraces are triploids, with high levels of male and female infertility. There are a number of international conventional breeding programs and many of these are developing new cultivars. However, it is virtually impossible to backcross bananas, thus excluding the possibility of introgressing new traits into a current cultivar. The alternative strategy is to “modify” the cultivar itself. We have been developing the capacity to modify Cavendish bananas and other cultivars for both disease resistance and enhanced fruit quality. Initially, we were using transgenes; genes that were derived from species outside of the Musa or banana genus. However, we have recently incorporated two banana genes (cisgenes into Cavendish; one to enhance the level of pro-vitamin A and the other to increase the resistance to Panama disease. Modified Cavendish with these cisgenes have been employed in a field trial. Almost certainly, the next advance will be to edit the Cavendish genome, to generate the desired traits. As these banana cultivars are essentially sterile, transgene flow and the outcrossing of modified genes into wild Musa species. are highly unlikely and virtually impossible in other triploid cultivars. Therefore, genetic changes in bananas may be compatible with organic farming.

  10. [Production of human proteins in the blood of transgenic animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Massoud, M.; Bischoff, Rainer; Dalemans, W.; Pointu, H.; Attal, J.; Schultz, H.; Clesse, D.; Stinnakre, M.G.; Pavirani, A.; Houdebine, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    The human alpha 1-antitrypsin gene has been microinjected into rabbit embryos. A line of transgenic rabbits has thus been established. Human alpha 1-antitrypsin was found in the blood of transgenic animals at the concentration of 1 mg/ml plasma. The human protein was active and separable from its

  11. Transgene transmission in chickens by sperm-mediated gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA by spermatozoa. Avian species, particularly chickens, have been increas- ingly used in transgenic research due to their inherent advantages, such as short generation times, high semen production and potential applications as transgenic bioreac- tors for heterologous protein production (Lillico et al. 2007;. Han 2009).

  12. Transgenic Learning for STEAM Subjects and Virtual Containers for OER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Daniel; Corbí, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    Transgenic learning is a disruptive approach in education. It encourages modification of moving parts of the educational chain. This article provides a view of transgenic learning focused on the delivery of enriched learning contents in STEAM areas. It discusses the mutagenic role that the virtual containers may play in current distance education.…

  13. Principles and application of transgenic technology in marine organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine organisms into which a foreign gene or noncoding DNA fragment is artificially introduced and stably integrated in their genomes are termed transgenic marine organisms. Since the first report in 1985, a wide range of transgenic fish and marine bivalve mollusks have been produced by microinjec...

  14. Transgenic sorghum ( Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) developed by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In planta and ex planta C. sublineolum infection assays were carried out using one-week old seedlings to determine tolerance to anthracnose. Seedlings from a transgenic line, KOSA-1, were found to be significantly more tolerant to anthracnose than the parent wild type, KAT 412. The transgenic line was further compared ...

  15. Transgenic manipulation of the metabolism of polyamines in poplar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratiksha Bhatnagar; Bernadette M. Glasheen; Suneet K. Bains; Stephanie L. Long; Rakesh Minocha; Christian Walter; Subhash C. Minocha

    2001-01-01

    The metabolism of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, and spermine) has become the target of genetic manipulation because of their significance in plant development and possibly stress tolerance. We studied the polyamine metabolism in non-transgenic (NT) and transgenic cells of poplar (Populus nigra 3 maximowiczii) expressing a...

  16. Development and application of transgenic technologies in cassava

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, N.; Chavarriaga, P.; Raemakers, C.J.J.M.; Sititunga, D.; Zhang, P.

    2004-01-01

    The capacity to integrate transgenes into the tropical root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is now established and being utilized to generate plants expressing traits of agronomic interest. The tissue culture and gene transfer systems currently employed to produce these transgenic cassava

  17. Ethical perception of human gene in transgenic banana | Amin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transgenic banana has been developed to prevent hepatitis B through vaccination. Its production seems to be an ideal alternative for cheaper vaccines. The objective of this paper is to assess the ethical perception of transgenic banana which involved the transfer of human albumin gene, and to compare their ethical ...

  18. Bioavailability of transgenic microRNAs in genetically modified plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic expression of small RNAs is a prevalent approach in agrobiotechnology for the global enhancement of plant foods. Meanwhile, emerging studies have, on the one hand, emphasized the potential of transgenic microRNAs (miRNAs) as novel dietary therapeutics and, on the other, suggested potentia...

  19. Recent advances in the development of new transgenic animal technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiangyang

    2013-03-01

    Transgenic animal technology is one of the fastest growing biotechnology areas. It is used to integrate exogenous genes into the animal genome by genetic engineering technology so that these genes can be inherited and expressed by offspring. The transgenic efficiency and precise control of gene expression are the key limiting factors in the production of transgenic animals. A variety of transgenic technologies are available. Each has its own advantages and disadvantages and needs further study because of unresolved technical and safety issues. Further studies will allow transgenic technology to explore gene function, animal genetic improvement, bioreactors, animal disease models, and organ transplantation. This article reviews the recently developed animal transgenic technologies, including the germ line stem cell-mediated method to improve efficiency, gene targeting to improve accuracy, RNA interference-mediated gene silencing technology, zinc-finger nuclease gene targeting technology and induced pluripotent stem cell technology. These new transgenic techniques can provide a better platform to develop transgenic animals for breeding new animal varieties and promote the development of medical sciences, livestock production, and other fields.

  20. Clean vector technology for marker-free transgenic fruit crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krens, F.A.; Pelgrom, K.T.B.; Schaart, J.G.; Nijs, den A.P.M.; Rouwendal, G.J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Marker-free transgenic crops confer several advantages over transgenic crops equipped with selection genes coding e.g. for antibiotic resistance. Firstly, the European Union has prepared a guidance document for risk assessment of GM-crops to be introduced in the environment (E.U. Joint Working Group

  1. Bioavailability of transgenic microRNAs in genetically modified plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Primo, Cecilia; Elbaz-Younes, Ismail; Hirschi, Kendal D

    2017-01-01

    Transgenic expression of small RNAs is a prevalent approach in agrobiotechnology for the global enhancement of plant foods. Meanwhile, emerging studies have, on the one hand, emphasized the potential of transgenic microRNAs (miRNAs) as novel dietary therapeutics and, on the other, suggested potential food safety issues if harmful miRNAs are absorbed and bioactive. For these reasons, it is necessary to evaluate the bioavailability of transgenic miRNAs in genetically modified crops. As a pilot study, two transgenic Arabidopsis lines ectopically expressing unique miRNAs were compared and contrasted with the plant bioavailable small RNA MIR2911 for digestive stability and serum bioavailability. The expression levels of these transgenic miRNAs in Arabidopsis were found to be comparable to that of MIR2911 in fresh tissues. Assays of digestive stability in vitro and in vivo suggested the transgenic miRNAs and MIR2911 had comparable resistance to degradation. Healthy mice consuming diets rich in Arabidopsis lines expressing these miRNAs displayed MIR2911 in the bloodstream but no detectable levels of the transgenic miRNAs. These preliminary results imply digestive stability and high expression levels of miRNAs in plants do not readily equate to bioavailability. This initial work suggests novel engineering strategies be employed to enhance miRNA bioavailability when attempting to use transgenic foods as a delivery platform.

  2. Biodiversity versus transgenic sugar beet : the one Euro question

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demont, M.; Wesseler, J.; Tollens, E.

    2002-01-01

    The decision whether to release transgenic crops in the EU is one subject to flexibility, uncertainty and irreversibility. The case of herbicide tolerant sugar beet is analysed. Reassessed is whether the 1998 de facto moratorium of the EU on transgenic crops for sugar beet was correct from a

  3. Transgene transmission in chickens by sperm-mediated gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transgenic animals have been successfully produced by mass gene transfer techniques such as sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT). The aim of this work was to demonstrate transgene transmission by SMGT in chickens using dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or ,-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) as transfectants after seminal ...

  4. 2013 North Dakota Transgenic Barley Research and FHB Nursery Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research continues to develop and test new transgenic plants using genes provided by collaborators. As lines are developed in Golden Promise, they are crossed to Conlon for field testing. Transgenic lines developed in Conlon are being crossed to resistant lines developed by the breeding programs. ...

  5. Dissection of a Synthesized Quantitative Trait to Characterize Transgene Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nap, Jan-Peter; Conner, Anthony J.; Mlynárová, Ludmila; Stiekema, Willem J.; Jansen, Ritsert C.

    1997-01-01

    Six transgenic tobacco lines, each homozygous for the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene at a different locus, and wild type were selfed and intercrossed to evaluate GUS activity in all possible hemizygous, homozygous and dihybrid combinations of GUS alleles. The transgenic lines are characterized by their

  6. Inheritance and segregation of exogenous genes in transgenic cotton

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results confirm inheritance and segregation of. the exogenous Bt gene in transgenic CCRI 30 and NewCott 33B, governing resistance to bollworm, and; the exogenous tfdA gene in transgenic TFD, governing resistance to the herbicide 2,4-D. Both resistance characters were governed by a single dominant nuclear gene ...

  7. Biodiversity versus transgenic sugar beet: the one euro question

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demont, M.; Wesseler, J.H.H.; Tollens, E.

    2004-01-01

    The decision on whether to release transgenic crops in the EU is subject to irreversibility, uncertainty and flexibility. We analyse the case of herbicide-tolerant sugar beet and assess whether the EU's 1998 de facto moratorium on transgenic crops for sugar beet was correct from a cost-benefit

  8. Advancing environmental risk assessment for transgenic biofeedstock crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolt Jeffrey D

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transgenic modification of plants is a key enabling technology for developing sustainable biofeedstocks for biofuels production. Regulatory decisions and the wider acceptance and development of transgenic biofeedstock crops are considered from the context of science-based risk assessment. The risk assessment paradigm for transgenic biofeedstock crops is fundamentally no different from that of current generation transgenic crops, except that the focus of the assessment must consider the unique attributes of a given biofeedstock crop and its environmental release. For currently envisioned biofeedstock crops, particular emphasis in risk assessment will be given to characterization of altered metabolic profiles and their implications relative to non-target environmental effects and food safety; weediness and invasiveness when plants are modified for abiotic stress tolerance or are domesticated; and aggregate risk when plants are platforms for multi-product production. Robust risk assessments for transgenic biofeedstock crops are case-specific, initiated through problem formulation, and use tiered approaches for risk characterization.

  9. Single-copy insertion of transgenes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frøkjaer-Jensen, Christian; Davis, M Wayne; Hopkins, Christopher E; Newman, Blake J; Thummel, Jason M; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Grunnet, Morten; Jorgensen, Erik M

    2008-11-01

    At present, transgenes in Caenorhabditis elegans are generated by injecting DNA into the germline. The DNA assembles into a semistable extrachromosomal array composed of many copies of injected DNA. These transgenes are typically overexpressed in somatic cells and silenced in the germline. We have developed a method that inserts a single copy of a transgene into a defined site. Mobilization of a Mos1 transposon generates a double-strand break in noncoding DNA. The break is repaired by copying DNA from an extrachromosomal template into the chromosomal site. Homozygous single-copy insertions can be obtained in less than 2 weeks by injecting approximately 20 worms. We have successfully inserted transgenes as long as 9 kb and verified that single copies are inserted at the targeted site. Single-copy transgenes are expressed at endogenous levels and can be expressed in the female and male germlines.

  10. ADAM 12 protease induces adipogenesis in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaguchi, Nobuko; Xu, Xiufeng; Tajima, Rie

    2002-01-01

    -anchored protein, ADAM 12-L, and a shorter secreted form, ADAM 12-S. Here we report the occurrence of adipocytes in the skeletal muscle of transgenic mice in which overexpression of either form is driven by the muscle creatine kinase promoter. Cells expressing a marker of early adipogenesis were apparent...... in the perivascular space in muscle tissue of 1- to 2-week-old transgenic mice whereas mature lipid-laden adipocytes were seen at 3 to 4 weeks. Moreover, female transgenics expressing ADAM 12-S exhibited increases in body weight, total body fat mass, abdominal fat mass, and herniation, but were normoglycemic and did...... not exhibit increased serum insulin, cholesterol, or triglycerides. Male transgenics were slightly overweight and also developed herniation but did not become obese. Transgenic mice expressing a truncated form of ADAM 12-S lacking the prodomain and the metalloprotease domain did not develop this adipogenic...

  11. Characterization of Growth and Reproduction Performance, Transgene Integration, Expression, and Transmission Patterns in Transgenic Pigs Produced by piggyBac Transposition-Mediated Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fang; Li, Zicong; Cai, Gengyuan; Gao, Wenchao; Jiang, Gelong; Liu, Dewu; Urschitz, Johann; Moisyadi, Stefan; Wu, Zhenfang

    2016-10-01

    Previously we successfully produced a group of EGFP-expressing founder transgenic pigs by a newly developed efficient and simple pig transgenesis method based on cytoplasmic injection of piggyBac plasmids. In this study, we investigated the growth and reproduction performance and characterized the transgene insertion, transmission, and expression patterns in transgenic pigs generated by piggyBac transposition. Results showed that transgene has no injurious effect on the growth and reproduction of transgenic pigs. Multiple copies of monogenic EGFP transgene were inserted at noncoding sequences of host genome, and passed from founder transgenic pigs to their transgenic offspring in segregation or linkage manner. The EGFP transgene was ubiquitously expressed in transgenic pigs, and its expression intensity was associated with transgene copy number but not related to its promoter DNA methylation level. To the best of our knowledge, this is first study that fully described the growth and reproduction performance, transgene insertion, expression, and transmission profiles in transgenic pigs produced by piggyBac system. It not only demonstrates that piggyBac transposition-mediated gene transfer is an effective and favorable approach for pig transgenesis, but also provides scientific information for understanding the transgene insertion, expression and transmission patterns in transgenic animals produced by piggyBac transposition.

  12. Composite potato plants with transgenic roots on non-transgenic shoots: a model system for studying gene silencing in roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Patricia; Santala, Johanna; Nielsen, Steen Lykke

    2014-01-01

    induced phenotypically normal roots which, however, showed a reduced response to cytokinin as compared with non-transgenic roots. Nevertheless, both types of roots were infected to a similar high rate with the zoospores of Spongospora subterranea, a soilborne potato pathogen. The transgenic roots...

  13. High-value products from transgenic maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Shaista; Ramessar, Koreen; Farré, Gemma; Sabalza, Maite; Miralpeix, Bruna; Twyman, Richard M; Capell, Teresa; Zhu, Changfu; Christou, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Maize (also known as corn) is a domesticated cereal grain that has been grown as food and animal feed for tens of thousands of years. It is currently the most widely grown crop in the world, and is used not only for food/feed but also to produce ethanol, industrial starches and oils. Maize is now at the beginning of a new agricultural revolution, where the grains are used as factories to synthesize high-value molecules. In this article we look at the diversity of high-value products from maize, recent technological advances in the field and the emerging regulatory framework that governs how transgenic maize plants and their products are grown, used and traded. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel transgenic rice-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azegami, Tatsuhiko; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2015-04-01

    Oral vaccination can induce both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune responses. To control rampant mucosal infectious diseases, the development of new effective oral vaccines is needed. Plant-based vaccines are new candidates for oral vaccines, and have some advantages over the traditional vaccines in cost, safety, and scalability. Rice seeds are attractive for vaccine production because of their stability and resistance to digestion in the stomach. The efficacy of some rice-based vaccines for infectious, autoimmune, and other diseases has been already demonstrated in animal models. We reported the efficacy in mice, safety, and stability of a rice-based cholera toxin B subunit vaccine called MucoRice-CTB. To advance MucoRice-CTB for use in humans, we also examined its efficacy and safety in primates. The potential of transgenic rice production as a new mucosal vaccine delivery system is reviewed from the perspective of future development of effective oral vaccines.

  15. A Transgenic Mouse Model of Poliomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Satoshi; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic mice (tg mice) that express the human poliovirus receptor (PVR), CD155, are susceptible to poliovirus and develop a neurological disease that resembles human poliomyelitis. Assessment of the neurovirulence levels of poliovirus strains, including mutant viruses produced by reverse genetics, circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus, and vaccine candidates, is useful for basic research of poliovirus pathogenicity, the surveillance of circulating polioviruses, and the quality control of oral live poliovirus vaccines, and does not require the use of monkeys. Furthermore, PVR-tg mice are useful for studying poliovirus tissue tropism and host immune responses. PVR-tg mice can be bred with mice deficient in the genes involved in viral pathogenicity. This report describes the methods used to analyze the pathogenicity and immune responses of poliovirus using the PVR-tg mouse model.

  16. WP1: transgenic opto-animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    UŻarowska, E.; Czajkowski, Rafał; Konopka, W.

    2014-11-01

    We aim to create a set of genetic tools where permanent opsin expression (ChR or NpHR) is precisely limited to the population of neurons that express immediate early gene c-fos during a specific temporal window of behavioral training. Since the c-fos gene is only expressed in neurons that form experience-dependent ensemble, this approach will result in specific labeling of a small subset of cells that create memory trace for the learned behavior. To this end we employ two alternative inducible gene expression systems: Tet Expression System and Cre/lox System. In both cases, the temporal window for opsin induction is controlled pharmacologically, by doxycycline or tamoxifen, respectively. Both systems will be used for creating lines of transgenic animals.

  17. Magnetic biomineralisation in Huntington's disease transgenic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyhum, W; Hautot, D; Dobson, J; Pankhurst, Q A

    2005-01-01

    The concentration levels of biogenic magnetite nanoparticles in transgenic R6/2 Huntington's disease (HD) mice have been investigated, using seven control and seven HD mice each from an 8 week-old litter and from a 12 week-old litter. Hysteresis and isothermal remnant magnetisation data were collected on a SQUID magnetometer, and analysed using a model comprising dia/paramagnetic, ferrimagnetic and superparamagnetic contributions, to extract the magnetite and ferritin concentrations present. It was found that magnetite was present in both superparamagnetic and blocked states. A larger spread and higher concentration of magnetite levels was found in the diseased mice for both the 8 week-old and 12 week-old batches, compared to the controls

  18. Comparative proteomics of Bt-transgenic and non-transgenic cotton leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Limin; Wang, Xuchu; Jin, Xiang; Jia, Ruizong; Huang, Qixing; Tan, Yanhua; Guo, Anping

    2015-01-01

    As the rapid growth of the commercialized acreage in genetically modified (GM) crops, the unintended effects of GM crops' biosafety assessment have been given much attention. To investigate whether transgenic events cause unintended effects, comparative proteomics of cotton leaves between the commercial transgenic Bt + CpTI cotton SGK321 (BT) clone and its non-transgenic parental counterpart SY321 wild type (WT) was performed. Using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Cry1Ac toxin protein was detected in the BT leaves, while its content was only 0.31 pg/g. By 2-DE, 58 differentially expressed proteins (DEPs) were detected. Among them 35 were identified by MS. These identified DEPs were mainly involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism, chaperones related to post-translational modification and energy production. Pathway analysis revealed that most of the DEPs were implicated in carbon fixation and photosynthesis, glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism, and oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Thirteen identified proteins were involved in protein-protein interaction. The protein interactions were mainly involved in photosynthesis and energy metabolite pathway. Our study demonstrated that exogenous DNA in a host cotton genome can affect the plant growth and photosynthesis. Although some unintended variations of proteins were found between BT and WT cotton, no toxic proteins or allergens were detected. This study verified genetically modified operation did not sharply alter cotton leaf proteome, and the target proteins were hardly checked by traditional proteomic analysis.

