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Sample records for transduction peptide ctp

  1. Cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP): New approach for the delivery of biomolecules into cytoplasm in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Daeyou; Jeon, Choonju; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Mi-Seon; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Bae, Yong-Soo

    2006-01-01

    The protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV-1 TAT has been extensively documented with regard to its membrane transduction potential, as well as its efficient delivery of biomolecules in vivo. However, the majority of PTD and PTD-conjugated molecules translocate to the nucleus rather than to the cytoplasm after transduction, due to the functional nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Here, we report a cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP), which was deliberately designed to ensure the efficient cytoplasmic delivery of the CTP-fused biomolecules. In comparison with PTD, CTP and its fusion partners exhibited a clear preference for cytoplasmic localization, and also markedly enhanced membrane transduction potential. Unlike the mechanism underlying PTD-mediated transduction, CTP-mediated transduction occurs independently of the lipid raft-dependent macropinocytosis pathway. The CTP-conjugated Smac/DIABLO peptide (Smac-CTP) was also shown to be much more efficient than Smac-PTD in the blockage of the antiapoptotic properties of XIAP, suggesting that cytoplasmic functional molecules can be more efficiently targeted by CTP-mediated delivery. In in vivo trafficking studies, CTP-fused β-gal exhibited unique organ tropisms to the liver and lymph nodes when systemically injected into mice, whereas PTD-β-gal exhibited no such tropisms. Taken together, our findings implicate CTP as a novel delivery peptide appropriate for (i) molecular targeting to cytoplasmic compartments in vitro, (ii) the development of class I-associated CTL vaccines, and (iii) special drug delivery in vivo, without causing any untoward effects on nuclear genetic material

  2. Development of oral CTL vaccine using a CTP-integrated Sabin 1 poliovirus-based vector system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung-Soo; Lee, Jinjoo; Jung, Yideul; Kang, Myeong-Ho; Hong, Jung-Hyub; Cha, Min-Suk; Park, Yu-Jin; Lee, Ezra; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Bae, Yong-Soo

    2015-09-11

    We developed a CTL vaccine vector by modification of the RPS-Vax system, a mucosal vaccine vector derived from a poliovirus Sabin 1 strain, and generated an oral CTL vaccine against HIV-1. A DNA fragment encoding a cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) was integrated into the RPS-Vax system to generate RPS-CTP, a CTL vaccine vector. An HIV-1 p24 cDNA fragment was introduced into the RPS-CTP vector system and a recombinant poliovirus (rec-PV) named vRPS-CTP/p24 was produced. vRPS-CTP/p24 was genetically stable and efficiently induced Th1 immunity and p24-specific CTLs in immunized poliovirus receptor-transgenic (PVR-Tg) mice. In challenge experiments, PVR-Tg mice that were pre-immunized orally with vRPS-CTP/p24 were resistant to challenge with a lethal dose of p24-expressing recombinant vaccinia virus (rMVA-p24). These results suggested that the RPS-CTP vector system had potential for developing oral CTL vaccines against infectious diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Elucidation of the Signal Transduction Pathways Activated by the Plant Natriuretic Peptide AtPNP-A

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2014-11-01

    Plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs) comprise a novel class of hormones that share some sequence similarity in the active site with their animal analogues that function as regulators of salt and water balance. A PNP present in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPNP-A) has been assigned a role in abiotic and biotic stress responses, and the recombinant protein has been demonstrated to elicit cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent stomatal guard cell opening, regulate ion movements, and induce osmoticum-dependent water uptake. Although the importance of the hormone in maintaining ion and fluid homeostasis has been established, key components of the AtPNP-A-dependent signal transduction pathway remain unknown. Since identification of the binding partners of AtPNP-A, including its receptor(s), is fundamental to understanding the mode of its action at the molecular level, comprehensive protein-protein interaction studies, involving yeast two-hybrid screening, affinity-based assays, protein cross-linking and co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometric (MS) analyses have been performed. Several candidate binding partners of AtPNP-A identified with at least two independent methods were subsequently expressed as recombinant proteins, purified, and the specificity of their interactions with the recombinant AtPNP-A was verified using surface plasmon resonance. Several specific binary interactants of AtPNP-A were subjected to functional assays aimed at unraveling the consequences of the interactions in planta. These experiments have revealed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are novel secondary messengers involved in the transduction of AtPNP-A signal in suspension-cultured cells of A. thaliana (Col-0). Further insight into the AtPNP-A dependent signalling events occurring in suspension-cultured cells in ROS-dependent or ROS-independent manner have been obtained from the large-scale proteomics study employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labelling followed by MS analysis to

  4. The Central Trigger Processor (CTP)

    CERN Multimedia

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The Central Trigger Processor (CTP) receives trigger information from the calorimeter and muon trigger processors, as well as from other sources of trigger. It makes the Level-1 decision (L1A) based on a trigger menu.

  5. RXP-E: a connexin43-binding peptide that prevents action potential propagation block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewandowski, Rebecca; Procida, Kristina; Vaidyanathan, Ravi

    2008-01-01

    . Separately, RXP-E was concatenated to a cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) for cytoplasmic translocation (CTP-RXP-E). The effect of RXP-E on action potential propagation was assessed by high-resolution optical mapping in monolayers of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, containing approximately 20......% of randomly distributed myofibroblasts. In contrast to control experiments, when heptanol (2 mmol/L) was added to the superfusate of monolayers loaded with CTP-RXP-E, action potential propagation was maintained, albeit at a slower velocity. Similarly, intracellular acidification (pH(i) 6.2) caused a loss...... of action potential propagation in control monolayers; however, propagation was maintained in CTP-RXP-E-treated cells, although at a slower rate. Patch-clamp experiments revealed that RXP-E did not prevent heptanol-induced block of sodium currents, nor did it alter voltage dependence or amplitude of Kir2...

  6. CTP limitation increases expression of CTP synthase in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C.M.; Hammer, Karin; Martinussen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    CTP synthase is encoded by the pyrG gene and catalyzes the conversion of UTP to CTP. A Lactococcus lactis pyrG mutant with a cytidine requirement was constructed, in which beta-galactosidase activity in a pyrG-lacLM transcriptional fusion was used to monitor gene expression of pyrG. A 10-fold...... decrease in the CTP pool induced by cytidine limitation was found to immediately increase expression of the L. lactis pyrG gene. The final level of expression of pyrG is 37-fold higher than the uninduced level. CTP limitation has pronounced effects on central cellular metabolism, and both RNA and protein...... for regulation of the pyrG gene. It is possible to fold the pyrG leader in an alternative structure that would prevent the formation of the terminator. We suggest a model for pyrG regulation in L. lactis, and probably in other gram-positive bacteria as well, in which pyrG expression is directly dependent...

  7. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culhane, Kelly J; Liu, Yuting; Cai, Yingying; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2015-01-01

    Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs.

  8. Transmembrane signal transduction by peptide hormones via family B G protein-coupled receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly J Culhane

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although family B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs contain only 15 members, they play key roles in transmembrane signal transduction of hormones. Family B GPCRs are drug targets for developing therapeutics for diseases ranging from metabolic to neurological disorders. Despite their importance, the molecular mechanism of activation of family B GPCRs remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in expression and purification of functional receptors to the quantity for biophysical characterization. Currently, there is no crystal structure available of a full-length family B GPCR. However, structures of key domains, including the extracellular ligand binding regions and seven-helical transmembrane regions, have been solved by X-ray crystallography and NMR, providing insights into the mechanisms of ligand recognition and selectivity, and helical arrangements within the cell membrane. Moreover, biophysical and biochemical methods have been used to explore functions, key residues for signaling, and the kinetics and dynamics of signaling processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signal transduction mechanism of family B GPCRs at the molecular level and comments on the challenges and outlook for mechanistic studies of family B GPCRs.

  9. Structural studies of the natriuretic peptide receptor: a novel hormone-induced rotation mechanism for transmembrane signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misono, Kunio S; Ogawa, Haruo; Qiu, Yue; Ogata, Craig M

    2005-06-01

    The atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptor is a single-span transmembrane receptor that is coupled to its intrinsic intracellular guanylate cyclase (GCase) catalytic activity. To investigate the mechanisms of hormone binding and signal transduction, we have expressed the extracellular hormone-binding domain of the ANP receptor (ANPR) and characterized its structure and function. The disulfide-bond structure, state of glycosylation, binding-site residues, chloride-dependence of ANP binding, dimerization, and binding stoichiometry have been determined. More recently, the crystal structures of both the apoANPR dimer and ANP-bound complex have been determined. The structural comparison between the two has shown that, upon ANP binding, two ANPR molecules in the dimer undergo an inter-molecular twist with little intra-molecular conformational change. This motion produces a Ferris wheel-like translocation of two juxtamembrane domains with essentially no change in the inter-domain distance. This movement alters the relative orientation of the two domains equivalent to counter-clockwise rotation of each by 24 degrees . These results suggest that transmembrane signaling by the ANP receptor is mediated by a novel hormone-induced rotation mechanism.

  10. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs): From delivery of nucleic acids and antigens to transduction of engineered nucleases for application in transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rádis-Baptista, Gandhi; Campelo, Iana S; Morlighem, Jean-Étienne R L; Melo, Luciana M; Freitas, Vicente J F

    2017-06-20

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been studied for their capacity to translocate across the lipid membrane of several cell types. In membrane translocation, these peptides can remarkably transport biologically active hydrophilic molecules, such as pharmaceuticals, nucleic acids (DNA and RNA) and even high-molecular-weight proteins, Fig. 3 into the cell cytoplasm and organelles. The development of CPPs as transduction agents includes the modification of gene and protein expression, the reprogramming and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells and the preparation of cellular vaccines. A relatively recent field of CPP application is the transduction of plasmid DNA vectors and CPP-fusion proteins to modify genomes and introduce new traits in cells and organisms. CPP-mediated transduction of components for genome editing is an advantageous alternative to viral DNA vectors. Engineered site-specific nucleases, such as Cre recombinase, ZFN, TALENs and CRISPR associated protein (Cas), have been coupled to CPPs, and the fused proteins have been used to permeate targeted cells and tissues. The functionally active fusion CPP-nucleases subsequently home to the nucleus, incise genomic DNA at specific sites and induce repair and recombination. This review has the objective of discussing CPPs and elucidating the prospective use of CPP-mediated transduction technology, particularly in genome modification and transgenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Ke-Mian [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Chang, Chia-Chun [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shen, Qing-Ji [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); Sung, Li-Ying, E-mail: liyingsung@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Ji-Long, E-mail: jilong.liu@dpag.ox.ac.uk [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  12. Involvement of formyl peptide receptors in receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE - and amyloid beta 1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slowik Alexander

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies suggest that the chemotactic G-protein-coupled-receptor (GPCR formyl-peptide-receptor-like-1 (FPRL1 and the receptor-for-advanced-glycation-end-products (RAGE play an important role in the inflammatory response involved in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Therefore, the expression and co-localisation of mouse formyl peptide receptor (mFPR 1 and 2 as well as RAGE in an APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model using immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR were analysed. The involvement of rat or human FPR1/FPRL1 (corresponds to mFPR1/2 and RAGE in amyloid-β 1–42 (Aβ1-42-induced signalling were investigated by extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the cAMP level in primary rat glial cells (microglia and astrocytes and transfected HEK 293 cells was measured. Formyl peptide receptors and RAGE were inhibited by a small synthetic antagonist WRW4 and an inactive receptor variant delta-RAGE, lacking the intracytoplasmatic domains. Results We demonstrated a strong increase of mFPR1/2 and RAGE expression in the cortex and hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mice co-localised to the glial cells. In addition, the Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction is dependant on FPRL1, but also on FPR1. For the first time, we have shown a functional interaction between FPRL1/FPR1 and RAGE in RAGE ligands S100B- or AGE-mediated signalling by ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement. In addition a possible physical interaction between FPRL1 as well as FPR1 and RAGE was shown with co-immunoprecipitation and fluorescence microscopy. Conclusions The results suggest that both formyl peptide receptors play an essential role in Aβ1-42-induced signal transduction in glial cells. The interaction with RAGE could explain the broad ligand spectrum of formyl peptide receptors and their important role for inflammation and the host defence against infections.

  13. Phage Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages mediate horizontal gene transfer through a mechanism known as transduction. Phage transduction carried out in the laboratory involves a bacterial donor and a recipient, both of which are susceptible to infection by the phage of interest. Phage is propagated in the donor, concentrated, and exposed transiently to recipient at different multiplicity of infection ratios. Transductants are selected for the desired phenotype by culture on selective medium. Here we describe transduction of ermB conferring resistance to erythromycin by the C. difficile phage ϕC2.

  14. Crystal structure of hormone-bound atrial natriuretic peptide receptor extracellular domain: rotation mechanism for transmembrane signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Haruo; Qiu, Yue; Ogata, Craig M; Misono, Kunio S

    2004-07-02

    A cardiac hormone, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), plays a major role in blood pressure and volume regulation. ANP activities are mediated by a single span transmembrane receptor carrying intrinsic guanylate cyclase activity. ANP binding to its extracellular domain stimulates guanylate cyclase activity by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here we report the crystal structure of dimerized extracellular hormone-binding domain in complex with ANP. The structural comparison with the unliganded receptor reveals that hormone binding causes the two receptor monomers to undergo an intermolecular twist with little intramolecular conformational change. This motion produces a Ferris wheel-like translocation of two juxtamembrane domains in the dimer with essentially no change in the interdomain distance. This movement alters the relative orientation of the two domains by a shift equivalent to counterclockwise rotation of each by 24 degrees. These results suggest that transmembrane signaling by the ANP receptor is initiated via a hormone-induced rotation mechanism.

  15. The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger Processor (CTP)

    CERN Document Server

    Spiwoks, Ralf; Ellis, Nick; Farthouat, P; Gällnö, P; Haller, J; Krasznahorkay, A; Maeno, T; Pauly, T; Pessoa-Lima, H; Resurreccion-Arcas, I; Schuler, G; De Seixas, J M; Torga-Teixeira, R; Wengler, T

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS Level-1 Central Trigger Processor (CTP) combines information from calorimeter and muon trigger processors and makes the final Level-1 Accept (L1A) decision on the basis of lists of selection criteria (trigger menus). In addition to the event-selection decision, the CTP also provides trigger summary information to the Level-2 trigger and the data acquisition system. It further provides accumulated and bunch-by-bunch scaler data for monitoring of the trigger, detector and beam conditions. The CTP is presented and results are shown from tests with the calorimeter adn muon trigger processors connected to detectors in a particle beam, as well as from stand-alone full-system tests in the laboratory which were used to validate the CTP.

  16. Protein Transduction Based Therapies for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robbins, Paul D

    2006-01-01

    We have demonstrated that certain transduction peptides such as 12 lysines and 12 arginines can facilitateinternalization into breast tumor lines with higher efficiency than smaller polymers of cationic amino acids...

  17. Protein Transduction Based Therapies for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robbins, Paul D

    2004-01-01

    We have demonstrated that certain transduction peptides such as 12 lysines and 12 arginines can facilitate internalization into breast tumor lines with higher efficiency than smaller polymers of cationic amino acids...

  18. Protein Transduction Based Therapies for Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robbins, Paul D

    2005-01-01

    We have demonstrated that certain transduction peptides such as 12 lysines and 12 arginines can facilitate internalization into breast tumor lines with higher efficiency than smaller polymers of cationic amino acids...

  19. RXP-E: A CX43-BINDING PEPTIDE THAT PREVENTS ACTION POTENTIAL PROPAGATION BLOCK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Rebecca; Procida, Kristina; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Coombs, Wanda; Jalife, Jose; Nielsen, Morten S.; Taffet, Steven M.; Delmar, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) provide a low-resistance pathway for cardiac electrical propagation. The role of GJ regulation in arrhythmia is unclear, partly due to limited availability of pharmacological tools. Recently, we showed that a peptide called “RXP-E” binds to the carboxyl terminal of connexin43 (Cx43) and prevents chemically-induced uncoupling in Cx43-expressing N2a cells. Here, pull-down experiments show RXP-E binding to adult cardiac Cx43. Patch-clamp studies revealed that RXP-E prevented heptanol-induced and acidification-induced uncoupling in pairs of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM’s). Separately, RXP-E was concatenated to a cytoplasmic transduction peptide for cytoplasmic translocation (CTP-RXP-E). The effect of RXP-E on action potential (AP) propagation was assessed by high resolution optical mapping in monolayers of NRVM’s, containing ~20% of randomly distributed myofibroblasts. In contrast to control experiments, when heptanol (2 mmol/L) was added to the superfusate of monolayers loaded with CTP-RXP-E, AP propagation was maintained, albeit at a slower velocity. Similarly, intracellular acidification (pHi=6.2) caused a loss of AP propagation in control monolayers; however, propagation was maintained in CTP-RXP-E treated cells, though at a slower rate. Patch clamp experiments revealed that RXP-E did not prevent heptanol-induced block of sodium currents, nor did it alter voltage dependence or amplitude of Kir2.1/Kir2.3 currents. RXP-E is the first synthetic molecule known to: (1) bind cardiac Cx43; (2) prevent heptanol and acidification-induced uncoupling of cardiac GJ’s and 3) preserve AP propagation among cardiac myocytes. RXP-E can be used to characterize the role of GJs in the function of multicellular systems, including the heart. PMID:18669919

  20. Structure of the dimeric form of CTP synthase from Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Iben; Willemoës, Martin; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2011-01-01

    CTP synthase catalyzes the last committed step in de novo pyrimidine-nucleotide biosynthesis. Active CTP synthase is a tetrameric enzyme composed of a dimer of dimers. The tetramer is favoured in the presence of the substrate nucleotides ATP and UTP; when saturated with nucleotide, the tetramer c....... solfataricus CTP synthase according to a structural alignment with the E. coli enzyme all have large thermal parameters in the dimeric form. Furthermore, they are seen to undergo substantial movement upon tetramerization....

  1. Ack kinase regulates CTP synthase filaments during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strochlic, Todd I; Stavrides, Kevin P; Thomas, Sam V; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; O'Reilly, Alana M; Peterson, Jeffrey R

    2014-11-01

    The enzyme CTP synthase (CTPS) dynamically assembles into macromolecular filaments in bacteria, yeast, Drosophila, and mammalian cells, but the role of this morphological reorganization in regulating CTPS activity is controversial. During Drosophila oogenesis, CTPS filaments are transiently apparent in ovarian germline cells during a period of intense genomic endoreplication and stockpiling of ribosomal RNA. Here, we demonstrate that CTPS filaments are catalytically active and that their assembly is regulated by the non-receptor tyrosine kinase DAck, the Drosophila homologue of mammalian Ack1 (activated cdc42-associated kinase 1), which we find also localizes to CTPS filaments. Egg chambers from flies deficient in DAck or lacking DAck catalytic activity exhibit disrupted CTPS filament architecture and morphological defects that correlate with reduced fertility. Furthermore, ovaries from these flies exhibit reduced levels of total RNA, suggesting that DAck may regulate CTP synthase activity. These findings highlight an unexpected function for DAck and provide insight into a novel pathway for the developmental control of an essential metabolic pathway governing nucleotide biosynthesis. © 2014 The Authors.

  2. The combined transduction of copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase and catalase mediated by cell-penetrating peptide, PEP-1, to protect myocardium from ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guang-Qing; Wang, Jia-Ning; Tang, Jun-Ming; Zhang, Lei; Zheng, Fei; Yang, Jian-Ye; Guo, Ling-Yun; Kong, Xia; Huang, Yong-Zhang; Liu, Yong; Chen, Shi-You

    2011-05-21

    Our previous studies indicate that either PEP-1-superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) or PEP-1-catalase (CAT) fusion proteins protects myocardium from ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury in rats. The aim of this study is to explore whether combined use of PEP-1-SOD1 and PEP-1-CAT enhances their protective effects. SOD1, PEP-1-SOD1, CAT or PEP-1-CAT fusion proteins were prepared and purified by genetic engineering. In vitro and in vivo effects of these proteins on cell apoptosis and the protection of myocardium after ischemia-reperfusion injury were measured. Embryo cardiac myocyte H9c2 cells were used for the in vitro studies. In vitro cellular injury was determined by the expression of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Cell apoptosis was quantitatively assessed with Annexin V and PI double staining by Flow cytometry. In vivo, rat left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was ligated for one hour followed by two hours of reperfusion. Hemodynamics was then measured. Myocardial infarct size was evaluated by TTC staining. Serum levels of myocardial markers, creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) and cTnT were quantified by ELISA. Bcl-2 and Bax expression in left ventricle myocardium were analyzed by western blot. In vitro, PEP-1-SOD1 or PEP-1-CAT inhibited LDH release and apoptosis rate of H9c2 cells. Combined transduction of PEP-1-SOD1 and PEP-1-CAT, however, further reduced the LDH level and apoptosis rate. In vivo, combined usage of PEP-1-SOD1 and PEP-1-CAT produced a greater effect than individual proteins on the reduction of CK-MB, cTnT, apoptosis rate, lipoxidation end product malondialdehyde, and the infarct size of myocardium. Functionally, the combination of these two proteins further increased left ventricle systolic pressure, but decreased left ventricle end-diastolic pressure. This study provided a basis for the treatment or prevention of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury with the combined usage of PEP-1-SOD1 and PEP-1-CAT fusion proteins.

  3. Identification and Characterization of the Nuclear Isoform of Drosophila melanogaster CTP:Phosphocholine Cytidylyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT) catalyzes the conversion of phosphocholine and cytidine 5'-triphosphate (CTP) to CDP-choline for the eventual synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC). The enzyme is regulated by reversible association with cellular membranes, with the rate of catalysis in...

  4. Molecular electroporation and the transduction of oligoarginines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Kevin

    2010-03-01

    Certain short polycations, such as TAT and polyarginine, rapidly pass through the plasma membranes of mammalian cells by an unknown mechanism called transduction as well as by endocytosis and macropinocytosis. These cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) promise to be medically useful when fused to biologically active peptides. I offer a simple model in which one or more CPPs and the phosphatidylserines of the inner leaflet form a kind of capacitor with a voltage in excess of about 200 mV, high enough to create a molecular electropore. The model is consistent with an empirical upper limit on the cargo peptide of 40-60 amino acids and with experimental data on how the transduction of a polyarginine-fluorophore into mouse C2C12 myoblasts depends on the number of arginines in the CPP and on the CPP concentration. The model makes three testable predictions.

  5. The J-Domain of Heat Shock Protein 40 Can Enhance the Transduction Efficiency of Arginine-Rich Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Yin Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sense and antisense oligonucleotide pairs encoding cell-penetrating peptides PTD (Tat47–57, DPV3A, E162, pVEC, R11, and TP13 were used to construct two sets of pET22b-CPP-DsRed and pET22b-CPP-J-DsRed vectors for CPP-DsRed and CPP-J-DsRed recombinant proteins expression. PTD-DsRed, DPV3A-DsRed, PTD-J-DsRed, and DPV3A-J-DsRed recombinant proteins were expressed in a soluble form. PTD-J-DsRed and DPV3A-J-DsRed recombinant proteins were able to escape from E. coli host cells into the culture medium. The membrane-penetrating activity of PTD-J-DsRed and DPV3A-J-DsRed recombinant proteins to mammalian cells was more effective than that of PTD-DsRed and DPV3A-DsRed. The route of the cellular membrane translocation of these recombinant proteins is suggested via macropinocytosis followed by an endosomal escape pathway.

  6. Secretory TAT-peptide-mediated protein transduction of LIF receptor α-chain distal cytoplasmic motifs into human myeloid HL-60 cells

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    Q. Sun

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The distal cytoplasmic motifs of leukemia inhibitory factor receptor α-chain (LIFRα-CT3 can independently induce intracellular myeloid differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells by gene transfection; however, there are significant limitations in the potential clinical use of these motifs due to liposome-derived genetic modifications. To produce a potentially therapeutic LIFRα-CT3 with cell-permeable activity, we constructed a eukaryotic expression pcDNA3.0-TAT-CT3-cMyc plasmid with a signal peptide (ss inserted into the N-terminal that codes for an ss-TAT-CT3-cMyc fusion protein. The stable transfection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells via this vector and subsequent selection by Geneticin resulted in cell lines that express and secrete TAT-CT3-cMyc. The spent medium of pcDNA3.0-TAT-CT3-cMyc-transfected CHO cells could be purified using a cMyc-epitope-tag agarose affinity chromatography column and could be detected via SDS-PAGE, with antibodies against cMyc-tag. The direct administration of TAT-CT3-cMyc to HL-60 cell culture media caused the enrichment of CT3-cMyc in the cytoplasm and nucleus within 30 min and led to a significant reduction of viable cells (P < 0.05 8 h after exposure. The advantages of using this mammalian expression system include the ease of generating TAT fusion proteins that are adequately transcripted and the potential for a sustained production of such proteins in vitro for future AML therapy.

  7. Secretory TAT-peptide-mediated protein transduction of LIF receptor α-chain distal cytoplasmic motifs into human myeloid HL-60 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Q. [Department of Hyperbaric Medicine, No. 401 Hospital of PLA, Qingdao (China); Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Xiong, J. [Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Lu, J. [Office of Medical Education, Training Department, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Xu, S. [Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Li, Y. [State Food and Drug Administration of China,Huangdao Branch, Qingdao (China); Zhong, X.P.; Gao, G.K. [Department of Hyperbaric Medicine, No. 401 Hospital of PLA, Qingdao (China); Liu, H.Q. [2Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China)

    2012-06-22

    The distal cytoplasmic motifs of leukemia inhibitory factor receptor α-chain (LIFRα-CT3) can independently induce intracellular myeloid differentiation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells by gene transfection; however, there are significant limitations in the potential clinical use of these motifs due to liposome-derived genetic modifications. To produce a potentially therapeutic LIFRα-CT3 with cell-permeable activity, we constructed a eukaryotic expression pcDNA3.0-TAT-CT3-cMyc plasmid with a signal peptide (ss) inserted into the N-terminal that codes for an ss-TAT-CT3-cMyc fusion protein. The stable transfection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells via this vector and subsequent selection by Geneticin resulted in cell lines that express and secrete TAT-CT3-cMyc. The spent medium of pcDNA3.0-TAT-CT3-cMyc-transfected CHO cells could be purified using a cMyc-epitope-tag agarose affinity chromatography column and could be detected via SDS-PAGE, with antibodies against cMyc-tag. The direct administration of TAT-CT3-cMyc to HL-60 cell culture media caused the enrichment of CT3-cMyc in the cytoplasm and nucleus within 30 min and led to a significant reduction of viable cells (P < 0.05) 8 h after exposure. The advantages of using this mammalian expression system include the ease of generating TAT fusion proteins that are adequately transcripted and the potential for a sustained production of such proteins in vitro for future AML therapy.

  8. Cloning and verification of the Lactococcus lactis pyrG gene and characterization of the gene product, CTP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadskov-Hansen, Steen Lyders Lerche; Willemoës, M.; Martinussen, Jan

    2001-01-01

    of a functional cdd gene encoding cytidine deaminase. A characterization of the enzyme revealed similar properties as found for CTP synthases from other organisms. However, unlike the majority of CTP synthases the lactococcal enzyme can convert dUTP to dCTP, although a half saturation concentration of 0.6 m...

  9. Analytical similarity assessment of rituximab biosimilar CT-P10 to reference medicinal product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Hoon; Lee, Jihun; Bae, Jin Soo; Kim, Yeon Jung; Kang, Hyun Ah; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, So Jung; Lim, Ki Jung; Lee, Jung Woo; Jung, Soon Kwan; Chang, Shin Jae

    2018-02-22

    CT-P10 (TruximaTM) was recently approved as the world's first rituximab biosimilar product in the European Union (EU) and South Korea. To demonstrate biosimilarity of CT-P10 with the reference medicinal product (RMP), extensive 3-way similarity assessment has been conducted between CT-P10, EU-Rituximab and US-Rituximab, focusing on the physicochemical and biological quality attributes. A multitude of state-of-the-art analyses revealed that CT-P10 has identical primary and higher order structures compared to the original product. Purity/impurity profiles of CT-P10 measured by the levels of aggregates, fragments, non-glycosylated form and process-related impurities were also found to be comparable with those of RMPs. In terms of the post-translational modification, CT-P10 contains slightly less N-terminal pyro-glutamate variant, which has been known not to affect product efficacy or safety. Oligosaccharide profiling has revealed that, although CT-P10 contains the same conserved glycan species and relative proportion with the RMPs, the content of total afucosylated glycan in CT-P10 was slightly higher than in EU- or US-Rituximab. Nevertheless, the effect of the observed level of afucosylation in CT-P10 drug product on Fc receptor binding affinity or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity was found to be negligible based on the spiking study with highly afucosylated sample. Arrays of biological assays representative of known and putative mechanisms of action for rituximab have shown that biological activities of CT-P10 are within the quality range of RMPs. Recent results of clinical studies have further confirmed that the CT-P10 exhibits equivalent clinical efficacy and safety profiles compared to EU- and US-Rituximab. The current 3-way similarity assessment together with clinical study results confidently demonstrate that CT-P10 is highly similar with EU- and US-Rituximab in terms of physicochemical properties, biological activities, efficacy, and safety for

  10. The Ctp type IVb pilus locus of Agrobacterium tumefaciens directs formation of the common pili and contributes to reversible surface attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Haitjema, Charles H; Fuqua, Clay

    2014-08-15

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens can adhere to plant tissues and abiotic surfaces and forms biofilms. Cell surface appendages called pili play an important role in adhesion and biofilm formation in diverse bacterial systems. The A. tumefaciens C58 genome sequence revealed the presence of the ctpABCDEFGHI genes (cluster of type IV pili; Atu0216 to Atu0224), homologous to tad-type pilus systems from several bacteria, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Caulobacter crescentus. These systems fall into the type IVb pilus group, which can function in bacterial adhesion. Transmission electron microscopy of A. tumefaciens revealed the presence of filaments, significantly thinner than flagella and often bundled, associated with cell surfaces and shed into the external milieu. In-frame deletion mutations of all of the ctp genes, with the exception of ctpF, resulted in nonpiliated derivatives. Mutations in ctpA (a pilin homologue), ctpB, and ctpG decreased early attachment and biofilm formation. The adherence of the ctpA mutant could be restored by ectopic expression of the paralogous pilA gene. The ΔctpA ΔpilA double pilin mutant displayed a diminished biovolume and lower biofilm height than the wild type under flowing conditions. Surprisingly, however, the ctpCD, ctpE, ctpF, ctpH, and ctpI mutants formed normal biofilms and showed enhanced reversible attachment. In-frame deletion of the ctpA pilin gene in the ctpCD, ctpE, ctpF, ctpH, and ctpI mutants caused the same attachment-deficient phenotype as the ctpA single mutant. Collectively, these findings indicate that the ctp locus is involved in pilus assembly and that nonpiliated mutants, which retain the CtpA pilin, are proficient in attachment and adherence. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Dielectric Transduction of NEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, Kaitlin

    2017-01-01

    We report on a four-mask process flow for creating resonant NanoElectroMechanical Systems (NEMS) based on dielectric transduction. Current transduction mechanisms for NEMS include piezoelectricity, flexoelectricity and dielectric force. While piezoelectricity gives the highest electromechanical efficiency in, NEMS using flexoelectricity and dielectric force are interesting alternatives with a larger range of possible active materials and potentially simpler fabrication. In this four-mask proc...

  12. Efficacy of Infliximab Biosimilar CT-P13 Induction Therapy on Mucosal Healing in Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Klaudia; Rutka, Mariann; Golovics, Petra A; Végh, Zsuzsanna; Lovász, Barbara D; Nyári, Tibor; Gecse, Krisztina B; Kolar, Martin; Bortlik, Martin; Duricova, Dana; Machkova, Nadezda; Hruba, Veronika; Lukas, Martin; Mitrova, Katarina; Malickova, Karin; Bálint, Anita; Nagy, Ferenc; Bor, Renáta; Milassin, Ágnes; Szepes, Zoltán; Palatka, Károly; Lakatos, Péter L; Lukas, Milan; Molnár, Tamás

    2016-11-01

    CT-P13 is the first biosimilar to infliximab that has been approved for the same indications as its originator infliximab. No data are available on the effect of infliximab biosimilar on mucosal healing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of CT-P13 induction therapy on mucosal healing in patients with ulcerative colitis [UC]. UC patients, who received CT-P13 therapy from its local introduction at three Hungarian and one Czech inflammatory bowel disease centres, were prospectively enrolled. Sigmoidoscopy was performed after the end of the induction therapy at week 14. Mucosal healing was defined as Mayo endoscopic subscore 0 or 1. Complete mucosal healing was defined as Mayo endoscopic subscore 0. Trough level of CT-P13 was measured at week 14. Sixty-three UC patients who underwent CT-P13 induction therapy were enrolled in the study. Indication for the therapy was acute, severe flare up and chronic, refractory activity in 24 and 39 patients, respectively. Cumulative clinical response and steroid-free remission at week 14 were achieved in 82.5% and 47.6% of the patients, respectively. Sigmoidoscopy revealed steroid-free mucosal healing in 47.6% of the patients, and complete mucosal healing was present in 27%. Mayo endoscopic subscore decreased significantly at week 14 compared to baseline. Trough levels of infliximab correlated with mucosal healing. This is, to our knowledge, the first study examining the efficacy of CT-P13 induction therapy on mucosal healing in UC. The results indicate that mucosal healing is achieved in two-thirds of UC patients by the end of the induction treatment with CT-P13. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Mechanish of dTTP Inhibition of the Bifunctional dCTP Deaminase:dUTPase Encoded by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helt, Signe Smedegaard; Thymark, Majbritt; Harris, Pernille

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant deoxycytidine triphosphate (dCTP) deaminase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was produced in Escherichia coli and purified. The enzyme proved to be a bifunctional dCTP deaminase:deoxyuridine triphosphatase. As such, the M. tuberculosis enzyme is the second bifunctional enzyme to be cha......Recombinant deoxycytidine triphosphate (dCTP) deaminase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was produced in Escherichia coli and purified. The enzyme proved to be a bifunctional dCTP deaminase:deoxyuridine triphosphatase. As such, the M. tuberculosis enzyme is the second bifunctional enzyme...

  14. Antibodies against a peptide of cholera toxin differing in cross-reactivity with the toxin differ in their specific interactions with the peptide as observed by sup 1 H NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anglister, J.; Zilber, B. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot (Israel))

    1990-01-30

    The interactions between the aromatic residues of the monoclonal antibody TE34, and its peptide antigen CTP3, have been studied by 2D TRNOE difference spectroscopy. The sequence of CTP3 corresponds to residues 50-64 of the B subunit of cholera toxin (VEVPGSQHIDSQKKA). Unlike two previously studied anti-CTP3 antibodies (TE32 and TE33), the TE34 antibody does not bind the toxin. The off-rate of CTP3 from TE34 was found to be too slow to measure strong TRNOE cross-peaks between the antibody and the peptide. Much faster off-rates, resulting in a strong TRNOE, were obtained for two peptide analogues: (a) CTP3 with an amide in the C-terminus (VEVPGSQHIDSQKKA-NH{sub 2}) and (b) a truncated version of the peptide (N-acetyl-IDSQKKA). These modifications do not interfere significantly either with the interactions of the unmodified part of the peptide with the antibody or with intramolecular interactions occurring in the epitope recognized by the antibody. The combined use of these peptides allows us to study the interactions between the antibody and the whole peptide. Two tyrosine residues and one or more tryptophan and phenylalanine residues have been found to interact with histidine-8, isoleucine-9, aspartate-10, lysine-13 and/or lysine-14, and alanine-15 of the peptide. The strong interaction of TE34 with the negatively charged C-terminus of CTP3 is one of the main reasons for its lack of cross-reactivity with the native toxin. Similar use of modified peptides may extend the applicability of 2D TRNOE difference spectroscopy to the study of other antibody-peptide complexes involving slow peptide off-rates.

  15. Lid L11 of the glutamine amidotransferase domain of CTP synthase mediates allosteric GTP activation of glutaminase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Mølgaard, Anne; Johansson, Eva

    2005-01-01

    GTP is an allosteric activator of CTP synthase and acts to increase the k(cat) for the glutamine-dependent CTP synthesis reaction. GTP is suggested, in part, to optimally orient the oxy-anion hole for hydrolysis of glutamine that takes place in the glutamine amidotransferase class I (GATase) doma...... with lid L11 and indicate that the GTP activation of glutamine dependent CTP synthesis may be explained by structural rearrangements around the oxy-anion hole of the GATase domain......GTP is an allosteric activator of CTP synthase and acts to increase the k(cat) for the glutamine-dependent CTP synthesis reaction. GTP is suggested, in part, to optimally orient the oxy-anion hole for hydrolysis of glutamine that takes place in the glutamine amidotransferase class I (GATase) domain...... of CTP synthase. In the GATase domain of the recently published structures of the Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus CTP synthases a loop region immediately proceeding amino acid residues forming the oxy-anion hole and named lid L11 is shown for the latter enzyme to be flexible and change position...

  16. Comparable Immune Function Inhibition by the Infliximab Biosimilar CT-P13: Implications for Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ki Jung; Lee, So Jung; Kim, Sunghwan; Lee, Su Yeon; Lee, Min Seob; Park, Yoon A; Choi, Eun Jin; Lee, Eun Beom; Jun, Hwang Keun; Cho, Jong Moon; Lee, SooYoung; Kwon, Ki Sung; Lim, Byung Pil; Jeon, Myung-Shin; Shin, Eui Cheol; Choi, Yong Sung; Fudim, Ella; Picard, Orit; Yavzori, Miri; Ben-Horin, Shomron; Chang, Shin Jae

    2017-05-01

    CT-P13 is the first biosimilar monoclonal antibody to infliximab, and was recently approved in the European Union, Japan, Korea, and USA for all six indications of infliximab. However, studies directly assessing the biologic activity of CT-P13 versus inflximab in the context of inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] are still scanty. In the present study, we aimed to compare the biological activities of CT-P13 and infliximab with specific focus on intestinal cells so as to gain insight into the potential biosimilarity of these two agents for treatment of IBD. CT-P13 and infliximab were investigated and compared by in vitro experiments for their neutralisation ability of soluble tumour necrosis factor alpha [sTNFα] and membrane-bound tumour necrosis factor alpha [mTNFα], suppression of cytokine release by reverse signalling, induction of regulatory macrophages and wound healing, and antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity [ADCC]. CT-P13 showed similar biological activities to infliximab as gauged by neutralisation of soluble TNFα, as well as blockade of apoptosis and suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in intestinal Caco-2 cells. Infliximab and CT-P13 equally induced apoptosis and outside-to-inside signals through transmembrane TNFα [tmTNFα]. Moreover, regulatory macrophage induction and ensuing wound healing were similarly exerted by CT-P13 and infliximab. However, neither CT-P13 nor infliximab exerted any significant ADCC of ex vivo-stimulated peripheral blood monocytes or lamina propria mononuclear cells from IBD patients. These findings indicate that CT-P13 and infliximab exert highly similar biological activities in intestinal cells, and further support a mechanistic comparability of these two drugs in the treatment of IBD. Copyright © 2016 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. Efficacy and safety of the trastuzumab biosimilar candidate CT-P6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteva, Francisco J; Saeki, Toshiaki; Kim, HoUng; Stebbing, Justin

    2018-02-27

    Trastuzumab is an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody indicated for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast and gastric cancers. Despite its clinical efficacy, access to the biological drug can be limited due to its relatively high price, especially in low-income countries. CT-P6 (Herzuma ® ) is a biosimilar candidate of originator or 'reference' trastuzumab, which may offer an alternative, more cost-effective treatment option. This article reviews the unmet needs of patients eligible to receive reference trastuzumab and the potential place of a trastuzumab biosimilar within the market. The review also summarizes the available clinical evidence supporting the biosimilarity of CT-P6 and reference trastuzumab with respect to pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety and immunogenicity.

  18. Assessment of urgent impacts of greenhouse gas emissions—the climate tipping potential (CTP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Susanne Vedel; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Nielsen, Per H.

    2014-01-01

    as on the chosen climatic target level and background scenario for atmospheric GHG concentration development. In order to enable direct application in life cycle assessment (LCA), CTP characterisation factors are presented for the three main anthropogenic GHGs, CO2, CH4 and N2O.The CTP metric distinguishes......The impact of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on climate change receives much focus today. This impact is however often considered only in terms of global warming potential (GWP), which does not take into account the need for staying below climatic target levels, in order to avoid...... passing critical climate tipping points. Some suggestions to include a target level in climate change impact assessment have been made, but with the consequence of disregarding impacts beyond that target level. The aim of this paper is to introduce the climate tipping impact category, which represents...

  19. A scientific update on biosimilar infliximab (CT-P13) in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The development of biologic drugs has undoubtedly enhanced the spectrum of treatments available for immune-mediated inflammatory rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. However, despite their clear clinical benifits, use of biologics is often hindered by their high costs. The manufacture and subsequent approval of more cost-effective 'biosimilar' versions of these drugs may address this issue and improve patient access. CT-P13 (Remsima(®), Inflectra(®)), a biosimilar of infliximab (Remicade(®)), has shown comparable efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics to its originator drug in clinical studies. The articles in this supplement present a scientific update on the development and use of biosimilars in rheumatic disorders, with specific focus on CT-P13. The information discussed highlights the predicted positive clinical and economic impact of biosimilars on the management of rheumatic diseases.

  20. Regulation of uridine kinase quaternary structure. Dissociation by the inhibitor CTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, R C; Traut, T W

    1982-11-10

    Uridine kinase from mouse Ehrlich ascites cells can exist in a variety of different aggregation states, from monomer up to aggregates that may contain 32 or more subunits. With very crude enzyme preparations, uridine kinase activity is always associated with several different coexisting molecular weight species. Changes in the aggregation state are produced in the presence of normal effectors (orthophosphate, ATP and CTP) at physiological concentrations. With uridine kinase that has been purified 9,000-fold, enzyme activity is associated with only a single molecular weight species, but is still responsive to the same physiological effectors. In the presence of orthophosphate, uridine kinase has a molecular weight of 380,000 (appropriate for a dodecamer). In the presence of CTP, the enzyme dissociates with concomitant loss of activity. The dissociated enzyme can be reassociated to the native size. These results imply that alteration of the enzyme's quaternary structure by normal effectors constitutes a mechanism for regulating uridine kinase activity in vivo.

  1. Mutational analysis of the nucleotide binding site of Escherichia coli dCTP deaminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thymark, Majbritt; Johansson, Eva; Larsen, Sine

    2007-01-01

    In Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium about 80% of the dUMP used for dTMP synthesis is derived from deamination of dCTP. The dCTP deaminase produces dUTP that subsequently is hydrolyzed by dUTPase to dUMP and diphosphate. The dCTP deaminase is regulated by dTTP that inhibits the enzyme...... by binding to the active site and induces an inactive conformation of the trimeric enzyme. We have analyzed the role of residues previously suggested to play a role in catalysis. The mutant enzymes R115Q, S111C, S111T and E138D were all purified and analyzed for activity. Only S111T and E138D displayed...... detectable activity with a 30- and 140-fold reduction in k(cat), respectively. Furthermore, S111T and E138D both showed altered dTTP inhibition compared to wild-type enzyme. S111T was almost insensitive to the presence of dTTP. With the E138D enzyme the dTTP dependent increase in cooperativity of d...

  2. La-CTP: Loop-Aware Routing for Energy-Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guodong; Shang, Xinna; Zuo, Yan

    2018-02-02

    In emerging energy-harvesting wireless sensor networks (EH-WSN), the sensor nodes can harvest environmental energy to drive their operation, releasing the user's burden in terms of frequent battery replacement, and even enabling perpetual sensing systems. In EH-WSN applications, usually, the node in energy-harvesting or recharging state has to stop working until it completes the energy replenishment. However, such temporary departures of recharging nodes severely impact the packet routing, and one immediate result is the routing loop problem. Controlling loops in connectivity-intermittent EH-WSN in an efficient way is a big challenge in practice, and so far, users still lack of effective and practicable routing protocols with loop handling. Based on the Collection Tree Protocol (CTP) widely used in traditional wireless sensor networks, this paper proposes a loop-aware routing protocol for real-world EH-WSNs, called La-CTP, which involves a new parent updating metric and a proactive, adaptive beaconing scheme to effectively suppress the occurrence of loops and unlock unavoidable loops, respectively. We constructed a 100-node testbed to evaluate La-CTP, and the experimental results showed its efficacy and efficiency.

  3. Inverse regulation of two classic Hippo pathway target genes in Drosophila by the dimerization hub protein Ctp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Daniel A; Moberg, Kenneth

    2016-03-14

    The LC8 family of small ~8 kD proteins are highly conserved and interact with multiple protein partners in eukaryotic cells. LC8-binding modulates target protein activity, often through induced dimerization via LC8:LC8 homodimers. Although many LC8-interactors have roles in signaling cascades, LC8's role in developing epithelia is poorly understood. Using the Drosophila wing as a developmental model, we find that the LC8 family member Cut up (Ctp) is primarily required to promote epithelial growth, which correlates with effects on the pro-growth factor dMyc and two genes, diap1 and bantam, that are classic targets of the Hippo pathway coactivator Yorkie. Genetic tests confirm that Ctp supports Yorkie-driven tissue overgrowth and indicate that Ctp acts through Yorkie to control bantam (ban) and diap1 transcription. Quite unexpectedly however, Ctp loss has inverse effects on ban and diap1: it elevates ban expression but reduces diap1 expression. In both cases these transcriptional changes map to small segments of these promoters that recruit Yorkie. Although LC8 complexes with Yap1, a Yorkie homolog, in human cells, an orthologous interaction was not detected in Drosophila cells. Collectively these findings reveal that that Drosophila Ctp is a required regulator of Yorkie-target genes in vivo and suggest that Ctp may interact with a Hippo pathway protein(s) to exert inverse transcriptional effects on Yorkie-target genes.

  4. Pheromone transduction in moths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Stengl

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Calling female moths attract their mates late at night with intermittent release of a species-specific sex-pheromone blend. Mean frequency of pheromone filaments encodes distance to the calling female. In their zig-zagging upwind search male moths encounter turbulent pheromone blend filaments at highly variable concentrations and frequencies. The male moth antennae are delicately designed to detect and distinguish even traces of these sex pheromones amongst the abundance of other odors. Its olfactory receptor neurons sense even single pheromone molecules and track intermittent pheromone filaments of highly variable frequencies up to about 30 Hz over a wide concentration range. In the hawkmoth Manduca sexta brief, weak pheromone stimuli as encountered during flight are detected via a metabotropic PLCβ-dependent signal transduction cascade which leads to transient changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. Strong or long pheromone stimuli, which are possibly perceived in direct contact with the female, activate receptor-guanylyl cyclases causing long-term adaptation. In addition, depending on endogenous rhythms of the moth´s physiological state, hormones such as the stress hormone octopamine modulate second messenger levels in sensory neurons. High octopamine levels during the activity phase maximize temporal resolution cAMP-dependently as a prerequisite to mate location. Thus, I suggest that sliding adjustment of odor response threshold and kinetics is based upon relative concentration ratios of intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic nucleotide levels which gate different ion channels synergistically. In addition, I propose a new hypothesis for the cyclic nucleotide-dependent ion channel formed by insect olfactory receptor/coreceptor complexes. Instead of being employed for an ionotropic mechanism of odor detection it is proposed to control subthreshold membrane potential oscillation of sensory neurons, as a basis for temporal encoding of odors.

  5. Investigation of the charge effect on the electrochemical transduction in a quinone-based DNA sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisberg, S.; Piro, B.; Noel, V.

    2008-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism involved in the electrochemical transduction process of a conducting polymer-based DNA sensor, peptide nucleic acids (PNA) were used. PNA are DNA analogues having similar hybridization properties but are neutral. This allows to discriminate the electrostatic effect of D...... strands from the steric hindrance generated on the bioelectrode upon hybridization. It can be concluded that DNA conformational changes are determinant in the transduction process and that the electrostatic effect is negligible....

  6. The Role of Cgrp-Receptor Component Protein (Rcp in Cgrp-Mediated Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Prado

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP is a 17-kDa intracellular peripheral membrane protein required for signal transduction at CGRP receptors. To determine the role of RCP in CGRP-mediated signal transduction, RCP was depleted from NIH3T3 cells using antisense strategy. Loss of RCP protein correlated with loss of cAMP production by CGRP in the antisense cells. In contrast, loss of RCP had no effect on CGRP-mediated binding; therefore RCP is not acting as a chaperone for the CGRP receptor. Instead, RCP is a novel signal transduction molecule that couples the CGRP receptor to the cellular signal transduction machinery. RCP thus represents a prototype for a new class of signal transduction proteins that are required for regulation of G protein-coupled receptors.

  7. Discovery of a compound that acts as a bacterial PyrG (CTP synthase) inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tatsuhiko; Nasu, Hatsumi; Namba, Eiko; Ubukata, Osamu; Yamashita, Makoto

    2012-09-01

    PyrG (CTP synthase) catalyses the conversion of UTP to CTP, an essential step in the pyrimidine metabolic pathway in a variety of bacteria, including those causing community-acquired respiratory tract infections (RTIs). In this study, a luminescence-based ATPase assay of PyrG was developed and used to evaluate the inhibitory activity of 2-(3-[3-oxo-1,2-benzisothiazol-2(3H)-yl]phenylsulfonylamino) benzoic acid (compound G1). Compound G1 inhibited PyrG derived from Streptococcus pneumoniae with a 50 % inhibitory concentration value of 0.091 µM, and the inhibitory activity of compound G1 was 13 times higher than that of acivicin (1.2 µM), an established PyrG inhibitor. The results of saturation transfer difference analysis using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy suggested that these compounds compete with ATP and/or UTP for binding to Strep. pneumoniae PyrG. Finally, compound G1 was shown to have antimicrobial activity against several different bacteria causing RTIs, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae, suggesting that it is a prototype chemical compound that could be harnessed as an antimicrobial drug with a novel structure to target bacterial PyrG.

  8. Cellular semiotics and signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2007-01-01

    (s)" in signal transduction; i.e.: how specificity is determined, how ubiquitous signals or messengers convey specific information, how undesired cross-talk is avoided, how redundancy integrates the system. This chapter proposes a basic conceptual toolbox for interpreting empirical data that deals...

  9. Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist ameliorates the insulin resistance function of islet β cells via the activation of PDX-1/JAK signaling transduction in C57/BL6 mice with high-fat diet-induced diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Tao; Zhang, Hongtao; Li, Sheyu; Tian, Haoming

    2017-04-01

    Long-term exposure to a high-fat diet (HFD) causes glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity in islet β cells and leads to the development of metabolic dysfunctions. Reductions in pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) expression have been shown to induce type 2 diabetes mellitus by causing impairments to islet β cells. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) treatment reduces endogenous insulin resistance in HFD-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus. In the present study, the underlying mechanism by which GLP-1 exerts its function in type 2 diabetes mellitus was investigated. The effect of liraglutide (GLP-1 receptor agonist) administration on glucose tolerance, insulin release, and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide level was detected in a HFD-induced diabetes C57/BL6 mouse model. Moreover, the role of liraglutide administration on the activity of PDX-1 was quantified to demonstrate the association between the two indicators. The results showed that administration of liraglutide could ameliorate the impairments to β cells due to HFD consumption. Liraglutide restored the insulin capacity and stimulated glucose disposal by improving the function and increasing the number of islet β cells. Furthermore, the hyperplasia and redundant function of islet α cells were inhibited by liraglutide treatment as well. At the molecular level, administration of liraglutide induced the expression of PDX-1, MafA, p-JAK2 and p-Stat3 in HFD model to relatively normal levels. It was suggested that the effect of liraglutide-induced activation of GLP-1 was exerted via activation of PDX-1 rather than its function in decreasing body weight. The study demonstrated that GLP-1 played an essential role in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  10. Liver X Receptor Agonists Inhibit the Phospholipid Regulatory Gene CTP: Phosphoethanolamine Cytidylyltransferase-Pcyt2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic pulse-chase experiments demonstrated that 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-OH, the endogenous activator of the liver X receptor (LXR, significantly reduced the biosynthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine via CDP-ethanolamine (Kennedy pathway at the step catalyzed by CTP: phosphoethanolamine cytidylyltransferase (Pcyt2. In the mouse embryonic fibroblasts C3H10T1/2, the LXR synthetic agonist TO901317 lowered Pcyt2 promoter-luciferase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, 25-OH and TO901317 reduced mouse Pcyt2 mRNA and protein levels by 35–60%. The inhibitory effects of oxysterols and TO901317 on the Pcyt2 promoter function, mRNA and protein expression were conserved in the human breast cancer cells MCF-7. These studies identify the Pcyt2 gene as a novel target whereby LXR agonists may indirectly modulate inflammatory responses and atherosclerosis.

  11. CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase and protein kinase C recognize different physical features of membranes: differential responses to an oxidized phosphatidylcholine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drobnies, A.E.; Davies, S.M.A.; Kraayenhof, R.; Epand, R.F.; Epand, R.M.; Cornell, R.B.

    2002-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) and CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CT) are two examples of enzymes that are regulated by reversible binding to membranes, and this binding is influenced by membrane physical properties. CT activation by oxidized phosphatidylcholines was recently demonstrated and was

  12. Kinome profiling for studying lipopolysaccharide signal transduction in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diks, SH; Kok, K; O'Toole, T; Hommes, DW; van Dijken, P; Joore, J; Peppelenbosch, MP

    2004-01-01

    The DNA array technique allows comprehensive analysis of the genome and transcriptome, but the high throughput array-based assessment of intracellular signal transduction remains troublesome. The goal of this study was to test a new peptide array technology for studying the activity of all kinases

  13. Defects in CTP:PHOSPHORYLETHANOLAMINE CYTIDYLYLTRANSFERASE affect embryonic and postembryonic development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoi, Junya; Nakamura, Masanobu; Nishida, Ikuo

    2006-12-01

    A TILLING strategy (for targeting-induced local-scale lesions in genomes) was used in Arabidopsis thaliana to isolate mutants of a gene encoding CTP:PHOSPHORYLETHANOLAMINE CYTIDYLYLTRANSFERASE (PECT; EC 2.7.7.14), a rate-limiting enzyme in phosphatidylethanolamine biosynthesis. A null mutation, pect1-6, caused embryo abortion before the octant stage. However, reciprocal crosses revealed that pect1-6 caused no significant gametophytic defect. In pect1-4, PECT activity was decreased by 74%. Growth was generally normal in these mutants, despite delays in embryo maturation and reduced fertility. At low temperatures, however, homozygotic pect1-4 plants displayed dwarfism. PECT activity was decreased by 47% in heterozygotic pect1-6 plants and by 80% in pect1-4/pect1-6 F1 plants, which also displayed a small but significant decrease of phosphatidylethanolamine and a reciprocal increase in phosphatidylcholine. These lipid changes were fully reversed by wild-type PECT1 expression. pect1-4/pect1-6 F1 plants displayed severe dwarfism, tissue abnormalities, and low fertility, which was attributable in part to inhibition of anther, embryo, and ovule development, as was the reduced fertility of pect1-4 seedlings. PECT1 cDNA expression under the control of an inducible promoter partially rectified the mutant phenotypes observed in pect1-4/pect1-6 F1 seedlings, indicating that malfunctions in different tissues have a synergistic effect on the mutant phenotypes.

  14. Infliximab Biosimilar (CT-P13; Infliximab-dyyb): A Review in Autoimmune Inflammatory Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Hannah A; Deeks, Emma D

    2016-10-01

    Infliximab biosimilar (CT-P13/infliximab-dyyb; Remsima ® , Inflectra ® ) is approved in several countries for use in all indications for which reference infliximab (Remicade ® ) is approved, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative colitis. Clinical data contributing to the EU approval of infliximab biosimilar were obtained from two pivotal double-blind clinical trials in patients with AS (PLANETAS) or RA (PLANETRA). Infliximab biosimilar demonstrated equivalence to reference infliximab in terms of its pharmacokinetic profile in patients with AS, patients with RA, and in healthy volunteers, and in terms of its efficacy in patients with RA. Clinical response rates in patients with RA or AS were maintained over the longer term (up to 102 weeks). In addition, the efficacy of infliximab biosimilar in patients with RA or Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis [i.e. inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)] has been demonstrated in the real-world setting. Infliximab biosimilar was generally well tolerated, with a tolerability profile similar to that of reference infliximab. Switching from reference infliximab to infliximab biosimilar had no detrimental effect on efficacy, safety, or immunogenicity compared with continuous infliximab biosimilar therapy, according to the extensions of PLANETAS and PLANETRA, and real-world data in IBD. Current evidence therefore suggests that infliximab biosimilar is a useful alternative to reference infliximab in patients with autoimmune inflammatory diseases.

  15. Sensory Transduction in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Austin L.; Ramot, Daniel; Goodman, Miriam B.

    The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has a well-defined and comparatively simple repertoire of sensory-guided behaviors, all of which rely on its ability to detect chemical, mechanical or thermal stimuli. In this chapter, we review what is known about the ion channels that mediate sensation in this remarkable model organism. Genetic screens for mutants defective in sensory-guided behaviors have identified genes encoding channel proteins, which are likely transducers of chemical, thermal, and mechanical stimuli. Such classical genetic approaches are now being coupled with molecular genetics and in vivo cellular physiology to elucidate how these channels are activated in specific sensory neurons. The ion channel superfamilies implicated in sensory transduction in C. elegans - CNG, TRP, and DEG/ENaC - are conserved across phyla and also appear to contribute to sensory transduction in other organisms, including vertebrates. What we learn about the role of these ion channels in C. elegans sensation is likely to illuminate analogous processes in other animals, including humans.

  16. Usefulness of three-dimensional CT pancreatography (3D-CTP) after the balloon-ERP for pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueki, Toshiharu; Oishi, Yayoi; Sakaguchi, Seigo; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Yao, Tsuneyoshi; Ichimaru, Yoshihiko; Koga, Yuki; Ikeda, Seiyo

    1998-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of 3D-CTP combined with the balloon-ERP and helical-CT was discussed. Authors diagnosed 42 patients with pancreatic diseases, including 5 of pancreatic carcinoma, 3 of serous cystadenoma, 6 of muciparous pancreatic cyst, 28 of chronic pancreatitis (including 8 cases of complicated pseudocyst). The images could reconstruct three-dimensionally the tapering constriction in the main pancreatic duct for all 5 cases of pancreatic carcinoma, the exclusion in the main pancreatic duct for 3 cases of serous cystadenoma and 1 case of muciparous pancreatic cyst, the parietal irregularity for 14 cases and the smooth constriction for 9 cases in main pancreatic duct of chronic pancreatitis, the morphology of the cyst and the spatial relationship between the cyst and the pancreatic duct in 5 of 6 cases of muciparous pancreatic cyst and 7 of 8 cases of complicated pseudocyst. Furthermore, the 3D-CTP could demonstrate the branched pancreatic duct at the constriction site which was not detected by the balloon-ERP in 2 cases of chronic pancreatitis with the constriction at the main pancreatic duct, and the joining manner of cyst to the pancreatic duct which was indistinct by the balloon-ERP in 6 cases of pancreatic cyst. These results show that 3D-CTP is useful for the qualitative diagnosis and applicable for the understanding of pancreatic diseases and for the simulation of surgery. (K.H.)

  17. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa periplasmic protease CtpA can affect systems that impact its ability to mount both acute and chronic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jin; Darwin, Andrew J

    2013-12-01

    Proteases play important roles in the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Some are exported to act on host targets and facilitate tissue destruction and bacterial dissemination. Others work within the bacterial cell to process virulence factors and regulate virulence gene expression. Relatively little is known about the role of one class of bacterial serine proteases known as the carboxyl-terminal processing proteases (CTPs). The P. aeruginosa genome encodes two CTPs annotated as PA3257/Prc and PA5134/CtpA in strain PAO1. Prc degrades mutant forms of the anti-sigma factor MucA to promote mucoidy in some cystic fibrosis lung isolates. However, nothing is known about the role or importance of CtpA. We have now found that endogenous CtpA is a soluble periplasmic protein and that a ctpA null mutant has specific phenotypes consistent with an altered cell envelope. Although a ctpA null mutation has no major effect on bacterial growth in the laboratory, CtpA is essential for the normal function of the type 3 secretion system (T3SS), for cytotoxicity toward host cells, and for virulence in a mouse model of acute pneumonia. Conversely, increasing the amount of CtpA above its endogenous level induces an uncharacterized extracytoplasmic function sigma factor regulon, an event that has been reported to attenuate P. aeruginosa in a rat model of chronic lung infection. Therefore, a normal level of CtpA activity is critical for T3SS function and acute virulence, whereas too much activity can trigger an apparent stress response that is detrimental to chronic virulence.

