WorldWideScience

Sample records for transfer spectral scanner

  1. A Cost Effective Multi-Spectral Scanner for Natural Gas Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yudaya Sivathanu; Jongmook Lim; Vinoo Narayanan; Seonghyeon Park

    2005-12-07

    The objective of this project is to design, fabricate and demonstrate a cost effective, multi-spectral scanner for natural gas leak detection in transmission and distribution pipelines. During the first year of the project, a laboratory version of the multi-spectral scanner was designed, fabricated, and tested at EnUrga Inc. The multi-spectral scanner was also evaluated using a blind Department of Energy study at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. The performance of the scanner was inconsistent during the blind study. However, most of the leaks were outside the view of the multi-spectral scanner that was developed during the first year of the project. Therefore, a definite evaluation of the capability of the scanner was not obtained. Despite the results, sufficient number of plumes was detected fully confirming the feasibility of the multi-spectral scanner. During the second year, the optical design of the scanner was changed to improve the sensitivity of the system. Laboratory tests show that the system can reliably detect small leaks (20 SCFH) at 30 to 50 feet. A prototype scanner was built and evaluated during the second year of the project. Only laboratory evaluations were completed during the second year. The laboratory evaluations show the feasibility of using the scanner to determine natural gas pipeline leaks. Further field evaluations and optimization of the scanner are required before commercialization of the scanner can be initiated.

  2. Terrain Extraction by Integrating Terrestrial Laser Scanner Data and Spectral Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, C. L.; Halim, S.; Zulkepli, M.; Azwan, A. M.; Tang, W. L.; Chong, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    The extraction of true terrain points from unstructured laser point cloud data is an important process in order to produce an accurate digital terrain model (DTM). However, most of these spatial filtering methods just utilizing the geometrical data to discriminate the terrain points from nonterrain points. The point cloud filtering method also can be improved by using the spectral information available with some scanners. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of using the three-channel (red, green and blue) of the colour image captured from built-in digital camera which is available in some Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) for terrain extraction. In this study, the data acquisition was conducted at a mini replica landscape in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Skudai campus using Leica ScanStation C10. The spectral information of the coloured point clouds from selected sample classes are extracted for spectral analysis. The coloured point clouds which within the corresponding preset spectral threshold are identified as that specific feature point from the dataset. This process of terrain extraction is done through using developed Matlab coding. Result demonstrates that a higher spectral resolution passive image is required in order to improve the output. This is because low quality of the colour images captured by the sensor contributes to the low separability in spectral reflectance. In conclusion, this study shows that, spectral information is capable to be used as a parameter for terrain extraction.

  3. Multi-spectral optical scanners for commercial earth observation missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Karin; Engel, Wolfgang; Berndt, Klaus

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, a number of commercial Earth observation missions have been initiated with the aim to gather data in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range. Some of these missions aim at medium resolution (5 to 10 m) multi-spectral imaging with the special background of daily revisiting. Typical applications aim at monitoring of farming area for growth control and harvest prediction, irrigation control, or disaster monitoring such as hail damage in farming, or flood survey. In order to arrive at profitable business plans for such missions, it is mandatory to establish the space segment, i.e. the spacecraft with their opto -electronic payloads, at minimum cost while guaranteeing maximum reliability for mission success. As multiple spacecraft are required for daily revisiting, the solutions are typically based on micro-satellites. This paper presents designs for multi-spectral opto-electric scanners for this type of missions. These designs are drive n by minimum mass and power budgets of microsatellites, and the need for minimum cost. As a consequence, it is mandatory to arrive at thermally robust, compact telescope designs. The paper gives a comparison between refractive, catadioptric, and TMA optics. For mirror designs, aluminium and Zerodur mirror technologies are briefly discussed. State-of-the art focal plane designs are presented. The paper also addresses the choice of detector technologies such as CCDs and CMOS Active Pixel Sensors. The electronics of the multi-spectral scanners represent the main design driver regarding power consumption, reliability, and (most often) cost. It can be subdivided into the detector drive electronics, analog and digital data processing chains, the data mass memory unit, formatting and down - linking units, payload control electronics, and local power supply. The paper gives overviews and trade-offs between data compression strategies and electronics solutions, mass memory unit designs, and data formatting approaches

  4. WE-FG-207B-12: Quantitative Evaluation of a Spectral CT Scanner in a Phantom Study: Results of Spectral Reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, X; Arbique, G; Guild, J; Anderson, J; Yagil, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the quantitative image quality of spectral reconstructions of phantom data from a spectral CT scanner. Methods: The spectral CT scanner (IQon Spectral CT, Philips Healthcare) is equipped with a dual-layer detector and generates conventional 80-140 kVp images and variety of spectral reconstructions, e.g., virtual monochromatic (VM) images, virtual non-contrast (VNC) images, iodine maps, and effective atomic number (Z) images. A cylindrical solid water phantom (Gammex 472, 33 cm diameter and 5 cm thick) with iodine (2.0-20.0 mg I/ml) and calcium (50-600 mg/ml) rod inserts was scanned at 120 kVp and 27 mGy CTDIvol. Spectral reconstructions were evaluated by comparing image measurements with theoretical values calculated from nominal rod compositions provided by the phantom manufacturer. The theoretical VNC was calculated using water and iodine basis material decomposition, and the theoretical Z was calculated using two common methods, the chemical formula method (Z1) and the dual-energy ratio method (Z2). Results: Beam-hardening-like artifacts between high-attenuation calcium rods (≥300 mg/ml, >800 HU) influenced quantitative measurements, so the quantitative analysis was only performed on iodine rods using the images from the scan with all the calcium rods removed. The CT numbers of the iodine rods in the VM images (50∼150 keV) were close to theoretical values with average difference of 2.4±6.9 HU. Compared with theoretical values, the average difference for iodine concentration, VNC CT number and effective Z of iodine rods were −0.10±0.38 mg/ml, −0.1±8.2 HU, 0.25±0.06 (Z1) and −0.23±0.07 (Z2). Conclusion: The results indicate that the spectral CT scanner generates quantitatively accurate spectral reconstructions at clinically relevant iodine concentrations. Beam-hardening-like artifacts still exist when high-attenuation objects are present and their impact on patient images needs further investigation. YY is an employee of Philips

  5. WE-FG-207B-12: Quantitative Evaluation of a Spectral CT Scanner in a Phantom Study: Results of Spectral Reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, X; Arbique, G; Guild, J; Anderson, J [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Yagil, Y [Philips Healthcare, Haifa (Israel)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the quantitative image quality of spectral reconstructions of phantom data from a spectral CT scanner. Methods: The spectral CT scanner (IQon Spectral CT, Philips Healthcare) is equipped with a dual-layer detector and generates conventional 80-140 kVp images and variety of spectral reconstructions, e.g., virtual monochromatic (VM) images, virtual non-contrast (VNC) images, iodine maps, and effective atomic number (Z) images. A cylindrical solid water phantom (Gammex 472, 33 cm diameter and 5 cm thick) with iodine (2.0-20.0 mg I/ml) and calcium (50-600 mg/ml) rod inserts was scanned at 120 kVp and 27 mGy CTDIvol. Spectral reconstructions were evaluated by comparing image measurements with theoretical values calculated from nominal rod compositions provided by the phantom manufacturer. The theoretical VNC was calculated using water and iodine basis material decomposition, and the theoretical Z was calculated using two common methods, the chemical formula method (Z1) and the dual-energy ratio method (Z2). Results: Beam-hardening-like artifacts between high-attenuation calcium rods (≥300 mg/ml, >800 HU) influenced quantitative measurements, so the quantitative analysis was only performed on iodine rods using the images from the scan with all the calcium rods removed. The CT numbers of the iodine rods in the VM images (50∼150 keV) were close to theoretical values with average difference of 2.4±6.9 HU. Compared with theoretical values, the average difference for iodine concentration, VNC CT number and effective Z of iodine rods were −0.10±0.38 mg/ml, −0.1±8.2 HU, 0.25±0.06 (Z1) and −0.23±0.07 (Z2). Conclusion: The results indicate that the spectral CT scanner generates quantitatively accurate spectral reconstructions at clinically relevant iodine concentrations. Beam-hardening-like artifacts still exist when high-attenuation objects are present and their impact on patient images needs further investigation. YY is an employee of Philips

  6. Assessment of Landsat multispectral scanner spectral indexes for monitoring arid rangeland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musick, H. B.

    1984-01-01

    Correlations between spectral indices and vegetation parameters in south-central New Mexico were used to determine the utility of Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) spectral indices in arid rangeland monitoring. In addition, spectral index change for 1976-1980 was calculated from retrospective MSS data and compared with qualitative ground truth in order to evaluate vegetation change detection by means of spectral indices. Brightness index change consistently differentiated between cover increase and decrease, but index change appears to have been offset from true cover change; this may at least partly be attributed to the failure of the methods used to standardize MSS scenes for differences in sensor response. Green vegetation indices, by contrast to brightness indices, failed to consistently differentiate between cover increase and decrease.

  7. Lack of CT scanner in a rural emergency department increases inter-facility transfers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Catherine; Fleet, Richard; Tounkara, Fatoumata Korika; Lavallée-Bourget, Isabelle; Turgeon-Pelchat, Catherine

    2017-12-28

    Rural emergency departments (EDs) are an important gateway to care for the 20% of Canadians who reside in rural areas. Less than 15% of Canadian rural EDs have access to a computed tomography (CT) scanner. We hypothesized that a significant proportion of inter-facility transfers from rural hospitals without CT scanners are for CT imaging. Our objective was to assess inter-facility transfers for CT imaging in a rural ED without a CT scanner. We selected a rural ED that offers 24/7 medical care with admission beds but no CT scanner. Descriptive statistics were collected from 2010 to 2015 on total ED visits and inter-facility transfers. Data was accessible through hospital and government databases. Between 2010 and 2014, there were respectively 13,531, 13,524, 13,827, 12,883, and 12,942 ED visits, with an average of 444 inter-facility transfers. An average of 33% (148/444) of inter-facility transfers were to a rural referral centre with a CT scan, with 84% being for CT scan. Inter-facility transfers incur costs and potential delays in patient diagnosis and management, yet current databases could not capture transfer times. Acquiring a CT scan may represent a reasonable opportunity for the selected rural hospital considering the number of required transfers.

  8. Investigation of Tree Spectral Reflectance Characteristics Using a Mobile Terrestrial Line Spectrometer and Laser Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eetu Puttonen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In mobile terrestrial hyperspectral imaging, individual trees often present large variations in spectral reflectance that may impact the relevant applications, but the related studies have been seldom reported. To fill this gap, this study was dedicated to investigating the spectral reflectance characteristics of individual trees with a Sensei mobile mapping system, which comprises a Specim line spectrometer and an Ibeo Lux laser scanner. The addition of the latter unit facilitates recording the structural characteristics of the target trees synchronously, and this is beneficial for revealing the characteristics of the spatial distributions of tree spectral reflectance with variations at different levels. Then, the parts of trees with relatively low-level variations can be extracted. At the same time, since it is difficult to manipulate the whole spectrum, the traditional concept of vegetation indices (VI based on some particular spectral bands was taken into account here. Whether the assumed VIs capable of behaving consistently for the whole crown of each tree was also checked. The specific analyses were deployed based on four deciduous tree species and six kinds of VIs. The test showed that with the help of the laser scanner data, the parts of individual trees with relatively low-level variations can be located. Based on these parts, the relatively stable spectral reflectance characteristics for different tree species can be learnt.

  9. Note: Low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope with detachable scanner and reliable transfer mechanism for tip and sample exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Weifeng; Wang, Jihao; Wang, Junting; Zhang, Jing; Hou, Yubin; Lu, Qingyou

    2017-12-01

    A homebuilt low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) featuring a detachable scanner based on a double slider design, along with a reliable transfer mechanism for tip and sample exchange, is present. The coarse motor is decoupled from the scanner, which prevents the motor instabilities including vibrations and drifts from entering the tip-sample loop and thus improves the performance of the STM. In addition, in situ exchange of tips and samples can be implemented easily and reliably using a winch-type transfer mechanism. Atomically resolved images on graphite are demonstrated to show the performance of the proposed STM.

  10. MFP scanner diagnostics using a self-printed target to measure the modulation transfer function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weibao; Bauer, Peter; Wagner, Jerry; Allebach, Jan P.

    2014-01-01

    In the current market, reduction of warranty costs is an important avenue for improving profitability by manufacturers of printer products. Our goal is to develop an autonomous capability for diagnosis of printer and scanner caused defects with mid-range laser multifunction printers (MFPs), so as to reduce warranty costs. If the scanner unit of the MFP is not performing according to specification, this issue needs to be diagnosed. If there is a print quality issue, this can be diagnosed by printing a special test page that is resident in the firmware of the MFP unit, and then scanning it. However, the reliability of this process will be compromised if the scanner unit is defective. Thus, for both scanner and printer image quality issues, it is important to be able to properly evaluate the scanner performance. In this paper, we consider evaluation of the scanner performance by measuring its modulation transfer function (MTF). The MTF is a fundamental tool for assessing the performance of imaging systems. Several ways have been proposed to measure the MTF, all of which require a special target, for example a slanted-edge target. It is unacceptably expensive to ship every MFP with such a standard target, and to expect that the customer can keep track of it. To reduce this cost, in this paper, we develop new approach to this task. It is based on a self-printed slanted-edge target. Then, we propose algorithms to improve the results using a self-printed slanted-edge target. Finally, we present experimental results for MTF measurement using self-printed targets and compare them to the results obtained with standard targets.

  11. Spectral Gap Energy Transfer in Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, S.; Walters, K.; Barros, A. P.; Nogueira, M.

    2012-12-01

    Experimental measurements of atmospheric turbulence energy spectra show E(k) ~ k-3 slopes at synoptic scales (~ 600 km - 2000 km) and k-5/3 slopes at the mesoscales (theory, it is expected that a strong backward energy cascade would develop at the synoptic scale, and that circulation would grow infinitely. To limit this backward transfer, energy arrest at macroscales must be introduced. The most commonly used turbulence models developed to mimic the above energy transfer include the energy backscatter model for 2D turbulence in the horizontal plane via Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models, dissipative URANS models in the vertical plane, and Ekman friction for the energy arrest. One of the controversial issues surrounding the atmospheric turbulence spectra is the explanation of the generation of the 2D and 3D spectra and transition between them, for energy injection at the synoptic scales. Lilly (1989) proposed that the existence of 2D and 3D spectra can only be explained by the presence of an additional energy injection in the meso-scale region. A second issue is related to the observations of dual peak spectra with small variance in meso-scale, suggesting that the energy transfer occurs across a spectral gap (Van Der Hoven, 1957). Several studies have confirmed the spectral gap for the meso-scale circulations, and have suggested that they are enhanced by smaller scale vertical convection rather than by the synoptic scales. Further, the widely accepted energy arrest mechanism by boundary layer friction is closely related to the spectral gap transfer. This study proposes an energy transfer mechanism for atmospheric turbulence with synoptic scale injection, wherein the generation of 2D and 3D spectra is explained using spectral gap energy transfer. The existence of the spectral gap energy transfer is validated by performing LES for the interaction of large scale circulation with a wall, and studying the evolution of the energy spectra both near to and far from the wall

  12. Restoration of Hyperspectral Push-Broom Scanner Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut

    1997-01-01

    Several effects combine to distort the multispectral data that are obtained from push-broom scanners. We develop an algorithm for restoration of such data, illustrated on images from the ROSIS scanner. In push-broom scanners variation between elements in the detector array results in a strong...... back into the original spectral space results in noise corrected variables. The noise components will now have been removed from the entire original data set by working on a smaller set of noise contaminated transformed variables only. The application of the above techniques results in a dramatic...

  13. Impedance Characterisation of the SPS Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091911; Prof. Sillanpää, Mika

    As a beam diagnostic tool, the SPS wire scanner interacts with the proton bunches traversing the vacuum pipes of the Super Proton Synchrotron particle accelerator. Following the interaction, the bunches decelerate or experience momentum kicks off-axis and couple energy to the cavity walls, resonances and to the diagnostic tool, the scanning wire. The beam coupling impedance and, in particular, the beam induced heating of the wire motivate the characterisation and redesign of the SPS wire scanner. In this thesis, we characterise RF-wise the low frequency modes of the SPS wire scanner. These have the highest contribution to the impedance. We measure the cavity modes in terms of resonance frequency and quality factor by traditional measurement techniques and data analysis. We carry out a 4-port measurement to evaluate the beam coupling to the scanning wire, that yields the spectral heating power. If combined with the simulations, one is able to extract the beam coupling impedance and deduce the spectral dissipa...

  14. Transferring x-ray based automated threat detection between scanners with different energies and resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, M.; Ransley, M.; Rogers, T. W.; Griffin, L. D.

    2017-10-01

    A significant obstacle to developing high performance Deep Learning algorithms for Automated Threat Detection (ATD) in security X-ray imagery, is the difficulty of obtaining large training datasets. In our previous work, we circumvented this problem for ATD in cargo containers, using Threat Image Projection and data augmentation. In this work, we investigate whether data scarcity for other modalities, such as parcels and baggage, can be ameliorated by transforming data from one domain so that it approximates the appearance of another. We present an ontology of ATD datasets to assess where transfer learning may be applied. We define frameworks for transfer at the training and testing stages, and compare the results for both methods against ATD where a common data source is used for training and testing. Our results show very poor transfer, which we attribute to the difficulty of accurately matching the blur and contrast characteristics of different scanners.

  15. Objective image characterization of a spectral CT scanner with dual-layer detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozguner, Orhan; Dhanantwari, Amar; Halliburton, Sandra; Wen, Gezheng; Utrup, Steven; Jordan, David

    2018-01-01

    This work evaluated the performance of a detector-based spectral CT system by obtaining objective reference data, evaluating attenuation response of iodine and accuracy of iodine quantification, and comparing conventional CT and virtual monoenergetic images in three common phantoms. Scanning was performed using the hospital’s clinical adult body protocol. Modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated for a tungsten wire and visual line pair targets were evaluated. Image noise power spectrum (NPS) and pixel standard deviation were calculated. MTF for monoenergetic images agreed with conventional images within 0.05 lp cm-1. NPS curves indicated that noise texture of 70 keV monoenergetic images is similar to conventional images. Standard deviation measurements showed monoenergetic images have lower noise except at 40 keV. Mean CT number and CNR agreed with conventional images at 75 keV. Measured iodine concentration agreed with true concentration within 6% for inserts at the center of the phantom. Performance of monoenergetic images at detector based spectral CT is the same as, or better than, that of conventional images. Spectral acquisition and reconstruction with a detector based platform represents the physical behaviour of iodine as expected and accurately quantifies the material concentration.

  16. Spectral element method for vector radiative transfer equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, J.M.; Liu, L.H.; Hsu, P.-F.; Tan, J.Y.

    2010-01-01

    A spectral element method (SEM) is developed to solve polarized radiative transfer in multidimensional participating medium. The angular discretization is based on the discrete-ordinates approach, and the spatial discretization is conducted by spectral element approach. Chebyshev polynomial is used to build basis function on each element. Four various test problems are taken as examples to verify the performance of the SEM. The effectiveness of the SEM is demonstrated. The h and the p convergence characteristics of the SEM are studied. The convergence rate of p-refinement follows the exponential decay trend and is superior to that of h-refinement. The accuracy and efficiency of the higher order approximation in the SEM is well demonstrated for the solution of the VRTE. The predicted angular distribution of brightness temperature and Stokes vector by the SEM agree very well with the benchmark solutions in references. Numerical results show that the SEM is accurate, flexible and effective to solve multidimensional polarized radiative transfer problems.

  17. Photoinduced electron transfer and persistent spectral hole-burning in natural emerald.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesen, Hans

    2011-06-02

    Wavelength-selective excited-state lifetime measurements and absorption, luminescence, and hole-burning spectra of a natural African emerald crystal are reported. The (2)E excited-state lifetime displays an extreme wavelength dependence, varying from 190 to 37 μs within 1.8 nm of the R(1)-line. Overall, the excited state is strongly quenched, in comparison to laboratory-created emerald (τ=1.3 ms), with an average quenching rate of ∼6 × 10(3) s(-1) at 2.5 K. This quenching is attributed to photoinduced electron transfer caused by a relatively high concentration of Fe(2+) ions. The forward electron-transfer rate, k(f), from the nearest possible Fe(2+) sites at around 5 Å is estimated to be ∼20 × 10(3) s(-1) at 2.5 K. The photoreductive quenching of the excited Cr(3+) ions by Fe(2+) is followed by rapid electron back-transfer in the ground state upon deactivation. The exchange interaction based quenching can be modeled by assuming a random quencher distribution within the possible Fe(2+) sites with the forward electron-transfer rate, k(f), given as a function of acceptor-donor separation R by exp[(R(f)-R)/a(f)]; R(f) and a(f) values of 13.5 and 2.7 Å are obtained at 2.5 K. The electron transfer/back-transfer reorganizes the local crystal lattice, occasionally leading to a minor variation of the short-range structure around the Cr(3+) ions. This provides a mechanism for spectral hole-burning for which a moderately high quantum efficiency of about ∼0.005% is observed. Spectral holes are subject to spontaneous hole-filling and spectral diffusion, and both effects can be quantified within the standard two-level systems for non-photochemical hole-burning. Importantly, the absorbance increases on both sides of broad spectral holes, and isosbestic points are observed, in accord with the expected distribution of the "photoproduct" in a non-photochemical hole-burning process. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  18. Product development of Indian cargo scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    A cargo scanner is required for nonintrusive screening of suspected cargo containers in trade, using high energy X-ray, to detect any mis-declarations, contraband goods concealment or hidden ammunition or explosives. The cargo scanners help authorities to process large number of suspected cargo with a high level of confidence with other additional benefit of faster clearance, minimised intrusive inspection and generating secured digital record of the process. BARC is in process of developing Indian Cargo Scanner with indigenous X-ray source. Proof of concept and conformance of the results to the international standards has been demonstrated in laboratory. Full scale equipment named as Portal scanner shall be demonstrated at Gamma field Trombay in year 2017. Subsequently the technology transfer may be done to a suitable Indian vendor

  19. Spectral signature selection for mapping unvegetated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, G. A.; Petersen, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    Airborne multispectral scanner data covering the wavelength interval from 0.40-2.60 microns were collected at an altitude of 1000 m above the terrain in southeastern Pennsylvania. Uniform training areas were selected within three sites from this flightline. Soil samples were collected from each site and a procedure developed to allow assignment of scan line and element number from the multispectral scanner data to each sampling location. These soil samples were analyzed on a spectrophotometer and laboratory spectral signatures were derived. After correcting for solar radiation and atmospheric attenuation, the laboratory signatures were compared to the spectral signatures derived from these same soils using multispectral scanner data. Both signatures were used in supervised and unsupervised classification routines. Computer-generated maps using the laboratory and multispectral scanner derived signatures resulted in maps that were similar to maps resulting from field surveys. Approximately 90% agreement was obtained between classification maps produced using multispectral scanner derived signatures and laboratory derived signatures.

  20. Spectral tuning of near-field radiative heat transfer by graphene-covered metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhiheng; Wang, Ao; Xuan, Yimin

    2018-03-01

    When two gratings are respectively covered by a layer of graphene sheet, the near-field radiative heat transfer between two parallel gratings made of silica (SiO2) could be greatly improved. As the material properties of doped silicon (n-type doping concentration is 1020 cm-3, marked as Si-20) and SiO2 differ greatly, we theoretically investigate the near-field radiative heat transfer between two parallel graphene-covered gratings made of Si-20 to explore some different phenomena, especially for modulating the spectral properties. The radiative heat flux between two parallel bulks made of Si-20 can be enhanced by using gratings instead of bulks. When the two gratings are respectively covered by a layer of graphene sheet, the radiative heat flux between two gratings made of Si-20 can be further enhanced. By tuning graphene chemical potential μ and grating filling factor f, due to the interaction between surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) of graphene sheets and grating structures, the spectral properties of the radiative heat flux between two parallel graphene-covered gratings can be effectively regulated. This work will develop and supplement the effects of materials on the near-field radiative heat transfer for this kind of system configuration, paving a way to modulate the spectral properties of near-field radiative heat transfer.

  1. Coherent Structures and Spectral Energy Transfer in Turbulent Plasma: A Space-Filter Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporeale, E.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Califano, F.; Retinò, A.

    2018-03-01

    Plasma turbulence at scales of the order of the ion inertial length is mediated by several mechanisms, including linear wave damping, magnetic reconnection, the formation and dissipation of thin current sheets, and stochastic heating. It is now understood that the presence of localized coherent structures enhances the dissipation channels and the kinetic features of the plasma. However, no formal way of quantifying the relationship between scale-to-scale energy transfer and the presence of spatial structures has been presented so far. In the Letter we quantify such a relationship analyzing the results of a two-dimensional high-resolution Hall magnetohydrodynamic simulation. In particular, we employ the technique of space filtering to derive a spectral energy flux term which defines, in any point of the computational domain, the signed flux of spectral energy across a given wave number. The characterization of coherent structures is performed by means of a traditional two-dimensional wavelet transformation. By studying the correlation between the spectral energy flux and the wavelet amplitude, we demonstrate the strong relationship between scale-to-scale transfer and coherent structures. Furthermore, by conditioning one quantity with respect to the other, we are able for the first time to quantify the inhomogeneity of the turbulence cascade induced by topological structures in the magnetic field. Taking into account the low space-filling factor of coherent structures (i.e., they cover a small portion of space), it emerges that 80% of the spectral energy transfer (both in the direct and inverse cascade directions) is localized in about 50% of space, and 50% of the energy transfer is localized in only 25% of space.

  2. Anomalous spectral weight transfer at the superconducting transition of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dessau, D.S.; Wells, B.O.; Shen, Z.; Spicer, W.E.; Arko, A.J.; List, R.S.; Mitzi, D.B.; Kapitulnik, A.

    1991-01-01

    Anomalous spectral weight transfer at the superconducting transition of single-crystalline Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ was observed by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. As the sample goes superconducting, not only is there spectral weight transfer from the gap region to the pileup peak as in BCS theory, but along the Γ-bar M direction there is also some spectral weight transfer from higher binding energies in the form of a dip. In addition, we note that at the superconducting transition there is a decrease (increase) in the occupied spectral weight for the spectra taken along Γ-bar M (Γ-X)

  3. Robust and transferable quantification of NMR spectral quality using IROC analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrello, Matthew A.; Maciejewski, Mark W.; Schuyler, Adam D.; Weatherby, Gerard; Hoch, Jeffrey C.

    2017-12-01

    Non-Fourier methods are increasingly utilized in NMR spectroscopy because of their ability to handle nonuniformly-sampled data. However, non-Fourier methods present unique challenges due to their nonlinearity, which can produce nonrandom noise and render conventional metrics for spectral quality such as signal-to-noise ratio unreliable. The lack of robust and transferable metrics (i.e. applicable to methods exhibiting different nonlinearities) has hampered comparison of non-Fourier methods and nonuniform sampling schemes, preventing the identification of best practices. We describe a novel method, in situ receiver operating characteristic analysis (IROC), for characterizing spectral quality based on the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve. IROC utilizes synthetic signals added to empirical data as "ground truth", and provides several robust scalar-valued metrics for spectral quality. This approach avoids problems posed by nonlinear spectral estimates, and provides a versatile quantitative means of characterizing many aspects of spectral quality. We demonstrate applications to parameter optimization in Fourier and non-Fourier spectral estimation, critical comparison of different methods for spectrum analysis, and optimization of nonuniform sampling schemes. The approach will accelerate the discovery of optimal approaches to nonuniform sampling experiment design and non-Fourier spectrum analysis for multidimensional NMR.

  4. Reconstruction of solar spectral surface UV irradiances using radiative transfer simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindfors, Anders; Heikkilä, Anu; Kaurola, Jussi; Koskela, Tapani; Lakkala, Kaisa

    2009-01-01

    UV radiation exerts several effects concerning life on Earth, and spectral information on the prevailing UV radiation conditions is needed in order to study each of these effects. In this paper, we present a method for reconstruction of solar spectral UV irradiances at the Earth's surface. The method, which is a further development of an earlier published method for reconstruction of erythemally weighted UV, relies on radiative transfer simulations, and takes as input (1) the effective cloud optical depth as inferred from pyranometer measurements of global radiation (300-3000 nm); (2) the total ozone column; (3) the surface albedo as estimated from measurements of snow depth; (4) the total water vapor column; and (5) the altitude of the location. Reconstructed daily cumulative spectral irradiances at Jokioinen and Sodankylä in Finland are, in general, in good agreement with measurements. The mean percentage difference, for instance, is mostly within +/-8%, and the root mean square of the percentage difference is around 10% or below for wavelengths over 310 nm and daily minimum solar zenith angles (SZA) less than 70 degrees . In this study, we used pseudospherical radiative transfer simulations, which were shown to improve the performance of our method under large SZA (low Sun).

  5. Numerical and experimental results on the spectral wave transfer in finite depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassai, Guido

    2016-04-01

    Determination of the form of the one-dimensional surface gravity wave spectrum in water of finite depth is important for many scientific and engineering applications. Spectral parameters of deep water and intermediate depth waves serve as input data for the design of all coastal structures and for the description of many coastal processes. Moreover, the wave spectra are given as an input for the response and seakeeping calculations of high speed vessels in extreme sea conditions and for reliable calculations of the amount of energy to be extracted by wave energy converters (WEC). Available data on finite depth spectral form is generally extrapolated from parametric forms applicable in deep water (e.g., JONSWAP) [Hasselmann et al., 1973; Mitsuyasu et al., 1980; Kahma, 1981; Donelan et al., 1992; Zakharov, 2005). The present paper gives a contribution in this field through the validation of the offshore energy spectra transfer from given spectral forms through the measurement of inshore wave heights and spectra. The wave spectra on deep water were recorded offshore Ponza by the Wave Measurement Network (Piscopia et al.,2002). The field regressions between the spectral parameters, fp and the nondimensional energy with the fetch length were evaluated for fetch-limited sea conditions. These regressions gave the values of the spectral parameters for the site of interest. The offshore wave spectra were transfered from the measurement station offshore Ponza to a site located offshore the Gulf of Salerno. The offshore local wave spectra so obtained were transfered on the coastline with the TMA model (Bouws et al., 1985). Finally the numerical results, in terms of significant wave heights, were compared with the wave data recorded by a meteo-oceanographic station owned by Naples Hydrographic Office on the coastline of Salerno in 9m depth. Some considerations about the wave energy to be potentially extracted by Wave Energy Converters were done and the results were discussed.

  6. A fast ADC scanner for multiparameter nuclear physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midttun, G.; Ingebretsen, F.; Holt, K.; Skaali, B.

    1983-04-01

    A fast readout system for multiparameter experiments in nuclear physics is described. The central part of the CAMAC aquisition hardware is an ADC scanner module. The scanner incorporates a new arbitration logic and direct memory access for simultaneous transfer of singles and correlated data. Together with specially designed ADC interfaces the system can be set up for any configuration of singles and multiparameter events from 1 up to 15 ADC's in one crate

  7. A fast ADC scanner for multiparameter nuclear physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midttun, G.; Holt, K.; Ingebretsen, F.; Skaali, B.

    1983-01-01

    A fast readout system for multiparameter experiments in nuclear physics is described. The central part of the CAMAC aquisition hardware is an ADC scanner module. The scanner incorporates a new arbitration logic and direct memory access for simultaneous transfer of singles and correlated data. Together with specially designed ADC interfaces the system can be set up for any configurations of singles and multiparameter events from 1 up to 15 ADC's in one crate

  8. Portable optical fiber probe-based spectroscopic scanner for rapid cancer diagnosis: a new tool for intraoperative margin assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyom Lue

    Full Text Available There continues to be a significant clinical need for rapid and reliable intraoperative margin assessment during cancer surgery. Here we describe a portable, quantitative, optical fiber probe-based, spectroscopic tissue scanner designed for intraoperative diagnostic imaging of surgical margins, which we tested in a proof of concept study in human tissue for breast cancer diagnosis. The tissue scanner combines both diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy (IFS, and has hyperspectral imaging capability, acquiring full DRS and IFS spectra for each scanned image pixel. Modeling of the DRS and IFS spectra yields quantitative parameters that reflect the metabolic, biochemical and morphological state of tissue, which are translated into disease diagnosis. The tissue scanner has high spatial resolution (0.25 mm over a wide field of view (10 cm × 10 cm, and both high spectral resolution (2 nm and high spectral contrast, readily distinguishing tissues with widely varying optical properties (bone, skeletal muscle, fat and connective tissue. Tissue-simulating phantom experiments confirm that the tissue scanner can quantitatively measure spectral parameters, such as hemoglobin concentration, in a physiologically relevant range with a high degree of accuracy (<5% error. Finally, studies using human breast tissues showed that the tissue scanner can detect small foci of breast cancer in a background of normal breast tissue. This tissue scanner is simpler in design, images a larger field of view at higher resolution and provides a more physically meaningful tissue diagnosis than other spectroscopic imaging systems currently reported in literatures. We believe this spectroscopic tissue scanner can provide real-time, comprehensive diagnostic imaging of surgical margins in excised tissues, overcoming the sampling limitation in current histopathology margin assessment. As such it is a significant step in the development of a

  9. Nonconservative and reverse spectral transfer in Hasegawa-Mima turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P.W.; Newman, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    The dual cascade is generally represented as a conservative cascade of enstrophy to short wavelengths through an enstrophy similarity range and an inverse cascade of energy to long wavelengths through an energy similarity range. This picture, based on a proof due to Kraichnan [Phys. Fluids 10, 1417 (1967)], is found to be significantly modified for a spectra of finite extent. Dimensional arguments and direct measurement of spectral flow in Hasegawa-Mima turbulence indicate that for both the energy and enstrophy cascades, transfer of the conserved quantity is accompanied by a nonconservative transfer of the other quantity. The decrease of a given invariant (energy or enstrophy) in the nonconservative transfer in one similarity range is balanced by the increase of that quantity in the other similarity range, thus maintaining net invariance. The increase or decrease of a given invariant quantity in one similarity range depends on the injection scale and is consistent with that quantity being carried in a self-similar transfer of the other invariant quantity. This leads, in an inertial range of finite size, to some energy being carried to small scales and some enstrophy being carried to large scales

  10. Charge-Transfer Processes in Warm Dense Matter: Selective Spectral Filtering for Laser-Accelerated Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braenzel, J.; Barriga-Carrasco, M. D.; Morales, R.; Schnürer, M.

    2018-05-01

    We investigate, both experimentally and theoretically, how the spectral distribution of laser accelerated carbon ions can be filtered by charge exchange processes in a double foil target setup. Carbon ions at multiple charge states with an initially wide kinetic energy spectrum, from 0.1 to 18 MeV, were detected with a remarkably narrow spectral bandwidth after they had passed through an ultrathin and partially ionized foil. With our theoretical calculations, we demonstrate that this process is a consequence of the evolution of the carbon ion charge states in the second foil. We calculated the resulting spectral distribution separately for each ion species by solving the rate equations for electron loss and capture processes within a collisional radiative model. We determine how the efficiency of charge transfer processes can be manipulated by controlling the ionization degree of the transfer matter.

  11. Optimal and robust control of quantum state transfer by shaping the spectral phase of ultrafast laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu; Dong, Daoyi; Shu, Chuan-Cun

    2018-04-04

    Achieving fast and efficient quantum state transfer is a fundamental task in physics, chemistry and quantum information science. However, the successful implementation of the perfect quantum state transfer also requires robustness under practically inevitable perturbative defects. Here, we demonstrate how an optimal and robust quantum state transfer can be achieved by shaping the spectral phase of an ultrafast laser pulse in the framework of frequency domain quantum optimal control theory. Our numerical simulations of the single dibenzoterrylene molecule as well as in atomic rubidium show that optimal and robust quantum state transfer via spectral phase modulated laser pulses can be achieved by incorporating a filtering function of the frequency into the optimization algorithm, which in turn has potential applications for ultrafast robust control of photochemical reactions.

  12. Audibility of spectral differences in head-related transfer functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Pablo F.F.; Møller, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    The spatial resolution at which head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) are available is an important aspect in the implementation of three-dimensional sound. Specifically, synthesis of moving sound requires that HRTFs are sufficiently close so the simulated sound is perceived as moving smoothly....... How close they must be, depends directly on how much the characteristics of neighboring HRTFs differ, and, most important, when these differences become audible. Differences between HRTFs exist in the interaural delay (ITD) and in the spectral characteristics, i.e. the magnitude spectrum of the HRTFs...

  13. The influence of compressibility on nonlinear spectral energy transfer - Part 2: Effect on hypersonic boundary layer transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Ankita; Girimaji, Sharath

    2017-11-01

    We examine the effect of compressible spectral energy transfer in the nonlinear regime of transition to turbulence of hypersonic boundary layers. The nature of spectral energy transfer between perturbation modes is profoundly influenced by two compressibility mechanisms. First and foremost, the emergence of nonlinear pressure-dilatation mechanism leads to kinetic-internal energy exchange within the perturbation field. Such interchange is absent in incompressible flow as pressure merely reorients the perturbation amplitude vector while conserving kinetic energy. Secondly, the nature of triadic interactions also changes due to variability in density. In this work, we demonstrate that the efficiency of nonlinear spectral energy transfer is diminished in compressible boundary layers. Emergence of new perturbation modes or `broad-banding' of the perturbation field is significantly delayed in comparison to incompressible boundary layer undergoing transition. A significant amount of perturbation energy is transformed to internal energy and thus unavailable for `tripping' the flow into turbulent state. These factors profoundly change the nature of the nonlinear stage of transition in compressible boundary layer leading to delayed onset of full-fledged turbulence.

  14. Evaluation of a LED-based flatbed document scanner for radiochromic film dosimetry in transmission mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José Manuel; García-Garduño, Olivia Amanda; Treviño-Palacios, Carlos; Herrera-González, José Alfredo

    2018-03-01

    Flatbed scanners are the most frequently used reading instrument for radiochromic film dosimetry because its low cost, high spatial resolution, among other advantages. These scanners use a fluorescent lamp and a CCD array as light source and detector, respectively. Recently, manufacturers of flatbed scanners replaced the fluorescent lamp by light emission diodes (LED) as a light source. The goal of this work is to evaluate the performance of a commercial flatbed scanner with LED based source light for radiochromic film dosimetry. Film read out consistency, response uniformity, film-scanner sensitivity, long term stability and total dose uncertainty was evaluated. In overall, the performance of the LED flatbed scanner is comparable to that of a cold cathode fluorescent lamp (CCFL). There are important spectral differences between LED and CCFL lamps that results in a higher sensitivity of the LED scanner in the green channel. Total dose uncertainty, film response reproducibility and long-term stability of LED scanner are slightly better than those of the CCFL. However, the LED based scanner has a strong non-uniform response, up to 9%, that must be adequately corrected for radiotherapy dosimetry QA. The differences in light emission spectra between LED and CCFL lamps and its potential impact on film-scanner sensitivity suggest that the design of a dedicated flat-bed scanner with LEDs may improve sensitivity and dose uncertainty in radiochromic film dosimetry. Copyright © 2018 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Raman spectral indicators of catalyst decoupling for transfer of CVD grown 2D materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whelan, Patrick Rebsdorf; Jessen, Bjarke Sørensen; Wang, Ruizhi

    2017-01-01

    .7% monolayer graphene coverage, for up to 300 mm diameter wafers.We find a strong correlation between the transfer coverage obtained for graphene and the emergence of a lower wavenumber 2D peak component, with the concurrent disappearance of the higher wavenumber 2Dþ peak component during oxidation......Through a combination of monitoring the Raman spectral characteristics of 2D materials grown on copper catalyst layers, and wafer scale automated detection of the fraction of transferred material, we reproducibly achieve transfers with over 97.5% monolayer hexagonal boron nitride and 99...... of the catalyst surface. The 2D peak characteristics can therefore act as an unambiguous predictor of the success of the transfer. The combined monitoring and transfer process presented here is highly scalable and amenable for roll-to-roll processing....

  16. Upgraded airborne scanner for commercial remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sheng-Huei; Rubin, Tod D.

    1994-06-01

    Traditional commercial remote sensing has focused on the geologic market, with primary focus on mineral identification and mapping in the visible through short-wave infrared spectral regions (0.4 to 2.4 microns). Commercial remote sensing users now demand airborne scanning capabilities spanning the entire wavelength range from ultraviolet through thermal infrared (0.3 to 12 microns). This spectral range enables detection, identification, and mapping of objects and liquids on the earth's surface and gases in the air. Applications requiring this range of wavelengths include detection and mapping of oil spills, soil and water contamination, stressed vegetation, and renewable and non-renewable natural resources, and also change detection, natural hazard mitigation, emergency response, agricultural management, and urban planning. GER has designed and built a configurable scanner that acquires high resolution images in 63 selected wave bands in this broad wavelength range.

  17. Side scanner for supermarkets: a new scanner design standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Charles K.; Cheng, J. K.

    1996-09-01

    High speed UPC bar code has become a standard mode of data capture for supermarkets in the US, Europe, and Japan. The influence of the ergonomics community on the design of the scanner is evident. During the past decade the ergonomic issues of cashier in check-outs has led to occupational hand-wrist cumulative trauma disorders, in most cases causing carpal tunnel syndrome, a permanent hand injury. In this paper, the design of a side scanner to resolve the issues is discussed. The complex optical module and the sensor for aforesaid side scanner is described. The ergonomic advantages offer the old counter mounted vertical scanner has been experimentally proved by the industrial funded study at an independent university.

  18. Development of a Fast and Accurate PCRTM Radiative Transfer Model in the Solar Spectral Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Yang, Qiguang; Li, Hui; Jin, Zhonghai; Wu, Wan; Kizer, Susan; Zhou, Daniel K.; Yang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    A fast and accurate principal component-based radiative transfer model in the solar spectral region (PCRTMSOLAR) has been developed. The algorithm is capable of simulating reflected solar spectra in both clear sky and cloudy atmospheric conditions. Multiple scattering of the solar beam by the multilayer clouds and aerosols are calculated using a discrete ordinate radiative transfer scheme. The PCRTM-SOLAR model can be trained to simulate top-of-atmosphere radiance or reflectance spectra with spectral resolution ranging from 1 cm(exp -1) resolution to a few nanometers. Broadband radiances or reflectance can also be calculated if desired. The current version of the PCRTM-SOLAR covers a spectral range from 300 to 2500 nm. The model is valid for solar zenith angles ranging from 0 to 80 deg, the instrument view zenith angles ranging from 0 to 70 deg, and the relative azimuthal angles ranging from 0 to 360 deg. Depending on the number of spectral channels, the speed of the current version of PCRTM-SOLAR is a few hundred to over one thousand times faster than the medium speed correlated-k option MODTRAN5. The absolute RMS error in channel radiance is smaller than 10(exp -3) mW/cm)exp 2)/sr/cm(exp -1) and the relative error is typically less than 0.2%.

  19. Large angle and high linearity two-dimensional laser scanner based on voice coil actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin; Chen, Sihai; Chen, Wei; Yang, Minghui; Fu, Wen

    2011-10-01

    A large angle and high linearity two-dimensional laser scanner with an in-house ingenious deflection angle detecting system is developed based on voice coil actuators direct driving mechanism. The specially designed voice coil actuators make the steering mirror moving at a sufficiently large angle. Frequency sweep method based on virtual instruments is employed to achieve the natural frequency of the laser scanner. The response shows that the performance of the laser scanner is limited by the mechanical resonances. The closed-loop controller based on mathematical model is used to reduce the oscillation of the laser scanner at resonance frequency. To design a qualified controller, the model of the laser scanner is set up. The transfer function of the model is identified with MATLAB according to the tested data. After introducing of the controller, the nonlinearity decreases from 13.75% to 2.67% at 50 Hz. The laser scanner also has other advantages such as large deflection mirror, small mechanical structure, and high scanning speed.

  20. MARS Spectral Imaging: From High-Energy Physics to a Biomedical Business

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Abstract MARS spectral scanners provide colour X-Ray images. Current MARS pre-clinical scanners enable researchers and clinicians to measure biochemical and physiological processes in specimens, and animal models of disease. The scanners have developed from a 10 year scientific collaboration between New Zealand and CERN. In parallel a company, MARS Bioimaging Ltd, was founded to commercialise the technology by productising the scanner and selling it to biomedical users around the world. The New Zealand team is now more than 30 people including staff and students from the fields of physics, engineering, computing, maths, radiology, cardiology, biochemistry, oncology, and orthopaedics. Current work with pre-clinical scanners has concluded that the technology will be  useful in heart disease, stroke, arthritis, joint replacements, and cancer. In late 2014, the government announced funding for NZ to build a MARS scanner capable of imaging humans. Bio Professor Anthony Butler is a radiologist wit...

  1. Spectral heterogeneity and carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 light-harvesting complexes from Allochromatium vinosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdaong, Nikki M; LaFountain, Amy M; Hacking, Kirsty; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Gibson, George N; Cogdell, Richard J; Frank, Harry A

    2016-02-01

    Photosynthetic organisms produce a vast array of spectral forms of antenna pigment-protein complexes to harvest solar energy and also to adapt to growth under the variable environmental conditions of light intensity, temperature, and nutrient availability. This behavior is exemplified by Allochromatium (Alc.) vinosum, a photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium that produces different types of LH2 light-harvesting complexes in response to variations in growth conditions. In the present work, three different spectral forms of LH2 from Alc. vinosum, B800-820, B800-840, and B800-850, were isolated, purified, and examined using steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and ultrafast time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. The pigment composition of the LH2 complexes was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, and all were found to contain five carotenoids: lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin, spirilloxanthin, rhodopin, and rhodovibrin. Spectral reconstructions of the absorption and fluorescence excitation spectra based on the pigment composition revealed significantly more spectral heterogeneity in these systems compared to LH2 complexes isolated from other species of purple bacteria. The data also revealed the individual carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer efficiencies which were correlated with the kinetic data from the ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopic experiments. This series of LH2 complexes allows a systematic exploration of the factors that determine the spectral properties of the bound pigments and control the rate and efficiency of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer.

  2. Image quality of conventional images of dual-layer SPECTRAL CT: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ommen, F; Bennink, E; Vlassenbroek, A; Dankbaar, J W; Schilham, A M R; Viergever, M A; de Jong, H W A M

    2018-05-10

    Spectral CT using a dual layer detector offers the possibility of retrospectively introducing spectral information to conventional CT images. In theory, the dual-layer technology should not come with a dose or image quality penalty for conventional images. In this study, we evaluate the influence of a dual-layer detector (IQon Spectral CT, Philips) on the image quality of conventional CT images, by comparing these images with those of a conventional but otherwise technically comparable single-layer CT scanner (Brilliance iCT, Philips), by means of phantom experiments. For both CT scanners conventional CT images were acquired using four adult scanning protocols: i) body helical, ii) body axial, iii) head helical and iv) head axial. A CATPHAN 600 phantom was scanned to conduct an assessment of image quality metrics at equivalent (CTDI) dose levels. Noise was characterized by means of noise power spectra (NPS) and standard deviation (SD) of a uniform region, and spatial resolution was evaluated with modulation transfer functions (MTF) of a tungsten wire. In addition, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), image uniformity, CT number linearity, slice thickness, slice spacing, and spatial linearity were measured and evaluated. Additional measurements of CNR, resolution and noise were performed in two larger phantoms. The resolution levels at 50%, 10% and 5% MTF of the iCT and IQon showed small but significant differences up to 0.25 lp/cm for body scans, and up to 0.2 lp/cm for head scans in favor of the IQon. The iCT and IQon showed perfect CT linearity for body scans, but for head scans both scanners showed an underestimation of the CT numbers of materials with a high opacity. Slice thickness was slightly overestimated for both scanners. Slice spacing was comparable and reconstructed correctly. In addition, spatial linearity was excellent for both scanners, with a maximum error of 0.11 mm. CNR was higher on the IQon compared to the iCT for both normal and larger phantoms with

  3. The development of a mobile CT-scanner gantry for use in the operating room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okudera, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Shigeaki; Koike, Jouji; Harada, Takanobu; Kanemaru, Kei

    1989-01-01

    We report the development of a mobile CT-scanner gantry which uses a gantry platter. This system has been developed for use in the operating room. We designed a small lift to move the gantry unit of the scanner: the gantry carrier. The scanner gantry is fixed to the gantry carrier. A phantom test with a digitalized operating table worked well in the laboratory, and operating-room use showed that there was no deterioration in image quality. The mobile gantry system has been developed to increase the efficiency of the operating CT-scanner system. This system enables us to obtain CT images during surgery of immediately after surgery in the operating room, i.e., in cases that are not transferable to the radiological department. The operability is basically the same as that of a conventional mobile X-ray unit. Theoretically, this unit could be used with any CT scanner and in any operating room. (author)

  4. Analyzing availability using transfer function models and cross spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singpurwalla, N.D.

    1980-01-01

    The paper shows how the methods of multivariate time series analysis can be used in a novel way to investigate the interrelationships between a series of operating (running) times and a series of maintenance (down) times of a complex system. Specifically, the techniques of cross spectral analysis are used to help obtain a Box-Jenkins type transfer function model for the running times and the down times of a nuclear reactor. A knowledge of the interrelationships between the running times and the down times is useful for an evaluation of maintenance policies, for replacement policy decisions, and for evaluating the availability and the readiness of complex systems

  5. Indirect identification and compensation of lateral scanner resonances in atomic force microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D J; Youcef-Toumi, K; Fantner, G E

    2011-01-01

    Improving the imaging speed of atomic force microscopy (AFM) requires accurate nanopositioning at high speeds. However, high speed operation excites resonances in the AFM's mechanical scanner that can distort the image, and therefore typical users of commercial AFMs elect to operate microscopes at speeds below which scanner resonances are observed. Although traditional robust feedforward controllers and input shaping have proven effective at minimizing the influence of scanner distortions, the lack of direct measurement and use of model-based controllers have required disassembling the microscope to access lateral scanner motion with external sensors in order to perform a full system identification experiment, which places excessive demands on routine microscope operators. Further, since the lightly damped instrument dynamics often change from experiment to experiment, model-based controllers designed from offline system identification experiments must trade off high speed performance for robustness to modeling errors. This work represents a new way to automatically characterize the lateral scanner dynamics without addition of lateral sensors, and shape the commanded input signals in such a way that disturbing dynamics are not excited. Scanner coupling between the lateral and out-of-plane directions is exploited and used to build a minimal model of the scanner that is also sufficient to describe the nature of the distorting resonances. This model informs the design of an online input shaper used to suppress spectral components of the high speed command signals. The method presented is distinct from alternative approaches in that neither an information-complete system identification experiment nor microscope modification are required. Because the system identification is performed online immediately before imaging, no tradeoff of performance is required. This approach has enabled an increase in the scan rates of unmodified commercial AFMs from 1-4 lines s -1 to over

  6. Spectral Properties of Dyes with Interfragmental Charge Transfer: Solvatochromism and Solvatofluorochromism of 2-(3-Coumaroyl-benzopyrylium Perchlorates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward V. Sanin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the spectral properties of dyes with interfragmental charge transfer, in particular, derivatives of 2-(3-coumaroylbenzopyrylium (CBP perchlorates. The positions of long-wavelength absorption and emission bands, quantum yields, and lifetimes of fluorescence were measured, mostly in aprotic solvents. Regression analysis of the relationship between the spectral characteristics of CBP and the main solvent parameters (polarity, polarisability, nucleophilicity, and electrophilicity was carried out. It was found that the characteristics of CBP depend mainly on two solvent parameters—polarity and/or nucleophilicity. An increase in these parameters results in a hypsochromic shift of absorption bands and a decrease of lifetimes and fluorescence intensity. The positions of the emission bands can demonstrate either hypsochromism or bathochromism, depending on the nature of the substituents. The solvatofluorochromic effects are not as strong as the solvatochromic ones. We believe that the spectral behaviour of CBP can be explained by cation depolarisation and by a decrease in the stability of nucleophilic complexes with solvent molecules that is associated with interfragmental charge transfer following excitation, relaxation, and radiative deactivation of the excited state.

  7. Radiative heat transfer enhancement using geometric and spectral control for achieving high-efficiency solar-thermophotovoltaic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohiyama, Asaka; Shimizu, Makoto; Yugami, Hiroo

    2018-04-01

    We numerically investigate radiative heat transfer enhancement using spectral and geometric control of the absorber/emitter. A high extraction of the radiative heat transfer from the emitter as well as minimization of the optical losses from the absorber leads to high extraction and solar thermophotovoltaic (STPV) system efficiency. The important points for high-efficiency STPV design are discussed for the low and high area ratio of the absorber/emitter. The obtained general guideline will support the design of various types of STPV systems.

  8. A stereotaxic frame and computer software for use with CT body scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.A.; Roberts, T.S.

    1979-01-01

    A prototype stereotaxic frame for use in conjunction with CT body scanners has been developed and is illustrated. Such a frame may be rigidly attached to the patient's cranium prior to CT scanning and kept attached until completion of the stereotaxic procedure. The frame produces landmarks in each CT slice which allow the CT scanner computer to calculate the spatial orientation of the slice with respect to the frame. Thus the computer may transfer information from the CT slice coordinate system to the frame coordinate system. Using this type of stereotaxic frame it is possible to complete the stereotaxic procedure either in the CT scanner or in the neurosurgery operating suite. In a series of 20 experiments with a target phantom the tip of the probe was placed at a target point with a mean error of 2.0 millimeters. (Auth.)

  9. Spectral Transfer Learning Using Information Geometry for a User-Independent Brain-Computer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waytowich, Nicholas R; Lawhern, Vernon J; Bohannon, Addison W; Ball, Kenneth R; Lance, Brent J

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in signal processing and machine learning techniques have enabled the application of Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) technologies to fields such as medicine, industry, and recreation; however, BCIs still suffer from the requirement of frequent calibration sessions due to the intra- and inter-individual variability of brain-signals, which makes calibration suppression through transfer learning an area of increasing interest for the development of practical BCI systems. In this paper, we present an unsupervised transfer method (spectral transfer using information geometry, STIG), which ranks and combines unlabeled predictions from an ensemble of information geometry classifiers built on data from individual training subjects. The STIG method is validated in both off-line and real-time feedback analysis during a rapid serial visual presentation task (RSVP). For detection of single-trial, event-related potentials (ERPs), the proposed method can significantly outperform existing calibration-free techniques as well as outperform traditional within-subject calibration techniques when limited data is available. This method demonstrates that unsupervised transfer learning for single-trial detection in ERP-based BCIs can be achieved without the requirement of costly training data, representing a step-forward in the overall goal of achieving a practical user-independent BCI system.

  10. Implementation of virtual simulation with a wide-bore multislice helcalct scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, P.; Kenny, J.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Multislice large-bore CT scanners specifically designed for radiotherapy have very recently become available. The issues relating to these type of scanners in radiotherapy and the implementation of virtual simulation are therefore of much current interest. A GE LightSpeed RT 4-slice helical CT scanner with a 80 cm bore size was installed in the radiation oncology department of the Newcastle Mater Hospital. This replaced our only simulator, a conventional unit. Specific issues relating to the imaging performance, and virtual simulation process with the large-bore multislice scanner were studied to ensure an accurate radiotherapy process. The detector array fully samples a 50 cm diameter scan circle. The reconstructed diameter can be increased to 65 cm with partial sampling of the extra volume. The GE Advantage Sim (ASim) virtual simulation software was commissioned, with transfer of CT images and DICOM RT plans to the Pinnacle radiotherapy planning system (RTPS) for dose calculation. Some specific issues investigated were: 1) The image quality performance for image reconstruction with the 65 cm area compared to 50 cm was measured with a line-pair phantom. 2) The accuracy of CT numbers with lateral position was assessed with a commercial electron density phantom. 3) Couch lateral movement and sag during acquisition were measured with the couch weighted with 86 kg. 4) The accuracy of the transfer of plans from ASim to Pinnacle was verified with known plan geometries. Image resolution throughout the entire CT image was found to be significantly lower when scan reconstruction was performed with 65 cm scan circle compared to 50 cm. The 0.3, 0.38 and 0.5 1p/mm bars were clearly distinguishable with the 50 cm reconstruction compared to only the 0.3 1p/mm bars in the 65 cm reconstruction. 2) CT numbers varied significantly outside the 50 cm reconstructed area. 3) Couch lateral movement during scanning was within 1 mm. Couch sag was 4 mm at the imaging plane

  11. Digital Data Matrix Scanner Developnent At Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Research at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has resulted in a system for reading hidden identification codes using a hand-held magnetic scanner. It's an invention that could help businesses improve inventory management, enhance safety, improve security, and aid in recall efforts if defects are discovered. Two-dimensional Data Matrix symbols consisting of letters and numbers permanently etched on items for identification and resembling a small checkerboard pattern are more efficient and reliable than traditional bar codes, and can store up to 100 times more information. A team led by Fred Schramm of the Marshall Center's Technology Transfer Department, in partnership with PRI,Torrance, California, has developed a hand-held device that can read this special type of coded symbols, even if covered by up to six layers of paint. Before this new technology was available, matrix symbols were read with optical scanners, and only if the codes were visible. This latest improvement in digital Data Matrix technologies offers greater flexibility for businesses and industries already using the marking system. Paint, inks, and pastes containing magnetic properties are applied in matrix symbol patterns to objects with two-dimensional codes, and the codes are read by a magnetic scanner, even after being covered with paint or other coatings. The ability to read hidden matrix symbols promises a wide range of benefits in a number of fields, including airlines, electronics, healthcare, and the automotive industry. Many industries would like to hide information on a part, so it can be read only by the party who put it there. For instance, the automotive industry uses direct parts marking for inventory control, but for aesthetic purposes the marks often need to be invisible. Symbols have been applied to a variety of materials, including metal, plastic, glass, paper, fabric and foam, on everything from electronic parts to pharmaceuticals to livestock. The portability of the hand

  12. Complete-arch accuracy of intraoral scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treesh, Joshua C; Liacouras, Peter C; Taft, Robert M; Brooks, Daniel I; Raiciulescu, Sorana; Ellert, Daniel O; Grant, Gerald T; Ye, Ling

    2018-04-30

    Intraoral scanners have shown varied results in complete-arch applications. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the complete-arch accuracy of 4 intraoral scanners based on trueness and precision measurements compared with a known reference (trueness) and with each other (precision). Four intraoral scanners were evaluated: CEREC Bluecam, CEREC Omnicam, TRIOS Color, and Carestream CS 3500. A complete-arch reference cast was created and printed using a 3-dimensional dental cast printer with photopolymer resin. The reference cast was digitized using a laboratory-based white light 3-dimensional scanner. The printed reference cast was scanned 10 times with each intraoral scanner. The digital standard tessellation language (STL) files from each scanner were then registered to the reference file and compared with differences in trueness and precision using a 3-dimensional modeling software. Additionally, scanning time was recorded for each scan performed. The Wilcoxon signed rank, Kruskal-Wallis, and Dunn tests were used to detect differences for trueness, precision, and scanning time (α=.05). Carestream CS 3500 had the lowest overall trueness and precision compared with Bluecam and TRIOS Color. The fourth scanner, Omnicam, had intermediate trueness and precision. All of the scanners tended to underestimate the size of the reference file, with exception of the Carestream CS 3500, which was more variable. Based on visual inspection of the color rendering of signed differences, the greatest amount of error tended to be in the posterior aspects of the arch, with local errors exceeding 100 μm for all scans. The single capture scanner Carestream CS 3500 had the overall longest scan times and was significantly slower than the continuous capture scanners TRIOS Color and Omnicam. Significant differences in both trueness and precision were found among the scanners. Scan times of the continuous capture scanners were faster than the single capture scanners

  13. Spectral Transfer Learning using Information Geometry for a User-Independent Brain-Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Roy Waytowich

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in signal processing and machine learning techniques have enabled the application of Brain-Computer Interface (BCI technologies to fields such as medicine, industry and recreation. However, BCIs still suffer from the requirement of frequent calibration sessions due to the intra- and inter- individual variability of brain-signals, which makes calibration suppression through transfer learning an area of increasing interest for the development of practical BCI systems. In this paper, we present an unsupervised transfer method (spectral transfer using information geometry, STIG, which ranks and combines unlabeled predictions from an ensemble of information geometry classifiers built on data from individual training subjects. The STIG method is validated in both offline and real-time feedback analysis during a rapid serial visual presentation task (RSVP. For detection of single-trial, event-related potentials (ERPs, the proposed method can significantly outperform existing calibration-free techniques as well as outperform traditional within-subject calibration techniques when limited data is available. This method demonstrates that unsupervised transfer learning for single-trial detection in ERP-based BCIs can be achieved without the requirement of costly training data, representing a step-forward in the overall goal of achieving a practical user-independent BCI system.

  14. In vivo cellular imaging with microscopes enabled by MEMS scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Hyejun

    High-resolution optical imaging plays an important role in medical diagnosis and biomedical research. Confocal microscopy is a widely used imaging method for obtaining cellular and sub-cellular images of biological tissue in reflectance and fluorescence modes. Its characteristic optical sectioning capability also enables three-dimensional (3-D) image reconstruction. However, its use has mostly been limited to excised tissues due to the requirement of high numerical aperture (NA) lenses for cellular resolution. Microscope miniaturization can enable in vivo imaging to make possible early cancer diagnosis and biological studies in the innate environment. In this dissertation, microscope miniaturization for in vivo cellular imaging is presented. The dual-axes confocal (DAC) architecture overcomes limitations of the conventional single-axis confocal (SAC) architecture to allow for miniaturization with high resolution. A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scanner is the central imaging component that is key in miniaturization of the DAC architecture. The design, fabrication, and characterization of the two-dimensional (2-D) MEMS scanner are presented. The gimbaled MEMS scanner is fabricated on a double silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer and is actuated by self-aligned vertical electrostatic combdrives. The imaging performance of the MEMS scanner in a DAC configuration is shown in a breadboard microscope setup, where reflectance and fluorescence imaging is demonstrated. Then, the MEMS scanner is integrated into a miniature DAC microscope. The whole imaging system is integrated into a portable unit for research in small animal models of human biology and disease. In vivo 3-D imaging is demonstrated on mouse skin models showing gene transfer and siRNA silencing. The siRNA silencing process is sequentially imaged in one mouse over time.

  15. PePSS - A portable sky scanner for measuring extremely low night-sky brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Kómar, Ladislav; Kundracik, František

    2018-05-01

    A new portable sky scanner designed for low-light-level detection at night is developed and employed in night sky brightness measurements in a rural region. The fast readout, adjustable sensitivity and linear response guaranteed in 5-6 orders of magnitude makes the device well suited for narrow-band photometry in both dark areas and bright urban and suburban environments. Quasi-monochromatic night-sky brightness data are advantageous in the accurate characterization of spectral power distribution of scattered and emitted light and, also allows for the possibility to retrieve light output patterns from whole-city light sources. The sky scanner can operate in both night and day regimes, taking advantage of the complementarity of both radiance data types. Due to its inherent very high sensitivity the photomultiplier tube could be used in night sky radiometry, while the spectrometer-equipped system component capable of detecting elevated intensities is used in daylight monitoring. Daylight is a source of information on atmospheric optical properties that in turn are necessary in processing night sky radiances. We believe that the sky scanner has the potential to revolutionize night-sky monitoring systems.

  16. A multidomain chebyshev pseudo-spectral method for fluid flow and heat transfer from square cylinders

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhiheng

    2015-01-01

    A simple multidomain Chebyshev pseudo-spectral method is developed for two-dimensional fluid flow and heat transfer over square cylinders. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with primitive variables are discretized in several subdomains of the computational domain. The velocities and pressure are discretized with the same order of Chebyshev polynomials, i.e., the PN-PN method. The Projection method is applied in coupling the pressure with the velocity. The present method is first validated by benchmark problems of natural convection in a square cavity. Then the method based on multidomains is applied to simulate fluid flow and heat transfer from square cylinders. The numerical results agree well with the existing results. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  17. Neurosurgical operating computerized tomographic scanner system. The CT scanner in the operating theater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okudera, Hiroshi; Sugita, Kenichiro; Kobayashi, Shigeaki; Kimishima, Sakae; Yoshida, Hisashi

    1988-12-01

    A neurosurgical operating computerized tomography scanner system is presented. This system has been developed for obtaining intra- and postoperative CT images in the operating room. A TCT-300 scanner (manufactured by the Toshiba Co., Tokyo) is placed in the operating room. The realization of a true intraoperative CT image requires certain improvements in the CT scanner and operating table. To adjust the axis of the co-ordinates of the motor system of the MST-7000 microsurgical operating table (manufactured by the Mizuho Ika Co., Tokyo) to the CT scanner, we have designed an interface and a precise motor system so that the computer of the CT scanner can directly control the movement of the operating table. Furthermore, a new head-fixation system has been designed for producing artifact-free intraoperative CT images. The head-pins of the head-fixation system are made of carbon-fiber bars and titanium tips. A simulation study of the total system in the operating room with the CT scanner, operating table, and head holder using a skull model yielded a degree of error similar to that in the phantom testing of the original scanner. Three patients underwent resection of a glial tumor using this system. Intraoperative CT scans taken after dural opening showed a bulging of the cortex, a shift in the central structure, and a displacement of the cortical subarachnoid spaces under the influence of gravity. With a contrast medium the edge of the surrounding brain after resection was enhanced and the residual tumor mass was demonstrated clearly. This system makes it possible to obtain a noninvasive intraoperative image in a situation where structural shifts are taking place.