  19. Transgenic Studies with a Keratin Promoter-Driven Growth Hormone Transgene: Prospects for Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zinkel, Sandra; Polonsky, Kenneth; Fuchs, Elaine

    1997-01-01

    Keratinocytes are potentially appealing vehicles for the delivery of secreted gene products because they can be transferred to human skin by the relatively simple procedure of grafting. Adult human keratinocytes can be efficiently propagated in culture with sufficient proliferative capacity to produce enough epidermis to cover the body surface of an average adult. However, the feasibility of delivering secreted proteins through skin grafting rests upon (i) the strength of the promoter in keratinocytes and (ii) the efficiency of protein transport through the basement membrane of the stratified epithelium and into the bloodstream. In this paper, we use transgenic technology to demonstrate that the activity of the human keratin 14 promoter remains high in adult skin and that keratinocyte-derived human growth hormone (hGH) can be produced, secreted, and transported to the bloodstream of mice with efficiency that is sufficient to exceed by an order of magnitude the circulating hGH concentration in growing children. Transgenic skin grafts from these adults continue to produce and secrete hGH stably, at ≈ 1/10 physiological levels in the bloodstream of nontransgenic recipient mice. These studies underscore the utility of the keratin 14 promoter for expressing foreign transgenes in keratinocytes and demonstrate that keratinocytes can be used as effective vehicles for transporting factors to the bloodstream and for eliciting metabolic changes. These findings have important implications for considering the keratinocyte as a possible vehicle for gene therapy.

  20. Human antibody production in transgenic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Marianne; Osborn, Michael J; Ma, Biao; Hayre, Jasvinder; Avis, Suzanne; Lundstrom, Brian; Buelow, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Fully human antibodies from transgenic animals account for an increasing number of new therapeutics. After immunization, diverse human monoclonal antibodies of high affinity can be obtained from transgenic rodents, while large animals, such as transchromosomic cattle, have produced respectable amounts of specific human immunoglobulin (Ig) in serum. Several strategies to derive animals expressing human antibody repertoires have been successful. In rodents, gene loci on bacterial artificial chromosomes or yeast artificial chromosomes were integrated by oocyte microinjection or transfection of embryonic stem (ES) cells, while ruminants were derived from manipulated fibroblasts with integrated human chromosome fragments or human artificial chromosomes. In all strains, the endogenous Ig loci have been silenced by gene targeting, either in ES or fibroblast cells, or by zinc finger technology via DNA microinjection; this was essential for optimal production. However, comparisons showed that fully human antibodies were not as efficiently produced as wild-type Ig. This suboptimal performance, with respect to immune response and antibody yield, was attributed to imperfect interaction of the human constant region with endogenous signaling components such as the Igα/β in mouse, rat or cattle. Significant improvements were obtained when the human V-region genes were linked to the endogenous CH-region, either on large constructs or, separately, by site-specific integration, which could also silence the endogenous Ig locus by gene replacement or inversion. In animals with knocked-out endogenous Ig loci and integrated large IgH loci, containing many human Vs, all D and all J segments linked to endogenous C genes, highly diverse human antibody production similar to normal animals was obtained.

  1. [Effect of transgenic insect-resistant rice on biodiversity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhu, Zhen

    2011-05-01

    Rice is the most important food crops in maintaining food security in China. The loss of China's annual rice production caused by pests is over ten million tons. Present studies showed that the transgenic insect-resistant rice can substantially reduce the application amount of chemical pesticides. In the case of no pesticide use, the pest density in transgenic rice field is significantly lower than that in non-transgenic field, and the neutral insects and natural enemies of pests increased significantly, indicating that the ecological environment and biodiversity toward the positive direction. The gene flow frequency from transgenic rice is dramatically reduced with the distance increases, reaching less than 0.01% at the distance of 6.2 m. Application of transgenic insect-resistant rice in China has an important significance for ensuring food security, maintaining sustainable agricultural development, and protecting the ecological environment and biodiversity. This review summarized the research progress in transgenic insect-resistant rice and its effect on biodiversity. The research directions and development trends of crop pest controlling in future are discussed. These help to promote better use of transgenic insect-resistant rice.

  2. Welfare assessment in transgenic pigs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Reinhard C; Remuge, Liliana; Carlisle, Ailsa; Lillico, Simon; Sandøe, Peter; Sørensen, Dorte B; Whitelaw, C Bruce A; Olsson, I Anna S

    2012-08-01

    Since large animal transgenesis has been successfully attempted for the first time about 25 years ago, the technology has been applied in various lines of transgenic pigs. Nevertheless one of the concerns with the technology--animal welfare--has not been approached through systematic assessment and statements regarding the welfare of transgenic pigs have been based on anecdotal observations during early stages of transgenic programs. The main aim of the present study was therefore to perform an extensive welfare assessment comparing heterozygous transgenic animals expressing GFP with wildtype animals along various stages of post natal development. The protocol used covered reproductory performance and behaviour in GFP and wildtype sows and general health and development, social behaviour, exploratory behaviour and emotionality in GFP and wildtype littermates from birth until an age of roughly 4 months. The absence of significant differences between GFP and wildtype animals in the parameters observed suggests that the transgenic animals in question are unlikely to suffer from deleterious effects of transgene expression on their welfare and thus support existing anecdotal observations of pigs expressing GFP as healthy. Although the results are not surprising in the light of previous experience, they give a more solid fundament to the evaluation of GFP expression as being relatively non-invasive in pigs. The present study may furthermore serve as starting point for researchers aiming at a systematic characterization of welfare relevant effects in the line of transgenic pigs they are working with.

  3. Design and Management of Field Trials of Transgenic Cereals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedő, Zoltán; Rakszegi, Mariann; Láng, László

    The development of gene transformation systems has allowed the introgression of alien genes into plant genomes, thus providing a mechanism for broadening the genetic resources available to plant breeders. The design and the management of field trials vary according to the purpose for which transgenic cereals are developed. Breeders study the phenotypic and genotypic stability of transgenic plants, monitor the increase in homozygosity of transgenic genotypes under field conditions, and develop backcross generations to transfer the introduced genes into secondary transgenic cereal genotypes. For practical purposes, they may also multiply seed of the transgenic lines to produce sufficient amounts of grain for the detailed analysis of trait(s) of interest, to determine the field performance of transgenic lines, and to compare them with the non-transformed parental genotypes. Prior to variety registration, the Distinctness, Uniformity and Stability (DUS) tests and Value for Cultivation and Use (VCU) experiments are carried out in field trials. Field testing includes specific requirements for transgenic cereals to assess potential environmental risks. The capacity of the pollen to survive, establish and disseminate in the field test environment, the potential for gene transfer, the effects of products expressed by the introduced sequences and phenotypic and genotypic instability that might cause deleterious effects must all be specifically monitored, as required by EU Directives 2003/701/EC (1) on the release of genetically modified higher plants in the environment.

  4. Genetic load and transgenic mitigating genes in transgenic Brassica rapa (field mustard × Brassica napus (oilseed rape hybrid populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warwick Suzanne I

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One theoretical explanation for the relatively poor performance of Brassica rapa (weed × Brassica napus (crop transgenic hybrids suggests that hybridization imparts a negative genetic load. Consequently, in hybrids genetic load could overshadow any benefits of fitness enhancing transgenes and become the limiting factor in transgenic hybrid persistence. Two types of genetic load were analyzed in this study: random/linkage-derived genetic load, and directly incorporated genetic load using a transgenic mitigation (TM strategy. In order to measure the effects of random genetic load, hybrid productivity (seed yield and biomass was correlated with crop- and weed-specific AFLP genomic markers. This portion of the study was designed to answer whether or not weed × transgenic crop hybrids possessing more crop genes were less competitive than hybrids containing fewer crop genes. The effects of directly incorporated genetic load (TM were analyzed through transgene persistence data. TM strategies are proposed to decrease transgene persistence if gene flow and subsequent transgene introgression to a wild host were to occur. Results In the absence of interspecific competition, transgenic weed × crop hybrids benefited from having more crop-specific alleles. There was a positive correlation between performance and number of B. napus crop-specific AFLP markers [seed yield vs. marker number (r = 0.54, P = 0.0003 and vegetative dry biomass vs. marker number (r = 0.44, P = 0.005]. However under interspecific competition with wheat or more weed-like conditions (i.e. representing a situation where hybrid plants emerge as volunteer weeds in subsequent cropping systems, there was a positive correlation between the number of B. rapa weed-specific AFLP markers and seed yield (r = 0.70, P = 0.0001, although no such correlation was detected for vegetative biomass. When genetic load was directly incorporated into the hybrid genome, by inserting a

  5. Transgenic fish systems and their application in ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Okhyun; Green, Jon M; Tyler, Charles R

    2015-02-01

    The use of transgenics in fish is a relatively recent development for advancing understanding of genetic mechanisms and developmental processes, improving aquaculture, and for pharmaceutical discovery. Transgenic fish have also been applied in ecotoxicology where they have the potential to provide more advanced and integrated systems for assessing health impacts of chemicals. The zebrafish (Daniorerio) is the most popular fish for transgenic models, for reasons including their high fecundity, transparency of their embryos, rapid organogenesis and availability of extensive genetic resources. The most commonly used technique for producing transgenic zebrafish is via microinjection of transgenes into fertilized eggs. Transposon and meganuclease have become the most reliable methods for insertion of the genetic construct in the production of stable transgenic fish lines. The GAL4-UAS system, where GAL4 is placed under the control of a desired promoter and UAS is fused with a fluorescent marker, has greatly enhanced model development for studies in ecotoxicology. Transgenic fish have been developed to study for the effects of heavy metal toxicity (via heat-shock protein genes), oxidative stress (via an electrophile-responsive element), for various organic chemicals acting through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, thyroid and glucocorticoid response pathways, and estrogenicity. These models vary in their sensitivity with only very few able to detect responses for environmentally relevant exposures. Nevertheless, the potential of these systems for analyses of chemical effects in real time and across multiple targets in intact organisms is considerable. Here we illustrate the techniques used for generating transgenic zebrafish and assess progress in the development and application of transgenic fish (principally zebrafish) for studies in environmental toxicology. We further provide a viewpoint on future development opportunities.

  6. Generation and characterization of human heme oxygenase-1 transgenic pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jung Yeom

    Full Text Available Xenotransplantation using transgenic pigs as an organ source is a promising strategy to overcome shortage of human organ for transplantation. Various genetic modifications have been tried to ameliorate xenograft rejection. In the present study we assessed effect of transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1, an inducible protein capable of cytoprotection by scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing apoptosis caused by cellular stress during inflammatory processes, in neonatal porcine islet-like cluster cells (NPCCs. Transduction of NPCCs with adenovirus containing hHO-1 gene significantly reduced apoptosis compared with the GFP-expressing adenovirus control after treatment with either hydrogen peroxide or hTNF-α and cycloheximide. These protective effects were diminished by co-treatment of hHO-1 antagonist, Zinc protoporphyrin IX. We also generated transgenic pigs expressing hHO-1 and analyzed expression and function of the transgene. Human HO-1 was expressed in most tissues, including the heart, kidney, lung, pancreas, spleen and skin, however, expression levels and patterns of the hHO-1 gene are not consistent in each organ. We isolate fibroblast from transgenic pigs to analyze protective effect of the hHO-1. As expected, fibroblasts derived from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs were significantly resistant to both hydrogen peroxide damage and hTNF-α and cycloheximide-mediated apoptosis when compared with wild-type fibroblasts. Furthermore, induction of RANTES in response to hTNF-α or LPS was significantly decreased in fibroblasts obtained from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs. These findings suggest that transgenic expression of hHO-1 can protect xenografts when exposed to oxidative stresses, especially from ischemia/reperfusion injury, and/or acute rejection mediated by cytokines. Accordingly, hHO-1 could be an important candidate molecule in a multi-transgenic pig strategy for xenotransplantation.

  7. Imaging mouse cancer models in vivo using reporter transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Scott K; Patrick, P Stephen; Brindle, Kevin M

    2013-08-01

    Imaging mouse models of cancer with reporter transgenes has become a relatively common experimental approach in the laboratory, which allows noninvasive and longitudinal investigation of diverse aspects of tumor biology in vivo. Our goal here is to outline briefly the principles of the relevant imaging modalities, emphasizing particularly their strengths and weaknesses and what the researcher can expect in a practical sense from each of these techniques. Furthermore, we discuss how relatively subtle modifications in the way reporter transgene expression is regulated in the cell underpin the ability of reporter transgenes as a whole to provide readouts on such varied aspects of tumor biology in vivo.

  8. Single-copy insertion of transgenes in Caenorhabditis elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøkjaer-Jensen, Christian; Davis, M Wayne; Hopkins, Christopher E

    2008-01-01

    developed a method that inserts a single copy of a transgene into a defined site. Mobilization of a Mos1 transposon generates a double-strand break in noncoding DNA. The break is repaired by copying DNA from an extrachromosomal template into the chromosomal site. Homozygous single-copy insertions can...... be obtained in less than 2 weeks by injecting approximately 20 worms. We have successfully inserted transgenes as long as 9 kb and verified that single copies are inserted at the targeted site. Single-copy transgenes are expressed at endogenous levels and can be expressed in the female and male germlines....

  9. Down with DON: Strategies for precise transgene delivery and rnai-based suppression of fusarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic strategies can effectively supplement other methods for controlling Fusarium head blight (FHB). Impediments to deploying FHB-resistant transgenic barley include a long time-frame for creating and testing transgenes in barley, imprecise transgene insertions that lead to unstable gene expre...

  10. Selectivity and Efficiency of Late Transgene Expression by Transcriptionally Targeted Oncolytic Adenoviruses Are Dependent on the Transgene Insertion Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirin, Christina; Rohmer, Stanimira; Fernández-Ulibarri, Inés; Behr, Michael; Hesse, Andrea; Engelhardt, Sarah; Erbs, Philippe; Enk, Alexander H.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Key challenges facing cancer therapy are the development of tumor-specific drugs and potent multimodal regimens. Oncolytic adenoviruses possess the potential to realize both aims by restricting virus replication to tumors and inserting therapeutic genes into the virus genome, respectively. A major effort in this regard is to express transgenes in a tumor-specific manner without affecting virus replication. Using both luciferase as a sensitive reporter and genetic prodrug activation, we show that promoter control of E1A facilitates highly selective expression of transgenes inserted into the late transcription unit. This, however, required multistep optimization of late transgene expression. Transgene insertion via internal ribosome entry site (IRES), splice acceptor (SA), or viral 2A sequences resulted in replication-dependent expression. Unexpectedly, analyses in appropriate substrates and with matching control viruses revealed that IRES and SA, but not 2A, facilitated indirect transgene targeting via tyrosinase promoter control of E1A. Transgene expression via SA was more selective (up to 1,500-fold) but less effective than via IRES. Notably, we also revealed transgene-dependent interference with splicing. Hence, the prodrug convertase FCU1 (a cytosine deaminase–uracil phosphoribosyltransferase fusion protein) was expressed only after optimizing the sequence surrounding the SA site and mutating a cryptic splice site within the transgene. The resulting tyrosinase promoter-regulated and FCU1-encoding adenovirus combined effective oncolysis with targeted prodrug activation therapy of melanoma. Thus, prodrug activation showed potent bystander killing and increased cytotoxicity of the virus up to 10-fold. We conclude that armed oncolytic viruses can be improved substantially by comparing and optimizing strategies for targeted transgene expression, thereby implementing selective and multimodal cancer therapies. PMID:20939692

  11. Sensitivity of a real-time PCR method for the detection of transgenes in a mixture of transgenic and non-transgenic seeds of papaya (Carica papaya L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageswara-Rao, Madhugiri; Kwit, Charles; Agarwal, Sujata; Patton, Mariah T; Skeen, Jordan A; Yuan, Joshua S; Manshardt, Richard M; Stewart, C Neal

    2013-09-01

    Genetically engineered (GE) ringspot virus-resistant papaya cultivars 'Rainbow' and 'SunUp' have been grown in Hawai'i for over 10 years. In Hawai'i, the introduction of GE papayas into regions where non-GE cultivars are grown and where feral non-GE papayas exist have been accompanied with concerns associated with transgene flow. Of particular concern is the possibility of transgenic seeds being found in non-GE papaya fruits via cross-pollination. Development of high-throughput methods to reliably detect the adventitious presence of such transgenic material would benefit both the scientific and regulatory communities. We assessed the accuracy of using conventional qualitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as well as real-time PCR-based assays to quantify the presence of transgenic DNA from bulk samples of non-GE papaya seeds. In this study, an optimized method of extracting high quality DNA from dry seeds of papaya was standardized. A reliable, sensitive real-time PCR method for detecting and quantifying viral coat protein (cp) transgenes in bulk seed samples utilizing the endogenous papain gene is presented. Quantification range was from 0.01 to 100 ng/μl of GE-papaya DNA template with a detection limit as low as 0.01% (10 pg). To test this system, we simulated transgene flow using known quantities of GE and non-GE DNA and determined that 0.038% (38 pg) GE papaya DNA could be detected using real-time PCR. We also validated this system by extracting DNA from known ratios of GE seeds to non-GE seeds of papaya followed by real-time PCR detection and observed a reliable detection limit of 0.4%. This method for the quick and sensitive detection of transgenes in bulked papaya seed lots using conventional as well as real-time PCR-based methods will benefit numerous stakeholders. In particular, this method could be utilized to screen selected fruits from maternal non-GE papaya trees in Hawai'i for the presence of transgenic seed at typical regulatory threshold levels

  12. Microinjection of A. aegypti Embryos to Obtain Transgenic Mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Jasinskiene, Nijole; Juhn, Jennifer; James, Anthony A.

    2007-01-01

    In this video, Nijole Jasinskiene demonstrates the methodology employed to generate transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which are vectors for dengue fever. The techniques for correctly preparing microinjection needles, dessicating embryos, and performing microinjection are demonstrated.

  13. Microinjection of A. aegypti embryos to obtain transgenic mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinskiene, Nijole; Juhn, Jennifer; James, Anthony A

    2007-01-01

    In this video, Nijole Jasinskiene demonstrates the methodology employed to generate transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, which are vectors for dengue fever. The techniques for correctly preparing microinjection needles, desiccating embryos, and performing microinjection are demonstrated.

  14. Efficient production of transgenic Alstroemeria plants by using Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, J.B.; Raemakers, C.J.J.M.; Jacobsen, E.; Visser, R.G.F.