  18. Quantum Transduction with Adaptive Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengzhen; Zou, Chang-Ling; Jiang, Liang

    2018-01-12

    Quantum transducers play a crucial role in hybrid quantum networks. A good quantum transducer can faithfully convert quantum signals from one mode to another with minimum decoherence. Most investigations of quantum transduction are based on the protocol of direct mode conversion. However, the direct protocol requires the matching condition, which in practice is not always feasible. Here we propose an adaptive protocol for quantum transducers, which can convert quantum signals without requiring the matching condition. The adaptive protocol only consists of Gaussian operations, feasible in various physical platforms. Moreover, we show that the adaptive protocol can be robust against imperfections associated with finite squeezing, thermal noise, and homodyne detection, and it can be implemented to realize quantum state transfer between microwave and optical modes.

  19. [Progress on Hedgehog signaling transduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ying; Cheng, Steven

    2014-08-25

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays an important role during embryonic development and pattern formation. Disruption of Hh pathway results in various developmental disorders and increasing cancer incidence. Here we provide a comprehensive review of the pathway members, focusing on how mammalian Hh regulates the Gli family of transcription factors through its downstream members, the so-called "canonical signaling pathway". Hh signaling pathway is highly conserved among species, and primary cilia plays an important role as a "signaling center" during vertebrate signal transduction. Further, in the past few years, numerous studies have shown that Hh signal can also be transduced through Gli-independent ways collectively referred to as "non-canonical signaling pathways", which can be subdivided into two modules: (i) those not requiring Smo and (ii) those downstream of Smo that do not require Gli transcription factors. Thus, we review the rapid progress on canonical and non-canonical Hh pathways.

  20. TRPM5 and taste transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liman, E R

    2007-01-01

    TRPM5 is a cation channel that it is essential for transduction of bitter, sweet and umami tastes. Signaling of these tastes involves the activation of G protein-coupled receptors that stimulate phospholipase C (PLC) beta2, leading to the breakdown of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) into diacylglycerol (DAG) and inositol trisphosphate (IP3), and release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. TRPM5 forms a nonselective cation channel that is directly activated by Ca2+ and it is likely to be the downstream target of this signaling cascade. Therefore, study of TRPM5 promises to provide insight into fundamental mechanisms of taste transduction. This review highlights recent work on the mechanisms of activation of the TRPM5 channel. The mouse TRPM5 gene encodes a protein of 1,158 amino acids that is proposed to have six transmembrane domains and to function as a tetramer. TRPM5 is structurally most closely related to the Ca(2+)-activated channel TRPM4 and it is more distantly related to the cold-activated channel TRPM8. In patch clamp recordings, TRPM5 channels are activated by micromolar concentrations of Ca2+ and are permeable to monovalent but not divalent cations. TRPM5 channel activity is strongly regulated by voltage, phosphoinositides and temperature, and is blocked by acid pH. Study of TRPM4 and TRPM8, which show similar modes of regulation, has yielded insights into possible structural domains of TRPM5. Understanding the structural basis for TRPM5 function will ultimately allow the design of pharmaceuticals to enhance or interfere with taste sensations.

  1. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long-te...

  2. Architectures and representations for string transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrupala, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    String transduction problems are ubiquitous in natural language processing: they include transliteration, grapheme-to-phoneme conversion, text normalization and translation. String transduction can be reduced to the simpler problems of sequence labeling by expressing the target string as a sequence

  3. Peptides, polypeptides and peptide-polymer hybrids as nucleic acid carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Marya

    2017-10-24

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), and protein transduction domains (PTDs) of viruses and other natural proteins serve as a template for the development of efficient peptide based gene delivery vectors. PTDs are sequences of acidic or basic amphipathic amino acids, with superior membrane trespassing efficacies. Gene delivery vectors derived from these natural, cationic and cationic amphipathic peptides, however, offer little flexibility in tailoring the physicochemical properties of single chain peptide based systems. Owing to significant advances in the field of peptide chemistry, synthetic mimics of natural peptides are often prepared and have been evaluated for their gene expression, as a function of amino acid functionalities, architecture and net cationic content of peptide chains. Moreover, chimeric single polypeptide chains are prepared by a combination of multiple small natural or synthetic peptides, which imparts distinct physiological properties to peptide based gene delivery therapeutics. In order to obtain multivalency and improve the gene delivery efficacies of low molecular weight cationic peptides, bioactive peptides are often incorporated into a polymeric architecture to obtain novel 'polymer-peptide hybrids' with improved gene delivery efficacies. Peptide modified polymers prepared by physical or chemical modifications exhibit enhanced endosomal escape, stimuli responsive degradation and targeting efficacies, as a function of physicochemical and biological activities of peptides attached onto a polymeric scaffold. The focus of this review is to provide comprehensive and step-wise progress in major natural and synthetic peptides, chimeric polypeptides, and peptide-polymer hybrids for nucleic acid delivery applications.

  4. Towards the systematic discovery of signal transduction networks using phosphorylation dynamics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yachie Nozomu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphorylation is a ubiquitous and fundamental regulatory mechanism that controls signal transduction in living cells. The number of identified phosphoproteins and their phosphosites is rapidly increasing as a result of recent mass spectrometry-based approaches. Results We analyzed time-course phosphoproteome data obtained previously by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry with the stable isotope labeling using amino acids in cell culture (SILAC method. This provides the relative phosphorylation activities of digested peptides at each of five time points after stimulating HeLa cells with epidermal growth factor (EGF. We initially calculated the correlations between the phosphorylation dynamics patterns of every pair of peptides and connected the strongly correlated pairs to construct a network. We found that peptides extracted from the same intracellular fraction (nucleus vs. cytoplasm tended to be close together within this phosphorylation dynamics-based network. The network was then analyzed using graph theory and compared with five known signal-transduction pathways. The dynamics-based network was correlated with known signaling pathways in the NetPath and Phospho.ELM databases, and especially with the EGF receptor (EGFR signaling pathway. Although the phosphorylation patterns of many proteins were drastically changed by the EGF stimulation, our results suggest that only EGFR signaling transduction was both strongly activated and precisely controlled. Conclusions The construction of a phosphorylation dynamics-based network provides a useful overview of condition-specific intracellular signal transduction using quantitative time-course phosphoproteome data under specific experimental conditions. Detailed prediction of signal transduction based on phosphoproteome dynamics remains challenging. However, since the phosphorylation profiles of kinase-substrate pairs on the specific pathway were localized in the dynamics

  5. Infliximab biosimilar CT-P13 therapy is effective and safe in maintaining remission in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis - experiences from a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Klaudia; Rutka, Mariann; Ferenci, Tamás; Nagy, Ferenc; Bálint, Anita; Bor, Renáta; Milassin, Ágnes; Fábián, Anna; Szántó, Kata; Végh, Zsuzsanna; Kürti, Zsuzsanna; Lakatos, Péter L; Szepes, Zoltán; Molnár, Tamás

    2017-11-01

    CT-P13, the first biosimilar monoclonal antibody to infliximab (IFX), has been confirmed to be efficacious in inducing remission in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of CT-P13 therapy in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), and to identify predictors of sustained clinical response during a 54-week CT-P13 treatment period. Patients with CD and UC, who were administered CT-P13, were prospectively enrolled. Clinical response was assessed at week 14 and week 54. Predictive factors for disease outcome at week 54 were evaluated. 57 CD and 57 UC patients were included; 55 CD and 49 UC patients completed the induction therapy and 50 CD and 46 UC patients completed the 54-week treatment period. Clinical remission was achieved in 65.5% of CD and 75.5% of UC patients at week 14. Rate of continuous clinical response was 51% in both CD and UC at week 54. None of the examined parameters were predictive to the clinical outcome neither in CD, nor in UC. This study confirmed the long-term efficacy and safety of CT-P13 therapy in IBD. Response rates at week 54 were similar in CD and UC.

  6. Capacitive axial position and speed transduction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez D, H.; Flores Ll, H.; Cabral P, A.; Ramirez J, F.J.; Galindo, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new and inexpensive circuit arrangement of a capacitive axial position and speed transduction system is described. Design details and the theory of operation of the device are briefly outlined together with performance results. (author)

  7. How complex an intron may be? The example of the first intron of the CTP synthase gene of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Piergentili

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, maturation of primary transcripts into mature messenger RNAs involves the elimination of parts of the gene called ‘introns’. The biological significance of introns is not yet completely understood. It has been demonstrated that introns may contain other genes, or regulatory sequences that may be involved in transcriptional control, or also being involved in alternative splicing mechanisms. However, these functions explain the role of only a small number of them, and it is very difficult to formulate any generalization. The CTP synthase gene of Drosophila melanogaster is characterized by the presence of a long first intron (approximately 7.2 kilobases whose role is currently unknown. In the present report we analyzed in silico the content of this intron, and found that it contains at least three interesting sub-sequences. Two of them are homologous to the CTP synthase itself and to a putative nucleotide pyrophosphatase, respectively. The third is a short stretch of DNA able to fold into a thermodynamically stable hairpin and showing homology with other 19 sequences from 21 genes inside the D. melanogaster genome. These findings suggest a complex yet very accurate way of controlling gene expression inside the fruit fly.

  8. Crystal Structure of the CTP1L Endolysin Reveals How Its Activity Is Regulated by a Secondary Translation Product*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Matthew; Leicht, Stefan; Krichel, Boris; Thompson, Andrew; Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Garde, Sonia; Narbad, Arjan; Mayer, Melinda J.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages produce endolysins, which lyse the bacterial host cell to release newly produced virions. The timing of lysis is regulated and is thought to involve the activation of a molecular switch. We present a crystal structure of the activated endolysin CTP1L that targets Clostridium tyrobutyricum, consisting of a complex between the full-length protein and an N-terminally truncated C-terminal cell wall binding domain (CBD). The truncated CBD is produced through an internal translation start site within the endolysin gene. Mutants affecting the internal translation site change the oligomeric state of the endolysin and reduce lytic activity. The activity can be modulated by reconstitution of the full-length endolysin-CBD complex with free CBD. The same oligomerization mechanism applies to the CD27L endolysin that targets Clostridium difficile and the CS74L endolysin that targets Clostridium sporogenes. When the CTP1L endolysin gene is introduced into the commensal bacterium Lactococcus lactis, the truncated CBD is also produced, showing that the alternative start codon can be used in other bacterial species. The identification of a translational switch affecting oligomerization presented here has implications for the design of effective endolysins for the treatment of bacterial infections. PMID:26683375

  9. Crystal Structure of the CTP1L Endolysin Reveals How Its Activity Is Regulated by a Secondary Translation Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Matthew; Leicht, Stefan; Krichel, Boris; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Thompson, Andrew; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Svergun, Dmitri I; Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Garde, Sonia; Uetrecht, Charlotte; Narbad, Arjan; Mayer, Melinda J; Meijers, Rob

    2016-03-04

    Bacteriophages produce endolysins, which lyse the bacterial host cell to release newly produced virions. The timing of lysis is regulated and is thought to involve the activation of a molecular switch. We present a crystal structure of the activated endolysin CTP1L that targets Clostridium tyrobutyricum, consisting of a complex between the full-length protein and an N-terminally truncated C-terminal cell wall binding domain (CBD). The truncated CBD is produced through an internal translation start site within the endolysin gene. Mutants affecting the internal translation site change the oligomeric state of the endolysin and reduce lytic activity. The activity can be modulated by reconstitution of the full-length endolysin-CBD complex with free CBD. The same oligomerization mechanism applies to the CD27L endolysin that targets Clostridium difficile and the CS74L endolysin that targets Clostridium sporogenes. When the CTP1L endolysin gene is introduced into the commensal bacterium Lactococcus lactis, the truncated CBD is also produced, showing that the alternative start codon can be used in other bacterial species. The identification of a translational switch affecting oligomerization presented here has implications for the design of effective endolysins for the treatment of bacterial infections. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Regulation of dCTP deaminase from Escherichia coli by nonallosteric dTTP binding to an inactive form of the enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Eva; Thymark, Majbritt; Bynck, Julie H

    2007-01-01

    -maximal activity and the cooperativity of dCTP saturation. Likewise, increasing concentrations of dCTP increase the cooperativity of dTTP inhibition. Previous structural studies showed that the complexes of inactive mutant protein, E138A, with dUTP or dCTP bound, and wild-type enzyme with dUTP bound were all...... highly similar and characterized by having an ordered C-terminal. When comparing with a new structure in which dTTP is bound to the active site of E138A, the region between Val120 and His125 was found to be in a new conformation. This and the previous conformation were mutually exclusive within...

  11. Cell-Type Specific Penetrating Peptides: Therapeutic Promises and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliha Zahid

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell penetrating peptides (CPP, also known as protein transduction domains (PTD, are small peptides able to carry peptides, proteins, nucleic acid, and nanoparticles, including viral particles, across the cellular membranes into cells, resulting in internalization of the intact cargo. In general, CPPs can be broadly classified into tissue-specific and non-tissue specific peptides, with the latter further sub-divided into three types: (1 cationic peptides of 6–12 amino acids in length comprised predominantly of arginine, lysine and/or ornithine residues; (2 hydrophobic peptides such as leader sequences of secreted growth factors or cytokines; and (3 amphipathic peptides obtained by linking hydrophobic peptides to nuclear localizing signals. Tissue-specific peptides are usually identified by screening of large peptide phage display libraries. These transduction peptides have the potential for a myriad of diagnostic as well as therapeutic applications, ranging from delivery of fluorescent or radioactive compounds for imaging, to delivery of peptides and proteins of therapeutic potential, and improving uptake of DNA, RNA, siRNA and even viral particles. Here we review the potential applications as well as hurdles to the tremendous potential of these CPPs, in particular the cell-type specific peptides.

  12. Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from the extreme thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus shibatae is an allosteric enzyme, activated by GTP and inhibited by CTP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Lise; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1996-01-01

    and it showed the highest activity at pH 6.4. The specific activity of the enzyme was 50-times higher at 95°C than at 37°C, but the functional half-life was short at 95°C. The activity of uracil phosphoribosyltransferase was strongly activated by GTP, which increased Vmax of the reaction by approximately 20......-fold without much effect on Km for the substrates. The concentration of GTP required for half-maximal activation was about 80 µM. CTP was a strong inhibitor and acted by raising the concentration of GTP needed for half-maximal activation of the enzyme. We conclude that uracil phosphoribosyltransferase......Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, which catalyses the formation of UMP and pyrophosphate from uracil and 5-phosphoribosyl a-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), was partly purified from the extreme thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus shibatae. The enzyme required divalent metal ions for activity...

  13. Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase from the extreme thermoacidophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus shibatae is an allosteric enzyme, activated by GTP and inhibited by CTP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Lise; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1996-01-01

    -fold without much effect on Km for the substrates. The concentration of GTP required for half-maximal activation was about 80 µM. CTP was a strong inhibitor and acted by raising the concentration of GTP needed for half-maximal activation of the enzyme. We conclude that uracil phosphoribosyltransferase......Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, which catalyses the formation of UMP and pyrophosphate from uracil and 5-phosphoribosyl a-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), was partly purified from the extreme thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus shibatae. The enzyme required divalent metal ions for activity...... and it showed the highest activity at pH 6.4. The specific activity of the enzyme was 50-times higher at 95°C than at 37°C, but the functional half-life was short at 95°C. The activity of uracil phosphoribosyltransferase was strongly activated by GTP, which increased Vmax of the reaction by approximately 20...

  14. Purinergic mechanosensory transduction and visceral pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnstock Geoffrey

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this review, evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that mechanosensory transduction occurs in tubes and sacs and can initiate visceral pain. Experimental evidence for this mechanism in urinary bladder, ureter, gut, lung, uterus, tooth-pulp and tongue is reviewed. Potential therapeutic strategies are considered for the treatment of visceral pain in such conditions as renal colic, interstitial cystitis and inflammatory bowel disease by agents that interfere with mechanosensory transduction in the organs considered, including P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptor antagonists that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and agents that inhibit or enhance ATP release and breakdown.

  15. PVC esaslı CTP kesme atığı dolgulu malzemelerin termal özelliklerinin incelenmesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Özüyağlı

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bu çalışmada, PVC üretiminde kullanılan CaCO3 dolgu malzemesi yerine, sanayi atığı kullanılması sonucu termal özelliklerdeki değişim araştırılmıştır. Kullanılan sanayi atığı CTP boru üretiminden sulu kesim sırasında çıkmakta ve SiO2, cam elyaf ve polyester reçine içermektedir. Sulu çamur halinde filtre presten çıkan atık fabrikadan alındıktan sonra kurutma ve eleme işlemleri uygulanarak toz formuna getirilmiştir. Numuneler PVC, CTP atık tozu ve prosese yardımcı maddeler mikserde karıştırılarak ekstrüzyon yöntemi ile profil şeklinde üretilmiştir. Atık toz PVC’ye oranla ağırlıkça %5-%70 oranlarında dolgu malzemesi olarak kullanılmıştır. Kalsit (CaCO3 katkılı ve katkısız PVC numuneleri de benzer proses parametreleri kullanılarak üretilmiştir. Üretilen numuneler, seramik krozeler kullanılarak DTA-TG analizleri yapılmıştır.

  16. The CD27L and CTP1L endolysins targeting Clostridia contain a built-in trigger and release factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Dunne

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The bacteriophage ΦCD27 is capable of lysing Clostridium difficile, a pathogenic bacterium that is a major cause for nosocomial infection. A recombinant CD27L endolysin lyses C. difficile in vitro, and represents a promising alternative as a bactericide. To better understand the lysis mechanism, we have determined the crystal structure of an autoproteolytic fragment of the CD27L endolysin. The structure covers the C-terminal domain of the endolysin, and represents a novel fold that is identified in a number of lysins that target Clostridia bacteria. The structure indicates endolysin cleavage occurs at the stem of the linker connecting the catalytic domain with the C-terminal domain. We also solved the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of a slow cleaving mutant of the CTP1L endolysin that targets C. tyrobutyricum. Two distinct dimerization modes are observed in the crystal structures for both endolysins, despite a sequence identity of only 22% between the domains. The dimers are validated to be present for the full length protein in solution by right angle light scattering, small angle X-ray scattering and cross-linking experiments using the cross-linking amino acid p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine (pBpa. Mutagenesis on residues contributing to the dimer interfaces indicates that there is a link between the dimerization modes and the autocleavage mechanism. We show that for the CTP1L endolysin, there is a reduction in lysis efficiency that is proportional to the cleavage efficiency. We propose a model for endolysin triggering, where the extended dimer presents the inactive state, and a switch to the side-by-side dimer triggers the cleavage of the C-terminal domain. This leads to the release of the catalytic portion of the endolysin, enabling the efficient digestion of the bacterial cell wall.

  17. The CD27L and CTP1L Endolysins Targeting Clostridia Contain a Built-in Trigger and Release Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Matthew; Mertens, Haydyn D. T.; Garefalaki, Vasiliki; Jeffries, Cy M.; Thompson, Andrew; Lemke, Edward A.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Mayer, Melinda J.; Narbad, Arjan; Meijers, Rob

    2014-01-01

    The bacteriophage ΦCD27 is capable of lysing Clostridium difficile, a pathogenic bacterium that is a major cause for nosocomial infection. A recombinant CD27L endolysin lyses C. difficile in vitro, and represents a promising alternative as a bactericide. To better understand the lysis mechanism, we have determined the crystal structure of an autoproteolytic fragment of the CD27L endolysin. The structure covers the C-terminal domain of the endolysin, and represents a novel fold that is identified in a number of lysins that target Clostridia bacteria. The structure indicates endolysin cleavage occurs at the stem of the linker connecting the catalytic domain with the C-terminal domain. We also solved the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of a slow cleaving mutant of the CTP1L endolysin that targets C. tyrobutyricum. Two distinct dimerization modes are observed in the crystal structures for both endolysins, despite a sequence identity of only 22% between the domains. The dimers are validated to be present for the full length protein in solution by right angle light scattering, small angle X-ray scattering and cross-linking experiments using the cross-linking amino acid p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine (pBpa). Mutagenesis on residues contributing to the dimer interfaces indicates that there is a link between the dimerization modes and the autocleavage mechanism. We show that for the CTP1L endolysin, there is a reduction in lysis efficiency that is proportional to the cleavage efficiency. We propose a model for endolysin triggering, where the extended dimer presents the inactive state, and a switch to the side-by-side dimer triggers the cleavage of the C-terminal domain. This leads to the release of the catalytic portion of the endolysin, enabling the efficient digestion of the bacterial cell wall. PMID:25058163

  18. A nationwide non-medical switch from originator infliximab to biosimilar CT-P13 in 802 patients with inflammatory arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Bente; Sørensen, Inge Juul; Loft, Anne Gitte

    2017-01-01

    Objectives According to guidelines, a nationwide non-medical switch from originator (INX, Remicade) to biosimilar infliximab (Remsima, CT-P13) was conducted in Danish patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and axial spondyloarthritis (AxSpA). We investigated disease...

  19. Cooperative binding of the bisubstrate analog N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate to aspartate transcarbamoylase and the heterotropic effects of ATP and CTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newell, J.O.; Markby, D.W.; Schachman, H.K.

    1989-01-01

    Most investigations of the allosteric properties of the regulatory enzyme aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) from Escherichia coli are based on the sigmoidal dependence of enzyme activity on substrate concentration and the effects of the inhibitor, CTP, and the activator, ATP, on the saturation curves. Interpretations of these effects in terms of molecular models are complicated by the inability to distinguish between changes in substrate binding and catalytic turnover accompanying the allosteric transition. In an effort to eliminate this ambiguity, the binding of the 3H-labeled bisubstrate analog N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) to aspartate transcarbamoylase in the absence and presence of the allosteric effectors ATP and CTP has been measured directly by equilibrium dialysis at pH 7 in phosphate buffer. PALA binds with marked cooperativity to the holoenzyme with an average dissociation constant of 110 nM. ATP and CTP alter both the average affinity of ATCase for PALA and the degree of cooperativity in the binding process in a manner analogous to their effects on the kinetic properties of the enzyme; the average dissociation constant of PALA decreases to 65 nM in the presence of ATP and increases to 266 nM in the presence of CTP while the Hill coefficient, which is 1.95 in the absence of effectors, becomes 1.35 and 2.27 in the presence of ATP and CTP, respectively. The dissociation constant of PALA from the catalytic subunit is 95 nM. Interpretation of these results in terms of a thermodynamic scheme linking PALA binding to the assembly of ATCase from catalytic and regulatory subunits demonstrates that saturation of the enzyme with PALA shifts the equilibrium between holoenzyme and subunits slightly toward dissociation

  20. The sugarcane signal transduction (SUCAST catalogue: prospecting signal transduction in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia Mendes Souza

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available EST sequencing has enabled the discovery of many new genes in a vast array of organisms, and the utility of this approach to the scientific community is greatly increased by the establishment of fully annotated databases. The present study aimed to identify sugarcane ESTs sequenced in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST project (http://sucest.lad.ic.unicamp.br that corresponded to signal transduction components. We also produced a sugarcane signal transduction (SUCAST catalogue (http://sucest.lad.ic.unicamp.br/private/mining-reports/QG/QG-mining.htm that covered the main categories and pathways. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs encoding enzymes for hormone (gibberellins, ethylene, auxins, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid biosynthetic pathways were found and tissue specificity was inferred from their relative frequency of occurrence in the different libraries. Whenever possible, transducers of hormones and plant peptide signaling were catalogued to the respective pathway. Over 100 receptors were found in sugarcane, which contains a large family of Ser/Thr kinase receptors and also photoreceptors, histidine kinase receptors and their response regulators. G-protein and small GTPases were analyzed and compared to known members of these families found in mammalian and plant systems. Major kinase and phosphatase pathways were mapped, with special attention being given to the MAP kinase and the inositol pathway, both of which are well known in plants.O sequenciamento de ESTs (etiquetas de sequencias transcritas tem possibilitado a descoberta de muitos novos genes em uma ampla variedade de organismos. Um aumento do aproveitamento desta informação pela comunidade científica tem sido possível graças ao desenvolvimento de base de dados contendo seqüências completamente anotadas. O trabalho aqui relatado teve como objetivo a identificação de ESTs de cana de açúcar seqüenciadas através do projeto SUCEST (http://sucest.lad.ic. unicamp.br que

  1. Energy transduction in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poolman, Bert

    In the discovery of some general principles of energy transduction, lactic acid bacteria have played an important role. In this review, the energy transducing processes of lactic acid bacteria are discussed with the emphasis on the major developments of the past 5 years. This work not only includes

  2. Cell-penetrating peptides - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the present day scientific frontiers, the researches on the cell-penetrating peptides has a special place since the scientific community has not yet reached a consensus even in the terminology on what we are referring to when we speak about cell-penetrating peptides studies. Thus, Prof. Ulo Langel (Dept. of Neurochemistry, Stockolm University, Stockolm, Sweden rightly explain in a necessary preface that there are in use so many definition for the same things: protein transduction domain (PTDs, Trojan peptides, model amphipathic peptides (MAPs, membrane translocating sequences (MTS that the best way to refer to all of these molecules is to call all of them cell-penetrating peptides, CPPs. Thus, there is a need for an accepted definition of CPPs.....

  3. Signal transduction and chemotaxis in mast cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dráber, Petr; Hálová, Ivana; Polakovičová, Iva; Kawakami, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 778, jaro (2016), s. 11-23 ISSN 0014-2999 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-09807S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP302/12/G101; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-00703S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Mast cell * IgE receptor * KIT receptor * Signal transduction * Chemotaxis * Plasma membrane Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.896, year: 2016

  4. Peptide dendrimers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niederhafner, Petr; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Ježek, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2005), 757-788 ISSN 1075-2617 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/03/1362 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : multiple antigen peptides * peptide dendrimers * synthetic vaccine * multipleantigenic peptides Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.803, year: 2005

  5. A review of the literature analyzing benefits and concerns of infliximab biosimilar CT-P13 for the treatment of rheumatologic diseases: focus on interchangeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becciolini A

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrea Becciolini,1 Maria Gabriella Raimondo,2 Chiara Crotti,2 Elena Agape,2 Martina Biggioggero,2 Ennio Giulio Favalli1 1Department of Rheumatology, 2Department of Clinical Sciences and Health Community, University of Milan, Division of Rheumatology, Gaetano Pini Institute, Milan, Italy Abstract: The introduction of biological agents drastically changed the treatment paradigm of inflammatory arthritides, ameliorating the natural history of the diseases but concomitantly increasing the drug costs due to the manufacturing process. On this concern, biosimilar drugs may represent a valid option for reducing this elevated cost and increasing the availability of these highly effective treatments. Recently, CT-P13, the first biosimilar of infliximab, has been approved with the same indications established for the reference product (RP, and its daily use is progressively increasing. However, the experience with biosimilar drugs in the field of rheumatology is still limited, raising potential doubts and concerns on their correct management in real-life settings. Comparability analysis between CT-P13 and its RP was evaluated in equivalence randomized controlled trials (RCTs – PLANETRA and PLANETAS – performed on patients with rheumatoid arthritis and axial spondylitis, respectively. CT-P13 and RP showed similar profile in terms of quality, biological activity, safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy. However, the interchangeability between infliximab RP and its biosimilar still represents the most challenging issue because of a lack of a long-lasting experience. To date, reassuring preliminary data on this topic were reported in open-label extensions of PLANETRA and PLANETAS RCTs and in ongoing real-life observational studies. These findings, taken all together, significantly affect the landscape of biosimilar regulatory pathways and strongly support CT-P13 introduction as a great opportunity for expanding the accessibility to these very effective and

  6. Use of Leeds-Keio connective tissue prosthesis (L-K CTP) for reconstruction of deficient extensor mechanism with total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherief, Tamer I; Naguib, Ashraf M; Sefton, Graham K

    2005-08-01

    This study was carried out in order to assess the results of reconstruction of a deficient extensor mechanism in the presence of a total knee replacement (TKR) using the Leeds-Keio Connective Tissue Prosthesis (L-K CTP). The L-K CTP is available as flat tapes constructed from polyester in an open weave structure. It was used to reinforce and reconstruct the extensor mechanism, which was deficient in three patients who had undergone total knee replacement or were about to undergo total knee replacement. Two cases had extensor mechanism deficiency as a complication following total knee replacement while the third case had extensor mechanism deficiency at the time of the primary knee replacement. The average follow-up was 2 years (range of follow up was 12 to 48 months). All three cases showed good results with no extension lag and good range of movement at follow up. The use of L-K CTP for reconstruction of the knee extensor mechanism offers a good option for the management of the uncommon but difficult problem of extensor mechanism deficiency in patients with a total knee replacement.

  7. Genomic Sequence and Characterization of the Virulent Bacteriophage φCTP1 from Clostridium tyrobutyricum and Heterologous Expression of Its Endolysin▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melinda J.; Payne, John; Gasson, Michael J.; Narbad, Arjan

    2010-01-01

    The growth of Clostridium tyrobutyricum in developing cheese leads to spoilage and cheese blowing. Bacteriophages or their specific lytic enzymes may provide a biological control method for eliminating such undesirable organisms without affecting other microflora. We isolated the virulent bacteriophage φCTP1 belonging to the Siphoviridae and have shown that it is effective in causing lysis of sensitive strains. The double-stranded DNA genome of φCTP1 is 59,199 bp, and sequence analysis indicated that it has 86 open reading frames. orf29 was identified as the gene coding for the phage endolysin responsible for cell wall degradation prior to virion release. We cloned and expressed the ctp1l gene in E. coli and demonstrated that the partially purified protein induced lysis of C. tyrobutyricum cells and reduced viable counts both in buffer and in milk. The endolysin was inactive against a range of clostridial species but did show lysis of Clostridium sporogenes, another potential spoilage organism. Removal of the C-terminal portion of the endolysin completely abolished lytic activity. PMID:20581196

  8. Genomic sequence and characterization of the virulent bacteriophage phiCTP1 from Clostridium tyrobutyricum and heterologous expression of its endolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melinda J; Payne, John; Gasson, Michael J; Narbad, Arjan

    2010-08-01

    The growth of Clostridium tyrobutyricum in developing cheese leads to spoilage and cheese blowing. Bacteriophages or their specific lytic enzymes may provide a biological control method for eliminating such undesirable organisms without affecting other microflora. We isolated the virulent bacteriophage phiCTP1 belonging to the Siphoviridae and have shown that it is effective in causing lysis of sensitive strains. The double-stranded DNA genome of phiCTP1 is 59,199 bp, and sequence analysis indicated that it has 86 open reading frames. orf29 was identified as the gene coding for the phage endolysin responsible for cell wall degradation prior to virion release. We cloned and expressed the ctp1l gene in E. coli and demonstrated that the partially purified protein induced lysis of C. tyrobutyricum cells and reduced viable counts both in buffer and in milk. The endolysin was inactive against a range of clostridial species but did show lysis of Clostridium sporogenes, another potential spoilage organism. Removal of the C-terminal portion of the endolysin completely abolished lytic activity.

  9. Designing a long-acting human growth hormone (hGH) by fusing the carboxyl-terminal peptide of human chorionic gonadotropin beta-subunit to the coding sequence of hGH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Fuad; Guy, Rachel; Bar-Ilan, Ahuva; Felikman, Yana; Fima, Eyal

    2010-09-01

    Chimeric genes were constructed by fusing of human GH (hGH) cDNA to one, two, or three cassettes of the carboxyl-terminal peptide (CTP) of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-beta-subunit. hGH variant genes were inserted into the pCI-DHFR plasmid, transfected into DG44 cells, and stable clones were selected. Bioactivity and pharmacokinetic studies were performed in hypophysectomized Sprague Dawley derived male rats. The results indicated that sc injections of GH-wild-type (WT), Biotropin (commercial), GH-CTP, or CTP-GH (0.6 mg/kg) once every 5 d for 11 d (total dose of 1.2 mg/kg) resulted in an increased weight gain by 4, 4.9, 5.1, and 7 g, respectively. Treatment with CTP-GH-CTP-CTP (GH-LA) or CTP-GH-CTP (0.6 mg/kg) once every 5 d for 11 d or with Biotropin (0.12 mg/kg) daily for 11 d (total dose 1.2 mg/kg) resulted in a dramatic increase in weight gain of 16.5, 16.8, and 17 g, respectively. Repeated injections with different doses of GH-LA, 0.6, 1.8 mg/kg every 4 d or daily injection of 0.12 mg/kg of Biotropin increased the weight gain by 16, 28, and 18 gr, respectively. In addition, the cumulative serum levels of IGF-I after injection of GH-LA was significantly higher than that detected after injection of Biotropin. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that the half-life, mean residence time, area under the curve, time of maximal plasma concentration, and maximal plasma concentration of GH-LA are dramatically increased compared with Biotropin. This may suggest that the mechanism of GH metabolic clearance is affected by the presence of CTP. These data establish a rationale for using this chimera as a long-acting GH analog.

  10. Energy metabolism and transduction in smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, R M; Paul, R J

    1985-08-15

    Early investigations into the nature of the coupling between energy transduction and metabolism in smooth muscle, particularly from the laboratories of Bülbring and Lundholm, suggested that specific metabolic pathways could independently supply energy for ion transport and actin-myosin interactions. Subsequent work has solidified the concept that oxidative phosphorylation is specifically coupled to tension generation and maintenance, whereas, aerobic glycolysis is not only a vital characteristic of smooth muscle metabolism, but also is likely to be independently coupled to Na-K transport at the plasmalemma. The independence of oxidative and glycolytic metabolism is reflected as a compartmentation of carbohydrate metabolism in the porcine carotid artery. The coupling of these independent metabolic pathways with specific energy utilizing processes, indicates a means by which energy production and transduction can be closely and efficiently regulated. The coupling of glycogenolysis to mitochondrial respiration may have evolved as a direct response to the energetic needs of VSM. That is, the large glycogenolytic response in the initial minutes of stimulation may be necessary to maximize the cellular production of ATP during the presteady state. Likewise, the coupling between aerobic glycolysis and Na-K transport indicates a sensitive and efficient means of coordinating energy metabolism with ion transport at the membrane level. Additionally, the regulation of substrate supply, i.e. glucose transport, also may be closely coordinated with changes in ion transport. One may speculate that alterations in the microenvironment of each compartment can independently regulate intermediary metabolism and therefore allow the cell to quickly and efficiently respond to localized stimuli. Thus, stimulation of Na-K transport could effectively regulate energy production at the membrane level without mobilizing or competing with the energy transduction of other cellular processes. This

  11. Membrane guanylate cyclase, a multimodal transduction machine: history, present, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rameshwar K; Duda, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    A sequel to these authors' earlier comprehensive reviews which covered the field of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclase (MGC) from its origin to the year 2010, this article contains 13 sections. The first is historical and covers MGC from the year 1963-1987, summarizing its colorful developmental stages from its passionate pursuit to its consolidation. The second deals with the establishment of its biochemical identity. MGC becomes the transducer of a hormonal signal and founder of the peptide hormone receptor family, and creates the notion that hormone signal transduction is its sole physiological function. The third defines its expansion. The discovery of ROS-GC subfamily is made and it links ROS-GC with the physiology of phototransduction. Sections ROS-GC, a Ca(2+)-Modulated Two Component Transduction System to Migration Patterns and Translations of the GCAP Signals Into Production of Cyclic GMP are Different cover its biochemistry and physiology. The noteworthy events are that augmented by GCAPs, ROS-GC proves to be a transducer of the free Ca(2+) signals generated within neurons; ROS-GC becomes a two-component transduction system and establishes itself as a source of cyclic GMP, the second messenger of phototransduction. Section ROS-GC1 Gene Linked Retinal Dystrophies demonstrates how this knowledge begins to be translated into the diagnosis and providing the molecular definition of retinal dystrophies. Section Controlled By Low and High Levels of [Ca(2+)]i, ROS-GC1 is a Bimodal Transduction Switch discusses a striking property of ROS-GC where it becomes a "[Ca(2+)]i bimodal switch" and transcends its signaling role in other neural processes. In this course, discovery of the first CD-GCAP (Ca(2+)-dependent guanylate cyclase activator), the S100B protein, is made. It extends the role of the ROS-GC transduction system beyond the phototransduction to the signaling processes in the synapse region between photoreceptor and cone ON-bipolar cells; in section Ca(2

  12. Simulated evolution of signal transduction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mobashir

    Full Text Available Signal transduction is the process of routing information inside cells when receiving stimuli from their environment that modulate the behavior and function. In such biological processes, the receptors, after receiving the corresponding signals, activate a number of biomolecules which eventually transduce the signal to the nucleus. The main objective of our work is to develop a theoretical approach which will help to better understand the behavior of signal transduction networks due to changes in kinetic parameters and network topology. By using an evolutionary algorithm, we designed a mathematical model which performs basic signaling tasks similar to the signaling process of living cells. We use a simple dynamical model of signaling networks of interacting proteins and their complexes. We study the evolution of signaling networks described by mass-action kinetics. The fitness of the networks is determined by the number of signals detected out of a series of signals with varying strength. The mutations include changes in the reaction rate and network topology. We found that stronger interactions and addition of new nodes lead to improved evolved responses. The strength of the signal does not play any role in determining the response type. This model will help to understand the dynamic behavior of the proteins involved in signaling pathways. It will also help to understand the robustness of the kinetics of the output response upon changes in the rate of reactions and the topology of the network.

  13. Adenovirus transduction: More complicated than receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyanka; Martis, Prithy C; Excoffon, Katherine J D A

    2017-02-01

    The abundance and accessibility of a primary virus receptor are critical factors that impact the susceptibility of a host cell to virus infection. The Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) has two transmembrane isoforms that occur due to alternative splicing and differ in localization and function in polarized epithelia. To determine the relevance of isoform-specific expression across cell types, the abundance and localization of both isoforms were determined in ten common cell lines, and correlated with susceptibility to adenovirus transduction relative to polarized primary human airway epithelia. Data show that the gene and protein expression for each isoform of CAR varies significantly between cell lines and polarization, as indicated by high transepithelial resistance, is inversely related to adenovirus transduction. In summary, the variability of polarity and isoform-specific expression among model cells are critical parameters that must be considered when evaluating the clinical relevance of potential adenovirus-mediated gene therapy and anti-adenovirus strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure Damages Brain Signal Transduction Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Caldwell, Kevin

    2001-01-01

    .... One and twenty-four hours following fear conditioning this learning deficit is associated with altered brain signal transduction mechanisms that are dependent on an enzyme termed phosphatidylinositol...

  15. Transductive Ridge Regression in Structure-activity Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcou, Gilles; Delouis, Grace; Mokshyna, Olena; Horvath, Dragos; Lachiche, Nicolas; Varnek, Alexandre

    2018-01-01

    In this article we consider the application of the Transductive Ridge Regression (TRR) approach to structure-activity modeling. An original procedure of the TRR parameters optimization is suggested. Calculations performed on 3 different datasets involving two types of descriptors demonstrated that TRR outperforms its non-transductive analogue (Ridge Regression) in more than 90 % of cases. The most significant transductive effect was observed for small datasets. This suggests that transduction may be particularly useful when the data are expensive or difficult to collect. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Membrane Guanylate Cyclase, A Multimodal Transduction Machine: History, Present and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rameshwar K Sharma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A sequel to these authors’ earlier comprehensive reviews which covered the field of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclase (MGC from its origin to the year 2010, this article contains 13 parts. The first is HISTORICAL and covers MGC from the year 1963-1987, summarizing its colorful developmental stages from its passionate pursuit to its consolidation. The second deals with the establishment of its BIOCHEMICAL IDENTITY. MGC becomes the transducer of a hormonal signal and founder of the peptide hormone receptor family, and creates the notion that hormone signal transduction is its sole physiological function. The third defines its EXPANSION. The discovery of ROS-GC subfamily is made and it links ROS-GC with the physiology of PHOTOTRANSDUCTION. Parts 4 to 7 cover its BIOCHEMISTRY and PHYSIOLOGY. The noteworthy events are that augmented by GCAPs, ROS-GC proves to be a transducer of the free Ca2+ signals generated within neurons; ROS-GC becomes a two-component transduction system and establishes itself as a source of cyclic GMP, the second messenger of phototransduction. Part 8 demonstrates how this knowledge begins to be TRANSLATED into the diagnosis and providing the molecular definition of retinal dystrophies. Part 9 discusses a striking property of ROS-GC where it becomes a [Ca2+]i bimodal switch and transcends its signaling role in other neural transduction processes. In this course, discovery of the first CD-GCAP (Ca2+-dependent guanylate cycles activator, the S100B protein, is made. It extends the role of ROS-GC transduction system beyond the photoreceptor cells to the signaling processes in the synapse region between photoreceptor and cone ON-bipolar cells; in Part 10, discovery of ANOTHER CD-GCAP, NC, is made and its linkage with signaling of the inner plexiform layer neurons is established. Part 11 discusses linkage of the ROS-GC transduction system with other sensory transduction processes: Pineal gland, Olfaction and Gustation. In the

  17. Protein transduction therapy into cochleae via the round window niche in guinea pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Takeda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs are short sequences of amino acids that facilitate the penetration of conjugated cargoes across mammalian cell membranes, and as such, they may provide a safe and effective method for drug delivery to the inner ear. Simple polyarginine peptides have been shown to induce significantly higher cell penetration rates among CPPs. Herein, we show that a peptide consisting of nine arginines (“9R” effectively delivered enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP into guinea pig cochleae via the round window niche without causing any deterioration in auditory function. A second application, 24 hours after the first, prolonged the presence of EGFP. To assess the feasibility of protein transduction using 9R-CPPs via the round window, we used “X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein” (XIAP bonded to a 9R peptide (XIAP-9R. XIAP-9R treatment prior to acoustic trauma significantly reduced putative hearing loss and the number of apoptotic hair cells loss in the cochleae. Thus, the topical application of molecules fused to 9R-CPPs may be a simple and promising strategy for treating inner ear diseases.

  18. Controlling Signal Transduction with Synthetic Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, David M.; Wandless, Thomas J.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Crabtree, Gerald R.

    1993-11-01

    Dimerization and oligomerization are general biological control mechanisms contributing to the activation of cell membrane receptors, transcription factors, vesicle fusion proteins, and other classes of intra- and extracellular proteins. Cell permeable, synthetic ligands were devised that can be used to control the intracellular oligomerization of specific proteins. To demonstrate their utility, these ligands were used to reduce intracellular oligomerization of cell surface receptors that lacked their transmembrane and extracellular regions but contained intracellular signaling domains. Addition of these ligands to cells in culture resulted in signal transmission and specific target gene activation. Monomeric forms of the ligands blocked the pathway. This method of ligandregulated activation and termination of signaling pathways has the potential to be applied wherever precise control of a signal transduction pathway is desired.

  19. FCJ-124 Interactive Environments as Fields of Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristoph Brunner

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a critical inquiry of interactive environments as fields of transduction. It is argued that Gilbert Simondon’s concepts of individuation, transduction, in-formation, the preindividual, and the associated milieu enable a processual thinking of the analysis and design of interactive technologies as technogenetic emergence. These concepts offer a way for interaction design to understand interactive environments through the dynamics between fields of transduction and fields of experience in relational and affective terms. The article analyses the way in which two technological assemblages, Voz Alta and the Impossible Room, provide different experiential fields experimenting with the transductive power of digital and interactive media. We emphasise the potential for creating new modes of experience. Our aim is to underline the necessary convergences between practices of design and thought; to enable affectively engaging fields of transduction.

  20. Endothelial cell oxidative stress and signal transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROCIO FONCEA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction (ED is an early event in atherosclerotic disease, preceding clinical manifestations and complications. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS have been implicated as important mechanisms that contribute to ED, and ROS’s may function as intracellular messengers that modulate signaling pathways. Several intracellular signal events stimulated by ROS have been defined, including the identification of two members of the mitogen activated protein kinase family (ERK1/2 and big MAP kinase, BMK1, tyrosine kinases (Src and Syk and different isoenzymes of PKC as redox-sensitive kinases. ROS regulation of signal transduction components include the modification in the activity of transcriptional factors such as NFkB and others that result in changes in gene expression and modifications in cellular responses. In order to understand the intracellular mechanisms induced by ROS in endothelial cells (EC, we are studying the response of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells to increased ROS generation by different pro-atherogenic stimuli. Our results show that Homocysteine (Hcy and oxidized LDL (oxLDL enhance the activity and expression of oxidative stress markers, such as NFkB and heme oxygenase 1. These results suggest that these pro-atherogenic stimuli increase oxidative stress in EC, and thus explain the loss of endothelial function associated with the atherogenic process

  1. TMC function in hair cell transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Jeffrey R.; Pan, Bifeng; Koussa, Mounir A.; Asai, Yukako

    2014-01-01

    Transmembrane channel-like (TMC) proteins 1 and 2 are necessary for hair cell mechanotransduction but their precise function is controversial. A growing body of evidence supports a direct role for TMC1 and TMC2 as components of the transduction complex. However, a number of important questions remain and alternate hypotheses have been proposed. Here we present an historical overview of the identification and cloning of Tmc genes, a discussion of mutations in TMC1 that cause deafness in mice and humans and a brief review of other members of the Tmc gene superfamily. We also examine expression of Tmc mRNAs and localization of the protein products. The review focuses on potential functions of TMC proteins and the evidence from Beethoven mice that suggests a direct role for TMC1 in hair cell mechanotransduction. Data that support alternate interpretations are also considered. The article concludes with a discussion of outstanding questions and future directions for TMC research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled “Annual Reviews 2014”. PMID:24423408

  2. Self-organization of signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    We propose a model of parameter learning for signal transduction, where the objective function is defined by signal transmission efficiency. We apply this to learn kinetic rates as a form of evolutionary learning, and look for parameters which satisfy the objective. This is a novel approach compared to the usual technique of adjusting parameters only on the basis of experimental data. The resulting model is self-organizing, i.e. perturbations in protein concentrations or changes in extracellular signaling will automatically lead to adaptation. We systematically perturb protein concentrations and observe the response of the system. We find compensatory or co-regulation of protein expression levels. In a novel experiment, we alter the distribution of extracellular signaling, and observe adaptation based on optimizing signal transmission. We also discuss the relationship between signaling with and without transients. Signaling by transients may involve maximization of signal transmission efficiency for the peak response, but a minimization in steady-state responses. With an appropriate objective function, this can also be achieved by concentration adjustment. Self-organizing systems may be predictive of unwanted drug interference effects, since they aim to mimic complex cellular adaptation in a unified way.

  3. Glycosphingolipid–Protein Interaction in Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Russo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glycosphingolipids (GSLs are a class of ceramide-based glycolipids essential for embryo development in mammals. The synthesis of specific GSLs depends on the expression of distinctive sets of GSL synthesizing enzymes that is tightly regulated during development. Several reports have described how cell surface receptors can be kept in a resting state or activate alternative signalling events as a consequence of their interaction with GSLs. Specific GSLs, indeed, interface with specific protein domains that are found in signalling molecules and which act as GSL sensors to modify signalling responses. The regulation exerted by GSLs on signal transduction is orthogonal to the ligand–receptor axis, as it usually does not directly interfere with the ligand binding to receptors. Due to their properties of adjustable production and orthogonal action on receptors, GSLs add a new dimension to the control of the signalling in development. GSLs can, indeed, dynamically influence progenitor cell response to morphogenetic stimuli, resulting in alternative differentiation fates. Here, we review the available literature on GSL–protein interactions and their effects on cell signalling and development.

  4. Overexpression of an EaZIP gene devoid of transit peptide sequence induced leaf variegation in tobacco.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiayu Guan

    Full Text Available Leaf variegation is an ornamental trait that is not only biologically but also economically important. In our previous study, a Mg-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester cyclase homologue, EaZIP (Epipremnum aureum leucine zipper was found to be associated with leaf variegation in Epipremnum aureum (Linden & Andre G.S. Bunting. The protein product of this nuclear-encoded gene is targeted back to chloroplast involving in chlorophyll biosynthesis. Based on a web-based homology analysis, the EaZIP was found to lack a chloroplast transit peptide (cTP sequence. In the present study, we tested if overexpression of the EaZIP cDNA with or without the cTP sequence could affect leaf variegation. Transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing EaZIP genes with (EaZIPwcTP and without (EaZIPwocTP cTP sequence were generated. Many plant lines harboring EaZIPwocTP showed variegated leaves, while none of the plant lines with EaZIPwcTP produced such a phenotype. Molecular analysis of T0 plants and selfed T1 progeny, as well as observations of tagged marker GFP (green fluorescent protein did not show any other difference in patterns of gene integrity and expression. Results from this study indicate that transgenic approach for expressing EaZIPwocTP could be a novel method of generating variegated plants even through the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated.

  5. Switching from originator infliximab to biosimilar CT-P13 compared with maintained treatment with originator infliximab (NOR-SWITCH): a 52-week, randomised, double-blind, non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Kristin K; Olsen, Inge C; Goll, Guro L; Lorentzen, Merete; Bolstad, Nils; Haavardsholm, Espen A; Lundin, Knut E A; Mørk, Cato; Jahnsen, Jørgen; Kvien, Tore K

    2017-06-10

    TNF inhibitors have improved treatment of Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, spondyloarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and chronic plaque psoriasis, but are expensive therapies. The aim of NOR-SWITCH was to examine switching from originator infliximab to the less expensive biosimilar CT-P13 regarding efficacy, safety, and immunogenicity. The study is a randomised, non-inferiority, double-blind, phase 4 trial with 52 weeks of follow-up. Adult patients on stable treatment with infliximab originator treated in a hospital setting for at least 6 months were eligible for participation. Patients with informed consent were randomised in a 1:1 ratio to either continued infliximab originator or to switch to CT-P13 treatment, with unchanged dosing regimen. Data were collected at infusion visits in 40 Norwegian study centres. Patients, assessors, and patient care providers were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was disease worsening during 52-week follow-up. 394 patients in the primary per-protocol set were needed to show a non-inferiority margin of 15%, assuming 30% disease worsening in each group. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02148640. Between Oct 24, 2014, and July 8, 2015, 482 patients were enrolled and randomised (241 to infliximab originator, 241 to CT-P13 group; one patient was excluded from the full analysis and safety set for CT-P13) and 408 were included in the per-protocol set (202 in the infliximab originator group and 206 in the CT-P13 group). 155 (32%) patients in the full analysis set had Crohn's disease, 93 (19%) had ulcerative colitis, 91 (19%) had spondyloarthritis, 77 (16%) had rheumatoid arthritis, 30 (6%) had psoriatic arthritis, and 35 (7%) had chronic plaque psoriasis. Disease worsening occurred in 53 (26%) patients in the infliximab originator group and 61 (30%) patients in the CT-P13 group (per-protocol set; adjusted treatment difference -4·4%, 95% CI -12·7 to 3·9). The

  6. Efficient myogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells by the transduction of engineered MyoD protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Min Sun [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Biosystems and Bioengineering Program, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Mun, Ji-Young [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ohsuk [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Biosystems and Bioengineering Program, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Ki-Sun [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Doo-Byoung, E-mail: dboh@kribb.re.kr [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Biosystems and Bioengineering Program, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •MyoD was engineered to contain protein transduction domain and endosome-disruptive INF7 peptide. •The engineered MyoD-IT showed efficient nuclear targeting through an endosomal escape by INF7 peptide. •By applying MyoD-IT, human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) were differentiated into myogenic cells. •hASCs differentiated by applying MyoD-IT fused to myotubes through co-culturing with mouse myoblasts. •Myogenic differentiation using MyoD-IT is a safe method without the concern of altering the genome. -- Abstract: Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) have great potential as cell sources for the treatment of muscle disorders. To provide a safe method for the myogenic differentiation of hASCs, we engineered the MyoD protein, a key transcription factor for myogenesis. The engineered MyoD (MyoD-IT) was designed to contain the TAT protein transduction domain for cell penetration and the membrane-disrupting INF7 peptide, which is an improved version of the HA2 peptide derived from influenza. MyoD-IT showed greatly improved nuclear targeting ability through an efficient endosomal escape induced by the pH-sensitive membrane disruption of the INF7 peptide. By applying MyoD-IT to a culture, hASCs were efficiently differentiated into long spindle-shaped myogenic cells expressing myosin heavy chains. Moreover, these cells differentiated by an application of MyoD-IT fused to myotubes with high efficiency through co-culturing with mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Because internalized proteins can be degraded in cells without altering the genome, the myogenic differentiation of hASCs using MyoD-IT would be a safe and clinically applicable method.

  7. Transduction mechanisms and their applications in micromechanical devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Blom, F.R.; Bouwstra, S.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; van de Pol, F.C.M.; Tilmans, H.A.C.; Popma, T.J.A.; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    1989-01-01

    Transduction mechanisms and their applications in micromechanical actuators and resonating sensors are presented. They include piezoelectric, dielectric, electro-thermo-mechanic, opto-thermo-mechanic, and thermo-pneumatic mechanisms. Advantages and disadvantages with respect to technology and

  8. Mechanical transduction by ion channels: A cautionary tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Frederick

    2015-09-28

    Mechanical transduction by ion channels occurs in all cells. The physiological functions of these channels have just begun to be elaborated, but if we focus on the upper animal kingdom, these channels serve the common sensory services such as hearing and touch, provide the central nervous system with information on the force and position of muscles and joints, and they provide the autonomic system with information about the filling of hollow organs such as blood vessels. However, all cells of the body have mechanosensitive channels (MSCs), including red cells. Most of these channels are cation selective and are activated by bilayer tension. There are also K + selective MSCs found commonly in neurons where they may be responsible for both general anesthesia and knockout punches in the boxing ring by hyperpolarizing neurons to reduce excitability. The cationic MSCs are typically inactive under normal mechanical stress, but open under pathologic stress. The channels are normally inactive because they are shielded from stress by the cytoskeleton. The cationic MSCs are specifically blocked by the externally applied peptide GsMtx4 (aka, AT-300). This is the first drug of its class and provides a new approach to many pathologies since it is nontoxic, non-immunogenic, stable in a biological environment and has a long pharmacokinetic lifetime. Pathologies involving excessive stress are common. They produce cardiac arrhythmias, contraction in stretched dystrophic muscle, xerocytotic and sickled red cells, etc . The channels seem to function primarily as "fire alarms", providing feedback to the cytoskeleton that a region of the bilayer is under excessive tension and needs reinforcing. The eukaryotic forms of MSCs have only been cloned in recent years and few people have experience working with them. "Newbies" need to become aware of the technology, potential artifacts, and the fundamentals of mechanics. The most difficult problem in studying MSCs is that the actual stimulus

  9. Hijacking PrPC-dependent signal transduction: when prions impair Αβ clearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eHernandez-Rapp

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The cellular prion protein PrPC is the normal counterpart of the scrapie prion protein PrPSc, the main component of the infectious agent of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies. The recent discovery that PrPC can serve as a receptor for the amyloid Αβ peptide and relay its neurotoxicity is sparking renewed interest on this protein and its involvement in signal transduction processes. Disease-associated PrPSc shares with Αβ the ability to hijack PrPC-dependent signalling cascades, and thereby instigate pathogenic events. Among these is an impairment of Αβ clearance, uncovered in prion-infected neuronal cells. These findings add another facet to the intricate interplay between PrPC and Αβ. Here, we summarize the connection between PrP-mediated signalling and Αβ clearance and discuss its pathological implications.

  10. The importance of valency in enhancing the import and cell routing potential of protein transduction domain-containing molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Michael; Poon, Gregory M K; Gariépy, Jean

    2006-03-01

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs) are peptides that afford the internalization of cargo macromolecules (including plasmid DNA, proteins, liposomes, and nanoparticles). In the case of polycationic peptides, the efficiency of PTDs to promote cellular uptake is directly related to their molecular mass or their polyvalent presentation. Similarly, the efficiency of routing to the nucleus increases with the number of nuclear localization signals (NLS) associated with a cargo. The quantitative enhancement, however, depends on the identity of the PTD sequence as well as the targeted cell type. Thus the choice and multivalent presentation of PTD and NLS sequences are important criteria guiding the design of macromolecules intended for specific intracellular localization. This review outlines synthetic and recombinant strategies whereby PTDs and signal sequences can be assembled into multivalent peptide dendrimers and promote the uptake and routing of their cargoes. In particular, the tetramerization domain of the tumour suppressor p53 (p53tet) is emerging as a useful scaffold to present multiple routing and targeting moieties. Short cationic peptides fused to the 31-residue long p53tet sequence resulted in tetramers displaying a significant enhancement (up to 1000 fold) in terms of their ability to be imported into cells and delivered to the cell nucleus in relation to their monomeric analogues. The design of future polycationic peptide dendrimers as effective delivering vehicles will need to incorporate selective cell targeting functions and provide solutions to the issue of endosomal entrapment.

  11. Scale-up and large-scale production of Tetraselmis sp. CTP4 (Chlorophyta) for CO2 mitigation: from an agar plate to 100-m3 industrial photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Hugo; Páramo, Jaime; Silva, Joana; Marques, Ana; Barros, Ana; Maurício, Dinis; Santos, Tamára; Schulze, Peter; Barros, Raúl; Gouveia, Luísa; Barreira, Luísa; Varela, João

    2018-03-23

    Industrial production of novel microalgal isolates is key to improving the current portfolio of available strains that are able to grow in large-scale production systems for different biotechnological applications, including carbon mitigation. In this context, Tetraselmis sp. CTP4 was successfully scaled up from an agar plate to 35- and 100-m 3 industrial scale tubular photobioreactors (PBR). Growth was performed semi-continuously for 60 days in the autumn-winter season (17 th October - 14 th December). Optimisation of tubular PBR operations showed that improved productivities were obtained at a culture velocity of 0.65-1.35 m s -1 and a pH set-point for CO 2 injection of 8.0. Highest volumetric (0.08 ± 0.01 g L -1 d -1 ) and areal (20.3 ± 3.2 g m -2 d -1 ) biomass productivities were attained in the 100-m 3 PBR compared to those of the 35-m 3 PBR (0.05 ± 0.02 g L -1 d -1 and 13.5 ± 4.3 g m -2 d -1 , respectively). Lipid contents were similar in both PBRs (9-10% of ash free dry weight). CO 2 sequestration was followed in the 100-m 3 PBR, revealing a mean CO 2 mitigation efficiency of 65% and a biomass to carbon ratio of 1.80. Tetraselmis sp. CTP4 is thus a robust candidate for industrial-scale production with promising biomass productivities and photosynthetic efficiencies up to 3.5% of total solar irradiance.