  18. Long-Range WindScanner System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasiljevic, Nikola; Lea, Guillaume; Courtney, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The technical aspects of a multi-Doppler LiDAR instrument, the long-range WindScanner system, are presented accompanied by an overview of the results from several field campaigns. The long-range WindScanner system consists of three spatially-separated, scanning coherent Doppler LiDARs and a remote......-rangeWindScanner system measures the wind field by emitting and directing three laser beams to intersect, and then scanning the beam intersection over a region of interest. The long-range WindScanner system was developed to tackle the need for high-quality observations of wind fields on scales of modern wind turbine...

  19. The cobalt-60 container scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jigang, A.; Liye, Z.; Yisi, L.; Haifeng, W.; Zhifang, W.; Liqiang, W.; Yuanshi, Z.; Xincheng, X.; Furong, L.; Baozeng, G.; Chunfa, S.

    1997-01-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology (INET) has successfully designed and constructed a container (cargo) scanner, which uses cobalt-60 of 100-300 Ci as radiation source. The following performances of the Cobalt-60 container scanner have been achieved at INET: a) IQI (Image Quality Indicator) - 2.5% behind 100 mm of steel; b) CI (Contrast Indicator) - 0.7% behind 100 mm of steel; c) SP (Steel Penetration) - 240 mm of steel; d) Maximum Dose per Scanning - 0.02mGy; e) Throughput - twenty 40-foot containers per hour. These performances are equal or similar to those of the accelerator scanners. Besides these nice enough inspection properties, the Cobalt-60 scanner possesses many other special features which are better than accelerator scanners: a) cheap price - it will be only or two tenths of the accelerator scanner's; b) low radiation intensity - the radiation protection problem is much easier to solve and a lot of money can be saved on the radiation shielding building; c) much smaller area for installation and operation; d) simple operation and convenient maintenance; e) high reliability and stability. The Cobalt-60 container (or cargo) scanner is satisfied for boundary customs, seaports, airports and railway stations etc. Because of the nice special features said above, it is more suitable to be applied widely. Its high properties and low price will make it have much better application prospects

  20. Scanner calibration revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pozhitkov Alexander E

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calibration of a microarray scanner is critical for accurate interpretation of microarray results. Shi et al. (BMC Bioinformatics, 2005, 6, Art. No. S11 Suppl. 2. reported usage of a Full Moon BioSystems slide for calibration. Inspired by the Shi et al. work, we have calibrated microarray scanners in our previous research. We were puzzled however, that most of the signal intensities from a biological sample fell below the sensitivity threshold level determined by the calibration slide. This conundrum led us to re-investigate the quality of calibration provided by the Full Moon BioSystems slide as well as the accuracy of the analysis performed by Shi et al. Methods Signal intensities were recorded on three different microarray scanners at various photomultiplier gain levels using the same calibration slide from Full Moon BioSystems. Data analysis was conducted on raw signal intensities without normalization or transformation of any kind. Weighted least-squares method was used to fit the data. Results We found that initial analysis performed by Shi et al. did not take into account autofluorescence of the Full Moon BioSystems slide, which led to a grossly distorted microarray scanner response. Our analysis revealed that a power-law function, which is explicitly accounting for the slide autofluorescence, perfectly described a relationship between signal intensities and fluorophore quantities. Conclusions Microarray scanners respond in a much less distorted fashion than was reported by Shi et al. Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration. We recommend against using these slides.

  1. Paul Lecoq assembles a read head made with special crystals for a PET (positron emission tomography) scanner. He is the initiator of the Crystal Clear collaboration, which aims to transfer crystals developed at CERN to applications in medical imaging.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Paul Lecoq assembles a read head made with special crystals for a PET (positron emission tomography) scanner. He is the initiator of the Crystal Clear collaboration, which aims to transfer crystals developed at CERN to applications in medical imaging.

  2. Hybrid Spectral Micro-CT: System Design, Implementation, and Preliminary Results

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, James R; Xu, Qiong; Yu, Hengyong; Walsh, Michael; Butler, Anthony; Butler, Phillip; Cao, Guohua; Mohs, Aaron; Wang, Ge

    2014-01-01

    Spectral CT has proven an important development in biomedical imaging, and there have been several publications in the past years demonstrating its merits in pre-clinical and clinical applications. In 2012, Xu et al. reported that near-term implementation of spectral micro-CT could be enhanced by a hybrid architecture: a narrow-beam spectral "interior" imaging chain integrated with a traditional wide-beam "global" imaging chain. This hybrid integration coupled with compressive sensing (CS)-based interior tomography demonstrated promising results for improved contrast resolution, and decreased system cost and radiation dose. The motivation for the current study is implementation and evaluation of the hybrid architecture with a first-of-its-kind hybrid spectral micro-CT system. Preliminary results confirm improvements in both contrast and spatial resolution. This technology is shown to merit further investigation and potential application in future spectral CT scanner design.

  3. Twisting wire scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharibyan, V.; Delfs, A.; Koruptchenkov, I.; Noelle, D.; Tiessen, H.; Werner, M.; Wittenburg, K.

    2012-11-01

    A new type of 'two-in-one' wire scanner is proposed. Recent advances in linear motors' technology make it possible to combine translational and rotational movements. This will allow to scan the beam in two perpendicular directions using a single driving motor and a special fork attached to it. Vertical or horizontal mounting will help to escape problems associated with the 45 deg scanners. Test results of the translational part with linear motors is presented.

  4. Recent micro-CT scanner developments at UGCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierick, Manuel, E-mail: Manuel.Dierick@UGent.be [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Loo, Denis, E-mail: info@XRE.be [XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Masschaele, Bert [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); XRE, X-Ray Engineering bvba, De Pintelaan 111, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van den Bulcke, Jan [UGCT-Woodlab-UGent, Department of Forest and Water Management, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Acker, Joris, E-mail: Joris.VanAcker@UGent.be [UGCT-Woodlab-UGent, Department of Forest and Water Management, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cnudde, Veerle, E-mail: Veerle.Cnudde@UGent.be [UGCT-SGIG, Department of Geology and Soil Science, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, S8, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoorebeke, Luc, E-mail: Luc.VanHoorebeke@UGent.be [UGCT-Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes two X-ray micro-CT scanners which were recently developed to extend the experimental possibilities of microtomography research at the Centre for X-ray Tomography ( (www.ugct.ugent.be)) of the Ghent University (Belgium). The first scanner, called Nanowood, is a wide-range CT scanner with two X-ray sources (160 kV{sub max}) and two detectors, resolving features down to 0.4 μm in small samples, but allowing samples up to 35 cm to be scanned. This is a sample size range of 3 orders of magnitude, making this scanner well suited for imaging multi-scale materials such as wood, stone, etc. Besides the traditional cone-beam acquisition, Nanowood supports helical acquisition, and it can generate images with significant phase-contrast contributions. The second scanner, known as the Environmental micro-CT scanner (EMCT), is a gantry based micro-CT scanner with variable magnification for scanning objects which are not easy to rotate in a standard micro-CT scanner, for example because they are physically connected to external experimental hardware such as sensor wiring, tubing or others. This scanner resolves 5 μm features, covers a field-of-view of about 12 cm wide with an 80 cm vertical travel range. Both scanners will be extensively described and characterized, and their potential will be demonstrated with some key application results.

  5. Recent micro-CT scanner developments at UGCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierick, Manuel; Van Loo, Denis; Masschaele, Bert; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Van Acker, Joris; Cnudde, Veerle; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes two X-ray micro-CT scanners which were recently developed to extend the experimental possibilities of microtomography research at the Centre for X-ray Tomography ( (www.ugct.ugent.be)) of the Ghent University (Belgium). The first scanner, called Nanowood, is a wide-range CT scanner with two X-ray sources (160 kV max ) and two detectors, resolving features down to 0.4 μm in small samples, but allowing samples up to 35 cm to be scanned. This is a sample size range of 3 orders of magnitude, making this scanner well suited for imaging multi-scale materials such as wood, stone, etc. Besides the traditional cone-beam acquisition, Nanowood supports helical acquisition, and it can generate images with significant phase-contrast contributions. The second scanner, known as the Environmental micro-CT scanner (EMCT), is a gantry based micro-CT scanner with variable magnification for scanning objects which are not easy to rotate in a standard micro-CT scanner, for example because they are physically connected to external experimental hardware such as sensor wiring, tubing or others. This scanner resolves 5 μm features, covers a field-of-view of about 12 cm wide with an 80 cm vertical travel range. Both scanners will be extensively described and characterized, and their potential will be demonstrated with some key application results

  6. Spectral OCT with speckle contrast reduction for evaluation of the healing process after PRK and transepithelial PRK

    OpenAIRE

    Kaluzny, Bartlomiej J.; Szkulmowski, Maciej; Bukowska, Danuta M.; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    We evaluate Spectral OCT (SOCT) with a speckle contrast reduction technique using resonant scanner for assessment of corneal surface changes after excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and we compare healing process between conventional PRK and transepithelial PRK. The measurements were performed before and after the surgery. Obtained results show that SOCT with a resonant scanner speckle contrast reduction is capable of providing information regarding the healing process after PRK....

  7. Twisting wire scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharibyan, V.; Delfs, A.; Koruptchenkov, I.; Noelle, D.; Tiessen, H.; Werner, M.; Wittenburg, K.

    2012-11-15

    A new type of 'two-in-one' wire scanner is proposed. Recent advances in linear motors' technology make it possible to combine translational and rotational movements. This will allow to scan the beam in two perpendicular directions using a single driving motor and a special fork attached to it. Vertical or horizontal mounting will help to escape problems associated with the 45 deg scanners. Test results of the translational part with linear motors is presented.

  8. Transfer of spectral weight in spectroscopies of correlated electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenberg, M.J.; Kotliar, G.; Kajueter, H.

    1996-01-01

    We study the transfer of spectral weight in the photoemission and optical spectra of strongly correlated electron systems. Within the local impurity self-consistent approximation, that becomes exact in the limit of large lattice coordination, we consider and compare two models of correlated electrons, the Hubbard model and the periodic Anderson model. The results are discussed in regard to recent experiments. In the Hubbard model, we predict an anomalous enhancement optical spectral weight as a function of temperature in the correlated metallic state which is in qualitative agreement with optical measurements in V 2 O 3 . We argue that anomalies observed in the spectroscopy of the metal are connected to the proximity to a crossover region in the phase diagram of the model. In the insulating phase, we obtain excellent agreement with the experimental data, and present a detailed discussion on the role of magnetic frustration by studying the k-resolved single-particle spectra. The results for the periodic Anderson model are discussed in connection to recent experimental data of the Kondo insulators Ce 3 Bi 4 Pt 3 and FeSi. The model can successfully explain the thermal filling of the optical gap and the corresponding changes in the photoemission density of states. The temperature dependence of the optical sum rule is obtained, and its relevance to the interpretation of the experimental data discussed. Finally, we argue that the large scattering rate measured in Kondo insulators cannot be described by the periodic Anderson model. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  9. Spectral energy transfer of atmospheric gravity waves through sum and difference nonlinear interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, K.M. [Wuhan Univ. (China). School of Electronic Information; Chinese Academey of Sciences, Hefei (China). Key Lab. of Geospace Environment; Embry Riddle Aeronautical Univ., Daytona Beach, FL (United States). Dept. of Physical Science; Ministry of Education, Wuhan (China). Key Lab. of Geospace Environment and Geodesy; State Observatory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing, Wuhan (China); Liu, A.Z.; Li, Z. [Embry Riddle Aeronautical Univ., Daytona Beach, FL (United States). Dept. of Physical Science; Zhang, S.D.; Yi, F. [Wuhan Univ. (China). School of Electronic Information; Ministry of Education, Wuhan (China). Key Lab. of Geospace Environment and Geodesy; State Observatory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing, Wuhan (China)

    2012-07-01

    Nonlinear interactions of gravity waves are studied with a two-dimensional, fully nonlinear model. The energy exchanges among resonant and near-resonant triads are examined in order to understand the spectral energy transfer through interactions. The results show that in both resonant and near-resonant interactions, the energy exchange between two high frequency waves is strong, but the energy transfer from large to small vertical scale waves is rather weak. This suggests that the energy cascade toward large vertical wavenumbers through nonlinear interaction is inefficient, which is different from the rapid turbulence cascade. Because of considerable energy exchange, nonlinear interactions can effectively spread high frequency spectrum, and play a significant role in limiting wave amplitude growth and transferring energy into higher altitudes. In resonant interaction, the interacting waves obey the resonant matching conditions, and resonant excitation is reversible, while near-resonant excitation is not so. Although near-resonant interaction shows the complexity of match relation, numerical experiments show an interesting result that when sum and difference near-resonant interactions occur between high and low frequency waves, the wave vectors tend to approximately match in horizontal direction, and the frequency of the excited waves is also close to the matching value. (orig.)

  10. Wire Scanner Motion Control Card

    CERN Document Server

    Forde, S E

    2006-01-01

    Scientists require a certain beam quality produced by the accelerator rings at CERN. The discovery potential of LHC is given by the reachable luminosity at its interaction points. The luminosity is maximized by minimizing the beam size. Therefore an accurate beam size measurement is required for optimizing the luminosity. The wire scanner performs very accurate profile measurements, but as it can not be used at full intensity in the LHC ring, it is used for calibrating other profile monitors. As the current wire scanner system, which is used in the present CERN accelerators, has not been made for the required specification of the LHC, a new design of a wire scanner motion control card is part of the LHC wire scanner project. The main functions of this card are to control the wire scanner motion and to acquire the position of the wire. In case of further upgrades at a later stage, it is required to allow an easy update of the firmware, hence the programmable features of FPGAs will be used for this purpose. The...

  11. Monte Carlo dose calibration in CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Poonam; Ramasubramanian, V.; Subbaiah, K.V.; Thayalan, K.

    2008-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) scanner is a high radiation imaging modality compared to radiography. The dose from a CT examination can vary greatly depending on the particular CT scanner used, the area of the body examined, and the operating parameters of the scan. CT is a major contributor to collective effective dose in diagnostic radiology. Apart from the clinical benefits, the widespread use of multislice scanner is increasing radiation level to patient in comparison with conventional CT scanner. So, it becomes necessary to increase awareness about the CT scanner. (author)

  12. Spectral Monte Carlo simulation of collimated solar irradiation transfer in a water-filled prismatic louver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yaomin; Guo, Zhixiong

    2018-04-20

    The Monte Carlo model was developed to simulate the collimated solar irradiation transfer and energy harvest in a hollow louver made of silica glass and filled with water. The full solar spectrum from the air mass 1.5 database was adopted and divided into various discrete bands for spectral calculations. The band-averaged spectral properties for the silica glass and water were obtained. Ray tracing was employed to find the solar energy harvested by the louver. Computational efficiency and accuracy were examined through intensive comparisons of different band partition approaches, various photon numbers, and element divisions. The influence of irradiation direction on the solar energy harvest efficiency was scrutinized. It was found that within a 15° polar angle of incidence, the harvested solar energy in the louver was high, and the total absorption efficiency reached 61.2% under normal incidence for the current louver geometry.

  13. NMR-CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kose, Katsumi; Sato, Kozo; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Sato, Masataka.

    1983-01-01

    A brief explanation is made on the imaging methods for a practical diagnostic NMR-CT scanner : A whole-body NMR-CT scanner utilizing a resistive magnet has been developed by Toshiba in cooperation with the Institute for Solid State Physics, the University of Tokyo. Typical NMR-CT images of volunteers and patients obtained in the clinical experiments using this device are presented. Detailed specifications are also shown about the practical NMR-CTs which are to be put on the market after obtaining the government approval. (author)

  14. A multispectral scanner survey of the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. Date of survey: August 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewster, S.B. Jr.; Howard, M.E.; Shines, J.E.

    1994-08-01

    The Multispectral Remote Sensing Department of the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an airborne multispectral scanner survey of a portion of the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. The survey was conducted on August 21 and 22, 1993, using a Daedalus AADS1268 scanner and coincident aerial color photography. Flight altitudes were 5,000 feet (1,524 meters) above ground level for systematic coverage and 1,000 feet (304 meters) for selected areas of special interest. The multispectral scanner survey was initiated as part of an interim and limited investigation conducted to gather preliminary information regarding historical hazardous material release sites which could have environmental impacts. The overall investigation also includes an inventory of environmental restoration sites, a ground-based geophysical survey, and an aerial radiological survey. The multispectral scanner imagery and coincident aerial photography were analyzed for the detection, identification, and mapping of man-made soil disturbances. Several standard image enhancement techniques were applied to the data to assist image interpretation. A geologic ratio enhancement and a color composite consisting of AADS1268 channels 10, 7, and 9 (mid-infrared, red, and near-infrared spectral bands) proved most useful for detecting soil disturbances. A total of 358 disturbance sites were identified on the imagery and mapped using a geographic information system. Of these sites, 326 were located within the Tonopah Test Range while the remaining sites were present on the imagery but outside the site boundary. The mapped site locations are being used to support ongoing field investigations

  15. Preliminary evaluation of vector flow and spectral velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Haugaard, Per

    Spectral estimation is considered as the golden standard in ultrasound velocity estimation. For spectral velocity estimation the blood flow angle is set by the ultrasound operator. Vector flow provides temporal and spatial estimates of the blood flow angle and velocity. A comparison of vector flow...... line covering the vessel diameter. A commercial ultrasound scanner (ProFocus 2202, BK Medical, Denmark) and a 7.6 MHz linear transducer was used (8670, BK Medical). The mean vector blood flow angle estimations were calculated {52(18);55(23);60(16)}°. For comparison the fixed angles for spectral...... estimation were obtained {52;56;52}°. The mean vector velocity estimates at PS {76(15);95(17);77(16)}cm/s and at end diastole (ED) {17(6);18(6);24(6)}cm/s were calculated. For comparison spectral velocity estimates at PS {77;110;76}cm/s and ED {18;18;20}cm/s were obtained. The mean vector angle estimates...

  16. Weighting training images by maximizing distribution similarity for supervised segmentation across scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Opbroek, Annegreet; Vernooij, Meike W; Ikram, M.Arfan

    2015-01-01

    Many automatic segmentation methods are based on supervised machine learning. Such methods have proven to perform well, on the condition that they are trained on a sufficiently large manually labeled training set that is representative of the images to segment. However, due to differences between...... scanners, scanning parameters, and patients such a training set may be difficult to obtain. We present a transfer-learning approach to segmentation by multi-feature voxelwise classification. The presented method can be trained using a heterogeneous set of training images that may be obtained with different...... scanners than the target image. In our approach each training image is given a weight based on the distribution of its voxels in the feature space. These image weights are chosen as to minimize the difference between the weighted probability density function (PDF) of the voxels of the training images...

  17. Spectral collocation method with a flexible angular discretization scheme for radiative transfer in multi-layer graded index medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Linyang; Qi, Hong; Sun, Jianping; Ren, Yatao; Ruan, Liming

    2017-05-01

    The spectral collocation method (SCM) is employed to solve the radiative transfer in multi-layer semitransparent medium with graded index. A new flexible angular discretization scheme is employed to discretize the solid angle domain freely to overcome the limit of the number of discrete radiative direction when adopting traditional SN discrete ordinate scheme. Three radial basis function interpolation approaches, named as multi-quadric (MQ), inverse multi-quadric (IMQ) and inverse quadratic (IQ) interpolation, are employed to couple the radiative intensity at the interface between two adjacent layers and numerical experiments show that MQ interpolation has the highest accuracy and best stability. Variable radiative transfer problems in double-layer semitransparent media with different thermophysical properties are investigated and the influence of these thermophysical properties on the radiative transfer procedure in double-layer semitransparent media is also analyzed. All the simulated results show that the present SCM with the new angular discretization scheme can predict the radiative transfer in multi-layer semitransparent medium with graded index efficiently and accurately.

  18. Array scanner as microdensitometer surrogate: a deal with the devil or . . . a great deal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Donald R.

    2005-01-01

    Inexpensive and easy-to-use linear and area-array scanners have frequently substituted as densitometers for low-frequency (i.e., large-area) hard copy image metrology. A number of workers and standards committees1 have in fact advocated such use. Increasingly, scanners are also being tasked for high spatial frequency, image microstructure metrology (which is usually reserved for high-performance microdensitometers that use microscope optics), photomultiplier tubes (PMT), and log amps. It is hard to resist their adoption for such use, given the convenience level. The high speed, large scan areas, auto-focus, discomfiting low cost, and low operator skill requirements of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) scanners makes one question if their use for such purpose is somehow too good to be true. To confidently judge their limitations requires a comprehensive signal and noise spatial frequency performance evaluation with respect to available driver options. This paper will outline and demonstrate evaluation techniques that use existing ISO metrology standards for modulation transfer function (MTF), noise, and dynamic range with a comparison to the performance of a Photometric Data Systems (PDS) microdensitometer.

  19. Array scanner as microdensitometer surrogate: a deal with the devil or… a great deal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Donald R.

    2004-10-01

    Inexpensive and easy-to-use linear and area-array scanners have frequently substituted as densitometers for low-frequency (i.e., large-area) hard copy image metrology. A number of workers and standards committees1 have in fact advocated such use. Increasingly, scanners are also being tasked for high spatial frequency, image microstructure metrology (which is usually reserved for high-performance microdensitometers that use microscope optics), photomultiplier tubes (PMT), and log amps. It is hard to resist their adoption for such use, given the convenience level. The high speed, large scan areas, auto-focus, discomfiting low cost, and low operator skill requirements of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) scanners makes one question if their use for such purpose is somehow too good to be true. To confidently judge their limitations requires a comprehensive signal and noise spatial frequency performance evaluation with respect to available driver options. This paper will outline and demonstrate evaluation techniques that use existing ISO metrology standards for modulation transfer function (MTF), noise, and dynamic range with a comparison to the performance of a Photometric Data Systems (PDS) microdensitometer.

  20. The feasibility of a scanner-independent technique to estimate organ dose from MDCT scans: Using CTDIvol to account for differences between scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Adam C.; Zankl, Maria; DeMarco, John J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; Zhang Di; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna D.; Stevens, Donna M.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo radiation transport techniques have made it possible to accurately estimate the radiation dose to radiosensitive organs in patient models from scans performed with modern multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. However, there is considerable variation in organ doses across scanners, even when similar acquisition conditions are used. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a technique to estimate organ doses that would be scanner independent. This was accomplished by assessing the ability of CTDI vol measurements to account for differences in MDCT scanners that lead to organ dose differences. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of 64-slice MDCT scanners from each of the four major manufacturers were performed. An adult female patient model from the GSF family of voxelized phantoms was used in which all ICRP Publication 103 radiosensitive organs were identified. A 120 kVp, full-body helical scan with a pitch of 1 was simulated for each scanner using similar scan protocols across scanners. From each simulated scan, the radiation dose to each organ was obtained on a per mA s basis (mGy/mA s). In addition, CTDI vol values were obtained from each scanner for the selected scan parameters. Then, to demonstrate the feasibility of generating organ dose estimates from scanner-independent coefficients, the simulated organ dose values resulting from each scanner were normalized by the CTDI vol value for those acquisition conditions. Results: CTDI vol values across scanners showed considerable variation as the coefficient of variation (CoV) across scanners was 34.1%. The simulated patient scans also demonstrated considerable differences in organ dose values, which varied by up to a factor of approximately 2 between some of the scanners. The CoV across scanners for the simulated organ doses ranged from 26.7% (for the adrenals) to 37.7% (for the thyroid), with a mean CoV of 31.5% across all organs. However, when organ doses

  1. Occurrence and characteristics of mutual interference between LIDAR scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gunzung; Eom, Jeongsook; Park, Seonghyeon; Park, Yongwan

    2015-05-01

    The LIDAR scanner is at the heart of object detection of the self-driving car. Mutual interference between LIDAR scanners has not been regarded as a problem because the percentage of vehicles equipped with LIDAR scanners was very rare. With the growing number of autonomous vehicle equipped with LIDAR scanner operated close to each other at the same time, the LIDAR scanner may receive laser pulses from other LIDAR scanners. In this paper, three types of experiments and their results are shown, according to the arrangement of two LIDAR scanners. We will show the probability that any LIDAR scanner will interfere mutually by considering spatial and temporal overlaps. It will present some typical mutual interference scenario and report an analysis of the interference mechanism.

  2. The MARS Photon Processing Cameras for Spectral CT

    CERN Document Server

    Doesburg, Robert Michael Nicholas; Butler, APH; Renaud, PF

    This thesis is about the development of the MARS camera: a stan- dalone portable digital x-ray camera with spectral sensitivity. It is built for use in the MARS Spectral system from the Medipix2 and Medipix3 imaging chips. Photon counting detectors and Spectral CT are introduced, and Medipix is identified as a powerful new imaging device. The goals and strategy for the MARS camera are discussed. The Medipix chip physical, electronic and functional aspects, and ex- perience gained, are described. The camera hardware, firmware and supporting PC software are presented. Reports of experimental work on the process of equalisation from noise, and of tests of charge sum- ming mode, conclude the main body of the thesis. The camera has been actively used since late 2009 in pre-clinical re- search. A list of publications that derive from the use of the camera and the MARS Spectral scanner demonstrates the practical benefits already obtained from this work. Two of the publications are first- author, eight are co-authore...

  3. Heavy carriers, non-drude optical conductivity and transfer of spectral weight in MnSi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mena, F.P.; Damascelli, A.; Marel, D. van der; Fath, M.; Menovsky, A.A.; Mydosh, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    The optical properties of the weak magnetic metal MnSi were determined using reflectance at 80 deg. (2-800 meV) and ellipsometry (0.8-4.5 eV). At low frequencies in the magnetic phase we observe a departure of the optical conductivity from Drude behavior: m*(ω)/m is strongly frequency dependent and 1/τ(ω) is approximately linear in frequency. In fact, we show that σ(ω)/σ(0)=(1+iω/Γ) -0.5 . Moreover, in the magnetic phase, the plasma frequency shifts to the red indicating that spectral weight is transferred to high frequencies. This is opposite to the effect recently seen in other magnetic compounds

  4. Computer Tomography Scanners in Portugal (1990-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Crispim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of Computed Tomography (CT has increased every year since its introduction into medicine in 1972. Technological developments have made CT one of the most important imaging modalities in modern medicine. This importance is evidenced in the increasing demand and number of CT scanners installed in Portugal and worldwide. This review compiles the most recent national statistics from official publications on the number of CT scanners installed in Portugal and compares them with data available in international publications. We conclude that the number of CT scanners installed in Portugal exceeded the EU27 average by 61.5 % and the OECD average by 78.2 %, and that in 2011 there were 203 CT scanners installed in hospitals in Portugal, which equated to 19.23 CT scanners per million inhabitants.

  5. Neurosurgical operating computerized tomographic scanner system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okudera, Hiroshi; Sugita, Kenichiro; Kobayashi, Shigeaki; Kimishima, Sakae; Yoshida, Hisashi.

    1988-01-01

    A neurosurgical operating computerized tomography scanner system is presented. This system has been developed for obtaining intra- and postoperative CT images in the operating room. A TCT-300 scanner (manufactured by the Toshiba Co., Tokyo) is placed in the operating room. The realization of a true intraoperative CT image requires certain improvements in the CT scanner and operating table. To adjust the axis of the co-ordinates of the motor system of the MST-7000 microsurgical operating table (manufactured by the Mizuho Ika Co., Tokyo) to the CT scanner, we have designed an interface and a precise motor system so that the computer of the CT scanner can directly control the movement of the operating table. Furthermore, a new head-fixation system has been designed for producing artifact-free intraoperative CT images. The head-pins of the head-fixation system are made of carbon-fiber bars and titanium tips. A simulation study of the total system in the operating room with the CT scanner, operating table, and head holder using a skull model yielded a degree of error similar to that in the phantom testing of the original scanner. Three patients underwent resection of a glial tumor using this system. Intraoperative CT scans taken after dural opening showed a bulging of the cortex, a shift in the central structure, and a displacement of the cortical subarachnoid spaces under the influence of gravity. With a contrast medium the edge of the surrounding brain after resection was enhanced and the residual tumor mass was demonstrated clearly. This system makes it possible to obtain a noninvasive intraoperative image in a situation where structural shifts are taking place. (author)

  6. Deuterium lamps as transfer standards for spectral radiance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, P.J.; Nettleton, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the work carried out at NPL and PTB to improve the performance of a low pressure deuterium discharge lamp, so that it can be used as a transfer standard in the spectral range 120 to 350 nm. To this end it was necessary: - to replace the original quartz windows by magnesium fluoride single crystal plates, which were cut perpendicular to the c-axis of the crystal and which had to be free of impurities, - to construct the lamps in that way that the directional uniformity of the emitted radiation is within the demands, - to age the lamps and to preselect only those of which the irradiance was stable within ± 1% during a thirty minute period after warm-up, - to improve the commercially available electrical power supply to meet the operational needs of the lamps. Thus, the deuterium lamps drifted by about 3% over a period of 100 h at all wavelengths except at 250 nm, where the ageing increased to 4.5%. A liquid nitrogen trap has been developed which can be installed between the vacuum system and the lamp. This reduced to about 2% the decrease of the window's transmission during the first hour of operation, caused by the deposition of oil from the vacuum system

  7. A spectral study of the elementary step of proton transfer in heterogeneous acid catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazanskii, V B

    1977-09-01

    A spectral study of the elementary step of proton transfer in heterogeneous acid catalysis involved a determination of the potential curves of the OH bond in surface hydroxyl groups (e.g., those on silica, NaHY zeolite, or glass) of differing acidity from IR stretching frequency data in the overtone region; a calculation of the activation energies for proton transfer during acid catalysis from the changes in the curve forms after adsorption of various molecules (e.g., water, ammonia, benzene, toluene, xylenes, acetone, and cyclohexane); and a comparison of the IR predictions with quantum-chemical calculations of the potential curves. The results appear to furnish a new criterion for the coordinate of reactions involving Broensted sites: if the activation energy measured during actual catalysis is close to that calculated from the IR stretching data, the reaction proceeds by the stepwise mechanism of acid catalysis; but if these values differ greatly, the reaction involves a concerted mechanism (i.e., activation of the adsorbed molecule without involvement of OH groups). Tables, graphs, and 15 references.

  8. Body scanners: are they dangerous for health?; Scanners corporels: dangereux pour la sante?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-07-01

    As there is a debate about the risk of cancer and of congenital malformation associated with the use of body scanners, notably in airports, this document recalls and comments the IAEA statement on this issue. According to a study performed by this international agency, the irradiation dose is very low. But the French IRSN is more prudent and recommends not to use X ray scanner, but to look for technologies which do not use ionizing radiation

  9. Quantification of leaf greenness and leaf spectral profile in plant diagnosis using an optical scanner Quantificação do nível de verde e padrão espectral foliar no diagnóstico de plantas através de um scanner ótico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoichi Doi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Observation of leaf spectral profile (color enables suitable management measures to be taken for crop production. An optical scanner was used: 1 to obtain an equation to determine the greenness of plant leaves and 2 to examine the power to discriminate among plants grown under different nutritional conditions. Sweet basil seedlings grown on vermiculite were supplemented with one-fifth-strength Hoagland solutions containing 0, 0.2, 1, 5, 20, and 50 mM NH4+. The 5 mM treatment resulted in the greatest leaf and shoot weights, indicating a quadratic growth response pattern to the NH4+ gradient. An equation involving b*, black and green to describe the greenness of leaves was provided by the spectral profiling of a color scale for rice leaves as the standard. The color scale values for the basil leaves subjected to 0.2 and 1 mM NH4+ treatments were 1.00 and 1.12, respectively. The other treatments resulted in significantly greater values of 2.25 to 2.42, again indicating a quadratic response pattern. Based on the spectral data set consisting of variables of red-green-blue and other color models and color scale values, in discriminant analysis, 81% of the plants were correctly classified into the six NH4+ treatment groups. Combining the spectral data set with the growth data set consisting of leaf and shoot weights, 92% of the plant samples were correctly classified whereas, using the growth data set, only 53% of plants were correctly classified. Therefore, the optical scanning of leaves and the use of spectral profiles helped plant diagnosis when biomass measurements were not effective.A observação do perfil espectral da folha (cor permite medidas de gestão adequadas a serem consideradas na produção. Um scanner óptico foi usado para: 1 obter uma equação para determinar o verde das folhas e 2 examinar o poder de discriminar entre as plantas cultivadas sob diferentes condições nutricionais. Mudas de manjericão cultivadas em vermiculita foram

  10. Fast Spectral Velocity Estimation Using Adaptive Techniques: In-Vivo Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Udesen, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to provide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the observation window(OW) is very sbort. In this paper two adaptive techniques are tested and compared to the averaged perlodogram (Welch) for blood velocity estimation. The Blood Power...... the blood process over slow-time and averaging over depth to find the power spectral density estimate. In this paper, the two adaptive methods are explained, and performance Is assessed in controlled steady How experiments and in-vivo measurements. The three methods were tested on a circulating How rig...... with a blood mimicking fluid flowing in the tube. The scanning section is submerged in water to allow ultrasound data acquisition. Data was recorded using a BK8804 linear array transducer and the RASMUS ultrasound scanner. The controlled experiments showed that the OW could be significantly reduced when...

  11. Focal plane scanner with reciprocating spatial window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chengye (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A focal plane scanner having a front objective lens, a spatial window for selectively passing a portion of the image therethrough, and a CCD array for receiving the passed portion of the image. All embodiments have a common feature whereby the spatial window and CCD array are mounted for simultaneous relative reciprocating movement with respect to the front objective lens, and the spatial window is mounted within the focal plane of the front objective. In a first embodiment, the spatial window is a slit and the CCD array is one-dimensional, and successive rows of the image in the focal plane of the front objective lens are passed to the CCD array by an image relay lens interposed between the slit and the CCD array. In a second embodiment, the spatial window is a slit, the CCD array is two-dimensional, and a prism-grating-prism optical spectrometer is interposed between the slit and the CCD array so as to cause the scanned row to be split into a plurality of spectral separations onto the CCD array. In a third embodiment, the CCD array is two-dimensional and the spatial window is a rectangular linear variable filter (LVF) window, so as to cause the scanned rows impinging on the LVF to be bandpass filtered into spectral components onto the CCD array through an image relay lens interposed between the LVF and the CCD array.

  12. Martian Radiative Transfer Modeling Using the Optimal Spectral Sampling Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eluszkiewicz, J.; Cady-Pereira, K.; Uymin, G.; Moncet, J.-L.

    2005-01-01

    The large volume of existing and planned infrared observations of Mars have prompted the development of a new martian radiative transfer model that could be used in the retrievals of atmospheric and surface properties. The model is based on the Optimal Spectral Sampling (OSS) method [1]. The method is a fast and accurate monochromatic technique applicable to a wide range of remote sensing platforms (from microwave to UV) and was originally developed for the real-time processing of infrared and microwave data acquired by instruments aboard the satellites forming part of the next-generation global weather satellite system NPOESS (National Polarorbiting Operational Satellite System) [2]. As part of our on-going research related to the radiative properties of the martian polar caps, we have begun the development of a martian OSS model with the goal of using it to perform self-consistent atmospheric corrections necessary to retrieve caps emissivity from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) spectra. While the caps will provide the initial focus area for applying the new model, it is hoped that the model will be of interest to the wider Mars remote sensing community.

  13. Compensation strategies for PET scanners with unconventional scanner geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gundlich, B; Oehler, M

    2006-01-01

    The small animal PET scanner ClearPET®Neuro, developed at the Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH in cooperation with the Crystal Clear Collaboration (CERN), represents scanners with an unconventional geometry: due to axial and transaxial detector gaps ClearPet®Neuro delivers inhomogeneous sinograms with missing data. When filtered backprojection (FBP) or Fourier rebinning (FORE) are applied, strong geometrical artifacts appear in the images. In this contribution we present a method that takes the geometrical sensitivity into account and converts the measured sinograms into homogeneous and complete data. By this means artifactfree images are achieved using FBP or FORE. Besides an advantageous measurement setup that reduces inhomogeneities and data gaps in the sinograms, a modification of the measured sinograms is necessary. This modification includes two steps: a geometrical normalization and corrections for missing data. To normalize the measured sinograms, computed sinograms are used that describe the geometric...

  14. Experience with a fuel rod enrichment scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubik, R.N.; Pettus, W.G.

    1975-01-01

    This enrichment scanner views all fuel rods produced at B and W's Commercial Nuclear Fuel Plant. The scanner design is derived from the PAPAS System reported by R. A. Forster, H. D. Menlove, and their associates at Los Alamos. The spatial resolution of the system and smoothing of the data are discussed in detail. The cost-effectiveness of multi-detector versus single detector scanners of this general design is also discussed

  15. Multi-parameter CAMAC compatible ADC scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Midttun, G J; Ingebretsen, F [Oslo Univ. (Norway). Fysisk Inst.; Johnsen, P J [Norsk Data A.S., Box 163, Oekern, Oslo 5, Norway

    1979-02-15

    A fast ADC scanner for multi-parameter nuclear physics experiments is described. The scanner is based on a standard CAMAC crate, and data from several different experiments can be handled simultaneously through a direct memory access (DMA) channel. The implementation on a PDP-7 computer is outlined.

  16. Scintillation scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrbrodt, A.W.; Mog, W.F.; Brunnett, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    A scintillation scanner having a visual image producing means coupled through a lost motion connection to the boom which supports the scintillation detector is described. The lost motion connection is adjustable to compensate for such delays as may occur between sensing and recording scintillations. 13 claims, 5 figures

  17. Radiographic scanners and shutter mechanisms in CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braden, A.B.; Kuwik, J.J.; Taylor, S.K.; Covic, J.

    1981-01-01

    This patent claim relates especially to the design of a shutter mechanism in a CT scanner having a rotatable source of radiation and a series of stationary radiation detectors coplanar with the path of the source and spaced about the axis of rotation of the source, and only partially encircling the path of the source. (U.K.)

  18. Imaging system models for small-bore DOI-PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Yamaya, Taiga; Murayama, Hideo; Kitamura, Keishi; Hasegawa, Tomoyuki; Suga, Mikio

    2006-01-01

    Depth-of-interaction (DOI) information, which improves resolution uniformity in the field of view (FOV), is expected to lead to high-sensitivity PET scanners with small-bore detector rings. We are developing small-bore PET scanners with DOI detectors arranged in hexagonal or overlapped tetragonal patterns for small animal imaging or mammography. It is necessary to optimize the imaging system model because these scanners exhibit irregular detector sampling. In this work, we compared two imaging system models: (a) a parallel sub-LOR model in which the detector response functions (DRFs) are assumed to be uniform along the line of responses (LORs) and (b) a sub-crystal model in which each crystal is divided into a set of smaller volumes. These two models were applied to the overlapped tetragonal scanner (FOV 38.1 mm in diameter) and the hexagonal scanner (FOV 85.2 mm in diameter) simulated by GATE. We showed that the resolution non-uniformity of system model (b) was improved by 40% compared with that of system model (a) in the overlapped tetragonal scanner and that the resolution non-uniformity of system model (a) was improved by 18% compared with that of system model (b) in the hexagonal scanner. These results indicate that system model (b) should be applied to the overlapped tetragonal scanner and system model (a) should be applied to the hexagonal scanner. (author)

  19. Scanner OPC signatures: automatic vendor-to-vendor OPE matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, Stephen P.

    2009-03-01

    As 193nm lithography continues to be stretched and the k1 factor decreases, optical proximity correction (OPC) has become a vital part of the lithographer's tool kit. Unfortunately, as is now well known, the design variations of lithographic scanners from different vendors cause them to have slightly different optical-proximity effect (OPE) behavior, meaning that they print features through pitch in distinct ways. This in turn means that their response to OPC is not the same, and that an OPC solution designed for a scanner from Company 1 may or may not work properly on a scanner from Company 2. Since OPC is not inexpensive, that causes trouble for chipmakers using more than one brand of scanner. Clearly a scanner-matching procedure is needed to meet this challenge. Previously, automatic matching has only been reported for scanners of different tool generations from the same manufacturer. In contrast, scanners from different companies have been matched using expert tuning and adjustment techniques, frequently requiring laborious test exposures. Automatic matching between scanners from Company 1 and Company 2 has remained an unsettled problem. We have recently solved this problem and introduce a novel method to perform the automatic matching. The success in meeting this challenge required three enabling factors. First, we recognized the strongest drivers of OPE mismatch and are thereby able to reduce the information needed about a tool from another supplier to that information readily available from all modern scanners. Second, we developed a means of reliably identifying the scanners' optical signatures, minimizing dependence on process parameters that can cloud the issue. Third, we carefully employed standard statistical techniques, checking for robustness of the algorithms used and maximizing efficiency. The result is an automatic software system that can predict an OPC matching solution for scanners from different suppliers without requiring expert intervention.

  20. Assessment of a new trauma workflow concept implementing a sliding CT scanner in the trauma room: the effect on workup times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fung Kon Jin, P. H. Ping; Goslings, J. Carel; Ponsen, Kees Jan; van Kuijk, Cees; Hoogerwerf, Nico; Luitse, Jan S.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We developed a new shockroom resuscitation setting that includes a moveable, multislice computed tomography (CT) scanner capable of scanning patients during the initial trauma resuscitation phase without (multiple) patient transfers that previously were necessary. This enables us to

  1. Transfer standard for the spectral density of relative intensity noise of optical fiber sources near 1550 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obarski, Gregory E.; Splett, Jolene D.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a transfer standard for the spectral density of relative intensity noise (RIN) of optical fiber sources near 1550 nm. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), when it is optically filtered over a narrow band (<5 nm), yields a stable RIN spectrum that is practically constant to several tens of gigahertz. The RIN is calculated from the power spectral density as measured with a calibrated optical spectrum analyzer. For a typical device it is -110 dB/Hz, with uncertainty ≤0.12 dB/Hz. The invariance of the RIN under attenuation yields a considerable dynamic range with respect to rf noise levels. Results are compared with those from a second method that uses a distributed-feedback laser (DFB) that has a Poisson-limited RIN. Application of each method to the same RIN measurement system yields frequency-dependent calibration functions that, when they are averaged, differ by ≤0.2 dB. [copyright] 2001 Optical Society of America

  2. MEMS temperature scanner: principles, advances, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Thomas; Saupe, Ray; Stock, Volker; Gessner, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Contactless measurement of temperatures has gained enormous significance in many application fields, ranging from climate protection over quality control to object recognition in public places or military objects. Thereby measurement of linear or spatially temperature distribution is often necessary. For this purposes mostly thermographic cameras or motor driven temperature scanners are used today. Both are relatively expensive and the motor drive devices are limited regarding to the scanning rate additionally. An economic alternative are temperature scanner devices based on micro mirrors. The micro mirror, attached in a simple optical setup, reflects the emitted radiation from the observed heat onto an adapted detector. A line scan of the target object is obtained by periodic deflection of the micro scanner. Planar temperature distribution will be achieved by perpendicularly moving the target object or the scanner device. Using Planck radiation law the temperature of the object is calculated. The device can be adapted to different temperature ranges and resolution by using different detectors - cooled or uncooled - and parameterized scanner parameters. With the basic configuration 40 spatially distributed measuring points can be determined with temperatures in a range from 350°C - 1000°C. The achieved miniaturization of such scanners permits the employment in complex plants with high building density or in direct proximity to the measuring point. The price advantage enables a lot of applications, especially new application in the low-price market segment This paper shows principle, setup and application of a temperature measurement system based on micro scanners working in the near infrared range. Packaging issues and measurement results will be discussed as well.

  3. Nogle muligheder i scanner data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Hans Jørn

    2000-01-01

    I artiklen gives en diskussion af en række af de muligheder for effektivisering af marketingaktiviteter, der er til stede for såvel mærkevareudbyder som detaillist, ved udnyttelse af information fra scanner data......I artiklen gives en diskussion af en række af de muligheder for effektivisering af marketingaktiviteter, der er til stede for såvel mærkevareudbyder som detaillist, ved udnyttelse af information fra scanner data...

  4. The number and distribution of computerised tomography scanners in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semin, S.; Amato, Z.

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the number and distribution of CT scanners in Turkey. Our results show 173 CT scanners in Turkey in 1994, which equals 2.9 scanners per million people. All of the scanners are located in 45 cities, where 81 % of the population resides. The other 31 cities in Turkey have no scanners. Of the 173 scanners, 103 (59.6 %) are owned by the private sector and the other 70 are owned by the public sector. Of Turkey's CT scanners, 49.2 % are located in private health centres, 21.9 % in university hospitals, 16.7 % in Ministry of Health (MOH) hospitals, 10.4 % in private hospitals and 1.8 % in social security hospitals. (orig.)

  5. 3D whole body scanners revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Haar, F.B. ter

    2013-01-01

    An overview of whole body scanners in 1998 (H.A.M. Daanen, G.J. Van De Water. Whole body scanners, Displays 19 (1998) 111-120) shortly after they emerged to the market revealed that the systems were bulky, slow, expensive and low in resolution. This update shows that new developments in sensing and

  6. Quantitative analysis of aircraft multispectral-scanner data and mapping of water-quality parameters in the James River in Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. W.; Bahn, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    Statistical analysis techniques were applied to develop quantitative relationships between in situ river measurements and the remotely sensed data that were obtained over the James River in Virginia on 28 May 1974. The remotely sensed data were collected with a multispectral scanner and with photographs taken from an aircraft platform. Concentration differences among water quality parameters such as suspended sediment, chlorophyll a, and nutrients indicated significant spectral variations. Calibrated equations from the multiple regression analysis were used to develop maps that indicated the quantitative distributions of water quality parameters and the dispersion characteristics of a pollutant plume entering the turbid river system. Results from further analyses that use only three preselected multispectral scanner bands of data indicated that regression coefficients and standard errors of estimate were not appreciably degraded compared with results from the 10-band analysis.

  7. Methods for CT automatic exposure control protocol translation between scanner platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Sarah E; Seibert, J Anthony; Lamba, Ramit; Boone, John M

    2014-03-01

    An imaging facility with a diverse fleet of CT scanners faces considerable challenges when propagating CT protocols with consistent image quality and patient dose across scanner makes and models. Although some protocol parameters can comfortably remain constant among scanners (eg, tube voltage, gantry rotation time), the automatic exposure control (AEC) parameter, which selects the overall mA level during tube current modulation, is difficult to match among scanners, especially from different CT manufacturers. Objective methods for converting tube current modulation protocols among CT scanners were developed. Three CT scanners were investigated, a GE LightSpeed 16 scanner, a GE VCT scanner, and a Siemens Definition AS+ scanner. Translation of the AEC parameters such as noise index and quality reference mAs across CT scanners was specifically investigated. A variable-diameter poly(methyl methacrylate) phantom was imaged on the 3 scanners using a range of AEC parameters for each scanner. The phantom consisted of 5 cylindrical sections with diameters of 13, 16, 20, 25, and 32 cm. The protocol translation scheme was based on matching either the volumetric CT dose index or image noise (in Hounsfield units) between two different CT scanners. A series of analytic fit functions, corresponding to different patient sizes (phantom diameters), were developed from the measured CT data. These functions relate the AEC metric of the reference scanner, the GE LightSpeed 16 in this case, to the AEC metric of a secondary scanner. When translating protocols between different models of CT scanners (from the GE LightSpeed 16 reference scanner to the GE VCT system), the translation functions were linear. However, a power-law function was necessary to convert the AEC functions of the GE LightSpeed 16 reference scanner to the Siemens Definition AS+ secondary scanner, because of differences in the AEC functionality designed by these two companies. Protocol translation on the basis of

  8. Wire scanner software and firmware issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, John Doug

    2008-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility presently has 110 slow wire scanning profile measurement instruments located along its various beam lines. These wire scanners were developed and have been operating for at least 30 years. While the wire scanners solved many problems to operate and have served the facility well they have increasingly suffered from several problems or limitations, such as maintenance and reliability problems, antiquated components, slow data acquisition, and etc. In order to refurbish these devices, these wire scanners will be replaced with newer versions. The replacement will consist of a completely new beam line actuator, new cables, new electronics and brand new software and firmware. This note describes the functions and modes of operation that LabVIEW VI software on the real time controller and FPGA LabVIEW firmware will be required. It will be especially interesting to understand the overall architecture of these LabVIEW VIs. While this note will endeavor to describe all of the requirements and issues for the wire scanners, undoubtedly, there will be missing details that will be added as time progresses.

  9. Comparison of Epson scanner quality for radiochromic film evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnawaf, Hani; Yu, Peter K N; Butson, Martin

    2012-09-06

    Epson Desktop scanners have been quoted as devices which match the characteristics required for the evaluation of radiation dose exposure by radiochromic films. Specifically, models such as the 10000XL have been used successfully for image analysis and are recommended by ISP for dosimetry purposes. This note investigates and compares the scanner characteristics of three Epson desktop scanner models including the Epson 10000XL, V700, and V330. Both of the latter are substantially cheaper models capable of A4 scanning. As the price variation between the V330 and the 10000XL is 20-fold (based on Australian recommended retail price), cost savings by using the cheaper scanners may be warranted based on results. By a direct comparison of scanner uniformity and reproducibility we can evaluate the accuracy of these scanners for radiochromic film dosimetry. Results have shown that all three scanners can produce adequate scanner uniformity and reproducibility, with the inexpensive V330 producing a standard deviation variation across its landscape direction of 0.7% and 1.2% in the portrait direction (reflection mode). This is compared to the V700 in reflection mode of 0.25% and 0.5% for landscape and portrait directions, respectively, and 0.5% and 0.8% for the 10000XL. In transmission mode, the V700 is comparable in reproducibility to the 10000XL for portrait and landscape mode, whilst the V330 is only capable of scanning in the landscape direction and produces a standard deviation in this direction of 1.0% compared to 0.6% (V700) and 0.25% (10000XL). Results have shown that the V700 and 10000XL are comparable scanners in quality and accuracy with the 10000XL obviously capable of imaging over an A3 area as opposed to an A4 area for the V700. The V330 scanner produced slightly lower accuracy and quality with uncertainties approximately twice as much as the other scanners. However, the results show that the V330 is still an adequate scanner and could be used for radiation

  10. Spectral OCT with speckle contrast reduction for evaluation of the healing process after PRK and transepithelial PRK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzny, Bartlomiej J; Szkulmowski, Maciej; Bukowska, Danuta M; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2014-04-01

    We evaluate Spectral OCT (SOCT) with a speckle contrast reduction technique using resonant scanner for assessment of corneal surface changes after excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and we compare healing process between conventional PRK and transepithelial PRK. The measurements were performed before and after the surgery. Obtained results show that SOCT with a resonant scanner speckle contrast reduction is capable of providing information regarding the healing process after PRK. The main difference between the healing processes of PRK and TransPRK, assessed by SOCT, was the time to cover the stroma with epithelium, which was shorter in the TransPRK group.

  11. A demonstration of wetland vegetation mapping in Florida from computer-processed satellite and aircraft multispectral scanner data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, M. K. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Major vegetative classes identified by the remote sensing technique were cypress swamp, pine, wetland grasses, salt grass, mixed mangrove, black mangrove, Brazilian pepper. Australian pine and melaleuca were not satisfactorily classified from LANDSAT. Aircraft scanners provided better resolution resulting in a classification of finer surface detail. An edge effect, created by the integration of diverse spectral responses within boundary elements of digital data, affected the wetlands classification. Accuracy classification for aircraft was 68% and for LANDSAT was 74%.

  12. In-vivo validation of fast spectral velocity estimation techniques – preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Gran, Fredrik; Pedersen, Mads Møller

    2008-01-01

    Spectral Doppler is a common way to estimate blood velocities in medical ultrasound (US). The standard way of estimating spectrograms is by using Welch's method (WM). WM is dependent on a long observation window (OW) (about 100 transmissions) to produce spectrograms with sufficient spectral...... resolution and contrast. Two adaptive filterbank methods have been suggested to circumvent this problem: the Blood spectral Power Capon method (BPC) and the Blood Amplitude and Phase Estimation method (BAPES). Previously, simulations and flow rig experiments have indicated that the two adaptive methods can...... was scanned using the experimental ultrasound scanner RASMUS and a B-K Medical 5 MHz linear array transducer with an angle of insonation not exceeding 60deg. All 280 spectrograms were then randomised and presented to a radiologist blinded for method and OW for visual evaluation: useful or not useful. WMbw...

  13. 21 CFR 882.1925 - Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. 882... Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scanner calibration test block is a block of material with known properties used to calibrate ultrasonic scanning devices (e.g., the...

  14. Scanners for analytic print measurement: the devil in the details

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeise, Eric K.; Williams, Don; Burns, Peter D.; Kress, William C.

    2007-01-01

    Inexpensive and easy-to-use linear and area-array scanners have frequently substituted as colorimeters and densitometers for low-frequency (i.e., large area) hard copy image measurement. Increasingly, scanners are also being used for high spatial frequency, image microstructure measurements, which were previously reserved for high performance microdensitometers. In this paper we address characteristics of flatbed reflection scanners in the evaluation of print uniformity, geometric distortion, geometric repeatability and the influence of scanner MTF and noise on analytic measurements. Suggestions are made for the specification and evaluation of scanners to be used in print image quality standards that are being developed.

  15. Free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Riza, Nabeel A

    2002-09-10

    Experimental demonstration of a no-moving-parts free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner (W-MOS) is presented. With fast tunable lasers or optical filters and planar wavelength dispersive elements such as diffraction gratings, this microsecond-speed scanner enables large several-centimeter apertures for subdegree angular scans. The proposed W-MOS design incorporates a unique optical amplifier and variable optical attenuator combination that enables the calibration and modulation of the scanner response, leading to any desired scanned laser beam power shaping. The experimental setup uses a tunable laser centered at 1560 nm and a 600-grooves/mm blazed reflection grating to accomplish an angular scan of 12.92 degrees as the source is tuned over an 80-nm bandwidth. The values for calculated maximum optical beam divergance, required wavelength resolution, beam-pointing accuracy, and measured scanner insertion loss are 1.076 mrad, 0.172 nm, 0.06 mrad, and 4.88 dB, respectively.

  16. Portable CT scanners for use on live trees and standing columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoe, M.; Tsao, J.W.; Yamada, H.; Nakamura, H.; Kogure, J.; Kawamura, H.; Isono, E.; Maeda, Y.; Matsumoto, S.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a technique to reconstruct a crosssection of a test object from multiple projections obtained using e.g. x-rays. A large number of medical CT scanners and a few industrial CT scanners have been used. Most of these scanners are fixed installations. In contrast, we developed portable CT scanners for nondestructive testing of live trees and standing building columns in field environment. The resolution of these scanners is high enough to reveal details of annual rings of trees and timbers. The scanners have been useful in a wide range of applications. This paper presents two types of scanners with small and large apertures, a system for quick look of reconstruction and a few examples of applications

  17. Transfer standard for the spectral density of relative intensity noise of optical fiber sources near 1550 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obarski, Gregory E.; Splett, Jolene D.

    2001-06-01

    We have developed a transfer standard for the spectral density of relative intensity noise (RIN) of optical fiber sources near 1550 nm. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), when it is optically filtered over a narrow band ({lt}5 nm), yields a stable RIN spectrum that is practically constant to several tens of gigahertz. The RIN is calculated from the power spectral density as measured with a calibrated optical spectrum analyzer. For a typical device it is {minus}110 dB/Hz, with uncertainty {le}0.12 dB/Hz. The invariance of the RIN under attenuation yields a considerable dynamic range with respect to rf noise levels. Results are compared with those from a second method that uses a distributed-feedback laser (DFB) that has a Poisson-limited RIN. Application of each method to the same RIN measurement system yields frequency-dependent calibration functions that, when they are averaged, differ by {le}0.2 dB. {copyright} 2001 Optical Society of America

  18. Multimodality Registration without a Dedicated Multimodality Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. Beattie

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Multimodality scanners that allow the acquisition of both functional and structural image sets on a single system have recently become available for animal research use. Although the resultant registered functional/structural image sets can greatly enhance the interpretability of the functional data, the cost of multimodality systems can be prohibitive, and they are often limited to two modalities, which generally do not include magnetic resonance imaging. Using a thin plastic wrap to immobilize and fix a mouse or other small animal atop a removable bed, we are able to calculate registrations between all combinations of four different small animal imaging scanners (positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and computed tomography [CT] at our disposal, effectively equivalent to a quadruple-modality scanner. A comparison of serially acquired CT images, with intervening acquisitions on other scanners, demonstrates the ability of the proposed procedures to maintain the rigidity of an anesthetized mouse during transport between scanners. Movement of the bony structures of the mouse was estimated to be 0.62 mm. Soft tissue movement was predominantly the result of the filling (or emptying of the urinary bladder and thus largely constrained to this region. Phantom studies estimate the registration errors for all registration types to be less than 0.5 mm. Functional images using tracers targeted to known structures verify the accuracy of the functional to structural registrations. The procedures are easy to perform and produce robust and accurate results that rival those of dedicated multimodality scanners, but with more flexible registration combinations and while avoiding the expense and redundancy of multimodality systems.

  19. Utilization pattern of whole body computed tomography scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Chul Ho; Lee, Sang Suk

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography scanner (CT scanner) is one of the most expensive and sophisticated diagnostic tool and has already been utilized in many hospitals in Korea. The price as well as operating costs of CT scanner is so expensive as to regulate its installment by government even in the United States. In order to identify the efficient utilization of the CT scanner, the utilization pattern for CT scanning was analyzed at three general hospital in seoul. The results are as follows: 1. Five out of one thousand outpatients and five out of one hundred inpatients were CT scanned. 2. Eighty percent of patients who were scanned were those of inpatients of the hospitals where the scanned are installed. 3. Head standings constitute 45.6 percent of examinations, internal medicine 63.8 percent, and 38.5 percent neurosurgery respectively. 4. The rate of indication for CT scanning showed no statistically significant difference between insured and non-insured groups. 5. Computed tomography scanner units were operated 5.5 days a week in average and full operation rate was 79.5% in average. 6. The major diagnoses mode by head scanning were: hematoma (56.7%), infarction (12.6%), tumor (8.2%), and hydrocephalus (4.4%). 7. Number of patients taken CT Scanning was 43 persons a week in average for each whole body scanner unit

  20. Transfer learning improves supervised image segmentation across imaging protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Opbroek, Annegreet; Ikram, M Arfan; Vernooij, Meike W; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2015-05-01

    The variation between images obtained with different scanners or different imaging protocols presents a major challenge in automatic segmentation of biomedical images. This variation especially hampers the application of otherwise successful supervised-learning techniques which, in order to perform well, often require a large amount of labeled training data that is exactly representative of the target data. We therefore propose to use transfer learning for image segmentation. Transfer-learning techniques can cope with differences in distributions between training and target data, and therefore may improve performance over supervised learning for segmentation across scanners and scan protocols. We present four transfer classifiers that can train a classification scheme with only a small amount of representative training data, in addition to a larger amount of other training data with slightly different characteristics. The performance of the four transfer classifiers was compared to that of standard supervised classification on two magnetic resonance imaging brain-segmentation tasks with multi-site data: white matter, gray matter, and cerebrospinal fluid segmentation; and white-matter-/MS-lesion segmentation. The experiments showed that when there is only a small amount of representative training data available, transfer learning can greatly outperform common supervised-learning approaches, minimizing classification errors by up to 60%.

  1. Input Scanners: A Growing Impact In A Diverse Marketplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Kevin E.

    1989-08-01

    Just as newly invented photographic processes revolutionized the printing industry at the turn of the century, electronic imaging has affected almost every computer application today. To completely emulate traditionally mechanical means of information handling, computer based systems must be able to capture graphic images. Thus, there is a widespread need for the electronic camera, the digitizer, the input scanner. This paper will review how various types of input scanners are being used in many diverse applications. The following topics will be covered: - Historical overview of input scanners - New applications for scanners - Impact of scanning technology on select markets - Scanning systems issues

  2. SCT-4800T whole body X-ray CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Yoshitaka; Sato, Yukio; Kuwahara, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    A whole body X-ray CT scanner, the SCT-4800T (trade name: INTELLECT series), has been developed. This system is the first CT scanner that is combined with general radiographic functions. The general radiographic functions include a patient couch with film casette and several tube support systems along with the CT scanner. This newly designed CT scanner also features a compact and light-weight gantry with a 700 mm diameter apperture and user-friendly operater's console. The SCT-4800T brings a new level of patient and operator comfort to the emergency radiology examination site. (author)

  3. Developments in holographic-based scanner designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, David M.

    1997-07-01

    Holographic-based scanning systems have been used for years in the high resolution prepress markets where monochromatic lasers are generally utilized. However, until recently, due to the dispersive properties of holographic optical elements (HOEs), along with the high cost associated with recording 'master' HOEs, holographic scanners have not been able to penetrate major scanning markets such as the laser printer and digital copier markets, low to mid-range imagesetter markets, and the non-contact inspection scanner market. Each of these markets has developed cost effective laser diode based solutions using conventional scanning approaches such as polygon/f-theta lens combinations. In order to penetrate these markets, holographic-based systems must exhibit low cost and immunity to wavelength shifts associated with laser diodes. This paper describes recent developments in the design of holographic scanners in which multiple HOEs, each possessing optical power, are used in conjunction with one curved mirror to passively correct focal plane position errors and spot size changes caused by the wavelength instability of laser diodes. This paper also describes recent advancements in low cost production of high quality HOEs and curved mirrors. Together these developments allow holographic scanners to be economically competitive alternatives to conventional devices in every segment of the laser scanning industry.

  4. Circumference estimation using 3D-whole body scanners and shadow scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Clothing designers and manufacturers use traditional body dimensions as their basis. When 3D-whole body scanners are introduced to determine the body dimensions, a conversion has to be made, since scan determined circumference measures are slightly larger than the traditional values. This pilot

  5. TU-F-18A-01: Preliminary Results of a Prototype Quality Control Process for Spectral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nute, J; Jacobsen, M; Pennington, J; Cody, D; Chandler, A; Imai, Y; Baiu, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A prototype quality control (QC) phantom and analysis process has been designed specifically to monitor dual-energy CT and address the current lack of quantitative oversight of the spectral capabilities of these scanners. Methods: A prototype solid water phantom was designed with multiple material inserts, and to support both head and body protocols. Inserts included tissue equivalent and material rods (iodine, iron, calcium) at various concentrations. The oval body phantom, measuring 30cm×40cm×15cm, was scanned using four dual-energy protocols with CTDIvol ranges of 19.6–62mGy (0.516 pitch) and 10.3–32.5mGy (0.984 pitch), and rotation times ranging from 0.5-1sec. The circular head phantom, measuring 22cm in diameter by 15cm, was scanned using three dual-energy protocols with CTDIvol ranges of 67–132.6mGy (0.531 pitch) and 36.7–72.7mGy (0.969 pitch), and rotation times ranging from 0.5–0.9sec. All images were reconstructed at 50, 70, 110 and 140 keV, and using a water-iodine material basis pair. The images were evaluated for iodine quantification accuracy and stability of monoenergetic reconstructions. The phantom was scanned twice on ten GE 750HD CT scanners to evaluate inter-scanner agreement, as well as ten times on a single scanner over a oneweek period to evaluate intra-scanner repeatability. Results: Preliminary analysis revealed consistent (inter- and intra-scanner) iodine quantification accuracy within 10% was only achieved for protocols in the upper half of dose levels assessed when grouped by pitch. Although all scanners undergo rigorous daily single-energy QC, iodine quantification accuracy from one scanner unexpectedly deviated from the other nine substantially. In general, inter-scanner agreement and intra-scanner repeatability varied with dose, rotation time and reconstructed keV. Conclusion: Preliminary results indicate the need for a dual-energy QC process to ensure inter-scanner agreement and intra-scanner repeatability. In

  6. Manually operated small envelope scanner system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sword, Charles Keith

    2017-04-18

    A scanner system and method for acquisition of position-based ultrasonic inspection data are described. The scanner system includes an inspection probe and a first non-contact linear encoder having a first sensor and a first scale to track inspection probe position. The first sensor is positioned to maintain a continuous non-contact interface between the first sensor and the first scale and to maintain a continuous alignment of the first sensor with the inspection probe. The scanner system may be used to acquire two-dimensional inspection probe position data by including a second non-contact linear encoder having a second sensor and a second scale, the second sensor positioned to maintain a continuous non-contact interface between the second sensor and the second scale and to maintain a continuous alignment of the second sensor with the first sensor.