    2007-01-01

    A highly efficient and reproducible protocol was developed to obtain transgenic Alstroemeria plants by combining Agrobacterium tumefaciens with friable embryogenic callus (FEC). To develop this transformation method, factors such as infection time, cocultivation period, effect of acetosyringone

  15. [Effects of agricultural activities and transgenic crops on agricultural biodiversity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi-Tao; Luo, Hong-Bing; Li, Jun-Sheng; Huang, Hai; Liu, Yong-Bo

    2014-09-01

    Agricultural biodiversity is a key part of the ecosystem biodiversity, but it receives little concern. The monoculture, environmental pollution and habitat fragmentation caused by agricultural activities have threatened agricultural biodiversity over the past 50 years. To optimize agricultural management measures for crop production and environmental protection, we reviewed the effects of agricultural activities, including cultivation patterns, plastic mulching, chemical additions and the cultivation of transgenic crops, on agricultural biodiversity. The results showed that chemical pesticides and fertilizers had the most serious influence and the effects of transgenic crops varied with other factors like the specific transgene inserted in crops. The environmental risk of transgenic crops should be assessed widely through case-by-case methods, particularly its potential impacts on agricultural biodiversity. It is important to consider the protection of agricultural biodiversity before taking certain agricultural practices, which could improve agricultural production and simultaneously reduce the environmental impacts.

  16. Calcium electrotransfer for termination of transgene expression in muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Spanggaard, Iben; Olsen, Caroline Holkman

    2011-01-01

    Gene electrotransfer is expanding in clinical use, thus we have searched for an emergency procedure to stop transgene expression in case of serious adverse events. Calcium is cytotoxic at high intracellular levels, so we tested effects of calcium electrotransfer on transgene expression in muscle....... A clinical grade calcium solution (20 µl, 168 mM) was injected into transfected mouse or rat tibialis cranialis muscle. Ca(2+) uptake was quantified using calcium 45 ((45)Ca), and voltage and time between injection and pulsation were varied. Extinction of transgene expression was investigated by using both...... voltage pulses of 1000 V/cm. Using these parameters, in vivo imaging showed that transgene expression significantly decreased 4 hr after Ca(2+) electrotransfer and was eliminated within 24 hr. Similarly, serum erythropoietin was reduced by 46% at 4 hr and to control levels at 2 days. Histological analyses...

  17. Strategies for metabolic pathway engineering with multiple transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Ralph

    2013-09-01

    The engineering of metabolic pathways in plants often requires the concerted expression of more than one gene. While with traditional transgenic approaches, the expression of multiple transgenes has been challenging, recent progress has greatly expanded our repertoire of powerful techniques making this possible. New technological options include large-scale co-transformation of the nuclear genome, also referred to as combinatorial transformation, and transformation of the chloroplast genome with synthetic operon constructs. This review describes the state of the art in multigene genetic engineering of plants. It focuses on the methods currently available for the introduction of multiple transgenes into plants and the molecular mechanisms underlying successful transgene expression. Selected examples of metabolic pathway engineering are used to illustrate the attractions and limitations of each method and to highlight key factors that influence the experimenter's choice of the best strategy for multigene engineering.

  18. Assessment of Bollgard II cotton pollen mediated transgenes flow to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of Bollgard II cotton pollen mediated transgenes flow to conventional cotton in the farming conditions of Burkina Faso. Bourgou Larbouga, Sanfo Denys, Tiemtore C Bernard, Traore Oula, Sanou Jacob, Traore Karim ...

  19. Analysis of Multistep Mammary Tumorigenesis in Wnt-1 Transgenic Mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shankar, Deepa

    1997-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is used as an insertion mutagen in transgenic mice that express the Wnt1 gene in their mammary gland, to produce additional events like activation of a second oncogene...

  20. Designer proton-channel transgenic algae for photobiological hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James Weifu [Knoxville, TN

    2011-04-26

    A designer proton-channel transgenic alga for photobiological hydrogen production that is specifically designed for production of molecular hydrogen (H.sub.2) through photosynthetic water splitting. The designer transgenic alga includes proton-conductive channels that are expressed to produce such uncoupler proteins in an amount sufficient to increase the algal H.sub.2 productivity. In one embodiment the designer proton-channel transgene is a nucleic acid construct (300) including a PCR forward primer (302), an externally inducible promoter (304), a transit targeting sequence (306), a designer proton-channel encoding sequence (308), a transcription and translation terminator (310), and a PCR reverse primer (312). In various embodiments, the designer proton-channel transgenic algae are used with a gas-separation system (500) and a gas-products-separation and utilization system (600) for photobiological H.sub.2 production.

  1. Transgenic mouse models of hormonal mammary carcinogenesis: advantages and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirma, Nameer B; Tekmal, Rajeshwar R

    2012-09-01

    Mouse models of breast cancer, especially transgenic and knockout mice, have been established as valuable tools in shedding light on factors involved in preneoplastic changes, tumor development and malignant progression. The majority of mouse transgenic models develop estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors. This is seen as a drawback because the majority of human breast cancers present an ER positive phenotype. On the other hand, several transgenic mouse models have been developed that produce ER positive mammary tumors. These include mice over-expressing aromatase, ERα, PELP-1 and AIB-1. In this review, we will discuss the value of these models as physiologically relevant in vivo systems to understand breast cancer as well as some of the pitfalls involving these models. In all, we argue that the use of transgenic models has improved our understanding of the molecular aspects and biology of breast cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficient production of transgenic soybean (Glycine max [L] Merrill ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficient production of transgenic soybean (Glycine max [L] Merrill) plants mediated via whisker-supersonic (WSS) method. MM Khalafalla, HA El-Shemy, SM Rahman, M Teraishi, H Hasegawa, T Terakawa, M Ishimoto ...

  3. Transgenic mouse models of metabolic bone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, L K

    2001-07-01

    The approach of gene-targeted animal models is likely the most important experimental tool contributing to recent advances in skeletal biology. Modifying the expression of a gene in vivo, and the analysis of the consequences of the mutation, are central to the understanding of gene function during development and physiology, and therefore to our understanding of the gene's role in disease states. Researchers had been limited to animal models primarily involving pharmaceutical manipulations and spontaneous mutations. With the advent of gene targeting, however, animal models that impact our understanding of metabolic bone disease have evolved dramatically. Interestingly, some genes that were expected to yield dramatic phenotypes in bone, such as estrogen receptor-alpha or osteopontin, proved to have subtle phenotypes, whereas other genes, such as interleukin-5 or osteoprotegerin, were initially identified as having a role in bone metabolism via the analysis of their phenotype after gene ablation or overexpression. Particularly important has been the advance in knowledge of osteoblast and osteoclast independent and dependent roles via the selective targeting of genes and the consequent disruption of bone formation, bone resorption, or both. Our understanding of interactions of the skeletal system with other systems, ie, the vascular system and homeostatic controls of adipogenesis, has evolved via animal models such as the matrix gla protein, knock-out, and the targeted overexpression of Delta FosB. Challenging transgenic models such as the osteopontin-deficient mice with mediators of bone remodeling like parathyroid hormone and mechanical stimuli and extending phenotype characterization to mechanistic in vitro studies of primary bone cells is providing additional insight into the mechanisms involved in pathologic states and their potentials for therapeutic strategies. This review segregates characterization of transgenic models based on the category of gene altered

  4. A novel transgenic mouse model of lysosomal storage disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz-Miranda, Sonia; Ji, Rui; Jurczyk, Agata; Aryee, Ken-Edwin; Mo, Shunyan; Fletcher, Terry; Shaffer, Scott A.; Greiner, Dale L.; Bortell, Rita; Gregg, Ronald G.; Cheng, Alan; Hennings, Leah J.; Rittenhouse, Ann R.

    2016-01-01

    We provide an explanation for striking pathology found in a subset of genetically engineered mice homozygous for a rat CaVβ2a transgene (Tg+/+). Multiple transgene (Tg) copies inserted into chromosome 19; at this same site a large deletion occurred, ablating cholesterol 25-hydroxylase and partially deleting lysosomal acid lipase and CD95. Their loss of function can account for lipid build up and immune system hypertrophy, which defines this phenotype and serendipitously provides a novel model...

  5. Dihydrofolate Reductase and Thymidylate Synthase Transgenes Resistant to Methotrexate Interact to Permit Novel Transgene Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushworth, David; Mathews, Amber; Alpert, Amir; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2015-09-18

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an anti-folate that inhibits de novo purine and thymidine nucleotide synthesis. MTX induces death in rapidly replicating cells and is used in the treatment of multiple cancers. MTX inhibits thymidine synthesis by targeting dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and thymidylate synthase (TYMS). The use of MTX to treat cancer also causes bone marrow suppression and inhibits the immune system. This has led to the development of an MTX-resistant DHFR, DHFR L22F, F31S (DHFR(FS)), to rescue healthy cells. 5-Fluorouracil-resistant TYMS T51S, G52S (TYMS(SS)) is resistant to MTX and improves MTX resistance of DHFR(FS) in primary T cells. Here we find that a known mechanism of MTX-induced increase in DHFR expression persists with DHFR(FS) and cis-expressed transgenes. We also find that TYMS(SS) expression of cis-expressed transgenes is similarly decreased in an MTX-inducible manner. MTX-inducible changes in DHFR(FS) and TYMS(SS) expression changes are lost when both genes are expressed together. In fact, expression of the DHFR(FS) and TYMS(SS) cis-expressed transgenes becomes correlated. These findings provide the basis for an unrecognized post-transcriptional mechanism that functionally links expression of DHFR and TYMS. These findings were made in genetically modified primary human T cells and have a clear potential for use in clinical applications where gene expression needs to be regulated by drug or maintained at a specific expression level. We demonstrate a potential application of this system in the controlled expression of systemically toxic cytokine IL-12. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. The use of transgenic parasites in malaria vaccine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Ahmad Syibli; Marin-Mogollon, Catherin; Salman, Ahmed M; Franke-Fayard, Blandine M; Janse, Chris J; Khan, Shahid M

    2017-07-01

    Transgenic malaria parasites expressing foreign genes, for example fluorescent and luminescent proteins, are used extensively to interrogate parasite biology and host-parasite interactions associated with malaria pathology. Increasingly transgenic parasites are also exploited to advance malaria vaccine development. Areas covered: We review how transgenic malaria parasites are used, in vitro and in vivo, to determine protective efficacy of different antigens and vaccination strategies and to determine immunological correlates of protection. We describe how chimeric rodent parasites expressing P. falciparum or P. vivax antigens are being used to directly evaluate and rank order human malaria vaccines before their advancement to clinical testing. In addition, we describe how transgenic human and rodent parasites are used to develop and evaluate live (genetically) attenuated vaccines. Expert commentary: Transgenic rodent and human malaria parasites are being used to both identify vaccine candidate antigens and to evaluate both sub-unit and whole organism vaccines before they are advanced into clinical testing. Transgenic parasites combined with in vivo pre-clinical testing models (e.g. mice) are used to evaluate vaccine safety, potency and the durability of protection as well as to uncover critical protective immune responses and to refine vaccination strategies.

  7. Resistance of Antimicrobial Peptide Gene Transgenic Rice to Bacterial Blight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei WANG

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptide is a polypeptide with antimicrobial activity. Antimicrobial peptide genes Np3 and Np5 from Chinese shrimp (Fenneropenaeus Chinensis were integrated into Oryza sativa L. subsp. japonica cv. Aichi ashahi by Agrobacterium mediated transformation system. PCR analysis showed that the positive ratios of Np3 and Np5 were 36% and 45% in T0 generation, respectively. RT-PCR analysis showed that the antimicrobial peptide genes were expressed in T1 generation, and there was no obvious difference in agronomic traits between transgenic plants and non-transgenic plants. Four Np3 and Np5 transgenic lines in T1 generation were inoculated with Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae strain CR4, and all the four transgenic lines had significantly enhanced resistance to bacterial blight caused by the strain CR4. The Np5 transgenic lines also showed higher resistance to bacterial blight caused by strains JS97-2, Zhe 173 and OS-225. It is suggested that transgenic lines with Np5 gene might possess broad spectrum resistance to rice bacterial blight.

  8. [Obtaining transgenic rice plants and their progenies using Agrobacterium tumefaciens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Z C; Yang, F; Xu, Y; Li, B J

    1998-12-01

    Rice (Oriza sativa L.) suspension cells of Taipei 309 were co-cultivated with A. tumefaciens stran EHA101 harbouring binary vector pBYT2 for 3 days in the presence of vir inducer, 100 mumol/L acetosyringone (AS). After 2 months of continuous selection, 17 stable hygromycin-resistant, GUS-positive calli were recovered from 364 suspension cell clusters co-cultivated with A. tumefaciens. 10 putative transgenic R0 plants obtained from 8 tansformed calli and their progenies were analyzed for the integration and expression of foreign genes. Southern blot analysis of R0 and R1 generations indicated that foreign genes had been stably integrated in the genome of transgenic rice and sexually transmitted. One of the transgenic lines showed 5 copies of T-DNA integration, while the others had only one copy. Histochemical staining observation and fluorometric assay of GUS activity in transgenic rice cells and plants showed ubiquitin promoter from maize was highly effective in driving the expression of gus reporter gene in transgenic rice cells. GUS protein and its activity were also investigated through ndPAGE-X-Gluc staining assay, and it was found that the GUS protein in transgenic rice cells was smaller in size than the standard GUS protein (Sigma Co. G0786) but as large as that from E.coli HB101 (pBI121). This study suggested that Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of plant is an efficient and reliable method to introduce foreign genes into rice.

  9. Dehydrins Impart Protection against Oxidative Stress in Transgenic Tobacco Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Tanmoy; Upadhyaya, Gouranga; Basak, Chandra; Das, Arup; Chakraborty, Chandrima; Ray, Sudipta

    2018-01-01

    Environmental stresses generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) which might be detrimental to the plants when produced in an uncontrolled way. However, the plants ameliorate such stresses by synthesizing antioxidants and enzymes responsible for the dismutation of ROS. Additionally, the dehydrins were also able to protect the inactivation of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase against hydroxyl radicals (OH ⋅ ) generated during Fenton's reaction. SbDhn1 and SbDhn2 overexpressing transgenic tobacco plants were able to protect against oxidative damage. Transgenic tobacco lines showed better photosynthetic efficiency along with high chlorophyll content, soluble sugar and proline. However, the malonyl dialdehyde (MDA) content was significantly lower in transgenic lines. Experimental evidence demonstrates the protective effect of dehydrins on electron transport chain in isolated chloroplast upon methyl viologen (MV) treatment. The transgenic tobacco plants showed significantly lower superoxide radical generation () upon MV treatment. The accumulation of the H 2 O 2 was also lower in the transgenic plants. Furthermore, in the transgenic plants the expression of ROS scavenging enzymes was higher compared to non-transformed (NT) or vector transformed (VT) plants. Taken together these data, during oxidative stress dehydrins function by scavenging the () directly and also by rendering protection to the enzymes responsible for the dismutation of () thereby significantly reducing the amount of hydrogen peroxides formed. Increase in proline content along with other antioxidants might also play a significant role in stress amelioration. Dehydrins thus function co-operatively with other protective mechanisms under oxidative stress conditions rendering protection in stress environment.

  10. Dehydrins Impart Protection against Oxidative Stress in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmoy Halder

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Environmental stresses generate reactive oxygen species (ROS which might be detrimental to the plants when produced in an uncontrolled way. However, the plants ameliorate such stresses by synthesizing antioxidants and enzymes responsible for the dismutation of ROS. Additionally, the dehydrins were also able to protect the inactivation of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase against hydroxyl radicals (OH⋅ generated during Fenton’s reaction. SbDhn1 and SbDhn2 overexpressing transgenic tobacco plants were able to protect against oxidative damage. Transgenic tobacco lines showed better photosynthetic efficiency along with high chlorophyll content, soluble sugar and proline. However, the malonyl dialdehyde (MDA content was significantly lower in transgenic lines. Experimental evidence demonstrates the protective effect of dehydrins on electron transport chain in isolated chloroplast upon methyl viologen (MV treatment. The transgenic tobacco plants showed significantly lower superoxide radical generation ( upon MV treatment. The accumulation of the H2O2 was also lower in the transgenic plants. Furthermore, in the transgenic plants the expression of ROS scavenging enzymes was higher compared to non-transformed (NT or vector transformed (VT plants. Taken together these data, during oxidative stress dehydrins function by scavenging the ( directly and also by rendering protection to the enzymes responsible for the dismutation of ( thereby significantly reducing the amount of hydrogen peroxides formed. Increase in proline content along with other antioxidants might also play a significant role in stress amelioration. Dehydrins thus function co-operatively with other protective mechanisms under oxidative stress conditions rendering protection in stress environment.

  11. Detection of Transgenes on DNA Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Fukashi

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was developed for detecting specific DNA sequences directly on mitotic or meiotic chromosomes. However, the resolution of FISH on chromosomes is limited by condensed structure of chromatin, and it is difficult to differentiate two target sites close to each other. To overcome this issue, the objects was changed to stretched DNA fibers, and this fiber FISH technique has now been used for revealing genome structure at molecular level. Hybridization and detection procedures of fiber FISH are common with FISH on chromosomes. Therefore, application of fiber FISH is not difficult for the researchers of some experience in ordinary FISH. DNA fibers can be released from nuclei fixed on glass slides using a detergent. The DNA fibers were shred in FISH procedure, and the resultant fragments became small bead-like shape. This makes FISH signals on DNA fibers a series of dots. The size of DNA in the dot is estimated to be approximately 1 kb, it corresponding to the resolution of fiber FISH. This makes it possible to analyze structures of transgenes on DNA fibers in detail.

  12. Evaluating cerebellar functions using optogenetic transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, John P.; Turecek, Josef; Turner, Eric E.

    2013-03-01

    We employed a transgenic mouse having conditional expression of ChR2(H134R) in neurons of the inferior olive to facilitate understanding of the role of electrical coupling and oscillation in central nervous system function. Two-photon excitation of ChR2-expressing neurons using 64 laser beams restricted to single inferior olive cell bodies depolarized neurons and evoked voltage deflections in neighboring neurons demonstrating electrical coupling. Broader illumination of neuronal ensembles using blue light induced an optical clamp of endogenous electrical rhythms in the inferior olive of acutely-prepared brain slices, which when applied in vivo directly modulated the local field potential activity and induced tremor. The experiments demonstrate novel methods to optically manipulate electrically coupled potentials and rhythmogenesis within a neuronal ensemble. From a functional perspective, the experiments shed light on the cellular and circuitry mechanisms of essential tremor, a prevalent neurological condition, by indicating time- and frequencydependence of tremor upon varying rhythms of inferior olive stimulation. The experiments indicate analog control of a brain rhythm that may be used to enhance our understanding of the functional consequences of central rhythmogenesis.

  13. Epigenetic Regulation of Intronic Transgenes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osabe, Kenji; Harukawa, Yoshiko; Miura, Saori; Saze, Hidetoshi

    2017-03-24

    Defense mechanisms of plant genomes can epigenetically inactivate repetitive sequences and exogenous transgenes. Loss of mutant phenotypes in intronic T-DNA insertion lines by interaction with another T-DNA locus, termed T-DNA suppression, has been observed in Arabidopsis thaliana, although the molecular basis of establishment and maintenance of T-DNA suppression is poorly understood. Here we show that maintenance of T-DNA suppression requires heterochromatinisation of T-DNA sequences and the nuclear proteins, INCREASED IN BONSAI METHYLATION 2 (IBM2) and ENHANCED DOWNY MILDEW 2 (EDM2), which prevent ectopic 3' end processing of mRNA in atypically long introns containing T-DNA sequences. Initiation of T-DNA suppression is mediated by the canonical RdDM pathway after hybridisation of two T-DNA strains, accompanied by DNA hypermethylation of T-DNA sequences in the F1 generation. Our results reveal the presence of a genome surveillance mechanism through genome hybridisation that masks repetitive DNAs intruding into transcription units.