  12. A randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study to demonstrate equivalence in efficacy and safety of CT-P13 compared with innovator infliximab when coadministered with methotrexate in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis: the PLANETRA study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dae Hyun; Hrycaj, Pawel; Miranda, Pedro; Ramiterre, Edgar; Piotrowski, Mariusz; Shevchuk, Sergii; Kovalenko, Volodymyr; Prodanovic, Nenad; Abello-Banfi, Mauricio; Gutierrez-Ureña, Sergio; Morales-Olazabal, Luis; Tee, Michael; Jimenez, Renato; Zamani, Omid; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, HoUng; Park, Won; Müller-Ladner, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To compare the efficacy and safety of innovator infliximab (INX) and CT-P13, an INX biosimilar, in active rheumatoid arthritis patients with inadequate response to methotrexate (MTX) treatment. Methods Phase III randomised, double-blind, multicentre, multinational, parallel-group study. Patients with active disease despite MTX (12.5–25 mg/week) were randomised to receive 3 mg/kg of CT-P13 (n=302) or INX (n=304) with MTX and folic acid. The primary endpoint was the American College of Rheumatology 20% (ACR20) response at week 30. Therapeutic equivalence of clinical response according to ACR20 criteria was concluded if the 95% CI for the treatment difference was within ±15%. Secondary endpoints included ACR response criteria, European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criteria, change in Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS28), Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), Simplified Disease Activity Index, Clinical Disease Activity Index, as well as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) parameters, safety and immunogenicity. Results At week 30, ACR20 responses were 60.9% for CT-P13 and 58.6% for INX (95% CI −6% to 10%) in the intention-to-treat population. The proportions in CT-P13 and INX groups achieving good or moderate EULAR responses (C reactive protein (CRP)) at week 30 were 85.8% and 87.1%, respectively. Low disease activity or remission according to DAS28–CRP, ACR–EULAR remission rates, ACR50/ACR70 responses and all other PK and PD endpoints were highly similar at week 30. Incidence of drug-related adverse events (35.2% vs 35.9%) and detection of antidrug antibodies (48.4% vs 48.2%) were highly similar for CT-P13 and INX, respectively. Conclusions CT-P13 demonstrated equivalent efficacy to INX at week 30, with a comparable PK profile and immunogenicity. CT-P13 was well tolerated, with a safety profile comparable with that of INX. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01217086 PMID:23687260

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Adem Bahar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics.

  14. PeptideMine - A webserver for the design of peptides for protein-peptide binding studies derived from protein-protein interactomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Balasubramanian

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transduction events often involve transient, yet specific, interactions between structurally conserved protein domains and polypeptide sequences in target proteins. The identification and validation of these associating domains is crucial to understand signal transduction pathways that modulate different cellular or developmental processes. Bioinformatics strategies to extract and integrate information from diverse sources have been shown to facilitate the experimental design to understand complex biological events. These methods, primarily based on information from high-throughput experiments, have also led to the identification of new connections thus providing hypothetical models for cellular events. Such models, in turn, provide a framework for directing experimental efforts for validating the predicted molecular rationale for complex cellular processes. In this context, it is envisaged that the rational design of peptides for protein-peptide binding studies could substantially facilitate the experimental strategies to evaluate a predicted interaction. This rational design procedure involves the integration of protein-protein interaction data, gene ontology, physico-chemical calculations, domain-domain interaction data and information on functional sites or critical residues. Results Here we describe an integrated approach called "PeptideMine" for the identification of peptides based on specific functional patterns present in the sequence of an interacting protein. This approach based on sequence searches in the interacting sequence space has been developed into a webserver, which can be used for the identification and analysis of peptides, peptide homologues or functional patterns from the interacting sequence space of a protein. To further facilitate experimental validation, the PeptideMine webserver also provides a list of physico-chemical parameters corresponding to the peptide to determine the feasibility of

  15. Integrated Electromechanical Transduction Schemes for Polymer MEMS Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Thuau

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Polymer Micro ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS have the potential to constitute a powerful alternative to silicon-based MEMS devices for sensing applications. Although the use of commercial photoresists as structural material in polymer MEMS has been widely reported, the integration of functional polymer materials as electromechanical transducers has not yet received the same amount of interest. In this context, we report on the design and fabrication of different electromechanical schemes based on polymeric materials ensuring different transduction functions. Piezoresistive transduction made of carbon nanotube-based nanocomposites with a gauge factor of 200 was embedded within U-shaped polymeric cantilevers operating either in static or dynamic modes. Flexible resonators with integrated piezoelectric transduction were also realized and used as efficient viscosity sensors. Finally, piezoelectric-based organic field effect transistor (OFET electromechanical transduction exhibiting a record sensitivity of over 600 was integrated into polymer cantilevers and used as highly sensitive strain and humidity sensors. Such advances in integrated electromechanical transduction schemes should favor the development of novel all-polymer MEMS devices for flexible and wearable applications in the future.

  16. Theory and modeling of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Lihong, E-mail: lhtong@ecjtu.edu.cn [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, Jiangxi (China); Lim, C.W. [Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR (China); Zhao, Xiushao; Geng, Daxing [School of Civil Engineering and Architecture, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, Jiangxi (China)

    2016-06-03

    Models both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed and the corresponding acoustic pressure solutions are obtained. The acoustic pressure for an individual carbon nanotube (CNT) as a function of input power is investigated analytically and it is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. Further numerical analysis on the acoustic pressure response and characteristics for varying input frequency and distance are also examined both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions. Through detailed theoretical and numerical studies on the acoustic pressure solution for thinfilm-solid cylindrical transduction, it is concluded that a solid with smaller thermal conductivity favors to improve the acoustic performance. In general, the proposed models are applicable to a variety of cylindrical thermo-acoustic devices performing in different gaseous media. - Highlights: • Theory and modeling both for solid and thinfilm-solid cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are proposed. • The modeling is verified by comparing with the published experimental data. • Acoustic response characteristics of cylindrical thermo-acoustic transductions are predicted by the proposed model.

  17. Signal Transduction in Histidine Kinases: Insights from New Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhate, Manasi P.; Molnar, Kathleen S.; Goulian, Mark; DeGrado, William F.

    2015-01-01

    Histidine kinases (HKs) are major players in bacterial signaling. There has been an explosion of new HK crystal structures in the last five years. We globally analyze the structures of HKs to yield insights into the mechanisms by which signals are transmitted to and across protein structures in this family. We interpret known enzymological data in the context of new structural data to show how asymmetry across the dimer interface is a key feature of signal transduction in HKs, and discuss how different HK domains undergo asymmetric-to-symmetric transitions during signal transduction and catalysis. A thermodynamic framework for signaling that encompasses these various properties is presented and the consequences of weak thermodynamic coupling are discussed. The synthesis of observations from enzymology, structural biology, protein engineering and thermodynamics paves the way for a deeper molecular understanding of histidine kinase signal transduction. PMID:25982528

  18. Physical aspects of sensory transduction on seeing, hearing and smelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Tohru; Sakakibara, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    What is the general principle of sensory transduction? Sensory transduction is defined as energy transformation from the external world to the internal world. The energy of the external world, such as thermal energy (heat), electro-magnetic energy (light), mechanical energy (sound) and the energy from molecules (chemicals), is converted into electrochemical events in the animal nervous system. The following five classes of special sense receptors are utilized for energy conversion: vision (photo); audition (sound); taste and smell (chemo); and tactile (mechano). There are also other special sense receptors, including thermo and noxious receptors. The focus of this study is on photoreceptors, sound-receptors and odorant-receptors because the transduction mechanisms of these receptors are explained biochemically and understood by a common physical principle; these biochemical models are well known in neuroscience. The following notable problems are inherent in these biochemical models: the cGMP ionophore model of the vertebrate photoreceptor cannot explain the fast photo-response (∼msec); the tip links connection model of stereocilia in the basilar membrane for opening the K(+) channel on the tip of a hair has difficulty explaining the high frequency vibration of hair cells without a damping of the oscillation, and the odorant shape-specific receptor model for olfactory transduction has difficulty in discriminating the minute differences among similar fragrant smells of essential oils with different molecular shapes. These difficulties might arise from a lack of the physical sense when the transduction models were proposed. This article will reconsider these problems and propose rational models for visual, olfactory and auditory transduction.

  19. 14-3-3zeta binds a phosphorylated Raf peptide and an unphosphorylated peptide via its conserved amphipathic groove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petosa, C; Masters, S C; Bankston, L A; Pohl, J; Wang, B; Fu, H; Liddington, R C

    1998-06-26

    14-3-3 proteins bind a variety of molecules involved in signal transduction, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis. 14-3-3 binds ligands such as Raf-1 kinase and Bad by recognizing the phosphorylated consensus motif, RSXpSXP, but must bind unphosphorylated ligands, such as glycoprotein Ib and Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S, via a different motif. Here we report the crystal structures of the zeta isoform of 14-3-3 in complex with two peptide ligands: a Raf-derived phosphopeptide (pS-Raf-259, LSQRQRSTpSTPNVHMV) and an unphosphorylated peptide derived from phage display (R18, PHCVPRDLSWLDLEANMCLP) that inhibits binding of exoenzyme S and Raf-1. The two peptides bind within a conserved amphipathic groove on the surface of 14-3-3 at overlapping but distinct sites. The phosphoserine of pS-Raf-259 engages a cluster of basic residues (Lys49, Arg56, Arg60, and Arg127), whereas R18 binds via the amphipathic sequence, WLDLE, with its two acidic groups coordinating the same basic cluster. 14-3-3 is dimeric, and its two peptide-binding grooves are arranged in an antiparallel fashion, 30 A apart. The ability of each groove to bind different peptide motifs suggests how 14-3-3 can act in signal transduction by inducing either homodimer or heterodimer formation in its target proteins.

  20. Synthetic antifreeze peptide

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    A synthetic antifreeze peptide and a synthetic gene coding for the antifreeze peptide have been produced. The antifreeze peptide has a greater number of repeating amino acid sequences than is present in the native antifreeze peptides from winter flounder upon which the synthetic antifreeze peptide was modeled. Each repeating amino acid sequence has two polar amino acid residues which are spaced a controlled distance apart so that the antifreeze peptide may inhibit ice formation. The synthetic...

  1. Cell biology symposium: Membrane trafficking and signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    In general, membrane trafficking is a broad group of processes where proteins and other large molecules are distributed throughout the cell as well as adjacent extracellular spaces. Whereas signal transduction is a process where signals are transmitted through a series of chemical or molecular event...

  2. A new dynamic electrochemical transduction mechanism for interdigitated array microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoshan; Choi, Jin-Woo; Ahn, Chong H

    2004-12-01

    A dynamic electrochemical transduction mechanism for interdigitated array microelectrodes using an electrical charge pumping method is presented in this paper. In this dynamic transduction mechanism, a charged external capacitor is used as the charge supplier for the electrochemical reaction of the reversible redox species at the interdigitated array electrodes. The charges stored in the capacitor are consumed as the electrochemical reaction current, which causes the capacitor potential decay. The theoretical analysis has shown that the species concentration has a decisive effect on the capacitor potential decay, and therefore the characteristics of the capacitor potential decay are recorded and analyzed to evaluate the concentration of redox species. The new transduction mechanism has the advantages of achieving high sensitivity with small sensor area and simplifying the measurement instrumentation. As a demonstration device, interdigitated array microelectrodes (approximately 0.2 mm(2) electrode surface area) have been fabricated and successfully characterized using p-aminophenol as the redox species under this dynamic mechanism. The detection limit of p-aminophenol was calculated to be approximately 4 x 10(-7) M for the sensor with the new dynamic transduction mechanism.

  3. Protein phosphorylation and its role in archaeal signal transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Dominik; Hoffmann, Lena; Pham, Trong Khoa; Bräsen, Christopher; Qiu, Wen; Wright, Phillip C.; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Siebers, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is the main mechanism of signal transduction that enables cells to rapidly respond to environmental changes by controlling the functional properties of proteins in response to external stimuli. However, whereas signal transduction is well studied in Eukaryotes and Bacteria, the knowledge in Archaea is still rather scarce. Archaea are special with regard to protein phosphorylation, due to the fact that the two best studied phyla, the Euryarchaeota and Crenarchaeaota, seem to exhibit fundamental differences in regulatory systems. Euryarchaeota (e.g. halophiles, methanogens, thermophiles), like Bacteria and Eukaryotes, rely on bacterial-type two-component signal transduction systems (phosphorylation on His and Asp), as well as on the protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr and Tyr by Hanks-type protein kinases. Instead, Crenarchaeota (e.g. acidophiles and (hyper)thermophiles) only depend on Hanks-type protein phosphorylation. In this review, the current knowledge of reversible protein phosphorylation in Archaea is presented. It combines results from identified phosphoproteins, biochemical characterization of protein kinases and protein phosphatases as well as target enzymes and first insights into archaeal signal transduction by biochemical, genetic and polyomic studies. PMID:27476079

  4. Diffusion wave and signal transduction in biological live cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Tian You; Fan, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Transduction of mechanical stimuli into biochemical signals is a fundamental subject for cell physics. In the experiments of FRET signal in cells a wave propagation in nanoscope was observed. We here develop a diffusion wave concept and try to give an explanation to the experimental observation. The theoretical prediction is in good agreement to result of the experiment.

  5. Exploring signal transduction networks using mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, L.A.T.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics can be used to answer a diversity of biological questions. In this thesis, we describe the application of several MS-based proteomics approaches to get insight into several aspects of signal transduction. In Chapter 2, quantitative global phosphoproteomics are

  6. Mitogen-activated protein kinase and abscisic acid signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S.; Testerink, C.; Wang, M.

    1998-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a classical plant hormone, responsible for regulation of abscission, diverse aspects of plant and seed development, stress responses and germination. It was found that ABA signal transduction in plants can involve the activity of type 2C-phosphatases (PP2C),

  7. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Skov, S; Bregenholt, S

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...

  8. Single Particle Tracking Confirms That Multivalent Tat Protein Transduction Domain-induced Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan Cross-linkage Activates Rac1 for Internalization*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Junji; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Gonda, Kohsuke; Roy, Chandra Nath; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Higuchi, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism by which HIV-1-Tat protein transduction domain (TatP) enters the cell remains unclear because of an insufficient understanding of the initial kinetics of peptide entry. Here, we report the successful visualization and tracking of TatP molecular kinetics on the cell surface with 7-nm spatial precision using quantum dots. Strong cell binding was only observed with a TatP valence of ≥8, whereas monovalent TatP binding was negligible. The requirement of the cell-surface heparan sulfate (HS) chains of HS proteoglycans (HSPGs) for TatP binding and intracellular transport was demonstrated by the enzymatic removal of HS and simultaneous observation of two individual particles. Multivalent TatP induces HSPG cross-linking, recruiting activated Rac1 to adjacent lipid rafts and thereby enhancing the recruitment of TatP/HSPG to actin-associated microdomains and its internalization by macropinocytosis. These findings clarify the initial binding mechanism of TatP to the cell surface and demonstrate the importance of TatP valence for strong surface binding and signal transduction. Our data also shed light on the ability of TatP to exploit the machinery of living cells, using HSPG signaling to activate Rac1 and alter TatP mobility and internalization. This work should guide the future design of TatP-based peptides as therapeutic nanocarriers with efficient transduction. PMID:21199870

  9. Single particle tracking confirms that multivalent Tat protein transduction domain-induced heparan sulfate proteoglycan cross-linkage activates Rac1 for internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Junji; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Gonda, Kohsuke; Roy, Chandra Nath; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Higuchi, Hideo

    2011-03-25

    The mechanism by which HIV-1-Tat protein transduction domain (TatP) enters the cell remains unclear because of an insufficient understanding of the initial kinetics of peptide entry. Here, we report the successful visualization and tracking of TatP molecular kinetics on the cell surface with 7-nm spatial precision using quantum dots. Strong cell binding was only observed with a TatP valence of ≥8, whereas monovalent TatP binding was negligible. The requirement of the cell-surface heparan sulfate (HS) chains of HS proteoglycans (HSPGs) for TatP binding and intracellular transport was demonstrated by the enzymatic removal of HS and simultaneous observation of two individual particles. Multivalent TatP induces HSPG cross-linking, recruiting activated Rac1 to adjacent lipid rafts and thereby enhancing the recruitment of TatP/HSPG to actin-associated microdomains and its internalization by macropinocytosis. These findings clarify the initial binding mechanism of TatP to the cell surface and demonstrate the importance of TatP valence for strong surface binding and signal transduction. Our data also shed light on the ability of TatP to exploit the machinery of living cells, using HSPG signaling to activate Rac1 and alter TatP mobility and internalization. This work should guide the future design of TatP-based peptides as therapeutic nanocarriers with efficient transduction.

  10. Ctp Atıklarının Kendiliğinden Yerleşen Tamir Harçlarının Özelliklerine Etkisi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çağlar Yalçınkaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Kendiliğinden yerleşen tamir harçları (KYTH dar kesitlerden vibrasyon gerekmeksizin geçebilen ürünlerdir. Tamir ve güçlendirme işlerinde kullanılabilecek nitelikte olan bu harçların yüksek oranda toz içermesi atık değerlendirilmesi açısından fırsat olarak görülebilir. Çalışmada, gemi ve tekne onarımında kullanılan cam lifi takviyeli plastiklerin (CTP uygulaması sırasında açığa çıkan tozların KYTH içerisinde kullanım potansiyeli araştırılmıştır. Çimento bağlayıcılı ve yüksek oranda (%50 öğütülmüş yüksek fırın cürufu (YFC ikameli matrislere hacmen %1, %2, %3 CTP katılarak 6 farklı karışım oluşturulmuştur. CTP tozunun KYTH'nın işlenebilirliğini azalttığı, mekanik özelliklere etkisinin ise bağlayıcı matrise göre değiştiği görülmüştür. CTP dozajı arttıkça erken dönem bünyesel büzülmeler sırf çimentolu matriste artarken, cüruf ikameli matriste azalmıştır.

  11. Characterization of sur-2, a Novel Ras-Mediated Signal Transduction Component in C. elegans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DesJardins, Edward

    1999-01-01

    ... (oncogenes). A subset of proto-oncogenes comprise the RAS signal transduction pathway. Vulval development in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans is controlled by a RAS signal transduction pathway. C...

  12. Characterization of sur-2, a Novel Ras-Mediated Signal Transduction Component in C. elegans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DesJardins, Edward

    1998-01-01

    ... (oncogenes). A subset of proto-oncogenes comprise the RAS signal transduction pathway. Vulval development in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans is controlled by a RAS signal transduction pathway...

  13. Human peptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2002-01-01

    Peptide transporters are epithelial solute carriers. Their functional role has been characterised in the small intestine and proximal tubules, where they are involved in absorption of dietary peptides and peptide reabsorption, respectively. Currently, two peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2, wh...

  14. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  15. DMPD: LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18304834 LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. Lu YC, Yeh WC, Ohashi PS. Cytokine. ...2008 May;42(2):145-51. Epub 2008 Mar 4. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show LPS/TLR4 signal transduction path...way. PubmedID 18304834 Title LPS/TLR4 signal transduction pathway. Authors Lu YC, Yeh WC, Ohashi PS. Publica

  16. DMPD: Toll-like receptor signal transduction. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17934330 Toll-like receptor signal transduction. Krishnan J, Selvarajoo K, Tsuchiya... M, Lee G, Choi S. Exp Mol Med. 2007 Aug 31;39(4):421-38. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptor sign...al transduction. PubmedID 17934330 Title Toll-like receptor signal transduction. Authors Krishnan J,

  17. Mechanisms of hypoxic signal transduction regulated by reactive nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbayev, V V; Yasinska, I M

    2007-05-01

    Recent reports devoted to the field of oxygen sensing outline that signalling molecules such as nitric oxide/nitric oxide derived species as well as cytokines and other inflammatory mediators participate in hypoxic signal transduction. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge about the role of nitric oxide and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) derived from it in hypoxic signal transduction and particularly in accumulation/de-accumulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1alpha) protein, which is critical not only for cellular adaptation to low oxygen availability but also for generation of inflammatory and innate immune responses. After brief description of nitric oxide and other RNS as multifunctional messengers we analyse and discuss the RNS-dependent accumulation of HIF-1alpha protein under normoxia followed by discussion of the mechanisms of nitric oxide (NO)-dependent enzyme-regulated degradation of HIF-1alpha protein under low oxygen availability.

  18. Molecular methods for the study of signal transduction in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Helen R; Gehring, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Novel and improved analytical methods have led to a rapid increase in our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying plant signal transduction. Progress has been made both at the level of single-component analysis and in vivo imaging as well as at the systems level where transcriptomics and particularly phosphoproteomics afford a window into complex biological responses. Here we review the role of the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP in plant signal transduction as well as the discovery and biochemical and biological characterization of an increasing number of complex multi-domain nucleotide cyclases that catalyze the synthesis of cAMP and cGMP from ATP and GTP, respectively.

  19. Transductive Regression for Data With Latent Dependence Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornitz, Nico; Lima, Luiz Alberto; Varella, Luiz Eduardo; Muller, Klaus-Robert; Nakajima, Shinichi

    2017-05-18

    Analyzing data with latent spatial and/or temporal structure is a challenge for machine learning. In this paper, we propose a novel nonlinear model for studying data with latent dependence structure. It successfully combines the concepts of Markov random fields, transductive learning, and regression, making heavy use of the notion of joint feature maps. Our transductive conditional random field regression model is able to infer the latent states by combining limited labeled data of high precision with unlabeled data containing measurement uncertainty. In this manner, we can propagate accurate information and greatly reduce uncertainty. We demonstrate the usefulness of our novel framework on generated time series data with the known temporal structure and successfully validate it on synthetic as well as real-world offshore data with the spatial structure from the oil industry to predict rock porosities from acoustic impedance data.

  20. Molecular methods for the study of signal transduction in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Irving, Helen R.

    2013-09-03

    Novel and improved analytical methods have led to a rapid increase in our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying plant signal transduction. Progress has been made both at the level of single-component analysis and in vivo imaging as well as at the systems level where transcriptomics and particularly phosphoproteomics afford a window into complex biological responses. Here we review the role of the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP in plant signal transduction as well as the discovery and biochemical and biological characterization of an increasing number of complex multi-domain nucleotide cyclases that catalyze the synthesis of cAMP and cGMP from ATP and GTP, respectively. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  1. Efficiency of Free Energy Transduction in Autonomous Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kawaguchi, Kyogo; Sano, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    We consider the thermodynamics of chemical coupling from the viewpoint of free energy transduction efficiency. In contrast to an external parameter-driven stochastic energetics setup, the dynamic change of the equilibrium distribution induced by chemical coupling, adopted, for example, in biological systems, is inevitably an autonomous process. We found that the efficiency is bounded by the ratio between the non-symmetric and the symmetrized Kullback-Leibler distance, which is significantly l...

  2. Tuning piezoresistive transduction in nanomechanical resonators by geometrical asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llobet, J.; Sansa, M.; Lorenzoni, M.; Pérez-Murano, F., E-mail: francesc.perez@csic.es [Institut de Microelectrònica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM CSIC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Borrisé, X. [Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia (ICN2), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra Spain (Spain); San Paulo, A. [Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid (IMM-CSIC), 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2015-08-17

    The effect of geometrical asymmetries on the piezoresistive transduction in suspended double clamped beam nanomechanical resonators is investigated. Tapered silicon nano-beams, fabricated using a fast and flexible prototyping method, are employed to determine how the asymmetry affects the transduced piezoresistive signal for different mechanical resonant modes. This effect is attributed to the modulation of the strain in pre-strained double clamped beams, and it is confirmed by means of finite element simulations.

  3. Signal Transduction in Histidine Kinases: Insights from New Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Bhate, Manasi P.; Molnar, Kathleen S.; Goulian, Mark; DeGrado, William F.

    2015-01-01

    Histidine kinases (HKs) are major players in bacterial signaling. There has been an explosion of new HK crystal structures in the last five years. We globally analyze the structures of HKs to yield insights into the mechanisms by which signals are transmitted to and across protein structures in this family. We interpret known enzymological data in the context of new structural data to show how asymmetry across the dimer interface is a key feature of signal transduction in HKs, and discuss how...

  4. Dynamic disorder and the energetic costs of information transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thill, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We study a model of dynamic disorder relevant for signal transduction pathways in which enzymatic reaction rates fluctuate over several orders of magnitude. For the simple networks we consider, dynamic disorder drives the system far from equilibrium and imposes an energetic burden for high fidelity signaling capability. We study how the dynamics of the underlying stochastic behavior in the reaction rate process is related to the energetic cost of transmitting information through the network

  5. Piezotransistive transduction of femtoscale displacement for photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Abdul; Faheem Khan, M.; Lee, Dongkyu; Kim, Seonghwan; Thundat, Thomas; Koley, Goutam

    2015-08-01

    Measurement of femtoscale displacements in the ultrasonic frequency range is attractive for advanced material characterization and sensing, yet major challenges remain in their reliable transduction using non-optical modalities, which can dramatically reduce the size and complexity of the transducer assembly. Here we demonstrate femtoscale displacement transduction using an AlGaN/GaN heterojunction field effect transistor-integrated GaN microcantilever that utilizes piezoelectric polarization-induced changes in two-dimensional electron gas to transduce displacement with very high sensitivity. The piezotransistor demonstrated an ultra-high gauge factor of 8,700 while consuming an extremely low power of 1.36 nW, and transduced external excitation with a superior noise-limited resolution of 12.43 fm Hz-1/2 and an outstanding responsivity of 170 nV fm-1, which is comparable to the optical transduction limits. These extraordinary characteristics, which enabled unique detection of nanogram quantity of analytes using photoacoustic spectroscopy, can be readily exploited in realizing a multitude of novel sensing paradigms.

  6. Transduction of normal and malignant oral epithelium by particle bombardment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shillitoe, E J; Noonan, S; Hinkle, C C; Marini, F C; Kellman, R M

    1998-01-01

    Although genetic approaches to the treatment and prevention of oral cancer are being developed, there are no suitable methods of transduction of the oral mucosa or early cancers. We therefore tested the technique of particle bombardment for its ability to transduce oral cancer cells in vitro and normal epithelium of the hamster cheek pouch in vivo. A gene gun was used to transfer a plasmid that encoded a marker/suicide fusion gene, beta-galactosidase-thymidine kinase (GAL-TEK), under control of a CMV promoter. For comparison we used the method of lipofection and an adenovirus vector. Particle bombardment transduced up to 13% of cells in culture, resulting in a 24.3% reduction in growth in the presence of ganciclovir. The efficiency of transduction was similar to that of lipofection but was much less than that of the adenovirus vector, which transduced 54% of cells and completely inhibited their growth in the presence of ganciclovir. Transduction of the hamster cheek pouch by particle bombardment produced expression of beta-galactosidase as judged by macroscopic staining, for up to 5 days. However, histological examination showed that the transduced cells were rare and superficial, and that administration of systemic ganciclovir did not lead to any changes in the tissue. Improvements in efficiency are necessary before the gene gun can be used in the management of oral cancer.

  7. The transduction of Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor-negative cells and protection against neutralizing antibodies by HPMA-co-oligolysine copolymer-coated adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chung-Huei K; Chan, Leslie W; Johnson, Russell N; Chu, David S H; Shi, Julie; Schellinger, Joan G; Lieber, André; Pun, Suzie H

    2011-12-01

    Adenoviral (AdV) gene vectors offer efficient nucleic acid transfer into both dividing and non-dividing cells. However issues such as vector immunogenicity, toxicity and restricted transduction to receptor-expressing cells have prevented broad clinical translation of these constructs. To address this issue, engineered AdV have been prepared by both genetic and chemical manipulation. In this work, a polymer-coated Ad5 formulation is optimized by evaluating a series of N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA)-co-oligolysine copolymers synthesized by living polymerization techniques. This synthesis approach was used to generate highly controlled and well-defined polymers with varying peptide length (K(5), K(10) and K(15)), polymer molecular weight, and degradability to coat the viral capsid. The optimal formulation was not affected by the presence of serum during transduction and significantly increased Ad5 transduction of several cell types that lack the Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor (CAR) by up to 6-fold compared to unmodified AdV. Polymer-coated Ad5 also retained high transduction capability in the presence of Ad5 neutralizing antibodies. The critical role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) in mediating cell binding and internalization of polymer-coated AdV was also demonstrated by evaluating transduction in HSPG-defective recombinant CHO cells. The formulations developed here are attractive vectors for ex vivo gene transfer in applications such as cell therapy. In addition, this platform for adenoviral modification allows for facile introduction of alternative targeting ligands. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Budget impact analysis of biosimilar infliximab (CT-P13) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in six Central and Eastern European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodszky, Valentin; Baji, Petra; Balogh, Orsolya; Péntek, Márta

    2014-05-01

    The first biosimilar monoclonal antibody (infliximab, CT-P13) was registered by the European Medicines Agency in 2013 for the treatment of several inflammatory conditions including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Biosimilar infliximab is first being marketed in the Central and Eastern European countries. This paper presents the estimated budget impact of the introduction of biosimilar infliximab in RA over a 3-year time period in six selected countries, namely Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania and Slovakia. A prevalence-based model was constructed for budget impact analysis. Two scenarios were compared to the reference scenario (RSc) where no biosimilar infliximab is available: biosimilar scenario 1 (BSc1), where interchanging the originator infliximab with biosimilar infliximab is disallowed, and only patients who start new biological therapy are allowed to use biosimilar infliximab; as well as biosimilar scenario 2 (BSc2), where interchanging the originator infliximab with biosimilar infliximab is allowed, and 80% of patients treated with originator infliximab are interchanged to biosimilar infliximab. Compared to the RSc, the net savings are estimated to be €15.3 or €20.8 M in BSc1 and BSc2, respectively, over the 3 years. If budget savings were spent on reimbursement of additional biosimilar infliximab treatment, approximately 1,200 or 1,800 more patients could be treated in the six countries within 3 years in the two biosimilar scenarios, respectively. The actual saving is most sensitive to the assumption of the acquisition cost of the biosimilar drug and to the initial number of patients treated with biological therapy. The study focused on one indication (RA) and demonstrated that the introduction of biosimilar infliximab can lead to substantial budget savings in health care budgets. Further savings are expected for other indications where biosimilar medicines are implemented.

  9. Molecular Mechanism for the Thermo-Sensitive Phenotype of CHO-MT58 Cell Line Harbouring a Mutant CTP:Phosphocholine Cytidylyltransferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Marton

    Full Text Available Control and elimination of malaria still represents a major public health challenge. Emerging parasite resistance to current therapies urges development of antimalarials with novel mechanism of action. Phospholipid biosynthesis of the Plasmodium parasite has been validated as promising candidate antimalarial target. The most prevalent de novo pathway for synthesis of phosphatidylcholine is the Kennedy pathway. Its regulatory and often also rate limiting step is catalyzed by CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT. The CHO-MT58 cell line expresses a mutant variant of CCT, and displays a thermo-sensitive phenotype. At non-permissive temperature (40°C, the endogenous CCT activity decreases dramatically, blocking membrane synthesis and ultimately leading to apoptosis. In the present study we investigated the impact of the analogous mutation in a catalytic domain construct of Plasmodium falciparum CCT in order to explore the underlying molecular mechanism that explains this phenotype. We used temperature dependent enzyme activity measurements and modeling to investigate the functionality of the mutant enzyme. Furthermore, MS measurements were performed to determine the oligomerization state of the protein, and MD simulations to assess the inter-subunit interactions in the dimer. Our results demonstrate that the R681H mutation does not directly influence enzyme catalytic activity. Instead, it provokes increased heat-sensitivity by destabilizing the CCT dimer. This can possibly explain the significance of the PfCCT pseudoheterodimer organization in ensuring proper enzymatic function. This also provide an explanation for the observed thermo-sensitive phenotype of CHO-MT58 cell line.

  10. Microscopic insight into thermodynamics of conformational changes of SAP-SLAM complex in signal transduction cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Sanchita

    2017-04-01

    The signalling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family of receptors, expressed by an array of immune cells, associate with SLAM-associated protein (SAP)-related molecules, composed of single SH2 domain architecture. SAP activates Src-family kinase Fyn after SLAM ligation, resulting in a SLAM-SAP-Fyn complex, where, SAP binds the Fyn SH3 domain that does not involve canonical SH3 or SH2 interactions. This demands insight into this SAP mediated signalling cascade. Thermodynamics of the conformational changes are extracted from the histograms of dihedral angles obtained from the all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of this structurally well characterized SAP-SLAM complex. The results incorporate the binding induced thermodynamic changes of individual amino acid as well as the secondary structural elements of the protein and the solvent. Stabilization of the peptide partially comes through a strong hydrogen bonding network with the protein, while hydrophobic interactions also play a significant role where the peptide inserts itself into a hydrophobic cavity of the protein. SLAM binding widens SAP's second binding site for Fyn, which is the next step in the signal transduction cascade. The higher stabilization and less fluctuation of specific residues of SAP in the Fyn binding site, induced by SAP-SLAM complexation, emerge as the key structural elements to trigger the recognition of SAP by the SH3 domain of Fyn. The thermodynamic quantification of the protein due to complexation not only throws deeper understanding in the established mode of SAP-SLAM interaction but also assists in the recognition of the relevant residues of the protein responsible for alterations in its activity.

  11. Exploring transduction mechanisms of protein transduction domains (PTDs) in living cells utilizing single-quantum dot tracking (SQT) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Specific protein domains known as protein transduction domains (PTDs) can permeate cell membranes and deliver proteins or bioactive materials into living cells. Various approaches have been applied for improving their transduction efficacy. It is, therefore, crucial to clarify the entry mechanisms and to identify the rate-limiting steps. Because of technical limitations for imaging PTD behavior on cells with conventional fluorescent-dyes, how PTDs enter the cells has been a topic of much debate. Utilizing quantum dots (QDs), we recently tracked the behavior of PTD that was derived from HIV-1 Tat (TatP) in living cells at the single-molecule level with 7-nm special precision. In this review article, we initially summarize the controversy on TatP entry mechanisms; thereafter, we will focus on our recent findings on single-TatP-QD tracking (SQT), to identify the major sequential steps of intracellular delivery in living cells and to discuss how SQT can easily provide direct information on TatP entry mechanisms. As a primer for SQT study, we also discuss the latest findings on single particle tracking of various molecules on the plasma membrane. Finally, we discuss the problems of QDs and the challenges for the future in utilizing currently available QD probes for SQT. In conclusion, direct identification of the rate-limiting steps of PTD entry with SQT should dramatically improve the methods for enhancing transduction efficiency.

  12. Exploring Transduction Mechanisms of Protein Transduction Domains (PTDs in Living Cells Utilizing Single-Quantum Dot Tracking (SQT Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific protein domains known as protein transduction domains (PTDs can permeate cell membranes and deliver proteins or bioactive materials into living cells. Various approaches have been applied for improving their transduction efficacy. It is, therefore, crucial to clarify the entry mechanisms and to identify the rate-limiting steps. Because of technical limitations for imaging PTD behavior on cells with conventional fluorescent-dyes, how PTDs enter the cells has been a topic of much debate. Utilizing quantum dots (QDs, we recently tracked the behavior of PTD that was derived from HIV-1 Tat (TatP in living cells at the single-molecule level with 7-nm special precision. In this review article, we initially summarize the controversy on TatP entry mechanisms; thereafter, we will focus on our recent findings on single-TatP-QD tracking (SQT, to identify the major sequential steps of intracellular delivery in living cells and to discuss how SQT can easily provide direct information on TatP entry mechanisms. As a primer for SQT study, we also discuss the latest findings on single particle tracking of various molecules on the plasma membrane. Finally, we discuss the problems of QDs and the challenges for the future in utilizing currently available QD probes for SQT. In conclusion, direct identification of the rate-limiting steps of PTD entry with SQT should dramatically improve the methods for enhancing transduction efficiency.

  13. Transduction with the antioxidant enzyme catalase protects human T cells against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Takashi; Mimura, Kousaku; Johansson, C Christian; Hanson, Mikael G; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Larsson, Charlotte; Martins da Palma, Telma; Sakurai, Daiju; Norell, Håkan; Li, Mingli; Nishimura, Michael I; Kiessling, Rolf

    2008-12-15

    Patients with diseases characterized by chronic inflammation, caused by infection or cancer, have T cells and NK cells with impaired function. The underlying molecular mechanisms are diverse, but one of the major mediators in this immune suppression is oxidative stress caused by activated monocytes, granulocytes, or myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Reactive oxygen species can seriously hamper the efficacy of active immunotherapy and adoptive transfer of T and NK cells into patients. In this study, we have evaluated whether enhanced expression of the antioxidant enzyme catalase in human T cells can protect them against reactive oxygen species. Human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells retrovirally transduced with the catalase gene had increased intracellular expression and activity of catalase. Catalase transduction made CD4(+) T cells less sensitive to H(2)O(2)-induced loss-of-function, measured by their cytokine production and ability to expand in vitro following anti-CD3 stimulation. It also enhanced the resistance to oxidative stress-induced cell death after coculture with activated granulocytes, exposure to the oxidized lipid 4-hydroxynonenal, or H(2)O(2). Expression of catalase by CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells saved cells from cell death and improved their capacity to recognize CMV peptide-loaded target cells when exposed to H(2)O(2). These findings indicate that catalase-transduced T cells potentially are more efficacious for the immunotherapy of patients with advanced cancer or chronic viral infections.

  14. Simulation and Evaluation of CTP and Secure-CTP Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pecho

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses characteristics and qualities of two routing protocols – Collection Tree Protocol and its secure modification. The original protocol, as well as other protocols for wireless sensors, solves only problems of ra- dio communication and limited resources. Our design of the secure protocol tries to solve also the essential security ob- jectives. For the evaluation of properties of our protocol in large networks, a TOSSIM simulator was used. Our effort was to show the influence of the modification of the routing protocol to its behavior and quality of routing trees. We have proved that adding security into protocol design does not necessarily mean higher demands for data transfer, power consumption or worse protocol efficiency. In the paper, we manifest that security in the protocol may be achieved with low cost and may offer similar performance as the original protocol.

  15. Single Particle Tracking Confirms That Multivalent Tat Protein Transduction Domain-induced Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan Cross-linkage Activates Rac1 for Internalization*

    OpenAIRE

    Imamura, Junji; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Gonda, Kohsuke; Roy, Chandra Nath; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Higuchi, Hideo

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism by which HIV-1-Tat protein transduction domain (TatP) enters the cell remains unclear because of an insufficient understanding of the initial kinetics of peptide entry. Here, we report the successful visualization and tracking of TatP molecular kinetics on the cell surface with 7-nm spatial precision using quantum dots. Strong cell binding was only observed with a TatP valence of ≥8, whereas monovalent TatP binding was negligible. The requirement of the cell-surface heparan sulf...

  16. [Novel achievements in development and application of GPCR-peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpakov, A O; Derkach, K V

    2015-01-01

    One of the approaches to creating the regulators of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) is the development of peptides that structurally correspond to the functionally important regions of the intracellular extracellular loops of the receptors. GPCR-peptides can selectively regulate the functional activity of homologous receptor and affect the hormonal signal transduction via the receptor. Among the peptides corresponding to the intracellular regions of GPCR, their derivatives modified with hydrophobic radicals exhibit the highest activity and selectivity of action in vitro and in vivo. Ample evidence demonstrates that lipophilic GPCR-peptides may be used to treat diseases and various abnormalities that depend on the functional activity of receptors homologous to them. In turn, the peptides corresponding to the extracellular regions of GPCR can be used as functional probes for studying the specific interaction between the receptors and their ligands, as well as for studying the etiology and pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases caused by the production of antibodies to GPCR antigenic determinants that are localized in the receptor extracellular loops. The present review focuses on the recent achievements in development and application of GPCR-peptides and on the prospects for their further use in medicine and fundamental biology.

  17. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  18. Umami taste in mice uses multiple receptors and transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumatsu, Keiko; Ogiwara, Yoko; Takai, Shingo; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Iwatsuki, Ken; Torii, Kunio; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2012-03-01

    The distinctive umami taste elicited by l-glutamate and some other amino acids is thought to be initiated by G-protein-coupled receptors. Proposed umami receptors include heteromers of taste receptor type 1, members 1 and 3 (T1R1+T1R3), and metabotropic glutamate receptors 1 and 4 (mGluR1 and mGluR4). Multiple lines of evidence support the involvement of T1R1+T1R3 in umami responses of mice. Although several studies suggest the involvement of receptors other than T1R1+T1R3 in umami, the identity of those receptors remains unclear. Here, we examined taste responsiveness of umami-sensitive chorda tympani nerve fibres from wild-type mice and mice genetically lacking T1R3 or its downstream transduction molecule, the ion channel TRPM5. Our results indicate that single umami-sensitive fibres in wild-type mice fall into two major groups: sucrose-best (S-type) and monopotassium glutamate (MPG)-best (M-type). Each fibre type has two subtypes; one shows synergism between MPG and inosine monophosphate (S1, M1) and the other shows no synergism (S2, M2). In both T1R3 and TRPM5 null mice, S1-type fibres were absent, whereas S2-, M1- and M2-types remained. Lingual application of mGluR antagonists selectively suppressed MPG responses of M1- and M2-type fibres. These data suggest the existence of multiple receptors and transduction pathways for umami responses in mice. Information initiated from T1R3-containing receptors may be mediated by a transduction pathway including TRPM5 and conveyed by sweet-best fibres, whereas umami information from mGluRs may be mediated by TRPM5-independent pathway(s) and conveyed by glutamate-best fibres.

  19. Characterization of the ABA signal transduction pathway in Vitis vinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneh, Uri; Biton, Iris; Schwartz, Amnon; Ben-Ari, Giora

    2012-05-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates many key processes in plants including the response to abiotic stress. ABA signal transduction consists of a double-negative regulatory mechanism, whereby ABA-bound PYR/RCARs inhibit PP2C activity, and PP2Cs inactivate SnRK2s. We studied and analyzed the various genes participating in the ABA signaling cascade of the grape (Vitis vinifera). The grape ABA signal transduction consists of at least six SnRK2s. Yeast two-hybrid system was used to test direct interactions between core components of grape ABA signal transduction. We found that a total of forty eight interactions can occur between the various components. Exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and abiotic stresses such as drought, high salt concentration and cold, were applied to vines growing in a hydroponic system. These stresses regulated the expression of various grape SnRK2s as well as ABFs in leaves and roots. Based on the interactions between SnRK2s and its targets and the expression pattern, we suggest that VvSnRK2.1 and VvSnRK2.6, can be considered the major VvSnRK2 candidates involved in the stomata response to abiotic stress. Furthermore, we found that the expression pattern of the two grape ABF genes indicates organ specificity of these genes. The key role of ABA signaling in response to abiotic stresses makes the genes involve in this signaling potential candidates for manipulation in programs designed to improve fruit tree performance in extreme environments. © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Designer Natriuretic Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Candace Y. W.; Lieu, Hsiao; Burnett, John C.

    2011-01-01

    Designer natriuretic peptides (NPs) are novel hybrid peptides that are engineered from the native NPs through addition, deletion, or substitution of amino acid(s) with a goal toward optimization of pharmacological actions while minimizing undesirable effects. In this article, selected peptides that were designed in our laboratory are reviewed, and future directions for research and development of designer NPs are discussed. PMID:19158603

  1. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  3. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  4. Peptide-Carrier Conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    2015-01-01

    To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined....

  5. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  6. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  7. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  8. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A E; Skov, Svend; Bregenholt, S

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...... and functioning, MHC-I molecules might be of importance for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis not only within the immune system, but also in the interplay between the immune system and other organ systems....

  9. Signaling transduction pathways involved in basophil adhesion and histamine release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sha, Quan; Poulsen, Lars K.; Gerwien, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about basophil with respect to the different signaling transduction pathways involved in spontaneous, cytokine or anti-IgE induced adhesion and how this compares to IgE-dependent and IgE-independent mediator secretion. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the roles ...... of beta1 and beta2 integrins in basophil adhesion as well as hosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), src-kinases and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in basophil adhesion and histamine release (HR)....

  10. Sensors and signal transduction pathways in vertebrate cell volume regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else K; Pedersen, Stine F

    2006-01-01

    to the identification of transporter binding partners such as protein kinases and phosphatases, cytoskeletal elements and lipids. Considerable progress has also been made recently in understanding the upstream elements in volume sensing and volume-sensitive signal transduction, and salient features of these systems...... will be discussed. In contrast to the simple pathway of osmosensing in yeast, cells from vertebrate organisms appear to exhibit multiple volume sensing systems, the specific mechanism(s) activated being cell type- and stimulus-dependent. Candidate sensors include integrins and growth factor receptors, while other...

  11. Signal transduction and activation of the NADPH oxidase in eosinophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Lindsay

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the eosinophil NADPH oxidase and the subsequent release of toxic oxygen radicals has been implicated in the mechanism of parasite killing and inflammation. At present, little is known of the signal transduction pathway that govern agonist-induced activation of the respiratory burst and is the subject of this review. In particular, we focus on the ability of leukotrine B4 to activate the NADPH oxidase in guinea-pig peritoneal eosinophils which can be obtained in sufficient number and purity for detailed biochemical experiments to be performed.

  12. Organizing signal transduction through A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logue, Jeremy S; Scott, John D

    2010-11-01

    A fundamental role for protein-protein interactions in the organization of signal transduction pathways is evident. Anchoring, scaffolding and adapter proteins function to enhance the precision and directionality of these signaling events by bringing enzymes together. The cAMP signaling pathway is organized by A-kinase anchoring proteins. This family of proteins assembles enzyme complexes containing the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, phosphoprotein phosphatases, phosphodiesterases and other signaling effectors to optimize cellular responses to cAMP and other second messengers. Selected A-kinase anchoring protein signaling complexes are highlighted in this minireview. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 FEBS.

  13. Modeling evolution of crosstalk in noisy signal transduction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareen, Ammar; Wingreen, Ned S.; Mukhopadhyay, Ranjan

    2018-02-01

    Signal transduction networks can form highly interconnected systems within cells due to crosstalk between constituent pathways. To better understand the evolutionary design principles underlying such networks, we study the evolution of crosstalk for two parallel signaling pathways that arise via gene duplication. We use a sequence-based evolutionary algorithm and evolve the network based on two physically motivated fitness functions related to information transmission. We find that one fitness function leads to a high degree of crosstalk while the other leads to pathway specificity. Our results offer insights on the relationship between network architecture and information transmission for noisy biomolecular networks.

  14. Myosin individualized: single nucleotide polymorphisms in energy transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieben Eric D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin performs ATP free energy transduction into mechanical work in the motor domain of the myosin heavy chain (MHC. Energy transduction is the definitive systemic feature of the myosin motor performed by coordinating in a time ordered sequence: ATP hydrolysis at the active site, actin affinity modulation at the actin binding site, and the lever-arm rotation of the power stroke. These functions are carried out by several conserved sub-domains within the motor domain. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs affect the MHC sequence of many isoforms expressed in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and non-muscle tissue. The purpose of this work is to provide a rationale for using SNPs as a functional genomics tool to investigate structurefunction relationships in myosin. In particular, to discover SNP distribution over the conserved sub-domains and surmise what it implies about sub-domain stability and criticality in the energy transduction mechanism. Results An automated routine identifying human nonsynonymous SNP amino acid missense substitutions for any MHC gene mined the NCBI SNP data base. The routine tested 22 MHC genes coding muscle and non-muscle isoforms and identified 89 missense mutation positions in the motor domain with 10 already implicated in heart disease and another 8 lacking sequence homology with a skeletal MHC isoform for which a crystallographic model is available. The remaining 71 SNP substitutions were found to be distributed over MHC with 22 falling outside identified functional sub-domains and 49 in or very near to myosin sub-domains assigned specific crucial functions in energy transduction. The latter includes the active site, the actin binding site, the rigid lever-arm, and regions facilitating their communication. Most MHC isoforms contained SNPs somewhere in the motor domain. Conclusions Several functional-crucial sub-domains are infiltrated by a large number of SNP substitution sites suggesting these

  15. Coincident resection at both ends of random, γ-induced double-strand breaks requires MRX (MRN, Sae2 (Ctp1, and Mre11-nuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Westmoreland

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Resection is an early step in homology-directed recombinational repair (HDRR of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. Resection enables strand invasion as well as reannealing following DNA synthesis across a DSB to assure efficient HDRR. While resection of only one end could result in genome instability, it has not been feasible to address events at both ends of a DSB, or to distinguish 1- versus 2-end resections at random, radiation-induced "dirty" DSBs or even enzyme-induced "clean" DSBs. Previously, we quantitatively addressed resection and the role of Mre11/Rad50/Xrs2 complex (MRX at random DSBs in circular chromosomes within budding yeast based on reduced pulsed-field gel electrophoretic mobility ("PFGE-shift". Here, we extend PFGE analysis to a second dimension and demonstrate unique patterns associated with 0-, 1-, and 2-end resections at DSBs, providing opportunities to examine coincidence of resection. In G2-arrested WT, Δrad51 and Δrad52 cells deficient in late stages of HDRR, resection occurs at both ends of γ-DSBs. However, for radiation-induced and I-SceI-induced DSBs, 1-end resections predominate in MRX (MRN null mutants with or without Ku70. Surprisingly, Sae2 (Ctp1/CtIP and Mre11 nuclease-deficient mutants have similar responses, although there is less impact on repair. Thus, we provide direct molecular characterization of coincident resection at random, radiation-induced DSBs and show that rapid and coincident initiation of resection at γ-DSBs requires MRX, Sae2 protein, and Mre11 nuclease. Structural features of MRX complex are consistent with coincident resection being due to an ability to interact with both DSB ends to directly coordinate resection. Interestingly, coincident resection at clean I-SceI-induced breaks is much less dependent on Mre11 nuclease or Sae2, contrary to a strong dependence on MRX complex, suggesting different roles for these functions at "dirty" and clean DSB ends. These approaches apply to resection at

  16. Signal transduction by interferon-α through arachidonic acid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannigan, G.E.; Williams, B.R.G.

    1991-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms that mediate signal transduction by growth inhibitory cytokines are poorly understood. Type 1 (α and β) interferons (IFNs) are potent growth inhibitory cytokines whose biological activities depend on induced changes in gene expression. IFN-α induced the transient activation of phospholipase A 2 in 3T3 fibroblasts and rapid hydrolysis of [ 3 H]arachidonic acid (AA) from prelabeled phospholipid pools. The phospholipase inhibitor, bromophenacyl bromide (BPB), specifically blocked IFN-induced binding of nuclear factors to a conserved, IFN-regulated enhancer element, the interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE). BPB also caused a dose-dependent inhibition of IFN-α-induced ISRE-dependent transcription in transient transfection assays. Specific inhibition of AA oxygenation by eicosatetraynoic acid prevented IFN-α induction of factor binding to the ISRE. Treatment of intact cells with inhibitors of fatty acid cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase enzymes resulted in amplification of IFN-α-induced ISRE binding and gene expression. Thus, IFN-α receptor-coupled AA hydrolysis may function in activation of latent transcription factors by IFN-α and provides a system for studying the role of AA metabolism in transduction of growth inhibitory signals

  17. Molecular mechanisms of root gravity sensing and signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Allison K; Baldwin, Katherine L; Masson, Patrick H

    2012-01-01

    Plants use gravity as a guide to direct their roots down into the soil to anchor themselves and to find resources needed for growth and development. In higher plants, the columella cells of the root tip form the primary site of gravity sensing, and in these cells the sedimentation of dense, starch-filled plastids (amyloplasts) triggers gravity signal transduction. This generates an auxin gradient across the root cap that is transmitted to the elongation zone where it promotes differential cell elongation, allowing the root to direct itself downward. It is still not well understood how amyloplast sedimentation leads to auxin redistribution. Models have been proposed to explain how mechanosensitive ion channels or ligand-receptor interactions could connect these events. Although their roles are still unclear, possible second messengers in this process include protons, Ca(2+), and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate. Upon gravistimulation, the auxin efflux facilitators PIN3 and PIN7 relocalize to the lower side of the columella cells and mediate auxin redistribution. However, evidence for an auxin-independent secondary mechanism of gravity sensing and signal transduction suggests that this physiological process is quite complex. Furthermore, plants must integrate a variety of environmental cues, resulting in multifaceted relationships between gravitropism and other directional growth responses such as hydro-, photo-, and thigmotropism. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Fetus Sound Stimulation: Cilia Memristor Effect of Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Jankovic-Raznatovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This experimental study evaluates fetal middle cerebral artery (MCA circulation after the defined prenatal acoustical stimulation (PAS and the role of cilia in hearing and memory and could explain signal transduction and memory according to cilia optical-acoustical properties. Methods. PAS was performed twice on 119 no-risk term pregnancies. We analyzed fetal MCA circulation before, after first and second PAS. Results. Analysis of the Pulsatility index basic (PIB and before PAS and Pulsatility index reactive after the first PAS (PIR 1 shows high statistical difference, representing high influence on the brain circulation. Analysis of PIB and Pulsatility index reactive after the second PAS (PIR 2 shows no statistical difference. Cilia as nanoscale structure possess magnetic flux linkage that depends on the amount of charge that has passed between two-terminal variable resistors of cilia. Microtubule resistance, as a function of the current through and voltage across the structure, leads to appearance of cilia memory with the “memristor” property. Conclusion. Acoustical and optical cilia properties play crucial role in hearing and memory processes. We suggest that fetuses are getting used to sound, developing a kind of memory patterns, considering acoustical and electromagnetically waves and involving cilia and microtubules and try to explain signal transduction.

  19. Acylation of Therapeutic Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Sofie; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Jensen, Simon Bjerregaard

    to the harsh and selective gastrointestinal system, and development has lacked far behind injection therapy. Peptide acylation is a powerful tool to alter the pharmacokinetics, biophysical properties and chemical stability of injectable peptide drugs, primarily used to prolong blood circulation....... This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of two therapeutic peptides by systematically increasing acyl chain length in order to elucidate its influence on membrane interaction and intestinal cell translocation in vitro. The studied peptides are the 33 amino acid Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2...... peptides can increase in vitro intestinal permeability, modestly for GLP-2 and drastically for sCT, and might benefit oral delivery. GLP-2 results provide a well-founded predictive power for future peptide analogues, whereas sCT results hold great promise for future analogues, albeit with a larger...

  20. The targeted transduction of MMP-overexpressing tumor cells by ACPP-HPMA copolymer-coated adenovirus conjugates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhua Li

    Full Text Available We have designed and tested a new way to selectively deliver HPMA polymer-coated adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 particles into matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-overexpressing tumor cells. An activatable cell penetrating peptide (ACPP was designed and attached to the reactive 4-nitrophenoxy groups of HPMA polymers by the C-terminal amino acid (asparagine, N. ACPPs are activatable cell penetrating peptides (CPPs with a linker between polycationic and polyanionic domains, and MMP-mediated cleavage releases the CPP portion and its attached cargo to enable cell entry. Our data indicate that the transport of these HPMA polymer conjugates by a single ACPP molecule to the cytoplasm occurs via a nonendocytotic and concentration-independent process. The uptake was observed to finish within 20 minutes by inverted fluorescence microscopy. In contrast, HPMA polymer-coated Ad5 without ACPPs was internalized solely by endocytosis. The optimal formulation was not affected by the presence of Ad5 neutralizing antibodies during transduction, and ACPP/polymer-coated Ad5 also retained high targeting capability to several MMP-overexpressing tumor cell types. For the first time, ACPP-mediated cytoplasmic delivery of polymer-bound Ad5 to MMP-overexpressing tumor cells was demonstrated. These findings are significant, as they demonstrate the use of a polymer-based system for the targeted delivery into MMP-overexpressing solid tumors and highlight how to overcome major cellular obstacles to achieve intracellular macromolecular delivery.

  1. Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cationic Antibacterial Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Morales-Nava, Rosmarbel; Diener, Christian; Schreiber, Gabriele; Gonzalez, Zyanya D.; Lara Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Ortega Blake, Ivan; Pantoja, Omar; Volkmer, Rudolf; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) and cationic antibacterial peptides (CAP) have similar physicochemical properties and yet it is not understood how such similar peptides display different activities. To address this question, we used Iztli peptide 1 (IP-1) because it has both CPP and CAP activities. Combining experimental and computational modeling of the internalization of IP-1, we show it is not internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, yet it permeates into many different cell types, including fungi and human cells. We also show that IP-1 makes pores in the presence of high electrical potential at the membrane, such as those found in bacteria and mitochondria. These results provide the basis to understand the functional redundancy of CPPs and CAPs. PMID:24706763

  2. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    for the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV-1) receptor or had specificity for the amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-A) receptor were used for transduction of five SCLC cell lines differing by a range of MDR mechanisms. Transduction efficiencies in these cell lines were compared by calculating the percentage...... of blue colonies after X-Gal staining of the cells grown in soft agar. All examined SCLC cell lines were transducible with either vector. Transduction efficiencies varied from 5.7% to 33.5% independent of the presence of MDR. These results indicate that MDR does not severely impair transduction of SCLC...

  3. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  4. Molecular transduction mechanisms in ACTH-induced grooming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Colbern, D.; Spruijt, B.M.

    1988-01-01

    Intraventricular administration of ACTH1-24 induces excessive grooming in the rat. Ethogram analysis shows that the peptide does not alter grooming behavior seen in a novel box, but that it prolongs the duration of the grooming bout. Extensive structure-activity studies have been performed which

  5. Sensory Transduction of the CO2 Response of Guard Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Eduardo Zeiger

    2003-06-30

    Stomata have a key role in the regulation of gas exchange and intercellular CO2 concentrations of leaves. Guard cells sense internal and external signals in the leaf environment and transduce these signals into osmoregulatory processes that control stomatal apertures. This research proposal addresses the characterization of the sensory transduction of the CO2 signal in guard cells. Recent studies have shown that in Vicia leaves kept at constant light and temperature in a growth chamber, changes in ambient CO2 concentrations cause large changes in guard cell zeaxanthin that are linear with CO2-dependent changes in stomatal apertures. Research proposed here will test the hypothesis that zeaxanthin function as a transducer of CO2 signals in guard cells. Three central aspects of this hypothesis will be investigated: CO2 sensing by the carboxylation reaction of Rubisco in the guard cell chloroplast, which would modulate zeaxanthin concentrations via changes in lumen pH; transduction of the CO2 signal by zeaxanthin via a transducing cascade that controls guard cell osmoregulation; and blue light dependence of the CO2 signal transduction by zeaxanthin, required for the formation of an isomeric form of zeaxanthin that is physiologically active as a transducer. The role of Rubisco in CO2 sensing will be investigated in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 in the Arabidopsis mutants R100 and rca-, which have reduced rates of Rubisco-dependent carboxylation. The role of zeaxanthin as a CO2 transducer will be studied in npq1, a zeaxanthin-less mutant. The blue light-dependence of CO2 sensing will be studied in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 under red light. Arabidopsis mutants will also be used in further studies of an acclimation of the stomatal response to CO2, and a possible role of the xanthophyll cycle of the guard cell chloroplast in acclimations of the stomatal response to CO2. Studies on the osmoregulatory role of sucrose in

  6. Analysis of the gravitaxis signal transduction chain in Euglena gracilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Adeel

    Abstract Euglena gracilis is a photosynthetic, eukaryotic flagellate. It can adapt autotrophic and heterotrophic mode of growth and respond to different stimuli, this makes it an organism of choice for different research disciplines. It swims to reach a suitable niche by employing different stimuli such as oxygen, light, gravity and different chemicals. Among these stimuli light and gravity are the most important. Phototaxis (locomotion under light stimulus) and gravitaxis (locomotion under gravity stimulus) synergistically help cells to attain an optimal niche in the environment. However, in the complete absence of light or under scarcity of detectable light, cells can totally depend on gravity to find its swimming path. Therefore gravity has certain advantages over other stimuli.Unlike phototatic signal transduction chain of Euglena gracilis no clear primary gravity receptor has been identified in Euglena cells so far. However, there are some convincing evidence that TRP like channels act as a primary gravity receptor in Euglena gracilis.Use of different inhibitors gave rise to the involvement of protein kinase and calmodulin proteins in signal transduction chain of Euglena gracilis. Recently, specific calmodulin (Calmodulin 2) and protein kinase (PKA) have been identified as potential candidates of gravitactic signal transduction chain. Further characterization and investigation of these candidates was required. Therefore a combination of biochemical and genetic techniques was employed to localize proteins in cells and also to find interacting partners. For localization studies, specific antibodies were raised and characterized. Specificity of antibodies was validated by knockdown mutants, Invitro-translated proteins and heterologously expressed proteins. Cell fractionation studies, involving separation of the cell body and flagella for western blot analysis and confocal immunofluorescence studies were performed for subcellular localization. In order to find

  7. Quantitative insight into models of Hedgehog signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzan, Shohreh F; Ogden, Stacey K; Robbins, David J

    2010-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is an essential regulator of embryonic development and a key factor in carcinogenesis.(1,2) Hh, a secreted morphogen, activates intracellular signaling events via downstream effector proteins, which translate the signal to regulate target gene transcription.(3,4) In a recent publication, we quantitatively compared two commonly accepted models of Hh signal transduction.(5) Each model requires a different ratio of signaling components to be feasible. Thus, we hypothesized that knowing the steady-state ratio of core signaling components might allow us to distinguish between models. We reported vast differences in the molar concentrations of endogenous effectors of Hh signaling, with Smo present in limiting concentrations.(5) This extra view summarizes the implications of this endogenous ratio in relation to current models of Hh signaling and places our results in the context of recent work describing the involvement of guanine nucleotide binding protein Galphai and Cos2 motility.