  7. Assessing spectral and temporal processing in children and adults using temporal modulation transfer function (TMTF), Iterated Ripple Noise (IRN) perception, and spectral ripple discrimination (SRD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Varghese; Wong, Kogo; Narne, Vijaya Kumar; Sharma, Mridula; Purdy, Suzanne C; McMahon, Catherine

    2014-02-01

    There are many clinically available tests for the assessment of auditory processing skills in children and adults. However, there is limited data available on the maturational effects on the performance on these tests. The current study investigated maturational effects on auditory processing abilities using three psychophysical measures: temporal modulation transfer function (TMTF), iterated ripple noise (IRN) perception, and spectral ripple discrimination (SRD). A cross-sectional study. Three groups of subjects were tested: 10 adults (18-30 yr), 10 older children (12-18 yr), and 10 young children (8-11 yr) Temporal envelope processing was measured by obtaining thresholds for amplitude modulation detection as a function of modulation frequency (TMTF; 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, and 128 Hz). Temporal fine structure processing was measured using IRN, and spectral processing was measured using SRD. The results showed that young children had significantly higher modulation thresholds at 4 Hz (TMTF) compared to the other two groups and poorer SRD scores compared to adults. The results on IRN did not differ across groups. The results suggest that different aspects of auditory processing mature at different age periods and these maturational effects need to be considered while assessing auditory processing in children. American Academy of Audiology.

  8. Particle discrimination by an automatic scanner for nuclear emulsion plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinecke, W.; Fischer, B.E.

    1976-01-01

    An automatic scanner for nuclear emulsion plates has been improved by adding particle discrimination. By determination of the mean luminosity of tracks in darkfield illumination in addition to the track length a clear discrimination has been obtained, at least for lighter particles. The scanning speed of the original automatic scanner has not been reduced. The scanner works up to 200 times faster than a human scanner. Besides the particle discrimination the determination of the mean track luminosity led to a lower perturbation sensitivity with respect to a high background of accidentally developed silvergrains, scratches in emulsion etc. The reproducibility of the results obtained by the automatic scanner is better than 5%. (Auth.)

  9. submitter Dynamical Models of a Wire Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Barjau, Ana; Dehning, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of the beam profile measurements achievable by the current wire scanners at CERN is limited by the vibrations of their mechanical parts. In particular, the vibrations of the carbon wire represent the major source of wire position uncertainty which limits the beam profile measurement accuracy. In the coming years, due to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade, a wire traveling speed up to 20 $m s^{−1}$ and a position measurement accuracy of the order of 1 μm will be required. A new wire scanner design based on the understanding of the wire vibration origin is therefore needed. We present the models developed to understand the main causes of the wire vibrations observed in an existing wire scanner. The development and tuning of those models are based on measurements and tests performed on that CERN proton synchrotron (PS) scanner. The final model for the (wire + fork) system has six degrees-of-freedom (DOF). The wire equations contain three different excitation terms: inertia...

  10. Myocardium scintigraphy and coronaries scanner: results and respective contribution of these two examinations; Scintigraphie myocardique et scanner coronaire: resultats et apport respectif des deux examens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Songy, B.; Balestrini, V.; Sablayrolles, J.L.; Vigoni, F.; Lussato, D. [Centre cardiologique du Nord (CCN), Saint-Denis, (France); Faccio, F. [fondation San Geronimo, Santa Fe, (Argentina)

    2009-05-15

    The objective were to evaluate the results and the respective contribution of the myocardium scintigraphy and the coro-scanner. It exists an excellent correlation between a normal scanner and a normal scintigraphy (97%). 30% of patients having non tight stenosis at scanner and 60% of these ones having tight stenosis have a scintigraphy ischemia; An abnormal scanner, whatever be the the degree of stenosis must be completed by a test of myocardium ischemia. The actual limitations of the coro-scanner (64 gills) are in relation with its spatial resolution (quantification) and temporal resolution (right coronary). The choice of the diagnosis examination to realize in first intention must depend on the age and prevalence of the coronary disease. (N.C.)

  11. APLIKASI INFO HALAL MENGGUNAKAN BARCODE SCANNER UNTUK SMARTPHONE ANDROID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beki Subeki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract – In the production and trade of food products in the era of globalization, people are consuming, especially Muslims need to be given the knowledge, information and access to adequate in order to obtain the correct information about the halal status of products bought. The use of barcode scanners halal product information using the mobile platform is effective and useful for the public to find out information on a product. Barcode scanners can be read by optical scanners called barcode readers or scanned from an image by special software. In Indonesia, most mobile phones have the scanning software for 2D codes, and similar devices available via smartphone.   Keywords : Barcode Scanner, Mobile Platform, Halal Products, Smartphone     Abstrak - Dalam kegiatan produksi dan perdagangan produk pangan di era globalisasi ini, masyarakat yang mengkonsumsi, khususnya umat islam perlu diberikan pengetahuan tentang kehalalan produk, informasi dan akses yang memadai agar memperoleh informasi yang benar tentang status kehalalan produk yang dibelinya. Penggunaan barcode scanner informasi produk halal dengan menggunakan mobile platform dinilai cukup efektif dan berguna bagi masyarakat luas untuk mengetahui informasi sebuah produk. Barcode scanner dapat dibaca oleh pemindai optik yang disebut pembaca kode batang atau dipindai dari sebuah gambar oleh perangkat lunak khusus. Di Indonesia, kebanyakan telepon genggam memiliki perangkat lunak pemindai untuk kode 2D, dan perangkat sejenis tersedia melalui smartphone.   Kata Kunci: Barcode Scanner, Mobile Platform, Produk Halal, Smartphone

  12. A simple scanner for Compton tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cesareo, R; Brunetti, A; Golosio, B; Castellano, A

    2002-01-01

    A first generation CT-scanner was designed and constructed to carry out Compton images. This CT-scanner is composed of a 80 kV, 5 mA X-ray tube and a NaI(Tl) X-ray detector; the tube is strongly collimated, generating a X-ray beam of 2 mm diameter, whilst the detector is not collimated to collect Compton photons from the whole irradiated cylinder. The performances of the equipment were tested contemporaneous transmission and Compton images.

  13. Monitoring tree health with a dual-wavelength terrestrial laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, S.

    2013-12-01

    Steven Hancock1, Rachel Gaulton1, Mark Danson2 1School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Newcastle University, UK, steven.hancock@ncl.ac.uk, rachel.gaulton@ncl.ac.uk 2 School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, UK, F.M.Danson@salford.ac.uk Forests are a vital part of the Earth's carbon cycle and drive interactions between the land and atmosphere. Accurate and repeatable measurement of forests is essential for understanding the Earth system. Terrestrial laser scanning can be a powerful tool for characterising forests. However, there are a number of issues that have yet to be resolved. Commercial laser scanners are optimised for measuring buildings and other hard targets. Vegetation canopies are complex and porous, confounding standard interpretation techniques. Commercial systems struggle with partial hits and cannot distinguish leaf from wood (Danson et al 2007). A new generation of terrestrial laser scanners, optimised for vegetation measurement, are in development. The Salford Advanced Laser Canopy Analyser (SALCA, Gaulton et al 2013) aims to overcome these issues using full-waveform analysis and two wavelengths (1064 nm and 1545 nm), allowing the characterisation of a porous canopy, the identification of leaf and wood and derivation of information on leaf biochemistry. Gaulton et al (2013) showed that SALCA is capable of measuring the Equivalent Water Thickness (EWT) of individual leaves in laboratory conditions. In this study, the method was applied to complete tree canopies. A controlled experiment simulating a small 'forest' of potted broadleaved (Tilia cordata) and coniferous trees (Pinus nigra) was established and groups subjected to different moisture stresses over a one month period. Trees were repeatedly scanned by SALCA and regular measurements were made of leaf EWT, stomatal conductance, chlorophyll content, spectral properties (using an ASD field spectroradiometer) and, for a limited number of trees, leaf area (by destructive

  14. Blood velocity estimation using ultrasound and spectral iterative adaptive approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundson, Erik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    -mode images are interleaved with the Doppler emissions. Furthermore, the techniques are shown, using both simplified and more realistic Field II simulations as well as in vivo data, to outperform current state-of-the-art techniques, allowing for accurate estimation of the blood velocity spectrum using only 30......This paper proposes two novel iterative data-adaptive spectral estimation techniques for blood velocity estimation using medical ultrasound scanners. The techniques make no assumption on the sampling pattern of the emissions or the depth samples, allowing for duplex mode transmissions where B...

  15. A flexible and wearable terahertz scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, D.; Oda, S.; Kawano, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Imaging technologies based on terahertz (THz) waves have great potential for use in powerful non-invasive inspection methods. However, most real objects have various three-dimensional curvatures and existing THz technologies often encounter difficulties in imaging such configurations, which limits the useful range of THz imaging applications. Here, we report the development of a flexible and wearable THz scanner based on carbon nanotubes. We achieved room-temperature THz detection over a broad frequency band ranging from 0.14 to 39 THz and developed a portable THz scanner. Using this scanner, we performed THz imaging of samples concealed behind opaque objects, breakages and metal impurities of a bent film and multi-view scans of a syringe. We demonstrated a passive biometric THz scan of a human hand. Our results are expected to have considerable implications for non-destructive and non-contact inspections, such as medical examinations for the continuous monitoring of health conditions.

  16. Calculation of the Scattered Radiation Profile in 64 Slice CT Scanners Using Experimental Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Akbarzadeh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most important parameters in x-ray CT imaging is the noise induced by detected scattered radiation. The detected scattered radiation is completely dependent on the scanner geometry as well as size, shape and material of the scanned object. The magnitude and spatial distribution of the scattered radiation in x-ray CT should be quantified for development of robust scatter correction techniques. Empirical methods based on blocking the primary photons in a small region are not able to extract scatter in all elements of the detector array while the scatter profile is required for a scatter correction procedure. In this study, we measured scatter profiles in 64 slice CT scanners using a new experimental measurement. Material and Methods: To measure the scatter profile, a lead block array was inserted under the collimator and the phantom was exposed at the isocenter. The raw data file, which contained detector array readouts, was transferred to a PC and was read using a dedicated GUI running under MatLab 7.5. The scatter profile was extracted by interpolating the shadowed area. Results: The scatter and SPR profiles were measured. Increasing the tube voltage from 80 to 140 kVp resulted in an 80% fall off in SPR for a water phantom (d=210 mm and 86% for a polypropylene phantom (d = 350 mm. Increasing the air gap to 20.9 cm caused a 30% decrease in SPR. Conclusion: In this study, we presented a novel approach for measurement of scattered radiation distribution and SPR in a CT scanner with 64-slice capability using a lead block array. The method can also be used on other multi-slice CT scanners. The proposed technique can accurately estimate scatter profiles. It is relatively straightforward, easy to use, and can be used for any related measurement.

  17. Design of active-neutron fuel rod scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, G.W.; Menlove, H.O.

    1996-01-01

    An active-neutron fuel rod scanner has been designed for the assay of fissile materials in mixed oxide fuel rods. A 252 Cf source is located at the center of the scanner very near the through hole for the fuel rods. Spontaneous fission neutrons from the californium are moderated and induce fissions within the passing fuel rod. The rod continues past a combined gamma-ray and neutron shield where delayed gamma rays above 1 MeV are detected. We used the Monte Carlo code MCNP to design the scanner and review optimum materials and geometries. An inhomogeneous beryllium, graphite, and polyethylene moderator has been designed that uses source neutrons much more efficiently than assay systems using polyethylene moderators. Layers of borated polyethylene and tungsten are used to shield the detectors. Large NaI(Tl) detectors were selected to measure the delayed gamma rays. The enrichment zones of a thermal reactor fuel pin could be measured to within 1% counting statistics for practical rod speeds. Applications of the rod scanner include accountability of fissile material for safeguards applications, quality control of the fissile content in a fuel rod, and the verification of reactivity potential for mixed oxide fuels. (orig.)

  18. Single-energy pediatric chest computed tomography with spectral filtration at 100 kVp: effects on radiation parameters and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodelle, Boris; Fischbach, Constanze; Booz, Christian; Yel, Ibrahim; Frellesen, Claudia; Kaup, Moritz; Beeres, Martin; Vogl, Thomas J.; Scholtz, Jan-Erik [Goethe University of Frankfurt, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Most of the applied radiation dose at CT is in the lower photon energy range, which is of limited diagnostic importance. To investigate image quality and effects on radiation parameters of 100-kVp spectral filtration single-energy chest CT using a tin-filter at third-generation dual-source CT in comparison to standard 100-kVp chest CT. Thirty-three children referred for a non-contrast chest CT performed on a third-generation dual-source CT scanner were examined at 100 kVp with a dedicated tin filter with a tube current-time product resulting in standard protocol dose. We compared resulting images with images from children examined using standard single-source chest CT at 100 kVp. We assessed objective and subjective image quality and compared radiation dose parameters. Radiation dose was comparable for children 5 years old and younger, and it was moderately decreased for older children when using spectral filtration (P=0.006). Effective tube current increased significantly (P=0.0001) with spectral filtration, up to a factor of 10. Signal-to-noise ratio and image noise were similar for both examination techniques (P≥0.06). Subjective image quality showed no significant differences (P≥0.2). Using 100-kVp spectral filtration chest CT in children by means of a tube-based tin-filter on a third-generation dual-source CT scanner increases effective tube current up to a factor of 10 to provide similar image quality at equivalent dose compared to standard single-source CT without spectral filtration. (orig.)

  19. Single-energy pediatric chest computed tomography with spectral filtration at 100 kVp: effects on radiation parameters and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodelle, Boris; Fischbach, Constanze; Booz, Christian; Yel, Ibrahim; Frellesen, Claudia; Kaup, Moritz; Beeres, Martin; Vogl, Thomas J.; Scholtz, Jan-Erik

    2017-01-01

    Most of the applied radiation dose at CT is in the lower photon energy range, which is of limited diagnostic importance. To investigate image quality and effects on radiation parameters of 100-kVp spectral filtration single-energy chest CT using a tin-filter at third-generation dual-source CT in comparison to standard 100-kVp chest CT. Thirty-three children referred for a non-contrast chest CT performed on a third-generation dual-source CT scanner were examined at 100 kVp with a dedicated tin filter with a tube current-time product resulting in standard protocol dose. We compared resulting images with images from children examined using standard single-source chest CT at 100 kVp. We assessed objective and subjective image quality and compared radiation dose parameters. Radiation dose was comparable for children 5 years old and younger, and it was moderately decreased for older children when using spectral filtration (P=0.006). Effective tube current increased significantly (P=0.0001) with spectral filtration, up to a factor of 10. Signal-to-noise ratio and image noise were similar for both examination techniques (P≥0.06). Subjective image quality showed no significant differences (P≥0.2). Using 100-kVp spectral filtration chest CT in children by means of a tube-based tin-filter on a third-generation dual-source CT scanner increases effective tube current up to a factor of 10 to provide similar image quality at equivalent dose compared to standard single-source CT without spectral filtration. (orig.)

  20. Accuracy of single-abutment digital cast obtained using intraoral and cast scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Jun; Jeong, Ii-Do; Park, Jin-Young; Jeon, Jin-Hun; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Woong-Chul

    2017-02-01

    Scanners are frequently used in the fabrication of dental prostheses. However, the accuracy of these scanners is variable, and little information is available. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the accuracy of cast scanners with that of intraoral scanners by using different image impression techniques. A poly(methyl methacrylate) master model was fabricated to replicate a maxillary first molar single-abutment tooth model. The master model was scanned with an accurate engineering scanner to obtain a true value (n=1) and with 2 intraoral scanners (CEREC Bluecam and CEREC Omnicam; n=6 each). The cast scanner scanned the master model and duplicated the dental stone cast from the master model (n=6). The trueness and precision of the data were measured using a 3-dimensional analysis program. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the different sets of scanning data, followed by a post hoc Mann-Whitney U test with a significance level modified by Bonferroni correction (α/6=.0083). The type 1 error level (α) was set at .05. The trueness value (root mean square: mean ±standard deviation) was 17.5 ±1.8 μm for the Bluecam, 13.8 ±1.4 μm for the Omnicam, 17.4 ±1.7 μm for cast scanner 1, and 12.3 ±0.1 μm for cast scanner 2. The differences between the Bluecam and the cast scanner 1 and between the Omnicam and the cast scanner 2 were not statistically significant (P>.0083), but a statistically significant difference was found between all the other pairs (POmnicam, 9.2 ±1.2 μm for cast scanner 1, and 6.9 ±2.6 μm for cast scanner 2. The differences between Bluecam and Omnicam and between Omnicam and cast scanner 1 were not statistically significant (P>.0083), but there was a statistically significant difference between all the other pairs (POmnicam in video image impression had better trueness than a cast scanner but with a similar level of precision. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by

  1. Inland wetland change detection using aircraft MSS [multispectral scanner] data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, J.R.; Ramsey, E.W.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Sharitz, R.R.; Christensen, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    Nontidal wetlands in a portion of the Savannah River swamp forest affected by reactor cooling water discharges were mapped using March 31, 1981 and April 29, 1985 high-resolution aircraft multispectral scanner (MSS) data. Due to the inherent distortion in the aircraft MSS data and the complex spectral characteristics of the wetland vegetation, it was necessary to implement multiple techniques in the registration and classification of the MSS imagery of the Pen Branch Delta on each date. In particular, it was necessary to use a piecewise-linear registration process over relatively small regions to perform image-to-image registration. When performing unsupervised classification, an iterative ''cluster busting'' technique was used, which simplified the cluster labeling process. These procedures allowed important wetland vegetation categories to be identified on each date. The multiple-date classification maps were then evaluated using a post-classification comparison technique yielding change classes that were of value in determining the extent of inland wetland change in this region

  2. Scanner Uniformity improvements for radiochromic film analysis with matt reflectance backing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, M.; Yu, P.K.N.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: A simple and reproducible method for increasing desktop scanner uniformity for the analysis of radiochromic films is presented. Scanner uniformity, especially in the non-scan direction, for transmission scanning is well known to be problematic for radiochromic film analysis and normally corrections need to be applied. These corrections are dependant on scanner coordinates and dose level applied which complicates dosimetry procedures. This study has highlighted that using reflectance scanning in combination with a matt, white backing material instead of the conventional gloss scanner finish, substantial increases in the scanner uniformity can be achieved within 90% of the scanning area. Uniformity within ±I% over the scanning area for our epsonV700 scanner tested was found. This is compared to within ±3% for reflection scanning with the gloss backing material and within ±4% for transmission scanning. The matt backing material used was simply 5 layers of standard quality white printing paper (80 g/m It was found that 5 layers was the optimal result for backing material however most of the improvements were seen with a minimum of 3 layers. Above 5 layers, no extra benefit was seen. This may eliminate the need to perform scanner corrections for position on the desktop scanners for radiochromic film dosimetry. (author)

  3. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Battum, L. J.; Huizenga, H.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Heukelom, S.

    2016-01-01

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2-2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner’s transmission mode, with red-green-blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner’s optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film.

  4. How flatbed scanners upset accurate film dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Battum, L J; Verdaasdonk, R M; Heukelom, S; Huizenga, H

    2016-01-01

    Film is an excellent dosimeter for verification of dose distributions due to its high spatial resolution. Irradiated film can be digitized with low-cost, transmission, flatbed scanners. However, a disadvantage is their lateral scan effect (LSE): a scanner readout change over its lateral scan axis. Although anisotropic light scattering was presented as the origin of the LSE, this paper presents an alternative cause. Hereto, LSE for two flatbed scanners (Epson 1680 Expression Pro and Epson 10000XL), and Gafchromic film (EBT, EBT2, EBT3) was investigated, focused on three effects: cross talk, optical path length and polarization. Cross talk was examined using triangular sheets of various optical densities. The optical path length effect was studied using absorptive and reflective neutral density filters with well-defined optical characteristics (OD range 0.2–2.0). Linear polarizer sheets were used to investigate light polarization on the CCD signal in absence and presence of (un)irradiated Gafchromic film. Film dose values ranged between 0.2 to 9 Gy, i.e. an optical density range between 0.25 to 1.1. Measurements were performed in the scanner’s transmission mode, with red–green–blue channels. LSE was found to depend on scanner construction and film type. Its magnitude depends on dose: for 9 Gy increasing up to 14% at maximum lateral position. Cross talk was only significant in high contrast regions, up to 2% for very small fields. The optical path length effect introduced by film on the scanner causes 3% for pixels in the extreme lateral position. Light polarization due to film and the scanner’s optical mirror system is the main contributor, different in magnitude for the red, green and blue channel. We concluded that any Gafchromic EBT type film scanned with a flatbed scanner will face these optical effects. Accurate dosimetry requires correction of LSE, therefore, determination of the LSE per color channel and dose delivered to the film. (paper)

  5. Was the Scanner Calibration Slide used for its intended purpose?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong Yaping

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the article, Scanner calibration revisited, BMC Bioinformatics 2010, 11:361, Dr. Pozhitkov used the Scanner Calibration Slide, a key product of Full Moon BioSystems to generate data in his study of microarray scanner PMT response and proposed a mathematic model for PMT response 1. In the end, the author concluded that "Full Moon BioSystems calibration slides are inadequate for performing calibration," and recommended "against using these slides." We found these conclusions are seriously flawed and misleading, and his recommendation against using the Scanner Calibration Slide was not properly supported.

  6. Scanner qualification with IntenCD based reticle error correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elblinger, Yair; Finders, Jo; Demarteau, Marcel; Wismans, Onno; Minnaert Janssen, Ingrid; Duray, Frank; Ben Yishai, Michael; Mangan, Shmoolik; Cohen, Yaron; Parizat, Ziv; Attal, Shay; Polonsky, Netanel; Englard, Ilan

    2010-03-01

    Scanner introduction into the fab production environment is a challenging task. An efficient evaluation of scanner performance matrices during factory acceptance test (FAT) and later on during site acceptance test (SAT) is crucial for minimizing the cycle time for pre and post production-start activities. If done effectively, the matrices of base line performance established during the SAT are used as a reference for scanner performance and fleet matching monitoring and maintenance in the fab environment. Key elements which can influence the cycle time of the SAT, FAT and maintenance cycles are the imaging, process and mask characterizations involved with those cycles. Discrete mask measurement techniques are currently in use to create across-mask CDU maps. By subtracting these maps from their final wafer measurement CDU map counterparts, it is possible to assess the real scanner induced printed errors within certain limitations. The current discrete measurement methods are time consuming and some techniques also overlook mask based effects other than line width variations, such as transmission and phase variations, all of which influence the final printed CD variability. Applied Materials Aera2TM mask inspection tool with IntenCDTM technology can scan the mask at high speed, offer full mask coverage and accurate assessment of all masks induced source of errors simultaneously, making it beneficial for scanner qualifications and performance monitoring. In this paper we report on a study that was done to improve a scanner introduction and qualification process using the IntenCD application to map the mask induced CD non uniformity. We will present the results of six scanners in production and discuss the benefits of the new method.

  7. Integrated Spectral Energy Distributions and Absorption Feature Indices of Single Stellar Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Fenghui; Han, Zhanwen; Li, Lifang; Hurley, Jarrod R.

    2004-01-01

    Using evolutionary population synthesis, we present integrated spectral energy distributions and absorption-line indices defined by the Lick Observatory image dissector scanner (referred to as Lick/IDS) system, for an extensive set of instantaneous burst single stellar populations (SSPs). The ages of the SSPs are in the range 1-19 Gyr and the metallicities [Fe/H] are in the range -2.3 - 0.2. Our models use the rapid single stellar evolution algorithm of Hurley, Pols and Tout for the stellar e...

  8. Vision Assisted Laser Scanner Navigation for Autonomous Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Christian; Andersen, Nils Axel; Ravn, Ole

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a navigation method based on road detection using both a laser scanner and a vision sensor. The method is to classify the surface in front of the robot into traversable segments (road) and obstacles using the laser scanner, this classifies the area just in front of the robot ...

  9. Spectral imaging and archival data in analyzing the Madonna of the Rabbit painting by Manet and Titian

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Striová, J.; Ruberto, C.; Barucci, M.; Blažek, Jan; Kunzelman, D.; Dal Fovo, A.; Pampaloni, E.; Fontana, R.

    (2018) ISSN 1433-7851 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : spectral mapping * image processing * visible near-infrared multispectral scanner Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 11.994, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2018/ZOI/blazek-0489046.pdf

  10. Comparison of two intraoral scanners based on three-dimensional surface analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Min Lee

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This in vivo study evaluated the difference of two well-known intraoral scanners used in dentistry, namely iTero (Align Technology and TRIOS (3Shape. Methods Thirty-two participants underwent intraoral scans with TRIOS and iTero scanners, as well as conventional alginate impressions. The scans obtained with the two intraoral scanners were compared with each other and were also compared with the corresponding model scans by means of three-dimensional surface analysis. The average differences between the two intraoral scans on the surfaces were evaluated by color-mapping. The average differences in the three-dimensional direction between each intraoral scans and its corresponding model scan were calculated at all points on the surfaces. Results The average differences between the two intraoral scanners were 0.057 mm at the maxilla and 0.069 mm at the mandible. Color histograms showed that local deviations between the two scanners occurred in the posterior area. As for difference in the three-dimensional direction, there was no statistically significant difference between two scanners. Conclusions Although there were some deviations in visible inspection, there was no statistical significance between the two intraoral scanners.

  11. Ionization beam scanner

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1973-01-01

    Inner structure of an ionization beam scanner, a rather intricate piece of apparatus which permits one to measure the density distribution of the proton beam passing through it. On the outside of the tank wall there is the coil for the longitudinal magnetic field, on the inside, one can see the arrangement of electrodes creating a highly homogeneous transverse electric field.

  12. Quality assurance of computed tomography (CT) scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankaran, A.; Sanu, K.K. . Email : a_sankaran@vsnl.com

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the present status of research work and development of various test objects, phantoms and detector/instrumentation systems for quality assurance (QA) of computed tomography (CT) scanners, carried out in advanced countries, with emphasis on similar work done in this research centre. CT scanner is a complex equipment and routine quality control procedures are essential to the maintenance of image quality with optimum patient dose. Image quality can be ensured only through correlation between prospective monitoring of system components and tests of overall performance with standard phantoms. CT examinations contribute a large share to the population dose in advanced countries. The unique dosimetry problems in CT necessitate special techniques. This article describes a comprehensive kit developed indigenously for the following QA and type approval tests as well as for research studies on image quality/dosimetry on CT scanners

  13. Localness of energy cascade in hydrodynamic turbulence, II. Sharp spectral filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aluie, Hussein [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eyink, Gregory L [JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the scale-locality of subgrid-scale (SGS) energy flux and interband energy transfers defined by the sharp spectral filter. We show by rigorous bounds, physical arguments, and numerical simulations that the spectral SGS flux is dominated by local triadic interactions in an extended turbulent inertial range. Interband energy transfers are also shown to be dominated by local triads if the spectral bands have constant width on a logarithmic scale. We disprove in particular an alternative picture of 'local transfer by nonlocal triads,' with the advecting wavenumber mode at the energy peak. Although such triads have the largest transfer rates of all individual wavenumber triads, we show rigorously that, due to their restricted number, they make an asymptotically negligible contribution to energy flux and log-banded energy transfers at high wavenumbers in the inertial range. We show that it is only the aggregate effect of a geometrically increasing number of local wavenumber triads which can sustain an energy cascade to small scales. Furthermore, nonlocal triads are argued to contribute even less to the space-average energy flux than is implied by our rigorous bounds, because of additional cancellations from scale-decorrelation effects. We can thus recover the -4/3 scaling of nonlocal contributions to spectral energy flux predicted by Kraichnan's abridged Lagrangian-history direct-interaction approximation and test-field model closures. We support our results with numerical data from a 512{sup 3} pseudospectral simulation of isotropic turbulence with phase-shift dealiasing. We also discuss a rigorous counterexample of Eyink [Physica D 78, 222 (1994)], which showed that nonlocal wavenumber triads may dominate in the sharp spectral flux (but not in the SGS energy flux for graded filters). We show that this mathematical counter example fails to satisfy reasonable physical requirements for a turbulent velocity field, which are employed in our

  14. Measurement of luminance and color uniformity of displays using the large-format scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazikowski, Adam

    2017-08-01

    Uniformity of display luminance and color is important for comfort and good perception of the information presented on the display. Although display technology has developed and improved a lot over the past years, different types of displays still present a challenge in selected applications, e.g. in medical use or in case of multi-screen installations. A simplified 9-point method of determining uniformity does not always produce satisfactory results, so a different solution is proposed in the paper. The developed system consists of the large-format X-Y-Z ISEL scanner (isel Germany AG), Konica Minolta high sensitivity spot photometer-colorimeter (e.g. CS-200, Konica Minolta, Inc.) and PC computer. Dedicated software in LabView environment for control of the scanner, transfer the measured data to the computer, and visualization of measurement results was also prepared. Based on the developed setup measurements of plasma display and LCD-LED display were performed. A heavily wornout plasma TV unit, with several artifacts visible was selected. These tests show the advantages and drawbacks of described scanning method with comparison with 9-point simplified uniformity determining method.

  15. Establishing a method to measure bone structure using spectral CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramyar, M.; Leary, C.; Raja, A.; Butler, A. P. H.; Woodfield, T. B. F.; Anderson, N. G.

    2017-03-01

    Combining bone structure and density measurement in 3D is required to assess site-specific fracture risk. Spectral molecular imaging can measure bone structure in relation to bone density by measuring macro and microstructure of bone in 3D. This study aimed to optimize spectral CT methodology to measure bone structure in excised bone samples. MARS CT with CdTe Medipix3RX detector was used in multiple energy bins to calibrate bone structure measurements. To calibrate thickness measurement, eight different thicknesses of Aluminium (Al) sheets were scanned one in air and the other around a falcon tube and then analysed. To test if trabecular thickness measurements differed depending on scan plane, a bone sample from sheep proximal tibia was scanned in two orthogonal directions. To assess the effect of air on thickness measurement, two parts of the same human femoral head were scanned in two conditions (in the air and in PBS). The results showed that the MARS scanner (with 90μm voxel size) is able to accurately measure the Al (in air) thicknesses over 200μm but it underestimates the thicknesses below 200μm because of partial volume effect in Al-air interface. The Al thickness measured in the highest energy bin is overestimated at Al-falcon tube interface. Bone scanning in two orthogonal directions gives the same trabecular thickness and air in the bone structure reduced measurement accuracy. We have established a bone structure assessment protocol on MARS scanner. The next step is to combine this with bone densitometry to assess bone strength.

  16. A LabVIEW® based generic CT scanner control software platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierick, M; Van Loo, D; Masschaele, B; Boone, M; Van Hoorebeke, L

    2010-01-01

    UGCT, the Centre for X-ray tomography at Ghent University (Belgium) does research on X-ray tomography and its applications. This includes the development and construction of state-of-the-art CT scanners for scientific research. Because these scanners are built for very different purposes they differ considerably in their physical implementations. However, they all share common principle functionality. In this context a generic software platform was developed using LabVIEW® in order to provide the same interface and functionality on all scanners. This article describes the concept and features of this software, and its potential for tomography in a research setting. The core concept is to rigorously separate the abstract operation of a CT scanner from its actual physical configuration. This separation is achieved by implementing a sender-listener architecture. The advantages are that the resulting software platform is generic, scalable, highly efficient, easy to develop and to extend, and that it can be deployed on future scanners with minimal effort.

  17. Evaluation of PeneloPET Simulations of Biograph PET/CT Scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushab, K. M.; Herraiz, J. L.; Vicente, E.; Cal-González, J.; España, S.; Vaquero, J. J.; Jakoby, B. W.; Udías, J. M.

    2016-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used in positron emission tomography (PET) for optimizing detector design, acquisition protocols, and evaluating corrections and reconstruction methods. PeneloPET is a MC code based on PENELOPE, for PET simulations which considers detector geometry, acquisition electronics and materials, and source definitions. While PeneloPET has been successfully employed and validated with small animal PET scanners, it required a proper validation with clinical PET scanners including time-of-flight (TOF) information. For this purpose, we chose the family of Biograph PET/CT scanners: the Biograph True-Point (B-TP), Biograph True-Point with TrueV (B-TPTV) and the Biograph mCT. They have similar block detectors and electronics, but a different number of rings and configuration. Some effective parameters of the simulations, such as the dead-time and the size of the reflectors in the detectors, were adjusted to reproduce the sensitivity and noise equivalent count (NEC) rate of the B-TPTV scanner. These parameters were then used to make predictions of experimental results such as sensitivity, NEC rate, spatial resolution, and scatter fraction (SF), from all the Biograph scanners and some variations of them (energy windows and additional rings of detectors). Predictions agree with the measured values for the three scanners, within 7% (sensitivity and NEC rate) and 5% (SF). The resolution obtained for the B-TPTV is slightly better (10%) than the experimental values. In conclusion, we have shown that PeneloPET is suitable for simulating and investigating clinical systems with good accuracy and short computational time, though some effort tuning of a few parameters of the scanners modeled may be needed in case that the full details of the scanners studied are not available.

  18. Opportunities for new CT contrast agents to maximize the diagnostic potential of emerging spectral CT technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Benjamin M; FitzGerald, Paul F; Edic, Peter M; Lambert, Jack W; Colborn, Robert E; Marino, Michael E; Evans, Paul M; Roberts, Jeannette C; Wang, Zhen J; Wong, Margaret J; Bonitatibus, Peter J

    2017-04-01

    The introduction of spectral CT imaging in the form of fast clinical dual-energy CT enabled contrast material to be differentiated from other radiodense materials, improved lesion detection in contrast-enhanced scans, and changed the way that existing iodine and barium contrast materials are used in clinical practice. More profoundly, spectral CT can differentiate between individual contrast materials that have different reporter elements such that high-resolution CT imaging of multiple contrast agents can be obtained in a single pass of the CT scanner. These spectral CT capabilities would be even more impactful with the development of contrast materials designed to complement the existing clinical iodine- and barium-based agents. New biocompatible high-atomic number contrast materials with different biodistribution and X-ray attenuation properties than existing agents will expand the diagnostic power of spectral CT imaging without penalties in radiation dose or scan time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation dosimetry of computed tomography x-ray scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletti, J.L.; Williamson, B.D.P.; Le Heron, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the development and application of the methods employed in National Radiation Laboratory (NRL) surveys of computed tomography x-ray scanners (CT scanners). It includes descriptions of the phantoms and equipment used, discussion of the various dose parameters measured, the principles of the various dosimetry systems employed and some indication of the doses to occupationally exposed personnel

  20. Using RADMC-3D to model the radiative transfer of spectral lines in protoplanetary disks and envelopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, John; Terebey, Susan

    2018-06-01

    Protoplanetary disks are the birthplaces of planets in our universe. Observations of these disks with radio telescopes like the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) offer great insight into the star and planet formation process. Comparing theories of formation with observations requires tracing the energy transfer via electromagnetic radiation, known as radiative transfer. To determine the temperature distribution of circumstellar material, a Monte Carlo code (Whitney et al. [1]) was used to to perform the radiative transfer through dust. The goal of this research is to utilize RADMC-3D [2] to handle the spectral line radiative transfer computations. An existing model of a rotating ring was expanded to include emission from the C18O isotopologue of carbon monoxide using data from the Leiden Atomic and Molecular Database (LAMDA). This feature of our model compliments ALMA's ability to measure C18O line emission, a proxy for disk rotation. In addition to modeling gas in the protoplanetary disk, dust also plays an important role. The generic description of absorption and scattering for dust provided by RADMC-3D was changed in favor of a more physically-realistic description with OH5 grains. This description is more appropriate in high-density regions of the envelope around a protostar. Further improvements, such as consideration for the finite resolution of observations, have been implemented. The task at present is to compare our model with observations of protoplanetary systems like L1527. Some results of these comparisons will be presented.[1] Whitney et al. 2013, ApJS, 207:30[2] RADMC-3D: http://www.ita.uni-heidelberg.de/~dullemond/software/radmc-3d/

  1. MARS spectral molecular imaging of lamb tissue: data collection and image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Aamir, R; Bateman, C.J.; Butler, A.P.H.; Butler, P.H.; Anderson, N.G.; Bell, S.T.; Panta, R.K.; Healy, J.L.; Mohr, J.L.; Rajendran, K.; Walsh, M.F.; Ruiter, N.de; Gieseg, S.P.; Woodfield, T.; Renaud, P.F.; Brooke, L.; Abdul-Majid, S.; Clyne, M.; Glendenning, R.; Bones, P.J.; Billinghurst, M.; Bartneck, C.; Mandalika, H.; Grasset, R.; Schleich, N.; Scott, N.; Nik, S.J.; Opie, A.; Janmale, T.; Tang, D.N.; Kim, D.; Doesburg, R.M.; Zainon, R.; Ronaldson, J.P.; Cook, N.J.; Smithies, D.J.; Hodge, K.

    2014-01-01

    Spectral molecular imaging is a new imaging technique able to discriminate and quantify different components of tissue simultaneously at high spatial and high energy resolution. Our MARS scanner is an x-ray based small animal CT system designed to be used in the diagnostic energy range (20 to 140 keV). In this paper, we demonstrate the use of the MARS scanner, equipped with the Medipix3RX spectroscopic photon-processing detector, to discriminate fat, calcium, and water in tissue. We present data collected from a sample of lamb meat including bone as an illustrative example of human tissue imaging. The data is analyzed using our 3D Algebraic Reconstruction Algorithm (MARS-ART) and by material decomposition based on a constrained linear least squares algorithm. The results presented here clearly show the quantification of lipid-like, water-like and bone-like components of tissue. However, it is also clear to us that better algorithms could extract more information of clinical interest from our data. Because we ...

  2. Free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Z; Rizvi, A A; Riza, N A

    2001-12-10

    A wavelength-multiplexed optical scanning scheme is proposed for deflecting a free-space optical beam by selection of the wavelength of the light incident on a wavelength-dispersive optical element. With fast tunable lasers or optical filters, this scanner features microsecond domain scan setting speeds and large- diameter apertures of several centimeters or more for subdegree angular scans. Analysis performed indicates an optimum scan range for a given diffraction order and grating period. Limitations include beam-spreading effects based on the varying scanner aperture sizes and the instantaneous information bandwidth of the data-carrying laser beam.

  3. Coastal Zone Color Scanner atmospheric correction algorithm - Multiple scattering effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Howard R.; Castano, Diego J.

    1987-01-01

    Errors due to multiple scattering which are expected to be encountered in application of the current Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) atmospheric correction algorithm are analyzed. The analysis is based on radiative transfer computations in model atmospheres, in which the aerosols and molecules are distributed vertically in an exponential manner, with most of the aerosol scattering located below the molecular scattering. A unique feature of the analysis is that it is carried out in scan coordinates rather than typical earth-sun coordinates, making it possible to determine the errors along typical CZCS scan lines. Information provided by the analysis makes it possible to judge the efficacy of the current algorithm with the current sensor and to estimate the impact of the algorithm-induced errors on a variety of applications.

  4. Miniaturized Fourier-plane fiber scanner for OCT endoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilches, Sergio; Kretschmer, Simon; Ataman, Çağlar; Zappe, Hans

    2017-01-01

    A forward-looking endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe featuring a Fourier-plane fiber scanner is designed, manufactured and characterized. In contrast to common image-plane fiber scanners, the Fourier-plane scanner is a telecentric arrangement that eliminates vignetting and spatial resolution variations across the image plane. To scan the OCT beam in a spiral pattern, a tubular piezoelectric actuator is used to resonate an optical fiber bearing a collimating GRIN lens at its tip. The free-end of the GRIN lens sits at the back focal plane of an objective lens, such that its rotation replicates the beam angles in the collimated region of a classical telecentric 4f optical system. Such an optical arrangement inherently has a low numerical aperture combined with a relatively large field-of-view, rendering it particularly useful for endoscopic OCT imaging. Furthermore, the optical train of the Fourier-plane scanner is shorter than that of a comparable image-plane scanner by one focal length of the objective lens, significantly shortening the final arrangement. As a result, enclosed within a 3D printed housing of 2.5 mm outer diameter and 15 mm total length, the developed probe is the most compact forward-looking endoscopic OCT imager to date. Due to its compact form factor and compatibility with real-time OCT imaging, the developed probe is also ideal for use in the working channel of flexible endoscopes as a potential optical biopsy tool. (paper)

  5. Miniaturized Fourier-plane fiber scanner for OCT endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilches, Sergio; Kretschmer, Simon; Ataman, Çağlar; Zappe, Hans

    2017-10-01

    A forward-looking endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) probe featuring a Fourier-plane fiber scanner is designed, manufactured and characterized. In contrast to common image-plane fiber scanners, the Fourier-plane scanner is a telecentric arrangement that eliminates vignetting and spatial resolution variations across the image plane. To scan the OCT beam in a spiral pattern, a tubular piezoelectric actuator is used to resonate an optical fiber bearing a collimating GRIN lens at its tip. The free-end of the GRIN lens sits at the back focal plane of an objective lens, such that its rotation replicates the beam angles in the collimated region of a classical telecentric 4f optical system. Such an optical arrangement inherently has a low numerical aperture combined with a relatively large field-of-view, rendering it particularly useful for endoscopic OCT imaging. Furthermore, the optical train of the Fourier-plane scanner is shorter than that of a comparable image-plane scanner by one focal length of the objective lens, significantly shortening the final arrangement. As a result, enclosed within a 3D printed housing of 2.5 mm outer diameter and 15 mm total length, the developed probe is the most compact forward-looking endoscopic OCT imager to date. Due to its compact form factor and compatibility with real-time OCT imaging, the developed probe is also ideal for use in the working channel of flexible endoscopes as a potential optical biopsy tool.

  6. Absolute dosimetric characterization of Gafchromic EBT3 and HDv2 films using commercial flat-bed scanners and evaluation of the scanner response function variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S. N.; Revet, G.; Fuchs, J. [LULI-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, CEA: Universite Paris-Saclay, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Universities, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov Street, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Gauthier, M.; Glenzer, S.; Propp, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Bazalova-Carter, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 5C2 (Canada); Bolanos, S. [LULI-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, CEA: Universite Paris-Saclay, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Universities, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Riquier, R. [LULI-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, CEA: Universite Paris-Saclay, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Sorbonne Universities, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Antici, P. [INRS-EMT, Varennes, J3X1S2 Québec (Canada); Morabito, A. [ELI-ALPS, ELI-HU non profit kft, Dugonics ter 13, H-6720, Szeged (Hungary); Starodubtsev, M. [Institute of Applied Physics, 46 Ulyanov Street, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    Radiochromic films (RCF) are commonly used in dosimetry for a wide range of radiation sources (electrons, protons, and photons) for medical, industrial, and scientific applications. They are multi-layered, which includes plastic substrate layers and sensitive layers that incorporate a radiation-sensitive dye. Quantitative dose can be retrieved by digitizing the film, provided that a prior calibration exists. Here, to calibrate the newly developed EBT3 and HDv2 RCFs from Gafchromic™, we used the Stanford Medical LINAC to deposit in the films various doses of 10 MeV photons, and by scanning the films using three independent EPSON Precision 2450 scanners, three independent EPSON V750 scanners, and two independent EPSON 11000XL scanners. The films were scanned in separate RGB channels, as well as in black and white, and film orientation was varied. We found that the green channel of the RGB scan and the grayscale channel are in fact quite consistent over the different models of the scanner, although this comes at the cost of a reduction in sensitivity (by a factor ∼2.5 compared to the red channel). To allow any user to extend the absolute calibration reported here to any other scanner, we furthermore provide a calibration curve of the EPSON 2450 scanner based on absolutely calibrated, commercially available, optical density filters.

  7. Evaluation of Handheld Scanners for Automotive Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadea Ameen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of generating a computerized geometric model for an existing part is known as Reverse Engineering (RE. It is a very useful technique in product development and plays a significant role in automotive, aerospace, and medical industries. In fact, it has been getting remarkable attention in manufacturing industries owing to its advanced data acquisition technologies. The process of RE is based on two primary steps: data acquisition (also known as scanning and data processing. To facilitate point data acquisition, a variety of scanning systems is available with different capabilities and limitations. Although the optical control of 3D scanners is fully developed, still several factors can affect the quality of the scanned data. As a result, the proper selection of scanning parameters, such as resolution, laser power, shutter time, etc., becomes very crucial. This kind of investigation can be very helpful and provide its users with guidelines to identify the appropriate factors. Moreover, it is worth noting that no single system is ideal in all applications. Accordingly, this work has compared two portable (handheld systems based on laser scanning and white light optical scanning for automotive applications. A car door containing a free-form surface has been used to achieve the above-mentioned goal. The design of experiments has been employed to determine the effects of different scanning parameters and optimize them. The capabilities and limitations have been identified by comparing the two scanners in terms of accuracy, scanning time, triangle numbers, ease of use, and portability. Then, the relationships between the system capabilities and the application requirements have been established. The results revealed that the laser scanner performed better than the white light scanner in terms of accuracy, while the white light scanner performed better in terms of acquisition speed and triangle numbers.

  8. The application of the Chebyshev-spectral method in transport phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Weidong; Narayanan, Ranga

    2012-01-01

    Transport phenomena problems that occur in engineering and physics are often multi-dimensional and multi-phase in character.  When taking recourse to numerical methods the spectral method is particularly useful and efficient. The book is meant principally to train students and non-specialists  to use the spectral method for solving problems that model fluid flow in closed geometries with heat or mass transfer.  To this aim the reader should bring a working knowledge of fluid mechanics and heat transfer and should be readily conversant with simple concepts of linear algebra including spectral decomposition of matrices as well as solvability conditions for inhomogeneous problems.  The book is neither meant to supply a ready-to-use program that is all-purpose nor to go through all manners of mathematical proofs.  The focus in this tutorial is on the use of the spectral methods for space discretization, because this is where most of the difficulty lies. While time dependent problems are also of great interes...

  9. [Practicability of the mobile one-finger scanner Cross Match MV5 in fingerprinting of corpses: are mobile fingerprinting scanners suitable for use in mass disasters?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitmeier, Dirk; Landmesser, Britta; Schulz, Yvonne; Albrecht, Knut

    2008-01-01

    Dactyloscopy is a special field in the police records department and a suitable means for identifying unknown dead persons as well as solving crimes by taking fingerprints from living persons. Apart from the conventional methods of dactyloscopy, mobile and more compact instruments are to facilitate taking prints of fingertips and palms also at the scene of mass disasters. In the presented study, living persons and corpses were examined to find out the possible uses and limits of mobile one-finger scanners. The concrete issue of the investigation was whether the mobile one-finger scanner Cross Match MV5 is suitable for application in mass disasters. The device was used in 12 corpses aged 5 weeks to 76 years (mean postmortem interval 5.5 days) and in 28 living persons aged 6 weeks to 87 years. In summary, the scanner produced qualitatively good prints in all age groups of the living individuals. In the corpses, the prints were only partly evaluable. In particular, fingers and fingertips with soot blackening and livid discoloration were difficult to analyse. Postmortem rigidity also complicated the handling of the scanner. In fresh corpses, the scanner can be recommended without reservation. Even if the epidermis was detached, the scanner was able to produce evaluable prints of the dermis of the hypothenar.

  10. Quantitative Magnetization Transfer Imaging in Human Brain at 3 T via Selective Inversion Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Dortch, Richard D.; Li, Ke; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Welch, E. Brian; Dula, Adrienne N.; Tamhane, Ashish A.; Gore, John C.; Smith, Seth A.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative magnetization transfer imaging yields indices describing the interactions between free water protons and immobile, macromolecular protons—including the macromolecular to free pool size ratio (PSR) and the rate of magnetization transfer between pools kmf. This study describes the first implementation of the selective inversion recovery quantitative magnetization transfer method on a clinical 3.0-T scanner in human brain in vivo. Selective inversion recovery data were acquired at 1...

  11. Initial investigation of a novel light-scattering gel phantom for evaluation of optical CT scanners for radiotherapy gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosi, Stephen; Naseri, Pourandokht; Puran, Alicia; Davies, Justin; Baldock, Clive

    2007-01-01

    There is a need for stable gel materials for phantoms used to validate optical computerized tomography (CT) scanners used in conjunction with radiation-induced polymerizing gel dosimeters. Phantoms based on addition of light-absorbing dyes to gelatine to simulate gel dosimeters have been employed. However, to more accurately simulate polymerizing gels one requires phantoms that employ light-scattering colloidal suspensions added to the gel. In this paper, we present the initial results of using an optical CT scanner to evaluate a novel phantom in which radiation-exposed polymer gels are simulated by the addition of colloidal suspensions of varying turbidity. The phantom may be useful as a calibration transfer standard for polymer gel dosimeters. The tests reveal some phenomena peculiar to light-scattering gels that need to be taken into account when calibrating polymer gel dosimeters

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of efficient data acquisition for an entire-body PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isnaini, Ismet; Obi, Takashi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    Conventional PET scanners can image the whole body using many bed positions. On the other hand, an entire-body PET scanner with an extended axial FOV, which can trace whole-body uptake images at the same time and improve sensitivity dynamically, has been desired. The entire-body PET scanner would have to process a large amount of data effectively. As a result, the entire-body PET scanner has high dead time at a multiplex detector grouping process. Also, the entire-body PET scanner has many oblique line-of-responses. In this work, we study an efficient data acquisition for the entire-body PET scanner using the Monte Carlo simulation. The simulated entire-body PET scanner based on depth-of-interaction detectors has a 2016-mm axial field-of-view (FOV) and an 80-cm ring diameter. Since the entire-body PET scanner has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits, the NECR of the entire-body PET scanner decreases. But, single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into multiple parts. Our choice of 3 groups of axially-arranged detectors has shown to increase the peak NECR by 41%. An appropriate choice of maximum ring difference (MRD) will also maintain the same high performance of sensitivity and high peak NECR while at the same time reduces the data size. The extremely-oblique line of response for large axial FOV does not contribute much to the performance of the scanner. The total sensitivity with full MRD increased only 15% than that with about half MRD. The peak NECR was saturated at about half MRD. The entire-body PET scanner promises to provide a large axial FOV and to have sufficient performance values without using the full data.

  13. Moths on the Flatbed Scanner: The Art of Joseph Scheer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L. Buchmann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade a few artists and even fewer entomologists discovered flatbed scanning technology, using extreme resolution graphical arts scanners for acquiring high magnification digital images of plants, animals and inanimate objects. They are not just for trip receipts anymore. The special attributes of certain scanners, to image thick objects is discussed along with the technical features of the scanners including magnification, color depth and shadow detail. The work of pioneering scanner artist, Joseph Scheer from New York’s Alfred University is highlighted. Representative flatbed-scanned images of moths are illustrated along with techniques to produce them. Collecting and preparing moths, and other objects, for scanning are described. Highlights of the Fulbright sabbatical year of professor Scheer in Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are presented, along with comments on moths in science, folklore, art and pop culture. The use of flatbed scanners is offered as a relatively new method for visualizing small objects while acquiring large files for creating archival inkjet prints for display and sale.

  14. Scanner-based macroscopic color variation estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chunghui; Lai, Di; Zeise, Eric

    2006-01-01

    Flatbed scanners have been adopted successfully in the measurement of microscopic image artifacts, such as granularity and mottle, in print samples because of their capability of providing full color, high resolution images. Accurate macroscopic color measurement relies on the use of colorimeters or spectrophotometers to provide a surrogate for human vision. The very different color response characteristics of flatbed scanners from any standard colorimetric response limits the utility of a flatbed scanner as a macroscopic color measuring device. This metamerism constraint can be significantly relaxed if our objective is mainly to quantify the color variations within a printed page or between pages where a small bias in measured colors can be tolerated as long as the color distributions relative to the individual mean values is similar. Two scenarios when converting color from the device RGB color space to a standardized color space such as CIELab are studied in this paper, blind and semi-blind color transformation, depending on the availability of the black channel information. We will show that both approaches offer satisfactory results in quantifying macroscopic color variation across pages while the semi-blind color transformation further provides fairly accurate color prediction capability.

  15. A scanner for single photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.B.; Cumpstey, D.E.; Evans, N.T.S.; Coleman, J.D.; Ettinger, K.V.; Mallard, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The technique of single photon ECT has now been available for some eighteen years, but has yet still to be exploited fully. The difficulties of doing this lie in the need for gathering data of sufficiently good statistical accuracy in a reasonable counting time, in the uniformity of detector sensitivity, and in the means for correcting the image satisfactorily for photon attenuation within the body. The relative ease with which a general purpose gamma camera can be adapted to give rotation around the patient makes this an attractive practical approach to the problem. However, the sensitivity of gamma cameras over their field of view is by no means uniform, and their sensitivity is less good than that of purpose-designed scanners when no more than about ten sections through the body are required. There is therefore a need to assess the clinical usefulness of a whole body tomographic scanner of high sensitivity and uniformity. Such a machine is the Aberdeen Section Scanner Mark II described

  16. Geometric calibration between PET scanner and structured light scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Hans Martin; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2011-01-01

    Head movements degrade the image quality of high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) brain studies through blurring and artifacts. Manny image reconstruction methods allows for motion correction if the head position is tracked continuously during the study. Our method for motion tracking...... is a structured light scanner placed just above the patient tunnel on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT, Siemens). It continuously registers point clouds of a part of the patient's face. The relative motion is estimated as the rigid transformation between frames. A geometric calibration between...

  17. The spectral irradiance traceability chain at PTB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Nevas, S.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral irradiance is a fundamental radiometric unit. Its application to measurement results requires qualified traceability to basic units of the international system of units (Système international d’unités, SI). The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is amongst other national metrological institutes (NMIs) responsible for the realization, maintenance and dissemination of various radiometric and photometric units based on and traceable to national standards. The unit of spectral irradiance is realized and represented by a blackbody-radiator as the national primary standard of the PTB. Based on Planck’s radiation law, the irradiance is calculated and realized for any wavelength taking into account the exact knowledge of the radiation temperature and the geometrical parameters. Using a double-monochromator-based spectroradiometer system, secondary standard lamps can be calibrated by direct comparison to the blackbody-radiator (substitution method). These secondary standard lamps are then used at the PTB to calibrate standard lamps of customers. The customers themselves use these so-called transfer standards to calibrate their working standard lamps. These working standards are then used to calibrate own spectroradiometers or sources. This rather complex calibration chain is a common procedural method that for the customers generally leads to satisfying measurement results on site. Nevertheless, the standard lamps in use have to fulfill highest requirements concerning stability and reproducibility. Only this allows achieving comparably low transfer measurement uncertainties, which occur at each calibration step. Thus, the PTB is constantly investigating the improvement and further development of transfer standards and measurement methods for various spectral regions. The realization and dissemination of the spectral irradiance using the blackbody-radiator at the PTB is accomplished with worldwide approved minimized measurement uncertainties confirmed

  18. The spectral irradiance traceability chain at PTB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Nevas, S. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 10, 381160 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-05-10

    Spectral irradiance is a fundamental radiometric unit. Its application to measurement results requires qualified traceability to basic units of the international system of units (Systeme international d'unites, SI). The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is amongst other national metrological institutes (NMIs) responsible for the realization, maintenance and dissemination of various radiometric and photometric units based on and traceable to national standards. The unit of spectral irradiance is realized and represented by a blackbody-radiator as the national primary standard of the PTB. Based on Planck's radiation law, the irradiance is calculated and realized for any wavelength taking into account the exact knowledge of the radiation temperature and the geometrical parameters. Using a double-monochromator-based spectroradiometer system, secondary standard lamps can be calibrated by direct comparison to the blackbody-radiator (substitution method). These secondary standard lamps are then used at the PTB to calibrate standard lamps of customers. The customers themselves use these so-called transfer standards to calibrate their working standard lamps. These working standards are then used to calibrate own spectroradiometers or sources. This rather complex calibration chain is a common procedural method that for the customers generally leads to satisfying measurement results on site. Nevertheless, the standard lamps in use have to fulfill highest requirements concerning stability and reproducibility. Only this allows achieving comparably low transfer measurement uncertainties, which occur at each calibration step. Thus, the PTB is constantly investigating the improvement and further development of transfer standards and measurement methods for various spectral regions. The realization and dissemination of the spectral irradiance using the blackbody-radiator at the PTB is accomplished with worldwide approved minimized measurement uncertainties

  19. Method for calibration of an axial tomographic scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparks, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    The method of calibrating an axial tomographic scanner including frame means having an opening therein in which an object to be examined is to be placed, source and detector means mounted on the frame means for directing one or more beams of penetrating radiation through the object from the source to the detector means, and means to rotate the scanner including the source and detector means about the object whereby a plurality of sets of data corresponding to the transmission or absorption by the object of a plurality of beams of penetrating radiation are collected; the calibration method comprising mounting calibration means supporting an adjustable centering member onto the frame means, positioning the adjustable centering member at approximately the center of rotation of the scanner, placing position-sensitive indicator means adjacent the approximately centered member, rotating the scanner and the calibration means mounted thereon at least one time and, if necessary, adjusting the positioning of the centering member until the centering member is coincident with the center of rotation of the scanner as determined by minimum deflection of the position-sensitive indicator means, rotating and translating the source and detector means and determining for each angular orientation of the frame means supporting the source and detector means the central position of each translational scan relative to the centered member and/or if a plurality of detectors are utilized with the detector means for each planar slice of the object being examined, the central position of each translational scan for each detector relative to the centered member

  20. Performance of an improved first generation optical CT scanner for 3D dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Xin; Wuu, Cheng-Shie; Adamovics, John

    2013-01-01

    Performance analysis of a modified 3D dosimetry optical scanner based on the first generation optical CT scanner OCTOPUS is presented. The system consists of PRESAGE™ dosimeters, the modified 3D scanner, and a new developed in-house user control panel written in Labview program which provides more flexibility to optimize mechanical control and data acquisition technique. The total scanning time has been significantly reduced from initial 8 h to ∼2 h by using the modified scanner. The functional performance of the modified scanner has been evaluated in terms of the mechanical integrity uncertainty of the data acquisition process. Optical density distribution comparison between the modified scanner, OCTOPUS and the treatment plan system has been studied. It has been demonstrated that the agreement between the modified scanner and treatment plans is comparable with that between the OCTOPUS and treatment plans. (note)

  1. Accuracy of automated volumetry of pulmonary nodules across different multislice CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Marco; Muehlenbruch, Georg; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Katoh, Markus; Guenther, Rolf W.; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Gietema, H.A.; Prokop, Mathias; Czech, Andre; Diederich, Stefan; Bakai, Annemarie; Salganicoff, Marcos

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of an automated volumetry software for phantom pulmonary nodules across various 16-slice multislice spiral CT (MSCT) scanners from different vendors. A lung phantom containing five different nodule categories (intraparenchymal, around a vessel, vessel attached, pleural, and attached to the pleura), with each category comprised of 7-9 nodules (total, n = 40) of varying sizes (diameter 3-10 mm; volume 6.62 mm 3 -525 mm 3 ), was scanned with four different 16-slice MSCT scanners (Siemens, GE, Philips, Toshiba). Routine and low-dose chest protocols with thin and thick collimations were applied. The data from all scanners were used for further analysis using a dedicated prototype volumetry software. Absolute percentage volume errors (APE) were calculated and compared. The mean APE for all nodules was 8.4% (±7.7%) for data acquired with the 16-slice Siemens scanner, 14.3% (±11.1%) for the GE scanner, 9.7% (±9.6%) for the Philips scanner and 7.5% (±7.2%) for the Toshiba scanner, respectively. The lowest APEs were found within the diameter size range of 5-10 mm and volumes >66 mm 3 . Nodule volumetry is accurate with a reasonable volume error in data from different scanner vendors. This may have an important impact for intraindividual follow-up studies. (orig.)

  2. SU-E-I-21: Dosimetric Characterization and Image Quality Evaluation of the AIRO Mobile CT Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, V; Zhang, J; Bruner, A [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The AIRO Mobile CT system was recently introduced which overcomes the limitations from existing CT, CT fluoroscopy, and intraoperative O-arm. With an integrated table and a large diameter bore, the system is suitable for cranial, spine and trauma procedures, making it a highly versatile intraoperative imaging system. This study is to investigate radiation dose and image quality of the AIRO and compared with those from a routine CT scanner. Methods: Radiation dose was measured using a conventional 100mm pencil ionization chamber and CT polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA) body and head phantoms. Image quality was evaluated with a CATPHAN 500 phantom. Spatial resolution, low contrast resolution (CNR), Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), and Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) were analyzed. Results: Under identical technique conditions, radiation dose (mGy/mAs) from the AIRO mobile CT system (AIRO) is higher than that from a 64 slice CT scanner. MTFs show that both Soft and Standard filters of the AIRO system lost resolution quickly compared to the Sensation 64 slice CT. With the Standard kernel, the spatial resolutions of the AIRO system are 3lp/cm and 4lp/cm for the body and head FOVs, respectively. NNPSs show low frequency noise due to ring-like artifacts. Due to a higher dose in terms of mGy/mAs at both head and body FOV, CNR of the AIRO system is higher than that of the Siemens scanner. However detectability of the low contrast objects is poorer in the AIRO due to the presence of ring artifacts in the location of the targets. Conclusion: For image guided surgery applications, the AIRO has some advantages over a routine CT scanner due to its versatility, large bore size, and acceptable image quality. Our evaluation of the physical performance helps its future improvements.

  3. Single nuclear transfer strengths and sum rules in the interacting boson-fermion model and in the spectral averaging theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kota, V.K.B.

    1991-01-01

    In the interacting boson-fermion model of collective nuclei, in the symmetry limits of the model appropriate for vibrational, rotational and γ-unstable nuclei, for one-particle transfer, the selection rules, model predictions for the allowed strengths and comparison of theory with experiment are briefly reviewed. In the spectral-averaging theory, with the specific example of orbit occupancies, the smoothed forms (linear or better ratio of Gaussians) as determined by central limit theorems, how they provide a good criterion for selecting effective interactions and the convolution structure of occupancy densities in huge spaces are described. Complementary information provided by nuclear models and statistical laws is broughtout. (author). 63 refs., 5 figs

  4. Efficient system modeling for a small animal PET scanner with tapered DOI detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Mengxi; Zhou, Jian; Yang, Yongfeng; Qi, Jinyi; Rodríguez-Villafuerte, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    A prototype small animal positron emission tomography (PET) scanner for mouse brain imaging has been developed at UC Davis. The new scanner uses tapered detector arrays with depth of interaction (DOI) measurement. In this paper, we present an efficient system model for the tapered PET scanner using matrix factorization and a virtual scanner geometry. The factored system matrix mainly consists of two components: a sinogram blurring matrix and a geometrical matrix. The geometric matrix is based on a virtual scanner geometry. The sinogram blurring matrix is estimated by matrix factorization. We investigate the performance of different virtual scanner geometries. Both simulation study and real data experiments are performed in the fully 3D mode to study the image quality under different system models. The results indicate that the proposed matrix factorization can maintain image quality while substantially reduce the image reconstruction time and system matrix storage cost. The proposed method can be also applied to other PET scanners with DOI measurement. (paper)

  5. Characterization of a Large, Low-Cost 3D Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Straub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Imagery-based 3D scanning can be performed by scanners with multiple form factors, ranging from small and inexpensive scanners requiring manual movement around a stationary object to large freestanding (nearly instantaneous units. Small mobile units are problematic for use in scanning living creatures, which may be unwilling or unable to (or for the very young and animals, unaware of the need to hold a fixed position for an extended period of time. Alternately, very high cost scanners that can capture a complete scan within a few seconds are available, but they are cost prohibitive for some applications. This paper seeks to assess the performance of a large, low-cost 3D scanner, presented in prior work, which is able to concurrently capture imagery from all around an object. It provides the capabilities of the large, freestanding units at a price point akin to the smaller, mobile ones. This allows access to 3D scanning technology (particularly for applications requiring instantaneous imaging at a lower cost. Problematically, prior analysis of the scanner’s performance was extremely limited. This paper characterizes the efficacy of the scanner for scanning both inanimate objects and humans. Given the importance of lighting to visible light scanning systems, the scanner’s performance under multiple lighting configurations is evaluated, characterizing its sensitivity to lighting design.