  14. Transgenic plants in the biopharmaceutical market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twyman, Richard M; Schillberg, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer

    2005-02-01

    Many of our 'small-molecule-drugs' are natural products from plants, or are synthetic compounds based on molecules found naturally in plants. However, the vast majority of the protein therapeutics (or biopharmaceuticals) we use are from animal or human sources, and are produced commercially in microbial or mammalian bioreactor systems. Over the last few years, it has become clear that plants have great potential for the production of human proteins and other protein-based therapeutic entities. Plants offer the prospect of inexpensive biopharmaceutical production without sacrificing product quality or safety, and following the success of several plant-derived technical proteins, the first therapeutic products are now approaching the market. In this review, the different plant-based production systems are discussed and the merits of transgenic plants are evaluated compared with other platforms. A detailed discussion is provided of the development issues that remain to be addressed before plants become an acceptable mainstream production technology. The many different proteins that have already been produced using plants are described, and a sketch of the current market and the activities of the key players is provided. Despite the currently unclear regulatory framework and general industry inertia, the benefits of plant-derived pharmaceuticals are now bringing the prospect of inexpensive veterinary and human medicines closer than ever before.

  15. Comparative study of transgenic and non-transgenic maize (Zea mays) flours commercialized in Brazil, focussing on proteomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Nádia; Barbosa, Herbert; Jacob, Silvana; Arruda, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Genetically modified foods are a major concern around the world due to the lack of information concerning their safety and health effects. This work evaluates differences, at the proteomic level, between two types of crop samples: transgenic (MON810 event with the Cry1Ab gene, which confers resistance to insects) and non-transgenic maize flour commercialized in Brazil. The 2-D DIGE technique revealed 99 differentially expressed spots, which were collected in 2-D PAGE gels and identified via mass spectrometry (nESI-QTOF MS/MS). The abundance of protein differences between the transgenic and non-transgenic samples could arise from genetic modification or as a result of an environmental influence pertaining to the commercial sample. The major functional category of proteins identified was related to disease/defense and, although differences were observed between samples, no toxins or allergenic proteins were found. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Efficient Generation of Marker-Free Transgenic Rice Plants Using an Improved Transposon-Mediated Transgene Reintegration Strategy1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Jie; Li, Jun; Zou, Xiaowei; Zhao, Jianhua; Li, Qingliang; Xia, Ran; Yang, Ruifang; Wang, Dekai; Zuo, Zhaoxue; Tu, Jumin; Tao, Yuezhi; Chen, Xiaoyun; Xie, Qi; Zhu, Zengrong

    2015-01-01

    Marker-free transgenic plants can be developed through transposon-mediated transgene reintegration, which allows intact transgene insertion with defined boundaries and requires only a few primary transformants. In this study, we improved the selection strategy and validated that the maize (Zea mays) Activator/Dissociation (Ds) transposable element can be routinely used to generate marker-free transgenic plants. A Ds-based gene of interest was linked to green fluorescent protein in transfer DNA (T-DNA), and a green fluorescent protein-aided counterselection against T-DNA was used together with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based positive selection for the gene of interest to screen marker-free progeny. To test the efficacy of this strategy, we cloned the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) δ-endotoxin gene into the Ds elements and transformed transposon vectors into rice (Oryza sativa) cultivars via Agrobacterium tumefaciens. PCR assays of the transposon empty donor site exhibited transposition in somatic cells in 60.5% to 100% of the rice transformants. Marker-free (T-DNA-free) transgenic rice plants derived from unlinked germinal transposition were obtained from the T1 generation of 26.1% of the primary transformants. Individual marker-free transgenic rice lines were subjected to thermal asymmetric interlaced-PCR to determine Ds(Bt) reintegration positions, reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect Bt expression levels, and bioassays to confirm resistance against the striped stem borer Chilo suppressalis. Overall, we efficiently generated marker-free transgenic plants with optimized transgene insertion and expression. The transposon-mediated marker-free platform established in this study can be used in rice and possibly in other important crops. PMID:25371551

  17. Composite potato plants with transgenic roots on non-transgenic shoots: a model system for studying gene silencing in roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Patricia; Santala, Johanna; Nielsen, Steen Lykke; Hühns, Maja; Broer, Inge; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2014-12-01

    Composite potato plants offer an extremely fast, effective and reliable system for studies on gene functions in roots using antisense or inverted-repeat but not sense constructs for gene inactivation. Composite plants, with transgenic roots on a non-transgenic shoot, can be obtained by shoot explant transformation with Agrobacterium rhizogenes. The aim of this study was to generate composite potato plants (Solanum tuberosum) to be used as a model system in future studies on root-pathogen interactions and gene silencing in the roots. The proportion of transgenic roots among the roots induced was high (80-100%) in the four potato cultivars tested (Albatros, Desirée, Sabina and Saturna). No wild-type adventitious roots were formed at mock inoculation site. All strains of A. rhizogenes tested induced phenotypically normal roots which, however, showed a reduced response to cytokinin as compared with non-transgenic roots. Nevertheless, both types of roots were infected to a similar high rate with the zoospores of Spongospora subterranea, a soilborne potato pathogen. The transgenic roots of composite potato plants expressed significantly higher amounts of β-glucuronidase (GUS) than the roots of a GUS-transgenic potato line event. Silencing of the uidA transgene (GUS) was tested by inducing roots on the GUS-transgenic cv. Albatros event with strains of A. rhizogenes over-expressing either the uidA sense or antisense transcripts, or inverted-repeat or hairpin uidA RNA. The three last mentioned constructs caused 2.5-4.0 fold reduction in the uidA mRNA expression. In contrast, over-expression of uidA resulted in over 3-fold increase in the uidA mRNA and GUS expression, indicating that sense-mediated silencing (co-suppression) was not functional in roots. The results suggest that composite plants offer a useful experimental system for potato research, which has gained little previous attention.

  18. RNAi-Mediated Knockdown of IKK1 in Transgenic Mice Using a Transgenic Construct Containing the Human H1 Promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Maldonado, Rodolfo; Murillas, Rodolfo; Page, Angustias; Suarez-Cabrera, Cristian; Alameda, Josefa P.; Bravo, Ana; Casanova, M. Llanos

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of gene expression through siRNAs is a tool increasingly used for the study of gene function in model systems, including transgenic mice. To achieve perdurable effects, the stable expression of siRNAs by an integrated transgenic construct is necessary. For transgenic siRNA expression, promoters transcribed by either RNApol II or III (such as U6 or H1 promoters) can be used. Relatively large amounts of small RNAs synthesis are achieved when using RNApol III promoters, which can be advantageous in knockdown experiments. To study the feasibility of H1 promoter-driven RNAi-expressing constructs for protein knockdown in transgenic mice, we chose IKK1 as the target gene. Our results indicate that constructs containing the H1 promoter are sensitive to the presence of prokaryotic sequences and to transgene position effects, similar to RNApol II promoters-driven constructs. We observed variable expression levels of transgenic siRNA among different tissues and animals and a reduction of up to 80% in IKK1 expression. Furthermore, IKK1 knockdown led to hair follicle alterations. In summary, we show that constructs directed by the H1 promoter can be used for knockdown of genes of interest in different organs and for the generation of animal models complementary to knockout and overexpression models. PMID:24523631

  19. A proteomic study to identify soya allergens--the human response to transgenic versus non-transgenic soya samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Rita; Martins, Isabel; Jeno, Paul; Ricardo, Cândido Pinto; Oliveira, Maria Margarida

    2007-01-01

    In spite of being among the main foods responsible for allergic reactions worldwide, soybean (Glycine max)-derived products continue to be increasingly widespread in a variety of food products due to their well-documented health benefits. Soybean also continues to be one of the elected target crops for genetic modification. The aim of this study was to characterize the soya proteome and, specifically, IgE-reactive proteins as well as to compare the IgE response in soya-allergic individuals to genetically modified Roundup Ready soya versus its non-transgenic control. We performed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of protein extracts from a 5% genetically modified Roundup Ready flour sample and its non-transgenic control followed by Western blotting with plasma from 5 soya-sensitive individuals. We used peptide tandem mass spectrometry to identify soya proteins (55 protein matches), specifically IgE-binding ones, and to evaluate differences between transgenic and non-transgenic samples. We identified 2 new potential soybean allergens--one is maturation associated and seems to be part of the late embryogenesis abundant proteins group and the other is a cysteine proteinase inhibitor. None of the individuals tested reacted differentially to the transgenic versus non-transgenic samples under study. Soybean endogenous allergen expression does not seem to be altered after genetic modification. Proteomics should be considered a powerful tool for functional characterization of plants and for food safety assessment. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. [Analysis of transgenic and non-transgenic rice leaves using visible/near-infrared spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen-chao; Cheng, Fang

    2012-02-01

    Visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) spectroscopy was investigated for the fast discrimination of rice leaves with different genes and the determination of chlorophyll content. Least squares-support vector machines (LS-SVM) was employed to discriminate transgenic rice leaves from non-transgenic ones. The classification accuracy of calibration samples reached to 100%. Successive projections algorithm (SPA) was proposed to select effective wavelengths. SPA-LS-SVM discrimination model was performed, and the result indicated that an 87.27% recognition ratio was achieved using only 0.3% of total variables. The optimal performance of each quantification model was achieved after orthogonal signal correction (OSA). Performances treated by SPA were better than that of full-spectrum PLS, which indicated that SPA is a powerful way for effective wavelength selection. The best performance of quantification was obtained by SPA-LS-SVM model; with correlation coefficient (R) and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) being 0.902 2 and 1.312 1, respectively. Excellent classification and prediction precision were achieved. The overall results indicated that the new proposed SPA-LS-SVM is a powerful method for varieties recognition and SPAD prediction. This study supplied a new and alternative approach to the further application of Vis/NIR spectroscopy in on-field classification and monitoring.

  1. Containment and competition: transgenic animals in the One Health agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezaun, Javier; Porter, Natalie

    2015-03-01

    The development of the One World, One Health agenda coincides in time with the appearance of a different model for the management of human-animal relations: the genetic manipulation of animal species in order to curtail their ability as carriers of human pathogens. In this paper we examine two examples of this emergent transgenic approach to disease control: the development of transgenic chickens incapable of shedding avian flu viruses, and the creation of transgenic mosquitoes refractory to dengue or malaria infection. Our analysis elaborates three distinctions between the One World, One Health agenda and its transgenic counterpoint. The first concerns the conceptualization of outbreaks and the forms of surveillance that support disease control efforts. The second addresses the nature of the interspecies interface, and the relative role of humans and animals in preventing pathogen transmission. The third axis of comparison considers the proprietary dimensions of transgenic animals and their implications for the assumed public health ethos of One Health programs. We argue that the fundamental difference between these two approaches to infectious disease control can be summarized as one between strategies of containment and strategies of competition. While One World, One Health programs seek to establish an equilibrium in the human-animal interface in order to contain the circulation of pathogens across species, transgenic strategies deliberately trigger a new ecological dynamic by introducing novel animal varieties designed to out-compete pathogen-carrying hosts and vectors. In other words, while One World, One Health policies focus on introducing measures of inter-species containment, transgenic approaches derive their prophylactic benefit from provoking new cycles of intra-species competition between GM animals and their wild-type counterparts. The coexistence of these divergent health protection strategies, we suggest, helps to elucidate enduring tensions and

  2. Rice transgene flow: its patterns, model and risk management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shirong; Yuan, Qianhua; Pei, Xinwu; Wang, Feng; Hu, Ning; Yao, Kemin; Wang, Zhixing

    2014-12-01

    Progress has been made in a 12 year's systemic study on the rice transgene flow including (i) with experiments conducted at multiple locations and years using up to 21 pollen recipients, we have elucidated the patterns of transgene flow to different types of rice. The frequency to male sterile lines is 10(1) and 10(3) higher than that to O. rufipogon and rice cultivars. Wind speed and direction are the key meteorological factors affecting rice transgene flow. (ii) A regional applicable rice gene flow model is established and used to predict the maximum threshold distances (MTDs) of gene flow during 30 years in 993 major rice producing counties of southern China. The MTD0.1% for rice cultivars is basically ≤5 m in the whole region, despite climate differs significantly at diverse locations and years. This figure is particularly valuable for the commercialization and regulation of transgenic rice. (iii) The long-term fate of transgene integrated into common wild rice was investigated. Results demonstrated that the F1 hybrids of transgenic rice/O. rufipogon gradually disappeared within 3-5 years, and the Bt or bar gene was not detectable in the mixed population, suggesting the O. rufipogon may possess a strong mechanism of exclusiveness for self-protection. (iv) The flowering time isolation and a 2-m-high cloth-screen protection were proved to be effective in reducing transgene flow. We have proposed to use a principle of classification and threshold management for different types of rice. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Leaf proteome profiling of transgenic mint infected with Alternaria alternata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Ragini; Bhattacharyya, Dipto; Majumdar, Aparupa Bose; Datta, Riddhi; Hazra, Saptarshi; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2013-11-20

    The genus Mentha has been widely used in food, flavor, culinary, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. Substantial damage to this crop happened regularly due to environmental stresses like metal toxicity and pathogen attack. Here, an approach has been taken to raise transgenic mint over-expressing γ-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase (γ-ECS), the rate-limiting enzyme of GSH biosynthesis, resulted enhanced GSH content and its in planta expression confers significant tolerance towards abiotic/biotic stresses viz. metal toxicity - Cd, Zn as well as against infection of Alternaria alternata and Rhizoctonia solani. A differential proteomic analysis through 2-DE and MALDI TOF-TOF MSMS was performed to focus on the altered abundance of functionally important protein species in control and infected transgenic mint. Results showed a significant variation in the protein profile of the infected transgenic plant as compared to the wild/control transgenic counterpart. In addition to protein species related to stress and defense, redox regulation, transcription factors and energy & metabolism, protein species related to signaling and gene regulation as well as cell division also showed differential accumulation in infected transgenic. Hence, proteomics can be used as a tool to decipher the mechanism of action of GSH in providing tolerance against a necrotrophic fungus, A. alternata in transgenic mint. The reported work describes a comparative proteomics of non-model unsequenced plants like Mentha. There is a comparative protein profile between transgenic and its wild counterparts under control and infected condition. The work has an impact in crop proteomics and also tries to explain the application of proteomic approach to decipher the mechanism by which a foreign metabolite mediates stress tolerance in plant under control and infected condition. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translational Plant Proteomics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Competitive performance of transgenic wheat resistant to powdery mildew.

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    Olena Kalinina

    Full Text Available Genetically modified (GM plants offer an ideal model system to study the influence of single genes that confer constitutive resistance to pathogens on the ecological behaviour of plants. We used phytometers to study competitive interactions between GM lines of spring wheat Triticum aestivum carrying such genes and control lines. We hypothesized that competitive performance of GM lines would be reduced due to enhanced transgene expression under pathogen levels typically encountered in the field. The transgenes pm3b from wheat (resistance against powdery mildew Blumeria graminis or chitinase and glucanase genes from barley (resistance against fungi in general were introduced with the ubiquitin promoter from maize (pm3b and chitinase genes or the actin promoter from rice (glucanase gene. Phytometers of 15 transgenic and non-transgenic wheat lines were transplanted as seedlings into plots sown with the same 15 lines as competitive environments and subject to two soil nutrient levels. Pm3b lines had reduced mildew incidence compared with control lines. Chitinase and chitinase/glucanase lines showed the same high resistance to mildew as their control in low-nutrient treatment and slightly lower mildew rates than the control in high-nutrient environment. Pm3b lines were weaker competitors than control lines. This resulted in reduced yield and seed number. The Pm3b line with the highest transgene expression had 53.2% lower yield than the control whereas the Pm3b line which segregated in resistance and had higher mildew rates showed only minor costs under competition. The line expressing both chitinase and glucanase genes also showed reduced yield and seed number under competition compared with its control. Our results suggest that single transgenes conferring constitutive resistance to pathogens can have ecological costs and can weaken plant competitiveness even in the presence of the pathogen. The magnitude of these costs appears related to the degree

  5. Detailed characterization of Mirafiori lettuce virus-resistant transgenic lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazu, Yoichi; Fujiyama, Ryoi; Noguchi, Yuji; Kubota, Masaharu; Ito, Hidekazu; Fukuoka, Hiroyuki

    2010-04-01

    Lettuce big-vein disease is caused by Mirafiori lettuce virus (MiLV), which is vectored by the soil-borne fungus Olpidium brassicae. A MiLV-resistant transgenic lettuce line was developed through introducing inverted repeats of the MiLV coat protein (CP) gene. Here, a detailed characterization study of this lettuce line was conducted by comparing it with the parental, non-transformed 'Kaiser' cultivar. There were no significant differences between transgenic and non-transgenic lettuce in terms of pollen fertility, pollen dispersal, seed production, seed dispersal, dormancy, germination, growth of seedlings under low or high temperature, chromatographic patterns of leaf extracts, or effects of lettuce on the growth of broccoli or soil microflora. A significant difference in pollen size was noted, but the difference was small. The length of the cotyledons of the transgenic lettuce was shorter than that of 'Kaiser,' but there were no differences in other morphological characteristics. Agrobacterium tumefaciens used for the production of transgenic lettuce was not detected in transgenic seeds. The transgenic T(3), T(4), and T(5) generations showed higher resistance to MiLV and big-vein symptoms expression than the resistant 'Pacific' cultivar, indicating that high resistance to lettuce big-vein disease is stably inherited. PCR analysis showed that segregation of the CP gene was nearly 3:1 in the T(1) and T(2) generations, and that the transgenic T(3) generation was homozygous for the CP gene. Segregation of the neomycin phosphotransferase II (npt II) gene was about 3:1 in the T(1) generation, but the full length npt II gene was not detected in the T(2) or T(3) generation. The segregation pattern of the CP and npt II genes in the T(1) generation showed the expected 9:3:3:1 ratio. These results suggest that the fragment including the CP gene and that including the npt II gene have been integrated into two unlinked loci, and that the T(1) plant selected in our study did

  6. Cloning of transgenic tobacco BY-2 cells; an efficient method to analyse and reduce high natural heterogeneity of transgene expression