  8. Piezoelectric Multilayer-Stacked Hybrid Actuation/Transduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A novel full piezoelectric multilayer stacked hybrid actuation/transduction system. The system demonstrates significantly-enhanced electromechanical performance by utilizing the cooperative contributions of the electromechanical responses of multilayer stacked negative and positive strain components. Both experimental and theoretical studies indicate that for this system, the displacement is over three times that of a same-sized conventional flextensional actuator/transducer. The system consists of at least 2 layers which include electromechanically active components. The layers are arranged such that when electric power is applied, one layer contracts in a transverse direction while the second layer expands in a transverse direction which is perpendicular to the transverse direction of the first layer. An alternate embodiment includes a third layer. In this embodiment, the outer two layers contract in parallel transverse directions while the middle layer expands in a transverse direction which is perpendicular to the transverse direction of the outer layers.

  9. Signal transduction by growth factor receptors: signaling in an instant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengjel, Joern; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2007-01-01

    -out by mass spectrometry-based proteomics has allowed exciting views on the very early events in signal transduction. Activation profiles of regulated phosphorylation sites on epidermal growth factor receptor and downstream signal transducers showed different kinetics within the first ten seconds......Phosphorylation-based signaling events happening within the first minute of receptor stimulation have so far only been analyzed by classical cell biological approaches like live-cell microscopy. The development of a quench flow system with a time resolution of one second coupled to a read...... of stimulation. This new technique opens the perspectives for accurate analysis of rapid cellular processes and will help to establish models describing signal initiation at the plasma membrane....

  10. Single-cell analysis of G-protein signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clister, Terri; Mehta, Sohum; Zhang, Jin

    2015-03-13

    The growing use of fluorescent biosensors to directly probe the spatiotemporal dynamics of biochemical processes in living cells has revolutionized the study of intracellular signaling. In this review, we summarize recent developments in the use of biosensors to illuminate the molecular details of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathways, which have long served as the model for our understanding of signal transduction, while also offering our perspectives on the future of this exciting field. Specifically, we highlight several ways in which biosensor-based single-cell analyses are being used to unravel many of the enduring mysteries that surround these diverse signaling pathways. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Phosphoinositide signal transduction pathway in rat liver mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasupathy, K.; Krishna, M.; Bhattacharya, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    Phosphorylation of endogenous phospholipids of rat liver mitochondrial fractions with γ[ 32 P]ATP revealed formation of all the known inositol phospholipids, such as phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol phosphate and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate. Additionally, a new inositol phospholipid was detected. Incorporation of [ 3 H]-labelled inositol followed a similar profile. Enzymatic experiments indicated that the new lipid could possibly be phosphatidylinositoltrisphosphate. The presence of phosphoinositides-generated second messengers such as diacylglycerol and inositol trisphosphate was also confirmed. Protein kinase C, which acts as mediator between second messengers and nuclear factors, was also found to be present in mitochondria in significant amount. These results suggest that phosphoinositide signal transduction pathway is operative in rat liver mitochondria. (author)

  12. Prolactin receptor and signal transduction to milk protein genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djiane, J.; Daniel, N.; Bignon, C. [Unite d`Endocrinologie Moleculaire, Jouy en Josas (France)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    After cloning of the mammary gland prolactin (PRL) receptor cDNA, a functional assay was established using co-transfection of PRL receptor cDNA together with a milk protein promoter/chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) construct in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Different mutants of the PRL receptor were tested in this CAT assay to delimit the domains in the receptor necessary for signal transduction to milk protein genes. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, high numbers of PRL receptor are expressed. By metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, expressed PRL receptor was identified as a single species of 100 kDa. Using these cells, we analyzed the effects of PRL on intracellular free Ca{sup ++} concentration. PRL stimulates Ca{sup ++} entry and induces secondary Ca{sup ++} mobilization. The entry of Ca{sup ++} is a result of an increase in K{sup +} conductance that hyperpolarizes the membranes. We have also analyzed tyrosine phosphorylation induced by PRL. In CHO cells stably transfected with PRL receptor cDNA, PRL induced a very rapid and transient tyrosine phosphorylation of a 100-kDa protein which is most probably the PRL receptor. The same finding was obtained in mammary membranes after PRL injection to lactating rabbits. Whereas tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and lavendustin were without effect, PRL stimulation of milk protein gene promoters was partially inhibited by 2 {mu}M herbimycin in CHO cells co-transfected with PRL receptor cDNA and the {Beta} lactoglobulin CAT construct. Taken together these observations indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of the PRL receptor interacts with one or several tyrosine kinases, which may represent early postreceptor events necessary for PRL signal transduction to milk protein genes. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Forward Programming of Cardiac Stem Cells by Homogeneous Transduction with MYOCD plus TBX5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Belian

    Full Text Available Adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs express many endogenous cardiogenic transcription factors including members of the Gata, Hand, Mef2, and T-box family. Unlike its DNA-binding targets, Myocardin (Myocd-a co-activator not only for serum response factor, but also for Gata4 and Tbx5-is not expressed in CSCs. We hypothesised that its absence was a limiting factor for reprogramming. Here, we sought to investigate the susceptibility of adult mouse Sca1+ side population CSCs to reprogramming by supplementing the triad of GATA4, MEF2C, and TBX5 (GMT, and more specifically by testing the effect of the missing co-activator, Myocd. Exogenous factors were expressed via doxycycline-inducible lentiviral vectors in various combinations. High throughput quantitative RT-PCR was used to test expression of 29 cardiac lineage markers two weeks post-induction. GMT induced more than half the analysed cardiac transcripts. However, no protein was detected for the induced sarcomeric genes Actc1, Myh6, and Myl2. Adding MYOCD to GMT affected only slightly the breadth and level of gene induction, but, importantly, triggered expression of all three proteins examined (α-cardiac actin, atrial natriuretic peptide, sarcomeric myosin heavy chains. MYOCD + TBX was the most effective pairwise combination in this system. In clonal derivatives homogenously expressing MYOCD + TBX at high levels, 93% of cardiac transcripts were up-regulated and all five proteins tested were visualized.(1 GMT induced cardiac genes in CSCs, but not cardiac proteins under the conditions used. (2 Complementing GMT with MYOCD induced cardiac protein expression, indicating a more complete cardiac differentiation program. (3 Homogeneous transduction with MYOCD + TBX5 facilitated the identification of differentiating cells and the validation of this combinatorial reprogramming strategy. Together, these results highlight the pivotal importance of MYOCD in driving CSCs toward a cardiac muscle fate.

  14. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  15. Therapeutic effects of cell-permeant peptides that activate G proteins downstream of growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gary S; Aznar, Nicolas; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Midde, Krishna K; Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Sato, Emi; Dunkel, Ying; Gallo, Richard L; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-05-19

    In eukaryotes, receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and trimeric G proteins are two major signaling hubs. Signal transduction via trimeric G proteins has long been believed to be triggered exclusively by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This paradigm has recently been challenged by several studies on a multimodular signal transducer, Gα-Interacting Vesicle associated protein (GIV/Girdin). We recently demonstrated that GIV's C terminus (CT) serves as a platform for dynamic association of ligand-activated RTKs with Gαi, and for noncanonical transactivation of G proteins. However, exogenous manipulation of this platform has remained beyond reach. Here we developed cell-permeable GIV-CT peptides by fusing a TAT-peptide transduction domain (TAT-PTD) to the minimal modular elements of GIV that are necessary and sufficient for activation of Gi downstream of RTKs, and used them to engineer signaling networks and alter cell behavior. In the presence of an intact GEF motif, TAT-GIV-CT peptides enhanced diverse processes in which GIV's GEF function has previously been implicated, e.g., 2D cell migration after scratch-wounding, invasion of cancer cells, and finally, myofibroblast activation and collagen production. Furthermore, topical application of TAT-GIV-CT peptides enhanced the complex, multireceptor-driven process of wound repair in mice in a GEF-dependent manner. Thus, TAT-GIV peptides provide a novel and versatile tool to manipulate Gαi activation downstream of growth factors in a diverse array of pathophysiologic conditions.

  16. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    of blue colonies after X-Gal staining of the cells grown in soft agar. All examined SCLC cell lines were transducible with either vector. Transduction efficiencies varied from 5.7% to 33.5% independent of the presence of MDR. These results indicate that MDR does not severely impair transduction of SCLC...

  17. Analysis of diverse signal transduction pathways using the genetic model system Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moorman, Celine

    2003-01-01

    Signal transduction allows cells to respond to signals from their environment and is therefore important for most biological processes. The binding of an extracellular signalling molecule to a cell-surface receptor is the first step in most signal transduction pathways. Cell-surface receptors

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of a Gd-DOTA-D-Permeation Peptide for Magnetic Resonance Relaxation Enhancement of Intracellular Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Prantner

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Many MR contrast agents have been developed and proven effective for extracellular nontargeted applications, but exploitation of intracellular MR contrast agents has been elusive due to the permeability barrier of the plasma membrane. Peptide transduction domains can circumvent this permeability barrier and deliver cargo molecules to the cell interior. Based upon enhanced cellular uptake of permeation peptides with D-amino acid residues, an all-D Tat basic domain peptide was conjugated to DOTA and chelated to gadolinium. Gd-DOTA-D-Tat peptide in serum at room temperature showed a relaxivity of 7.94 ± 0.11 mM−1 sec−1 at 4.7 T. The peptide complex displayed no significant binding to serum proteins, was efficiently internalized by human Jurkat leukemia cells resulting in intracellular T1 relaxation enhancement, and in preliminary T1-weighted MRI experiments, significantly enhanced liver, kidney, and mesenteric signals.

  19. Insulin C-peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  20. Neuritogenic and survival-promoting effects of the P2 peptide derived from a homophilic binding site in the neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin V; Køhler, Lene B; Ditlevsen, Dorte K

    2004-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a pivotal role in neural development, regeneration, and plasticity. NCAM mediates adhesion and subsequent signal transduction through NCAM-NCAM binding. Recently, a peptide ligand termed P2 corresponding to a 12-amino-acid sequence in the FG loop...

  1. Ciliary neurotrophic factor infused intracerebroventricularly shows reduced catabolic effects when linked to the TAT protein transduction domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, André S; Rezende, Alexandre C S; Grigoletto, Jessica; Rogério, Fabio; Velloso, Lício A; Skaper, Stephen D; Negro, Alessandro; Langone, Francesco

    2009-09-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) regulates the differentiation and survival of a wide spectrum of developing and adult neurons, including motor neuron loss after injury. We recently described a cell-penetrant recombinant human CNTF (rhCNTF) molecule, formed by fusion with the human immunodeficiency virus-1 transactivator of transcription (TAT) protein transduction domain (TAT-CNTF) that, upon subcutaneous administration, retains full neurotrophic activity without cytokine-like side-effects. Although the CNTF receptor is present in hypothalamic nuclei, which are involved in the control of energy, rhCNTF but not TAT-CNTF stimulates signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 phosphorylation in the rat hypothalamus after subcutaneous administration. This could be due limited TAT-CNTF distribution in the hypothalamus and/or altered intracellular signaling by the fusion protein. To explore these possibilities, we examined the effect of intracerebroventricular administration of TAT-CNTF in male adult rats. TAT-CNTF-induced weight loss, although the effect was smaller than that seen with either rhCNTF or leptin (which exerts CNTF-like effects via its receptor). In contrast to rhCNTF and leptin, TAT-CNTF neither induced morphological changes in adipose tissues nor increased uncoupling protein 1 expression in brown adipose tissue, a characteristic feature of rhCNTF and leptin. Acute intracerebroventricular administration of TAT-CNTF induced a less robust phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 in the hypothalamus, compared with rhCNTF. The data show that fusion of a protein transduction domain may change rhCNTF CNS distribution, while further strengthening the utility of cell-penetrating peptide technology to neurotrophic factor biology beyond the neuroscience field.

  2. Interaction of the protein transduction domain of HIV-1 TAT with heparan sulfate: binding mechanism and thermodynamic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, André; Seelig, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    The positively charged protein transduction domain of the HIV-1 TAT protein (TAT-PTD; residues 47-57 of TAT) rapidly translocates across the plasma membrane of living cells. This property is exploited for the delivery of proteins, drugs, and genes into cells. The mechanism of this translocation is, however, not yet understood. Recent theories for translocation suggest binding of the protein transduction domain (PTD) to extracellular glycosaminoglycans as a possible mechanism. We have studied the binding equilibrium between TAT-PTD and three different glycosaminoglycans with high sensitivity isothermal titration calorimetry and provide the first quantitative thermodynamic description. The polysulfonated macromolecules were found to exhibit multiple identical binding sites for TAT-PTD with only small differences between the three species as far as the thermodynamic parameters are concerned. Heparan sulfate (HS, molecular weight, 14.2 +/- 2 kDa) has 6.3 +/- 1.0 independent binding sites for TAT-PTD which are characterized by a binding constant K0 = (6.0 +/- 0.6) x 10(5) M(-1) and a reaction enthalpy deltaHpep0 = -4.6 +/- 1.0 kcal/mol at 28 degrees C. The binding affinity, deltaGpep0, is determined to equal extent by enthalpic and entropic contributions. The HS-TAT-PTD complex formation entails a positive heat capacity change of deltaCp0 = +135 cal/mol peptide, which is characteristic of a charge neutralization reaction. This is in contrast to hydrophobic binding reactions which display a large negative heat capacity change. The stoichiometry of 6-7 TAT-PTD molecules per HS corresponds to an electric charge neutralization. Light scattering data demonstrate a maximum scattering intensity at this stoichiometric ratio, the intensity of which depends on the order of mixing of the two components. The data suggest cross-linking and/or aggregation of HS-TAT-PTD complexes. Two other glycosaminoglycans, namely heparin and chondroitin sulfate B, were also studied with isothermal

  3. Identification of a mutant α1 Na/K-ATPase that pumps but is defective in signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Fangfang; Madan, Namrata; Ye, Qiqi; Duan, Qiming; Li, Zhichuan; Wang, Shaomeng; Si, Shuyi; Xie, Zijian

    2013-05-10

    It has not been possible to study the pumping and signaling functions of Na/K-ATPase independently in live cells. Both cell-free and cell-based assays indicate that the A420P mutation abolishes the Src regulatory function of Na/K-ATPase. A420P mutant has normal pumping but not signaling function. Identification of Src regulation-null mutants is crucial for addressing physiological role of Na/K-ATPase. The α1 Na/K-ATPase possesses both pumping and signaling functions. However, it has not been possible to study these functions independently in live cells. We have identified a 20-amino acid peptide (Ser-415 to Gln-434) (NaKtide) from the nucleotide binding domain of α1 Na/K-ATPase that binds and inhibits Src in vitro. The N terminus of NaKtide adapts a helical structure. In vitro kinase assays showed that replacement of residues that contain a bulky side chain in the helical structure of NaKtide by alanine abolished the inhibitory effect of the peptide on Src. Similarly, disruption of helical structure by proline replacement, either single or in combination, reduced the inhibitory potency of NaKtide on Src. To identify mutant α1 that retains normal pumping function but is defective in Src regulation, we transfected Na/K-ATPase α1 knockdown PY-17 cells with expression vectors of wild type or mutant α1 carrying Ala to Pro mutations in the region of NaKtide helical structure and generated several stable cell lines. We found that expression of either A416P or A420P or A425P mutant fully restored the α1 content and consequently the pumping capacity of cells. However, in contrast to A416P, either A420P or A425P mutant was incapable of interacting and regulating cellular Src. Consequently, expression of these two mutants caused significant inhibition of ouabain-activated signal transduction and cell growth. Thus we have identified α1 mutant that has normal pumping function but is defective in signal transduction.

  4. Glycation & the RAGE axis: targeting signal transduction through DIAPH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhtman, Alexander; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2017-02-01

    The consequences of chronic disease are vast and unremitting; hence, understanding the pathogenic mechanisms mediating such disorders holds promise to identify therapeutics and diminish the consequences. The ligands of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) accumulate in chronic diseases, particularly those characterized by inflammation and metabolic dysfunction. Although first discovered and reported as a receptor for advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the expansion of the repertoire of RAGE ligands implicates the receptor in diverse milieus, such as autoimmunity, chronic inflammation, obesity, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. Areas covered: This review summarizes current knowledge regarding the ligand families of RAGE and data from human subjects and animal models on the role of the RAGE axis in chronic diseases. The recent discovery that the cytoplasmic domain of RAGE binds to the formin homology 1 (FH1) domain, DIAPH1, and that this interaction is essential for RAGE ligand-stimulated signal transduction, is discussed. Finally, we review therapeutic opportunities targeting the RAGE axis as a means to mitigate chronic diseases. Expert commentary: With the aging of the population and the epidemic of cardiometabolic disease, therapeutic strategies to target molecular pathways that contribute to the sequelae of these chronic diseases are urgently needed. In this review, we propose that the ligand/RAGE axis and its signaling nexus is a key factor in the pathogenesis of chronic disease and that therapeutic interruption of this pathway may improve quality and duration of life.

  5. The interleukin-4 receptor: signal transduction by a hematopoietin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, A D; Pierce, J H

    1994-02-01

    Over the last several years, the receptors for numerous cytokines have been molecularly characterized. Analysis of their amino acid sequences shows that some of these receptors bear certain motifs in their extracellular domains that define a family of receptors called the Hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Significant advances in characterizing the structure, function, and mechanisms of signal transduction have been made for several members of this family. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances made for one of the family members, the interleukin (IL) 4 receptor. Other receptor systems have recently been reviewed elsewhere. The IL-4 receptor consists of, at the minimum, the cloned 140 kDa IL-4-binding chain with the potential for associating with other chains. The IL-4 receptor transduces its signal by activating a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates cellular substrates, including the receptor itself, and the 170 kDa substrate called 4PS. Phosphorylated 4PS interacts with the SH2 domain of the enzyme PI-3'-kinase and increases its enzymatic activity. These early events in the IL-4 receptor initiated signaling pathway may trigger a series of signals that will ultimately lead to an IL-4 specific biologic outcome.

  6. Phosphoproteomics-based systems analysis of signal transduction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko eKozuka-Hata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transduction systems coordinate complex cellular information to regulate biological events such as cell proliferation and differentiation. Although the accumulating evidence on widespread association of signaling molecules has revealed essential contribution of phosphorylation-dependent interaction networks to cellular regulation, their dynamic behavior is mostly yet to be analyzed. Recent technological advances regarding mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics have enabled us to describe the comprehensive status of phosphorylated molecules in a time-resolved manner. Computational analyses based on the phosphoproteome dynamics accelerate generation of novel methodologies for mathematical analysis of cellular signaling. Phosphoproteomics-based numerical modeling can be used to evaluate regulatory network elements from a statistical point of view. Integration with transcriptome dynamics also uncovers regulatory hubs at the transcriptional level. These omics-based computational methodologies, which have firstly been applied to representative signaling systems such as the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway, have now opened up a gate for systems analysis of signaling networks involved in immune response and cancer.

  7. Metformin selectively targets redox control of complex I energy transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy R. Cameron

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Many guanide-containing drugs are antihyperglycaemic but most exhibit toxicity, to the extent that only the biguanide metformin has enjoyed sustained clinical use. Here, we have isolated unique mitochondrial redox control properties of metformin that are likely to account for this difference. In primary hepatocytes and H4IIE hepatoma cells we found that antihyperglycaemic diguanides DG5-DG10 and the biguanide phenformin were up to 1000-fold more potent than metformin on cell signalling responses, gluconeogenic promoter expression and hepatocyte glucose production. Each drug inhibited cellular oxygen consumption similarly but there were marked differences in other respects. All diguanides and phenformin but not metformin inhibited NADH oxidation in submitochondrial particles, indicative of complex I inhibition, which also corresponded closely with dehydrogenase activity in living cells measured by WST-1. Consistent with these findings, in isolated mitochondria, DG8 but not metformin caused the NADH/NAD+ couple to become more reduced over time and mitochondrial deterioration ensued, suggesting direct inhibition of complex I and mitochondrial toxicity of DG8. In contrast, metformin exerted a selective oxidation of the mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ couple, without triggering mitochondrial deterioration. Together, our results suggest that metformin suppresses energy transduction by selectively inducing a state in complex I where redox and proton transfer domains are no longer efficiently coupled. Keywords: Diabetes, Metformin, Mitochondria, NADH, NAD+

  8. Oxygen sensing and signal transduction in hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Natascha; Strielkov, Ievgen; Pak, Oleg; Weissmann, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV), also known as the von Euler-Liljestrand mechanism, is an essential response of the pulmonary vasculature to acute and sustained alveolar hypoxia. During local alveolar hypoxia, HPV matches perfusion to ventilation to maintain optimal arterial oxygenation. In contrast, during global alveolar hypoxia, HPV leads to pulmonary hypertension. The oxygen sensing and signal transduction machinery is located in the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) of the pre-capillary vessels, albeit the physiological response may be modulated in vivo by the endothelium. While factors such as nitric oxide modulate HPV, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been suggested to act as essential mediators in HPV. ROS may originate from mitochondria and/or NADPH oxidases but the exact oxygen sensing mechanisms, as well as the question of whether increased or decreased ROS cause HPV, are under debate. ROS may induce intracellular calcium increase and subsequent contraction of PASMCs via direct or indirect interactions with protein kinases, phospholipases, sarcoplasmic calcium channels, transient receptor potential channels, voltage-dependent potassium channels and L-type calcium channels, whose relevance may vary under different experimental conditions. Successful identification of factors regulating HPV may allow development of novel therapeutic approaches for conditions of disturbed HPV. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  9. Signal transduction in cells of the immune system in microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Kathrin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Life on Earth developed in the presence and under the constant influence of gravity. Gravity has been present during the entire evolution, from the first organic molecule to mammals and humans. Modern research revealed clearly that gravity is important, probably indispensable for the function of living systems, from unicellular organisms to men. Thus, gravity research is no more or less a fundamental question about the conditions of life on Earth. Since the first space missions and supported thereafter by a multitude of space and ground-based experiments, it is well known that immune cell function is severely suppressed in microgravity, which renders the cells of the immune system an ideal model organism to investigate the influence of gravity on the cellular and molecular level. Here we review the current knowledge about the question, if and how cellular signal transduction depends on the existence of gravity, with special focus on cells of the immune system. Since immune cell function is fundamental to keep the organism under imnological surveillance during the defence against pathogens, to investigate the effects and possible molecular mechanisms of altered gravity is indispensable for long-term space flights to Earth Moon or Mars. Thus, understanding the impact of gravity on cellular functions on Earth will provide not only important informations about the development of life on Earth, but also for therapeutic and preventive strategies to cope successfully with medical problems during space exploration.

  10. Mutations of TMC1 cause deafness by disrupting mechanoelectrical transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Kurima, Kiyoto; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Griffith, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mutations of transmembrane channel-like 1 gene (TMC1) can cause dominant (DFNA36) or recessive (DFNB7/B11) deafness. In this article, we describe the characteristics of DFNA36 and DFNB7/B11 deafness, the features of the Tmc1 mutant mouse strains, and recent advances in our understanding of TMC1 function. Methods Publications related to TMC1, DFNA36 or DFNB7/B11 were identified through PubMed. Results All affected DFNA36 subjects showed post-lingual, progressive, sensorineural hearing loss (HL), initially affecting high frequencies. In contrast, almost all affected DFNB7/B11 subjects demonstrated congenital or prelingual severe to profound sensorineural HL. The mouse Tmc1 gene also has dominant and recessive mutant alleles that cause HL in mutant strains, including Beethoven, deafness and Tmc1 knockout mice. These mutant mice have been instrumental for revealing that Tmc1 and its closely related paralog Tmc2 are expressed in cochlear and vestibular hair cells, and are required for hair cell mechanoelectrical transduction (MET). Recent studies suggest that TMC1 and TMC2 may be components of the long-sought hair cell MET channel. Conclusion TMC1 mutations disrupt hair cell MET. PMID:24933710

  11. A microfluidic platform for regulating signal transduction in single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Pak Kin; Yu, Fuqu; Sun, Ren; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2004-11-01

    Recent progress in micro cell culture systems has lead to new approaches in cell biology studies. Using micro devices for cell culturing possesses distinctive advantages over traditional methods. Length scale matching facilitates manipulation and detection at the single cell level. Previously, we have demonstrated generation of various stimulations such as spatial chemical gradient, electric field, and shear stress to study the dynamic responses of individual cells. Dynamic stimulations and continuous monitoring in a microfluidic system can be useful in studying different aspects of cellular process. In this work, we present a microfluidic platform for regulating nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) signal transduction in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. Time-varying bio-chemical stimulants, such as interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor, are introduced into the microchannel to activate the NF-kB signaling pathway. The dynamic responses of individual cells are monitored with the expression of reporter gene, green fluorescent protein. Regulation of the NF-kB activity is successfully demonstrated. This work is supported by CMISE through NASA URETI program.

  12. Signal transduction by the platelet-derived growth factor receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, L.T.; Escobedo, J.A.; Keating, M.T.; Coughlin, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    The mitogenic effects of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are mediated by the PDGF receptor. The mouse PDGF receptor was recently purified on the basis of its ability to become tyrosine phosphorylated in response to the A-B human platelet form of PDGF, and the receptor amino acid sequence was determined from a full-length cDNA clone. Both the human and mouse receptor cDNA sequences have been expressed in Chinese hamster ovary fibroblast (CHO) cells that normally lack PDGF receptors. This paper summarizes recent results using this system to study signal transduction by the PDGF receptor. Some of the findings show that the KI domain of the PDGF receptor plays an important role in the stimulation of DNA synthesis by PDGF. Surprisingly, the kinase insert region is not essential for PDGF stimulation of PtdIns turnover, pH change, increase in cellular calcium, and receptor autophosphorylation. In addition, PDGF stimulates a conformational change in the receptor

  13. Mutations of TMC1 cause deafness by disrupting mechanoelectrical transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Kurima, Kiyoto; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Griffith, Andrew J

    2014-10-01

    Mutations of transmembrane channel-like 1 gene (TMC1) can cause dominant (DFNA36) or recessive (DFNB7/B11) deafness. In this article, we describe the characteristics of DFNA36 and DFNB7/B11 deafness, the features of the Tmc1 mutant mouse strains, and recent advances in our understanding of TMC1 function. Publications related to TMC1, DFNA36, or DFNB7/B11 were identified through PubMed. All affected DFNA36 subjects showed post-lingual, progressive, sensorineural hearing loss (HL), initially affecting high frequencies. In contrast, almost all affected DFNB7/B11 subjects demonstrated congenital or prelingual severe to profound sensorineural HL. The mouse Tmc1 gene also has dominant and recessive mutant alleles that cause HL in mutant strains, including Beethoven, deafness, and Tmc1 knockout mice. These mutant mice have been instrumental for revealing that Tmc1 and its closely related paralog Tmc2 are expressed in cochlear and vestibular hair cells, and are required for hair cell mechanoelectrical transduction (MET). Recent studies suggest that TMC1 and TMC2 may be components of the long-sought hair cell MET channel. TMC1 mutations disrupt hair cell MET. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Modulation of signal transduction by tea catechins and related phytochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Masahito [Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, HHSC-1509, 701 West 168 Street, NY 10032-2704 (United States); Weinstein, I. Bernard [Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center and Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, HHSC-1509, 701 West 168 Street, NY 10032-2704 (United States)]. E-mail: ibw1@columbia.edu

    2005-12-11

    Epidemiologic studies in human populations and experimental studies in rodents provide evidence that green tea and its constituents can inhibit both the development and growth of tumors at a variety of tissue sites. In addition, EGCG, a major biologically active component of green tea, inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in a variety of cancer cell lines. The purpose of this paper is to review evidence that these effects are mediated, at least in part, through inhibition of the activity of specific receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and related downstream pathways of signal transduction. We also review evidence indicating that the antitumor effects of the related polyphenolic phytochemicals resveratrol, genistein, curcumin, and capsaicin are exerted via similar mechanisms. Some of these agents (EGCG, genistein, and curcumin) appear to directly target specific RTKs, and all of these compounds cause inhibition of the activity of the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B, thus inhibiting cell proliferation and enhancing apoptosis. Critical areas of future investigation include: (1) identification of the direct molecular target(s) of EGCG and related polyphenolic compounds in cells; (2) the in vivo metabolism and bioavailability of these compounds; (3) the ancillary effects of these compounds on tumor-stromal interactions; (4) the development of synergistic combinations with other antitumor agents to enhance efficacy in cancer prevention and therapy, and also minimize potential toxicities.

  15. Signal transduction around thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP in atopic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuepper Michael

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP, a novel interleukin-7-like cytokine, triggers dendritic cell-mediated inflammatory responses ultimately executed by T helper cells of the Th2 subtype. TSLP emerged as a central player in the development of allergic symptoms, especially in the airways, and is a prime regulatory cytokine at the interface of virus- or antigen-exposed epithelial cells and dendritic cells (DCs. DCs activated by epithelium-derived TSLP can promote naïve CD4+ T cells to adopt a Th2 phenotype, which in turn recruite eosinophilic and basophilic granulocytes as well as mast cells into the airway mucosa. These different cells secrete inflammatory cytokines and chemokines operative in inducing an allergic inflammation and atopic asthma. TSLP is, thus, involved in the control of both an innate and an adaptive immune response. Since TSLP links contact of allergen with the airway epithelium to the onset and maintainance of the asthmatic syndrome, defining the signal transduction underlying TSLP expression and function is of profound interest for a better understandimg of the disease and for the development of new therapeutics.

  16. How Y-Family DNA polymerase IV is more accurate than Dpo4 at dCTP insertion opposite an N2-dG adduct of benzo[a]pyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholder, Gabriel; Creech, Amanda; Loechler, Edward L

    2015-11-01

    To bypass DNA damage, cells have Y-Family DNA polymerases (DNAPs). One Y-Family-class includes DNAP κ and DNAP IV, which accurately insert dCTP opposite N(2)-dG adducts, including from the carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (BP). Another class includes DNAP η and DNAP V, which insert accurately opposite UV-damage, but inaccurately opposite BP-N(2)-dG. To investigate structural differences between Y-Family-classes, regions are swapped between DNAP IV (a κ/IV-class-member) and Dpo4 (a η/V-class-member); the kinetic consequences are evaluated via primer-extension studies with a BP-N(2)-dG-containing template. Four key structural elements are revealed. (1) Y-Family DNAPs have discreet non-covalent contacts between their little finger-domain (LF-Domain) and their catalytic core-domain (CC-Domain), which we call "non-covalent bridges" (NCBs). Arg37 and Arg38 in DNAP IV's CC-Domain near the active site form a non-covalent bridge (AS-NCB) by interacting with Glu251 and Asp252, respectively, in DNAP IV's LF-Domain. Without these interactions dATP/dGTP/dTTP misinsertions increase. DNAP IV's AS-NCB suppresses misinsertions better than Dpo4's equivalent AS-NCB. (2) DNAP IV also suppresses dATP/dGTP/dTTP misinsertions via a second non-covalent bridge, which is ∼8Å from the active site (Distal-NCB). Dpo4 has no Distal-NCB, rendering it inferior at dATP/dGTP/dTTP suppression. (3) dCTP insertion is facilitated by the larger minor groove opening near the active site in DNAP IV versus Dpo4, which is sensible given that Watson/Crick-like [dCTP:BP-N(2)-dG] pairing requires the BP-moiety to be in the minor groove. (4) Compared to Dpo4, DNAP IV has a smaller major groove opening, which suppresses dGTP misinsertion, implying BP-N(2)-dG bulk in the major groove during Hoogsteen syn-adduct-dG:dGTP pairing. In summary, DNAP IV has a large minor groove opening to enhance dCTP insertion, a plugged major groove opening to suppress dGTP misinsertion, and two non-covalent bridges (near and distal

  17. Disruption of Microtubules Post-Virus Entry Enhances Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ping-Jie; Mitchell, Angela M.; Huang, Lu; Li, Chengwen; Samulski, R. Jude

    2016-01-01

    Perinuclear retention of viral particles is a poorly understood phenomenon observed during many virus infections. In this study, we investigated whether perinuclear accumulation acts as a barrier to limit recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) transduction. After nocodazole treatment to disrupt microtubules at microtubule-organization center (MT-MTOC) after virus entry, we observed higher rAAV transduction. To elucidate the role of MT-MTOC in rAAV infection and study its underlying mechanisms, we demonstrated that rAAV's perinuclear localization was retained by MT-MTOC with fluorescent analysis, and enhanced rAAV transduction from MT-MTOC disruption was dependent on the rAAV capsid's nuclear import signals. Interestingly, after knocking down RhoA or inhibiting its downstream effectors (ROCK and Actin), MT-MTOC disruption failed to increase rAAV transduction or nuclear entry. These data suggest that enhancement of rAAV transduction is the result of increased trafficking to the nucleus via the RhoA-ROCK-Actin pathway. Ten-fold higher rAAV transduction was also observed by disrupting MT-MTOC in brain, liver, and tumor in vivo. In summary, this study indicates that virus perinuclear accumulation at MT-MTOC is a barrier-limiting parameter for effective rAAV transduction and defines a novel defense mechanism by which host cells restrain viral invasion. PMID:26942476

  18. Targeted Lymphoma Cell Death by Novel Signal Transduction Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    killing potential in a malignant T cell line, Jurkat , figure 4. While the peptides did demonstrate some cytotoxicty in T cells it was not of the same...assessed as described in figure 2 A ssessm ent of C ytotoxic P otentail of C D 22 B inding P eptides in Jurkat T cells, Figure 4 0 20 40 60 80...60 80 100 120 Jurkat R am os R aji M C 116 D O H H 2 W S U -W M W S U -C LL K arpas 519 C ell Lines A s C o n tr o l ( % ) Figure 6

  19. DMPD: Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15379975 Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor... Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. PubmedID 15379975 Title Signa...l transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. Authors

  20. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A frightening increase in the number of isolated multidrug resistant bacterial strains linked to the decline in novel antimicrobial drugs entering the market is a great cause for concern. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have lately been introduced as a potential new class...... of antimicrobial drugs, and computational methods utilizing molecular descriptors can significantly accelerate the development of new peptide drug candidates. Areas covered: This paper gives a broad overview of peptide and amino-acid scale descriptors available for AMP modeling and highlights which...

  1. Graph Regularized Meta-path Based Transductive Regression in Heterogeneous Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Mengting; Ouyang, Yunbo; Kaplan, Lance; Han, Jiawei

    2015-01-01

    A number of real-world networks are heterogeneous information networks, which are composed of different types of nodes and links. Numerical prediction in heterogeneous information networks is a challenging but significant area because network based information for unlabeled objects is usually limited to make precise estimations. In this paper, we consider a graph regularized meta-path based transductive regression model ( Grempt ), which combines the principal philosophies of typical graph-based transductive classification methods and transductive regression models designed for homogeneous networks. The computation of our method is time and space efficient and the precision of our model can be verified by numerical experiments.

  2. Responsiveness of beta-escin-permeabilized rabbit gastric gland model: effects of functional peptide fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, K; Nagao, T; Urushidani, T

    1999-09-01

    We established a beta-escin-permeabilized gland model with the use of rabbit isolated gastric glands. The glands retained an ability to secrete acid, monitored by [14C]aminopyrine accumulation, in response to cAMP, forskolin, and histamine. These responses were all inhibited by cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitory peptide. Myosin light-chain kinase inhibitory peptide also suppressed aminopyrine accumulation, whereas the inhibitory peptide of protein kinase C or that of calmodulin kinase II was without effect. Guanosine-5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPgammaS) abolished cAMP-stimulated acid secretion concomitantly, interfering with the redistribution of H+-K+-ATPase from tubulovesicles to the apical membrane. To identify the targets of GTPgammaS, effects of peptide fragments of certain GTP-binding proteins were examined. Although none of the peptides related to Rab proteins showed any effect, the inhibitory peptide of Arf protein inhibited cAMP-stimulated secretion. These results demonstrate that our new model, the beta-escin-permeabilized gland, allows the introduction of relatively large molecules, e.g., peptides, into the cell, and will be quite useful for analyzing signal transduction of parietal cell function.

  3. Origin of anti-tumor activity of the cysteine-containing GO peptides and further optimization of their cytotoxic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyuryaeva, Irina I.; Lyublinskaya, Olga G.; Podkorytov, Ivan S.; Skrynnikov, Nikolai R.

    2017-01-01

    Antitumor GO peptides have been designed as dimerization inhibitors of prominent oncoprotein mucin 1. In this study we demonstrate that activity of GO peptides is independent of the level of cellular expression of mucin 1. Furthermore, these peptides prove to be broadly cytotoxic, causing cell death also in normal cells such as dermal fibroblasts and endometrial mesenchymal stem cells. To explore molecular mechanism of their cytotoxicity, we have designed and tested a number of new peptide sequences containing the key CxC or CxxC motifs. Of note, these sequences bear no similarity to mucin 1 except that they also contain a pair of proximal cysteines. Several of the new peptides turned out to be significantly more potent than their GO prototypes. The results suggest that cytotoxicity of these peptides stems from their (moderate) activity as disulfide oxidoreductases. It is expected that such peptides, which we have termed DO peptides, are involved in disulfide-dithiol exchange reaction, resulting in formation of adventitious disulfide bridges in cell proteins. In turn, this leads to a partial loss of protein function and rapid onset of apoptosis. We anticipate that coupling DO sequences with tumor-homing transduction domains can create a potentially valuable new class of tumoricidal peptides.

  4. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambet eTeesalu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular zip code of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  5. Tumor-Penetrating Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC), contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor-homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR) motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies, and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is present in the

  6. Signal transduction through the IL-4 and insulin receptor families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L M; Keegan, A; Frankel, M; Paul, W E; Pierce, J H

    1995-07-01

    Activation of tyrosine kinase-containing receptors and intracellular tyrosine kinases by ligand stimulation is known to be crucial for mediating initial and subsequent events involved in mitogenic signal transduction. Receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) contain cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domains that undergo autophosphorylation upon ligand stimulation. Activation of these receptors also leads to pronounced and rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) in cells of connective tissue origin. A related substrate, designated 4PS, is similarly phosphorylated by insulin and IGF-1 stimulation in many hematopoietic cell types. IRS-1 and 4PS possess a number of tyrosine phosphorylation sites that are within motifs that bind specific SH2-containing molecules known to be involved in mitogenic signaling such as PI-3 kinase, SHPTP-2 (Syp) and Grb-2. Thus, they appear to act as docking substrates for a variety of signaling molecules. The majority of hematopoietic cytokines bind to receptors that do not possess intrinsic kinase activity, and these receptors have been collectively termed as members of the hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Despite their lack of tyrosine kinase domains, stimulation of these receptors has been demonstrated to activate intracellular kinases leading to tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple substrates. Recent evidence has demonstrated that activation of different members of the Janus family of tyrosine kinases is involved in mediating tyrosine phosphorylation events by specific cytokines. Stimulation of the interleukin 4 (IL-4) receptor, a member of the hematopoietin receptor superfamily, is thought to result in activation of Jak1, Jak3, and/or Fes tyrosine kinases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Transduction-like gene transfer in the methanogen Methanococcus voltae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, G.

    1999-01-01

    Strain PS of Methanococcus voltae (a methanogenic, anaerobic archaebacterium) was shown to generate spontaneously 4.4-kbp chromosomal DNA fragments that are fully protected from DNase and that, upon contact with a cell, transform it genetically. This activity, here called VTA (voltae transfer agent), affects all markers tested: three different auxotrophies (histidine, purine, and cobalamin) and resistance to BES (2-bromoethanesulfonate, an inhibitor of methanogenesis). VTA was most effectively prepared by culture filtration. This process disrupted a fraction of the M. voltae cells (which have only an S-layer covering their cytoplasmic membrane). VTA was rapidly inactivated upon storage. VTA particles were present in cultures at concentrations of approximately two per cell. Gene transfer activity varied from a minimum of 2 x 10(-5) (BES resistance) to a maximum of 10(-3) (histidine independence) per donor cell. Very little VTA was found free in culture supernatants. The phenomenon is functionally similar to generalized transduction, but there is no evidence, for the time being, of intrinsically viral (i.e., containing a complete viral genome) particles. Consideration of VTA DNA size makes the existence of such viral particles unlikely. If they exist, they must be relatively few in number;perhaps they differ from VTA particles in size and other properties and thus escaped detection. Digestion of VTA DNA with the AluI restriction enzyme suggests that it is a random sample of the bacterial DNA, except for a 0.9-kbp sequence which is amplified relative to the rest of the bacterial chromosome. A VTA-sized DNA fraction was demonstrated in a few other isolates of M. voltae.

  8. Comparative genomics and transduction potential of Enterococcus faecalis temperate bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Azra; Kenny, John G; Shankar, Jayendra; Darby, Alistair C; Hall, Neil; Edwards, Clive; Horsburgh, Malcolm J

    2010-02-01

    To determine the relative importance of temperate bacteriophage in the horizontal gene transfer of fitness and virulence determinants of Enterococcus faecalis, a panel of 47 bacteremia isolates were treated with the inducing agents mitomycin C, norfloxacin, and UV radiation. Thirty-four phages were purified from culture supernatants and discriminated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and restriction mapping. From these analyses the genomes of eight representative phages were pyrosequenced, revealing four distinct groups of phages. Three groups of phages, PhiFL1 to 3, were found to be sequence related, with PhiFL1A to C and PhiFL2A and B sharing the greatest identity (87 to 88%), while PhiFL3A and B share 37 to 41% identity with PhiFL1 and 2. PhiFL4A shares 3 to 12% identity with the phages PhiFL1 to 3. The PhiFL3A and B phages possess a high DNA sequence identity with the morphogenesis and lysis modules of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris prophages. Homologs of the Streptococcus mitis platelet binding phage tail proteins, PblA and PblB, are encoded on each sequenced E. faecalis phage. Few other phage genes encoding potential virulence functions were identified, and there was little evidence of carriage of lysogenic conversion genes distal to endolysin, as has been observed with genomes of many temperate phages from the opportunist pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. E. faecalis JH2-2 lysogens were generated using the eight phages, and these were examined for their relative fitness in Galleria mellonella. Several lysogens exhibited different effects upon survival of G. mellonella compared to their isogenic parent. The eight phages were tested for their ability to package host DNA, and three were shown to be very effective for generalized transduction of naive host cells of the laboratory strains OG1RF and JH2-2.

  9. New insights into transduction pathways that regulate boar sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado de Llera, A; Martin-Hidalgo, D; Gil, M C; Garcia-Marin, L J; Bragado, M J

    2016-01-01

    Detailed molecular mechanisms mediating signal transduction cascades that regulate boar sperm function involving Ser/Thr and tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins have been reviewed previously. Therefore, this review will focus in those kinase pathways identified recently (functional spermatozoa processes. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cell energy sensor kinase that was first identified in mammalian spermatozoa in 2012, and since then it has emerged as an essential regulator of boar sperm function. Signaling pathways leading to AMPK activation in boar sperm are highlighted in this review (PKA, CaMKKα/β, and PKC as well as Ca(2+) and cAMP messengers as upstream regulators). Interestingly, stimuli considered as cell stress (hyperosmotic stress, inhibition of mitochondrial activity, absence of intracellular Ca(2+)) markedly activate AMPK in boar spermatozoa. Moreover, AMPK plays a remarkable and necessary regulatory role in mammalian sperm function, controlling essential boar sperm functional processes such as motility, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, organization and fluidity of plasma membrane, and outer acrosome membrane integrity. These mentioned processes are all required under fluctuating environment of spermatozoa when transiting through the female reproductive tract to achieve fertilization. An applied role of AMPK in artificial insemination techniques is also suggested as during boar seminal doses preservation at 17 °C, physiological levels of AMPK activity markedly increase (maximum on Day 7) and result essential to maintain the aforementioned fundamental sperm processes. Moreover, regulation of sperm function exerted by the glycogen synthase kinase 3 and Src family kinase pathways is summarized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Transduction on Directed Graphs via Absorbing Random Walks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Jaydeep; Zhang, Xiaowei; Lin, Feng; Cheng, Li

    2017-08-11

    In this paper we consider the problem of graph-based transductive classification, and we are particularly interested in the directed graph scenario which is a natural form for many real world applications.Different from existing research efforts that either only deal with undirected graphs or circumvent directionality by means of symmetrization, we propose a novel random walk approach on directed graphs using absorbing Markov chains, which can be regarded as maximizing the accumulated expected number of visits from the unlabeled transient states. Our algorithm is simple, easy to implement, and works with large-scale graphs on binary, multiclass, and multi-label prediction problems. Moreover, it is capable of preserving the graph structure even when the input graph is sparse and changes over time, as well as retaining weak signals presented in the directed edges. We present its intimate connections to a number of existing methods, including graph kernels, graph Laplacian based methods, and interestingly, spanning forest of graphs. Its computational complexity and the generalization error are also studied. Empirically our algorithm is systematically evaluated on a wide range of applications, where it has shown to perform competitively comparing to a suite of state-of-the-art methods. In particular, our algorithm is shown to work exceptionally well with large sparse directed graphs with e.g. millions of nodes and tens of millions of edges, where it significantly outperforms other state-of-the-art methods. In the dynamic graph setting involving insertion or deletion of nodes and edge-weight changes over time, it also allows efficient online updates that produce the same results as of the batch update counterparts.

  11. Computational study of noise in a large signal transduction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruohonen Keijo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biochemical systems are inherently noisy due to the discrete reaction events that occur in a random manner. Although noise is often perceived as a disturbing factor, the system might actually benefit from it. In order to understand the role of noise better, its quality must be studied in a quantitative manner. Computational analysis and modeling play an essential role in this demanding endeavor. Results We implemented a large nonlinear signal transduction network combining protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinase, phospholipase A2, and β isoform of phospholipase C networks. We simulated the network in 300 different cellular volumes using the exact Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm and analyzed the results in both the time and frequency domain. In order to perform simulations in a reasonable time, we used modern parallel computing techniques. The analysis revealed that time and frequency domain characteristics depend on the system volume. The simulation results also indicated that there are several kinds of noise processes in the network, all of them representing different kinds of low-frequency fluctuations. In the simulations, the power of noise decreased on all frequencies when the system volume was increased. Conclusions We concluded that basic frequency domain techniques can be applied to the analysis of simulation results produced by the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. This approach is suited not only to the study of fluctuations but also to the study of pure noise processes. Noise seems to have an important role in biochemical systems and its properties can be numerically studied by simulating the reacting system in different cellular volumes. Parallel computing techniques make it possible to run massive simulations in hundreds of volumes and, as a result, accurate statistics can be obtained from computational studies.

  12. Novel Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Nordahl, Emma

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides serve as a first line of defence against invading microorganisms and are an essential part of our fast innate immune system. They are ancient molecules found in all classes of life. Antimicrobial peptides rapidly kill a broad spectrum of microbes and are immunomodulatory, i.e. having additional actions influencing inflammation and other innate immune responses. Results presented in this thesis demonstrate that proteases of common human pathogens degrade and inactivate t...

  13. Lipid rafts are required for signal transduction by angiotensin II receptor type 1 in neonatal glomerular mesangial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adebiyi, Adebowale, E-mail: aadebiyi@uthsc.edu; Soni, Hitesh; John, Theresa A.; Yang, Fen

    2014-05-15

    Angiotensin II (ANG-II) receptors (AGTRs) contribute to renal physiology and pathophysiology, but the underlying mechanisms that regulate AGTR function in glomerular mesangium are poorly understood. Here, we show that AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal pig glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Cyclodextrin (CDX)-mediated cholesterol depletion attenuated cell surface AGTR1 protein expression and ANG-II-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) elevation in the cells. The COOH-terminus of porcine AGTR1 contains a caveolin (CAV)-binding motif. However, neonatal GMCs express CAV-1, but not CAV-2 and CAV-3. Colocalization and in situ proximity ligation assay detected an association between endogenous AGTR1 and CAV-1 in the cells. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the CAV-1 scaffolding domain (CSD) sequence also reduced ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in the cells. Real-time imaging of cell growth revealed that ANG-II stimulates neonatal GMC proliferation. ANG-II-induced GMC growth was attenuated by EMD 66684, an AGTR1 antagonist; BAPTA, a [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} chelator; KN-93, a Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor; CDX; and a CSD peptide, but not PD 123319, a selective AGTR2 antagonist. Collectively, our data demonstrate [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-dependent proliferative effect of ANG-II and highlight a critical role for lipid raft microdomains in AGTR1-mediated signal transduction in neonatal GMCs. - Highlights: • AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal mesangial cells. • Endogenous AGTR1 associates with CAV-1 in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption attenuates cell surface AGTR1 protein expression. • Lipid raft disruption reduces ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption inhibits ANG-II-induced neonatal mesangial cell growth.

  14. Peptide aldehyde inhibitors of bacterial peptide deformylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, D J; Gordon Green, B; O'Connell, J F; Grant, S K

    1999-07-15

    Bacterial peptide deformylases (PDF, EC 3.5.1.27) are metalloenzymes that cleave the N-formyl groups from N-blocked methionine polypeptides. Peptide aldehydes containing a methional or norleucinal inhibited recombinant peptide deformylase from gram-negative Escherichia coli and gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. The most potent inhibitor was calpeptin, N-CBZ-Leu-norleucinal, which was a competitive inhibitor of the zinc-containing metalloenzymes, E. coli and B. subtilis PDF with Ki values of 26.0 and 55.6 microM, respectively. Cobalt-substituted E. coli and B. subtilis deformylases were also inhibited by these aldehydes with Ki values for calpeptin of 9.5 and 12.4 microM, respectively. Distinct spectral changes were observed upon binding of calpeptin to the Co(II)-deformylases, consistent with the noncovalent binding of the inhibitor rather than the formation of a covalent complex. In contrast, the chelator 1,10-phenanthroline caused the time-dependent inhibition of B. subtilis Co(II)-PDF activity with the loss of the active site metal. The fact that calpeptin was nearly equipotent against deformylases from both gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial sources lends further support to the idea that a single deformylase inhibitor might have broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  15. [Cellular adhesion signal transduction network of tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced hepatocellular carcinoma cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yongchang; Du, Shunda; Xu, Haifeng; Xu, Yiyao; Zhao, Haitao; Chi, Tianyi; Lu, Xin; Sang, Xinting; Mao, Yilei

    2014-11-18

    To systemically explore the cellular adhesion signal transduction network of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)-induced hepatocellular carcinoma cells with bioinformatics tools. Published microarray dataset of TNF-α-induced HepG2, human transcription factor database HTRI and human protein-protein interaction database HPRD were used to construct and analyze the signal transduction network. In the signal transduction network, MYC and SP1 were the key nodes of signaling transduction. Several genes from the network were closely related with cellular adhesion.Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a possible key gene of effectively regulating cellular adhesion during the induction of TNF-α. EGFR is a possible key gene for TNF-α-induced metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  16. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major problem in the successful treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). New treatment strategies are needed, such as gene therapy specifically targeting the MDR cells in the tumor. Retroviral LacZ gene-containing vectors that were either pseudotyped...... for the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV-1) receptor or had specificity for the amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-A) receptor were used for transduction of five SCLC cell lines differing by a range of MDR mechanisms. Transduction efficiencies in these cell lines were compared by calculating the percentage...... of blue colonies after X-Gal staining of the cells grown in soft agar. All examined SCLC cell lines were transducible with either vector. Transduction efficiencies varied from 5.7% to 33.5% independent of the presence of MDR. These results indicate that MDR does not severely impair transduction of SCLC...

  17. Quorum sensing by peptide pheromones and two-component signal-transduction systems in Gram-positive bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleerebezem, Michiel; Quadri, Luis E.N.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Vos, Willem M. de

    1997-01-01

    Cell-density-dependent gene expression appears to be widely spread in bacteria. This quorum-sensing phenomenon has been well established in Gram-negative bacteria, where N-acyl homoserine lactones are the diffusible communication molecules that modulate cell-density-dependent phenotypes. Similarly,

  18. Signal transduction through CsrRS confers an invasive phenotype in group A Streptococcus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hien J Tran-Winkler

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The CsrRS (or CovRS two component system controls expression of up to 15% of the genome of group A Streptococcus (GAS. While some studies have suggested that the sensor histidine kinase CsrS responds to membrane perturbations as a result of various environmental stresses, other data have implicated the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and extracellular Mg(2+ as specific signals. We now report that Mg(2+ and LL-37 have opposite effects on expression of multiple genes that are activated or repressed by the transcriptional regulator CsrR. Using a GAS isolate representative of the recently emerged and widely disseminated M1T1 clone implicated in severe invasive disease, we found marked up-regulation by CsrRS of multiple virulence factors including pyrogenic exotoxin A, DNase Sda1, streptolysin O, and the hyaluronic acid capsular polysaccharide, among others. Topology and surface protein labeling studies indicated that CsrS is associated with the bacterial cell membrane and has a surface-exposed extracellular domain accessible to environmental ligands. Replacement of a cluster of three acidic amino acids with uncharged residues in the extracellular domain of CsrS abrogated LL-37 signaling and conferred a hyporesponsive phenotype consistent with tonic activation of CsrS autokinase activity, an effect that could be overridden by mutation of the CsrS active site histidine. Both loss- and gain-of-function mutations of a conserved site in the receiver domain of CsrR established an essential role for lysine 102 in CsrS-to-CsrR signal transduction. These results provide strong evidence that Mg(2+ and LL-37 are specific signals that function by altering CsrS autokinase activity and downstream phosphotransfer to CsrR to modulate its activity as a transcriptional regulator. The representation of multiple antiphagocytic and cytotoxic factors in the CsrRS regulon together with results of in vitro phagocytic killing assays support the hypothesis that Csr

  19. Finite-State Channel Models for Signal Transduction in Neural Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Eckford, Andrew W.; Loparo, Kenneth A.; Thomas, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Information theory provides powerful tools for understanding communication systems. This analysis can be applied to intercellular signal transduction, which is a means of chemical communication among cells and microbes. We discuss how to apply information-theoretic analysis to ligand-receptor systems, which form the signal carrier and receiver in intercellular signal transduction channels. We also discuss the applications of these results to neuroscience.

  20. A design of the acoustic electric transduction system with piezoelectric ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qingyu

    2017-05-01

    Based on the theory of acoustic-electric transduction, a piezoelectric acoustic electric transduction system was designed, aiming at recycling the noise of turbine generator sets. The frequency response characteristic of the equivalent input impedance and output voltage. And the simulation was conducted with MATLAB. Then the conclusion was drawn that when the equivalent input impedance reached the minimum, the output voltage amplitude reached the maximum. The resonance frequency of Helmholtz resonator is the primary factor to the whole system.

  1. Intracellular Ca2+ and the phospholipid PIP2 regulate the taste transduction ion channel TRPM5

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Dan; Liman, Emily R.

    2003-01-01

    The transduction of taste is a fundamental process that allows animals to discriminate nutritious from noxious substances. Three taste modalities, bitter, sweet, and amino acid, are mediated by G protein-coupled receptors that signal through a common transduction cascade: activation of phospholipase C β2, leading to a breakdown of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) into diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, which causes release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. The ion c...

  2. Differences in radiosensitivity of the respiratory burst generated in HL-60 cells via different signal transduction pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaffenberger, W.; Beuningen, D. van

    1994-01-01

    Induced differentiation of the promyelocytic leukaemia cell line, HL-60, is associated with the acquisition of functional properties, like the expression of specific receptors and the competence to exert the respiratory burst (RB). In this system we evaluated the effects of ionizing radiation on the signal transduction processes involved in the activation of the respiratory burst/NADPH oxidase. HL-60 cells were X-irradiated with up to 1 Gy and induced towards granulocytic differentiation by treatment with 1.25% DMSO on day 0. The expression of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR), the development of responsiveness of the cells to its ligand (f-MLP) and to 4 β-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) were measured up to day 7 postinduction/irradiation. Using flow cytometry, fluorescinated formyl-hexapeptide or unlabelled f-MLP as ligands and dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR 123) as an indicator of RB activity, respectively, the acquisition of functional responsiveness to both stimuli was determined. (author)

  3. Transduction for pheromones in the main olfactory epithelium is mediated by the Ca2+ -activated channel TRPM5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Fabián; Delgado, Ricardo; López, Roberto; Bacigalupo, Juan; Restrepo, Diego

    2014-02-26

    Growing evidence suggests that the main olfactory epithelium contains a subset of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) responding to pheromones. One candidate subpopulation expresses the calcium activated cation channel TRPM5 (transient receptor potential channel M5). Using GFP driven by the TRPM5 promoter in mice, we show that this subpopulation responds to putative pheromones, urine, and major histocompatibility complex peptides, but not to regular odors or a pheromone detected by other species. In addition, this subpopulation of TRPM5-GFP+ OSNs uses novel transduction. In regular OSNs, odorants elicit activation of the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel, leading to Ca2+ gating of Cl- channels; in TRPM5-GFP+ OSNs, the Ca2+ -activated Cl- ANO2 (anoctamin 2) channel is not expressed, and pheromones elicit activation of the CNG channel leading to Ca2+ gating of TRPM5. In conclusion, we show that OSNs expressing TRPM5 respond to pheromones, but not to regular odors through the opening of CNG channels leading to Ca2+ gating of TRPM5.

  4. Evidence that membrane transduction of oligoarginine does not require vesicle formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaro, Jennica L.; Shen Weichiang

    2005-01-01

    The involvement of vesicular formation processes in the membrane transduction and nuclear transport of oligoarginine is currently a subject of controversy. In this report, a novel quantitative method which allows for the selective measurement of membrane transduction excluding concurrent endocytosis was used to determine the effects of temperature, endosomal acidification, endosomolysis, and several known inhibitors of endocytic pathways on the internalization of oligoarginine. The results show that, unlike endocytosis, transduction of oligoarginine was not affected by incubation at 16 deg. C as compared to the 37 deg. C control, and was only partially inhibited at 4 deg. C incubation. Additionally, membrane transduction was not inhibited to the same extent as endocytosis following treatment with ammonium chloride, hypertonic medium, amiloride, or filipin. The endosomolytic activity of oligoarginine was investigated by examining the leakage of FITC-dextran into the cytosolic compartment, which was not higher in the presence of oligoarginine. Furthermore, ammonium chloride showed no effect on the nuclear transport of oligoarginine. The data presented in this report indicate that membrane transduction is likely to occur at the plasma membrane without the formation of membrane vesicles, and the nuclear localization involves membrane transduction, rather than endocytosis of oligoarginine

  5. Granin-derived peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troger, Josef; Theurl, Markus; Kirchmair, Rudolf; Pasqua, Teresa; Tota, Bruno; Angelone, Tommaso; Cerra, Maria C; Nowosielski, Yvonne; Mätzler, Raphaela; Troger, Jasmin; Gayen, Jaur R; Trudeau, Vance; Corti, Angelo; Helle, Karen B

    2017-07-01

    The granin family comprises altogether 7 different proteins originating from the diffuse neuroendocrine system and elements of the central and peripheral nervous systems. The family is dominated by three uniquely acidic members, namely chromogranin A (CgA), chromogranin B (CgB) and secretogranin II (SgII). Since the late 1980s it has become evident that these proteins are proteolytically processed, intragranularly and/or extracellularly into a range of biologically active peptides; a number of them with regulatory properties of physiological and/or pathophysiological significance. The aim of this comprehensive overview is to provide an up-to-date insight into the distribution and properties of the well established granin-derived peptides and their putative roles in homeostatic regulations. Hence, focus is directed to peptides derived from the three main granins, e.g. to the chromogranin A derived vasostatins, betagranins, pancreastatin and catestatins, the chromogranin B-derived secretolytin and the secretogranin II-derived secretoneurin (SN). In addition, the distribution and properties of the chromogranin A-derived peptides prochromacin, chromofungin, WE14, parastatin, GE-25 and serpinins, the CgB-peptide PE-11 and the SgII-peptides EM66 and manserin will also be commented on. Finally, the opposing effects of the CgA-derived vasostatin-I and catestatin and the SgII-derived peptide SN on the integrity of the vasculature, myocardial contractility, angiogenesis in wound healing, inflammatory conditions and tumors will be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Diversity-oriented peptide stapling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thu Phuong; Larsen, Christian Ørnbøl; Røndbjerg, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of macrocyclic constraints in peptides (peptide stapling) is an important tool within peptide medicinal chemistry for stabilising and pre-organising peptides in a desired conformation. In recent years, the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) has emerged as a power......The introduction of macrocyclic constraints in peptides (peptide stapling) is an important tool within peptide medicinal chemistry for stabilising and pre-organising peptides in a desired conformation. In recent years, the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) has emerged...... incorporating two azide-modified amino acids with 1,3,5-triethynylbenzene efficiently provides (i, i+7)- and (i, i+9)-stapled peptides with a single free alkyne positioned on the staple, that can be further conjugated or dimerised. A unique feature of the present method is that it provides easy access...