  6. A near-infrared confocal scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seungwoo; Yoo, Hongki

    2014-01-01

    In the semiconductor industry, manufacturing of three-dimensional (3D) packages or 3D integrated circuits is a high-performance technique that requires combining several functions in a small volume. Through-silicon vias, which are vertical electrical connections extending through a wafer, can be used to direct signals between stacked chips, thus increasing areal density by stacking and connecting multiple patterned chips. While defect detection is essential in the semiconductor manufacturing process, it is difficult to identify defects within a wafer or to monitor the bonding results between bonded surfaces because silicon and many other semiconductor materials are opaque to visible wavelengths. In this context, near-infrared (NIR) imaging is a promising non-destructive method to detect defects within silicon chips, to inspect bonding between chips and to monitor the chip alignment since NIR transmits through silicon. In addition, a confocal scanner provides high-contrast, optically-sectioned images of the specimen due to its ability to reject out-of-focus noise. In this study, we report an NIR confocal scanner that rapidly acquires high-resolution images with a large field of view through silicon. Two orthogonal line-scanning images can be acquired without rotating the system or the specimen by utilizing two orthogonally configured resonant scanning mirrors. This NIR confocal scanner can be efficiently used as an in-line inspection system when manufacturing semiconductor devices by rapidly detecting defects on and beneath the surface. (paper)

  7. Application of Terrestrial Laser Scanner with an Integrated Thermal Camera in Non-Destructive Evaluation of Concrete Surface of Hydrotechnical Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarek, Łukasz Dominik; Dobak, Paweł Józef; Kiełbasiński, Kamil

    2017-12-01

    The authors present possible applications of thermal data as an additional source of information on an object's behaviour during the technical assessment of the condition of a concrete surface. For the study one of the most recent propositions introduced by Zoller + Fröhlich company was used, which is an integration of a thermal camera with a terrestrial laser scanner. This solution enables an acquisition of geometric and spectral data on the surveyed object and also provides information on the surface's temperature in the selected points. A section of the dam's downstream concrete wall was selected as the subject of the study for which a number of scans were carried out and a number of thermal images were taken at different times of the day. The obtained thermal data was confronted with the acquired spectral information for the specified points. This made it possible to carry out broader analysis of the surface and an inspection of the revealed fissure. The thermal analysis of said fissure indicated that the temperature changes within it are slower, which may affect the way the concrete works and may require further elaboration by the appropriate experts. Through the integration of a thermal camera with a terrestrial laser scanner one can not only analyse changes of temperature in the discretely selected points but on the whole surface as well. Moreover, it is also possible to accurately determine the range and the area of the change affecting the surface. The authors note the limitations of the presented solution like, inter alia, the resolution of the thermal camera.

  8. The performance characteristics of the Philips Gemini PET/CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Keefe, G.J.; Papenfuss, A.T.; Scott, A.M.; Rowe, C.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Department of Nuclear Medicine, Centre for PET at the ARMC is commissioning a next generation PET/CT scanner based on gadolinium silicic dioxide (GSO) crystal technology to replace the BGO crystal PET scanner that has been in operation since 1992. The Gemini PET/CT scanner is a fully 3D PET system which offers significantly increased resolution and sensitivity allowing wholebody scans in under 30 minutes. Until the late 90's, PET scanners were largely used with septa for neurological imaging and the performance characteristics of PET scanners were presented according to the NEMA-NU2-94 standard which specifically addresses the performance of PET scanners for neurological applications. PET is now largely used without septa for oncological imaging and as such, the NEMA-NU2-94 standard does not adequately reflect performance. The NEMA-NU2-2001 standard was designed to incorporate the effects of out-of-FOV activity and its contribution to performance by virtue of the increased scatter and randoms that result when performing wholebody scans without the use of septa. As part of the acceptance program of the Allegro/Gemini systems, the NEMA-NU2-2001 standard will be used to characterise the spatial resolution, sensitivity, randoms and scatter contributions and the Noise Equivalent Count rate (NECr). These results will be presented and compared with the ECAT 951/31R performance characteristics. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  9. Addressing Spatial Variability of Surface-Layer Wind with Long-Range WindScanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jacob; Vasiljevic, Nikola; Kelly, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    of the WindScanner data is high, although the fidelity of the estimated vertical velocity component is significantly limited by the elevation angles of the scanner heads. The system of long-range WindScanners presented in this paper is close to being fully operational, with the pilot study herein serving...

  10. NOAA-9 Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner offsets determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avis, Lee M.; Paden, Jack; Lee, Robert B., III; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Stassi, Joseph C.; Wilson, Robert S.; Tolson, Carol J.; Bolden, William C.

    1994-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) instruments are designed to measure the components of the radiative exchange between the Sun, Earth and space. ERBE is comprised of three spacecraft, each carrying a nearly identical set of radiometers: a three-channel narrow-field-of-view scanner, a two-channel wide-field-of-view (limb-to-limb) non-scanning radiometer, a two-channel medium field-of view (1000 km) non-scanning radiometer, and a solar monitor. Ground testing showed the scanners to be susceptible to self-generated and externally generated electromagnetic noise. This paper describes the pre-launch corrective measures taken and the post-launch corrections to the NOAA-9 scanner data. The NOAA-9 scanner has met the mission objectives in accuracy and precision, in part because of the pre-launch reductions of and post-launch data corrections for the electromagnetic noise.

  11. Improved quality of image got through whole-body CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asahina, Kiyotaka

    1980-01-01

    The quality of brain images taken with a whole-body CT scanner has so far been generally inferior in quality to those got through a CT scanner exclusively used for brains. In order to improve the whole-body CT scanner so as to get better brain image, its detection system has been made multichannel; the capacity of its X-ray tube, increased; and its software, innovated. As a result, the spatial resolution has been improved from 5.51 p/cm to 9.01 p/cm, the contrast resolution has been improved from 3.2 mm% to 1.5 mm%, with the noise maintained at 0.5%. In clinical examination, the image quality has been improved equally well for brains, abdomens and lungs. Especially high appreciation is given to the diagnosis information got through this new scanner. (author)

  12. Multichannel spectral mode of the ALOHA up-conversion interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, L.; Darré, P.; Boulogne, H.; Delage, L.; Grossard, L.; Reynaud, F.

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a multichannel spectral configuration of the Astronomical Light Optical Hybrid Analysis (ALOHA) instrument dedicated to high-resolution imaging. A frequency conversion process is implemented in each arm of an interferometer to transfer the astronomical light to a shorter wavelength domain. Exploiting the spectral selectivity of this non-linear optical process, we propose to use a set of independent pump lasers in order to simultaneously study multiple spectral channels. This principle is experimentally demonstrated with a dual-channel configuration as a proof-of-principle.

  13. The CT scanner as a therapy machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, K.S.; Norman, A.

    1990-01-01

    Many tumors in the brain and in other tissues can be delineated precisely in images obtained with a CT scanner. After the scan is obtained the patient is taken to another room for radiation therapy and is positioned in the beam with the aid of external markers, simulators or stereotactic devices. This procedure is time consuming and subject to error when precise localization of the beam is desired. The CT scanner itself, with the addition of the collimator, is capable of delivering radiation therapy with great precision without the need for external markers. The patient can be scanned and treated on the same table, the isocenter of the beam can be placed precisely in the center of the lesion, the beam can be restricted to just those planes in which the lesion appears, several arcs can be obtained by simply tilting the gantry, and the position of the patient in the beam can be monitored continuously during therapy. The authors describe the properties of the CTX, the CT scanner modified for therapy. (author). 6 refs.; 6 figs

  14. Computer-aided analysis of digital dental impressions obtained from intraoral and extraoral scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, Lauren Oliveira Lima; De Luca Canto, Graziela; Marció, Bruno Silva; Laganá, Dalva Cruz; Sesma, Newton; Tortamano Neto, Pedro

    2017-11-01

    The internal and marginal adaptation of a computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) prosthesis relies on the quality of the 3-dimensional image. The quality of imaging systems requires evaluation. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the trueness of intraoral and extraoral scanners in scanning prepared teeth. Ten acrylic resin teeth to be used as a reference dataset were prepared according to standard guidelines and scanned with an industrial computed tomography system. Data were acquired with 4 scanner devices (n=10): the Trios intraoral scanner (TIS), the D250 extraoral scanner (DES), the Cerec Bluecam intraoral scanner (CBIS), and the Cerec InEosX5 extraoral scanner (CIES). For intraoral scanners, each tooth was digitized individually. Extraoral scanning was obtained from dental casts of each prepared tooth. The discrepancy between each scan and its respective reference model was obtained by deviation analysis (μm) and volume/area difference (μm). Statistical analysis was performed using linear models for repeated measurement factors test and 1-way ANOVA (α=.05). No significant differences in deviation values were found among scanners. For CBIS and CIES, the deviation was significantly higher (PDentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Initial results of the quality control in 11 computed tomography scanners at Curitiba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodlulovich, S; Oliveira, L.; Jakubiak, R.R.; Miquelin, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of 11 scanners installed in public and private centers of Curitiba, Brazil. This sample represents 30% of the CT scanners in the city so far. The ACR CT accreditation phantom was used to verify the accomplishment of the scanners performance to the international quality requirements. The results indicate that efforts should be concentrated in the maintenance of the equipments and specific training of the technicians. Most of the scanners have showed some non-conformity. In 27,5% of the sample the positioning requirement wasn't accomplished. The CT number accuracy evaluation showed that in 72,3 % of the scanners the CT numbers were out of the tolerance range, reaching values 35% greater than the limit. The low contrast resolution criteria weren't accomplished in 9% of the scanners. The main concern is that there isn't a specific program to evaluate the image quality of the CT scanners neither to estimate the CT doses in the procedures. (author)

  16. Thermal remote sensing from Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner data in the framework of the SPARC and SEN2FLEX projects: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Shen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The AHS (Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner instrument has 80 spectral bands covering the visible and near infrared (VNIR, short wave infrared (SWIR, mid infrared (MIR and thermal infrared (TIR spectral range. The instrument is operated by Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aerospacial (INTA, and it has been involved in several field campaigns since 2004.

    This paper presents an overview of the work performed with the AHS thermal imagery provided in the framework of the SPARC and SEN2FLEX campaigns, carried out respectively in 2004 and 2005 over an agricultural area in Spain. The data collected in both campaigns allowed for the first time the development and testing of algorithms for land surface temperature and emissivity retrieval as well as the estimation of evapotranspiration from AHS data. Errors were found to be around 1.5 K for land surface temperature and 1 mm/day for evapotranspiration.

  17. Design Optimization of a TOF, Breast PET Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eunsin; Werner, Matthew E.; Karp, Joel S.; Surti, Suleman

    2013-01-01

    A dedicated breast positron emission tomography (PET) scanner with limited angle geometry can provide flexibility in detector placement around the patient as well as the ability to combine it with other imaging modalities. A primary challenge of a stationary limited angle scanner is the reduced image quality due to artifacts present in the reconstructed image leading to a loss in quantitative information. Previously it has been shown that using time-of-flight (TOF) information in image recons...

  18. Energy transfer in plasmonic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovit, Vitaliy N; Urbas, Augustine M; Shahbazyan, Tigran V

    2014-01-01

    We present our results on energy transfer between donor and acceptor molecules or quantum dots near a plasmonic nanoparticle. In such systems, the Förster resonance energy transfer is strongly modified due to plasmon-mediated coupling between donors and acceptors. The transfer efficiency is determined by a competition between transfer, radiation and dissipation that depends sensitively on system parameters. When donor and accepror spectral bands overlap with dipole surface plasmon resonance, the dominant transfer mechanism is through plasmon-enhanced radiative coupling. When transfer takes place from an ensemble of donors to an acceptor, a cooperative amplification of energy transfer takes place in a wide range of system parameters. (paper)

  19. Compensation for the signal processing characteristics of ultrasound B-mode scanners in adaptive speckle reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, D C; Bell, D S; Bamber, J C

    1993-01-01

    A systematic method to compensate for nonlinear amplification of individual ultrasound B-scanners has been investigated in order to optimise performance of an adaptive speckle reduction (ASR) filter for a wide range of clinical ultrasonic imaging equipment. Three potential methods have been investigated: (1) a method involving an appropriate selection of the speckle recognition feature was successful when the scanner signal processing executes simple logarithmic compressions; (2) an inverse transform (decompression) of the B-mode image was effective in correcting for the measured characteristics of image data compression when the algorithm was implemented in full floating point arithmetic; (3) characterising the behaviour of the statistical speckle recognition feature under conditions of speckle noise was found to be the method of choice for implementation of the adaptive speckle reduction algorithm in limited precision integer arithmetic. In this example, the statistical features of variance and mean were investigated. The third method may be implemented on commercially available fast image processing hardware and is also better suited for transfer into dedicated hardware to facilitate real-time adaptive speckle reduction. A systematic method is described for obtaining ASR calibration data from B-mode images of a speckle producing phantom.

  20. A rural CT scanner: evaluating the effect on local health care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkens, B.J.; Mowbray, R.D.; Creeden, L.; Engels, P.T.; Rothwell, D.M.; Chan, B.T.B.; Tu, K.

    2006-01-01

    The first small rural hospital in Ontario to propose a computed tomography (CT) scanner was in Walkerton, a town 160 km north of London. The Ontario Ministry of Health approved the proposal as a pilot project to evaluate the effect on local health care of a rural scanner. This evaluation study had 3 parts: a survey of physicians, a survey of patients, and an analysis of population CT scanning rates. The physicians in the area served by the scanner were asked about its impact on their care of their patients in a mailed questionnaire and in semistructured interviews. Scanner outpatients were given a questionnaire in which they rated the importance of its advantages. The analysis of scanning rates--the ratio of number of scans to estimated population--compared rates in the area with other Ontario rates before and after the scanner was introduced. The physicians reported that local CT allowed them to diagnose and treat patients sooner, closer to home, and with greater confidence. On average, 75% of the patients ranked faster and closer access as very important. Scanning rates in the area rose, although they did not match urban rates. The study confirms that the rural scanner changed the area's health care in significant ways and that it helped to narrow the gap between rural and urban service levels. We recommend that CT be expanded to other rural regions. (author)

  1. Verification of a CT scanner using a miniature step gauge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantatore, Angela; Andreasen, J.L.; Carmignato, S.

    2011-01-01

    The work deals with performance verification of a CT scanner using a 42mm miniature replica step gauge developed for optical scanner verification. Errors quantification and optimization of CT system set-up in terms of resolution and measurement accuracy are fundamental for use of CT scanning...

  2. DETERMINING SPECTRAL REFLECTANCE COEFFICIENTS FROM HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES OBTAINED FROM LOW ALTITUDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Walczykowski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Remote Sensing plays very important role in many different study fields, like hydrology, crop management, environmental and ecosystem studies. For all mentioned areas of interest different remote sensing and image processing techniques, such as: image classification (object and pixel- based, object identification, change detection, etc. can be applied. Most of this techniques use spectral reflectance coefficients as the basis for the identification and distinction of different objects and materials, e.g. monitoring of vegetation stress, identification of water pollutants, yield identification, etc. Spectral characteristics are usually acquired using discrete methods such as spectrometric measurements in both laboratory and field conditions. Such measurements however can be very time consuming, which has led many international researchers to investigate the reliability and accuracy of using image-based methods. According to published and ongoing studies, in order to acquire these spectral characteristics from images, it is necessary to have hyperspectral data. The presented article describes a series of experiments conducted using the push-broom Headwall MicroHyperspec A-series VNIR. This hyperspectral scanner allows for registration of images with more than 300 spectral channels with a 1.9 nm spectral bandwidth in the 380- 1000 nm range. The aim of these experiments was to establish a methodology for acquiring spectral reflectance characteristics of different forms of land cover using such sensor. All research work was conducted in controlled conditions from low altitudes. Hyperspectral images obtained with this specific type of sensor requires a unique approach in terms of post-processing, especially radiometric correction. Large amounts of acquired imagery data allowed the authors to establish a new post- processing approach. The developed methodology allowed the authors to obtain spectral reflectance coefficients from a hyperspectral sensor

  3. Determining Spectral Reflectance Coefficients from Hyperspectral Images Obtained from Low Altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczykowski, P.; Jenerowicz, A.; Orych, A.; Siok, K.

    2016-06-01

    Remote Sensing plays very important role in many different study fields, like hydrology, crop management, environmental and ecosystem studies. For all mentioned areas of interest different remote sensing and image processing techniques, such as: image classification (object and pixel- based), object identification, change detection, etc. can be applied. Most of this techniques use spectral reflectance coefficients as the basis for the identification and distinction of different objects and materials, e.g. monitoring of vegetation stress, identification of water pollutants, yield identification, etc. Spectral characteristics are usually acquired using discrete methods such as spectrometric measurements in both laboratory and field conditions. Such measurements however can be very time consuming, which has led many international researchers to investigate the reliability and accuracy of using image-based methods. According to published and ongoing studies, in order to acquire these spectral characteristics from images, it is necessary to have hyperspectral data. The presented article describes a series of experiments conducted using the push-broom Headwall MicroHyperspec A-series VNIR. This hyperspectral scanner allows for registration of images with more than 300 spectral channels with a 1.9 nm spectral bandwidth in the 380- 1000 nm range. The aim of these experiments was to establish a methodology for acquiring spectral reflectance characteristics of different forms of land cover using such sensor. All research work was conducted in controlled conditions from low altitudes. Hyperspectral images obtained with this specific type of sensor requires a unique approach in terms of post-processing, especially radiometric correction. Large amounts of acquired imagery data allowed the authors to establish a new post- processing approach. The developed methodology allowed the authors to obtain spectral reflectance coefficients from a hyperspectral sensor mounted on an

  4. Quality assurance for MR stereotactic imaging for three Siemens scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozubikova, P.; Novotny, J. Jr.; Kulhova, K.; Mihalova, P.; Tamasova, J.; Veselsk, T.

    2014-01-01

    Quality assurance of stereotactic imaging, especially with MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), is a complex issue. It can be divided in the basic verification and commissioning of a particular new scanner or a new scanning MRI protocol that is being implemented into a clinical practice and the routine quality assurance performed for each single radiosurgical case. The aim of this study was geometric distortion assessment in MRI with a special PTGR (Physikalisch-Technische Gesellschaft fuer Radiologie - GmbH, Tuebingen, Germany) target phantom. PTGR phantom consists of 21 three-dimensional cross-hairs filled with contrast medium. Cross hairs are positioned at known Leksell coordinates with a precision of better than 0.1 mm and covering the whole stereotactic space. The phantom can be fixed in the Leksell stereotactic frame and thus stereotactic imaging procedures can be reproduced following exactly the same steps as for a real patient, including also the stereotactic image definition in the Leksell GammaPlan. Since the geometric position (stereotactic coordinates) of each cross-hair is known based on the construction of the phantom, it can be compared with the actual measured Leksell coordinates based on the stereotactic MRI. Deviations between expected and actual coordinates provide information about the level of distortion. The measured distortions proved satisfactory accuracy precision for stereotactic localization at 1.5 T Siemens Magnetom Avanto scanner, Siemens Magnetom Symphony scanner and 3T Siemens Magnetom Skyra scanner (Na Homolce Hospital, Prague). The mean distortion for these MR scanners for standard imaging protocol (T1 weighted 3D images) were 0.8 mm, 1.1 mm and 1.1 mm and maximum distortions were 1.3 mm, 1.9 mm and 2.2 mm, respectively.There was detected dependence of the distortions on the slice orientation and the type of imaging protocol. Image distortions are also property of each particular scanner, the worst distortion were observed for 3T

  5. Defense Commissaries: Issues Related to the Sale of Electronic Scanner Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    In response to your request that we review DeCA'S sale of scanner data and its implementation of category management, this report identifies DeCA'S total revenue from selling scanner data and compares license revenues...

  6. Ultra-High-Resolution Computed Tomography of the Lung: Image Quality of a Prototype Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Muramatsu, Yukio; Gomi, Shiho; Suzuki, Masahiro; Nagasawa, Hirobumi; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Aso, Tomohiko; Muramatsu, Yoshihisa; Tsuchida, Takaaki; Tsuta, Koji; Maeshima, Akiko Miyagi; Tochigi, Naobumi; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Sugihara, Naoki; Tsukagoshi, Shinsuke; Saito, Yasuo; Kazama, Masahiro; Ashizawa, Kazuto; Awai, Kazuo; Honda, Osamu; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Naoya; Komoto, Daisuke; Moriya, Hiroshi; Oda, Seitaro; Oshiro, Yasuji; Yanagawa, Masahiro; Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Asamura, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The image noise and image quality of a prototype ultra-high-resolution computed tomography (U-HRCT) scanner was evaluated and compared with those of conventional high-resolution CT (C-HRCT) scanners. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board. A U-HRCT scanner prototype with 0.25 mm x 4 rows and operating at 120 mAs was used. The C-HRCT images were obtained using a 0.5 mm x 16 or 0.5 mm x 64 detector-row CT scanner operating at 150 mAs. Images from both scanners were reconstructed at 0.1-mm intervals; the slice thickness was 0.25 mm for the U-HRCT scanner and 0.5 mm for the C-HRCT scanners. For both scanners, the display field of view was 80 mm. The image noise of each scanner was evaluated using a phantom. U-HRCT and C-HRCT images of 53 images selected from 37 lung nodules were then observed and graded using a 5-point score by 10 board-certified thoracic radiologists. The images were presented to the observers randomly and in a blinded manner. Results The image noise for U-HRCT (100.87 ± 0.51 Hounsfield units [HU]) was greater than that for C-HRCT (40.41 ± 0.52 HU; P < .0001). The image quality of U-HRCT was graded as superior to that of C-HRCT (P < .0001) for all of the following parameters that were examined: margins of subsolid and solid nodules, edges of solid components and pulmonary vessels in subsolid nodules, air bronchograms, pleural indentations, margins of pulmonary vessels, edges of bronchi, and interlobar fissures. Conclusion Despite a larger image noise, the prototype U-HRCT scanner had a significantly better image quality than the C-HRCT scanners. PMID:26352144

  7. Ultra-High-Resolution Computed Tomography of the Lung: Image Quality of a Prototype Scanner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryutaro Kakinuma

    Full Text Available The image noise and image quality of a prototype ultra-high-resolution computed tomography (U-HRCT scanner was evaluated and compared with those of conventional high-resolution CT (C-HRCT scanners.This study was approved by the institutional review board. A U-HRCT scanner prototype with 0.25 mm x 4 rows and operating at 120 mAs was used. The C-HRCT images were obtained using a 0.5 mm x 16 or 0.5 mm x 64 detector-row CT scanner operating at 150 mAs. Images from both scanners were reconstructed at 0.1-mm intervals; the slice thickness was 0.25 mm for the U-HRCT scanner and 0.5 mm for the C-HRCT scanners. For both scanners, the display field of view was 80 mm. The image noise of each scanner was evaluated using a phantom. U-HRCT and C-HRCT images of 53 images selected from 37 lung nodules were then observed and graded using a 5-point score by 10 board-certified thoracic radiologists. The images were presented to the observers randomly and in a blinded manner.The image noise for U-HRCT (100.87 ± 0.51 Hounsfield units [HU] was greater than that for C-HRCT (40.41 ± 0.52 HU; P < .0001. The image quality of U-HRCT was graded as superior to that of C-HRCT (P < .0001 for all of the following parameters that were examined: margins of subsolid and solid nodules, edges of solid components and pulmonary vessels in subsolid nodules, air bronchograms, pleural indentations, margins of pulmonary vessels, edges of bronchi, and interlobar fissures.Despite a larger image noise, the prototype U-HRCT scanner had a significantly better image quality than the C-HRCT scanners.

  8. SU-E-T-135: Investigation of Commercial-Grade Flatbed Scanners and a Medical- Grade Scanner for Radiochromic EBT Film Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syh, J; Patel, B; Syh, J; Wu, H; Rosen, L; Durci, M; Katz, S; Sibata, C

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the characteristics of commercial-grade flatbed scanners and medical-grade scanners for radiochromic EBT film dosimetry. Performance aspects of a Vidar Dosimetry Pro Advantage (Red), Epson 750 Pro, Microtek ArtixScan 1800f, and Microtek ScanMaker 8700 scanner for EBT2 Gafchromic film were evaluated in the categories of repeatability, maximum distinguishable optical density (OD) differentiation, OD variance, and dose curve characteristics. OD step film by Stouffer Industries containing 31 steps ranging from 0.05 to 3.62 OD was used. EBT films were irradiated with dose ranging from 20 to 600 cGy in 6×6 cm 2 field sizes and analyzed 24 hours later using RIT113 and Tomotherapy Film Analyzer software. Scans were performed in transmissive mode, landscape orientation, 16-bit image. The mean and standard deviation Analog to Digital (A/D) scanner value was measured by selecting a 3×3 mm 2 uniform area in the central region of each OD step from a total of 20 scans performed over several weeks. Repeatability was determined from the variance of OD step 0.38. Maximum distinguishable OD was defined as the last OD step whose range of A/D values does not overlap with its neighboring step. Repeatability uncertainty ranged from 0.1% for Vidar to 4% for Epson. Average standard deviation of OD steps ranged from 0.21% for Vidar to 6.4% for ArtixScan 1800f. Maximum distinguishable optical density ranged from 3.38 for Vidar to 1.32 for ScanMaker 8700. A/D range of each OD step corresponds to a dose range. Dose ranges of OD steps varied from 1% for Vidar to 20% for ScanMaker 8700. The Vidar exhibited a dose curve that utilized a broader range of OD values than the other scanners. Vidar exhibited higher maximum distinguishable OD, smaller variance in repeatability, smaller A/D value deviation per OD step, and a shallower dose curve with respect to OD. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Accuracy of complete-arch model using an intraoral video scanner: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Il-Do; Lee, Jae-Jun; Jeon, Jin-Hun; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Young; Kim, Woong-Chul

    2016-06-01

    Information on the accuracy of intraoral video scanners for long-span areas is limited. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the trueness and precision of an intraoral video scanner, an intraoral still image scanner, and a blue-light scanner for the production of digital impressions. Reference scan data were obtained by scanning a complete-arch model. An identical model was scanned 8 times using an intraoral video scanner (CEREC Omnicam; Sirona) and an intraoral still image scanner (CEREC Bluecam; Sirona), and stone casts made from conventional impressions of the same model were scanned 8 times with a blue-light scanner as a control (Identica Blue; Medit). Accuracy consists of trueness (the extent to which the scan data differ from the reference scan) and precision (the similarity of the data from multiple scans). To evaluate precision, 8 scans were superimposed using 3-dimensional analysis software; the reference scan data were then superimposed to determine the trueness. Differences were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey HSD tests (α=.05). Trueness in the video scanner group was not significantly different from that in the control group. However, the video scanner group showed significantly lower values than those of the still image scanner group for all variables (P<.05), except in tolerance range. The root mean square, standard deviations, and mean negative precision values for the video scanner group were significantly higher than those for the other groups (P<.05). Digital impressions obtained by the intraoral video scanner showed better accuracy for long-span areas than those captured by the still image scanner. However, the video scanner was less accurate than the laboratory scanner. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Laser measuring scanners and their accuracy limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Ryszard

    1993-09-01

    Scanning methods have gained the greater importance for some years now due to a short measuring time and wide range of application in flexible manufacturing processes. This paper is a summing up of the autho?s creative scientific work in the field of measuring scanners. The research conducted allowed to elaborate the optimal configurations of measuring systems based on the scanning method. An important part of the work was the analysis of a measuring scanner - as a transducer of an angle rotation into the linear displacement which resulted in obtaining its much higher accuracy and finally in working out a measuring scanner eliminating the use of an additional reference standard. The completion of the work is an attempt to determine an attainable accuracy limit of scanning measurement of both length and angle. Using a high stability deflector and a corrected scanning lens one can obtain the angle determination over 30 (or 2 mm) to an accuracy 0 (or 0 tm) when the measuring rate is 1000 Hz or the range d60 (4 mm) with accuracy 0 " (0 jim) and measurement frequency 6 Hz.

  11. Quantitative Assay for Starch by Colorimetry Using a Desktop Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kurt R.; Landmark, James D.; Stickle, Douglas F.

    2004-01-01

    The procedure to produce standard curve for starch concentration measurement by image analysis using a color scanner and computer for data acquisition and color analysis is described. Color analysis is performed by a Visual Basic program that measures red, green, and blue (RGB) color intensities for pixels within the scanner image.

  12. Application of Terrestrial Laser Scanner with an Integrated Thermal Camera in Non-Destructive Evaluation of Concrete Surface of Hydrotechnical Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalska Maria

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors present possible applications of thermal data as an additional source of information on an object’s behaviour during the technical assessment of the condition of a concrete surface. For the study one of the most recent propositions introduced by Zoller + Fröhlich company was used, which is an integration of a thermal camera with a terrestrial laser scanner. This solution enables an acquisition of geometric and spectral data on the surveyed object and also provides information on the surface’s temperature in the selected points. A section of the dam’s downstream concrete wall was selected as the subject of the study for which a number of scans were carried out and a number of thermal images were taken at different times of the day. The obtained thermal data was confronted with the acquired spectral information for the specified points. This made it possible to carry out broader analysis of the surface and an inspection of the revealed fissure. The thermal analysis of said fissure indicated that the temperature changes within it are slower, which may affect the way the concrete works and may require further elaboration by the appropriate experts. Through the integration of a thermal camera with a terrestrial laser scanner one can not only analyse changes of temperature in the discretely selected points but on the whole surface as well. Moreover, it is also possible to accurately determine the range and the area of the change affecting the surface. The authors note the limitations of the presented solution like, inter alia, the resolution of the thermal camera.

  13. Ghost signals in Allison emittance scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Moehs, D.P.; Keller, R.; Welton, R.F.

    2004-01-01

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%

  14. Ghost Signals In Allison Emittance Scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Keller, R.; Moehs, D.P.; Welton, R. F.

    2005-01-01

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%

  15. Spectral decomposition in advection-diffusion analysis by finite element methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickell, R.E.; Gartling, D.K.; Strang, G.

    1978-01-01

    In a recent study of the convergence properties of finite element methods in nonlinear fluid mechanics, an indirect approach was taken. A two-dimensional example with a known exact solution was chosen as the vehicle for the study, and various mesh refinements were tested in an attempt to extract information on the effect of the local Reynolds number. However, more direct approaches are usually preferred. In this study one such direct approach is followed, based upon the spectral decomposition of the solution operator. Spectral decomposition is widely employed as a solution technique for linear structural dynamics problems and can be applied readily to linear, transient heat transfer analysis; in this case, the extension to nonlinear problems is of interest. It was shown previously that spectral techniques were applicable to stiff systems of rate equations, while recent studies of geometrically and materially nonlinear structural dynamics have demonstrated the increased information content of the numerical results. The use of spectral decomposition in nonlinear problems of heat and mass transfer would be expected to yield equally increased flow of information to the analyst, and this information could include a quantitative comparison of various solution strategies, meshes, and element hierarchies

  16. Comparison of working efficiency of terrestrial laser scanner in day and night conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, A. E.; Kalkan, K.

    2013-10-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanning is a popular and widely used technique to scan existing objects, document historical sites and items, and remodel them if and when needed. Their ability to collect thousands of point data per second makes them an invaluable tool in many areas from engineering to historical reconstruction. There are many scanners in the market with different technical specifications. One main technical specification of laser scanners is range and illumination. In this study, it is tested to be determined the optimal working times of a laser scanner and the scanners consistency with its specifications sheet. In order to conduct this work, series of GNSS measurements in Istanbul Technical University have been carried out, connected to the national reference network, to determine precise positions of target points and the scanner, which makes possible to define a precise distance between the scanner and targets. Those ground surveys has been used for calibration and registration purposes. Two different scan campaigns conducted at 12 am and 11 pm to compare working efficiency of laser scanner in different illumination conditions and targets are measured with a handheld spectro-radiometer in order to determine their reflective characteristics. The obtained results are compared and their accuracies have been analysed.

  17. FormScanner: Open-Source Solution for Grading Multiple-Choice Exams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Chadwick; Lo, Glenn; Young, Kaisa; Borsetta, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The multiple-choice exam remains a staple for many introductory physics courses. In the past, people have graded these by hand or even flaming needles. Today, one usually grades the exams with a form scanner that utilizes optical mark recognition (OMR). Several companies provide these scanners and particular forms, such as the eponymous…

  18. The accuracy of the CAD system using intraoral and extraoral scanners for designing of fixed dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Sakura; Shinya, Akikazu; Kuroda, Soichi; Gomi, Harunori

    2017-07-26

    The accuracy of prostheses affects clinical success and is, in turn, affected by the accuracy of the scanner and CAD programs. Thus, their accuracy is important. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of an intraoral scanner with active triangulation (Cerec Omnicam), an intraoral scanner with a confocal laser (3Shape Trios), and an extraoral scanner with active triangulation (D810). The second aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of the digital crowns designed with two different scanner/CAD combinations. The accuracy of the intraoral scanners and extraoral scanner was clinically acceptable. Marginal and internal fit of the digital crowns fabricated using the intraoral scanner and CAD programs were inferior to those fabricated using the extraoral scanner and CAD programs.

  19. Performance evaluation of 8 CT scanners for clinical use in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, I.; De Denaro, M.; Giribona, P.; Gicericin, C.; Bravar, D.

    1988-01-01

    In the past few years the use of CT scanners has widely spread in Italian care institutions. This methodology has thus become an important creates the need for an accurate study of the various aspects of the phenomenon, e.g. technological, diagnostic and economic. In order to evaluate the quality of the CT scanners used in our country, the majors suppliers of the Italian market were asked to provide us with a unit from their production. Six out of 7 companies complied with our request. A standard protocol was used to evaluate the performance of 8 CT scanners, currently used in Italy. The following parameters were evaluated: spatial resolution, contrast resolution, noise, slice thickness, uniformity, linearity and radiation dose. Five currently-used operating modalities were employed. The results allow an overall assessment of the performance of the 8 CT scanners

  20. Mechanical optimisation of a high-precision fast wire scanner at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Samuelsson, Sebastian; Veness, Raymond

    Wire scanners are instruments used to measure the transverse beam prole in particle accelerators by passing a thin wire through the particle beam. To avoid the issues of vacuum leakage through the bellows and wire failure related to current designs of wire scanners, a new concept for a wire scanner has been developed at CERN. This design has all moving parts inside the beam vacuum and has a nominal wire scanning speed of 20 m/s. The demands on the design associated with this together with the high precision requirements create a need for\

  1. Transmitting Performance Evaluation of ASICs for CMUT-Based Portable Ultrasound Scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llimos Muntal, Pere; Diederichsen, Søren Elmin; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger

    2017-01-01

    Portable ultrasound scanners (PUS) have, in recent years, raised a lot of attention, as they can potentially overcome some of the limitations of static scanners. However, PUS have a lot of design limitations including size and power consumption. These restrictions can compromise the image quality...... of the scanner. In order to overcome these restrictions, application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) are needed to implement the electronics. In this work, a comparative study of the transmitting performance of a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) driven by a commercial generic ultrasound...

  2. Active Damping of a Piezoelectric Tube Scanner using Self-Sensing Piezo Actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, S.; Schitter, G.

    2010-01-01

    In most Atomic Force Microscopes (AFM), a piezoelectric tube scanner is used to position the sample underneath the measurement probe. Oscillations stemming from the weakly damped resonances of the tube scanner are a major source of image distortion, putting a limitation on the achievable imaging speed. This paper demonstrates active damping of these oscillations in multiple scanning axes without the need for additional position sensors. By connecting the tube scanner in a capacitive bridge circuit the scanner oscillations can be measured in both scanning axes, using the same piezo material as an actuator and sensor simultaneously. In order to compensate for circuit imbalance caused by hysteresis in the piezo element, an adaptive balancing circuit is used. The obtained measurement signal is used for feedback control, reducing the resonance peaks in both scanning axes by 18 dB and the cross-coupling at those frequencies by 30 dB. Experimental results demonstrate a significant reduction in scanner oscillations when applying the typical triangular scanning signals, as well as a strong reduction in coupling induced oscillations. Recorded AFM images show a considerable reduction in image distortion due to the proposed control method, enabling artifact free AFM imaging at a speed of 122 lines per second with a standard piezoelectric tube scanner. PMID:26412944

  3. Cyclone: A laser scanner for mobile robot navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjiv; West, Jay

    1991-09-01

    Researchers at Carnegie Mellon's Field Robotics Center have designed and implemented a scanning laser rangefinder. The device uses a commercially available time-of-flight ranging instrument that is capable of making up to 7200 measurements per second. The laser beam is reflected by a rotating mirror, producing up to a 360 degree view. Mounted on a robot vehicle, the scanner can be used to detect obstacles in the vehicle's path or to locate the robot on a map. This report discusses the motivation, design, and some applications of the scanner.

  4. Thermo-mechanical design of a CW sweep plate emittance scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathke, J.; Peacock, M.; Sredniawski, J.

    1996-01-01

    A sweep plate emittance scanner for use with high power, continuous wave (CW) beams has been designed, fabricated and commissioned at Northrop Grumman. The design is capable of scanning beams of up to 20 kW beam power with a spot diameter as small as 2 cm. The scanner pod is mounted on a ball screw driven linear bearing table that is driven through the beam by a stepper motor at velocities up to 30 cm/sec. This paper presents the thermo-mechanical analysis of the pod moving through a gaussian beam and the details of the mechanical design of the pod and motion system. Analyses to determine scanner cooling schemes and structural materials are presented. (author)

  5. Out of lab calibration of a rotating 2D scanner for 3D mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Rainer; Böttcher, Lena; Jahrsdörfer, Maximilian; Maier, Johannes; Trommer, Malte; May, Stefan; Nüchter, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    Mapping is an essential task in mobile robotics. To fulfil advanced navigation and manipulation tasks a 3D representation of the environment is required. Applying stereo cameras or Time-of-flight cameras (TOF cameras) are one way to archive this requirement. Unfortunately, they suffer from drawbacks which makes it difficult to map properly. Therefore, costly 3D laser scanners are applied. An inexpensive way to build a 3D representation is to use a 2D laser scanner and rotate the scan plane around an additional axis. A 3D point cloud acquired with such a custom device consists of multiple 2D line scans. Therefore the scanner pose of each line scan need to be determined as well as parameters resulting from a calibration to generate a 3D point cloud. Using external sensor systems are a common method to determine these calibration parameters. This is costly and difficult when the robot needs to be calibrated outside the lab. Thus, this work presents a calibration method applied on a rotating 2D laser scanner. It uses a hardware setup to identify the required parameters for calibration. This hardware setup is light, small, and easy to transport. Hence, an out of lab calibration is possible. Additional a theoretical model was created to test the algorithm and analyse impact of the scanner accuracy. The hardware components of the 3D scanner system are an HOKUYO UTM-30LX-EW 2D laser scanner, a Dynamixel servo-motor, and a control unit. The calibration system consists of an hemisphere. In the inner of the hemisphere a circular plate is mounted. The algorithm needs to be provided with a dataset of a single rotation from the laser scanner. To achieve a proper calibration result the scanner needs to be located in the middle of the hemisphere. By means of geometric formulas the algorithms determine the individual deviations of the placed laser scanner. In order to minimize errors, the algorithm solves the formulas in an iterative process. First, the calibration algorithm was

  6. Perancangan dan Pembuatan Alat Scanner 3D Menggunakan Sensor Kinect Xbox 360

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Armansyah

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Scanner 3D adalah teknologi yang digunakan untuk memindai objek nyata untuk mendapatkan bentuk, ukuran dan fitur lainnya agar menghasilkan gambar yang sangat akurat. Dalam perancangan alat scanner 3D sebelumnya, yaitu scanner 3D menggunakan sensor ultrasonik, infra merah, dan line laser. Maka dapat disimpulkan terdapat beberapa kekurangan yaitu masih terbatasnya objek yang di scan serta hasil scan yang belum akurat karena hanya menghasilkan garis-garis yang membentuk objek. Pada penelitian ini, penulis membuat scanner 3D dengan hasil akurasi yang tinggi. Scanner 3D yang dibuat adalah menggunakan sensor Kinect xbox 360. Cara kerja dari kinect yaitu dengan menggabungkan antara beberapa kamera, Color Cimos (VNA38209015 kamera ini berfungsi membantu dalam pengenalan objek dan fitur deteksi lainnya, serta kamera IR CMOS (VCA379C7130, dan IR Projector (OG12 yaitu sebagai depth sensor atau sensor kedalaman yang merupakan sebuah proyektor infrared dan sebuah sensor monochrome CMOS yang bekerja secara bersama-sama untuk melihat ruangan atau area dalam bentuk 3D tanpa memperdulikan kondisi cahaya. Untuk mengolah serta menampilkan hasil dari objek yang sudah di scan menggunakan aplikasi KScan3D. Kemudian untuk koneksi antara PC dengan media penggerak menggunakan Bluetooth HC-06. Setelah dilakukan pengujian didapatkan model gambar 3D dengan dengan hasil akurasi yang cukup tinggi. Kata Kunci: Bluetooth HC-06, Infra Merah, Line Laser, Kinect, KScan3D, Scanner 3D, Ultrasonik Abstract Scanner 3D is the technology used to scan real objects to get the form, size and other features in order to produce pictures that are very accurate. In the design of the appliance scanner 3D previously, namely scanner 3D using the ultrasonic sensor, infrared and laser line. It can be concluded there are some disadvantages that is still limited objects in the scan and the scans are not accurate because only produces lines that formed the object. In this research, author

  7. Fast neutron radiography scanner for the detection of contraband in air cargo containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhardt, J.E.; Rainey, S.; Stevens, R.J.; Sowerby, B.D.; Tickner, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing need to rapidly scan bulk air cargo for contraband such as illicit drugs and explosives. The Commonwealth Science and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have been working with Australian Customs Service to develop a scanner capable of directly scanning airfreight containers in 1-2 minutes without unpacking. The scanner combines fast neutron and gamma-ray radiography to provide high-resolution images that include information on material composition. A full-scale prototype scanner has been successfully tested in the laboratory and a commercial-scale scanner is due to be installed at Brisbane airport in 2005

  8. Fast neutron radiography scanner for the detection of contraband in air cargo containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhardt, J.E. [CSIRO Minerals, Private Mail Bag 5, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Rainey, S. [CSIRO Minerals, Private Mail Bag 5, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Stevens, R.J. [CSIRO Minerals, Private Mail Bag 5, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Sowerby, B.D. [CSIRO Minerals, Private Mail Bag 5, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)]. E-mail: brian.sowerby@csiro.au; Tickner, J.R. [CSIRO Minerals, Private Mail Bag 5, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia)

    2005-08-01

    There is a growing need to rapidly scan bulk air cargo for contraband such as illicit drugs and explosives. The Commonwealth Science and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) have been working with Australian Customs Service to develop a scanner capable of directly scanning airfreight containers in 1-2 minutes without unpacking. The scanner combines fast neutron and gamma-ray radiography to provide high-resolution images that include information on material composition. A full-scale prototype scanner has been successfully tested in the laboratory and a commercial-scale scanner is due to be installed at Brisbane airport in 2005.

  9. A Cross-Platform Smartphone Brain Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Stahlhut, Carsten

    We describe a smartphone brain scanner with a low-costwireless 14-channel Emotiv EEG neuroheadset interfacingwith multiple mobile devices. This personal informaticssystem enables minimally invasive and continuouscapturing of brain imaging data in natural settings. Thesystem applies an inverse...

  10. Robotic Prostate Biopsy in Closed MRI Scanner

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fischer, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    .... This work enables prostate brachytherapy and biopsy procedures in standard high-field diagnostic MRI scanners through the development of a robotic needle placement device specifically designed...

  11. Development of high pressure pipe scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae H.; Lee, Jae C.; Moon, Soon S.; Eom, Heung S.; Choi, Yu R.

    1998-12-01

    This report describes an automatic ultrasonic scanning system for pressure pipe welds, which was developed in this project using recent advanced technologies on mobile robot and computer. The system consists of two modules: a robot scanner module which navigates and manipulates scanning devices, and a data acquisition module which generates ultrasonic signal and processes the data from the scanner. The robot has 4 magnetic wheels and 2 -axis manipulator on which ultrasonic transducer attached. The wheeled robot can navigate curved surface such as outer wall of circular pipes. Magnetic wheels were optimally designed through magnetic field analysis. Free surface sensing and line tracking control algorithm were developed and implemented, and the control devices and software can be used in practical inspection works. We expect our system can contribute to reduction of inspection time, performance enhancement, and effective management of inspection results

  12. Generalized radiative transfer theory for scattering by particles in an absorbing gas: Addressing both spatial and spectral integration in multi-angle remote sensing of optically thin aerosol layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Anthony B.; Xu, Feng; Diner, David J.

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate the computational advantage gained by introducing non-exponential transmission laws into radiative transfer theory for two specific situations. One is the problem of spatial integration over a large domain where the scattering particles cluster randomly in a medium uniformly filled with an absorbing gas, and only a probabilistic description of the variability is available. The increasingly important application here is passive atmospheric profiling using oxygen absorption in the visible/near-IR spectrum. The other scenario is spectral integration over a region where the absorption cross-section of a spatially uniform gas varies rapidly and widely and, moreover, there are scattering particles embedded in the gas that are distributed uniformly, or not. This comes up in many applications, O2 A-band profiling being just one instance. We bring a common framework to solve these problems both efficiently and accurately that is grounded in the recently developed theory of Generalized Radiative Transfer (GRT). In GRT, the classic exponential law of transmission is replaced by one with a slower power-law decay that accounts for the unresolved spectral or spatial variability. Analytical results are derived in the single-scattering limit that applies to optically thin aerosol layers. In spectral integration, a modest gain in accuracy is obtained. As for spatial integration of near-monochromatic radiance, we find that, although both continuum and in-band radiances are affected by moderate levels of sub-pixel variability, only extreme variability will affect in-band/continuum ratios.

  13. Analysis of the Performance of a Laser Scanner for Predictive Automotive Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeisler, J.; Maas, H.-G.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we evaluate the use of a laser scanner for future advanced driver assistance systems. We focus on the important task of predicting the target vehicle for longitudinal ego vehicle control. Our motivation is to decrease the reaction time of existing systems during cut-in maneuvers of other traffic participants. A state-of-the-art laser scanner, the Ibeo Scala B2 R , is presented, providing its sensing characteristics and the subsequent high level object data output. We evaluate the performance of the scanner towards object tracking with the help of a GPS real time kinematics system on a test track. Two designed scenarios show phases with constant distance and velocity as well as dynamic motion of the vehicles. We provide the results for the error in position and velocity of the scanner and furthermore, review our algorithm for target vehicle prediction. Finally we show the potential of the laser scanner with the estimated error, that leads to a decrease of up to 40% in reaction time with best conditions.

  14. Multi-center transferability of a breath-hold T2 technique for myocardial iron assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Godfrey CF

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac iron overload is the leading cause of death in thalassemia major and is usually assessed using myocardial T2* measurements. Recently a cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR breath-hold T2 sequence has been developed as a possible alternative. This cardiac T2 technique has good interstudy reproducibility, but its transferability to different centres has not yet been investigated. Methods and Results The breath-hold black blood spin echo T2 sequence was installed and validated on 1.5T Siemens MR scanners at 4 different centres across the world. Using this sequence, 5–10 thalassemia patients from each centre were scanned twice locally within a week for local interstudy reproducibility (n = 34 and all were rescanned within one month at the standardization centre in London (intersite reproducibility. The local interstudy reproducibility (coefficient of variance and mean difference were 4.4% and -0.06 ms. The intersite reproducibility and mean difference between scanners were 5.2% and -0.07 ms. Conclusion The breath-hold myocardial T2 technique is transferable between Siemens scanners with good intersite and local interstudy reproducibility. This technique may have value in the diagnosis and management of patients with iron overload conditions such as thalassemia.

  15. Element-specific spectral imaging of multiple contrast agents: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panta, R. K.; Bell, S. T.; Healy, J. L.; Aamir, R.; Bateman, C. J.; Moghiseh, M.; Butler, A. P. H.; Anderson, N. G.

    2018-02-01

    This work demonstrates the feasibility of simultaneous discrimination of multiple contrast agents based on their element-specific and energy-dependent X-ray attenuation properties using a pre-clinical photon-counting spectral CT. We used a photon-counting based pre-clinical spectral CT scanner with four energy thresholds to measure the X-ray attenuation properties of various concentrations of iodine (9, 18 and 36 mg/ml), gadolinium (2, 4 and 8 mg/ml) and gold (2, 4 and 8 mg/ml) based contrast agents, calcium chloride (140 and 280 mg/ml) and water. We evaluated the spectral imaging performances of different energy threshold schemes between 25 to 82 keV at 118 kVp, based on K-factor and signal-to-noise ratio and ranked them. K-factor was defined as the X-ray attenuation in the K-edge containing energy range divided by the X-ray attenuation in the preceding energy range, expressed as a percentage. We evaluated the effectiveness of the optimised energy selection to discriminate all three contrast agents in a phantom of 33 mm diameter. A photon-counting spectral CT using four energy thresholds of 27, 33, 49 and 81 keV at 118 kVp simultaneously discriminated three contrast agents based on iodine, gadolinium and gold at various concentrations using their K-edge and energy-dependent X-ray attenuation features in a single scan. A ranking method to evaluate spectral imaging performance enabled energy thresholds to be optimised to discriminate iodine, gadolinium and gold contrast agents in a single spectral CT scan. Simultaneous discrimination of multiple contrast agents in a single scan is likely to open up new possibilities of improving the accuracy of disease diagnosis by simultaneously imaging multiple bio-markers each labelled with a nano-contrast agent.

  16. A new generation of PET scanners for small animal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegyesi, G.; Imrek, J.; Kalinka, G.; Molnar, J.; Novak, D.; Valastyan, I.; Balkay, L.; Emri, M.; Kis, S.; Tron, L.

    2008-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Research on small animal PET scanners has been a hot topic in recent years. These devices are used in the preclinical phases of drug tests and during the development of new radiopharmaceuticals. They also provide a cost efficient way to test new materials, new design concepts and new technologies that later can be used to build more efficient human medical imaging devices. The development of a PET scanner requires expertise on different fields, therefore a consortium was formed that brought together Hungarian academic and industrial partners: the Nuclear Research Institute (which has experience in the development of nuclear detectors and data acquisition systems), the PET Center of the University of Debrecen (which has clinical experience in the application of nuclear imaging devices and background in image processing software), Mediso Ltd. (which has been developing, manufacturing, selling and servicing medical imaging devices since 1990) and other academic partners. This consortium has been working together since 2003: the knowledge base acquired during the development of our small animal PET scanners (miniPET-I and miniPET-II) is now being utilized to build a commercial multimodal human PET scanner. The operation of a PET scanner is based on the simultaneous detection ('coincidence') of two gamma photons originating from a positron annihilation. In traditional PET scanners coincidence is detected by a central unit during the measurement. In our system there is no such central module: all detected single gamma events are recorded (list mode data acquisition), and the list of events are processed using a computer cluster (built from PCs). The usage of independent detector modules and commercial components reduce both development and maintenance costs. Also, this mode of data acquisition is more suitable for development purposes, since once the data is collected and stored it can be used many times to test different signal

  17. A dedicated tool for PET scanner simulations using FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, P.G.; Boehlen, T.T.; Cerutti, F.; Chin, M.P.W.; Ferrari, A.; Mancini, C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Mairani, A.; Sala, Paola R.

    2013-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a well-established medical imaging technique. It is based on the detection of pairs of annihilation gamma rays from a beta+-emitting radionuclide, usually inoculated in the body via a biologically active molecule. Apart from its wide-spread use for clinical diagnosis, new applications are proposed. This includes notably the usage of PET for treatment monitoring of radiation therapy with protons and ions. PET is currently the only available technique for non-invasive monitoring of ion beam dose delivery, which was tested in several clinical pilot studies. For hadrontherapy, the distribution of positron emitters, produced by the ion beam, can be analyzed to verify the correct treatment delivery. The adaptation of previous PET scanners to new environments and the necessity of more precise diagnostics by better image quality triggered the development of new PET scanner designs. The use of Monte Carlo (MC) codes is essential in the early stages of the scanner design to simulate the transport of particles and nuclear interactions from therapeutic ion beams or radioisotopes and to predict radiation fields in tissues and radiation emerging from the patient. In particular, range verification using PET is based on the comparison of detected and simulated activity distributions. The accuracy of the MC code for the relevant physics processes is obviously essential for such applications. In this work we present new developments of the physics models with importance for PET monitoring and integrated tools for PET scanner simulations for FLUKA, a fully-integrated MC particle-transport code, which is widely used for an extended range of applications (accelerator shielding, detector and target design, calorimetry, activation, dosimetry, medical physics, radiobiology, ...). The developed tools include a PET scanner geometry builder and a dedicated scoring routine for coincident event determination. The geometry builder allows the efficient

  18. DirtyGrid I: 3D Dust Radiative Transfer Modeling of Spectral Energy Distributions of Dusty Stellar Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ka-Hei; Gordon, Karl D.; Misselt, Karl A.

    2018-06-01

    Understanding the properties of stellar populations and interstellar dust has important implications for galaxy evolution. In normal star-forming galaxies, stars and the interstellar medium dominate the radiation from ultraviolet (UV) to infrared (IR). In particular, interstellar dust absorbs and scatters UV and optical light, re-emitting the absorbed energy in the IR. This is a strongly nonlinear process that makes independent studies of the UV-optical and IR susceptible to large uncertainties and degeneracies. Over the years, UV to IR spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting utilizing varying approximations has revealed important results on the stellar and dust properties of galaxies. Yet the approximations limit the fidelity of the derived properties. There is sufficient computer power now available that it is now possible to remove these approximations and map out of landscape of galaxy SEDs using full dust radiative transfer. This improves upon previous work by directly connecting the UV, optical, and IR through dust grain physics. We present the DIRTYGrid, a grid of radiative transfer models of SEDs of dusty stellar populations in galactic environments designed to span the full range of physical parameters of galaxies. Using the stellar and gas radiation input from the stellar population synthesis model PEGASE, our radiative transfer model DIRTY self-consistently computes the UV to far-IR/sub-mm SEDs for each set of parameters in our grid. DIRTY computes the dust absorption, scattering, and emission from the local radiation field and a dust grain model, thereby physically connecting the UV-optical to the IR. We describe the computational method and explain the choices of parameters in DIRTYGrid. The computation took millions of CPU hours on supercomputers, and the SEDs produced are an invaluable tool for fitting multi-wavelength data sets. We provide the complete set of SEDs in an online table.

  19. Quantitative imaging of excised osteoarthritic cartilage using spectral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendran, Kishore; Bateman, Christopher J.; Younis, Raja Aamir; De Ruiter, Niels J.A.; Ramyar, Mohsen; Anderson, Nigel G. [University of Otago - Christchurch, Department of Radiology, Christchurch (New Zealand); Loebker, Caroline [University of Otago, Christchurch Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Christchurch (New Zealand); University of Twente, Department of Developmental BioEngineering, Enschede (Netherlands); Schon, Benjamin S.; Hooper, Gary J.; Woodfield, Tim B.F. [University of Otago, Christchurch Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering Group, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Medicine, Christchurch (New Zealand); Chernoglazov, Alex I. [University of Canterbury, Human Interface Technology Laboratory New Zealand, Christchurch (New Zealand); Butler, Anthony P.H. [University of Otago - Christchurch, Department of Radiology, Christchurch (New Zealand); European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); MARS Bioimaging, Christchurch (New Zealand)

    2017-01-15

    To quantify iodine uptake in articular cartilage as a marker of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content using multi-energy spectral CT. We incubated a 25-mm strip of excised osteoarthritic human tibial plateau in 50 % ionic iodine contrast and imaged it using a small-animal spectral scanner with a cadmium telluride photon-processing detector to quantify the iodine through the thickness of the articular cartilage. We imaged both spectroscopic phantoms and osteoarthritic tibial plateau samples. The iodine distribution as an inverse marker of GAG content was presented in the form of 2D and 3D images after applying a basis material decomposition technique to separate iodine in cartilage from bone. We compared this result with a histological section stained for GAG. The iodine in cartilage could be distinguished from subchondral bone and quantified using multi-energy CT. The articular cartilage showed variation in iodine concentration throughout its thickness which appeared to be inversely related to GAG distribution observed in histological sections. Multi-energy CT can quantify ionic iodine contrast (as a marker of GAG content) within articular cartilage and distinguish it from bone by exploiting the energy-specific attenuation profiles of the associated materials. (orig.)

  20. Does the Use of Body Scanners Discriminate Overweight Flight Passengers? The Effect of Body Scanners on Body Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Laib

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Whereas the introduction of body scanners at airports has been accompanied by critical voices raising concerns that body scanners might have a negative impact on different minority groups, it has not been investigated thus far whether they might also have negative impacts on the average flight passenger and if the provision of adequate information might attenuate such negative impacts. Using a pre/post-design the current study examines the effect of a body scan in a controlled laboratory setting on the explicit and implicit body image of normal-weight and overweight people as assessed by questionnaires and an Implicit Association Test. Half of the sample received an information sheet concerning body scanners before they were scanned. While there was a negative impact of the body scan on the implicit body image of overweight participants, there was a positive impact on their explicit body image. The negative effect of the body scan was unaffected by receiving information. This study demonstrates that body scans do not only have negative effects on certain minority groups but potentially on a large proportion of the general public which suggests a critical reconsideration of the control procedures at airports, the training of the airport staff who is in charge of these procedures and the information flight passengers get about these procedures.

  1. Unsteady pressures on a blunt trailing edge measured with an embedded pressure scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Jonathan; Nikoueeyan, Pourya; Hind, Michael; Strike, John; Dahland, Matz; Keeter, Steven

    2017-11-01

    Development of direct-mount pressure scanners can decrease the pneumatic tubing length required to connect the measurement ports to the scanner manifold resulting in improved dynamic range for unsteady pressure measurements. In this work, the performance of a direct-mount pressure scanner for time-resolved pressure measurement is demonstrated in a well-established flow; the pressure fluctuations near the base of flat plate is considered. The additive manufactured model is instrumented with a pressure scanner and flush-mounted high-speed pressure transducers. The configuration of the ports on the model allows for side-by-side comparison of the pressures measured via embedded pneumatic tubing routed to a pressure scanner with that measured by high-speed transducers. Prior to testing, the dynamic response of each embedded pressure port is dynamically calibrated via an in-situ calibration technique. Pressure data is then acquired for fixed angle-of-attack and different dynamic pitching conditions. The dynamic range of the measurements acquired via direct-mount scanner will be compared to those acquired by the high speed transducers for both static and dynamic pitching configurations. The uncertainties associated with Weiner deconvolution are also quantified for the measurements.

  2. Construction and Test of Low Cost X-Ray Tomography Scanner for Physical-Chemical Analysis and Nondestructive Inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Jose Martins Jr. de; Martins, Antonio Cesar Germano

    2009-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) refers to the cross-sectional imaging of an object measuring the transmitted radiation at different directions. In this work, we describe the development of a low cost micro-CT X-ray scanner that is being developed for nondestructive testing. This tomograph operates using a microfocus X-ray source and contains a silicon photodiode as detectors. The performance of the system, by its spatial resolution, has been estimated through its Modulation Transfer Function-MTF and the obtained value at 10% of MTF is 661 μm. It was built as a general purpose nondestructive testing device.

  3. The design of the detector and collimators for a hybrid scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauramo, E.; Virjo, A.

    1977-01-01

    The hybrid scanner is a scanning device in which a long crystal with two or more photomultiplier (PM) tubes acts as a gamma camera along the crystal axis; the device acts as a linear scanner in a direction perpendicular to the crystal axis. A detailed analysis of the intrinsic resolution and uniformity is given for a two-PM-tube hybrid scanner (with one PM tube at each end) and the expressions derived should help the designer to choose the best crystal system. Collimation theory is discussed for the general hybrid scanner. Expressions and graphs are given to help in the design of a collimator with the best balance between the conflicting requirements of resolution, sensitivity, depth independence and freedom from artifacts (collimator holes may be seen in the image at high energy). Examples of practical collimators are given for energies of 80 to 140, 364, 511, 662 and 840 keV. (author)

  4. Accuracy and efficiency of full-arch digitalization and 3D printing: A comparison between desktop model scanners, an intraoral scanner, a CBCT model scan, and stereolithographic 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesemann, Christian; Muallah, Jonas; Mah, James; Bumann, Axel

    2017-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare the accuracy and time efficiency of an indirect and direct digitalization workflow with that of a three-dimensional (3D) printer in order to identify the most suitable method for orthodontic use. A master model was measured with a coordinate measuring instrument. The distances measured were the intercanine width, the intermolar width, and the dental arch length. Sixty-four scans were taken with each of the desktop scanners R900 and R700 (3Shape), the intraoral scanner TRIOS Color Pod (3Shape), and the Promax 3D Mid cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit (Planmeca). All scans were measured with measuring software. One scan was selected and printed 37 times on the D35 stereolithographic 3D printer (Innovation MediTech). The printed models were measured again using the coordinate measuring instrument. The most accurate results were obtained by the R900. The R700 and the TRIOS intraoral scanner showed comparable results. CBCT-3D-rendering with the Promax 3D Mid CBCT unit revealed significantly higher accuracy with regard to dental casts than dental impressions. 3D printing offered a significantly higher level of deviation than digitalization with desktop scanners or an intraoral scanner. The chairside time required for digital impressions was 27% longer than for conventional impressions. Conventional impressions, model casting, and optional digitization with desktop scanners remains the recommended workflow process. For orthodontic demands, intraoral scanners are a useful alternative for full-arch scans. For prosthodontic use, the scanning scope should be less than one quadrant and three additional teeth.

  5. Quantitative spectral K-edge imaging in preclinical photon-counting x-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Anke; Roessl, Ewald; Kneepkens, Esther; Thran, Axel; Brendel, Bernhard; Martens, Gerhard; Proska, Roland; Nicolay, Klaas; Grüll, Holger

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility and the accuracy of spectral computed tomography (spectral CT) to determine the tissue concentrations and localization of high-attenuation, iodine-based contrast agents in mice. Iodine tissue concentrations determined with spectral CT are compared with concentrations measured with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). All animal procedures were performed according to the US National Institutes of Health principles of laboratory animal care and were approved by the ethical review committee of Maastricht, The Netherlands. Healthy Swiss mice (n = 4) were injected with an iodinated emulsion radiolabeled with indium as multimodal contrast agent for CT and SPECT. The CT and SPECT scans were acquired using a dedicated small-animal SPECT/CT system. Subsequently, scans were performed with a preclinical spectral CT scanner equipped with a photon-counting detector and 6 energy threshold levels. Quantitative data analysis of SPECT and spectral CT scans were obtained using 3-dimensional volumes-of-interest drawing methods. The ICP-MS on dissected organs was performed to determine iodine uptake per organ and was compared with the amounts determined from spectral CT and SPECT. Iodine concentrations obtained with image-processed spectral CT data correlated well with data obtained either with noninvasive SPECT imaging (slope = 0.96, r = 0.75) or with ICP-MS (slope = 0.99, r = 0.89) in tissue samples. This preclinical proof-of-concept study shows the in vivo quantification of iodine concentrations in tissues using spectral CT. Our multimodal imaging approach with spectral CT and SPECT using radiolabeled iodinated emulsions together with ICP-based quantification allows a direct comparison of all methods. Benchmarked against ICP-MS data, spectral CT in the present implementation shows a slight underestimation of organ iodine concentrations compared

  6. Estimation of spectral distribution of sky radiance using a commercial digital camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masanori; Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Murata, Isao

    2016-01-10

    Methods for estimating spectral distribution of sky radiance from images captured by a digital camera and for accurately estimating spectral responses of the camera are proposed. Spectral distribution of sky radiance is represented as a polynomial of the wavelength, with coefficients obtained from digital RGB counts by linear transformation. The spectral distribution of radiance as measured is consistent with that obtained by spectrometer and radiative transfer simulation for wavelengths of 430-680 nm, with standard deviation below 1%. Preliminary applications suggest this method is useful for detecting clouds and studying the relation between irradiance at the ground and cloud distribution.

  7. Transfer learning improves supervised image segmentation across imaging protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Opbroek, Annegreet; Ikram, M. Arfan; Vernooij, Meike W.

    2015-01-01

    with slightly different characteristics. The performance of the four transfer classifiers was compared to that of standard supervised classification on two MRI brain-segmentation tasks with multi-site data: white matter, gray matter, and CSF segmentation; and white-matter- /MS-lesion segmentation......The variation between images obtained with different scanners or different imaging protocols presents a major challenge in automatic segmentation of biomedical images. This variation especially hampers the application of otherwise successful supervised-learning techniques which, in order to perform...... well, often require a large amount of labeled training data that is exactly representative of the target data. We therefore propose to use transfer learning for image segmentation. Transfer-learning techniques can cope with differences in distributions between training and target data, and therefore...

  8. Detector Position Estimation for PET Scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Larry; Miyaoka, Robert; Lewellen, Tom; Alessio, Adam; Kinahan, Paul

    2012-06-11

    Physical positioning of scintillation crystal detector blocks in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners is not always exact. We test a proof of concept methodology for the determination of the six degrees of freedom for detector block positioning errors by utilizing a rotating point source over stepped axial intervals. To test our method, we created computer simulations of seven Micro Crystal Element Scanner (MiCES) PET systems with randomized positioning errors. The computer simulations show that our positioning algorithm can estimate the positions of the block detectors to an average of one-seventh of the crystal pitch tangentially, and one-third of the crystal pitch axially. Virtual acquisitions of a point source grid and a distributed phantom show that our algorithm improves both the quantitative and qualitative accuracy of the reconstructed objects. We believe this estimation algorithm is a practical and accurate method for determining the spatial positions of scintillation detector blocks.