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    Fischer Lukas

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenotypic characterization of transgenic cell lines, frequently used in plant biology studies, is complicated because transgene expression in individual cells is often heterogeneous and unstable. To identify the sources and to reduce this heterogeneity, we transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. BY-2 cells with a gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP using Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and then introduced a simple cloning procedure to generate cell lines derived from the individual transformed cells. Expression of the transgene was monitored by analysing GFP fluorescence in the cloned lines and also in lines obtained directly after transformation. Results The majority (~90% of suspension culture lines derived from calli that were obtained directly from transformation consisted of cells with various levels of GFP fluorescence. In contrast, nearly 50% of lines generated by cloning cells from the primary heterogeneous suspensions consisted of cells with homogenous GFP fluorescence. The rest of the lines exhibited "permanent heterogeneity" that could not be resolved by cloning. The extent of fluorescence heterogeneity often varied, even among genetically identical clones derived from the primary transformed lines. In contrast, the offspring of subsequent cloning of the cloned lines was uniform, showing GFP fluorescence intensity and heterogeneity that corresponded to the original clone. Conclusion The results demonstrate that, besides genetic heterogeneity detected in some lines, the primary lines often contained a mixture of epigenetically different cells that could be separated by cloning. This indicates that a single integration event frequently results in various heritable expression patterns, which are probably accidental and become stabilized in the offspring of the primary transformed cells early after the integration event. Because heterogeneity in transgene expression has proven to be a serious problem, it is

  7. The Dmp1-SOST Transgene Interacts With and Downregulates the Dmp1-Cre Transgene and the Rosa(Notch) Allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti, Stefano; Canalis, Ernesto

    2016-05-01

    Activation of Notch1 in osteocytes of Rosa(Notch) mice, where a loxP-flanked STOP cassette and the Nicd coding sequence were targeted to the reverse orientation splice acceptor (Rosa)26 locus, causes osteopetrosis associated with suppressed Sost expression and enhanced Wnt signaling. To determine whether Sost downregulation mediates the effects of Notch activation in osteocytes, Rosa(Notch) mice were crossed with transgenics expressing Cre recombinase or SOST under the control of the dentin matrix protein (Dmp)1 promoter. Dmp1-SOST transgenics displayed vertebral osteopenia and a modest femoral cancellous and cortical bone phenotype, whereas hemizygous Dmp1-Cre transgenics heterozygous for the Rosa(Notch) allele (Dmp1-Cre;Rosa(Notch)) exhibited osteopetrosis. The phenotype of Notch activation in osteocytes was prevented in Dmp1-Cre;Rosa(Notch) mice hemizygous for the Dmp1-SOST transgene. The effect was associated with downregulated Notch signaling and suppressed Dmp1 and Rosa26 expression. To test whether SOST regulates Notch expression in osteocytes, cortical bone cultures from Dmp1-Cre;Rosa(Notch) mice or from Rosa(Notch) control littermates were exposed to recombinant human SOST. The addition of SOST had only modest effects on Notch target gene mRNA levels and suppressed Dmp1, but not Cre or Rosa26, expression. These findings suggest that prevention of the Dmp1-Cre;Rosa(Notch) skeletal phenotype by Dmp1-SOST is not secondary to SOST expression but to interactions among the Dmp1-SOST and Dmp1-Cre transgenes and the Rosa26 locus. In conclusion, the Dmp1-SOST transgene suppresses the expression of the Dmp1-Cre transgene and of Rosa26. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Development of transgenic watermelon resistant to Cucumber mosaic virus and Watermelon mosaic virus by using a single chimeric transgene construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Yi; Ku, Hsin-Mei; Chiang, Yi-Hua; Ho, Hsiu-Yin; Yu, Tsong-Ann; Jan, Fuh-Jyh

    2012-10-01

    Watermelon, an important fruit crop worldwide, is prone to attack by several viruses that often results in destructive yield loss. To develop a transgenic watermelon resistant to multiple virus infection, a single chimeric transgene comprising a silencer DNA from the partial N gene of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV) fused to the partial coat protein (CP) gene sequences of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) and Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) was constructed and transformed into watermelon (cv. Feeling) via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Single or multiple transgene copies randomly inserted into various locations in the genome were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Transgenic watermelon R(0) plants were individually challenged with CMV, CGMMV or WMV, or with a mixture of these three viruses for resistance evaluation. Two lines were identified to exhibit resistance to CMV, CGMMV, WMV individually, and a mixed inoculation of the three viruses. The R(1) progeny of the two resistant R(0) lines showed resistance to CMV and WMV, but not to CGMMV. Low level accumulation of transgene transcripts in resistant plants and small interfering (si) RNAs specific to CMV and WMV were readily detected in the resistant R(1) plants by northern blot analysis, indicating that the resistance was established via RNA-mediated post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Loss of the CGMMV CP-transgene fragment in R1 progeny might be the reason for the failure to resistant CGMMV infection, as shown by the absence of a hybridization signal and no detectable siRNA specific to CGMMV in Southern and northern blot analyses. In summary, this study demonstrated that fusion of different viral CP gene fragments in transgenic watermelon contributed to multiple virus resistance via PTGS. The construct and resistant watermelon lines developed in this study could be used in a watermelon breeding program for resistance to multiple viruses.

  9. Developing transgenic Anopheles mosquitoes for the sterile insect technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Tony; Papathanos, Philippos; Windbichler, Nikolai; Magnusson, Kalle; Benton, Jason; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Crisanti, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    In the last 10 years the availability of the genome sequence of Anopheles gambiae and the development of a transgenic technology for several species of Anopheles mosquitoes have, in combination, helped in enabling us to gain several insights into the biology of these mosquitoes that is relevant to their capacity as vectors of the malaria parasite. While this information is anticipated to inform many novel vector control strategies, the technique most likely to benefit in the near future from the availability of a reliable transgenic technology is the sterile insect technique (SIT), which relies on releasing large numbers of sterile insects to compete for mates in the wild, leading to population suppression. Although SIT has been proven to work reliably for many insects, the construction of suitable strains, and induction of sterility, has until now been a laborious process, combining classical genetics with radiation-induced sterility. Using transgenesis to create strains of Anopheles suitable for SIT could potentially offer several advantages over current approaches, in that the basic design of transgenic constructs designed for other insects should be rapidly transferable to mosquitoes, and induction of sterility as a product of the transgenic modification could obviate the requirement for radiation and its associated deleterious effects. In this paper the progress of different transgenic approaches in constructing tools for SIT will be reviewed.

  10. Transgenic expression of nonclassically secreted FGF suppresses kidney repair.

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    Aleksandr Kirov

    Full Text Available FGF1 is a signal peptide-less nonclassically released growth factor that is involved in angiogenesis, tissue repair, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. The effects of nonclassical FGF export in vivo are not sufficiently studied. We produced transgenic mice expressing FGF1 in endothelial cells (EC, which allowed the detection of FGF1 export to the vasculature, and studied the efficiency of postischemic kidney repair in these animals. Although FGF1 transgenic mice had a normal phenotype with unperturbed kidney structure, they showed a severely inhibited kidney repair after unilateral ischemia/reperfusion. This was manifested by a strong decrease of postischemic kidney size and weight, whereas the undamaged contralateral kidney exhibited an enhanced compensatory size increase. In addition, the postischemic kidneys of transgenic mice were characterized by hyperplasia of interstitial cells, paucity of epithelial tubular structures, increase of the areas occupied by connective tissue, and neutrophil and macrophage infiltration. The continuous treatment of transgenic mice with the cell membrane stabilizer, taurine, inhibited nonclassical FGF1 export and significantly rescued postischemic kidney repair. It was also found that similar to EC, the transgenic expression of FGF1 in monocytes and macrophages suppresses kidney repair. We suggest that nonclassical export may be used as a target for the treatment of pathologies involving signal peptide-less FGFs.

  11. CCK Response Deficiency in Synphilin-1 Transgenic Mice.

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    Wanli W Smith

    Full Text Available Previously, we have identified a novel role for the cytoplasmic protein, synphilin-1(SP1, in the controls of food intake and body weight in both mice and Drosophila. Ubiquitous overexpression of human SP1 in brain neurons in transgenic mice results in hyperphagia expressed as an increase in meal size. However, the mechanisms underlying this action of SP1 remain to be determined. Here we investigate a potential role for altered gut feedback signaling in the effects of SP1 on food intake. We examined responses to peripheral administration of cholecytokinin (CCK, amylin, and the glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor agonist, exendin-4. Intraperitoneal administration of CCK at doses ranging from 1-10 nmol/kg significantly reduced glucose intake in wild type (WT mice, but failed to affect intake in SP1 transgenic mice. Moreover, there was a significant attenuation of CCK-induced c-Fos expression in the dorsal vagal complex in SP1 transgenic mice. In contrast, WT and SP1 transgenic mice were similarly responsive to both amylin and exendin-4 treatment. These studies demonstrate that SP1 results in a CCK response deficiency that may contribute to the increased meal size and overall hyperphagia in synphillin-1 transgenic mice.

  12. CCK Response Deficiency in Synphilin-1 Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Wanli W; Smith, Megan; Yang, Dejun; Choi, Pique P; Moghadam, Alexander; Li, Tianxia; Moran, Timothy H

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have identified a novel role for the cytoplasmic protein, synphilin-1(SP1), in the controls of food intake and body weight in both mice and Drosophila. Ubiquitous overexpression of human SP1 in brain neurons in transgenic mice results in hyperphagia expressed as an increase in meal size. However, the mechanisms underlying this action of SP1 remain to be determined. Here we investigate a potential role for altered gut feedback signaling in the effects of SP1 on food intake. We examined responses to peripheral administration of cholecytokinin (CCK), amylin, and the glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, exendin-4. Intraperitoneal administration of CCK at doses ranging from 1-10 nmol/kg significantly reduced glucose intake in wild type (WT) mice, but failed to affect intake in SP1 transgenic mice. Moreover, there was a significant attenuation of CCK-induced c-Fos expression in the dorsal vagal complex in SP1 transgenic mice. In contrast, WT and SP1 transgenic mice were similarly responsive to both amylin and exendin-4 treatment. These studies demonstrate that SP1 results in a CCK response deficiency that may contribute to the increased meal size and overall hyperphagia in synphillin-1 transgenic mice.

  13. Ectopic serotonin production in β-cell specific transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeongseok; Kim, Hyunki; Kim, Kyuho; German, Michael S; Kim, Hail

    2018-01-08

    Genetically modified mice have been widely used in the field of β-cell research. However, analysis of results gathered using genetically modified organisms should be interpreted carefully as the results may be confounded by several factors. Here, we showed the ectopic serotonin (5-HT) production in β-cells of RIP-Cre Mgn , MIP-GFP, and MIP-Cre/ERT mice. These mice contained a human growth hormone (hGH) cassette to enhance transgene expression and hGH expression and Stat5 phosphorylation were detected in pancreatic islets of these mice. The expression level of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1) was upregulated in pancreatic islets of transgenic mice with an hGH cassette but not in transgenic mice without an hGH cassette. Ectopic 5-HT production was not observed in β-cell-specific prolactin receptor (Prlr) knockout mice or Stat5 knockout mice crossed with RIP-Cre Mgn . We further confirmed that 5-HT production in β-cells of several transgenic mice was induced by hGH expression followed by the activation of the Prlr-Stat5-Tph1 pathway. These findings indicate that results obtained using transgenic mice containing the hGH cassette should be interpreted with care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Accelerated hepatocellular carcinoma development in CUL4B transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jupeng; Jiang, Baichun; Zhang, Aizhen; Qian, Yanyan; Tan, Haining; Gao, Jiangang; Shao, Changshun; Gong, Yaoqin

    2015-06-20

    Cullin 4B (CUL4B) is a component of the Cullin 4B-Ring E3 ligase (CRL4B) complex that functions in proteolysis and in epigenetic regulation. CUL4B possesses tumor-promoting properties and is markedly upregulated in many types of human cancers. To determine the role of CUL4B in liver tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice that expressed human CUL4B in livers and other tissues and evaluated the development of spontaneous and chemically-induced hepatocellular carcinomas. We observed that CUL4B transgenic mice spontaneously developed liver tumors at a high incidence at old ages and exhibited enhanced DEN-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. There was a high proliferation rate in the livers of CUL4B transgenic mice that was accompanied by increased levels of Cdk1, Cdk4 and cyclin D1 and decreased level of p16. The transgenic mice also exhibited increased compensatory proliferation after DEN-induced liver injury, which was accompanied by activation of Akt, Erk, p38 and NF-κB. We also found that Prdx3 was downregulated and that DEN induced a higher level of reactive oxygen species in the livers of transgenic mice. Together, our results demonstrate a critical role of CUL4B in hepatocarcinogenesis in mice.

  15. [Improving the nutritional value of plant foods through transgenic approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong-Mei; Mao, Xue; Wang, Shu-Jian; Li, Run-Zhi

    2004-07-01

    The most nutrients required in the human diet come from plants. The nutritional quality of plant products affects the human healthy. The advance of molecular cloning and transgenic technology has provided a new way to enhance the nutritional value of plant material. Transgenic modification of plant nutritional value has progressed greatly in the following aspects: improving the quality, composition and levels of protein, starch and fatty acid in different crops; increasing the levels of antioxidants (e.g. carotenoids and flavonoids); breeding the new type of plants with medical value for human. To date, many transgenic plants with nutritional enhancement have been developed. These transgenic plant products could be directly used as human diet or as valued materials in developing the "functional food" with especial nutritional quality and healthy effects after they are approved by a series of evaluations on their safety and nutritional efficiency for human being. We designed new zinc finger transcription factors (ZFP-TFs) that can specifically down-regulate the expression of the endogenous soybean FAD2-1 gene which catalyzes oleic acid to linoleic acid. Seed-specific expression of these ZFP-TFs in transgenic soybean somatic embryos repressed FAD2-1 transcription and increased significantly the levels of oleic acid, indicating that the engineered ZFP-TFs are capable of regulating fatty acid metabolism and modulating the expression of endogenous genes in plants.

  16. Dietary Safety Assessment of Flk1-Transgenic Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yalan; Huang, Ling; Cao, Jinghui; Wang, Chenghui; Yan, Jizhou

    2018-01-01

    Genetic engineering, also called genetic modification, is facing with growing demands of aquaculture and aquatic products. Although various genetically modified (GM) aquatics have been generated, it is important to evaluate biosafety of GM organisms on the human health before entering into our food chain. For this purpose, we establish a zebrafish wild adult feeding Flk1-transgenic larvae model to examine the predatory fish's histology in multiple tissues, and the global gene expression profile in the liver. 180 days of feeding trial show that there are no significantly morphological changes in intestine, liver, kidney, and sex gonads between fish fed with Flk1 transgenic fish diet (TFD) and fish fed with regular food meal (RFM). However, a characteristic skin spot and autofluorescence increase in the theca of follicle are observed in F1 generation of TFD fish. Liver RNA-sequencing analyses demonstrate that 53 out of 56712 genes or isoforms are differentially transcribed, and mostly involved in proteolysis in extracellular region. According to GO enrichment terms these deregulated genes function in catalytic activity, steroid storing, lipid metabolic process and N-Glycan biosynthesis. These results suggest that a long term of Flk1-transgenic fish diet could alter certain metabolic pathways and possibly cause related tissue deformation. Compared to the previous reports, our feasible transgenic dietary assess system could evaluate subchronic and potential health impact of transgenic fish diet by combining multi-tissue histology and liver transcriptome analyses.

  17. Consumer sensory analysis of high flavonoid transgenic tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Wansang; Miller, Rebecca; Park, Jungeun; Park, Sunghun

    2014-06-01

    Tomatoes have ameliorative effects on cardiovascular disease and cancer. In this study, metabolic engineering of flavonoids was utilized to improve the nutritional value of tomatoes by increasing flavonol and anthocyanin content. Total flavonol content was significantly increased in both the peel and flesh using the onion chalcone isomerase (CHI) gene. The Delila (Del) and Rosea1 (Ros1) genes from the snapdragon Antirrhinum majus were concomitantly expressed to produce an anthocyanin-rich tomato which was purple in color. Sensory evaluation by a panel of 81 untrained consumers revealed no significant difference in liking of color or texture between CHI, Del/Ros1, and wild-type tomatoes. Consumers reported marginal but significantly higher preference for the flavor and overall liking of CHI tomatoes over Del/Ros1 and wild-type tomatoes. This study is the first to report the results of sensory tests of transgenic tomatoes by a consumer panel representing the general consuming public. Transgenic procedures were used to increase the flavonol and anthocyanin contents of tomatoes. An untrained consumer panel scored flavor and overall liking of the 2 transgenic tomatoes higher than wild-type tomatoes and reported no difference in liking of texture or color between the 3 tomatoes. After participating in the sensory study, 14% of the panelists changed their attitudes positively toward transgenic vegetables and 96% of the consumers on the panel reported that they would buy transgenic food if they believed that it would promote health. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Identification and quantification of anthocyanins in transgenic purple tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaoyu; Xu, Jianteng; Rhodes, Davina; Shen, Yanting; Song, Weixing; Katz, Benjamin; Tomich, John; Wang, Weiqun

    2016-07-01

    Anthocyanins are natural pigments derived from the phenylpropanoid pathway. Most tomatoes produce little anthocyanins, but the transgenic purple tomato biosynthesizes a high level of anthocyanins due to expression of two transcription factors (Del and Ros1). This study was to identify and quantify anthocyanins in this transgenic tomato line. Seven anthocyanins, including two new anthocyanins [malvidin-3-(p-coumaroyl)-rutinoside-5-glucoside and malvidin-3-(feruloyl)-rutinoside-5-glucoside], were identified by LC-MS/MS. Petunidin-3-(trans-coumaroyl)-rutinoside-5-glucoside and delphinidin-3-(trans-coumaroyl)-rutinoside-5-glucoside were the most abundant anthocyanins, making up 86% of the total anthocyanins. Compared to undetectable anthocyanins in the wild type, the contents of anthocyanins in the whole fruit, peel, and flesh of the Del/Ros1-transgenic tomato were 5.2±0.5, 5.1±0.5, and 5.8±0.3g/kg dry matter, respectively. Anthocyanins were undetectable in the seeds of both wide-type and transgenic tomato lines. Such novel and high levels of anthocyanins obtained in this transgenic tomato may provide unique functional products with potential health benefits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [The allergic risk of transgenic foods strategy for prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moneret-Vautrin, D-A

    2003-03-01

    A significant number of allergens arise from foods. The allergic risk of transgenic foods must be evaluated in accordance with the recommendations of the Joint Expert Committee FAO/WHO. Potential issues are the risk of cross reactivity with existing allergens, the modification of allergenicity of the transgenic protein induced by a modified metabolism in the host, the modified allergenicity of the proteins of the transgenic plant, a potential neo-allergenicity of the transgenic protein, and the risk of dissemination through pollens, inducing a respiratory sensitization then a cross food allergy. The algorithm includes three steps for evaluation: first the search for significant homology of the protein with allergens listed in allergen databanks, or the identity of a sequence of six aminoacids with known epitopes, then a cross reactivity explored through the binding to IgEs from patients allergic to the source of the gene, or allergic to organisms of the same group or botanical family, and finally the extent of the pepsine resistance. The risk of immunogenicity has to be studied with appropriate animal models. A post-marketing surveillance is recommended for monitoring of adverse effects. The structure of an Allergo-Vigilance Network, the tools for efficiency and the groups at higher risk will be discussed. The potential risk of transgenic foods to be allergenic cannot be overlooked, not ignoring the fact that current technologies modify allergenicity of foods.