  8. Peptide Integrated Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, Amir; Lapshina, Nadezda; Apter, Boris; Rosenman, Gil

    2018-02-01

    Bio-nanophotonics is a wide field in which advanced optical materials, biomedicine, fundamental optics, and nanotechnology are combined and result in the development of biomedical optical chips. Silk fibers or synthetic bioabsorbable polymers are the main light-guiding components. In this work, an advanced concept of integrated bio-optics is proposed, which is based on bioinspired peptide optical materials exhibiting wide optical transparency, nonlinear and electrooptical properties, and effective passive and active waveguiding. Developed new technology combining bottom-up controlled deposition of peptide planar wafers of a large area and top-down focus ion beam lithography provides direct fabrication of peptide optical integrated circuits. Finding a deep modification of peptide optical properties by reconformation of biological secondary structure from native phase to β-sheet architecture is followed by the appearance of visible fluorescence and unexpected transition from a native passive optical waveguiding to an active one. Original biocompatibility, switchable regimes of waveguiding, and multifunctional nonlinear optical properties make these new peptide planar optical materials attractive for application in emerging technology of lab-on-biochips, combining biomedical photonic and electronic circuits toward medical diagnosis, light-activated therapy, and health monitoring. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Squalestatin alters the intracellular trafficking of a neurotoxic prion peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Alun

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurotoxic peptides derived from the protease-resistant core of the prion protein are used to model the pathogenesis of prion diseases. The current study characterised the ingestion, internalization and intracellular trafficking of a neurotoxic peptide containing amino acids 105–132 of the murine prion protein (MoPrP105-132 in neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons. Results Fluorescence microscopy and cell fractionation techniques showed that MoPrP105-132 co-localised with lipid raft markers (cholera toxin and caveolin-1 and trafficked intracellularly within lipid rafts. This trafficking followed a non-classical endosomal pathway delivering peptide to the Golgi and ER, avoiding classical endosomal trafficking via early endosomes to lysosomes. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis demonstrated close interactions of MoPrP105-132 with cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2 and cyclo-oxygenase-1 (COX-1, enzymes implicated in the neurotoxicity of prions. Treatment with squalestatin reduced neuronal cholesterol levels and caused the redistribution of MoPrP105-132 out of lipid rafts. In squalestatin-treated cells, MoPrP105-132 was rerouted away from the Golgi/ER into degradative lysosomes. Squalestatin treatment also reduced the association between MoPrP105-132 and cPLA2/COX-1. Conclusion As the observed shift in peptide trafficking was accompanied by increased cell survival these studies suggest that the neurotoxicity of this PrP peptide is dependent on trafficking to specific organelles where it activates specific signal transduction pathways.

  10. Proposed Role for KaiC-Like ATPases as Major Signal Transduction Hubs in Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarova, Kira S; Galperin, Michael Y; Koonin, Eugene V

    2017-12-05

    All organisms must adapt to ever-changing environmental conditions and accordingly have evolved diverse signal transduction systems. In bacteria, the most abundant networks are built around the two-component signal transduction systems that include histidine kinases and receiver domains. In contrast, eukaryotic signal transduction is dominated by serine/threonine/tyrosine protein kinases. Both of these systems are also found in archaea, but they are not as common and diversified as their bacterial and eukaryotic counterparts, suggesting the possibility that archaea have evolved other, still uncharacterized signal transduction networks. Here we propose a role for KaiC family ATPases, known to be key components of the circadian clock in cyanobacteria, in archaeal signal transduction. The KaiC family is notably expanded in most archaeal genomes, and although most of these ATPases remain poorly characterized, members of the KaiC family have been shown to control archaellum assembly and have been found to be a stable component of the gas vesicle system in Halobacteria Computational analyses described here suggest that KaiC-like ATPases and their homologues with inactivated ATPase domains are involved in many other archaeal signal transduction pathways and comprise major hubs of complex regulatory networks. We predict numerous input and output domains that are linked to KaiC-like proteins, including putative homologues of eukaryotic DEATH domains that could function as adapters in archaeal signaling networks. We further address the relationships of the archaeal family of KaiC homologues to the bona fide KaiC of cyanobacteria and implications for the existence of a KaiC-based circadian clock apparatus in archaea. IMPORTANCE Little is currently known about signal transduction pathways in Archaea Recent studies indicate that KaiC-like ATPases, known as key components of the circadian clock apparatus in cyanobacteria, are involved in the regulation of archaellum assembly and

  11. Synthetic antibiofilm peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; Franco, Octavio Luiz; Hancock, Robert E W

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria predominantly exist as multicellular aggregates known as biofilms that are associated with at least two thirds of all infections and exhibit increased adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotic therapies. Therefore, biofilms are major contributors to the global health problem of antibiotic resistance, and novel approaches to counter them are urgently needed. Small molecules of the innate immune system called host defense peptides (HDPs) have emerged as promising templates for the design of potent, broad-spectrum antibiofilm agents. Here, we review recent developments in the new field of synthetic antibiofilm peptides, including mechanistic insights, synergistic interactions with available antibiotics, and their potential as novel antimicrobials against persistent infections caused by biofilms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Rod Outer Segment Development Influences AAV-Mediated Photoreceptor Transduction After Subretinal Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Lolita; Ma, Shan; Cheng, Shun-Yun; Gao, Guangping; Punzo, Claudio

    2017-06-01

    Vectors based on the adeno-associated virus (AAV) are currently the preferred tools for delivering genes to photoreceptors (PR) in small and large animals. AAVs have been applied successfully in various models of PR dystrophies. However, unknown barriers still limit AAV's efficient application in several forms of severe PR degenerations due to insufficient transgene expression and/or treated cells at the time of injection. Optimizations of PR gene therapy strategies will likely benefit from the identification of the cellular factors that influence PR transduction. Interestingly, recent studies have shown that the AAV transduction profile of PRs differs significantly between neonatal and adult mouse retinas after subretinal injection. This phenomenon may provide clues to identify host factors that influence the efficiency of AAV-mediated PR transduction. This study demonstrates that rod outer segments are critical modulators of efficient AAV-mediated rod transduction. During retinal development, rod transduction correlated temporally and spatially with the differentiation order of PRs when vectors were introduced subretinally but not when introduced intravitreally. All subretinally injected vectors had an initial preference to transduce cones in the absence of formed rod outer segments and then displayed a preference for rods as the cells matured, independently of the expression cassette or AAV serotype. Consistent with this observation, altered development of rod outer segments was associated with a strong reduction of rod transduction and an increase in the percentage of transduced cones by 2- to 2.8-fold. A similar increase of cone transduction was observed in the adult retinal degeneration 1 (rd1) retina compared to wild-type mice. These results suggest that the loss of rod outer segments in diseased retinas could markedly affect gene transfer efficiency of AAV vectors by limiting the ability of AAVs to infect dying rods efficiently. This information could be

  13. A transductive neuro-fuzzy controller: application to a drilling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajate, Agustín; Haber, Rodolfo E; Vega, Pastora I; Alique, José R

    2010-07-01

    Recently, new neuro-fuzzy inference algorithms have been developed to deal with the time-varying behavior and uncertainty of many complex systems. This paper presents the design and application of a novel transductive neuro-fuzzy inference method to control force in a high-performance drilling process. The main goal is to study, analyze, and verify the behavior of a transductive neuro-fuzzy inference system for controlling this complex process, specifically addressing the dynamic modeling, computational efficiency, and viability of the real-time application of this algorithm as well as assessing the topology of the neuro-fuzzy system (e.g., number of clusters, number of rules). A transductive reasoning method is used to create local neuro-fuzzy models for each input/output data set in a case study. The direct and inverse dynamics of a complex process are modeled using this strategy. The synergies among fuzzy, neural, and transductive strategies are then exploited to deal with process complexity and uncertainty through the application of the neuro-fuzzy models within an internal model control (IMC) scheme. A comparative study is made of the adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and the suggested method inspired in a transductive neuro-fuzzy inference strategy. The two neuro-fuzzy strategies are evaluated in a real drilling force control problem. The experimental results demonstrated that the transductive neuro-fuzzy control system provides a good transient response (without overshoot) and better error-based performance indices than the ANFIS-based control system. In particular, the IMC system based on a transductive neuro-fuzzy inference approach reduces the influence of the increase in cutting force that occurs as the drill depth increases, reducing the risk of rapid tool wear and catastrophic tool breakage.

  14. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  15. Peptide Vaccine Against Paracoccidioidomycosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborda, Carlos P; Travassos, Luiz R

    2017-01-01

    The chapter reviews methods utilized for the isolation and characterization of a promising immunogen candidate, aiming at a human vaccine against paracoccidioidomycosis. Peptide P10 carries a T-CD4+ epitope and was identified as an internal sequence of the major diagnostic antigen known as gp43 glycoprotein. It successfully treated massive intratracheal infections by virulent Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in combination with chemotherapy.An introduction about the systemic mycosis was found essential to understand the various options that were considered to design prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine protocols using peptide P10.

  16. Genetic incorporation of the protein transduction domain of Tat into Ad5 fiber enhances gene transfer efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegal Gene P

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 has been widely explored as a gene delivery vector for a variety of diseases. Many target cells, however, express low levels of Ad5 native receptor, the Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR, and thus are resistant to Ad5 infection. The Protein Transduction Domain of the HIV Tat protein, namely PTDtat, has been shown to mediate protein transduction in a wide range of cells. We hypothesize that re-targeting Ad5 vector via the PTDtat motif would improve the efficacy of Ad5-mediated gene delivery. Results In this study, we genetically incorporated the PTDtat motif into the knob domain of Ad5 fiber, and rescued the resultant viral vector, Ad5.PTDtat. Our data showed the modification did not interfere with Ad5 binding to its native receptor CAR, suggesting Ad5 infection via the CAR pathway is retained. In addition, we found that Ad5.PTDtat exhibited enhanced gene transfer efficacy in all of the cell lines that we have tested, which included both low-CAR and high-CAR decorated cells. Competitive inhibition assays suggested the enhanced infectivity of Ad5.PTDtat was mediated by binding of the positively charged PTDtat peptide to the negatively charged epitopes on the cells' surface. Furthermore, we investigated in vivo gene delivery efficacy of Ad5.PTDtat using subcutaneous tumor models established with U118MG glioma cells, and found that Ad5.PTDtat exhibited enhanced gene transfer efficacy compared to unmodified Ad5 vector as analyzed by a non-invasive fluorescence imaging technique. Conclusion Genetic incorporation of the PTDtat motif into Ad5 fiber allowed Ad5 vectors to infect cells via an alternative PTDtat targeting motif while retaining the native CAR-mediated infection pathway. The enhanced infectivity was demonstrated in both cultured cells and in in vivo tumor models. Taken together, our study identifies a novel tropism expanded Ad5 vector that may be useful for clinical gene therapy

  17. Discovery of intramolecular signal transduction network based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Ma

    Full Text Available A novel approach to reveal intramolecular signal transduction network is proposed in this work. To this end, a new algorithm of network construction is developed, which is based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation. A key feature of this approach is that direction information is specified after inferring protein residue-residue interaction network involved in the process of signal transduction. This enables fundamental analysis of the regulation hierarchy and identification of regulation hubs of the signaling network. A well-studied allosteric enzyme, E. coli aspartokinase III, is used as a model system to demonstrate the new method. Comparison with experimental results shows that the new approach is able to predict all the sites that have been experimentally proved to desensitize allosteric regulation of the enzyme. In addition, the signal transduction network shows a clear preference for specific structural regions, secondary structural types and residue conservation. Occurrence of super-hubs in the network indicates that allosteric regulation tends to gather residues with high connection ability to collectively facilitate the signaling process. Furthermore, a new parameter of propagation coefficient is defined to determine the propagation capability of residues within a signal transduction network. In conclusion, the new approach is useful for fundamental understanding of the process of intramolecular signal transduction and thus has significant impact on rational design of novel allosteric proteins.

  18. The effect of antimicrobials on verocytotoxin bacteriophage transduction under bovine rumen fluid and broth conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyambe S.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The verocytotoxin genes in verocytotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC are carried by bacteriophages, incorporated into the bacterial genome (prophage. Antibiotics may promote phage replication and release to infect other cells (transduction, thus leading to the emergence of new VTEC strains. This study investigated transduction of a verocytotoxin2-encoding bacteriophage (3538(vtx2::cat under laboratory conditions, including the effect of antibiotic treatments. Luria-Bertani Miller broth and rumen fluid (raw and sterilised by irradiation were inoculated with the donor (C600φ3538(Δvtx2::cat and recipient (E. coli C600::kanamycinR strains (4 log10 cfu/mL and incubated at 38°C. Antibiotic treatments (minimal inhibitory and sub-inhibitory concentrations of ampicillin, cefquinome, oxytetracycline and sodium sulfamethazine were applied after 3 h. Samples were tested for donor, recipient, cell-free phage and transductants at times t = 0, 3, 4, 6, 27 (24 h post-antibiotic treatment and 51 h. Free phage was detected in the untreated broth and rumen samples, as were the transductants confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. The antibiotic treatments did not significantly (P > 0.01 increase the concentrations of free phage or transductants detected. It was therefore concluded that, under laboratory conditions, the antibiotics tested did not induce bacteriophage lysis, release and infection of new bacterial cells beyond that constitutively found in the phage population.

  19. The SUMOylation Pathway Restricts Gene Transduction by Adeno-Associated Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Hölscher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Adeno-associated viruses are members of the genus dependoviruses of the parvoviridae family. AAV vectors are considered promising vectors for gene therapy and genetic vaccination as they can be easily produced, are highly stable and non-pathogenic. Nevertheless, transduction of cells in vitro and in vivo by AAV in the absence of a helper virus is comparatively inefficient requiring high multiplicity of infection. Several bottlenecks for AAV transduction have previously been described, including release from endosomes, nuclear transport and conversion of the single stranded DNA into a double stranded molecule. We hypothesized that the bottlenecks in AAV transduction are, in part, due to the presence of host cell restriction factors acting directly or indirectly on the AAV-mediated gene transduction. In order to identify such factors we performed a whole genome siRNA screen which identified a number of putative genes interfering with AAV gene transduction. A number of factors, yielding the highest scores, were identified as members of the SUMOylation pathway. We identified Ubc9, the E2 conjugating enzyme as well as Sae1 and Sae2, enzymes responsible for activating E1, as factors involved in restricting AAV. The restriction effect, mediated by these factors, was validated and reproduced independently. Our data indicate that SUMOylation targets entry of AAV capsids and not downstream processes of uncoating, including DNA single strand conversion or DNA damage signaling. We suggest that transiently targeting SUMOylation will enhance application of AAV in vitro and in vivo.

  20. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W. Fearnley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145 promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes.

  1. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Gareth W; Smith, Gina A; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Mughal, Nadeem A; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kearney, Mark T; Zachary, Ian C; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-05-15

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A-VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor-ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145) promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Suppression of tumorigenicity and metastatic potential of melanoma cells by transduction of interferon gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lykhova A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate an inhibitory effect of baculovirus-mediated transduction of the murine interferon-beta gene on mouse melanoma in vitro and in vivo. Methods. Studies were performed on B16 mouse melanoma (MM-4 cell line. Transduction, immunocytochemical and tumor cell biology approaches have been used in this study. Results. Transduction of MM-4 cells by the recombinant baculovirus with IFN-beta gene is accompanied by morphological changes of tumor cells, suppression of cell proliferation, significant inhibition of platting efficiency of cells and their colonies formation in semisolid agar. Moreover, transduction of melanoma MM-4 cells by the baculovirus IFN-transgene leads to inhibition of tumorigenicity and metastatic ability of the cells in vivo. The intravenous administration of recombinant baculovirus vector with IFN gene inhibits growth of metastases induced in the lungs of mice by intravenously injected tumor cells. Conclusions. Transduction of mouse melanoma cells by the recombinant baculovirus with murine IFN-beta gene inhibits their proliferative potential, tumorigenicity and metastatic activity.

  3. MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction regulates the actin cytoskeleton through the downregulation of WAVE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C-L; Ueno, M; Liu, D; Masuya, D; Nakano, J; Yokomise, H; Nakagawa, T; Miyake, M

    2006-10-19

    Motility-related protein-1 (MRP-1/CD9) is involved in cell motility. We studied the change in the actin cytoskeleton, and the expression of actin-related protein (Arp) 2 and Arp3 and the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) family according to MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction into HT1080 cells. The frequency of cells with lamellipodia was significantly lower in MRP-1/CD9-transfected HT1080 cells than in control HT1080 cells (PMRP-1/CD9 gene transduction affected the subcellular localization of Arp2 and Arp3 proteins. Furthermore, MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction induced a downregulation of WAVE2 expression (PMRP-1/CD9 monoclonal antibody inhibited downregulation of WAVE2 in MRP-1/CD9-transfected HT1080 cells (PMRP-1/CD9 gene transduction. Furthermore, downregulation of WAVE2 by transfection of WAVE2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) mimicked the morphological effects of MRP-1/CD9 gene transduction and suppressed cell motility. However, transfection of each siRNA for Wnt1, Wnt2b1 or Wnt5a did not affect WAVE2 expression. Transfection of WAVE2-specific siRNA also did not affect expressions of these Wnts. These results indicate that MRP-1/CD9 regulates the actin cytoskeleton by downregulating of the WAVE2, through the Wnt-independent signal pathway.

  4. Biologically active leptin-related synthetic peptides activate STAT3 via phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and PI-3K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Yun; Yang, Sheng-Huei; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Cheng, Guei-Yun; Davis, Paul J; Grasso, Patricia

    2014-07-01

    The effects of leptin-related synthetic peptides [d-Leu-4]-OB3 and OB3 on energy balance and glucose homeostasis in ob/ob and db/db mice have been confirmed. The molecular basis of these effects, however, remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the ability of these peptides to activate signal transduction pathways known to be involved in transduction of the leptin signal. In a specific and concentration-dependent manner, [d-Leu-4]-OB3 induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, PI-3K, Ser-727 STAT3, and Tyr-705 of STAT3. OB3 also induced activation of STAT3 via phosphorylation of ERK1/2, STAT3 Ser-727, STAT3 Tyr-705 and PI-3K p85, but to a lesser degree. Using PD98059 and LY294002, specific inhibitors of MEK and PI-3K, respectively, we were able to identify the signal transduction pathways involved in peptide-induced STAT3 activation. [d-Leu-4]-OB3 induced serine phosphorylation of STAT3 primarily through activation of ERK1/2. Tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT3, however, was induced primarily through activation of PI-3K. Our data suggest that in db/db mice, [d-Leu-4]-OB3 binding to short isoforms of the leptin receptor induces intracellular signaling cascades which do not require OB-Rb activation. These signals may ultimately result in peptide effects on transcriptional and translational events associated with energy balance and glycemic regulation. In summary, we have shown for the first time that, similar to leptin, bioactive leptin-related synthetic peptide analogs activate STAT3 via phosphorylation of serine and tyrosine residues by multiple signal transduction pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. NCAM Mimetic Peptides: An Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    of combinatorial peptide libraries. The C3 and NBP10 peptides target the first Ig module whereas the ENFIN2 and ENFIN11 peptides target fibronectin type III (FN3) modules of NCAM. A number of NCAM mimetics can induce neurite outgrowth and exhibit neuroprotective and synaptic plasticity modulating properties...

  6. brain natriuretic peptide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Recently brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level has been introduced as a screening test for congestive heart failure (CHF) in children. The current CHF assessment scores are not satisfactory as they use a large number of variables. Objective: To evaluate two CHF scores: a modified clinical score and an echo-.

  7. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  8. [Biosynthesis of opioid peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossier, J

    1988-01-01

    The endogenous opioid peptides all contain the enkephalin sequence Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met and Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu at their aminoterminus. Three distinct families of these peptides (endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins) are present in different neuronal pathways within the central nervous system. Molecular genetics have shown that these three families of opioid peptides are derived from three distinct precursors. Pro-opiomelanocortin gives rise to the endorphins, as well as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and the melanotropic hormones (MSH's). [Met] enkephalin, [Leu] enkephalin and the related heptapeptide [Met] enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7 and octapeptide [Met] enkephalin-Arg6-Gly7-Leu8 are derived from proenkephalin. The third family is derived from prodynorphin and includes dynorphin A, dynorphin B (also known as rimorphin) and alpha- and beta-neo-endorphin. The structure of the genes coding for these precursors are similar, suggesting the possibility of one common ancestral gene. The most common scheme for enzymatic maturation of precursors proposes the action of a trypsin-like endopeptidase followed by a carboxypeptidase B-like exopeptidase. However, we have provided evidence that this combination of trypsin-like and carboxypeptidase B-like enzymes may not be the only mechanism for liberating enkephalin from low molecular weight enkephalin-containing peptides. Indeed, endo-oligopeptidase A, an enzyme, known to hydrolyze the Phe5-Ser6 bond of bradykinin and the Arg8-Arg9 bond of neurotensin, has been shown to produce, by a single cleavage, [Leu] enkephalin or [Met] enkephalin from small enkephalin-containing peptides, (Camargo et al., 1987, J. Neurochem. 48, 1258-1263).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  10. Mechanical regulation of a molecular clutch defines force transmission and transduction in response to matrix rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Oria, Roger; Chen, Yunfeng; Kosmalska, Anita; Pérez-González, Carlos; Castro, Natalia; Zhu, Cheng; Trepat, Xavier; Roca-Cusachs, Pere

    2016-05-01

    Cell function depends on tissue rigidity, which cells probe by applying and transmitting forces to their extracellular matrix, and then transducing them into biochemical signals. Here we show that in response to matrix rigidity and density, force transmission and transduction are explained by the mechanical properties of the actin-talin-integrin-fibronectin clutch. We demonstrate that force transmission is regulated by a dynamic clutch mechanism, which unveils its fundamental biphasic force/rigidity relationship on talin depletion. Force transduction is triggered by talin unfolding above a stiffness threshold. Below this threshold, integrins unbind and release force before talin can unfold. Above the threshold, talin unfolds and binds to vinculin, leading to adhesion growth and YAP nuclear translocation. Matrix density, myosin contractility, integrin ligation and talin mechanical stability differently and nonlinearly regulate both force transmission and the transduction threshold. In all cases, coupling of talin unfolding dynamics to a theoretical clutch model quantitatively predicts cell response.

  11. Effects of pergolide mesylate on transduction efficiency of PEP-1-catalase protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, So Mi [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Soon Sung [Department of Food Science and Nutrition and RIC Center, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Tae-Cheon [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyeok Yil [Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Duk-Soo [Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan-Si 330-090 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung-Woo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hyun Sook, E-mail: wazzup@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo Young, E-mail: sychoi@hallym.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Science and Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chunchon 200-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-18

    Research highlights: {yields} We studied effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on in vitro and in vivo transduction of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PEP-1-catatase inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation. {yields} PM enhanced the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells and skin tissue. {yields} PM increased anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catalase. {yields} PM stimulated therapeutic action of anti-oxidant enzyme catalase in oxidative-related diseases. -- Abstract: The low transduction efficiency of various proteins is an obstacle to their therapeutic application. However, protein transduction domains (PTDs) are well-known for a highly effective tool for exogenous protein delivery to cells. We examined the effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT human keratinocytes and mice skin and on the anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catatase against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation using Western blot and histological analysis. PM enhanced the time- and dose-dependent transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells without affecting the cellular toxicity. In a mouse edema model, PEP-1-catalase inhibited the increased expressions of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6 and -1{beta}, and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} induced by TPA. On the other hand, PM alone failed to exert any significant anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of co-treatment with PEP-1-catalase and PM was more potent than that of PEP-1-catalase alone. Our results indicate that PM may enhance the delivery of PTDs fusion therapeutic proteins to target cells and tissues and has potential to increase their therapeutic effects of such drugs against various diseases.

  12. Effects of pergolide mesylate on transduction efficiency of PEP-1-catalase protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, So Mi; Lim, Soon Sung; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Kwon, Hyeok Yil; Kim, Duk-Soo; Cho, Sung-Woo; Han, Kyu Hyung; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Hwang, Hyun Sook; Choi, Soo Young

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We studied effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on in vitro and in vivo transduction of PEP-1-catalase. → PEP-1-catatase inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation. → PM enhanced the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells and skin tissue. → PM increased anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catalase. → PM stimulated therapeutic action of anti-oxidant enzyme catalase in oxidative-related diseases. -- Abstract: The low transduction efficiency of various proteins is an obstacle to their therapeutic application. However, protein transduction domains (PTDs) are well-known for a highly effective tool for exogenous protein delivery to cells. We examined the effects of pergolide mesylate (PM) on the transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT human keratinocytes and mice skin and on the anti-inflammatory activity of PEP-1-catatase against 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation using Western blot and histological analysis. PM enhanced the time- and dose-dependent transduction of PEP-1-catalase into HaCaT cells without affecting the cellular toxicity. In a mouse edema model, PEP-1-catalase inhibited the increased expressions of inflammatory mediators and cytokines such as cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6 and -1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α induced by TPA. On the other hand, PM alone failed to exert any significant anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-inflammatory effect of co-treatment with PEP-1-catalase and PM was more potent than that of PEP-1-catalase alone. Our results indicate that PM may enhance the delivery of PTDs fusion therapeutic proteins to target cells and tissues and has potential to increase their therapeutic effects of such drugs against various diseases.

  13. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column.

  14. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  15. Deciphering complex dynamics of water counteraction around secondary structural elements of allosteric protein complex: Case study of SAP-SLAM system in signal transduction cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Sanchita

    2018-01-01

    The first hydration shell of a protein exhibits heterogeneous behavior owing to several attributes, majorly local polarity and structural flexibility as revealed by solvation dynamics of secondary structural elements. We attempt to recognize the change in complex water counteraction generated due to substantial alteration in flexibility during protein complex formation. The investigation is carried out with the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family of receptors, expressed by an array of immune cells, and interacting with SLAM-associated protein (SAP), composed of one SH2 domain. All atom molecular dynamics simulations are employed to the aqueous solutions of free SAP and SLAM-peptide bound SAP. We observed that water dynamics around different secondary structural elements became highly affected as well as nicely correlated with the SLAM-peptide induced change in structural rigidity obtained by thermodynamic quantification. A few instances of contradictory dynamic features of water to the change in structural flexibility are explained by means of occluded polar residues by the peptide. For βD, EFloop, and BGloop, both structural flexibility and solvent accessibility of the residues confirm the obvious contribution. Most importantly, we have quantified enhanced restriction in water dynamics around the second Fyn-binding site of the SAP due to SAP-SLAM complexation, even prior to the presence of Fyn. This observation leads to a novel argument that SLAM induced more restricted water molecules could offer more water entropic contribution during the subsequent Fyn binding and provide enhanced stability to the SAP-Fyn complex in the signaling cascade. Finally, SLAM induced water counteraction around the second binding site of the SAP sheds light on the allosteric property of the SAP, which becomes an integral part of the underlying signal transduction mechanism.

  16. Deciphering complex dynamics of water counteraction around secondary structural elements of allosteric protein complex: Case study of SAP-SLAM system in signal transduction cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Sanchita

    2018-01-28

    The first hydration shell of a protein exhibits heterogeneous behavior owing to several attributes, majorly local polarity and structural flexibility as revealed by solvation dynamics of secondary structural elements. We attempt to recognize the change in complex water counteraction generated due to substantial alteration in flexibility during protein complex formation. The investigation is carried out with the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family of receptors, expressed by an array of immune cells, and interacting with SLAM-associated protein (SAP), composed of one SH2 domain. All atom molecular dynamics simulations are employed to the aqueous solutions of free SAP and SLAM-peptide bound SAP. We observed that water dynamics around different secondary structural elements became highly affected as well as nicely correlated with the SLAM-peptide induced change in structural rigidity obtained by thermodynamic quantification. A few instances of contradictory dynamic features of water to the change in structural flexibility are explained by means of occluded polar residues by the peptide. For βD, EFloop, and BGloop, both structural flexibility and solvent accessibility of the residues confirm the obvious contribution. Most importantly, we have quantified enhanced restriction in water dynamics around the second Fyn-binding site of the SAP due to SAP-SLAM complexation, even prior to the presence of Fyn. This observation leads to a novel argument that SLAM induced more restricted water molecules could offer more water entropic contribution during the subsequent Fyn binding and provide enhanced stability to the SAP-Fyn complex in the signaling cascade. Finally, SLAM induced water counteraction around the second binding site of the SAP sheds light on the allosteric property of the SAP, which becomes an integral part of the underlying signal transduction mechanism.

  17. Basic peptides as functional components of non-viral gene transfer vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Mahito; Eguchi, Akiko; Akuta, Teruo; Nagoshi, Emi; Fujita, Shigeo; Okabe, Jun; Senda, Takao; Hasegawa, Mamoru

    2003-04-01

    Improving the performance of non-viral gene-delivery vehicles that consist of synthetic compounds and nucleic acids is a key to successful gene therapy. Supplementing synthetic vehicles with various biological functions by using natural or artificial peptides is a promising approach with which to achieve this goal. One of the obstacles hindering this effort is that some of the potentially useful peptides, especially those with many basic amino acid residues, interfere with the formation of the complex owing to strong electrostatic interactions with the nucleic acid. In this review, we describe our recent work in examining the potential of these peptides in gene delivery, using a recombinant lambda phage particle as the model for the gene-delivery complex. Lambda phage encapsulates large duplex DNA in a rigid polyplex-like shell with a diameter of 55 nm, and can display various peptides on this capsid, independently of particle formation. By examining the expression of marker genes encapsulated in the phage capsid, we have demonstrated that the protein transduction domain of HIV Tat protein and the nuclear localization signal derived from SV40 T antigen can remarkably facilitate the delivery of these marker genes across the two major barriers, the cell membrane and the nuclear membrane, respectively. Our results indicate that these basic peptides can constitute effective components of synthetic gene-transfer complexes, as long as sufficient copies are displayed on the outer surface of the complex.

  18. Radiolabelled peptides vs. nanoparticle-peptide complexes for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro F, G.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The principle that peptide receptors can be used successfully for in vivo targeting of human cancers has been provided and the peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy for malignant tumors is a real treatment option. Targeted entry into cells is an increasingly important area of research. The diagnoses and treatment of disease by novel methods would be enhanced greatly by the efficient transport of materials to living cell nuclei. Membrane-trans locating peptides complexed to nanoparticles are small enough (30 nm) to cross the nuclear membrane and to enter the cell via receptor-mediated endocytosis, emerging as a new type of pharmaceuticals. Pharmacokinetic properties and molecular specificity of iron or gold nanoparticle-peptide complexes that do not induce biological toxicity is a topic of world interest in current and future medical investigations. Some perspectives and achievements on the preparation, pharmacokinetics and dosimetry of radiolabelled peptides versus nanoparticle-peptide complexes for medical applications are presented. (Author)

  19. Nonpeptide and peptide growth hormone secretagogues act both as ghrelin receptor agonist and as positive or negative allosteric modulators of ghrelin signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Brandt, Erik; Bach, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Two nonpeptide (L692,429 and MK-677) and two peptide [GH-releasing peptide (GHRP)-6 and ghrelin] agonists were compared in binding and in signal transduction assays: calcium mobilization, inositol phosphate turnover, cAMP-responsive element (CRE), and serum-responsive element (SRE) controlled...... transcription, as well as arrestin mobilization. MK-677 acted as a simple agonist having an affinity of 6.5 nm and activated all signal transduction systems with similar high potency (0.2-1.4 nm). L-692,429 also displayed a very similar potency in all signaling assays (25-60 nm) but competed with a 1000-fold...... agonist properties and in their ability to modulate ghrelin signaling. A receptor model is presented wherein ghrelin normally only activates one receptor subunit in a dimer and where the smaller nonendogenous agonists bind in the other subunit to act both as coagonists and as either neutral (MK-677...

  20. Sensory cilia and integration of signal transduction in human health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren T; Pedersen, Lotte B; Schneider, Linda

    2007-01-01

    The primary cilium is a hallmark of mammalian tissue cells. Recent research has shown that these organelles display unique sets of selected signal transduction modules including receptors, ion channels, effector proteins and transcription factors that relay chemical and physical stimuli from the ...

  1. Expression of the cholinergic signal-transduction pathway components during embryonic rat heart development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franco, D.; Moorman, A. F.; Lamers, W. H.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies showed that acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity is present in the downstream (arterial) part of the embryonic chick and rat heart, but its functional significance was unclear. To establish whether other components of a cholinergic signal-transduction pathway are present

  2. The role of Ryk and Ror receptor tyrosine kinases in Wnt signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, J.; Nusse, R.; van Amerongen, R.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases of the Ryk and Ror families were initially classified as orphan receptors because their ligands were unknown. They are now known to contain functional extracellular Wnt-binding domains and are implicated in Wnt-signal transduction in multiple species. Although their

  3. Molecular insights into the mechanism of sensing and signal transduction of the thermosensor DesK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballering, J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to sense and respond to environmental signals is essential for cell survival. Unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying signaling processes remains a challenge, however. This thesis provides molecular insights into the mechanism of sensing and signal transduction of the thermosensor

  4. Regulation of autophagy by amino acids and MTOR-dependent signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Alfred J.; Lorin, Séverine; Blommaart, Edward F.; Codogno, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Amino acids not only participate in intermediary metabolism but also stimulate insulin-mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR)-mediated signal transduction which controls the major metabolic pathways. Among these is the pathway of autophagy which takes care of the degradation of long-lived proteins

  5. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl3-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 ¿M AlCl3 showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation.

  6. Effects of matrine on JAK-STAT signaling transduction pathways in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current study aims to investigate the effects of matrine on the JAK-STAT signaling transduction pathways in bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis (PF) and to explore its action mechanism. A total of 72 male C57BL/6 mice were randomized into the control, model, and treatment groups. PF models were ...

  7. CRISPR-cas-mediated phage resistance enhances horizontal gene transfer by transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watson, Bridget N.J.; Staals, Raymond H.J.; Fineran, Peter C.

    2018-01-01

    A powerful contributor to prokaryotic evolution is horizontal gene transfer (HGT) through transformation, conjugation, and transduction, which can be advantageous, neutral, or detrimental to fitness. Bacteria and archaea control HGT and phage infection through CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly

  8. Intrapulmonary Versus Nasal Transduction of Murine Airways With GP64-pseudotyped Viral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Oakland

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent viral vector-mediated transgene expression in the airways requires delivery to cells with progenitor capacity and avoidance of immune responses. Previously, we observed that GP64-pseudotyped feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV-mediated gene transfer was more efficient in the nasal airways than the large airways of the murine lung. We hypothesized that in vivo gene transfer was limited by immunological and physiological barriers in the murine intrapulmonary airways. Here, we systematically investigate multiple potential barriers to lentiviral gene transfer in the airways of mice. We show that GP64-FIV vector transduced primary cultures of well-differentiated murine nasal epithelia with greater efficiency than primary cultures of murine tracheal epithelia. We further demonstrate that neutrophils, type I interferon (IFN responses, as well as T and B lymphocytes are not the major factors limiting the transduction of murine conducting airways. In addition, we observed better transduction of GP64-pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV in the nasal epithelia compared with the intrapulmonary airways in mice. VSVG glycoprotein pseudotyped VSV transduced intrapulmonary epithelia with similar efficiency as nasal epithelia. Our results suggest that the differential transduction efficiency of nasal versus intrapulmonary airways by FIV vector is not a result of immunological barriers or surface area, but rather differential expression of cellular factors specific for FIV vector transduction.

  9. NA+ AS COUPLING ION IN ENERGY TRANSDUCTION IN EXTREMOPHILIC BACTERIA AND ARCHAEA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speelmans, G.; Poolman, B.; Konings, W.N

    For microoganisms to live under extreme physical conditions requires important adaptations of the cells. In many organisms the use of Na+ instead of protons as coupling ion in energy transduction is associated with such adaptation. This review focuses on the enzymes that are responsible for the

  10. Characterization of adenoviral transduction profile in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Jianzhong; Tai, Phillip W L; Lu, Yi; Li, Jia; Ma, Hong; Su, Qin; Wei, Qiang; Li, Hong; Gao, Guangping

    2017-09-01

    Prostate diseases are common in males worldwide with high morbidity. Gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic strategy for prostate diseases, however, it is currently underdeveloped. As well known, adeno virus (Ad) is the most widely used gene therapy vector. The aims of this study are to explore transduction efficiency of Ad in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue, thus further providing guidance for future prostate pathophysiological studies and therapeutic development of prostate diseases. We produced Ad expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), and characterized the transduction efficiency of Ad in both human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines in vitro, as well as prostate tumor xenograft, and wild-type mouse prostate tissue in vivo. Ad transduction efficiency was determined by EGFP fluorescence using microscopy and flow cytometry. Cell type-specific transduction was examined by immunofluorescence staining of cell markers. Our data showed that Ad efficiently transduced human and mouse prostate cancer cells in vitro in a dose dependent manner. Following intratumoral and intraprostate injection, Ad could efficiently transduce prostate tumor xenograft and the major prostatic cell types in vivo, respectively. Our findings suggest that Ad can efficiently transduce prostate tumor cells in vitro as well as xenograft and normal prostate tissue in vivo, and further indicate that Ad could be a potentially powerful toolbox for future gene therapy of prostate diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. FASEB summer research conference on signal transduction in plants. Final report, June 16, 1996--June 21, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomax, T.L.; Quatrano, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    This is the program from the second FASEB conference on Signal Transduction in Plants. Topic areas included the following: environmental signaling; perception and transduction of light signals; signaling in plant microbe interactions; signaling in plant pathogen interactions; cell, cell communication; cytoskeleton, plasma membrane, and cellwall continuum; signaling molecules in plant growth and development I and II. A list of participants is included.

  12. Hair cell mechano-transduction : Its influence on the gross mechanical characteristics of a hair cell sense organ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanNetten, Sietse M.

    1997-01-01

    The complex mechanical behaviour of a hair cell bundle appears to be a direct consequence of the gating forces on the individual transduction channels. The mechanical molecular interactions involved in transduction channel gating, therefore, also bear a reciprocal influence, via the hair bundles; on

  13. Structure-function relationships of Na+, K+, ATP, or Mg2+ binding and energy transduction in Na,K-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Peter L.; Pedersen, Per Amstrup

    2000-01-01

    Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction......Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction...

  14. Peptide-enhanced oral delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mie; Foged, Camilla; Berthelsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Systemic therapy upon oral delivery of biologics, such as peptide and protein drugs is limited due to their large molecular size, their low enzymatic stability and their inability to cross the intestinal epithelium. Ways to overcome the epithelial barrier include the use of peptide-based excipients...... throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, chemical stability is an inherent challenge when employing amino acid-based excipients for oral delivery, and multiple approaches have been investigated to improve this. The exact mechanisms of transepithelial translocation are discussed, and it is believed...... for oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs highlighting recent studies and the most promising compounds from these classes of peptide excipients....

  15. Biological activity of rainbow trout Ea4-peptide of the pro-insulin-like growth factor (pro-IGF)-I on promoting attachment of breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) via alpha2- and beta1-integrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siri, Sineenat; Chen, Maria J; Chen, Thomas T

    2006-12-15

    E-peptide of pro-IGF-I was considered as biologically inactive. We have demonstrated that rainbow trout (rt) Ea4-peptide exerted biological activities in several established tumor cell lines [Chen et al., 2002; Kuo and Chen, 2002]. Here we report the activity of rtEa4-peptide in promoting attachment of human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). While rtEa2-, rtEa3-, and rtEa4-peptides enhanced the attachment of MDA-MB-231 cells in a dose dependent manner, rtEa4-peptide possessed the highest activity. Antibodies specific to alpha2 and beta1 integrins significantly inhibited the attachment of cells to rtEa4-peptide coated-plates by 40%. In addition, rtEa4-peptide induced the expression of fibronectin 1 and laminin receptor genes in MDA-MB-231 cells. Blocking new protein synthesis by cycloheximide significantly reduced the attachment of MDA-MB-231 cells to rtEa4-peptide coated wells by 50%. These results suggest that rtEa4-peptide may promote cell attachment by interacting with alpha2/beta1 integrin receptors at the cell surface and by inducing the expression of fibronectin 1 and laminin receptor genes. Expression of fibronectin 1 gene induced by rtEa4-peptide in MDA-MB-231 cells was abolished by inhibitors of PI3K, PKC, Mek1/2, JNK1/2, and p38 MAPK signaling transduction molecules. These results suggested that induction of fibronectin 1 gene expression in MDA-MB-231 cells by rtEa4-peptide may be mediated via PI3K, PKC, Mek1/2, JNK1/2, and p38 MAPK signal transduction molecules. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Enrichment of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells facilitates transduction for stem cell gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kismet; Urbinati, Fabrizia; Romero, Zulema; Campo-Fernandez, Beatriz; Kaufman, Michael L; Cooper, Aaron R; Masiuk, Katelyn; Hollis, Roger P; Kohn, Donald B

    2015-05-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy for sickle cell disease has the potential to treat this illness without the major immunological complications associated with allogeneic transplantation. However, transduction efficiency by β-globin lentiviral vectors using CD34-enriched cell populations is suboptimal and large vector production batches may be needed for clinical trials. Transducing a cell population more enriched for HSC could greatly reduce vector needs and, potentially, increase transduction efficiency. CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells, comprising ∼1%-3% of all CD34(+) cells, were isolated from healthy cord blood CD34(+) cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and transduced with a lentiviral vector expressing an antisickling form of beta-globin (CCL-β(AS3) -FB). Isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells were able to generate progeny over an extended period of long-term culture (LTC) compared to the CD34(+) cells and required up to 40-fold less vector for transduction compared to bulk CD34(+) preparations containing an equivalent number of CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells. Transduction of isolated CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells was comparable to CD34(+) cells measured by quantitative PCR at day 14 with reduced vector needs, and average vector copy/cell remained higher over time for LTC initiated from CD34(+) /38(-) cells. Following in vitro erythroid differentiation, HBBAS3 mRNA expression was similar in cultures derived from CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells or unfractionated CD34(+) cells. In vivo studies showed equivalent engraftment of transduced CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells when transplanted in competition with 100-fold more CD34(+) /CD38(+) cells. This work provides initial evidence for the beneficial effects from isolating human CD34(+) /CD38(-) cells to use significantly less vector and potentially improve transduction for HSC gene therapy. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  17. Peptide Signals Encode Protein Localization▿

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Jay H.; Keiler, Kenneth C.

    2007-01-01

    Many bacterial proteins are localized to precise intracellular locations, but in most cases the mechanism for encoding localization information is not known. Screening libraries of peptides fused to green fluorescent protein identified sequences that directed the protein to helical structures or to midcell. These peptides indicate that protein localization can be encoded in 20-amino-acid peptides instead of complex protein-protein interactions and raise the possibility that the location of a ...

  18. The Equine PeptideAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Louise; Jacobsen, Stine; Sorensen, Mette A.

    2014-01-01

    Equine PeptideAtlas encompassing high-resolution tandem MS analyses of 51 samples representing a selection of equine tissues and body fluids from healthy and diseased animals. The raw data were processed through the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline to yield high quality identification of proteins and peptides...... analyses, and emphasizes the value of the Equine PeptideAtlas as a resource for the design of targeted quantitative proteomic studies....

  19. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptides...... can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery...

  20. Cell-permeable peptides improve cellular uptake and therapeutic gene delivery of replication-deficient viruses in cells and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, Jean-Philippe; Yu, Jun; Griffith, Jason W; Babbitt, Roger W; Scotland, Ramona S; Hickey, Reed; Giordano, Frank J; Sessa, William C

    2003-03-01

    Small polybasic peptides derived from the transduction domains of certain proteins, such as the third alpha-helix of the Antennapedia (Antp) homeodomain, can cross the cell membrane through a receptor-independent mechanism. These cell-permeable molecules have been used as 'Trojan horses' to introduce biologically active cargo molecules such as DNA, peptides or proteins into cells. Using these cell-permeable peptides, we have developed an efficient and simple method to increase virally mediated gene delivery and protein expression in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show that cell-permeable peptides increase viral cell entry, improve gene expression at reduced titers of virus and improve efficacy of therapeutically relevant genes in vivo.

  1. One Hundred Years of Peptide Chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    thus a chiral center. Today, 20 amino acids are known as genetically encoded as building blocks of peptides and proteins. Almost all of them present in peptides have L-configura- tion. D-amino acids have been found only in small peptides of bacterial cell walls, peptide antibiotics and peptides in South American frog skin.

  2. Branched dimerization of Tat peptide improves permeability to HeLa and hippocampal neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monreal, I Abrrey; Liu, Qian; Tyson, Katherine; Bland, Tyler; Dalisay, Doralyn S; Adams, Erin V; Wayman, Gary A; Aguilar, Hector C; Saludes, Jonel P

    2015-03-28

    A dimeric branched peptide TATp-D designed as an analogue of the HIV-Tat protein transduction domain (TATp), a prototypical cell penetrating peptide (CPP), demonstrates significantly enhanced cell uptake at 0.25 to 2.5 μM. Live cell confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that multivalency dramatically improved the permeation potency of TATp-D to HeLa and primary hippocampal neuronal cells. The observed enhanced ability of TATp-D to translocate through the membrane is highlighted by a non-linear dependence on concentration, exhibiting the greatest uptake at sub-micromolar concentrations as compared to TATp. Multimerization via bis-Fmoc Lysine offered a synthetically straightforward method to investigate the effects of multivalent CPPs while offering orthogonal handles for cargo attachment, increasing the utility of CPPs at significantly lower concentrations.

  3. Anti-apoptotic peptides protect against radiation-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, Kevin W.; Muenzer, Jared T.; Chang, Kathy C.; Davis, Chris G.; McDunn, Jonathan E.; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Hilliard, Carolyn A.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Grigsby, Perry W.; Hunt, Clayton R.

    2007-01-01

    The risk of terrorist attacks utilizing either nuclear or radiological weapons has raised concerns about the current lack of effective radioprotectants. Here it is demonstrated that the BH4 peptide domain of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL can be delivered to cells by covalent attachment to the TAT peptide transduction domain (TAT-BH4) and provide protection in vitro and in vivo from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Isolated human lymphocytes treated with TAT-BH4 were protected against apoptosis following exposure to 15 Gy radiation. In mice exposed to 5 Gy radiation, TAT-BH4 treatment protected splenocytes and thymocytes from radiation-induced apoptotic cell death. Most importantly, in vivo radiation protection was observed in mice whether TAT-BH4 treatment was given prior to or after irradiation. Thus, by targeting steps within the apoptosis signaling pathway it is possible to develop post-exposure treatments to protect radio-sensitive tissues

  4. Piezoresistive measurement of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide binding with microcantilever arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, N.; Maldonado, C. J.; Thundat, T.; Passian, A.

    2014-03-01

    Effective detection of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide is crucial as it could be used as a positive control to screen for highly infectious flu strains such as Swine-Origin Influenza A (H1N1). Piezoresistive microcantilever arrays present a pathway towards highly sensitive and label-free detection of biomolecules by transducing the antigen-antibody binding into change in resistivity via induced surface stress variation. We demonstrate a mechanical transduction of Swine H1N1 Hemagglutinin peptide binding and suggest the employed technique may offer a potential platform for detection of the H1N1 virus, which could be clinically used to diagnose and provide subsequent relief.

  5. Peptide Vaccines for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kono K

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In general, the preferable characteristic of the target molecules for development of cancer vaccines are high immunogenicity, very common expression in cancer cells, specific expression in cancer cells and essential molecules for cell survival (to avoid loss of expression. We previously reported that three novel HLA-A24-restricted immunodominant peptides, which were derived from three different oncoantigens, TTK, LY6K, and IMP-3,were promising targets for cancer vaccination for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCCpatients. Then, we had performed a phase I clinical trial using three HLA-A24-binding peptides and the results had been shown to be promising for ESCC. Therefore, we further performed a multicenter, non-randomized phase II clinical trial. Patients and Methods: Sixty ESCC patients were enrolled to evaluate OS, PFS, immunological response employing ELISPOT and pentamer assays. Each of the three peptides was administered with IFA weekly. All patients received the vaccination without knowing an HLA-A type, and the HLA types were key-opened at the analysis point. Hence, the endpoints were set to evaluate differences between HLA-A*2402-positive (24(+ and -negative (24(- groups. Results: The OS in the 24 (+ group (n=35 tended to be better than that in the 24(- group (n=25 (MST 4.6 vs. 2.6 month, respectively, p = 0.121, although the difference was not statistically significant. However, the PFS in the 24(+ group was significantly better than that in the 24(- group (p = 0.032. In the 24(+ group, ELISPOT assay indicated that the LY6K-, TTK-, and IMP3-specific CTL responses were observed after the vaccination in 63%, 45%, and 60% of the 24(+ group, respectively. The patients having LY6K-, TTK-, and IMP3-specific CTL responses revealed the better OS than those not having CTL induction, respectively. The patients showing the CTL induction for multiple peptides have better clinical responses. Conclusion: The immune response induced

  6. Enhancing gene delivery of adeno-associated viruses by cell-permeable peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2 is considered a promising gene delivery vector and has been extensively applied in several disease models; however, inefficient transduction in various cells and tissues has limited its widespread application in many areas of gene therapy. In this study, we have developed a general, but efficient, strategy to enhance viral transduction, both in vitro and in vivo, by incubating viral particles with cell-permeable peptides (CPPs. We show that CPPs increase internalization of viral particles into cells by facilitating both energy-independent and energy-dependent endocytosis. Moreover, CPPs can significantly enhance the endosomal escape process of viral particles, thus enhancing viral transduction to those cells that have exhibited very low permissiveness to AAV2 infection as a result of impaired intracellular viral processing. We also demonstrated that this approach could be applicable to other AAV serotypes. Thus, the membrane-penetrating ability of CPPs enables us to generate an efficient method for enhanced gene delivery of AAV vectors, potentially facilitating its applicability to human gene therapy.

  7. Distinct Signaling Cascades Elicited by Different Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 (FPR2 Agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Cattaneo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2 is a remarkably versatile transmembrane protein belonging to the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR family. FPR2 is activated by an array of ligands, which include structurally unrelated lipids and peptide/proteins agonists, resulting in different intracellular responses in a ligand-specific fashion. In addition to the anti-inflammatory lipid, lipoxin A4, several other endogenous agonists also bind FPR2, including serum amyloid A, glucocorticoid-induced annexin 1, urokinase and its receptor, suggesting that the activation of FPR2 may result in potent pro- or anti-inflammatory responses. Other endogenous ligands, also present in biological samples, include resolvins, amyloidogenic proteins, such as beta amyloid (Aβ-42 and prion protein (Prp106–126, the neuroprotective peptide, humanin, antibacterial peptides, annexin 1-derived peptides, chemokine variants, the neuropeptides, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP-27, and mitochondrial peptides. Upon activation, intracellular domains of FPR2 mediate signaling to G-proteins, which trigger several agonist-dependent signal transduction pathways, including activation of phospholipase C (PLC, protein kinase C (PKC isoforms, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt pathway, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway, p38MAPK, as well as the phosphorylation of cytosolic tyrosine kinases, tyrosine kinase receptor transactivation, phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of regulatory transcriptional factors, release of calcium and production of oxidants. FPR2 is an attractive therapeutic target, because of its involvement in a range of normal physiological processes and pathological diseases. Here, we review and discuss the most significant findings on the intracellular pathways and on the cross-communication between FPR2 and tyrosine kinase receptors triggered by different FPR2

  8. PEP-on-DEP: A competitive peptide-based disposable electrochemical aptasensor for renin diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyani, Manish; Kawai, Keiko; Kitamura, Koichiro; Chikae, Miyuki; Biyani, Madhu; Ushijima, Hiromi; Tamiya, Eiichi; Yoneda, Takashi; Takamura, Yuzuru

    2016-10-15

    Antibody-based immunosensors are relatively less accessible to a wide variety of unreachable targets, such as low-molecular-weight biomarkers that represent a rich untapped source of disease-specific diagnostic information. Here, we present a peptide aptamer-based electrochemical sensor technology called 'PEP-on-DEP' to detect less accessible target molecules, such as renin, and to improve the quality of life. Peptide-based aptamers represent a relatively smart class of affinity binders and show great promise in biosensor development. Renin is involved in the regulation of arterial blood pressure and is an emerging biomarker protein for predicting cardiovascular risk and prognosis. To our knowledge, no studies have described aptamer molecules that can be used as new potent probes for renin. Here, we describe a portable electrochemical biosensor platform based on the newly identified peptide aptamer molecules for renin. We constructed a randomized octapeptide library pool with diversified sequences and selected renin specific peptide aptamers using cDNA display technology. We identified a few peptide aptamer sequences with a KD in the µM binding affinity range for renin. Next, we grafted the selected peptide aptamers onto gold nanoparticles and detected renin in a one-step competitive assay using our originally developed DEP (Disposable Electrochemical Printed) chip and a USB powered portable potentiostat system. We successfully detected renin in as little as 300ngmL(-1) using the PEP-on-DEP method. Thus, the generation and characterization of novel probes for unreachable target molecules by merging a newly identified peptide aptamer with electrochemical transduction allowed for the development of a more practical biosensor that, in principle, can be adapted to develop a portable, low-cost and mass-producible biosensor for point-of-care applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Natriuretic peptides in cardiometabolic regulation and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zois, Nora E; Bartels, Emil D; Hunter, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    these conditions can coexist and potentially lead to heart failure, a syndrome associated with a functional natriuretic peptide deficiency despite high circulating concentrations of immunoreactive peptides. Therefore, dysregulation of the natriuretic peptide system, a 'natriuretic handicap', might be an important...

  10. Radiolabeling of methionine containing proteins and peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garlick, R.K.; Jirousek, L.

    1986-01-01

    A process for radiolabeling methionine-containing peptides and proteins is disclosed. The process comprises the steps of oxidizing the protein or peptide, radiolabeling and reducing the radiolabeled protein or peptide. (author)

  11. Peptide radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blok, D.; Vermeij, P.; Feitsma, R.I.J.; Pauwels, E.J.K.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews the labelling of peptides that are recognised to be of interest for nuclear medicine or are the subject of ongoing nuclear medicine research. Applications and approaches to the labelling of peptide radiopharmaceuticals are discussed, and drawbacks in their development considered. (orig.)

  12. Antimicrobial peptides in the airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, D M; Yim, S; Ryan, L K; Kisich, K O; Diamond, G

    2006-01-01

    The airway provides numerous defense mechanisms to prevent microbial colonization by the large numbers of bacteria and viruses present in ambient air. An important component of this defense is the antimicrobial peptides and proteins present in the airway surface fluid (ASF), the mucin-rich fluid covering the respiratory epithelium. These include larger proteins such as lysozyme and lactoferrin, as well as the cationic defensin and cathelicidin peptides. While some of these peptides, such as human beta-defensin (hBD)-1, are present constitutively, others, including hBD2 and -3 are inducible in response to bacterial recognition by Toll-like receptor-mediated pathways. These peptides can act as microbicides in the ASF, but also exhibit other activities, including potent chemotactic activity for cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems, suggesting they play a complex role in the host defense of the airway. Inhibition of antimicrobial peptide activity or gene expression can result in increased susceptibility to infections. This has been observed with cystic fibrosis (CF), where the CF phenotype leads to reduced antimicrobial capacity of peptides in the airway. Pathogenic virulence factors can inhibit defensin gene expression, as can environmental factors such as air pollution. Such an interference can result in infections by airway-specific pathogens including Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and influenza virus. Research into the modulation of peptide gene expression in animal models, as well as the optimization of peptide-based therapeutics shows promise for the treatment and prevention of airway infectious diseases.

  13. Peptide-LNA oligonucleotide conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte

    2013-01-01

    properties, peptides were introduced into oligonucleotides via a 2'-alkyne-2'-amino-LNA scaffold. Derivatives of methionine- and leucine-enkephalins were chosen as model peptides of mixed amino acid content, which were singly and doubly incorporated into LNA/DNA strands using highly efficient copper...

  14. Chemical Synthesis of Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzker, Lena; Oddo, Alberto; Hansen, Paul R

    2017-01-01

    Solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) is the method of choice for chemical synthesis of peptides. In this nonspecialist review, we describe commonly used resins, linkers, protecting groups, and coupling reagents in 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc) SPPS. Finally, a detailed protocol for manual Fmoc SPPS is presented.

  15. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.D. Zegers (Netty)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps

  16. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the

  17. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  18. Solid-phase peptide synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an introduction to and overview of peptide chemistry with a focus on solid-phase peptide synthesis. The background, the most common reagents, and some mechanisms are presented. This chapter also points to the different chapters and puts them into perspective....

  19. Structural Basis of Rap Phosphatase Inhibition by Phr Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego del Sol, Francisca; Marina, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Two-component systems, composed of a sensor histidine kinase and an effector response regulator (RR), are the main signal transduction devices in bacteria. In Bacillus, the Rap protein family modulates complex signaling processes mediated by two-component systems, such as competence, sporulation, or biofilm formation, by inhibiting the RR components involved in these pathways. Despite the high degree of sequence homology, Rap proteins exert their activity by two completely different mechanisms of action: inducing RR dephosphorylation or blocking RR binding to its target promoter. However the regulatory mechanism involving Rap proteins is even more complex since Rap activity is antagonized by specific signaling peptides (Phr) through a mechanism that remains unknown at the molecular level. Using X-ray analyses, we determined the structure of RapF, the anti-activator of competence RR ComA, alone and in complex with its regulatory peptide PhrF. The structural and functional data presented herein reveal that peptide PhrF blocks the RapF-ComA interaction through an allosteric mechanism. PhrF accommodates in the C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat domain of RapF by inducing its constriction, a conformational change propagated by a pronounced rotation to the N-terminal ComA-binding domain. This movement partially disrupts the ComA binding site by triggering the ComA disassociation, whose interaction with RapF is also sterically impaired in the PhrF-induced conformation of RapF. Sequence analyses of the Rap proteins, guided by the RapF-PhrF structure, unveil the molecular basis of Phr recognition and discrimination, allowing us to relax the Phr specificity of RapF by a single residue change. PMID:23526880

  20. Functional and structural characteristics of anticancer peptide Pep27 analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Youn-Kyung

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A secreted peptide Pep27 initiates the cell death program in S. pneumoniae through signal transduction. This study was undertaken to evaluate the relation between the structure and cytotoxic activity of Pep27 and its analogues on cancer cells. Results Pep27anal2 characterized substituting (2R→W, (4E→W, (11S→W and (13Q→W in native Pep27, exhibited greater hydrophobicity and anticancer activity than Pep27 and other analogues. The IC50 values of Pep27anal2 were approximately 10 – 30 μM in a number of cell lines (AML-2, HL-60, Jurkat, MCF-7 and SNU-601. Confocal microscopy showed that Pep27anal2-FITC was localized in the plasma membrane, and then moving from the membrane to subcellular compartments with the initiation of membrane blebbing. Flow cytometric analysis using propidium iodide and Annexin V also revealed that Pep27anal2 induced apoptosis with minor membrane damage. Electron microscopy revealed that Pep27 induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells. The anticancer activity of Pep27anal2 was neither abrogated by pan-caspase inhibitor (Z-VAD-fmk nor related to cytochrome c release from mitochondria. The 3D solution structures of these two Pep27 peptides revealed that both form a random coil conformation in water; however, they adopted stable α-helical conformations in solutions. Conclusion The results indicate that Pep27anal2 can penetrate the plasma membrane, and then induce apoptosis in both caspase-and cytochrome c-independent manner. The hydrophobicity of Pep27anal2 appears to play an important role in membrane permeabilization and/or anticancer properties. The structure-functional relationships of these peptides are also discussed. It is proposed that Pep27anal2 is a potential candidate for anticancer therapeutic agents.