  9. Detector position estimation for PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, Larry; Miyaoka, Robert; Lewellen, Tom; Alessio, Adam; Kinahan, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Physical positioning of scintillation crystal detector blocks in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanners is not always exact. We test a proof of concept methodology for the determination of the six degrees of freedom for detector block positioning errors by utilizing a rotating point source over stepped axial intervals. To test our method, we created computer simulations of seven Micro Crystal Element Scanner (MiCES) PET systems with randomized positioning errors. The computer simulations show that our positioning algorithm can estimate the positions of the block detectors to an average of one-seventh of the crystal pitch tangentially, and one-third of the crystal pitch axially. Virtual acquisitions of a point source grid and a distributed phantom show that our algorithm improves both the quantitative and qualitative accuracy of the reconstructed objects. We believe this estimation algorithm is a practical and accurate method for determining the spatial positions of scintillation detector blocks.

  10. AN AUTOMATIC PROCEDURE FOR COMBINING DIGITAL IMAGES AND LASER SCANNER DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Moussa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Besides improving both the geometry and the visual quality of the model, the integration of close-range photogrammetry and terrestrial laser scanning techniques directs at filling gaps in laser scanner point clouds to avoid modeling errors, reconstructing more details in higher resolution and recovering simple structures with less geometric details. Thus, within this paper a flexible approach for the automatic combination of digital images and laser scanner data is presented. Our approach comprises two methods for data fusion. The first method starts by a marker-free registration of digital images based on a point-based environment model (PEM of a scene which stores the 3D laser scanner point clouds associated with intensity and RGB values. The PEM allows the extraction of accurate control information for the direct computation of absolute camera orientations with redundant information by means of accurate space resection methods. In order to use the computed relations between the digital images and the laser scanner data, an extended Helmert (seven-parameter transformation is introduced and its parameters are estimated. Precedent to that, in the second method, the local relative orientation parameters of the camera images are calculated by means of an optimized Structure and Motion (SaM reconstruction method. Then, using the determined transformation parameters results in having absolute oriented images in relation to the laser scanner data. With the resulting absolute orientations we have employed robust dense image reconstruction algorithms to create oriented dense image point clouds, which are automatically combined with the laser scanner data to form a complete detailed representation of a scene. Examples of different data sets are shown and experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented procedures.

  11. Ultra-High-Resolution Computed Tomography of the Lung: Image Quality of a Prototype Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Muramatsu, Yukio; Gomi, Shiho; Suzuki, Masahiro; Nagasawa, Hirobumi; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Aso, Tomohiko; Muramatsu, Yoshihisa; Tsuchida, Takaaki; Tsuta, Koji; Maeshima, Akiko Miyagi; Tochigi, Naobumi; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Sugihara, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The image noise and image quality of a prototype ultra-high-resolution computed tomography (U-HRCT) scanner was evaluated and compared with those of conventional high-resolution CT (C-HRCT) scanners. Materials and Methods: This study was approved by the institutional review board. A U-HRCT scanner prototype with 0.25 mm × 4 rows and operating at 120 mAs was used. The C-HRCT images were obtained using a 0.5 mm × 16 or 0.5 mm × 64 detector-row CT scanner operating at 150 mAs. Images fr...

  12. Measuring Identification and Quantification Errors in Spectral CT Material Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Younis Raja

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Material decomposition methods are used to identify and quantify multiple tissue components in spectral CT but there is no published method to quantify the misidentification of materials. This paper describes a new method for assessing misidentification and mis-quantification in spectral CT. We scanned a phantom containing gadolinium (1, 2, 4, 8 mg/mL, hydroxyapatite (54.3, 211.7, 808.5 mg/mL, water and vegetable oil using a MARS spectral scanner equipped with a poly-energetic X-ray source operated at 118 kVp and a CdTe Medipix3RX camera. Two imaging protocols were used; both with and without 0.375 mm external brass filter. A proprietary material decomposition method identified voxels as gadolinium, hydroxyapatite, lipid or water. Sensitivity and specificity information was used to evaluate material misidentification. Biological samples were also scanned. There were marked differences in identification and quantification between the two protocols even though spectral and linear correlation of gadolinium and hydroxyapatite in the reconstructed images was high and no qualitative segmentation differences in the material decomposed images were observed. At 8 mg/mL, gadolinium was correctly identified for both protocols, but concentration was underestimated by over half for the unfiltered protocol. At 1 mg/mL, gadolinium was misidentified in 38% of voxels for the filtered protocol and 58% of voxels for the unfiltered protocol. Hydroxyapatite was correctly identified at the two higher concentrations for both protocols, but mis-quantified for the unfiltered protocol. Gadolinium concentration as measured in the biological specimen showed a two-fold difference between protocols. In future, this methodology could be used to compare and optimize scanning protocols, image reconstruction methods, and methods for material differentiation in spectral CT.

  13. Radiation safety concerns and diagnostic reference levels for computed tomography scanners in Tamil Nadu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingstone, Roshan S.; Dinakaran, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation safety in computed tomography (CT) scanners is of concern due its widespread use in the field of radiological imaging. This study intends to evaluate radiation doses imparted to patients undergoing thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations and formulate regional diagnostic reference levels (DRL) in Tamil Nadu, South India. In-site CT dose measurement was performed in 127 CT scanners in Tamil Nadu for a period of 2 years as a part of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB)-funded project. Out of the 127 CT scanners,13 were conventional; 53 single-slice helical scanners (SSHS); 44 multislice CT (MSCT) scanners; and 17 refurbished scanners. CT dose index (CTDI) was measured using a 32-cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-body phantom in each CT scanner. Dose length product (DLP) for different anatomical regions was generated using CTDI values. The regional DRLs for thorax, abdomen and pelvis examinations were 557, 521 and 294 mGy cm, respectively. The mean effective dose was estimated using the DLP values and was found to be 8.04, 6.69 and 4.79 mSv for thorax, abdomen and pelvic CT examinations, respectively. The establishment of DRLs in this study is the first step towards optimization of CT doses in the Indian context. (author)

  14. Improved Scanners for Microscopic Hyperspectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chengye

    2009-01-01

    Improved scanners to be incorporated into hyperspectral microscope-based imaging systems have been invented. Heretofore, in microscopic imaging, including spectral imaging, it has been customary to either move the specimen relative to the optical assembly that includes the microscope or else move the entire assembly relative to the specimen. It becomes extremely difficult to control such scanning when submicron translation increments are required, because the high magnification of the microscope enlarges all movements in the specimen image on the focal plane. To overcome this difficulty, in a system based on this invention, no attempt would be made to move either the specimen or the optical assembly. Instead, an objective lens would be moved within the assembly so as to cause translation of the image at the focal plane: the effect would be equivalent to scanning in the focal plane. The upper part of the figure depicts a generic proposed microscope-based hyperspectral imaging system incorporating the invention. The optical assembly of this system would include an objective lens (normally, a microscope objective lens) and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera. The objective lens would be mounted on a servomotor-driven translation stage, which would be capable of moving the lens in precisely controlled increments, relative to the camera, parallel to the focal-plane scan axis. The output of the CCD camera would be digitized and fed to a frame grabber in a computer. The computer would store the frame-grabber output for subsequent viewing and/or processing of images. The computer would contain a position-control interface board, through which it would control the servomotor. There are several versions of the invention. An essential feature common to all versions is that the stationary optical subassembly containing the camera would also contain a spatial window, at the focal plane of the objective lens, that would pass only a selected portion of the image. In one version

  15. Inter-operator and inter-device agreement and reliability of the SEM Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clendenin, Marta; Jaradeh, Kindah; Shamirian, Anasheh; Rhodes, Shannon L

    2015-02-01

    The SEM Scanner is a medical device designed for use by healthcare providers as part of pressure ulcer prevention programs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the inter-rater and inter-device agreement and reliability of the SEM Scanner. Thirty-one (31) volunteers free of pressure ulcers or broken skin at the sternum, sacrum, and heels were assessed with the SEM Scanner. Each of three operators utilized each of three devices to collect readings from four anatomical sites (sternum, sacrum, left and right heels) on each subject for a total of 108 readings per subject collected over approximately 30 min. For each combination of operator-device-anatomical site, three SEM readings were collected. Inter-operator and inter-device agreement and reliability were estimated. Over the course of this study, more than 3000 SEM Scanner readings were collected. Agreement between operators was good with mean differences ranging from -0.01 to 0.11. Inter-operator and inter-device reliability exceeded 0.80 at all anatomical sites assessed. The results of this study demonstrate the high reliability and good agreement of the SEM Scanner across different operators and different devices. Given the limitations of current methods to prevent and detect pressure ulcers, the SEM Scanner shows promise as an objective, reliable tool for assessing the presence or absence of pressure-induced tissue damage such as pressure ulcers. Copyright © 2015 Bruin Biometrics, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. A double-bent planar leaf flexure guide for a nano-scanner: experimental report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Jong-Moon; Lee, Young-Hyoung; Lee, Dong-Yeon

    2014-01-01

    We describe an experimental study on the double-bent leaf flexure-guided nano-scanner introduced in a previous paper [J. Korean Phy. Soc. 57, 1581 (2010)]. The optimally-designed nanoscanner was fabricated. Its performances were verified using a finite element analysis (FEA). The nano-scanner is actuated by a voice coil motor. Its characteristics were measured with a laser interferometer. The first resonant frequency is calculated as 17.1 Hz. The performances of the nano-scanner, including sine tracking capability, a multi-step response, and range of travel check were evaluated using various experimental procedures. Test results reveal that the scanner traveled over a 4.0 mm range and had good nano-precision (4 nm).

  17. A sweep plate emittance scanner for high-power CW ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debiak, T.W.; Ng, Y.; Sredniawski, J.; Stasi, W.

    1996-01-01

    Sweep plate scanners are preferred for emittance measurement due to their versatility, simplicity, and precision. At the Advanced Technology and Development Center of Northrop Grumman, we have routinely used these devices for characterization of injector beams with less than 20 W/cm 2 average power density. To characterize higher power beams, like those required for production of tritium or for radioactive waste transmutation, the scanner pod and data collection algorithm must be redesigned due to the possibility of melting the scanner's protective front face or distorting the precision entrance knife edges. Among the methods we have used to mitigate these effects, one consists of drastically reducing the amount of time required for data collection. In this method, the emittance scanner pod traverses the beam in two passes, each requiring less than 0.5 second. In the first pass, the phase space limits of the beam are determined. In the second pass, data is collected primarily within the phase space region limits determined in the first pass. In this way, enough points are collected to assure that the precision of the measurement is high, even though the data collection time for each scan is less than 0.5 second. This paper will describe the layout of the scanner components, the data collection electronics and algorithm, and the data analysis. (author)

  18. Radiation and combined heat transfer in channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamonis, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents numerical methods of calculation of radiative and combined heat transfer in channel flows of radiating as well as nonradiating media. Results obtained in calculations for flow conditions of combustion products from organic fuel products are given and methods used in determining the spectral optical properties of molecular gases are analyzed. The book presents applications of heat transfer in solving problems. Topic covered are as follows: optical properties of molecular gases; transfer equations for combined heat transfer; experimental technique; convective heat transfer in heated gas flows; radiative heat transfer in gaseous media; combined heat transfer; and radiative and combined heat transfer in applied problems

  19. Monitoring scanner calibration using the image-derived arterial blood SUV in whole-body FDG-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Jens; Hofheinz, Frank; Apostolova, Ivayla; Kreissl, Michael C; Kotzerke, Jörg; van den Hoff, Jörg

    2018-05-15

    The current de facto standard for quantification of tumor metabolism in oncological whole-body PET is the standardized uptake value (SUV) approach. SUV determination requires accurate scanner calibration. Residual inaccuracies of the calibration lead to biased SUV values. Especially, this can adversely affect multicenter trials where it is difficult to ensure reliable cross-calibration across participating sites. The goal of the present work was the evaluation of a new method for monitoring scanner calibration utilizing the image-derived arterial blood SUV (BSUV) averaged over a sufficiently large number of whole-body FDG-PET investigations. Data of 681 patients from three sites which underwent routine 18 F-FDG PET/CT or PET/MR were retrospectively analyzed. BSUV was determined in the descending aorta using a three-dimensional ROI concentric to the aorta's centerline. The ROI was delineated in the CT or MRI images and transferred to the PET images. A minimum ROI volume of 5 mL and a concentric safety margin to the aortic wall was observed. Mean BSUV, standard deviation (SD), and standard error of the mean (SE) were computed for three groups of patients at each site, investigated 2 years apart, respectively, with group sizes between 53 and 100 patients. Differences of mean BSUV between the individual groups and sites were determined. SD (SE) of BSUV in the different groups ranged from 14.3 to 20.7% (1.7 to 2.8%). Differences of mean BSUV between intra-site groups were small (1.1-6.3%). Only one out of nine of these differences reached statistical significance. Inter-site differences were distinctly larger (12.6-25.1%) and highly significant (PPET investigations is a viable approach for ensuring consistent scanner calibration over time and across different sites. We propose this approach as a quality control and cross-calibration tool augmenting established phantom-based procedures.

  20. A novel construction of complex-valued Gaussian processes with arbitrary spectral densities and its application to excitation energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin; Cao, Jianshu; Silbey, Robert J

    2013-06-14

    The recent experimental discoveries about excitation energy transfer (EET) in light harvesting antenna (LHA) attract a lot of interest. As an open non-equilibrium quantum system, the EET demands more rigorous theoretical framework to understand the interaction between system and environment and therein the evolution of reduced density matrix. A phonon is often used to model the fluctuating environment and convolutes the reduced quantum system temporarily. In this paper, we propose a novel way to construct complex-valued Gaussian processes to describe thermal quantum phonon bath exactly by converting the convolution of influence functional into the time correlation of complex Gaussian random field. Based on the construction, we propose a rigorous and efficient computational method, the covariance decomposition and conditional propagation scheme, to simulate the temporarily entangled reduced system. The new method allows us to study the non-Markovian effect without perturbation under the influence of different spectral densities of the linear system-phonon coupling coefficients. Its application in the study of EET in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson model Hamiltonian under four different spectral densities is discussed. Since the scaling of our algorithm is linear due to its Monte Carlo nature, the future application of the method for large LHA systems is attractive. In addition, this method can be used to study the effect of correlated initial condition on the reduced dynamics in the future.

  1. Non-Markovian reduced dynamics of ultrafast charge transfer at an oligothiophene–fullerene heterojunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Keith H., E-mail: keith.hughes@bangor.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Cahier, Benjamin [School of Chemistry, Bangor University, Bangor, Gwynedd LL57 2UW (United Kingdom); Martinazzo, Rocco [Dipartimento di Chimica Università degli Studi di Milano, v. Golgi 19, 20133 Milano (Italy); Tamura, Hiroyuki [WPI-Advanced Institute for Material Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Burghardt, Irene [Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Goethe University Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Str. 7, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • Quantum dynamical study of exciton dissociation at a heterojunction interface. • The non-Markovian quantum dynamics involves a highly structured spectral density. • Spectral density is reconstructed from an effective mode transformation of the Hamiltonian. • The dynamics is studied using the hierarchical equations of motion approach. • It was found that the temperature has little effect on the charge transfer. - Abstract: We extend our recent quantum dynamical study of the exciton dissociation and charge transfer at an oligothiophene–fullerene heterojunction interface (Tamura et al., 2012) [6] by investigating the process using the non-perturbative hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) approach. Based upon an effective mode reconstruction of the spectral density the effect of temperature on the charge transfer is studied using reduced density matrices. It was found that the temperature had little effect on the charge transfer and a coherent dynamics persists over the first few tens of femtoseconds, indicating that the primary charge transfer step proceeds by an activationless pathway.

  2. Landsat 1-5 Multispectral Scanner V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract: The Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) was a sensor onboard Landsats 1 through 5 and acquired images of the Earth nearly continuously from July 1972 to...

  3. Important considerations for radiochromic film dosimetry with flatbed CCD scanners and EBT GAFCHROMIC[reg] film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, Bart D.; Kozelka, Jakub; Ranade, Manisha K.; Li, Jonathan G.; Simon, William E.; Dempsey, James F.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we present three significant artifacts that have the potential to negatively impact the accuracy and precision of film dosimetry measurements made using GAFCHROMIC[reg] EBT radiochromic film when read out with CCD flatbed scanners. Films were scanned using three commonly employed instruments: a Macbeth TD932 spot densitometer, an Epson Expression 1680 CCD array scanner, and a Microtek ScanMaker i900 CCD array scanner. For the two scanners we assessed the variation in optical density (OD) of GAFCHROMIC EBT film with scanning bed position, angular rotation of the film with respect to the scan line direction, and temperature inside the scanner due to repeated scanning. Scanning uniform radiochromic films demonstrated a distinct bowing effect in profiles in the direction of the CCD array with a nonuniformity of up to 17%. Profiles along a direction orthogonal to the CCD array demonstrated a 7% variation. A strong angular dependence was found in measurements made with the flatbed scanners; the effect could not be reproduced with the spot densitometer. An IMRT quality assurance film was scanned twice rotating the film 90 deg. between the scans. For films scanned on the Epson scanner, up to 12% variation was observed in unirradiated EBT films rotated between 0 deg. and 90 deg. , which decreased to approximately 8% for EBT films irradiated to 300 cGy. Variations of up to 80% were observed for films scanned with the Microtek scanner. The scanners were found to significantly increase the film temperature with repeated scanning. Film temperature between 18 and 33 deg. C caused OD changes of approximately 7%. Considering these effects, we recommend adherence to a strict scanning protocol that includes: maintaining the orientation of films scanned on flatbed scanners, limiting scanning to the central portion of the scanner bed, and limiting the number of consecutive scans to minimize changes in OD caused by film heating

  4. SU-F-I-54: Spatial Resolution Studies in Proton CT Using a Phase-II Prototype Head Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plautz, Tia E.; Johnson, R. P.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Zatserklyaniy, A. [University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Bashkirov, V.; Hurley, R. F.; Schulte, R. W. [Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Piersimoni, P. [University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Giacometti, V. [University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the pre-clinical (phase II) head scanner developed for proton computed tomography (pCT) by the pCT collaboration. To evaluate the spatial resolution achievable by this system. Methods: Our phase II proton CT scanner prototype consists of two silicon telescopes that track individual protons upstream and downstream from a phantom, and a 5-stage scintillation detector that measures a combination of the residual energy and range of the proton. Residual energy is converted to water equivalent path length (WEPL) of the protons in the scanned object. The set of WEPL values and associated paths of protons passing through the object over a 360° angular scan is processed by an iterative parallelizable reconstruction algorithm that runs on GP-GPU hardware. A custom edge phantom composed of water-equivalent polymer and tissue-equivalent material inserts was constructed. The phantom was first simulated in Geant4 and then built to perform experimental beam tests with 200 MeV protons at the Northwestern Medicine Chicago Proton Center. The oversampling method was used to construct radial and azimuthal edge spread functions and modulation transfer functions. The spatial resolution was defined by the 10% point of the modulation transfer function in units of lp/cm. Results: The spatial resolution of the image was found to be strongly correlated with the radial position of the insert but independent of the relative stopping power of the insert. The spatial resolution varies between roughly 4 and 6 lp/cm in both the the radial and azimuthal directions depending on the radial displacement of the edge. Conclusion: The amount of image degradation due to our detector system is small compared with the effects of multiple Coulomb scattering, pixelation of the image and the reconstruction algorithm. Improvements in reconstruction will be made in order to achieve the theoretical limits of spatial resolution.

  5. Scanner and irradiation: optimization of protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchemin, J.; Martine-Rollet, B.; Lienart, S.; Mobailly, M.; Florin, J.P.; Beregi, J.P.; Puech, N.

    2006-01-01

    The irradiation of the patient or the personnel increased with the arrival of the multi-detector scanners. The objective of this work is to realize a didactic poster to inform and make sensitive on the irradiation with scan so that to propose solutions of protection. (N.C.)

  6. Linac beam core modeling from wire-scanner data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, A.G.

    1977-08-01

    This study introduces mathematical modeling of accelerator beams from data collected by wire scanners. Details about a beam core D(x,x',y,y') are examined in several situations: (a) for a discretization of the projection into xy-space, a maximum-entropy solution and a minimum-norm solution are developed and discussed, (b) for undiscretized xy-subspace, a two-dimensional Gaussian approximation D(x,.,y,.) = a exp [α(x-x 0 ) 2 + β(x-x 0 )(y-y 0 ) + γ(y-y 0 ) 2 ] is obtained by least squares, and (c) for four-dimensional space, the fit of a single Gaussian to data from a succession of wire scanners is investigated

  7. Isocount scintillation scanner with preset statistical data reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikebe, J.; Yamaguchi, H.; Nawa, O.A.

    1975-01-01

    A scintillation detector scans an object such as a live body along horizontal straight scanning lines in such a manner that the scintillation detector is stopped at a scanning point during the time interval T required for counting a predetermined number of N pulses. The rate R/sub N/ = N/T is then calculated and the output signal pulses the number of which represents the rate R or the corresponding output signal is used as the recording signal for forming the scintigram. In contrast to the usual scanner, the isocount scanner scans an object stepwise in order to gather data with statistically uniform reliability

  8. Methods and apparatus for laser beam scanners with different actuating mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si-hai; Xiang, Si-hua; Wu, Xin; Dong, Shan; Xiao, Ding; Zheng, Xia-wei

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, 3 types of laser beam scanner are introduced. One is transmissive beam scanner, which is composed of convex and concave microlens arrays (MLAs). By moving the concave lens in the plane vertical to the optical axis, the incident beam can be deflected in two dimensions. Those two kinds of MLAs are fabricated by thermal reflow and replication process. A set of mechanical scanner frame is fabricated with the two MLAs assembling in it. The testing result shown that the beam deflection angles are 9.5° and 9.6°, in the 2 dimension(2D) with the scanning frequency of 2 HZ and 8 HZ, respectively. The second type of laser beam scanner is actuated by voice coil actuators (VCAs). Based on ANSOFT MAXWELL software, we have designed VCAs with small size and large force which have optimized properties. The model of VCAs is built using AutoCAD and is analyzed by Ansoft maxwell. According to the simulation results, high performance VCAs are fabricated and tested. The result is that the force of the VCAs is 6.39N/A, and the displacement is +/-2.5mm. A set up of beam scanner is fabricated and actuated by the designed VCAs. The testing result shown that the two dimensional scanning angle is 15° and 10° respectively at the frequency of 60HZ. The two dimensional scanning angle is 8.3° and 6° respectively at the frequency of 100HZ. The third type of scanner is actuated by amplified piezoelectric actuators (APAs). The scanning mirror is actuated by the piezoelectric (PZ) actuators with the scanning frequency of 700HZ, 250HZ and 87HZ respectively. The optical scanning angle is +/-0.5° at the three frequencies.

  9. High-picture quality industrial CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Takao; Nishide, Akihiko; Fujii, Masashi.

    1989-01-01

    Industrial X-ray-CT-scanners, which provide cross-sectional images of a tested sample without destroying it, are attracting attention as a new nondestructive inspection device. In 1982, Toshiba commenced the development of industrial CT scanners, and introduced the 'TOSCANER' -3000 and-4000 series. Now, the state of the art 'TOSCANER'-20000 series of CT systems has been developed incorporating the latest computer tomography and image processing technology, such as the T9506 image processor. One of the advantages of this system is its applicability to a wide range of X-ray energy . The 'TOSCANER'-20000 series can be utilized for inspecting castings and other materials with relatively low-transparency to X-rays, as well as ceramics, composite materials and other materials with high X-ray transparency. A further feature of the new system is its high-picture quality, with a high-spatial resolution resulting from a pixel size of 0.2x0.2(mm). (author)

  10. Interferometric Laser Scanner for Direction Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Kaloshin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we explore the potential capabilities of new laser scanning-based method for direction determination. The method for fully coherent beams is extended to the case when interference pattern is produced in the turbulent atmosphere by two partially coherent sources. The performed theoretical analysis identified the conditions under which stable pattern may form on extended paths of 0.5–10 km in length. We describe a method for selecting laser scanner parameters, ensuring the necessary operability range in the atmosphere for any possible turbulence characteristics. The method is based on analysis of the mean intensity of interference pattern, formed by two partially coherent sources of optical radiation. Visibility of interference pattern is estimated as a function of propagation pathlength, structure parameter of atmospheric turbulence, and spacing of radiation sources, producing the interference pattern. It is shown that, when atmospheric turbulences are moderately strong, the contrast of interference pattern of laser scanner may ensure its applicability at ranges up to 10 km.

  11. Interferometric Laser Scanner for Direction Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloshin, Gennady; Lukin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the potential capabilities of new laser scanning-based method for direction determination. The method for fully coherent beams is extended to the case when interference pattern is produced in the turbulent atmosphere by two partially coherent sources. The performed theoretical analysis identified the conditions under which stable pattern may form on extended paths of 0.5–10 km in length. We describe a method for selecting laser scanner parameters, ensuring the necessary operability range in the atmosphere for any possible turbulence characteristics. The method is based on analysis of the mean intensity of interference pattern, formed by two partially coherent sources of optical radiation. Visibility of interference pattern is estimated as a function of propagation pathlength, structure parameter of atmospheric turbulence, and spacing of radiation sources, producing the interference pattern. It is shown that, when atmospheric turbulences are moderately strong, the contrast of interference pattern of laser scanner may ensure its applicability at ranges up to 10 km. PMID:26805841

  12. Modeling and Calibration of a Novel One-Mirror Galvanometric Laser Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengyi Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A laser stripe sensor has limited application when a point cloud of geometric samples on the surface of the object needs to be collected, so a galvanometric laser scanner is designed by using a one-mirror galvanometer element as its mechanical device to drive the laser stripe to sweep along the object. A novel mathematical model is derived for the proposed galvanometer laser scanner without any position assumptions and then a model-driven calibration procedure is proposed. Compared with available model-driven approaches, the influence of machining and assembly errors is considered in the proposed model. Meanwhile, a plane-constraint-based approach is proposed to extract a large number of calibration points effectively and accurately to calibrate the galvanometric laser scanner. Repeatability and accuracy of the galvanometric laser scanner are evaluated on the automobile production line to verify the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed calibration method. Experimental results show that the proposed calibration approach yields similar measurement performance compared with a look-up table calibration method.

  13. Accuracy of four different digital intraoral scanners: effects of the presence of orthodontic brackets and wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoo-Ran; Park, Ji-Man; Chun, Youn-Sic; Lee, Kkot-Nim; Kim, Minji

    The objective of this study was to compare the accuracy of four different digital intraoral scanners and the effects of buccal brackets and orthodontic wire. For this study, three sets of models (Control model, BKT model with buccal bracket, and WBKT model with buccal bracket and orthodontic wire) were scanned using four different types of intraoral scanners: E4D dentist, iTero, Trios, and Zfx IntraScan. The mesiodistal width of the teeth, intercanine width, and intermolar width measured by four scanners were compared. Three-dimensional (3D) images of the brackets were taken using the four scanners. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA, independent t test, and post-hoc Tukey test at a significance level of P brackets and orthodontic wire. Comparison of 3D bracket images scanned by the four scanners showed differences in image distortion among the scanners. Bracket characteristics did not affect the 3D bracket images. The four intraoral scanners used in this study differed in accuracy. However, the results acquired by iTero and Trios were more reliable. Effects of buccal brackets and orthodontic wire on the 3D images taken by intraoral scanners were not clinically significant.

  14. The mechatronic design of a fast wire scanner in IHEP U-70 accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranov, V.T. [Institute for High Energy Physics in National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Protvino 142281 (Russian Federation); Makhov, S.S. [Microprivod Ltd., Moscow 111123 (Russian Federation); Savin, D.A.; Terekhov, V.I. [Institute for High Energy Physics in National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute”, Protvino 142281 (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-11

    This paper presents the mechatronic design of a fast wire scanner based on a servomotor. The design of the wire scanner is motivated by the need to measure the transverse profile of the high power proton and carbon beams at the IHEP U-70 accelerator. This paper formulates the requirements to the fast wire scanner system for the high intensity proton beam at the U-70 accelerator. The results on the design of electro-mechanical device for the wire scanner with a wire traveling speed 10–20 m/s are presented. The solution consists in a brushless servomotor and standard motor control electronics. High radiation levels in the accelerator enclosure dictate the use of a resolver as the position feedback element.

  15. Financing technical-medical activities. CT scanner example in France (1986)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, C.; Lefaure, C.; Fagnani, F.

    1988-01-01

    To analyze the french methods for financing technical-medical activities as CT scanners, and to assess if they can face, or not, the management constraints of such activities a financial simulation has been executed. First, current expenditures are totalized (including depreciations and financial charges) with variations according to the numer of examinations per year. Costs are classified especially according to fixed and variable charges: the weight of fixed charges, especially equipment charges, is the most significant. It's very high in yearly expenditures. Most, that involves a very fast decreasing cost with increasing number of procedures. Second, consequences of such accounts are analyzed: - on private CT scanners, Payed with a charge per examination whatever would be the factor's cost; - on public CT scanners, payed with an annual allowance; in this case charges equal receipts whatever would be the cost for a procedure. Third, a break point is defined; either the annual activity is higher: there would be an excedent; either it is lower: there would be a deficit. Then, those results are reported to CT-scanners activity's data in France (1986). After all, financing systems themselves, are discussed and a few hypothesis to explain those desadjustments between charges and their financing way are suggested [fr

  16. A comprehensive spectral theory of zonal-mode dynamics in trapped electron mode turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P.W.; Gatto, R.; Baver, D.A.; Fernandez, E.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive, self-consistent theory for spectral dynamics in trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence offers critical new understanding and insights into zonal-mode physics. This theory shows that 1) zonal mode structure, anisotropy, excitation, and temporal behavior arise at and from the interface of nonlinear advection and linear wave properties; 2) waves induce a marked spectral energy-transfer anisotropy that preferentially drives zonal modes relative to non zonal modes; 3) triplet correlations involving density (as opposed to those involving only flow) mediate the dominant energy transfer at long wavelengths; 4) energy transfer becomes inverse in the presence of wave anisotropy, where otherwise it is forward; 5) zonal-mode excitation is accompanied by excitation of a spectrum of damped eigenmodes, making zonal modes nonlinearly damped; and 6) the combination of anisotropic transfer to zonal modes and their nonlinear damping make this the dominant saturation mechanism for TEM turbulence. This accounts for the reduction of turbulence level by zonal modes, not zonal-flow ExB shearing. (author)

  17. Spectral density of Cooper pairs in two level quantum dot–superconductors Josephson junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhyani, A., E-mail: archana.d2003@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun 248007, Uttarakhand (India); Rawat, P.S. [Department of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun 248007, Uttarakhand (India); Tewari, B.S., E-mail: bstewari@ddn.upes.ac.in [Department of Physics, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun 248007, Uttarakhand (India)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • The present work deals with the study of the electronic spectral density of electron pairs and its effect in charge transport in superconductor-quantum dot-superconductor junctions. • The charge transfer across such junctions can be controlled by changing the positions of the dot level. • The Josephson supercurrent can also be tuned by controlling the position of quantum dot energy levels. - Abstract: In the present paper, we report the role of quantum dot energy levels on the electronic spectral density for a two level quantum dot coupled to s-wave superconducting leads. The theoretical arguments in this work are based on the Anderson model so that it necessarily includes dot energies, single particle tunneling and superconducting order parameter for BCS superconductors. The expression for single particle spectral function is obtained by using the Green's function equation of motion technique. On the basis of numerical computation of spectral function of superconducting leads, it has been found that the charge transfer across such junctions can be controlled by the positions and availability of the dot levels.

  18. Time scales of pattern evolution from cross-spectrum analysis of advanced very high resolution radiometer and coastal zone color scanner imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman, Kenneth L.; Abbott, Mark R.

    1994-01-01

    We have selected square subareas (110 km on a side) from coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) and advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) images for 1981 in the California Current region off northern California for which we could identify sequences of cloud-free data over periods of days to weeks. We applied a two-dimensional fast Fourier transformation to images after median filtering, (x, y) plane removal, and cosine tapering. We formed autospectra and coherence spectra as functions of a scalar wavenumber. Coherence estimates between pairs of images were plotted against time separation between images for several wide wavenumber bands to provide a temporal lagged coherence function. The temporal rate of loss of correlation (decorrelation time scale) in surface patterns provides a measure of the rate of pattern change or evolution as a function of spatial dimension. We found that patterns evolved (or lost correlation) approximately twice as rapidly in upwelling jets as in the 'quieter' regions between jets. The rapid evolution of pigment patterns (lifetime of about 1 week or less for scales of 50-100 km) ought to hinder biomass transfer to zooplankton predators compared with phytoplankton patches that persist for longer times. We found no significant differences between the statistics of CZCS and AVHRR images (spectral shape or rate of decorrelation). In addition, in two of the three areas studied, the peak correlation between AVHRR and CZCS images from the same area occurred at zero lag, indicating that the patterns evolved simutaneously. In the third area, maximum coherence between thermal and pigment patterns occurred when pigment images lagged thermal images by 1-2 days, mirroring the expected lag of high pigment behind low temperatures (and high nutrients) in recently upwelled water. We conclude that in dynamic areas such as coastal upwelling systems, the phytoplankton cells (identified by pigment color patterns) behave largely as passive scalars at the

  19. Design and evaluation of a low thermal electromotive force guarded scanner for resistance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Dean G.; Marshall, James A.; Marshall, Thomas A.; Dziuba, Ronald F.

    1999-06-01

    The design and testing of a low thermal electromotive force guarded scanner, developed to provide completely guarded switching when used with actively guarded resistance bridge networks, is described. The design provides a continuous guard circuit trace on the scanner circuit boards that surrounds the relay contacts and protects the measurement circuit from leakages to ground. Modification to the circuit boards and relays of the guarded scanner are explained. Several tests were developed to evaluate the guarding effectiveness, including isolating sections of the guard circuit to create a potential drop between the main and guard circuits. Calibration of standard resistors using the guarded scanner has shown relative differences less than 1×10-6, 30×10-6, and 150×10-6 for measurements made with and without the guarded scanner at nominal resistances of 1, 10, and 100 GΩ, respectively. The substitution method was used to significantly reduce the relative differences between channels to less than 0.5×10-6, 3×10-6, and 30×10-6 for nominal resistances of 1, 10, and 100 GΩ, respectively. Applications for the guarded scanner in automated direct current measurement systems are presented.

  20. A two-dimensional micro scanner integrated with a piezoelectric actuator and piezoresistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Gaofei; You, Zheng

    2009-01-01

    A compact two-dimensional micro scanner with small volume, large deflection angles and high frequency is presented and the two-dimensional laser scanning is achieved by specular reflection. To achieve large deflection angles, the micro scanner excited by a piezoelectric actuator operates in the resonance mode. The scanning frequencies and the maximum scanning angles of the two degrees of freedom are analyzed by modeling and simulation of the structure. For the deflection angle measurement, piezoresistors are integrated in the micro scanner. The appropriate directions and crystal orientations of the piezoresistors are designed to obtain the large piezoresistive coefficients for the high sensitivities. Wheatstone bridges are used to measure the deflection angles of each direction independently and precisely. The scanner is fabricated and packaged with the piezoelectric actuator and the piezoresistors detection circuits in a size of 28 mm×20 mm×18 mm. The experiment shows that the two scanning frequencies are 216.8 Hz and 464.8 Hz, respectively. By an actuation displacement of 10 μm, the scanning range of the two-dimensional micro scanner is above 26° × 23°. The deflection angle measurement sensitivities for two directions are 59 mV/deg and 30 mV/deg, respectively.

  1. High-speed two-dimensional laser scanner based on Bragg gratings stored in photothermorefractive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Arain, Muzammil A; Riza, Nabeel A

    2003-09-10

    A high-speed free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner with high-speed wavelength selection coupled with narrowband volume Bragg gratings stored in photothermorefractive (PTR) glass is reported. The proposed scanner with no moving parts has a modular design with a wide angular scan range, accurate beam pointing, low scanner insertion loss, and two-dimensional beam scan capabilities. We present a complete analysis and design procedure for storing multiple tilted Bragg-grating structures in a single PTR glass volume (for normal incidence) in an optimal fashion. Because the scanner design is modular, many PTR glass volumes (each having multiple tilted Bragg-grating structures) can be stacked together, providing an efficient throughput with operations in both the visible and the infrared (IR) regions. A proof-of-concept experimental study is conducted with four Bragg gratings in independent PTR glass plates, and both visible and IR region scanner operations are demonstrated.

  2. Current segmented gamma-ray scanner technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjork, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    A new generation of segmented gamma-ray scanners has been developed at Los Alamos for scrap and waste measurements at the Savannah River Plant and the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The new designs are highly automated and exhibit special features such as good segmentation and thorough shielding to improve performance

  3. Basic study of entire whole-body PET scanners based on the OpenPET geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.j [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaya, Taiga; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-09-21

    A conventional PET scanner has a 15-25 cm axial field-of-view (FOV) and images a whole body using about six bed positions. An OpenPET geometry can extend the axial FOV with a limited number of detectors. The entire whole-body PET scanner must be able to process a large amount of data effectively. In this work, we study feasibility of the fully 3D entire whole-body PET scanner using the GATE simulation. The OpenPET has 12 block detector rings with the ring diameter of 840 mm and each block detector ring consists of 48 depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors. The OpenPET has the axial length of 895.95 mm with five parts of 58.95 mm open gaps. The OpenPET has higher single data loss than a conventional PET scanner at grouping circuits. NECR of the OpenPET decreases by single data loss. But single data loss is mitigated by separating the axially arranged detector into two parts. Also, multiple coincidences are found to be important for the entire whole-body PET scanner. The entire whole-body PET scanner with the OpenPET geometry promises to provide a large axial FOV with the open space and to have sufficient performance values. But single data loss at the grouping circuits and multiple coincidences are limited to the peak noise equivalent count rate (NECR) for the entire whole-body PET scanner.

  4. Evaluation of scattered radiation emitted from X-ray security scanners on occupational dose to airport personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalah, Entesar; Fakhry, Angham; Mukhtar, Asma; Al Salti, Farah; Bader, May; Khouri, Sara; Al-Zahmi, Reem

    2017-01-01

    Based on security issues and regulations airports are provided with luggage cargo scanners. These scanners utilize ionizing radiation that in principle present health risks toward humans. The study aims to investigate the amount of backscatter produced by passenger luggage and cargo toward airport personnel who are located at different distances from the scanners. To approach our investigation a Thermo Electron Radeye-G probe was used to quantify the backscattered radiation measured in terms of dose-rate emitted from airport scanners, Measurements were taken at the entrance and exit positions of the X-ray tunnel at three different distances (0, 50, and 100 cm) for two different scanners; both scanners include shielding curtains that reduce scattered radiation. Correlation was demonstrated using the Pearson coefficient test. Measurements confirmed an inverse relationship between dose rate and distance. An estimated occupational accumulative dose of 0.88 mSv/y, and 2.04 mSv/y were obtained for personnel working in inspection of carry-on, and cargo, respectively. Findings confirm that the projected dose of security and engineering staff are being well within dose limits. - Highlights: • Backscattered radiation emitted from the airport security scanners is estimated. • Inverse relation observed between backscattered radiation and scanners distance. • Occupational dose for personnel inspecting the scanners were up to 2.04 mSv/y. • The projected dose of security and engineering staff are well within dose limits.

  5. Determining the surface roughness coefficient by 3D Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karmen Fifer Bizjak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, several test methods can be used in the laboratory to determine the roughness of rock joint surfaces.However, true roughness can be distorted and underestimated by the differences in the sampling interval of themeasurement methods. Thus, these measurement methods produce a dead zone and distorted roughness profiles.In this paper a new rock joint surface roughness measurement method is presented, with the use of a camera-typethree-dimensional (3D scanner as an alternative to current methods. For this study, the surfaces of ten samples oftuff were digitized by means of a 3D scanner, and the results were compared with the corresponding Rock JointCoefficient (JRC values. Up until now such 3D scanner have been mostly used in the automotive industry, whereastheir use for comparison with obtained JRC coefficient values in rock mechanics is presented here for the first time.The proposed new method is a faster, more precise and more accurate than other existing test methods, and is apromising technique for use in this area of study in the future.

  6. Precision of dosimetry-related measurements obtained on current multidetector computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Zhang, Di; Kim, Hyun J.; Cody, Dianna D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) intrascanner and interscanner variability has not been well characterized. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the within-run, between-run, and between-scanner precision of physical dosimetry-related measurements collected over the course of 1 yr on three different makes and models of multidetector row CT (MDCT) scanners. Methods: Physical measurements were collected using nine CT scanners (three scanners each of GE VCT, GE LightSpeed 16, and Siemens Sensation 64 CT). Measurements were made using various combinations of technical factors, including kVp, type of bowtie filter, and x-ray beam collimation, for several dosimetry-related quantities, including (a) free-in-air CT dose index (CTDI 100,air ); (b) calculated half-value layers and quarter-value layers; and (c) weighted CT dose index (CTDI w ) calculated from exposure measurements collected in both a 16 and 32 cm diameter CTDI phantom. Data collection was repeated at several different time intervals, ranging from seconds (for CTDI 100,air values) to weekly for 3 weeks and then quarterly or triannually for 1 yr. Precision of the data was quantified by the percent coefficient of variation (%CV). Results: The maximum relative precision error (maximum %CV value) across all dosimetry metrics, time periods, and scanners included in this study was 4.33%. The median observed %CV values for CTDI 100,air ranged from 0.05% to 0.19% over several seconds, 0.12%-0.52% over 1 week, and 0.58%-2.31% over 3-4 months. For CTDI w for a 16 and 32 cm CTDI phantom, respectively, the range of median %CVs was 0.38%-1.14% and 0.62%-1.23% in data gathered weekly for 3 weeks and 1.32%-2.79% and 0.84%-2.47% in data gathered quarterly or triannually for 1 yr. Conclusions: From a dosimetry perspective, the MDCT scanners tested in this study demonstrated a high degree of within-run, between-run, and between-scanner precision (with relative precision errors typically well under 5%).

  7. Evaluation of radiation leakage of the scanner HCV-mobile of the port of Toamasina and the scanner THSCAN of the station of Soarano Antananarivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RAZAKARIMANANA, T.

    2011-01-01

    This work was performed at Madagascar-INSTN in collaboration with the GasyNet Company.In order to improve the use of X-rays scanners for control of containers at the SPAT Toamasina and the Soarano Antananarivo's station, the protection of workers and the public against the harmful effects of the ionizing radiation should be strengthen. According to the results obtained in two scanners (HCV-Mobile and THSCAN), the company GasyNet has a system of radiation protection appropriate, dose rates measured do not exceed the regulation standards.The use of devices for checking a leak radiations and the respect of three means of protection (time, distance, and screen) are the most effective means to protect the workers and public against the harmful effects of ionizing radiation emitted by scanners of x-ray. However, to avoid the incidents and accidents, it is necessary to respect and to apply the standards and the national regulations in force. [fr

  8. Application of intra-oral dental scanners in the digital workflow of implantology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Wicher J; Andriessen, Frank S; Wismeijer, Daniel; Ren, Yijin

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned

  9. Application of intra-oral dental scanners in the digital workflow of implantology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, W.J.; Andriessen, F.S.; Wismeijer, D.; Ren, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared. Materials and methods: A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned with three

  10. LANSCE-R WIRE-SCANNER ANALOG FRONT-END ELECTRONICS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruchalla, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    A new AFE is being developed for the new LANSCE-R wire-scanner systems. The new AFE is implemented in a National Instruments Compact RIO (cRIO) module installed a BiRa 4U BiRIO cRIO chassis specifically designed to accommodate the cRIO crate and all the wire-scanner interface, control and motor-drive electronics. A single AFE module provides interface to both X and Y wire sensors using true DC coupled transimpedance amplifiers providing collection of the wire charge signals, real-time wire integrity verification using the normal dataacquisition system, and wire bias of 0V to +/-50V. The AFE system is designed to accommodate comparatively long macropulses (>1ms) with high PRF (>120Hz) without the need to provide timing signals. The basic AFE bandwidth is flat from true DC to 50kHz with a true first-order pole at 50kHz. Numeric integration in the cRIO FPGA provides real-time pulse-to-pulse numeric integration of the AFE signal to compute the total charge collected in each macropulse. This method of charge collection eliminates the need to provide synchronization signals to the wire-scanner AFE while providing the capability to accurately record the charge from long macropulses at high PRF.

  11. The Open Spectral Database: an open platform for sharing and searching spectral data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalk, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    A number of websites make available spectral data for download (typically as JCAMP-DX text files) and one (ChemSpider) that also allows users to contribute spectral files. As a result, searching and retrieving such spectral data can be time consuming, and difficult to reuse if the data is compressed in the JCAMP-DX file. What is needed is a single resource that allows submission of JCAMP-DX files, export of the raw data in multiple formats, searching based on multiple chemical identifiers, and is open in terms of license and access. To address these issues a new online resource called the Open Spectral Database (OSDB) http://osdb.info/ has been developed and is now available. Built using open source tools, using open code (hosted on GitHub), providing open data, and open to community input about design and functionality, the OSDB is available for anyone to submit spectral data, making it searchable and available to the scientific community. This paper details the concept and coding, internal architecture, export formats, Representational State Transfer (REST) Application Programming Interface and options for submission of data. The OSDB website went live in November 2015. Concurrently, the GitHub repository was made available at https://github.com/stuchalk/OSDB/, and is open for collaborators to join the project, submit issues, and contribute code. The combination of a scripting environment (PHPStorm), a PHP Framework (CakePHP), a relational database (MySQL) and a code repository (GitHub) provides all the capabilities to easily develop REST based websites for ingestion, curation and exposure of open chemical data to the community at all levels. It is hoped this software stack (or equivalent ones in other scripting languages) will be leveraged to make more chemical data available for both humans and computers.

  12. Stability of deep features across CT scanners and field of view using a physical phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rahul; Shafiq-ul-Hassan, Muhammad; Moros, Eduardo G.; Gillies, Robert J.; Hall, Lawrence O.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.

    2018-02-01

    Radiomics is the process of analyzing radiological images by extracting quantitative features for monitoring and diagnosis of various cancers. Analyzing images acquired from different medical centers is confounded by many choices in acquisition, reconstruction parameters and differences among device manufacturers. Consequently, scanning the same patient or phantom using various acquisition/reconstruction parameters as well as different scanners may result in different feature values. To further evaluate this issue, in this study, CT images from a physical radiomic phantom were used. Recent studies showed that some quantitative features were dependent on voxel size and that this dependency could be reduced or removed by the appropriate normalization factor. Deep features extracted from a convolutional neural network, may also provide additional features for image analysis. Using a transfer learning approach, we obtained deep features from three convolutional neural networks pre-trained on color camera images. An we examination of the dependency of deep features on image pixel size was done. We found that some deep features were pixel size dependent, and to remove this dependency we proposed two effective normalization approaches. For analyzing the effects of normalization, a threshold has been used based on the calculated standard deviation and average distance from a best fit horizontal line among the features' underlying pixel size before and after normalization. The inter and intra scanner dependency of deep features has also been evaluated.

  13. Accuracy of five intraoral scanners compared to indirect digitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güth, Jan-Frederik; Runkel, Cornelius; Beuer, Florian; Stimmelmayr, Michael; Edelhoff, Daniel; Keul, Christine

    2017-06-01

    Direct and indirect digitalization offer two options for computer-aided design (CAD)/ computer-aided manufacturing (CAM)-generated restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of different intraoral scanners and compare them to the process of indirect digitalization. A titanium testing model was directly digitized 12 times with each intraoral scanner: (1) CS 3500 (CS), (2) Zfx Intrascan (ZFX), (3) CEREC AC Bluecam (BLU), (4) CEREC AC Omnicam (OC) and (5) True Definition (TD). As control, 12 polyether impressions were taken and the referring plaster casts were digitized indirectly with the D-810 laboratory scanner (CON). The accuracy (trueness/precision) of the datasets was evaluated by an analysing software (Geomagic Qualify 12.1) using a "best fit alignment" of the datasets with a highly accurate reference dataset of the testing model, received from industrial computed tomography. Direct digitalization using the TD showed the significant highest overall "trueness", followed by CS. Both performed better than CON. BLU, ZFX and OC showed higher differences from the reference dataset than CON. Regarding the overall "precision", the CS 3500 intraoral scanner and the True Definition showed the best performance. CON, BLU and OC resulted in significantly higher precision than ZFX did. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, the accuracy of the ascertained datasets was dependent on the scanning system. The direct digitalization was not superior to indirect digitalization for all tested systems. Regarding the accuracy, all tested intraoral scanning technologies seem to be able to reproduce a single quadrant within clinical acceptable accuracy. However, differences were detected between the tested systems.

  14. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H [Chiayi Chang Gung Memorial Hospital of The C.G.M.F, Puzi City, Chiayi County, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle.

  15. SU-E-P-11: Comparison of Image Quality and Radiation Dose Between Different Scanner System in Routine Abdomen CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, S; Wang, Y; Weng, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate image quality and radiation dose of routine abdomen computed tomography exam with the automatic current modulation technique (ATCM) performed in two different brand 64-slice CT scanners in our site. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of routine abdomen CT exam performed with two scanners; scanner A and scanner B in our site. To calculate standard deviation of the portal hepatic level with a region of interest of 12.5 mm x 12.5mm represented to the image noise. The radiation dose was obtained from CT DICOM image information. Using Computed tomography dose index volume (CTDIv) to represented CT radiation dose. The patient data in this study were with normal weight (about 65–75 Kg). Results The standard deviation of Scanner A was smaller than scanner B, the scanner A might with better image quality than scanner B. On the other hand, the radiation dose of scanner A was higher than scanner B(about higher 50–60%) with ATCM. Both of them, the radiation dose was under diagnostic reference level. Conclusion The ATCM systems in modern CT scanners can contribute a significant reduction in radiation dose to the patient. But the reduction by ATCM systems from different CT scanner manufacturers has slightly variation. Whatever CT scanner we use, it is necessary to find the acceptable threshold of image quality with the minimum possible radiation exposure to the patient in agreement with the ALARA principle

  16. Survey of damage to 602 MR scanners after the Great East Japan Earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Toshiharu; Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Tsuchihashi, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    An earthquake of 9.0 magnitude, the largest in modern Japanese history, struck east Japan on March 11, 2011. We investigated hazards and observations related to magnetic resonance (MR) scanners in this earthquake to evaluate potential risks and consider further prevention or minimization of damage from and injury of patients in such large earthquakes. The investigation team funded by MHLW sent questionnaires to the 984 facilities with installed MR scanners in the 7 prefectures of east Japan (Iwate, Miyagi, Fukushima, Ibaraki, Chiba, Tokyo, Saitama) and collected 458 responses (46.6%) with information on 602 MR scanners (144 units≤0.5 tesla; 31 one-T units; 371 1.5-T units; and 56 units≥3 T). Significant differences in damage were observed between seismic scale 5 and 6 (χ 2 test, P<0.001 for all items of damage checked). The frequencies of typical damage were displacement of magnets (12.4%), failure of the chiller or air conditioning (9.6%), rapid decrease in liquid helium (8.4%), damage to magnet enclosure and its equipment (7.6%), damage to shielding of the MR scanner room (6.1%), damage to the quench duct (4.5%), breakage of devices anchoring system cabinets (4.4%), damage to the magnet base (3.9%), and flying of metal components (1.5%). Twelve facilities reported flooding by the subsequent tsunami, and quench was confirmed in 19 facilities. No fire damage was reported. It was confirmed that no one was severely injured in MR scanners, and base isolation of the building was very useful in completely preventing damage even at seismic scale 7. In the future, training for evacuation and establishment of a standard protocol for emergency shutdown of MR scanners, onsite checking by MR operators, and emergency power plant equipment to maintain chiller for MR scanners will further ensure MR safety in an earthquake. (author)

  17. Scanner baseliner monitoring and control in high volume manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudrala, Pavan; Chung, Woong Jae; Aung, Nyan; Subramany, Lokesh; Gao, Haiyong; Gomez, Juan-Manuel

    2016-03-01

    We analyze performance of different customized models on baseliner overlay data and demonstrate the reduction in overlay residuals by ~10%. Smart Sampling sets were assessed and compared with the full wafer measurements. We found that performance of the grid can still be maintained by going to one-third of total sampling points, while reducing metrology time by 60%. We also demonstrate the feasibility of achieving time to time matching using scanner fleet manager and thus identify the tool drifts even when the tool monitoring controls are within spec limits. We also explore the scanner feedback constant variation with illumination sources.

  18. Modelling the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 64 Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, A T Mohd; Rahni, A A Abd

    2017-01-01

    Reconstructing large volumetric 3D images with minimal radiation dosage exposure with reduced scanning time has been one of the main objectives in the advancement of CT development. One of its advancement is the introduction of multi-slice arc detector geometry from a cone-beam source in third generation scanners. In solving this complex geometry, apart from the known vast computations in CT image reconstruction due to large CT images, iterative reconstruction methods are preferred compared to analytic methods due to its flexibility in image reconstruction. A scanner of interest that has this type of geometry is the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 64 Multi-Slice CT (MSCT) Scanner , which has a total of 32 slices with 672 detector elements on each slice. In this paper, the scanner projection is modelled via the intersecting lengths between each ray (exhibited from the source to the detector elements) with the scanned image voxels, which are evaluated using the classical Siddon’s algorithm to generate the system matrix, H . This is a prerequisite to perform various iterative reconstruction methods, which involves solving the inverse problem arising from the linear equation: S = H· I; where S is the projections produced from the image, I. Due to the ‘cone-beam geometry’ along the z -axis, the effective field-of-view (FOV) with voxel dimensions (0.4×0.4×0.4) mm 3 is 512×512×32 voxels. The scanner model is demonstrated by reconstructing an image from simulated projections using the analytic Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) method against basic iterative image reconstruction methods. (paper)

  19. The spectral invariant approximation within canopy radiative transfer to support the use of the EPIC/DSCOVR oxygen B-band for monitoring vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Yuri

    2017-01-01

    EPIC (Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera) is a 10-channel spectroradiometer onboard DSCOVR (Deep Space Climate Observatory) spacecraft. In addition to the near-infrared (NIR, 780 nm) and the ‘red’ (680 nm) channels, EPIC also has the O2 A-band (764±0.2 nm) and B-band (687.75±0.2 nm). The EPIC Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is defined as the difference between NIR and ‘red’ channels normalized to their sum. However, the use of the O2 B-band instead of the ‘red’ channel mitigates the effect of atmosphere on remote sensing of surface reflectance because O2 reduces contribution from the radiation scattered by the atmosphere. Applying the radiative transfer theory and the spectral invariant approximation to EPIC observations, the paper provides supportive arguments for using the O2 band instead of the red channel for monitoring vegetation dynamics. Our results suggest that the use of the O2 B-band enhances the sensitivity of the top-of-atmosphere NDVI to the presence of vegetation. - Highlights: • The use of the O2 B-band channel (688 nm) instead of the red channel (680 nm) mitigates the effect of atmosphere on remote sensing of surface reflectance. • The spectral invariant approach confirms that the synergy of the green, O2 B-band and near IR channels mimics spectral properties of vegetation. • The structural parameter of vegetation retrieved remotely is weakly sensitive to the uncertainty in the atmospheric optical depth.

  20. Temperature dependence of APD-based PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keereman, Vincent; Van Holen, Roel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Vanhove, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Solid state detectors such as avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are increasingly being used in PET detectors. One of the disadvantages of APDs is the strong decrease of their gain factor with increasing ambient temperature. The light yield of most scintillation crystals also decreases when ambient temperature is increased. Both effects lead to considerable temperature dependence of the performance of APD-based PET scanners. In this paper, the authors propose a model for this dependence and the performance of the LabPET8 APD-based small animal PET scanner is evaluated at different temperatures.Methods: The model proposes that the effect of increasing temperature on the energy histogram of an APD-based PET scanner is a compression of the histogram along the energy axis. The energy histogram of the LabPET system was acquired at 21 °C and 25 °C to verify the validity of this model. Using the proposed model, the effect of temperature on system sensitivity was simulated for different detector temperature coefficients and temperatures. Subsequently, the effect of short term and long term temperature changes on the peak sensitivity of the LabPET system was measured. The axial sensitivity profile was measured at 21 °C and 24 °C following the NEMA NU 4-2008 standard. System spatial resolution was also evaluated. Furthermore, scatter fraction, count losses and random coincidences were evaluated at different temperatures. Image quality was also investigated.Results: As predicted by the model, the photopeak energy at 25 °C is lower than at 21 °C with a shift of approximately 6% per °C. Simulations showed that this results in an approximately linear decrease of sensitivity when temperature is increased from 21 °C to 24 °C and energy thresholds are constant. Experimental evaluation of the peak sensitivity at different temperatures showed a strong linear correlation for short term (2.32 kcps/MBq/°C = 12%/°C, R = −0.95) and long term (1.92 kcps/MBq/°C = 10%/

  1. Automatic Tree Data Removal Method for Topography Measurement Result Using Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, H.; Chikatsu, H.

    2017-02-01

    Recently, laser scanning has been receiving greater attention as a useful tool for real-time 3D data acquisition, and various applications such as city modelling, DTM generation and 3D modelling of cultural heritage sites have been proposed. And, former digital data processing were demanded in the past digital archive techniques for cultural heritage sites. However, robust filtering method for distinguishing on- and off-terrain points by terrestrial laser scanner still have many issues. In the past investigation, former digital data processing using air-bone laser scanner were reported. Though, efficient tree removal methods from terrain points for the cultural heritage are not considered. In this paper, authors describe a new robust filtering method for cultural heritage using terrestrial laser scanner with "the echo digital processing technology" as latest data processing techniques of terrestrial laser scanner.

  2. A Two-Dimensional Micro Scanner Integrated with a Piezoelectric Actuator and Piezoresistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng You

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact two-dimensional micro scanner with small volume, large deflection angles and high frequency is presented and the two-dimensional laser scanning is achieved by specular reflection. To achieve large deflection angles, the micro scanner excited by a piezoelectric actuator operates in the resonance mode. The scanning frequencies and the maximum scanning angles of the two degrees of freedom are analyzed by modeling and simulation of the structure. For the deflection angle measurement, piezoresistors are integrated in the micro scanner. The appropriate directions and crystal orientations of the piezoresistors are designed to obtain the large piezoresistive coefficients for the high sensitivities. Wheatstone bridges are used to measure the deflection angles of each direction independently and precisely. The scanner is fabricated and packaged with the piezoelectric actuator and the piezoresistors detection circuits in a size of 28 mm×20 mm×18 mm. The experiment shows that the two scanning frequencies are 216.8 Hz and 464.8 Hz, respectively. By an actuation displacement of 10 μm, the scanning range of the two-dimensional micro scanner is above 26º × 23º. The deflection angle measurement sensitivities for two directions are 59 mV/deg and 30 mV/deg, respectively.

  3. Comparison of coronary artery calcium screening image quality between C-150 and e-Speed electron beam scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budoff, Matthew J; Shinbane, Jerold S; Oudiz, Ronald J; Child, Janis; Carson, Sivi; Chau, Alex; Tseng, Philip; Gao, Yanlin; Mao, Songshou

    2005-03-01

    The newest generation of electron beam tomographic scanner (e-Speed) has increased spatial and temporal resolution compared with the C-150 XP scanner. The aim of this study was to evaluate coronary artery calcium screening image quality between the e-Speed and C-150 scanners (GE Imatron, San Francisco, CA). Studies from 41 patients (14 women and 27 men) who underwent serial coronary artery calcium screening with the C-150 (first study) and the e-Speed (second study) were analyzed. Individual computed tomography (CT) slices were assessed for coronary artery motion artifacts, and CT Hounsfield units (HU) and noise values (CT HU standard deviation) at 16 discrete cardiac sites were measured and averaged. With the e-Speed scanner, there were significant decreases in right coronary artery motion artifacts compared with the C-150 scanner (0.3% versus 1.8%, P Image quality is significantly improved with use of the e-Speed scanner, due to its improved temporal and spatial resolution, compared with the C-150 scanner.

  4. Radiative transfer model for heterogeneous 3-D scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimes, D. S.; Kirchner, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    A general mathematical framework for simulating processes in heterogeneous 3-D scenes is presented. Specifically, a model was designed and coded for application to radiative transfers in vegetative scenes. The model is unique in that it predicts (1) the directional spectral reflectance factors as a function of the sensor's azimuth and zenith angles and the sensor's position above the canopy, (2) the spectral absorption as a function of location within the scene, and (3) the directional spectral radiance as a function of the sensor's location within the scene. The model was shown to follow known physical principles of radiative transfer. Initial verification of the model as applied to a soybean row crop showed that the simulated directional reflectance data corresponded relatively well in gross trends to the measured data. However, the model can be greatly improved by incorporating more sophisticated and realistic anisotropic scattering algorithms

  5. An Enhanced Rule-Based Web Scanner Based on Similarity Score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEE, M.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an enhanced rule-based web scanner in order to get better accuracy in detecting web vulnerabilities than the existing tools, which have relatively high false alarm rate when the web pages are installed in unconventional directory paths. Using the proposed matching method based on similarity score, the proposed scheme can determine whether two pages have the same vulnerabilities or not. With this method, the proposed scheme is able to figure out the target web pages are vulnerable by comparing them to the web pages that are known to have vulnerabilities. We show the proposed scanner reduces 12% false alarm rate compared to the existing well-known scanner through the performance evaluation via various experiments. The proposed scheme is especially helpful in detecting vulnerabilities of the web applications which come from well-known open-source web applications after small customization, which happens frequently in many small-sized companies.

  6. Dental impressions using 3D digital scanners: virtual becomes reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Nathan S; Aaronson, Heidi B

    2008-10-01

    The technologies that have made the use of three-dimensional (3D) digital scanners an integral part of many industries for decades have been improved and refined for application to dentistry. Since the introduction of the first dental impressioning digital scanner in the 1980s, development engineers at a number of companies have enhanced the technologies and created in-office scanners that are increasingly user-friendly and able to produce precisely fitting dental restorations. These systems are capable of capturing 3D virtual images of tooth preparations, from which restorations may be fabricated directly (ie, CAD/CAM systems) or fabricated indirectly (ie, dedicated impression scanning systems for the creation of accurate master models). The use of these products is increasing rapidly around the world and presents a paradigm shift in the way in which dental impressions are made. Several of the leading 3D dental digital scanning systems are presented and discussed in this article.

  7. Design and Development of a Megavoltage CT Scanner for Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Tai

    A Varian 4 MeV isocentric therapy accelerator has been modified to perform also as a CT scanner. The goal is to provide low cost computed tomography capability for use in radiotherapy. The system will have three principal uses. These are (i) to provide 2- and 3-dimensional maps of electron density distribution for CT assisted therapy planning, (ii) to aid in patient set up by providing sectional views of the treatment volume and high contrast scout-mode verification images and (iii) to provide a means for periodically checking the patients anatomical conformation against what was used to generate the original therapy plan. The treatment machine was modified by mounting an array of detectors on a frame bolted to the counter weight end of the gantry in such a manner as to define a 'third generation' CT Scanner geometry. The data gathering is controlled by a Z-80 based microcomputer system which transfers the x-ray transmission data to a general purpose PDP 11/34 for processing. There a series of calibration processes and a logarithmic conversion are performed to get projection data. After reordering the projection data to an equivalent parallel beam sinogram format a convolution algorithm is employed to construct the image from the equivalent parallel projection data. Results of phantom studies have shown a spatial resolution of 2.6 mm and an electron density discrimination of less than 1% which are sufficiently good for accurate therapy planning. Results also show that the system is linear to within the precision of our measurement ((DBLTURN).75%) over a wide range of electron densities corresponding to those found in body tissues. Animal and human images are also presented to demonstrate that the system's imaging capability is sufficient to allow the necessary visualization of anatomy.

  8. Wave propagation of spectral energy content in a granular chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shrivastava, Rohit Kumar; Luding, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    A mechanical wave is propagation of vibration with transfer of energy and momentum. Understanding the spectral energy characteristics of a propagating wave through disordered granular media can assist in understanding the overall properties of wave propagation through inhomogeneous materials like

  9. Algorithms for Coastal-Zone Color-Scanner Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Software for Nimbus-7 Coastal-Zone Color-Scanner (CZCS) derived products consists of set of scientific algorithms for extracting information from CZCS-gathered data. Software uses CZCS-generated Calibrated RadianceTemperature (CRT) tape as input and outputs computer-compatible tape and film product.

  10. Evaluation of plasma-wave spectral density from cross-power spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilic, D.B.; Harker, K.J.

    1975-01-01

    The plasma-wave spectral density is evaluated by performing a spatial Fourier transform on experimental cross-power spectra of ion acoustic waves. The cross-power spectra are recorded on analog magnetic tape, converted to digital form, transferred to digital magnetic tape, and Fourier transformed on a digital computer. The important effects of sampling, finite data strings, and data smoothing on the end results are discussed and illustrated. The results indicate the usefulness of the spectral density method for the study of nonlinear wave phenomena. (auth)

  11. Laser scanner 3D terrestri e mobile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Ciamba

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recentemente si è svolto a Roma un evento dimostrativo per informare, professionisti e ricercatori del settore inerente il rilievo strumentale, sulle recenti innovazioni che riguardano i laser scanner 3d. Il mercato della strumentazione dedicata al rilevamento architettonico e dell'ambiente, offre molte possibilità di scelta. Oggi i principali marchi producono strumenti sempre più efficienti ed ideati per ambiti di applicazione specifici, permettendo ai professionisti, la giusta scelta in termini di prestazioni ed economia. A demonstration event was recently held in Rome with the aim to inform professionals and researchers on recent innovations on instrumental survey related to the 3d laser scanner. The market of instrumentation for architectural survey offers many possibilitiesof choice. Today the major brands produce instruments that are more efficient and designed for specific areas of application, allowing the right choice in terms of performance and economy.