  20. Heart-specific expression of laminopathic mutations in transgenic zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ajay D; Parnaik, Veena K

    2017-07-01

    Lamins are key determinants of nuclear organization and function in the metazoan nucleus. Mutations in human lamin A cause a spectrum of genetic diseases that affect cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle as well as other tissues. A few laminopathies have been modeled using the mouse. As zebrafish is a well established model for the study of cardiac development and disease, we have investigated the effects of heart-specific lamin A mutations in transgenic zebrafish. We have developed transgenic lines of zebrafish expressing conserved lamin A mutations that cause cardiac dysfunction in humans. Expression of zlamin A mutations Q291P and M368K in the heart was driven by the zebrafish cardiac troponin T2 promoter. Homozygous mutant embryos displayed nuclear abnormalities in cardiomyocyte nuclei. Expression analysis showed the upregulation of genes involved in heart regeneration in transgenic mutant embryos and a cell proliferation marker was increased in adult heart tissue. At the physiological level, there was deviation of up to 20% from normal heart rate in transgenic embryos expressing mutant lamins. Adult homozygous zebrafish were fertile and did not show signs of early mortality. Our results suggest that transgenic zebrafish models of heart-specific laminopathies show cardiac regeneration and moderate deviations in heart rate during embryonic development. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  1. Identification of Secretory Odontoblasts Using DMP1-GFP Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balic, Anamaria; Mina, Mina

    2011-01-01

    Terminal differentiation of odontoblasts from dental papilla is a long process involving several intermediate steps and changes in the transcriptional profile and expression of proteins secreted by cells in the odontoblast lineage. Transgenic mouse lines in which GFP expression is under the control of tissue-and stage specific promoters have provided powerful experimental tools for identification and isolation of cells at specific stages of differentiation along a lineage. Our previous studies showed utilization of pOBCol3.6GFP and pOBCol2.3GFP animals for identification of odontoblasts at early and late stages of polarization respectively. In the present study we used the DMP1-GFP transgenic animal as an experimental model to examine its expression during the differentiation of odontoblasts from progenitor cells in vivo and in vitro. Our observations showed that DMP1-GFP transgene is first activated in secretory/functional odontoblasts engaged in secretion of predentin and then transiently expressed at high levels in newly differentiated odontoblasts. Expression of DMP1-GFP was down-regulated in highly differentiated odontoblasts. The temporal and spatial pattern of expression of DMP1-GFP transgene closely mimics the expression of endogenous DMP1. This transgenic animal will facilitate studies of gene expression and biological functions in secretory/functional odontoblasts. PMID:21172466

  2. Handmade Cloned Transgenic Sheep Rich in Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Hongwei; Chen, Lei; Chen, Longxin; Lin, Lin; Tan, Pingping; Vajta, Gabor; Gao, Jianfeng; Du, Yutao; Ma, Runlin Z.

    2013-01-01

    Technology of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been adapted worldwide to generate transgenic animals, although the traditional procedure relies largely on instrumental micromanipulation. In this study, we used the modified handmade cloning (HMC) established in cattle and pig to produce transgenic sheep with elevated levels of omega-3 (n−3) fatty acids. Codon-optimized nematode mfat-1 was inserted into a eukaryotic expression vector and was transferred into the genome of primary ovine fibroblast cells from a male Chinese merino sheep. Reverse transcriptase PCR, gas chromatography, and chromosome analyses were performed to select nuclear donor cells capable of converting omega-6 (n−6) into n−3 fatty acids. Blastocysts developed after 7 days of in vitro culture were surgically transplanted into the uterus of female ovine recipients of a local sheep breed in Xinjiang. For the HMC, approximately 8.9% (n  = 925) of reconstructed embryos developed to the blastocyst stage. Four recipients became pregnant after 53 blastocysts were transplanted into 29 naturally cycling females, and a total of 3 live transgenic lambs were produced. Detailed analyses on one of the transgenic lambs revealed a single integration of the modified nematode mfat-1 gene at sheep chromosome 5. The transgenic sheep expressed functional n−3 fatty acid desaturase, accompanied by more than 2-folds reduction of n−6/n−3 ratio in the muscle (psheep produced by the HMC. Compared to the traditional SCNT method, HMC showed an equivalent efficiency but proved cheaper and easier in operation. PMID:23437077

  3. Water use, root activity and deep drainage within a perennial legume-grass pasture: A case study in southern inland Queensland, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nahuel A. Pachas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Water use and depth of water extraction of leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala and Rhodes grass (Chloris gayana pasture, irrigated with desalinated coal seam water (a by-product of the coal seam gas industry, were monitored to provide background information on root activity, spatial and temporal water use and deep drainage over a 757-day period from August 2011 to August 2013. Methodology comprised measurement of soil water from surface to 4 m depth using 8 EnviroSCAN probes connected to dataloggers positioned within leucaena twin rows and within the Rhodes grass inter-row. Just over 581,000 individual moisture measurements were collated and are reported here. Water extraction (and by inference root activity of leucaena and Rhodes grass showed marked seasonal fluctuation with deepest and highest water extraction occurring during the first growing season; water extraction was greatly diminished during the following drier and cooler seasons due to the negative influences of lower soil moisture contents, lower temperatures and increased defoliation on pasture growth. The highest values of deep drainage below 4 m depth occurred when high rainfall events corresponded with high soil water storage in the entire profile (0–4 m depth. Given that water usage by both leucaena and Rhodes grass was greatest in the upper layers of soil (<1.5 m, future research should focus on how the level of competitive interaction might be managed by choice of row spacing and frequency of irrigation. Further studies are needed, including: (a physical sampling to determine the depth of active roots; (b how defoliation affects rooting behaviours and water use of leucaena; and (c modelling of the water and salt balances of leucaena and grass inter-row systems using data from this study, with various levels of irrigation, to investigate the risks of deep drainage over an extended climate sequence.Keywords: Active rooting depth, agroforestry, Chloris gayana, Leucaena leucocephala

  4. Limited fitness advantages of crop-weed hybrid progeny containing insect-resistant transgenes (Bt/CpTI in transgenic rice field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The spread of insect-resistance transgenes from genetically engineered (GE rice to its coexisting weedy rice (O. sativa f. spontanea populations via gene flow creates a major concern for commercial GE rice cultivation. Transgene flow to weedy rice seems unavoidable. Therefore, characterization of potential fitness effect brought by the transgenes is essential to assess environmental consequences caused by crop-weed transgene flow. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Field performance of fitness-related traits was assessed in advanced hybrid progeny of F(4 generation derived from a cross between an insect-resistant transgenic (Bt/CpTI rice line and a weedy strain. The performance of transgene-positive hybrid progeny was compared with the transgene-negative progeny and weedy parent in pure and mixed planting of transgenic and nontransgenic plants under environmental conditions with natural vs. low insect pressure. Results showed that under natural insect pressure the insect-resistant transgenes could effectively suppress target insects and bring significantly increased fitness to transgenic plants in pure planting, compared with nontransgenic plants (including weedy parent. In contrast, no significant differences in fitness were detected under low insect pressure. However, such increase in fitness was not detected in the mixed planting of transgenic and nontransgenic plants due to significantly reduced insect pressure. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Insect-resistance transgenes may have limited fitness advantages to hybrid progeny resulted from crop-weed transgene flow owning to the significantly reduced ambient target insect pressure when an insect-resistant GE crop is grown. Given that the extensive cultivation of an insect-resistant GE crop will ultimately reduce the target insect pressure, the rapid spread of insect-resistance transgenes in weedy populations in commercial GE crop fields may be not likely to happen.

  5. Limited fitness advantages of crop-weed hybrid progeny containing insect-resistant transgenes (Bt/CpTI) in transgenic rice field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Wang, Feng; Su, Jun; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2012-01-01

    The spread of insect-resistance transgenes from genetically engineered (GE) rice to its coexisting weedy rice (O. sativa f. spontanea) populations via gene flow creates a major concern for commercial GE rice cultivation. Transgene flow to weedy rice seems unavoidable. Therefore, characterization of potential fitness effect brought by the transgenes is essential to assess environmental consequences caused by crop-weed transgene flow. Field performance of fitness-related traits was assessed in advanced hybrid progeny of F(4) generation derived from a cross between an insect-resistant transgenic (Bt/CpTI) rice line and a weedy strain. The performance of transgene-positive hybrid progeny was compared with the transgene-negative progeny and weedy parent in pure and mixed planting of transgenic and nontransgenic plants under environmental conditions with natural vs. low insect pressure. Results showed that under natural insect pressure the insect-resistant transgenes could effectively suppress target insects and bring significantly increased fitness to transgenic plants in pure planting, compared with nontransgenic plants (including weedy parent). In contrast, no significant differences in fitness were detected under low insect pressure. However, such increase in fitness was not detected in the mixed planting of transgenic and nontransgenic plants due to significantly reduced insect pressure. Insect-resistance transgenes may have limited fitness advantages to hybrid progeny resulted from crop-weed transgene flow owning to the significantly reduced ambient target insect pressure when an insect-resistant GE crop is grown. Given that the extensive cultivation of an insect-resistant GE crop will ultimately reduce the target insect pressure, the rapid spread of insect-resistance transgenes in weedy populations in commercial GE crop fields may be not likely to happen.

  6. Glycinebetaine synthesizing transgenic potato plants exhibit enhanced tolerance to salt and cold stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, R.; Hussain, J.

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic stresses are the most important contributors towards low productivity of major food crops. Various attempts have been made to enhance abiotic stress tolerance of crop plants by classical breeding and genetic transformation. Genetic transformation with glycinebetaine (GB) synthesizing enzymes' gene(s) in naturally non accumulating plants has resulted in enhanced tolerance against variety of abiotic stresses. Present study was aimed to evaluate the performance of GB synthesizing transgenic potato plants against salt and cold stresses. Transgenic potato plants were challenged against salt and cold stresses at whole plant level. Transgenic lines were characterized to determine the transgene copy number. Different parameters like integrity, chlorophyll contents, tuber yield and vegetative biomass were studied to monitor the stress tolerance of transgenic potato plants. The results were compared with Non-transgenic (NT) plants and statistically analyzed to evaluate significant differences. Multi-copy insertion of expression cassette was found in both transgenic lines. Upon salt stress, transgenic plants maintained better growth as compared to NT plants. The tuber yield of transgenic plants was significantly greater than NT plants in salt stress. Transgenic plants showed improved membrane integrity against cold stress by depicting appreciably reduced ion leakage as compared to NT plants. Moreover, transgenic plants showed significantly less chlorophyll bleaching than NT plants upon cold stress. In addition, NT plants accumulated significantly less biomass, and yielded fewer tubers as compared to transgenic plants after cold stress treatment. The study will be a committed step for field evaluation of transgenic plants with the aim of commercialization. (author)

  7. Degradation of β-Aryl Ether Bonds in Transgenic Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mnich, Ewelina

    of the cell wall. The aim of the study was to alter lignin structure by expression in plants of the enzymes from S. paucimobilis involved in ether bond degradation (LigDFG). Arabidopsis thaliana and Brachypodium distachyon transgenic lines were generated and characterized with respect to lignin structure...... and cell wall polysaccharide extractability. Structural changes in lignin detected by 2D HSQC NMR analysis of transgenic Arabidopsis stems correlated with a slight increase in the saccharification yield. An increase in oxidized guaiacyl and syringyl units resulting from the action of LigDFG was observed...... be degraded by LigDFG, which can presumably cause loosening of the lignin-ferulate-polysaccharide matrix. In a xylanase hydrolysis of Brachypodium transgenic stems, the release of arabinose and xylose was increased compared to wild type. The data presented demonstrate that introduction of lignin degrading...

  8. Development and application of transgenic technologies in cassava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nigel; Chavarriaga, Paul; Raemakers, Krit; Siritunga, Dimuth; Zhang, Peng

    2004-11-01

    The capacity to integrate transgenes into the tropical root crop cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is now established and being utilized to generate plants expressing traits of agronomic interest. The tissue culture and gene transfer systems currently employed to produce these transgenic cassava have improved significantly over the past 5 years and are assessed and compared in this review. Programs are underway to develop cassava with enhanced resistance to viral diseases and insects pests, improved nutritional content, modified and increased starch metabolism and reduced cyanogenic content of processed roots. Each of these is described individually for the underlying biology the molecular strategies being employed and progress achieved towards the desired product. Important advances have occurred, with transgenic plants from several laboratories being prepared for field trails.

  9. Transgenic cells with increased plastoquinone levels and methods of use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayre, Richard T.; Subramanian, Sowmya; Cahoon, Edgar

    2016-12-27

    Disclosed herein are transgenic cells expressing a heterologous nucleic acid encoding a prephenate dehydrogenase (PDH) protein, a heterologous nucleic acid encoding a homogentisate solanesyl transferase (HST) protein, a heterologous nucleic acid encoding a deoxyxylulose phosphate synthase (DXS) protein, or a combination of two or more thereof. In particular examples, the disclosed transgenic cells have increased plastoquinone levels. Also disclosed are methods of increasing cell growth rates or production of biomass by cultivating transgenic cells expressing a heterologous nucleic acid encoding a PDH protein, a heterologous nucleic acid encoding an HST protein, a heterologous nucleic acid encoding a DXS protein, or a combination of two or more thereof under conditions sufficient to produce cell growth or biomass.

  10. Effects of HCV proteins in current HCV transgenic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jian; Wang, Jiangbin; Sallberg, Matii

    2010-02-01

    Hepatits C virus (HCV) is an enveloped virus with positive-sense single-stranded RNA genome that causes both acute and persistent infections associated with chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, which needs fully functional human hepatocytes for its development. Due to the strict human tropism of HCV, only human and higher primates such as chimpanzees have been receptive to HCV infection and development, cognition about pathophysiololgy and host immune responses of HCV infection is limited by lacking of simple laboratory models of infection for a long time. During the past decade, gene transfer approaches have been helpful to the understanding of the molecular basis of human disease. Transgenic cell lines, chimeric and transgenic animal models were developed and had been demonstrated their invaluable benefits. This review focuses on the existing HCV transgenic models and summarize the relative results about probable pathophysical changes induced by HCV proteins.

  11. Identification of transgenic foods using NIR spectroscopy: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alishahi, A.; Farahmand, H.; Prieto, N.; Cozzolino, D.

    2010-01-01

    The utilization of chemometric methods in the quantitative and qualitative analysis of feeds, foods, medicine and so on has been accompanied with the great evolution in the progress and in the near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Hence, recently the application of NIR spectroscopy has extended on the context of genetics and transgenic products. The aim of this review was to investigate the application of NIR spectroscopy to identificate transgenic products and to compare it with the traditional methods. The results of copious researches showed that the application of NIRS technology was successful to distinguish transgenic foods and it has advantages such as fast, avoiding time-consuming, non-destructive and low cost in relation to the antecedent methods such as PCR and ELISA.

  12. Bioassay for detection of transgenic soybean seeds tolerant to glyphosate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres Antonio Carlos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate is a systemic, nonselective, postemergence herbicide that inhibits growth of both weeds and crop plants. Once inside the plant, glyphosate interferes with biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan, by inhibiting the activity of 5enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS, a key enzyme of the shikimate pathway. The objective of this work was to develop a simple, effective and inexpensible method for identification of transgenic soybean tolerant to glyphosate. This technique consisted in germinating soybean seeds in filter paper moistened with 100 to 200 muM of glyphosate. Transgenic soybean seeds tolerant to glyphosate germinated normally in this solution and, between 7 and 10 days, started to develop a primary root system. However non-transgenic seeds stopped primary root growth and emission of secondary roots.

  13. ADAM 12 protease induces adipogenesis in transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaguchi, Nobuko; Xu, Xiufeng; Tajima, Rie

    2002-01-01

    in the perivascular space in muscle tissue of 1- to 2-week-old transgenic mice whereas mature lipid-laden adipocytes were seen at 3 to 4 weeks. Moreover, female transgenics expressing ADAM 12-S exhibited increases in body weight, total body fat mass, abdominal fat mass, and herniation, but were normoglycemic and did......ADAM 12 (meltrin-alpha) is a member of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family. ADAM 12 functions as an active metalloprotease, supports cell adhesion, and has been implicated in myoblast differentiation and fusion. Human ADAM 12 exists in two forms: the prototype membrane......-anchored protein, ADAM 12-L, and a shorter secreted form, ADAM 12-S. Here we report the occurrence of adipocytes in the skeletal muscle of transgenic mice in which overexpression of either form is driven by the muscle creatine kinase promoter. Cells expressing a marker of early adipogenesis were apparent...

  14. Establishment of a novel, eco-friendly transgenic pig model using porcine pancreatic amylase promoter-driven fungal cellulase transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y S; Yang, C C; Hsu, C C; Hsu, J T; Wu, S C; Lin, C J; Cheng, W T K

    2015-02-01

    Competition between humans and livestock for cereal and legume grains makes it challenging to provide economical feeds to livestock animals. Recent increases in corn and soybean prices have had a significant impact on the cost of feed for pig producers. The utilization of byproducts and alternative ingredients in pig diets has the potential to reduce feed costs. Moreover, unlike ruminants, pigs have limited ability to utilize diets with high fiber content because they lack endogenous enzymes capable of breaking down nonstarch polysaccharides into simple sugars. Here, we investigated the feasibility of a transgenic strategy in which expression of the fungal cellulase transgene was driven by the porcine pancreatic amylase promoter in pigs. A 2,488 bp 5'-flanking region of the porcine pancreatic amylase gene was cloned by the genomic walking technique, and its structural features were characterized. Using GFP as a reporter, we found that this region contained promoter activity and had the potential to control heterologous gene expression. Transgenic pigs were generated by pronuclear microinjection. Founders and offspring were identified by PCR and Southern blot analyses. Cellulase mRNA and protein showed tissue-specific expression in the pancreas of F1 generation pigs. Cellulolytic enzyme activity was also identified in the pancreas of transgenic pigs. These results demonstrated the establishment of a tissue-specific promoter of the porcine pancreatic amylase gene. Transgenic pigs expressing exogenous cellulase may represent a way to increase the intake of low-cost, fiber-rich feeds.

  15. Handmade cloned transgenic sheep rich in omega-3 Fatty acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    Full Text Available Technology of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT has been adapted worldwide to generate transgenic animals, although the traditional procedure relies largely on instrumental micromanipulation. In this study, we used the modified handmade cloning (HMC established in cattle and pig to produce transgenic sheep with elevated levels of omega-3 (n-3 fatty acids. Codon-optimized nematode mfat-1 was inserted into a eukaryotic expression vector and was transferred into the genome of primary ovine fibroblast cells from a male Chinese merino sheep. Reverse transcriptase PCR, gas chromatography, and chromosome analyses were performed to select nuclear donor cells capable of converting omega-6 (n-6 into n-3 fatty acids. Blastocysts developed after 7 days of in vitro culture were surgically transplanted into the uterus of female ovine recipients of a local sheep breed in Xinjiang. For the HMC, approximately 8.9% (n  =925 of reconstructed embryos developed to the blastocyst stage. Four recipients became pregnant after 53 blastocysts were transplanted into 29 naturally cycling females, and a total of 3 live transgenic lambs were produced. Detailed analyses on one of the transgenic lambs revealed a single integration of the modified nematode mfat-1 gene at sheep chromosome 5. The transgenic sheep expressed functional n-3 fatty acid desaturase, accompanied by more than 2-folds reduction of n-6/n-3 ratio in the muscle (p<0.01 and other major organs/tissues (p<0.05. To our knowledge, this is the first report of transgenic sheep produced by the HMC. Compared to the traditional SCNT method, HMC showed an equivalent efficiency but proved cheaper and easier in operation.