  1. DMPD: Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14751759 Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withTo...;16(1):17-22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of... CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. PubmedID 14751759 Title Signal transduction pathways

  2. Maize Bioactive Peptides against Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Gómez, Jorge L.; Castorena-Torres, Fabiola; Preciado-Ortiz, Ricardo E.; García-Lara, Silverio

    2017-06-01

    Cancer is one of the main chronic degenerative diseases worldwide. In recent years, consumption of whole-grain cereals and their derived food products has been associated with reduction risks of various types of cancer. Cereals main biomolecules includes proteins, peptides, and amino acids present in different quantities within the grain. The nutraceutical properties associated with peptides exerts biological functions that promote health and prevent this disease. In this review, we report the current status and advances on maize peptides regarding bioactive properties that have been reported such as antioxidant, antihypertensive, hepatoprotective, and anti-tumour activities. We also highlighted its biological potential through which maize bioactive peptides exert anti-cancer activity. Finally, we analyse and emphasize the possible areas of application for maize peptides.

  3. The ALICE Central Trigger Processor (CTP) upgrade

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krivda, M.; Alexandre, D.; Barnby, L. S.; Evans, D.; Johnes, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Lietava, R.; Pospíšil, Jan; Baillie, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, MAR (2016), C03051 ISSN 1748-0221. [Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics (TWEPP). Lisbon, 28.09.2015-02.10.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13031 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Trigger concepts and systems * Trigger algorithms * digital electronics circuits Subject RIV: JC - Computer Hardware ; Software Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2016

  4. Experimental demonstration of high fidelity entanglement distribution over decoherence channels via qubit transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyang-Tag; Hong, Kang-Hee; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2015-10-21

    Quantum coherence and entanglement, which are essential resources for quantum information, are often degraded and lost due to decoherence. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration of high fidelity entanglement distribution over decoherence channels via qubit transduction. By unitarily switching the initial qubit encoding to another, which is insensitive to particular forms of decoherence, we have demonstrated that it is possible to avoid the effect of decoherence completely. In particular, we demonstrate high-fidelity distribution of photonic polarization entanglement over quantum channels with two types of decoherence, amplitude damping and polarization-mode dispersion, via qubit transduction between polarization qubits and dual-rail qubits. These results represent a significant breakthrough in quantum communication over decoherence channels as the protocol is input-state independent, requires no ancillary photons and symmetries, and has near-unity success probability.

  5. TWNFI--a transductive neuro-fuzzy inference system with weighted data normalization for personalized modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qun; Kasabov, Nikola

    2006-12-01

    This paper introduces a novel transductive neuro-fuzzy inference model with weighted data normalization (TWNFI). In transductive systems a local model is developed for every new input vector, based on a certain number of data that are selected from the training data set and the closest to this vector. The weighted data normalization method (WDN) optimizes the data normalization ranges of the input variables for the model. A steepest descent algorithm is used for training the TWNFI models. The TWNFI is compared with some other widely used connectionist systems on two case study problems: Mackey-Glass time series prediction and a real medical decision support problem of estimating the level of renal function of a patient. The TWNFI method not only results in a "personalized" model with a better accuracy of prediction for a single new sample, but also depicts the most significant input variables (features) for the model that may be used for a personalized medicine.

  6. Improved migration of tumor ascites lymphocytes to ovarian cancer microenvironment by CXCR2 transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; Olsen, Maria; Halldórsdóttir, Hólmfrídur Rósa

    2018-01-01

    analyzed by flow cytometry. We found that FoxP3+ regulatory T cells accumulation in patients with OC associates with CCR4 expression. We characterized a chemokine profile of ascites chemokines, and expression of corresponding receptors on circulating T cells and tumor ascites lymphocytes (TALs). CCL22......, CXCL9, CXCL10 and CXCL12 associated with enrichment of CCR4+, CCR5+, CXCR3+ and CXCR4+ T cells in ascites. Circulating T cells and TALs however did not express CXCR2, identifying CXCR2 as candidate for chemokine receptor transduction. TALs readily expressed IFNγ and TNFα upon stimulation despite...... the frequency decreasing with in vitro expansion. Lentiviral transduction of TALs (n = 4) with chemokine receptor CXCR2 significantly increased transwell migration of TALs towards rhIL8 and autologous ascites. The majority of expanded and transduced TALs were of a T effector memory subtype. This proof...

  7. Robustness and fragility in the yeast high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) signal-transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Marcus; Ahmadpour, Doryaneh; Ottosson, Lars-Göran; Warringer, Jonas; Waltermann, Christian; Nordlander, Bodil; Klipp, Edda; Blomberg, Anders; Hohmann, Stefan; Kitano, Hiroaki

    2009-01-01

    Cellular signalling networks integrate environmental stimuli with the information on cellular status. These networks must be robust against stochastic fluctuations in stimuli as well as in the amounts of signalling components. Here, we challenge the yeast HOG signal-transduction pathway with systematic perturbations in components' expression levels under various external conditions in search for nodes of fragility. We observe a substantially higher frequency of fragile nodes in this signal-transduction pathway than that has been observed for other cellular processes. These fragilities disperse without any clear pattern over biochemical functions or location in pathway topology and they are largely independent of pathway activation by external stimuli. However, the strongest toxicities are caused by pathway hyperactivation. In silico analysis highlights the impact of model structure on in silico robustness, and suggests complex formation and scaffolding as important contributors to the observed fragility patterns. Thus, in vivo robustness data can be used to discriminate and improve mathematical models.

  8. Pharmacological analysis of feeding in a caterpillar: different transduction pathways for umami and saccharin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pszczolkowski, Maciej A.; Durden, Kevin; Marquis, Juleah; Ramaswamy, Sonny B.; Brown, John J.

    2009-05-01

    Neonate larvae of codling moth, Cydia pomonella (L.), modify their behavior in the presence of saccharin, monosodium glutamate (MSG), or L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) by commencing their feeding earlier. Previously published pharmacological analysis demonstrated that phagostimulatory effects of MSG and L-AP4 (which elicit umami taste sensation in humans) are reversed by adenylate cyclase activator and phosphodiesterase inhibitor. In this study, by measuring the time needed to start ingestion of foliage treated with mixtures of phagostimulants and signal transduction modulators, we show that phagostimulatory effects of l-aspartate (the third hallmark umami substance) are also abolished by both adenylate cyclase activator and phosphodiesterase inhibitor, but not by phospholipase C inhibitor. However, stimulatory effects of hemicalcium saccharin were affected only by phospholipase C inhibitor. The results suggest that codling moth neonates use different transduction pathways for perception of hemicalcium saccharin and umami.

  9. A Prize-Collecting Steiner Tree Approach for Transduction Network Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly-Bechet, Marc; Braunstein, Alfredo; Zecchina, Riccardo

    Into the cell, information from the environment is mainly propagated via signaling pathways which form a transduction network. Here we propose a new algorithm to infer transduction networks from heterogeneous data, using both the protein interaction network and expression datasets. We formulate the inference problem as an optimization task, and develop a message-passing, probabilistic and distributed formalism to solve it. We apply our algorithm to the pheromone response in the baker’s yeast S. cerevisiae. We are able to find the backbone of the known structure of the MAPK cascade of pheromone response, validating our algorithm. More importantly, we make biological predictions about some proteins whose role could be at the interface between pheromone response and other cellular functions.

  10. Systematic Prediction of Scaffold Proteins Reveals New Design Principles in Scaffold-Mediated Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianfei; Neiswinger, Johnathan; Zhang, Jin; Zhu, Heng; Qian, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins play a crucial role in facilitating signal transduction in eukaryotes by bringing together multiple signaling components. In this study, we performed a systematic analysis of scaffold proteins in signal transduction by integrating protein-protein interaction and kinase-substrate relationship networks. We predicted 212 scaffold proteins that are involved in 605 distinct signaling pathways. The computational prediction was validated using a protein microarray-based approach. The predicted scaffold proteins showed several interesting characteristics, as we expected from the functionality of scaffold proteins. We found that the scaffold proteins are likely to interact with each other, which is consistent with previous finding that scaffold proteins tend to form homodimers and heterodimers. Interestingly, a single scaffold protein can be involved in multiple signaling pathways by interacting with other scaffold protein partners. Furthermore, we propose two possible regulatory mechanisms by which the activity of scaffold proteins is coordinated with their associated pathways through phosphorylation process. PMID:26393507

  11. A multifunctional material based on co-electrospinning for developing biosensors with optical oxygen transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon-Marquez, Teresa; Medina-Castillo, Antonio L; Nagiah, Naveen; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Alberto; Fernandez-Sanchez, Jorge F

    2018-07-26

    A multifunctional material based on co-electrospinning has been developed as a basic material for the development of biosensors with optical oxygen transduction. It is based on coaxial nanofibres: inner fibres containing an oxygen sensitive dye and outer fibres containing aldehyde groups to allow the formation of Schiff bases with the amino groups of the enzyme. The resulting material preserves the oxygen sensing properties of the inner optical transducer as well as exhibits a high capacity for immobilizing molecules on its surface. Uricase has been selected as model enzyme and several parameters (temperature, pH, reaction time, buffer, and enzyme concentration) have been optimised to demonstrate the versatility of this novel multifunctional material in the development of biosensors with optical oxygen transduction for determining uric acid in serum samples. It suggests that the proposed multifunctional material can provide a promising multifunctional platform for biosensing applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficient transduction of neurons using Ross River glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsson, J; Nielsen, T Tolstrup; Staflin, K

    2006-01-01

    Lentiviral vectors are promising tools for CNS gene transfer since they efficiently transduce the cells of the nervous system in vivo. In this study, we have investigated the transduction efficiency of lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with Ross River virus glycoprotein (RRV-G) (RRV-G-pseudotyped le......Lentiviral vectors are promising tools for CNS gene transfer since they efficiently transduce the cells of the nervous system in vivo. In this study, we have investigated the transduction efficiency of lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with Ross River virus glycoprotein (RRV-G) (RRV...... and human glial fibrillary acidic protein, we demonstrated cell-specific transgene expression in the desired cell type. Ross River virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors also transduced human neural progenitor cells in vitro, showing that receptors for the RRV-G are present on human neural cells....

  13. TRANSDUCTION OF BACILLUS LICHENIFORMIS AND BACILLUS SUBTILIS BY EACH OF TWO PHAGES1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Martha J.; Thorne, Curtis B.

    1963-01-01

    Taylor, Martha J. (U.S. Army Biological Laboratories, Fort Detrick, Frederick, Md.) and Curtis B. Thorne. Transduction of Bacillus licheniformis and Bacillus subtilis by each of two phages. J. Bacteriol. 86:452–461. 1963.—A second transducing bacteriophage, designated SP-15, was isolated from the same soil-sample culture filtrate that supplied the Bacillus subtilis transducing phage, SP-10, reported earlier from this laboratory. SP-10 and SP-15 differ serologically and in several other respects, but share the ability to propagate on B. subtilis W-23-Sr (streptomycin-resistant) and B. licheniformis ATCC 9945a, and to mediate general transduction in either species when propagated homologously. Attempts to transduce between the species have failed. SP-10 forms plaques readily on both W-23-Sr and 9945a; SP-15 forms minute plaques on W-23-Sr and has shown no evidence of any lytic activity on 9945a. Maximal recoveries of prototrophic colonies from mixtures of SP-10 with auxotrophs of either W-23-Sr or 9945a were obtained only when excess phage was neutralized by post-transduction treatment with specific phage antiserum. Such treatment was not necessary for maximal recovery of transductants effected by SP-15. Unlike SP-10, SP-15 propagated on W-23-Sr did not transduce B. subtilis 168 (indole−). SP-15 transduced B. licheniformis more efficiently than did SP-10. Neither phage was able to transduce B. licheniformis as efficiently as it transduced B. subtilis. The differing influences of multiplicity of infection were compared for the two phages in both species. PMID:14066421

  14. A Computational Study on the Structure, Dynamics and Mechanoelectric Transduction of Vestibular Hair cell

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Jong-Hoon

    2005-01-01

    The hair cell, a specialized cell in the inner ear, is responsible for hearing and balance. The hair cell is an exquisite sensor that captures mechanical stimuli and generates neurosensory signals. A theory called gating theory has been developed and widely used to analyze the experimental data of hair cell transduction. Despite increasing knowledge about molecular structures of hair cells, the mechanical model in the gating theory remained simple. Efforts to make the most of the recent f...

  15. Physiological performance of warm-adapted marine ectotherms: Thermal limits of mitochondrial energy transduction efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Eloy; Hendricks, Eric; Menze, Michael A; Torres, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Thermal regimes in aquatic systems have profound implications for the physiology of ectotherms. In particular, the effect of elevated temperatures on mitochondrial energy transduction in tropical and subtropical teleosts may have profound consequences on organismal performance and population viability. Upper and lower whole-organism critical temperatures for teleosts suggest that subtropical and tropical species are not susceptible to the warming trends associated with climate change, but sub-lethal effects on energy transduction efficiency and population dynamics remain unclear. The goal of the present study was to compare the thermal sensitivity of processes associated with mitochondrial energy transduction in liver mitochondria from the striped mojarra (Eugerres plumieri), the whitemouth croaker (Micropogonias furnieri) and the palometa (Trachinotus goodei), to those of the subtropical pinfish (Lagodon rhomboides) and the blue runner (Caranx crysos). Mitochondrial function was assayed at temperatures ranging from 10 to 40°C and results obtained for both tropical and subtropical species showed a reduction in the energy transduction efficiency of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system in most species studied at temperatures below whole-organism critical temperature thresholds. Our results show a loss of coupling between O2 consumption and ATP production before the onset of the critical thermal maxima, indicating that elevated temperature may severely impact the yield of ATP production per carbon unit oxidized. As warming trends are projected for tropical regions, increasing water temperatures in tropical estuaries and coral reefs could impact long-term growth and reproductive performance in tropical organisms, which are already close to their upper thermal limit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Elementary signaling modes predict the essentiality of signal transduction network components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Sheng; Albert, Réka

    2011-03-22

    Understanding how signals propagate through signaling pathways and networks is a central goal in systems biology. Quantitative dynamic models help to achieve this understanding, but are difficult to construct and validate because of the scarcity of known mechanistic details and kinetic parameters. Structural and qualitative analysis is emerging as a feasible and useful alternative for interpreting signal transduction. In this work, we present an integrative computational method for evaluating the essentiality of components in signaling networks. This approach expands an existing signaling network to a richer representation that incorporates the positive or negative nature of interactions and the synergistic behaviors among multiple components. Our method simulates both knockout and constitutive activation of components as node disruptions, and takes into account the possible cascading effects of a node's disruption. We introduce the concept of elementary signaling mode (ESM), as the minimal set of nodes that can perform signal transduction independently. Our method ranks the importance of signaling components by the effects of their perturbation on the ESMs of the network. Validation on several signaling networks describing the immune response of mammals to bacteria, guard cell abscisic acid signaling in plants, and T cell receptor signaling shows that this method can effectively uncover the essentiality of components mediating a signal transduction process and results in strong agreement with the results of Boolean (logical) dynamic models and experimental observations. This integrative method is an efficient procedure for exploratory analysis of large signaling and regulatory networks where dynamic modeling or experimental tests are impractical. Its results serve as testable predictions, provide insights into signal transduction and regulatory mechanisms and can guide targeted computational or experimental follow-up studies. The source codes for the algorithms

  17. A Learning-Based CT Prostate Segmentation Method via Joint Transductive Feature Selection and Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yinghuan; Gao, Yaozong; Liao, Shu; Zhang, Daoqiang; Gao, Yang; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-15

    In 1 recent years, there has been a great interest in prostate segmentation, which is a important and challenging task for CT image guided radiotherapy. In this paper, a learning-based segmentation method via joint transductive feature selection and transductive regression is presented, which incorporates the physician's simple manual specification (only taking a few seconds), to aid accurate segmentation, especially for the case with large irregular prostate motion. More specifically, for the current treatment image, experienced physician is first allowed to manually assign the labels for a small subset of prostate and non-prostate voxels, especially in the first and last slices of the prostate regions. Then, the proposed method follows the two step: in prostate-likelihood estimation step, two novel algorithms: tLasso and wLapRLS, will be sequentially employed for transductive feature selection and transductive regression, respectively, aiming to generate the prostate-likelihood map. In multi-atlases based label fusion step, the final segmentation result will be obtained according to the corresponding prostate-likelihood map and the previous images of the same patient. The proposed method has been substantially evaluated on a real prostate CT dataset including 24 patients with 330 CT images, and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. Experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms the state-of-the-arts in terms of higher Dice ratio, higher true positive fraction, and lower centroid distances. Also, the results demonstrate that simple manual specification can help improve the segmentation performance, which is clinically feasible in real practice.

  18. An intimate link: two-component signal transduction systems and metal transport systems in bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Kamna; Senadheera, Dilani B; Cvitkovitch, Dennis G

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved various strategies to contend with high concentrations of environmental heavy metal ions for rapid, adaptive responses to maintain cell viability. Evidence gathered in the past two decades suggests that bacterial two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTSs) are intimately involved in monitoring cation accumulation, and can regulate the expression of related metabolic and virulence genes to elicit adaptive responses to changes in the concentration of these ions. Usi...

  19. Ca2+-sensors and ROS-GC: Interlocked sensory transduction elements: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rameshwar K Sharma

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available From its initial discovery that ROS-GC membrane guanylate cyclase is a mono-modal Ca2+-transduction system linked exclusively with the phototransduction machinery to the successive finding that it embodies a remarkable bimodal Ca2+signaling device, its widened transduction role in the general signaling mechanisms of the sensory neuron cells was envisioned. A theoretical concept was proposed where Ca2+-modulates ROS-GC through its generated cyclic GMP via a nearby cyclic nucleotide gated channel and creates a hyper- or depolarized sate in the neuron membrane (Ca2+ Binding Proteins 1:1, 7-11, 2006. The generated electric potential then becomes a mode of transmission of the parent [Ca2+]i signal. Ca2+ and ROS-GC are interlocked messengers in multiple sensory transduction mechanisms.This comprehensive review discusses the developmental stages to the present status of this concept and demonstrates how neuronal Ca2+-sensor proteins are the interconnected elements of this elegant ROS-GC transduction system. The focus is on the dynamism of the structural composition of this system, and how it accommodates selectivity and elasticity for the Ca2+ signals to perform multiple tasks linked with the SENSES of vision, smell and possibly of taste and the pineal gland. An intriguing illustration is provided for the Ca2+ sensor GCAP1 which displays its remarkable ability for its flexibility in function from being a photoreceptor sensor to an odorant receptor sensor. In doing so it reverses its function from an inhibitor of ROS-GC to the stimulator of ONE-GC membrane guanylate cyclase.

  20. Role of Glycolytic Intermediates in Global Regulation and Signal Transduction. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, J.C.

    2000-05-08

    The goal of this project is to determine the role of glycolytic intermediates in regulation of cell physiology. It is known that many glycolytic intermediates are involved in regulation of enzyme activities at the kinetic level. However, little is known regarding the role of these metabolites in global regulation and signal transduction. This project aims to investigate the role of glycolytic intermediates in the regulation of gene expression.

  1. Mechanism of active transport: free energy dissipation and free energy transduction.

    OpenAIRE

    Tanford, C

    1982-01-01

    The thermodynamic pathway for "chemiosmotic" free energy transduction in active transport is discussed with an ATP-driven Ca2+ pump as an illustrative example. Two innovations are made in the analysis. (i) Free energy dissipated as heat is rigorously excluded from overall free energy bookkeeping by focusing on the dynamic equilibrium state of the chemiosmotic process. (ii) Separate chemical potential terms for free energy donor and transported ions are used to keep track of the thermodynamic ...

  2. A matrix formulation for noise transduction as a general case of noise measure

    OpenAIRE

    Hallgren, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional noise characteristics of an active device or circuit are given by the minimum noise figure, the optimum source reflection coefficient, and a noise resistance. The noise measure proposed extends the noise figure to include the available gain of the network, for the case of a conjugate output match, and gives values that minimize the noise power available from the network consistent with maximum available gain. Noise transduction follows as a general case of the noise measure by us...

  3. Tapping of Love waves in an isotropic surface waveguide by surface-to-bulk wave transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuan, H.-S.; Chang, C.-P.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical study of tapping a Love wave in an isotropic microacoustic surface waveguide is given. The surface Love wave is tapped by partial transduction into a bulk wave at a discontinuity. It is shown that, by careful design of the discontinuity, the converted bulk wave power and the radiation pattern may be controlled. General formulas are derived for the calculation of these important characteristics from a relatively general surface contour deformation.

  4. The Drosophila rolled locus encodes a MAP kinase required in the sevenless signal transduction pathway.

    OpenAIRE

    Biggs, W H; Zavitz, K H; Dickson, B; van der Straten, A; Brunner, D; Hafen, E; Zipursky, S L

    1994-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases have been proposed to play a critical role in receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-mediated signal transduction pathways. Although genetic and biochemical studies of RTK pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and mammals have revealed remarkable similarities, a genetic requirement for MAP kinases in RTK signaling has not been established. During retinal development in Drosophila, the sevenless (Sev) RTK is required for development of the ...

  5. Enhanced transduction of photonic crystal dye lasers for gas sensing via swelling polymer film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Cameron; Lind, Johan Ulrik; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner

    2011-01-01

    We present the enhanced transduction of a photonic crystal dye laser for gas sensing via deposition of an additional swelling polymer film. Device operation involves swelling of the polymer film during exposure to specific gases, leading to a change in total effective refractive index. Experimental...... in its application to other intracavity-based detection schemes to enable gas sensing. © 2011 Optical Society of America....

  6. Cathepsin-Mediated Cleavage of Peptides from Peptide Amphiphiles Leads to Enhanced Intracellular Peptide Accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acar, Handan [Institute; Department; Samaeekia, Ravand [Institute; Department; Schnorenberg, Mathew R. [Institute; Department; Medical; Sasmal, Dibyendu K. [Institute; Huang, Jun [Institute; Tirrell, Matthew V. [Institute; Institute; LaBelle, James L. [Department

    2017-08-24

    Peptides synthesized in the likeness of their native interaction domain(s) are natural choices to target protein protein interactions (PPIs) due to their fidelity of orthostatic contact points between binding partners. Despite therapeutic promise, intracellular delivery of biofunctional peptides at concentrations necessary for efficacy remains a formidable challenge. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) provide a facile method of intracellular delivery and stabilization of bioactive peptides. PAs consisting of biofunctional peptide headgroups linked to hydrophobic alkyl lipid-like tails prevent peptide hydrolysis and proteolysis in circulation, and PA monomers are internalized via endocytosis. However, endocytotic sequestration and steric hindrance from the lipid tail are two major mechanisms that limit PA efficacy to target intracellular PPIs. To address these problems, we have constructed a PA platform consisting of cathepsin-B cleavable PAs in which a selective p53-based inhibitory peptide is cleaved from its lipid tail within endosomes, allowing for intracellular peptide accumulation and extracellular recycling of the lipid moiety. We monitor for cleavage and follow individual PA components in real time using a resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based tracking system. Using this platform, components in real time using a Forster we provide a better understanding and quantification of cellular internalization, trafficking, and endosomal cleavage of PAs and of the ultimate fates of each component.

  7. Purification and use of E. coli peptide deformylase for peptide deprotection in chemoenzymatic peptide synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Toma, Claudia; Sonke, Theo; Quaedflieg, Peter J.; Janssen, Dick B.

    Peptide deformylases (PDFs) catalyze the removal of the formyl group from the N-terminal methionine residue in nascent polypeptide chains in prokaryotes. Its deformylation activity makes PDF an attractive candidate for the biocatalytic deprotection of formylated peptides that are used in

  8. G-protein-coupled receptors mediate 14-3-3 signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Eishingdrelo, Alex; Kongsamut, Sathapana; Eishingdrelo, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-interacting proteins likely participate in regulating GPCR signaling by eliciting specific signal transduction cascades, inducing cross-talk with other pathways, and fine tuning the signal. However, except for G-proteins and β-arrestins, other GPCR-interacting proteins are poorly characterized. 14-3-3 proteins are signal adaptors, and their participation in GPCR signaling is not well understood or recognized. Here we demonstrate that GPCR-mediated 14-3-3 signaling is ligand-regulated and is likely to be a more general phenomenon than suggested by the previous reports of 14-3-3 involvement with a few GPCRs. For the first time, we can pharmacologically characterize GPCR/14-3-3 signaling. We have shown that GPCR-mediated 14-3-3 signaling is phosphorylation-dependent, and that the GPCR/14-3-3 interaction likely occurs later than receptor desensitization and internalization. GPCR-mediated 14-3-3 signaling can be β-arrestin-independent, and individual agonists can have different potencies on 14-3-3 and β-arrestin signaling. GPCRs can also mediate the interaction between 14-3-3 and Raf-1. Our work opens up a new broad realm of previously unappreciated GPCR signal transduction. Linking GPCRs to 14-3-3 signal transduction creates the potential for the development of new research directions and provides a new signaling pathway for drug discovery.

  9. A Biosensor for Urea from Succinimide-Modified Acrylic Microspheres Based on Reflectance Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Ahmad

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available New acrylic microspheres were synthesised by photopolymerisation where the succinimide functional group was incorporated during the microsphere preparation. An optical biosensor for urea based on reflectance transduction with a large linear response range to urea was successfully developed using this material. The biosensor utilized succinimide-modified acrylic microspheres immobilized with a Nile blue chromoionophore (ETH 5294 for optical detection and urease enzyme was immobilized on the surface of the microspheres via the succinimide groups. No leaching of the enzyme or chromoionophore was observed. Hydrolysis of the urea by urease changes the pH and leads to a color change of the immobilized chromoionophore. When the color change was monitored by reflectance spectrophotometry, the linear response range of the biosensor to urea was from 0.01 to 1,000 mM (R2 = 0.97 with a limit of detection of 9.97 mM. The biosensor response showed good reproducibility (relative standard deviation = 1.43%, n = 5 with no interference by major cations such as Na+, K+, NH4+ and Mg2+. The use of reflectance as a transduction method led to a large linear response range that is better than that of many urea biosensors based on other optical transduction methods.

  10. Nanopore Event-Transduction Signal Stabilization for Wide pH Range under Extreme Chaotrope Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters-Hilt, Stephen; Stoyanov, Alexander

    2016-03-14

    Operation of an α-hemolysin nanopore transduction detector is found to be surprisingly robust over a critical range of pH (6-9), including physiological pH = 7.4 and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) pH = 8.4, and extreme chaotrope concentration, including 5 M urea. The engineered transducer molecule that is captured in the standard α-hemolysin nanopore detector, to transform it into a transduction detector, appears to play a central role in this stabilization process by stabilizing the channel against gating during its capture. This enables the nanopore transduction detector to operate as a single molecule "nanoscope" in a wide range of conditions, where tracking on molecular state is possible in a variety of different environmental conditions. In the case of streptavidin biosensing, results are shown for detector operation when in the presence of extreme (5 M) urea concentration. Complications involving degenerate states are encountered at higher chaotrope concentrations, but since the degeneracy is only of order two, this is easily absorbed into the classification task as in prior work. This allows useful detector operation over a wide range of conditions relevant to biochemistry, biomedical engineering, and biotechnology.

  11. Nanopore Event-Transduction Signal Stabilization for Wide pH Range under Extreme Chaotrope Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Winters-Hilt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Operation of an α-hemolysin nanopore transduction detector is found to be surprisingly robust over a critical range of pH (6–9, including physiological pH = 7.4 and polymerase chain reaction (PCR pH = 8.4, and extreme chaotrope concentration, including 5 M urea. The engineered transducer molecule that is captured in the standard α-hemolysin nanopore detector, to transform it into a transduction detector, appears to play a central role in this stabilization process by stabilizing the channel against gating during its capture. This enables the nanopore transduction detector to operate as a single molecule “nanoscope” in a wide range of conditions, where tracking on molecular state is possible in a variety of different environmental conditions. In the case of streptavidin biosensing, results are shown for detector operation when in the presence of extreme (5 M urea concentration. Complications involving degenerate states are encountered at higher chaotrope concentrations, but since the degeneracy is only of order two, this is easily absorbed into the classification task as in prior work. This allows useful detector operation over a wide range of conditions relevant to biochemistry, biomedical engineering, and biotechnology.

  12. Morphing structures and signal transduction in Mimosa pudica L. induced by localized thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; O'Neal, Lawrence; Volkova, Maia I; Markin, Vladislav S

    2013-10-15

    Leaf movements in Mimosa pudica, are in response to thermal stress, touch, and light or darkness, appear to be regulated by electrical, hydrodynamical, and chemical signal transduction. The pulvinus of the M. pudica shows elastic properties. We have found that the movements of the petiole, or pinnules, are accompanied by a change of the pulvinus morphing structures. After brief flaming of a pinna, the volume of the lower part of the pulvinus decreases and the volume of the upper part increases due to the redistribution of electrolytes between these parts of the pulvinus; as a result of these changes the petiole falls. During the relaxation of the petiole, the process goes in the opposite direction. Ion and water channel blockers, uncouplers as well as anesthetic agents diethyl ether or chloroform decrease the speed of alert wave propagation along the plant. Brief flaming of a pinna induces bidirectional propagation of electrical signal in pulvini. Transduction of electrical signals along a pulvinus induces generation of an action potential in perpendicular direction between extensor and flexor sides of a pulvinus. Inhibition of signal transduction and mechanical responses in M. pudica by volatile anesthetic agents chloroform or by blockers of voltage gated ion channels shows that the generation and propagation of electrical signals is a primary effect responsible for turgor change and propagation of an excitation. There is an electrical coupling in a pulvinus similar to the electrical synapse in the animal nerves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. New Signal Transduction Principles for Amperometric Enzyme and Antibody based Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsinke, Axel

    2008-10-01

    The way of how the signal transfer from the analyte recognizing biocomponent to the sensor surface is performed influences strongly the characteristics of a biosensor e.g. response time, sensitivity and specificity. Most of the described amperometric enzyme sensors are using oxidases. The signal transduction is carried out simply by electrochemical indication of the produced hydrogen peroxide or via a sensor-immobilized redox polymer. However, due to the limited number of appropriate oxidases the range of detectable analytes is restricted. Hence, we have developed a new general principle for the sensitive transduction of the more than 400 different NAD(P) dependent dehydrogenase reactions. The transduction is based on a hydroxylase reaction which produces an electrochemically active substance under the consumption of NAD(P)H. The principle should be applicable to miniaturized sensor configuration and could be the basis for a new generation of point-of-care devices. For other analytes where no oxidases and dehydrogenases are available antibodies can be used as specific recognition element. We have developed a new principle of redox-labeled immunoassays called size exclusion redox-labeled immunoassay (SERI), where after the antigen antibody binding reaction the indication is carried out amperometrically without a washing step in between. The principle was proved for measurement of creatinine. At the moment the assay needs a relatively high amount of antibodies. However, in future it should be possible to reduce the amount of antibodies by using miniaturized microfluidic chips.

  14. Nox family NADPH oxidases in mechano-transduction: mechanisms and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Ralf P; Weissmann, Norbert; Schröder, Katrin

    2014-02-20

    The majority of cells in a multi-cellular organism are continuously exposed to ever-changing physical forces. Mechano-transduction links these events to appropriate reactions of the cells involving stimulation of signaling cascades, reorganization of the cytoskeleton and alteration of gene expression. Mechano-transduction alters the cellular redox balance and the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nicotine amide adenine dinucleotide reduced form (NADPH) oxidases of the Nox family are prominent ROS generators and thus, contribute to this stress-induced ROS formation. Different types and patterns of mechano-stress lead to Nox-dependent ROS formation and Nox-mediated ROS formation contributes to cellular responses and adaptation to physical forces. Thereby, Nox enzymes can mediate vascular protection during physiological mechano-stress. Despite this, over-activation and induction of Nox enzymes and a subsequent substantial increase in ROS formation also promotes oxidative stress in pathological situations like disturbed blood flow or extensive stretch. Individual protein targets of Nox-mediated redox-signaling will be identified to better understand the specificity of Nox-dependent ROS signaling in mechano-transduction. Nox-inhibitors will be tested to reduce cellular activation in response to mechano-stimuli.

  15. Decision Aggregation in Distributed Classification by a Transductive Extension of Maximum Entropy/Improved Iterative Scaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Kesidis

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In many ensemble classification paradigms, the function which combines local/base classifier decisions is learned in a supervised fashion. Such methods require common labeled training examples across the classifier ensemble. However, in some scenarios, where an ensemble solution is necessitated, common labeled data may not exist: (i legacy/proprietary classifiers, and (ii spatially distributed and/or multiple modality sensors. In such cases, it is standard to apply fixed (untrained decision aggregation such as voting, averaging, or naive Bayes rules. In recent work, an alternative transductive learning strategy was proposed. There, decisions on test samples were chosen aiming to satisfy constraints measured by each local classifier. This approach was shown to reliably correct for class prior mismatch and to robustly account for classifier dependencies. Significant gains in accuracy over fixed aggregation rules were demonstrated. There are two main limitations of that work. First, feasibility of the constraints was not guaranteed. Second, heuristic learning was applied. Here, we overcome these problems via a transductive extension of maximum entropy/improved iterative scaling for aggregation in distributed classification. This method is shown to achieve improved decision accuracy over the earlier transductive approach and fixed rules on a number of UC Irvine datasets.

  16. Adenovirus coxsackie adenovirus receptor-mediated binding to human erythrocytes does not preclude systemic transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, L A; Moreno, R; Calderón, H; Alemany, R

    2016-12-01

    There is great skepticism in the capability of adenovirus vectors and oncolytic adenoviruses to reach specific organs or tumors upon systemic administration. Besides antibodies, the presence of CAR (coxsackie and adenovirus receptor) in human erythrocytes has been postulated to sequester CAR-binding adenoviruses, commonly used in gene therapy and oncolytic applications. The use of non-CAR-binding fibers or serotypes has been postulated to solve this limitation. Given the lack of integrins in erythrocytes and therefore of internalization of the CAR-bound virus, we hypothesized that the interaction of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) with CAR in human erythrocytes could be reversible. In this work, we have studied the effects of Ad5 interaction with human erythrocytes via CAR. Although erythrocyte binding was observed, it did not reduce viral transduction of tumor cells in vitro after long-term incubations. Transplantation of human erythrocytes into nude mice did not reduce Ad5 extravasation and transduction of liver and human xenograft tumors after systemic administration. These findings indicate that despite human erythrocytes are able to bind to Ad5, this binding is reversible and does not prevent extravasation and organ transduction after systemic delivery. Thus, the poor bioavailability of systemically delivered CAR-binding adenoviruses in humans is likely due to other factors such as liver sequestration or neutralizing antibodies.

  17. Adeno-associated virus vector transduction of vascular smooth muscle cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M; Iwata, A; Nyhuis, J; Nitta, Y; Miller, A D; Halbert, C L; Allen, M D

    2000-04-27

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors might offer solutions for restenosis and angiogenesis by transducing nondividing cells and providing long-term gene expression. We investigated the feasibility of vascular cell transduction by AAV vectors in an in vivo rabbit carotid artery model. Time course of gene expression, inflammatory reaction to the vector, and effects of varying viral titer, exposure time, and intraluminal pressures on gene expression were examined. Recombinant AAV vectors with an Rous sarcoma virus promoter and alkaline phosphatase reporter gene were injected intraluminally into transiently isolated carotid segments. Following transduction, gene expression increased significantly over 14 days and then remained stable to 28 days, the last time point examined. Medial vascular smooth muscle cells were the main cell type transduced even with an intact endothelial layer. Increasing the viral titer and intraluminal pressure both enhanced transduction efficiency to achieve a mean of 34 +/- 7% of the subintimal layer of smooth muscle cells expressing gene product. A mild inflammatory reaction, composed of T cells with only rare macrophages, with minimal intimal thickening was demonstrated in 40% of transduced vessels; inflammatory cells were not detected in sham-operated control arteries. These findings demonstrate that AAV is a promising vector for intravascular applications in coronary and peripheral vascular diseases.

  18. Proof-of-concept: neonatal intravenous injection of adeno-associated virus vectors results in successful transduction of myenteric and submucosal neurons in the mouse small and large intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckinx, R; Van Remoortel, S; Gijsbers, R; Waddington, S N; Timmermans, J-P

    2016-02-01

    Despite the success of viral vector technology in the transduction of the central nervous system in both preclinical research and gene therapy, its potential in neurogastroenterological research remains largely unexploited. This study asked whether and to what extent myenteric and submucosal neurons in the ileum and distal colon of the mouse were transduced after neonatal systemic delivery of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (AAVs). Mice were intravenously injected at postnatal day one with AAV pseudotypes AAV8 or AAV9 carrying a cassette encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) as a reporter under the control of a cytomegalovirus promoter. At postnatal day 35, transduction of the myenteric and submucosal plexuses of the ileum and distal colon was evaluated in whole-mount preparations, using immunohistochemistry to neurochemically identify transduced enteric neurons. The pseudotypes AAV8 and AAV9 showed equal potential in transducing the enteric nervous system (ENS), with 25-30% of the neurons expressing eGFP. However, the percentage of eGFP-expressing colonic submucosal neurons was significantly lower. Neurochemical analysis showed that all enteric neuron subtypes, but not glia, expressed the reporter protein. Intrinsic sensory neurons were most efficiently transduced as nearly 80% of calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive neurons expressed the transgene. The pseudotypes AAV8 and AAV9 can be employed for gene delivery to both the myenteric and the submucosal plexus, although the transduction efficiency in the latter is region-dependent. These findings open perspectives for novel preclinical applications aimed at manipulating and imaging the ENS in the short term, and in gene therapy in the longer term. © 2015 The Authors. Neurogastroenterology & Motility Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Use of Intraductal Adenovins Transduction to Assess the Mammary Tumorigenic Potential of a Constitutively Active Prolactin Receptor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    ... are expressed. Transgenic technology has been used to evaluate the effects of an activated prolactin receptor, aPRLR, and an activated member of the prolactin signal transduction pathway, Akt, on the mammary...

  20. Phase I Trial of Adenovirus-Mediated IL-12 Gene Transduction in Patients With Radiorecurrent Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hall, Simon J

    2004-01-01

    .... Pre-clinical studies using adenovirus-mediated (Ad) transduction of IL-12 (Ad.mIL-12) in metastatic model of prostate cancer resulted in local growth suppression, survival enhancement and inhibition of pre-established metastases...

  1. Inconsistent Transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie Koldkjær; Riis, Morten S.

    2017-01-01

    The growing integration of sounding art as research practice in academia is a part of the “practice turn” in humanities and social sciences, where artistic practices and artefacts themselves become a form of academic inquiry. As the process of creating art represents a valid research method...... for gaining new knowledge, sounding art pieces thus become more than mere objects for analysis: because the research unfolds in and through the acts of creating and performing art, practice is not only a methodological vehicle but also a site of knowledge production. Scholars in this new strand of literature...... with the objects in question on their own premises. Therefore, tuning into the “not-knowing” requires expanding the perspective to encompass non-human forms of knowledge incorporated through an object-oriented ontological line of thinking. By switching the focus from the human perspective to that of the objects...

  2. Delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Randi; Malmsten, Martin

    2017-01-01

    on the identification such peptides, as well as on their optimization to reach potent antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects at simultaneously low toxicity against human cells. In comparison, delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides have attracted considerably less interest. However, such delivery systems......, or through achieving co-localization with intracellular pathogens. Here, an overview is provided of the current understanding of delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides, with special focus on AMP-carrier interactions, as well as consequences of these interactions for antimicrobial and related biological...

  3. Modeling the Infection Dynamics of Bacteriophages in Enteric Escherichia coli: Estimating the Contribution of Transduction to Antimicrobial Gene Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhao; Besser, Thomas; Gröhn, Yrjö T.

    2014-01-01

    Animal-associated bacterial communities are infected by bacteriophages, although the dynamics of these infections are poorly understood. Transduction by bacteriophages may contribute to transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes, but the relative importance of transduction among other gene transfer mechanisms is unknown. We therefore developed a candidate deterministic mathematical model of the infection dynamics of enteric coliphages in commensal Escherichia coli in the large intestine of cattle. We assumed the phages were associated with the intestine and were predominantly temperate. Model simulations demonstrated how, given the bacterial ecology and infection dynamics, most (>90%) commensal enteric E. coli bacteria may become lysogens of enteric coliphages during intestinal transit. Using the model and the most liberal assumptions about transduction efficiency and resistance gene frequency, we approximated the upper numerical limits (“worst-case scenario”) of gene transfer through specialized and generalized transduction in E. coli by enteric coliphages when the transduced genetic segment is picked at random. The estimates were consistent with a relatively small contribution of transduction to lateral gene spread; for example, generalized transduction delivered the chromosomal resistance gene to up to 8 E. coli bacteria/hour within the population of 1.47 × 108 E. coli bacteria/liter luminal contents. In comparison, the plasmidic blaCMY-2 gene carried by ∼2% of enteric E. coli was transferred by conjugation at a rate at least 1.4 × 103 times greater than our generalized transduction estimate. The estimated numbers of transductants varied nonlinearly depending on the ecology of bacteria available for phages to infect, that is, on the assumed rates of turnover and replication of enteric E. coli. PMID:24814786

  4. Novel peptides with tyrosinase inhibitory activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, M.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Wichers, H.J.; Boeriu, C.G.

    2007-01-01

    Tyrosinase inhibition by peptides may find its application in food, cosmetics or medicine. In order to identify novel tyrosinase inhibitory peptides, protein-based peptide libraries made by SPOT synthesis were used to screen for peptides that show direct interaction with tyrosinase. One of the

  5. Characterization of Synthetic Peptides by Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Mirza, Osman; Højrup, Peter; Hansen, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-MS of synthetic peptides.

  6. Towards a clinically relevant lentiviral transduction protocol for primary human CD34 hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Millington

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC, in particular mobilized peripheral blood stem cells, represent an attractive target for cell and gene therapy. Efficient gene delivery into these target cells without compromising self-renewal and multi-potency is crucial for the success of gene therapy. We investigated factors involved in the ex vivo transduction of CD34(+ HSCs in order to develop a clinically relevant transduction protocol for gene delivery. Specifically sought was a protocol that allows for efficient transduction with minimal ex vivo manipulation without serum or other reagents of animal origin.Using commercially available G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood (PB CD34(+ cells as the most clinically relevant target, we systematically examined factors including the use of serum, cytokine combinations, pre-stimulation time, multiplicity of infection (MOI, transduction duration and the use of spinoculation and/or retronectin. A self-inactivating lentiviral vector (SIN-LV carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP was used as the gene delivery vehicle. HSCs were monitored for transduction efficiency, surface marker expression and cellular function. We were able to demonstrate that efficient gene transduction can be achieved with minimal ex vivo manipulation while maintaining the cellular function of transduced HSCs without serum or other reagents of animal origin.This study helps to better define factors relevant towards developing a standard clinical protocol for the delivery of SIN-LV into CD34(+ cells.

  7. Gastro-Resistant Insulin Receptor-Binding Peptide from Momordica charantia Improved the Glucose Tolerance in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Mice via Insulin Receptor Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hsin-Yi; Li, Chia-Cheng; Chen, Feng-Yuan; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun; Ho, Tin-Yun

    2017-10-25

    Momordica charantia is a commonly used food and has been used for the management of diabetes. Our previous study has identified an insulin receptor (IR)-binding protein (mcIRBP) from Momordica charantia. Here we identified the gastro-resistant hypoglycemic bioactive peptides from protease-digested mcIRBP. By in vitro digestion and IR kinase activity assay, we found that a 9-amino-acid-residue peptide, mcIRBP-9, was a gastro-resistant peptide that enhanced IR kinase activities. mcIRBP-9 activated IR signaling transduction pathway, which resulted in the phosphorylation of IR, the translocation of glucose transporter 4, and the uptake of glucose in cells. Intraperitoneal and oral administration of mcIRBP-9 stimulated the glucose clearance by 30.91 ± 0.39% and 32.09 ± 0.38%, respectively, in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Moreover, a pilot study showed that daily ingestion of mcIRBP-9 for 30 days decreased the fasting blood glucose levels and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels by 23.62 ± 6.14% and 24.06 ± 1.53%, respectively. In conclusion, mcIRBP-9 is a unique gastro-resistant bioactive peptide generated after the digestion of mcIRBP. Furthermore, oral administration of mcIRBP-9 improves both the glucose tolerance and the HbA1c levels in diabetic mice via targeting IR signaling transduction pathway.

  8. Neoglycolipidation for modulating peptide properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Witteloostuijn, Søren Blok

    regulation of appetite, food intake, and glucose homeostasis, and many of these peptides display a signicant potential for treatment of obesity and/or type 2 diabetes. This Ph.D. thesis describes three novel approaches for utilizing gut peptides as the starting point for developing obesity and diabetes drugs....... Subsequent stereological analyses of the pancreata showed that chronic treatment with GUB06-046 led to increased cell mass in db/db mice. The results of projects I and II clearly illustrate how chemical modications can improve the pharmacological properties of native peptides. Collectively, the ndings...... of this thesis contribute to emphasize the tremendous therapeutic potential of gut peptides for treatment of obesity and diabetes....

  9. New vasoactive peptides in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimer, Nina; Goetze, Jens Peter; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with cirrhosis have substantial circulatory imbalance between vasoconstrictive and vasodilating forces. The study of circulatory vasoactive peptides may provide important pathophysiological information. This study aimed to assess concentrations, organ extraction and relations...

  10. Moonlighting peptides with emerging function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan G Rodríguez Plaza

    Full Text Available Hunter-killer peptides combine two activities in a single polypeptide that work in an independent fashion like many other multi-functional, multi-domain proteins. We hypothesize that emergent functions may result from the combination of two or more activities in a single protein domain and that could be a mechanism selected in nature to form moonlighting proteins. We designed moonlighting peptides using the two mechanisms proposed to be involved in the evolution of such molecules (i.e., to mutate non-functional residues and the use of natively unfolded peptides. We observed that our moonlighting peptides exhibited two activities that together rendered a new function that induces cell death in yeast. Thus, we propose that moonlighting in proteins promotes emergent properties providing a further level of complexity in living organisms so far unappreciated.

  11. Matrix-assisted peptide synthesis on nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandadash, Raz; Machtey, Victoria; Weiss, Aryeh; Byk, Gerardo

    2014-09-01

    We report a new method for multistep peptide synthesis on polymeric nanoparticles of differing sizes. Polymeric nanoparticles were functionalized via their temporary embedment into a magnetic inorganic matrix that allows multistep peptide synthesis. The matrix is removed at the end of the process for obtaining nanoparticles functionalized with peptides. The matrix-assisted synthesis on nanoparticles was proved by generating various biologically relevant peptides. Copyright © 2014 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Intracellular protein delivery activity of peptides derived from insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 3 and 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Inomata, Kosuke; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have various IGF-independent cellular activities, including receptor-independent cellular uptake followed by transcriptional regulation, although mechanisms of cellular entry remain unclear. Herein, we focused on their receptor-independent cellular entry mechanism in terms of protein transduction domain (PTD) activity, which is an emerging technique useful for clinical applications. The peptides of 18 amino acid residues derived from IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, which involve heparin-binding regions, mediated cellular delivery of an exogenous protein into NIH3T3 and HeLa cells. Relative protein delivery activities of IGFBP-3/5-derived peptides were approximately 20-150% compared to that of the HIV-Tat peptide, a potent PTD. Heparin inhibited the uptake of the fusion proteins with IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, indicating that the delivery pathway is heparin-dependent endocytosis, similar to that of HIV-Tat. The delivery of GST fused to HIV-Tat was competed by either IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5-derived synthetic peptides. Therefore, the entry pathways of the three PTDs are shared. Our data has shown a new approach for designing protein delivery systems using IGFBP-3/5 derived peptides based on the molecular mechanisms of IGF-independent activities of IGFBPs

  13. Beta-methyl substitution of cyclohexylalanine in Dmt-Tic-Cha-Phe peptides results in highly potent delta opioid antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Géza; Ioja, Eniko; Tömböly, Csaba; Ballet, Steven; Tourwé, Dirk; Péter, Antal; Martinek, Tamás; Chung, Nga N; Schiller, Peter W; Benyhe, Sándor; Borsodi, Anna

    2007-01-25

    The opioid peptide TIPP (H-Tyr-Tic-Phe-Phe-OH, Tic:1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid) was substituted with Dmt (2',6'-dimethyltyrosine) and a new unnatural amino acid, beta-MeCha (beta-methyl-cyclohexylalanine). This double substitution led to a new series of opioid peptides displaying subnanomolar delta antagonist activity and mu agonist or antagonist properties depending on the configuration of the beta-MeCha residue. The most promising analog, H-Dmt-Tic-(2S,3S)-beta-MeCha-Phe-OH was a very selective delta antagonist both in the mouse vas deferens (MVD) assay (Ke = 0.241 +/- 0.05 nM) and in radioligand binding assay (K i delta = 0.48 +/- 0.05 nM, K i mu/K i delta = 2800). The epimeric peptide H-Dmt-Tic-(2S,3R)-beta-MeCha-Phe-OH and the corresponding peptide amide turned out to be mixed partial mu agonist/delta antagonists in the guinea pig ileum and MVD assays. Our results constitute further examples of the influence of Dmt and beta-methyl substitution as well as C-terminal amidation on the potency, selectivity, and signal transduction properties of TIPP related peptides. Some of these compounds represent valuable pharmacological tools for opioid research.

  14. Material Binding Peptides for Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urartu Ozgur Safak Seker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable progress has been made to date in the discovery of material binding peptides and their utilization in nanotechnology, which has brought new challenges and opportunities. Nowadays phage display is a versatile tool, important for the selection of ligands for proteins and peptides. This combinatorial approach has also been adapted over the past decade to select material-specific peptides. Screening and selection of such phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest, in particular because of their use in nanotechnology. Phage display selected peptides are either synthesized independently or expressed on phage coat protein. Selected phage particles are subsequently utilized in the synthesis of nanoparticles, in the assembly of nanostructures on inorganic surfaces, and oriented protein immobilization as fusion partners of proteins. In this paper, we present an overview on the research conducted on this area. In this review we not only focus on the selection process, but also on molecular binding characterization and utilization of peptides as molecular linkers, molecular assemblers and material synthesizers.

  15. A rapid and clean synthetic approach to cyclic peptides via micro-flow peptide chain elongation and photochemical cyclization: synthesis of a cyclic RGD peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifune, Yuto; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Fuse, Shinichiro

    2016-11-29

    A cyclic RGD peptide was efficiently synthesized based on micro-flow, triphosgene-mediated peptide chain elongation and micro-flow photochemical macrolactamization. Our approach enabled a rapid (amidation for peptide chain elongation peptide.

  16. Mechano-sensing and transduction by endothelial surface glycocalyx: composition, structure, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Bingmei M; Tarbell, John M

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial cells (ECs) lining every blood vessel wall are constantly exposed to the mechanical forces generated by blood flow. The EC responses to these hemodynamic forces play a critical role in the homeostasis of the circulatory system. To ensure proper EC mechano-sensing and transduction, there are a variety of mechano-sensors and transducers that have been identified on the EC surface, intra- and trans-EC membrane and within the EC cytoskeleton. Among them, the most recent candidate is the endothelial surface glycocalyx (ESG), which is a matrix-like thin layer covering the luminal surface of the EC. It consists of various proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans, and plasma proteins, and is close to other prominent EC mechano-sensors and transducers. The ESG thickness was found to be in the order of 0.1-1 µm by different visualization techniques and in different types of vessels. Detailed analysis on the electron microscopy (EM) images of the microvascular ESG revealed a quasi-periodic substructure with the ESG fiber diameter of 10-12 and 20 nm spacing between adjacent fibers. Atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers were applied to investigate the mechanical properties of the ESG on the cultured EC monolayers and in solutions. Enzymatic degradation of specific ESG glycosaminoglycan components was used to directly elucidate the role of the ESG in EC mechano-sensing and transduction by measuring the shear-induced productions of nitric oxide and prostacyclin, two characteristic responses of the ECs to the flow. The unique location, composition, and structure of the ESG determine its role in EC mechano-sensing and transduction. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Semi-Supervised Transductive Hot Spot Predictor Working on Multiple Assumptions

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-05-23

    Protein-protein interactions are critically dependent on just a few residues (“hot spots”) at the interfaces. Hot spots make a dominant contribution to the binding free energy and if mutated they can disrupt the interaction. As mutagenesis studies require significant experimental efforts, there exists a need for accurate and reliable computational hot spot prediction methods. Compared to the supervised hot spot prediction algorithms, the semi-supervised prediction methods can take into consideration both the labeled and unlabeled residues in the dataset during the prediction procedure. The transductive support vector machine has been utilized for this task and demonstrated a better prediction performance. To the best of our knowledge, however, none of the transductive semi-supervised algorithms takes all the three semisupervised assumptions, i.e., smoothness, cluster and manifold assumptions, together into account during learning. In this paper, we propose a novel semi-supervised method for hot spot residue prediction, by considering all the three semisupervised assumptions using nonlinear models. Our algorithm, IterPropMCS, works in an iterative manner. In each iteration, the algorithm first propagates the labels of the labeled residues to the unlabeled ones, along the shortest path between them on a graph, assuming that they lie on a nonlinear manifold. Then it selects the most confident residues as the labeled ones for the next iteration, according to the cluster and smoothness criteria, which is implemented by a nonlinear density estimator. Experiments on a benchmark dataset, using protein structure-based features, demonstrate that our approach is effective in predicting hot spots and compares favorably to other available methods. The results also show that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art transductive learning methods.

  18. Developing Itô stochastic differential equation models for neuronal signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Tiina; Linne, Marja-Leena; Ruohonen, Keijo

    2006-08-01

    Mathematical modeling and simulation of dynamic biochemical systems are receiving considerable attention due to the increasing availability of experimental knowledge of complex intracellular functions. In addition to deterministic approaches, several stochastic approaches have been developed for simulating the time-series behavior of biochemical systems. The problem with stochastic approaches, however, is the larger computational time compared to deterministic approaches. It is therefore necessary to study alternative ways to incorporate stochasticity and to seek approaches that reduce the computational time needed for simulations, yet preserve the characteristic behavior of the system in question. In this work, we develop a computational framework based on the Itô stochastic differential equations for neuronal signal transduction networks. There are several different ways to incorporate stochasticity into deterministic differential equation models and to obtain Itô stochastic differential equations. Two of the developed models are found most suitable for stochastic modeling of neuronal signal transduction. The best models give stable responses which means that the variances of the responses with time are not increasing and negative concentrations are avoided. We also make a comparative analysis of different kinds of stochastic approaches, that is the Itô stochastic differential equations, the chemical Langevin equation, and the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. Different kinds of stochastic approaches can be used to produce similar responses for the neuronal protein kinase C signal transduction pathway. The fine details of the responses vary slightly, depending on the approach and the parameter values. However, when simulating great numbers of chemical species, the Gillespie algorithm is computationally several orders of magnitude slower than the Itô stochastic differential equations and the chemical Langevin equation. Furthermore, the chemical

  19. Self-Complementary Adeno-Associated Virus Vectors Improve Transduction Efficiency of Corneal Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja K Gruenert

    Full Text Available Transplantation of a donor cornea to restore vision is the most frequently performed transplantation in the world. Corneal endothelial cells (CEC are crucial for the outcome of a graft as they maintain corneal transparency and avoid graft failure due to corneal opaqueness. Given the characteristic of being a monolayer and in direct contact with culture medium during cultivation in eye banks, CEC are specifically suitable for gene therapeutic approaches prior to transplantation. Recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (rAAV2 vectors represent a promising tool for gene therapy of CEC. However, high vector titers are needed to achieve sufficient gene expression. One of the rate-limiting steps for transgene expression is the conversion of single-stranded (ss- DNA vector genome into double-stranded (ds- DNA. This step can be bypassed by using self-complementary (sc- AAV2 vectors. Aim of this study was to compare for the first time transduction efficiencies of ss- and scAAV2 vectors in CEC. For this purpose AAV2 vectors containing enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP as transgene were used. Both in CEC and in donor corneas, transduction with scAAV2 resulted in significantly higher transgene expression compared to ssAAV2. The difference in transduction efficiency decreased with increasing vector titer. In most cases, only half the vector titer of scAAV2 was required for equal or higher gene expression rates than those of ssAAV2. In human donor corneas, GFP expression was 64.7±11.3% (scAAV and 38.0±8.6% (ssAAV (p<0.001, respectively. Furthermore, transduced cells maintained their viability and showed regular morphology. Working together with regulatory authorities, a translation of AAV2 vector-mediated gene therapy to achieve a temporary protection of corneal allografts during cultivation and transplantation could therefore become more realistic.

  20. Transfer functions for protein signal transduction: application to a model of striatal neural plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel formulation for biochemical reaction networks in the context of protein signal transduction. The model consists of input-output transfer functions, which are derived from differential equations, using stable equilibria. We select a set of "source" species, which are interpreted as input signals. Signals are transmitted to all other species in the system (the "target" species) with a specific delay and with a specific transmission strength. The delay is computed as the maximal reaction time until a stable equilibrium for the target species is reached, in the context of all other reactions in the system. The transmission strength is the concentration change of the target species. The computed input-output transfer functions can be stored in a matrix, fitted with parameters, and even recalled to build dynamical models on the basis of state changes. By separating the temporal and the magnitudinal domain we can greatly simplify the computational model, circumventing typical problems of complex dynamical systems. The transfer function transformation of biochemical reaction systems can be applied to mass-action kinetic models of signal transduction. The paper shows that this approach yields significant novel insights while remaining a fully testable and executable dynamical model for signal transduction. In particular we can deconstruct the complex system into local transfer functions between individual species. As an example, we examine modularity and signal integration using a published model of striatal neural plasticity. The modularizations that emerge correspond to a known biological distinction between calcium-dependent and cAMP-dependent pathways. Remarkably, we found that overall interconnectedness depends on the magnitude of inputs, with higher connectivity at low input concentrations and significant modularization at moderate to high input concentrations. This general result, which directly follows from the properties of individual transfer

  1. Transfer functions for protein signal transduction: application to a model of striatal neural plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Scheler

    Full Text Available We present a novel formulation for biochemical reaction networks in the context of protein signal transduction. The model consists of input-output transfer functions, which are derived from differential equations, using stable equilibria. We select a set of "source" species, which are interpreted as input signals. Signals are transmitted to all other species in the system (the "target" species with a specific delay and with a specific transmission strength. The delay is computed as the maximal reaction time until a stable equilibrium for the target species is reached, in the context of all other reactions in the system. The transmission strength is the concentration change of the target species. The computed input-output transfer functions can be stored in a matrix, fitted with parameters, and even recalled to build dynamical models on the basis of state changes. By separating the temporal and the magnitudinal domain we can greatly simplify the computational model, circumventing typical problems of complex dynamical systems. The transfer function transformation of biochemical reaction systems can be applied to mass-action kinetic models of signal transduction. The paper shows that this approach yields significant novel insights while remaining a fully testable and executable dynamical model for signal transduction. In particular we can deconstruct the complex system into local transfer functions between individual species. As an example, we examine modularity and signal integration using a published model of striatal neural plasticity. The modularizations that emerge correspond to a known biological distinction between calcium-dependent and cAMP-dependent pathways. Remarkably, we found that overall interconnectedness depends on the magnitude of inputs, with higher connectivity at low input concentrations and significant modularization at moderate to high input concentrations. This general result, which directly follows from the properties of

  2. Multiple sweet receptors and transduction pathways revealed in knockout mice by temperature dependence and gurmarin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkuri, Tadahiro; Yasumatsu, Keiko; Horio, Nao; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2009-04-01

    Sweet taste transduction involves taste receptor type 1, member 2 (T1R2), taste receptor type 1, member 3 (T1R3), gustducin, and TRPM5. Because knockout (KO) mice lacking T1R3, gustducin's Galpha subunit (Galphagust), or TRPM5 exhibited greatly reduced, but not abolished responses of the chorda tympani (CT) nerve to sweet compounds, it is likely that multiple sweet transduction pathways exist. That gurmarin (Gur), a sweet taste inhibitor, inhibits some but not all mouse CT responses to sweet compounds supports the existence of multiple sweet pathways. Here, we investigated Gur inhibition of CT responses to sweet compounds as a function of temperature in KO mice lacking T1R3, Galphagust, or TRPM5. In T1R3-KO mice, responses to sucrose and glucose were Gur sensitive (GS) and displayed a temperature-dependent increase (TDI). In Galphagust-KO mice, responses to sucrose and glucose were Gur-insensitive (GI) and showed a TDI. In TRPM5-KO mice, responses to glucose were GS and showed a TDI. All three KO mice exhibited no detectable responses to SC45647, and their responses to saccharin displayed neither GS nor a TDI. For all three KO mice, the lingual application of pronase, another sweet response inhibitor, almost fully abolished responses to sucrose and glucose but did not affect responses to saccharin. These results provide evidence for 1) the existence of multiple transduction pathways underlying responses to sugars: a T1R3-independent GS pathway for sucrose and glucose, and a TRPM5-independent temperature sensitive GS pathway for glucose; 2) the requirement for Galphagust in GS sweet taste responses; and 3) the existence of a sweet independent pathway for saccharin, in mouse taste cells on the anterior tongue.