  12. Laser scanner 3D terrestri e mobile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Ciamba

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recentemente si è svolto a Roma un evento dimostrativo per informare, professionisti e ricercatori del settore inerente il rilievo strumentale, sulle recenti innovazioni che riguardano i laser scanner 3d. Il mercato della strumentazione dedicata al rilevamento architettonico e dell'ambiente, offre molte possibilità di scelta. Oggi i principali marchi producono strumenti sempre più efficienti ed ideati per ambiti di applicazione specifici, permettendo ai professionisti, la giusta scelta in termini di prestazioni ed economia.A demonstration event was recently held in Rome with the aim to inform professionals and researchers on recent innovations on instrumental survey related to the 3d laser scanner. The market of instrumentation for architectural survey offers many possibilitiesof choice. Today the major brands produce instruments that are more efficient and designed for specific areas of application, allowing the right choice in terms of performance and economy.

  13. Multi-spectrometer calibration transfer based on independent component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Xu, Hao; Xia, Zhenzhen; Gong, Zhiyong

    2018-02-26

    Calibration transfer is indispensable for practical applications of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy due to the need for precise and consistent measurements across different spectrometers. In this work, a method for multi-spectrometer calibration transfer is described based on independent component analysis (ICA). A spectral matrix is first obtained by aligning the spectra measured on different spectrometers. Then, by using independent component analysis, the aligned spectral matrix is decomposed into the mixing matrix and the independent components of different spectrometers. These differing measurements between spectrometers can then be standardized by correcting the coefficients within the independent components. Two NIR datasets of corn and edible oil samples measured with three and four spectrometers, respectively, were used to test the reliability of this method. The results of both datasets reveal that spectra measurements across different spectrometers can be transferred simultaneously and that the partial least squares (PLS) models built with the measurements on one spectrometer can predict that the spectra can be transferred correctly on another.

  14. Digital data storage of core image using high resolution full color core scanner; Kokaizodo full color scanner wo mochiita core image no digital ka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, W; Ujo, S; Osato, K; Takasugi, S [Geothermal Energy Research and Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper reports on digitization of core images by using a new type core scanner system. This system consists of a core scanner unit (equipped with a CCD camera), a personal computer and ancillary devices. This is a modification of the old type system, with measurable core length made to 100 cm/3 scans, and resolution enhanced to 5100 pixels/m (1024 pixels/m in the old type). The camera was changed to that of a color specification, and the A/D conversion was improved to 24-bit full color. As a result of carrying out a detail reproduction test on digital images of this core scanner, it was found that objects can be identified at a level of about the size of pixels constituting the image in the case when the best contrast is obtained between the objects and the background, and that in an evaluation test on visibility of concaves and convexes on core surface, reproducibility is not very good in large concaves and convexes. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Radiation exposure and privacy concerns surrounding full-body scanners in airports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Accardo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Millions of people filter through airport security check points in the United States every year. These security checks, in response to the post 9/11 and 2009 “Underwear Bomber” terrorist threats, have become increasingly burdensome to the general public due to the wide spread deployment of “enhanced screening systems.” The enhanced screening systems that have generated the most controversy are the passenger “full-body scanners.” These systems enable airport security personnel to effectively detect contraband (often concealed under clothing without the physical contact necessitated by a strip search. The two types of full-body scanners (also known as Advanced Imaging Technology systems, used in airports in the United States and around the world are referred to as backscatter technology units and millimeter-wave technology units. Although their respective radiation emissions vary, both scanners serve the same purpose; that is, the detection of concealed metallic and non-metallic threats in the form of liquids, gels, plastics, etc. Although enhanced screening systems were deployed to further public safety efforts, they have also generated wide spread public concern. Specifically, these concerns address the potential of adverse health and privacy issues that may result from continued public exposure to full-body scanner systems.

  16. Advanced optical 3D scanners using DMD technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenstermann, P.; Godding, R.; Hermstein, M.

    2017-02-01

    Optical 3D measurement techniques are state-of-the-art for highly precise, non-contact surface scanners - not only in industrial development, but also in near-production and even in-line configurations. The need for automated systems with very high accuracy and clear implementation of national precision standards is growing extremely due to expanding international quality guidelines, increasing production transparency and new concepts related to the demands of the fourth industrial revolution. The presentation gives an overview about the present technical concepts for optical 3D scanners and their benefit for customers and various different applications - not only in quality control, but also in design centers or in medical applications. The advantages of DMD-based systems will be discussed and compared to other approaches. Looking at today's 3D scanner market, there is a confusing amount of solutions varying from lowprice solutions to high end systems. Many of them are linked to a very special target group or to special applications. The article will clarify the differences of the approaches and will discuss some key features which are necessary to render optical measurement systems suitable for industrial environments. The paper will be completed by examples for DMDbased systems, e. g. RGB true-color systems with very high accuracy like the StereoScan neo of AICON 3D Systems. Typical applications and the benefits for customers using such systems are described.

  17. Measurement properties and usability of non-contact scanners for measuring transtibial residual limb volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofman, Rianne; Beekman, Anna M; Emmelot, Cornelis H; Geertzen, Jan H B; Dijkstra, Pieter U

    2018-06-01

    Non-contact scanners may have potential for measurement of residual limb volume. Different non-contact scanners have been introduced during the last decades. Reliability and usability (practicality and user friendliness) should be assessed before introducing these systems in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to analyze the measurement properties and usability of four non-contact scanners (TT Design, Omega Scanner, BioSculptor Bioscanner, and Rodin4D Scanner). Quasi experimental. Nine (geometric and residual limb) models were measured on two occasions, each consisting of two sessions, thus in total 4 sessions. In each session, four observers used the four systems for volume measurement. Mean for each model, repeatability coefficients for each system, variance components, and their two-way interactions of measurement conditions were calculated. User satisfaction was evaluated with the Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire. Systematic differences between the systems were found in volume measurements. Most of the variances were explained by the model (97%), while error variance was 3%. Measurement system and the interaction between system and model explained 44% of the error variance. Repeatability coefficient of the systems ranged from 0.101 (Omega Scanner) to 0.131 L (Rodin4D). Differences in Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire scores between the systems were small and not significant. The systems were reliable in determining residual limb volume. Measurement systems and the interaction between system and residual limb model explained most of the error variances. The differences in repeatability coefficient and usability between the four CAD/CAM systems were small. Clinical relevance If accurate measurements of residual limb volume are required (in case of research), modern non-contact scanners should be taken in consideration nowadays.

  18. Picosecond excitation energy transfer of allophycocyanin studied in solution and in crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar Choubeh, Reza; Sonani, Ravi R; Madamwar, Datta; Struik, Paul C; Bader, Arjen N; Robert, Bruno; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2018-03-01

    Cyanobacteria perform photosynthesis with the use of large light-harvesting antennae called phycobilisomes (PBSs). These hemispherical PBSs contain hundreds of open-chain tetrapyrrole chromophores bound to different peptides, providing an arrangement in which excitation energy is funnelled towards the PBS core from where it can be transferred to photosystem I and/or photosystem II. In the PBS core, many allophycocyanin (APC) trimers are present, red-light-absorbing phycobiliproteins that covalently bind phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophores. APC trimers were amongst the first light-harvesting complexes to be crystallized. APC trimers have two spectrally different PCBs per monomer, a high- and a low-energy pigment. The crystal structure of the APC trimer reveals the close distance (~21 Å) between those two chromophores (the distance within one monomer is ~51 Å) and this explains the ultrafast (~1 ps) excitation energy transfer (EET) between them. Both chromophores adopt a somewhat different structure, which is held responsible for their spectral difference. Here we used spectrally resolved picosecond fluorescence to study EET in these APC trimers both in crystallized and in solubilized form. We found that not all closely spaced pigment couples consist of a low- and a high-energy pigment. In ~10% of the cases, a couple consists of two high-energy pigments. EET to a low-energy pigment, which can spectrally be resolved, occurs on a time scale of tens of picoseconds. This transfer turns out to be three times faster in the crystal than in the solution. The spectral characteristics and the time scale of this transfer component are similar to what have been observed in the whole cells of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, for which it was ascribed to EET from C-phycocyanin to APC. The present results thus demonstrate that part of this transfer should probably also be ascribed to EET within APC trimers.

  19. A comparison of the accuracy of intraoral scanners using an intraoral environment simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Nan; Lim, Young-Jun; Yi, Won-Jin; Han, Jung-Suk; Lee, Seung-Pyo

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to design an intraoral environment simulator and to assess the accuracy of two intraoral scanners using the simulator. A box-shaped intraoral environment simulator was designed to simulate two specific intraoral environments. The cast was scanned 10 times by Identica Blue (MEDIT, Seoul, South Korea), TRIOS (3Shape, Copenhagen, Denmark), and CS3500 (Carestream Dental, Georgia, USA) scanners in the two simulated groups. The distances between the left and right canines (D3), first molars (D6), second molars (D7), and the left canine and left second molar (D37) were measured. The distance data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test. The differences in intraoral environments were not statistically significant ( P >.05). Between intraoral scanners, statistically significant differences ( P Kruskal-Wallis test with regard to D3 and D6. No difference due to the intraoral environment was revealed. The simulator will contribute to the higher accuracy of intraoral scanners in the future.

  20. Inter laboratory comparison of industrial CT scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angel, Jais Andreas Breusch; Cantatore, Angela; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    In this report results from an intercomparison of industrial CT scanners are presented. Three audit items, similar to common industrial parts, were selected for circulation: a single polymer part with complex geometry (Item 1), a simple geometry part made of two polymers (Item 2) and a miniature...

  1. Get Mobile – The Smartphone Brain Scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Petersen, Michael Kai

    This demonstration will provide live-interaction with a smartphone brain scanner consisting of a low-cost wireless 14-channel EEG headset (Emotiv Epoc) and a mobile device. With our system it is possible to perform real-time functional brain imaging on a smartphone device, including stimulus...

  2. A PET scanner developed by CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1998-01-01

    This image shows a Position Emission Tomography (PET) scanner at the Hopital Cantonal Universitaire de Genève. Development of the multiwire proportional chamber at CERN in the mid-1970s was soon seen as a potential device for medical imaging. It is much more sensitive than previous devices and greatly reduced the dose of radiation received by the patient.

  3. NMR of geophysical drill cores with a mobile Halbach scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talnishnikh, E.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to a mobile NMR with an improved Halbach scanner. This is a lightweight tube-shaped magnet with sensitive volume larger and a homogeneity of the magnetic field higher than the previous prototype version. The improved Halbach scanner is used for analysis of water-saturated drill cores and plugs with diameters up to 60 mm. To provide the analysis, the standard 1D technique with the CPMG sequence as well as 2D correlation experiments were successfully applied and adapted to study properties of fluid-saturated sediments. Afterwards the Halbach scanner was calibrated to fast non-destructive measurements of porosity, relaxation time distributions, and estimation of permeability. These properties can be calculated directly from the NMR data using the developed methodology. Any independent measurements of these properties with other methods are not needed. One of the main results of this work is the development of a new NMR on-line core scanner for measurements of porosity in long cylindrical and semi cylindrical drill cores. Also dedicated software was written to operate the NMR on-line core scanner. The physical background of this work is the study of the diffusion influence on transverse relaxation. The diffusion effect in the presence of internal gradients in porous media was probed by 1D and 2D experiments. The transverse relaxation time distributions obtained from 1D and from 2D experiments are comparable but different in fine details. Two new methodologies were developed based on the results of this study. First is the methodology quantifying the influence of diffusion in the internal gradients of water-saturated sediments on transverse relaxation from 2D correlation experiments. The second one is the correction of the permeability estimation from the NMR data taking in account the influence of the diffusion. Furthermore, PFG NMR technique was used to study restricted diffusion in the same kind of samples. Preliminary results are reported

  4. NMR of geophysical drill cores with a mobile Halbach scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talnishnikh, E.

    2007-08-21

    This thesis is devoted to a mobile NMR with an improved Halbach scanner. This is a lightweight tube-shaped magnet with sensitive volume larger and a homogeneity of the magnetic field higher than the previous prototype version. The improved Halbach scanner is used for analysis of water-saturated drill cores and plugs with diameters up to 60 mm. To provide the analysis, the standard 1D technique with the CPMG sequence as well as 2D correlation experiments were successfully applied and adapted to study properties of fluid-saturated sediments. Afterwards the Halbach scanner was calibrated to fast non-destructive measurements of porosity, relaxation time distributions, and estimation of permeability. These properties can be calculated directly from the NMR data using the developed methodology. Any independent measurements of these properties with other methods are not needed. One of the main results of this work is the development of a new NMR on-line core scanner for measurements of porosity in long cylindrical and semi cylindrical drill cores. Also dedicated software was written to operate the NMR on-line core scanner. The physical background of this work is the study of the diffusion influence on transverse relaxation. The diffusion effect in the presence of internal gradients in porous media was probed by 1D and 2D experiments. The transverse relaxation time distributions obtained from 1D and from 2D experiments are comparable but different in fine details. Two new methodologies were developed based on the results of this study. First is the methodology quantifying the influence of diffusion in the internal gradients of water-saturated sediments on transverse relaxation from 2D correlation experiments. The second one is the correction of the permeability estimation from the NMR data taking in account the influence of the diffusion. Furthermore, PFG NMR technique was used to study restricted diffusion in the same kind of samples. Preliminary results are reported

  5. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jan T. M.; Shrimpton, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990’s. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10’s of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  6. Excitation transfer pathways in excitonic aggregates revealed by the stochastic Schrödinger equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramavicius, Vytautas, E-mail: vytautas.ab@gmail.com; Abramavicius, Darius, E-mail: darius.abramavicius@ff.vu.lt [Faculty of Physics, Department of Theoretical Physics, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio 9, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2014-02-14

    We derive the stochastic Schrödinger equation for the system wave vector and use it to describe the excitation energy transfer dynamics in molecular aggregates. We suggest a quantum-measurement based method of estimating the excitation transfer time. Adequacy of the proposed approach is demonstrated by performing calculations on a model system. The theory is then applied to study the excitation transfer dynamics in a photosynthetic pigment-protein Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) aggregate using both the Debye spectral density and the spectral density obtained from earlier molecular dynamics simulations containing strong vibrational high-frequency modes. The obtained results show that the excitation transfer times in the FMO system are affected by the presence of the vibrational modes; however, the transfer pathways remain the same.

  7. A research program on radiative transfer model development in support of the ARM program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clough, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this research effort is to develop radiative transfer models that are consistent with ARM spectral radiance measurements for clear and cloudy atmospheres. Our approach is to develop the model physics and related databases with a line-by-line model in the context of available spectral radiance measurements. The line-by-line model then functions as an intermediate standard to both develop and validate rapid radiative transfer models appropriate to GCM applications. A preprint of an extended abstract for the 1994 AMS volume describing a Quality Measurement Experiment using the ARM spectral data is included as an attachment

  8. A dedicated breast-PET/CT scanner: Evaluation of basic performance characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R; Van Kampen, Will; Stolin, Alexander V; Gong, Wenbo; Jaliparthi, Gangadhar; Martone, Peter F; Smith, Mark F; Sarment, David; Clinthorne, Neal H; Perna, Mark

    2018-04-01

    Application of advanced imaging techniques, such as PET and x ray CT, can potentially improve detection of breast cancer. Unfortunately, both modalities have challenges in the detection of some lesions. The combination of the two techniques, however, could potentially lead to an overall improvement in diagnostic breast imaging. The purpose of this investigation is to test the basic performance of a new dedicated breast-PET/CT. The PET component consists of a rotating pair of detectors. Its performance was evaluated using the NEMA NU4-2008 protocols. The CT component utilizes a pulsed x ray source and flat panel detector mounted on the same gantry as the PET scanner. Its performance was assessed using specialized phantoms. The radiation dose to a breast during CT imaging was explored by the measurement of free-in-air kerma and air kerma measured at the center of a 16 cm-diameter PMMA cylinder. Finally, the combined capabilities of the system were demonstrated by imaging of a micro-hot-rod phantom. Overall, performance of the PET component is comparable to many pre-clinical and other dedicated breast-PET scanners. Its spatial resolution is 2.2 mm, 5 mm from the center of the scanner using images created with the single-sliced-filtered-backprojection algorithm. Peak NECR is 24.6 kcps; peak sensitivity is 1.36%; the scatter fraction is 27%. Spatial resolution of the CT scanner is 1.1 lp/mm at 10% MTF. The free-in-air kerma is 2.33 mGy, while the PMMA-air kerma is 1.24 mGy. Finally, combined imaging of a micro-hot-rod phantom illustrated the potential utility of the dual-modality images produced by the system. The basic performance characteristics of a new dedicated breast-PET/CT scanner are good, demonstrating that its performance is similar to current dedicated PET and CT scanners. The potential value of this system is the capability to produce combined duality-modality images that could improve detection of breast disease. The next stage in development of this system

  9. Spectral gamuts and spectral gamut mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Mitchell R.; Derhak, Maxim W.

    2006-01-01

    All imaging devices have two gamuts: the stimulus gamut and the response gamut. The response gamut of a print engine is typically described in CIE colorimetry units, a system derived to quantify human color response. More fundamental than colorimetric gamuts are spectral gamuts, based on radiance, reflectance or transmittance units. Spectral gamuts depend on the physics of light or on how materials interact with light and do not involve the human's photoreceptor integration or brain processing. Methods for visualizing a spectral gamut raise challenges as do considerations of how to utilize such a data-set for producing superior color reproductions. Recent work has described a transformation of spectra reduced to 6-dimensions called LabPQR. LabPQR was designed as a hybrid space with three explicit colorimetric axes and three additional spectral reconstruction axes. In this paper spectral gamuts are discussed making use of LabPQR. Also, spectral gamut mapping is considered in light of the colorimetric-spectral duality of the LabPQR space.

  10. Experimental characterization of the Clear-PEM scanner spectrometric performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugalho, R; Carrico, B; Ferreira, C S; Frade, M; Ferreira, M; Moura, R; Ortigao, C; Pinheiro, J F; Rodrigues, P; Rolo, I; Silva, J C; Trindade, A; Varela, J [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas (LIP), Av. Elias Garcia 14-1, 1000-149 Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: frade@lip.pt

    2009-10-15

    In the framework of the Clear-PEM project for the construction of a high-resolution and high-specificity scanner for breast cancer imaging, a Positron Emission Mammography tomograph has been developed and installed at the Instituto Portugues de Oncologia do Porto hospital. The Clear-PEM scanner is mainly composed by two planar detector heads attached to a robotic arm, trigger/data acquisition electronics system and computing servers. The detector heads hold crystal matrices built from 2 x 2 x 20 mm{sup 3} LYSO:Ce crystals readout by Hamamatsu S8550 APD arrays. The APDs are optically coupled to both ends of the 6144 crystals in order to extract the DOI information for each detected event. Each one of 12288 APD's pixels is read and controlled by Application Specific Integrated Circuits water-cooled by an external cooling unit. The Clear-PEM frontend boards innovative design results in a unprecedented integration of the crystal matrices, APDs and ASICs, making Clear-PEM the PET scanner with the highest number of APD pixels ever integrated so far. In this paper, the scanner's main technical characteristics, calibration strategies and the first spectrometric performance evaluation in a clinical environment are presented. The first commissioning results show 99.7% active channels, which, after calibration, have inter-pixel and absolute gain distributions with dispersions of, respectively, 12.2% and 15.3%, demonstrating that despite the large number of channels, the system is uniform. The mean energy resolution at 511 keV is of 15.9%, with a 8.8% dispersion, and the mean C{sub DOI}{sup -1} is 5.9%/mm, with a 7.8% dispersion. The coincidence time resolution, at 511 keV, for a energy window between 400 and 600 keV, is 5.2 ns FWHM.

  11. Internal calibration for equipment AR-2000 radio-TLC imaging scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yayan Tahyan; Enny Lestari; Endang Sarmini; Sri Setiyowati

    2013-01-01

    Testing quality system ISO / IEC 17025:2008 requires that equipment and software used in testing have to give good precision and accuracy. Internal calibration is needed to assess the precision and accuracy of the testing device. The equipment AR-2000 radio-TLC Imaging Scanner in the field of nuclear medicine used in radiochemical purity testing. Determined with precision by the coefficient of variation (% CV) and accuracy, while the deviation value based on internal calibration of the retention factor value reading three peaks Carbon-standard sources mentioned that the reference 14. Standard value % CV ≤ 15% and ≤ 3 mm deviation value. Internal calibration results show that the tool AR-2000 radio-TLC Imaging Scanner provides precision values with a mean coefficient of variation (% CV) and accuracy gained 3.1% for the peak value of unity deviation of 1.79 mm, 0.39 mm and the second peak of the peak three 0.55 mm. This suggests that AR-2000 radio tool-TLC Imaging Scanner in good condition. (author)

  12. Comparative Performance Analysis of Different Fingerprint Biometric Scanners for Patient Matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasiiti, Noah; Wawira, Judy; Purkayastha, Saptarshi; Were, Martin C

    2017-01-01

    Unique patient identification within health services is an operational challenge in healthcare settings. Use of key identifiers, such as patient names, hospital identification numbers, national ID, and birth date are often inadequate for ensuring unique patient identification. In addition approximate string comparator algorithms, such as distance-based algorithms, have proven suboptimal for improving patient matching, especially in low-resource settings. Biometric approaches may improve unique patient identification. However, before implementing the technology in a given setting, such as health care, the right scanners should be rigorously tested to identify an optimal package for the implementation. This study aimed to investigate the effects of factors such as resolution, template size, and scan capture area on the matching performance of different fingerprint scanners for use within health care settings. Performance analysis of eight different scanners was tested using the demo application distributed as part of the Neurotech Verifinger SDK 6.0.

  13. A 3D airborne ultrasound scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capineri, L.; Masotti, L.; Rocchi, S.

    1998-06-01

    This work investigates the feasibility of an ultrasound scanner designed to reconstruct three-dimensional profiles of objects in air. There are many industrial applications in which it is important to obtain quickly and accurately the digital reconstruction of solid objects with contactless methods. The final aim of this project was the profile reconstruction of shoe lasts in order to eliminate the mechanical tracers from the reproduction process of shoe prototypes. The feasibility of an ultrasonic scanner was investigated in laboratory conditions on wooden test objects with axial symmetry. A bistatic system based on five airborne polyvinylidenedifluoride (PVDF) transducers was mechanically moved to emulate a cylindrical array transducer that can host objects of maximum width and height 20 cm and 40 cm respectively. The object reconstruction was based on a simplified version of the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT): the time of flight (TOF) of the first in time echo for each receiving transducer was taken into account, a coarse spatial sampling of the ultrasonic field reflected on the array transducer was delivered and the reconstruction algorithm was based on the ellipsoidal backprojection. Measurements on a wooden cone section provided submillimetre accuracy in a controlled environment.

  14. Phycoerythrin evolution and diversification of spectral phenotype in marine Synechococcus and related picocyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everroad, R Craig; Wood, A Michelle

    2012-09-01

    In marine Synechococcus there is evidence for the adaptive evolution of spectrally distinct forms of the major light harvesting pigment phycoerythrin (PE). Recent research has suggested that these spectral forms of PE have a different evolutionary history than the core genome. However, a lack of explicit statistical testing of alternative hypotheses or for selection on these genes has made it difficult to evaluate the evolutionary relationships between spectral forms of PE or the role horizontal gene transfer (HGT) may have had in the adaptive phenotypic evolution of the pigment system in marine Synechococcus. In this work, PE phylogenies of picocyanobacteria with known spectral phenotypes, including newly co-isolated strains of marine Synechococcus from the Gulf of Mexico, were constructed to explore the diversification of spectral phenotype and PE evolution in this group more completely. For the first time, statistical evaluation of competing evolutionary hypotheses and tests for positive selection on the PE locus in picocyanobacteria were performed. Genes for PEs associated with specific PE spectral phenotypes formed strongly supported monophyletic clades within the PE tree with positive directional selection driving evolution towards higher phycourobilin (PUB) content. The presence of the PUB-lacking phenotype in PE-containing marine picocyanobacteria from cyanobacterial lineages identified as Cyanobium is best explained by HGT into this group from marine Synechococcus. Taken together, these data provide strong examples of adaptive evolution of a single phenotypic trait in bacteria via mutation, positive directional selection and horizontal gene transfer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Shielding design for testing room of large container scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yisi; Miao Qitian; Zhou Liye

    1997-01-01

    Testing facility for large container scanner is a most advanced anti-smuggle tool. The X-ray scanning principle is adopted in this system. The X-ray was collimated a ted as a fan-shape beam. The accelerator only supplies the ray beam when the container is scanned. The irradiation time is less than one minute per test. The X-ray burst irradiation and highly collimated a ted scanning beam of this system is different from the common industrial irradiation accelerator. The shielding design of the 1:1 large container scanner introduced has better collimation level because of tri-collimation. The irradiation dose is less than 150 μGy per test, which is obviously lower than importations

  16. Accuracy of 3-dimensional curvilinear measurements on digital models with intraoral scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Spencer; Bonilla, Tammy; English, Jeryl D; Cozad, Benjamin; Akyalcin, Sercan

    2017-09-01

    Our objectives were to evaluate and compare the digital dental models generated from 2 commercial intraoral scanners with manual measurements when performing 3-dimensional surface measurements along a curved line (curvilinear). Dry mandibles (n = 61) with intact dentition were used. The mandibles were digitized using 2 chair-side intraoral scanners: Cadent iTero (Align Technology, San Jose, Calif) and Lythos Digital Impression system (Ormco, Orange, Calif). Digitized 3-dimensional models were converted to individual stereolithography files and used with commercial software to obtain the curvilinear measurements. Manual measurements were carried out directly on the mandibular teeth. Measurements were made on different locations on the dental arch in various directions. One-sample t tests and linear regression analyses were performed. To further graphically examine the accuracy between the different methods, Bland-Altman plots were computed. The level of significance was set at P 0.05). Bland-Altman analysis showed no fixed bias of 1 approach vs the other, and random errors were detected in all comparisons. Although the mean biases of the digital models obtained by the iTero and Lythos scanners, when compared with direct caliper measurements, were low, the comparison of the 2 intraoral scanners yielded the lowest mean bias. No comparison displayed statistical significance for the t scores; this indicated the absence of proportional bias in these comparisons. The intraoral scanners tested in this study produced digital dental models that were comparatively accurate when performing direct surface measurements along a curved line in 3 dimensions. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Study on a high resolution positron emission tomography scanner for brain study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, N.; Tomitani, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Murayama, H.; Tanaka, E.

    1990-01-01

    The spatial resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) scanners is usually limited by the finite size of crystals such as bismuth germanate (BGO). To attain high resolution as well as high sensitivity, it is essential to use a large number of small BGO crystals arranged in close-packing on circular rings. In developing high resolution PET scanners, however, there are two physical factors limiting the spatial resolution. One is the finite range of positrons before annihilation and the other the deviation from 180 degrees of annihilation photons. The effect of the factors on the spatial resolution has been evaluated for positron-emitting sources as a function of detector ring radius. A high resolution PET scanner has been developed for brain study, aiming to have spatial resolutions as high as less than 4-mm FWHM in tomographic plane and less than 6-mm FWHM in axial direction at the detector ring center. For the goal of the high resolutions a multi-segment type of photomultiplier tubes has been specially designed and developed, which allows one tube to be directly coupled by four BGO crystals. The scanner consists of five detector rings of 47-cm in diameter, using all 1200 BGO crystals each measuring 5 mm x 12 mm x 30 mm. The scanner provides simultaneous 9 images by combination of in-plane and cross-plane, offering a 24-cm dia. x7.4-cm field-of-view. Physical performance of the scanner was investigated. At the ring center, the spatial resolution in the tomographic plane was measured to be 3.5-mm FWHM. The axial resolution was measured to be 5.7-mm FWHM for in-plane and 5.3-mm FWHM for cross-plane. Sensitivity for a 20-cm dia. uniform source was measured to be 9.5 kcps/μCi/ml for in-plane and 15.3 kcps/μCi/ml for cross-plane. (J.P.N.)

  18. Initial clinical experience with dual-layer detector spectral CT in patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage: A single-centre pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Buem Cho

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical feasibility of spectral analyses using dual-layer detector spectral computed tomography (CT in acute intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH.We retrospectively reviewed patients with acute ICH who underwent CT angiography on a dual-layer detector spectral CT scanner. A spectral data analysis was performed to detect contrast enhancement in or adjacent to acute ICH by using spectral image reconstructions including monoenergetic (MonoE, virtual noncontrast (VNC, and iodine overlay fusion images. We also acquired a spectral plot to assess material differentiation within lesions.Among the 30 patients, the most common cause of acute ICH was chronic hypertension (18/30, 60% followed by trauma (5/30, 16.7%, brain tumour (3/30, 10%, Moyamoya disease (2/30, 6.7%, and haemorrhagic diathesis from anticoagulation therapy (2/30, 6.7%. Of 30 patients, 13 showed suboptimal iodine suppression in the subcalvarial spaces on VNC images compared with true noncontrast images. The CT angiographic spot sign within the acute ICH was detected in four patients (4/30, 13.3%. All three tumours were metastatic and included lung cancer (n = 2 and hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 1 which showed conspicuous delineation of an enhancing tumour portion in the spectral analysis. Spectral analyses allowed the discrimination of acute haemorrhage and iodine with enhanced lesion visualization on the MonoE images obtained at lower keVs (less than 70 keV and spectral plot.Even though the image quality of VNC is perceived to be inferior, it is feasible to evaluate acute ICH in clinical settings using dual-layer detector spectral CT. The MonoE images taken at lower keVs were useful for depicting contrast enhancing lesion, and spectral plot might be helpful for material differentiation in patients with acute ICH.

  19. Initial clinical experience with dual-layer detector spectral CT in patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage: A single-centre pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Soo Buem; Baek, Hye Jin; Ryu, Kyeong Hwa; Moon, Jin Il; Choi, Bo Hwa; Park, Sung Eun; Bae, Kyungsoo; Jeon, Kyung Nyeo; Kim, Dong Wook

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical feasibility of spectral analyses using dual-layer detector spectral computed tomography (CT) in acute intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH). We retrospectively reviewed patients with acute ICH who underwent CT angiography on a dual-layer detector spectral CT scanner. A spectral data analysis was performed to detect contrast enhancement in or adjacent to acute ICH by using spectral image reconstructions including monoenergetic (MonoE), virtual noncontrast (VNC), and iodine overlay fusion images. We also acquired a spectral plot to assess material differentiation within lesions. Among the 30 patients, the most common cause of acute ICH was chronic hypertension (18/30, 60%) followed by trauma (5/30, 16.7%), brain tumour (3/30, 10%), Moyamoya disease (2/30, 6.7%), and haemorrhagic diathesis from anticoagulation therapy (2/30, 6.7%). Of 30 patients, 13 showed suboptimal iodine suppression in the subcalvarial spaces on VNC images compared with true noncontrast images. The CT angiographic spot sign within the acute ICH was detected in four patients (4/30, 13.3%). All three tumours were metastatic and included lung cancer (n = 2) and hepatocellular carcinoma (n = 1) which showed conspicuous delineation of an enhancing tumour portion in the spectral analysis. Spectral analyses allowed the discrimination of acute haemorrhage and iodine with enhanced lesion visualization on the MonoE images obtained at lower keVs (less than 70 keV) and spectral plot. Even though the image quality of VNC is perceived to be inferior, it is feasible to evaluate acute ICH in clinical settings using dual-layer detector spectral CT. The MonoE images taken at lower keVs were useful for depicting contrast enhancing lesion, and spectral plot might be helpful for material differentiation in patients with acute ICH.

  20. Erosion can't hide from laser scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstant, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Particles of topsoil blown by wind will bounce along the soil surface and finally escape a field, leaving it less able to support crops. Water will wash away valuable topsoil and nutrients. And how rough the soil surface is influences whether the soil will erode. Until now, soil scientists have had no suitable technique to measure soil roughness - or microtopography - on the small scale. ARS soil scientists Joe M. Bradford and Chi-hua Huang, of the National Soil Erosion Research Laboratory in West Lafayette, Indiana, have developed a portable scanner that can. It measures the tiny ridges left in the soil by tilling or clods of soil particles that clump together naturally. What does the scanner do? It measures soil elevation by shining a low-power laser beam onto the surface and detecting the position of the laser spot reflected from the soil with a 35-mm camera. In place of film, the scanner camera uses electronic circuitry somewhat similar to that in a video camera to transmit the spot's position to a small computer about 30,000 times a minute. The laser and camera are mounted on the frame of a motor-driven carriage. The computer controls the carriage movement. At the end of a scan, a microtopographic map is stored in the computer. Scientists can analyze it immediately and can compare it to previous maps to see whether erosion has occurred

  1. Dynamic myocardial perfusion in a porcine balloon-induced ischemia model using a prototype spectral detector CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Fares, Anas; Levi, Jacob; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2015-03-01

    Myocardial CT perfusion (CTP) imaging is an application that should greatly benefit from spectral CT through the significant reduction of beam hardening (BH) artifacts using mono-energetic (monoE) image reconstructions. We used a prototype spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner (Philips Healthcare) and developed advanced processing tools (registration, segmentation, and deconvolution-based flow estimation) for quantitative myocardial CTP in a porcine ischemia model with different degrees of coronary occlusion using a balloon catheter. The occlusion severity was adjusted with fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurements. The SDCT scanner is a single source, dual-layer detector system, which allows simultaneous acquisitions of low and high energy projections, hence enabling accurate projection-based material decomposition and effective reduction of BH-artifacts. In addition, the SDCT scanner eliminates partial scan artifacts with fast (0.27s), full gantry rotation acquisitions. We acquired CTP data under different hemodynamic conditions and reconstructed conventional 120kVp images and projection-based monoenergetic (monoE) images for energies ranging from 55keV-to-120keV. We computed and compared myocardial blood flow (MBF) between different reconstructions. With balloon completely deflated (FFR=1), we compared the mean attenuation in a myocardial region of interest before iodine arrival and at peak iodine enhancement in the left ventricle (LV), and we found that monoE images at 70keV effectively minimized the difference in attenuation, due to BH, to less than 1 HU compared to 14 HU with conventional 120kVp images. Flow maps under baseline condition (FFR=1) were more uniform throughout the myocardial wall at 70keV, whereas with 120kVp data about 12% reduction in blood flow was noticed on BH-hypoattenuated areas compared to other myocardial regions. We compared MBF maps at different keVs under an ischemic condition (FFR < 0.7), and we found that flow

  2. Development of the Shimadzu computed tomographic scanner SCT-200N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Hiroshi; Yamaoka, Nobuyuki; Saito, Masahiro

    1982-01-01

    The Shimadzu Computed Tomographic Scanner SCT-200N has been developed as an ideal CT scanner for diagnosing the head and spine. Due to the large aperture, moderate scan time and the Zoom Scan Mode, any part of the body can be scanned. High quality image can be obtained by adopting the precisely stabilized X-ray unit and densely packed array of 64-detectors. As for its operation, capability of computed radiography (CR) prior to patient positioning and real time reconstruction ensure efficient patient through-put. Details of the SCT-200N are described in this paper. (author)

  3. Spectral Phase Modulation and chirped pulse amplification in High Gain Harmonic Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zilu; Krinsky, Sam; Loos, Henrik; Murphy, James; Shaftan, Timur; Sheehy, Brian; Shen, Yuzhen; Wang, Xijie; Yu Li Hua

    2004-01-01

    High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG), because it produces longitudinally coherent pulses derived from a coherent seed, presents remarkable possibilities for manipulating FEL pulses. If spectral phase modulation imposed on the seed modulates the spectral phase of the HGHG in a deterministic fashion, then chirped pulse amplification, pulse shaping, and coherent control experiments at short wavelengths become possible. In addition, the details of the transfer function will likely depend on electron beam and radiator dynamics and so prove to be a useful tool for studying these. Using the DUVFEL at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, we present spectral phase analyses of both coherent HGHG and incoherent SASE ultraviolet FEL radiation, applying Spectral Interferometry for Direct Electric Field Reconstruction (SPIDER), and assess the potential for employing compression and shaping techniques.

  4. A new self-made digital slide scanner and microscope for imaging and quantification of fluorescent microspheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henning, William; Bjerglund Andersen, Julie; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A low-cost microscope slide scanner was constructed for the purpose of digital imaging of newborn piglet brain tissue and to quantify fluorescent microspheres in tissue. Methods: Using a standard digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera, fluorescent imaging of newborn piglet brain tissue......-field imaging was tested by adding light diffuser film. Results: Cost of the slide scanner was a fraction of the cost of a commercial slide scanner. The slide scanner was able to image a large number of tissue slides in a semiautomatic manner and provided a large field of view (FOV) of 101 mm2 combined...... and an automatic algorithm to detect fluorescent microspheres in tissue was developed and validated and showed an acceptable difference to “gold standard” manual counting. The slide scanner can be regarded as a low-cost alternative for researchers when digital slide imaging and quantification of fluorescent...

  5. Intramolecular singlet-singlet energy transfer in antenna-substituted azoalkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischel, Uwe; Huang, Fang; Nau, Werner M

    2004-03-01

    Two novel azoalkane bichromophores and related model compounds have been synthesised and photophysically characterised. Dimethylphenylsiloxy (DPSO) or dimethylnaphthylsiloxy (DNSO) serve as aromatic donor groups (antenna) and the azoalkane 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene (DBO) as the acceptor. The UV spectral window of DBO (250-300 nm) allows selective excitation of the donor. Intramolecular singlet-singlet energy transfer to DBO is highly efficient and proceeds with quantum yields of 0.76 with DPSO and 0.99 with DNSO. The photophysical and spectral properties of the bichromophoric systems suggest that energy transfer occurs through diffusional approach of the donor and acceptor within a van der Waals contact at which the exchange mechanism is presumed to dominate. Furthermore, akin to the behaviour of electron-transfer systems in the Marcus inverted region, a rate of energy transfer 2.5 times slower was observed for the system with the more favourable energetics, i.e. singlet-singlet energy transfer from DPSO proceeded slower than from DNSO, although the process is more exergonic for DPSO (-142 kJ mol(-1) for DPSO versus-67 kJ mol(-1) for DNSO).

  6. Validity and Repeatability of the Sizestream 3D Scanner and Poikos Modeling System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, T.E.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) body scanning becomes increasingly important in the medical, ergonomical and apparel industry. The SizeStream 3D body scanner is a 3D body scanner in the shape of a fitting room that can generate a 3D copy of the human body in a few seconds. The Poikos modeling system

  7. A laser scanner for imaging fluorophore labeled molecules in electrophoretic gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, D.J.; Sutherland, J.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Biology Dept.

    1995-08-01

    A laser scanner for imaging electrophoretic gels was constructed and tested. The scanner incorporates a green helium-neon (HeNe) laser (543.5nm wavelength) and can achieve a spatial resolution of 19{micro}m. The instrument can function in two modes : snap-shot and finish-line. In snapshot mode, all samples are electrophoresed for the same time and the gel is scanned after completion of electrophoresis, while in finish-line mode, fluorophore labeled samples are electrophoresed for a constant distance and the image is formed as the samples pass under the detector. The resolving power of the finish-line mode of imaging is found to be greater than that of the snapshot mode of imaging. This laser scanner is also compared with a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) camera and in terms of resolving power is found to be superior. Sensitivity of the instrument is presented in terms of the minimum amount of DNA that can be detected verses its molecular length.

  8. A passive gamma scanner for estimation of plutonium in fabrication waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesan, P.P.; Burte, P.P.; Manohar, S.B.; Satya Prakash; Ramaniah, M.V.

    1978-01-01

    The solid plutonium wastes arising from plutonium handling laboratories and fuel fabrication facilities by their very nature (heterogeneous) are not amenable to proper sampling and hence to the standard techniques of estimation. For the proper accounting of nuclear materials a non-destructive method of waste assay is essential. A passive gamma-ray scanner developed in the Radiochemistry Division is described in the present report. The scanner detects the 384 KeV gamma complex of plutonium in a (3'' x 3'') NaI(Tl) detector. The rotation-collimation technique is used to achieve the flat response with respect to the plutonium distribution inside the waste can. The sensitivity of the scanner is 200 mg of Pu per can at 2 sigma level and 20% accuracy for a total scan time of 2000 sec. The assay results of typical waste cans and comparison of a few of these with chemical assay results are presented. This non-destructive method is fast, simple and has satisfactory accuracy. (author)

  9. Spectral analysis of turbulence propagation mechanisms in solar wind and tokamaks plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Yue

    2014-01-01

    This thesis takes part in the study of spectral transfers in the turbulence of magnetized plasmas. We will be interested in turbulence in solar wind and tokamaks. Spacecraft measures, first principle simulations and simple dynamical systems will be used to understand the mechanisms behind spectral anisotropy and spectral transfers in these plasmas. The first part of this manuscript will introduce the common context of solar wind and tokamaks, what is specific to each of them and present some notions needed to understand the work presented here. The second part deals with turbulence in the solar wind. We will present first an observational study on the spectral variability of solar wind turbulence. Starting from the study of Grappin et al. (1990, 1991) on Helios mission data, we bring a new analysis taking into account a correct evaluation of large scale spectral break, provided by the higher frequency data of the Wind mission. This considerably modifies the result on the spectral index distribution of the magnetic and kinetic energy. A second observational study is presented on solar wind turbulence anisotropy using autocorrelation functions. Following the work of Matthaeus et al. (1990); Dasso et al. (2005), we bring a new insight on this statistical, in particular the question of normalisation choices used to build the autocorrelation function, and its consequence on the measured anisotropy. This allows us to bring a new element in the debate on the measured anisotropy depending on the choice of the referential either based on local or global mean magnetic field. Finally, we study for the first time in 3D the effects of the transverse expansion of solar wind on its turbulence. This work is based on a theoretical and numerical scheme developed by Grappin et al. (1993); Grappin and Velli (1996), but never used in 3D. Our main results deal with the evolution of spectral and polarization anisotropy due to the competition between non-linear and linear (Alfven coupling

  10. Coastal Zone Color Scanner studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrod, J.

    1988-01-01

    Activities over the past year have included cooperative work with a summer faculty fellow using the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) imagery to study the effects of gradients in trophic resources on coral reefs in the Caribbean. Other research included characterization of ocean radiances specific to an acid-waste plume. Other activities include involvement in the quality control of imagery produced in the processing of the global CZCS data set, the collection of various other data global sets, and the subsequent data comparison and analysis.

  11. Beam hardening artifacts by dental implants: Comparison of cone-beam and 64-slice computed tomography scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Esmaeili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT is an alternative to a computed tomography (CT scan, which is appropriate for a wide range of craniomaxillofacial indications. The long-term use of metallic materials in dentistry means that artifacts caused by metallic restorations in the oral cavity should be taken into account when utilizing CBCT and CT scanners. The aim of this study was to quantitatively compare the beam hardening artifacts produced by dental implants between CBCT and a 64-Slice CT scanner. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study , an implant drilling model similar to the human mandible was used in the present study. The implants (Dentis were placed in the canine, premolar and molar areas. Three series of scans were provided from the implant areas using Somatom Sensation 64-slice and NewTom VGi (CBCT CT scanners. Identical images were evaluated by three radiologists. The artifacts in each image were determined based on pre-determined criteria. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare mean values; Mann-Whitney U test was used for two-by-two comparisons when there was a statistical significance ( P < 0.05. Results: The images of the two scanners had similar resolutions in axial sections ( P = 0.299. In coronal sections, there were significant differences in the resolutions of the images produced by the two scanners ( P < 0.001, with a higher resolution in the images produced by NewTom VGi scanner. On the whole, there were significant differences between the resolutions of the images produced by the two CT scanners ( P < 0.001, with higher resolution in the images produced by NewTom VGi scanner in comparison to those of Somatom Sensation. Conclusion: Given the high quality of the images produced by NewTom VGi and the lower costs in comparison to CT, the use of the images of this scanner in dental procedures is recommended, especially in patients with extensive restorations, multiple prostheses and previous implants.

  12. Two-Dimensional Metrology with Flatbed Scanners at Room and Liquid Nitrogen Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau Malonda, A. [CIEMAT. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    We study the capability of the commercial flatbed scanner as a measuring instrument of two-coordinate sample both at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. We describes simple procedure to calibrate the scanner, and the most adequate standard configuration to carry out the measurements. To illustrate the procedure, we measure the relative positions of the conductors in a cross-section of a superconducting magnet of CERN. (Author) 8 refs.

  13. Two-Dimensional Metrology with Flatbed Scanners at Room and Liquid Nitrogen Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau Malonda, A.

    2000-01-01

    We study the capability of the commercial flatbed scanner as a measuring instrument of two-coordinate sample both at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. We describes simple procedure to calibrate the scanner, and the most adequate standard configuration to carry out the measurements. To illustrate the procedure, we measure the relative positions of the conductors in a cross-section of a superconducting magnet of CERN. (Author) 8 refs

  14. Hamiltonian indices and rational spectral densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, C. I.; Duncan, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    Several (global) topological properties of various spaces of linear systems, particularly symmetric, lossless, and Hamiltonian systems, and multivariable spectral densities of fixed McMillan degree are announced. The study is motivated by a result asserting that on a connected but not simply connected manifold, it is not possible to find a vector field having a sink as its only critical point. In the scalar case, this is illustrated by showing that only on the space of McMillan degree = /Cauchy index/ = n, scalar transfer functions can one define a globally convergent vector field. This result holds both in discrete-time and for the nonautonomous case. With these motivations in mind, theorems of Bochner and Fogarty are used in showing that spaces of transfer functions defined by symmetry conditions are, in fact, smooth algebraic manifolds.

  15. Feature-space transformation improves supervised segmentation across scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Opbroek, Annegreet; Achterberg, Hakim C.; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    Image-segmentation techniques based on supervised classification generally perform well on the condition that training and test samples have the same feature distribution. However, if training and test images are acquired with different scanners or scanning parameters, their feature distributions...

  16. Joint Calibration of 3d Laser Scanner and Digital Camera Based on Dlt Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, X.; Li, M.; Xing, L.; Liu, Y.

    2018-04-01

    Design a calibration target that can be scanned by 3D laser scanner while shot by digital camera, achieving point cloud and photos of a same target. A method to joint calibrate 3D laser scanner and digital camera based on Direct Linear Transformation algorithm was proposed. This method adds a distortion model of digital camera to traditional DLT algorithm, after repeating iteration, it can solve the inner and external position element of the camera as well as the joint calibration of 3D laser scanner and digital camera. It comes to prove that this method is reliable.

  17. Application of stochastic Liouville–von Neumann equation to electronic energy transfer in FMO complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hajime; Ohtsuki, Yukiyoshi; Kono, Hirohiko

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Stochastic Liouville–von Neumann equation is applied to energy transfer dynamics. • Noise generation methods for dealing with exciton in FMO complexes are proposed. • Structured spectral densities could better support coherent population dynamics. - Abstract: A stochastic Liouville–von Neumann approach to solving a spin-boson model is applied to electronic energy transfer in Fenna–Matthews–Olson (FMO) complexes as a case study of the dynamics in biological systems. We modify a noise generation method to treat an experimentally obtained highly structured spectral density. By considering the population dynamics in a two-site system with a model structured spectral density, we numerically observe two kinds of coherent motions associated with inter-site coupling and system–bath coupling, the latter of which is mainly attributed to the peak structure of the spectral density

  18. Digitisation of electron microscope films: Six useful tests applied to three film scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, R.; Cattermole, D.; McMullan, G.; Scotcher, S.; Fordham, M.; Amos, W.B.; Faruqi, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    A series of simple tests have been used to measure the performance of flat-bed film scanners suitable for digitisation of electron micrographs. Two of the film scanners evaluated are commercially available and one has been constructed in the laboratory paying special attention to the needs of the electron microscopist. The tests may be useful for others

  19. Quality evaluation of tandem mass spectral libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberacher, Herbert; Weinmann, Wolfgang; Dresen, Sebastian

    2011-06-01

    Tandem mass spectral libraries are gaining more and more importance for the identification of unknowns in different fields of research, including metabolomics, forensics, toxicology, and environmental analysis. Particularly, the recent invention of reliable, robust, and transferable libraries has increased the general acceptance of these tools. Herein, we report on results obtained from thorough evaluation of the match reliabilities of two tandem mass spectral libraries: the MSforID library established by the Oberacher group in Innsbruck and the Weinmann library established by the Weinmann group in Freiburg. Three different experiments were performed: (1) Spectra of the libraries were searched against their corresponding library after excluding either this single compound-specific spectrum or all compound-specific spectra prior to searching; (2) the libraries were searched against each other using either library as reference set or sample set; (3) spectra acquired on different mass spectrometric instruments were matched to both libraries. Almost 13,000 tandem mass spectra were included in this study. The MSforID search algorithm was used for spectral matching. Statistical evaluation of the library search results revealed that principally both libraries enable the sensitive and specific identification of compounds. Due to higher mass accuracy of the QqTOF compared with the QTrap instrument, matches to the MSforID library were more reliable when comparing spectra with both libraries. Furthermore, only the MSforID library was shown to be efficiently transferable to different kinds of tandem mass spectrometers, including "tandem-in-time" instruments; this is due to the coverage of a large range of different collision energy settings-including the very low range-which is an outstanding characteristics of the MSforID library.

  20. Calibration between a Laser Range Scanner and an Industrial Robot Manipulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Timm; Andersen, Nils Axel; Ravn, Ole

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for findingthe transformation between a laser scanner and a robotmanipulator. We present the design of a flat calibration targetthat can easily fit between a laser scanner and a conveyor belt,making the method easily implementable in a manufacturingline.We prove...... that the method works by simulating a range ofdifferent orientations of the target, and performs an extensivenumerical evaluation of the targets design parameters to estab-lish the optimal values as well as the worst-case accuracy ofthe method...

  1. Aquilion ONE / ViSION Edition CT scanner realizing 3D dynamic observation with low-dose scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazama, Masahiro; Saito, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) scanners have been continuously advancing as essential diagnostic imaging equipment for the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of diseases, including the three major disease classes of cerebrovascular disease, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Through the development of helical CT scanners and multislice CT scanners, Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation has developed the Aquilion ONE, a CT scanner with a scanning range of up to 160 mm per rotation that can obtain three-dimensional (3D) images of the brain, heart, and other organs in a single rotation. We have now developed the Aquilion ONE / ViSION Edition, a next-generation 320-row multislice CT scanner incorporating the latest technologies that achieves a shorter scanning time and significant reduction in dose compared with conventional products. This product with its low-dose scanning technology will contribute to the practical realization of new diagnosis and treatment modalities employing four-dimensional (4D) data based on 3D dynamic observations through continuous rotations. (author)

  2. A scanning probe microscope for magnetoresistive cantilevers utilizing a nested scanner design for large-area scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Meier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM for the characterization of self-sensing tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR cantilevers. Furthermore, we achieve a large scan-range with a nested scanner design of two independent piezo scanners: a small high resolution scanner with a scan range of 5 × 5 × 5 μm3 is mounted on a large-area scanner with a scan range of 800 × 800 × 35 μm3. In order to characterize TMR sensors on AFM cantilevers as deflection sensors, the AFM is equipped with a laser beam deflection setup to measure the deflection of the cantilevers independently. The instrument is based on a commercial AFM controller and capable to perform large-area scanning directly without stitching of images. Images obtained on different samples such as calibration standard, optical grating, EPROM chip, self-assembled monolayers and atomic step-edges of gold demonstrate the high stability of the nested scanner design and the performance of self-sensing TMR cantilevers.

  3. Gamma scanner conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinth, K.L.

    1979-11-01

    The Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) will include several stations for the nondestructive examination of irradiated fuels. One of these stations will be the gamma scanner which will be employed to detect gamma radiation from the irradiated fuel pins. The conceptual design of the gamma scan station is described. The gamma scanner will use a Standard Exam Stage (SES) as a positioner and transport mechanism for the fuel pins which it will obtain from a magazine. A pin guide mechanism mounted on the face of the collimator will assure that the fuel pins remain in front of the collimator during scanning. The collimator has remotely adjustable tungsten slits and can be manually rotated to align the slit at various angles. A shielded detector cart located in the operating corridor holds an intrinsic germanium detector and associated sodium-iodide anticoincidence detector. The electronics associated with the counting system consist of standard NIM modules to process the detector signals and a stand-alone multichannel analyzer (MCA) for counting data accumulation. Data from the MCA are bussed to the station computer for analysis and storage on magnetic tape. The station computer controls the collimator, the MCA, a source positioner and the SES through CAMAC-based interface hardware. Most of the electronic hardware is commercially available but some interfaces will require development. Conceptual drawings are included for mechanical hardware that must be designed and fabricated

  4. Effects of injected dose, BMI and scanner type on NECR and image noise in PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Tingting; Chang Guoping; Clark, John W Jr; Kohlmyer, Steve; Rohren, Eric; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2011-01-01

    Noise equivalent count rate (NECR) and image noise are two different but related metrics that have been used to predict and assess image quality, respectively. The aim of this study is to investigate, using patient studies, the relationships between injected dose (ID), body mass index (BMI) and scanner type on NECR and image noise measurements in PET imaging. Two groups of 90 patients each were imaged on a GE DSTE and a DRX PET/CT scanner, respectively. The patients in each group were divided into nine subgroups according to three BMI (20-24.9, 25-29.9, 30-45 kg m -2 ) and three ID (296-444, 444-555, 555-740 MBq) ranges, resulting in ten patients/subgroup. All PET data were acquired in 3D mode and reconstructed using the VuePoint HD (registered) fully 3D OSEM algorithm (2 iterations, 21(DRX) or 20 (DSTE) subsets). NECR and image noise measurements for bed positions covering the liver were calculated for each patient. NECR was calculated from the trues, randoms and scatter events recorded in the DICOM header of each patient study, while image noise was determined as the standard deviation of 50 non-neighboring voxels in the liver of each patient. A t-test compared the NECR and image noise for different scanners but with the same BMI and ID. An ANOVA test on the other hand was used to compare the results of patients with different BMI but the same ID and scanner type as well as different ID but the same BMI and scanner type. As expected the t-test showed a significant difference in NECR between the two scanners for all BMI and ID subgroups. However, contrary to what is expected no such findings were observed for image noise measurement. The ANOVA results showed a statistically significant difference in both NECR and image noise among the different BMI for each ID and scanner subgroup. However, there was no statistically significant difference in NECR and image noise across different ID for each BMI and scanner subgroup. Although the GE DRX PET/CT scanner has better

  5. Enhanced methodology of focus control and monitoring on scanner tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Jen; Kim, Young Ki; Hao, Xueli; Gomez, Juan-Manuel; Tian, Ye; Kamalizadeh, Ferhad; Hanson, Justin K.

    2017-03-01

    As the demand of the technology node shrinks from 14nm to 7nm, the reliability of tool monitoring techniques in advanced semiconductor fabs to achieve high yield and quality becomes more critical. Tool health monitoring methods involve periodic sampling of moderately processed test wafers to detect for particles, defects, and tool stability in order to ensure proper tool health. For lithography TWINSCAN scanner tools, the requirements for overlay stability and focus control are very strict. Current scanner tool health monitoring methods include running BaseLiner to ensure proper tool stability on a periodic basis. The focus measurement on YIELDSTAR by real-time or library-based reconstruction of critical dimensions (CD) and side wall angle (SWA) has been demonstrated as an accurate metrology input to the control loop. The high accuracy and repeatability of the YIELDSTAR focus measurement provides a common reference of scanner setup and user process. In order to further improve the metrology and matching performance, Diffraction Based Focus (DBF) metrology enabling accurate, fast, and non-destructive focus acquisition, has been successfully utilized for focus monitoring/control of TWINSCAN NXT immersion scanners. The optimal DBF target was determined to have minimized dose crosstalk, dynamic precision, set-get residual, and lens aberration sensitivity. By exploiting this new measurement target design, 80% improvement in tool-to-tool matching, >16% improvement in run-to-run mean focus stability, and >32% improvement in focus uniformity have been demonstrated compared to the previous BaseLiner methodology. Matching control and monitoring on multiple illumination conditions, opens an avenue to significantly reduce Focus-Exposure Matrix (FEM) wafer exposure for new product/layer best focus (BF) setup.

  6. Time-invariant component-based normalization for a simultaneous PET-MR scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzunce, M A; Reader, A J

    2016-05-07

    Component-based normalization is a method used to compensate for the sensitivity of each of the lines of response acquired in positron emission tomography. This method consists of modelling the sensitivity of each line of response as a product of multiple factors, which can be classified as time-invariant, time-variant and acquisition-dependent components. Typical time-variant factors are the intrinsic crystal efficiencies, which are needed to be updated by a regular normalization scan. Failure to do so would in principle generate artifacts in the reconstructed images due to the use of out of date time-variant factors. For this reason, an assessment of the variability and the impact of the crystal efficiencies in the reconstructed images is important to determine the frequency needed for the normalization scans, as well as to estimate the error obtained when an inappropriate normalization is used. Furthermore, if the fluctuations of these components are low enough, they could be neglected and nearly artifact-free reconstructions become achievable without performing a regular normalization scan. In this work, we analyse the impact of the time-variant factors in the component-based normalization used in the Biograph mMR scanner, but the work is applicable to other PET scanners. These factors are the intrinsic crystal efficiencies and the axial factors. For the latter, we propose a new method to obtain fixed axial factors that was validated with simulated data. Regarding the crystal efficiencies, we assessed their fluctuations during a period of 230 d and we found that they had good stability and low dispersion. We studied the impact of not including the intrinsic crystal efficiencies in the normalization when reconstructing simulated and real data. Based on this assessment and using the fixed axial factors, we propose the use of a time-invariant normalization that is able to achieve comparable results to the standard, daily updated, normalization factors used in this

  7. Importance of professional qualification for operators of body scanners in prisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kühn, P.; Huhn, A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The implantation of the personal search by body scanners is gradually being implanted in Brazilian prisons. The body scanner, if operated by a qualified professional, allows the observation of images, generated by X-rays, of the whole body avoiding the intimate search, which is questioned for being embarrassing to the visitors of the inmates. The use of X-rays without control of absorbed doses may endanger the health of operators of equipment and, in the case of prisons, also to visitors. Method: Exploratory and descriptive, based on national and international legislation on the subject, in order to analyze and identify suitable training for the operation of body scanners. Results: The study was composed of the Standards and Recommendations of the National and International Nuclear Energy Commission. The results although the legislation does not clearly identify professional training to operate scanners in prisons, a broad knowledge on ionizing radiation and radiological protection is of the utmost importance. Conclusion: The manipulation of equipment generating ionizing radiation must be performed by qualified and authorized professional, to guarantee the principles of radiological protection to whoever operates the equipment and the population that will possibly be submitted to the personal search in the prison units. Therefore, it is understood that professionals with adequate training and competence to ensure the integrity of the health of all are the professional of Radiological Techniques and these must prove their training with registration in the specific Class Council

  8. Beam Dumping Ghost Signals in Electric Sweep Scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockli, M.P.; Leitner, M.; Keller, R.; Moehs, D.P.; Welton, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    Over the last 20 years many labs started to use Allison scanners to measure low-energy ion beam emittances. We show that large trajectory angles produce ghost signals due to the impact of the beamlet on the electric deflection plates. The strength of the ghost signal is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions and their velocity, ghost signals can have the opposite polarity as the main beam signals or the same polarity. These ghost signals are easily overlooked because they partly overlap the real signals, they are mostly below the 1% level, and they are often hidden in the noise. However, they cause significant errors in emittance estimates because they are associated with large trajectory angles. The strength of ghost signals, and the associated errors, can be drastically reduced with a simple modification of the deflection plates

  9. Beam dumping ghost signals in electric sweep scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockli, M.P.; SNS Project, Oak Ridge; Tennessee U.; Leitner, M.; LBL, Berkeley; Moehs, D.P.; Keller, R.; LBL, Berkeley; Welton, R.F.; SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2004-01-01

    Over the last 20 years many labs started to use Allison scanners to measure loW--energy ion beam emittances. We show that large trajectory angles produce ghost signals due to the impact of the beamlet on the electric deflection plates. The strength of the ghost signal is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions and their velocity, ghost signals can have the opposite polarity as the main beam signals or the same polarity. These ghost signals are easily overlooked because they partly overlap the real signals, they are mostly below the 1% level, and they are often hidden in the noise. However, they cause significant errors in emittance estimates because they are associated with large trajectory angles. The strength of ghost signals, and the associated errors, can be drastically reduced with a simple modification of the deflection plates

  10. The 3D laser scanner: a useful technique in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    This 3-dimensional laser scanner allows the visualization of all the structures and equipment visible in a nuclear unit even contaminated. This device can be introduced in any place where its dimensions 60 cm * 20 cm (laser + tripod) permit it. The rotation of the head gives a field of view of 360 degrees in the horizontal plane and of 300 degrees in the vertical plane. The exposition time of the staff is reduced to the intervention times required to position the laser scanner and to recover it which reduces the personnel radiation dose. (A.C.)

  11. Learning and Teaching with a Computer Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planinsic, G.; Gregorcic, B.; Etkina, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the readers to simple inquiry-based activities (experiments with supporting questions) that one can do with a computer scanner to help students learn and apply the concepts of relative motion in 1 and 2D, vibrational motion and the Doppler effect. We also show how to use these activities to help students think like…

  12. Multiple Scattering Principal Component-based Radiative Transfer Model (PCRTM) from Far IR to UV-Vis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Wu, W.; Yang, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Modern satellite hyperspectral satellite remote sensors such as AIRS, CrIS, IASI, CLARREO all require accurate and fast radiative transfer models that can deal with multiple scattering of clouds and aerosols to explore the information contents. However, performing full radiative transfer calculations using multiple stream methods such as discrete ordinate (DISORT), doubling and adding (AD), successive order of scattering order of scattering (SOS) are very time consuming. We have developed a principal component-based radiative transfer model (PCRTM) to reduce the computational burden by orders of magnitudes while maintain high accuracy. By exploring spectral correlations, the PCRTM reduce the number of radiative transfer calculations in frequency domain. It further uses a hybrid stream method to decrease the number of calls to the computational expensive multiple scattering calculations with high stream numbers. Other fast parameterizations have been used in the infrared spectral region reduce the computational time to milliseconds for an AIRS forward simulation (2378 spectral channels). The PCRTM has been development to cover spectral range from far IR to UV-Vis. The PCRTM model have been be used for satellite data inversions, proxy data generation, inter-satellite calibrations, spectral fingerprinting, and climate OSSE. We will show examples of applying the PCRTM to single field of view cloudy retrievals of atmospheric temperature, moisture, traces gases, clouds, and surface parameters. We will also show how the PCRTM are used for the NASA CLARREO project.

  13. MCPT: A Monte Carlo code for simulation of photon transport in tomographic scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prettyman, T.H.; Gardner, R.P.; Verghese, K.

    1990-01-01

    MCPT is a special-purpose Monte Carlo code designed to simulate photon transport in tomographic scanners. Variance reduction schemes and sampling games present in MCPT were selected to characterize features common to most tomographic scanners. Combined splitting and biasing (CSB) games are used to systematically sample important detection pathways. An efficient splitting game is used to tally particle energy deposition in detection zones. The pulse height distribution of each detector can be found by convolving the calculated energy deposition distribution with the detector's resolution function. A general geometric modelling package, HERMETOR, is used to describe the geometry of the tomographic scanners and provide MCPT information needed for particle tracking. MCPT's modelling capabilites are described and preliminary experimental validation is presented. (orig.)