  16. Comprehensive Assessment of Milk Composition in Transgenic Cloned Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Shunchao; Yu, Tian; Wang, Jianwu; Li, Ning

    2012-01-01

    The development of transgenic cloned animals offers new opportunities for agriculture, biomedicine and environmental science. Expressing recombinant proteins in dairy animals to alter their milk composition is considered beneficial for human health. However, relatively little is known about the expression profile of the proteins in milk derived from transgenic cloned animals. In this study, we compared the proteome and nutrient composition of the colostrum and mature milk from three lines of transgenic cloned (TC) cattle that specifically express human α-lactalbumin (TC-LA), lactoferrin (TC-LF) or lysozyme (TC-LZ) in the mammary gland with those from cloned non-transgenic (C) and conventionally bred normal animals (N). Protein expression profile identification was performed, 37 proteins were specifically expressed in the TC animals and 70 protein spots that were classified as 22 proteins with significantly altered expression levels in the TC and C groups compared to N group. Assessment of the relationship of the transgene effect and normal variability in the milk protein profiles in each group indicated that the variation in the endogenous protein profiles of the three TC groups was within the limit of natural variability. More than 50 parameters for the colostrum and mature milk were compared between each TC group and the N controls. The data revealed essentially similar profiles for all groups. This comprehensive study demonstrated that in TC cattle the mean values for the measured milk parameters were all within the normal range, suggesting that the expression of a transgene does not affect the composition of milk. PMID:23185411

  17. The Germination of Some Species Tropical Legume Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Poetri

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A study to evaluate the seed germination of Leucaena pallida under climatic and soil conditions in Palu was conducted in village of Taipa, Sub district of North Palu, District of Palu. To compare with other species of legume trees however, this study involved Leucaena leucocephala cv Tarramba, Leucaena leucocephala cv Gumph and Gliricidia maculata. This experiment used completely randomized design with species of tropical tree legumes as treatment.  Each treatment was replicated five times.  Each experimental unit consisted of one tray (size 12.5 x 25 cm and planted by 20 seed.  Each tray was filled with soil while the seeds were planted one cm deep.  All seeds were immersed in warm water (600C for five minutes before planted.  The base of the trays were drilled to create some holes for water to drain out.  The trays were sprayed twice daily (07.00 am and 03.00 pm to keep the soil to be moist using a very smooth sprayer.  The variables recorded included the initiation time of germination, the range time of germination and the percentage of seed germination.  The data obtained were analyses using the Minitab 11. Least significance difference was used to test for possible differences between treatment means. The result revealed that initiation time of germination and the range of germination were not varied (P>0.05 among the seeds tested. The initiation time of germination ranged between 9 to 12 d after sowing.  Gliricidia maculata seed has the shortest period to germinate (12-16 d after sowing, meanwhile Leucaena leucocephala cv. Tarramba appear to be the longest (9-17 d after sowing. The highest seed viability was 60% in Leucaena leucocephala, cv Gump while the lowest was found in Gliricidia maculata (29%. In addition, both Leucaena pallida and Leucaena leucocephala cv Tarramba had medium seed germination (40% and 53% respectively. (Animal Production 7(3: 156-160 (2005Key Words: Seed, Germination, Tropical Leguminous

  18. A recombinase-mediated transcriptional induction system in transgenic plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, T; Schnorr, K M; Mundy, J

    2001-01-01

    We constructed and tested a Cre-loxP recombination-mediated vector system termed pCrox for use in transgenic plants. In this system, treatment of Arabidopsis under inducing conditions mediates an excision event that removes an intervening piece of DNA between a promoter and the gene to be expressed......-mediated GUS activation. Induction was shown to be possible at essentially any stage of plant growth. This single vector system circumvents the need for genetic crosses required by other, dual recombinase vector systems. The pCrox system may prove particularly useful in instances where transgene over...

  19. Migratory beekeeping practices contribute insignificantly to transgenic pollen flow among fields of alfalfa produced for seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased use of genetically engineered crops in agriculture has raised concerns over pollinator-mediated gene flow between transgenic and conventional agricultural varieties. This study evaluated whether contracted migratory beekeeping practices influence transgenic pollen flow among spatially iso...

  20. ESTABLISHMENT OF TRANSGENIC CREEPING BENTGRASS (AGROSTIS STOLONIFERA L.) IN NON-AGRONOMIC HABITATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concerns about genetically modified crops include transgene flow to compatible wild species and potential unintended ecological consequences associated with transgene introgression. To date, there has been little empirical documentation of the relative frequency of establishment...

  1. Adventitious presence of transgenic events in the maize supply chain in Peru: A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santa-Maria, M.C.; Lajo-Morgan, G.; Guardia, L.

    2014-01-01

    Cultivation and trade of transgenic or genetically modified organisms (GMO) and commodities has become widespread worldwide. In particular, production of transgenic crops has seen an accelerated growth along with a complex regulatory process. Current Peruvian legislation prohibits import of

  2. First molecular identification of the transgene red fluorescent protein (RFP in transgenic ornamental zebrafish (Danio rerio introduced in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Scotto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the transgenic fluorescent red, orange and pink zebra fish (Danio rerio, found in local aquariums in Peru, were identified using the PCR technique to amplify the transgene RFP sea anemone belonging to Discosoma spp. The gene expression of the red fluorescent protein (RFP transgene was found to determine different gradients-of-bioluminescence (shades in color in each GMO fish analyzed. We performed sequence analysis of the two variants of the RFP along with six variants of the existing fluorescent protein GFP from the Genbank, this could help identify quickly if they are new genes or variants thereof as these novel fluorescent proteins may be introduced in aquatic GMO in the future. Thus, developing and improving biosecurity measures through its timely detection at the molecular genetic level.

  3. Glyphosate-drift but not herbivory alters the rate of transgene flow from single and stacked trait transgenic canola (Brassica napus) to nontransgenic B. napus and B. rapa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londo, Jason P; Bollman, Michael A; Sagers, Cynthia L; Lee, E Henry; Watrud, Lidia S

    2011-08-01

    Transgenic plants can offer agricultural benefits, but the escape of transgenes is an environmental concern. In this study we tested the hypothesis that glyphosate drift and herbivory selective pressures can change the rate of transgene flow between the crop Brassica napus (canola), and weedy species and contribute to the potential for increased transgene escape risk and persistence outside of cultivation. • We constructed plant communities containing single transgenic B. napus genotypes expressing glyphosate herbicide resistance (CP4 EPSPS), lepidopteran insect resistance (Cry1Ac), or both traits ('stacked'), plus nontransgenic B. napus, Brassica rapa and Brassica nigra. Two different selective pressures, a sublethal glyphosate dose and lepidopteran herbivores (Plutella xylostella), were applied and rates of transgene flow and transgenic seed production were measured. • Selective treatments differed in the degree in which they affected gene flow and production of transgenic hybrid seed. Most notably, glyphosate-drift increased the incidence of transgenic seeds on nontransgenic B. napus by altering flowering phenology and reproductive function. • The findings of this study indicate that transgenic traits may be transmitted to wild populations and may increase in frequency in weedy populations through the direct and indirect effects of selection pressures on gene flow. No claim to original US government works. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Highly efficient generation of transgenic sheep by lentivirus accompanying the alteration of methylation status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxi Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low efficiency of gene transfer and silence of transgene expression are the critical factors hampering the development of transgenic livestock. Recently, transfer of recombinant lentivirus has been demonstrated to be an efficient transgene delivery method in various animals. However, the lentiviral transgenesis and the methylation status of transgene in sheep have not been well addressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: EGFP transgenic sheep were generated by injecting recombinant lentivirus into zygotes. Of the 13 lambs born, 8 carried the EGFP transgene, and its chromosomal integration was identified in all tested tissues. Western blotting showed that GFP was expressed in all transgenic founders and their various tissues. Analysis of CpG methylation status of CMV promoter by bisulfate sequencing unraveled remarkable variation of methylation levels in transgenic sheep. The average methylation levels ranged from 37.6% to 79.1% in the transgenic individuals and 34.7% to 83% in the tested tissues. Correlative analysis of methylation status with GFP expression revealed that the GFP expression level was inversely correlated with methylation density. The similar phenomenon was also observed in tested tissues. Transgene integration determined by Southern blotting presented multiple integrants ranging from 2 to 6 copies in the genome of transgenic sheep. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Injection of lentiviral transgene into zygotes could be a promising efficient gene delivery system to generate transgenic sheep and achieved widespread transgene expression. The promoter of integrants transferred by lentiviral vector was subjected to dramatic alteration of methylation status and the transgene expression level was inversely correlative with promoter methylation density. Our work illustrated for the first time that generation of transgenic sheep by injecting recombinant lentivirus into zygote could be an efficient tool to improve sheep performance by

  5. Behaviors and Numerical Simulations of Malaria Dynamic Models with Transgenic Mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiongwei; Xu, Junjun; Wang, Xiao; Cheng, Lizhi

    2013-01-01

    The release of transgenic mosquitoes to interact with wild ones is a promising method for controlling malaria. How to effectively release transgenic mosquitoes to prevent malaria is always a concern for researchers. This paper investigates two methods of releasing transgenic mosquitoes and proposes two epidemic models involving malaria patients, anopheles, wild mosquitoes, and transgenic mosquitoes based on system of continuous differential equations. A basic reproduction number ${\\mathbf{R}}...

  6. Effective generation of transgenic pigs and mice by linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer.

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Keejong; Qian, Jin; Jiang, MeiSheng; Liu, Yi-Hsin; Wu, Ming-Che; Chen, Chi-Dar; Lai, Chao-Kuen; Lo, Hsin-Lung; Hsiao, Chin-Ton; Brown, Lucy; Bolen, James; Huang, Hsiao-I; Ho, Pei-Yu; Shih, Ping Yao; Yao, Chen-Wen

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Transgenic animals have become valuable tools for both research and applied purposes. The current method of gene transfer, microinjection, which is widely used in transgenic mouse production, has only had limited success in producing transgenic animals of larger or higher species. Here, we report a linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer method (LB-SMGT) that greatly improves the production efficiency of large transgenic animals. Results The linker protein, a monoclonal ...

  7. Simple and rapid determination of homozygous transgenic mice via in vivo fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaolin; Jia, Junshuang; Qin, Yujuan; Lin, Xia; Li, Wei; Xiao, Gaofang; Li, Yanqing; Xie, Raoying; Huang, Hailu; Zhong, Lin; Wu, Qinghong; Wang, Wanshan; Huang, Wenhua; Yao, Kaitai; Xiao, Dong; Sun, Yan

    2015-11-17

    Setting up breeding programs for transgenic mouse strains require to distinguish homozygous from the heterozygous transgenic animals. The combinational use of the fluorescence reporter transgene and small animal in-vivo imaging system might allow us to rapidly and visually determine the transgenic mice homozygous for transgene(s) by the in vivo fluorescence imaging. RLG, RCLG or Rm17LG transgenic mice ubiquitously express red fluorescent protein (RFP). To identify homozygous RLG transgenic mice, whole-body fluorescence imaging for all of newborn F2-generation littermates produced by mating of RFP-positive heterozygous transgenic mice (F1-generation) derived from the same transgenic founder was performed. Subsequently, the immediate data analysis of the in vivo fluorescence imaging was carried out, which greatly facilitated us to rapidly and readily distinguish RLG transgenic individual(s) with strong fluorescence from the rest of F2-generation littermates, followed by further determining this/these RLG individual(s) showing strong fluorescence to be homozygous, as strongly confirmed by mouse mating. Additionally, homozygous RCLG or Rm17LG transgenic mice were also rapidly and precisely distinguished by the above-mentioned optical approach. This approach allowed us within the shortest time period to obtain 10, 8 and 2 transgenic mice homozygous for RLG, RCLG and Rm17LG transgene, respectively, as verified by mouse mating, indicating the practicality and reliability of this optical method. Taken together, our findings fully demonstrate that the in vivo fluorescence imaging offers a visual, rapid and reliable alternative method to the traditional approaches (i.e., mouse mating and real-time quantitative PCR) in identifying homozygous transgenic mice harboring fluorescence reporter transgene under the control of a ubiquitous promoter in the situation mentioned in this study.

  8. In vivo mutation analysis using the ΦX174 transgenic mouse and comparisons with other transgenes and endogenous genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Carrie R; Delongchamp, Robert R; Pearce, Mason G; Rainey, Heather F; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Malling, Heinrich V; Heflich, Robert H

    2010-12-01

    The ΦX174 transgenic mouse was first developed as an in vivo Ames test, detecting base pair substitution (bps) at a single bp in a reversion assay. A forward mutational assay was also developed, which is a gain of function assay that also detects bps exclusively. Later work with both assays focused on establishing that a mutation was fixed in vivo using single-burst analysis: determining the number of mutant progeny virus from an electroporated cell by dividing the culture into aliquots before scoring mutants. We review results obtained from single-burst analysis, including testing the hypothesis that high mutant frequencies (MFs) of G:C to A:T mutation recovered by transgenic targets include significant numbers of unrepaired G:T mismatches. Comparison between the ΦX174 and lacI transgenes in mouse spleen indicates that the spontaneous bps mutation frequency per nucleotide (mf(n)) is not significantly lower for ΦX174 than for lacI; the response to ENU is also comparable. For the lacI transgene, the spontaneous bps mf(n) is highly age-dependent up to 12 weeks of age and the linear trend extrapolates at conception to a frequency close to the human bps mf(n) per generation of 1.7 × 10(-8). Unexpectedly, we found that the lacI somatic (spleen) bps mf(n) per cell division at early ages was estimated to be the same as for the human germ-line. The bps mf(n) in bone marrow for the gpt transgene is comparable to spleen for the lacI and ΦX174 transgenes. We conclude that the G:C to A:T transition is characteristic of spontaneous in vivo mutation and that the MFs measured in these transgenes at early ages reflect the expected accumulation of in vivo mutation typical of endogenous mammalian mutation rates. However, spontaneous and induced mf(n)s per nucleotide for the cII gene in spleen are 5-10 times higher than for these other transgenes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Plant mitochondrial genome: “A sweet and safe home'' for transgene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transfer of transgene through pollens to related plant species is a big environmental concern. Mitochondrion is also a superb and putative aspirant for transgene containment like plastids. Having its own transcription and translation machinery, and maternal inheritance gives assurance of transgene containment with high ...

  10. Salicylate and catechol levels are maintained in nahG transgenic poplar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alison M. Morse; Timothy J. Tschaplinski; Christopher Dervinis; Paula M. Pijut; Eric A. Schmelz; Wendy Day; John M. Davis

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic profiling was used to investigate the molecular phenotypes of a transgenic Populus tremula × P. alba hybrid expressing the nahG transgene, a bacterial gene encoding salicylate hydroxylase that converts salicylic acid to catechol. Despite the efficacy of this transgenic approach to reduce...

  11. Evaluating the potential ecological effects of transgene escape and persistence in constructed plant communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    To date, published studies with herbicide tolerant transgenic crops have failed to demonstrate that transgene escape to wild relatives results in more competitive hybrids. However, it is important to consider transgene escape in the context of the types of traits, which will lik...

  12. Accurate measure of transgene copy number in crop plants using droplet digital PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic transformation is a powerful means for the improvement of crop plants, but requires labor- and resource-intensive methods. An efficient method for identifying single-copy transgene insertion events from a population of independent transgenic lines is desirable. Currently, transgene copy numb...

  13. Dominos in the dairy: An analysis of transgenic maize in Dutch dairy farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, R.A.; Wesseler, J.H.H.; Berentsen, P.B.M.

    2013-01-01

    EU member states require farmers growing transgenic maize to respect a minimum distance from fields with non-transgenic maize. Previous studies have theoretically argued that such minimum distance requirements may lead to a so-called ‘domino effect’ where farmers who want to grow transgenic maize

  14. Peripheral neuropathy in mice transgenic for a human MDR3 P-glycoprotein mini-gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, J. J.; Baas, F.; Hoogendijk, J. E.; Jansen, G. H.; van der Valk, M. A.; Schinkel, A. H.; Berns, A. J.; Acton, D.; Nooter, K.; Burger, H.; Smith, S. J.; Borst, P.

    1996-01-01

    We have generated mice transgenic for a human MDR3 mini-gene, under control of a hamster vimentin promoter. Expression of the MDR3 transgene was found in mesenchymal tissues, peripheral nerves, and the eye lens. These MDR3 transgenic mice have a slowed motor nerve conduction and dysmyelination of

  15. Maintenance and distribution of transgenic mice susceptible to human viruses: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    This Memorandum discusses the use of transgenic mice in poliovirus research and the potential risks to public health. General and specific recommendations are given concerning the maintenance, containment and transport of transgenic animals which are susceptible to pathogenic human viruses, with special attention to transgenic mice susceptible to polioviruses.

  16. The effect of ethylene on transgenic melon ripening and fruit quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In cell wall expression analysis, MPG1 increased when fruits of transgenic melons were exposed to ethylene; showing they are ethylene- dependent. MPG2 decreased ... Ethylene productions in transgenic fruits were reestablished when ethylene was applied, exhibiting the same behavior as transgenic fruits. Antioxidant ...

  17. Production of transgenic pigs over-expressing the antiviral gene Mx1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanmei Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The myxovirus resistance gene (Mx1 has a broad spectrum of antiviral activities. It is therefore an interesting candidate gene to improve disease resistance in farm animals. In this study, we report the use of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT to produce transgenic pigs over-expressing the Mx1 gene. These transgenic pigs express approximately 15–25 times more Mx1 mRNA than non-transgenic pigs, and the protein level of Mx1 was also markedly enhanced. We challenged fibroblast cells isolated from the ear skin of transgenic and control pigs with influenza A virus and classical swine fever virus (CFSV. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA revealed a profound decrease of influenza A proliferation in Mx1 transgenic cells. Growth kinetics showed an approximately 10-fold reduction of viral copies in the transgenic cells compared to non-transgenic controls. Additionally, we found that the Mx1 transgenic cells were more resistant to CSFV infection in comparison to non-transgenic cells. These results demonstrate that the Mx1 transgene can protect against viral infection in cells of transgenic pigs and indicate that the Mx1 transgene can be harnessed to develop disease-resistant pigs.

  18. Determinación in vitro de la calidad nutricional de tres leguminosas forrajeras

    OpenAIRE

    Vivas Arturo, Walter; Vera Arteaga, Dídimo; Alpizar Muni, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    La  presente  investigación  se  condujo  con  el  propósito  de  establecer  el  contenido  nutricional, producción de gases  y  digestibilidad  de  la  materia  seca  de  tres  leguminosas,  alfalfa  (Medicago sativa),  centrosema (Centrosema  pubens)  y  leucaena  (Leucaena  leucocephala).  La  determinación del contenido nutricional se ...

  19. Transgenic strategies for improving rice disease resistance | Zhang ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvement of virus resistance can be achieved by generating transgenic rice lines with expression of genes encoding viral coat protein or replication enzymes, expression of RNA interference constructs and suppression of insect vectors. Varieties with improved resistance against fungal and bacterial pathogens can be ...