  3. Equivalence of Lauric Acid and Glycerol Monolaurate as Inhibitors of Signal Transduction in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzin, Alexey; Novick, Richard P.

    2000-01-01

    Glycerol monolaurate (GML) inhibits the expression of virulence factors in Staphylococus aureus and the induction of vancomycin resistance in Enterococcus faecalis, presumably by blocking signal transduction. Although GML is rapidly hydrolyzed by bacteria, one of the products, lauric acid, has identical inhibitory activity and is metabolized much more slowly. At least four distinct GML-hydrolyzing activities are identified in S. aureus: the secreted Geh lipase, residual supernatant activity in a geh-null mutant strain, a novel membrane-bound esterase, and a cytoplasmic activity. PMID:10762277

  4. Transductive and matched-pair machine learning for difficult target detection problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiler, James

    2014-06-01

    This paper will describe the application of two non-traditional kinds of machine learning (transductive machine learning and the more recently proposed matched-pair machine learning) to the target detection problem. The approach combines explicit domain knowledge to model the target signal with a more agnostic machine-learning approach to characterize the background. The concept is illustrated with simulated data from an elliptically-contoured background distribution, on which a subpixel target of known spectral signature but unknown spatial extent has been implanted.

  5. Resting lymphocyte transduction with measles virus glycoprotein pseudotyped lentiviral vectors relies on CD46 and SLAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Qi; Schneider, Irene C.; Gallet, Manuela; Kneissl, Sabrina; Buchholz, Christian J.

    2011-01-01

    The measles virus (MV) glycoproteins hemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) were recently shown to mediate transduction of resting lymphocytes by lentiviral vectors. MV vaccine strains use CD46 or signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) as receptor for cell entry. A panel of H protein mutants derived from vaccine strain or wild-type MVs that lost or gained CD46 or SLAM receptor usage were investigated for their ability to mediate gene transfer into unstimulated T lymphocytes. The results demonstrate that CD46 is sufficient for efficient vector particle association with unstimulated lymphocytes. For stable gene transfer into these cells, however, both MV receptors were found to be essential.

  6. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis to obtain therapeutic peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Mäde

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The great versatility and the inherent high affinities of peptides for their respective targets have led to tremendous progress for therapeutic applications in the last years. In order to increase the drugability of these frequently unstable and rapidly cleared molecules, chemical modifications are of great interest. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS offers a suitable technology to produce chemically engineered peptides. This review concentrates on the application of SPPS by Fmoc/t-Bu protecting-group strategy, which is most commonly used. Critical issues and suggestions for the synthesis are covered. The development of automated methods from conventional to essentially improved microwave-assisted instruments is discussed. In order to improve pharmacokinetic properties of peptides, lipidation and PEGylation are described as covalent conjugation methods, which can be applied by a combination of automated and manual synthesis approaches. The synthesis and application of SPPS is described for neuropeptide Y receptor analogs as an example for bioactive hormones. The applied strategies represent innovative and potent methods for the development of novel peptide drug candidates that can be manufactured with optimized automated synthesis technologies.

  7. Peptides and Food Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sobrino Crespo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nutrients created by the digestion of food are proposed to active G protein coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells e.g. the L-cell. This stimulates the release of gut hormones. Hormones released from the gut and adipose tissue play an important rol in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure (1.Many circulating signals, including gut hormones, can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC neurons directly, after passing across the median eminence. The ARC is adjacent to the median eminence, a circumventricular organ with fenestrated capillaries and hence an incomplete blood-brain barrier (2. The ARC of the hypothalamus is believed to play a crucial role in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. The ARC contains two populations of neurons with opposing effect on food intake (3. Medially located orexigenic neurons (i.e those stimulating appetite express neuropeptide Y (NPY and agouti-related protein (AgRP (4-5. Anorexigenic neurons (i.e. those inhibiting appetite in the lateral ARC express alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH derived from pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC and cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART (6. The balance between activities of these neuronal circuits is critical to body weight regulation.In contrast, other peripheral signals influence the hypothalamus indirectly via afferent neuronal pathway and brainstem circuits. In this context gastrointestinal’s vagal afferents are activated by mechanoreceptors and chemoreceptors, and converge in the nucleus of the tractus solitaries (NTS of the brainstem. Neuronal projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypotalamus (1, 7. Gut hormones also alter the activity of the ascending vagal pathway from the gut to the brainstem. In the cases of ghrelin and Peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY, there are evidences for both to have a direct action on the arcuate nucleus and an action via the vagus nerve a

  8. Exploration of the Medicinal Peptide Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Bert; Stalmans, Sofie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Taevernier, Lien; Bracke, Nathalie; D'Hondt, Matthias; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    The chemical properties of peptide medicines, known as the 'medicinal peptide space' is considered a multi-dimensional subset of the global peptide space, where each dimension represents a chemical descriptor. These descriptors can be linked to biofunctional, medicinal properties to varying degrees. Knowledge of this space can increase the efficiency of the peptide-drug discovery and development process, as well as advance our understanding and classification of peptide medicines. For 245 peptide drugs, already available on the market or in clinical development, multivariate dataexploration was performed using peptide relevant physicochemical descriptors, their specific peptidedrug target and their clinical use. Our retrospective analysis indicates that clusters in the medicinal peptide space are located in a relatively narrow range of the physicochemical space: dense and empty regions were found, which can be explored for the discovery of novel peptide drugs.

  9. Cyclic peptide therapeutics: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Deyle, Kaycie; Heinis, Christian

    2017-06-01

    Cyclic peptides combine several favorable properties such as good binding affinity, target selectivity and low toxicity that make them an attractive modality for the development of therapeutics. Over 40 cyclic peptide drugs are currently in clinical use and around one new cyclic peptide drug enters the market every year on average. The vast majority of clinically approved cyclic peptides are derived from natural products, such as antimicrobials or human peptide hormones. New powerful techniques based on rational design and in vitro evolution have enabled the de novo development of cyclic peptide ligands to targets for which nature does not offer solutions. A look at the cyclic peptides currently under clinical evaluation shows that several have been developed using such techniques. This new source for cyclic peptide ligands introduces a freshness to the field, and it is likely that de novo developed cyclic peptides will be in clinical use in the near future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Perspectives and Peptides of the Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogden, Kim A.

    Shortly after their discovery, antimicrobial peptides from prokaryotes and eukaryotes were recognized as the next potential generation of pharmaceuticals to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections and septic shock, to preserve food, or to sanitize surfaces. Initial research focused on identifying the spectrum of antimicrobial agents, determining the range of antimicrobial activities against bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens, and assessing the antimicrobial activity of synthetic peptides versus their natural counterparts. Subsequent research then focused on the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in model membrane systems not only to identify the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in microorganisms but also to discern differences in cytotoxicity for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Recent, contemporary work now focuses on current and future efforts to construct hybrid peptides, peptide congeners, stabilized peptides, peptide conjugates, and immobilized peptides for unique and specific applications to control the growth of microorganisms in vitro and in vivo.

  11. A neural cell adhesion molecule-derived peptide reduces neuropathological signs and cognitive impairment induced by Abeta25-35

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klementiev, B; Novikova, T; Novitskaya, V

    2007-01-01

    death and brain atrophy in response to Abeta25-35. Finally, the Abeta25-35-administration led to a reduced short-term memory as determined by the social recognition test. A synthetic peptide termed FGL derived from the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) was able to prevent or, if already manifest......, strongly reduce all investigated signs of Abeta25-35-induced neuropathology and cognitive impairment. The FGL peptide was recently demonstrated to be able to cross the blood-brain-barrier. Accordingly, we found that the beneficial effects of FGL were achieved not only by intracisternal, but also...... and cognitive impairment involves the modulation of intracellular signal-transduction mediated through GSK3beta....

  12. Fmoc Solid-Phase Synthesis of Human a-Calcitonin Gene- Related Peptide and Two Carboxyfluorescein-labeled Analogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, L. Sabbah; Abdolalizadeh, Bahareh; Sheykhzade, Majid

    Human-alpha-Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (h-alpha-CGRP) is a naturally occurring 37 amino acid vasodilatory neuropeptide amide, ACDTATCVTHRLAGLLSRSGGVVKNNFVPTNVGSKAF, with a disulfide bond between residues 2 and 7. The peptide is found in primary afferent sensory nerves and is widely distributed...... for biological activity and onset of signal transduction. Fluorescent h-alpha-CGRP analogs are useful for investigating the mechanism of action behind (re)uptake of h-alpha-CGRP into the sensory nerve terminals and monitoring trafficking of CGRP receptors. As part of an ongoing study on the mechanism of action......–17. Following purification by preparative HPLC, concentration-response curves were made with fluorescent CGRP analogues on isolated human subcutaneous arteries. CGRP (fluolysine35) and CGRP (wildtype) showed similar potency (pIC50 = 9.40) while CGRP (fluolysine24) showed approximately 5-fold less potency (pIC50...

  13. A gene in the region of the autosomal dominant torsion dystonia locus on 9q34 contains SH3 signal transduction and binding motifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, G.F.; Kunkel, L.M.; Khurana, T. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    In a search to identify cytoskeletal proteins which might be involved in neuromuscular diseases, we identified an expressed tag (EST) that exhibited distant sequence homology to dystrophia and which mapped to 9q24-ter in somatic cell hybrids. A dinucleotide repeat polymorphism from a genomic clone of the EST showed complete co-segregation without recombination to the DYT1 locus on the 9q34 in families with autosomal dominant torsion dystonia. cDNAs were obtained from the brain cDNA libraries and these contained parts of trapped exons from the 9q34 region. Northern blotting reveals two distinct transcripts, 6-7 kb and 3 kb, which differ primarily in their 3{prime} untranslated regions. The transcripts are co-expressed at highest levels in brain and thymus, but are found in most other tissues as well. A comparison of cDNA sequences derived from this gene reveals a high degree of alternate processing in both the coding and 3{prime} untranslated regions. Antibodies raised against synthetic peptides from the ORF recognize a doublet of bands at approximately 50-55 kd in brain by Western blotting. In contrast to the Northern tissue distribution, the protein is detected only in small amounts in peripheral nerve and muscle and not at all in several other tissues, with the amount in thymus yet to be determined. A Genbank search of amino acid sequence homologies has revealed several interesting features, including: aN src homology 3 (SH3) domain that is a common feature of proteins involved in the tyrosine kinase signal transduction pathway and is found in some cytoskeletal proteins; a proline-rich region that may function as an intra- or intermolecular SH3 binding site; and weak homologies to the rod domains of dystrophin, myosin, and spectrin. These findings raise the possibility of a defect in signal transduction or the cytoskeleton as a cause of torsion dystonia. Mutation analysis of the gene and biochemical characterization of the protein are in progress.

  14. Intracellular delivery of peptide cargos using iron oxide based nanoparticles: studies on antitumor efficacy of a BCL-2 converting peptide, NuBCP-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Singh, Gurpal; Sharma, Sapna; Gupta, Dikshi; Bansal, Vivek; Arora, Vikas; Bhat, Madhusudan; Srivastava, Sandeep K.; Sapra, Sameer; Kharbanda, Surender; Dinda, Amit K.; Singh, Harpal

    2014-11-01

    Delivering peptides into cells targeting the undruggable oncoproteins is an emerging area in cancer therapeutics. Here we report a novel nanoparticle-based delivery system that can transport therapeutic cargos to the intracellular sites without the need for a cell transduction or penetration domain (CPP). In the present study, we have used iron oxide nanoparticles to deliver an oncopeptide, NuBCP-9, targeting the BCL-2 BH3 domain. Citric acid/2-bromo 2-methylpropanoic acid (CA/BMPA)-capped SPIONs were used to immobilize and deliver the NuBCP-9 peptide to the cancer cells without any noticeable off-target effects. Our results have demonstrated that NuBCP-9-SPIONs efficiently penetrate into cancer cells and bind to its intracellular target protein BCL-2. Moreover, significant inhibition of proliferation and substantial induction of cell death were observed when cancer cells were treated with NuBCP-9-SPIONs at different time intervals. Importantly, the IC50 values for killing of breast cancer cells with NuBCP-9-SPIONs were much lower compared to cells treated with the NuBCP-9 peptide linked with a CPP (Arg-8; NuBCP-9-R8). Molecular and biochemical analyses further supported that NuBCP-9-SPIONs killed breast cancer cells by apoptosis-mediated mechanisms. Furthermore, our data demonstrated that administration of NuBCP-9-SPIONs to mice bearing Ehrlich ascites tumors (EAT) was associated with loss of tumorigenicity and extensive apoptosis in tumor tissues. Taken together, these findings show that a non-CPP-tagged peptide can be successfully delivered to undruggable intracellular oncotargets using SPIONs.Delivering peptides into cells targeting the undruggable oncoproteins is an emerging area in cancer therapeutics. Here we report a novel nanoparticle-based delivery system that can transport therapeutic cargos to the intracellular sites without the need for a cell transduction or penetration domain (CPP). In the present study, we have used iron oxide nanoparticles to

  15. The Potential Role of Cell Penetrating Peptides in the Intracellular Delivery of Proteins for Therapy of Erythroid Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefkothea C. Papadopoulou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The erythroid related disorders (ERDs represent a large group of hematological diseases, which in most cases are attributed either to the deficiency or malfunction of biosynthetic enzymes or oxygen transport proteins. Current treatments for these disorders include histo-compatible erythrocyte transfusions or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation. Gene therapy delivered via suitable viral vectors or genetically modified HSCs have been under way. Protein Transduction Domain (PTD technology has allowed the production and intracellular delivery of recombinant therapeutic proteins, bearing Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs, into a variety of mammalian cells. Remarkable progress in the field of protein transduction leads to the development of novel protein therapeutics (CPP-mediated PTs for the treatment of monogenetic and/or metabolic disorders. The “concept” developed in this paper is the intracellular protein delivery made possible via the PTD technology as a novel therapeutic intervention for treatment of ERDs. This can be achieved via four stages including: (i the production of genetically engineered human CPP-mediated PT of interest, since the corresponding native protein either is missing or is mutated in the erythroid progenitor cell (ErPCs or mature erythrocytes of patients; (ii isolation of target cells from the peripheral blood of the selected patients; (iii ex vivo transduction of cells with the CPP-mediated PT of interest; and (iv re-administration of the successfully transduced cells back into the same patients.

  16. Characterization of Synthetic Peptides by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Mirza, Osman; Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI-TOF-MS an......Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI...

  17. Generation of Functional Human Cardiac Progenitor Cells by High-Efficiency Protein Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Li, Qianqian; Jiang, Lin; Deng, Chunyu; Liu, Zaiyi; Fu, Yongheng; Zhang, Mengzhen; Tan, Honghong; Feng, Yuliang; Shan, Zhixin; Wang, Jianjun; Yu, Xi-Yong

    2015-12-01

    The reprogramming of fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells raises the possibility that somatic cells could be directly reprogrammed to cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs). The present study aimed to assess highly efficient protein-based approaches to reduce or eliminate the genetic manipulations to generate CPCs for cardiac regeneration therapy. A combination of QQ-reagent-modified Gata4, Hand2, Mef2c, and Tbx5 and three cytokines rapidly and efficiently reprogrammed human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) into CPCs. This reprogramming process enriched trimethylated histone H3 lysine 4, monoacetylated histone H3 lysine 9, and Baf60c at the Nkx2.5 cardiac enhancer region by the chromatin immunoprecipitation quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay. Protein-induced CPCs transplanted into rat hearts after myocardial infarction improved cardiac function, and this was related to differentiation into cardiomyocyte-like cells. These findings demonstrate that the highly efficient protein-transduction method can directly reprogram HDFs into CPCs. This protein reprogramming strategy lays the foundation for future refinements both in vitro and in vivo and might provide a source of CPCs for regenerative approaches. The findings from the present study have demonstrated an efficient protein-transduction method of directly reprogramming fibroblasts into cardiac progenitor cells. These results have great potential in cell-based therapy for cardiovascular diseases. ©AlphaMed Press.

  18. Displacement and hybridization reactions in aptamer-functionalized hydrogels for biomimetic protein release and signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jinping; Li, Shihui; Shi, Xuechen; Coyne, James; Zhao, Nan; Dong, Fengping; Mao, Yingwei; Wang, Yong

    2017-11-01

    A variety of hydrogels have been synthesized for controlling the release of signaling molecules in applications such as drug delivery and regenerative medicine. However, it remains challenging to synthesize hydrogels with the ability to control the release of signaling molecules sequentially or periodically under physiological conditions as living cells do in response to the variation of metabolism. The purpose of this work was to study a novel biomimetic hydrogel system with the ability of recapitulating the procedure of cellular signal transduction and controlling the sequential release of signaling molecules under physiological conditions. In the presence of a small chemical, the signaling molecule is regulated to change from a DNA-bound state to a free state and the freed signaling molecule is able to regulate intracellular signal transduction and cell migration. Moreover, periodic exposure of the hydrogel system to the small chemical leads to sequential protein release. Since signaling molecules are important for every activity of the cell, this hydrogel system holds potential as a metabolism-responsive platform for controlled release of signaling molecules and cell regulation in various applications.

  19. Subsumed complexity: abiogenesis as a by-product of complex energy transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Z. R.; Zubarev, D.; Aono, M.; Cleaves, H. James

    2017-11-01

    The origins of life bring into stark relief the inadequacy of our current synthesis of thermodynamic, chemical, physical and information theory to predict the conditions under which complex, living states of organic matter can arise. Origins research has traditionally proceeded under an array of implicit or explicit guiding principles in lieu of a universal formalism for abiogenesis. Within the framework of a new guiding principle for prebiotic chemistry called subsumed complexity, organic compounds are viewed as by-products of energy transduction phenomena at different scales (subatomic, atomic, molecular and polymeric) that retain energy in the form of bonds that inhibit energy from reaching the ground state. There is evidence for an emergent level of complexity that is overlooked in most conceptualizations of abiogenesis that arises from populations of compounds formed from atomic energy input. We posit that different forms of energy input can exhibit different degrees of dissipation complexity within an identical chemical medium. By extension, the maximum capacity for organic chemical complexification across molecular and macromolecular scales subsumes, rather than emerges from, the underlying complexity of energy transduction processes that drive their production and modification. This article is part of the themed issue 'Reconceptualizing the origins of life'.

  20. Preclinical validation: LV/IL-12 transduction of patient leukemia cells for immunotherapy of AML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-12 (IL-12 is a potent cytokine that may be harnessed to treat cancer. To date, nearly 100 IL-12-based clinical trials have been initiated worldwide. Yet systemic administration of IL-12 is toxic. Different strategies are being developed to reduce such toxicities by restricting IL-12 distribution. Our previous studies employed lentivector-mediated expression of murine IL-12 in tumor cells and demonstrated effective protection in both mouse leukemia and solid tumor challenge models. In this study, we carried out preclinical validation studies using a novel lentivector to engineer expression of human IL-12 in acute myeloid leukemia blast cells isolated from 21 patients. Acute myeloid leukemia cells were transduced with a bicistronic lentivector that encodes the human IL-12 cDNA as a fusion, as well as a LNGFR (ΔLNGFR/mutant thymidylate kinase cassette as a marking and cell-fate control element. A range of 20–70% functional transduction efficiencies was achieved. Transduced acute myeloid leukemia cells produced bioactive IL-12 protein and displayed dose-dependent sensitivity to the prodrug 3′-azido-3′-deoxythymidine. In vitro immortalization assays using transduced mouse hematopoietic stem cells demonstrated minimal genotoxic risk from our IL-12 vector. Scale-up transduction and cell processing was subsequently validated in a GMP facility to support our (now approved Clinical Trial Application (CTA.

  1. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Ubiquitination and De-Ubiquitination in Signal Transduction and Receptor Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Critchley

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs are membrane-based sensors that enable rapid communication between cells and their environment. Evidence is now emerging that interdependent regulatory mechanisms, such as membrane trafficking, ubiquitination, proteolysis and gene expression, have substantial effects on RTK signal transduction and cellular responses. Different RTKs exhibit both basal and ligand-stimulated ubiquitination, linked to trafficking through different intracellular compartments including the secretory pathway, plasma membrane, endosomes and lysosomes. The ubiquitin ligase superfamily comprising the E1, E2 and E3 enzymes are increasingly implicated in this post-translational modification by adding mono- and polyubiquitin tags to RTKs. Conversely, removal of these ubiquitin tags by proteases called de-ubiquitinases (DUBs enables RTK recycling for another round of ligand sensing and signal transduction. The endocytosis of basal and activated RTKs from the plasma membrane is closely linked to controlled proteolysis after trafficking and delivery to late endosomes and lysosomes. Proteolytic RTK fragments can also have the capacity to move to compartments such as the nucleus and regulate gene expression. Such mechanistic diversity now provides new opportunities for modulating RTK-regulated cellular responses in health and disease states.

  2. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems of Pathogenic Bacteria As Targets for Antimicrobial Therapy: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Tiwari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial communities in a wide range of environmental niches sense and respond to numerous external stimuli for their survival. Primarily, a source they require to follow up this communication is the two-component signal transduction system (TCS, which typically comprises a sensor Histidine kinase for receiving external input signals and a response regulator that conveys a proper change in the bacterial cell physiology. For numerous reasons, TCSs have ascended as convincing targets for antibacterial drug design. Several studies have shown that TCSs are essential for the coordinated expression of virulence factors and, in some cases, for bacterial viability and growth. It has also been reported that the expression of antibiotic resistance determinants may be regulated by some TCSs. In addition, as a mode of signal transduction, phosphorylation of histidine in bacteria differs from normal serine/threonine and tyrosine phosphorylation in higher eukaryotes. Several studies have shown the molecular mechanisms by which TCSs regulate virulence and antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria. In this review, we list some of the characteristics of the bacterial TCSs and their involvement in virulence and antibiotic resistance. Furthermore, this review lists and discusses inhibitors that have been reported to target TCSs in pathogenic bacteria.

  3. Molecular Analysis of the Graviperception Signal Transduction in the Flagellate Euglena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häder, Donat; Daiker, Viktor; Richter, Peter; Lebert, Michael

    The unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis perceives and reacts to the gravitational vector of the Earth. Recent results of experiments on parabolic rocket flights have revealed that the orientation can be explained by passive orientation only to a small extend while the remainder relies on an active physiological sensor and an internal sensory transduction chain. Our current working hypothesis is based on the fact that the cellular contents is heavier than the surrounding medium and consequently exerts pressure onto the lower membrane where it activates mechano-sensitive ion channels located at the front end under the trailing flagellum. We recently succeeded in identifying these channels as gene products of the TRP family. RNAi of the corresponding gene abolished graviperception. These channels allow a gated influx of calcium which depolarizes the internal electrical potential and eventually causes a course correction by the flagellar beating. The inwardly gated calcium binds to a specific calmodulin which is likewise an intrinsic element of the signal transduction chain. RNAi of the related mRNA also stopped graviperception. This calmodulin is thought to activate an adenylyl cyclase which generates cyclic AMP which in turn modulates the beating pattern of the flagellum.

  4. Two-Component Signal Transduction System SaeRS Positively Regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis Glucose Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Lou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus epidermidis, which is a causative pathogen of nosocomial infection, expresses its virulent traits such as biofilm and autolysis regulated by two-component signal transduction system SaeRS. In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of differences in expression between the S. epidermidis 1457 wild-type and saeRS mutant to identify candidates regulated by saeRS using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/lonization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS. Of 55 identified proteins that significantly differed in expression between the two strains, 15 were upregulated and 40 were downregulated. The downregulated proteins included enzymes related to glycolysis and TCA cycle, suggesting that glucose is not properly utilized in S. epidermidis when saeRS was deleted. The study will be helpful for treatment of S. epidermidis infection from the viewpoint of metabolic modulation dependent on two-component signal transduction system SaeRS.

  5. Progression in sensing cardiac troponin biomarker charge transductions on semiconducting nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathil, M.F.M., E-mail: faris.fathil@gmail.com [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Md Arshad, M.K., E-mail: mohd.khairuddin@unimap.edu.my [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); School of Microelectronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Ruslinda, A.R., E-mail: ruslinda@unimap.edu.my [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Nuzaihan, M.N.M., E-mail: m.nuzaihan@unimap.edu.my [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Gopinath, Subash C.B., E-mail: subash@unimap.edu.my [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); School of Bioprocess Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 02600, Arau, Perlis (Malaysia); Adzhri, R., E-mail: adzhri@gmail.com [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Hashim, U., E-mail: uda@unimap.edu.my [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering (INEE), Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); School of Microelectronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2016-09-07

    A real-time ability to interpret the interaction between targeted biomolecules and the surface of semiconductors (metal transducers) into readable electrical signals, without biomolecular modification involving fluorescence dyes, redox enzymes, and radioactive labels, created by label-free biosensors has been extensively researched. Field-effect transistor (FET)- and capacitor-based biosensors are among the diverse electrical charge biosensing architectures that have drawn much attention for having charge transduction; thus, enabling the early and rapid diagnosis of the appropriate cardiac biomarkers at lower concentrations. These semiconducting material-based transducers are very suitable to be integrated with portable electronic devices for future online collection, transmission, reception, analysis, and reporting. This overview elucidates and clarifies two major electrical label-free systems (FET- and capacitor-based biosensors) with cardiac troponin (cTn) biomarker-mediated charge transduction for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) diagnosis. Advances in these systems are highlighted by their progression in bridging the laboratory and industry; the foremost technologies have made the transition from benchtop to bedside and beyond. - Highlights: • The progression of cardiac troponin detection from past to future are presented. • Electrical label-free biosensors for cardiac troponin are discussed. • The discussion focused on field-effect transistor-and capacitor-based devices. • Surface functionalization, sensitivity, and innovation of devices are highlighted. • They presented high sensitivity and specificity of real-time AMI determination.

  6. Progression in sensing cardiac troponin biomarker charge transductions on semiconducting nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathil, M.F.M.; Md Arshad, M.K.; Ruslinda, A.R.; Nuzaihan, M.N.M.; Gopinath, Subash C.B.; Adzhri, R.; Hashim, U.

    2016-01-01

    A real-time ability to interpret the interaction between targeted biomolecules and the surface of semiconductors (metal transducers) into readable electrical signals, without biomolecular modification involving fluorescence dyes, redox enzymes, and radioactive labels, created by label-free biosensors has been extensively researched. Field-effect transistor (FET)- and capacitor-based biosensors are among the diverse electrical charge biosensing architectures that have drawn much attention for having charge transduction; thus, enabling the early and rapid diagnosis of the appropriate cardiac biomarkers at lower concentrations. These semiconducting material-based transducers are very suitable to be integrated with portable electronic devices for future online collection, transmission, reception, analysis, and reporting. This overview elucidates and clarifies two major electrical label-free systems (FET- and capacitor-based biosensors) with cardiac troponin (cTn) biomarker-mediated charge transduction for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) diagnosis. Advances in these systems are highlighted by their progression in bridging the laboratory and industry; the foremost technologies have made the transition from benchtop to bedside and beyond. - Highlights: • The progression of cardiac troponin detection from past to future are presented. • Electrical label-free biosensors for cardiac troponin are discussed. • The discussion focused on field-effect transistor-and capacitor-based devices. • Surface functionalization, sensitivity, and innovation of devices are highlighted. • They presented high sensitivity and specificity of real-time AMI determination.

  7. Ubiquitination of basal VEGFR2 regulates signal transduction and endothelial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2017-10-15

    Cell surface receptors can undergo recycling or proteolysis but the cellular decision-making events that sort between these pathways remain poorly defined. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) regulate signal transduction and angiogenesis, but how signaling and proteolysis is regulated is not well understood. Here, we provide evidence that a pathway requiring the E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme UBA1 controls basal VEGFR2 levels, hence metering plasma membrane receptor availability for the VEGF-A-regulated endothelial cell response. VEGFR2 undergoes VEGF-A-independent constitutive degradation via a UBA1-dependent ubiquitin-linked pathway. Depletion of UBA1 increased VEGFR2 recycling from endosome-to-plasma membrane and decreased proteolysis. Increased membrane receptor availability after UBA1 depletion elevated VEGF-A-stimulated activation of key signaling enzymes such as PLCγ1 and ERK1/2. Although UBA1 depletion caused an overall decrease in endothelial cell proliferation, surviving cells showed greater VEGF-A-stimulated responses such as cell migration and tubulogenesis. Our study now suggests that a ubiquitin-linked pathway regulates the balance between receptor recycling and degradation which in turn impacts on the intensity and duration of VEGF-A-stimulated signal transduction and the endothelial response. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Grouper (Epinephelus coioides) MyD88 and Tollip: intracellular localization and signal transduction function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Wei; Wang, Zheng; Mo, Ze-Quan; Li, Xia; Luo, Xiao-Chun; Dan, Xue-Ming; Li, An-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and Toll-interacting protein (Tollip) are two important regulatory proteins of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways. In this paper, a Tollip sequence of grouper (Epinephelus coioides) was identified and the signal transduction functions of Tollip and MyD88 were studied. The full length of E. coioides Tollip (EcTollip) cDNA with an open reading frame (ORF) of 1734 nucleotides encoded a putative protein of 274 amino acid residues. The EcTollip protein had conservative domains with mammalian homologous proteins, and high identity (78%-95%) with other vertebrates. MyD88 and Tollip were distributed in the HeLa cytoplasm in a highly condensed form. Over-expression of MyD88 could activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and its function was dependent on the death domain and ID domain on the N-terminal. Some important functional sites of mammalian MyD88 also affected fish MyD88 signal transduction. Tollip impaired NF-κB signals activated by MyD88, and its activity was dependent on the coupling of ubiquitin to the endoplasmic reticulum degradation (CUE) domain on the C-terminal. These results suggest that MyD88 and Tollip of fish and mammals are conservative on function during evolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A functional TOC complex contributes to gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Allison K; Barrett-Wilt, Greg A; Masson, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    Although plastid sedimentation has long been recognized as important for a plant's perception of gravity, it was recently shown that plastids play an additional function in gravitropism. The Translocon at the Outer envelope membrane of Chloroplasts (TOC) complex transports nuclear-encoded proteins into plastids, and a receptor of this complex, Toc132, was previously hypothesized to contribute to gravitropism either by directly functioning as a gravity signal transducer or by indirectly mediating the plastid localization of a gravity signal transducer. Here we show that mutations in multiple genes encoding TOC complex components affect gravitropism in a genetically sensitized background and that the cytoplasmic acidic domain of Toc132 is not required for its involvement in this process. Furthermore, mutations in TOC132 enhance the gravitropic defect of a mutant whose amyloplasts lack starch. Finally, we show that the levels of several nuclear-encoded root proteins are altered in toc132 mutants. These data suggest that the TOC complex indirectly mediates gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis and support the idea that plastids are involved in gravitropism not only through their ability to sediment but also as part of the signal transduction mechanism.

  10. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Ubiquitination and De-Ubiquitination in Signal Transduction and Receptor Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, William R.; Pellet-Many, Caroline; Ringham-Terry, Benjamin; Zachary, Ian C.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2018-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are membrane-based sensors that enable rapid communication between cells and their environment. Evidence is now emerging that interdependent regulatory mechanisms, such as membrane trafficking, ubiquitination, proteolysis and gene expression, have substantial effects on RTK signal transduction and cellular responses. Different RTKs exhibit both basal and ligand-stimulated ubiquitination, linked to trafficking through different intracellular compartments including the secretory pathway, plasma membrane, endosomes and lysosomes. The ubiquitin ligase superfamily comprising the E1, E2 and E3 enzymes are increasingly implicated in this post-translational modification by adding mono- and polyubiquitin tags to RTKs. Conversely, removal of these ubiquitin tags by proteases called de-ubiquitinases (DUBs) enables RTK recycling for another round of ligand sensing and signal transduction. The endocytosis of basal and activated RTKs from the plasma membrane is closely linked to controlled proteolysis after trafficking and delivery to late endosomes and lysosomes. Proteolytic RTK fragments can also have the capacity to move to compartments such as the nucleus and regulate gene expression. Such mechanistic diversity now provides new opportunities for modulating RTK-regulated cellular responses in health and disease states. PMID:29543760

  11. Targeted genome editing by lentiviral protein transduction of zinc-finger and TAL-effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yujia; Bak, Rasmus O; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2014-04-24

    Future therapeutic use of engineered site-directed nucleases, like zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), relies on safe and effective means of delivering nucleases to cells. In this study, we adapt lentiviral vectors as carriers of designer nuclease proteins, providing efficient targeted gene disruption in vector-treated cell lines and primary cells. By co-packaging pairs of ZFN proteins with donor RNA in 'all-in-one' lentiviral particles, we co-deliver ZFN proteins and the donor template for homology-directed repair leading to targeted DNA insertion and gene correction. Comparative studies of ZFN activity in a predetermined target locus and a known nearby off-target locus demonstrate reduced off-target activity after ZFN protein transduction relative to conventional delivery approaches. Additionally, TALEN proteins are added to the repertoire of custom-designed nucleases that can be delivered by protein transduction. Altogether, our findings generate a new platform for genome engineering based on efficient and potentially safer delivery of programmable nucleases.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01911.001. Copyright © 2014, Cai et al.

  12. Dynamic receptor team formation can explain the high signal transduction gain in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Réka; Chiu, Yu-Wen; Othmer, Hans G

    2004-05-01

    Evolution has provided many organisms with sophisticated sensory systems that enable them to respond to signals in their environment. The response frequently involves alteration in the pattern of movement, either by directed movement, a process called taxis, or by altering the speed or frequency of turning, which is called kinesis. Chemokinesis has been most thoroughly studied in the peritrichous bacterium Escherichia coli, which has four helical flagella distributed over the cell surface, and swims by rotating them. When rotated counterclockwise the flagella coalesce into a propulsive bundle, producing a relatively straight "run," and when rotated clockwise they fly apart, resulting in a "tumble" which reorients the cell with little translocation. A stochastic process generates the runs and tumbles, and in a chemoeffector gradient, runs that carry the cell in a favorable direction are extended. The cell senses spatial gradients as temporal changes in receptor occupancy and changes the probability of counterclockwise rotation (the bias) on a fast timescale, but adaptation returns the bias to baseline on a slow timescale, enabling the cell to detect and respond to further concentration changes. The overall structure of the signal transduction pathways is well characterized in E. coli, but important details are still not understood. Only recently has a source of gain in the signal transduction network been identified experimentally, and here we present a mathematical model based on dynamic assembly of receptor teams that can explain this observation.

  13. Immunohistochemical analysis of receptor tyrosine kinase signal transduction activity in chordoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasig, J H; Dupont, W D; LaFleur, B J; Olson, S J; Cates, J M M

    2008-02-01

    Currently, there are no effective chemotherapeutic protocols for chordoma. Reports of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) expression in chordoma suggest that these tumours may respond to kinase inhibitor therapy. However, RTK signalling activity has not been extensively investigated in chordoma. A tissue microarray containing 21 cases of chordoma was analysed for expression of a number of proteins involved in signal transduction from RTKs by immunohistochemistry. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), KIT and HER2 were detected in 100%, 67%, 33% and 0% of cases, respectively. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta staining was of moderate-to-strong intensity in 20 of 21 cases. In contrast, KIT immunoreactivity was weak and focal in each of the seven positive cases. Total EGFR staining was variable; weak staining for phosphorylated EGFR was detected in nine cases. Phosphorylated isoforms of p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase, Akt and STAT3, indicative of tyrosine kinase activity, were detected in 86%, 76% and 67% of cases, respectively. Chordomas commonly express RTKs and activated signal transduction molecules. Although there were no statistically significant correlations between the expression of any of the markers studied and disease-free survival or tumour location, the results nonetheless indicate that chordomas may respond to RTK inhibitors or modulators of other downstream signalling molecules.

  14. Cell loss during pseudoislet formation hampers profound improvements in islet lentiviral transduction efficacy for transplantation purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callewaert, H; Gysemans, C; Cardozo, A K; Elsner, M; Tiedge, M; Eizirik, D L; Mathieu, C

    2007-01-01

    Islet transplantation is a promising treatment in type 1 diabetes, but the need for chronic immunosuppression is a major hurdle to broad applicability. Ex vivo introduction of agents by lentiviral vectors-improving beta-cell resistance against immune attack-is an attractive path to pursue. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dissociation of islets to single cells prior to viral infection and reaggregation before transplantation would improve viral transduction efficacy without cytotoxicity. This procedure improved transduction efficacy with a LV-pWPT-CMV-EGFP construct from 11.2 +/- 4.1% at MOI 50 in whole islets to 80.0 +/- 2.8% at MOI 5. Viability (as measured by Hoechst/PI) and functionality (as measured by glucose challenge) remained high. After transplantation, the transfected pseudoislet aggregates remained EGFP positive for more than 90 days and the expression of EGFP colocalized primarily with the insulin-positive beta-cells. No increased vulnerability to immune attack was observed in vitro or in vivo. These data demonstrate that dispersion of islets prior to lentiviral transfection and reaggregation prior to transplantation is a highly efficient way to introduce genes of interest into islets for transplantation purposes in vitro and in vivo, but the amount of beta-cells needed for normalization of glycemia was more than eightfold higher when using dispersed cell aggregates versus unmanipulated islets. The high price to pay to reach stable and strong transgene expression in islet cells is certainly an important cell loss.

  15. The taste transduction channel TRPM5 is a locus for bitter-sweet taste interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, Karel; Yasumatsu, Keiko; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Margolskee, Robert F; Voets, Thomas; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Nilius, Bernd

    2008-05-01

    Ordinary gustatory experiences, which are usually evoked by taste mixtures, are determined by multiple interactions between different taste stimuli. The most studied model for these gustatory interactions is the suppression of the responses to sweeteners by the prototype bitter compound quinine. Here we report that TRPM5, a cation channel involved in sweet taste transduction, is inhibited by quinine (EC(50)=50 microM at -50 mV) owing to a decrease in the maximal whole-cell TRPM5 conductance and an acceleration of channel closure. Notably, quinine inhibits the gustatory responses of sweet-sensitive gustatory nerves in wild-type (EC(50)= approximately 1.6 mM) but not in Trpm5 knockout mice. Quinine induces a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of TRPM5-dependent responses of single sweet-sensitive fibers to sucrose, according to the restricted diffusion of the drug into the taste tissue. Quinidine, the stereoisomer of quinine, has similar effects on TRPM5 currents and on sweet-induced gustatory responses. In contrast, the chemically unrelated bitter compound denatonium benzoate has an approximately 100-fold weaker effect on TRPM5 currents and, accordingly, at 10 mM it does not alter gustatory responses to sucrose. The inhibition of TRPM5 by bitter compounds constitutes the molecular basis of a novel mechanism of taste interactions, whereby the bitter tastant inhibits directly the sweet transduction pathway.

  16. Intracellular Ca2+ and the phospholipid PIP2 regulate the taste transduction ion channel TRPM5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Liman, Emily R

    2003-12-09

    The transduction of taste is a fundamental process that allows animals to discriminate nutritious from noxious substances. Three taste modalities, bitter, sweet, and amino acid, are mediated by G protein-coupled receptors that signal through a common transduction cascade: activation of phospholipase C beta2, leading to a breakdown of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) into diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, which causes release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. The ion channel, TRPM5, is an essential component of this cascade; however, the mechanism by which it is activated is not known. Here we show that heterologously expressed TRPM5 forms a cation channel that is directly activated by micromolar concentrations of intracellular Ca2+ (K1/2 = 21 microM). Sustained exposure to Ca2+ desensitizes TRPM5 channels, but PIP2 reverses desensitization, partially restoring channel activity. Whole-cell TRPM5 currents can be activated by intracellular Ca2+ and show strong outward rectification because of voltage-sensitive gating of the channels. TRPM5 channels are nonselective among monovalent cations and not detectably permeable to divalent cations. We propose that the regulation of TRPM5 by Ca2+ mediates sensory activation in the taste system.

  17. Ubiquitination of basal VEGFR2 regulates signal transduction and endothelial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina A. Smith

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell surface receptors can undergo recycling or proteolysis but the cellular decision-making events that sort between these pathways remain poorly defined. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 regulate signal transduction and angiogenesis, but how signaling and proteolysis is regulated is not well understood. Here, we provide evidence that a pathway requiring the E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme UBA1 controls basal VEGFR2 levels, hence metering plasma membrane receptor availability for the VEGF-A-regulated endothelial cell response. VEGFR2 undergoes VEGF-A-independent constitutive degradation via a UBA1-dependent ubiquitin-linked pathway. Depletion of UBA1 increased VEGFR2 recycling from endosome-to-plasma membrane and decreased proteolysis. Increased membrane receptor availability after UBA1 depletion elevated VEGF-A-stimulated activation of key signaling enzymes such as PLCγ1 and ERK1/2. Although UBA1 depletion caused an overall decrease in endothelial cell proliferation, surviving cells showed greater VEGF-A-stimulated responses such as cell migration and tubulogenesis. Our study now suggests that a ubiquitin-linked pathway regulates the balance between receptor recycling and degradation which in turn impacts on the intensity and duration of VEGF-A-stimulated signal transduction and the endothelial response.

  18. Sensory transduction channel subunits, tax-4 and tax-2, modify presynaptic molecular architecture in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Andrew B; Shen, Kang

    2011-01-01

    During development, neural activity is important for forming proper connections in neural networks. The effect of activity on the gross morphology and synaptic strength of neurons has been well documented, but little is known about how activity affects different molecular components during development. Here, we examine the localization of four fluorescently-tagged presynaptic proteins, RAB-3, SNG-1/synaptogyrin, SYD-2/Liprin-α, and SAD-1/SAD kinase, in the C. elegans thermosensory neuron AFD. We show that tax-4 and tax-2, two genes that encode the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel necessary for sensory transduction in AFD, disrupt the localization of all four proteins. In wild-type animals, the synaptic vesicle (SV) markers RAB-3 and SNG-1 and the active zone markers SYD-2 and SAD-1 localize in a stereotyped, punctate pattern in the AFD axon. In tax-4 and tax-2 mutants, SV and SYD-2 puncta are more numerous and less intense. Interestingly, SAD-1 puncta are also less intense but do not increase in number. The change in puncta number can be rescued cell-autonomously in AFD. These results suggest that sensory transduction genes tax-4 and tax-2 are necessary for the proper assembly of presynapses.

  19. Sensory transduction channel subunits, tax-4 and tax-2, modify presynaptic molecular architecture in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew B Hellman

    Full Text Available During development, neural activity is important for forming proper connections in neural networks. The effect of activity on the gross morphology and synaptic strength of neurons has been well documented, but little is known about how activity affects different molecular components during development. Here, we examine the localization of four fluorescently-tagged presynaptic proteins, RAB-3, SNG-1/synaptogyrin, SYD-2/Liprin-α, and SAD-1/SAD kinase, in the C. elegans thermosensory neuron AFD. We show that tax-4 and tax-2, two genes that encode the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel necessary for sensory transduction in AFD, disrupt the localization of all four proteins. In wild-type animals, the synaptic vesicle (SV markers RAB-3 and SNG-1 and the active zone markers SYD-2 and SAD-1 localize in a stereotyped, punctate pattern in the AFD axon. In tax-4 and tax-2 mutants, SV and SYD-2 puncta are more numerous and less intense. Interestingly, SAD-1 puncta are also less intense but do not increase in number. The change in puncta number can be rescued cell-autonomously in AFD. These results suggest that sensory transduction genes tax-4 and tax-2 are necessary for the proper assembly of presynapses.

  20. Uncovering signal transduction networks from high-throughput data by integer linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xing-Ming; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Chen, Luonan; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-05-01

    Signal transduction is an important process that transmits signals from the outside of a cell to the inside to mediate sophisticated biological responses. Effective computational models to unravel such a process by taking advantage of high-throughput genomic and proteomic data are needed to understand the essential mechanisms underlying the signaling pathways. In this article, we propose a novel method for uncovering signal transduction networks (STNs) by integrating protein interaction with gene expression data. Specifically, we formulate STN identification problem as an integer linear programming (ILP) model, which can be actually solved by a relaxed linear programming algorithm and is flexible for handling various prior information without any restriction on the network structures. The numerical results on yeast MAPK signaling pathways demonstrate that the proposed ILP model is able to uncover STNs or pathways in an efficient and accurate manner. In particular, the prediction results are found to be in high agreement with current biological knowledge and available information in literature. In addition, the proposed model is simple to be interpreted and easy to be implemented even for a large-scale system.

  1. The application of multiple biophysical cues to engineer functional neocartilage for treatment of osteoarthritis. Part II: signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Mariea A; Waldman, Stephen D; Ethier, C Ross

    2015-02-01

    The unique mechanoelectrochemical environment of cartilage has motivated researchers to investigate the effect of multiple biophysical cues, including mechanical, magnetic, and electrical stimulation, on chondrocyte biology. It is well established that biophysical stimuli promote chondrocyte proliferation, differentiation, and maturation within "biological windows" of defined dose parameters, including mode, frequency, magnitude, and duration of stimuli (see companion review Part I: Cellular Response). However, the underlying molecular mechanisms and signal transduction pathways activated in response to multiple biophysical stimuli remain to be elucidated. Understanding the mechanisms of biophysical signal transduction will deepen knowledge of tissue organogenesis, remodeling, and regeneration and aiding in the treatment of pathologies such as osteoarthritis. Further, this knowledge will provide the tissue engineer with a potent toolset to manipulate and control cell fate and subsequently develop functional replacement cartilage. The aim of this article is to review chondrocyte signal transduction pathways in response to mechanical, magnetic, and electrical cues. Signal transduction does not occur along a single pathway; rather a number of parallel pathways appear to be activated, with calcium signaling apparently common to all three types of stimuli, though there are different modes of activation. Current tissue engineering strategies, such as the development of "smart" functionalized biomaterials that enable the delivery of growth factors or integration of conjugated nanoparticles, may further benefit from targeting known signal transduction pathways in combination with external biophysical cues.

  2. Invertebrate Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Related Peptides and Their Receptors: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsubasa Sakai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRHs play pivotal roles in reproductive functions via the hypothalamus, pituitary, and gonad axis, namely, HPG axis in vertebrates. GnRHs and their receptors (GnRHRs are likely to be conserved in invertebrate deuterostomes and lophotrochozoans. All vertebrate and urochordate GnRHs are composed of 10 amino acids, whereas protostome, echinoderm, and amphioxus GnRH-like peptides are 11- or 12-residue peptide containing two amino acids after an N-terminal pyro-Glu. In urochordates, Halocynthia roretzi GnRH gene encodes two GnRH peptide sequences, whereas two GnRH genes encode three different GnRH peptides in Ciona intestinalis. These findings indicate the species-specific diversification of GnRHs. Intriguingly, the major signaling pathway for GnRHRs is intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in chordates, echinoderms, and protostomes, whereas Ciona GnRHRs (Ci-GnRHRs are endowed with multiple GnRHergic cAMP production pathways in a ligand-selective manner. Moreover, the ligand-specific modulation of signal transduction via heterodimerization among Ci-GnRHR paralogs suggests the species-specific development of fine-tuning of gonadal functions in ascidians. Echinoderm GnRH-like peptides show high sequence differences compared to those of protostome counterparts, leading to the difficulty in classification of peptides and receptors. These findings also show both the diversity and conservation of GnRH signaling systems in invertebrates. The lack of the HPG axis in invertebrates indicates that biological functions of GnRHs are not release of gonadotropins in current invertebrates and common ancestors of vertebrates and invertebrates. To date, authentic or putative GnRHRs have been characterized from various echinoderms and protostomes as well as chordates and the mRNAs have been found to be distributed not only reproductive organs but also other tissues. Collectively, these findings further support the notion that invertebrate Gn

  3. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  4. Dietary bioactive peptides: Human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouglé, Dominique; Bouhallab, Saïd

    2017-01-22

    Current opinion strongly links nutrition and health. Among nutrients, proteins, and peptides which are encrypted in their sequences and released during digestion could play a key role in improving health. These peptides have been claimed to be active on a wide spectrum of biological functions or diseases, including blood pressure and metabolic risk factors (coagulation, obesity, lipoprotein metabolism, and peroxidation), gut and neurological functions, immunity, cancer, dental health, and mineral metabolism. A majority of studies involved dairy peptides, but the properties of vegetal, animal, and sea products were also assessed. However, these allegations are mainly based on in vitro and experimental studies which are seldom confirmed in humans. This review focused on molecules which were tested in humans, and on the mechanisms explaining discrepancies between experimental and human studies.

  5. Natriuretic peptides and cerebral hemodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Barringer, Filippa; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    in decompensated disease. In contrast, their biological effects on the cerebral hemodynamics are poorly understood. In this mini-review, we summarize the hemodynamic effects of the natriuretic peptides with a focus on the cerebral hemodynamics. In addition, we will discuss its potential implications in diseases...... where alteration of the cerebral hemodynamics plays a role such as migraine and acute brain injury including stroke. We conclude that a possible role of the peptides is feasible as evaluated from animal and in vitro studies, but more research is needed in humans to determine the precise response...

  6. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  7. Biodegradable Peptide-Silica Nanodonuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggini, Laura; Travaglini, Leana; Cabrera, Ingrid; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-07

    We report hybrid organosilica toroidal particles containing a short peptide sequence as the organic component of the hybrid systems. Once internalised in cancer cells, the presence of the peptide allows for interaction with peptidase enzymes, which attack the nanocarrier effectively triggering its structural breakdown. Moreover, these biodegradable nanovectors are characterised by high cellular uptake and exocytosis, showing great potential as biodegradable drug carriers. To demonstrate this feature, doxorubicin was employed and its delivery in HeLa cells investigated. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, Paul Robert; Houen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies...... are powerful tools in experimental biology and are easily produced to any peptide of choice. A widely used approach for production of peptide antibodies is to immunize animals with a synthetic peptide coupled to a carrier protein. Very important is the selection of the synthetic peptide, where factors...... such as structure, accessibility and amino acid composition are crucial. Since small peptides tend not to be immunogenic, it may be necessary to conjugate them to carrier proteins in order to enhance immune presentation. Several strategies for conjugation of peptide-carriers applied for immunization exist...

  9. The intracellular pharmacokinetics of terminally capped peptides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruttekolk, I.R.R.; Witsenburg, J.J.; Glauner, H.B.; Bovee-Geurts, P.H.M.; Ferro, E.S.; Verdurmen, W.P.R.; Brock, R.E.

    2012-01-01

    With significant progress in delivery technologies, peptides and peptidomimetics are receiving increasing attention as potential therapeutics also for intracellular applications. However, analyses of the intracellular behavior of peptides are a challenge; therefore, knowledge on the intracellular

  10. Strategic approaches to optimizing peptide ADME properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Li

    2015-01-01

    Development of peptide drugs is challenging but also quite rewarding. Five blockbuster peptide drugs are currently on the market, and six new peptides received first marketing approval as new molecular entities in 2012. Although peptides only represent 2% of the drug market, the market is growing twice as quickly and might soon occupy a larger niche. Natural peptides typically have poor absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties with rapid clearance, short half-life, low permeability, and sometimes low solubility. Strategies have been developed to improve peptide drugability through enhancing permeability, reducing proteolysis and renal clearance, and prolonging half-life. In vivo, in vitro, and in silico tools are available to evaluate ADME properties of peptides, and structural modification strategies are in place to improve peptide developability.

  11. Histidine-Containing Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics.......Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics....

  12. Tumor Associated Antigenic Peptides in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tiwari, Raj

    2001-01-01

    .... Since this tumor rejection property was specifically mediated by tumor denved and not non-tumor derived gp96-peptide complexes, and that gp96 preparations stripped of its peptides are non-immunogenic...

  13. Peptides: Production, bioactivity, functionality, and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajfathalian, Mona; Ghelichi, Sakhi; García Moreno, Pedro Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Production of peptides with various effects from proteins of different sources continues to receive academic attention. Researchers of different disciplines are putting increasing efforts to produce bioactive and functional peptides from different sources such as plants, animals, and food industry...

  14. Development and use of engineered peptide deformylase in chemoenzymatic peptide synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Toma, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Deze thesis beschrijft het onderzoek naar potentieel van het gebruik van het peptide deformylase (PDF) in chemo enzymatische peptide synthese. PDF is geschikt voor selective N terminale deformylatie van bepaalde N-formyl-peptides zonder gelijktijdige hydrolyse van de peptide binding. Door de

  15. STM studies of synthetic peptide monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, David J.; Clauss, Wilfried; Pilloud, Denis L.; Leslie Dutton, P.; Johnson, Alan T.

    1998-08-01

    We have used scanning probe microscopy to investigate self-assembled monolayers of chemically synthesized peptides. We find that the peptides form a dense uniform monolayer, above which is found a sparse additional layer. Using scanning tunneling microscopy, submolecular resolution can be obtained, revealing the alpha helices which constitute the peptide. The nature of the images is not significantly affected by the incorporation of redox cofactors (hemes) in the peptides.

  16. Antimicrobial activities of heparin-binding peptides.

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Emma; Rydengård, Victoria; Sonesson, Andreas; Mörgelin, Matthias; Björck, Lars; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2004-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are effector molecules of the innate immune system. We recently showed that the human antimicrobial peptides alpha-defensin and LL-37 bind to glycosaminoglycans (heparin and dermatan sulphate). Here we demonstrate the obverse, i.e. structural motifs associated with heparin affinity (cationicity, amphipaticity, and consensus regions) may confer antimicrobial properties to a given peptide. Thus, heparin-binding peptides derived from laminin isoforms, von Willebrand factor...

  17. Coating with spermine-pullulan polymer enhances adenoviral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan L

    2016-12-01

    coating could enhance adenoviral transduction of MSCs without detectable cytotoxicity or effects on differentiation. Our results argue in favor of the potentiality of the SP-coated Adv as a prototype vector for efficient and safe transduction of MSCs. Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, adenovirus vectors, spermine-pullulan, polymer, gene transduction

  18. Plant gravitropic signal transduction: A network analysis leads to gene discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah

    Gravity plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development. Although a significant body of research has helped define the events of gravity perception, the role of the plant growth regulator auxin, and the mechanisms resulting in the gravity response, the events of signal transduction, those that link the biophysical action of perception to a biochemical signal that results in auxin redistribution, those that regulate the gravitropic effects on plant growth, remain, for the most part, a “black box.” Using a cold affect, dubbed the gravity persistent signal (GPS) response, we developed a mutant screen to specifically identify components of the signal transduction pathway. Cloning of the GPS genes have identified new proteins involved in gravitropic signaling. We have further exploited the GPS response using a multi-faceted approach including gene expression microarrays, proteomics analysis, and bioinformatics analysis and continued mutant analysis to identified additional genes, physiological and biochemical processes. Gene expression data provided the foundation of a regulatory network for gravitropic signaling. Based on these gene expression data and related data sets/information from the literature/repositories, we constructed a gravitropic signaling network for Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. To generate the network, both a dynamic Bayesian network approach and a time-lagged correlation coefficient approach were used. The dynamic Bayesian network added existing information of protein-protein interaction while the time-lagged correlation coefficient allowed incorporation of temporal regulation and thus could incorporate the time-course metric from the data set. Thus the methods complemented each other and provided us with a more comprehensive evaluation of connections. Each method generated a list of possible interactions associated with a statistical significance value. The two networks were then overlaid to generate a more rigorous, intersected

  19. Intracellular delivery of cell-penetrating peptide-transcriptional factor fusion protein and its role in selective osteogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Jin Sook; Lee, Jue Yeon; Choi, Yoon Jung; You, Hyung Keun; Hong, Seong-Doo; Chung, Chong Pyoung; Park, Yoon Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Protein-transduction technology has been attempted to deliver macromolecular materials, including protein, nucleic acids, and polymeric drugs, for either diagnosis or therapeutic purposes. Herein, fusion protein composed of an arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptide, termed low-molecular-weight protamine (LMWP), and a transcriptional coactivator with a PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) protein was prepared and applied in combination with biomaterials to increase bone-forming capacity. TAZ has been recently identified as a specific osteogenic stimulating transcriptional coactivator in human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) differentiation, while simultaneously blocking adipogenic differentiation. However, TAZ by itself cannot penetrate the cells, and thus needs a transfection tool for translocalization. The LMWP-TAZ fusion proteins were efficiently translocalized into the cytosol of hMSCs. The hMSCs treated with cell-penetrating LMWP-TAZ exhibited increased expression of osteoblastic genes and protein, producing significantly higher quantities of mineralized matrix compared to free TAZ. In contrast, adipogenic differentiation of the hMSCs was blocked by treatment of LMWP-TAZ fusion protein, as reflected by reduced marker-protein expression, adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein 2, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ messenger ribonucleic acid levels. LMWP-TAZ was applied in alginate gel for the purpose of localization and controlled release. The LMWP-TAZ fusion protein-loaded alginate gel matrix significantly increased bone formation in rabbit calvarial defects compared with alginate gel matrix mixed with free TAZ protein. The protein transduction of TAZ fused with cell-penetrating LMWP peptide was able selectively to stimulate osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, this fusion protein-transduction technology for osteogenic protein can thus be applied in combination with biomaterials for tissue regeneration and controlled release for tissue

  20. Real-time monitoring of intracellular signal transduction in PC12 cells by non-adiabatic tapered optical fiber biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibaii, M. I.; Latifi, H.; Asadollahi, A.; Noraeipoor, Z.; Dargahi, L.

    2014-05-01

    Real-time observation of intracellular process of signal transduction is very useful for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications as well as for basic research work of cell biology. For feasible and reagentless observation of intracellular alterations in real time, we examined the use of a nonadiabatic tapered optical fiber (NATOF) biosensor for monitoring of intracellular signal transduction that was mainly translocation of protein kinase C via refractive index change in PC12 cells adhered on tapered fiber sensor without any indicator reagent. PC12 cells were stimulated with KCl . Our results suggest that complex intracellular reactions could be real-time monitored and characterized by NATOF biosensor.

  1. One Hundred Years of Peptide Chemistry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ber of residues are often denoted as peptides. The chemical synthesis of peptides, as envisaged by Fischer, involves ... known as genetically encoded as building blocks of peptides and proteins. Almost all of .... inhibit final stages of the enzymatic construction of the bacterial peptidoglycan cell wall component, a network of.