  14. Two examples of indication specific radiation dose calculations in dental CBCT and Multidetector CT scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratis, Andreas; Zhang, Guozhi; Lopez-Rendon, Xochitl; Politis, Constantinus; Hermans, Robert; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Shaheen, Eman; Bosmans, Hilde

    2017-09-01

    To calculate organ doses and estimate the effective dose for justification purposes in patients undergoing orthognathic treatment planning purposes and temporal bone imaging in dental cone beam CT (CBCT) and Multidetector CT (MDCT) scanners. The radiation dose to the ICRP reference male voxel phantom was calculated for dedicated orthognathic treatment planning acquisitions via Monte Carlo simulations in two dental CBCT scanners, Promax 3D Max (Planmeca, FI) and NewTom VGi evo (QR s.r.l, IT) and in Somatom Definition Flash (Siemens, DE) MDCT scanner. For temporal bone imaging, radiation doses were calculated via MC simulations for a CBCT protocol in NewTom 5G (QR s.r.l, IT) and with the use of a software tool (CT-expo) for Somatom Force (Siemens, DE). All procedures had been optimized at the acceptance tests of the devices. For orthognathic protocols, dental CBCT scanners deliver lower doses compared to MDCT scanners. The estimated effective dose (ED) was 0.32mSv for a normal resolution operation mode in Promax 3D Max, 0.27mSv in VGi-evo and 1.18mSv in the Somatom Definition Flash. For temporal bone protocols, the Somatom Force resulted in an estimated ED of 0.28mSv while for NewTom 5G the ED was 0.31 and 0.22mSv for monolateral and bilateral imaging respectively. Two clinical exams which are carried out with both a CBCT or a MDCT scanner were compared in terms of radiation dose. Dental CBCT scanners deliver lower doses for orthognathic patients whereas for temporal bone procedures the doses were similar. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Competition for pollinators and intra-communal spectral dissimilarity of flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kooi, C J; Pen, I; Staal, M; Stavenga, D G; Elzenga, J T M

    2016-01-01

    Competition for pollinators occurs when, in a community of flowering plants, several simultaneously flowering plant species depend on the same pollinator. Competition for pollinators increases interspecific pollen transfer rates, thereby reducing the number of viable offspring. In order to decrease interspecific pollen transfer, plant species can distinguish themselves from competitors by having a divergent phenotype. Floral colour is an important signalling cue to attract potential pollinators and thus a major aspect of the flower phenotype. In this study, we analysed the amount of spectral dissimilarity of flowers among pollinator-competing plants in a Dutch nature reserve. We expected pollinator-competing plants to exhibit more spectral dissimilarity than non-competing plants. Using flower visitation data of 2 years, we determined the amount of competition for pollinators by different plant species. Plant species that were visited by the same pollinator were considered specialist and competing for that pollinator, whereas plant species visited by a broad array of pollinators were considered non-competing generalists. We used principal components analysis to quantify floral reflectance, and found evidence for enhanced spectral dissimilarity among plant species within specialist pollinator guilds (i.e. groups of plant species competing for the same pollinator). This is the first study that examined intra-communal dissimilarity in floral reflectance with a focus on the pollination system. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  16. Influence of scanner, powder application, and adjustments on CAD-CAM crown misfit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudente, Marcel S; Davi, Letícia R; Nabbout, Kemilly O; Prado, Célio J; Pereira, Leandro M; Zancopé, Karla; Neves, Flávio D

    2018-03-01

    The manufacturers of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) systems emphasize that new technologies can improve the marginal fit of dental crowns. However, data supporting this claim are limited. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the differences among the following fabrication methods on the marginal discrepancy of dental crowns: intraoral optical scanners, powder application, and adjustments of intaglio surface. A single human premolar was fixed on a typodont and prepared to receive crowns prepared by the CEREC CAD-CAM system. Three fabrication techniques were used: digital scans using the CEREC Bluecam scanner with titanium dioxide powder (TDP), digital scans using the CEREC Omnicam scanner without TDP, and digital scans using the Omnicam scanner with TDP. Five experimental groups (n=10) were designated: Bluecam (group B), Bluecam with adjustments (group BA), Omnicam (group O), Omnicam with adjustments (group OA), and Omnicam with TDP (group OP). The specimens were scanned using microcomputed tomography to measure the vertical, horizontal, and internal fit and volumetric 3-dimensional (3D) internal fit values of each luting space. The paired t test was used to evaluate mean marginal fit change after adjustments within the same group. One-way analysis of variance and post hoc tests were used to compare groups B, O, and OP (α=.05). Mean vertical fit values ±standard deviations of group B=29.5 ±13.2 μm; BA=26.9 ±7.7 μm; O=149.4 ±64.4 μm; OA=49.4 ±12.7 μm; and OP=33.0 ±8.3 μm. Adjustments in the intaglio surface and TDP application statistically influenced the vertical fit of group O (POmnicam system had significantly higher vertical discrepancy and volumetric 3D internal fit than those fabricated using the Bluecam scanner with TDP. Adjustments of the intaglio surface improved the vertical fit of crowns made using the Omnicam scanner; however, TDP application before Omnicam scanning improved the vertical fit

  17. Applicability of optical scanner method for fine root dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Tomonori; Ohashi, Mizue; Makita, Naoki; Khoon Kho, Lip; Katayama, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Ikeno, Hidetoshi

    2016-04-01

    Fine root dynamics is one of the important components in forest carbon cycling, as ~60 % of tree photosynthetic production can be allocated to root growth and metabolic activities. Various techniques have been developed for monitoring fine root biomass, production, mortality in order to understand carbon pools and fluxes resulting from fine roots dynamics. The minirhizotron method is now a widely used technique, in which a transparent tube is inserted into the soil and researchers count an increase and decrease of roots along the tube using images taken by a minirhizotron camera or minirhizotron video camera inside the tube. This method allows us to observe root behavior directly without destruction, but has several weaknesses; e.g., the difficulty of scaling up the results to stand level because of the small observation windows. Also, most of the image analysis are performed manually, which may yield insufficient quantitative and objective data. Recently, scanner method has been proposed, which can produce much bigger-size images (A4-size) with lower cost than those of the minirhizotron methods. However, laborious and time-consuming image analysis still limits the applicability of this method. In this study, therefore, we aimed to develop a new protocol for scanner image analysis to extract root behavior in soil. We evaluated applicability of this method in two ways; 1) the impact of different observers including root-study professionals, semi- and non-professionals on the detected results of root dynamics such as abundance, growth, and decomposition, and 2) the impact of window size on the results using a random sampling basis exercise. We applied our new protocol to analyze temporal changes of root behavior from sequential scanner images derived from a Bornean tropical forests. The results detected by the six observers showed considerable concordance in temporal changes in the abundance and the growth of fine roots but less in the decomposition. We also examined

  18. Spectral modeling of radiation in combustion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Gopalendu

    Radiation calculations are important in combustion due to the high temperatures encountered but has not been studied in sufficient detail in the case of turbulent flames. Radiation calculations for such problems require accurate, robust, and computationally efficient models for the solution of radiative transfer equation (RTE), and spectral properties of radiation. One more layer of complexity is added in predicting the overall heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems due to nonlinear interactions between turbulent fluctuations and radiation. The present work is aimed at the development of finite volume-based high-accuracy thermal radiation modeling, including spectral radiation properties in order to accurately capture turbulence-radiation interactions (TRI) and predict heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems correctly and efficiently. The turbulent fluctuations of temperature and chemical species concentrations have strong effects on spectral radiative intensities, and TRI create a closure problem when the governing partial differential equations are averaged. Recently, several approaches have been proposed to take TRI into account. Among these attempts the most promising approaches are the probability density function (PDF) methods, which can treat nonlinear coupling between turbulence and radiative emission exactly, i.e., "emission TRI". The basic idea of the PDF method is to treat physical variables as random variables and to solve the PDF transport equation stochastically. The actual reacting flow field is represented by a large number of discrete stochastic particles each carrying their own random variable values and evolving with time. The mean value of any function of those random variables, such as the chemical source term, can be evaluated exactly by taking the ensemble average of particles. The local emission term belongs to this class and thus, can be evaluated directly and exactly from particle ensembles. However, the local absorption term

  19. RRTM: A rapid radiative transfer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mlawer, E.J.; Taubman, S.J.; Clough, S.A. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) for the calculation of longwave clear-sky fluxes and cooling rates has been developed. The model, which uses the correlated-k method, is both accurate and computationally fast. The foundation for RRTM is the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM) from which the relevant k-distributions are obtained. LBLRTM, which has been extensively validated against spectral observations e.g., the high-resolution sounder and the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, is used to validate the flux and cooling rate results from RRTM. Validations of RRTM`s results have been performed for the tropical, midlatitude summer, and midlatitude winter atmospheres, as well as for the four Intercomparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) cases from the Spectral Radiance Experiment (SPECTRE). Details of some of these validations are presented below. RRTM has the identical atmospheric input module as LBLRTM, facilitating intercomparisons with LBLRTM and application of the model at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Cloud and Radiation Testbed sites.

  20. Application of intra-oral dental scanners in the digital workflow of implantology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wicher J van der Meer

    Full Text Available Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared.A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned with three intra-oral scanners: the CEREC (Sirona, the iTero (Cadent and the Lava COS (3M. In software the digital files were imported and the distance between the centres of the cylinders and the angulation between the cylinders was assessed. These values were compared to the measurements made on a high accuracy 3D scan of the master model.The distance errors were the smallest and most consistent for the Lava COS. The distance errors for the Cerec were the largest and least consistent. All the angulation errors were small.The Lava COS in combination with a high accuracy scanning protocol resulted in the smallest and most consistent errors of all three scanners tested when considering mean distance errors in full arch impressions both in absolute values and in consistency for both measured distances. For the mean angulation errors, the Lava COS had the smallest errors between cylinders 1-2 and the largest errors between cylinders 1-3, although the absolute difference with the smallest mean value (iTero was very small (0,0529°. An expected increase in distance and/or angular errors over the length of the arch due to an accumulation of registration errors of the patched 3D surfaces could be observed in this study design, but the effects were statistically not significant.For making impressions of implant cases for digital workflows, the most accurate scanner with the scanning protocol that will ensure the most accurate digital impression should be used. In our study model that was the Lava COS with the high accuracy scanning protocol.

  1. A Novel Atomic Force Microscope with Multi-Mode Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Chun; Zhang, Haijun; Xu, Rui; Han, Xu; Wang, Shuying

    2016-01-01

    A new type of atomic force microscope (AFM) with multi-mode scanner is proposed. The AFM system provides more than four scanning modes using a specially designed scanner with three tube piezoelectric ceramics and three stack piezoelectric ceramics. Sample scanning of small range with high resolution can be realized by using tube piezos, meanwhile, large range scanning can be achieved by stack piezos. Furthermore, the combination with tube piezos and stack piezos not only realizes high-resolution scanning of small samples with large- scale fluctuation structure, but also achieves small range area-selecting scanning. Corresponding experiments are carried out in terms of four different scanning modes showing that the AFM is of reliable stability, high resolution and can be widely applied in the fields of micro/nano-technology. (paper)

  2. Classification of Hyperspectral or Trichromatic Measurements of Ocean Color Data into Spectral Classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip K. Prasad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method for classifying radiometric oceanic color data measured by hyperspectral satellite sensors into known spectral classes, irrespective of the downwelling irradiance of the particular day, i.e., the illumination conditions. The focus is not on retrieving the inherent optical properties but to classify the pixels according to the known spectral classes of the reflectances from the ocean. The method compensates for the unknown downwelling irradiance by white balancing the radiometric data at the ocean pixels using the radiometric data of bright pixels (typically from clouds. The white-balanced data is compared with the entries in a pre-calibrated lookup table in which each entry represents the spectral properties of one class. The proposed approach is tested on two datasets of in situ measurements and 26 different daylight illumination spectra for medium resolution imaging spectrometer (MERIS, moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS, sea-viewing wide field-of-view sensor (SeaWiFS, coastal zone color scanner (CZCS, ocean and land colour instrument (OLCI, and visible infrared imaging radiometer suite (VIIRS sensors. Results are also shown for CIMEL’s SeaPRISM sun photometer sensor used on-board field trips. Accuracy of more than 92% is observed on the validation dataset and more than 86% is observed on the other dataset for all satellite sensors. The potential of applying the algorithms to non-satellite and non-multi-spectral sensors mountable on airborne systems is demonstrated by showing classification results for two consumer cameras. Classification on actual MERIS data is also shown. Additional results comparing the spectra of remote sensing reflectance with level 2 MERIS data and chlorophyll concentration estimates of the data are included.

  3. Assessment of the impact of the scanner-related factors on brain morphometry analysis with Brainvisa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhi Mahsa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain morphometry is extensively used in cross-sectional studies. However, the difference in the estimated values of the morphometric measures between patients and healthy subjects may be small and hence overshadowed by the scanner-related variability, especially with multicentre and longitudinal studies. It is important therefore to investigate the variability and reliability of morphometric measurements between different scanners and different sessions of the same scanner. Methods We assessed the variability and reliability for the grey matter, white matter, cerebrospinal fluid and cerebral hemisphere volumes as well as the global sulcal index, sulcal surface and mean geodesic depth using Brainvisa. We used datasets obtained across multiple MR scanners at 1.5 T and 3 T from the same groups of 13 and 11 healthy volunteers, respectively. For each morphometric measure, we conducted ANOVA analysis and verified whether the estimated values were significantly different across different scanners or different sessions of the same scanner. The between-centre and between-visit reliabilities were estimated from their contribution to the total variance, using a random-effects ANOVA model. To estimate the main processes responsible for low reliability, the results of brain segmentation were compared to those obtained using FAST within FSL. Results In a considerable number of cases, the main effects of both centre and visit factors were found to be significant. Moreover, both between-centre and between-visit reliabilities ranged from poor to excellent for most morphometric measures. A comparison between segmentation using Brainvisa and FAST revealed that FAST improved the reliabilities for most cases, suggesting that morphometry could benefit from improving the bias correction. However, the results were still significantly different across different scanners or different visits. Conclusions Our results confirm that for morphometry

  4. X-ray backscatter imaging with a spiral scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossi, R.H.; Cline, J.L.; Friddell, K.D.

    1989-01-01

    X-ray backscatter imaging allows radiographic inspections to be performed with access to only one side of the object. A collimated beam of radiation striking an object will scatter x-rays by Compton scatter and x-ray fluorescence. A detector located on the source side of the part will measure the backscatter signal. By plotting signal strength as gray scale intensity vs. beam position on the object, an image of the object can be constructed. A novel approach to the motion of the collimated incident beam is a spiral scanner. The spiral scanner approach, described in this paper, can image an area of an object without the synchronized motion of the object or detector, required by other backscatter imaging techniques. X-ray backscatter is particularly useful for flaw detection in light element materials such as composites. The ease of operation and the ability to operate non-contact from one side of an object make x-ray backscatter imaging of increasing interest to industrial inspection problems

  5. Initial analyses of surface spectral radiance between observations and Line-By-Line calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, P.D.; Clough, S.A. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Miller, N.E.; Shippert, T.R.; Turner, D.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The evaluation an improvement of radiative transfer calculations are essential to attain improved performance of general circulation models (GCMs) for climate change applications. A Quality Measurement Experiment (QME) is being conducted to analyze the spectral residuals between the downwelling longwave radiance measured by the University of Wisconsin Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) and spectral radiance calculated by the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM). The three critical components of this study are (1) the assessment of the quality of the high resolution AERI measurements, (2) the assessment of the ability to define the atmospheric state in the radiating column, and (3) the evaluation of the capability of LBLRTM. Validations have been performed on spectral radiance data, obtained from April 1994 through July 1994, through the analysis of the spectral interval and physical process. The results are archived as a function of time, enabling the retrieval of specific data and facilitating investigations and diurnal effects, seasonal effects, and longer-term trends. While the initial focus is restricted to clear-sky analyses, efforts are under way to include the effects of clouds and aerosols. Plans are well formulated for the extension of the current approach to the shortwave. An overview of the concept of the QME is described by Miller et al. (1994), and a detailed description of this study is provided by Clough et al. (1994).

  6. Selberg zeta functions and transfer operators an experimental approach to singular perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Fraczek, Markus Szymon

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a method for evaluating Selberg zeta functions via transfer operators for the full modular group and its congruence subgroups with characters. Studying zeros of Selberg zeta functions for character deformations allows us to access the discrete spectra and resonances of hyperbolic Laplacians under both singular and non-singular perturbations. Areas in which the theory has not yet been sufficiently developed, such as the spectral theory of transfer operators or the singular perturbation theory of hyperbolic Laplacians, will profit from the numerical experiments discussed in this book. Detailed descriptions of numerical approaches to the spectra and eigenfunctions of transfer operators and to computations of Selberg zeta functions will be of value to researchers active in analysis, while those researchers focusing more on numerical aspects will benefit from discussions of the analytic theory, in particular those concerning the transfer operator method and the spectral theory of hyperbolic spac...

  7. Phosphor Scanner For Imaging X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Hecht, Diana L.; Witherow, William K.

    1992-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic scanning apparatus generates digitized image of x-ray image recorded in phosphor. Scanning fiber-optic probe supplies laser light stimulating luminescence in areas of phosphor exposed to x rays. Luminescence passes through probe and fiber to integrating sphere and photomultiplier. Sensitivity and resolution exceed previously available scanners. Intended for use in x-ray crystallography, medical radiography, and molecular biology.

  8. Study of the heat transfers spectral radiation - conduction - natural convection in hybrid photovoltaic systems for buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muresan, C.

    2005-01-01

    numerical solution of the Radiative Transfer Equation in diffused part in the case of a mono-dimensional plane geometry. The directional discretizations of each layer are selected in such a way that the discrete directions of one of the layers correspond to those refracted of the close layer and this makes it possible to avoid the use of approximations related to non coincidence of the discrete directions of a layer with those refracted by the close layer. Directional quadratures are then established in an adaptive way in each layer and for each spectral frequency. The results obtained are validated by an approach of Monte Carlo type. The coupling of this model with a Low Reynolds number RANS model will be carried out. This will be done in order to study the convective heat transfers in natural convection for configurations of double facade integration under consideration within the framework of PRI CNRS. The comparison of this model is carried out for experimental configurations of vertical channel type uniformly heated in natural convection. The prospects for this stage are multiple and consist of analyzing the influence of the mode of flow on the thermal pulling of the hybrid components, the effects of the positioning of modules statement, the air gap between the two frontages and the boundary conditions thermal generated by the modules. Lastly, in order to supplement the energy balance of such components and more particularly that governs the thermal behavior of a photosensitive cell, the electric phenomenon of conversion is approached in adequacy with the level of modeling of the coupled thermal transfers radiation - conduction within a PV component. To carry this out, we can consider the local power of spectral radiation absorbed and converted into electric output. (author)

  9. Performance characteristics of 3D GSO PET/CT scanner (Philips GEMINI PET/CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Su; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Byeong Il; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2004-01-01

    Philips GEMINI is a newly introduced whole-body GSO PET/CT scanner. In this study, performance of the scanner including spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, noise equivalent count ratio (NECR) was measured utilizing NEMA NU2-2001 standard protocol and compared with performance of LSO, BGO crystal scanner. GEMINI is composed of the Philips ALLEGRO PET and MX8000 D multi-slice CT scanners. The PET scanner has 28 detector segments which have an array of 29 by 22 GSO crystals (4*6*20 mm), covering axial FOV of 18 cm. PET data to measure spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, and NECR were acquired in 3D mode according to the NEMA NU2 protocols (coincidence window: 8 ns, energy window : 409∼664 keV). For the measurement of spatial resolution, images were reconstructed with FBP using ramp filter and an iterative reconstruction algorithm, 3D RAMLA. Data for sensitivity measurement were acquired using NEMA sensitivity phantom filled with F-18 solution and surrounded by 1∼5 aluminum sleeves after we confirmed that dead time loss did not exceed 1%. To measure NECR and scatter fraction, 1110 MBq of F-18 solution was injected into a NEMA scatter phantom with a length of 70 cm and dynamic scan with 20-min frame duration was acquired for 7 half-lives. Oblique sinograms were collapsed into transaxial slices using single slice rebinning method, and true to background (scatter + random) ratio for each slice and frame was estimated. Scatter fraction was determined by averaging the true to background ratio of last 3 frames in which the dead time loss was below 1%. Transverse and axial resolutions at 1 cm radius were (1) 5.3 and 6.5 mm (FBP), (2) 5.1 and 5.9 mm (3D RAMLA). Transverse radial, transverse tangential, and axial resolution at 10 cm were (1) 5.7, 5.7, and 7.0 mm (FBP), (2) 5.4, 5.4, and 6.4 mm (3D RAMLA). Attenuation free values of sensitivity were 3,620 counts/sec/MBq at the center of transaxial FOV and 4,324 counts/sec/MBq at 10 cm offset

  10. A handy time alignment probe for timing calibration of PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, Melanie; Pepin, Catherine M.; Arpin, Louis; Leroux, Jean-Daniel; Tetrault, Marc-Andre; Viscogliosi, Nicolas; Fontaine, Rejean; Lecomte, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Accurate time alignment of detectors in PET scanners is required for improving overall coincidence timing resolution. This is mandatory to reduce the coincidence time window of the scanner and limit as much as possible the rate of random events in images. Several techniques have been proposed so far, but most have shortcomings relating to difficult use, collection of huge amount of data or long acquisition times, not to mention transport regulation of radioactive source embedded in time alignment probes. A handy liquid scintillation beta probe was developed to overcome these problems. It consists of a PMT coupled to a small glass container that can be filled with a liquid scintillation cocktail loaded with radioactivity (such as 18 F). The PMT signal is processed by an analog CFD and a digital TDC supplying an accurate timestamp on positron detection. When tested in coincidence with a fast PMT/plastic detector, a timing resolution of 1.1 ns FWHM was obtained using a standard off-the-shelf liquid cocktail having a scintillation decay time of 6.2 ns. For time alignment, coincidences are recorded between positron detected by the probe and one of the two 511 keV annihilation photons reaching detectors in the scanner. Using this simple probe, it is possible to determine the time offsets for individual LYSO and LGSO crystals in LabPET TM scanners in about 15 min. Due to its ease of use and short acquisition time, the proposed timing calibration method was found ideal for tuning the APD bias of individual detectors to reach optimal timing resolution on every channel.

  11. Static field influences on transcranial magnetic stimulation: considerations for TMS in the scanner environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Jeffrey M; Jalinous, Reza; Cantarero, Gabriela L; Desmond, John E

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can be combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to simultaneously manipulate and monitor human cortical responses. Although tremendous efforts have been directed at characterizing the impact of TMS on image acquisition, the influence of the scanner's static field on the TMS coil has received limited attention. The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of the scanner's static field on TMS. We hypothesized that spatial variations in the static field could account for TMS field variations in the scanner environment. Using an MRI-compatible TMS coil, we estimated TMS field strengths based on TMS-induced voltage changes measured in a search coil. We compared peak field strengths obtained with the TMS coil positioned at different locations (B0 field vs fringe field) and orientations in the static field. We also measured the scanner's static field to derive a field map to account for TMS field variations. TMS field strength scaled depending on coil location and orientation with respect to the static field. Larger TMS field variations were observed in fringe field regions near the gantry as compared to regions inside the bore or further removed from the bore. The scanner's static field also exhibited the greatest spatial variations in fringe field regions near the gantry. The scanner's static field influences TMS fields and spatial variations in the static field correlate with TMS field variations. Coil orientation changes in the B0 field did not result in substantial TMS field variations. TMS field variations can be minimized by delivering TMS in the bore or outside of the 0-70 cm region from the bore entrance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Accuracy and reproducibility of the DAVID SLS-2 scanner in three-dimensional facial imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Jesper Jared; Darvann, Tron Andre; Pinholt, Else Marie

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: A prospective study was performed to test the accuracy and reproducibility of the DAVID-SLS-2 scanner (SLS-2) [DAVID Vision Systems GmbH], compared to the validated 3dMDtrio scanner (3dMD) [3dMD, LLC, Atlanta, GA, USA]. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The accuracy of the SLS-2 was determined thro...

  13. Toward Improved Modeling of Spectral Solar Irradiance for Solar Energy Applications: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yu [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sengupta, Manajit [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-19

    This study introduces the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) recent efforts to extend the capability of the Fast All-sky Radiation Model for Solar applications (FARMS) by computing spectral solar irradiances over both horizontal and inclined surfaces. A new model is developed by computing the optical thickness of the atmosphere using a spectral irradiance model for clear-sky conditions, SMARTS2. A comprehensive lookup table (LUT) of cloud bidirectional transmittance distribution functions (BTDFs) is precomputed for 2002 wavelength bands using an atmospheric radiative transfer model, libRadtran. The solar radiation transmitted through the atmosphere is given by considering all possible paths of photon transmission and the relevent scattering and absorption attenuation. Our results indicate that this new model has an accuracy that is similar to that of state-of-the-art radiative transfer models, but it is significantly more efficient.

  14. Incorporation of a laser range scanner into image-guided liver surgery: Surface acquisition, registration, and tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cash, David M.; Sinha, Tuhin K.; Chapman, William C.; Terawaki, Hiromi; Dawant, Benoit M.; Galloway, Robert L.; Miga, Michael I.

    2003-01-01

    As image guided surgical procedures become increasingly diverse, there will be more scenarios where point-based fiducials cannot be accurately localized for registration and rigid body assumptions no longer hold. As a result, procedures will rely more frequently on anatomical surfaces for the basis of image alignment and will require intraoperative geometric data to measure and compensate for tissue deformation in the organ. In this paper we outline methods for which a laser range scanner may be used to accomplish these tasks intraoperatively. A laser range scanner based on the optical principle of triangulation acquires a dense set of three-dimensional point data in a very rapid, noncontact fashion. Phantom studies were performed to test the ability to link range scan data with traditional modes of image-guided surgery data through localization, registration, and tracking in physical space. The experiments demonstrate that the scanner is capable of localizing point-based fiducials to within 0.2 mm and capable of achieving point and surface based registrations with target registration error of less than 2.0 mm. Tracking points in physical space with the range scanning system yields an error of 1.4±0.8 mm. Surface deformation studies were performed with the range scanner in order to determine if this device was capable of acquiring enough information for compensation algorithms. In the surface deformation studies, the range scanner was able to detect changes in surface shape due to deformation comparable to those detected by tomographic image studies. Use of the range scanner has been approved for clinical trials, and an initial intraoperative range scan experiment is presented. In all of these studies, the primary source of error in range scan data is deterministically related to the position and orientation of the surface within the scanner's field of view. However, this systematic error can be corrected, allowing the range scanner to provide a rapid, robust

  15. Demonstration: A smartphone 3D functional brain scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Carsten; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Larsen, Jakob Eg

    We demonstrate a fully portable 3D real-time functional brain scanner consisting of a wireless 14-channel ‘Neuroheadset‘ (Emotiv EPOC) and a Nokia N900 smartphone. The novelty of our system is the ability to perform real-time functional brain imaging on a smartphone device, including stimulus...

  16. Reprint of 'Evaluation of Scattered Radiation Emitted From X-ray Security Scanners on Occupational Dose to Airport Personnel'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalah, Entesar; Fakhry, Angham; Mukhtar, Asma; Al Salti, Farah; Bader, May; Khouri, Sara; Al-Zahmi, Reem

    2017-11-01

    Based on security issues and regulations airports are provided with luggage cargo scanners. These scanners utilize ionizing radiation that in principle present health risks toward humans. The study aims to investigate the amount of backscatter produced by passenger luggage and cargo toward airport personnel who are located at different distances from the scanners. To approach our investigation a Thermo Electron Radeye-G probe was used to quantify the backscattered radiation measured in terms of dose-rate emitted from airport scanners, Measurements were taken at the entrance and exit positions of the X-ray tunnel at three different distances (0, 50, and 100 cm) for two different scanners; both scanners include shielding curtains that reduce scattered radiation. Correlation was demonstrated using the Pearson coefficient test. Measurements confirmed an inverse relationship between dose rate and distance. An estimated occupational accumulative dose of 0.88 mSv/y, and 2.04 mSv/y were obtained for personnel working in inspection of carry-on, and cargo, respectively. Findings confirm that the projected dose of security and engineering staff are being well within dose limits.

  17. [Study on the arc spectral information for welding quality diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Yong; Gu, Xiao-Yan; Li, Huan; Yang, Li-Jun

    2009-03-01

    Through collecting the spectral signals of TIG and MIG welding arc with spectrometer, the arc light radiations were analyzed based on the basic theory of plasma physics. The radiation of welding arc distributes over a broad range of frequency, from infrared to ultraviolet. The arc spectrum is composed of line spectra and continuous spectra. Due to the variation of metal density in the welding arc, there is great difference between the welding arc spectra of TIG and MIG in both their intensity and distribution. The MIG welding arc provides more line spectra of metal and the intensity of radiation is greater than TIG. The arc spectrum of TIG welding is stable during the welding process, disturbance factors that cause the spectral variations can be reflected by the spectral line related to the corresponding element entering the welding arc. The arc spectrum of MIG welding will fluctuate severely due to droplet transfer, which produces "noise" in the line spectrum aggregation zone. So for MIG welding, the spectral zone lacking spectral line is suitable for welding quality diagnosis. According to the characteristic of TIG and MIG, special spectral zones were selected for welding quality diagnosis. For TIG welding, the selected zone is in ultraviolet zone (230-300 nm). For MIG welding, the selected zone is in visible zone (570-590 nm). With the basic theory provided for welding quality diagnosis, the integral intensity of spectral signal in the selected zone of welding process with disturbing factor was studied to prove the theory. The results show that the welding quality and disturbance factors can be diagnosed with good signal to noise ratio in the selected spectral zone compared with signal in other spectral zone. The spectral signal can be used for real-time diagnosis of the welding quality.

  18. Quality assurance of computed tomography scanner beams in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindskoug, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    The number of computed tomography (CT) scanners in diagnostic radiology is increasing, to the extent that they are now found in relatively small hospitals. These hospitals do not have local physicists available and so methods must be developed to allow quality assurance to be carried out at distant laboratories. Several different types of solid water phantoms are available with various built-in test objects that may supply sufficient information about the many parameters that must be checked. The dose distributions, however, are usually not so well considered, although the connection between image quality and absorbed dose must be known for optimal use of a CT scanner. By introducing thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) into a commercial phantom (RMI), it was possible to measure the absorbed dose profile and the line integral of the absorbed dose across the slit. The computer-guided readout of the TLDs gives the absorbed dose, the average dose and half maximum width, absorbed dose curve, and also the line integral of the peak. The only modification of the phantom was five holes, drilled at strategic positions, that did not influence the built-in test objects. This single measurement provides an appropriate monthly quality assurance check of the CT scanner with little extra effort. (author)

  19. Computer-aided diagnosis of pneumoconiosis abnormalities extracted from chest radiographs scanned with a CCD scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Koji; Minami, Masahide; Nakamura, Munehiro

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a computer-aided diagnosis for pneumoconiosis radiographs obtained with a common charge-coupled devices (CCD) scanner. Since the current computer-aided diagnosis systems of pneumoconiosis are not practical for medical doctors due to high costs of usage for a special scanner, we propose a novel system which measures abnormalities of pneumoconiosis from lung images obtained with a common CCD scanner. Experimental results of discriminations between normal and abnormal cases for 56 right-lung images including 6 standard pneumoconiosis images have shown that the proposed abnormalities are well extracted according to the standards of pneumoconiosis categories. (author)

  20. Optimizing the feedback control of Galvo scanners for laser manufacturing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtchev, Theodore; Weeks, Robert; Minko, Sergey

    2010-06-01

    This paper summarizes the factors that limit the performance of moving-magnet galvo scanners driven by closed-loop digital servo amplifiers: torsional resonances, drifts, nonlinearities, feedback noise and friction. Then it describes a detailed Simulink® simulator that takes into account these factors and can be used to automatically tune the controller for best results with given galvo type and trajectory patterns. It allows for rapid testing of different control schemes, for instance combined position/velocity PID loops and displays the corresponding output in terms of torque, angular position and feedback sensor signal. The tool is configurable and can either use a dynamical state-space model of galvo's open-loop response, or can import the experimentally measured frequency domain transfer function. Next a drive signal digital pre-filtering technique is discussed. By performing a real-time Fourier analysis of the raw command signal it can be pre-warped to minimize all harmonics around the torsional resonances while boosting other non-resonant high frequencies. The optimized waveform results in much smaller overshoot and better settling time. Similar performance gain cannot be extracted from the servo controller alone.

  1. Performance and limitations of positron emission tomography (PET) scanners for imaging very low activity sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedenberg, Melissa I; Badawi, Ramsey D; Tarantal, Alice F; Cherry, Simon R

    2014-02-01

    Emerging applications for positron emission tomography (PET) may require the ability to image very low activity source distributions in the body. The performance of clinical PET scanners in the regime where activity in the field of view is source in the NEMA scatter phantom), the BGO-based scanner significantly outperformed the LSO-based scanner. This was largely due to the effect of background counts emanating from naturally occurring but radioactive (176)Lu within the LSO detector material, which dominates the observed counting rate at the lowest activities. Increasing the lower energy threshold from 350 keV to 425 keV in an attempt to reduce this background did not significantly improve the measured NECR performance. The measured singles rate due to (176)Lu emissions within the scanner energy window was also found to be dependent on temperature, and to be affected by the operation of the CT component, making approaches to correct or compensate for the background more challenging. We conclude that for PET studies in a very low activity range, BGO-based scanners are likely to have better performance because of the lack of significant background. Copyright © 2013 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A climate index derived from satellite measured spectral infrared radiation. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, M. D.; Fox, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    The vertical infrared radiative emitting structure (VIRES) climate index, based on radiative transfer theory and derived from the spectral radiances typically used to retrieve temperature profiles, is introduced. It is assumed that clouds and climate are closely related and a change in one will result in a change in the other. The index is a function of the cloud, temperature, and moisture distributions. It is more accurately retrieved from satellite data than is cloudiness per se. The VIRES index is based upon the shape and relative magnitude of the broadband weighting function of the infrared radiative transfer equation. The broadband weighting curves are retrieved from simulated satellite infrared sounder data (spectral radiances). The retrieval procedure is described and the error error sensitivities of the method investigated. Index measuring options and possible applications of the VIRES index are proposed.

  3. Airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) images over disseminated gold deposits, Osgood Mountains, Humboldt County, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, M. Dennis

    1986-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) acquired airborne Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) images over several disseminated gold deposits in northern Nevada in 1983. The aerial surveys were flown to determine whether TIMS data could depict jasperoids (siliceous replacement bodies) associated with the gold deposits. The TIMS data were collected over the Pinson and Getchell Mines in the Osgood Mountains, the Carlin, Maggie Creek, Bootstrap, and other mines in the Tuscarora Mountains, and the Jerritt Canyon Mine in the Independence Mountains. The TIMS data seem to be a useful supplement to conventional geochemical exploration for disseminated gold deposits in the western United States. Siliceous outcrops are readily separable in the TIMS image from other types of host rocks. Different forms of silicification are not readily separable, yet, due to limitations of spatial resolution and spectral dynamic range. Features associated with the disseminated gold deposits, such as the large intrusive bodies and fault structures, are also resolvable on TIMS data. Inclusion of high-resolution thermal inertia data would be a useful supplement to the TIMS data.

  4. Robust Object Segmentation Using a Multi-Layer Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beomseong; Choi, Baehoon; Yoo, Minkyun; Kim, Hyunju; Kim, Euntai

    2014-01-01

    The major problem in an advanced driver assistance system (ADAS) is the proper use of sensor measurements and recognition of the surrounding environment. To this end, there are several types of sensors to consider, one of which is the laser scanner. In this paper, we propose a method to segment the measurement of the surrounding environment as obtained by a multi-layer laser scanner. In the segmentation, a full set of measurements is decomposed into several segments, each representing a single object. Sometimes a ghost is detected due to the ground or fog, and the ghost has to be eliminated to ensure the stability of the system. The proposed method is implemented on a real vehicle, and its performance is tested in a real-world environment. The experiments show that the proposed method demonstrates good performance in many real-life situations. PMID:25356645

  5. 2D X-ray scanner and its uses in laboratory reservoir characterization measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.

    1997-08-01

    X-ray techniques are used in petroleum laboratories for a variety of reservoir characterization measurements. This paper describes the configuration of a 2D X-ray scanner and many of the ways in which it simplifies and improves accuracy`s of laboratory measurements. Linear X-ray scanners are most often used to provide descriptions of fluid saturations within core plugs during flow tests. We configured our linear scanner for both horizontal and vertical movement. Samples can be scanned horizontally, vertically, or according to horizontal and vertical grids. X-ray measurements are fast, allowing measurements of two- and three-phase fluid saturations during both steady- and unsteady-state flow processes. Rock samples can be scanned while they are subjected to stress, pore pressure, and temperature conditions simulating those of a petroleum reservoir. Many types of measurements are possible by selecting appropriate X-ray power settings, dopes, filters, and collimator configurations. The scanner has been used for a variety of applications besides fluid saturation measurements. It is useful for measuring porosity distributions in rocks, concentrations of X-ray dopes within flow streams during tracer tests, gap widths in fracture flow cells, fluid interface levels in PVT cells and fluid separators, and other features and phenomena.

  6. A combined positron emission tomography (PET)- electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) system: initial evaluation of a prototype scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseytlin, Mark; Stolin, Alexander V; Guggilapu, Priyaankadevi; Bobko, Andrey A; Khramtsov, Valery V; Tseytlin, Oxana; Raylman, Raymond R

    2018-04-20

    The advent of hybrid scanners, combining complementary modalities, has revolutionized imaging; enhancing clinical practice and biomedical research. In this project, we investigated the melding of two complementary, functional imaging methods: positron emission tomography (PET) and electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). The PET radiotracers can provide important information about cellular parameters, such as glucose metabolism. While EPR probes can provide assessment of tissue microenvironment, measuring parameters such as oxygenation and pH, for example. A combined PET/EPRI scanner has the promise to provide new insights not attainable with current imagers by simultaneous acquisition of multiple components of tissue microenvironments. In this investigation, a prototype system was created by combing two existing scanners, modified for simultaneous imaging. Specifically, a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) based PET scanner ring designed as a portable scanner was combined with an EPRI scanner designed for the imaging of small animals. The ability of the system to obtain simultaneous images was assessed with a small phantom consisting of four cylinders containing both PET and EPR tracers. The resulting images demonstrated the ability to obtain contemporaneous PET and ERP images without cross-modality interference. The next step in this project is the construction of pre-clinical PET/EPRI scanner for multi-parametric assessment of physiologically important parameters of tissue microenvironments. . © 2018 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

  7. A combined positron emission tomography (PET)-electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI) system: initial evaluation of a prototype scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseytlin, Mark; Stolin, Alexander V.; Guggilapu, Priyaankadevi; Bobko, Andrey A.; Khramtsov, Valery V.; Tseytlin, Oxana; Raylman, Raymond R.

    2018-05-01

    The advent of hybrid scanners, combining complementary modalities, has revolutionized the application of advanced imaging technology to clinical practice and biomedical research. In this project, we investigated the melding of two complementary, functional imaging methods: positron emission tomography (PET) and electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). PET radiotracers can provide important information about cellular parameters, such as glucose metabolism. While EPR probes can provide assessment of tissue microenvironment, measuring oxygenation and pH, for example. Therefore, a combined PET/EPRI scanner promises to provide new insights not attainable with current imagers by simultaneous acquisition of multiple components of tissue microenvironments. To explore the simultaneous acquisition of PET and EPR images, a prototype system was created by combining two existing scanners. Specifically, a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based PET scanner ring designed as a portable scanner was combined with an EPRI scanner designed for the imaging of small animals. The ability of the system to obtain simultaneous images was assessed with a small phantom consisting of four cylinders containing both a PET tracer and EPR spin probe. The resulting images demonstrated the ability to obtain contemporaneous PET and EPR images without cross-modality interference. Given the promising results from this initial investigation, the next step in this project is the construction of the next generation pre-clinical PET/EPRI scanner for multi-parametric assessment of physiologically-important parameters of tissue microenvironments.

  8. Free spectral range adjustment of a silicon rib racetrack resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keča, T; Matavulj, P; Headley, W; Mashanovich, G

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important parameters that describe the quality of photonic components and devices is the free spectral range (FSR). In this paper, the measured outgoing power of a silicon rib racetrack resonator was compared with calculated transfer functions derived by coupled mode theory. The influence of geometric parameters on the FSR and resonant wavelength has been investigated. By altering the values of the coupling length and racetrack radius, derived transfer functions were adjusted to match experimental data. This procedure gives the possibility of estimating the FSR and resonant wavelength for different geometric parameters and predicting resonator functionality.

  9. Sea surface temperature mapping using a thermal infrared scanner

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R; Pandya, R; Mathur, K.M.; Charyulu, R; Rao, L.V.G.

    1 metre water column below the sea surface. A thermal infrared scanner developed by the Space Applications Centre (ISRO), Ahmedabad was operated on board R.V. Gaveshani in April/May 1984 for mapping SST over the eastern Arabian Sea. SST values...

  10. Impacts of Intelligent Automated Quality Control on a Small Animal APD-Based Digital PET Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charest, Jonathan; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Bergeron, Mélanie; Cadorette, Jules; Arpin, Louis; Lecomte, Roger; Brunet, Charles-Antoine; Fontaine, Réjean

    2016-10-01

    Stable system performance is mandatory to warrant the accuracy and reliability of biological results relying on small animal positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. This simple requirement sets the ground for imposing routine quality control (QC) procedures to keep PET scanners at a reliable optimal performance level. However, such procedures can become burdensome to implement for scanner operators, especially taking into account the increasing number of data acquisition channels in newer generation PET scanners. In systems using pixel detectors to achieve enhanced spatial resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), the QC workload rapidly increases to unmanageable levels due to the number of independent channels involved. An artificial intelligence based QC system, referred to as Scanner Intelligent Diagnosis for Optimal Performance (SIDOP), was proposed to help reducing the QC workload by performing automatic channel fault detection and diagnosis. SIDOP consists of four high-level modules that employ machine learning methods to perform their tasks: Parameter Extraction, Channel Fault Detection, Fault Prioritization, and Fault Diagnosis. Ultimately, SIDOP submits a prioritized faulty channel list to the operator and proposes actions to correct them. To validate that SIDOP can perform QC procedures adequately, it was deployed on a LabPET™ scanner and multiple performance metrics were extracted. After multiple corrections on sub-optimal scanner settings, a 8.5% (with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of [7.6, 9.3]) improvement in the CNR, a 17.0% (CI: [15.3, 18.7]) decrease of the uniformity percentage standard deviation, and a 6.8% gain in global sensitivity were observed. These results confirm that SIDOP can indeed be of assistance in performing QC procedures and restore performance to optimal figures.

  11. Fabrication of malleable three-dimensional-printed customized bolus using three-dimensional scanner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Won Park

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional (3D-printed customized bolus (3D bolus can be used for radiotherapy application to irregular surfaces. However, bolus fabrication based on computed tomography (CT scans is complicated and also delivers unwanted irradiation. Consequently, we fabricated a bolus using a 3D scanner and evaluated its efficacy. The head of an Alderson Rando phantom was scanned with a 3D scanner. The 3D surface data were exported and reconstructed with Geomagic Design X software. A 3D bolus of 5-mm thickness designed to fit onto the nose was printed with the use of rubber-like printing material, and a radiotherapy plan was developed. We successfully fabricated the customized 3D bolus, and further, a CT simulation indicated an acceptable fit of the 3D bolus to the nose. There was no air gap between the bolus and the phantom surface. The percent depth dose (PDD curve of the phantom with the 3D bolus showed an enhanced surface dose when compared with that of the phantom without the bolus. The PDD of the 3D bolus was comparable with that of a commercial superflab bolus. The radiotherapy plan considering the 3D bolus showed improved target coverage when compared with that without the bolus. Thus, we successfully fabricated a customized 3D bolus for an irregular surface using a 3D scanner instead of a CT scanner.

  12. A multispectral scanner survey of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Hanford Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewster, S.B. Jr.; Howard, M.E.; Shines, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    An airborne multispectral scanner survey of selected sites on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Hanford Reservation was performed in mid-November 1993. Aerial multispectral scanner and photography data were acquired coincidentally with the Big O experiment at both locations. To illustrate two potential applications, the multispectral scanner data were digitally enhanced to facilitate the detection of soil disturbance and evidence of surface water transport. The main conclusion of this study was that multispectral data acquired under these conditions can be useful for soil disturbance detection. The imagery did not prove as useful, however, for direct indications of surface water transport. It was possible to infer some water transport patterns from dry water beds, but only if surface indications were present

  13. 3D WindScanner lidar measurements of wind and turbulence around wind turbines, buildings and bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben Krogh; Sjöholm, Mikael; Angelou, Nikolas

    2017-01-01

    WindScanner is a distributed research infrastructure developed at DTU with the participation of a number of European countries. The research infrastructure consists of a mobile technically advanced facility for remote measurement of wind and turbulence in 3D. The WindScanners provide coordinated...... structures and of flow in urban environments. The mobile WindScanner facility enables 3D scanning of wind and turbulence fields in full scale within the atmospheric boundary layer at ranges from 10 meters to 5 (10) kilometers. Measurements of turbulent coherent structures are applied for investigation...

  14. Radiographic scanner apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wake, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The preferred embodiment of this invention includes a hardware system, or processing means, which operates faster than software. Moreover the computer needed is less expensive and smaller. Radiographic scanner apparatus is described for measuring the intensity of radiation after passage through a planar region and for reconstructing a representation of the attenuation of radiation by the medium. There is a source which can be rotated, and detectors, the output from which forms a data line. The detectors are disposed opposite the planar region from the source to produce a succession of data lines corresponding to the succession of angular orientations of the source. There is a convolver means for convolving each of these data lines, with a filter function, and a means of processing the convolved data lines to create the representation of the radiation attenuation in the planar region. There is also apparatus to generate a succession of data lines indicating radiation attenuation along a determinable path with convolver means. (U.K.)

  15. Implementation of a versatile research data acquisition system using a commercially available medical ultrasound scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Pedersen, Mads Møller

    2012-01-01

    to the clinic. The system consists of a standard PC equipped with a camera link and an ultrasound scanner equipped with a research interface. The ultrasound scanner is an easy-to-use imaging device that is capable of generating high-quality images. In addition to supporting the acquisition of multiple data...

  16. Scanner component and head development for confocal microscopy using moving mirror technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loney, Gregory C.

    1993-12-01

    One of the challenges in designing a confocal microscope is choosing the scan system configuration. The selection is based largely on the microscope application and involves a few distinct schemes. One scheme, moving mirror using galvanometer and resonant scanners, has been shown to offer an excellent solution exhibited by the large number of commercial systems which utilize them. Perceived shortcomings, such as slow image acquisition, are being dispelled due to the advent of large angle, high frequency resonant scanners. These newer devices offer near video rate performance at good scan efficiency.

  17. Use of airborne multispectral scanner data to map alteration related to roll-front uranium migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    Computer-enhanced airborne multispectral scanner (MSS) images have been used to detect and map red oxidized alteration related to roll-front uranium migration in the southern Powder River basin, Wyoming. Information in the 0.4- to 1.1-μm spectral region was used to produce a color ratio composite image, upon which the red-altered areas can be differentiated. The red-altered and incipiently altered sandstones result from the migration of a roll-front (or geochemical cell) through the sandstone in the direction of the hydrologic gradient. Most uranium deposits in the Powder River basin occur at the boundary between this oxidized sandstone and reduced sandstone. Therefore, the ability to detect and map this alteration reliably can provide important information about the potential for uranium mineralization down gradient from the altered areas, at the surface in an area of interest. Spectral reflectance studies indicate that a shift in the absorption band edge from 0.52 μm (for goethitic sandstone) to 0.58 μm (for hematitic sandstone) and an intensification of an absorption band at 0.85 μm (for hematitic sandstone) are the bases for identifying the red-altered sandstone as green anomalous areas on the color ratio composite image. Some of the incipiently altered sandstone also appears green, whereas unaltered material and white-altered sandstone appear as blue to cyan colors. Therefore, the composite image is useful in discriminating hematitic sandstone from goethitic sandstone. At high densities (>65%), vegetation masks the sandstones on the color ratio composite image. Artemisia tridentata (sage) and Stipa comata (grass) are the species that have the greatest individual effect on the image

  18. Benchmarking Advanced Control Algorithms for a Laser Scanner System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Ordys, A.W.; Smillie, I.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes tests performed on the laser scanner system toassess feasibility of modern control techniques in achieving a requiredperformance in the trajectory following problem. The two methods tested areQTR H-infinity and Predictive Control. The results are ilustated ona simulation example....

  19. Application of Intra-Oral Dental Scanners in the Digital Workflow of Implantology

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Wicher J.; Andriessen, Frank S.; Wismeijer, Daniel; Ren, Yijin

    2012-01-01

    Intra-oral scanners will play a central role in digital dentistry in the near future. In this study the accuracy of three intra-oral scanners was compared. Materials and methods: A master model made of stone was fitted with three high precision manufactured PEEK cylinders and scanned with three intra-oral scanners: the CEREC (Sirona), the iTero (Cadent) and the Lava COS (3M). In software the digital files were imported and the distance between the centres of the cylinders and the angulation between the cylinders was assessed. These values were compared to the measurements made on a high accuracy 3D scan of the master model. Results: The distance errors were the smallest and most consistent for the Lava COS. The distance errors for the Cerec were the largest and least consistent. All the angulation errors were small. Conclusions: The Lava COS in combination with a high accuracy scanning protocol resulted in the smallest and most consistent errors of all three scanners tested when considering mean distance errors in full arch impressions both in absolute values and in consistency for both measured distances. For the mean angulation errors, the Lava COS had the smallest errors between cylinders 1–2 and the largest errors between cylinders 1–3, although the absolute difference with the smallest mean value (iTero) was very small (0,0529°). An expected increase in distance and/or angular errors over the length of the arch due to an accumulation of registration errors of the patched 3D surfaces could be observed in this study design, but the effects were statistically not significant. Clinical relevance For making impressions of implant cases for digital workflows, the most accurate scanner with the scanning protocol that will ensure the most accurate digital impression should be used. In our study model that was the Lava COS with the high accuracy scanning protocol. PMID:22937030

  20. Atmospheric radiative transfer modeling: a summary of the AER codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clough, S.A. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Shephard, M.W. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States)]. E-mail: mshephar@aer.com; Mlawer, E.J. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Delamere, J.S. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Iacono, M.J. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Cady-Pereira, K. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Boukabara, S. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States); Brown, P.D. [Atmospheric and Environmental Research (AER) Inc., 131 Hartwell Avenue, Lexington, MA 02421-3126 (United States)

    2005-03-01

    The radiative transfer models developed at AER are being used extensively for a wide range of applications in the atmospheric sciences. This communication is intended to provide a coherent summary of the various radiative transfer models and associated databases publicly available from AER (http://www.rtweb.aer.com). Among the communities using the models are the remote sensing community (e.g. TES, IASI), the numerical weather prediction community (e.g. ECMWF, NCEP GFS, WRF, MM5), and the climate community (e.g. ECHAM5). Included in this communication is a description of the central features and recent updates for the following models: the line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM); the line file creation program (LNFL); the longwave and shortwave rapid radiative transfer models, RRTM{sub L}W and RRTM{sub S}W; the Monochromatic Radiative Transfer Model (MonoRTM); the MT{sub C}KD Continuum; and the Kurucz Solar Source Function. LBLRTM and the associated line parameter database (e.g. HITRAN 2000 with 2001 updates) play a central role in the suite of models. The physics adopted for LBLRTM has been extensively analyzed in the context of closure experiments involving the evaluation of the model inputs (e.g. atmospheric state), spectral radiative measurements and the spectral model output. The rapid radiative transfer models are then developed and evaluated using the validated LBLRTM model.

  1. A new crystal whole-body scanner for positron emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostertag, H.; Kuebler, W.; Kubesch, R.; Lorenz, W.J.; Woerner, P.

    1980-01-01

    A multicrystal whole body scanner for positron emitters has been constructed. The annihilation quanta are measured in two opposing detector banks. Each detector bank consists of 64 NaI crystals of 1.5'' diameter x 3'' length. Directly opposing single detectors are in coincidence. The patient moves linearly between the stationary transverse detector banks. The scanning area of the system is 64 x 192 cm 2 . The spatial resolution is 2 cm at a sampling distance of 1 cm. The sensitivity is 6400 counts/s for a pure positron flood source with 1 μCi/cm 2 . The system is controlled by a microcomputer (DEC LSI-11). The scintigrams are shown on a display. Absolute activities can be calculated by mathematical comparison of consecutive emission and transmission scans. The design of the positron scanner and its capacibilities are described. Experimental and initial clinical results are presented. (author)

  2. Psychological Prices and Price Rigidity in Grocery Retailing: Analysis of German Scanner Data

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann, Roland; Moeser, Anke

    2005-01-01

    A substantial degree of price rigidity has been reported for branded foods in various studies with scanner data. One possible explanation for price rigidity is the existence of psychological pricing points. We analyze to which extent psychological pricing plays a role in grocery retailing and whether it contributes to price rigidity of branded foods in Germany. Psychological pricing defined here as just-below-the-round-figure-pricing is empirically analyzed with scanner data of weekly prices ...

  3. Imaging Scanner Usage in Radiochemical Purity Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norhafizah Othman; Yahaya Talib; Wan Hamirul Bahrin Wan Kamal

    2011-01-01

    Imaging Scanner model BIOSCAN AR-2000 has been used in the radiochemical purity test for the product of Mo-99/ Tc-99m generator. Result from this test was produced directly where the percentage of pertechnetate was calculated based on width peak area by thin layer chromatography. This paperwork will explain the function, procedure, calibration of the instrument and discussed the advantages compared to the previous method. (author)

  4. Emittance scanner for intense low-energy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, P.W.; Sherman, J.D.; Holtkamp, D.B.

    1983-01-01

    An emittance scanner has been developed for use with low-energy H - ion beams to satisfy the following requirements: (1) angular resolution of +-1/2 mrad, (2) small errors from beam space charge, and (3) compact and simple design. The scanner consists of a 10-cm-long analyzer containing two slits and a pair of electric deflection plates driven by a +-500-V linear ramp generator. As the analyzer is mechanically driven across the beam, the front slit passes a thin ribbon of beam through the plates. The ion transit time is short compared with the ramp speed; therefore, the initial angle of the ions that pass through the rear slit is proportional to the instantaneous ramp voltage. The current through the rear slit then is proportional to the phase-space density d 2 i/dxdx'. The data are computer-analyzed to give, for example, rms emittance and phase-space density contours. Comparison of measured data with those calculated from a prepared (collimated) phase space is in good agreement

  5. Minimisation of the wire position uncertainties of the new CERN vacuum wire scanner

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069346; Barjau Condomines, A

    In the next years the luminosity of the LHC will be significantly increased. This will require a much higher accuracy of beam profile measurement than actually achievable by the current wire scanner. The new fast wire scanner is foreseen to measure small emittance beams throughout the LHC injector chain, which demands a wire travelling speed up to 20 ms-1 and position measurement accuracy of the order of a few microns. The vibrations of the mechanical parts of the system, and particularly the vibrations of the thin carbon wire, were identified as the major error sources of wire position uncertainty. Therefore the understanding of the wire vibrations is a high priority for the design and operation of the new device. This document presents the work performed to understand the main causes of the wire vibrations observed in one of the existing wire scanner and the new proposed design.

  6. The Coude spectrograph and echelle scanner of the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tull, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    The design of the Coude spectrograph of the 2.7 m McDonald telescope is discussed. A description is given of the Coude scanner which uses the spectrograph optics, the configuration of the large echelle and the computer scanner control and data systems.

  7. Hybrid Systems Based on Layered Silicate and Organic Dyes for Cascade Energy Transfer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Belušáková, S.; Lang, Kamil; Bujdák, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 38 (2015), s. 21784-21794 ISSN 1932-7447 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Cascade energy transfers * Multicomponent films * Resonance energy transfer * Spectral properties * Steady state fluorescence * Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.509, year: 2015

  8. Transferência de energia entre corantes catiônicos em sistemas homogêneos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Hueder Paulo Moisés de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the energy transfer by dipole-dipole interaction between cationic dyes in n-alcohols (methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol and 1-butanol is studied by time resolved and steady state fluorescence measurements. The critical radii of energy transfer were determined by three independent methods; the spectral overlap, fluorescence decay profiles, and relative intensity measurements. In all solvents, R0 values of the dye pairs obtained from spectral overlap were between 40 to 90 Å. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence measurements resulted in values of R0 in the range of 50 - 80 Å, with good correlation of values.

  9. Whole body line scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berninger, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A bar-shaped scintillator converts incident collimated gamma rays to light pulses which are detected by a row of photoelectric tubes positioned along the output face of the scintillator wherein each tube has a convexly curved photocathode disposed in close proximity to the scintillator. Electronic circuitry connected to the output of phototubes develops the scintillation event x-axis position coordinate electrical signal with good linearity and with substantial independence of the spacing between the scintillator and photocathodes so that the phototubes can be positioned as close to the scintillator as possible to obtain reduced distortion in the field of view and improved spatial resolution. A mechanical drive of the scanner results in an image of the gamma ray source being formed by sequencing the developed scintillation position coordinate signals in the y-axis dimension

  10. A multispectral scanner survey of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and surrounding area, Golden, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewster, S.B. Jr.; Brickey, D.W.; Ross, S.L.; Shines, J.E.

    1997-04-01

    Aerial multispectral scanner imagery was collected of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden, Colorado, on June 3, 5, 6, and 7, 1994, using a Daedalus AADS1268 multispectral scanner and coincident aerial color and color infrared photography. Flight altitudes were 4,500 feet (1372 meters) above ground level to match prior 1989 survey data; 2,000 feet (609 meters) above ground level for sitewide vegetation mapping; and 1,000 feet (304 meters) above ground level for selected areas of special interest. A multispectral survey was initiated to improve the existing vegetation classification map, to identify seeps and springs, and to generate ARC/INFO Geographic Information System compatible coverages of the vegetation and wetlands for the entire site including the buffer zone. The multispectral scanner imagery and coincident aerial photography were analyzed for the detection, identification, and mapping of vegetation and wetlands. The multispectral scanner data were processed digitally while the color and color infrared photography were manually photo-interpreted to define vegetation and wetlands. Several standard image enhancement techniques were applied to the multispectral scanner data to assist image interpretation. A seep enhancement was applied and a color composite consisting of multispectral scanner channels 11, 7, and 5 (thermal infrared, mid-infrared, and red bands, respectively) proved most useful for detecting seeps, seep zones, and springs. The predawn thermal infrared data were also useful in identifying and locating seeps. The remote sensing data, mapped wetlands, and ancillary Geographic Information System compatible data sets were spatially analyzed for seeps

  11. Intensity and shape of spectral lines from laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamelot, G; Jaegle, P; Carillon, A; Wehenkel, C [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 91 - Orsay (France); Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France); Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France))

    1979-01-01

    In starting from spectral studies of multicharged ions in dense laser-produced plasmas, the main processes which determine the intensity and the shape of lines in the X-UV range are described. The role of radiation transfer is underlined. Intensity anomalies resulting from occurrence of population inversions are considered and a recent experiment performed for investigating such anomalies is described.

  12. A fully automated and scalable timing probe-based method for time alignment of the LabPET II scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Arnaud; Thibaudeau, Christian; Bouchard, Jonathan; Gaudin, Émilie; Paulin, Caroline; Lecomte, Roger; Fontaine, Réjean

    2018-05-01

    A fully automated time alignment method based on a positron timing probe was developed to correct the channel-to-channel coincidence time dispersion of the LabPET II avalanche photodiode-based positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. The timing probe was designed to directly detect positrons and generate an absolute time reference. The probe-to-channel coincidences are recorded and processed using firmware embedded in the scanner hardware to compute the time differences between detector channels. The time corrections are then applied in real-time to each event in every channel during PET data acquisition to align all coincidence time spectra, thus enhancing the scanner time resolution. When applied to the mouse version of the LabPET II scanner, the calibration of 6 144 channels was performed in less than 15 min and showed a 47% improvement on the overall time resolution of the scanner, decreasing from 7 ns to 3.7 ns full width at half maximum (FWHM).

  13. Evaluation of the accuracy of extraoral laboratory scanners with a single-tooth abutment model: A 3D analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelli, Federico; Gherlone, Enrico; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Ferrari, Marco

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of different laboratory scanners using a calibrated coordinate measuring machine as reference. A sand blasted titanium reference model (RM) was scanned with an industrial 3D scanner in order to obtain a reference digital model (dRM) that was saved in the standard tessellation format (.stl). RM was scanned ten times with each one of the tested scanners (GC Europe Aadva, Zfx Evolution, 3Shape D640, 3Shape D700, NobilMetal Sinergia, EGS DScan3, Open Technologies Concept Scan Top) and all the scans were exported in .stl format for the comparison. All files were imported in a dedicated software (Geomagic Qualify 2013). Accuracy was evaluated calculating trueness and precision. Trueness values (μm [95% confidence interval]) were: Aadva 7,7 [6,8-8,5]; Zfx Evolution 9,2 [8,6-9,8]; D640 18,1 [12,2-24,0]; D700 12,8 [12,4-13,3]; Sinergia 31,1 [26,3-35,9]; DScan3 15,6 [11,5-19,7]; Concept Scan Top 28,6 [25,6-31,6]. Differences between scanners were statistically significant (p<.0005). Precision values (μm [95% CI]) were: Aadva 4,0 [3,8-4,2]; Zfx Evolution 5,1 [4,4-5,9]; D640 12,7 [12,4-13,1]; D700 11,0 [10,7-11,3]; Sinergia 16,3 [15,0-17,5]; DScan3 9,5 [8,3-10,6]; Concept Scan Top 19,5 [19,1-19,8]. Differences between scanners were statistically significant (p<.0005). The use a standardized scanning procedure fabricating a titanium reference model is useful to compare trueness and precision of different laboratory scanners; two laboratory scanners (Aadva, Zfx Evolution) were significantly better that other tested scanners. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. SU-G-206-07: Dual-Energy CT Inter- and Intra-Scanner Variability Within One Make and Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, M; Wood, C; Cody, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: It can be logistically quite difficult to scan patients on the same exact device for their repeat visits in multi-scanner facilities. The reliability between dual-energy CT scanners’ quantitative results is not known, nor is their individual repeatability. Therefore, we evaluated inter- and intra-scanner variability with respect to several key clinical quantitative metrics specific to dual-energy CT. Methods: Eleven identical GE HD-750 CT scanners in a busy clinical environment were used to perform dual-energy (DE) CT scans of a large elliptical quality control (QC) phantom (Gammex, Inc.; Middleton, WI) which contains many standard insert materials. The DE-QC phantom was scanned bi-weekly during 2016; 3 to 4 scans were obtained from each scanner (a total of 35 data sets were used for analysis). Iodine accuracy for the 2mg/ml, 5mg/ml and 15mg/ml rods (from the Iodine(Water) image set) and soft tissue HU (40 HU based on NIST constants) from the 50keV data set were used to assess inter- and intra-scanner variability (standard deviation). Results: Intra-scanner variability average for 2mg/ml Iodine was 0.10 mg/ml (range 0.05–0.15 mg/ml), for 5mg/ml Iodine was 0.12 mg/ml (range 0.07–0.16 mg/ml), for 15 mg/ml Iodine was 0.25 mg/ml (range 0.16–0.37 mg/ml), and for the soft tissue inserts was 2.1 HU (range 1.8–2.6 HU). Inter-scanner variability average for 2mg/ml Iodine was 0.16 mg/ml (range 0.11–0.19 mg/ml), for 5mg/ml Iodine was 0.18 mg/ml (range 0.11–0.22 mg/ml), for 15 mg/ml Iodine was 0.35 mg/ml (range 0.23–0.44 mg/ml), and for the soft tissue inserts was 3.8 HU (range 3.1–4.5 HU). Conclusion: Intra-scanner variability for the iodine and soft tissue inserts averaged 3.1% and 5.2% respectively, and inter-scanner variability for these regions analyzed averaged 5.0% and 9.5%, respectively. Future work will include determination of smallest measurable change and acceptable limits for DE-CT scanner variability over longer time intervals. This

  15. Feasibility studies on the direct wire readout on wire scanners in electron accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markert, Michael

    2010-10-01

    This bachelor thesis deals essentially with the signal processing of a so-called wire scanner, a special monitor, which comes to application in the beam diagnostics of particle accelerators. In this direct wire readout the voltage signal, which is induced by the particle beam in the measurement wire of the wire scanner, shall be directly read out. The aim of this thesis is to show fundamental considerations and perform studies, which study, whether and how in the future by means of a suited data transmission as well as readout electronics conclusion on the most important parameters of the beam, like position and profile, are possible. The measurement system presented here is divided in three main components: Signal measurement, signal preparation, and signal stretching. A suited test facility was developed and is presented in detail, in which then all components, like for instance the transmission cables, the wire-scanner fork, and the developed measurement circuit, are studied, which are of importance for a faultless signal transmission and presentation. Extensive measurements on the single components, as well as calculations for the signal transmission on and in the wire scanner were performed, whereby a good agreement could be found. Thereafter a comparison and a selection of the component used in this project were made. Furthermore improvement proposals, new constructions, and outlooks are presented, which could be of importance in further works.

  16. Heat Transfer Modelling of Glass Media within TPV Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Thomas; Forbes, Ian; Penlington, Roger; Pearsall, Nicola

    2004-11-01

    Understanding and optimisation of heat transfer, and in particular radiative heat transfer in terms of spectral, angular and spatial radiation distributions is important to achieve high system efficiencies and high electrical power densities for thermophtovoltaics (TPV). This work reviews heat transfer models and uses the Discrete Ordinates method. Firstly one-dimensional heat transfer in fused silica (quartz glass) shields was examined for the common arrangement, radiator-air-glass-air-PV cell. It has been concluded that an alternative arrangement radiator-glass-air-PV cell with increased thickness of fused silica should have advantages in terms of improved transmission of convertible radiation and enhanced suppression of non-convertible radiation.