  20. Recent advances in development of marker-free transgenic plants ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Here we describe the current technologies to eliminate the selectablemarker genes (SMG) in order to develop marker-free transgenic plants and also discuss the ... International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067, India; Proteomics and Genomics Lab, Agricultural ...

  1. Novel Transgenic Mouse Model of Polycystic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kito, Yusuke; Saigo, Chiemi; Takeuchi, Tamotsu

    2017-09-01

    Transmembrane protein 207 (TMEM207) is characterized as an important molecule for invasiveness of gastric signet-ring cell carcinoma cells. To clarify the pathobiological effects of TMEM207, we generated 13 transgenic mouse strains, designated C57BL/6-transgenic (Tg) (ITF-TMEM207), where the mouse Tmem207 is ectopically expressed under the proximal promoter of the murine intestinal trefoil factor gene. A C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207) mouse strain unexpectedly exhibited a high incidence of spontaneous kidney cysts with histopathological features resembling human polycystic kidney disease, which were found in approximately all mice within 1 year. TMEM207 immunoreactivity was found in noncystic kidney tubules and in renal cysts of the transgenic mice. The ITF-TMEM207 construct was inserted into Mitf at chromosome 6. Cystic kidney was not observed in other C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207) transgenic mouse strains. Although several genetically manipulated animal models exist, this mouse strain harboring a genetic mutation in Mitf and overexpression of Tmem207 protein was not reported as a model of polycystic kidney disease until now. This study demonstrates that the C57BL/6-Tg (ITF-TMEM207) mouse may be a suitable model for understanding human polycystic kidney disease. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Bee venom phospholipase inhibits malaria parasite development in transgenic mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Luciano A; Ito, Junitsu; Ghosh, Anil; Devenport, Martin; Zieler, Helge; Abraham, Eappen G; Crisanti, Andrea; Nolan, Tony; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2002-10-25

    Malaria kills millions of people every year, and new control measures are urgently needed. The recent demonstration that (effector) genes can be introduced into the mosquito germ line to diminish their ability to transmit the malaria parasite offers new hope toward the fight of the disease (Ito, J., Ghosh, A., Moreira, L. A., Wimmer, E. A. & Jacobs-Lorena, M. (2002) Nature, 417, 452-455). Because of the high selection pressure that an effector gene imposes on the parasite population, development of resistant strains is likely to occur. In search of additional antiparasitic effector genes, we have generated transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes that express the bee venom phospholipase A2 (PLA2) gene from the gut-specific and blood-inducible Anopheles gambiae carboxypeptidase (AgCP) promoter. Northern blot analysis indicated that the PLA2 mRNA is specifically expressed in the guts of transgenic mosquitoes with peak expression at approximately 4 h after blood ingestion. Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses detected PLA2 protein in the midgut epithelia of transgenic mosquitoes from 8 to 24 h after a blood meal. Importantly, transgene expression reduced Plasmodium berghei oocyst formation by 87% on average and greatly impaired transmission of the parasite to naive mice. The results indicate that PLA2 may be used as an additional effector gene to block the development of the malaria parasite in mosquitoes.

  3. Cloning and functional analysis in transgenic tobacco of a tapetum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-10-11

    Oct 11, 2010 ... State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University,. Beijing ..... of GUS activity in the anther and pollen of transgenic tobacco T0 plants conferred by the constructs. ..... A chalcone synthase-like gene is highly expressed in the tapetum of.

  4. Autopsy and histological analysis of the transgenic mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijbels, Marion J. J.; de Winther, Menno P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decades, transgenic and knock-out mouse models have become common use in research laboratories. Detailed phenotypic characterization of such models is essential for understanding basic mechanisms of normal physiology and disease. Hereto, pathological examination is a very helpful tool.

  5. Adaptability and stability of transgenic soybean lines and cultivars in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subsequently, genotypic adaptability and stability were evaluated by the methods of Eberhart and Russel (1966), Lin and Binns modified by Carneiro, Annicchiarico and Centroid. All methods presented partial coherence on classifying the best genotypes and allowed the identification of the transgenic lines L1 and L4, and ...

  6. Transgenic plants as green factories for vaccine production | Vinod ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Edible vaccine technology represents an alternative to fermentation based vaccine production system. Transgenic plants are used for the production of plant derived specific vaccines with native immunogenic properties stimulating both humoral and mucosal immune responses. Keeping in view the practical need of new ...

  7. Calcium electrotransfer for termination of transgene expression in muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Spanggaard, Iben; Olsen, Caroline Holkman

    2011-01-01

    . A clinical grade calcium solution (20 μl, 168 mM) was injected into transfected mouse or rat tibialis cranialis muscle. Ca(2+) uptake was quantified using calcium 45 ((45)Ca), and voltage and time between injection and pulsation were varied. Extinction of transgene expression was investigated by using both...

  8. Development of putative transgenic lines of cassava variety H-226 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CMD) caused by the Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV) and Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV). An attempt was done to develop transgenic cassava lines resistant to SLCMV through RNAi vector targeting a conserved 440 bp of 5' end ...

  9. Testicular pathology in transgenic minipig boars - in brief

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mačáková, Monika; Bohuslavová, Božena; Vochozková, Petra; Baxa, Monika; Ellederová, Zdeňka; Sedláčková, M.; Lišková, Irena; Valeková, Ivona; Vidinská, Daniela; Klíma, Jiří; Juhás, Štefan; Motlík, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 78, Suppl 2 (2015), s. 19-19 ISSN 1210-7859 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14308; GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : transgenic minipig model of Huntington´s disease * testes * spermatozoa Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  10. The stability of transgene expression and effect of DNA methylation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-08

    Aug 8, 2011 ... transformation system (Zhan et al., 2003). Stable expression of foreign gene is important for commercial use of genetic transformation in long-lived tree species as well as for ecological risk-assessment studies. However, analysis of the instable/stable transgene expression in tree is more problematic than in ...

  11. Inheritance and segregation of exogenous genes in transgenic cotton

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    were not damaged by bollworms. The results (table 1) indicate that they are all insect-resistant plants. The results confirm that the insect-resistance character controlled by the exogenous Bt gene is a dominant character. It did not matter whether the transgenic insect-resistant cotton cultivars CCRI 30 and NewCott 33B were ...

  12. Transgenic plants as vital components of integrated pest management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kos, Martine; van Loon, J.J.A.; Dicke, M.; Vet, L.E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Although integrated pest management (IPM) strategies have been developed worldwide, further improvement of IPM effectiveness is required. The use of transgenic technology to create insect-resistant plants can offer a solution to the limited availability of highly insect-resistant cultivars.

  13. Transgene expression in cowpea ( Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pollen transformation shows potential as a fast and easy means of obtaining transformed plants carrying desirable transgenes. Agrobacterium tumefaciens has been suggested as the best natural plant genetic engineering system. Laboratory and screenhouse studies were undertaken to investigate the possibility of ...

  14. Suppression of Arabidopsis genes by terminator-less transgene constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgene-mediated gene silencing is an important biotechnological and research tool. There are several RNAi-mediated techniques available for silencing genes in plants. The basis of all these techniques is to generate double stranded RNA precursors in the cell, which are recognized by the cellula...

  15. Transgenic Crops to Address Third World Hunger? A Critical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosset, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    Industry and mainstream research and policy institutions often suggest that transgenic crop varieties can raise the productivity of poor third world farmers, feed the hungry, and reduce poverty. These claims are critically evaluated by examining global-hunger data, the constraints that affect the productivity of small farmers in the third world,…

  16. Recent progress on technologies and applications of transgenic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-14

    Jun 14, 2010 ... cell cultures and the subsequent production of high-grade somatic chimeras has been reported, but germline .... by one generation. Several viable protocols via cell-based strategy for the production of transgenic chicken are illustrated in Figure 1. To date, several kinds of cells have been cultured in vitro for ...

  17. Generation of transgenic mice producing fungal xylanase in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR TONUKARI NYEROVWO

    Generation of transgenic mice producing fungal xylanase in the saliva as a model for improving feed .... Guangdong Institute of Microbiology Culture Collection Center,. China) using RNAiso Plus kit (Takara, Dalian, China) ..... Deng P, Li D, Cao Y, Lu W,Wang C. (2006). Cloning of a gene encoding an acidophilic endo-β-1 ...

  18. TRANSGENE ESCAPE MONITORING, POPULATION GENETICS, AND THE LAW

    Science.gov (United States)

    There has been little discussion about how to apply population genetics methods to monitor the spread of transgenes that are detected outside the agricultural populations where they are deployed. Population geneticists have developed tools for analyzing the genetic makeup of indi...

  19. The stability of transgene expression and effect of DNA methylation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we selected transgenic birch (Betula platyphylla Suk) plants, which included nonsilencing plants, transcriptional silence plants including TP96, TP74, TP73 and the post-transcriptional silence ones (TP67 and TP72). The transcription of the bgt gene in different tissues and organs were significantly different.

  20. Transgene expression of lilies grown in the greenhouse and outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilium longiflorum cv. Nellie White plants were transformed with either the bar-uidA fusion gene or the npt II and uidA genes and grown for two seasons in the greenhouse and outdoors in containers. All transgenes were under control of the CaMV 35S promoter. During the first year there was no differ...

  1. Transgenic engineering of male-specific muscular hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirottin, D.; Grobet, L.; Adamantidis, A.

    2005-01-01

    Using a two-step procedure involving insertional gene targeting and recombinase-mediated cassette exchange in ES cells, we have produced two lines of transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative latency-associated myostatin propeptide under control of the myosin light chain 1F promoter and 1...

  2. Dispersal of Transgenes through Maize Seed Systems in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, George A.; Serratos-Hernández, J. Antonio; Perales, Hugo R.; Gepts, Paul; Piñeyro-Nelson, Alma; Chávez, Angeles; Salinas-Arreortua, Noé; Yúnez-Naude, Antonio; Taylor, J. Edward; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Current models of transgene dispersal focus on gene flow via pollen while neglecting seed, a vital vehicle for gene flow in centers of crop origin and diversity. We analyze the dispersal of maize transgenes via seeds in Mexico, the crop's cradle. Methods We use immunoassays (ELISA) to screen for the activity of recombinant proteins in a nationwide sample of farmer seed stocks. We estimate critical parameters of seed population dynamics using household survey data and combine these estimates with analytical results to examine presumed sources and mechanisms of dispersal. Results Recombinant proteins Cry1Ab/Ac and CP4/EPSPS were found in 3.1% and 1.8% of samples, respectively. They are most abundant in southeast Mexico but also present in the west-central region. Diffusion of seed and grain imported from the United States might explain the frequency and distribution of transgenes in west-central Mexico but not in the southeast. Conclusions Understanding the potential for transgene survival and dispersal should help design methods to regulate the diffusion of germplasm into local seed stocks. Further research is needed on the interactions between formal and informal seed systems and grain markets in centers of crop origin and diversification. PMID:19503610

  3. Transgene transmission in South American catfish (Rhamdia quelen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2001, 2006; Reidel et al. 2010). The biological characteristics of semen ejaculates of this species are of interest in aquaculture biotechnology (Borges et al. 2005). In the past, microinjection of plasmid DNA into early embryos represented the state of the art in generating transgenic fish. However, this approach suffers from.

  4. The role of transgenic crops in sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond Park, Julian; McFarlane, Ian; Hartley Phipps, Richard; Ceddia, Graziano

    2011-01-01

    The concept of sustainable development forms the basis for a wide variety of international and national policy making. World population continues to expand at about 80 M people per year, while the demand for natural resources continues to escalate. Important policies, treaties and goals underpin the notion of sustainable development. In this paper, we discuss and evaluate a range of scientific literature pertaining to the use of transgenic crops in meeting sustainable development goals. It is concluded that a considerable body of evidence has accrued since the first commercial growing of transgenic crops, which suggests that they can contribute in all three traditional pillars of sustainability, i.e. economically, environmentally and socially. Management of herbicide-tolerant and insect-resistant transgenic crops to minimize the risk of weeds and pests developing resistance is discussed, together with the associated concern about the risk of loss of biodiversity. As the world population continues to rise, the evidence reviewed here suggests it would be unwise to ignore transgenic crops as one of the tools that can help meet aspirations for increasingly sustainable global development. © 2010 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2010 Society for Experimental Biology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Inheritance and segregation of exogenous genes in transgenic cotton

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Three transgenic cotton varieties (lines) were chosen for the study of inheritance and segregation of foreign Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis toxin) and tfdA ... Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) gene and express the CryIA insecticidal proteins for ... Identification of insect resistance: At six-to-eight-leaf stage, three to five bollworms were ...

  6. Development of transgenic finger millet (Eleusine coracana (L ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-18

    Jan 18, 2012 ... quickly in size, leading to death of seedlings within 25–30 days after the spraying of the fungal spores. High level of resistance was conferred by transgenic finger ... viral diseases through alien gene transfer. Fungal disease is a major constraint in the crop production due to high yield loss. Significant yield ...

  7. Phosphate uptake and growth characteristics of transgenic rice with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farmers have used phosphate fertilizer to provide sufficient yields. However, overuse of phosphorus accumulate in soil and causes soil and water pollution. We evaluated the phosphate acquisition and growth characteristics of OsPT1 transgenic rice (OsPT1-OX, over-expressing the high affinity phosphate transporter 1) in ...

  8. Transgenic mouse models--a seminal breakthrough in oncogene research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Harvey W; Muller, William J

    2013-12-01

    Transgenic mouse models are an integral part of modern cancer research, providing a versatile and powerful means of studying tumor initiation and progression, metastasis, and therapy. The present repertoire of these models is very diverse, with a wide range of strategies used to induce tumorigenesis by expressing dominant-acting oncogenes or disrupting the function of tumor-suppressor genes, often in a highly tissue-specific manner. Much of the current technology used in the creation and characterization of transgenic mouse models of cancer will be discussed in depth elsewhere. However, to gain a complete appreciation and understanding of these complex models, it is important to review the history of the field. Transgenic mouse models of cancer evolved as a new and, compared with the early cell-culture-based techniques, more physiologically relevant approach for studying the properties and transforming capacities of oncogenes. Here, we will describe early transgenic mouse models of cancer based on tissue-specific expression of oncogenes and discuss their impact on the development of this still rapidly growing field.

  9. Transgenic RNAi in mouse oocytes: The first decade

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malík, Radek; Svoboda, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 134, 1-2 (2012), s. 64-68 ISSN 0378-4320 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : RNAi * oocyte * transgene * silencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.897, year: 2012

  10. Callus induction and growth in transgenic potato genotypes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    The aim of this study was to establish an effective protocol for callus induction from the potato genotypes (Solanum tuberosum L.) used and to investigate whether the transferred oxalate oxidase enzyme or transformation procedure has any effect on callus induction of transgenic lines of cultivar. Desiree and Maris Bard.

  11. Inactivation of a transgene due to transposition of insertion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Agrobacterium strains harbour insertion sequences, which are known to transpose into genomes as well as into Ti plasmids. In this study we report the inactivation of a transgene due to transposition of the A. tumefaciens insertion sequence IS136. The transposition was discovered following transformation of plant tissues, ...

  12. Callus induction and growth in transgenic potato genotypes | Turhan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to establish an effective protocol for callus induction from the potato genotypes (Solanum tuberosum L.) used and to investigate whether the transferred oxalate oxidase enzyme or transformation procedure has any effect on callus induction of transgenic lines of cultivar Desiree and Maris Bard.

  13. Analysis of promoter activity in transgenic plants by normalizing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Variations in transgene expression due to position effect and copy number are normalized when analysing and comparing the strengths of different promoters. In such experiments, the promoter to be tested is placed upstream to a reporter gene and a second expression cassette is introduced in a linked fashion in the same ...

  14. Transgenic resistance of eggplants to the Colorado potato beetle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arpaia, S.

    1999-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the use of transgenic plant resistance as a method to control the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say in eggplant. The gene conferring resistance is coding for a Cry3B toxin and it is a synthetic version of a wild-type

  15. Assessing the Socioeconomic Impact of Transgenic Crops on Small ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant will allow the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) and several partners to develop a comprehensive methodology for assessing the socioeconomic impact of transgenic crops on small-scale farming systems. The aim is to provide policymakers in developing countries with reliable data on which to ...

  16. Destabilizing domains mediate reversible transgene expression in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Tai

    Full Text Available Regulating transgene expression in vivo by delivering oral drugs has been a long-time goal for the gene therapy field. A novel gene regulating system based on targeted proteasomal degradation has been recently developed. The system is based on a destabilizing domain (DD of the Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR that directs fused proteins to proteasomal destruction. Creating YFP proteins fused to destabilizing domains enabled TMP based induction of YFP expression in the brain, whereas omission of TMP resulted in loss of YFP expression. Moreover, induction of YFP expression was dose dependent and at higher TMP dosages, induced YFP reached levels comparable to expression of unregulated transgene., Transgene expression could be reversibly regulated using the DD system. Importantly, no adverse effects of TMP treatment or expression of DD-fusion proteins in the brain were observed. To show proof of concept that destabilizing domains derived from DHFR could be used with a biologically active molecule, DD were fused to GDNF, which is a potent neurotrophic factor of dopamine neurons. N-terminal placement of the DD resulted in TMP-regulated release of biologically active GDNF. Our findings suggest that TMP-regulated destabilizing domains can afford transgene regulation in the brain. The fact that GDNF could be regulated is very promising for developing future gene therapies (e.g. for Parkinson's disease and should be further investigated.

  17. Transgene transmission in South American catfish (Rhamdia quelen ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    M 2005 Expression of endogenous and exogenous growth hormone (GH) messenger (m) RNA in a GH-transgenic tilapia. (Oreochromis niloticus); Trans. Res. 14 95–104. Christensen J M and Tiersch T R 1997 Cryopreservation of channel catfish spermatozoa: effect of cryoprotectant, straw size, and formulation of extender ...

  18. Transgenic approaches in potato: effects on glycoalkaloids levels

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sayyar

    2013-02-20

    Feb 20, 2013 ... unwanted characters in genetically engineered crop plants. In this context, the subject of ... Key words: Unintended effects, transgenic potato, glycoalkaloids, food safety, environmental stress. INTRODUCTION. Genetic ..... infection, prevention of human colon and liver cancer cells, enhancement of general ...

  19. Analysis of promoter activity in transgenic plants by normalizing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2009-12-09

    Dec 9, 2009 ... a closely linked upstream promoter in different organisms. (Adhya and Gottesman 1982 in prokaryotic systems;. Ingelbrecht et al. 1991 in transgenic tobacco calli; Padidam and Cao 2001 in protoplasts prepared from tobacco cell suspension line BY2; Eszterhas et al. 2002 in mouse cell lines; Callen et al.

  20. Preliminary sampling of arthropod fauna of transgenic cassava in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    COLLINS-NRCRI, UMUDIKE

    2012-03-13

    Mar 13, 2012 ... arthropod fauna of transgenic cassava in a confined field trial (CFT) at National Root Crops Research. Institute (NRCRI), Umudike, Nigeria. The trial took place from August to November, in 2009 and. February to July, in 2010 to identify the major arthropods associated with the crop and to monitor changes ...