  2. Toxins and antimicrobial peptides: interactions with membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2009-08-01

    The innate immunity to pathogenic invasion of organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms relies upon cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the first line of defense. In addition to these natural peptide antibiotics, similar cationic peptides, such as the bee venom toxin melittin, act as nonspecific toxins. Molecular details of AMP and peptide toxin action are not known, but the universal function of these peptides to disrupt cell membranes of pathogenic bacteria (AMPs) or a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (melittin) is widely accepted. Here, we have utilized spectroscopic techniques to elucidate peptide-membrane interactions of alpha-helical human and mouse AMPs of the cathelicidin family as well as the peptide toxin melittin. The activity of these natural peptides and their engineered analogs was studied on eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane mimics consisting of <200-nm bilayer vesicles composed of anionic and neutral lipids as well as cholesterol. Vesicle disruption, or peptide potency, was monitored with a sensitive fluorescence leakage assay. Detailed molecular information on peptidemembrane interactions and peptide structure was further gained through vibrational spectroscopy combined with circular dichroism. Finally, steady-state fluorescence experiments yielded insight into the local environment of native or engineered tryptophan residues in melittin and human cathelicidin embedded in bilayer vesicles. Collectively, our results provide clues to the functional structures of the engineered and toxic peptides and may impact the design of synthetic antibiotic peptides that can be used against the growing number of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  3. Ribosome evolution: Emergence of peptide synthesis machinery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    allows the histidine to position close to the PTC during the reaction, it may contribute to improving peptide bond formation. Thus, it is important to analyse biomolecular interactions in terms of the dynamic nature of the structure. 3. Origin of peptide bond formation and the RNA world. Minihelix-based peptide bond formation ...

  4. Double-Stranded Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  5. Synthetic Procedures for Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  6. Glucagon-like peptide-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deacon, C F; Holst, Jens Juul; Carr, R D

    1999-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease resulting in raised blood sugar which, if not satisfactorily controlled, can cause severe and often debilitating complications. Unfortunately, for many patients, the existing therapies do not give adequate control. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1...

  7. Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy & Oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Bergsma (Hendrik)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractNeuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare neoplasms with differences in clinical presentation, course and prognosis. Most of the NETs express the somatostatine receptor, which can be utilized for imaging and therapy. Radiolabeled somatostatin analogs can be used for peptide receptor

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deacon, C F; Holst, Jens Juul; Carr, R D

    1999-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease resulting in raised blood sugar which, if not satisfactorily controlled, can cause severe and often debilitating complications. Unfortunately, for many patients, the existing therapies do not give adequate control. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1...... advantages offered by GLP-1 and give the hope of providing effective glycemic control without the risk of overt hypoglycemia....

  9. Synthetic peptides for diagnostic use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meloen, R.H.; Langedijk, J.P.M.; Langeveld, J.P.M.

    1997-01-01

    Synthetic peptides representing relevant B-cell epitopes are, potentially, ideal antigens to be used in diagnostic assays because of their superior properties with respect to quality control as compared to those of biologically derived molecules and the much higher specificity that sometimes can be

  10. Next generation natriuretic peptide measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, Ingrid; Goetze, Jens P

    2012-01-01

    in the molecular heterogeneity could in itself contain valuable information of clinical status, and the time seems right for industry and dedicated researchers in the field to get together and discuss the next generation natriuretic peptide measurement. In such an environment, new strategies can be developed...

  11. Atrial natriuretic peptides in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens P; Holst Hansen, Lasse; Terzic, Dijana

    2015-01-01

    derivatizations. In this mini-review, we summarize measurement of the principal cardiac hormone, e.g. atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and its precursor fragments. We also highlight some of the analytical pitfalls and problems and the concurrent clinical "proof of concept". We conclude that biochemical research...

  12. Cell Penetrating Capacity and Internalization Mechanisms Used by the Synthetic Peptide CIGB-552 and Its Relationship with Tumor Cell Line Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrada, Soledad; Fernández Massó, Julio Raúl; Vallespí, Maribel G; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela

    2018-03-30

    CIGB-552 is a twenty-amino-acid novel synthetic peptide that has proven to be effective in reducing tumor size and increasing lifespan in tumor-bearing mice. Such capability is conferred by its cell-penetrating peptide character, which allows it to enter cells and elicit a pro-apoptotic effect through its major mediator, COMMD1 protein. Cell-penetrating peptides are able to use different internalization mechanisms, such as endocytosis or direct transduction through the plasma membrane. Although CIGB-552 cytotoxicity has been evaluated in several non-tumor- and tumor-derived cell lines, no data regarding the relationship between cell line sensitivity, cell penetrating capacity, the internalization mechanisms involved, COMMD1 expression levels, or its subcellular localization has yet been produced. Here, we present the results obtained from a comparative analysis of CIGB-552 sensitivity, internalization capacity and the mechanisms involved in three human tumor-derived cell lines from different origins: mammary gland, colon and lung (MCF-7, HT-29 and H460, respectively). Furthermore, cell surface markers relevant for internalization processes such as phosphatidylserine, as well as CIGB-552 target COMMD1 expression/localization, were also evaluated. We found that both endocytosis and transduction are involved in CIGB-552 internalization in the three cell lines evaluated. However, CIGB-552 incorporation efficiency and contribution of each mechanism is cell-line dependent. Finally, sensitivity was directly correlated with high internalization capacity in those cell lines where endocytosis had a major contribution on CIGB-552 internalization.

  13. Rotavirus NSP4114-135 peptide has no direct, specific effect on chloride transport in rabbit brush-border membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasseur Monique

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The direct effect of the rotavirus NSP4114-135 and Norovirus NV464-483 peptides on 36Cl uptake was studied by using villus cell brush border membrane (BBM isolated from young rabbits. Both peptides inhibited the Cl-/H+ symport activity about equally and partially. The interaction involved one peptide-binding site per carrier unit. Whereas in vitro NSP4114-135 caused nonspecific inhibition of the Cl-/H+ symporter, the situation in vivo is different. Because rotavirus infection in young rabbits accelerated both Cl- influx and Cl- efflux rates across villi BBM without stimulating Cl- transport in crypt BBM, we conclude that the NSP4114-135 peptide, which causes diarrhea in young rodents, did not have any direct, specific effect on either intestinal absorption or secretion of chloride. The lack of direct effect of NSP4 on chloride transport strengthens the hypothesis that NSP4 would trigger signal transduction pathways to enhance net chloride secretion at the onset of rotavirus diarrhea.

  14. A relaxin-like peptide purified from radial nerves induces oocyte maturation and ovulation in the starfish, Asterina pectinifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Masatoshi; Yoshikuni, Michiyasu; Ohno, Kaoru; Shibata, Yasushi; Paul-Prasanth, Bindhu; Pitchayawasin, Suthasinee; Isobe, Minoru; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2009-01-01

    Gonad-stimulating substance (GSS) of starfish is the only known invertebrate peptide hormone responsible for final gamete maturation, rendering it functionally analogous to the vertebrate luteinizing hormone (LH). Here, we purified GSS of starfish, Asterina pectinifera, from radial nerves and determined its amino acid sequence. The purified GSS was a heterodimer composed of 2 different peptides, A and B chains, with disulfide cross-linkages. Based on its cysteine motif, starfish GSS was classified as a member of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)/relaxin superfamily. The cDNA of GSS encodes a preprohormone sequence with a C peptide between the A and B chains. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that starfish GSS was a relaxin-like peptide. Chemically synthesized GSS induced not only oocyte maturation and ovulation in isolated ovarian fragments, but also unique spawning behavior, followed by release of gametes shortly after the injection. Importantly, the action of the synthetic GSS on oocyte maturation and ovulation was mediated through the production of cAMP by isolated ovarian follicle cells, thereby producing the maturation-inducing hormone of this species, 1-methyladenine. In situ hybridization showed the transcription of GSS to occur in the periphery of radial nerves at the side of tube feet. Together, the structure, sequence, and mode of signal transduction strongly suggest that GSS is closely related to the vertebrate relaxin. PMID:19470645

  15. Constitutively active form of natriuretic peptide receptor 2 ameliorates experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobutoshi Nawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently found a constitutively active mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (caNPR2; V883M, which synthesizes larger amounts of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP intracellularly without any ligand stimulation than existing drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of gene transduction using caNPR2 for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. In vitro gene transduction into human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells using Sendai virus (SeV vectors carrying caNPR2 induced 10,000-fold increases in the synthesis of cGMP without ligand stimulation, and the proliferation of caNPR2-expressing cells was significantly attenuated. The PAH model rats generated by hypoxia and the administration of SU5416 were then treated with SeV vectors through a direct injection into the left pulmonary artery. Right ventricular systolic pressure was significantly decreased 2 weeks after the treatment, while systemic blood pressure remained unchanged. Histological analyses revealed that the medial wall thickness and occlusion rate of pulmonary arterioles were significantly improved in caNPR2-treated lungs. Neither the systemic integration of virus vectors nor side effects were observed. The massive stimulation of cGMP synthesis by gene therapy with caNPR2 was safe and effective in a PAH rat model and, thus, has potential as a novel therapy for patients with severe progressive PAH.

  16. Cysteines in the neuropilin-2 MAM domain modulate receptor homooligomerization and signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Rachael; Driscoll, Alyssa; Flores, Samuel; Mudbhari, Durlav; Collins, Theresa; Iovine, M Kathryn; Berger, Bryan W

    2015-07-01

    Neuropilins (NRPs) are transmembrane receptors involved in angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, and neuronal development as well as in cancer metastasis. Previous studies suggest that NRPs exist in heteromeric complexes with vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) and VEGF receptors as well as plexins and semaphorins. We determined via site-directed mutagenesis and bioluminescent resonance energy transfer assays that a conserved cysteine (C711) in the Danio rerio NRP2a MAM (meprin, A-5 protein, and protein tyrosine phosphatase μ) domain modulates NRP2a homomeric interactions. Mutation of this residue also disrupts semaphorin-3F binding in NRP2a-transfected COS-7 cells and prevents the NRP2a overexpression effects in a zebrafish vascular model. Collectively, our results indicate the MAM domain plays an important role in defining the NRP2 homodimer structure, which is important for semaphorin-dependent signal transduction via NRP2. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The role of Ryk and Ror receptor tyrosine kinases in Wnt signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer; Nusse, Roel; van Amerongen, Renée

    2014-02-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases of the Ryk and Ror families were initially classified as orphan receptors because their ligands were unknown. They are now known to contain functional extracellular Wnt-binding domains and are implicated in Wnt-signal transduction in multiple species. Although their signaling mechanisms still remain to be resolved in detail, both Ryk and Ror control important developmental processes in different tissues. However, whereas many other Wnt-signaling responses affect cell proliferation and differentiation, Ryk and Ror are mostly associated with controlling processes that rely on the polarized migration of cells. Here we discuss what is currently known about the involvement of this exciting class of receptors in development and disease.

  18. A bead-based western for high-throughput cellular signal transduction analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treindl, Fridolin; Ruprecht, Benjamin; Beiter, Yvonne; Schultz, Silke; Döttinger, Anette; Staebler, Annette; Joos, Thomas O.; Kling, Simon; Poetz, Oliver; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans; Kuster, Bernhard; Templin, Markus F.

    2016-01-01

    Dissecting cellular signalling requires the analysis of large number of proteins. The DigiWest approach we describe here transfers the western blot to a bead-based microarray platform. By combining gel-based protein separation with immobilization on microspheres, hundreds of replicas of the initial blot are created, thus enabling the comprehensive analysis of limited material, such as cells collected by laser capture microdissection, and extending traditional western blotting to reach proteomic scales. The combination of molecular weight resolution, sensitivity and signal linearity on an automated platform enables the rapid quantification of hundreds of specific proteins and protein modifications in complex samples. This high-throughput western blot approach allowed us to identify and characterize alterations in cellular signal transduction that occur during the development of resistance to the kinase inhibitor Lapatinib, revealing major changes in the activation state of Ephrin-mediated signalling and a central role for p53-controlled processes. PMID:27659302

  19. Regulation of autophagy by amino acids and MTOR-dependent signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Alfred J; Lorin, Séverine; Blommaart, Edward F; Codogno, Patrice

    2015-10-01

    Amino acids not only participate in intermediary metabolism but also stimulate insulin-mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR)-mediated signal transduction which controls the major metabolic pathways. Among these is the pathway of autophagy which takes care of the degradation of long-lived proteins and of the elimination of damaged or functionally redundant organelles. Proper functioning of this process is essential for cell survival. Dysregulation of autophagy has been implicated in the etiology of several pathologies. The history of the studies on the interrelationship between amino acids, MTOR signaling and autophagy is the subject of this review. The mechanisms responsible for the stimulation of MTOR-mediated signaling, and the inhibition of autophagy, by amino acids have been studied intensively in the past but are still not completely clarified. Recent developments in this field are discussed.

  20. Efficient, Broadband and Wide-Angle Hot-Electron Transduction using Metal-Semiconductor Hyperbolic Metamaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Sakhdari, Maryam

    2016-05-20

    Hot-electron devices are emerging as promising candidates for the transduction of optical radiation into electrical current, as they enable photodetection and solar/infrared energy harvesting at sub-bandgap wavelengths. Nevertheless, poor photoconversion quantum yields and low bandwidth pose fundamental challenge to fascinating applications of hot-electron optoelectronics. Based on a novel hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) structure, we theoretically propose a vertically-integrated hot-electron device that can efficiently couple plasmonic excitations into electron flows, with an external quantum efficiency approaching the physical limit. Further, this metamaterial-based device can have a broadband and omnidirectional response at infrared and visible wavelengths. We believe that these findings may shed some light on designing practical devices for energy-efficient photodetection and energy harvesting beyond the bandgap spectral limit.

  1. Arm-in-Arm Response Regulator Dimers Promote Intermolecular Signal Transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Anna W.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Morales, Neydis Moreno; Forest, Katrina T. (UW)

    2016-02-01

    ABSTRACT

    Bacteriophytochrome photoreceptors (BphPs) and their cognate response regulators make up two-component signal transduction systems which direct bacteria to mount phenotypic responses to changes in environmental light quality. Most of these systems utilize single-domain response regulators to transduce signals through unknown pathways and mechanisms. Here we describe the photocycle and autophosphorylation kinetics of RtBphP1, a red light-regulated histidine kinase from the desert bacteriumRamlibacter tataouinensis. RtBphP1 undergoes red to far-red photoconversion with rapid thermal reversion to the dark state. RtBphP1 is autophosphorylated in the dark; this activity is inhibited under red light. The RtBphP1 cognate response regulator, theR. tataouinensisbacteriophytochrome response regulator (RtBRR), and a homolog, AtBRR fromAgrobacterium tumefaciens, crystallize unexpectedly as arm-in-arm dimers, reliant on a conserved hydrophobic motif, hFWAhL (where h is a hydrophobic M, V, L, or I residue). RtBRR and AtBRR dimerize distinctly from four structurally characterized phytochrome response regulators found in photosynthetic organisms and from all other receiver domain homodimers in the Protein Data Bank. A unique cacodylate-zinc-histidine tag metal organic framework yielded single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phases and may be of general interest. Examination of the effect of the BRR stoichiometry on signal transduction showed that phosphorylated RtBRR is accumulated more efficiently than the engineered monomeric RtBRR (RtBRRmon) in phosphotransfer reactions. Thus, we conclude that arm-in-arm dimers are a relevant signaling intermediate in this class of two-component regulatory systems.

  2. The ubiquitin–proteasome system and signal transduction pathways regulating Epithelial Mesenchymal transition of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voutsadakis Ioannis A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epithelial to Mesenchymal transition (EMT in cancer, a process permitting cancer cells to become mobile and metastatic, has a signaling hardwire forged from development. Multiple signaling pathways that regulate carcinogenesis enabling characteristics in neoplastic cells such as proliferation, resistance to apoptosis and angiogenesis are also the main players in EMT. These pathways, as almost all cellular processes, are in their turn regulated by ubiquitination and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS. Ubiquitination is the covalent link of target proteins with the small protein ubiquitin and serves as a signal to target protein degradation by the proteasome or to other outcomes such as endocytosis, degradation by the lysosome or specification of cellular localization. This paper reviews signal transduction pathways regulating EMT and being regulated by ubiquitination.

  3. Transduction of Repetitive Mechanical Stimuli by Piezo1 and Piezo2 Ion Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda H. Lewis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Several cell types experience repetitive mechanical stimuli, including vein endothelial cells during pulsating blood flow, inner ear hair cells upon sound exposure, and skin cells and their innervating dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons when sweeping across a textured surface or touching a vibrating object. While mechanosensitive Piezo ion channels have been clearly implicated in sensing static touch, their roles in transducing repetitive stimulations are less clear. Here, we perform electrophysiological recordings of heterologously expressed mouse Piezo1 and Piezo2 responding to repetitive mechanical stimulations. We find that both channels function as pronounced frequency filters whose transduction efficiencies vary with stimulus frequency, waveform, and duration. We then use numerical simulations and human disease-related point mutations to demonstrate that channel inactivation is the molecular mechanism underlying frequency filtering and further show that frequency filtering is conserved in rapidly adapting mouse DRG neurons. Our results give insight into the potential contributions of Piezos in transducing repetitive mechanical stimuli.

  4. Expression of cDNAs in human Natural Killer cell lines by retroviral transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, S M Shahjahan; Campbell, Kerry S

    2010-01-01

    Human NK-like cell lines are difficult to transfect using standard mammalian expression vectors and conventional transfection protocols, but they are susceptible to retroviral transduction as a means to introduce cDNAs. Our laboratory has exploited this technique to study a number of receptors in human NK cell lines. The method utilizes a bicistronic retroviral vector that co-expresses either drug resistance or enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in parallel with the gene of interest. After a single infection with recombinant retrovirus, transduced NK cells can be sorted for expression of EGFP or the transduced cell surface marker. Alternatively, cells expressing the transduced cDNAs can be selected for by treatment with neomycin, puromycin, or hygromycin. Using this method, the sorted/selected cells uniformly express the gene of interest and the expression is stable for many weeks of culture.

  5. Controlled membrane translocation provides a mechanism for signal transduction and amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Matthew J.; Keymeulen, Flore; Ciaccia, Maria; Williams, Nicholas H.; Hunter, Christopher A.

    2017-05-01

    Transmission and amplification of chemical signals across lipid bilayer membranes is of profound significance in many biological processes, from the development of multicellular organisms to information processing in the nervous system. In biology, membrane-spanning proteins are responsible for the transmission of chemical signals across membranes, and signal transduction is often associated with an amplified signalling cascade. The ability to reproduce such processes in artificial systems has potential applications in sensing, controlled drug delivery and communication between compartments in tissue-like constructs of synthetic vesicles. Here we describe a mechanism for transmitting a chemical signal across a membrane based on the controlled translocation of a synthetic molecular transducer from one side of a lipid bilayer membrane to the other. The controlled molecular motion has been coupled to the activation of a catalyst on the inside of a vesicle, which leads to a signal-amplification process analogous to the biological counterpart.

  6. Role and regulation of 90 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) in signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Gammeltoft, S

    1999-01-01

    ), which were among the first substrates of ERK to be discovered and which has proven to be a ubiquitous and versatile mediator of ERK signal transduction. RSK is composed of two functional kinase domains that are activated in a sequential manner by a series of phosphorylations. Recently, a family of RSK......-related kinases that are activated by ERK as well as p38 MAPK were discovered and named mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases (MSK). A number of cellular functions of RSK have been proposed. (1) Regulation of gene expression via association and phosphorylation of transcriptional regulators including c......-Fos, estrogen receptor, NFkappaB/IkappaB alpha, cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) and CREB-binding protein; (2) RSK is implicated in cell cycle regulation in Xenopus laevis oocytes by inactivation of the Myt1 protein kinase leading to activation of the cyclin-dependent kinase p34cdc2; (3) RSK may...

  7. Creating and analyzing pathway and protein interaction compendia for modelling signal transduction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirouac Daniel C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the information-processing capabilities of signal transduction networks, how those networks are disrupted in disease, and rationally designing therapies to manipulate diseased states require systematic and accurate reconstruction of network topology. Data on networks central to human physiology, such as the inflammatory signalling networks analyzed here, are found in a multiplicity of on-line resources of pathway and interactome databases (Cancer CellMap, GeneGo, KEGG, NCI-Pathway Interactome Database (NCI-PID, PANTHER, Reactome, I2D, and STRING. We sought to determine whether these databases contain overlapping information and whether they can be used to construct high reliability prior knowledge networks for subsequent modeling of experimental data. Results We have assembled an ensemble network from multiple on-line sources representing a significant portion of all machine-readable and reconcilable human knowledge on proteins and protein interactions involved in inflammation. This ensemble network has many features expected of complex signalling networks assembled from high-throughput data: a power law distribution of both node degree and edge annotations, and topological features of a “bow tie” architecture in which diverse pathways converge on a highly conserved set of enzymatic cascades focused around PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK, JAK/STAT, NFκB, and apoptotic signaling. Individual pathways exhibit “fuzzy” modularity that is statistically significant but still involving a majority of “cross-talk” interactions. However, we find that the most widely used pathway databases are highly inconsistent with respect to the actual constituents and interactions in this network. Using a set of growth factor signalling networks as examples (epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-beta, tumor necrosis factor, and wingless, we find a multiplicity of network topologies in which receptors couple to downstream

  8. Drawing a Transductive Ecosophy in Process: Technological Arts, Residual Matter, Associated Milieus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisèle Trudel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Drawing a Transductive Ecosophy in Process: Technological Arts, Residual Matter, Associated Milieus by Gisèle Trudel. NANO: New American Notes Online, Issue 7: The Aesthetics of Trash - nanocrit.com. This text examines the tetralogy of media artworks about residual matter produced by Ælab between 2008 and 2014. Taking its own title as a diagram (Deleuze and Guattari Mille Plateaux, it charts and builds on the processes of these artworks, elucidating their relations to materiality, philosophy and technicity. Technological research-creation becomes in these instances a transdisciplinary aesthetic act, emerging from an ecology of practices that combine humans, non-humans and waste matter in an effort to increase attentiveness in actions.

  9. Oxidative Stress in Fungi: Its Function in Signal Transduction, Interaction with Plant Hosts, and Lignocellulose Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Breitenbach

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, we want to present an overview of oxidative stress in fungal cells in relation to signal transduction, interaction of fungi with plant hosts, and lignocellulose degradation. We will discuss external oxidative stress which may occur through the interaction with other microorganisms or plant hosts as well as internally generated oxidative stress, which can for instance originate from NADPH oxidases or “leaky” mitochondria and may be modulated by the peroxiredoxin system or by protein disulfide isomerases thus contributing to redox signaling. Analyzing redox signaling in fungi with the tools of molecular genetics is presently only in its beginning. However, it is already clear that redox signaling in fungal cells often is linked to cell differentiation (like the formation of perithecia, virulence (in plant pathogens, hyphal growth and the successful passage through the stationary phase.

  10. Energy transduction and signal averaging of fluctuating electric fields by a single protein ion channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdia-Baguena, C; Gomez, V; Cervera, J; Ramirez, P; Mafe, S

    2016-12-21

    We demonstrate the electrical rectification and signal averaging of fluctuating signals using a biological nanostructure in aqueous solution: a single protein ion channel inserted in the lipid bilayer characteristic of cell membranes. The conversion of oscillating, zero time-average potentials into directional currents permits charging of a load capacitor to significant steady-state voltages within a few minutes in the case of the outer membrane porin F (OmpF) protein, a bacterial channel of Escherichia coli. The experiments and simulations show signal averaging effects at a more fundamental level than the traditional cell and tissue scales, which are characterized by ensembles of many ion channels operating simultaneously. The results also suggest signal transduction schemes with bio-electronic interfaces and ionic circuits where soft matter nanodiodes can be coupled to conventional electronic elements.

  11. Improved intracellular delivery of glucocerebrosidase mediated by the HIV-1 TAT protein transduction domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyun Oh; Luu, Nga; Kaneski, Christine R.; Schiffmann, Raphael; Brady, Roscoe O.; Murray, Gary J.

    2005-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for Gaucher disease designed to target glucocerebrosidase (GC) to macrophages via mannose-specific endocytosis is very effective in reversing hepatosplenomegaly, and normalizing hematologic parameters but is less effective in improving bone and lung involvement and ineffective in brain. Recombinant GCs containing an in-frame fusion to the HIV-1 trans-activator protein transduction domain (TAT) were expressed in eukaryotic cells in order to obtain active, normally glycosylated GC fusion proteins for enzyme uptake studies. Despite the absence of mannose-specific endocytic receptors on the plasma membranes of various fibroblasts, the recombinant GCs with C-terminal TAT fusions were readily internalized by these cells. Immunofluorescent confocal microscopy demonstrated the recombinant TAT-fusion proteins with a mixed endosomal and lysosomal localization. Thus, TAT-modified GCs represent a novel strategy for a new generation of therapeutic enzymes for ERT for Gaucher disease

  12. Anomalous Brownian motion discloses viscoelasticity in the ear’s mechanoelectrical-transduction apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Andrei S.; Andor-Ardó, Daniel; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    The ear detects sounds so faint that they produce only atomic-scale displacements in the mechanoelectrical transducer, yet thermal noise causes fluctuations larger by an order of magnitude. Explaining how hearing can operate when the magnitude of the noise greatly exceeds that of the signal requires an understanding both of the transducer’s micromechanics and of the associated noise. Using microrheology, we characterize the statistics of this noise; exploiting the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we determine the associated micromechanics. The statistics reveal unusual Brownian motion in which the mean square displacement increases as a fractional power of time, indicating that the mechanisms governing energy dissipation are related to those of energy storage. This anomalous scaling contradicts the canonical model of mechanoelectrical transduction, but the results can be explained if the micromechanics incorporates viscoelasticity, a salient characteristic of biopolymers. We amend the canonical model and demonstrate several consequences of viscoelasticity for sensory coding. PMID:22328158

  13. Identification of intracellular domains in the growth hormone receptor involved in signal transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Billestrup, N; Allevato, G; Norstedt, G

    1994-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH) receptor belongs to the GH/prolactin/cytokine super-family of receptors. The signal transduction mechanism utilized by this class of receptors remains largely unknown. In order to identify functional domains in the intracellular region of the GH receptor we generated...... a number of GH receptor mutants and analyzed their function after transfection into various cell lines. A truncated GH receptor missing 184 amino acids at the C-terminus was unable to mediate GH effects on transcription of the Spi 2.1 and insulin genes. However, this mutant was fully active in mediating GH...... as well as metabolic effects. These results indicate that the intracellular part of the GH receptor can be divided into at least three functional domains: (i) for transcriptional activity, two domains are involved, one located in the C-terminal 184 amino acids and the other in the proline-rich domain; (ii...

  14. Identification of signal transduction pathways used by orphan g protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresnick, Janine N; Skynner, Heather A; Chapman, Kerry L; Jack, Andrew D; Zamiara, Elize; Negulescu, Paul; Beaumont, Kevin; Patel, Smita; McAllister, George

    2003-04-01

    The superfamily of GPCRs have diverse biological roles, transducing signals from a range of stimuli, from photon recognition by opsins to neurotransmitter regulation of neuronal function. Of the many identified genes encoding GPCRs, >130 are orphan receptors ( i.e., their endogenous ligands are unknown), and this subset represents putative novel therapeutic targets for pharmaceutical intervention in a variety of diseases. As an initial step toward drug discovery, determining a biological function for these newly identified receptors is of vital importance, and thus identification of a natural ligand(s) is a primary aim. There are several established methods for doing this, but many have drawbacks and usually require some in-depth knowledge about how the receptor functions. The technique described here utilizes a transcription-based reporter assay in live cells. This allows the determination of the signal transduction pathway any given oGPCR uses, without any prior knowledge of the endogenous ligand. This can therefore reduce the redundancy of effort involved in screening ligands at a given receptor in multiple formats (i.e., Galpha(s), Galpha(i/0), and Galpha(q) assays), as well as ensuring that the receptor targeted is capable of signaling if appropriately activated. Such knowledge is often laboriously obtained, and for almost all oGPCRs, this kind of information is not yet available. This technology can also be used to develop inverse agonist as well as agonist sensitive high throughput assays for oGPCRs. The veracity of this approach is demonstrated, using a number of known GPCRs. The likely signaling pathways of the GPR3, GPR12, GPR19, GPR21, and HG55 oGPCRs are shown, and a high throughput assay for GPR26 receptors developed. The methods outlined here for elucidation of the signal transduction pathways for oGPCRs and development of functional assays should speed up the process of identification of ligands for this potentially therapeutically useful group of

  15. Human HOXA5 homeodomain enhances protein transduction and its application to vascular inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Young; Park, Kyoung sook; Cho, Eun Jung; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Sang Ki; Lee, Sang Do; Park, Jin Bong; Chang, Seok Jong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We have developed an E. coli protein expression vector including human specific gene sequences for protein cellular delivery. → The plasmid was generated by ligation the nucleotides 770-817 of the homeobox A5 mRNA sequence. → HOXA5-APE1/Ref-1 inhibited TNF-alpha-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. → Human HOXA5-PTD vector provides a powerful research tools for uncovering cellular functions of proteins or for the generation of human PTD-containing proteins. -- Abstract: Cellular protein delivery is an emerging technique by which exogenous recombinant proteins are delivered into mammalian cells across the membrane. We have developed an Escherichia coli expression vector including human specific gene sequences for protein cellular delivery. The plasmid was generated by ligation the nucleotides 770-817 of the homeobox A5 mRNA sequence which was matched with protein transduction domain (PTD) of homeodomain protein A5 (HOXA5) into pET expression vector. The cellular uptake of HOXA5-PTD-EGFP was detected in 1 min and its transduction reached a maximum at 1 h within cell lysates. The cellular uptake of HOXA5-EGFP at 37 o C was greater than in 4 o C. For study for the functional role of human HOXA5-PTD, we purified HOXA5-APE1/Ref-1 and applied it on monocyte adhesion. Pretreatment with HOXA5-APE1/Ref-1 (100 nM) inhibited TNF-α-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, compared with HOXA5-EGFP. Taken together, our data suggested that human HOXA5-PTD vector provides a powerful research tools for uncovering cellular functions of proteins or for the generation of human PTD-containing proteins.

  16. Cell type specificity of signaling: view from membrane receptors distribution and their downstream transduction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Yu, Zhonghao; Ge, Dongya; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen; Xie, Lu; Li, Yixue

    2012-09-01

    Studies on cell signaling pay more attention to spatial dynamics and how such diverse organization can relate to high order of cellular capabilities. To overview the specificity of cell signaling, we integrated human receptome data with proteome spatial expression profiles to systematically investigate the specificity of receptors and receptor-triggered transduction networks across 62 normal cell types and 14 cancer types. Six percent receptors showed cell-type-specific expression, and 4% signaling networks presented enriched cell-specific proteins induced by the receptors. We introduced a concept of "response context" to annotate the cell-type dependent signaling networks. We found that most cells respond similarly to the same stimulus, as the "response contexts" presented high functional similarity. Despite this, the subtle spatial diversity can be observed from the difference in network architectures. The architecture of the signaling networks in nerve cells displayed less completeness than that in glandular cells, which indicated cellular-context dependent signaling patterns are elaborately spatially organized. Likewise, in cancer cells most signaling networks were generally dysfunctional and less complete than that in normal cells. However, glioma emerged hyper-activated transduction mechanism in malignant state. Receptor ATP6AP2 and TNFRSF21 induced rennin-angiotensin and apoptosis signaling were found likely to explain the glioma-specific mechanism. This work represents an effort to decipher context-specific signaling network from spatial dimension. Our results indicated that although a majority of cells engage general signaling response with subtle differences, the spatial dynamics of cell signaling can not only deepen our insights into different signaling mechanisms, but also help understand cell signaling in disease.

  17. Dual transgene expression in murine cerebellar Purkinje neurons by viral transduction in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Marie K; Nerbonne, Jeanne M; Ornitz, David M

    2014-01-01

    Viral-vector mediated gene transfer to cerebellar Purkinje neurons in vivo is a promising avenue for gene therapy of cerebellar ataxias and for genetic manipulation in functional studies of animal models of cerebellar disease. Here, we report the results of experiments designed to identify efficient methods for viral transduction of adult murine Purkinje neurons in vivo. For these analyses, several lentiviral and an adeno-associated virus (AAV), serotype 1, vector with various promoter combinations were generated and compared for in situ transduction efficiency, assayed by fluorescent reporter protein expression in Purkinje neurons. Additional experiments were also conducted to identify the optimal experimental strategy for co-expression of two proteins in individual Purkinje neurons. Of the viruses tested, AAV1 with a CAG promoter exhibited the highest specificity for Purkinje neurons. To deliver two proteins to the same Purkinje neuron, several methods were tested, including: an internal ribosome entry site (IRES), a 2A sequence, a dual promoter vector, and co-injection of two viruses. Efficient expression of both proteins in the same Purkinje neuron was only achieved by co-injecting two AAV1-CAG viruses. We found that use of an AAV1-CAG virus outperformed similar lentivirus vectors and that co-injection of two AAV1-CAG viruses could be used to efficiently deliver two proteins to the same Purkinje neuron in adult mice. AAV1 with a CAG promoter is highly efficient and selective at transducing adult cerebellar Purkinje neurons and two AAV-CAG viruses can be used to efficiently express two proteins in the same neuron in vivo.

  18. Dual transgene expression in murine cerebellar Purkinje neurons by viral transduction in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie K Bosch

    Full Text Available Viral-vector mediated gene transfer to cerebellar Purkinje neurons in vivo is a promising avenue for gene therapy of cerebellar ataxias and for genetic manipulation in functional studies of animal models of cerebellar disease. Here, we report the results of experiments designed to identify efficient methods for viral transduction of adult murine Purkinje neurons in vivo. For these analyses, several lentiviral and an adeno-associated virus (AAV, serotype 1, vector with various promoter combinations were generated and compared for in situ transduction efficiency, assayed by fluorescent reporter protein expression in Purkinje neurons. Additional experiments were also conducted to identify the optimal experimental strategy for co-expression of two proteins in individual Purkinje neurons. Of the viruses tested, AAV1 with a CAG promoter exhibited the highest specificity for Purkinje neurons. To deliver two proteins to the same Purkinje neuron, several methods were tested, including: an internal ribosome entry site (IRES, a 2A sequence, a dual promoter vector, and co-injection of two viruses. Efficient expression of both proteins in the same Purkinje neuron was only achieved by co-injecting two AAV1-CAG viruses. We found that use of an AAV1-CAG virus outperformed similar lentivirus vectors and that co-injection of two AAV1-CAG viruses could be used to efficiently deliver two proteins to the same Purkinje neuron in adult mice. AAV1 with a CAG promoter is highly efficient and selective at transducing adult cerebellar Purkinje neurons and two AAV-CAG viruses can be used to efficiently express two proteins in the same neuron in vivo.

  19. Retroviral transduction of murine and human hematopoietic progenitors and stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuculescu, Marioara F; Brendel, Christian; Harris, Chad E; Williams, David A

    2014-01-01

    Genetic modification of cells using retroviral vectors is the method of choice when the cell population is difficult to transfect and/or requires persistent transgene expression in progeny cells. There are innumerable potential applications for these procedures in laboratory research and clinical therapeutic interventions. One paradigmatic example is the genetic modification of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). These are rare nucleated cells which reside in a specialized microenvironment within the bone marrow, and have the potential to self-renew and/or differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages. Due to their enormous regenerative capacity in steady state or under stress conditions these cells are routinely used in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation to reconstitute the hematopoietic system in patients with metabolic, inflammatory, malignant, and other hematologic disorders. For patients lacking a matched bone marrow donor, gene therapy of autologous hematopoietic stem cells has proven to be an alternative as highlighted recently by several successful gene therapy trials. Genetic modification of HSPCs using retrovirus vectors requires ex vivo manipulation to efficiently introduce the new genetic material into cells (transduction). Optimal culture conditions are essential to facilitate this process while preserving the stemness of the cells. The most frequently used retroviral vector systems for the genetic modifications of HSPCs are derived either from Moloney murine leukemia-virus (Mo-MLV) or the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) and are generally termed according to their genus gamma-retroviral (γ-RV) or lentiviral vectors (LV), respectively. This chapter describes in a step-by-step fashion some techniques used to produce research grade vector supernatants and to obtain purified murine or human hematopoietic stem cells for transduction, as well as follow-up methods for analysis of transduced cell populations.

  20. Further evidence supporting a role for gs signal transduction in severe malaria pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Auburn

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available With the functional demonstration of a role in erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum parasites, implications in the aetiology of common conditions that prevail in individuals of African origin, and a wealth of pharmacological knowledge, the stimulatory G protein (Gs signal transduction pathway presents an exciting target for anti-malarial drug intervention. Having previously demonstrated a role for the G-alpha-s gene, GNAS, in severe malaria disease, we sought to identify other important components of the Gs pathway. Using meta-analysis across case-control and family trio (affected child and parental controls studies of severe malaria from The Gambia and Malawi, we sought evidence of association in six Gs pathway candidate genes: adenosine receptor 2A (ADORA2A and 2B (ADORA2B, beta-adrenergic receptor kinase 1 (ADRBK1, adenylyl cyclase 9 (ADCY9, G protein beta subunit 3 (GNB3, and regulator of G protein signalling 2 (RGS2. Our study amassed a total of 2278 cases and 2364 controls. Allele-based models of association were investigated in all genes, and genotype and haplotype-based models were investigated where significant allelic associations were identified. Although no significant associations were observed in the other genes, several were identified in ADORA2A. The most significant association was observed at the rs9624472 locus, where the G allele (approximately 20% frequency appeared to confer enhanced risk to severe malaria [OR = 1.22 (1.09-1.37; P = 0.001]. Further investigation of the ADORA2A gene region is required to validate the associations identified here, and to identify and functionally characterize the responsible causal variant(s. Our results provide further evidence supporting a role of the Gs signal transduction pathway in the regulation of severe malaria, and request further exploration of this pathway in future studies.

  1. Studies of the mechanism of mIg-mediated signal transduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coggeshall, K.M.

    1985-01-01

    B lymphocytes express surface immunoglobulins (Ig) which act as antigen receptors. Antigen binding by these receptors appears to lead to B cell receptivity to the regulatory signals. Transduction of the surface Ig-derived signal is manifest by B cell depolarization and increased expression of surface I-A antigen. This dissertation describes studies of the biochemical mechanism by which surface Ig occupancy induces these cell biologic changes in B cells. Using [32P]Pi as label to monitor phospholipid metabolism, the authors have observed that crosslinking of B cell surface Ig results in the activation of a common signal transduction pathway called the phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) cycle. The PtdIns cycle, through the generation of the PtdIns metabolite diacyglycerol (DG), has been proposed to be a regulatory mechanism for the enzyme protein kinase C (PK-C). The observation that the PtdIns cycle is activated upon receptor occupancy in B cells suggest that this cycle and subsequent PK-C activation regulates B cell depolarization and increased I-A expression. Although studies indicate that extracellular Ca ++ does not appear to be required for anti-immunoglobulin induced events, they demonstrate that the Ca ++ ionophore is able to induce depolarization and increased I-A antigen. Studies on the role of protein kinase C in surface Ig-mediated signalling indicated that this ability of Ca ++ ionophore as well as that of LPS and PMA is due to cation of PK-C. These results support the notion that occupancy of antigen receptors on B cells is linked to subsequent biologic responses by the PtdIns cycle and protein kinase C activation

  2. The blue light signal transduction pathway is involved in anthocyanin accumulation in 'Red Zaosu' pear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ruiyan; Bai, Songling; Ni, Junbei; Yang, Qinsong; Zhao, Yuan; Teng, Yuanwen

    2018-03-15

    A conserved blue light sensing and transduction pathway contributes to blue light-induced anthocyanin accumulation in the peel of red pear. Peel color is an economically important characteristic that influences the appearance quality of red pear, whose red color is due to anthocyanin accumulation. The process of coloration in the fruit peel is strongly influenced by light. However, how light quality influences color development remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed the effects of different light qualities on color development in the red pear 'Red Zaosu', a mutant of the hybrid cultivar 'Zaosu' of Pyrus pyrifolia and P. communis. The results showed that blue light increased anthocyanin accumulation after 72 h of light treatment, while red light had almost no effect. The expression of anthocyanin biosynthesis-related genes showed a similar trend to the anthocyanin accumulation. To clarify the mechanism of blue-light induced coloration, PpCRYs, PpCOP1 and PpHY5 genes were cloned. Gene expression analysis showed that their transcript abundance did not correlate with the expression of anthocyanin-related genes or anthocyanin content, but the yeast two-hybrid system revealed conserved physical interactions among these proteins. In addition, PpHY5 directly bound to the promoters of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes PpCHS, PpDFR, PpANS and PpMYB10, and activated the transcription of PpCHS in a Nicotiana benthamiana-based dual-luciferase assay. In summary, our results preliminarily revealed that the conserved blue light signal transduction module CRY-COP1-HY5 contributed to the anthocyanin biosynthesis induced by blue light in red pear. However, our results did not provide evidence for why red light had no effect on anthocyanin accumulation, which needs further study.

  3. Gene transfer and genome-wide insertional mutagenesis by retroviral transduction in fish stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qizhi Liu

    Full Text Available Retrovirus (RV is efficient for gene transfer and integration in dividing cells of diverse organisms. RV provides a powerful tool for insertional mutagenesis (IM to identify and functionally analyze genes essential for normal and pathological processes. Here we report RV-mediated gene transfer and genome-wide IM in fish stem cells from medaka and zebrafish. Three RVs were produced for fish cell transduction: rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce green fluorescent protein (GFP and mCherry fluorescent protein respectively under control of human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter upon any chromosomal integration, whereas rvGTgfp contains a splicing acceptor and expresses GFP only upon gene trapping (GT via intronic in-frame integration and spliced to endogenous active genes. We show that rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce a transduction efficiency of 11~23% in medaka and zebrafish stem cell lines, which is as 30~67% efficient as the positive control in NIH/3T3. Upon co-infection with rvGTgfp and rvLcherry, GFP-positive cells were much fewer than Cherry-positive cells, consistent with rareness of productive gene trapping events versus random integration. Importantly, rvGTgfp infection in the medaka haploid embryonic stem (ES cell line HX1 generated GTgfp insertion on all 24 chromosomes of the haploid genome. Similar to the mammalian haploid cells, these insertion events were presented predominantly in intergenic regions and introns but rarely in exons. RV-transduced HX1 retained the ES cell properties such as stable growth, embryoid body formation and pluripotency gene expression. Therefore, RV is proficient for gene transfer and IM in fish stem cells. Our results open new avenue for genome-wide IM in medaka haploid ES cells in culture.

  4. Targeting specific cell signaling transduction pathways by dietary and medicinal phytochemicals in cancer chemoprevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neergheen, Vidushi S.; Bahorun, Theeshan; Taylor, Ethan Will; Jen, Ling-Sun; Aruoma, Okezie I.

    2010-01-01

    Natural phytochemicals derived from dietary sources or medicinal plants have gained significant recognition in the potential management of several human clinical conditions. Much research has also been geared towards the evaluation of plant extracts as effective prophylactic agents since they can act on specific and/or multiple molecular and cellular targets. Plants have been an abundant source of highly effective phytochemicals which offer great potential in the fight against cancer by inhibiting the process of carcinogenesis through the upregulation of cytoprotective genes that encode for carcinogen detoxifying enzymes and antioxidant enzymes. The mechanistic insight into chemoprevention further includes induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis or inhibition of signal transduction pathways mainly the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), protein kinases C (PKC), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) which lead to abnormal cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), activator protein-1 (AP-1), nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and c-myc expression. Effectiveness of chemopreventive agents reflects their ability to counteract certain upstream signals that leads to genotoxic damage, redox imbalances and other forms of cellular stress. Targeting malfunctioning molecules along the disrupted signal transduction pathway in cancer represent a rational strategy in chemoprevention. NF-κB and AP-1 provide mechanistic links between inflammation and cancer, and moreover regulate tumor angiogenesis and invasiveness, indicating that signaling pathways that mediate their activation provide attractive targets for new chemotherapeutic approaches. Thus cell signaling cascades and their interacting factors have become important targets of chemoprevention and phenolic phytochemicals and plant extracts seem to be promising in this endeavor.

  5. Evolution of multiple phosphodiesterase isoforms in stickleback involved in cAMP signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yukuto; Hashiguchi, Yasuyuki; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2009-02-20

    Duplicate genes are considered to have evolved through the partitioning of ancestral functions among duplicates (subfunctionalization) and/or the acquisition of novel functions from a beneficial mutation (neofunctionalization). Additionally, an increase in gene dosage resulting from duplication may also confer an advantageous effect, as has been suggested for histone, tRNA, and rRNA genes. Currently, there is little understanding of the effect of increased gene dosage on subcellular networks like signal transduction pathways. Addressing this issue may provide further insights into the evolution by gene duplication. We analyzed the evolution of multiple stickleback phosphodiesterase (PDE, EC: 3.1.4.17) 1C genes involved in the cyclic nucleotide signaling pathway. Stickleback has 8-9 copies of this gene, whereas only one or two loci exist in other model vertebrates. Our phylogenetic and synteny analyses suggested that the multiple PDE1C genes in stickleback were generated by repeated duplications of >100-kbp chromosome segments. Sequence evolution analysis did not provide strong evidence for neofunctionalization in the coding sequences of stickleback PDE1C isoforms. On the other hand, gene expression analysis suggested that the derived isoforms acquired expression in new organs, implying their neofunctionalization in terms of expression patterns. In addition, at least seven isoforms of the stickleback PDE1C were co-expressed with olfactory-type G-proteins in the nose, suggesting that PDE1C dosage is increased in the stickleback olfactory transduction (OT) pathway. In silico simulations of OT implied that the increased PDE1C dosage extends the longevity of the depolarization signals of the olfactory receptor neuron. The predicted effect of the increase in PDE1C products on the OT pathway may play an important role in stickleback behavior and ecology. However, this possibility should be empirically examined. Our analyses imply that an increase in gene product sometimes

  6. Evolution of multiple phosphodiesterase isoforms in stickleback involved in cAMP signal transduction pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Mutsumi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duplicate genes are considered to have evolved through the partitioning of ancestral functions among duplicates (subfunctionalization and/or the acquisition of novel functions from a beneficial mutation (neofunctionalization. Additionally, an increase in gene dosage resulting from duplication may also confer an advantageous effect, as has been suggested for histone, tRNA, and rRNA genes. Currently, there is little understanding of the effect of increased gene dosage on subcellular networks like signal transduction pathways. Addressing this issue may provide further insights into the evolution by gene duplication. Results We analyzed the evolution of multiple stickleback phosphodiesterase (PDE, EC: 3.1.4.17 1C genes involved in the cyclic nucleotide signaling pathway. Stickleback has 8–9 copies of this gene, whereas only one or two loci exist in other model vertebrates. Our phylogenetic and synteny analyses suggested that the multiple PDE1C genes in stickleback were generated by repeated duplications of >100-kbp chromosome segments. Sequence evolution analysis did not provide strong evidence for neofunctionalization in the coding sequences of stickleback PDE1C isoforms. On the other hand, gene expression analysis suggested that the derived isoforms acquired expression in new organs, implying their neofunctionalization in terms of expression patterns. In addition, at least seven isoforms of the stickleback PDE1C were co-expressed with olfactory-type G-proteins in the nose, suggesting that PDE1C dosage is increased in the stickleback olfactory transduction (OT pathway. In silico simulations of OT implied that the increased PDE1C dosage extends the longevity of the depolarization signals of the olfactory receptor neuron. Conclusion The predicted effect of the increase in PDE1C products on the OT pathway may play an important role in stickleback behavior and ecology. However, this possibility should be empirically examined. Our

  7. MMP-1/PAR-1 signal transduction axis and its prognostic impact in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-hua Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1/protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1 signal transduction axis plays an important role in tumorigenesis. To explore the expression and prognostic value of MMP-1 and PAR-1 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC, we evaluated the expression of two proteins in resected specimens from 85 patients with ESCC by immunohistochemistry. Sixty-two (72.9% and 58 (68.2% tumors were MMP-1- and PAR-1-positive, respectively, while no significant staining was observed in normal esophageal squamous epithelium. MMP-1 and PAR-1 overexpression was significantly associated with tumor node metastasis (TNM stage and regional lymph node involvement. Patients with MMP-1- and PAR-1-positive tumors, respectively, had poorer disease-free survival (DFS than those with negative ESCC (P = 0.002 and 0.003, respectively. Univariate analysis showed a significant relationship between TNM stage [hazard ratio (HR = 2.836, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.866-4.308], regional lymph node involvement (HR = 2.955, 95%CI = 1.713-5.068, MMP-1 expression (HR = 2.669, 95%CI = 1.229-6.127, and PAR-1 expression (HR = 1.762, 95%CI = 1.156-2.883 and DFS. Multivariate analysis including the above four parameters identified TNM stage (HR = 2.035, 95%CI = 1.167-3.681, MMP-1 expression (HR = 2.109, 95%CI = 1.293-3.279, and PAR-1 expression (HR = 1.967, 95%CI = 1.256-2.881 as independent and significant prognostic factors for DFS. Our data suggest for the first time that MMP-1 and PAR-1 were both overexpressed in ESCC and are novel predictors of poor patient prognosis after curative resection. The MMP-1/PAR-1 signal transduction axis might be a new therapeutic target for future therapies tailored against ESCC.

  8. Insect Peptides - Perspectives in Human Diseases Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowanski, Szymon; Adamski, Zbigniew; Lubawy, Jan; Marciniak, Pawel; Pacholska-Bogalska, Joanna; Slocinska, Malgorzata; Spochacz, Marta; Szymczak, Monika; Urbanski, Arkadiusz; Walkowiak-Nowicka, Karolina; Rosinski, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Insects are the largest and the most widely distributed group of animals in the world. Their diversity is a source of incredible variety of different mechanisms of life processes regulation. There are many agents that regulate immunology, reproduction, growth and development or metabolism. Hence, it seems that insects may be a source of numerous substances useful in human diseases treatment. Especially important in the regulation of insect physiology are peptides, like neuropeptides, peptide hormones or antimicrobial peptides. There are two main aspects where they can be helpful, 1) Peptides isolated from insects may become potential drugs in therapy of different diseases, 2) A lot of insect peptide hormones show structural or functional homology to mammalian peptide hormones and the comparative studies may give a new look on human disorders. In our review we focused on three group of insect derived peptides: 1) immune-active peptides, 2) peptide hormones and 3) peptides present in venoms. In our review we try to show the considerable potential of insect peptides in searching for new solutions for mammalian diseases treatment. We summarise the knowledge about properties of insect peptides against different virulent agents, anti-inflammatory or anti-nociceptive properties as well as compare insect and mammalian/vertebrate peptide endocrine system to indicate usefulness of knowledge about insect peptide hormones in drug design. The field of possible using of insect delivered peptide to therapy of various human diseases is still not sufficiently explored. Undoubtedly, more attention should be paid to insects due to searching new drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. GLP-1 secretion is stimulated by 1,10-phenanthroline via colocalized T2R5 signal transduction in human enteroendocrine L cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jiyoung; Kim, Ki-Suk; Kim, Kang-Hoon; Lee, In-Seung; Jeong, Hyeon-soo; Kim, Yumi; Jang, Hyeung-Jin, E-mail: hjjang@khu.ac.kr

    2015-12-04

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) hormone is known to regulate blood glucose by an insulinotropic effect and increases proliferation as and also prevents apoptosis of pancreatic β cells. We know that GLP-1 is secreted by nutrients such as fatty acids and sweet compounds but also bitter compounds via stimulation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the gut. Among these, bitter compounds are multiply-contained in phytochemicals or artificial materials and perceived as ligands of various bitter taste receptors. We hypothesized that GLP-1 hormone is secreted through stimulation of a single bitter taste receptor by 1,10-phenanthroline which is known agonist of taste receptor type 2 member 5 (T2R5). To prove this hypothesis, we used the representatively well-known 1,10-phenanthroline as ligand of single receptor and evaluated the existence of T2R5 by double-labeling immunofluorescence and then 1,10-phenanthroline is able to secrete GLP-1 hormone through stimulation of T2R5 in human enteroendocrine cells. Consequently, we verify that GLP-1 hormone is colocalized with T2R5 in the human duodenum and ileum tissue and is secreted by 1,10-phenanthroline via T2R5 signal transduction in differentiated human enteroendocrine L cells. - Highlights: • Taste receptor type 2 member 5 (T2R5) is colocalized with GLP-1 hormone in human enteroendocrine cells. • GLP-1 secretion is stimulated by 1,10-phenanthroline via stimulation of T2R5. • Inhibition of the bitter taste pathway reduce GLP-1 secretion.

  10. Preparation of polypeptides comprising multiple TAA peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing; Jia, Zhengcai; Wu, Yuzhang

    2014-01-01

    Polypeptides consisting of multiple tumor-associated antigen epitopes (multiepitope peptides) are commonly used as therapeutic peptide cancer vaccines in experimental studies and clinical trials. These methods include polypeptides composed of multiple major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted cytotoxic T cell (CTL) epitopes and those containing multiple CTL epitopes and one T helper (Th) epitope. This chapter describes a complete set of methods for preparing multiepitope peptides and branched multiple antigen peptides (MAPs), including sequence design, peptide synthesis, purification, preservation, and the preparation of polypeptide solutions.

  11. Computer-Aided Design of Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjell, Christopher D.; Hancock, Robert E.W.; Jenssen, Håvard

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of reported cases of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, demonstrate the urgent need for new therapeutics that are effective against such and other multi-drug resistant bacteria. Antimicrobial peptides have for two decades now been looked upon...... as interesting leads for development of new therapeutics combating these drug resistant microbes. High-throughput screening of peptide libraries have generated large amounts of information on peptide activities. However, scientists still struggle with explaining the specific peptide motifs resulting...... in antimicrobial activity. Consequently, the majority of peptides put into clinical trials have failed at some point, underlining the importance of a thorough peptide optimization. An important tool in peptide design and optimization is quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis, correlating...

  12. Natural and synthetic peptides with antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciociola, Tecla; Giovati, Laura; Conti, Stefania; Magliani, Walter; Santinoli, Claudia; Polonelli, Luciano

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the increase of invasive fungal infections and the emergence of antifungal resistance stressed the need for new antifungal drugs. Peptides have shown to be good candidates for the development of alternative antimicrobial agents through high-throughput screening, and subsequent optimization according to a rational approach. This review presents a brief overview on antifungal natural peptides of different sources (animals, plants, micro-organisms), peptide fragments derived by proteolytic cleavage of precursor physiological proteins (cryptides), synthetic unnatural peptides and peptide derivatives. Antifungal peptides are schematically reported based on their structure, antifungal spectrum and reported effects. Natural or synthetic peptides and their modified derivatives may represent the basis for new compounds active against fungal infections.

  13. A competitive cell growth assay for the detection of subtle effects of gene transduction on cell proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekels, J. J. M.; Pasternak, A. O.; Schut, A. M.; Geerts, D.; Jeeninga, R. E.; Berkhout, B.

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific gene silencing mechanism with therapeutic potential against many human pathogens. To obtain a durable therapeutic effect, stable transduction of target cells with for instance a lentiviral vector that expresses a short hairpin (shRNA) inducer of the

  14. Cloning of a two-component signal transduction system of Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans strain BXPF65

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, JWYF; Maynard, Scott; Goodwin, PH

    1998-01-01

    A putative two-component signal transduction system was amplified and cloned from the plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans isolate BXPF65. The 620 bp amplified fragment was sequenced and analyzed with the BLAST Enhanced Alignment Utility (BEAUTY). BEAUTY ana...

  15. Jasmonates differentially affect interconnected signal-transduction pathways of Pieris rapae-induced defenses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeren, T.A.L.; Broekgaarden, C.; Dicke, M.

    2011-01-01

    The jasmonic acid (JA) pathway is the main signal-transduction pathway induced by insect folivory. Mutant plants affected in the jasmonate pathway (18:0 and/or 16:0-oxylipin routes) were studied to assess the effects of JA and its oxylipin intermediates 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA) and dinor-OPDA

  16. Roles of Intracellular Cyclic AMP Signal Transduction in the Capacitation and Subsequent Hyperactivation of Mouse and Boar Spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    HARAYAMA, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    It is not until accomplishment of a variety of molecular changes during the transit through the female reproductive tract that mammalian spermatozoa are capable of exhibiting highly activated motility with asymmetric whiplash beating of the flagella (hyperactivation) and undergoing acrosomal exocytosis in the head (acrosome reaction). These molecular changes of the spermatozoa are collectively termed capacitation and promoted by bicarbonate, calcium and cholesterol acceptors. Such capacitation-promoting factors can stimulate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) signal transduction in the spermatozoa. Meanwhile, hyperactivation and the acrosome reaction are essential to sperm fertilization with oocytes and are apparently triggered by a sufficient increase of intracellular Ca2+ in the sperm flagellum and head, respectively. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the relationship between cAMP signal transduction and calcium signaling cascades in the spermatozoa for the purpose of understanding the molecular basis of capacitation. In this review, I cover updated insights regarding intracellular cAMP signal transduction, the acrosome reaction and flagellar motility in mammalian spermatozoa and then account for possible roles of intracellular cAMP signal transduction in the capacitation and subsequent hyperactivation of mouse and boar spermatozoa. PMID:24162806

  17. AAV9 supports wide-scale transduction of the CNS and TDP-43 disease modeling in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasey L Jackson

    Full Text Available AAV9 has emerged as an efficient adeno-associated virus (AAV serotype for gene transfer to the central nervous system. We have used this technique to study aspects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS by administering AAV encoding the ALS-related gene transactive response DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43 to neonatal rats. However, inducing the expression in adult subjects would be preferable to mimic the adult onset of symptoms in ALS. We expressed either green fluorescent protein (GFP or TDP-43 in adult rats after an intravenous (i.v. route of administration to attempt wide-scale transduction of the spinal cord for disease modeling. In order to optimize the gene transfer, we made comparisons of efficiency by age, gender, and across several AAV serotypes (AAV1, AAV8, AAV9, and AAV10. The data indicate more efficient neuronal transduction in neonates, with little evidence of glial transduction at either age, no gender-related differences in transduction, and that AAV9 was efficient in adults relative to the other serotypes tested. Based on these data, AAV9 TDP-43 was expressed at three vector doses in adult female rats yielding highly consistent, dose-dependent motor deficits. AAV9 can be delivered i.v. to adult rats to achieve consistent pathophysiological changes and a relevant adult-onset system for disease modeling.

  18. Differences in two-component signal transduction proteins among the genus Brucella: implications for host preference and pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binnewies, Tim Terence; Ussery, David; Lavín, JL

    2010-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are the predominant bacterial signal transduction mechanisms. Species of the genus Brucella are genetically highly related and differ mainly in mammalian host adaptation and pathogenesis. In this study, TCS proteins encoded in the available genome sequences of Brucell...

  19. The cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factors requires co-ordinated signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-08-18

    VEGFs (vascular endothelial growth factors) are a family of conserved disulfide-linked soluble secretory glycoproteins found in higher eukaryotes. VEGFs mediate a wide range of responses in different tissues including metabolic homoeostasis, cell proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis. Such responses are initiated by VEGF binding to soluble and membrane-bound VEGFRs (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases) and co-receptors. VEGF and receptor splice isoform diversity further enhances complexity of membrane protein assembly and function in signal transduction pathways that control multiple cellular responses. Different signal transduction pathways are simultaneously activated by VEGFR-VEGF complexes with membrane trafficking along the endosome-lysosome network further modulating signal output from multiple enzymatic events associated with such pathways. Balancing VEGFR-VEGF signal transduction with trafficking and proteolysis is essential in controlling the intensity and duration of different intracellular signalling events. Dysfunction in VEGF-regulated signal transduction is important in chronic disease states including cancer, atherosclerosis and blindness. This family of growth factors and receptors is an important model system for understanding human disease pathology and developing new therapeutics for treating such ailments. © 2015 Authors.

  20. DMPD: Gram-negative endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effects oneukaryotic signal transduction. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1916089 Gram-negative endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effects oneuk...ep;5(12):2652-60. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Gram-negative endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with pr...tive endotoxin: an extraordinary lipid with profound effects oneukaryotic signal transduction. Authors Raetz