  17. The 3He spectral function in light-front dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldi Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A distorted spin-dependent spectral function for 3He is considered for the extraction of the transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions in the neutron from semi-inclusive deep inelastic electron scattering off polarized 3He at finite momentum transfers, where final state interactions are taken into account. The generalization of the analysis to a Poincaré covariant framework within the light-front dynamics is outlined.

  18. Determination of Primary Spectral Bands for Remote Sensing of Aquatic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MingXia He

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available About 30 years ago, NASA launched the first ocean-color observing satellite:the Coastal Zone Color Scanner. CZCS had 5 bands in the visible-infrared domain with anobjective to detect changes of phytoplankton (measured by concentration of chlorophyll inthe oceans. Twenty years later, for the same objective but with advanced technology, theSea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS, 7 bands, the Moderate-ResolutionImaging Spectrometer (MODIS, 8 bands, and the Medium Resolution ImagingSpectrometer (MERIS, 12 bands were launched. The selection of the number of bands andtheir positions was based on experimental and theoretical results achieved before thedesign of these satellite sensors. Recently, Lee and Carder (2002 demonstrated that foradequate derivation of major properties (phytoplankton biomass, colored dissolved organicmatter, suspended sediments, and bottom properties in both oceanic and coastalenvironments from observation of water color, it is better for a sensor to have ~15 bands inthe 400 – 800 nm range. In that study, however, it did not provide detailed analysesregarding the spectral locations of the 15 bands. Here, from nearly 400 hyperspectral (~ 3-nm resolution measurements of remote-sensing reflectance (a measure of water colortaken in both coastal and oceanic waters covering both optically deep and optically shallowwaters, first- and second-order derivatives were calculated after interpolating themeasurements to 1-nm resolution. From these derivatives, the frequency of zero values foreach wavelength was accounted for, and the distribution spectrum of such frequencies wasobtained. Furthermore, the wavelengths that have the highest appearance of zeros wereidentified. Because these spectral locations indicate extrema (a local maximum orminimum of the reflectance spectrum or inflections of the spectral curvature, placing the bands of a sensor at these wavelengths maximizes the potential of capturing (and then restoring

  19. Comparison of statistical sampling methods with ScannerBit, the GAMBIT scanning module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Gregory D. [University of California, Physics and Astronomy Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McKay, James; Scott, Pat [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, London (United Kingdom); Farmer, Ben; Conrad, Jan [AlbaNova University Centre, Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Stockholm University, Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Roebber, Elinore [McGill University, Department of Physics, Montreal, QC (Canada); Putze, Antje [LAPTh, Universite de Savoie, CNRS, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Collaboration: The GAMBIT Scanner Workgroup

    2017-11-15

    We introduce ScannerBit, the statistics and sampling module of the public, open-source global fitting framework GAMBIT. ScannerBit provides a standardised interface to different sampling algorithms, enabling the use and comparison of multiple computational methods for inferring profile likelihoods, Bayesian posteriors, and other statistical quantities. The current version offers random, grid, raster, nested sampling, differential evolution, Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) and ensemble Monte Carlo samplers. We also announce the release of a new standalone differential evolution sampler, Diver, and describe its design, usage and interface to ScannerBit. We subject Diver and three other samplers (the nested sampler MultiNest, the MCMC GreAT, and the native ScannerBit implementation of the ensemble Monte Carlo algorithm T-Walk) to a battery of statistical tests. For this we use a realistic physical likelihood function, based on the scalar singlet model of dark matter. We examine the performance of each sampler as a function of its adjustable settings, and the dimensionality of the sampling problem. We evaluate performance on four metrics: optimality of the best fit found, completeness in exploring the best-fit region, number of likelihood evaluations, and total runtime. For Bayesian posterior estimation at high resolution, T-Walk provides the most accurate and timely mapping of the full parameter space. For profile likelihood analysis in less than about ten dimensions, we find that Diver and MultiNest score similarly in terms of best fit and speed, outperforming GreAT and T-Walk; in ten or more dimensions, Diver substantially outperforms the other three samplers on all metrics. (orig.)

  20. High-Resolution Spectral Measurement of High Temperature CO2 and H2O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    a major constituent which critically controls the infrared radiative transfer in the telluric atmosphere. Their absorption bands are distributed over... movement to prevent cracking. Also, the continuous Q = s/) spectrum spectral coverage filament ceramic fiber, brand AB-312 manufactured by resolution the 3M

  1. Using of scanner on the evaluation of pesticides mobility by thin-layer chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tornisielo, V.L.; Costa, M.A.; Furlan, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of pesticide leaching potential is an essential information to preview environmental fate. The experiment confirms the possibility of using radiochromatogram scanning as a substitute for X-ray autoradiography, when Thin Layer Chromatografy (TLC) methodogy is used to determine mobility of a pesticide. Three types of soil from Sao Paulo state and five herbicides (metolachlor, asulan, simazing, 2,4-D and trifluralin), labeled with 14 C, were used. The radiochromatogram scanners permits a quick detection of the position of the radioactive spots to determine the Rf for each pesticide, while X-ray film has to be placed on the plate on the dark room for several days or weeks and then developed to detect spots, subsequently measure and calculate Rf. The results showed that the evaluation by scanner and X-ray were similar. Hence we conclude that the use of the scanner should be considered since this methodology is faster and as accurate as the X-ray methodology. (author). 4 refs, 1 fig, 2 tabs

  2. Quantitative image reconstruction for total-body PET imaging using the 2-meter long EXPLORER scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Cherry, Simon R.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Qi, Jinyi

    2017-03-01

    The EXPLORER project aims to build a 2 meter long total-body PET scanner, which will provide extremely high sensitivity for imaging the entire human body. It will possess a range of capabilities currently unavailable to state-of-the-art clinical PET scanners with a limited axial field-of-view. The huge number of lines-of-response (LORs) of the EXPLORER poses a challenge to the data handling and image reconstruction. The objective of this study is to develop a quantitative image reconstruction method for the EXPLORER and compare its performance with current whole-body scanners. Fully 3D image reconstruction was performed using time-of-flight list-mode data with parallel computation. To recover the resolution loss caused by the parallax error between crystal pairs at a large axial ring difference or transaxial radial offset, we applied an image domain resolution model estimated from point source data. To evaluate the image quality, we conducted computer simulations using the SimSET Monte-Carlo toolkit and XCAT 2.0 anthropomorphic phantom to mimic a 20 min whole-body PET scan with an injection of 25 MBq 18F-FDG. We compare the performance of the EXPLORER with a current clinical scanner that has an axial FOV of 22 cm. The comparison results demonstrated superior image quality from the EXPLORER with a 6.9-fold reduction in noise standard deviation comparing with multi-bed imaging using the clinical scanner.

  3. Validation of novel calibration scheme with traceable point-like (22)Na sources on six types of PET scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tomoyuki; Oda, Keiichi; Wada, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Toshiaki; Sato, Yasushi; Yamada, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Mikio; Murayama, Hideo; Kikuchi, Kei; Miyatake, Hiroki; Abe, Yutaka; Miwa, Kenta; Akimoto, Kenta; Wagatsuma, Kei

    2013-05-01

    To improve the reliability and convenience of the calibration procedure of positron emission tomography (PET) scanners, we have been developing a novel calibration path based on traceable point-like sources. When using (22)Na sources, special care should be taken to avoid the effects of 1.275-MeV γ rays accompanying β (+) decays. The purpose of this study is to validate this new calibration scheme with traceable point-like (22)Na sources on various types of PET scanners. Traceable point-like (22)Na sources with a spherical absorber design that assures uniform angular distribution of the emitted annihilation photons were used. The tested PET scanners included a clinical whole-body PET scanner, four types of clinical PET/CT scanners from different manufacturers, and a small-animal PET scanner. The region of interest (ROI) diameter dependence of ROI values was represented with a fitting function, which was assumed to consist of a recovery part due to spatial resolution and a quadratic background part originating from the scattered γ rays. The observed ROI radius dependence was well represented with the assumed fitting function (R (2) > 0.994). The calibration factors determined using the point-like sources were consistent with those by the standard cross-calibration method within an uncertainty of ±4 %, which was reasonable considering the uncertainty in the standard cross-calibration method. This novel calibration scheme based on the use of traceable (22)Na point-like sources was successfully validated for six types of commercial PET scanners.

  4. SU-E-T-70: Commissioning a Multislice CT Scanner for X-Ray CT Polymer Gel Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, H [University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Australia); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Hilts, M [University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Australia); BC Cancer Agency, Kelowna, BC (Australia); Jirasek, A [University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Australia)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To commission a multislice computed tomography (CT) scanner for fast and reliable readout of radiation therapy (RT) dose distributions using CT polymer gel dosimetry (PGD). Methods: Commissioning was performed for a 16-slice CT scanner using images acquired through a 1L cylinder filled with water. Additional images were collected using a single slice machine for comparison purposes. The variability in CT number associated with the anode heel effect was evaluated and used to define a new slice-by-slice background image subtraction technique. Image quality was assessed for the multislice system by comparing image noise and uniformity to that of the single slice machine. The consistency in CT number across slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array was also evaluated. Finally, the variability in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load was measured for the multislice scanner and compared to the tube load effects observed on the single slice machine. Results: Slice-by-slice background subtraction effectively removes the variability in CT number across images acquired simultaneously using the multislice scanner and is the recommended background subtraction method when using a multislice CT system. Image quality for the multislice machine was found to be comparable to that of the single slice scanner. Further study showed CT number was consistent across image slices acquired simultaneously using the multislice detector array for each detector configuration of the slice thickness examined. In addition, the multislice system was found to eliminate variations in CT number due to increasing x-ray tube load and reduce scanning time by a factor of 4 when compared to imaging a large volume using a single slice scanner. Conclusion: A multislice CT scanner has been commissioning for CT PGD, allowing images of an entire dose distribution to be acquired in a matter of minutes. Funding support provided by the Natural Sciences and Engineering

  5. Calibrating an optical scanner for quality assurance of large area radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadzhinova, A.; Hildén, T.; Berdova, M.; Lauhakangas, R.; Heino, J.; Tuominen, E.; Franssila, S.; Hæggström, E.; Kassamakov, I.

    2014-11-01

    A gas electron multiplier (GEM) is a particle detector used in high-energy physics. Its main component is a thin copper-polymer-copper sandwich that carries Ø =70  ±  5 µm holes. Quality assurance (QA) is needed to guarantee both long operating life and reading fidelity of the GEM. Absence of layer defects and conformity of the holes to specifications is important. Both hole size and shape influence the detector’s gas multiplication factor and hence affect the collected data. For the scanner the required lateral measurement tolerance is ± 5 µm. We calibrated a high aspect ratio optical scanning system (OSS) to allow ensuring the quality of large GEM foils. For the calibration we microfabricated transfer standards, which were imaged with the OSS and which were compared to corresponding scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. The calibration fulfilled the ISO/IEC 17025 and UKAS M3003 requirements: the calibration factor was 1.01  ±  0.01, determined at 95% confidence level across a 950  ×  950 mm2 area. The proposed large-scale scanning technique can potentially be valuable in other microfabricated products too.

  6. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, John D.; Batygin, Yuri K.; Gonzales, Fermin; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Kutac, Vincent G.; Martinez, Derwin; Sedillo, James Daniel; Pillai, Chandra; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Smith, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H - beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  7. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batygin, Yuri K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Fermin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  8. Understanding Soliton Spectral Tunneling as a Spectral Coupling Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Hairun; Wang, Shaofei; Zeng, Xianglong

    2013-01-01

    Soliton eigenstate is found corresponding to a dispersive phase profile under which the soliton phase changes induced by the dispersion and nonlinearity are instantaneously counterbalanced. Much like a waveguide coupler relying on a spatial refractive index profile that supports mode coupling...... between channels, here we suggest that the soliton spectral tunneling effect can be understood supported by a spectral phase coupler. The dispersive wave number in the spectral domain must have a coupler-like symmetric profile for soliton spectral tunneling to occur. We show that such a spectral coupler...

  9. SU-F-T-581: The Effect of Scanning Orientation On New EBT-XD Film Using Vidar and Epson Scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu-Tsao, S; Chan, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study the effect of film scanning orientation for new EBT-XD film using Vidar and Epson scanners, compared with EBT3 films. Methods: The EBT-XD (lot#01081501) and EBT3 films (lot#11031501) were cut into 4cm×7cm pieces and each film piece was uniformly exposed to a 6MV photon beam (15×15cm"2) at 5 cm depth and 100cm SAD in polystyrene phantom, one at a time. The doses delivered were 0,2.5,5,10,20,30,40 and 50 Gy for EBT-XD films, and 0,0.5,1,2,4,8,12 and 16 Gy for EBT3 films, respectively. All films were scanned at least 16 hours after irradiation, one at a time, in portrait or landscape orientation, using a Vidar DosimetryPro Advantage Red and an Epson 10000XL scanner (red channel). Each film piece was positioned at the center of a frame (36cm×36cm) with a cutout slightly larger than the film size for scanning. The scanned data (71 dpi), were analyzed using ImageJ and the average in the ROI (3cm×3cm) of each film at the center was obtained. Results: Dose response curves (netOD vs. dose) were established and compared with EBT-XD and EBT3 film in portrait or landscape orientation using these two scanners. The portrait to landscape (P/L) ratio for each film/scanner combination was determined. The EBT-XD film is about three times less sensitive than EBT3 film. The netOD is higher for portrait than landscape orientation for all the film/scanner combinations. For EBT-XD and EBT3, the average P/L ratios are 1.02 and 1.03 using Vidar scanner, and 1.03 and 1.05 using Epson scanner (red channel), respectively. Conclusion: The effect of film scanning orientation for new EBT-XD film using Vidar Advantage Red and Epson 10000XL scanners has been studied, in comparison with EBT3 film. The portrait/landscape ratios are the lowest for EBT-XD film using Vidar Advantage Red scanner among the four film/scanner combinations.

  10. SU-F-T-581: The Effect of Scanning Orientation On New EBT-XD Film Using Vidar and Epson Scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu-Tsao, S [Quality MediPhys LLC, Denville, NJ (United States); Chan, M [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Basking Ridge, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To study the effect of film scanning orientation for new EBT-XD film using Vidar and Epson scanners, compared with EBT3 films. Methods: The EBT-XD (lot#01081501) and EBT3 films (lot#11031501) were cut into 4cm×7cm pieces and each film piece was uniformly exposed to a 6MV photon beam (15×15cm{sup 2}) at 5 cm depth and 100cm SAD in polystyrene phantom, one at a time. The doses delivered were 0,2.5,5,10,20,30,40 and 50 Gy for EBT-XD films, and 0,0.5,1,2,4,8,12 and 16 Gy for EBT3 films, respectively. All films were scanned at least 16 hours after irradiation, one at a time, in portrait or landscape orientation, using a Vidar DosimetryPro Advantage Red and an Epson 10000XL scanner (red channel). Each film piece was positioned at the center of a frame (36cm×36cm) with a cutout slightly larger than the film size for scanning. The scanned data (71 dpi), were analyzed using ImageJ and the average in the ROI (3cm×3cm) of each film at the center was obtained. Results: Dose response curves (netOD vs. dose) were established and compared with EBT-XD and EBT3 film in portrait or landscape orientation using these two scanners. The portrait to landscape (P/L) ratio for each film/scanner combination was determined. The EBT-XD film is about three times less sensitive than EBT3 film. The netOD is higher for portrait than landscape orientation for all the film/scanner combinations. For EBT-XD and EBT3, the average P/L ratios are 1.02 and 1.03 using Vidar scanner, and 1.03 and 1.05 using Epson scanner (red channel), respectively. Conclusion: The effect of film scanning orientation for new EBT-XD film using Vidar Advantage Red and Epson 10000XL scanners has been studied, in comparison with EBT3 film. The portrait/landscape ratios are the lowest for EBT-XD film using Vidar Advantage Red scanner among the four film/scanner combinations.

  11. Metallic artifacts caused by dental metal prostheses on PET images. A PET/CT phantom study using different PET/CT scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Hiroaki; Kakimoto, Naoya; Murakami, Shumei; Furukawa, Souhei; Fujino, Kouichi; Hamada, Seiki; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of computed tomography (CT) artifacts caused by dental metal prostheses on positron emission tomography (PET) images. A dental arch cast was fixed in a cylindrical water-bath phantom. A spherical phantom positioned in the vicinity of the dental arch cast was used to simulate a tumor. To simulate the tumor imaging, the ratio of the 18 F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose radioactivity concentration of the spherical phantom to that of the water-bath phantom was set at 2.5. A dental bridge composed of a gold-silver-palladium alloy on the right mandibular side was prepared. A spherical phantom was set in the white artifact area on the CT images (site A), in a slightly remote area from the white artifact (site B), and in a black artifact area (site C). A PET/CT scan was performed with and without the metal bridge at each simulated tumor site, and the artifactual influence was evaluated on the axial attenuation-corrected (AC) PET images, in which the simulated tumor produced the strongest accumulation. Measurements were performed using three types of PET/CT scanners (scanners 1 and 2 with CT-based attenuation correction, and 3 with Cesium-137 ( 137 Cs)-based attenuation correction). The influence of the metal bridge was evaluated using the change rate of the SUVmean with and without the metal bridge. At site A, an overestimation was shown (scanner 1: +5.0% and scanner 2: +2.5%), while scanner 3 showed an underestimation of -31.8%. At site B, an overestimation was shown (scanner 1: +2.1% and scanner 2: +2.0%), while scanner 3 showed an underestimation of -2.6%. However, at site C, an underestimation was shown (scanner 1: -25.0%, scanner 2: -32.4%, and scanner 3: -8.4%). When CT is used for attenuation correction in patients with dental metal prostheses, an underestimation of radioactivity of accumulated tracer is anticipated in the dark streak artifact area on the CT images. In this study, the dark streak artifacts of the CT

  12. Description and availability of the SMARTS spectral model for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Daryl R.; Gueymard, Christian A.

    2004-11-01

    Limited spectral response range of photocoltaic (PV) devices requires device performance be characterized with respect to widely varying terrestrial solar spectra. The FORTRAN code "Simple Model for Atmospheric Transmission of Sunshine" (SMARTS) was developed for various clear-sky solar renewable energy applications. The model is partly based on parameterizations of transmittance functions in the MODTRAN/LOWTRAN band model family of radiative transfer codes. SMARTS computes spectra with a resolution of 0.5 nanometers (nm) below 400 nm, 1.0 nm from 400 nm to 1700 nm, and 5 nm from 1700 nm to 4000 nm. Fewer than 20 input parameters are required to compute spectral irradiance distributions including spectral direct beam, total, and diffuse hemispherical radiation, and up to 30 other spectral parameters. A spreadsheet-based graphical user interface can be used to simplify the construction of input files for the model. The model is the basis for new terrestrial reference spectra developed by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) for photovoltaic and materials degradation applications. We describe the model accuracy, functionality, and the availability of source and executable code. Applications to PV rating and efficiency and the combined effects of spectral selectivity and varying atmospheric conditions are briefly discussed.

  13. Detection of analyte binding to microarrays using gold nanoparticle labels and a desktop scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Anpan; Dufva, Martin; Belleville, Erik

    2003-01-01

    on gold nanoparticle labeled antibodies visualized by a commercial, office desktop flatbed scanner. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed that the signal from the flatbed scanner was proportional to the surface density of the bound antibody-gold conjugates, and that the flatbed scanner could detect...... six attomoles of antibody-gold conjugates. This detection system was used in a competitive immunoassay to measure the concentration of the pesticide metabolite 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) in water samples. The results showed that the gold labeled antibodies functioned comparably with a fluorescent...... based immunoassay for detecting BAM in water. A qualitative immunoassay based on gold-labeled antibodies could determineif a water sample contained BAM above and below 60-70 ng L(-1), which is below the maximum allowed BAM concentration for drinking water (100 ng L(-1)) according to European Union...

  14. TomoMINT - the current status and future plan of MINT's computed tomography scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanesan Sinnakaruppan; Jaafar Abdullah

    2000-01-01

    TomoMINT, a second generation computed tomography scanner developed by MINT, is a powerful non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique for producing two-dimensional cross-sectional images of an object without physically sectioning it. Characteristics of the internal structure of an object such as dimensions, shape, internal defects, density and component distribution are readily available from the scan. Tomographs of wood, metal components and concrete slabs have been successfully obtained from TomoMINT. This paper deals with the current status and future development of this scanner. (author)

  15. Energy transfer in purple bacterial photosynthetic units from cells grown in various light intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Gardiner, Alastair T; Blankenship, Robert E; Cogdell, Richard J

    2018-05-03

    Three photosynthetic membranes, called intra-cytoplasmic membranes (ICMs), from wild-type and the ∆pucBA abce mutant of the purple phototrophic bacterium Rps. palustris were investigated using optical spectroscopy. The ICMs contain identical light-harvesting complex 1-reaction centers (LH1-RC) but have various spectral forms of light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2). Spectroscopic studies involving steady-state absorption, fluorescence, and femtosecond time-resolved absorption at room temperature and at 77 K focused on inter-protein excitation energy transfer. The studies investigated how energy transfer is affected by altered spectral features of the LH2 complexes as those develop under growth at different light conditions. The study shows that LH1 → LH2 excitation energy transfer is strongly affected if the LH2 complex alters its spectroscopic signature. The LH1 → LH2 excitation energy transfer rate modeled with the Förster mechanism and kinetic simulations of transient absorption of the ICMs demonstrated that the transfer rate will be 2-3 times larger for ICMs accumulating LH2 complexes with the classical B800-850 spectral signature (grown in high light) compared to the ICMs from the same strain grown in low light. For the ICMs from the ∆pucBA abce mutant, in which the B850 band of the LH2 complex is blue-shifted and almost degenerate with the B800 band, the LH1 → LH2 excitation energy transfer was not observed nor predicted by calculations.

  16. Spectral response analysis of PVDF capacitive sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Ramírez, B.; García-Segundo, C.; García-Valenzuela, A.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the spectral response to ultrasound waves in water of low-noise capacitive sensors based on PVDF polymer piezoelectric films. First, we analyze theoretically the mechanical-to-electrical transduction as a function of the frequency of ultrasonic signals and derive an analytic expression of the sensor's transfer function. Then we present experimental results of the frequency response of a home-made PDVF in water to test signals from 1 to 20 MHz induced by a commercial hydrophone powered by a signal generator and compare with our theoretical model.

  17. Alpha spectral analysis via artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kangas, L.J.; Hashem, S.; Keller, P.E.; Kouzes, R.T.; Troyer, G.L.

    1994-10-01

    An artificial neural network system that assigns quality factors to alpha particle energy spectra is discussed. The alpha energy spectra are used to detect plutonium contamination in the work environment. The quality factors represent the levels of spectral degradation caused by miscalibration and foreign matter affecting the instruments. A set of spectra was labeled with a quality factor by an expert and used in training the artificial neural network expert system. The investigation shows that the expert knowledge of alpha spectra quality factors can be transferred to an ANN system

  18. Assessment of coronary calcification using calibrated mass score with two different multidetector computed tomography scanners in the Copenhagen General Population Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, Andreas [Department of Cardiology, The Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Groen, Jaap M. [Department of Radiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Medical Physics, OLVG, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Arnold, Ben A. [Image Analysis, 1380 Burkesville Road, Columbia, KY (United States); Nikolovski, Sasho [Department of Radiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Knudsen, Andreas D., E-mail: dehlbaek@gmail.com [Department of Cardiology, The Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Kühl, J. Tobias [Department of Cardiology, The Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Nordestgaard, Børge G. [Department of Clinical Biochemistry and the Copenhagen General Population Study, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Greuter, Marcel J.W. [Department of Radiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands); Kofoed, Klaus F. [Department of Cardiology, The Heart Centre, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Radiology, The Diagnostic Centre, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2017-03-15

    Objective: Population studies have shown coronary calcium score to improve risk stratification in subjects suspected for cardiovascular disease. The aim of this work was to assess the validity of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for measurement of calibrated mass scores (MS) in a phantom study, and to investigate inter-scanner variability for MS and Agaston score (AS) recorded in a population study on two different high-end MDCT scanners. Materials and methods: A calcium phantom was scanned by a first (A) and second (B) generation 320-MDCT. MS was measured for each calcium deposit from repeated measurements in each scanner and compared to known physical phantom mass. Random samples of human subjects from the Copenhagen General Population Study were scanned with scanner A (N = 254) and scanner B (N = 253) where MS and AS distributions of these two groups were compared. Results: The mean total MS of the phantom was 32.9 ± 0.8 mg and 33.1 ± 0.9 mg (p = 0.43) assessed by scanner A and B respectively – the physical calcium mass was 34.0 mg. Correlation between measured MS and physical calcium mass was R{sup 2} = 0.99 in both scanners. In the population study the median total MS was 16.8 mg (interquartile range (IQR): 3.5–81.1) and 15.8 mg (IQR: 3.8–63.4) in scanner A and B (p = 0.88). The corresponding median total AS were 92 (IQR: 23–471) and 89 (IQR: 40–384) (p = 0.64). Conclusion: Calibrated calcium mass score may be assessed with very high accuracy in a calcium phantom by different generations of 320-MDCT scanners. In population studies, it appears acceptable to pool calcium scores acquired on different 320-MDCT scanners.

  19. Spectral analysis and multigrid preconditioners for two-dimensional space-fractional diffusion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaderi, Hamid; Dehghan, Mehdi; Donatelli, Marco; Mazza, Mariarosa

    2017-12-01

    Fractional diffusion equations (FDEs) are a mathematical tool used for describing some special diffusion phenomena arising in many different applications like porous media and computational finance. In this paper, we focus on a two-dimensional space-FDE problem discretized by means of a second order finite difference scheme obtained as combination of the Crank-Nicolson scheme and the so-called weighted and shifted Grünwald formula. By fully exploiting the Toeplitz-like structure of the resulting linear system, we provide a detailed spectral analysis of the coefficient matrix at each time step, both in the case of constant and variable diffusion coefficients. Such a spectral analysis has a very crucial role, since it can be used for designing fast and robust iterative solvers. In particular, we employ the obtained spectral information to define a Galerkin multigrid method based on the classical linear interpolation as grid transfer operator and damped-Jacobi as smoother, and to prove the linear convergence rate of the corresponding two-grid method. The theoretical analysis suggests that the proposed grid transfer operator is strong enough for working also with the V-cycle method and the geometric multigrid. On this basis, we introduce two computationally favourable variants of the proposed multigrid method and we use them as preconditioners for Krylov methods. Several numerical results confirm that the resulting preconditioning strategies still keep a linear convergence rate.

  20. Bio-Inspired Photon Absorption and Energy Transfer for Next Generation Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magsi, Komal

    Nature's solar energy harvesting system, photosynthesis, serves as a model for photon absorption, spectra broadening, and energy transfer. Photosynthesis harvests light far differently than photovoltaic cells. These differences offer both engineering opportunity and scientific challenges since not all of the natural photon absorption mechanisms have been understood. In return, solar cells can be a very sensitive probe for the absorption characteristics of molecules capable of transferring charge to a conductive interface. The objective of this scientific work is the advancement of next generation photovoltaics through the development and application of natural photo-energy transfer processes. Two scientific methods were used in the development and application of enhancing photon absorption and transfer. First, a detailed analysis of photovoltaic front surface fluorescent spectral modification and light scattering by hetero-structure was conducted. Phosphor based spectral down-conversion is a well-known laser technology. The theoretical calculations presented here indicate that parasitic losses and light scattering within the spectral range are large enough to offset any expected gains. The second approach for enhancing photon absorption is based on bio-inspired mechanisms. Key to the utilization of these natural processes is the development of a detailed scientific understanding and the application of these processes to cost effective systems and devices. In this work both aspects are investigated. Dye type solar cells were prepared and tested as a function of Chlorophyll (or Sodium-Copper Chlorophyllin) and accessory dyes. Forster has shown that the fluorescence ratio of Chlorophyll is modified and broadened by separate photon absorption (sensitized absorption) through interaction with nearby accessory pigments. This work used the dye type solar cell as a diagnostic tool by which to investigate photon absorption and photon energy transfer. These experiments shed

  1. Experimental developments in dedicated scanners for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damiani, Chiara

    2001-01-01

    The thesis describes a prototype of a new read out electronics developed for the YAPPET small animal PET tomograph at the Physics Laboratory of the University of Ferrara. The purpose of the new electronics was to make the YAPPET scanner easier to use and more suitable for duplication at other research institutes. The results of tests of the new electronics over a 3 year period are presented. The new electronics prototype attained the same performance as the present YAPPET electronics in energy, position, and time measurements. In addition, a significant improvement in count rate capability is now being studied. The second major component of this thesis is a description of the development of a new scanner prototype incorporating a PET detection system based on YAP:Ce scintillator matrix crystals and wave length shifting (WLS) fibers. Two ribbons of WLS fibers are mounted on the opposite sides of the scintillator matrix in order to read out the columns and the rows of the matrix and recognize the interaction point XY position. The thesis describes the investigation of the materials and methods to be used in this new design. The first tests with the new prototype detector are described in detail: the main result of these preliminary measurements is the evaluation of the light yield of the system which is a signal of about 10 photoelectrons on the detector for 511 keV photoelectric interactions. The new scanner design uses the YAPPET basic principles, but it should have improved performance with applicability to other fields such as scinti-mammography. Copies of this thesis can be obtained from the Department of Physics of the University of Pisa or the author

  2. NIMBUS-7 CZCS. Coastal Zone Color Scanner Imagery for Selected Coastal Regions. North America - Europe. South America - Africa - Antarctica. Level 2 Photographic Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The Nimbus-7 Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) is the first spacecraft instrument devoted to the measurement of ocean color. Although instruments on other satellites have sensed ocean color, their spectral bands, spatial resolution, and dynamic range were optimized for geographical or meteorological use. In the CZCS, every parameter is optimized for use over water to the exclusion of any other type of sensing. The signal-to-noise ratios in the spectral channels sensing reflected solar radiance are higher than those required in the past. These ratios need to be high because the ocean is such a poor reflecting surface that the majority of the signal seen by the reflected energy channels at spacecraft altitudes is backscattered solar radiation from the atmosphere rather than reflected solar energy from the ocean. The CZCS is a conventional multichannel scanning radiometer utilizing a rotating plane mirror at a 45 deg angle to the optic axis of a Cassegrain telescope. The mirror scans 360 deg; however, only 80 deg of data centered on the spacecraft nadir is collected for ocean color measurements. Spatial resolution at spacecraft nadir is 825x825 m with some degradation at the edges of the scan swath. The useful swath width from a spacecraft altitude of 955 km is 1600 km.

  3. Extending the Effective Ranging Depth of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography by Spatial Frequency Domain Multiplexing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Wu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a spatial frequency domain multiplexing method for extending the imaging depth range of a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT system without any expensive device. This method uses two galvo scanners with different pivot-offset distances in two independent reference arms for spatial frequency modulation and multiplexing. The spatial frequency contents corresponding to different depth regions of the sample can be shifted to different frequency bands. The spatial frequency domain multiplexing SDOCT system provides an approximately 1.9-fold increase in the effective ranging depth compared with that of a conventional full-range SDOCT system. The reconstructed images of phantom and biological tissue demonstrate the expected increase in ranging depth. The parameters choice criterion for this method is discussed.

  4. Do we really need to thank the Beatles for the financing of the development of the computed tomography scanner?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizlin, Zeev V; Vos, Patrick M

    2012-01-01

    It is commonly believed that the revenues from the selling of the Beatles' records by Electric and Musical Industries (EMI) allowed the company to develop the computed tomography (CT) scanner. Some went to define this as the Beatles' gift to medicine. However, significant controversies and discrepancies arise from analysis of this statement, making its correctness doubtful. The details of financing required for the CT development and the part of EMI in financial input have never been publicly announced. This work analyzes the financial contributions to the CT development and investigates if the revenues received from the sales of the Beatles' records were used for the creation of the CT scanner. Timeline of the development of the EMI CT scanner and the financial inputs of EMI and British Department of Health and Social Security (DHSS) were assessed. Without salary expenses to Godfrey Hounsfield and his team, the development of the CT scanner cost EMI approximately £100,000. The British DHSS's expenses were £606,000. Hence, the financial contribution of DHSS into the development of the CT scanner was significantly bigger than that of EMI. Accordingly, British tax payers and officials of British DHSS are to be thanked for the CT scanner. The Beatles' input into the world's culture is valuable and does not require decoration by nonexistent connection to the development of CT. A positive aspect to this misconception is that it keeps in public memory the name of the company that developed the CT scanner.

  5. Recent developments with a prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W. G.; Jirasek, A.; Wells, D.

    2013-06-01

    The latest design of a prototype fan-beam optical computed tomography scanner is presented. A new beam creation system consists of a 635 nm laser diode module with variable, DC voltage-controlled beam intensity. A change in scanner alignment allows for the elimination of ring artefacts caused by data corruption that is spaced symmetrically across the detector array. These artefacts, as well as a pair of streaking artefacts caused by flask seams, are removed in sinogram space. A flask registration technique has been developed that allows for accurate, reproducible dosimeter placement. Protocol investigations with gel dosimeters have indicated the importance of: i) proper cooling techniques during gel manufacture, and ii) scanning the dosimeter while it is at room temperature. Latest reconstructions of a normoxic polymer gel dosimeter are presented as an indicator of current system performance.

  6. Recent developments with a prototype fan-beam optical CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, W G; Jirasek, A; Wells, D

    2013-01-01

    The latest design of a prototype fan-beam optical computed tomography scanner is presented. A new beam creation system consists of a 635 nm laser diode module with variable, DC voltage-controlled beam intensity. A change in scanner alignment allows for the elimination of ring artefacts caused by data corruption that is spaced symmetrically across the detector array. These artefacts, as well as a pair of streaking artefacts caused by flask seams, are removed in sinogram space. A flask registration technique has been developed that allows for accurate, reproducible dosimeter placement. Protocol investigations with gel dosimeters have indicated the importance of: i) proper cooling techniques during gel manufacture, and ii) scanning the dosimeter while it is at room temperature. Latest reconstructions of a normoxic polymer gel dosimeter are presented as an indicator of current system performance.

  7. Integration of Absorption Feature Information from Visible to Longwave Infrared Spectral Ranges for Mineral Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Kopačková

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Merging hyperspectral data from optical and thermal ranges allows a wider variety of minerals to be mapped and thus allows lithology to be mapped in a more complex way. In contrast, in most of the studies that have taken advantage of the data from the visible (VIS, near-infrared (NIR, shortwave infrared (SWIR and longwave infrared (LWIR spectral ranges, these different spectral ranges were analysed and interpreted separately. This limits the complexity of the final interpretation. In this study a presentation is made of how multiple absorption features, which are directly linked to the mineral composition and are present throughout the VIS, NIR, SWIR and LWIR ranges, can be automatically derived and, moreover, how these new datasets can be successfully used for mineral/lithology mapping. The biggest advantage of this approach is that it overcomes the issue of prior definition of endmembers, which is a requested routine employed in all widely used spectral mapping techniques. In this study, two different airborne image datasets were analysed, HyMap (VIS/NIR/SWIR image data and Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner (AHS, LWIR image data. Both datasets were acquired over the Sokolov lignite open-cast mines in the Czech Republic. It is further demonstrated that even in this case, when the absorption feature information derived from multispectral LWIR data is integrated with the absorption feature information derived from hyperspectral VIS/NIR/SWIR data, an important improvement in terms of more complex mineral mapping is achieved.

  8. Spectral detector CT-derived virtual non-contrast images: comparison of attenuation values with unenhanced CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, Lakshmi; Rajiah, Prabhakar; Ahn, Richard; Rassouli, Negin; Xi, Yin; Soesbe, Todd C; Lewis, Matthew A; Lenkinski, Robert E; Leyendecker, John R; Abbara, Suhny

    2017-03-01

    To assess virtual non-contrast (VNC) images obtained on a detection-based spectral detector CT scanner and determine how attenuation on VNC images derived from various phases of enhanced CT compare to those obtained from true unenhanced images. In this HIPAA compliant, IRB approved prospective multi-institutional study, 46 patients underwent pre- and post-contrast imaging on a prototype dual-layer spectral detector CT between October 2013 and November 2015, yielding 84 unenhanced and VNC pairs (25 arterial, 39 portal venous/nephrographic, 20 urographic). Mean attenuation was measured by one of three readers in the liver, spleen, kidneys, psoas muscle, abdominal aorta, and subcutaneous fat. Equivalence testing was used to determine if the mean difference between unenhanced and VNC attenuation was less than 5, 10, or 15 HU. VNC image quality was assessed on a 5 point scale. Mean difference between unenhanced and VNC attenuation was VNC attenuation were equivalent in all tissues except fat using a threshold of VNC overestimated the HU relative to unenhanced images. VNC image quality was rated as excellent or good in 84% of arterial phase and 85% of nephrographic phase cases, but only 40% of urographic phase. VNC images derived from novel dual layer spectral detector CT demonstrate attenuation values similar to unenhanced images in all tissues evaluated except for subcutaneous fat. Further study is needed to determine if attenuation thresholds currently used clinically for common pathology should be adjusted, particularly for lesions containing fat.

  9. Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART 5 for Modeling Airborne and Satellite Spectroradiometer and LIDAR Acquisitions of Natural and Urban Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Gastellu-Etchegorry

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Satellite and airborne optical sensors are increasingly used by scientists, and policy makers, and managers for studying and managing forests, agriculture crops, and urban areas. Their data acquired with given instrumental specifications (spectral resolution, viewing direction, sensor field-of-view, etc. and for a specific experimental configuration (surface and atmosphere conditions, sun direction, etc. are commonly translated into qualitative and quantitative Earth surface parameters. However, atmosphere properties and Earth surface 3D architecture often confound their interpretation. Radiative transfer models capable of simulating the Earth and atmosphere complexity are, therefore, ideal tools for linking remotely sensed data to the surface parameters. Still, many existing models are oversimplifying the Earth-atmosphere system interactions and their parameterization of sensor specifications is often neglected or poorly considered. The Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART model is one of the most comprehensive physically based 3D models simulating the Earth-atmosphere radiation interaction from visible to thermal infrared wavelengths. It has been developed since 1992. It models optical signals at the entrance of imaging radiometers and laser scanners on board of satellites and airplanes, as well as the 3D radiative budget, of urban and natural landscapes for any experimental configuration and instrumental specification. It is freely distributed for research and teaching activities. This paper presents DART physical bases and its latest functionality for simulating imaging spectroscopy of natural and urban landscapes with atmosphere, including the perspective projection of airborne acquisitions and LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR waveform and photon counting signals.

  10. Piecewise spectrally band-pass for compressive coded aperture spectral imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Lu-Lu; Lü Qun-Bo; Huang Min; Xiang Li-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Coded aperture snapshot spectral imaging (CASSI) has been discussed in recent years. It has the remarkable advantages of high optical throughput, snapshot imaging, etc. The entire spatial-spectral data-cube can be reconstructed with just a single two-dimensional (2D) compressive sensing measurement. On the other hand, for less spectrally sparse scenes, the insufficiency of sparse sampling and aliasing in spatial-spectral images reduce the accuracy of reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) spectral cube. To solve this problem, this paper extends the improved CASSI. A band-pass filter array is mounted on the coded mask, and then the first image plane is divided into some continuous spectral sub-band areas. The entire 3D spectral cube could be captured by the relative movement between the object and the instrument. The principle analysis and imaging simulation are presented. Compared with peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and the information entropy of the reconstructed images at different numbers of spectral sub-band areas, the reconstructed 3D spectral cube reveals an observable improvement in the reconstruction fidelity, with an increase in the number of the sub-bands and a simultaneous decrease in the number of spectral channels of each sub-band. (paper)

  11. Developing patient-specific dose protocols for a CT scanner and exam using diagnostic reference levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, Keith J.

    2014-01-01

    The management of image quality and radiation dose during pediatric CT scanning is dependent on how well one manages the radiographic techniques as a function of the type of exam, type of CT scanner, and patient size. The CT scanner's display of expected CT dose index volume (CTDI vol ) after the projection scan provides the operator with a powerful tool prior to the patient scan to identify and manage appropriate CT techniques, provided the department has established appropriate diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). This paper provides a step-by-step process that allows the development of DRLs as a function of type of exam, of actual patient size and of the individual radiation output of each CT scanner in a department. Abdomen, pelvis, thorax and head scans are addressed. Patient sizes from newborns to large adults are discussed. The method addresses every CT scanner regardless of vendor, model or vintage. We cover adjustments to techniques to manage the impact of iterative reconstruction and provide a method to handle all available voltages other than 120 kV. This level of management of CT techniques is necessary to properly monitor radiation dose and image quality during pediatric CT scans. (orig.)

  12. Image quality assessment of LaBr3-based whole-body 3D PET scanners: a Monte Carlo evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surti, S; Karp, J S; Muehllehner, G

    2004-01-01

    The main thrust for this work is the investigation and design of a whole-body PET scanner based on new lanthanum bromide scintillators. We use Monte Carlo simulations to generate data for a 3D PET scanner based on LaBr 3 detectors, and to assess the count-rate capability and the reconstructed image quality of phantoms with hot and cold spheres using contrast and noise parameters. Previously we have shown that LaBr 3 has very high light output, excellent energy resolution and fast timing properties which can lead to the design of a time-of-flight (TOF) whole-body PET camera. The data presented here illustrate the performance of LaBr 3 without the additional benefit of TOF information, although our intention is to develop a scanner with TOF measurement capability. The only drawbacks of LaBr 3 are the lower stopping power and photo-fraction which affect both sensitivity and spatial resolution. However, in 3D PET imaging where energy resolution is very important for reducing scattered coincidences in the reconstructed image, the image quality attained in a non-TOF LaBr 3 scanner can potentially equal or surpass that achieved with other high sensitivity scanners. Our results show that there is a gain in NEC arising from the reduced scatter and random fractions in a LaBr 3 scanner. The reconstructed image resolution is slightly worse than a high-Z scintillator, but at increased count-rates, reduced pulse pileup leads to an image resolution similar to that of LSO. Image quality simulations predict reduced contrast for small hot spheres compared to an LSO scanner, but improved noise characteristics at similar clinical activity levels

  13. Scanner image methodology (SIM) to measure dimensions of leaves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A scanner image methodology was used to determine plant dimensions, such as leaf area, length and width. The values obtained using SIM were compared with those recorded by the LI-COR leaf area meter. Bias, linearity, reproducibility and repeatability (R&R) were evaluated for SIM. Different groups of leaves were ...

  14. Commissioning of a passive rod scanner at INB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junqueira, Fabio da Silva; Oliveira, Carlos A.; Palheiros, Franklin, E-mail: carlossilva@inb.gov.br, E-mail: franklin@inb.gov.br [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Resende, RJ (Brazil). Superintendencia de Engenharia do Combustivel; Fernandez, Pablo Jesus Piñer, E-mail: pineiro@tecnatom.es [Tecnatom, San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    For the 21st reload for Angra 1, a shift from Standard to Advanced fuel design will be introduced, where the fuel assemblies under the new design will contain fuel rods with axial blanket, in line with ELETRONUCLEAR's requirement for a higher energy efficient reactor fuel. Additionally, fuel rods for Angra 2 and 3, using gadolinium type burnable poison, have to be submitted to inspections due to the demand for the same type of inspection, which cannot be certified at INB currently. In keeping with CNEN regulations, every fuel-assembly component must be inspected and certified by a qualified method. Nevertheless, INB lacks the means to perform the certification-required inspection aimed at determining the uranium enrichment and presence of gadolinium pellets inside the closed rods. Hence, the use is necessary of a scanner capable of inspecting differently enriched fuel rods and/or gadolinium pellets (axial blanket). This work aims to present the recent Passive Rod Scanner installed at INB with most advance technology in the area, making possible to completely fulfill Angra 1, 2 and 3 rods inspection at INB Resende site. (author)

  15. A noble refractive optical scanner with linear response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Yair J.; Lai, Zhenhua; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2013-03-01

    Many applications in various fields of science and engineering use steered optical beam systems. Currently, many methods utilize mirrors in order to steer the beam. However, this approach is an off-axis solution, which normally increases the total size of the system as well as its error and complexity. Other methods use a "Risely Prisms" based solution, which is on-axis solution, however it poses some difficulties from an engineering standpoint, and therefore isn't widely used. We present here a novel technique for steering a beam on its optical axis with a linear deflection response. We derived the formulation for the profile required of the refractive optical component necessary for preforming the beam steering. The functionality of the device was simulated analytically using Matlab, as well as using a ray-tracing software, Zemax, and showed agreement with the analytical model. An optical element was manufactured based on the proposed design and the device was tested. The results show agreement with our hypothesis. We also present some proposed geometries of the several other devices, all based on the same concept, which can be used for higher performance applications such as two-dimensional scanner, video rate scanner etc.

  16. Sensitive detection of aerosol effect on simulated IASI spectral radiance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, X.; Huang, H.-L.; Zhang, L.; Weisz, E.; Cao, X.

    2013-01-01

    Guided by radiative transfer modeling of the effects of dust (aerosol) on satellite thermal infrared radiance by many different imaging radiometers, in this article, we present the aerosol-effected satellite radiative signal changes in the top of atmosphere (TOA). The simulation of TOA radiance for Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) is performed by using the RTTOV fast radiative transfer model. The model computation is carried out with setting representative geographical atmospheric models and typical default aerosol climatological models under clear sky condition. The radiative differences (in units of equivalent black body brightness temperature differences (BTDs)) between simulated radiances without consideration of the impact of aerosol (Aerosol-free) and with various aerosol models (Aerosol-modified) are calculated for the whole IASI spectrum between 3.62 and 15.5 μm. The comparisons of BTDs are performed through 11 aerosol models in 5 classified atmospheric models. The results show that the Desert aerosol model has the most significant impact on IASI spectral simulated radiances than the other aerosol models (Continental, Urban, Maritime types and so on) in Mid-latitude Summer, contributing to the mineral aerosol components contained. The value of BTDs could reach up to 1 K at peak points. The atmospheric window spectral region between 900 and 1100 cm −1 (9.09–11.11 μm) is concentrated after the investigation for the largest values of aerosol-affected radiance differences. BTDs in IASI spectral region between 645 and 1200 cm −1 occupies the largest oscillation and the major part of the whole spectrum. The IASI highest window peak-points channels (such as 9.4 and 10.2 μm) are obtained finally, which are the most sensitive ones to the simulated IASI radiance. -- Highlights: ► Sensitive study of aerosol effect on simulated IASI spectral radiance is performed. ► The aerosol components have influenced IASI spectral regions

  17. A 10 MHz Bandwidth Continuous-Time Delta-Sigma Modulator for Portable Ultrasound Scanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llimos Muntal, Pere; Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bruun, Erik

    2016-01-01

    comparator and a pull-down clocked latch. The feedback signal is generated with voltage DACs based on transmission gates. Using this implementation, a small and low-power solution required for portable ultrasound scanner applications is achieved. The modulator has a bandwidth of 10 MHz with an oversampling......A fourth-order 1-bit continuous-time delta-sigma modulator designed in a 65 nm process for portable ultrasound scanners is presented in this paper. The loop filter consists of RCintegrators, with programmable capacitor arrays and resistors, and the quantizer is implemented with a high-speed clocked...

  18. DRAWING AND LANDSCAPE SIMULATION FOR JAPANESE GARDEN BY USING TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kumazaki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, many laser scanners are applied for various measurement fields. This paper investigates that it was useful to use the terrestrial laser scanner in the field of landscape architecture and examined a usage in Japanese garden. As for the use of 3D point cloud data in the Japanese garden, it is the visual use such as the animations. Therefore, some applications of the 3D point cloud data was investigated that are as follows. Firstly, ortho image of the Japanese garden could be outputted for the 3D point cloud data. Secondly, contour lines of the Japanese garden also could be extracted, and drawing was became possible. Consequently, drawing of Japanese garden was realized more efficiency due to achievement of laborsaving. Moreover, operation of the measurement and drawing could be performed without technical skills, and any observers can be operated. Furthermore, 3D point cloud data could be edited, and some landscape simulations that extraction and placement of tree or some objects were became possible. As a result, it can be said that the terrestrial laser scanner will be applied in landscape architecture field more widely.

  19. Drawing and Landscape Simulation for Japanese Garden by Using Terrestrial Laser Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazaki, R.; Kunii, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Recently, many laser scanners are applied for various measurement fields. This paper investigates that it was useful to use the terrestrial laser scanner in the field of landscape architecture and examined a usage in Japanese garden. As for the use of 3D point cloud data in the Japanese garden, it is the visual use such as the animations. Therefore, some applications of the 3D point cloud data was investigated that are as follows. Firstly, ortho image of the Japanese garden could be outputted for the 3D point cloud data. Secondly, contour lines of the Japanese garden also could be extracted, and drawing was became possible. Consequently, drawing of Japanese garden was realized more efficiency due to achievement of laborsaving. Moreover, operation of the measurement and drawing could be performed without technical skills, and any observers can be operated. Furthermore, 3D point cloud data could be edited, and some landscape simulations that extraction and placement of tree or some objects were became possible. As a result, it can be said that the terrestrial laser scanner will be applied in landscape architecture field more widely.

  20. Heat transfer modelling in thermophotovoltaic cavities using glass media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, T.; Forbes, I.; Penlington, R.; Pearsall, N. [Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). School of Engineering and Technology

    2005-08-15

    Optimisation of heat transfer, and in particular radiative heat transfer in terms of the spectral, angular and spatial radiation distributions, is required to achieve high efficiencies and high electrical power densities for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion. This work examines heat transfer from the radiator to the PV cell in an infinite plate arrangement using three different arrangements of participating dielectric media. The modelling applies the Discrete Ordinates method and assumes fused silica (quartz glass) as the dielectric medium. The arrangement radiator-glass-PV cell (also termed dielectric photon concentration) was found to be superior in terms of efficiency and power density. (author)

  1. SU-E-J-35: Clinical Performance Evaluation of a Phase II Proton CT Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandapaka, A; Ghebremedhin, A; Farley, D; Giacometti, V; Vence, N; Bashkirov, V; Patyal, B; Schulte, R; Plautz, T; Zatserklyaniy, A; Johnson, R; Sadrozinski, H

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop the methodology to evaluate the clinical performance of a Phase II Proton CT scanner Methods: Range errors on the order of 3%-5% constitute a major uncertainty in current charged particle treatment planning based on Hounsfield Unit (HU)-relative stopping power (RSP) calibration curves. Within our proton CT collaboration, we previously developed and built a Phase I proton CT scanner that provided a sensitive area of 9 cm (axial) × 18 cm (in-plane). This scanner served to get initial experience with this new treatment planning tool and to incorporate lessons learned into the next generation design. A Phase II scanner was recently completed and is now undergoing initial performance testing. It will increase the proton acquisition rate and provide a larger detection area of 9 cm x 36 cm. We are now designing a comprehensive evaluation program to test the image quality, imaging dose, and range uncertainty associated with this scanner. The testing will be performed along the lines of AAPM TG 66. Results: In our discussion of the evaluation protocol we identified the following priorities. The image quality of proton CT images, in particular spatial resolution and low-density contrast discrimination, will be evaluated with the Catphan600 phantom. Initial testing showed that the Catphan uniformity phantom did not provide sufficient uniformity; it was thus replaced by a cylindrical water phantom. The imaging dose will be tested with a Catphan dose module, and compared to a typical cone beam CT dose for comparable image quality. Lastly, we developed a dedicated dosimetry range phantom based on the CIRS pediatric head phantom HN715. Conclusion: A formal evaluation of proton CT as a new tool for proton treatment planning is an important task. The availability of the new Phase II proton CT scanner will allow us to perform this task. This research is supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the NIH under award number R01

  2. Estimation of effectiveness of automatic exposure control in computed tomograph scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhilesh, Philomina; Sharma, S.D.; Datta, D.; Kulkarni, Arti

    2018-01-01

    With the advent of multiple detector array technology, the use of Computed Tomography (CT) scanning has increase tremendously. Computed Tomography examinations deliver relatively high radiation dose to patients in comparison with conventional radiography. It is therefore required to reduce the dose delivered in CT scans without compromising the image quality. Several parameters like applied potential, tube current, scan length, pitch etc. influence the dose delivered in CT scans. For optimization of patient dose and image quality, all modern CT scanners are enabled with Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) systems. The aim of this work is to compare the dose delivered during CT scans performed with and without AEC in order to estimate the effectiveness of AEC techniques used in CT scanners of various manufacturer

  3. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  4. Pediatric radiation dose and risk from bone density measurements using a GE Lunar Prodigy scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damilakis, J; Solomou, G; Manios, G E; Karantanas, A

    2013-07-01

    Effective radiation doses associated with bone mineral density examinations performed on children using a GE Lunar Prodigy fan-beam dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanner were found to be comparable to doses from pencil-beam DXA devices, i.e., lower than 1 μSv. Cancer risks associated with acquisitions obtained in this study are negligible. No data were found in the literature on radiation doses and potential risks following pediatric DXA performed on GE Lunar DXA scanners. This study aimed to estimate effective doses and associated cancer risks involved in pediatric examinations performed on a GE Lunar Prodigy scanner. Four physical anthropomorphic phantoms representing newborn, 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old patients were employed to simulate DXA exposures. All acquisitions were carried out using the Prodigy scanner. Dose measurements were performed for spine and dual femur using the phantoms simulating the 5- and 10-year-old child. Moreover, doses associated with whole-body examinations were measured for the four phantoms used in the current study. The gender-average effective dose for spine and hip examinations were 0.65 and 0.36 μSv, respectively, for the phantom representing the 5-year-old child and 0.93 and 0.205 μSv, respectively, for the phantom representing the 10-year-old child. Effective doses for whole-body examinations were 0.25, 0.22, 0.19, and 0.15 μSv for the neonate, 1-, 5-, and 10-year old child, respectively. The estimated lifetime cancer risks were negligible, i.e., 0.02-0.25 per million, depending on the sex, age, and type of DXA examination. A formula is presented for the estimation of effective dose from examinations performed on GE Lunar Prodigy scanners installed in other institutions. The effective doses and potential cancer risks associated with pediatric DXA examinations performed on a GE Lunar Prodigy fan-beam scanner were found to be comparable to doses and risks reported from pencil-beam DXA devices.

  5. Sensitivity booster for DOI-PET scanner by utilizing Compton scattering events between detector blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp; Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-11-01

    In a conventional PET scanner, coincidence events are measured with a limited energy window for detection of photoelectric events in order to reject Compton scatter events that occur in a patient, but Compton scatter events caused in detector crystals are also rejected. Scatter events within the patient causes scatter coincidences, but inter crystal scattering (ICS) events have useful information for determining an activity distribution. Some researchers have reported the feasibility of PET scanners based on a Compton camera for tracing ICS into the detector. However, these scanners require expensive semiconductor detectors for high-energy resolution. In the Anger-type block detector, single photons interacting with multiple detectors can be obtained for each interacting position and complete information can be gotten just as for photoelectric events in the single detector. ICS events in the single detector have been used to get coincidence, but single photons interacting with multiple detectors have not been used to get coincidence. In this work, we evaluated effect of sensitivity improvement using Compton kinetics in several types of DOI-PET scanners. The proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity using coincidence events of single photons interacting with multiple detectors, which are identified as the first interaction (FI). FI estimation accuracy can be improved to determine FI validity from the correlation between Compton scatter angles calculated on the coincidence line-of-response. We simulated an animal PET scanner consisting of 42 detectors. Each detector block consists of three types of scintillator crystals (LSO, GSO and GAGG). After the simulation, coincidence events are added as information for several depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolutions. From the simulation results, we concluded the proposed method promises to improve the sensitivity considerably when effective atomic number of a scintillator is low. Also, we showed that FI estimate

  6. The economic potential of CT scanners for hardwood sawmills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald G. Hodges; Walter C. Anderson; Charles W. McMillin

    1990-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that a knowledge of internal log defects prior to sawing could improve lumber value yields significantly. This study evaluated the potential economic returns from investments in computerized tomographic (CT) scanners to detect internal defects in hardwood logs at southern sawmills. The results indicate that such investments would be profitable...

  7. WindScanner.eu - a new Remote Sensing Research Infrastructure for On- and Offshore Wind Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben; Siggaard Knudsen, Søren; Sjöholm, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    will be disseminated throughout Europe to pilot European wind energy research centers. The new research infrastructure will become an open source infrastructure that also invites collaboration with wind energy related atmospheric scientists and wind energy industry overseas. Recent achievements with 3D Wind......A new remote sensing based research infrastructure for atmospheric boundary-layer wind and turbulence measurements named WindScanner have during the past three years been in its early phase of development at DTU Wind Energy in Denmark. During the forthcoming three years the technology......Scanners and spin-off innovation activity are described. The Danish WindScanner.dk research facility is build from new and fast-scanning remote sensing equipment spurred from achievements within fiber optics and telecommunication technologies. At the same time the wind energy society has demanded excessive 3D wind...

  8. Simple Methods for Scanner Drift Normalization Validated for Automatic Segmentation of Knee Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Erik Bjørnager

    2018-01-01

    Scanner drift is a well-known magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) artifact characterized by gradual signal degradation and scan intensity changes over time. In addition, hardware and software updates may imply abrupt changes in signal. The combined effects are particularly challenging for automatic...... image analysis methods used in longitudinal studies. The implication is increased measurement variation and a risk of bias in the estimations (e.g. in the volume change for a structure). We proposed two quite different approaches for scanner drift normalization and demonstrated the performance...... for segmentation of knee MRI using the fully automatic KneeIQ framework. The validation included a total of 1975 scans from both high-field and low-field MRI. The results demonstrated that the pre-processing method denoted Atlas Affine Normalization significantly removed scanner drift effects and ensured...

  9. Neutrino mass hierarchy and three-flavor spectral splits of supernova neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Tomas, Ricard; Tamborra, Irene

    2010-01-01

    It was recently realized that three-flavor effects could peculiarly modify the development of spectral splits induced by collective oscillations, for supernova neutrinos emitted during the cooling phase of a protoneutron star. We systematically explore this case, explaining how the impact of these three-flavor effects depends on the ordering of the neutrino masses. In inverted mass hierarchy, the solar mass splitting gives rise to instabilities in regions of the (anti)neutrino energy spectra that were otherwise stable under the leading two-flavor evolution governed by the atmospheric mass splitting and by the 1-3 mixing angle. As a consequence, the high-energy spectral splits found in the electron (anti)neutrino spectra disappear, and are transferred to other flavors. Imperfect adiabaticity leads to smearing of spectral swap features. In normal mass hierarchy, the three-flavor and the two-flavor instabilities act in the same region of the neutrino energy spectrum, leading to only minor departures from the two-flavor treatment.

  10. Evaluation of the desert dust effects on global, direct and diffuse spectral ultraviolet irradiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Román

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of a strong desert dust episode over the Iberian Peninsula, and its effect on the spectral ultraviolet (UV irradiance in Granada, Spain. Remote sensing measurements, forecast models, and synoptic analysis are used to identify a Saharan desert dust outbreak that affected the Iberian Peninsula starting 20 July 2009. Additionally, a Bentham DMc150 spectroradiometer is employed to obtain global, direct and diffuse spectral UV irradiances every 15 minutes in Granada. The desert dust caused a large attenuation of the direct UV irradiance (up to 55%, while the diffuse UV irradiance increased up to 40% at 400 nm. The UVSPEC/LibRadtran radiative transfer model is used to study the spectral dependence of the experimental UV irradiance ratios (ratios of spectral irradiance for the day with the highest aerosol load to that measured in days with low–moderate load. The spectral increase or decrease of the UV direct irradiance ratios depends on a new parameter: a threshold wavelength. The spectral dependence of the UV diffuse irradiance ratio can be explained because under the influence of the intense dust outbreak, the Mie scattering by aerosols at shorter wavelengths is stronger than the Rayleigh scattering by gases. Finally, the sensitivity analysis of the aerosol absorption properties shows a substantial attenuation of UV spectral irradiance with a weak spectral dependence.

  11. Preliminary assessment of the operating performance and calibration of rectilinear scanners and dose calibrators in Rio de Janeiro - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, L.; Wegst, A.

    1983-01-01

    Thirty rectilinear scanners and ten dose calibrators were tested for a variety of operating conditions. The test for rectilinear scanners were based on image quality obtained with phantoms of the brain, liver (Williams phantom) and thyroid. The parameters investigated specifically for rectilinear scanners included those under direct control of the operator, such as proper setting of the focal distance, the velocity, the photopeak calibration, contrast correct collimator, line spacing, and background count. (E.G.) [pt

  12. Characterization of radiochromic films EBT3 by means of the scanner Vidar dosimetry Pro Red and Epson 10000-XL use; Caracterizacion de films radiocromicos EBT3 mediante el uso de scanner Vidar dosimetry Pro Red y Epson 10000-XL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, L.; Garrigo, E.; Venencia, D.; Adrada, A.; Filipuzzi, M., E-mail: fisicamedina11@gmail.com [Instituto Privado de Radioterapia, Obispo Oro 423, X5000BFI Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    The Radiochromic film have become an attractive tool for verification of dose distributions in IMRT because these have high spatial resolution film, are near water equivalent and not require revealed, A critical aspect of the use of these film is used for digitizing scanner The purpose of this paper is to characterize EBT3 using two types of scanner. Were employed The Radiochromic film EBT3, was used photon beam 6 MV generated by a linear accelerator Siemens Primus, he films were irradiated at a dose range between 0 Gy a 9 Gy. The stabilization time after irradiation was 24 hours. The films were digitized with a scanner Epson 10000-XL y el VIDAR Dosimetry Pro Red. We used the software for construction of the calibration curve. The resolution of each dosimetry system was analyzed through the results of the spatial response function by analyzing a step pattern. The Epson scanner is most sensitive to the red channel. This is less than that obtained with the Vidar. The Vidar scanner spatial response profiles disturbs not opposed to Epson analyzed. The calibration curves for both dosimetry systems can be employed. However, the sensitivity and repeatability of the system is better than Red Vidar Epson 10000-XL. (author)

  13. Teach Your Computer to Read: Scanners and Optical Character Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Jim

    1993-01-01

    Desktop scanners can be used with a software technology called optical character recognition (OCR) to convert the text on virtually any paper document into an electronic form. OCR offers educators new flexibility in incorporating text into tests, lesson plans, and other materials. (MLF)

  14. USGS Digital Spectral Library splib06a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Wise, Richard A.; Livo, K. Eric; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Sutley, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    ), one simply needs a diagnostic absorption band. The mapping system uses continuum-removed reference spectral features fitted to features in observed spectra. Spectral features for such algorithms can be obtained from a spectrum of a sample containing large amounts of contaminants, including those that add other spectral features, as long as the shape of the diagnostic feature of interest is not modified. If, however, the data are needed for radiative transfer models to derive mineral abundances from reflectance spectra, then completely uncontaminated spectra are required. This library contains spectra that span a range of quality, with purity indicators to flag spectra for (or against) particular uses. Acquiring spectral measurements and performing sample characterizations for this library has taken about 15 person-years of effort. Software to manage the library and provide scientific analysis capability is provided (Clark, 1980, 1993). A personal computer (PC) reader for the library is also available (Livo and others, 1993). The program reads specpr binary files (Clark, 1980, 1993) and plots spectra. Another program that reads the specpr format is written in IDL (Kokaly, 2005). In our view, an ideal spectral library consists of samples covering a very wide range of materials, has large wavelength range with very high precision, and has enough sample analyses and documentation to establish the quality of the spectra. Time and available resources limit what can be achieved. Ideally, for each mineral, the sample analysis would include X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EM) or X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and petrographic microscopic analyses. For some minerals, such as iron oxides, additional analyses such as Mossbauer would be helpful. We have found that to make the basic spectral measurements, provide XRD, EM or XRF analyses, and microscopic analyses, document the results, and complete an entry of one spectral library sample, all takes about

  15. Whole body X-ray CT scanner SCT-3000T series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Teruhiko; Takemura, Kunihiko; Suzuki, Satoru; Sato, Yukio; Kawamoto, Yasushi; Goto, Mitsuhiro; Mishina, Yukio

    1989-01-01

    The whole body CT scanner, SCT-3000T series which improve the patient through-put and the diagnostic capability, has been developed. In the SCT-3000T series CT scanners, the great reduction of the reconstruction time and the scan cycle time has been achieved by developing the special purpose hardwares for image reconstruction such as the fast front end processor, the intelligent buffer memory. In case of the SCT-3000TX routine conditions of operation, including 3.0 sec scan, table increment, image reconstruction and image filing, the scan cycle time is about 9 seconds which is the shortest value among the competitive models. Furthermore, the higher diagnostic capability has been provided with the system, by adopting the 1024 x 1024 display matrices, and by developing the diagnostic softwares such as 3-D display program, arbitrary curved plane MPR program, r-CBF measurement program and etc. (author)

  16. Using mid-range laser scanners to digitize cultural-he